The East Carolinian, November 29, 1988






Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FFATURF it
� �"�� W�U�M�M��f((al�M�Mm.MMll
SPORTS15
Features
The Bonehead gets into the Christmas spirit with a
four star review of Bill Murray's Saooged'
See page1L
����.��
Sports
The Pirate hoopsters chalk up their first win with a
91-65 victory over N.C Weslyan. Also, UNG-G came to
Minges Monday night Get the story on page 15.
J
aUje
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 38
Tuesday November 29,1988
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Eiy�vear. $5 million research plan
Vital research being conducted at ECU
By BEN SELBY
Stiff Writer
ECU scientists are conduct-
ing some of the most important
environmental research in the
world today. Geologists and bi-
ologists at ECU are actively in-
volved in a five-year, $5 million
study of the second largest estuar-
ine system in the United States.
The Albemarle-Pamlico
Estuarine Study (APES) is a fed-
eral and state funded program
created to study the presence and
degree of nutrients in the sounds
and estuaries of coastal North
Carolina.
We need to establish if the heavy Most scientists at ECU "I think that one of the
metals are making it into the food believe that the problem of pollu- biggest problems we have here
chain lion is a multifaceted problem and it's a problem people under-
Mercury, lead, cadmium, that is going to require more strin- estimate is the problem of acid
arsenic, cobalt, and copper have 8cnt EPA guidelines, greater fed- rain Spruill said,
been found in the food chain in cral financial participation in re- "Some people consider
other areas. "Part oi APES' goal is search, and a lot of money in cdu- acid rain to actually be a point-
to find out what's causing the cation. source of pollution because you
stress and disease in our region "We need to look at the can actually point at the individ-
Riggs said. whole problem of dumping ual centers that are producing the
The EPA regulates the waste Riggs said. "We need sulfur-dioxides and nitrates and
number of parts per million (of a cleaner sewage and we need to liberating them into the atmos-
particular element) that arc envi- spend more money on educa- phere ending up causing this
ronmentallv safe and may be tion problem of acid rain
"No matter how we cut "The second problem
the mustard it's going to cost alot that I would mention which may
of money said Riggs. actually be the real non point-
One of the biggest prob- source of pollution is excessive
dumped into rivers or streams.
"EPA and state officials
believe the old idea that dilution is
the solution to pollution Riggs
said. "When industries dump l?ms facing the country today is
use of pesticides and fertilizers by
"Our whole project was EPA approved amounts of waste the lack of understanding of the our nation's farmers said
designed to let the state and EPA elements into parts of a tributary different types of pollution and Spruill.
know what heavy metals are pros
ent in the estuaries, where they're
coming from, and in whatconcen- the entire system
trations and distributions they Mud, or sediment, is or-
exist said Dr. Stan Riggs, ECU ganically active and the trace
geologist and project director. elements present in industrial
For the past five vcars the discharge is chemically reactive,
region's fishermen have "reported The nutrients don't pass through
system, it is believed that those why they exist. People believe
elements are carried throughout that they have very little impact
on the environment and as long as
a problem is out of sight it is out of
mind.
Problems like Love Ca-
that 80 percent of their catch was
diseased. "The disease comes
from stress Riggs said. "We
don't know for a fact that it's
heavy metals causing the stress.
the estuaries and make their way
into the open sea. "The nutrients
become chemically trapped and
accumulate in the sediment of the
estuary Rigs explained.
"We've made great
strides in agricultural practices,
but people haven't really looked
at agricultural practices from the
point of view of what they're
doing to the environment
nal, chemicalspillsand industries Spruill said. "It's only a few
ike Texas Gulf get a lot of media peoplc who rca�y havQ cnough
attention. "It's easy to point your
finger at a smoking gun said Dr.
Richard Spruill, an ECU geologist
(who is not involved in the APES
program)
understanding to realize thatfc
we've got these big non point-
sources of pollution around the
country
Graduation set for Saturday at Minges
'Angie' arid Amy Sprull of the Lady Irates frisbee team
"ham-up" for a photo taken during a practice session
last week. (Photo By Mar Starari ECU Photo Lab)
By SEAN HERRING
Atstttant N�w� Editor
On December 3, approxi-
mately 1,700 ECU students will
complete one of the most crucial
steps of their college lives.
The 1988 Summer and Fall
semester candidates will take that
final step called graduation at
Minges Coliseum.
This is the second year the
commencement services have
been held at the fall semester and
will be the 80th commencement
service at ECU.
Chairman of the Commence-
ment Committee C.C. Rowe said,
the commencement service is
held before exams to increase at-
tendance
"We feel that, because of the
holidays, it is better to have the
ceremony before exams instead of
having it in mid-December
Rowe said.
"Everyone who is graduating
is considered a candidate,
whether he officially passes or
fails his exams or meets the re-
quirements for graduation he
said.
He added, "It docs not make
any difference, since thediplomas
are mailed to graduates at the end
of the semester in which they
complete their graduation re-
quirements
Rowe said that the ceremony
will begin at 9:15 a.m with an
ECU band concert.
"We ask the candidates to be
present during the band concert,
in order to begin organizing ev-
eryone Rowe said.
"Because of increased traffic,
candidates should allow addi-
tional time for reaching Minges
Coliseum. The procession will
form at 9:45 a.m and will move
promptly at 10 a.m he said.
See GUIDELINES, page 2
University searching
for vice chancellors
ECU News Bureau
Forensic Society beats the odds, headed for
national AFA tournament next semester
By JOE HARRIS
News Editor
In only their second outing,
the ECU Forensic Society, with an
undermanned team, managed to
get into the finals in four events
and bring home a trophy in each.
Because of their performance
at Marshall, the Forensic Society
qualified to participate in the na-
tional tournament given by the
American Forensic Association.
The Forensic Society is a de-
bate team that competes in re-
gional and national tournaments.
The individual debating competi-
tions are: public speaking, oral
interpretation, dramatic speak-
ing, after dinner speaking, prose
and formative and dual speaking.
"We're really enthusiastic
about qualifing for the tourna-
ment said Mary Harrison, presi-
dent. "It usually takes a while for
a team to become established and
run smoothly. Placing and quali-
fying on our second outing, with
only four people, really says a lot
about this team
The four-person team trav-
eled to Marshall University in
Huntington, W.Va to compete
against 18 other schools in a re-
gional tournament.
"The competition was very
intense Ms. Harrison said. "The
18 schools we faced probably try
and compete every weekend. This
is our second competition.
"The fact that we made it past
the first round is incredible
"Some schools brought any-
where from 10 to 40 people to
compete said Ms. Harrison. We
have 15 members on this year's
team (last year's had 5), but all of
them couldn't make the trip for
various reasons
Ms. Harrison explained that
there are three rounds of prelimi-
See FORENSIC, page 2
East Carolina University has
launched national searches for
candidates to succeed two vet-
eran vice chancellors in high uni-
versity administrative posts.
Clifton G. Moore, vice chan-
cellor for business affairs, and Dr.
William E. Laupus, vice chancel-
lor for health sciences, have an-
nounced plans to retire at the end
of the current academic year.
Laupus earlier this year relin-
quished his post as dean of the
School of Medicine.
Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor, has appointed search
committees which will advertise
nationally, screen candidates and
recommend three candidates,
unranked, for on-campus inter-
views next March. Eakin said he
hopes the searches can be con-
cluded by mid-April and that the
new officials will assume duties
by July 1.
Richard A. Edwards, execu-
tive assistant to the chancellor,
will chair the search committee
for vice chancellor-business af-
fairs. Dr. Ronald Thiele, dean of
the School of Allied Health Sci-
ences, will chair the committee to
recommend candidates for vice
chancellor for health sciences.
Serving with Edwards will be
Thomas A. Bennett of Winston-
Salem, immediate past chairman
of the ECU board of trustees; Dr.
Caroline A. Avers, professor of
chemistry and a former faculty
chair; Dr. Ernest B. Uhr, dean of
the School of Business; Sue A.
Hodges, director of planning and
institutional research, and Robert
I. Webb, director of physical plant
and architectural planning.
Eric Cashin, enjoying the summer-like weather, catches 50 winks between classes. The warm
weather came to an abrupt end yesterday as cold temperatures, rain and tornadoes came to the
state. (Photo By Jeff Whitpile ECU Photo Lab)
South Carolinians cross border
for confidential AIDS testing
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) -
Some South Carolina residents
are traveling to North Carolina to
be tested for AIDS, where they can
undergo the test with anonymity.
Since 1986, South Carolina
has required names of those tak-
ing AIDS tests at county health
departments. At North Carolina's
health departments, most testing
is anonymous, with participants
identified by number.
David Jones, coordinator of
the Durham-based North Caro-
lina AIDS Service Coalition, says
health officials do not have "any
firm numbers" of South Carolini-
ans being tested for AIDS across
the border. "But they are he
says.
South Carolina is one of at
least 16 states with confidential
testing - where names are re-
corded but kept private.
South Carolina AIDS pro-
gram director Lynda Kettinger
says having names has enabled
health officials to trace drug and
sex partners of infected people.
"There's been no break to date in
the health department's system of
confidentiality she says.
Still, callers seeking testing
information from the Columbia,
S.Cbased Palmetto AIDS Life
Support Services are often
pointed toward North Carolina or
Georgia for anonymous testing.
The Charlotte Observer reported
Sunday.
And in Charlotte, safe-sex
brochures distributed by First
Tuesday, a gay and lesbian politi-
cal action group, also advise
South Carolina residents to travel
to North Carolina for testing.
Of 45 patients seeking serv-
ices from PALSS as of last May, 33
were tested for AIDS at locations
other than South Carolina health
departments, largely because
they didn't want to provide their
names, says i'ALSS Executive
Director Bill Edens. Eighteen of
those were tested out of state.
The differing philosophies
reflect a debate that has taken
place from international AIDS
conferences to the Mecklenburg
County commissioners, who last
week suggested ending North
Carolina's vmous AIDS test-
ing.
Comr uers said having
names Cbuk help them track
down those infected with the
AIDS virus and their partners.
Other sa v requiring names could
drive away those at the highest
risk for the disease and expose
victims to loss of jobs and homes.
"There's merit on both sides
of this issue said Dr. Steve
Keener, Mecklenburg's assistant
health director for disease control.
"We're not in disagreement at all
with the way the state is doing it
See AIDS, page 2
l
i





I
THE LAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 188
Guidelines for commencement
Continued from page 1
Students receiving under-
graduate degrees will form two
lines in the north corridor and two
lines in the south corridor. Candi-
dates for degrees other than un-
dergraduate will form two lines in
the south corridor.
Roue said. "All candidates
should arrange themselves ac-
cording to their department.
school or graduate level as indi-
cated by the signs that will be
posted along the corridor
"I ask the students to please
enter the door nearest their de-
partment, school or graduate
level so as not to congest the corri-
dors he added.
Rowe stated, "Candidates
will be led in the procession by
marshals. They should maintain
hvo lines and follow the person in
front of them to help eliminate
confusion and to easily reach their
seats
In addition to the student
marshals their will be five faculty
marshals participating in the cere-
mony. The five faculty marshals
include: Dr. Carl G. Adler, Phys-
ics Department; Dr. Tatricia C.
Dunn, Health Physical Education
and Recreational Safetv Depart-
ment; Dr. Sandra VVirth-Hough,
Political Science Department; Dr.
Susan . McDaniel, Biology De-
partment; and Dr. David S.
Phelps, Sociology and Anthropol-
ogy Department.
According to Rowe the guest
speaker will be Dr. JamesG. Jones,
Chairman of the Department of
Family Medicine in Greenville.
Forensic Society places in tough competition
Continued from page 1
nan- competition. Then, six semi-
finalists from each category who
are chosen from the preliminaries
go to the finals.
The four finalists were: Marv
Harrison. Michael Harvey, Doug
Kasales and lody lones.
Ms Harrison and Harvev
combined their talents and placed the Forensic Society has seen was
in the dual speaking category. Ms. at the begining of the year at
Harrison placed in the individual
category of prose and formative
speaking while Harvey won hon-
ors in the after-dinner speaking
category.
The only other competition
Appalachain State. Two members
from the team participated in that
event.
"Wedid pretty well consider-
ing the size of the team Ms.
Harrison said. 'The competition
was really tough � we didn't
come in last
She said the chances of win-
ning increase with the number of
people on each team. With more
people, the team is able to place
more participants in each of the
events.
Confidential AIDS testing provided
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Mevmandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashlev F. Dal ton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate S4 7S
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 5 Insertions in
200-299 col. inches$4.40 (12" .
300-399 col. inches$4.30 10 Insertion �
400-499 col. inches$4.20 (12
500-599 col. inches$4.10 15 Insertioi
600and above$4.00 !2 25").
Classified Display 20 Insertions t
Open Rate$5.00 (12 .
Color Advertising 25 Insertions I
One Color and black$90-00 12 25")
Two Color and black$155.00
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE.
757-6366
i
Continued from page 1
now. But I think the trend is to-
ward confidential reporting and
testing
Keener and other health offi-
cials echoed their counterparts in
South Carolina, saving that confi-
dential testing could help them
locate those infected with the
human immunodeficiency virus,
which causes AIDS, and their
drug and sex partners.
But others are wary of the
idea, at least until North Carolina
passes laws protecting those in-
fected with the virus from dis-
crimination.
"Anonymous testing is, in the
current environment, absolutely
essential if people are going to get
tested says Jones, who has seen
cases involving victims losing
apartments and jobs. "People
Oil may drop to prices
lower than anticipated
whoareinfected with the virus, or
think they miht be, have everv
reason to be afraid because of the
climate in (North Carolina)
At least five states have
passed legislation protecting
AIDS patients and those infected
with HIV from unfair discrimina-
tion, according to the Intergov-
ernmental Health Policv Project
at George Washington Liu versify
in Washington.
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyers Market F&U SclVlIlffS
Memorial Drive &
Open
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sundav 1-6
VIENNA, Austria (AP) -
Saudi Arabia's proposal to lower
the benchmark pnee oi crude oil
from SIS to SI5 a barrel threatens
a tenative accord aimed at reduc-
points to be worked out.
Aghazadeh, who flew to
Tehran on Friday, had by that
time announced his
government's acceptance of the
ing the world oil glut and driving plan.
Late Sundav, Nazer appeared
in the lobby o( the luxury hotel
where most of the OPEC delega-
up prices.
Saudi Arabia's oil minister,
Hisham Nazer, said late Sundav
the proposal was designed to
prevent prices from falling below
$15. But other ministers fear that a
minimum price could become the
ceiling price.
The Organization of Petro
tions are staving.
"All we intend is the preven-
tion of the deterioration of the
price below $15 he said. "What
we wanted is even to eliminate a
reference to the $18, just in case
leum Exporting Countries cur- the price might even go beyond
rentlv maintains a benchmark of $18
iiMS33!
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Ntke and Reebok)
Low Prices.
And More
Including The Best Variety Anywhere For Your Holiday Needs
SIS a barrel, but prices recently
have been running at $14 or less.
Each $1 nse in the price of
crude oil theoretically means a
pickup of 2.5 cents a gallon in
retail gasoline prices, although oil
companies do not always pass
along the full increase.
The ministers had been
scheduled to resume their formal
discussions Sunday, but they
were postponed until today.
A senior Iranian delegate to
the conference, Feredoon Barke-
shli, said the Saudi plan "is a
major divergence from OPEC
resolutions so far" and "can to-
tally sabotage the agreement
"Iran is not going to accept
Oil prices rose Friday on
word that OPEC reached a tenta-
tive production pact.
The accord would reduce the
cartel's output from the current
estimated 22.5 million barrels a
dav to 18.5 million barrels a day.
Within that total, each country
would be given a production
quota, or ceiling.
The idea is to trim produc-
tion, dry up the glut on the market
and lift weak prices. If countries
stick to their quotas, Nazer said,
prices could climb beyond $18 a
barrel.
Nazer insisted he would not
back down. Asked if he would
remain firm even at the risk of
tlarvoi �&$&.
u � e p teed I �� I in :��' Pie; sc b. . �
foe i Krogei si .re an
specie � marked receptacles t.
� �� � � . � will be d v.i buted l
al Fc l Ba � � ' � com 3r S'
m rhank you tor youi supi tort
Tangelos
Tangerines
Each
Deli Fresh
Pepperoni Pizza
12 Inch 17oi
this tvpe of idea he said. Barke- scuttling an agreement, he re-
shh said that among OPEC's 13 plied, "Well, that depends on
members, Algeria, Nigeria and them
Libya also oppose changing the
S18 benchmark. Venezuelan Oil
Minister Julio Cesar Gil said his
country favors maintaining the
$18 price.
Barkcshli said the Iranian oil
minister, Gholamreza
Iraq wants additional reve-
nues to rebuild their economies,
which were badly damaged in
their eight-year war. They agreed
to an August cease-fire.
Under the new agreement,
Iran and Iraq each would get the
Aghazadeh, had agreed to a tenta- same quota of 2.64 million barrels
tive proposal that kept the bench- a day.
mark at $18. The issue of parity had been a
The dispute surfaced Sunday sticking point in discussions of
morning when Barkeshli told the cartel's winter meeting, which
reporters there were still some began Nov. 21.

$
Fresh'
Tide Laundry
Detergent
42 07.
Chops ib
SoldlnlO-lUb.Pkg.
$�59
WkTM HEWLETT
LU PACKARD
Calculators
Ask Santa For One!
HP-28S$167.95
HP-32S$55.95
HP-41CV$124.95
HP-41CX$177.95
HP-42S$86.95
Infrared Printer$96.95
Infra. Print. Module$56.95
PHONE ORDEHS Maste�ardVISA are accepted CaN 1-800-334-0095
MAIL ORDERS You may suDtract 2 of your total when you pay by cash or check Send a
Txry oroe' cert!ed check or businesspersonal check (bus Jw checks take 10 day to
clear) Enoose yotf street address tor UPS snpp.no and .t different, your P O Box tor pa.d
.nvo.ee Mail to Surveyors Supply Co P O Box 809, Ape. N C 27502
SHIPPING: & 00 srvop.no charge per order Please add 5 tax Sates are final Defects are
-epiaced free for 30 days Offer expJosa 12-30-8
Holly Farms
Breast Quarters
Pound
HP-1 CS49.95
HP-ilC$57.95
HP -l:SC. $57.95
HP-17B$78.95
HP-19B S124.95
HP 22S$49.95
HP 2 S$78.00
99
Coca Cola Classic
or Coke

2 Ltf
89
C
ryy
CLASSIC
SURVEYORS syPELX CQi
Hwy 64 at Salem SL � Apex. N C. 27502 � 1-800-334-0095.(919)362-7000
Valleydale
Sliced Bacon
1 lb
99
0
8tiC�dbocon
Sungold
Orange Juice
Gallon
$929
Quav
apr.A
Sup.
sev-
are:�

01c
trai� .
Surmd
thr
the
thir
anc�
Lo?. . . .
sta�
Ret
(he
ma
fooi 1 -
de
iso
by
the
Ra
str.
CU
Ch
bu
Yo. .
ph
17,
48
k
I
in
e
tfc
-P
in
n
iS
9M
pc
;e
nil
tot
ph
to
fin
po
COI
DO
isb
en
3U
for
im;
car
!tei
Aq
Pre
Ge
no
to
id
the
SU(
by
sec
wc
tre
10
Bush r
Dole v
-
rrv '
v 11
-
-
� -
i
i
: S
New N rV
leader -
Soviets s
form
Unil
the fan
lish S
home
Two
Thank-
nabu -
ily va
Th
will .
-
week
pron
tion . . '

I
-





i
J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,1988
Guidelines for commencement
Continued from page 1
Students receiving under-
graduate degrees will form two
lines in the north corridor and two
lines in the south corridor. Candi-
dates for degrees other than un-
dergraduate will form two lines in
the south corridor.
Rowe said, "All candidates
should arrange themselves ac-
cording to their department,
school or graduate level as indi-
cated by the signs that will be
posted along the corridor
"I ask the students to please
enter the door nearest their de-
partment, school or graduate
level so as not to congest the corri-
dors he added.
Rowe stated, "Candidates
will be led in the procession by
marshals. They should maintain
t� vo lines and follow the person in
front of them to help eliminate
confusion and to easily reach their
seats
In addition to the student
marshals their will be five faculty
marshals participating in the cere-
mony. The five faculty marshals
include: Dr. Carl G. Adler, Phys-
ics Department; Dr. Patricia C.
Dunn, Health Physical Education
and Recreational Safety Depart-
ment; Dr. Sandra Wirth-Hough,
Political Science Department; Dr.
Susan J. McDaniel, Biology De-
partment; and Dr. David S.
Phelps, Sociology and Anthropol-
ogy Department.
According to Rowe the guest
speaker will be Dr. JamesG. Jones,
Chairman of the Department of
Family Medicine in Greenville.
Forensic Society places in tough competition
Continued from page 1
nary competition. Then, six semi-
finalists from each category who
are chosen from the preliminaries
go to the finals.
The four finalists were: Marv
Harrison, Michael Harvey, Doug
Kasales and Jody Jones.
Ms. Harrison and Harvey
combined their talents and placed
in the dual speaking category. Ms.
Harrison placed in the individual
category of prose and formative
speaking while Harvey won hon-
ors in the after-dinner speaking
category.
The only other competition
the Forensic Society has seen was
at the bcgining of the year at
Appalachain State. Tvo members
from the team participated in that
event.
"We did pretty well consider-
ing the size of the team Ms.
Harrison said. "The competition
was really tough � we didn't
come in last
She said the chances of win-
ning increase with the number of
people on each team. With more
people, the team is able to place
more participants in each of the
events.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymand.
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4-95 Local Open Rate $4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50
200-299 col. inches$4-40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$420
500-599 col. inches$410
600 and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$500
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 0225")$4.20
Two Color and black$155.00
(1225")
10 Inscrtions(4
(l225")
in
$4.50
$4.50
$4.45
15 Insertions4" in$4.45
$4.40
20 Insertions 4li")$440
$4.35
25 Inserttions (4li )$4.35
Confidential AIDS testing provided
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
Continued from page 1
now. But I think the trend is to-
ward confidential reporting and
testing
Keener and other health offi-
cials echoed their counterparts in
South Carolina, saying that confi-
dential testing could help them
locate those infected with the
human immunodeficiency virus,
which causes AIDS, and their
drug and sex partners.
But others are wary of the
idea, at least until North Carolina
passes laws protecting those in-
fected with the virus from dis-
crimination.
"Anonymous testing is, in the
current environment, absolutely
essential if people are going to get
tested says Jones, who has seen
cases involving victims losing
apartments and jobs. "Peoole
Oil may drop to prices
lower than anticipated
who are infected with the virus, or
think they might be, have every
reason to be afraid because of the
climate in (North Carolina)
At least five states have
passed legislation protecting
AIDS patients and those infected
with HIV from unfair discrimina-
tion, according to the Intergov-
ernmental Health Policy Project
at George Washington University
in Washington.
Quay
apr. NEW YORK (AP
$uj cans want military parr
lev crackdown on users t
fire illegal drugs, but m ;
choice of Vice Presidi
$k Quayle to run th efl rt
frai General-Associated Prei
Sui round.
thr Although George Bu
the a campaign pk
pUl running mate in d
'ight against dn:
cent of the 1,084 ads.
vjidQuayk ivasl
'he job.
As manv weren't s
� ie selection, and
Quayle was not thv �
.ad the drug war
vere more
but fewer than
backed him as druj
Although the
abinet-Ievel druj
� official from I
federal post, Bush ha
he might ha
j ort to Qua
The nal
pendents far
ducing tht -
should be Bu
president 10 I
ricked drugs. Ma
ax crackdov.
rise spend
deficit
VIENNA, Austria (AP) -
Saudi Arabia's proposal to lower
the benchmark price of crude oil
from $18 to $15 a barrel threatens
a tenative accord aimed at reduc-
ing the world oil glut and driving
up prices.
Saudi Arabia's oil minister,
Hisham Nazer, said late Sunday
the proposal was designed to
prevent prices from falling below
$15. But other ministers fear that a
minimum price could become the
ceiling price.
The Organization of Petro-
leum Exporting Countries cur-
rently maintains a benchmark of
$18 a barrel, but prices recently
have been running at $14 or less.
Each $1 rise in the price of
crude oil theoretically means a
pickup of 2.5 cents a gallon in
retail gasoline prices, although oil
companies do not always pass
along the full increase.
The ministers had been
scheduled to resume their formal
discussions Sunday, but they
were postponed until today.
A senior Iranian delegate to
the conference, Feredoon Barke-
shli, said the Saudi plan "is a
major divergence from OPEC
resolutions so far" and "can to-
tally sabotage the agreement
"Iran is not going to accept
this type of idea he said. Barke-
shli said that among OPEC's 13
members, Algeria, Nigeria and
Libya also oppose changing the
$18 benchmark. Venezuelan Oil
Minister Julio Cesar Gil said his
country favors maintaining the
$18 price.
Barkeshli said the Iranian oil
minister, Gholamreza
Aghazadeh, had agreed to a tenta-
tive proposal that kept the bench-
mark at $18.
The dispute surfaced Sunday
morning when Barkeshli told
reporters there were still some
points to be worked out.
Aghazadeh, who flew to
Tehran on Friday, had by that
time announced his
government's acceptance of the
plan.
Late Sunday, Nazer appeared
in the lobby of the luxury hotel
where most of the OPEC delega-
tions are staying.
"All we intend is the preven-
tion of the deterioration of the
price below $15 he said. "What
we wanted is even to eliminate a
reference to the $18, just in case
the price might even go beyond
$18
Oil prices rose Friday on
word that OPEC reached a tenta-
tive production pact.
The accord would reduce the
cartel's output from the current
estimated 22.5 million barrels a
day to 18.5 million barrels a day.
Within that total, each country
would be given a production
quota, or ceiling.
The idea is to trim produc-
tion, dry up the glut on the market
and lift weak prices. If countries
stick to their quotas, Nazer said,
prices could climb beyond $18 a
barrel.
Nazer insisted he would not
back down. Asked if he would
remain firm even at the risk of
scuttling an agreement, he re-
plied, "Well, that depends on
them
Iraq wants additional reve-
nues to rebuild their economies,
which were badly damaged in
their eight-year war. They agreed
to an August cease-fire.
Under the new agreement,
Iran and Iraq each would get the
same quota of 2.64 million barrels
a day.
The issue of parity had been a
sticking point in discussions of
the cartel's winter meeting, which
began Nov. 21.
X)W PRICE
and Reebok)
s.
And More
i IU I I
Including The Best Variety Anywhere For Your Holiday Needs!
i

larve&l
Won't you help feed the hungry? Please bring your
extra caped food by vour local Kroger store and
place it m our specially marked receptacles by
December 10th The food will be distributed by
Kroger to local FooO Banks in support or Second
irvest Proqram Thank you for your support.
FiOHiOA 125 SIZE
Tangelos
P ' ' t- s 7 f
Tangerines
Each
)
THE DEL1 PAS"P� ShQPPE
Deli Fresh
Pepperoni Pizza
12 Inch 17 oi.
$
For
SAVE 79C EACH
Fresh
Pork
Chops ib.
Sold In 10-11-lb. Pkg.
40C OFE . ABEL
REGULAR OR SCENTf
Tide Laundry
Detergent
42 or
$158
W,S�?K " ��'
HEWLETT
PACKARD
m
Calculators
Ask Santa For One!
HP-11C
HP-12C
HP-15C
HP-17B.
$49.95
$57.95
$57.95
$78.95
HP-19B$124.95
HP-22S$49.95
HP-27S$78.00
PHONE ORDERS: MasterCareWISA are accepted. Cal 1-80O-334-O096.
MAIL ORDERS.You may eubtract 2 of your total whan you pay by caah or check. Sand a
money order, certified check or bueinesaperaonal check (bueVper. checks take 10 day to
dear) Enclose your street address tor UPS shipping and if afferent, your P.O. Box tor paid
invoice. Mail to Surveyors Supply Co P.O. Box 809. Apex. N.C. 27502.
SHIPPING: $500 shipping charge per order. Please add 5 tax. Sales are �nai. Delects are
HP-28S$167.95
HP-32S$55.95
HP-41CV$124.95
HP-41CX$177.95
HP-42S$86.95
Infrared Printer$96.95
Infr. Print Module$56.95
replaced free tor 30 days
Offer expire 12-M-M
NUNRETuRNiABl E BOTH E DIET COKE
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE
Coca Cola Classic
or Coke
I
2i.tr
89
C
Enjoy
em
CLASSIC
Hwy. 64 at Silem St. � Apex, N.C. 27502 � 1-800-334-0095 .(919)362-7000
Valleydale
Sliced Bacon
Mb.
99
C
tfeftyofa- '�3p?
stictd bacon
mi ED
Sungold
Orange Juice
V Gallon
$929
iso
z
Ra
str;
CU
Cb
bu
Yo
17,
48,
I
I
11
an
C9
th.
;n
in
i$
Sift
po
tee
nil
tot
pU
to
fin
po
oot
po:
isb
en
3U
for
imj
car
hei
Aq
Pre
Ge
TlOl
iha
sue
by
sea
vyc
fre
ix
The sun
port for resh
Bush it
Dole
WASHING! N
George Bush's schcdul
dent-elect inclu
meetings that t
diplomacv, such as tl
week with n iet lij
Gorbachev and
with Senate Minori
Dole.
Bu;h is mo �
rival tor the G
with whom he has
more than a
with when he sat besi
private lunch in his
Executive Office Buii
White House.
Just back from
Thanksgiving va
Bush also was I
fast session with all i
Republican- on Tues
Athough Dole I
Bush briefly after
whelmed by the
September's GOr pn
two have had little ci
the primaries
Bush - '
Hart said the meet:
ranged by Bush but tbj
had wanted it for s j
of mutual it
Bush alread
House Speaker
has promised an j
new Senate Dem
soon as he is ch
The pi I
President Reagan
luncheon w
New York
leader's -
United Nati rts
In his campaig
wariness in J- S
Soviets, saying that!
current Soviet leadj
form-minded is no
United State- to
guard
Bush, his wife
the familv dec Ml
lish Springer S
home on Sunda)
Two after spending
Thanksgiving vs I
nabuckport Mainel
ily vacation home
The vice presi rJU
will consider putnj
his defense team
week. He a No proj
prompt attention tcj
tion options
The vice pres
not named a deft
Aides, who spoW





