The East Carolinian, November 17, 1988






5
Inside
EDITORIALS�l�4
CLASSIFIEDS��6
FEATURES�8
SPORTS12
���
Features
Micah, the movie maniac, reviews John Carpenter's
latest horror, "They Live' It's Thursday, so check out
the Clearly Labeled Satire Page and Pirate Comics see
pages 810,11.
Sports
The Pirates travel to Cincinnati where they meet the
inal challenge of the football season and plan to win
things up on a winning note, see page 12�
She lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 36
Thursday November 17,1988
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Easier access to Pirate b-ball tickets
By MICHAEL BARTLETT
Staff Writer
New seating arrangements
and a different ticket distribu-
tion: policy were the main sub-
jects at Monday's SGA meeting.
Lee Workman, the athletic
be available at Mingcs Coliseum
each working day before the
scheduled game. Tickets for Mon-
day games will be available on
Friday and tickets for games over
Other proposals being imple-
mented this season are three for the upcoming season was wel-
specified gate entrances to facili- corned by the entire body.
tate student seating.
The first entrance will be the
front lobby and will serve purple
holidays will be sold the last
working day before the vacation, and green ticket holders. Purple
All remaining tickets will be sold tickets are for seating along side
marketing directorpsentedlhe on he,day of th 8ame on a first
come first serve basis.
Students must present a valid behind the band. The second and
ECU l.D. and activity card at third entrances are located on the
Minges Coliseum ticket office to tennis court side of Minges for up-
lines on the student side while
green tickets will be for seats
new policies
Workman's presented a new
system for obtaining tickets for
the upcoming basketball season.
The new system will be imple- rcceive thcir frce tlckct Thc day per-level seating and is colored
mented in order to compensate borc lhc 8amc students will be gray
for the projected increase in fan ableu l� purchase one free ticket
participation vv r own a one otn2r
Under the new system, tick- " tlckct with a c�n valid
ets for the upcoming games will
free ticket
ECU l.D.
When purchasing tickets,
students should specify in which
section they wish to be seated.
"We have great expectations
for the upcoming season in both
men and women's basketball, "
Workman said. "Our sale of sea-
son tickets has doubled this year
Workman continued to
elaborate on the need for strong
fan support. "People in the stands
are what we need stated Work-
man.
In the old business during the
SGA meeting, an appropriation
was Sigma Tau Delta. This appro-
priation was for $375; it was
passed by a unanimous decision.
Farm show
attendance
comes to
of 36,000
Greenville,
expected
By BEN SELBY
Staff Writer
The sign says it all. You park, they tow; what a hassle. (Photo
By Thomas Walters, ECU Photo Lab)
Nationwide survey
shows AIDS virus
plaguing students
Thousands of people turned
out for the 13th annual Mid-At-
lantic Farm Show to get the latest
information in agricultural tech-
nology.
The spectators took advan-
tage of great buys and enjoyed
live entertainment during the
Southeast's biggest three-day
farm show event.
"The purpose of the farm
show is to educate farmers and
citizens of the farming commu-
nity in the use of the newest
equipment and supplies avail-
able said Mary Taylor, show co- could not oiler any information
ordinator. on the new smokeless cigarette
Taylor hopes attendance will being test-marketed in the nid
exceed the 36,000 mark that and southwest,
the farm show experienced last Young said thai inl'ormaticn
vear. on the takeover v;as being
"We have $10 million worth handled through the Atlanta
of equipment on the floor Taylor public relations office,
said. We issued about 236 con- "We're adopting a wait and
tracts to exhibitors representing see attitude Dyer said.
over 500 companies.
One of the largest exhibitors
at the show was R.J. Reynolds
with their Pride in Tobacco Pro-
gram.
RJR public relations officers
R.J.R. provides land grant
funds to large agriculture univer-
sities like NCSU and the Univer-
sity of Kentucky. R.J.R. hosts
workshops in Washington D.C.
that enable tomorrow's farmers
Wharehouse was tilled with
booths displaying wares from the
latest in rod and reels to the larg-
est of John Deere tractors. Local
radio and television personalities
dotted the wharehouse floor.
Attractive spokesmodels like
Patty Tiedt were on hand to boost
interest in pesticides and herba-
cides.
Kay Young and Dee Dee Dyer de- better insight into the mechanics
clined to comment on the Rey- of agricultural politics.
nolds coorporate
takeover and
The Farmers' Tobacco
Members of Sigma Sigma
Sigma sorority have helped with
the event for the past twelve
years. Sorority president, Natalie
Moore said that one year a sister
met her husband at the farm
show.
(CPS) - As many as three out
of every one thousand college stu-
dents may have AIDS, the pre-
liminary results of a nationwide
study involving 20 campuses
show.
administrators believe, leave stu-
dents especially vulnerable to the
disease.
"Students are a sexually ac-
tive group said Dr. Florence
Winship of thc University of
Bush has his work cut out for him
The results, if thev hold up Georgia health center. And be-
when the full study is completed cause they tend to be young and
in Februarv, would indicate stu
dents are not paying much atten-
tion to efforts to get them to
change their sex habits and mean
a significant portion of the Ameri-
can student body is at risk of
catching � and dying of � AIDS,
observers say.
"If the figures hold up, there
is more concern than we had an-
ticipated said Dr. Rolan Zick,
director of the University of Colo-
rado health center. "If there is an
infection rate in that range then
students will simply have to start
paying more attention to educat-
ing themselves "
inexperienced, "they feel im-
mune, even when they know the
problem's out there
Many students objected to the
WASHINGTON (AP) � As
one of eight or so senators who
can claim George Bush as a con-
stituent, Democrat George Mitch-
ell says he's always had "a cordial
CDC study when it was proposed relationship" with the president
last spring, noting they would elect despite their political differ-
never know if a blood sample they ences and he hopes that will con-
gave at their clinic was being tinue.
tested or if, in the end, they tested Of course, it won't continue,
positive for the disease. The going will get rough and
Still others worried samples probably fairly early in thc Bush
could be traced back to the do- administration,
nors. In New Jersey, for example, But for now the Republican
the American Civil Liberties
Union lodged a formal complaint
with Rutgers University, charg-
ing the school's participation in
"At this point, the numbers surveY endangered students'
are so preliminary it's practically privacy
meaningless cautioned Anne
Sims of the Centers for Disease
Control (CDC). "Meaningful esti-
mates" won't be proper until the
studv is finished in February.
Through it all, however, the
CDC believed the study was
worthwhile. Sims contends, "The
survey will help us focus our ef-
forts
About 5,000 of the 20,000 col-
the CDC, along with the
American College Health Asso- ge blood samples to be tested
clarion, is gathering and testing ve been processed, Sims said,
1,000 blood samples drawn from
students on 20 campuses for other
medical reasons to see how far
AIDS has spread.
Few know which 20 cam-
puses are in the study, but Tulane
and Rutgers universities as well
as the universities of Colorado,
Maryland and Georgia have ac-
knowledged they're participat-
ing.
AIDS (acquired immune defi-
ciency syndrome) is caused by a
virus which destroys the body's
immune system. The virus is most
showing a rate of about three
cases per 1,000 students. Sims said
she didn't know from which cam-
puses the samples came.
"The only thing we can show
from these preliminary results is
president-elect and the Demo-
crats who have firm control of
Congress are acting determined
to enjoy a bit of a honeymoon.
As soon as his victory was
confirmed election night, Bush
talked about his determination to
work with Congress and he con-
tinued that theme Tuesday when
he announced his intention to
retain Nicholas F. Brady as Treas-
ury secretary.
Bush said "Brady knows
we've got to sit down with the
Congress on a deficit-reduction
agreement and we've got to do it
soon
From an office in the Capitol
where he can look down the Mall
to theWashington Monument
claim a kinship with all four
states.
Mitchell is involved in an-
other election now, one that gives
special weight to his view of how
relations might evolve between
Bush and the Democrats in Con-
gress.
The Maine senator is one of
three candidates for Senate major-
ity leader. The others are Sen. Ben-
nett Johnston of Louisiana and
Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii.
"I think I have a chance to win
on the first ballot said Mitchell
history of commitments made
and then broken when the secret
ballots are marked in the party
caucus.
Whoever emerges as the win-
ner in that contest will join House
be prepared to actively and ag-
gressively establish our agenda
The battleground will be on
taxes.
Bush locked himself into a
of the election that will take place positive attitude said Mitchell.
at the end of this month. "On the other hand, it's obvious
But senators are not a readily there are differences and there
predictable electorate. There is a will be differences and we must
Speaker Jim Wright of Texas near position of rejecting a tax increase,
the top of the new president's VIP "Read my lips he told the na-
list. tion, "No new taxes
The Democratic attitude at
While the talk is now of coop- this point is: OK, then, you come
eration the differences on how to up with a way to reduce the defi-
deal with the budget deficit are
clear.
"I think vou begin with a
at.
"There's no question reve-
nues must be a part of it
Johnston said. "That's not a ques-
tion of philosoohy; thuf s a ques-
tion of mathematics
that there is infection on college and beyond to the White house
campuses. College students are Mitchell picked up a fruit salad
not immune from AIDS,
Sims d steadfastly refused to pick a
said.
"The figure cited is based on
just one-quarter of the sample
added Miguel Garcia-Tunom of
the "American College Health
Association. "In that sense it's
lyTonttacVed'bhaving inconclusive. It's just a number,
intravenous But what s important is not to fix-
sex or sharing
needles with an infected person,
or by contaminated blood prod-
ucts. There have been more than
76,000 cases reported in the
United States since 1981, with
43,000 fatalities.
Campus lifestyles, health
ate on a number, but to deal with
the problem on campuses. Stu-
dents must be aware of this
"It's not surprising to me
Winship said of the preliminary
figure. While the data may be
See AIDS, page 2
fight with the new administra-
tion.
"1 am very much opposed to
the notion that we should be con-
frontational for the sake of con-
frontation said the Maine sena-
tor who was re-elected last week
with 81 percent of the vote � the
highest percentage ever received
by a Senate candidate in his state.
Bush has a summer home in
Maine. The president-elect was
born in Massachusetts, grew up in
Connecticut and votes in Texas
for political purposes, he likes to
A campus blood drive sponsored by the Red Cross took place all day Wednesday at Menden-
hall student center. Here students relax and contribute a few pints. (Photo By Thomas Walters
ECU Photo Lab)