II II I V AR H
. 3
?1inianOuavle
i diNEW YORK (AP) Ameri-
cans want military patrols and a crackdown on users to combat illegal drugs but main doubt the
jchok eol Vice President elect Pan Quayle to run the effort, a Media
vj General-Associated Tress poll has found
0Although George Hush made
$4 5a campaign pledge to put his
running mate in charge of the
I itight against drugs only J2 per-
cent ot the 1,084 adults surveyed said Qua le was the right man tor
the job.
� iAs main weren't sure about
the selection, and 36 percent said Quayle was not the right choice to lead the drug war Republicans were more supporth e ot Quay le, but tower than hair ot them backed him as drug chief. Although the bill creating the abinet-level drug czar prohibits the official from holding another federal post. Bush has indicated he might have the drug czar re-
port to Quayle The nationwide poll's respondents tar and away said reducing the tederal budget deficit
should be Bush s top priority as
president 10 times as many as
picked drugs Majorities backed a
SmELtax crackdown jnd cuts in defense spending to address the
iv "jHIdeficit.
picked to lead task force
The survev also found sup-
port tor restrictions on foreign
investments in the I nited States,
and broad backing tor aggressive
measures to address the tederal
trade deficit including higher
import taxes and quotas.
On drugs. si in 10 favored
drug testing of all federal employ-
ees and two in 10 favored testing
some of them. The government
now conducts random tests of
federal workers in sensitive jobs,
,md has proposed testing pri-
vately employed transportation
workers.
Support tor other drug fight-
ing efforts said Hush should push
tor a crackdown on illegal drug
usei s a nd asmany or more backed
more tederal spending tor drug
enforcement education and treat-
ment.
Three quarters said the mili-
tary should patrol the nation's
borders tor drug smugglers. But
considerably fewer. 40 percent,
said the military should strike at
illegal drug operations abroad.
In addressing the deficit, re-
spondents firmly opposed most
new or higher taxes. Most also
opposed cuts in spending tor do-
mestic programs such as welfare
ora freeze in Social Security bene-
fits.
Strong majorities, however,
supported higher taxes on ciga-
rettes and alcoholic beverages.
And a narrow majority, 52 per
cent, favored defense spending
cuts.
The survey also found over
whelming support for an Internal
Revenue Service crackdown to
collect taxes, an approach urged
by DemcKratic nominee Michael
Dukakis in the presidential cam-
paign but ridiculed by Bush.
The poll, conducted Nov. 10
20, had a margin of sampling er
ror of plus or minus 3 percentage
points.
Those polled were asked
'What do vou think should be
George Bush's No. 1 priority once
he takes office? Thirty-four per-
cent said the deficit, an unusually
high rate of agreement in an open-
ended question.
No other category drew a
response rate in double digits.
Seven percent cited other eco-
nomic matters, 5 percent said
poverty or homelessness, 5 per
cent said defense and the rest
were other issues.
Only 3 percent said drugs, an
issue that ranked far higher in
importance in pre-election polls
during the summer but then
faded in the fall.
Respondents gave mixed sig-
nals on how to address the deficit.
Two-thirds, tor example, favored
higher corporate taxes - but a
Bush meets with Gorbachev,
Dole wants to discuss issues

A
-����
CLASSIC
�-
WASHINGTON (AP)
George Bush's schedule as presi-
dent-elect includes high-level
meetings that call tor delicate
diplomacy, such as the one next
week with Soviet leader Mikhal
Gorbachev and today's session
with Senate Minority Leader
Dole.
Bush is meeting his former
rival for the COP nomination
with whom he ha- never had
more than a cordial relationship
with when he sat beside Dole at a
private lunch in his suite in the
Executive Office Building to the
White House.
I back from a four-day
Thanksgiving vacation in Maine.
Bush also was to attend a break-
fast session with all other Senate
Republicans on Tuesday.
Athough Dole talked with
Bush briefly alter being over-
whelmed by the vice president in
September's GOP primaries, the
two have had little contact since
the primaries.
Busl spokesman Stephen
Hart said the meeting was ar-
ranged by Bush but that both men
lad wanted it forsometime. "It's
of mutual interest 1 lart said.
Bush already has met with
use Speaker Jim Wright and
as promised a meeting with the
new Senate Democratic leader as
soon as he is chosen.
The president-elect will join
President Reagan for a Dec. 7
luncheon with Gorbachev in
New York during the Soviet
leader's visit to address the
United Nations.
In his campaign Bush urged
iriness in U.S. dealings the
� � saying that just because
.rront Soviet leaders seem re-
rm-minded is no reason tor the
ted States to let down its
ird.
Bush, his wife Barbara, and
imily dog "Millie an 1-ng-
hsh Springer Spaniel, returned
home on Sunday on Air Force
after spending an extended
mksgiving weekend in Ken-
� il kport, Maine, at their fam-
vacation home.
The vice president has said he
11 consider putting the rest of
his defense team together this
week. He also promised to give
prompt attention to deficit reduc-
tion options.
The vice president still has
I named a defense secretary
les who spoke only on the
The ice pi
expected to fill the job of com
merce secretarv this work with a
longtime friend. Texas oilman
Robert Mosbacher.
Mrs. Bush told reporters on
the plane on Sunday that she
ver, Bush has empha- , r . , - , , ,
, f , hopes to accompany her husband
to New York next month and
meet Gorbachev's wife, Raisa.
However, she added, "I'm
sort of' planning on going but I
won't be shattered it 1 don't
I anonymity, said ter-
mer Senate Armed Services
Committee Chairman John
lower still appears to be the front-
runner.
How.
sized that the d( cision will be his
alone and that he has not been
ready thus tar to make his deci-
sion nul

Driving A Ford-Built Vehicle?
ENGINE SALE
Ford Authorized Remanufactured Engines
C mon In now and save big on a big selection
of Ford Authorized emanulactured
Engines You II flndpowerlul savings
on engines for almost any Ford-
bunt car or truck Were offering
special Installation rates, too
Every engine Is remanufactured In the
Ford tradition of quality An 1 backed
by a national limited warranty' covering
parts and labor Ask about our new
Extended Service Plan. too. It covert
you against unexpected repair costs for up to 36
months 36 000 miles, whichever comes first.
Get an engine for your Ford that's priced right,
backed right, and Installed right See us today
3U2 V-8 Engine
�Ccnp'ete iuck eiq nps
12.00C miles O' 6 mos
(wh.cheve' comes first'
Comp ate pBssenge' C8'
ng,n�s 12,000 miles Of
i 2 mos
�WOT
-i�.
T2
&ord
Eran�� Parts
$
998
"Limited time offer
'Extended war-
ranty for $80 00
covers up to 36
months36.000
miles Labor not
included
Drive An Engine Bargain
HASTINGS FORD
10th Street & 264-Bypass � Greenville, NC � 919-758-0114
Toll Free 1-800-654-3429
YOUR DEALER POR FORD AUTHORIZED REMANUFACTURED PARTS
third ot that group said they
would change their minds if cor-
porations responded by raising
prices.
Opposition toother taxes was
stronger; Eight in 10 opposed
higher personal income taxes,
three-quarters opposed higher
gasoline taxes, three-quarters
opposed taxing the Social Secu-
rity benefits of higher-income
Americans and 4 percent op-
posed �i national sales tax.
Media General Inc a com-
munications company based in
Richmond, Va publishes the
Richmond limes-Dispatch, the
Richmond News Leader, the
Tampa (I la.) Tribune and the
Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal,
and operates TV stations WXFL in
Tampa, WCBD in Charleston,
S.C and WJKS in Jacksonville,
Fla.
AN ALTERNATIVE
THIS CHRISTMAS
The Same Beautiful Jewelry
For So Much Iass!
Gold, Silver. Diamond, Necklaces,
Bracelets, Rings, etc
Also coins, collectibles, china,
crystal & porclain gifts
( TiiqiA' &fausual Gifts
Foi So Mm h. Lesi '
The Estate Shop
At
The Coin & Ring Man

I
: - 5:00 M F
10:00 3 in; Sat
KX S Evans Si
)n : he corn r below F ;
; J866
Gel cash for your books�hard cover or paperback whether used on
this campus or not. We buy all titles having Resale Market Value.
Sell them at:
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
Travel Values at ITG are
ervwhere in between. Call 11 (
SUPHR AIRFARE SPECIALS
NUk SiiKK
Bl FFALi
1
� iRI DO
� � , (, i
I H HI ' I ! i
�A s H (
DAI I s
MIAMI
HI M�
mi
1 IM
S178 LOS ANGELES $358
S168 HOUSTON $248
siss si Aim $348
$210 C I I VI LAND $168
$203 si LOUIS $218
7S PHOENIX $348
$168 DENVER $268
WHS BOSTON $201
1220 NASHVIlll $168
SPECIAL VACATION PACKAGES
LASVEGAS
Nighl
; i i I � i �
LONDON
i �
v �� I
ORLANDO
NASSAl
FRE1 PORT
Hi Al
III!
HNf
J'KIM
298
770
from
$234
$239
$199
i:u YORK
. Ill h Aii
P KIS
Kl Y VU SI
C AN MAN IS
SKI Kl YSTONE
219
774
from
$334
$499
$609
� v �
K
v
TRAVEL CENTER
355-5075
MOM �AY I RII an -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,1988 3
olinian
Advertising
atives
Spencer Meymandi
Adam Blankenship
SING
Open Rate $4.75
ency (Contracts)
$4.55
$4.50
$4.50
$4 45
$4.45
$4.40
S ; $440
$435
54.35
$4.20
)URS:
day
p.m.
kI7 �
j - i
WE
r&r
�r -
� -
� JK
cm
CLASSIC
ms
Quayle picked to lead task force
NEW YORK (AP) - Ameri-
cans want military patrols and a
crackc wn on users to combat
illegal drugs, but many doubt the
choice of Vice President-elect Dan
Quayle to run the effort, a Media
General-Associated Press poll has
found.
Although George Bush made
a campaign pledge to put his
running mate in charge of the
fight against drugs, only 32 per-
cent of the 1,084 adults surveyed
said Quayle was the right man for
the job.
As many weren't sure about
the selection, and 36 percent said
Quayle was not the right choice to
lead the drug war. Republicans
were more supportive of Quayle,
but fewer than half of them
backed him as drug chief.
Although the bill creating the
Cabinet-level drug czar prohibits
the official from holding another
federal post, Bush has indicated
he might have the drug czar re-
port to Quayle.
The nationwide poll's re-
spondents far and away said re-
ducing the federal budget deficit
should be Bush's top priority as
president � 10 times as many as
picked drugs. Majorities backed a
tax crackdown and cuts in de-
fense spending to address the
deficit.
The survey also found sup-
port for restrictions on foreign
investments in the United States,
and broad backing for aggressive
measures to address the federal
trade deficit, including higher
import taxes and quotas.
On drugs, six in 10 favored
drug testing of all federal employ-
ees and two in 10 favored testing
some of them. The government
now conducts random tests of
federal workers in sensitive jobs,
and has proposed testing pri-
vately employed transportation
workers.
Support for other drug fight-
ing efforts said Bush should push
for a crackdown on illegal drug
users and as many or more backed
more i'ederal spending for drug
enforcement, education and treat-
ment.
Three-quarters said the mili-
tary should patrol the nation's
borders for drug smugglers. But
considerably fewer, 40 percent,
said the military should strike at
illegal drug operations abroad.
In addressing the deficit, re-
spondents firmly opposed most
new or higher taxes. Most also
opposed cuts in spending for do-
mestic programs such as welfare
or a freeze in Social Security bene-
fits.
Strong majorities, however,
supported higher taxes on ciga-
rettes and alcoholic beverages.
And a narrow majority, 52 per-
cent, favored defense spending
cuts.
The survey also found over-
whelming support for an Internal
Revenue Service crackdown to
collect taxes, an approach urged
by Democratic nominee Michael
Dukakis in the presidential cam-
paign but ridiculed by Bush.
The poll, conducted Nov. 10-
20, had a margin of sampling er-
ror of plus or minus 3 percentage
points.
Those polled were asked:
"What do you think should be
George Bush's No. 1 priority once
he takes office?" Thirty-four per-
cent said the deficit, an unusually
high rate of agreement in an open-
ended question.
No other category drew a
response rate in double digits.
Seven percent cited other eco-
nomic matters, 5 percent said
poverty or homelessness, 5 per-
cent said defense and the rest
were other issues.
Only 3 percent said drugs, an
issue that ranked far higher in
importance in pre-election polls
during the summer but then
faded in the fall.
Respondents gave mixed sig-
nals on how to address the deficit.
Two-thirds, for example, favored
higher corporate taxes - but a
third of that group said they
would change their minds if cor-
porations responded by raising
prices.
Opposition to other taxes was
stronger: Eight in 10 opposed
higher personal income taxes,
three-quarters opposed higher
gasoline taxes, three-quarters
opposed taxing the Social Secu-
rity benefits of higher-income
Americans and 64 percent op-
posed a national sales tax.
Media General Inc a com-
munications company based in
Richmond, Va publishes the
Richmond Times-Dispatch, the
Richmond News Leader, the
Tampa (Fla.) Tribune and the
Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal,
and operates TV stations WXFL in
Tampa, WCBD in Charleston,
S.C, and WJKS in Jacksonville,
Ha.
AN ALTERNATIVE
THIS CHRISTMAS
The Same Beautiful Jewelry
For So Much Less!
Gold, Silver, Diamond, Necklaces,
Bracelets, Rings, etc
Also coins, collectibles, china,
crystal & porclain gifts
Unique & Unusual Gifts
For So Much Less!
The Estate Shop
At
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
4O0 S. Evans St.
On the corner below "fizz
�Recycled Clothing (New & Used)
752-3866
Bush meets with Gorbachev,
Dole wants to discuss issues
WASHINGTON (AP) �
George Bush's schedule as presi-
dent-elect includes high-level
meetings that call for delicate
diplomacy, such as the one next
week with Soviet leader Mikhal
Gorbachev and today's session
with Senate Minority Leader
Dole.
Bush is meeting his former
rival for the GOP nomination
with whom he has never had
more than a cordial relationship
with when he sat beside Dole at a
private lunch in his suite in the
Executive Office Building to the
White House.
Just back from a four-day
Thanksgiving vacation in Maine,
Bush also was to attend a break-
fast session with all other Senate
Republicans on Tuesday.
Athough Dole talked with
Bush briefly after being over-
whelmed by the vice president in
September's GOP primaries, the
two have had little contact since
the primaries.
Bush spokesman Stephen
Hart said the meeting was ar-
ranged by Bush but that both men
had wanted it for some time. "It's
of mutual interest Hart said.
Bush already has met with
House Speaker Jim Wright and
has promised a meeting with the
new Senate Democratic leader as
soon as he is chosen.
The president-elect will join
President Reagan for a Dec. 7
luncheon with Gorbachev in
New York during the Soviet
leader's visit to address the
United Nations.
In his campaign, Bush urged
wariness in U.S. dealings the
Soviets, saying that just because
current Soviet leaders seem re-
form-minded is no reason for the
United States to let down its
guard.
Bush, his wife Barbara, and
the family dog "Millie an Eng-
lish Springer Spaniel, returned
home on Sunday on Air Force
Two after spending an extended
Thanksgiving weekend in Ken-
nabuckport, Maine, at their fam-
ily vacation home.
The vice president has said he
will consider putting the rest of
his defense team together this
week. He also promised to give
prompt attention to deficit reduc-
tion options.
The vice president still has
not named a defense secretary.
Aides, who spoke only on the
condition of anonymity, said for-
mer Senate Armed Services
Committee Chairman John
Tower still appears to be the front-
runner.
However, Bush has empha-
sized that the decision will be his
alone and that he has not been
ready thus far to make his deci-
sion public.
The vice president also was
expected to fill the job of com-
merce secretary this week with a
longtime friend, Texas oilman
Robert Mosbacher.
Mrs. Bush told reporters on
the plane on Sunday that she
hopes to accompany her husband
to New York next month and
meet Gorbachev's wife, Raisa.
However, she added, "I'm
sort of planning on going but I
won't be shattered if I don't
mmmmmammmmmmtmmmmmmmmmmm
tik�&
Driving JHFtmi-Biiilt Vehicle?
ENGINE SALE
Ford Authorized Remanufactured Engines
C'mon In now and save big on a big selection
ot Ford Authorized Remanutactured
Engines. You'll find powerful savings
on engines for almost any Ford-
built car or truck. We're offering
special Installation rates, too.
Every engine Is remanutactured In the
Ford tradition of quality. And backed
by a national limited warranty covering
parts and labor. Ask about our new
Extended Service Plan, too. It covers
you against unexpected repair costs tor up to 36
months 36,000 miles, whichever comes first.
Get an engine for your Ford that's priced right,
backed right, and Installed right. See us today.
'Complet truck engines
12.000 miles or 6 mo
(whichever comes first)
Complete passenger car
�ngines 12.000 miles or
12 mos
Remanutactured
J&i&cl
.nu Parts
FORD
302 V-8 Engine
$998
'Limited time offer
'Extended war-
ranty for $80.00
covers up to 36
months36,000
miles. Labor not
included.
Drive An Engine Bargain
HASTINGS FORD
10th Street & 264-Bypass � Greenville, IMC � 919-758-0114
Toll Free 1-800-654-3429
YOUR DEALER FOR FORD AUTHORIZED REMANUFRCTURED PARTS.
Get cash for your bookshard cover or paperback whether used on
this campus or not. We buy all titles having Resale Market Value.
Sell them at:
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
Travel Values at ITG are
Running Hot An
Check out our low airfares and vacation packages
to the surf and sand, or the ice and snow, and ev-
erywhere in between. Call ITG and Save.
NEW YOKh
BlFFALO
ATLANTA
ORLANDO
CHICAGO
CHARLOTTE
VV ASH D C
DALLAS
MIAMI
READ
THE
FINE
PRINT
i AS178LOS ANGELES.L9 $358
S168HOUSTON$248
$188SEATTLE$348
S210CLEVELAND$168
$203ST LOUIS$218
$78PHOENIX$348
SI 68DENVER$268
S288BOSTON$201
$220NASHVILLE$168
-v i Sea's are im.ted ft dav advance'es�raitons are
�-�H .fa "ave; Travel on otner days siignn�tofhai Faes are
m pal iaMM,si oe purcnased vnithm 2� �ou�o' resections
� - VTM5rugh' M'nimum 5!�'equed
SPECIAL VACATION PACKAGES
298
From
LAS VEGAS
2 Nights With Air.
Hotel From Kaletgh
LONDON
6 Nights With Air. Hotel
i Day Subway Pass Tax &
More From
Greenville From
ORLANDO
NASSAU
FREEPORT
NEW YORK
I Nights With Air.
Hotel From Kinston
From
219
770
from
$234
$239
$199
PARIS
1. Night With Air. Hotel.
Sightseeing ruise hopping
Discounts From
(ireenville From
KEY WEST
CAYMAN IS.
SKI KEYSTONE -
774
from
$334
$499
$609
READ
THE
FINE
PRINT
Tnese packages dude air'are notel ana wt Packages art of varying lengths Ad
vance reservations are required Prices are SuDiec' IS change Rates are higher dunng
holiday Travel periods pea favet da�es and aveefcajntfl rres Da-urd on Greenvtte
departures Motel upgrades and longe' vays are Mi arjie An rates based on per person
�hen 2 travel together
TRAVEL CENTER
355-5075
MONDAY FRIDAY 9 00 A M -5 00 P M