2 THE ffrST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 17. 1988
t
15
�"1
Runners, beware of shinsplints
ECU School of Medicine
ranked fourth nationally in the
percentage of its medical students
who chose family medicine as a
specialty according to a survey of
residency choices for the Class of
1987.
The study, carried in the Sep-
temberOctober issue of the Jour-
nal of Fomilv Medicine, examined
the medical specialty choices oi
accomplishment
"It speaks well on behalf of
our school fulfilling its mission
for the trainingof family doctors
said Sanchez.
As a rule, about 25 percent of
ECU medical graduates go on to
residencies in family medicine
each year - double the national
average.
None of the top four schools
15,872 phvsicians who entered produced as many family doctors
their first year of residency train
ing in the 1987-88 academic year.
Most oi the physicians graduated
from medical schools in the
spring of 1987. Nationally, about
12 percent of the graduates chose
to specialize in family medicine.
At ECU, 21 of 67 graduates, or 31
percent, opted for family medi-
cine.
That figure positioned ECU
behind only three of the other 125
medical schools in the country
Oral Roberts University placed
435 percent of its graduates in
family medicine programs
Southern Illinois University, 43.3
percent; and Wright State Univer-
sity- in Davton, Ohio, 33 percent.
Dr. Rafael C. Sanchez, vice
chairman of the ECU Department
of Family Medicine, described
FCU's performance as "a notable
as the University of Minnesota,
which sent 68 graduates into
Lower leg injuries are an in-
creasing problem among those in-
dividuals participating in the fit-
ness craze. Shinsplints, knee pain,
and ankle sprains are among the
common complaints.
Shinsplints is a common term
used to describe a variety of low
leg injuries which may range from
a mild to serious condition. Sh-
insplints often occur to those who
participate in an activity that re-
quires a lot oi repetitive move-
ment, such as running and jump
ing.
Tain usually occurs on both
of the inner legs several inches
above the ankle bone to the mid-
calf area. Mild swelling and dis-
coloration may be present. Pain
intensities with exercise and
To Your Health
By
Mary-Elesha Adams
should slowly diminish as legs
have a chance to rest.
The best treatment for mild
cases of shinsplints is rest until
pain disappears. During this pe-
riod of rest, try an alternative form
of exercise that places less stress
on the legs. Swimming is a great
form of aerobic exercise. Icing the
area and taking an anti-inflamma-
torv such as aspirin will help re-
lieve pain and swelling. Ice packs
should be applied for twenty min-
utes three or four times a day.
If you continue to exercise
through this period, ice the area
before and after activity. Do not
apply heat�this may increase
swelling and delay the healing
process.
See your health care provider
if any of the following symptoms
occur:
-pain persist more than two to
three weeks after rest
-sharp pain occurring in only niry Health Intern.
one leg
-sharp and nagging pain is
occurring during non-activity
-numbness occurs on the bot-
tom of the foot or between the toes
-weakness or inability to
move the foot or toes.
Shinsplints may be avoided
by proper stretching and
strengthening. Be sure to stretch
out the calf muscles and Achilles'
tendon. Wear good supportive
shoes appropriate for your activ-
ity. They do not have to be the
most expensive.
Avoid frequent changes in
surfaces. Going from the basket-
ball court, the aerobic room, and
running the roads of Crecnville
may make you a prime candidate
for shinsplints. Remember, do not
do too much too fast
Overuse is one of the number
one causes of injury to both the
professional and amateur athlete.
If pain other than sore muscles oc-
curs from activity, stop what you
are doing and find out the cause.
Pain is your body's way of telling
you something might be seriously
wrong.
This Health Column was
written by Lisa Walser, Commu-
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hi
AIDS spreading rapidly on campuses
Continued from page 1
"skewed" and doesn't "provide
the full picture she predictts the
final tally "won't be too far off
If it isn't, many health officials
wonder how they'd make colle-
gians respond to the AIDS threat
more seriously.
"In general said Rich
Wolitski of the AIDS Education
Troject at California State Univer
period (for AIDS) is sever years or folks who look like their parents
longer, it's clear that many oi the Winship said.
14,000 patients in this group were
high school or college age at the
time of their infection VVindom
said.
Moreover, a 1987 survey ot
college students by Blotnick As-
sociates, a New York polling firm,
revealed that only 6 percent oi
men think about AIDS before
as Michigan State, Southwest
Missouri State, Indiana and
Georgia now has a peer coun- Plattsburgh State College in New
soling program in which students York among them �have supple-
actually spread the word about mented education programs by
The East Carolinian
Serving tlvc Easi Carolina campus comniunify since 1925.
James F. J. McKce, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Halt on
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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sity at Long Beach, "college stu- choosing sexual partners.
dents have a fairly high knowl-
edge about AIDS. They know-
how it is transmitted and what
thev can do to protect them-
selves
"But in general, they do not
consider themselves vulnerable
And officials at the universi-
ties of Texas and Arizona and
Denver's Metropolitan State Col-
lege have reported that the rates
of other sexually transmitted dis
eases have not declined, suggest-
ing that students arc not protect-
AIDS, Winship reported.
Virtually every campus in the
U.S of course, now has some
kind of AIDS program.
Some � the universities of
Colorado-Colorado Springs,
Iowa and Texas at El Paso, as well
installing condom machines in
dormitories and student unions,
or by distributing condoms for
free.
Critics say condom distribu-
tion promotes sexual promiscu-
ity.
Inserts
5.000 or less
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In September, the CDC re- ing themselves against AIDS.
ported the AIDS scare apparently "It's a little frustrating
had not markedlv changed stu- Georgia's Winship said. Then
dents' sexual habits, prompting behavior doesn't go along with
Assistant U.S. Secretary of Health their education. We need to do
Dr. Robert E. VVindom to urge everything we can to transfer that
campus officials to try harder to Ves-I-know-ibout-it' attitude to a
educate their students about the
plague.
Windom said that one-fifth of
the reported AIDS cases occur
among people 20 to 29 years old.
"Since the average incubation
change in their behavior
She believes students simply
may be unwilling to listen to
"parental figures like older col-
lege health officials
listen to their peers
"Students
more than
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 17, 1W 3
Namibia gets first free election
WASHINGTON (AP) South
African-controlled Namibia will
hold elections for its first inde-
pendent government next year
and the more than 50,000Cuban
troops in Angola will be sent
homeb) early 1991 under a tenta-
tive aoreement reached in Ge-
neva, US. officials say.
Ihe agreement was worked
out by negotiators during five
days of talks that ended Tuesday
and issubject to final approval by
the governments ol South Africa,
Cuba and Angola, officials said.
If ratified, the agreement
ould represent a victory tor U.S.
Assistant Secretary Chester
v rocker, who has been attempt-
to v ork out a ettlement since
-1 and has served as mediator
tor the current phase of the nego-
tiations, which began in May.
Ihe officials, insisting op
anon mity, said it was agreed the
Cuban troops would be with-
drawn over a 27-month period
probably starting in December
rhat represented a compro-
mise between a Cuban proposal
tor a 30-month withdrawal pe-
riod and a South African call for a
two-year withdrawal, the officials
said.
About two-thirds of the Cu-
bans would be withdrawn during
the first ear and the remainder
w ould be restricted at some point
to the northern half ol thecountry,
tar from the stronghold of U.S
backed anti-communist rebels.
I he plan also calls tor im-
plementation, starting in Febru-
ary, ot a IN. Security Council
resolution designed to end South
Africa's 73-year rule over Na-
mibia. Africa's List colony.
Under the plan, elections for
Namibia's tirst independent gov-
ernment will be held in August
and the new regime will take of-
fi e in earl) 1990, the officials said.
In Geneva, no details were
disclosed bat South Africa's chief
negotiator, Neil Van Heerden
said 'All parties have agreed to
take a document home to their
governm nts '
i lo said the document would
ice
in
Cuba initially sent troops to shift thc military balan
Angola in 1975 to help the fledg- UNITA's favor,
ling independent government, Crocker has sought to bring
newly freed from Portuguese co- an end to Angola's internal con-
lonia'l rule, fend off military incur- flict by calling for national recon-
sions from South Africa, which eiliation negotiations between
a
tor a final agreement,
it
he pai ties a
Southw i
i
tern
Africa has
been a sour e of superpower con-
tention for years. In Angola. Cu-
backed by Soviet
havi been arraved
ban troo
v eaponrv
was concerned about communist
penetration of the region.
Left unanswered is the fate of
the Angolan rebel movement,
known by its Portuguese initials,
UN1TA.
South Africa has been the
principal supplier of the UN1TA
forces for years, ferrying equip-
ment across the Namibian border
to the rebel stronghold in south-
east Angola.
But with South Africa appar-
ent 1 y i n ten t on removi ng i ts forces
from Namibia, the resupply
operation will face logistical
problems.
President-elect George Bush
has said U.S. support for UNITA
will but American officials have
indicated that the South African
resupply role cannot be dupli-
cated.
On the other hand, the offi-
Angola's Marxist government
and the UNITA rebels.
But the Angolan government
has rejected negotiations with
UNITA, calling instead on the
rebels to lav down their arms and
join in a national reconstruction
effort.
Havana's head delegate to
the Geneva talks, Carlos Aldana,
told reporters after a final plenary
meeting, "There are still very
important points outstanding
The tentative accord wascau
tiously welcomed by an official of
the South-West African People's
Organization, which has been
fighting South Africa for Namib-
ian independence.
Theo-Ben Gurirab, SW APO's
foreign affairs spokesman and an
observer at the Geneva round,
said his movement would revoke
"BID FOR BACHELORS"
TO BENEFIT
THE MARCH OF DIMES
Y
ei
against a rt.
equipped with I
face to air
material
movement
supplied sur-
les and other
cials said Cuba has played an its threat of resuming an armed
indispensable role in supporting Struggle against Pretoria if the
the Angolan Army and that the P�'uv package is finalized by fan.
removal oi the Cuban troops will 1 �
Defender of k4Kristallnacht"quits
FRANKFURT West Ger-
many (AP) A West German
Jewish leader who defended last
week's controversial Kris-
tallnacht speech in parliament
today atter strong criticism
from other Jews, officials said.
Michael Fuerst, deputy chair-
man of the national ewish coun-
cil, had been harshly criticized for
the con
Thursday
ment President Philipp lennm- 1
g( r.
� nger had reminded his
audience that mam (lermans ini
tiallv welcomed Nazi dictator
ts he made following
jpeechof then-Parlia-
Ade
litter,
and recall
hi
main people thought tin
cd that
ewsde-
rved being "out back in their
piace.
Jenninger also caned thccarlv
years a "triumphal proces-
sion
Furor over
mounted at home
and
lenninger quit
He said he had been misunder-
d, but also told nationwide
television you cant iull every-
thing by its name in (.ermanv
lenninger, 56, gave the speech
on the 50th anniversary ol Kris-
tallnacht, the night of terror
against the lews that signaled the
coming 1 lolocau t.
lust hours atter the speech,
Fuersl told a nationally televised
panel discussion: '1 welcome the
fa t thai the parliament president
described in full claritv w hat was
opening n G rmany between
jand i 38 especially the
fact that everything 1 litler did
was strongly supported by the
masse s i all (lermans
i uerst, 41, on Monday told
The V-s. . iated Press thai he fully
supported a hat he said last week.
and said that he had received
'numerou's telephone caTTs oil ap-
proval.
"I've been confirmed in that
the speech opinion by the many people who
and abroad, have called me since then he
told the AP He acknowledged,
however that a 'maiority" oi
West Germany's lew ish Commu-
it the next day
nitv telt differently.
Council chairman Heinz Gal-
inski, who had led the criticism
against his own deputy, today
made the announcement of
Fuerst's resignation.
"Fie gave asa reason the long-
standing lack oi agreement be-
tween me and himself Galinski,
a 75-year-old Auschwitz survi-
vor, told the AP at a council meet-
ing in Frankfurt.
Galinski said the rest of the
national council leadership stood
behind him "100 percent Gal-
inski has been at the forefront of
condemning Jenninger's speech.
Fuerst was at the meeting, but
not immediately available for
comment.
The Jenninger dispute has
intensified West Germany's de-
bate over the haunting legacy oi
the Third Reich.
Many people, like Fuerst,
have cautiously approved of the
Christian Democratic politician's
reminders of how the Germans
initially greeted Hitler.
"Thc part about the peooie
staving silent, giving approval,
and that it could happen among a
majority oi the Germans - people
say that very seldom said Parlia-
ment member
ATTENTION:
Ladies may raise contributrions toward their bids
ahead of this event. Contact 355-6393 for details.
Advance Tickets ($10.00) may be picked up from the
Ramada Inn, Steinbeck's, or call 355-6393. Tickets will
be sold at the desk on event night for $12.00 donation.
Northern Telecom plans to
layoff 200 in the Triangle
RESEARCH RIANG1 E
�- - N ' (AP) The layoff of
� . nid-level managers by
Northern Telecom Inc. in Re
irch Triangle Park is the latest
in a series oi moves the company
has made to become more effi-
cient, an industry analyst says.
"It's probably what they've
been doing for the last couple of
. ars, making them mere effi-
cient says Robert D. Thorbum,
an analyst for Nesbitt Thomson
Deacon Inc. in Toronto, where
Northern Telecom's parent com-
pany is based.
"1 don't think it represents a
problem with any one product
: urn said of the company,
which makes telephone-switch-
ing equipment.
"The company's profitability
has been flatfish, but not reall)
disappointing he said. "It's a
very important stock in Canada
and widely held"
Ihe layoffs will affect manag-
ers at Northern Telecom facilities
throughout the Triangle, where
the company's Integrated Net
work Systems Group division
employs about 7,000 people, said
ohn I C a liana n, a company
spokesman
"We are completing a restn
luring to eliminate these middle
management positions he said.
!he company has been consider-
ing the restructuring plan for
about six months, he said.
Northern Telecom, a subside
ary of Northern Telecom Ltd. in
Mississauga, Ontario, also is lay
ing off about 50 other managers in
sites scattered throughout the
United States, Callahan said
The employees being laid off
typically have about four years'
service with the company and can
expect about two months' sever-
ance pav, he said. The company
will continue insurance benefits
tor the employees for about 90
da vs.
Northern Telecom, based in
d - n t expect
within the RTP
makes computer-
beards.
an-
nouncement is another in a series
of layoffs by major North Caro-
lina employers.
Thursday Phi Kappa Tau L'il Sisters
Presents Ladies Night
All Ladies Free All Night
Come Early Drink Specials All Night
Friday: Free Pizza
$50 Cash for Sorority and Fraternity
with best attendance
Sign up when you enter
n
$2.00 Frozen
16 oz.
Specials
ThursSun.






�i� iEaat (ftarnltman
Pete Fernald, rwiiM
Chip Carter, ,wu.r�i �
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, -Vector ofUwrtw�l
Joe Harris, n� u
KR1STEN HALBERG, Sport. ��
Tim Hampton, F�-hr��Aior
Michelle England, c�M��i�r
Debbie Stevens, sk,
Stephanie Folsom, c u�
JEFF PARKER,S��ffUirfr�tor
TOM FURR, CrrcKJahor. Maujcr
Susan Howell, pro, m
JOHN W. MEDLIN, Art Dimeter
Mac Clark, goigMf
November 17, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Space race
Soviet launch re-ignites race to final frontier
first unmanned test flight, and, ac-
cording to the Soviet press, all went
well.
Who controls the high ground
controls the battle, and this is one of
the fundamental concepts behind
SDI. There are two major problems
with Reagan's beloved SDI, the Stra-
tegic Defense Initiative (often erro-
neously referred to as "Star Wars").
First, most reputable scientists
are against it, and many quite
rightly refuse to have anything to do
with it.
One of the few who support the
program is Dr. Edmund Teller, com-
monly recognized as the father of
the very weapons against which SDI
would ostensibly defend. It is not
hard to imagine that his obsession
with seeing this dream become real-
ity is the product of guilt over his
having had a hand in placing the
world at risk in the first place.
Perhaps even more important,
however, is that SDI threatens the
peaceful development of space, just
as setting up large numbers of
armed garrisons throughout the
New World would have destroyed
any hope of its peaceful develop-
ment.
The chief implement by which
space may be peacefully explored
(at least initially) is the American
civilian space program, which is
overseen by NASA. For too long the
space program was left to languish,
weak from underfunding and a
general lack of public interest. In
order to maintain what little public
support it enjoyed, NASA was
forced to cut corners and assign
duties to the manned space program
(the Shuttle) which should have
been performed by the unmanned
space program.
The result, of course, was the
Challenger disaster, one of few
"disasters" really worthy of the
term. The explosion paralyzed
NASA from the top down, and left it
badly demoralized and confused.
After long therapy and recon-
structive surgery involving, among
other things, severe personnel lay-
offs, NASA is at least walking again.
Limping, maybe, but walking none-
theless.
In the meantime, the Soviets
have been running hard. Tuesday
the Soviet shuttle Buran made its
The Soviets, not America, were
first in outer space but they are in a
way responsible for our achieve-
ments. Had we not been galvanized
into action by the Sputnik launch, it
is doubtful that we would have
reached the moon even today.
For the near future, the Soviets
are planning a permanent manned
space station and a manned mission
to Mars. Both projects have the full
support of the Soviet government,
for the Soviets well know that, if
nothing else, advances in space tech-
nology contribute to a reputation for
technological excellence back on
terra firma.
America's reputation for excel-
lence is derived in part from the
American space program. Propelled
mainly by the implications of Sput-
nik, the space program went from
zero to the Moon in one decade. But
just when the infinite reaches of the
universe seemed ours for the taking,
we released our tenuous grip and let
the arm of Man fall back to Earth.
Clearly, the space program
needs a shot in the arm, but this time
we may not be able to overtake our
rivals as easily as we did in the late
1950s and 1960s. For this country to
become a true world leader again,
we must do what the rest of the
world cannot: we must use our
impressive resources and resource-
fulness to put Americans in space.
This will require the unflagging
support of the American govern-
ment and the American people. The
risks are great, the stakes are high,
and the mere thought of the poten-
tial rewards is intoxicating.
America's best chance to reestablish
itself as what it has long claimed to
be � a leader and an innovator �
lies in a vast expanse of blackness
and a thousand points of light.
As long as we do not throw ob-
stacles such as SDI in our own way,
nothing can stop us save apathy.
One hopes that America's support
of the space program will be revived
by something less drastic than pic-
tures of the Red flag on the Red
Planet.
�i
THE X.ACB
HAS STAXreb - AG-Ati
Buyouts seem unethical
By MICHAEL M. LEWIS
The New Republic
If F. Ross Johnson, the president of RJR Nabisco,
succeeds in his plan to take his company private in a
$17.6 billion leveraged buyout (LBO), it will be the
largest single business transaction in history. (LBO
specialists Kohlberg Kraus & Roberts have made a
rival bid of $20 billion.) Maybe this will finally bring
leveraged buyouts� perhaps the Reagan era's most
distinctive contribution to the culture of finance�
the skeptical attention they deserve.
Fortune lists them copiously among America's
50 most interesting businesspeople. The only ques-
tion usually raised is whether our heroes will win the
day (they usually do). But what is really worth
discussing is whether our heroes and their deals
shou'd be outlawed.
Management-led LbCs became big business
before anyone gave them much thought. The vol-
ume of management buyouts increased from 46
deals worth $4.8 billion in 1984 to 54 deals worth
$16.6 billion in 1987. The RJR Nabisco deal (involv-
ing the company formed when Nabisco, the food
conglomerate, merged with R.J. Renolds, the to-
bacco purveyor, in 1985) is larger than all of last
year's deals combined.
Hold the applause for a moment. As several
observers have pointed out, the very idea of man-
agement buying out its shareholders raised a conflict
of interest. How can the manager of a publicity held
company represent the interest of shareholder�
which is what they are paid to do�at the same time
that they are attempting to buy the company from
the shareholders at the lowest possible price?
Doesn't that put them on both sides of the negotiat-
ing table at once?
"Entrepreneurs" are never lazy or dumb. Know-
ing that he will go down with the ship, and also that
he will benefit directly from smooth sailing, the
owner-manager skippers the newly privatized busi-
ness more efficiently than when he was merely an
employee.
If it is true that privately held companies are
inherently more efficent than publicly traded ones,
American capitalism�which is dominated by large,
publicy owned corporations� is based on an
enormous fallacy, and generations of business
propaganda about the wonders of widespread share
ownership have been a gigantic fraud. This may well
be the case, but the advent of LBOs does not prove it.
Consider the buyout of Macy's, completed two
years ago. Edward K. Finklestein, now the
company largest stockholder, worked at Macy's
for 39 years. In June 1985 Finklestein, then chairman,
raised the idea of buyout with Macy's board of
directors, which included Beverly Sill; Robert
Schwartz, the chairman of Metropolitan Life; and
Lawrence Fouraker, former dean of the Harvard
Business School. Outside directors are supposedly
the guardians of shareholders' interests vis-a-vis
management.
Finklestein told board members he was losing
executives to competitors becaue he couldn't com-
pensate them properly. The board was skeptical
Finklestein had been given a free hand in running
Macy's. He had bought himself a $15 million
Gulfstream jet with shareholder's money. No one
questioned his business judgment. Under his man-
agement, Macy's had prospered. But why did he
need to own the company in order to pay his execu-
tives whatever it took to keep them?
Initially, the board was strongly opposed to a
buyout. This upset Finklestein. He argued that his
bid of $68 a share was 50 percent higher than the
market price, 165 percent of the tangible book value
and 18.4 times earnings. A few weeks later the board
mysteriously agreed to dicuss a management
buyout.
Finklestein wanted to pay $68 a share, and the
board of directors asked for 70. No sweat
Finkestein's financial advisers, Goldman, Sachs
claimed not to be able to finance a buyout at $70 a
share, after which the Macy's board came down to
Finklestein's price. The board then hired an adviser,
Wolfensohn & Co which agreed, in January 1986
that $68 a share was fair.
Finklestein became an "owner-manager The
actual deal he cut for himself, however, shows how
misused that phrase can be. At $68 a share, Fin-
klestein took a $9,755,280 profit on share options he
held in Macy's stock. Of that, he put back in
$4375,000. In other words, he had less of his own
money riding on the future of the company after his
buyout than before.
Finklestein and his associates bought the entire
company for about $3 billion, virtually all of it bor-
rowed. A year later� after the stock market crash-
they offered a 40 percent interest in Macy's in lieu of
cash in a bid to buy another chain of retail stores
called Federated. They valued the 40 percent stake at
$2.4 billion (including the taking on of about $1.4
billion in debt). That made their valuation for all of
Macy's about $6 billion. Finklestein's stake, for
which he paid $4,375 million, is now worth $122.5
million. Seven other Macy's executives who partici-
pated in the buyout have become millionaires.
What magic have Finklestein and company
worked to double the value of the company? Well,
for a start, there are the brown bags. A McKinsey
report intended as a paean to LBOs notes that Macy's
said it saved a million dollars a year by standarizing
its shopping bags and buying them in bulk. Some
might think that buying bags in bulk is something
even the most indolent coporate management might
think of. How naive! Not until after a buyout do
these little efficiencies become obvious.
But Macy's has enriched Finklestein et al. for
different reasons. Part of the magic is in the new
financial structure of the company. Like all buyouts,
it has been stripped of equity and laden with debt
Shareholders have been replaced by bondholders.
Quayle's wife, parents follow religious colonel
By ELINOR I. BRECHER
The New Republic
The list of things George Bush doubtless wishes
he had known about Dan Quayle three months ago
continues to grow. The latest pieceof bad p.r. Quayle
has brought to the Republican president-elect is a
man named Col. Robert B. Thieme Jr an ultracon-
servative preacher with a preternatural affection for
all things military and a weird theology that in-
cludes a pseudoscientific synthesis of biology and
Christianity.
There's no evidence that Quayle himself is a
follower of Thieme's. Rather, if s his parents, his
wife, Marilyn, her parents, and two of her sisters
who are longtime admirers of the colonel and fol-
lowers of his audiocassette ministry. (And Marilyn,
according to one of her sisters, uses Thieme's in-
structional materials to supplement the religious
education of the Quayle children.)
But the Bushies aren't eager for Colonel Thieme
to work himself into the Quayle family portrait. Dan
and Marilyn have tried hard to distance themselves
from Thieme since his name surfaced a few weeks
ago.
These attempts haven't been entirely successful.
Marilyn now minimizes her connection with Th-
ieme and denies any knowledge of his extremist
political views. But back in September, before Th-
ieme became an issue, she was less guarded. "I read
Dr. Thieme's literature and I do find him very good,
and enjoy listening to his tapes she told one of us.
Quayle, meanwhile, has insisted he knows very little
about Thieme, professing total ignorance of his po-
litical and social views. "I don't believe I've listened
to any Thieme tapes he said. But Marilyn has said
that she and Dan "occasionally have listened to them
when we visited my father
Colonel Thieme, pastor of Houston's Berachah
Church since 1950, is a caricature of a right-wing
evangelical. He preaches about Armageddon and
the Red Tide and warns that the United States is
imperiled by creeping socialism. The welfare sys-
tem, he says, is a "satanic attempt to reproduce the
perfect conditions of the Millennium
He fulminates against "power-mad hbor
"spineless" government leaders, feminists, "do-
gooders and liberals permissive parents, gays, gun
controllers, rock music, and internationalism. The
United Nations and the World Council of Churches,
he has written, are "satanic, anti-christian, and anti-
God Field reports from a Rice University course
taught by sociologist William Martin have quoted
the colonel as asserting� as he dismissed sugges-
tions that the United States vigorously discourage
apartheid� that the South African government is
far superior to ours. In the same sermon he insisted,
by way of condemning the TV series "Roots that
black slaves should have been grateful to be brought
from Africa to the "Magnificent South where they
could better support themselves.
It would be an exaggeration to call Thieme a
fascist (though some of his pronouncements have an
unsettling echo, such as: "Art, literature, and drama
should always manifest the vigor, the best of a
nation, not its decadence, scum, and reversionism").
But is is safe to say that he embodies an unusually
strong combination of economic conservatism, au-
thoritarianism, and militarism.
A World War II veteran who remained on active
reserve until 1961, Thieme still wears his Air Force
uniform in the pulpit on the Fourth of July and
Memorial Day. He decorates his pastoral study with
a Confederate flag and crossed sabers, and the
church building's hallways with images not of the
Savior but of fighter planes, war heroes, a huge
replica of an Airborne Ranger shoulder patch, and a
framed copy of a newpaper with the headline "JAPS
SURRENDER WAR IS OVER1! 500 RESCUED
FROM HELL HOLE NIP PRISON Many churches
have weekly film nights, but Berachah is surely one
of the few to have shown "Guadalcanal Diary
"Guadalcanal Odyssey "Deserter and "Battle of
the Bulge" in a single month.
Military metaphors permeate Thieme's teach-
ings, notably in conveying his emphasis on author-
ity. If a husband fails to assert authority over his
wife, Thieme has written, she will "hate herself and
will react like a grenade with the pin out A hus-
band, once his wife has children, "is promoted from
'captain' to 'colonel He now has an 'army He is
accountable for disciplining the children and han-
dling the courts-martial
Quayle's parents didn't become Thieme follow-
ers until well after Dan was out of the house, so they
couldn't draw on Thieme's pronouncements in
advising Dan in the 1960s on whether to join the
National Guard or a branch of the service more likely
to see combat. Thieme has written, "This country is
filled with sycophants and trash, as well as short-
sighted mothers who are afraid their sons might get
hurt if they enter the service When the men of high
character tight and die to defend the cowardly para-
sites, eventually, the people who are establishment
oriented cease to exist (Psalms 12:1), and the surviv-
ing leeches destroy the nation
Thieme would gather few votes for a White
House chaplaincy even in Dan Quayle's conserva-
tive political circles. He is a laughingstock among
evangelical leaders in the South, especially in Texas
They derisively trade stories about Thieme's teach-
ings, such as his "right man-right woman" theory of
predestined marriage. This theory holds that for
each man there is exactly one woman who is right for
him not only spiritually but anatomically; that is to
say, if the sexual equipment doesn't fit snugly, the
match wasn't made in heaven. Thieme's peculiar
bio-spirituality further asserts that God made one
nostril for breathing the Holy Spirit and that sin is
genetically carried by both men and women but
transmitted "only through the 23 chromosomes in
the male sperm that fertilizes the female ovum
Thieme, a Beveraly Hills native and University
of Arizona graduate, is an ordained Baptist minister
the product of the theologically conservative Dallas
Theological Seminary. Reclusive and autocratic, he
insists on total silence and rapt attention during
church services, which consist almost exclusively oi
Scripture lessons taught with an overhead projector
and his own brand of interpretive jargon, incompre-
hensible to anyone not schooled in it. "Essence box
for example, means the listing of divine attributes
"Grace pipe" describes the opening of a channel of
blessings to the believer.
(
N.C.
RALEIGH (Al
company of one of th
nesses that wants t
low-level radii . I
lty in Northaroliru
fined more thai
environmental v,
environmental 1 lit id
"A proven I
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inv aj ;
spokesmai
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But, it nurture
swing toward 1
Palestine I
tion could mark the
ous peace d 1
The big qu(
far the United States
prepared to go in k
talks with the PLC
declared an indepi
timan state with ler
capital.
Tuesday's de
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Israel and renounc
mark a significant
in the Middle I
even though Palest
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moves.
A veteran
speaking on condj
nymity, described t
National Council's
"a serious atti
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there is an) signific
in the Middle Fast
The resell.
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If America looks
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Thedeclan.
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Palestinian stat
occupied by
u





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 17, 1988 5

i I
a I
tical
an
: he
cm
-
in
ires
�.at
an
ung
ight
tor
h rs
onel
� ardly para
tablishiru
I the sun i
r a White
onserva
� � k anv
. ially in Texas
it rhieme's teach
man" theory of
holds that for
an who is right for
ut anatomically, that is to
n't fit snugly, the
rhieme's peculiar
that Cod made one
Hdy Spirit and that sin is
th men and women but
jh tho 2" chromosomes in
female ovum
Hills native and University
retained Baptist minister,
all) conservative Dallas
eclusive and autocratic, he
ind rapt attention during
insist almost exclusively of
U with an overhead projector
Morpretive jargon, mcompre-
chooled in it. "Essence box
listing ot divine attributes.
the opening of a channel of
N.C. waste facility fined$30 million
RALEIGH (AP) - The parent
company of one of the two busi-
nesses that wants to operate a
low-level radioactive waste facil-
ity in North Carolina has been
fined more than $30 million for
environmental violations, a state
environmental coalition saw
"A proven history of non-
compliance with environmental
regulations and disregard for
Zeller said future fines, law-
aits and cleanup costs could
imperil W Mi's corporate financial
stability, possibly threatening the
safety Ot a North Carolina facility.
The criticisms came Tuesday
during a meeting of the low-level
radioactive waste management
panel, which is seeking a site for
the facility and a contractor to
operate it. A report on potential
public health should disqualify sites was expected Nov. 30 and a
to Chem-Nuclear and appeared tive director, a job that carries an
better suited to protecting work- $85,(XX) salary.
ers. Almost one-third of North
Bob Reincke,a spokesman for Carolina will be excluded from
WM1 in Illinois, said the fine fig consideration for a low-level radi-
ures were inflated and that none oactive waste plant when a siting
of the problems were related to report is released in two weeks,
low-level radioactive waste han- officials say.
tiling. Paul Gukrhard of low-level
Dave Ebenhack of Chem waste management panel said
Nuclear, which runs the radioac that rural areas and undeveloped
ATLANTA.
BOSTON-
'Minftr Money,
any applicant' Lou Zeller, a
spokesman for the N.C. Radioac
tive Waste Roundtable. said in a
letter to the North Carolina I ow
level Radioactive Waste Man
agement Authority.
Zeller said Waste Manage-
ment Inc the parent company of
Chem-Nuclear, was fined more
than$30million from l982tomid-
1987. He said a Greenpeace report
showed 18 WM1 sites have been
found out of compliance with fed
eral and state environmental
regulations, while 10 have con
taminated groundwater and five
have been ordered to close.
contractor was to be chosen by
Ian. 31.
North Carolina was chosen
by an eight state Southeast com-
pact to handle the region's low-
level waste when the facility in
Barn well, S.C. closes in 1992.
Environmentalist lohn
Runkle said opponents ot Chem-
Nuclear were not necessarily
endorsing Westinghouse Electric
Corp , the only other bidder. But
he said, "So far, their record is
betterJesse Riley, a Charlotte
chemist said in a letter to the
authority that Westinghouse's
proposal was technically superior
tive-waste landfill in Barnwell,
S.C, also objected to the criti-
cisms.
"We're separate he said
"We don't deal with them (WM1)
at all. And none of those viola-
tions arc against us
"I am absolutely positive that
Chem-Nuclear is fully licensable
in North Carolina Ebenhack
said.
In other action, executive di
rector Paul Stam submitted his
resignation, citing "personal rea-
sons Stam had taken the post in
July.
Tenney Deane, chairman ol
the authority, was named execu-
sections of about 70 counties will
be identified for further review in
a survey to be released Nov. 30.
That will start the evaluation
of the state's remaining 34,000
square miles to try to find at least
two eligible tracts of about 100
acres each to begin studying,
beginning next August.
After a year of environmental
studies, a final site is to be selected
byNov 15 1990.
J
The report will automatically
i liminate population centers and
areas that are within a 100-year
Hood plain; or which have a water
table less than seven feet from the
surface, or arc geologically un-
stable.
CHARLOTTE
CMCAQO
DALLAS
LAGUAftOtA.
LOS ANGELES.
.US
.ttM
m
.$ass
� SITS
NEWARK.
OHLANOO.
PH&ADELMA
nTTSaUROH
SAN FRANCISCO
SAVANNAH
.$tM WASHINGTON
.�17t
I1M
.I17S
.$37
Prtccs are round trip based on midweek travel. Tickets
are nonrefundable with no changes allowed. Reservations
must be made a minimum of 14 days In advance. Prices
arc subject to change without notice.
Cfreenville
�W travel center
200 Arlington Blvd Suite M
756-1521
Fumigation of home results in two dead,
Orkin Exterminating Co. facing penalties
ALGIERS, Algeria (AD It
could be months before the PIvs
strategic shift from guerrilla war-
fare to political pragmatism
based on indirect recognition of
Israel, has any real impact on
Middle East peace efforts.
But, if nurtured, the clear
swing toward moderation by the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion could mark the start oi a seri-
ous peace dialogue.
The big question now is hov
far the United States and Israel are
prepared to go in terms of direct
talks with the PLO, which also
declared an independent Pales-
tinian state with Jerusalem as its
capital.
Tuesday's declarations in
Algiers, by implicitly recognizing
Israel and renouncing terrorism
mark a significant breakthrough
in the Middle Fast pace process
even though Palestinian pragma-
iibts havt? long advocated the
moves.
A veteran Western diplomat
speaking on condition of ano
nymity, described the Palestinian
National Council's resolutions as
"a serious attempt" to break the
logjam that has stymied pre ious
efforts.
But with Ronald Reagan tv (
months away from handing over
the LS. presidency to George
Bush, it could be months before
there is any significant movement
in the Middle East equation.
The resolutions of thecouncil,
the PLO's policy-making body
and parliament-in-exile, spelled
out for the first time, however
timidly, Palestinians' willingness
to accept a state comprising only
the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
The territories, which Israel
seized in the 1967 Middle East
war, are just part of what was
originally Palestine - land the
Palestinians have claimed since
1948.
Nabil Shaath, head of the
political committee that dratted
the resolutions, said; "We expect a
change in the American attitude
toward the Palestinian problem.
If Amcnca looks hard and sc n
ouslv enough, it will find all tl
elements needed for a true change
in its position.
"Only a blind statesman v ill
fail to see what the Palestinians
arc offering he said.
The United States's long
standing preconditions for direct
negotiations with the PLO have
been that it recognize Israel and
renounce terrorism The White
House said Tuesday that the PI O
resolutions had "positive
elements and Bush said lie
wanted to be sure that the Pales
tinians have truly recognized Is
rael.
Israeli leaders, however, re
jected the PLO declaration of in-
dependence as being full of
"double talk saying it did not
explicity recognize Israel or re
nounce terrorism.
But some Israeli analysts said
the move has put Israel on the
defensive.
The resolutions speak vo-
lumes about what moderate Pal
estinians see as achievable and
what they will settle for to get the
peace ball rolling.
The declaration of independ-
ence based its legitimacy for a
Palestinian state, albeit territory
occupied by Israel, on a 1947
i inited Nations resolution pro
posing, the partition of Palestine
into Arab and Jewish states
On that basis, it appears the
PL( is prepared to negotiate. But
progress in attaining peace also
lunges on how far Palestinian
radicals arc prepared to go along
with the terms the national coun-
cil laid down.
George 1 labash, leader of the
Marxist Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine and a long-
time critic of PLO leader Yasser
Arafat's efforts to find a political
solution, bluntly stated Tuesday
that as far as he was concerned the
PLO has riot recognized Israel
The national council, whose
members include Arafat rivals
such a Habasn, for the first time
unanimously endorsed the Cairo
Declaration on terrorism, which
Arafat signed in 1985. That re
stricted guerrilla operations to
targets inside Israel after two
decades ot worldwide war
against the leu ish state.
flexibility
"It's obvious from the politi-
cal document that the shape and
borders of the state is a negotiable
detail
That's a lone jump from the
PLO's 1968 charter, which
stressed that the Palestinian state
should embrace all the land under
the British mandate after World
War II, not Just the West Bank and
Gaza
tm
Urit�dW�v�
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
E. 10th St; or call 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. n day, year
around, in order to assist you in virtually any problem area
you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quali'y of life for you and our com-
munity
Licensed And Accredited By Th State of North Carolina
PARKER'S
DINNERS INCLUDE Brunswick Stew,
Cole Salw, Boiled Potatoes or French Fries
and Corn Sticks PLATES INCLUDE Cole
Slaw and Corn Sticks
BARBECUE
I ARGl BARBUXT D1NN1 R
SMA1 I ISARBI CUE DINM K
LARGE BARBliCUl PLATE
SMALL BARBECUE ItATE
CHICKEN
FRIED OR BARBECUED
i ARGl ct- �' R
SMAl 1 C1IH K '� ! INNER
I RU DLIVtH II AT
COMBINATIONS
! UtGE COMBINATION
BaT.ac �nd Chicken(WhiB Met;
SMALL COMBINATION
B�ibr.
I Chicken ;DuIl Ma
Renunciation of terrorism is
omething Arafat twice has failed
to convince the PI O's legislative
body to endorse.
Neither the declaration of m-
dependence nor the political
statement explicitly define the
borders for an independent Pales-
tinian state
Shaath said that even in that,
Ihe Palestinians we're showing
Family
ISTEAKHOUSE
LET US HELP YOU WITH
YOUR
CHRISTMAS PARTY
PLANS.
758-8550
SHHHHi
-���
T
-
1 ocated on huh Stret-t
Next to Hastings Ford
. �������������
I
FAMILY STYLE DINM LS i j�d�) 5 00
IV II DES Iirlu uc, I r.ulbkkea,
Cote Slav, Brunswick st. Boiled Potatoes
anil (Urn Sticks
CHILDKEN Through 10 Years Old
F'lUirc Table Mu.st OrJir Tamil) Slvie
No Doggie Hag From f'amih Style
SEAFOOD
FISH DINNER . �.
ovsn KIHY
OYSTI R STEW
SIBUMPD1NN1 K
ANY TWO COMBINATIONS SEAFOOD
SEA1 Oi 1 n ATIVR 1 uh. Shrimp, 0scrs) .
.5 TO
5 r
- o
- 90
PARKER'S WILL CATER ALL YOUR NEEDS
Two Locations To Serve You
No. 1 S. Memorial Drive No. 2. 2020 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-2388 758-9215
STEVE HARDY'S ORIGINAL BEACH PARTY
BIAS
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Fun After Business Hours
Steve Hardy Begins at 7 00
Drink Specials All Evening
Hot Buffalo Wings til 7:30
FEATURING
STEVE
HARDY'S
V OxiqinaC
BEACH PARTY
WIT
VUARNET.
U C C I
m& 'zm
?�(�.
s0YYTHERN�j
Store I lours
MonSat. 10-9
Sun. 1-6
L
$5.00 Off All
ffyfCm. Cats
In Stock
Located In The Plaza Mall Entrance
Telephone
355-7695
m
BOWLING TURKEY SHOOT
Tuesday, November 22
7:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Knock down 9 out of 10 pins
on 9 out of 10 balls,
you win a holiday turkey.
Entry fee - $2.00 per round.