i
PETE FERNALD, Cmmmtmrn
Chip Carter, M�-r�i Editor
James F.J. McKee, !� of Adxrt.nt
Joe Harris, mm u.
KRISTEN HALBERG,SpoH.Wtfor
Tim Hampton, Fm &
Michelle England, c��m�.�r
Debbie Stevens, s�r�ry
STEPIIANIE FOLSOM, Copy Utof
Jeff Parker
TOM FURR,CircwUfw�Moufr
Susan Howell, product Mamr
John W. Medlin, m D�c�0r
Mac Clark, B�sm�mmm
November 29.1988
OPINION
Page 4
U S rejects peace overtures
With characteristic narrow- Arafat outright, however, and so
mindedness, the Reagan Admini- invited strong criticism from U.S.
stration has dealt a savage blow to friends and foes. Even Britain's
the delicate emerging peace in the Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher,
Middle East. a close personal friend and political
Both Secretary of State George ally of the Reagans, urged the ad-
Shultz and Official Lame Duck ministration to reconsider its posi-
Ronald Reagan categorically denied tion. The outcry was to be expected,
Yasir Arafat's application for an and is not in itself a reason to recon-
entrance visa. Bush got behind this sider Arafat's request. There is noth-
position as much as he ever gets ing wrong with making an unpopu-
behind anything � he sent word lar decision, as long as it is also the
through spokesmen that he was "a
loyal member of the administra-
tion
Arafat was applying for a visa in
order to attend and speak at a meet-
right decision. This is not the right
decision.
In fact, the administration exac-
erbated the problem by putting off
until the last minute an official de-
" Black
ing of the U.N. General Assembly. nial or acceptance of Arafaf s visa
Arafat, the leader of the Palestine This s bevond mere rudeness �
Liberation Organization, has re-
nounced terrorism and is attempt-
ing to end the fighting in the Middle
East. America, taking a shaky stand
on its "rights as the host nation
insisted that there was no justifica-
it also makes it much more difficult
for the United Nations to hear Ara-
fat before the body ends its yearly
session December 17.
Yet the United Nations is already
tion for allowing a terrorist leader making moves to set up a meeting
with Arafat, in spite of the United
States. Most likely, the United Na-
tions will convene a special session
in Geneva to hear Arafat speak. The
entrance into the United States. (Yes,
this is the same administration that
was responsible for the Iranamok
deal. You're supposed to ignore
that.)
Presumably, according to the
administration, allowing Arafat to
administration's efforts to postpone
Arafat's speech will be counterpro-
ductive: the incoming Bush Admini-
enter the country and speak at the stration will have to deal with Arafat
United Nations would cripple the one way or another, and for the US
United States' ongoing war against government to reject Arafat at this
terrorism. (Yes, this is the same point will put Bush in the position of
administration that supports terror- having to "make up" to Arafat.
ists �r er, "freedom fighters" � in . . .
The administration could easily
have come up with a solution that
saved face for all involved, but it
chose instead to pursue the path of
most resistance. Reagan said that
allowing a brief visit by Arafat
would make the United States look
like "patsies It is clearly his view
that America must stand on prin-
Nicafagua and Afghanistan. You're
supposed to ignore that, too.)
It surely would have been pos-
sible togrant Arafat severely limited
access � saying, for example, that
he was allowed to remain in the
United States for no more than eight
hours, and specifying that he was to
be allowed to speak only to the
General Assembly and would have ciple and reject terrorism.
to leave the country immediately
afterward.
Such an approach would have
produced the maximum good and
the minimum evil � the United
States would retain its anti-terror-
ism stance by specifying that Arafat
was here for one reason and one
reason only, and Arafat would have
been able to take the next crucial
But an even stronger and more
deeply-rooted principle in this
country is the idea that freedom of
speech is the surest route to the best
solution. By attempting to muzzle
Arafat, the Reagan Administration
has sacrificed free speech, common
sense and political status on the altar
of anti-terrorism. Given that the
administration's anti-terrorism pol-
steps in forging peace. There must icv has often been little impediment
be some justification for allowing to its pursuit of other goals, one
Arafat to speak � after all, he has cannot help but wonder what
addressed the General Assembly at amount of respect the administra-
least once before, in 1974. tion gives those qualities it chooses
The United States chose to reject to sacrifice.
Plusminus system good
To the editor:
The proposal of adding s to
the grading system has incensed
many students. I have a suggestion
that might soothe some of the flames.
The specific problem I'm ad-
dressing is that the proposed system
would be unfair to students with
GPA's above 3.5. This is because the
bottom of the A range (the range into
which a student has to score to get a
4.0 GP) will be raised to accommo-
da te the A- (3.7 GP). Thus, A students
will have to score higher in order to
maintain their GPAs. Other students
will be helped about as much as they
will be hurt, but A students will only
be hurt.
One suggestion is to establish an
A and assign to it a GP around 4.25,
but this has many drawbacks. ECU
would no longer have a 4.0 grading
scale, but a 4.25 one. The 4.0 is sup-
posed fc�be the atwohito, perfect"
GPA, But' un&er' Ihi'I' SysTem, If"
wouldn't be that big of a deal. The
purpose of adding precision to the
grading system is to increase the
value of ECU's diplomas, and
thereby raise the university's pres-
tige. The 4.25 scale would defeat that
purpose because it is looked upon
unfavorably by mainstream acade-
mia and many potential employers.
A modification of this that I find
somewhat more acceptable is to use
A's (at 4.25) in determining GPA's
but to record overall GPA's above 4.0
as 4.0 (and thus, "hide" the 4.25 sys-
tem). But this system would make the
higher GPA's, especially the 4.0,
much easier to attain, and therefore
deflate their value.
My proposal is to drop the A
Granted, this would remove some of
the precision from the top portion of
the scale, but is it really necessary to
distinguish between marginal A's
and solid ones?
Leaving out the As will reduce
the chanc - of the overall GPA of the
university falling, as happened at
NCSU and the University of South
Carolina. In addition, it will keep the
number of A students at about the
same level it is now, which is about
where it should be. For if ECU allows
its number of A students to drop, that
will mean fewer ECU graduates will
get the really competitive jobs or get
into the quality graduate programs,
which means lower prestige for ECU.
The - system, with the A- in-
tact, would be a great solution, if only
ECU had a problem with having too
many A students. Dropping the As
is a good solution � and it definitely
has a problem.
Craig Spitz
Freshman
Psychology
Name wrong
or:
But had this been a more sensil
issue or had you the misfortune I
misprint Chancellor Eakin's name i
simple letter to the editor would
the least of your worries.
May I remind you that a funda-
mental objective of journalists is
report accurately. Though beina j
college newpaper, you may not
about whether you spell words c r
rectly or follow grammatical rule-
get names right. Unlike you, I car
cared enough about the issue t
tend the hearing and to speak n
opinions.
The least Joe could have done, ii
he didn't catch mv name, was to ask
me.
Leona Masor
Journalism
Mass Communications
Sophomore
like to congratulate The East
Carolinian for getting yet another
name wrong on the front page.
Having worked for The East Caro-
linian for over a semester and cur-
rently being the editor for the Honors
Program's newsletter, Honorable
Mentions, I understand that journal-
ists keep horrible hours, often work-
ing until three or four o'clock in the
morning. Under such circumstances,
mistakes are bound to be made.
Imagine T-ty surprise, however,
when I glance I at the front page story
in Tuesday's November 22) paper
about the grading policy only to find
my name, not just spelled incorrectly,
but completely, utterly wrong.
Imagine my disappointment
when I looked at the by-line and saw,
not a novice journalist, but joe Harris,
the News Editor, had written the
story, I worked in joe's department
for two months and thought he had a
great deal of potential as a journalist.
Of course, mistaking "Holder"
for "Mason" may not be of Earth-
shattering importance; after all we
are talking of one student at a small
university in eastern North Carolina.
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes It:
ters expressing all points of vieu
Mail or drop themby our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance to joyner library.
For purposes of verification, all
letters must include the name, map
classification, address,phone numbcr
and the signature of the author-
Letters are limited to 300 ivords
or less, double -spaced, typed or
neatly printed. All letters are sub-
ject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal at tacks will
be permitted. Students, faculty and
staff writing letters for this page are
reminded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday
Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday
for Thursday editions.
Democratic Congress defies Republicans
By SIMON LAZARUS
The New Republic
A major reason why Lloyd Bentsen's debate
performance stood out so sharply from that of the
other three contestants on the campaign trail was
that he seemed not only to know the issues, but
actually to be doing something about them. On item
after item, the message was the same: Bentsen has
"passed" a historic international trade bill and the
most important welfare reform "in our history he
had played a "major role" in important environ-
mental legislation; he had directly pressured the
prime minister of japan to cut trade barriers and to
shoulder a fair burden of the cost of defending the
Far East.
Implicit in this message was a further point: Not
only is Lloyd Bentsen one of those who run Con-
gress, but it isCongress not the White House - that
runs the government the way the people want it run.
And indeed, although Ronald Reagan is one of
the most popular presidents in recent history, he will
leave office as one of the least effective. Reagan
remains king, but on issues such as international
trade, environmental protection, education, health,
ethics in government, even civil rights, the parlia-
ment has come to rule. And despite the fact that the
Democrats in the 100th Congress lacked a single,
charismatic leader to serve as a de facto prime min-
ister, our de facto parliament was increasingly able
to impose the kind of activist policies that the public
seems to demand.
With its last-minute surge of major legislation,
the 100th Congress startled the national press. But in
fact the achievements of October 1988 simply
capped a long-running trend. Immediately after
Reagan attained his initial success in changing fed-
eral priorities with bigger defense budgets, lower
domestic expenditures and lower taxes, he began to
cede power to Congress. At the same time, he found
himilf obliged to accept agency heads who were
not in sympathy with his philosophical instincts.
Reagan's power began to deteriorate in March
1983, when Eilliam Ruckelshaus replaced Anne
Gorsuch Burford as head of the Environmental
Protection Agency. Burford was sacrificed for doing
precisely what the president had sent her to EPA to
do-initiate a radically new regime in which environ-
mental protection was left largely to market forces
and voluntarism. Once alerted, the public re-
sponded with a rare "firestorm" of disapproval. The
firestorm could be quelled only by the selection of a
Ruckelshaus, known not only as a strict environ-
mental enforcer but as the man who had refused a
decade earlier to knuckle under to Richard Nixon
over Watergate. Ruckelshaus turned EPA back
toward the center and the agency stayed essentially
out of Reagan's control for the duration of his ad-
ministration.
Repeatedly, and out-gunned President Reagan
has had to decide whether to fight over particular
rontroversies and face certain defeat, retire to the
sidelines, or claim victory when in fact his own
preferences were being overridden. An early ex-
ample of the last scenario was the Tax Equity and
Fiscal Reform Act of 1982. Bob Dole, then chairman
of the Senate Finance Committee, pushed through a
raft of Democrat-originated loophole-closers to cut
the deficit by $50 billion at the expense of the
wealthy, and left the president little choice but to
embrace the tax reform bill as his own. The same
year, Dole forced the White House to accept an
extension of the 1965 Voting Rights Act without
weakening amendments.
Indeed, it was during this early period, when
Reagan still retained his overall dominance, that he
began to display his talent for what is known in
Washington as eating dirt and calling it ice cream
one of the skills that has enabled him to play so well
the role of ceremonial monarch. Some would con-
sider a more dramatic example his signing of an
arms control treaty opposed by his erstwhile conser-
vative allies, and his subsequent rush to proclaim an
era of unprecedented U.SSoviet comity.
On many of the major economic policy decisions
made during the Reagan reign, especially in its
second term, the White House has not even been a
major player. The trade bill was forced on the ad-
ministration by the Senate Finance and House Ways
and Means committees. The AT&T divestiture hap-
pened with no White House participation. The
multibillion dollar omnibus drug and AIDS bills
passed during the last week of this session were pure
congressional artifacts. Even tax reform owes more
to Bill Bradley and bureaucrats at the Treasury and
on congressional tax committee staffs than to Ronald
Reagan, who was startled to learn (after it had
reached his desk) that it would raise taxes paid by
many large corporations.
The same pattern has been evident in non-eco-
nomic fields: Reagan challenged the constitutional-
ity of the independent counsel law and complained
about the damage it did to the careers of his close
adivisers, but he impotently signed the bill rather
than face a certain veto override. And then, of
course, when he did choose to "be Reagan" and
recommend Robert Bork for the Supreme Court,
Reagan suffered the most humiliating judicial nomi-
nation defeat in history.
But despite the Bork defeat, Iran-contra and
other lesser setbacks, Reagan's magic "Teflon" has
stayed unscratched; repudiation of the president's
policies has not led to rejection of the man as presi-
dent.
And that, of course, could well have been the
nub of Michael Dukakis's problem. The public maj
have grown too comfortable with having a graceful
and likable monarch who has little to do with the real
business of government, while an activist Congress
keeps the ship of state in the mainstream and meeto
our national needs. That may help explain why, foi
all the support his domestic policy views seemed t�
enjoy, Dukakis failed to persuaae a majority that a
Democratic hands-on CEO was needed in the White
House to make those views prevail.
Perhaps Lloyd Bentsen's Congress has done lfc
work too well.

ii
ti
a
n
i
C
I
a:
RA1 EIGH(AP)-An
a controversial si r
tls on bla �
ims last summer, C
tin let Demo, rats
wouldn't be able to i
port from I
without .1 I
"What it did
i k community, ar
ttic Party, that th.
campaign
r the 1 � � �
larl
. . . .
St F I
�� �
Early ind
me su( �
� �
ted tl
I up I
k .
w

� n in ti.
it
Micl .
. d he h
he
Martin.
I � �

:
th
East's v
setback
that blocks fS
East trom I j
oi tour m :
wei
only a mil
mill
. . -
atl �
i The
Raleigh. He said he
bring his case again -
. ernment to trial i
East, a Republican ell
the Senate in I9S
suicide at his Gr
no me in fune -
Mrs East or
-��- n from I
ernment in an
daun that wa rejected.
S e filed the suit a
rlaiming that d
Maval I
to diagnose the &
m, a e. "
tine
� s
Mrs
e rs i
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
Quantity rights rese
Store Hours:
Open Sun 1 p.m. 6
MonSat. S a.m8 pi
Fresh Fry
Leg
Quarter
29c
11
Ground Fresh
Fresh Ground!
65 lbs or m
97
Coca-C
All 2 liter prol
89
Charmin T
4 roll pkj
99
j





uood
; sensitive
fortune t
s name
would be
it a funda-
alists is to
h being a
ty not care
is cor-
ral rules 01
. care.I
sue to at-
ak my
ved( ne, it
isk
Leona Mason
Journalism
Tnrr
Sophon
)rum
ales
. . mes let
p ints of view.
. ui einthe
icross from
� ibrary.
� � rification, all
nust in �. tfa name, major,
! . � phi kcnumber
� the authors).
its are limited to 300 words
ss, double -spaced, typed or
!y printed. i ire sub-
:�r brevity, obscenity
. � . � � � � ml attacks will
'udents, faculty and
� � ��; pageare
.re limited to one.
'he deadline for
is p.m. Friday for
day � ipei ind 5 p.m. Tuesday
ns.
:ans
tatts than to Ronald
led to learn (after it had
it it would raise taxes paid by
ons.
is Ken evident in non-eco-
challcnged 'he constitutional-
unsel law and complained
did to the careers of his close
potently signed the bill rather
veto override. And then, of
d choose to "be Reagan" and
Berk for the Supreme Court,
lost humiliating judicial n .mi-
lory.
Bork defeat, Iran-contra and
, Reagan's magic "Teflon" has
repudiation of the president's
ts rejection of the man as presi-
irse, could well have been the
ikis's problem. The public may
fortable with having a graceful
who has little to do with the reaj
ent, while an activist Congress
in the mainstream and meets
i hat may help explain why, fot
mestic policy views seemed to
si to persuade a majority that a
n CEO was needed in the VVhi te
E views prevail.
Bentsen's Congress has done its
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,1988 5
Black vote was won on the radio
RALEIGH (AD - Armed with
a controversial series of commer-
cials on black-oriented radio sta-
tions last summer, Gov. Jim Mar-
tin let Democrats know they
wouldn't be able to rely on sup-
port from the state's black voters
without a tight.
"What it did was prove to the
black community, and the Demo-
cratic Party, that the Jim Martin
campaign was going to compete
for the black voter this time
Martin campaign manager Kevin
Brown told the Greensboro News
& Record. "We were not writing
off the black vote
Early indications shows that
Martin's efforts might have had
some success. Post-election tele-
vision network exit polls sug-
gested the incumbent Republican
received up to 18 percent of the
black vote � very good for Re-
publican candidates, who usually
win no more than about 10 per-
cent. But other estimates have
been in the 10 percent range.
But State Rep. H.M. 'Mickey'
Michaux, D-Durham, one of the
state's leading black politicians,
said he has long doubted claims
he's heard of black support for
Martin.
"1 just don't see it. I don't
know how Martin can get over 10
percent he said.
"He made a lot of radio sta-
tions happy, but he didn't court
the black voter personally
Michaux said. And they laid no
claim to the fact that they had a
black on the ticket Michaux was
refering to Ed Garner, the Repub-
lican candidate for state auditor.
A look at largely black pre-
cincts in the state's largest coun-
ties and the four counties where
the majority of registered voters
are black shows Martin won
about 10 percent of the black vote.
But Brown said he thinks Martin
did better.
"I think that we did get a
stronger black vote than Republi-
cans generally get he said.
Brown said looking at voting
returns in largely black precincts
doesn't account for the votes from
a cross-section of the black com-
munity � covering all economic
and social levels.
He said Martin reached out to
black voters. He has chaired the
United Negro College Fund cam-
paign in the state and exceeded
previous administrations in hir-
ing blacks. Also, seven of the nine
divisions of state government
Martin oversees exceeded a goal
set to make 4 percent of total pur-
chases from firms controlled bv
minorities, women or disabled
persons.
In Guilford County, Martin
captured 9 percent of the vote in a
dozen largely black precincts.
In Durham County, Martin
drew 15 percent of the support.
Martin's share of support in
largely black precincts in Forsyth,
Mecklenburg and Wake counties
didn't exceed 10 percent.
In Bertie County, where
blacks make up 57 percent of the
voters, Democrat Bob Jordan got
66 percent of the vote. In Hertford
County, where blacks account for
56 percent of the voters, Jordan
received 65 percent of the vote.
In Northamption County,
where blacks make up 58 percent,
of the registered voters, Jordan
received 69 percent of the vote
and in Warren County, where
blacks are 58 percent of the regis-
tered voters, Jordan received 68
percent of the vote.
Jordan campaigned
extensively in the black commu-
nity, advertising on black-ori-
ented radio stations, in black-
owned newspapers and appeared
with black leaders.
Martin's campaign staff in-
cluded a five-person division
aimed at building support in the
black communitv. It also had a a
coordinator and four field work-
ers who tried to build support in
churches, fraternal organizations
and civic groups.
The effort also included hir-
ing a Baton Rouge, La firm that
specializes in helping Republican
candidates appeal to black voters.
Martin's campaign finance
report says The Nathan Group
was paid $18,000 for help in de-
veloping and producing a radio
campaign aimed at black voters.
The report did not break out how
much money was spent on buy-
ing commerciais on black ori-
ented radio stations.
Bethel Nathan, co-founder
and vice president of The Nathan
Group, said his firm's work for
Martin succeeded � if not
through more votes, through
forcing Jordan to spend more time
and crucial campaign dollars to
answer Martin's efforts and
charges.
Nathan points particularly to
a controversial radio ad he pro-
duced for Martin that aired last
August.
It cited Jordan's refusal to
serve on the governor's Martin
Luther King commission and
questioned Jordan's support for
the dead civil rights leader.
The commercial was ironic
since it was Martin who opposed
making King's birthday a state
holiday and Jordan who was
strong in his support for it. The ad
was roundly criticized by black
leaders around the state.
"It neutralized and threw his
(Jordan's) campaign in an up-
roar Nathan said.
"It's not so much that Martin
got the black vote as he disrupted
the Jordan campaign Nathan
said. "Jordan had to go back and
shore up his base � a base that he
would have normally taken for
granted
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
r
i
i
i
i
L
MonThurs.
Shrimp Plate $3.65
Fri. & Sat.
Weekend Specials
1
I
I
I
I
.J
Beer, Wine Brown Baggin O.K.
752-3172
QUALITY
FILM DEVELOPING
Double Prints
? 12 exp. $3.17
? 15 exp$4.37
J 24 exp$6.29
Single Prints
? 12 exp$1.97
? 15 exp$2.87
? 24 exp$3.89
MARK 35 CUSTOM 135 mm Prints
? 12 exp$2.59 12 exp
? 24 exp$5.19
1 36 exp$6.29 Coupon Expi
1�' r 12-9-88
'ires
I I 24 exp.
I 36 exp.
.$3.59
.$6.19
.$7.29
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
East's widow suffers another
setback in inheritance lawsuit
Coupon Service Specials
BALTIMORE (AD - A ruling
that blocks the widow of Sen. John
East trom divulging the contents
of four medical documents that
wore given to her mistakenly is
only a minor setack in her $10
million wrongful death lawsuit,
her lawyer says.
"It really doesn't affect our
case attornev James Hounhan
told The News and Observer of
Raleigh He said he expects to
bring his case against the federal
government to trial next year.
East, a Republican elected to
the Senate in 1980, committed
suicide at his Greenville, N.C,
no me in June 19S6.
Mrs. East originally sought
$3.5 million from the federal gov-
ernment in an administrative
claim that was rejected.
She filed the suit a year ago,
claiming that doctors at Bethesda
Naval Hospital repeatedly failed
to diagnose the senator's hypo
thvroidism, a severe thyroid mal-
function that can cause depres-
sion, despite several symptoms
that should have alerted them.
Mrs. East's lawsuit says the
.tors' negligence led to emo-
tional and physical injuries that
"directly caused" East's death.
Lawyers in the U.S.
Attorney's office in Baltimore,
where the suit was filed, are de-
fending the government.
The suit already has raised
questions about the quality of care
at Bethesda Naval Hospital,
where members of Congress and
other top government officials
often are treated. In a 1987 letter.
Hourihan urged Navy officials to
settle out of court, warning: "The
Navy can ill afford the significant
bad publicity regarding its medi-
cal facilities, which this case is
certain to generate
In preparing the suit, Mrs.
East's lawyers in 1987 filed a re-
quest under the Freedom of Infor-
mation Act with Navy officials,
seeking documents regarding the
senator's treatment at Bethesda.
I Winterize Check 11
& Service j j
(includes belts & hoses) j j
88
"1
Front-end
Alignment j
(Set to Factory Specifications)
$1588 ;
h
plus anti-freeze
II
With This Coupon JiLC�P2.n
Hb
H
Western Steer
Family
STEAKH0USE
LET US HELP YOU WITH
YOUR
CHRISTMAS PARTY
PLANS.
758-8550

pw
Located on 10th Street j
Next to Hastings Ford'
ift
wwpgw-f �. �
L
Front Disc Brake j J4 Wheel Tire Rotatioflj
Reline H and I
ivciinc Computer Balance
(Include Machining Rotors)
(Foreign or Semi-Metallic Pads Extra)
88 ii
J J I
With iTcoupon J l WitTKi�eoupon
We accept Visa, Mastercard, Money Express, American Express, Dayton Charge and BF Goodrich.
COGGINS CAR CARE
320 W. Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C, Phone 756-5244
211 Jarvis St.
2 Blocks from ECU
Quantity rights reserved
Store Hours:
Open Sun. 1 p.m6 p.m.
MonSat. 8 a.m8 p.m.
OVERTONS
,vywv:
lYircs F.Pfrruvr Wednesday. N'ov 30
through Saturday. Dec. 3, 1988
Vaster Card. Visa. Food Stamps. A W1C welcome
Fresh Fryer
Leg
Quarters
29
lb
Ground Fresh Daily
Fresh Ground Beef
65 lbs or more
97
lb
Natural Light
Beer
12 - 12 oz. cans
$4.99
Richfood
Jumbo Eggs
69
dozen
Coca-Cola
All 2 liter products
89
Charmin Tissue
4 roll pkg
99
Bounty Towels
Giant Roll
69
Golden
Bananas
22
lb
Cooctr5tecfe
Its I BF for quality Russell Athletic sports- colors. And even see the lull line of Russell
wear 1 ligh performance sweat shirts, sweat pants Athletic Active Wear.
and pullover ruxxls. And they re guaranteed to But xu better hum. Classic Russell Athletic
stand up to five Hill years of wear. That's long styling like this seems to run out fast. So start
distance performance. (lioose from a variety of sportin Russell Athletic today only at I BE.
"83K
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville
"Exclusive of team or organized sports participation.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,188
Classifieds
FOR RENT
SERVICES OFFERED
SWEET ROOM FOR RENT: Room in 3
bd room house 3 blocks from campus on
Meade Street 13 rent and utilities Call
Troll at 757-1007
FOR RENT: Need 1 non-smoking female
to rent furnished trailer in real nice trailer
park. SlSO.OOmonth 23 utilities. Call
756-9758.
FEMALE NON-SMOKING ROOM-
MATE WANTED: To share 2 bdrm , 1 1
2 bath mobile home. Fully furnished,
washdryer. $120 00mo ' 12 ubl.
Leave message at 830-6908. Upperclass-
man preferred.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male $13000
for rent & 14 utilities Kingston Place
Available December Call 830 6897 ask for
Klpp.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Studious
male, upperclass or grad preferred. Non-
smoker, furnished. SllOmo & 12 util.
2319 E. 10th St Ask for Kyle, 830-3871
FURNISHED APT. AVAILABLE: Two
bedrooms Bus service For more info .call
752-3941
HUGE 1 BEDROOM: Of 5 bedroom
house. S120 month. Close to campus. Call
Luke or Christine 830-9315.
TAR RIVER 3 BEDROOM APT. AVAIL-
ABLE: 5 month lease left. (Jan - May),
option to renew. For info. 752-7620
FOR RENT: Room in 3 bd house on
Meade Street. 3 blocks from campus. 13
rent & utilities. Call Troll at 757-1007.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: SI 15
a month dose to campus 830-18S7.
FOR SALE
MOVING SALE: Bernoulli Box 1010
Megabyte Storage; '83 Chevette AMFM;
'84 Sentra AC, AMFM Cassette; New
Sharp Stereo, etc. Must sell. Call 355-71S7
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa and 2 chairs in
good condition. Price negotiable Call
738-2493 after 5:00.
FOR SALE: 1987 VVV Fox GL. Mint Con-
dition. Excellent value! Small down pay
ment and take over payments of S145.00
month. Great Puy! Call 752-2467.
FOR SLE: 1969 Dodge Dart. Only 60.000
ong. miles Great car for around school,
$500.00. Also 6 ft. Local Motion Surfboard
� $100.00 Call Joe 757-3642 or 757-6366.
S1LDENT TYTING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer re'sume'
production, and other business and pro-
fessional services Call 757-3111 M-F for
more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C. 752-3694
PARTY If you re having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
tics dance, top 40 & beach Call 353-2781,
ask for Morgan.
PAPERS. RESUMES, ETC Done bv
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted Call 752-1933.
HELP WANTED
THE AD YOU'VE BEEN WAITING TO
SEE: WREATH MAKERS has started
production! Come by 403 12 Evans St.
Mall (.upstairs, doorway between
Bradshaws & House of Hats) to make
extra bucks in v our spare time - no mandi-
torv hours work when, as long, & as often
as you like - $10 $20 00 ph according to
how fast you work HANDICAPPED
person welcome - check door for hours
(usually 10 am - 10 p.m 7 days a week)
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take signups for our FLORIDA tours. We
furnish all materials for a successful pro-
motion. Good PA and FUN Call CAM-
PUS MARKETING at 1 800-777-2270.
RESORT HOTELS: Cruiselmes Airlines
& Amusement Parks NOW accepting ap-
plications for summer jobs, internships
and cjreer positions. For more informa-
tion and an application, write National
Collegiate Recreation Service, PO Box
8074; 1 lilton 1 lead, SC 29938.
TRAVEL FRlt SPUING BREAK! ERA
TERN1T1ES & SORORITIES INVITED;
For information about being a Campus
Travel Rep , call 800-826 9100 Ask for
Steve or Janet
HELP WANTED: The Waffle House is
now taking applications for all positions,
full and part-time, also management. No
experience necessary, will train. Benefits
include pd. vacation after 6 months, cook
incentive bonuses, and medical and den-
tal insurance available. Must be depend-
able, honest, and enjoy working with the
public. Apply in person only! 306
Greenville Blvd M-F, 11 a.m2 p.m.
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To distribute
"Student Rate" subscription cards at this
campus. Good income. For information
and application write to: COLLEGIATE
MARKETING SERVICES, 251 Glenwood
Dr Mooresvtlle, NC 28115. 704-664-4063.
PART-TIME HELP WANTED: Young
male for sales & stock. Must be outgoing &
aggressive. Apply at The Youth Shop,
Carolina East Center.
WAKE 'N' BAKE: In beautiful Negril, Ja
maica for Spring Break '89. Very afford-
able packages. Organize group travel free.
Call 1-800-426-7710.
CHILD CARENANNIES NEEDED:
Join our (Nanny Network) of over 800
placed by us in the Northeast. One year
working with kids in exchange for salaries
up to S300.00 per week. Room and board,
airfare and benefits. We offer THE BEST
CHOICES in families and locations. Con-
tact Maureen Carol, A HELPING HANDS
INC, Recruitment Counselor, 919-577-
5154 (evenings) for brochure and applica-
tion Featured on NBC's Today Show and
October 1987 Working Mother magazine
as nationally recognized leader in nanny
placement. Est. 1984.
PERSONALS
KAS, HLZ: Good luck this spring. Study
hard or Anne's Temporaries vocation
will become a permanent situation!
A.P.P.
THE WAY CAMPUS FELLOWSHIP
TWIG FELLOWSHIPS ARE AVAIL-
ABLE: Every Tuesday and Thursday at
7:30 p.m. at 2007 Tiffany Dr. in Heritage
Village Call 355-5164 for details. Hot
Bible! Great Fellowship!
GOOD LUCK: To the Delta Zeta volley-
ball team We're with you all the wav girls!
�Love, Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: Congratulations to our
soccer team on an awesome season!
THETA CHI: Thanks guys for a rockin
time, all bandaged up we were still in our
prime The real First Aid came the next
day when aspirin took the headaches
away. Thanks again �Love, Delta Zeta.
HEY PIKES: The Heaven and Hell that
couldn't be beat, although in limbo was
where we were to meet. Playing cool tunes
in the midst of the night kept fireballs in
hell from becoming a fright. All in all the
night was way O.K. Let's do it again be-
fore judgement day! �Love, Delta Zeta.
LOST-N-FOUND: Lost 6 months old
white ChowGerman Shepherd mixed.
Answers to Bailey Lost in the East 2nd
Street area. Has brown leather collar Call
Carmen Smith 758 4443 -h; 551-4493 w
REWARD.
THETRISIGMAS AND DELTAE r AS
WILL BE HOLDING: A Red Ribbon
Candlelight vigile on Tuesday, December
6, 1988 at 6:00 p.m. We would like all of
those interested to please attend. Any
questions please call 355-6248.
TO PI KAPPA PHI PLEDGES The tin.e
is coming near 1 lang in there And re
member we are always here for you guys'
�Love, The Little Sisters.
TO PI KAPPA PHI BROTHERS: Con
gratulations on all vour intramural wins!
Keep up the good work We're proud of
you! �Love, The Little Sisters
SIGMAS: Thank you for all vour help last
week with Pirate Walk!
IT'S ALMOST HERE The Delta Sigma
Phi "Date of Fate" extravaganza' Are you
one of the lucky girls? Will you be there7
Only fate will decide
GIRLS: When fate pursues you do you
run the other wav' If so. you may bo
missing out The Delta Sigma Phi "Date ot
Fate" bash is upon us Let fate taKe hold
Good fortunes and great times are in
store! �The Brothers of Delta Sig.
DELTA SIGMA PHI: Would like to con
gratulate its new officers for 1989 Presi
dent: Mike Holmes, Vice President: Bob
Faircloth, Treasurer: Greg Sisk, Secretary.
Steve Parker, Sergeant at Arms Eric
Hampton, Engineered Leadership Direc
tor: Walter Holt, Pledge Trainer. Steve
Schaefer. Way to go! We look forward to a
great year.
ALPHA XI DELTA: Congratulations to
the 1989 officers. Kimberlv Fleming,
President, Stefanie Pena, Membership;
Rarbara Lamb, Panhellenic Delegate;
Kathv Moore, Pledge Educator, Mi hclle
England, Treasurer; Kelly Barnos Qiii 1
Chairman; Allison MacKinnon, R���� (rd-
ing Secretary; Shan Booth, Corresponding
Secretary; Amy Row, Historian; Tonya
tlildreth. Chaplain, TynaSloute, Marshal,
Frances Brown, Ritual Chairman; Treacv
Taylor, Scholarship, Julie Boley, Alumnae
Chairman, and Julie Wesslcr, Financial
Chairman
KA'S: Ilianks for the pre party Saturday
night We had a blast. � Love the Alpha Xi
Delta's.
BARBARA LAMB: Thanks for doing
such a great pb as President this past year
we love you rooster' �the Alpha Xi
I Vita's.
1 IN A T "I Love Ya Babe " - John G.
ETAS, ZETAS, ZE1AS. Now wasn't
formal great7 Crown Ball was kicked off
when the limo pulled up. Caroline, this
sear, you had the 'do that topped all
Mandy, we are so glad that you finally
found vour shoe The awards were cute,
and isn't it something that we all won. All
of our congrads to Michelle - you area true
Crown Zeta Girls it was great fun Hope
that all of our dates had as much fun. �
Zeta Love.
ALPHA SIGS: New Bern rocked, some
how the Sheraton survived Rod hit his
head, but he's still alive' Goo finally came
down, for dinner he was late, but he made
it for the awards, they were great' Ve
danced all night, out on the floor, till Slate
made a train, and led it out the door!
Formal was the best' Thanks to ail
Sigs, Little Sisters and date
Buy, sell or say hello via The
East Carolinian Classified
Ads.
Deadlines for Tuesday's
paper is Friday at 4p.m. and
Thursday's paper is Mon-
day at 4p.m.
Your Best Look
Specializing In: MANICURES:
French Mamcures'Nail Tips
Overlays Wrapping Acrylics"
PEDICURES-SKIN CARE Body
Wrapping-Face & Body Waxing
Facials'Deep Pore Cleansing
Acne TreatmentsMuscle Tone
Treatments 'Complete Line Of
l herapeutic Skin Care Products Fo:
Men iWomen
355-2969 For Appointment
314 Plaa Dr Greenville
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
.
ACCU
S5COPY
758-2400
GRADUATF. NURSING
STUDENTS
Needed for home health euro
or staff relief. A perfect job
for busy students. You design
vour own schedule to meet
your academic needs. Please
call Northcare Health Services
at 757-0029, or send resume
to P.O. Box 8424, Greenville,
NC 27834
ABORTION
Personal und Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
� for appointment Mon thru Sjt. law
I dsi rcrmlnaoon to 2Q wcck� of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
A Beautiful Tlace to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
l NIVERSm APARTMENTS
$991 5th sirrrr
� -citfd Near
� Acxom Fiorn Highway Patrol s -
?.imitid o(frr-$77S I month
Contart J r. or Tommy Williams
7S6-7815 Of IWHi:
Office opes-Apl I Upm
�AZALEA GADENS
C .ejr and quirt oaf beincrr. rurr
apartrrwrvs, ererQ- efficient, 'rre water am
sewer, optional ivasncTt, drve-rs. cable TV
iptes r angles only S2Q5 a rnontfc. 6 mo
asf Ml HLEHOME RENTALS-couple
singles Apatmrn; and rrubtle home in Ava
C.arderu near Hruofc Valley Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy William-
756-7815
��
Mb'
menls
CHRISTIAN FFLLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center You
are invited to join us.
rQ I FCF WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMIM CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
COOPERATIVE ED.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered by
the University, is designed to help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. We would like to
extend an invitation to all students to at-
tend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Nov. semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are: 'extra cash to help cover the cost of
college expenses or perhaps to increase
your "fun" budget, 'opportunities to test
a career choice if you have made one or to
explore career options if undecided about
a future career, and a highly "market-
able" degree, which includes a valuable
career-related experience, when vou
graduate. Co-op Seminars�Fall, 1988:
Mon, Nov. 28, 4 p.m rm 2006; Thurs,
Dec. 1,1 p.m rm 2010; and Mon , Dec 5,
4 p.m rm. 2006.
pAHAMAS OR CANCUN?
Let the Student Union Travel Committee
take you to a new and exating place for
Spring Break '89. Shop in the world's
marketplace, plan on eating 5-6 times a
day, dip in the pool, play shuf fleboard, get
a tan, just relax . cruise the Bahamas for
5 days4 nights OR if cruising the ocean
blue is not for you, then come with us for
7 days and nights in Cancun, Mexico.
While in Cancun, stay in a hotel that is on
one of Cancun's finest beaches. Just relax
and enjoy the sun and beach on this gor-
geous island of paradise. Check out our
affordable prices at Central Ticket Office
at Mendcnhall (757-6611).
GEQJJES
Group photographs will not be taken after
Dec 5. If your org. has not had their pic-
ture taken bv Dec 5, thev will not appear
in the 198 BUCCANEER. Cull 757-6501
and leave date & time for the photo to be
taken Please give two days notice for the
photographer.
CLASS PICTURES
There will be another session for students
to have their class pictures taken for the
1989 Buccaneer. If you were turned away,
or did not get the chance to have them
taken last time, you may have them taken
Jan. 23-27. 1989. Come by the Buccaneer
office & sign up on the sheet posted on the
door. We are located on the 2nd fljor of
the Publications Bldg. in front of Joyner
Library.
PAST KEY CLUB MEMBERS
All Past Key Cub Members and anyone
else interested are invited to attend the
Circle-K organizational meeting on Nov.
30 at 7:00 p m. in room 212 of Mendcnhall.
Officers will be elected and the upcoming
ski trip will be discussed. If you were in
Key Club, Kevwanettes, Beta Club, Inter-
act, OU, or Junior Civitans - then this is
the college organization for you. Call 756-
9783 for more info.
AMNESTY INTL.
Amnesty International usually meets
every 4th Wed. at 8 p.m. at St Paul's
Episcopal Church, 401 E. 4th St in the
upper floor - enter from the 4th St. en-
trance. Due to the Thanksgiving holiday,
the next meeting will be on Nov. 30.
EDUCATION MAIORS
The School of Education is sponsoring a
workstudy trip to Puebla, Mexico dur-
ing spring break (March 4-12, 1989).
Opportunities are available to observe ed.
in Mexico, teach, and travel. All ed. majors
are invited to participate Applications
are in the Dean's office, Speight Bldg. For
more infocontact Marianne Eum at 757-
6271 Application deadline � Dec. 12.
1989. Weight training and puonc relations
experience helpful. Average 6-10 hours
per week and must be able to work occa-
sional weekends. Stop by 204 Memorial
Gym to complete an application.
1989. If you have anv questions, please
contact 559-5100.
NATIONAL STUDENT
EXCHANGE
TICKETS AVAILABLE
Tickets for the New York trip over
Thanksgiving are still on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall. Rush
over and get a ticket for this exciting trip
before the tickets run out. (Only a limited
number left).
All LITTLE SISTER ORG.
Get your group photo taken for the Bucca-
neer todav Call757-6501 tosetupanappt.
The last day to get a picture taken is Dec.
5.
LIFEGUARD
Applications are now being accepted for
lifeguard positions with Intramural-Rec-
reational Services during Spring 1989.
Must have current CPR and Advanced
Lifesaving Certification Average 6-10
hours per week and must be able to work
occasional weekends Stop by 204 Memo-
rial Gym to complete an application
WEJjGJlTRQONlit
GJEMATTENPANT
Applications are now being accepted for
facility attendant positions with Intramu-
ral-Recreational Services during Spring
EXPRESSIONS
"Expressions" would like to thank every-
one that submitted poetry or short stories
for the Dec. issue. Since production has
already begun, we are no longer accepting
entries. The Dec. issue will feature thre
sections entitled "Voices "On Campus
and The Arts So look for it soon.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Student Union Travel Committee has
scheduled a meeting today at 430 p.m.
Please plan to attend! (Group photos for
the yearbook will be taken at 5:00 p.m. at
this meeting). Thanks!
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to attend our
Bible Studies every Tues. night at 7:00
p.m. in Rawl 130. Bring a friend. For more
info, call Jim at 752-7199.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma's last meeting will be on
Nov. 29th, 7:30 p.m. at Western Sizzlen.
All members are invited to attend. Any-
one needing transporation can call Dana,
Wendy or Dawn.
AGC BANQUET
The ECU student chapter of the Associ-
ated General Contractors will hold its 2nd
Annual Contractors Banquet Nov. 30th,
630 p.m at the Comfort Inn. This years
speaker will be "Roddy" Jones, Exec. VP
of Davidson & Jones Construction Co.
Other area contractors will also be in at-
tendance. This is an excellent opportunity
to make contacts in the Construction In-
dustry. $10.00 for AGC members, $15.00
for non-members (includes AGC mem-
bership). Pay by Nov. 28 at CMGT office,
Rawl 325.
CASMHLL CENTERS
PROJECT INSIDEOUT
This is a unique opportunity to examine a
state institution for persons with mental
retardation. Project InsideOut is an in-
tensive 3 12 day live-in experience de-
signed to expose persons in the field to the
entirety of the facility. It provides an in-
valuable learning experience for students.
This year's project will be held Feb. 1-4,
Interested in exploring now places? Na-
tional Student Exchange provides .in ex-
citing opportunity for ECU students to
attend one of over 80 colleges or universi-
ties across the U.S. Live in another p.ut of
the country and experience college life in
a different setting tor a semester or a war
ECU students pay the same tuition and
fees as at ECU, and avoid the red tape
normally associated with transferring to
another institution For more info, and
applications, contact Stephanie Cvancho
or Dr. Maurice Simon. 1002 GCB or call
757-6769.
CM AT
The Graduate Mgmt. Admission lest
(GMAT) will be offered at ECU on Jan. 28,
1989. Application blanks are to be com-
pleted and mailed to GMAT, Educational
Testing Service, Box 966-R, Princeton, N.J
08540. Applications must be postmarked
no later than Dec. 26, 1988. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center, Room-105, Speight Bldg.
GRE
The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) will be
offered at ECU on Feb. 4, 1989 Applka
bon blanks are to be completed and
mailed to GRE, Educational Testing Serv-
ice, Box 955, Princeton, N J. 08540 Appli
cations must be postmarked no later than
Dec. 27, 1988 Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105, Speight Bldg.
semester is (double room) $520.00. Spon-
sored by Wesley FoundationMethodist
Student Center.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
i inal meeting of the semester, important
planning for next semester to be dis-
cussed. All members required to attend
i a how bout it twenty three!
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
The Overseas Development Network
(ODN) is having an end-of-(he-semester
holiday dinner on Dec. 1 at 6 p.m. Every
one bring a covered dish - anyone inter-
ested is welcome to come Location: 210 S.
Pitt St For more info, call Marianne Exum
(h) 830-9450 or (w) 757-6271
CHRISTMAS PARTY
Fhe School of Ed. Christmas Party will be
held on Nov. 30. All faculty, staff and
students are welcome to drop in anytime
from 7 pm. to 12 midnight. Tins will be a
semi-formal social and small foods and
snacks will be served. It will be held at the
Courtney Square Gubhousc Please join
us!
-A CHRISTMAS CEL
TION"
:bra-
The Greenville Choral Society will pres-
ent "A Christmas Celebration" with the
Tar River Orchestra and Chorus on Dec
10 at 8:00 p.m in Wright Auditorium. Dr.
Rhonda Fleming, director of the
Greenville Choral Society has announced
that this concert will be one that the entire
family will enjoy featuring approximately
300 performers. A pre-concert program
beginning at 7:30 p.m will feature the
Suzuki Violins of Eastern N C and the
Greenville Suzuki Assoc , Joanne Bath, co-
ordinator. The Tar River Orchestra and
Chorus, Hern an Murno, will be appear-
ing with the Greenville Society. Tickets
are available from Cha-Rich Music Co.
and Piano and Organ Distributors of
Greenville. Group rates are available For
info call Stephen Vaughn, 752-6154 This
program is sponsored in part by Carolina
Telephone and Greenville Cable TV.
PQOMS FOR RENT
Private and semi-private. Applications
now being accepted for Spring semester.
Male or female. Cost of room for one
(EQ2CLUB
The last (EC)2 meeting of the semester will
be held on Nov. 30 The topic will be folder
games, please bring markers, glue, scis-
sors etc Sweatshirts will be distributed on
Wed. The club picture will also be taken
Please be on time! This will be a busy
meeting!
CHRISTMAS COMMUNION
Enjoy a silent Christmas agape dinner
with turkey and all the trimmings, then
worship God in a beautiful candlelight
communion service this Wed. night at 5
p m at the Methodist Student Center (501
E 5th St, across from Garrett Dorm) The
meal is free, an offering will be collected
it the pxr of Greenville Call 758-2030
!or . servations Sponsored by Presbyte-
:ian and Methodist Campus Ministries.
P,E. MOTOR & PHYSICAL
FITNESS TEST
Place Mtnges. Time and date 10:00 am ,
Dec b (Reading Day) A passing score on
this test is required of all students prior to
declaring P E as a major 1) Maintaining
an average T score of 45 on the six item
test battery 2) Having a T-score of 45 on
the aerobics run Any student with a
medical condition that would contraindi
cate participation in the testing should
contact Mike McCannon or Dr Gav Israel
at 757 6497. To be exempted from any
portion of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A detailed summary
of the test components is available in the
Human Performance Lab (room 113,
Minges) Your physicians' excuse must
specifically state from which items you
are exempt.
COMPUTER CLUB
Join
Joe Harris and The
East Carolinian
News Department
for the latest devel-
opments in campus
news.
Every Tuesday and
Thursday.