. .
V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 17, 1988
Classifieds
I Twi
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Only two blocks from Joyner
Library � one room of a two bedroom
apartment for sublease after December.
Hardwood floor, cable TV, fully fur-
nished, etc. SlSOmonth plus utilities.
757-0411
SWEET ROOM FOR RENT: Room in 3
bd room house 3 blocks from campus on
Mcade Street. 1 3 rent and utilities. Call
TroU at 757-1007.
ROOM FOR RENT: Tar River Apart
Monthly rent $83 00. 14 utilities. Fun
Roommates. Good Study Habits. Aprt.
kept semi-dean to clean. 34 of a mile
from Central Campus. Prefer non-
smoker. Call 830-3819. Ask for Rob, Mike,
Phil or Dork.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Spring Semester, non-smoker, Wilson
Acres, own room - furnished; wd in-
duded, $190 mo. 12 utilities. Call ML
758-6906 - leave message.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Two bed
room apartment in Tar River Estates.
Washer, dryer hook up, cable TV $370.00
a month. Avbl. Spring Semester. Call 752-
3385.
FOR RENT: 2 bdm. apt. for sublease, one
block from campus. 830-8996.
FOR RENT: Need 1 non-smoking female
to rent furnished trailer in real nice trailer
park. $l50.00month 23 utilities. Call
756-9758.
PRIVATE ROOM FOR RENT: In house
with fireplace, 1 block from campus. $125
month, 1 5 utilities. Call 752-5016, ask for
Bart. Available Immediately!
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Eastbrook Apts 3 bedroom $127.50 it 1
3 utilities. New carpet. Nice 758-4924
after 5:00 p.m.
FOR SALE
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Lexington
Sq (adj Athletic dub)-S42,500�2-bdrms,
1 1 2 bths, lndry hkup, liv rm wbay win,
kitdin area wbar, refrig, stove,
dshwshr, Fmch drs open to priv patio w
stor rm, adj to prkng lot for easy access, ac-
tive hmownrs' assn. 355-6974 after 5.
FOR SALE: 1985 14 x 70 Fisher Mobile
I lome. 2 br2 ba. Extra nice. Asking pay-
off 524-4165.
POOL TABLE FOR SALE: 8 ft, 34"
slate, new cover, great condition. $395.00
or best offer. Call 355-4833 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: AKC pups - Chows, Labs,
Cocker Spaniels, German Shepherds and
Shelties. Call 746-4328.
FOR SALE: Refrigerator with cabinet -
$65.00. Call 756-1415
FOR SALE: Deutscaer Miester German -
Tournament Top Foots Ball Table. $300
neg. Call 758-7364.
PUPPIES: Black lab golden mixed. AU
black or black with white bib. MF Avail-
able now. A great Christmas gift. $25. Call
Mike 758-6912.
FOR SALE: 1979 Toyota Corolla. 1 owner
Good Condition. Call 757-1053.
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS, CARS, 4 X 4'S:
Seized in drug raids for under $100.00?
Call for facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
'84 MONTE CARLO SS: Metallic blue,
$6,000, call 796-8746.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pn
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer resume'
production, and other business and pro-
fessional services. Call 757-3111 M-F for
more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 it beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC Done bv
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933
HELP WANTED
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Recreation and Parks Department is re-
cruiting for part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter program Appli
cants must possess some knowledge of
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
9-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 p.m. - 7 pm Monday thru
Fridav, and some night and weekend
coaching. The program will extend from
December 1 to mid-February. Salary rate
is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour. Applications
will be accepted starting October 20.
Contact Ben James at 830-4543
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take signups for our FLORIDA tours We
furnish all materials for a successful pro-
motion. Good PAY and FUN. Call CAM-
PUS MARKETING at 1-800-777-2270.
RESORT HOTELS: Cruiselmes, Airlines
&. Amusement Parks. NOW accepting ap-
plications for summer jobs, internships
and career positions For more informa-
tion and an application, write National
Collegiate Recreation Service, PO Box
8074; I lilton I lead, S.C. 29938.
TRAVEL FREE SPRING BREAK! FRA-
TERNITIES & SORORITIES INVITED:
For information about being a Campus
Travel Rep call: 800-826-9100. Ask for
Steve or Janet.
ATTENTION - HIRING Federal gov
ernment jobs in your area and overseas.
Manv immediate openings without wait-
ing list or test 517,840 - $69,485. Phone call
refundable. 602-R38-8885 Ext J-5285.
BABYSITTER NEEDED: Must supply
own transportation. Call 756-7457.
HELP WANTED: Professor CTcools is
hiring for wait staff Come bv and apply in
person (No phone calls) on Monday and
Tuesday 2 4 p m
PERSONALS
NEED CASH? 1 lave baseball cards7 Call
Earlvis, the mad baseball buyer. I pay
damn good money for cards of any year,
any shape, and any condition If you need
partv money, Big F is the one to call. 757-
6366, leave a message.
ANTHONY: The last four years have
been the best of mv life and 1 look forward
to spending the next forty with you I
Love You Always and Forever! �Rae.
JOHN G SCOTT AND TIM: Last Thurs
night was out of sight! Our pool game was
a fright, but the cheese pizza was a nice
delight' When does the next order go in?
�Kav-Kav and Sure
ALPHA SIGS, LITTLE SISTFRS AND
DATES: Get vour tuxes and dresses
ready; black and white this weekend!
Let's partv hard and rock New Bern'
PAMI-RAE: For on Sunday she's having a
big birthday Now that you've reached 22
let me tell you what to do. First we'll sip
your favorite wine, then go somewhere
fine to dine And this time as we're cruis
ing thru, we'll be watching for the flashing
blue. And as for those boys from Favettev-
Ule, the ones who've run us through the
mill, the onlv stitement we can make, is
our hearts cracked but they didn't break.
So here's a wish to one of mv best friends,
not just on her birthday, but till the end,
�hat joy it success may come yyir way
and Pam, mv dear, have a GREAT birth
day Love Stephanie
ANDY: I'm interested in buying your car.
The posters were a great idea! How did
you get your friends to put them up every-
where? If you haven't had any offers give
me a call. 758-4924.
CARTER, BRAD, JIMMY, TOM,
JIMBO, ROB, RANDY & DEREK: Baby
know what you like! But just remember,
Chlamydia is not a flower! Love, your
buddies in 302-H.
AOPI: Roseball plans are coming along.
Beta Lambda's start preparing your
songs. Founder's Day is one to celebrate
and AOPi Christmas is always great. Get
ready for the upcoming events
AOPI: Good luck to everyone running for
an office in the elections. Whatever the
turnout, it will be another great year!
HAPPY BIRTHDAY POOH We love
you! �Your Phi Kappa Tau Little Sisters.
HAPPY HOUR: Every Thursday night at
the Elbo Phi Tau's little sisters have happy
hour - $2 teas and a chance to meet the
little sister pledges.
LEORA, KERRY AND MARY: Being my
Phi Kappa Tau little sisters will be lots of
fun, so get ready to party because we've
just begun! �Love your Big Sis Donna
M.
COLEMAN: You are a great Little Sister!
I'm so glad we've gotten dose! Good Luck
on the rest of the semester. �Love ya! -
Lori.
MIKE NADEAU: It's time for lunch or
something. - Looking forward to Thanks-
giving dinner! �YLS - Lori.
YOU HEARD ABOUT IT LAST WEEK
AND NOW IT IS HERE: That's right - it's
Turkey Gram time. Starting Thursday the
17th thru Monday the 21st, the Kappa
Alpha Little Sisters are selling fun ways to
say Happy Thanksgiving to a friend.
We'll be in front of the Student Store from
9:00-3:00. It's only $-50!
ZETAS: Formal is Saturday Hope that
you are ready, hope that your excited cuz
Crown Ball is around the corner!
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
FRESHMEN: Join an organization that
really does something. If you have an
opinion about anything then call 355-3152
or come by 212 Mendenhall, Monday at
7:00.
CONGRATS: Tnsh Gough, Tiaa Pilati,
ShelleySumner, Karen Cope and Lorraine
Andre. We know it took us a while, but we
hope you all made it through with a smile
We love you. �Delta Zeta
DELTA ZETA: Looking forward to party-
ing with ya'll on Friday night Come pre-
pared to throw down �From the Broth
ers and Pledges of Theta Chi.
TO THETA CHI ROADTRIP CREW:
ODU and Va. Beach was killer We were
definitely in thar! Care for a lemon, Mcln-
tosh? Moye - watch that slippery floor.
Fowler, capster and gerbster love you.
Porter, "wanna go home? Batch, how
were the shots? Gary, Brent, Mitch, you
have no personality. Byerly, empty the
bucket. Pfautz - see-saw anyone? P.J,
foosbaJl anyone. Clayton, Leslie and her
sisters want to many you!
RIDER WANTED: To share gas & tolls to
Western Pennsylvania, Greensburg, La-
trobe, East of Pittsburgh Leaving Nov. 23.
Return Nov. 27 - 830-4708.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
TO PI KAPPA PHI BROTHERS: Con
gratuWith that comes the responsibilit i I
successfully guiding our chapter through
another year Those are big shoes to fill but
all of you are more than capable Good
luck in the elections. �The Brother, of
Delta Sig.
DELTA SIGMA PHI CARNATION
BALL DATES: Friday night will be long
remembered (Saturday morning too)
Hot tub, swimming, pool, tine food, drink
ing, and dancing all provided the ingredi
ents for romance and frivolity All of th
dates looked stunning and we hope .i.
ladies had as much fun as we did Wo novv
look forward to Sailor's Ball in the spring
PI KAPPA PHI PLEDGES: The end
near Mavbe �The Brothers PS vap
preciate the Pig
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
�i
Your Best Look
Specializing !n: MANICURES:
Frorch Manicures � Nail Tips �
Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
; EOICUFES � SKIN CAREBody
Wrapping � Face & Bjdy Waxing �
Facials Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products for
N" n & Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaza Dr. Greenville
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Can
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Cai for appointment Mon thru Sa: Low
Cort Trrrrraf.or. to 20 ���� i of pi ,yar.c
1-800-433-2930
GRADUATE NURSING
STUDENTS
Needed for home health care
or staff relief. A perfect job
for busy students. You design
your own schedule to meet
your academic needs. Please
call Northcare Health Services
at 757-0029, or send resume
! to P.O. Box 124, Greenville,
NCI 27834 �
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
28ME 5th Street
� Located Near FjCU
� AcroM From Highway Patrol Station
Limited offer-$275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
7S6-7S15orMO-lW7
Office open-Apt. 8,12-530 p.m
�AZALt GARDENS-
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional waihen, dryer cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6 month
lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS-couples or
singles Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook VpUry Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD
IT s OUR BUSINESS
ACCU
SSCOPY

Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester and or Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LQSH
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS rHATIFMrTF,
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the un com promised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7.00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
COOPERATIVE EP.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered by
the University, is designed to help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. We would like to
extend an invitation to all students to at-
tend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Nov. semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking tune from your busy schedule
are: 'extra cash to help cover the cost of
college expenses or perhaps to increase
your "fun" budget, 'opportunities to test
a career choice if you have made one or to
explore career options if undecided about
a future career, and a highly "market-
able" degree, which includes a valuable
career-related experience, when you
graduate. Co-op Seminars�Fall, 1988:
Thurs Nov. 17, 1 pm rm. 2010; Mon
Nov. 21,1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon Nov. 28,4
p.m rm. 2006; Thurs Dec 1,1 p.m rm.
2010; and Mon Dec. 5, 4 p.m rm. 2006.
STATE COVT INTERNSHIPS
Each year the N.C. Internship office pro-
vides 150 paid summer internships with
stare agencies. Positions are available for
students in all majors. On Nov. 17, a rep-
resentative of the program will be on
campus to discuss these opportunities.
For info, on rimes and locations, contact
Co-op. Ed 2028 GCB.
JAZZ COLLECTION
Tom The Jazz Man" Mallison recently
donated a wide variety of jazz cassettes
and CD's to the Mendenhall Music Listen-
ing Center. Come by anyday (2-10:30
p.m.) and enjoy the sounds of jazz from
the daaaks to the latest in new age.
ATTENTIONS GRADUATE
STUDENTS
Academic Computing is in need of
Graduate Student Assistants to staff the
academic cor ig labs on campus
These lab assib ositiaM will be avail-
able starting this ; semester and will
involve working 5 hours a week.
Duties will invoh iding assistance
with users on var, tmputer systems
and maintaining computing lab
operations. Experier. � with ' 1 PC's,
Apple Macintosh, or the IBM 81 Aca-
demic Mainframe is preferred but not
essential. To apply, send your resume or a
letter detailing your computer skills to
Terry Harrision (Austin 216) or call 757-
6401.
WHATS YOUR OPINION
OF THE TEACHER?
During the week of Nov. 14-18, a survey of
student opinion of instruction will be
conducted at ECU. Questionnaires will be
distributed in every class with enrollment
greater than five. All students will have
the opportunity to express opinions on
the teaching effectiveness of their instruc-
tors in those classes. The survey will be
conducted during class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes to complete.
Student partir pation is voluntary and no
identities are requested. Instructors have
been requested to leave the classroom
while the questionnaires are being com-
pleted. The teaching effectiveness ques-
tionnaire was created by the Faculty Sen-
ate Committee for Teaching Effectiveness
and the Office of Planning and Institu-
tional Research. The results of the survey,
along with other information and factors,
are used for administrative evaluation of
the instructor by the supervising adminis-
trator within the department or division.
BAHAMAS OR CANCUN?
Let the Student Union Travel Committee
take you to a new and exating place for
Spring Break '89. Shop in the world's
marketplace, plan on eating 5-6 times a
day, dip in the pool, play shuf fleboard, get
a tan, just relax . cruise the Bahamas for
5 days4 nights OR if cruising the ocean
blue is not for you, then come with us for
7 days and nights in Cancun, Mexico.
While in Cancun, stay in a hotel that is on
one of Cancun s finest beaches. Just relax
and enjoy the sun and beach on this gor-
geous island of paradise. Check out our
affordable prices at Central Ticket Office
at Mendenhall (757-6611).
ECU PLAYHOUSE
We need ushers for the next show "A
Moon for the Misbegotten" which runs
Nov. 18-22. Ushers will get to see the show
free with the minimal work before the
show starts. For more info, call 757-6390
or see the sign-up sheet on the main board
in Measick Theatre Arts bldg
WHAT BANDSDQ YQU
WANT TO SEE?
Student Union Special Concerts Commit-
tee wants your opinion! What kinds of
bands do you want to see on campus?
Suggestion box located in Mendenhall at
the Info. Desk.
STRESS MGMT.
Stress Mgmt. For Finals: Do you become
increasingly "jittery as finals approach,
have trouble concentrating while study-
ing, avoid studying or feel like studying
won't help your test performance because
you'll go blank anyway? You're not alone
and there is hope! This workshop will
include relaxahon training, getting "psy-
ched up" in a positive way for fina's and
strategies of preparation and test taking to
reduce stress. Nov. 30, Dec. 2 and 5, 329
Wright Bldg 3-4 p.m. It is important to
attend all three meetings. We will be prac-
ticing and building relaxation skills
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to our Bible
Studies every Tues. night at 7:00 p.m. in
Rawl 130. Bring a friend For more info ,
call Jim at 752-7199.
CHRISTMAS BONUS
Come support the ECU Gospel Choir and
win some cash We are giving away $25
just in time for the holidays. Your chance
at the big money is onlv $.25 Tickets are
on sale in the Student Store MonFn. 9-3.
Drawing will be held Nov 18 at 3 p.m.
Good Luck!
ECU LAW SOCIETY
("hir next meeting will be at 7:30on Nov. 17
in the GCB, rm 1012
GROUPS
Group photographs will not be taken after
Dec 5. If your org has not had their pic-
ture taken by Dec 5, they will not appear
in the 1989 BUCCANEER. Call 757-6501
and leave date it time for the photo to be
taken. Please give two days notice for the
photographer.
CLASS PICTURES
There will be another session for students
to have their class pictures taken for the
1989 Buccaneer. If you were turned away,
or did not get the chance to have them
taken last time, you may have them taken
Jan. 23-27, 1989. Come by the Buccaneer
office it sign up on the sheet osted on the
door. We are located on the 2nd floor of
the Publications Bldg. in front of Joyner
Library.
PAST KEY CLUB MEMBERS
All Past Key Club Members and anyone
else interested are invited to attend the
Circle-K organizational meeting on Nov.
30 at 700 p.m. in room 212 of Mendenhall.
Officers will be elected and the upcoming
ski trip will be discussed. If you were in
Key Club, Key wanettes, Beta Club, Inter-
act, YOU, or Junior Civitans - then this is
the college organization for you. Call 756-
9783 for more info.
AMNESTY INTL.
Amnesty International usually meets
every 4th Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's
Episcopal Church, 401 E. 4th St in the
upper floor - enter from the 4th St. en-
trance. Due to the Thanksgiving holiday,
the next meeting will be on Nov. 30.
EDUCATION MAJORS
The School of Education is sponsoring a
workstudy trip to Puebla, Mexico dur-
ing spring break (March 4-12, 1989).
Opportunities are available to observe ed.
in Mexico, teach, and travel. All ed. majors
are invited to participate. �Applications
are in the Dean's office, Speight Bldg. For
more info, contact Marianne Exum at 757-
6271. Application deadline � Dec. 12.
SPANISH CLUB
Spanish Club will hold its weekly meeting
Wed. in Conf. Rm. of Foreign Lang. Dept.
in GCB. The semester is quickly coming to
an end and we would like to make our last
events successful. Please join us todiscuss
our Spanish Dinner, Thurs 5-8:00 p.m. at
Methodist Student Center on 5th St. Bien-
venidos.
ALL LITTLE SISTER PRO.
Get your group photo taken for the Bucca-
neer today. Call 757-6501 to set up an appt.
The last day to get a picture taken is Dec.
5.
CHRISTMAS DANCE
West Area Residence Council Christmas
Dance Dec. 5th 8:00-12:00 midnight at the
Moose Lodge. Tickets on sale Nov. 14th,
15th, 21st & 22nd in front of Student Store.
$2 w SRA card, $4 wo SRA card. All
campus is welcome.
HOLIDAY LIBRARY HOURS
ECU Joyner Library operating hours dur-
ing the Thanksgiving Holiday season will
be as follows: Wed 1123-8 a.m. - 5 p.m
Thurs. & Fri 1124 & 1125 - CLOSED;
Sat 1126-9 am. - 6 p.m. Normal fall
semester operating hours will resume on
Nov. 27.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
East Carolina Friends thanks the mem-
bers of Alpha Xi Delta Sorority, Clement
Dorm and all others who helped make the
Halloween party a success.
ECU GOSPEL CHOTR
Come and enjoy an evening of great enter-
tainment while supporting your favorite
entry in our STAR SEARCH competition.
The excitement begins at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 22
in room 244 Mendenhall. Admission is $1
at the door.
SWIMMINGPIVINC,
The Pirate SwimmersDivers will take on
UNC Charlotte this Sat. at 2 00 in the
Minges Aquatic Center. Both squads
sport fine clubs once again this year and
would appreciate vour support.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
The Pirate Hoopsters will play an exhibi-
tion game tonight against Marathon Oil (a
team of former college players). Tip-off is
set for 7:30 in Minges. Come out and join
us and be a part of the "Building Excite-
ment
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
The Lady Pirates will host an ECU Alumni
squad on Sat. at 7.00 p.m. in Minges. This
will be the first chance to look at this year
squad.
SENIOR CLASS COIINCTT,
There will be a meeting at 4:30 today in
Mendenhall. Check for room number at
front desk.
PHI ALPHA THFTA
There will be a meeting on Nov 28th at
2:30 p.m. The meeting will be held in the
Todd Room located in the Brewster Bldg
Please try to attend this meeting
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Come join us for a time of fun, fellowship
and training on how to lead a more effec-
tive Christian life on a college campus.
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m Brewster C-103.
Everyone welcome.
LIFEGUARD
Applications are now being accepted for
lifeguard positions with Intramural-Rec-
reational Services during Spring 1989
Must have current CPR and Advanced
Lifesaving Certification. Average 6-10
hours per week and must be able to work
occasional weekends. Stop by 204 Memo-
rial Gym to complete an application.
WEIGHT ROOM &
GYM ATTENDANT
Applications are now being accepted for
facility attendant positions with Intramu-
ral- Recreational Services during Spring
1989. Weight training and public relations
experience helpful. Average 6-10 hours
per week and must be able to work occa-
sional weekends Stop bv 204 M :
Gym to complete an application
SCEC
Last meeting of the semester Nov 21 ;
p.m Sp. 103. Speakers on Attention I
orders and Project Inside Out La ei one
is welcome
DELTA 51GMA TH�TA
Delta Sigma Theta will bv having ts
Annual Dating Game on N'ov 18 in I
Biology Bldg. in the lecture room behind
the right main entrance We are askil :
everyone to please come out
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi 1 lonor
Society will hold their last meeting f the
fall semester Nov 22 at 8 p.m in rv� -
Aud. A pizza social will be held afti i
wards. Please intend to turn in point
cards.
NCSL
Join us as we travel to Charlotte this m eek
end for a state conference Man issues
will be debated and a good time
had bv all It vou are interested in tali
part, please call 355-3152 Everyone is
welcome
CAHOS
Talks in Sociology Dt Mike Daleckt, No
17, 3:30-430 GCB 1012
DIYtCLLB
The Coral Red Dive Club will be meet
on Nov 21 in Mendenhall. room 208 at S
P m AU interested are invited to attend
For more info , call Dave at 758 5132
PHOTOGRAPHYHQW
Faces structures and architectures of
North and Central American Earth as
seen by Ernst Habnchs. Oct 24-Nov 19
Mendenhall Gallery
SUMMER JOB
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be Nov 21 at 1O00 am
in 1029 GCB. The ten-week internship
program, in the Raleigh area, is open to
sophomores, juniors, and seniors cur
rently enrolled in college (Those entering
Graduate School as of May, 1989 are not
eligible)
W
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(AP) �At leas
churned a trail
through five states
and Midwest, k
people and mrunn
tional Guardsmen
today helped sear
and clean up dama
The same
three people dead
dents m the seav
snowfall. The stor
followed toda
weather that .�
drop temperature
degrees.
The twister I
toll in Arlca
were killed and in-
jured Tuc -
aged bui!
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can t
PLOt
no m
ROAI -
pn -
dence this morni
Extern-Una-
garded safetv
fumigari n I then
couple whod
sorting
rn - Vkm
Clark �
mere tha � furrl
the pesticide I
sistant I S
Pierce says
Freida Watson afl
gated their home
lWv
, . QaxK testified
ter
IS District( �
numeous furr
ducted, he v
safety instrm I i
label and thei I r
them
Another
worker. Ronald C
tihed as Orxin's
ing began Tu
onlv sclex-ted part
label, incli
manufacturer's
" didn't real
though VfuFJinsI
ing that was I i
morning in I S '
Atlanta-hao
fines of up it S
ernment can
killed Huher
in the fall of 1 $6
face a tine of up t
defense attorney
Favettex il
� files law
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
concerni
FAYETTl
federal official hi
pnme Court notl
peal ota 1985 law
federal eovernmi
abandoned Ame
held in Southeai
attorney ho I 4
time is working
If the c I
hear it. then
about PON - i !
different way
lawyer Mark Wai
US. Solicitor
Fried states in a
Supreme Court tl
filed bv Wapleonj
members oi missl
was justly dismij
Circuit Court of
Waple filed
the Supreme Cou
He admits t
ago, when retu
Smith and Sgt il
Mclntire approaj
taking the case.
about their claim;)
more than 2J0OO
missing m Soutl
alive
But Waple
given to the go
tired Lt. Gen &
mer head of the
classified govei
who Waple sav
that at least 50
thought to be all
him the issue ha;
cal liabiliy.
But the Sup
not look at those
evidence when tl
ing the case, Wad
court will only re
guments of the
If the Suprej
the case, the onj
getting the mhi
public is writinj