The East Carolina Computer Club
meet in Austin 223 on Dec. 1 at 3:30pa
We will have refreshments, decide
design for the club shirts and discuss
an programming contest
SANTA GRAMS
Alpha Phi Omega, the coed Nat
Service Fraternity, will be selling Santl
Grams on Nov. 28, 29 and 30th in tr.
the Student Stores. lust S 50 and vou car
send a message and candy to anyone, a
where' (even off-campus) Santa-Grams
will be delivered Dec 1st Only S 5
CHANGE IN MAT TEST FEE
The Miller Analogies Test (MAT) wul B
given on Nov. 30 at 2:30 p m in Speight
Bldg , room 203, at a cost of S25 This
be the last administration for ' -
semester The nevt MAT will be given on
Jan 11. Beginning with the Ian 11 teH
date, the test fee will increase from S2
S30.
ECU HOLIDAY CONCERT
A free Holiday Concert of favorite musj
of the season will be held in Wright A
torium Dec 1 at 7:30 p m Performed bj
the ECU Wind Ensemble, the program
includes themes from The Nutcracker
"Sleigh Ride" and "A Christmas Festival
bv Leroy Anderson, "A Child is Born and
other carols, as well as an audience sing
along and an appearance by Saint Nick
This popular concert is sponsored anr �
allv b the Friends of the ECU Sch�o ot
Music for students, facult and commu
nitv members
SELF-HELP POSITION
U'art time QerkTyptsi and Reception
ist) The Dept of Political Science seeks
reliable, conscientious, and efficient stu
dent with strong skills and some expen
once to assist statj and faculty in a variety
ot activities Good tvping, copying arv,
clerical skills aro desired Please contact
Mrs Cynthia Smith. Brewster A 124 per-
sonally or by telephone. 757-6030, 8 3
a m to 5 00 p m , Mon Fn We will be
hiring as soon as possible
Five de
as torn
RALEIGH(AP)- Five
.lied and at least 100 other
injured when tornadoe
srioyed houses and mobile I
and flattened apartment
ings in eastern North C
i jrh Monday, authorities
Three people, inciud
11-year-old boy, died in
County which contains kj
Two deaths were reporl
"Nash County, said Al Wai
the N.C Department of
Control and Public Sal
not know further del
Raleigh (
Dempsey Benton r suKj
r2 people were taken t
�pitals and thre
people required sur
t �ur houses ere dai
nine more were d
sid
"These number

mtlv higher numb
. isessment is comj
Ion said
He said the ton
i apital city at about I ;15aj
list s transp rt i re tl
ople to two shcltt �
"To our kn
I eople have been . �
-aid Benton. ado .
ind rescue personnel
routing for problem 1
an uru on firmed report r
said PoliceChief FredHej
it he wouldn't say who;
Four three-stor J
! i inklings in the Coopci
. artment complex in
ore flattened and ml
j i thers suffered
es said Deirdre Bolln
ager of the complex.
No one in those buildi
seriously hurt. Mrs. Bolii
The t'irst rescue worker
: scene there pulled peo
third-floor wind. �
dents wandered aroun
with visible cuts. One
i clad only in a bath t �
"A couple of peo
rushed off to the h j
don't think thev were

11
inq
coni
l
i
is ad
l
u(
that!
(nt
I
llstJ
VI l





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 1988 7
rock ed some-
d Kvi hit his
� finally come
is lie bul ho made
great! We
I t fl hm till Slate
I the door!
all Alpha
r s.iv hello ia The
an'lassified
v is
tes lor ruesday's
aj .it 4p.m. and
paper is Mon-
n .it 4p.m.
'R RESUMES
MAKE A
IFFERENCE
ACCU
COPY
58-2400
i Live
ii ;
mv VN lUiam-
Five dead, hundreds injured
as tornadoes rip Raleigh
RALEIGH (AP) - Five people
.lied and at least 100 others were
injured when tornadoes de-
stroyed housesand mobile homes
and flattened apartment build-
ings in eastern North Carolina
early Monday, authorities said.
Three people, including an
11-year-old boy, died in Wake
County which contains Raleigh.
Two deaths were reported in
ash County, said Al Warlick of
the N.C. Department of Crime
Control and Public Safety. He did
not know further details.
Raleigh City Manager
i Vmpsey Benton Ir. said at least
62 people were taken to local
hospitals, and three of those
people required surgery. Forty-
tour houses were damaged, and
nine more were destroyed, he
said.
'These numbers are being
tpdated and we expect signifi-
arttly higher numbers when the
isscssment is completed Ben-
ton said.
He said the tornado hit the
apital city at about 1:15 a.m. City
I uses transported more than 300
eople to two shelters.
"To our knowledge, all
I eople have been accounted for
-aid Benton, adding that police
irtd rescue personnel were out
routing for problems. There was
an unconfirmed report of looting,
said Police Chief Fred Heineman,
it he wouldn't say where.
Four three-story apartment
i liildings in the Cooper's Pond
arrment complex in Raleigh
ere flattened and numerous
v thers suffered structural dam-
ages, said Deirdre Boiling, man-
ager of the complex.
No one in those buildings was
seriously hurt, Mrs. Boiling said.
The first rescue workers on the
scene there pulled people from
third-floor windows. Several rcsi-
J.L'iits wandered around dazed,
�.ith visible cuts. One man was
clad only in a bath towel.
"A couple of people were
rushed off to the hospital, but I
don't think they were hurt very
badly Ms. Boiling said. "We
didn't lose anybody. We feel re-
ally lucky about that
Residents were given tempo-
rary lodging at nearby hotels,
Mrs. Boiling said. Some residents
were planning to find shelters
that were being opened at area
schools.
Lisa Panier, who works and
lives at the complex, said her
building was untouched and that
she did not realize the tornado
had struck until a neighbor tele-
phoned.
"The thunder woke me up,
and 1 heard an extremely loud
roar Miss Lanier said. "It was
like a train, like you hear people
say. It was like a jet coming down
too low
The roar lasted 30 to 45 sec-
onds and then the wind died
down. "1 went back to bed be-
cause 1 didn't know what had
happened she said. "If I ever
hear that noise again, I'll dive for
the bathtub
Sonia Jones, assistant man
ager of the complex, said her
building also was spared major
damage but had some minor
damage, including blown-out
windows.
"It passed right by me she
said, "I was real lucky
Officer B.R. Baucon with the
Wake County sheriff's depart-
ment said about 300 officers were
checking the area for damage.
A spokesman for the Nash
County sheriff's department said
at least 20 residents of that county-
were brought to two hospitals in
Rocky Mount.
The two tornado victims in
Nash County were in separate
mobile homes that were de-
stroyed, authorities said. At least
two houses in the county also
were destroyed.
Freddy Leonard, mayor and
fire chief of the Nash County town
of Castalia, said he had received a
report of a pickup truck lodged in
a tree.
"It's terrible, and there's an
extensive amount of damage
Leonard said. "I'm fearful that we
may still find further (damage)
once it gets daylight
In neighboring Franklin
County, about 25 people were
injured, said Sheriff Arthur E.
Johnson.
"We've had churches that
have been demolished, some
trailers and some homes said
Johnson, who added that Red
Cross personnel were on their
way to the county.
The tornadoes and storms
appeared to hit hardest in parts of
Wake, Nash and Franklin coun-
ties, and power outages were
rampant. In north Raleigh, a K-
Mart department store was flat-
tened, and one person was
trapped inside, according to Sgt.
ID. Everett of the Raleigh Police
Department.
The man inside the store later
was freed, but he suffered a bro-
ken leg, said Robert Whittington,
an assistant Raleigh fire chief.
At least two other people
were injured near the store, Ever-
ett said, adding that he did not
know the extent of the injuries.
Bricks, cinder blocks and
twisted steel girders lay in a heap
with racks of clothing and other
merchandise. The shopping cen-
ter parking lot was filled with
police, sheriff's vehicles, and res-
cue vehicles.
Everett and other officers
hastily dispatched many of them
to surrounding neighborhoods
and other shopping centers to
look for people in need of help
and to prevent looting.
"I bet we've got extensive
damage all over the area Everet
said. "We do have some extensive
injuries, but I can't tell you how
many or who they are
At least two shelters had been
opened for people whose homes
were damaged, one at an elemen-
tary school and a park in North
Raleigh, Everett said.
There appeared to be several
tornadoes that occurred said Joe
Pehha meteorologist with the
National Weather Service.
COPY EDITORS
Exprience A Plus!
Apply at The East Carolinian
Publications Building - 2nd Floor
(In front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please
DELIVERY
SMALL
Cheese Pizza$4.95
Cheese and 1 Topping$5.60
Each Additional ToppingS 65
SPECIALTY PIZZAS
Cheese LoversS6.90
Meat Lovers$6.90
Supreme$6.90
Super SupremeS7.55
MEDIUM LARQI
S6.85
$7 65
$ 80
$9.25
$9 25
S925
S10.05
$895
S90
S.95
$1180
$11 80
$1180
$1275
FAMOUS PIZZA HUTQUALTFY
�GENEROUS TOPPINGS
�REAL CHEESE
�FRESH VEGETABLES
�DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY
DELIVERY HOURS DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
SUNTHURS. 4 PM TO MIDNIGHT
FRI.&SAT. 4PM TO 1:00 AM
DELIVERY CHARGE 75
NEVER FROZEN
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PHONE 752-4445
4lut
DELIVERY
$3 OFF ANY LARGE PIZZZA
OR $2 OFF ANY MEDIUM
OR $1 OFF ANY SMALL
Good for delivery, dine in or take out at your Pizza Hut
restaurant at 2601 EWtUouooicxglresDec i22?L � -J
p.n
on a
i
jrta
anv
I 1 1 bT Ft L
� n
I aght
- will
foi this
in on
a 11 test
� $25 t(
xc, I RT
� � . nusi
1 in V i.ii
�� rmed b
I r-irr
� � �. f er
-�a at
irui
: e -mg
. � K'k
. ir.nu
: - .1 Of
.mu
JTJQN
i seeks
lent tu
men pen
a ii '
.r and
- � 124 per
IV, , he
otn

Harris and The
it Carolinian
ws Department
the latest devel-
lents in campus
news.
:ry Tuesday and
Thursday.
You dorit need your parent money
id buy a Macintosh.
Just their signature
It s never been difficult f r students t i a n-
vince their parents of the need for a Macinu )sh
compeer at school.
Persuading them t i write the check, h e er,
is another thing altogether.
Which is why Apple created the Student U �an
to Own Program. An ingenk us loan program
that makes buying a Macinu sh as easy as using
one.
Simply pick up an applicatk n at the kxatk n
listed below, or call 800-831UOAN. All
your parents need to do is fill it out.
sign it, and send it. If they qualify, they'll receive
a check ft )r you in just a few weeks.
There's no collateral. No need to prove finan-
cial hardship. No application fee.
Best of all. the loan payments can be spread
over as many as 10 years.
itr
Which gives you and your parents plenty ot
time to decide just who pays for it all.
IntroducingApples
Student Loan-to-Dwn Program
ECU Student Stores
757-6731
rFrfjiiz
�lss Apple i "inimkT. Iiu
Appfe tlu Ppk ki ml NUiniush art regNereil tuiUnurks ot Apple Computer. Irk





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 1988
Soviet reforms in danger
MOSCOW (AP) � Soviet
President Mikhail Gorbachev
said ethnic strife is threatening his
program of economic and social
reforms, and he said restructuring
is the cure for the violence, not the
cause.
Gorbachev was reacting to a
wave of nationalist unrest that has
swept across the country from the
Baltic republics in the northwest
to the Caucasus in the southwest.
He said in a speech broadcast
on state television Sunday that
"attempts are being made to
kindle dislike in the interethnic
sphere
"This would be disastrous, it
would put perestroika in
jeopardy he said, referring to his
reform campaign. It would even
make some people think that it is,
perhaps, perestroika that is to
blame for all that
He said his policy of opening
up information and opinion is the
solution to ethnic tension, which
exists in many of "the 15 Soviet
republics.
Gorbachev's remarks come
during violent tensions between
the neighboring southern repub-
lics of Armenia and Azerbaijan
and during demands for in-
creased autonomy in the Baltic
republics of Estonia, Latvia and
Lithuania.
He made his speech Saturday
before the Presidium of the Su-
preme Soviet, the nation's top ex-
ecutive bodv.
Saturday's session of the Pre-
sidum struck down an Estonian
declaration of limited sovereignty
made earlier this month, official
media reported. Estonia declared
then that it had the right to veto
Soviet laws.
Official media said Gor-
bachev acknowledged before the
Presidium that national constitu-
tional amendments he has pro-
posed may have angered Estoni-
ans and others by curtailing local
rule.
But his remarks Saturday also
carried a veiled warning. "I must
say we receive a great number of
letters frrjTtrwotWng petfpto ttr
unrest.
every republic with remarks that
we are at times too tolerant with
regard to extremists Gorbachev
said.
In Azerbaijan on Sunday, two
Communist Party officials were
reported fired.
Soviet newspapers charged
that local authorities were not
helping soldiers halt the ethnic
violence in the republic.
Rallies of up to 500,000 people
were reported Sunday in Baku,
the troops trying to keep the
clashing Azerbaijanis and Arme-
nians apart in the Azerbaijani city
of Kirovabad.
At least seven people were
killed and 160 injured in Kirov-
abad in last week's violence be-
tween the mainly Christian Ar-
menians and Moslem Azer-
baijanis, reports have said.
A duty officer at the Azer-
baijani Communist Partv head-
quarters in the ci ty of Baku denied
charges that local authorities
were not helping the military
quell the violence, saying "The
party is in control He refused to
give his name.
Ethnic fighting between Az-
erbaijanis and Armenians first
began in February and culmi-
nated in last week's massive dem-
onstrations.
The Armenians, who domi-
nate the Nagorno-Karabakh re-
gion of Azerbaijan, are demand-
ing that it be annexed to neighbor-
ing Armenia.
Tass reported Sunday that
building materials were being
removed from a construction site
for an Armenian workshop and
recreation center in Azerbaijan's
Topkhan Natural Preserve. The
official news agency said the con-
struction of the center at an Arme-
nian-controlled aluminum fac-
tory contributed to last week's
UP
Wt your lips around Rio's hottest
event in November. Perform
your favorite Lipsync to the tune
of $100.00 weekly & $500.00
to the finalist on December 7th.
Starts Wednesday, Nov. 2.
ff
$1.50 Vodka Drinks
H Itonlnn Greenv e355-500C
HELP WANTED
APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR
NEWS EDITOR
&
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
APPLY IN PERSON
MONDAY-FRIDAY
10 a.m4 p.m.
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
2nd FLOOR
PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
IN FRONT OF JOYNER LIBRARY
No phone calls please
Layout Experience Preferred
georges
hair designers
For the latest in
Contemporary Hair Styling

� European Trained Hair Stylists
Free Consultation � Latest New Fall Fashions
� 1 Indoor Tanning System
The Plaza
Open 'til 9 p.m.
c�py tfOLVDSVfS
756-6200
BUY ONE PIZZA GET ONE
FREE EVERYDAY!
0 0
0 A
6
ft

(
,x cc
0
r
l�

WE SERVE
Cal G
m
T
CRUSTY'S
PIZZA
WE
DELIVER
( I.VSSK
Eotoy.
WE
DELIVER!
Limited Delivery Area!
�T A SLICE
0F THE
in 16 oz. bottles
Greenville
E.C.U.
1414 S. Charles
758-2233
Serving Surrounding Areas
I
CRUSTY'SV
PIZZA
1)1 1 l I K
CRUSTY
PIZZA r
CRUSTY'
CRUSTY'
I IL.Lr imlivi
11 CRUSTY'S'
w AmL,t mm
� SKS�
OIIIMR
TWO SMALL
I THREE ITEM
I PIZZAS
65
Plus Tax
Delivered
Expires: 12-31-88
TWO SMALL
TWO ITEM
PIZZAS
Plus 2 Cokes
Plus Tax &
Deposit
Delivered
Expires: 12-31-88
TWO MEDIUM
THREE ITEM
PIZZAS
99
$10
Plus Tax
Delivered
Expires: 12-31-88
8 INCH SUB
(Ham & Cheese or Italian)
1 Drink & Chips
$Q49
Deposit
DtUbvwy
Addtaaai
Delivered
Expires: 12-31-88
TWO LARGE
TWO ITEM
PIZZAS
Plus 4 Cokes
99
$13
Plus Tax
Deposit
TWO LARGE
ONE ITEM
PIZZAS
$1095
�" PI T,v
Plus Tax
Delivered
Expires: 12-31-88
Delivered
Expires: 12-31-88
1
Hou
Majc
Fors
Golc
is th
Stars