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V
FA PHI BROTHERS: Con
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lid ig our chapter through
hose jre big shoes to till but
more than capable Cood
ecbons The Brothers ot
IC.MA THI CARNATION
ighl will he long
ming hx
. food drink-
� All of the
i id we hope ou
did W now
in the spring
DGES end is
rothers P.S Ve ap
l (.1 ASSIF1ED
ORTION
ION I
E Pregnancy
Testing
8:30-4 p.m.
t. 10 1 p.m.
gle Women's
salth Center
11)0-433-2930
LLATION
OUR BUSINESS
ISCOPY
SCK
LLTA SIGMA THETA
. heta
A.MMA BETA PHI
a ma Beta I'hi 1 i
d their last meetii
22 at 8 p.m. ir
�ia s,KTal will -
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NCSL
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iSoci log Dr. Mil
DIVE CLUB
n8
' : � m 208 at 8
ire invited to attend
it 758 5132
orOGRAPHYSHQW
I tures and arrhi lectures oi
land Central American Earth as
Ernst Habrichs Oct 24-Nov 19
�hall Gallery
SUMMER QB
Vogt. a representative from the
e 4 Government Summer Intern
is coming to ECU to speak on
b- pbs in state government The
lation will be Nov 21 at 1000 am
GCB The ten week internship
in the Raleigh area, is open to
res, luniors, and seniors cur
Enrolled in college (Those entering
kte School as of Mav, 189 are not
lead The East
olinian. Every
ies. and Thurs.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 17,1988 7
Twisters, snow pound Midwest
(AP) � At least 35 tornadoes
churned a trail of destruction
through five states in the South
and Midwest, killing seven
people and injuring dozens. Na-
tional Guardsmen in Arkansas
today helped search for people
and clean up damage.
The same storm system left
I'm on because the trees are up- high wind,
rooted' said Police Chief Darnell "It may be a little unusual for
Scott of the central Arkansas town this time of year to have a tornado
of Lonoke. "Damage is so bad, I outbreak like this, because they
think we were very lucky it wasn't normally occur in spring said
more tragic than it was meteorologist Brian Smith from
Guardsmen in Pulaski and the National Weather Service's
Van Buren County in Arkansas Severe Storms Center in Kansas
searched house to house to ac-
count for people and clean up
three people dead in road acci
dents in the season's first major damaged areas
snowfall. The storms were to be Tornadoes also struck Mis
followed today by a blast of cold souri, Kansas, Illinois and Iowa,
City.
The twisters and the accom-
panying thunderstorms were cre-
ated by an intense area of low
west Iowa and eastern Nebraska,
he said. The storm closed schools
in Colorado and caused three traf-
fic fatalities there.
In Arkansas, as many as 10
tornadoes touched down Tues-
day night, toppling trees, down-
ing power lines and crumbling
mobile homes, houses and busi-
nesses.
In Topeka, Kan a tornado
descended without warning,
Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy)
1 Vanilla In U.S.A. 88-89
Delivery 758-0000
25 f OFF ANY
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EXPIRES 11 24 88
pressure over the upper Missis- crashing into Topeka West High
weather that was expected to while in Oklahoma high winds sippi Valley and a cold front trail- School shortly before 2 p.m.
drop temperatures as many as 20 caused damage and fanned the
degrees. flames of a cotton fire that de-
The twisters took their worst stroyed 20 homes and businesses
toll in Arkansas, where six people and injured 18 people in Altus.
were killed and many others in- One person died in Missouri
jured Tuesday. Tornadoes dam- when a tornado threw a trailer
aged buildings and overturned home into the air authorities said,
cars. a woman in Illinois was electro-
I can't even tell what street cuted by a power line downed bv
Everyone's ears started pop-
ing south from the low, Smith said pingand me teacher told us �3,
this morning. down said student Jennifer
The same low pressure sys- Stan, �A11 the windows started
tern produced up to a foot of snow popple out�
over most of Colorado and West- Six students suffered minor
ern Kansas on Tuesday, and the
snow moved today into the east-
ern Dakotas, Minnesr , north-
cuts from broken glass, said
Superintendent Gary Livingston.
PLO to recognize Israel as a state, also say
no more guerrilla tactics will be used
ROANOKE, Va. (AP) - A
prosecutor presented more evi-
dence this morning that Orkin
Exterminating Co. Inc. disre-
garded safety standards in the
prove his contention that Orkin's
failure to monitor the air in the
home "didn't have anything to do
with the Watsons' deaths
The couple's home was fumi-
fumigationofthehomeofaGalax gated by Orkin on Sept. 25. 1986
couple who died of pesticide poi- Watson, 73, died three days later
soning. and his wife, 65, died in another
Former Orkin worker Arling three days.
the nation's largest exterminator.
In Tuesday's testimony,
Mullins said he supervised about
30 or more fumigations, although
he had failed a state certification
test for fumigators.
Watsons were killed by heart and
lung failure brought onby a "toxic
agent" that he identified from the
witness stand as Vikane. But he
acknowledged under cross-ex-
amination from defense lawyer
FRI NOV 18
slurp -
ATTIC
Clark testified that he performed
more than 200 fumigations using
the pesticide Vikane, which As-
sistant U.S. Attorney Richard
Pierce says killed Hubert and
Freida Watson after Orkin fumi-
Assistant U.S. Attorney Rich- James Jennings that autopsy re-
ard Pierce showed Mullins a copy ports he filled out did not list the
of Orkin's fumigation manual name of the poison believed to
and asked if he knew what it was. have killed the Watsons.
3ere'iS 2?HbililyK !M!�I T"� Wat" daughters took
pesticide was applied improperly migh have looked through it, but stand and dcscrib, how the
as workers failed to follow direc- I don t recall, Mullins saiC poking lcft their par.
tions on the label. U.S. District Although the company ents listless and nauseated after
Judge James Turk convicted ciaims to have had a policy that all they spent a night in a bedroom
Orkin was charged in a five-
)unt indictment alleging the
alleged the workers failed to
monitor the air in the Watson
home before the Watsons were let
back inside a day after the fumiga-
tion.
The judge dismissed the
other four counts against Orkin,
knowledgeable crews which used with a fan after the fumigation.
a standard checklist to ensure
safety, Mullins said, 'I've never
filled one out
Forensic pathologist David
Oxlev testified Tuesday that the
Mullins testified that Orkin
used a fan on three of the four
floors of the Watson home, but not
the floor containing the master
bedroom
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1989.
The Air Force has a special pro-
gram for 1989 BSNs. If selected,
you can enter active duty soon
after graduation�without waiting
tor the results of your State Boards
To qualify you must have on overall
2 75 Gf. After commissioning,
you'll attend a five-month intern-
ship at a major Air Force medical
facility. Itfs an excellent way to pre-
pare tor the wide range of experi-
ences you'll have serving your
country as an Air Force nurse of-
ficer For more information, call
MSGT NICK NERO
919-850-9549
STATION-TO-STATION COLLECT
STUDENTS
Get ready to join America's number
one naem in temporary help. Kelly
Services can help you make the most
of your free time this semester by
offering the flexibility to earn some
great cash while still being able to
ean. good grades. We have a variety
of short and long term assignments,
many of which do not require
special skills or experience.
�Secretaries
�Typists
�WP and DE Operators
�General Clerical
�Light Wclustrial
OD or �op in ind let u� tell you about our com-
prehentive benefit package.
204 E. Arlington Blvd
Suite E Arlington Center
355-7850
KLU
SERVICES
The First And The Best-
US. law requires �11 applicants to show proof of
ldenity and right to work in the US.
! ! !WTC WANT YOU!
! !
gated their home in September Orkin in August on one counUhat fumjgations were performed by that had not even been aired out
. , .Clark,testified at Orkin's sen-
tencing hearing this moming in
U .S. District Court that during the
numeous fumigations he con-
ducted, he was unaware of the
safety instructions on the Vikane
label and therefore did not follow
them.
Another former Orkin
worker, Ronald Dean Mullins tes-
tified as Orxin's sentencing hear-
ing began Tuesday that he read
only selected parts of the Vikane
label, including the
manufacturer's name.
"I didn't read the fine print,
though Mullins said at the head-
ing that was to continue this
moming in U.S. District Court.
Atlanta-based Orkin faces
fines of up to $500,000 if the gov-
ernment can show the fumigation
killed Hubert and Freida Watson
in the fall of 1986. But Orkin will
face a fine of up to just $100,000 if
defense attorney Sam Wilson can
Fayetteville man
files lawsuit
concerning POWs
FAYETTEVILLE (AP) � A
federal official has asked the Su-
preme Court not to hear the ap-
peal of a 1985 lawsuit claiming the
federal government has illegally
abandoned American servicemen
held in Southeast Asia and the
attorney who filed the case says
time is working against him.
"If the courts don't want to
hear it, then it's (information
about POWs) got to come out a
different way said Fayetteville
lawyer Mark Waple.
US. Solicitor General Charles
Fried states in a petition to the
Supreme Court that the lawsuit,
filed bv Waple on behalf of family
members of missing servicemen,
was justly dismissed by the 4th
Circuit Court of Appeals in April.
Waple filed an appeal with
the Supreme Court in August.
He admits that three years
ago, when retired Maj. Mark
Smith and Sgt. 1st Class Melvin
Mclntire approached him about
taking the case, he had doubts
about theirclaims that some of the
more than 2,000 U.S. servicemen
missing in Southeast Asia were
alive.
But Waple says information
given to the government by re-
tired Lt. Gen. Eugene Tighe, for-
mer head of the DIA, and other
classified government sources
who Waple says have admitted
that at least 50 U.S. POWs are
thought to be alive, has convinced
him the issue has become a politi-
cal liabiliy.
But the Supreme Court will
not look at those facts or any other
evidence when it considers hear-
ing the case, Waple said. The high
court will only review the legal ar-
guments of the case.
If the Supreme Court rejects
the case, the only alternative for
getting the information to the
public is writing a book
TONIGHT IS RIGHT
FOR DINNER AT
ANNABELLE'S.
Escape from the world o ordinary cuisine and
discover the extraordinary tastes of Annahelle's
Restaurant. At Annahelle's
ill find a variety of
ible dinner entrees
iding your favorite
chicken and
atood dishes as well
. pasta and stir fry
specialties. So treat
yourself right.
Make tonight the
inner
RESTAURANT & PUB
ca Mm-THm II V AM I! .V PM
� ik RivJ Fn-S.i' AM Mk!ni�ht
- S � u U �n - tlOC PM
To Work in Martin County.
The following employers have current and future
entry level and skilled job openings available:
?FIRST CAROLINA INDUSTRIES
?GENERATION II INDUSTRIES, INC.
?JUNE DAY MANUFACTURING COMPANY
?MARTIN GENERAL HOSPITAL
?OAK MANUFACTURING COMPANY
?PERDUE, INC.
?PHARMAFAIR, INC.
?SOUTHERN APPAREL COMPANY
?UNITED ORGANICS COMPANY
?WEST POINT PEPPERELL
?WEYERHAEUSER COMPANY
If you are interested in working within
Martin County,
CONTACT THE EMPLOYMENT SECURITY
COMMISSION OFFICE AT
792-7816 from 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
-Monday ibru Friday jorj3inplfiie jfrfcJbltoinE.
I WANT TO WORK IN MARTIN COUNTY!
START SLIMMING
DOWN BY
THANKSGIVING
AND FATTEN UP
YOUR BANK ACCOUNT
'TIL JANUARY
Name
Address.
Social Security
Phone
Best Time to Call.
m��Ti� COWATV MB
RETURN TO:
EMPLOYMENT SECURITY lfm
COMMISSION vow
212 Washington Street xnvn
Williamston, NC 27892
We want you to try The
Spa. So if you join The Spa
by Thanksgiving you won't
have to pay a dime in dues
til after New Years. Now
Greenville's Best health club
value is even more of a bar
gain.
Fifty classes a week In one
of Greenville's largest
aerobic rooms.
Our newly remodeled
aerobics room is one of the
largest around. And The
Spa has 50 different classes
a week to choose from. In-
cluding beginning aerobics
classes for people just start
ing out. to advanced classes
for the "SupT Fit" individual.
A complete health
program.
The Spa has trained
insturctors. a certified dieti
cian and massage therapist
to help you plan a complete
excercise and diet program
around your aerobics, free
weights, dynacam weight
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cycles, steam, sauna and
whilrpool. Also for working
mothers. The Spa now offers
a nursery staffed with
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watch voursclf become more
fit.
No dues until January.
Come by The Spa and
ask about our new member
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prised at our new. com-
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And while you slim down,
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account.
Bring this Coupon in for,
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I
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bt-st lutilth dub iiihw
SOI nirKK-H"MTINt.U s'i w