And
pcop
But
turru
aster
dern
I
tunn
nervs
theb
C
lion
pate
pro
intej
c :x?i
fag,
I
s�
I
ric
male
! v
eca
puib
forci
D
Pi
Religij
be ad
RALEIGH (AD
neglected as a subj
Carolina classroom
void is deprivii
other knowiedgi
history, literature ar
countries, a report
Religion rareiv y
state's social si
r-r textbooks, and
hasn't for at least a
10-mcmber commit!
B�rd of Education
Students anno?
stand
n debate or �
Middk
- : iudaisn
lam dnj (
commit!
W �
current siti �
exi-
pr . �.
a nine ;
. j, . . .
better textb -
citizei �
the lar.i ai
E. Beers, an N
his -
tha'
teach the r
Th
makir
Ghost
nephe
Ever
based
ford.
Den
Grey,
Ghost
Grey
model
lustict
playet
North
Qua
businc
andh
hares,
Rerrry
first b:
attenti
"All
allow
shine i
his act
Their
yearti
Jes
town'f
Ghosf
the
couple
staroi
le(
majoi
hist. �
!t j. - i
state . xamine wht tl
� . ' ind bio
pub urc
.
1 here wt re
Camp
more
what ha s become Iq
mone) politi
millions ,t dollar
thov funneled mid
teOTM up to hel
vote efforts and o
activities
The mor�
nrfkanl art
the stat
R-M cl
bore News &
In cor r
lineal par;
joined st metl
trend th
gence in th
tnbutior.thathad
US. political si
Watergate scandal
While federal
limit the amount o
can give to candid
action committee!
limits or the ami
that can he given
htical parries
Rabbyhadbi
passing� Sta! I
ten and oral exa
December 1985
on his written tes
each time Hewa
rule change
shorth K I
other "oral as�
dais said th o
blind appli
them to tak
not as cyn a a- il
The & id bl
were rtnitirw
mi��
sion estsd j
cal standards re.
fc ail di
V rei' �
I 'n State IV
is that all foreign
m be ' world
aru' -hat a bhnd
expected to deal
yc andsdipV mi
m ottici ii
Sta - " helpind
v,me their handicf
torcicii countries
coflnmodations
Another saic!
it involves readin
guage" oi foreign
diplomatic discu
tures as winks anj
of the overall meif
must assimilate,
Rabby said
less able "than si
read other people
"silent or verbal
Accepting a
diplomatic servil
terribly unfair tH
individual said
who cited high rj





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,1988 9
- around Rio's hottest
November. Perform
I tpsync to the tune
s eekly & $500.00
on December 7th.
rtesda Nov 2
�ers
fling
r Stylists
ew Fall Fashions
System
DAys
756-6200
ERVE
z. bottles
reenville
E.C.U.
S. Charles
8 2233
lrrounding Areas
A
u
CRUSTY'S
PIZZA

TWO LARGE
ONE ITEM
PIZZAS
$1095
Plus Tax
Delivered
Empires: 12-31-88
Religion a neglected subject, may
be added to school curriculums
RALEIGH (AP) - Religion is
neglected as a subject in North
Carolina classrooms, and that
void is depriving students of
other knowledge, including the
history, literature and art of other
countries, a report says.
Religion rarely surfaces in the
state's social studies curriculum
or textbooks, and it probably
hasn't for at least a generation, a
10-member committee of the state
Board of Education says.
Students cannot fully under-
stand Western history, the abor-
tion debate or turmoil in the
Middle East without knowing
about Judaism, Christianity, Is-
lam and Catholicism, the
committee's report says.
"We believe strongly that the
current situation only prolongs
existing ignorance, confusion and
prejudice the committee says in
a nine-page report that it will
present to the state Board or Edu-
cation on Wednesday. "We need
better textbooks, better educated
teachers, and a more informed
citizenry "
The committee appointed by
the txard and chaired by Burton
E, Beers, an N.C State University
history professor - recommends
that the state train teachers how to
teach the ro'e or major religions in
history, geography and econom-
ics courses.
It also recommends that the
state examine whether religion is
neglected in other subjects such as
literature and biology and that
publishers be urged to include
more about religion in textbooks.
"There were no substantive
Campaign
more than
disagreements among members created in part to fight the influ- cerned about the impressionabil-
of the committee Beers, author
of the nation's best-selling high
school world history book, told
the News and Observer of
Raleigh.
Teaching about religion in
school will likely be contra versial,
commit ten? members said. But
most people would not object,
according to a Gallup Poll two
ence of the religious right
If the board decides to adopt
the committee's recommenda-
tions, its biggest challenge will be
making sure teachers carry it out
without violating the
Constitution, Ms. Rosenthal, who
is
interview
Courts have ruled schools
ity of all students and the
w
ten-
tial for proselytizing - whether
intended or not says the report.
years ago. The poll showed 79 may teach about religion, but they
percent of those surveyed would cannot promote religion without
not oppose teaching about major violating the First Amendment.
Because of that potential, the
committee recommends that
, teachers be informed about the
lZ m P e&1 constraints on religious in-
struction and that such lessons
focus on older, more mature and
less impressionable students.
Many teachers also need to learn
more about religon, said John D.
Ellington, member of the commit-
tee and director of the state De-
partment of Public Instruction's
social studies division.
But, like Ms. Rosenthal, the
committee expressed fears that
not all teachers would under-
stand that distinction.
"We are particularly con-
jj5
&
For The Finest
In Fresh Seafood
religions in school.
The influence of religion
should be taught throughout the
social studies curriculum, par-
ticularly in middle and high
school grades the committee's
report says. IX'tails would be left
to state curriculum specialists, but
the report provides some ex-
amples of how religion could be
infused into history courses.
In American history, for ex-
ample, the report suggests stu-
dents could be taught the role of
holy men among Indians, the in-
fluence of religious beliefs on the
Salem witch trials, religious argu-
ments for and against slavery,
movement and the religious rea- ��,t�'�-�'T'TTw"T" t "7v
tBOtHjTA'S 'BOVmQJA'L 07 JLOfWtL'K5 & QUS
gi&'EWlLL'E SQUARE SrtOVPI'Hg CLOPEI
355-7888
Holiday Specials� Long Stem Roses
(in vases)
Through Christmas:
(IDoz.)$30.00
(12 Doz.)$17.00
(3) Roses$12.00
(1) Rose$ 7.00
9ULL f&$&X�2.ME$QCS S(PLCIRLLrf(2lCL'Di
i
St&DIIIOT&UL 10 'DISCOUNT ALL T.C11 S'TU'DLXS
Y Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
AWWAlEOFAMEAl
758-0327
105 AipportRd.
Banquet Facilities Available
Hank's
Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen
Yogurt & Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
sons a Quaker would have for re- L
fusing to go to war. v
The report appears to be "a 77
real good attempt to try to expose "��"
North Carolina children to diver- "Tv
sity said Cathy J. Rosenthal
executive director of People for �L
the American Way in North Caro- w
Una. The Raleigh-based group 7Y
has 5,000 members and is affili- Q
ated with a national oreanization "Tv

3?a
D
T
ffft
money has
one use
Supplies & Decorations
Cups, Plates, Streamers
Tree Ornaments
Room Decorations
ECU Discount With ID.
"Anything Paper"
Hank's Gift Certificates,
Long Sleeve Tye Dyes,
And Other Holiday Treats,
For The "Sweetest" Gifts Around!
m
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream, j
�rift
Frozen Yogurt & Sorbet
321 E. 10th St (Next to Wendy's)
25 C Off Any
Blend
RALEIGH (AP) Through
what has become known as "soft"
money, political parties raised
millions of dollars this year that
they tunneled into local commit
tees-set up to help get-out4he
vote efforts and other campaign
activities.
'The money was a very sig-
nificant part of the campaign in
the state' state Sen Larry Cobb,
R-Mecklenburg, toiti TheGra ns-
boro News & Record.
In contributing money to po-
litical parties, North Carolinian?
joined something of a national
trend this year, marking a resur-
gence in the large campaign con-
tributions that had faded from the
U.S. political scene after the 1972
Watergate scandals.
While federal and state laws
limi t the amount of m ney donors
can give to candidates or political
action committees, there are no
limits on the amount of money
that can be given to national po-
litical parties.
Rabby had been taking - and
passing�State Department writ-
ten and oral examinations since
December 1985. He said his score
on his written tests had improved
each time. fe was informed of the
rule change earlier this month
shortly before he was to take an-
other "oral assessment the offi-
cials said the policy of rejecting
blind applicants alter allowing
them to take admission tests was
not as cyni a! as it miht seem.
They said blind applicants
were routinely advised that per-
mission foi them to take admis-
sion tests did not mean that medi-
cal standards requiring "visual
acuity" for all diplomats would
be relaxed.
pht Stale Departments view
is that all foreign service officers
m be "worldwide available"
and 'hat a blind person cannot be
expected to deal with the myriad
demands dipt mats face.
One official said the United
Su.es for helping the blind over-
come their handicapbut that most
foreign rountrics lack such ar-
commodations.
Another said that muchot it it
it involves reading the "body lan-
guage" of foreign envoys during
diplomatic discussions. Such ges-
tures as winks and nods form part
of the overall message a diplomat
must assimilate, the official said.
Rabby said the blind are no
less able than sighted people to
read other people's language, be it
"silent or verbal
Accepting a blind person for
diplomatic service "would be a
terribly unfair thing to do to that
individual said another official,
who cited high risk posts, such as
Lebanon, as particularly inappro- Bells Fork Square
pnate tor a sightless person. "rJ s 4? �x�.���x��x�x�v x�x�A'V�A'�Ak' �4
. r r t r r r r f r r r r r r �f j f p p p p p
GORDON'S
GORDON'S
GOLF AND SKI SHOP
Open til 9 Wed Fri XJjgSHL
& All Sundays til Christmas
for all
your snowskiing
needs
-�� .�"��
s;J
i
"y:
Greanvill. Blvd.
r$6-t003 Next lo Greenville TV and ApptiancesT
IRTCTIRVED
CLASS Rl NGS
Lip Sync Contest
Sponsored by Leisure Systems Studies
1st $100
2nd $50
3rd $25
Open 9-1
Admission $1 Members,
$2 Guest
Bar Specials All Nite
Sign Up At
Leisure Systems
Studies Office
or Call the Elbo
758-4591
Now is the season for big
savings on your college
ring. Order now, opt for
March delivery, and you
can save
on a gold ArtCarved ring.
It's your opportunity to
own a ring of the finest
style and quality, backed
by the ArtCarved Full
Lifetime Warranty. At a
price you'll thank us for.
Don't miss it!
The Quality.
The Craftsmanship.
The Reward You Deserve
9ajn4Ma�
Student Store Lobby
Wright BuildinR
Date
c 1988 ArtQrcd dan lings.
Time
Place
$20 Deposit Required





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,18
Organizations unite to fight rape
(CPS) � Students of the left-
wing United Progressives at the
University of Illinois don't have
much in common with the
campus's greeks, an 1 the two
groups often find themselves on
opposite sides of issues.
'They're our rivals noted
Jane Brouwer, president of Ul's
Panhellenic Council.
But now the Panhellenic
Council, Brouwer said, has been
mobilized and galvanized,
marching and working with radi-
cals and moderates, by a tragic
series of 15 unsolved rapes near
the Urbana-Champaign campus.
And it's happening else-
where: in early November in
Providence, R.I Brown Univer-
sity women rallied in the wake of
two near-campus rapes, sharing
horror stories of their own sexual
abuse and demanding more pro-
tection.
Angry students have rallied
against rape � and for better
campus security � at Northwest
Missouri State, Millersville State
in Pennsvlvania, Yale and the
University of Pennsylvania,
among others, this fall.
Perhaps even more signifi-
cantly, the participants are mak-
ing barelv veiled promises to be
more militant in fighting campus
crime.
At Brown, for instance, stu-
dent Both Bird vowed to form a
"counter-terrorist" group to re-
taliate against men who try to
assault women.
An Illinois women's group
Spray-painted anti-rape graffiti
on two fraternity houses on a
street where a rape was reported
last fall. When MankatoStateoffi-
cials tried to solve budget prob-
lems by cutting a Sexual Assault
Service job, hundreds of angry-
students protested, noting there
had been a record number of stu-
dent sexual assault reports in
September.
'Women statewide and na-
tionwide are fighting back
stronger and more united than
ever before University of Wis-
don't want to put up with this
abuse anymore said Junior
Bridge, a spokeswoman for the
National Organization for
Women. "And the culture has
cousin-Milwaukee activist Mary changed. It's now saying this is
Martin said at a recent Marquctte not acceptable behavior that will
rally.
"A consciousness is develop-
ing added Elena DiLapi of the
University of Pennsylvania's
Women's Center. "Women real-
ize wiey don't have to be silent
Dan Keller, public safety di
no longer be tolerated. Loud pro-
tests may have made people un-
comfortable, but the message has
sunk in
"I resent the fact of feeling
powerless said Kathy Hatha-
way, a senior who helped organ-
rector at the University of Louis- �ze Brown's rally
ville and a former officer of sev-
eral national campus police
groups, agreed. People "are be-
coming more assertive of their
rights, and demanding greater
protection from colleges and uni-
versities
Students have been holding
anti-rape vigils and marches for
vears, of course, but this fall's ef-
forts have been bigger, angrier,
more emotional, laced with those
allusions to "counter terrorism"
and joined, at last, by groups that
While most of the fall's
marches were provoked by recent
on- or near-campus rapes, Jan
Sherrill, director of the Center for
The Study and Prevention of
Campus Violenceat Towson State
JJniversity in Maryland, says
there is good reason for ongoing
concern.
American Colleges. "Rape is not a
rare occurrence. Every woman
has a fear of rape. You can't walk
across a campus at night without
the fear of being raped
But while student concern
about burglaries, muggings and
assaults is usually articulated by
demands for more police and
better campus security, the new
anti-rape coalitions at many
schools are targeting the sexism
they say pervades their campuses
and allows rape to exist.
"Everyone has worked so
hard to get into this school said
Brouwer. "It's a slap in the face
when we can't walk across cam-
pus, especially when we proved
ourselves to be independent and
competent
"Women don't feel welcome
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5pm
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
on campuses all the time added
There were 64 percent more DJLapi. "They have to fight for
their space. When you look at ho w
hard it is for a woman to get ten-
ure on a campus, it sends students
rapes reported during the 1986-87
academic year than in 1985-86, the
center's annual survey of campus
crime revealed, although sexual
have been notably apolitical in the assault was down by 40 percent,
past. Since rape � especially when
"We stay d away from issues it's committed by a date or an ac-
hke this because we're a social quaintance �is perhaps the most
group, and we tend to keep away underreported crime in the
from political issues explained United States, the survey doesn't
Brouwer of Ul's Panhellenic necessarily mean that rapes are
Council, which has 3,500 mem-
bers.
"But sexism is a social issue,
and we're the biggest women's
group on campus
At Marquette's early Novem-
ber Take Back the Night vigil, or-
ganizer Beth Nowell was "im-
pressed with the number of un-
derclassmen and men. The scope
is much broader now. You can't
typify Democrat or Republican,
which is good because these is-
sues are not party issues. Every-
i n (who attended) is not a radical
or left-wing person
"This tells us that women
up, but that students are report
ing it more frequently
a message of who is valued and
who isn't
DiLapi asserted that "institu-
tions, run primarily by white
men, don't see these issues. They
challenge women's values. Why
don't thev believe us when we sav
this is our experience?"
Although most colleges have
It'shardtoreportafriend,or developed rape awareness and
someone who lives in the dorm
room next to vou Sherrill said.
But the women's movement
has taught women to speak up
when they've been violated,
which may be why sexual assaults
are down. "Some things that were
once rcpoiled as sexual assault
arc now considered rape Sher-
rill noted.
As many as 25 percent of col-
lege women have been raped by a
date or an acquaintance, said Ber-
nice Sandier of the Association of
Poll shows majority of young
voters went with Democrats
(CPS) � Initial exit poll re- at Bellarmine College in Ken-
suits suggested a slight majority tucky and Arizona State Univer-
of the voters under age 25 voted sity by wide margins,
for Gov. Michael Dukakis in the But al the University of Pcnn-
Nov. 8 election, though George syiVania, for example, Dukakis
Bush won the endorsement of 56 took 42 percent of the vote while
percent of the nation's college
Bush received 36 percent in a sci-
entific poll conducted by the
Daily Pennsylvanian, the school
newspaper, and the Penn Political
Union. Twenty percent of the stu-
dents polled were undecided.
grads.
The results, tabulated from
exit polls conducted by the NBC,
ABC and CBS television net-
works, did not distinguish be-
tween college students and other
voters younger than age 25.
ABC News found Dukakis
won a majority of the votes cast by
both the youngest (under the age
of 25) and oldest (over the age of
60) citizens, while winning 51
percent of those cast by people
with only a high school diploma
and 62 percent of the nation's high
school dropouts.
New voters � typically those
who have turned 18 since the 1984
presidential election � preferred
Bush instead of Dukakis by a 50-
47 percent margin.
Young voters, said CBS politi-
cal editor Dotty Lynch, were con-
spicuous by their absence at the
polls. Voters younger than age 30
made up only 20 percent of the
electorate Nov. 8, down from 24
percent in 1984.
In both 1980 and 1984, poll-
sters concluded a majority of the
college students who voted en-
dorsed Ronald Reagan. The re-
sults were widely interpreted as a
nationwide swing to the right on
campuses.
More unscientific mock elec-
tions conducted on hundreds of
campuses this fall, moreover,
suggested students favored the
Republican this time around, too.
At Stephens College in Mis-
souri, for example. Bush received
221 votes while Dukakis picked
up 176.
Morris the Cat and Mickey
Mouse each received one vote.
"I don't feel like Dukakis and
Bentsen know what they are
doing said Erin Malone, a
Democrat who said she voted for
Bush.
At Virginia's George Mason
University, the Republican ticket
was chosen by almost twice as
manv students as the Democrats.
J
Bush received 51 percent of the
vote during George Mason's
mock election, while Dukakis got
33 percent. A large number of
George Mason students � 16
percent � were undecided.
Bush also won mock elections
ATTENTION STUDENTS
COME & SEE
REMCO EAST, INC.
For All Tour Housing Needs
We Offer:
-Prices Starting at $195
Furnished Rooms
1, 2, and 3 Bedroom Apts.Townhouses
Locations convenient to Campus and Bus
Route.
Call for an
appointment
758-6061
1521 E. 14th street
P
HERFS
WHO
MAKES
OUR
LIFETIME GUARANTEE
ON CAR REPAIRS
POSSIBLE.
Herbert Powell
Because we offer the
free Lifetime Service
Guarantee on car re
pairs, my job as service
manager is a little
tougher I have to make
sure car repairs are done
right 'he first time Be
cause it they re not, it's
our problem, not yours
Here's how the Life-
time Service Guarantee
works If you pay for any
covered repair and it has
to be done again we fix
��i
4�
it tree That s free parts
and free labor For as
long as you own your
Ford. Lincoln, Mercury,
Merkur or Ford light
truck
The Lifetime Service
Guarantee covers thou
sands of parts and re
pairs And it doesn't mat
ter how old your vehicle
is, how many miles are
on it. or even where you
bought it Add all this up
and you've got the best
car repair guarantee in
America.
Ask us to see a copy
of the Lifetime Service
Guarantee Then give us
a chance to turn our
guarantee into a lifetime
reality
IfordII

L-4UffTIMI SIRVICI OUAKANIU
Quality Care for Quality Cars.
HASTINGS FORD
10th Street & 264 Bypass � Greenville. NC � 919 758 0114
sexual harassment programs,
many schools still don't handle
rape crises very well, DiLapi said.
"I've heard lots of stories of cover-
ups she said.
"In the long run, colleges will
confront this Sherrill predicted.
"College officials don't want to
see their students endangered
Yet Sherrill maintained "we
need to confront issues of overall
violence. As long as the climate of
violence is accepted, women will
be raped
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
TiVft'fvr
m
IBM's got the package
that'll help wrap up
your studies.
IBM" PERSONAL SYSTEM2 MODEL 25 PACKAGE SAVINGS
t IBM 1988
XiaBmBBaif4gi ic
LaSJSStRacfcaBfi i
PACKAGE 1
MO KB Memory. 8086 protvs
soi. one J.5' t ltpi di ive
(720KB), :�1H t ixed Disk
Drive with Adapter l4110).
one full size expansion slot,
serial and parallel port, en
hanced keyboard High res 12"
monochrome display Mouse
1X)S4 0.
ST YOUR YOU
PRICE SAVE
$2460 $1362 $1098
PACKAGE 2
Mt KB Memory, 8086 proces-
sor, one 3.5" tlopp drive
(720KB), :nX1B Fixed Disk
Drive with Adapter i 4110).
one full sie expansion slot.
serial (: parallel port, enhanced
keyboard. High resolution 12"
color display Mouse IX )S 4.0
and Windows Kit for PS 2
PACKAGEJ
MO KB Memory 8086 proves
sor. one 3.5" flopp drive
i720KB). :)MB Fixed Disk
Drive with Adapter i4IKM.
one full sie expansion slot,
serial & parallel port, enhanced
keyboard High resolution 12"
color display Mouse DOS 4 0
and Windows kit for PS 2. Pro
printer II dot matrix, high
speed diatt or near letterqualit)
printer with cahle
$2969 $1595 $1374
$3591 $1943
$1648
From August J. llWN until further notice tor eligible students, facuttv and staff
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
IBM Personal System2 and Propnntef N are registered trademarks of IBM Corporation Microsoft is a reaistered !raomarV of Microsoft Corporation
i
I HI i S
N
ew
By CHIPPY BOM HI Al
Ghost of fhmimis !�� nri
Bill Murray,
Houseman, Mary Lou Rctton,
Majors, Buster Poindcxter
Forsvthc, Anne Ramsey,
Goldthwait, Karen Allen
is this, "Battle ol
Stars"?
Well, no
And admitted n t of I
people just show up
But for a movie thai
turned into a nan
aster, "Sen
dnristmas film
fferful Life
Murray is -
funny as Frai
network j �
the banner in h
Cole's
'HIP C AI

lions j
stream
pate t e ;
pr a e �'
ink rity I
pei
Bag, ltd -
logical fl k
Lloyd
Bui
pig,CoU sno-i
I rics cut in
making some ��� i
the song, th( �
bccasionall) trj
guitars and voca
forcibly.
Cole's lyrics
Strongest point
album "Rattlesnake -
1984, sutter none for I
'O-year hiatus sins'
album, "Brand New
tact, the wait may have helpe
"My Bag's
need love 1 need a I
OOen window illustr I
of "Mainstream
across as a romantic but one
understands that "l.o1
ffi
Dennis
i play bal
By ALICIA FORD
"There is more to life
making touchdowns the
Ghost savs convincingly toj
nephew. Cake, in the new ml
"Everybody's All Amerid
based on the novel by Frank
ford.
Dennis Quaid stars as C
Grey, better known as the
Ghost. Deford's character o
Grey Ghost is supposed tJ
modeled after Charlie "Cho (
Justice, a football great
played for the Universit
North Carolina at Chapel Hii
Quaid has been in the ml
business for over twelve vl
and has had roles in nineteen
hires. His role as the CajunJ
Remy McSwain in The Big
first brought him to the pul
attention as a sew leading n
"All American" doesn't rj
allow Quaid's sexy qualitid
shino through, but it does al
his acting abilities to standr
The movie travels over a t
year time span.
Jessica Unge is "Babsy'
town's Magnolia Queen am:
Ghost's mam squeeze. The
the picture-perfect col
couple, the beautiful coed anJ
star of the football team. WheJ
1 ear old Babs is asked whaj
major is, she replies, "Gavirf