Tit EASTCAROI INIAN
Features
N( VI MM K 17. 1988 Page fi
Fishbone comes Friday
By JEFF GIBSON
stilf Writer
November is more than half
over, which means the end oi the
tall semester is near and WZMBis
busier than ever! WZMB is al-
ready giving away prizes eaeh
day during Christmas in Novem-
ber, but the Z-team has many
more surprises
On Friday, November IS.
WMl' will be airing a live studio
interview with members oi Fish-
bone. The west coast band will be
in the WZMB studios between 4
and h p.m answering questions
and promoting their newest
album "Truth and Soul
Fishbone will be bringing
their "funky reggae" sound to the
Attic Fndav night along with
Slurpee (formerly Soul Train).
During the interview, WZMB will
be tracking some oi the hot cuts
off of "Truth and Soul" and give
listeners a chance to call in with
questions for the band.
This is not Fishbone's first
appearance in the Fmerald city,
but it will be the first time they
have played the Attic.
In other WZMB news, 41.3 in
junction with the Bicycle Post will
be giving away a earth cruiser
bike this month. A drawing for
the bike will be held during a live
remote in front of the student
Store at noon.
To register tor the earth
cruiser, simply stop by one oi the
following locations: WZMB,
Mendenhall Student Center, the
Student Store, jovner Library,
Fast Coast Music and Video, and
the Bicycle Post.
WZMB is also giving away
free guest passes to see Roily Gray
and Sunfire at the New Deli, Sat-
urday the 19th. Come by the New
Deli and hear some jammin' reg-
gae straight from Jamacia.
December 2, WZMB, along
with the T.J. Martell Foundation,
presents a benefit concert featur-
ing Jackyl and lots of door prizes.
All proceeds will go to the T.J.
Martell Foundation, which helps
fund research on AIDS, cancer
and lukemia.
Door prizes include a Bod-
yglove wetsuit, six pairs of Ray-
ban sunglasses and guitar strings.
Also, free albums will be given
away featuring artists like REM,
U2, Edie Brickell and the New
Bohemians and many more.
Fantasy concert, sign of things to come
The only disappointing thing
about Fantasy's Saturdav night
performance was its poor atten-
dance.
The show, a send-up oi chari-
table telethons, was both very fun
and touching, never a dull mo-
ment, and obviously a production
that had required a lot oi work.
Fantasv are a group of nine
hearing and hearing impaired
students who perform songs and
skits, accompanving themselves
or the music in sign language.
Saturday's performance in-
cluded twelve songs and two
skits, all introduced by an M.C.
Donna B. Fowler, who doubled as
a performer and the MC for the
show's second half, was consis-
tentlv hilarious.
The show's highlights in-
cluded their rendition (in lip-
syncsigningacting) of Billy
Joel's "You May Be Right The
Beach Bovs' "Kokomok Escape
Club's "Wild Wild West and
Stvx's "The Best of Times
Greenville's own "The Usuals" to play at the Attic tonight
New Bohemians jam Raleigh
Bv BFTH ELLISON
Stiff Writer
Edie Brickell and New Bohe-
mians don't resort to yelling or to
cranking out mindless distortions
or synthetically produced music.
They just jam.
New Bohemians played two
sold-out shows at the Rialto the-
atre in Raleigh Saturday and
Sunday.
Lead singer Edie Brickell
stood with one foot crossed in
front oi the other while rubbing
her hands together. Her shy looks
and warm smile offset her throaty
soprano voice.
Occassionally brandishing
acoustic guitar or spinning an
introductory tale between songs,
Edie put on a show. Her stories
lulled the audience into silence as
shewhispered in the dim theatre
between songs.
She talked about "being uglv
and broke and not caring about it"
and "sitting in the tub, wringing
out your washrag, having a
thought, and wondering if some-
one, somewhere had the exact
same thought at the exact same
time as you
Her storyteller carried the
crowd on an emotional roller-
coaster; one moment they were
dancing and the next they were
listening intently.
The marquee outside did not
read "Edie Brickell but simply
"New Bohemians" and rightfully
so. The band is extremely talented
and Edie just happens to be one of
them.
The atmosphere of the show
was very relaxed and upbeat with
people dancing in the aisles to
sounds along the lines of Rickie
Lee Jones and 10,000 Maniacs.
Watching the dreamy-eyed con-
tentedness of the people on stage,
most of the crowd was more than
entertained.
Many songs off of the band's
album "Shooting Rubber Bands at
the Stars" were played along with
other songs to fill an hour and a
half. Of course the band's hit
"What I am" brought the biggest
reponse, but all others like "Noth-
ing "Air of December and a
highly flip-flopping sped version
oi "Keep Coming Back" were re-
ceived nearly as well.
The band came back for an en-
core of two songs. Then Edie
alone played a stirring acoustic
version of "I Do" to a completely
silent and spellbound audience.
New Bohemians left no de-
stroyed stage, yelled nothing
rude at the audience, and caused
no riots. Instead, they sent people
home glad to have been there with
a feeling that they had seen some-
thing exceptional.
Coming
in
Entertainment
Thursday
The Usuals (see photo)
(doing down to Lybia)
Attic
Friday
Fishbone (see photo)
and opening band
Surlpee
Attic
Liquid Sound
New Deli
Saturday
Bareback, Attic
Roily (I ray & Sunfire,
.New Deli
Comparing new horror flicks
Fishbone will be at the WZMB studios Nov. 18
addition, they will be playing at the Attic the s,
to promote their tu-w all
line night.
:
In
Bad review for 4The Live'
By MIC AH HARRIS
SUfl Writer
lohn Carpenter's "They Live"
is that rare, curious mix ot B-
movie sci-fi and socialpolitical
commentary: a mix not unlike
that of oil and water.
Carpenter's admitted Reagan
era allegory proposes that the
current Yuppie mentality is the
result oi mass brain-washing by a
perpetual bombardment sublimi-
nal messages by an alien race. The
aliens are a group of interstellar
free enterprises who are "disman-
tling the sleeping middle-class" to
create an aristocracy which they
and their Yuppie proselytes will
rule.
Honestly, the above synopsis
makes the movie sound better
than it actually is. Admittedly,
Carpenter has worked his vari-
ation on the alien invasion more
successfully than the creators of
this Fall's previous and some-
what similar movie, "Alien Na-
tion Carpenter gives "They
Live" the sense of scale and sense
ot humor "Alien Nation" was
lacking.
But "They Live 's type oi
humor is entirely inappropriate
tor the social satire Carpenter is
trying to pull oii. Instead of draw-
ing inspiration fromSvv ift irc en
Douglas Adams. Carpenter has
apparently found his muses in
Larry, Moe, and Curly. He's sub
stituted slapstick for wit and it
doesn't work.
Was it Carpenter's idea to cast
wrestler "Rowdy" Roddy Piper
as Nada, last believer oi the
American Dream? In the first part
of the movie, Piper's character
comes across as a hybrid oi Peter
Fonda in ' Easy Rider" and David
Carradine as Cam from TV s
"Kung Fu" with a little of Stephen
"Patch" Nichols from "Days ot
Our Lives" thrown in.
if that description makes no
sense whatsoever well,you're
right. It makes no sense whatso-
ever. Carpenter must have
thought so too, because half-wa)
through Piper suddenly dropshis
hippy hi gh la ma S t e p h e n
t plas Nad t as '
: ly Piper!
rhe hitl�� � � la
is suddenh
Piper's pal
will have die-hai I
wetting their p
hich are n .
And there s c en an indt
overdone "v i tatch man
alU . .
Keith David
sound -efi
ern -
I he
blv plastic U - i the
sB-m
oi your cl r sheer
The dialogue is equa
tic We all know there ai
that look better in bla - tc
thanincolor ITievLive ison
the few that vould be better with
subtitles than sound. Not oi
v ould v e be spared inane
insults, but - sas
thi fol ��. t; between Piper and
Da �
See rHE page l
Pickm the Bones
Fear and loathing in Chicago
By CHIPPY BONBHEAD
"Sweet Home. Chicago"
By MARSHALL MOORE
SUff Writer
What's in a name? When it
comes to horror and suspense
movies in particular, directors
seem to go to great lengths to
avoid the label of "horror movie
Take John Carpenter's "They
Live for instance. Carpenter has
insisted that it is not a "horror
movie but a "science-fiction
political satire Regardless of its
label, the effect is the same: fear
and paranoia. Then consider
"Child's Play a current "horror
movie which claims to be nothing
else" In reality, it's more of a
thriller; tension is maintained
through eerie music and chase
scenes everyone has experienced
before.
Directors aside, which is the
really horrifying movie? Though
Carpenter's assesscment of his
film is acurate, the film was much
more deeply frightening than
"Child's Play The subject matter
ot "They Live" is plausible
enough: aliens' attempts to take
over the earth by money and sub-
liminal brainwashing are
thwarted by a drifter who discov-
ers their plot and joins a resistence
group.
Carpenter uses the film to
make a few unsettling observa-
tions about the effects of money
on human nature. The plot of
"Child's Play" is less challenging:
a plastic doll is animated by a
revenge-hungry voodoo priest; it
names itself "Chuckie" and walks
around gruesomely killing
people it doesn't like. The movie
intends more to thrill and startle
without activating many brain
cells.
"Child's Play while very
well-made and well-acted, is fun
but not likely to install any lasting
worries.
They Live" is not as sus-
penseful and much less mali-
cious, but its long-term effects are
more memorable: preying upon
the imagination and pointing out
some nasty truths. Oi the two, it is
the true horror movie; in the fu-
ture, perhaps, more directors
should examine their films and
see them as they are.
"I get so emotional"
� Whitney
Houston
"I guess we got what we asked
for, Mike Togetherness
�Carol Brady
"Belmont is next. Smoking,
littering and radio playing are not
permitted. Stand clear of the doors.
Belmont is next"
� every subway
driver in Chicago
These three quotes pretty
much sum up my trip to Chi-
cago. Like last year's journey to
Atlanta, this year's conference
of Investigative Reporters and
Editors was fraught with peril.
This then, is the story of Fear
and Loathing in The Windy
Gty.
We were in the Charlotte
airport when the Valium began
to take effect. Not that we
needed it. The four of us had
been dragged from our beds,
beaten with the editorial crow-
bar, and deposited in the lobby
of the Pitt-Greenville airport
and ordered to go to Chicago.
Not only go to Chicago, but
be good and "represent" our
school. And represent it in a so-
cially acceptable manner, no
less. Thus armed with this dic-
tum, a few pieces of luggage and
a handful of prescription drugs,
we took off for the Windy City.
The first flight was unevent-
ful save for an annoying flight
attendant we started calling
"the day tripper He continu-
ally offered such helpful tidbits
of information like, "Don't
worry, we won't come any-
where near that 747 and "If
you chew some gum as we
descend, your ears will adjust to
the change in air pressure and
the semi-permeable membranes
in your inner ear won't explode
from the inside out
After four bags of peanuts, a
narrowly-missed connecting
flight and shuttle bus ride from
O'Hare airport to our hotel, we
wearily sat and pondered our
next move. Sean, who we ended
up calling Mr. Excitement,
wanted to see a taping of the
Oprah Winfrey show.
I flatly refused. No way
were the memories of my busi-
ness-vacal on going to be
marred b n urring night-
mares of a woman wheeling out
67 pounds oi mimal tat on stage
to demonstrate how much
weight she'd lost I m tough, but
not that tough.
Freckles Marvel wanted to
go to the Sears Tower and look
out over the city I nixed that
idea too. We'd ahead) seen ALL
ot Chicago from the air �
what's a few thousand story
view after that
Kristen. who kept coming
up with exciting ideas like.
'Let's go see the south side oi
Chicago suggested we go to
Hard Rock Caie and spend lots
of money on trendy sweatshirts
1 told her I'd rather go home and
buy a Fizz tee-shirt.
Set MORE, page 9
Kristen, Freckles and The Bonehead smile as they enter Chicago I ittlc do they
know they'll spend the rest of their natural horn days here.
(Photo by ttemnglabS)
Mor
c (

-
irrr
I'll
e
as ci k
"Moo
i
V
Cheesy H
Ad!
Features pag
It's (Come
you Know i
I'm going to a
don't von?)
-
.







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
NOVEM BER 17,1988 Page 8
Fishbone comes Friday
By JEFF GIBSON
Staff Writer
November is more than half
-over, which means the end of the
fall semester is near and WZMB is
busier than ever! WZMB is al-
ready giving away prizes each
day during Christmas in Novem-
ber, but the Z-team has many
more surprises.
On Friday, November 18,
WZMB will be airing a live studio
; interview with members of Fish-
: bone. The west coast band will be
: in the WZMB studios between 4
I and 6 p.m answering questions
3 and promoting their newest
album 'Truth and Soul
Fishbone will be bringing
I their "funky reggae" sound to the
j Attic Friday night along with
I Slurpee (formerly Soul Train).
During the interview, WZMB will
be tracking some of the hot cuts
off of 'Truth and Soul" and give
listeners a chance to call in with
questions for the band.
This is not Fishbone's first
appearance in the Emerald city,
but it will be the first time they
have played the Attic.
In other WZMB news, 91.3 in
junction with the Bicycle Post will
be giving away a earth cruiser
bike this month. A drawing for
the bike will be held during a live
remote in front of the Student
Store at noon.
To register for the earth
cruiser, simply stop by one of the
following locations: WZMB,
Mendenhall Student Center, the
Student Store, Joyner Library,
East Coast Mu?: �nd Video, and
the Bicycle Post.
WZMB is also giving away
free guest passes to see Roily Gray
and Sunfire at the New Deli, Sat-
urday the 19th. Come by the New
Deli and hear some jammin' reg-
gae straight from Jamacia.
December 2, WZMB, along
with the T.J. Martell Foundation,
presents a benefit concert featur-
ing Jackyl and lots of door prizes.
All proceeds will go to the T.J.
Martell Foundation, which helps
fund research on AIDS, cancer
and lukemia.
Door prizes include a Bod-
yglove wetsuit, six pairs of Ray-
ban sunglasses and guitar strings.
Also, free albums will be given
away featuring artists like REM,
U2, Edie Brickell and the New
Bohemians and many more.
Fantasy concert, sign of things to come
The only disappointing thing
about Fantasy's Saturday night
performance was its poor atten-
dance.
The show, a send-up of chari-
; table telethons, was both very fun
Sand touching, never a dull mo-
ment, and obviously a production
! that had required a lot of work.
Fantasy are a group of nine
hearing and hearing impaired
students who perform songs and
skits, accompanying themselves
or the music in sign language.
Saturday's performance in-
cluded twelve songs and two
skits, all introduced by an M.C.
Donna B. Fowler, who doubled as
a performer and the MC for the
show's second half, was consis-
tently hilarious.
The show's highlights in-
cluded their rendition (in lip-
syncsigningacting) of Billy
Joel's "You May Be Right The
Beach Boys' "Kokomok Escape
Club's "Wild Wild West and
Styx's "The Best of Times
Fishbone will be at the WZMB studios Nov. 18 to promote their new album, "Truth and Soul In
addition, they will be playing at the Attic the same night
�'�� � J$W
Bad review for 'They Live'
Greenville's own "The Usuals
New Bohemians jam Raleigh
By BETH ELLISON
Staff Writer
Edie Brickell and New Bohe-
mians don't resort to yelling or to
cranking out mindless distortions
or synthetically produced music.
They just jam.
New Bohemians played two
sold-out shows at the Rialto the-
atre in Raleigh Saturday and
Sunday.
Lead singer Edie Brickell
stood with one foot crossed in
front of the other while rubbing
her hands together. Her shy looks
and warm smile offset her throaty
soprano voice.
Occassionally brandishing
acoustic guitar or spinning an
introductory tale between songs,
Edie put on a show. Her stories
lulled the audience into silence as
shewhispered in the dim theatre
between songs.
She talked about "being ugly
��������
and broke and not caring about it"
and "sitting in the tub, wringing
out your washrag, having a
thought, and wondering if some-
one, somewhere had the exact
same thought at the exact same
time as you
Her storyteller carried the
crowd on an emotional roller-
coaster; one moment they were
dancing and the next they were
listening intently.
The marquee outside did not
read "Edie Brickell but simply
"New Bohemians" and rightfully
so. The band is extremely talented
and Edie just happens to be one of
them.
The atmosphere of the show
was very relaxed and upbeat with
people dancing in the aisles to
sounds along the lines of Rickie
Lee Jones and 10,000 Maniacs.
Watching the dreamy-eyed con-
tentedness of the people on stage,
most of the crowd was more than
entertained.
Many songs off of the band's
album "Shooting Rubber Bands at
the Stars" were played along with
other songs to fill an hour and a
half. Of course the band's hit
"What I am" brought the biggest
reponse, but all others like "Noth-
ing "Air of December and a
highly flip-flopping sped version
of "Keep Coming Back" were re-
ceived nearly as well.
The band came back for an en-
core of two songs. Then Edie
alone played a stirring acoustic
version of "I Do" to a completely
silent and spellbound audience.
New Bohemians left no de-
stroyed stage, yelled nothing
rude at the audience, and caused
no riots. Instead, they sent people
home glad to have been there with
a feeling that they had seen some-
thing exceptional.
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
John Carpenter's "They Live"
is that rare, curious mix of B-
movie sci-fi and socialpolitical
commentary: a mix not unlike
that of oil and water.
Carpenter's admitted Reagan
era allegory proposes that the
current Yuppie mentality is the
result of mass brain-washing by a
perpetual bombardment sublimi-
nal messages by an alien race. The
aliens are a group of interstellar
free enterprises who are "disman-
tling the sleeping middle-class" to
create an aristocracy which they
and their Yuppie proselytes will
rule.
Honestly, the above synopsis
makes the movie sound better
than it actually is. Admittedly,
Carpenter has worked his vari-
ation on the alien invasion more
successfully than the creators of
this Fall's previous and some-
what similar movie, "Alien Na-
tion Carpenter gives "They
Live" the sense of scale and sense
of humor "Alien Nation" was
lacking.
But "They Lives type of
humor is entirely inappropriate
for the social satire Carpenter is
trying to pull off. Instead of draw-
ing inspiration from Swift or even
Douglas Adams, Carpenter has
apparently found his muses in
Larry, Moe, and Curly. He's sub-
stituted slapstick for wit and it
doesn't work.
Was it Carpenter's idea to cast
wrestler "Rowdy" Roddy Piper
as Nada, last believer of the
American Dream? In the first part
of the movie, Piper's character
comes across as a hybrid of Peter
Fonda in "Easy Rider" and David
Carradine as Cain from TV's
"Kung Fu" with a little of Stephen
"Patch" Nichols from "Days of
Our Lives" thrown in.
If that description makes no
sense whatsoever well, you're
right. It makes no sense whatso-
ever. Carpenter must have
thought so too, because half-way
through Piper suddenly drops his
hippyhigh lamaStephen
"Patch" Nichols characterization
to play Nada as (ta-da!) Rowdy
Roddy Piper!
The hitherto "mellow" Nada
is suddenly spouting some of
Piper's patented put-downs that
will have die-hard wrestling fans
wetting their pants, I suppose, but
which are really just plain silly.
And there's even an indulgent,
overdone "wrestling" match in an
alley between Piper and co-star
Keith David, complete with
sound-effects out of an old west-
ern movie brawl.
The alien make-up is incredi-
bly plastic looking, rivaling the
'ISO's B-movie monster make-up
of your choice for sheer hokiness.
The dialogue is equally plas-
tic. We all know there are movies
that look better in black and white
thanincolor. "They Live" isoneof
the few that would be better with
subtitles than sound. Not only
would we be spared Piper's inane
insults, but also such exchanges as
the following between Piper and
Daviu:
See THEY, page 9
atpjUJCfifrmifm I, ttt n
Fear and loathing in Chicago
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
1 get so emotional"
� Whitney
Houston
1
for,M
we
Coming
in
Entertainment
Thursday
The Usuals (see photo)
(Going down to Lybia)
Attic
Friday
Fishbone (see photo)
and opening band
Surlpee
Attic
Liquid Sound
New Deli
Saturday
Bareback, Attic
Roily Gray &Sunfire,
n�w rwii
Comparing new horror flicks
By MARSHALL MOORE
Staff Witter
What's in a name? When it
comes to horror and suspense
movies in particular, directors
seem to go to great lengths to
avoid the label of "horror movie
Take John Carpenter's "They
Live for instance. Carpenter has
insisted that it is not a "horror
movie but a "science-fiction
political satire Regardless of its
label, the effect is the same: fear
and paranoia. Then consider
"Child's Play a current "horror
movie which claims to be nothing
else In reality, if s more of a
thriller; tension is maintained
through eerie music and chase
scenes everyone has experienced
before.
Directors aside, which is the
really horrifying movie? Though
Carpenter's assessement of his
film is acurate, the film was much
more deeply frightening than
"Child's Flay The subject matter
of They Live" is plausible
enough: aliens' attempts to take
over the earth by money and sub-
liminal brainwashing are
thwarted by a drifter who discov-
ers their plot and joins a resistence
group.
Carpenter uses the film to
make a few unsettling observa-
tions about the effects of money
on human nature. The plot of
"Child's Play" is less challenging:
a plastic doll is animated by a
revenge-hungry voodoo priest; it
names itself "Quickie" and walks
around gruesomely killing
people it doesn't like. The movie
intends more to thrill and startle
without activating many brain
cells.
"Child's Play while very
well-made and weli-acted, is fun
but not likely to install any lasting
worries.
"They Live" is not as sus-
penscful and much less mali-
cious, but its long-term effects are
more memorable: preying upon
the imagination and pointing out
some nasty truths. Or the two, it is
the true horror movie; in the fu-
ture, perhaps, more directors
should examine their films and
see them as they are.
-Omrf8ry
"Bdmont � next. Smoking,
and radio ptayinv are not
Stand clear of the doors.
. �a m
nKIt)
driver in Chicago
These three quotes pretty
stun up my trip to �t&
ike last yew's Journey to
this year's conference
was fraught with peril
torn, is the story of Fear
and Loathing in The Windy
till save lor an annoying flight
attendant we started calling
"the day tripper He continu-
ally offered such helpful tidbits
�f information like, "Don't
worry, we won't come any-
where near that 747 and "If
you chew some gum as we
descend, your ears will adjust to
ike change in air pressure and
the semi-permeable membranes
in your inner ear won't explode
from the inside out
After four bags of pea nuts, a
narrowly-missed connecting
flight and shuttle bus ride from
CTHare airport to our hotel, we
wearily sat and pondered our
next move. Sean, who we ended
up calling Mr. Excitement,
wanted to see a taping of the
Mo way
ness-vacation going to be
marred by recurring night-
mares of a woman wheeling out
67 pounds of animal fat on stage
to demonstrate how much
weight she'd lost. I'm tough, but
not that tough.
Freckles Marvel wanted to
go to the Sears Tower and look
out over the city. I nixed that
idea too. We'd already seen ALL
of Chicago from the air �
what's a few thousand story
view after that.
Kristen, who kept coming
up with exciting ideas like,
"Let's go see the south side of
Chicago suggested we go to
Hard Rock Cafe and spend tots
of money on trendy sweatshirts.
I told her I'd rather go home and
buy a Fizz tee-shirt.
See MORE, page 9
We were in the Charlotte
when the Vauum began
effect Hot that we
from our beds,
the editorial crow-
bar deposited in the lobby
Not only go to Chicago, but
tttaaso-
Kristen, Freckltt and The Bonehead smile as they enter Chicago. Little do they
know they'll spend the re of thfcir natural born days ��, ,t
- (Photo by Herringlabsa