; he i.ni
J AL BEACH PAATY
rVn
ST
LIT
Ml
ckage
i
V
YOl
10(
"4
!U
!64X
I HI I si t AROI INIAN
Features
( 1 MBER29, 1988 Page 11
New 'Scrooge' may be best holiday flick
B) CHIPP BON1 HEAD
l hn-f1 I V mr�
ty, arol Kane ohn
in Mary 1 ou Retton, lee
.ter Poindexter, ohn
Anne Ramsey Bobcat
,A Wk n what
Netv ork
Scrooged
. ��! ei those
show up in cameos.
' atould have
dropping dis-
isea' ilv thebesl
It's a Won
. pingn
- � ungest
niic
network's
somt thingyou nail people to
producing his
ive adaptation of
Scrooge, he mirrors the fic-
tional character's "bah, hum-
bug altitude He fires Goldth-
w lit sends towels with his
network's logo to people on his
hristmas list and steals eabs
lagged down by old ladies.
1 he high point of Ins nueltv
comes when the animal trainer for
he "Scrooge" show relates his
blcms with gluing antlers on
tiny mice playing dormice.
ross suggests Have you tried
stapling them?"
A true unfeeling bastard, his
subtU transformation to caring
human being is believable and
'�x, iting
1 't 11 mrse, he
the
CMe's vocals highlight Lp
The throe ghosts oi Christmas
drive, beat and burn him into the
realization that everyone carries
the spirit of Christmas within
them.
Christmas Past, a cab driver
from hell played to perfection by
Buster Poindexter's alter ego
David lohanson, takes him back
through time to visit Cross's un-
happy childhood"I know slugs
that had a more active life than
you"), his bumpy meeting with
his true love"You hit me here,
.no the sidewalk hit me in the
back oi the head") and the choice
that drove her away for 1 years.
Christmas Present, a wacked-
out, bumbling, fairv played by
Kane, knees him in the groin, belts
him with a toaster and locks him
in the sewer with a frozen bum to
everything as he sings in the
day lament "29
attitude hascomeacross
in ole's work "Brand
1 and "Perfect Skm"
oih raved about true love, but
Iso re ilized things likeloveoften
i�S) trouble than they are
1 � ii
k
� ommotions used to get
; ibout being too heavv-
led 1 their subject matter.
H � ir debut LP was
"� love songs,
iturated wit. n �thos.
�o i n their next all im, to
1 nee things out they re-
st Weekend jvd
nt ol tin most hil
im the humoi re in-
'� su jeel .aei
�. iuit human
. .
S4ip still lets loose
year hiatus sine-with a s i rival tune called Sean
m" "Mr. K'
: ie wait may havehelpdonna" does have his problems.
���'1 d n IMy wife savs 1 go looking for
. love 1 need a fitrouble I surely find it It It: ish
�tins ! u i ra, I know I will feel
.betti
hoMost ol the tunes on the
lerstai tl at "1 i� s notalbum either stick to the crisp
guitar melodies or slow strum-
ming that characterized the Com-
motions' first two records. The
new LP branches out with longer
songs and new instnimentation.
The most surprising experi-
ments on "Mainstream" are "Big
Snake" with its dominating horn
solos and "These Davs with its
Laurie Anderson-like svnthesizer
intro.
While the music the Commo-
tions produce is some of the best
around, what makes this band
wade through the pop channels
higher than anyone else is Cole's
lyrics and his incredible voice. On
"Rattlesnakes" his voice often got
overpowered in the mix.
Both of his follow-up LPs
have taken care oi this, giving
equal strengthto the music and
the vocals. Cole has one of the
most soulful voices in music, light
years beyond Michael Bolton and
his pitiful Otis Redding remakes,
or Morrisey and his perpetual
whining.
For such a scary album title,
"Mainstream" is actuallv a reas-
suring record, one that could set
nc a- standards for the diluted
r k pool of talent. To quote
Cole Feels like Prohibition
Civc me the hard sell.
Concert to
be held
ewi Release
A free concert for the public is
sponsored on Thursday, Decem-
ber 1, by the Friends of the ECU
School of Music. The annual con
cert featuring the ECU Wind En-
semble under Director Robert
Ponto will begin at 7:30 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium on the ECU
campus and will not be over an
hour in length.
)ennis Quaid, Jessica Lange
play ball in ' All American'
By AI ICIA IORI)
SurHn!t-r
more to life than
. � u� hdow ns the Grey
mvincingly to his
! ike, in the now movie
s All American
novel b) Frank De-
Quaid stars as (a in
'tor known as the Grey
f Dcford's character oi the
i i is supposed to lx-
1 ifterharlie "ChoCho"
i ! h 'thill great who
d for the I Iniversity ol
I arolina athapel 1 hll.
has been in the movie
for over twelve Mars
had roles in nineteen pi
His r �le as theajun cop
' I Swain in "I he Big East'
ught him to the public's
is a sexy leading man.
All American" doesn't really
Quaid's sexy qualities to
throuph, but it does allow
a ting abilities to stand out
Movie travels over a thirty
ir time span.
i t I .ango is "Babsv the
S Magnolia Queen and the
i s main squeeze They are
picture-perfect college
the beautiful coed and the
of the football team. When the
ear old Babs is asked what her
�jor is, she replies, "Gavin and
me.
In the beginning, the Ghost
doesn't let the fame and stardom
go to his head. He challenges a
former black football star, simply
known as "Blue to a foot race
just to see it he is as good as every-
one thinks he is. The race ends in
a tie, but Gavin is proclaimed the
winner by his buddies.
Timothy 1 lut ton gives a notable
performance as the Ghost's
nephew C ake, who receives rec-
ognition just tor being related to
the football star. He worships the
(.host while in college at I.U (a
takeoff ot LSU), but loses respect
tor him as they grow older.
( ake spends most of his time
lurking in his uncle's shadow and
falling in love with Babs. In one
scene, Babs unites Cake to go
skinny dipping with her (a nude
lessica Lange that is) to which he
complies
As expected, the Ghost and
Babs get married and he is drafted
for the Washington Redskins af-
ter graduation. The Ghost be-
comes a star wideout for the Re-
dskins and he plays with the team
for most of his pro career. Babs
stays at home and becomes preg-
nant, again, again, and again. The
two of them invest their football
money into a local bar in Louisi-
ana, which proves to be a flop.
Babs is an interesting character
because she evolves from the
dizzy blonde teenager into a
shrewd business woman when
becoming manager of the failing
bar.
She starts to spend more time
with Cake while the Ghost is
away playing football, and the
two have an expected affair.
Somehow the Ghost forgets there
is more to life than football and he
starts to neglect his family and
devotes all his time to the game.
Towards the end of Grey's car-
reer, the Redskins retire his jersey
at a fairly early age. Ghost has a
lot of time on his hands after retir-
ing and he fills the empty hours
by drinking at the bar and telling
football stories to his local fans.
He becomes very unhappy with-
out football and makes the grave
mistake of trying to go back to the
game playing for the Denver
Broncos.
The Ghost doesn't last too long
with the Broncos-he seems to
have lost his touch - and winds up
being benched for the remainder
of the season. Frustrated and un-
happy, he walks away from foot-
ball forever, but he still can't seem
to leave it behind him.
The unusual character of Blue is
the one who makes the Ghost
realize that he has forgotten what
is most important in life. While he
was playing for the Redskins he
tried to get Blue a contract with
them but he refused, saying, "I
See GHOST, page 12
make him see the effectshrist-
mas is having on other people.
The sewer scene shows
Murray's adeptness at straddling
the line between drama and com
edv as he berates the ice-blue
bum. "You should have staved
inside' You'd be taken care oi1
You'd sure be a better color
Kane is wonderful .is the
maliciousChristm is Present "()h
look! a toaster she squeaks, as
she goes upside his chin with the
appliance
The foreboding special effect
that plays Christmas Future also
brings out Murray's talent tor
drama. As he sees the aftermath of
his careless words to his secretary,
ex-girlfriend and brother, he fi-
nally realizes what an effect he
has on people and that it's not
too late tt' change.
Cross sees his girlfriend give
up her job as social worker after he
suggested she save herself first
His secretary's youngest child, a
hological mute who func-
tions as a modern liny Tim, is
placed in an institution after he
refuses her raise.
�Ml this ddd up to the inev-
itable. You know what's going to
happen. But the fun is in seeing it
happen. He springs back to life
after the vision of his cremation,
rehires the now-homicidal
Goldthwait and takes over the
live broadcast.
While the only low point of
this m vie is the length of time
Murray takes to preach about his
change of heart, it doesn't matter,
fhe cast oi the show and the
world-wide audience feel the
magic rhe cinematic audience
feels it. especially when Murray
begins coaxing them to sing
along.
What would have made that
scene a classic is if, after Murray's
speech, he looked in the
cameras and said, "He) I'mgood
at this. ! should be a televai
.St
Before I start getting dis-
gustingly sentimental, I'll finish
up quickly. "Scrooged" is magic.
Richard Donnerand his cast have
put together one of the most
moving and hilarious movies
ever. It you don't leave the theater
singing, dancing and generally
read to get down to this lift busi-
ness you're either dead or next
on the ghosts' list
Lloyd Coles and the Commotion's new release "Mainstream" plays outside of the flooding pop river
r r r �-�
'Fresh Horses' features super
brats Ringwald, McCarthy
By MARSHAI L MOORE
Mali Writer
If you've seen "The Breakfast
Club "Less Than Zero or "St.
Elmo's Fire then you will have a
good idea what "Fresh Horses"
has in store. Basically, the Brat
Pack are at it again.
This is not to say that it'sabad
movie, while it's considered un-
hip to actress Molly Ringwald
who usually does what she does
very well. Co-star Andrew Mc-
Carthy, who is typecast again - all
his movie characters interchan-
gable and is the most interesting
person in the movie.
Although watching Mc-
Carthy go through the motions of
�nsitive oung man again is dis-
tracting, the mo ie's plot is inof-
fensive. The other characters.
especially Ringwald's and a re-
volting fellow named Sprolcs.are
v olorful enough to command the
viewer's attention.
Fresh Horses' begins as the
story of a love triangle: Larkin
(McCarthy) is a college senior
engaged to rich but bonne, Alice.
1 le meets m sterious lew el (Ring-
wald), who is dirt-poor, a high-
school drop-out, possibly sixteen
I )1 course, Larkin dumps Alice to
pursue (against almost
everyone's advice) ewel. Hoes it
work out? Sort of.
There is plenty to like about
the movie: it is isually beautiful
without relying on pretty im
agery. The supporting cast are too
scuzzy to dislike inch and poor
alike). Molly Ringwald has her
most interesting role yet and
Andrew McCarthy gets roughed
upby drunk rednecks. Filestore's
climax and conclusion are cred-
ible, something which has eluded
the Brat Pack until now
McCarthy is the main draw-
back the depth ot his acting here
is found in his expressions of pain
,md suffering after his face ac-
cidently moots several redneck
knuckles. And the ending while
plausible enough is not cheerful.
All in all. it was pretty good.
Given an actor of moredepth than
McCarthy and less deliberate
drama, this movie could have
boon creat
Man clutches 'tornado pillow'
RALEIGH, N. (AP)
Tony DeVita still clutched his
"tornado pillow" hours after kil-
ler storms ripped through
Raleigh and counties to the north-
east today killing five and injur-
ing more than 100 people.
The tornadoes swirled along
a five-mile path through heavily-
populated northern suburbs of
North Carolina's capital city, be-
fore leaping to neighboring coun-
ties.
"It sounded like a rush of
water, followed bv a bunch of
shaking DeVita said. "The roof
was totally gone, the patio doors
were gone and every window
was smashed. The carpet was
rolled up like someone was going
to replace it
DeVita, 4, grabbed a pillow
and got behind his bedroom door.
1 le still held the pillow during an
interview at a shelter in a central
Raleigh school.
"1 had to dig my way out
I from the corner of the room) he
said. "I was kind oi buried in
rubble In fact, I later found plas
ter Hi my ears
Fort) -six people stayed at the
shelter after the storms hit be-
tween 1 a.m. and 2 a.m.
It you felt a big, hot hair
dryer blowing by you and the
whole place was shaking apart
and if this (pillow) was the only
thing that protected your iace,
you'd hold onto it DeVita said,
calling it his ' tornado pillow
DeVita left his town house
wearing onl pajamas, no socks
or shoes 1 le borrowed clothes
from neighbors a pink jacket
from one. gra sweatpants from
another, and socks from someone
at the shelter He still was without
shoes
Residents ot the complex
were told to evacuate because of a
gas leak
DeVita'scar was parked just
feet from his front entrance He
said it was untouched
Raleigh City Manager
Dempsey Benton said there were
three gas lines broken.





S HEALTH
IONS
t additional cost. Preg-
Problem Pregnancy
tion. call 832-0535 (toll
ftween 9 a.m. and 5 p m,
thesia available.
TO 12th WEEK OF
IAL BEACH PARTY
lAY NIGHT
;ss Hours
Evening
l 5
f i
��' ��
RAM ADA
ckage
ipup
s.
KAGE SAVINGS
YOUR YOU
PRICE SAVE
1362
$1098 I
r

s
i
$1595 $1374
$1943 $1648
:c
faults and staff
:�adem� o Mcrosoti Corporate
rfi

U2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
New 'Scrooge' may
Features
NOVEM BER 29,1988 Page 11
flick
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Ghoat of Christinas Deadline
The three ghosts of Christmas
drive, beat and burn him into the
realization that everyone carries
the spirit of Christmas within
them.
is "something you nail people to
While producing his
�" �- network's live adaptation of
Bill Murray, Carol Kane, John "Scrooge he mirrors the fic-
Houseman, Mary Lou Retton, Lee tional character's "bah, hum-
Majors Buster Poindexter John bug attitude. He fires Coldth-
Forsythe, Anne Ramsey, Bobcat wait, sends towels with his
Goldthwait, Karen Allen what network's logo to peoDle on his
is this "Battle of The Network Christmas lift, anneals cabs
w If �c na88 down by old ladies.
And idmiUfillv mnt n??i�� h P�int of his C!uelty nappy childhood f"J know slurc
X33L& T1�Z ffsswsisSS ,hal L a more ac,ive Hfe ,han
But for a movie that could have problems with gluing antlers on
turned into a name dropping dis- the tiny mice playing dormice
aster "Scrooged" is easily the best Cross suggests Have you tried
Christmas film since "It's a Won- stapling them?"
derful Life A true unfceli bastard hig
Murray is knee-slappingly subtle transformation to carine
tunny as Frank Cross, youngest human being is believable and
network president ever. Cross, as exciting.
the banner in his office proclaims, Of course, he has some help.
make him see the effects Christ-
mas is having on other people.
The sewer scene shows
Murray's adeptness at straddling
the line between drama and com-
Christmas Past, a cab driver edy as he berates the ice-blue
from hell played to perfection by bum. "You should have stayed
Buster Poindexter's alter ego inside! You'd be taken care of!
David Johanson, takes him back You'd sure be a better color
through time to visit Cross's un- Kane is wonderful as the
malicious Christmas Present. "Oh
look! a toaster she squeaks, as
you"), his bumpy meeting with she goes upside his chin with the
his true love"You hit me here, appliance,
and the sidewalk hit me in the The foreboding special effect
back of the head") and the choice that plays Christmas Future also
that drove her away for 15 years, brings out Murray's talent for
Christmas Present, a wacked- drama. As he sees the aftermath of
out, bumbling, fairy played by n�s careless words to his secretary,
Kane,kneeshiminthegroin,belts ex-girlfriend and brother, he fi-
him with a toaster and locks him nallY realizes what an effect he
in the sewer with a frozen bum to nas on people � �� and that it's not
r ��� me jcnrci Wllll d ITUZCn DUITt tO
Cole's vocals highlight Lp
everything as he sines in the g31" melodies or slow strum-
too late to change.
Cross sees his girlfriend give
up her job as social worker after he
suggested she save herself first.
His secretary's youngest child, a
psychological mute who func-
tions as a modem Tiny Tim, is
placed in an institution after he
refuses her raise.
All this adds up to the inev-
itable. You know what's going to
happen. But the fun is in seeing it
happen. He springs back to life
after the vision of his cremation,
rehires the now-homicidal
Goldthwait and takes over the
live broadcast.
While the only low point of
this movie is the length of time
Murray takes to preach about his
change of heart, it doesn't matter.
The cast of the show and the
world-wide audience feel the
magic. The cinematic audience
feels it, especially when Murray
begins coaxing them to sing
along.
What would have made that
scene a classic is if, after Murray's
long speech, he looked in the
cameras and said, "Hey. I'm good
at this. I should be a televangel-
ist
Before I start getting dis-
gustingly sentimental, I'll finish
up quickly. "Scrooged" is magic.
Richard Dormer and his cast have
put together one of the most
moving and hilarious movies
ever. If you don't leave the theater
singing, dancing and generally
ready to get down to this life busi-
ness you're either dead or next
on the ghosts'list1
y CHIP CARTER
Stall Writer
nnmo-
ain-
lions
stream
bate tl e
proves they still have too nrv
in tegri ty to d n wn there. Fro
openingsynti-sizer notesoi Mv
Bag it docs look like uV techno-
logical flood i about to deluge
Lloyd.
But then th irums start kick-
ing, Cole's no-r isense voice and
lyrics cut in and the song starts
everything as he sings
birthday lament "29
This attitude has come across
before in Cole's work. "Brand
New Friend" and "Perfect Skin
Cole and the (
ird aitum,
.nay be trying to navi- b�tn ravcd about true love, but
pop river, but it also also realized things like love often
cause more trouble than they are
worth.
The Commotions used to get
criticized about being too heavy-
handed in their subject matter.
Admittedly, their debut LP was
full of angst-ndden love songs,
but still saturated with n.imos.
So on their next album, to
corded "Lost Weekend and
filmed one of the most hilarious
os ever for it. On Main-
stream the humor is more in-
trinsic to the subject ii alter � the
darkly funny things about human
beings in love.
making some waves. Throughout hclP balance things out, they re-
thc song, the keyboard strains corded Lost WpoWpiiH �a
Occasionally try to surface, but the
guitars and vocals submerge it
forcibly.
Cole's lyrics, arguably hib
Strongest point since his debut
album "Rattlesnakes" came out in
1984, suffer none for the band's
o-year hiatus since the 1986
album, "Brand New Friend In
tact, the wait may have helped.
"My Bag's" lines, "I don't
need love I need a fire escape,
open window illustrate the tone
or "Mainstream Cole comes
across as a romantic, but one who
understands that "Love's not
guitar melodies or slow strum-
ming that characterized the Com-
motions' first two records. The
new LP branches out with longer
songs and new instrumentation.
The most surprising experi-
ments on Mainstream" are "Big
Snake" with its dominating horn
solos and "These Days with its
Laurie Anderson-like synthesizer
intro.
While the music the Commo-
tions produce is some of the best
around, what makes this band
wade through the pop channels
higher than anyone else is Cole's
lyrics and his incredible voice. On
"Rattlesnakes" his voice often got
overpowered in the mix.
Both of his follow-up LPs
have taken care of this, giving
equal strengthto the music and
the vocals. Cole has one of the
most soulful voices in music, light
But the group still lets loose years beyond Michael Boltonand
with a satirical tunecalledSean nis Pihnjl Otis Redding remakes.
Tenn Blues Poor "Mr. Ma- or Morrisey and his perpetual
�whining.�
donna" does have his problems.
"My wife says I go looking for
trouble I surely find it If I trash
this TV camera, I know I will feel
better
Most of the tunes on the
album either stick to the crisp
For such a scary album title,
"Mainstream" is actually a reas-
suring record, one that could set
new standards for the diluted
rock pool of talent. To quote
Cole Feels like Prohibition
Give me the hard sell
Concert to
be held
NawaRdeaM
A free concert for the public is
sponsored on Thursday, Decem-
ber 1, by the Friends of the ECU
School of Music. The annual con-
cert featuring the ECU Wind En
semble under Director Robert
Ponto will begin at 7:30 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium on the ECU
campus and will not be over an
hour in length.
Dennis Quaid, Jessica Lange
play ball in ' All American'
By ALICIA FORD
StatTWritar
"There is more to life than
making touchdowns the Grey
Ghost says convincingly to his
nephew, Cake, in the new movie
Everybody's All American
based on the novel by Frank De-
ford.
Dennis Quaid stars as Gavin
Grey, better known as the Grey
Ghost. Deford's character of the
Grey Ghost is supposed to be
modeled after Charlie "Cho Cho"
justice, a football great who
played for the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Quaid has been in the movie
business for over twelve years
and has had roles in nineteen pic-
tures. His role as the Cajun cop
Remy McSwain in "The Big East'
first brought him to the public's
attention as a sexy leading man.
"All American" doesn't really
allow Quaid's sexy qualities to
shine through, but it does allow
His acting abilities to stand out.
The movie travels over a thirty
year time span.
Jessica Lange is "Babsy the
town's Magnolia Queen and the
Ghost's main squeeze. They are
the picture-perfect college
couple, the beautiful coed and the
star of the football team. When the
:ear old Babs is asked what her
major is, she replies, "Gavin and
me.
In the beginning, the Ghost
doesn't let the fame and stardom
go to his head. He challenges a
former black football star, simply
known as "Blue to a foot race
just to see if he is as good as every-
one thinks he is. The race ends in
a tie, but Gavin is proclaimed the
winner by his buddies.
Timothy Hutton gives a notable
performance as the Ghost's
nephew Cake, who receives rec-
ognition just for being related to
the football star. He worships the
Ghost while in college at LU (a
takeoff of LSU), but loses respect
for him as they grow older.
Cake spends most of his time
lurking in his uncle's shadow and
falling in love with Babs. In one
scene, Babs invites Cake to go
skinny dipping with her (a nude
Jessica Lange that is) to which he
complies.
As expected, the Ghost and
Babs get married and he is drafted
for the Washington Redskins af-
ter graduation. The Ghost be-
comesstar wideout for the Re-
dskins and he plays with the team
for most of his pro career. Babs
stays at home and becomes preg-
nant, again, again, and again. The
two of them invest their football
money into a local bar in Louisi-
ana, which proves to be a flop.
Babs is an interesting character
because she evolves from the
dizzy blonde teenager into a
shrewd business woman when
becoming manager of the failing
bar.
She starts to spend more time
with Cake while the Ghost is
away playing football, and the
two have an expected affair.
Somehow the Ghost forgets there
is more to life than football and he
starts to neglect his family and
devotes all his time to the game.
Towards the end of Grey's car-
reer, the Redskins retire his jersey
at a fairly early age. Ghost has a
lot of time on his hands after retir-
ing and he fills the empty hours
by drinking at the bar and telling
football stories to his local fans.
He becomes very unhappy with-
out football and makes tne grave
mistake of trying to go back to the
game playing for the Denver
Broncos.
The Ghost doesn't last too long
with the Broncos-he seems to
have lost his touch -and winds up
being benched for the remainder
of the season. Frustrated and un-
happy, he walks away from foot-
ball forever, but he still can't seem
to leave it behind him.
The unusual character of Blue is
the one who makes the Ghost
realize that he has forgotten what
is most important in life. While he
was playing for the Redskins he
tried to get Blue a contract with
them but he refused, saying, 1
See GHOST, page 12
Lloyd Coles and the Commotion's new release "Mainstream" plays outside of the flooding pop river.
'Fresh Horses' features super
brats Ringwald, McCarthy
1� fensive. The other characters, alike). Molly Ringwald has her
cJKSSSSZZ SSSS "C
S'tsSSS SSiZTZ swseeSS
hTs in store Basicaut thPttL . f V� the ible, something which haseluded
Pack are atTt aain y' SZJ �lu !�VG "&. Urkin lhe Brat Pack �� �ow.
i ackare at it again. (McCarthy) is a college senior McCarthy is the main dra w-
Thisisnot tosay thatit'sabad engaged to rich but boring Alice. bmSJiSSm
movie, while ifs considered un- He meets mvsteriousIeweHRin HJSlS? .
u;� tJ rii is- u "cu-iiny3renous jewel VKing- is found in his expressions of oam
hip to actress Molly Ringwald Wald), who is dirt-poor, a high- and suffering after his face ac-
ZTt05 schooldroputpolsTblysixteln. cidently meltssveSreo.n�k
very well. Co-star Andrew Mc- Of course, Larkin dumps Alice to knuckles. And the endinghUe
pursue (against almost plausible enough, is not cheerful.
everyone's advice) Jewel. Does it AH in all, it was pretty good.
work out? Sort of. Given an actor of more depth than
There is plenty to like about McCarthy and less deliberate
the movie: it is visually beautiful drama, this movie could have
without relying on pretty im- been great.
Man clutches 'tornado pillow'
Carthy, who is typecast again - all
his movie characters interchan-
gable and is the most interesting
person in the movie.
Although watching Mc-
Carthy go through the motions of
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) �
Tony DeVita still clutched his
"tornado pillow" hours after kil-
ler storms ripped through
Raleigh and counties to the north-
east today killing five and injur-
ing more than 100 people.
The tornadoes swirled along
a five-mile path through heavily-
populated northern suburbs of
North Carolina's capital city, be-
fore leaping to neighboring coun-
ties.
"It sounded like a rush of
water, followed by a bunch of
shaking DeVita said. The roof
was totally gone, the patio doors
were gone and every window
was smashed. The carpet was
rolled up like someone was going
to replace it
DeVita, 34, grabbed a pillow
and got behind his bedroom door.
He still held the pillow during an
interview at a shelter in a central
Raleigh school.
"I had to dig my way out
(from the corner of the room) he
said. "I was kind of buried in
rubble. In fact, I later found plas-
ter in my ears
Forfy-six people stayed at the
shelter after the storms hit be-
tween 1 a.m. and 2 a.m.
"If you felt a big, hot hair
dryer blowing by you and the
whole place was shaking apart
and if this (pillow) was the only
thing that protected your face,
you'd hold onto it DeVita said,
calling it his "tornado pillow
DeVita left his town house
wearing only pajamas, no socks
or shoes. He borrowed clothes
from neighbors � a pink jacket
from one, gray sweatpants from
another, and socks from someone
at the shelter. He still was without
shoes
Residents of the complex
were told to evacuate because of a
gas leak.
DeVita's car was parked just
feet from his front entrance. He
said it was untouched
Raleigh City Manager
Dempsey Benton said there were
three gas lines broken.





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER29, ls.s
Man adopts Indian ways
MORRISTOWN.Tenn. (AD
He smiles, blows a little. The
smoking ball oi cedar bark crack-
les into flames.
"Thank you, fire Eustace
Conway says, and he means it.
The fire is his brother. The
vucca and basswood sticks he
used to make it are his brothers.
The deer that provides him meat,
clothing, tools and shelter is his
brother. The water in the stream,
the nettles from a plant, the tree
bark for his rope.
Conwav is a 26-year-old
North Carolina native who lives
with respect for Mother Earth.
He's adopted the ways of Ameri-
can Indians who survived in har-
mony with nature 12,000 years
agp.
They were the primitives,
which means simply they were
first, Conway says The rest of us
are "modern people' new comers
who abuse and deliberately de-
tach ourselves from the natural
environment through middle-
men and conveniences.
"We as modem Americans
pretty much separated ourselves
trom oi our perspective oi the
world Conway says. "You can
only rape our mother for so long
before she'll kick you out, and so
the native people, they think
we're very confused
Conway's smile fades when
he speaks of this abuse, but his
face lights up again when he de-
scribes what he's learned from
tribal elders and trial and error
during eight years of living in a
tepee.
Conwav doesn't just preach.
He lives in comfort and happiness
out in the woixis.
His clothes are buckskin, sof-
tened by the brains oi a deer,
tanned over a smoking fire and
adorned with skull from the same
dead animal. A strong, blue ten-
don that runs down the deer's
back becomes thread.
Its toes become jingles for a
knife case made trom its hide. Its
fur provides warmth and protec-
tion. The meat is food that is dried
in the sun.
His tools and utensils are
bone from the deer and stone
from the stream. He kneels and
twists fiber of softened tulip pop-
lar bark into a strong, valuable
rope using his hands and thigh.
"Anything that's long,
stringv and strong you can make
a rope out of Conway says. "No
magic. No hard thing. And it
doesn't take three hours either
Conway calls himself a native
American culturalist. He has a
bachelor's in English and anthro-
pology from Appalachian State
University in his native Boone,
N.C. He has lived among Indians
in Mexico, Alaska, Arizona and
North Carolina. He has kayaked
over 1,000 miles of shoreline
along Alaska's inland waterway.
1 le has hiked the entire 2,000-mile
Appalachian Trail.
He's had some scrapes, but
he's always survived.
"One day I went on a camp
ing tnp and here 1 am eight years
later and I still haven't come
back Conway said during a re-
cent lecture.
Conway is a man with a mis-
sion that he executes with wit and
the knowledge he's acquired. He
lues near Boone on land he's
dubbed "Turtle Island Preserve
1 here, he passes on his skills to
old people, young people, fami-
lies anyone who wants to stay
awhile and learn.
"Experience is one of the best
teachers and nature is the
teacher he says. 'The more you
immerse yourself in nature the
more you're going to have
Conway is a man of both
worlds. He travels to school lec-
tures in a van. He wears hiking
boots. He'll go to the hospital if
sickness threatens his life. He
shaves with the same straight-
edge razor he started out with in
puberty. Sometimes, he hunts
with a powder-loaded rifle.
But Conway never forgets the
earth, which the only he ventures
out of the woods.
"I've seen the simplicity of
life. The native people live a life of
balance he said. "They are the
people that are waiting for you to
get rid of yourselves so that they
can carry on with life.
Crispell's
Cover to Cover