f
Mor
Continued from pal
I said, "Let's catchj
way downtown, searc
for a comic book store
see a child get run ov
insane van driver The
we can hang out and
irritated as Kristen anc
spend three hours in th
retail chain that has at
branches in North Caro
sells the same clothes tj
They obviously thc
idea had some ment, sn
what we proceeded tol
did try to get into Hal
Cafe, but Freckles had tf
be born in 1968, and w,
quently not old enough
Luckily, the Mel
across the street had
enough rock memorabl
isfy even the most dj
tourists. It even had
board cut-outs of Supej
Spider Man. Pretty boa
The next dav Was fj
ing news lectures. That
others skipped off do
spend tons of money
priced drinks and thenl
pay three dollars to go I
Scars Tower on an oven
Incidentally, the tol
sale right now. If
roughly an amount
equal to the national
might consider buy in j
quired, but the amount!
they're asking for it was
I nodded off before trj
finish reading off all thj
Donald Trump'll prot
up with it anyway.
I stayed at the hotel
'They
as a h
Continued from paj
David. "Where are
aliens) from?"
Piper: "Well, they aj
Cleveland
Or this dazzling duej
phors between our here
David: "I'm walkinf
line now. 1 don't bot
body
Piper: "White linej
middle of the road
worse place to drive.
You begin to feel tha
ter has not onlv not
A "Mool
bv scott ma:
taatstanl rcaturra E4
Romance and drat
bine beautifully in "A
the Misbegotten
O'Neill's last completj
and the ECU
Department's latest pro
The play, set in Neul
m the 1930s, is the seen
Long Day's Journey Intj
With all its characters'
and counter-scheming
much of the structure or J
It is, however, not a th
rather a blend compo
most equal parts romam
and drama.
This year mark t
birthday of O'Neill, wh
regarded as America si
playwright and is also
playwright ever to have I
Pulitzer Prizes.
The ECU productioij
David Blanchard,Chris
Catherine Edwards!
Maxwell and Paul Lom
The plav will be
Nov 18,19, 21 and 22 at I
in McGinnis Theater. TJ
$5 for the general publl
heesy H
Ad!
Features pag
It's (Come
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citv l nixed that
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few thousand story
br that.
fen, who kept coming
exciting ideas like,
see the south side of
' suggested we go to
Ck Cafe and spend lots
r on trendy sweatshirts.
I'd rather go home and
iz tee-shirt.
MORI .page 9
1
enter Chicago Little do they
as here.
(Photo by HerringlabS)

V

n
d
THE EAST CAROLINIAN

NOVEMBER 17, 1988 9
More Tear and Loathing'
in the whirlpool with my new overpriced,trendy sweatshirts,
friends, Natasha and Gremlina, Frecklesgo get me another pack
who turned out to be some of the of two dollar cigarettes
G.L.O.W. wrestlers. After a I took off. I ran. 1 hurtled over
couple of hours of stimulating small children and seeing eye
conversation and leglock demon-
strations, I retired to the room. dogs. I elbowed a Moonie. I
The kids snuck in about four dashed up the down escalator. I
a.m. Then at five in the morning, galloped past gaping security
we were rudely awakened by the guards,
fire alarm. I paused only to check my
Freckles leapt out of bed and lottery ticket numbers. I slid into
headed for the balcony. Sean had gate F6 only to see our plane
to go to the bathroom. Kristcn taxiing down the runway - - its
Continued from page 8
1 said, "Let's catch the sub-
way downtown, search in vain
tor a comic book store and then
see a child get run over by an
msane van driver. Then maybe
we can hang out and get real
irritated as Kristen and Freckles
spend three hours in the Gap�, a
retail chain that has at least 15
branches in North Carolina, and
sells the same clothes too
Lhev obviously thought my
idea had some merit, since that's
what we proceeded to do. We
viid trv to get into Hard Rock
ate, but Freckles had the gall to
born in 1968, and was conse-
quently not old enough to get in.
Luckily, the McDonald's�
icross the street had more than
enough rock memorabilia to sat-
sf) even the most demanding
tourists. It even had big card-
vard cut-outs of Superman and
Spider Man. Prettv boss.
The next day was full of bor-
g news lectures. That night, the
�thers skipped off downtown to
end tons of money on over-
riced drinks and then refuse to
pay three dollars to go up in the
Sears Tower on an overcast night.
Incidentally, the tower is for
ile right now. If you have
oughly an amount of money
qual to the national debt, you
night consider buving it. I in-
jured, but the amount of money
they're asking for it was so much, plane. Oh, we tried. We finally
nodded off before they could madeitbacktoO'Hareat5:07.We
inish reading off all those zeros, had eight minutes. I barked or-
tonald Trump'll probably end ders.
ip with it anyway. "Sean get to the lockers.
I stayed at the hotel relaxing Kristen � carry the
They Live' suffers
as a horror-satire
'CLIFF'S05'
This column has been brought to
you by the Save The Bonehcad From
Winter in Chicago Fund. Donations
are welcome, and should be sent to
Locker 4446, O'Hare Airport, Chi-
cago.
refused to wake up. I grabbed the
few comics I'd been able to find
and ran downstairs.
Turned out to be a false alarm.
For some reason, this struck
Freckles as incredibly funny. She
started giggling, and wouldn't go
back to sleep until we hit her
upside the noggin with a
hairdryer.
The next day, we prepared to
go home. Thinking ahead, we left
our baggage in a locker in the air-
port. We caught a train down-
town and went to Hard Rock to
buy some overpriced, trendy
sweatshirts.
After we ate, we headed back
to the airport. We caught an early
train, but it didn't help. One of the
subway tracks decided to act up,
so we had to wait for five other
trains to go past us before we
started rolling again.
Of course, we missed our
taillights winking evilly at me.
I swallowed the last of the
Valiums�. It seemed like the only
thing left to do.
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ONLY page of humor, hijinks
and good almost-clean fun
that's clearly labeled!
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Continued from page 8
David: "Where are they (the
iens) from?"
Piper: "Well, thev ain't from
C teveland
Or this dazzling duel of meta-
1 �rs between our heroes:
David
line now.
body
Piper: "White lines in
iddle oi the road. That's
. orse place to drive
"I'm walking a white
I don't bother anv-
the
the
You begin to feel that Carpen-
r has not onlv not taken his
movie seriously but treated it
with contempt as well as hisau-
diences who, due to some maso-
chistic tendency, have made
"They Live" the nation's number
one movie.
If you must suffer, save your-
self four bucks and stay home to
watch "Dirty Dancing: the Series"
instead. Wait for "They Live to
surface on cable. Pay to see "They
Live today, kick yourself in the
butt tomorrow! You've been
warned! Two cat heads, mm
HAVtE A IFH1S1TA2
0
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A "Moon" over ECU
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With
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by SCOTT MAXWELL
Assistant hi itures I ditur
Romance and drama com-
beautifully in "A Moon for
the Misbegotten Eugene
KNeill's last completed work
the ECU Theater
partment's latest production.
The play, set in New England
n the 1930s, is the sequel to "A
Day's Journey Into Night
h all its characters' scheming
and counter-scheming, it has
much of the structure of a thriller.
is. however, not a thriller but
it her a blend composed of al-
�sl equal parts romance, humor
md drama.
This year marks the 100th
irthdav of O'Neill, who widely
. rded as America's greatest
playwright and is also the only
: ywright ever to have won four
ulitzer Prizes.
The ECU production features
i idBlanchard,ChrisChappell,
ttherine Edwards, Stuart
Maxwell and Paul Lombardi.
The play will be performed
Nov 18,19, 21 and 22 at 8:15 p.m.
in McGinnis Theater. Tickets are
fr for the general public, $4 for
heesy Hous
Ad!
Features page!
It's (Come on,
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1
!
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 17, WS
The Clearly Labeled
enftfiir
The "Big Bills' 9uotc of
the week: "Joea seen every-
thing, been everything and
eaten everything
- Ashley Dalton
Male impersonator has transvestite roommate
Dear Mr. Earlvis,
1 noticed that a downtown bar
installed a condom machine
in the men's bathroom. Do you
think condom machines should
be installed in the dorms?
Unsigned
Hev, Nameless
Yes, condom machines
should be allowed in ECU resi-
dence halls. They should be in-
stalled in the bathrooms, the halls,
what the hev, even the rooms.
In the dorm rooms, the ma-
chines should be placed right
above the beds for easy access.
"Hev Mom and Dad, here is my
spacious two square foot closet,
here is mv study-inducivc desk,
here is mv springless, hard-as-a-
rock bed and oh yeah, that's my
half empty condom machine
Dear Big E,
1 live in an apartment with
three other guys. The guy 1 share a
bedroom with snores like a freight
train. He snores so loud that 1 have
to sleep on the couch, but even in
the livingroom 1 can still hear him
sometimes. My back hurts and I
am addicted to NyQuil. Help.
Ravmond judge, Greenville
Hey, The judge,
Another snoring roommate
Come on, someone sent in a letter
just like this the other week. Can't
you people invent some new
problems? I wish just for once
someone would write in and ask:
Why do the toilet dispensors used
in campus bathroom only allow
you to pull one sheet at a time?
Advice: Line up shoes beside
bed, then pelt the snoring train.
a paper bag and matches on hand.
Dear Earlvis,
1 am stuck in a very bad situ-
atkn. My roommate has a prob-
lem. Ever since 1 moved in, he has
acted strange. 1 couldn't explain it
until one night 1 came home ear-
his thing" mean? If the guy likes
circle jerks, why not just say it.
"Doing his thing" is one of those
ambiguous phrases that can have
a host of meanings. Here is an
example:
(Judy and Tatty are in front of
specific the next time.
who live
.i pitbull
Dear Big E,
The girl and guy
across the street own
Thev let the dog go where he
wants to when he has to go and
that usually means he heads right
for mv yard. What do 1 dv?
Signed, Yard Full of Land
Mines
Hev, Guv With the
Lawn,
umpy
lier than 1 had told him. There he
was, dressed in a black neglige
watchinga pomo tape and "doing
his thing
Ever since that night, I've
been staying over at my girl
friend's (the word dorm' is
whited out lure in the letter)
apartment A guv that stays in the
dorm ne d to my roommate'ssaid
that he has gotten his ear pierced
and is wearing make-up. My
roommate called last night and
wants t� explain the whole thing.
Am 1 wrong to tell him wher
to go? My girl friend stands be-
hind me (ii this (better her than
my roommate) What's our ad-
vice
If you take the what' and tin
T out of your question, what is
left? According to main- veteri-
narians, dogs like to defecate in
order to establish territorial
boundaries. So why not establish
your own boundaries? All you
needistoeatatTacoBelland have
.r.i. i
ck 11'
in n:
Wl
.ere
,Guy Who 1 )oesn't know
le i r rs,
First ol all, v hat does "doing
the Student Store.)
Judy: "Look here comes
Thurston Eames, the school
freak
Patty: "Why does he look so
unkempt?"
Judy: "I guess he's just Doing
His Thing
Now in a short quiz, the Big E
will demonstrate that "Doing his
thing" has more than one mean-
ing.
Question: In the above pas-
sage between Judy and Patty,
what is Judy implying when she
says "Doing his thing" to Patty?
A. Thurston Eames is a cool
surf beach rider from VA beach.
B. Thurston Eames is an anti-
social dead head who washes his
clothes only when it rains.
C.Thurston Fames is a hippie
who drives a VW Tiling.
D. Thurston Eames is mastur-
bating in front oi the school store.
See what 1 mean dude? IV
Wait a minute. Your letter is
Secondly, in the part about full of falsity. I personally know
you staying over at your girl's many of our fine ECU Kuggers
place, you didn't use enough and have never heard one of them
White Out when trying to cover mutter anything close to an ob-
up the word