TdperBcu(i'Boofi'Lchange
All Paperbacks 50 Off j
75 Off With Trade �
See More
For
$50.00 less.
Right now at our Greenville office you can be
fitted for a pair of daily wear or extended wear
contact lenses and receive a $60.00 discount
oft our usual package price
Usual Fee
Discount
Your Pile
Daily
Wear
$155 00
50 00
$105.00
Extended
Wear
$195 00
60.00
$145,00
� 41 Evans Si
t (Nexl lo Bissette �'
� 830 844
Mon Fn 10 6
Sat 10 3
Egyptology explores tombs
HENDRIX THEATER!
WED NOV. 30
Mhiiaratisg:
CAIRO, Egvpt (AP) � Indi-
ana Jones and his swashbuckling
treasure hunts would have been
at home in Egvpt in the early
1800$, whena mixof travelersand
adventurers became � by chance
the world's first Egyptologists.
The calling still retained a lot
of 1 larrison Ford's movie charac-
ter in 1922 when Howard Carter,
an eccentric Briton, dug into the
most famous tomb of all, the gold-
packed burial place oi Pharaoh
Tutankhamen.
But as Egyptology prepares
to enter the 21 st century, the coun-
try that gave the science its name
is asking lovers of its ancient past
to give up the shovel and trowel.
Don't Wig and destroy, Egyptian
antiquities officials are saying,
but restore and rebuild.
"Our grandfathers, the an-
cient Egyptians, were reaching
for eternity the acting chairman
of the Egyptian Antiquities Or-
ganization, M.A. Nur-el-din, told
the fifth annual International
Congress of Egyptology. "It's our
task to let them remain eternal
Egypt's monuments have
seemed immortal, a rich and glo-
rious past paraded in stone mono-
liths and on tomb walls. Evidence
is growing, however, that time is
running out.
"We must leave the artifacts
safely buried in the ground (and)
restore and preserve what has
been unearthed said Egyptol-
ogy professor Faiza Haikal.
"The once slow process of
deterioration is accelerating. We
Ghost gets
drunk
Continued from page 11
don't need football anymore, that
part of my life is over
It takes the Ghost a long time to
realize that part of his life is over
too. He goes from being a former
hero to an aged, alcoholic has-
been who spends all of his time
boring people with his football
stories
"Everybody's All American"
isn't just a football story. It is a
love story, and more importantly,
a story about change. It is a good
way to spend two hours in a freez-
ing theatre, and it offers some-
thing to everyone who goes to see
it.
ha e the usual problems of envi-
ronment and a rising water table,
but now the monuments face the
spread oi settlements, with sew-
age and other risks
Most scholars support the
changing face oi Egyptology, its
shift from seeking treasure to
seeking knowledge. Many of
today's Egyptologists spend their
days before delicately painted
walls or engraved columns.
i
HMtt UUWA.
TWO THl'MBS
i rr
r
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
�DIAMONDS
� STERLING SILVERY
�TELEVISIONS
�GUNS
�.JEWELRY
�GUITARS
� COINS
�CAMERAS
� STEREOS
�VCRS
HOPE
vn
ULORi
n; i
Q
So call us for an appointmenf and see how
seeing better can cost you less
Contact Us
And Save.
Dr. John C. Molnar
Optomefnc Eye Caie Center OD PA
The Plaza in Greenville
Greenville NC
(919) 756-9771
OnOMCINC
�lCAR�C�MTtR
Package .nciuaes Eye Exam. Contact lens hvKjrin
Eye Glass Prescription, htting afd toiow-up. Contacts,
Care Kit and Instructions No ofne discounts apply
Coupon must be cxesenlea lo rec.efce dfccct jtU at ime at
after Oft oxues Offer expires N
rrv
his
an �
ad
V
N
lie
�d
nn
752-0322
CORNER OF 10TH & DICKINSON
GREENVILLE
a
SHEAR
HAIR
DESIGN
NC.
STYLISTS
Beth Long
Pam Freedman
Linda Jones
Tina Getsinger
Ricky Narron
Lisa Bissell Whitehurst
Melody Furci
Linda Murrell
I
t Afar Zfrperience' tip feattrf
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP AND NEWLY REMODELED
Beth Perry Long and Keith Long. New Owners
SPECIALIZING IN:
Cuts for the entire family � Color � Perms
Highlighting � Eyebrow and facial waxing
Monday - Friday 9 00 UNTIL
Saturday by appointment
752-79109706
514 E 14th Street
I Between King Sandwich and The Wash House)
We carry 3 maior product lines
� � �
������ �"�"�� � � � � �
� � ������������������
-��-�� � � � � � � �
� � � � � � � � � � �
. . � � I i �.�.�� � � �
� � � � �
� � � �'
� � � � i t
����It
� � � �
� � � �
� � � � �
� � � � � I
'����� I
� �����
������
� � � � � � � � � � � � � �����. -
MAVA �������������
� �������������������
Tfie Unique gift!
Based on the popular IAs�rolojry greeting cards, the Ugh Quality bUvk ceramic mugs feature the
brilliantly colored male and female astrological figures outlined in gold F.ach 8 a? mug is packaged in its
own unique black and gold gift bo�
Available At
GREETINGS!
211 W. 14th St Suite C
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(919)830-0105
While you re there see our African American Heritage Christmas Cards also!
Let's change the meaning
of "tie one on
December 6th 6:00 p.m. for a
MADD RED RIBBON CANDLELIGHT VIGIL.
AT 801-803 E. 5th St.
MADD
Sponsored by Sigma Sigma Sigma & Delta Zeta
1985 Mothers Against Drunk Driving
Aft
RESEARC H
PARK, N.C.
Hitchings knew rij
Gertrude Elion waj
"ve had may
interviews for this
tant in the hi
ment Hitchings
after I talked -
research director,
we're looking I -
Elicn. 7
hers that meeting
"George I
questions. I had tl
offers, and tl
what the last I
read and that
never did H
about what tl
was so e
thought Th
to work
That I �
launched
develoj
mia, malar .
kidne)
collaboratj - I
this year's
Mel
LOS
does a
sudde?
national st u
alive"?
"You d
the mind sa I ' '
figure: Is it
much" Does
damn as mu
decide not I
The Gibs
to be wort
changed fr
arrived her -
appearii g
Australian n
Warrior
� shy ia ss
self
on the Si l
The
ing ; -
Keaton
dramati
drama?:
playing
custod) .
husband
Bas d
novel by Su
by Mi
shows the lift
who has a hui
grudging cri
ments from her
James Naug
show repressed
domineering, unt
(Ralph Bellam
Keaton m
free-living artist n
inhibitions with u
The idyll is
Na ugh ton claims
daughter In the (
accuses the coup
tercourse in the sa
the girl was sleepii
Keaton ; rel
court by Jason Ro
trial is heart-wrend
Leonard Nimq
an astounding chl
trom his last ' Th-
Baby There is no
serious film
The I
credit for atte i
complex social issq
the single mother
how tar sexual frs
go. But the
clouded and the J
the emotional impa!
vs Kramer
Keaton is ,
mother s anguish ti
ot her nt rvous m
i � I
Satire
Fowe rs
ftiC t I V
Yes, those
Trashy Joi
are back t
yoi
EVERY TH1





n IT EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 1988 13
be
litcount
60.00
$ 145 00
0v
ne
hi-
me
ide
tfe
ate
or!
ha
he
i
id
'
tUs
ive.
GMfcH .
kictj
CtpprV
Matttmeof
!
i
iV n
�������
��
� � � �
� � ���
� � � �
���
��
� � � � iV � � �
� � � � Y� � � �
� � � � . ����
mug
n
� r a
HI VIGIL.
Sigma & Delta Zeta
iv ing
After 40 years, pair win Nobel
RESEARCH TRIANGLE
PARK, N.C. (AP) � George
I litchings knew right away that
Gertrude Elion was special.
"We had maybe four or five
interviews tor this job as an assis-
tant in the biochemistry depart-
ment Hitchirtgs recalled. "But
alter I talked to Trudy, I told the
research director, This is the one
we're looking for
Elion, 70, also clearly remem-
bers that meeting.
"George didn't ask me any
questions. I had three other job
offers, and they had all asked
hat the last book was that 1 had
d and that sort of thing. George
never viid. He just started talking
ibout what they were doing. He
nvas so excited about it that 1
thought, 'This is the place 1 want
to work
That 1944 job interview
uinched a lifelong collaboration
developing medicines for leuke-
mia, malaria, gout, herpes and
kidney transplant rejection � a
collaboration that led to a share of
this year's Nobel Trize for medi-
cine.
"When we started it was all
trial and error Hitchings said.
"You'd develop a compound
and take some kind of target �
usually a mouse � plug it in and
see what it did or didn't do. Over
the last 40 years, there has been
more shifting to our system
Hitchings and Elion's "ra-
tional" approach involves prob-
ing the chemistry behind a dis-
ease and then developing chemi-
cal compounds to fight it.
Hitchings had been working
on nucleic acids at Burroughs
Wellcome Corp. for two years as
the company's only biochemist
when he hired Elion.
She had a master's degree in
chemistry from New York Uni-
versity at the time and went part-
time for two or three years, but my
professor told me if I wanted a
Ph.D 1 would have to go full-
time. 1 told him 1 couldn't do that
because 1 liked my job too much
Hitchings, however, had no
reservations. "She could have had
a doctorate at anv time. There was
never any question about that
Elion later was awarded hon-
orary doctorates, making her �
in her words � an "honest
woman
Elion wanted a career in re-
search, but ended up teaching
high school among other jobs af-
ter earning a chemistry degree
from Hunter College. World War
II helped her get into the field she
wanted. "The war had taken all
the men, so that gave me my
opportunity
Hitchings, too, had wan-
dered through other jobs � at
Harvard and Western Reserve
universities � before getting the
work he wanted in research.
Elion said she and Hitchings
had been successful partners for
44 years because they "just kept
working. There was no time for
anything else
And neither of them was
concerned about who got the
credit.
"As the scope of our work
grew and I took on assistants of
my own, we would spend a lot of
time talking through a problem
she said.
"By the end of our discus-
sions, we'd usually come up with
an approach, but neither one of us
would remember who had origi-
nally come up with the approach.
There never was any of this, 'Oh,
that was my idea between us
Elion, never married, and
Hitchings, a widower since 1985,
are officially retired from Bur-
roughs Wellcome. But they both
report every day when they're not
on the road lecturing. "People
around here just laugh when I say
I'm retired Elion said. "I do like
to stay busy.
"What's the use of retiring If
you don't have anything to con-
vo� n ry,m�rC' P��Ple �� tell
you. But as long as you can make
a contribution, you should Sci-
ence is a continuum If the older
ones don't pass along their
knowledge to the younger ones it
comes to a dead stop "
Dale Cards
(theyjrgfunnyj)
BALLOONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
local and Out of Town Newspapers
Central Book & News
Greenville Square
Shopping Center
756-7177
Mel Gibson named sexiest man
LOS ANGELES (AP) � How
does a young actor deal with
suddenly being named an inter-
national star and "the sexiest man
alive"?
"You deal with it by a trick of
the mind said Mel Gibson. "You
figure: Is it worrying me that
much? Does anybody else give a
damn as much as I do? So you
decide not to. It's easy
The Gibson method appears
to be working. He seems un-
changed from the time he first
arrived here seven years ago after
appearing as Mad Max in the
Australian movie, 'The Road
Warrior He still displays a hint
ol shyness, contrasting with the
self-assured roles he has played
on the screen.
The actor was here publiciz-
ing his latest Warner Bros, film,
Keaton turns
dramatic
(AP) � Diane Keaton turns
iramatic in "The Good Mother
plaving a divorcee caught in a
ustodv battle with her former
husband.
Based on the best-selling
novel by Sue Miller and written
by Michael Bortman, the film
shows the life of a single mother
ho has a humdrum job and gets
grudging child support pay-
ments from her ex, played by
'ames Naughton. Flashbacks
-how repressed sexuality due to a
domineering, unfeeling father
�Ralph Bellamy).
Keaton meets Liam Neeson, a
free-living artist who releases her
inhibitions with unbridled sex.
The idyll is destroyed when
aughton claims his 6-ycar-old
laughter. In the custody suit, he
accuses the couple of having in-
tercourse in the same bed where
the girl was sleeping.
Keaton is represented in
court by Jason Robards and the
trial is heart-wrenching.
Leonard NJimoy directed in
an astounding change of pace
trom his last, "Three Men and a
Babv There is no humor in this
serious film.
The filmmakers deserve
credit for attempting a drama of
mplex social issues: the role of
the single mother; the question of
I a far sexual frankness should
go But the issues become
clouded, and the outcome lacks
thv emotional impact of "Kramer
vs Kramer
Keaton is adept at the
mother's anguish, employing few
of her nervous mannerisms.
"Tequila Sunrise co-starring
Kurt Russell, Michelle Pfeiffer
and Raul Julia. Gibson's last role
cast him as a Los Angeles cop in
"Lethal Weapon The new
movie puts him on the other side
of the law.
"Things don't quite match
up, and that's what appealed to
me about the script said Gibson.
"Here's a man who has a very
illicit lifestyle and has had an
unsavory career. Yet he always
tells the tnith and deals honora-
bly with people. That makes an
interesting combination.
"The script doesn't deal with
good and bad but shades of gray
in-between. He's retired (from
drug-dealing). But nobody wants
him to retire
In "Tequila Sunrise Gibson
is at odds with his high school
buddy, Russell, a narcotics cop.
Pfeiffer is the beauty caught be-
tween. The writer is Robert
Towne, who wrote "Chinatown
he also directed "Tequila
"The script just lobbed into
mv mailbox one day said Gi-
bson. "It was one of those scripts
that you just kept turning the
pages; you didn't know why. It
demanded a second read. I liked
it
Gibson sounds totally Ameri-
can in the movie. In conversation,
the Australian creeps in. That's
only natural for a fellow who
spent his first 12 years in Peekskill
and Mount Vemon, N.Y. His
mother was Australian, his father


n
&
o
MALPASS
MUFFLER
BRAKE SERVICE
METRIC HARDWARE
SPEEDOMETER SERVICE
AUTO PARTS
758-7676
2616 E. 10th St.
Greenville. NC
Satire Page
gower s o,o
Activate I
lTHON
ESTAURANTS
Greek Owned & Operated Since 1979
Delivery Hours
Mon. - Fri. 4-11
Sat. - Sun. 11-11
SUBS
GREEK DISHES
SANDWICHES
SALADS
PIZZA
GREEK PASTRIES
Best Deal in Town
tt
S
s
Yes, those Twins of
Trashy Journalism
are back to plague
you!
EVERY THURSDAY
AJ
752-0326
or
752-3753
560 Evans St.
an American who decided to
emigrate to Sydney with his 10
children so the older sons would
not be drafted during the Viet-
nam War.
Gibson was going to be a chef
or a journalist until his sister sub-
mitted him for a drama institute at
the University of New South
Wales. He appeared in plays and
a cheapie flick, "Summer"City
that attracted director George
Miller. The result was the star-
making "Road Warrior
Gibson filmed two sequels
and also co-starred in the ac-
claimed World War I film, "Gal-
lipoli and Tetcr Weir's "The
Year of Living Dangerously His
American-made movies have
been less successful: "The
Bountv "The River "Mrs Sof-
fel
Tom Togs
is having a
Gigantic Warehouse Sale
Just For You
NOTHING OVER $10
FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY
&
&
JACK
X
Tom Togs
Factorv Outlet
Trocadero Fashions & Tom Togs is
Running a 12 Price Sale on First Quality!
We have added irregulars to this location for vour shopping convenience.
located Next to Tons of Toys - S. Metnmai Pnt
Hours: 10-6 MonSat. (Fri. & Sat. til 9)
Visit Our Other Locations
Hwy. 64 East Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C.
WedSat. 9-5
Hwy. 70 West
Morchead Gtv, N.C.
WedSat. 9-5
NEW MICHELOB DRY.
Available at all locations on premise and off premise.





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,1988
Bangles stay away from M
NEW YORK (AD �Bangle
Susanna Hoffs' mom invoked the
dreaded "M-word" when her
daughter recently played her
group's latest album, "Every-
thing for her.
"She thought it was more
sophisticated and MATURE
than the band s first two records,
- Hoffs said.
Maturity may be a dirty word
for many rockers � and Hoffs
xnuckly disavowed her mother's
language � but it's an apt de-
scription for both the record's
sound and the approach the
Bangles took in recording their
first album in almost three years.
After two LPs and seemingly
endless rounds ot touring, the
Bangles say thev finally feel com-
fortable with their craft.
We're learning to trust our-
selves more, to be more emotional
in our performance said bass
player Michael Steele. "I really
don't know if you can call it ma-
turity. It's more of an artistic
growth
The four women of the
Bangles, who pay homage to clas-
sic bands of the 1960s with their
sunny melodies and intricate
harmonies, became stars with
such hits as "Walk Like an Egyp-
tian and the Prince tune, "Manic
Monday from the 1986 LP,
"Different Light
The Bangles are thankful for
their success, but said they
needed to take greater control
over their music.
Producer David Kahne,
whose relationship with the band
was stormy at best, was replaced
bv Davitt Sigerson. Hoffs, Steele
and sisters Vicki and Debbi Peter-
son, who once readily accepted
contributions from outside song-
writers, each wrote or co-wrote all
of the new album's 13 songs.
When all four members of a
band write songs, they notice
when their biggest hits are writ-
ten by someone else. "Walk Like
an Egyptian" was written by
Liam Steinberg, "If She Knew
What She Wants" is a Jules Shear
song and the Bangles hit the Top
10 with a cover of Paul Simon's
"Hazy Shade of Winter
"It was a reaction to the suc-
cess of 'Different Light' that made
us determined to write as many
songs as we could come up with
� strong stuff that we could feel
was emotionally attached to us
Steele said. "We had a strange,
slight feeling of distance from
'Different Light
The flip side to trusting your
own instincts, of course, is getting
burned if the public rejects you.
Some critics have grumbled that
"Everything" sounds overpro-
duced and the songs don't
sparkle. But the public's respond-
ing to the first single, a Hoffs
rocker called "In Your Room
which is moving swiftly up the
charts.
The Bangles will spend much
of 1989 touring to support a rec-
ord they say even moms and dads
can love � they know, because
they've asked theirs.
"I played it for my dad
Steele said. "He said, 'this is a
much more professional-sound-
ing record
ABOVE PAR
Public Driving Range
November Hours
MonFri. 11 a.m. -Dark
SatSun. lOa.mDark
1V2 miles past D H. Conley
High School on the New Bern
Hwy.(Hwy43S)
355-6725 -
Uris bases 'Mitla Pass' on past
NEW YORK (AP) � Leon
Uris has based much of his work
on historical events. In "Mitla
Pass the history is his own.
I was looking for a legacy to
leave my new family and my
grandchildren" said Uris, the64-
ar-old author of such best sell-
ers as "Exodus" and "QB VII
"Mitla Pass" (Doubleday,
$19.95), which closely follows the
11 e of Lris and his familv, begins
in Israel in 1956 during the Suez
Canal cnis and centers on the
author s alter ego,Gideon Zadok,
�a writer covering the incident.
The novel then traces Zadok's
ahec tr back to the 1880s.
Uris lues in Aspen, Colo
with his third wife I ill and hopes
the book wil bring him closer to
their two children.
"I wanted to leave them with
a storv of what their old man did
and let them know he was not
infallible. You spend the sec-
ond half of vour life getting over
your first half he said.
In "Mitla Pass the writer
had difficulties with both parents.
Like Zadok, Uris was born in
Baltimore and spent several vears
growing up in Norfolk, Va. His
father. Wolf William, was a paper
hanger and storekeeper. Uris
remembered him as an unhappy
man.
"i thmk his personality was
formed by the harsh realities of
being a Jew in Czarist Russia he
said. "1 le was basically a failure.
He went from failure to failure. I
think failure formed his charac-
ter, made him bitter.
"I think I can say without
hesitation that from earliest
memory 1 was determined not to
be a failure
Uris credits his mother,
Anna, with teaching him an ap-
preciation of the arts, but says
they did not get along.
"Her life was such that there
was a heavy distrust of men, in
large part because of a very cruel
father. We were essentially disin-
terested in each other. She was
inside of her own head there
somewhere
Uris struggled to establish his
own independence and World
World II provided the opportu-
nity.
"All societies that I know of
are shaped by macho, the need of
a man to be' macho said Uris,
DAN'S
"Let us Dress you up for Halloween"
VINTAGE CLOIIIING.
JEWELRY. COLUXTABLES
AND FURNITURE
212 East Fifth St.
Greenville, NC
919 752-1750
nr
who served as a marine. 'There's
no better proving ground than a
war
His first novel, "Battle Cry' a
story about the Marine Corps,
was released in 1953 and made
into a film. "Exodus the novel
which depicted the history of
European Jewry from the turn of
the century to the establishment
of Israel, was released in 1958 and
sold millions of copies.
Uris said researching "Mitla
Pass" made him sec himself in an
entirelv different wav. "1 used to
think of myself as a very sad little
Jewish bov, isolated in a Southern
town, undersized, asthmatic.
"When I read all my corre-
spondence again, I realized I was
a hustler he said. "I was tough. I
used everything to my advan-
tage.
521 CoUnche St.
Make Your Christmas
Shopping Easier With
Chico 's Gift Certificates
Celebrate Your Christmas Parties In
Our Fiesta Room.
Accommodations To 60.
Reservations
��. 757-1666
for A tfJfig
V-W -N
iiiii
! 1 I i i i , I 1 '
liilJJC
I rat.

CAROLINA MINI
STORAGE
L Commercial & Household
Low Monti i? Rates Electrical Outlet Aateble
Ccnae'e & Steel
7 Day Ret �'�- � - '� bs Construrtion
Moving No PlaceTo Store
YourBelongings? $15.00 & up
Need More Space
Store Furniture
I Room For Studio Space
, IN 1
STORAGE UNIT AND
RECEIVE 3rd MONTH
FREE!
3275 LANDMARK ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
355-3000
Can You Offer ft .CfTeyfc Contribution to Your Field?
Christmas
Is Special
Special People
deserve a
special present.
Let us help you
pick out just
the perfect gift.
Handcrafted jewelry, silk & coHon lingerie, handknitted
sweaters, ponchos, and X-mas socks.
MonSat. 10-6
Thurs. 10-8
919 A. Redbanks Rd.
Arlington Village
756-1058
Enter the Zenith Data Systems
MASTERS of
INNOWTION
COMPETITION
Win a $5,000 Zenith Computer System.
We're searching for tomorrow's innovators.
If you've developed or used software or hardware�thai is compatible with
Zenith Data Systems products�to creative!) address a problem or task in youi
field of study, we want to hear from u.
You could win a $5,(MM) Zenith Data Systems computer system for vourself,
�$5,000 worth of computer equipment for your college campus given in
your name, and national recognition from your peers.
For More Information And Official Rules, Call 1-800-553-0301. !
Competition Ends March 1, 1989. Void Where Prohibited.
rgfini I data
systems
THE QUALITY GOES IN BEFORE THE NAME GOES ON'
Hne values hased on turrenc Zenith Data Sy-uemV standard t-diuational n in�
lhrrt RinMnn BctMcd h l"ht- K(-r RKhinan tfrno. lnt -Bcerl Hilly
C NHH. -nuh Ha vn.�
p

UNC-Grt
ward Blue Ed �
Photolab).
Swimme
due to B
Bv DAVID MONROI
SuH ��
While the : k tb �
has been strug the p
five years and with the ba �
team on track for a v.
son, East Carolina s swimm
program continues I roll
victories.
Year in and year
fields some o i the I nteal
Meredith Bridgers
in the Colonial Athletic ssoi
tion. This vear is no ex
the team has posted a com
record of nine wins and one II
against teams such as Old I j
ion, William and Mary, Ul
Charlotte, James V.
American. In all. the men arc
and the women are 4-1
Much of the suet
vomen's team can be placed (
relative newcomer Meredith
idgers. A sophomore from Soi
1 Duke Analysis
NoDu
By DAVID MONROE!
Slalf Writer
Just imagine it. . East a
ina University playing
nation's top-ranked basket!
team 8,000 plus screaming tj
delirious with excitement, all
the wildest place imaginable H
basketball game. . � Di
University's Cameron Ind(
Stadium.
On Wednesday, Noveml
30th, Mike Steele takes his sh
cm the road against the Duke
Devils in a matchup that shoj
wove to be to the fans dehj
Unfortunately for the Pirate faj
fulyou can forget about follow
the Purple and Gold to Durhij
Through a discovery made
ast weekend, tickets for
Duke vs. East Carolina basketl
game are not being made avj
ible to Pirate fans. In fact, t(
never were available.





AR
ange
5;
58

rmas
ith
ares
S
a
p
a rties In K
b
Id


tat'
v I- Tinh ; i.n.i s
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 29,1988 Page 15
Hoopsters begin season 2-0
Pirates begin season on right track
UNC-Greensboro's Ron Sheppard blocks a shot by Pirate for-
ward Blue Edwards during last night's 68-49 win. (Photo by ECU
Photolab).
Swimmers' success
due to Bridgers
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sport Editor
The East Carolina Pirates
opened their 1988-89 season at
home over the weekend with both
impressive and not so impressive
victories over opponents N.C.
Wesleyan and UNC-Greensboro.
The cagers played their first
opponent, N.C. Wesleyan, on Sat-
urday at Minges Coliseum where
the Pirates outscored Wesleyan
91-65. Blue Edwards gave an
awesome showing as he had 34
points for the night.
Staples also had a good game
with 18 points and Stanley Love
put in a good showing with 10
points.
ECU's shot percentage was
also impressive as they shot 49
percent against Wesleyan. The
Pirates began their assult right
from the beginning in the first
period taking the lead right off the
bat and increasing its margin
from there on.
The final outcome of last
night's UNC-Greensboro game
was equally as awesome with
ECU winning 68-49, but head
coach Mike Steele was not happy
with the way his hoopsters
played.
"I thought our defense was
really good, it was solid Steele
said. "But offensively, I thought
we were horrible. Everybody was
looking to score after one pass
The Pirates held an impres-
sive 36-22 lead in the first half in
front of a crowd of 3,954 but let
their 14-point margin slide to as
close as a four-point spread in the
second half.
Steele explained that none of
the members of the team "were
enjoying it and having fun pass-
ing the basketball
But despite Steele's bitterness
over the way his team played as a
whole, a couple of Pirates had
worthy performances.
Gus Hill, the junior forward,
led the cagers in scoring with 20
points. Steele was especially
pleased with Hill's performance
in the second half. "Gus did a nice
job in the second half. He came in
and won the defensive boards
and got a coupleof big plays for us
and had a pretty good game
"1 was really pleased with
Gus. He struggled in the first
game against N.C. WesleyanJ
Jeff Kelly didn't score any
points but had an impressive
game giving the Pirates the "lift"
that it needed to secure the vic-
tory. "Jeff Kelly came in the game
and gave us a nice lift and helped
us and got us rolling. That was
really important for us
Steele explained that the
UNC-G game was especially
good for Edwards because played
in a more realistic environment as
far as the rest of the season is
concerned, namely, against Duke
on Wednesday.
UNC-G's Verdel Ellis stayed
with Edwards for most of the
game and did a great job in cover-
ing ECU's best offensive player.
"Blue kind of did anything he
wanted in the first game but this is
more like how it is going to be for
him
The highlight of the game that
shifted the Pirates back in gear
after letting UNC-G catch up to
within five, was the technical foul
called on Reed Lose with 10:24
remaining in the game, after he
slammed the basketball on a
UNC-G player's leg before it went
out of bounds. The technical was
because the whistle signaling
dead ball had already been
blown. The once quiet Minges
crowd got up on its feet and the
Pirates returned to their emo-
tional play to increase their
spread in the final score, to 19.
"I think he just missed the
call'Steele explained regarding
the official that called the techni-
cal. "He had blown the whistle
and he thought Reed heard the
whistle. "I hadn't heard the
whistle either
Steele and the ECU bench
were the next ones to receive two
additional technical fouls with
2:22 left to play after they pro-
tested an official's call.
"I think you've got to give
UNC-G some real credit. I
thought that their kids really
played hard. Their kids came to
play and thev really did a nice
job
The 2-0 Pirates travel to Dur-
ham on Wednesday to challenge
the No. 1 Blue Devils of Duke
University in their first away
game
Lady Pirates suffer 79-74 loss to Stetson;
come back to beat South Carolina State
Bv DAVID MONROE
Staff Writer
While the football program
has been struggling for the past
five years and with the basketball
team on track for a winning sea-
son, East Carolina's swimming
program continues to roll with
victories.
Year in and year out, ECU
fields some of the best swim teams
Meredith Bridgers
in the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion. This year is no exception as
the team has posted a combined
record of nine wins and one loss
against teams such as Old Domin-
ion, William and Mary, UNC-
Charlottc, James Madison and
American. In all, the men are 5-0
and the women are 4-1.
Much of the success for the
women's team can be placed on a
relative newcomer Meredith Br-
idgers. A sophomore from South
Mecklenburg High School in
Charlotte, she is currently unde-
feated in the 100 and 200-yard
breaststroke.
Just this past week, she quali-
fied for the prestigous NCAA
Championships to be held at Indi-
ana University March 16-18. By
qualifying so early in th&S�asen
Bridgers became the quickest
qualifier for the NCAA's in East
Carolina swimming history.
Up at 5:30 a.m. and in the pool
by 6 a.m Bridgers will swim close
to 8,000 yards (1620 yards is
equivalent to one mile in the pool)
before the day is over. Morning
practice is scheduled from 6 a.m.
to 7:30 a.m. followed by classes,
then weight training at 2:20 p.m.
with another practice at 3:30 p.m.
and lasting until 6:30 p.m.
Bridgers is quick to point out
that swimming has its definite
sacrifices just like any other colle-
giate sport, but she finds it diffi-
cult to miss something she has
never had. When she does find
time to relax, she enjoys reading
the classics. She remembers in
high school when the teacher
would assign a novel to be read,
but she would always put it off.
Now she finds that she is attracted
to reading the novels that she
avoided in high school.
When not reading she can
usually be found hanging out
with the other members of the
swim team. One thing about East
Carolina that really impressed her
was the casual atmosphere that
tends to run rampant around
campus. "It is easy to be yourself
See NEWCOMER, page 17
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
The East Carolina women's
basketball team opened its season
on Thanksgiving evening at the
Appalachian State Classic in
Boone, N.C. with a loss to Stetson
University. But they came back in
second round action action to
earn their first win of the season
against South Carolina State.
In first round action against
the Laty Hatters trf Stetson, 'ECU
took a 79-74 loss. The Lady Pirates
had three players finish in double
figures with sophomore Sarah
Gray leading the way with 17
points.
Grav, a forward from Wash-
ington, N.C. who was selected to
the all-tournament team, was also
the Lady Pirates' second leading
rebo under.
Senior Pam Williams and
freshman Tonya Hargrove scored �
11 points each in the ECU effort.
Hargrove lead ECU on the boards
with 10 rebounds.
In second round action, the
Lady Pirates mmped out to an
early lead and led by as many as
12 in the first six minutes. Despite
shooting just 35 percent from the
floor for the game, ECU came
away with its first win.
Sarah Gray once again led
ECU, this time inboth scoring and
rebounding. Gray had 24 points
for the game and pulled down 13
rebounds.
Senior Gretta Savage scored
in double figures with 13 and also
had nine rebounds. Pam Wil-
liams, with her second double
figure game of the season, scored
11 points.
With her first win of the sea-
son, ECU head coach Pat Pierson
said that her team still needs a lot
of work to be ready for conference
play.
"We did not play very well
tonight. At times we played great
defensively, creating a lot of turn-
overs and steals Pierson said
about the Lady Pirates who fin-
ished third in the ASU Classic.
"We just didn't do a good job of
converting them into points.
We'll need to work hard this week
in practice
East Carolina, now 1-1, will
be on the road Wednesday at
Duke and the open their home
season on Friday as the host of the
seventh annual Lady Pirates Clas-
sic at Minges Coliseum.
TAirkey Trot
victors awarded
(IRS) � The annual intramu-
ral run for the birds was held pre-
Thanksgiving at Bunting Track.
Dr. Al Matthews and Frank Sole-
man (Dining Services) were on
hand for the awards presenta-
tions as well as Dr. Matthews'
serving as official race starter.
The 1988 Turkey Trot saw the
return and total domination of
last years first place finishers,
Return of the Yukmen. Barry
Scott, Charley Justice, Brent
Brewer and Billy Best ran for a
total 30:48 to take top honors.
Falling behind nine seconds
was the three men team form Pi
Kappa Alpha 'A comprised of
Scott Oliveri, Kevin Plumb and
Tim McNamara.
Sophomore Meredith Bridgers of Charlotte swims the 200 individual medley. Bridgers qualified for
the NCAA Championship meet in 200-yard breast stroke. (Photo by Thomas Walters,ECU Photolab).
Duke Analysis
No Duke tickets available to ECU fans
By DAVID MONROE
Suff Writer
Just imagine it. . . East Caro-
lina University playing the
nation's top-ranked basketball
team 8,000 plus screaming fans
delirious with excitement, all in
the wildest place imaginable for a
basketball game. . . Duke
University's Cameron Indoor
Stadium.
On Wednesday, November
30th, Mike Steele takes his show
on the road against the Duke Blue
Devils in a matchup that should
prove to be to the fans delight.
Unfortunately for the Pirate faith-
ful you can forget about following
the Purple and Gold to Durham.
Through a discovery made this
past weekend, tickets for the
Duke vs. East Carolina basketball
game are not being made avail-
able to Pirate fans. In fact, they
never were available.
It seems Duke University has
a "long" standing policy of not
providing the visiting school with
the opportunity of having its fans
present to support them. All tick-
ets are available only to Duke
University students and season
ticket holders. When an effort was
made to acquire tickets for this
exciting game by calling the Duke
Ticket Office this fact was
pounded home time and time
again. Want tickets? Either buy a
season ticket package or enroll at
Duke (for those out there who are
not up on their college tuition
prices for prestigious private
Universities, Duke is a modest
$13,000 a year).
And so the question currently
stands: Why can't such exuberant
fan support exist at ECU as well?
Upon realizing that East
Carolina was going to Durham
without fan support, this scenario
at East rolina's Minges Coli-
seum, ti jteele Mill of the South,
began to take root. With a student
enrollment of over 15,000 and a
surrounding community boast-
ing over 35,000 citizens, it really
boggles the mind as to why East
Carolina has managed to sell out
its 6,500 seat arena only four times
in the past three years.
If David Robinson had not
decided to attend the Naval Acad-
emy and had Wilmington not
brought some 500 or so fans to
their games, Minges might not
have been filled to capacity. Just
in case you might be wondering,
Duke's student enrollment is in
the neighborhood of 11,500 (give
or take 1,000).
With excitement returning to
East Carolina basketball for the
first time in over nine years, vi-
sions of winning seasons and
even someday an NCAA tourna-
ment bid are suddenly within
reason of becoming a reality. As
the University makes a commit-
ment to ennff ftlf PlPpram
Mike Steele is trying to build by
upgrading Minges Coliseum, it
now falls upon the student body
and surrounding community to
provide the finishing touch.
The thought of sellout games
at Minges, visiting fans standing
out in the cold because they could
not get tickets, a twenty win sea-
son, and even an NCAA bid
makes one excited with expecta-
tion. All this can happen.
With an excellent class of re-
cruits joining a solid group of
experienced juniors and seniors,
the ground floor has been laid. In
order to ensure success, ECU
must be able to attract top athletes
to our program and there must be
a strong showing of school and
community support.
Regardless of whether East
Carolina is playing a Top 20 team
or a team with a 10 game losing
streak, there must be enthusiasm
and excitement behind the bas-
ketball program. The first steps
have been taken by the commu-
nity by doubling the amount of
season ticket packages purchased
over last years total. Now the stu-
dent body needs to show that they
too appreciate what is happening
to the East Carolina basketball
program.
Mike Steele has shown that
he can win. During his six seasons
as head coach fo. the DePauw
Tigers, Mike Steele led his team to
a 124-40 record during his reign.
The last four seasons at DePauw,
he posted consecutive 20 win sea-
sons receiving four NCAA Divi-
sion III tournament bids, and es-
tablished a Division III record for
consecutive homecourt wins with
61.
East Carolina has long taken
pride in itself as an institution of
higher learning and with your
help it can establish itself as one of
the top basketball programs in the
country.
Sigma Phi Epsilon took the
third spot behind the Pi Kaps with
a total 39:40 time.
From out of the women's
starting blocks came Delta Zeta.
The DZ squad placed first in the
women's team category with a
60:50 time spread. Team members
include Laurie Sadono, Marney
McKee, Mardy Parrish and
Rhonda Mount.
Individual honors were pre-
sented to the three mile finishers
as well. It seemed only minutes
before top male finisher Barry
Scott started the race and com-
pleted its course. Scott, the first to
cross the finish line, ran a 9:59
race.
Close behind Scott was
Yukmen teammate Charlie Jus-
tice who breezed through the fin-
ish lone with a 10:00.
Female top individual honors
go to Suzanne Uzzell, a lone run-
ner with a time of 1532. UzzeH's
time ousted all female as well as
several male scores in the event.
Taking the second place position
was DZ Laurie Sadono with an
18:38 time.
Sponsored by dining services
and the Canteen Corporation, the
annual Turkey Trot winner re-
ceived turkeys and pumpkin pies
to brighten their holiday week-
end.






16
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,1988
Terrapin mascot injured
BALTIMORE (AP) � The
mascot for the University of
Maryland football team said
Monday he may never regain full
use of his left arm, which was
broken as he tussled with the
University of Virginia mascot.
Scntl Rudolph soid doctors
had to remove about three-quar-
ters of an inch of bone that was
shattered on Saturday when his
arm was broken in three places
and dislocated before the Mary-
land-Virginia g?me.
The 21-year-old Rudolph,
speaking from hisbed at St. Agnes
Hospital in Baltimore, said doc-
tors have told him he may regain
only 90 percent mobilitv and feel-
ing in his arm. Rudolph said he'll
wear a cast on the arm for two
months.
Rudolph says the Virginia
mascot threw him to the ground
and fell on top of him. Before his
arm was broken, Rudolph was
jumped by several members of
the Virginia band, but he wasn't
injured, he said.
He said there was "no ex-
cuse for the scuffle, and he hopes
it will prevent something similar
from happening to someone else.
"People forget there is a person
inside the mascot's costume
Rudolph said.
Maryland sports information
director Herb Hartnett said Satur-
day that Rudolph's injury oc-
curred during a skit. Hartnett said
the incident was not malicious.
But Rudolph said if there
were a skit, he didn't know about
it.
"It was an unfortunate acci-
dent, and we're sorry that it hap-
pened Virginia sports informa-
tion director Rich Murray said,
reading from a statement the
school released Monday. "We
wish Scott a speedy recovery
The Maryland mascot ap-
pears as a terrapin, with a turtle-
like head and a dark and light
brown shell. The Virginia Cava-
lier wears a long orange and blue
tunic, topped with a plumed hat.
This Coupon good for one (1)
page of incredibly advanced,
scientifically tested, pretty
much guaranteed to offend
most rational beings, humor
material.
Redeem every Thursday for
The Clearly Labeled Satire
Page.
"The finest humnr for the
price
Void where prohibited, all slate and local tut
apply
Student hoops are gift idea
The Clearly Labeled
Satire Page - The world's
ONLY page of humor, hijinks
and good almost-clean fun
that's clearly labeled!
Every Thursday, from
now 'til we graduate!
No deposit, no return.
Void in any Journalism 2000 class on
campus.
stern bo's
THE ORIGINAL HARDEE
Corner 5th and Readc St. (next to Stop Shop)
Phone 83&5A76
Fresh Ground Hamburger
We Cook Our Own Barbecue
Serving:
SEVEN SPECIALS EACH DAY
14 lb. I Iamburgcr Dressed, New style French Erics
&Large Drink $2.19
Serving:
Shrimp Dinners Bar-B-Q Dinners
Chicken Dinners Fish Dinners
Bar-B-Q & Chicken Shrimp & Fish
All dinners screed with slaw, french fries, hushpuppies
Our French Fries will make vour day.
Open 10 a.m. til 1 a.m. - Closed Sunday
by KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Kditor
Looking for a neat Christmas
gift idea for your favorite sports
enthusiast? Or how about some-
thing to hang on a bare wall in
your dorm room to help pass the
studv time away? The Depart-
ment of Manufacturing in the
ECU School of Industry and Tech-
nology may have just the thing for
you.
The students in manufactur-
ing 4092 have started their own
mock corporation as a class proj-
ect and have created a miniture
Pirate basketball hoop. The hoop
comes complete with a backboard
which includes an Fast Carolina
Pirate logo. And ever since Harry
Nesbit and a group of students
appeared on the Carolina Today
show aired Nov. 15 on WNCTCh.
9, "these basketball hoops have
been selling like hotcakes
Nesbit, who is a senior major-
ing in electronics, said the basket-
ball hoops are designed for use
with Nerf balls or some sort of soft
and small basketball. The hoops
are currently available for $10
apiece.
Nesbit said the class is de-
signed as a corporation to test and
market a product.
Chuck Peoples originally
came up with the idea to market
Pirate basketball hoops. He then
was elected president of the mock
corporation while Nesbit was
elected vice president in charge of
marketing.
Nesbit had to come up with
an intended target market and
decided that the students would
be the central focus. "We wanted
to make the product available to
them Nesbit explained.
"Basketball season began
Nov. 17 with the Marathon Oil
Tournament so it was perfect
timing. Christmastime also made
it perfect timing
The class manufactures the
basketball hoops during their lab
hours. "We run kind of an assem-
bly line Nesbit explained. "All
the workers get paid as if it were a
real job
The target goal of the class is
to manufacture and sell 100 hoops
before the end of the semester.
"That should be no problem
Nesbit said.
Anyone interested in pur-
chasing a Pirate basketball hoop
should call the Department of
Manfacturing in the School of
Industry and Technology at 757-
6705.
NFL players using drugs
CHICAGO (AP) � Begin-
ning next season, NFL players
testing positively for steroids a
second time will be subject to the
same suspensions now handed
down to players who use cocaine
and other illegal substances.
Commissioner Pete Rozelle
told NFL owners at their fall
meeting Tuesday that the policy-
will apply to players who tested
positively for steroids during
training camp this year � a figure
he estimated at six percent of
those tested.
So far this year, 20 players
have been suspended for second
violations of the NFL's substance
abuse program � 19 for 30 days,
or four games, and one, Tony
Collins of the Indianapolis Colts,
for the season as a third-time vio-
lator.
"Our legal staff feels we know
more about it Rozelle said in
explaining his decision on ster-
oids.
Asked if that meant he
thought it could withstand a court
challenge, he replied:
"That's part of it Steroids are
bad for the players. We know they
can affect life after football
Rozelle also aid he thinks the
suspensions are having an effect,
noting that the majority came in
pre-season and in the first six
weeks of the regular season, with
only one, Mike Bell of Kansas
City, who was disciplined last
week, suspended since the early
rash.
"I think the suspensions are
having an important impact on
players who might be tempted to
do something with drugs he
said. "Because there has been a
slack period, 1 would hopefully
assume there will be fewer cases
the rest of the season
Still, Rozelle urged the teams
to make sure they have contacts
both with drug treatment facili-
ties in their areas and with doctors
who specialize in addiction rather
than just relying on team doctors.
"So many teams he said,
"have orthopedists or internists
as their team doctors he said.
"We're going to hit them about
netting close to a local treatment
facility and a drug doctor
While Rozelle was lamenting
that the lack of a contract with the
NFL Playeis Association and the
union's objection to random test-
ing prevented him from imple-
menting a stronger policy, the
union seemed headed for steps of
its own.
Accoding to an NFLPA
source, the union is preparing a
class action suit complaining that
IheNFL'sdrug testing program is
a violation of the 1982 collective
cargaining agreement. While that
agreement expired last Sept. 1 �
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
strike � many of its provisions
are still being honored.
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The? Gmtcr la Oocn
Wed.
9-2:30
Fri.
9-5
Tuet.
10-2
For an appointment or more Infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
111 East Third Street � The Lee Building
OreenvUk, N. C.
Fret Pregnancy Te�t-
Confldentll Couneehnf
PARKER'S
DINNERS INCLUDE Brunswick Stew,
Cole Salw, Boiled Potatoes or French Fries
and Corn Sticks PLATES INCLUDE Cole
Slaw and Corn Sticks
BARBECUE
LARGE BARBECUE DINNER 4 00
SMAI1. BARBECUE DINNER3.50
LARGE BARBECUE PLATE4.00
SMALL UAKUECUE I1.ATE 3.50
CHICKEN
FRIED OR BARBECUED
LARGE CiHCiUN DINNER4.25
SMALL CHICKEN DINNER3 JO
l"KU.L LIVER PLATE 3.75
COMBINATIONS
LARGE COMBINATION4.25
BnUlM md Chicken (While Meet)
SMALL COMBINATION 3.90
Bubc-uc iu Chicken (D�ik Men)
FAMILY STYLE DINNERS(Each) 5.00
INCLUDES Harbccue, Fried Chicken,
Cole Slaw, Brunswick Stew, Itoilcd Potatoes
and Corn Sticks
CHILDREN Through 10 Years Old2.75
Entire Table Must Order Family Style
No Doggie Bag From Family Style
SEAFOOD
HSU DINNER �5.00
OYSTER PRY5.00
OYSTER STEW5.00
SI IR1MP DINNER����5.00
ANY 1 WO COMBINATIONS SEAFOOD 5.75
SEAJ OOD PLATTER (luh. Shirop. Outers) 6.75
PARKERS WILL CATER ALL YOUR NEEDS
Two Locations To Serve You
No. 1 S. Memorial Drive No. 2. 2020 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-2388 758-9215
Student Union Tree
Trimming Party
Tuesday, November 29th
4-6 p.m.
Music by ECU Gospel Choir
Santa will be there with gifts
refreshments
FREE to all ECU Community
Sponsored by Productions Committee
'I-X�
x-
riiv
�.i�o�
�MV'
Student Union
Coming Attractions
u.�v

(PS f lO 1 I (n 1 f C� I I D l D I f (ftH
Student Union Events
TONIGHT
Everyone is invited to the Student Union Tree Trimming Party
It will be held at 4 p.m. on the First Floor of Mendenhall
Join Us!
MOVIE OF THE WEEK
BULL DURHAM - R
Dec. 1-4 in Hendrix Theatre at 8 p.m.
: �?" All Films are FREE to ECU Students with valid ECU l.D
All films are shown at 8:00 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre unlessothenvise stated and are FREE
to ECU students with valid ECU l.D.
Sponsored bv the Student Union Films Committee
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee wants
to know what concerts you would like to have at ECU
An opinion box is located next to the information
desk in Mendenhall Student Center.
Stop by and help us to bring you
,� the concerts of your choice.
I OUT TO UWVf KXJ
rone
The Denver Broncos, wh.
peared to be headed from � I
iper Bowl to the Super Bore with
�ven straight scoreless quarters
re back on top in the AFC West
The Broncos, coming oft a421
loss to New Orleans last v j
ailed 7-0 in the second quarto
(unday before John Elway thrc
tree touchdown passes
iem in a 15-second span in thJ
irdquarter,andranonevar I
nother score as Denver
s Angeles Rams 35-24 Sui
"We had to win the game
ttay alive Denver coa h Dai
Jeeves said. "We came up witj
he big plays when .
�ke them against a
tball team, one that
lesperate for a win as we wen
Although the Br i
isonly 7-6, they lead theirdivisi
y a half-game over &
Ithe Los Angeles Raid
Rams suffered theii
straight loss and U I
In other garr
Cleveland 1"
Chicago 16, Green :
I burgh 16, Kansa- C
York Jets 38, Miami �
phia 31, Phoenix 21; ar I
17, Tampa Ba II San
48, San Diego 10; Indiana
New England 21; Deri
Newcom
Continued from page 15
and people are more -
cept you as who you are i j
than who you are not.
Bridgers has r
sports writers tend to
individuals who do not r .1
in a swim meet. She said that
is unfair because as 1.
swimmer finishes in the top 'i
positions, they are help
team significance. With a I
nine points going to first I
four to second place, three t J
place, two to fourth place a
to fifth place, having somec
finish in the top fi e spa � -
points. As long as V
continue to secure the first pi
position, a teammate that can
ish in one of the next tour pla
ensures that East Carolina
outseore their opponent. Tin
fore, although finishing
impressive, finishing even
carries much respect
Bridgers contributes
her success to the V � j
Aquatic Club Summer Trail
ProgTam under the dire
George Koch. It was -
noticed Bridgers and insp
to swim. Through coa
idgers, Koch has cor.
that she has the pott
successful swimmer as is
by her achievements thu I
season. In high school Men j
won the State Championship
freshman and senior year
100-yard breaststrokc
Bridgers came to East (I
D&D
2x6 Bunk Beds $15?.0
A Savings o
Bunkies not inq
available at a
Use as 2 sepal
Various appliances aj
Brii
r
L
HERALPINq
:1m
'Tfu LCU
'Thursday, '&
Wrifjftt
With a prcx
popular cl
Adrrl
Frit





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 19SK 17
O'S
HARDEE

ree
y
N
� .
I A
-
5 ��

ns
D 11 f
r) ;
N
t
make a comeback
The Denver Broncos, who
appeared to be headed from the
Super Bowl to the Super Bore with
seven straight scoreless quarters,
are back on top in the AFC West.
The Broncos, coming off a 42-
0 loss to New Orleans last week,
trailed 7-0 in the second quarter
Sunday before John Elwav threw
three touchdown passes, two of
them in a 15-second span in the
third quarter, and ran one yard for
another score as Denver beat the
1 os Angeles Rams 35-24 Sunday.
"We had to win the game to
stay alive Denver coach Dan
Reeves said. "We came up with
the big plays when we had to
make them against a very good
tootball team, one that was as
desperate for a win as we were
Although the Broncos' record
:s only 7-6, they lead their division
by a half-game over Seattle and
the Los Angeles Raiders. The
Rams suffered their fourth
straight loss and fell to 7-6.
In other games Sunday, it was
Cleveland 17, Washington 13;
Chicago 16, Green Bay 0; Pitts-
burgh 16, Kansas City 10; New
York lets 38, Miami 34; Philadel-
phia 31, Phoenix 21; and Atlanta
17. Tampa Bay 10; San Francisco
48. San Diego 10; Indianapolis 24,
New England 21; Denver 35, Los
Angeles Rams 24; and the New
York Giants 13, New Orleans 12.
Bengals 35, Bills 21
Cincinnati took a 21-0 lead in
the second quarter and rolled up
287 yards in the first half, 17 more
than Buffalo's per-game defen-
sive average - then held on to beat
the Bills and retain sole posses-
sion o first place in the AFC
Central.
Boomer Esiason completed
18 of 25 passes for 238 yards, Ickey
Woods ran for 129 yards on 26
carries and scored three times and
lames Brooks ran for 93 yards and
scored twice against Buffalo, 1T2,
which already has clinched the
AFC East title and still has the best
record in the conference.
The Bengals, 10-3, netted 455
yards against a defense that had
been Neal Anderson scored his
second touchdown of the game on
an 80-yard run and Chicago held
Green Bay to 22 yards rushing and
167 passing.
But the victory, which tied the
Bears with Buffalo for the best
record in the NFL, was a costly
one, as Chicago lost quarterback
Mike Tomczak and defensive end
Richard Dent to injuries.
The Bears clinched at least a
wild-card playoff spot with a 11-2
record, while the Packers fell to 2-
11 with their sixth straight defeat.
Giants 13, Saints 12
New York, playing with two
backup quarterbacks because of
an injury to Phil Simms, overcame
five turnovers and four field goals
by Morten Andersen.
Paul McFadden kicked a 35-
yard field goal with 21 seconds
left after quarterbacks Jeff Hos-
tetler and Jeff Rutledge combined
to lead three scoring drives.
Hostetler, who started the
game, passed for one first-half-
touchdown, an 85-yard scoring
play to Stephen Baker. Rutledge
relieved Hostetler in the second
half and led a short march to a 46-
yard field goal by McFadden and
a 33-yard drive to the game-win-
ning field goal.
Eagles 31, Cardinals 21
Philadelphia won its fourth
straight game and stayed in a tie
for the NFC East lead as Ron
Johnson, who didn't have a job
three weeks ago, caught two
touchdown passes and set up a
third.
The Eagles boosted their rec-
ord to 8-5 and dropped the Cardi-
nals, 7-6, out of a tie for the divi-
sion lead.
Randall Cunningham, who
completed 17 of 35 passes for 214
yards and two touchdowns, ral-
lied the Eagles from a 14-7
halftime deficit to a 24-14 lead
after three periods. The comeback
was helped by backup quarter-
back Matt Cavanaugh, who came
in for one play when Cunning-
ham suffered a back injury and
threw a nine-yard touchdown
pass to Johnson.
49crs 48, Chargers 10
Joe Montana threw a team-
record 96-yard touchdown pass
to Jerry Rice, a 41-yard scoring
pass to Rice and a left-handed,
underhand 2-yard TD toss to
Roger Craig as San Francisco
improved its playoff hopes by
routing San Diego.
Craig scored three times for
San Francisco with the short
touchdown reception and touch-
down runs covering one and
seven yards.
Steve Young relieved Mon-
tana with the score 38-10 and
guided the 49ers to two scores,
including a 37-yard touchdown
run by Doug DuBose.
Bindery
Services
Binding
Cutting �
Stapling
kinko's
the copy center
Folding
Padding
321 E. 10th St.
752-0875
SPECIAL
Newcomer Bridgers helps team
Continued from page 15
and people are more likelv to ac-
ceptVou as who you are rather o the tact that several of
than who vou are int EL stop swimmers were gradu-
ating out ot the program
lina because she believed that she to heights never before achieved
would be a good swimmer and by an East Carolina swimmer.
With the possibility of being
than who you are not.
Bridgers has noticed that
sports writers tend to discredit
individuals who do not finish first
in a swim meet. She said that this
is unfair because as long as a
swimmer finishes in the top five
positions, they are helping the
team significantly. With a total of
nine points going to first place,
tour to second place, three to third
place, two to fourth place and one
to fifth place, having someone
finish in the top five spaces carries
points. As long as Meredith can
continue to secure the first place
position, a teammate that can fin-
ish in one of the next four places,
-ensures that East Carolina will
outscore their opponent. There-
fore, although finishing first is
impressive, finishing even fifth
carries much respect.
Bridgers contributes much of
her success to the Mecklenburg
quatic Club Summer Training
Program under the direction of
George Koch. It was Koch who
noticed Bndgersand inspired her
to swim. Through coaching Br-
idgers, Koch has convinced her
that she has the potential to be a
successful swimmer as is evident
by her achievements thus far this
season. In high school, Meredith
won the State Championships her
freshman and senior year in the
100-yard breaststrokc.
Bridgers came to East Caro-
of the program, thus
giving her the chance to step right
into the top position.
As long as Bridgers continues
to believe in herself and her abili-
ties, she has the potential to excel
tagged an All American, Bridgers
has the opportunity to bring to
this university the pride and rec-
ognition that it strives to achieve
and to herself, the respect and
acceptance that she so deserves.
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes Students to Come By
And �pp
Our 2 Bedroom and 1 Bedroom
Garden Apartments.
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
STUDENTS
Cot ready to join America's number
one name in temporary help. Kelly
Services can help you make the most
of your free time this semester by
offering the flexibility to earn some
great cash while still being able to
earn gtxid grades. VVc have a variety
of short and long term assignments,
many of which do not require
special skills or experience.
�Secretaries
�Typists
�UP and DE Operators
�General Clerical
�Light Industrial
Call oi stop :n and lit us toil you about our conv
prt'honsivt' benefit package.
204 E. Arlington Blvd
Suite E Arlington Center
355-7850
"The First And The Best"
LS. Ijw requires all apphoantsto show proof of
idomty and nght to work in the U.S
MONSAT.
11 AM - 3 PM
12 - 8 oz. Round
Sirloin
Potato Bar
Sundae Bar
$2.99
r
Daily Specials
10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student I.D.
Hot Bar and Salad Bar only
an additional $1.99 with a meal
FREE DESSERT BAR
with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
"1
J 2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
D & D New And Used
1504 N. Greene St. Greenville
830-9262
Store Hours: M,TTh,F-10-6p.m.
Sat. 8-6 p.m.
2x6 Bunk Beds $155.00 (Pine Finished) Couches and chairs start as low as $35.00
A Savings of $15.65 Pillows- top quality set $5.95
Bunkies not included, but 5 Piece Dinette (Pinewood) $139.95
available at a sale price. 3 Piece table sets (Walnut Finished)
Use as 2 separate beds $95.99
Various appliances available wrifh warranty (Refrigerators, Washers & Dryers, Ranges)
Bring this Ad in Before Nov. 15,hfor 10 Discount
90-day Layaway Plan
HERALDING THE CHRISTMAS SEASON
Annual Christmas Concert
featuring
The 'ECU Symphonic "Wind EnsemSfe
pbert 'Ponto, Conducting
'Thursday, DecemSeT 1, 1988 at 7:30 p.m.
Wright Auditorium, 'ECU Campus
With a program of traditional favorites and
popular classics as wett as a special visit
from Santa, himself.
Admission Free to the Public
Sponsored By:
Friends of the school of Music
W�
1 QJSs'TsSssr'
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building





18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29,1988
UniversftVBookExchange
ks
Book Buy Back With UBE
The One For The Cash
UBE pays more for your textbooks. That s
right, UBE will buy back your textbooks
y x a an y�u U leave wit extra cas
$wtSM� ro sPen over the holidays. So
A P II wkm remember the one for the cash
is UBE.
The One For Free Gifts and Savings
When you come to UBE, you
not only leave with cash, but also
well be giving away ECU razors, campus
trial packs and tokens for1.00 off �
anything from our large selection of &J
sportswear. Let UBE pay more for
your textbooks and you leave with
cash, free gifts and extra savings.

The One For ECU
While at UBE, make sure you browse
through our large selection of ECU apparrel
and ECU items. Choose from shirts and
rt sweats to back packs and coffee mugs. As
a matter of fact, UBE has the
largest"seIection of quality
sweat pants and sweat
shirts in Greenville and all
at great UBE prices.
UBE for ECU
Stop by UBE today. Well buy
back your books, give you cash and
so much more. Were located across
from Chicos restaurant in down-
town Greenville. Everyone meets at
UBE because were the one for the
cash, the savings and we re for ECU.
Regular Hours
9:00 A.M5:30 P.M. M-F
10:00 A.M5:00 P.M. Saturday
Largest SelectionOf
Used Books

The One
For The Cash
Book Buy Back
WithUBE
The One For
Free Gifts
and Savings
0
519 Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville 758-2616





Title
The East Carolinian, November 29, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 29, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.644
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy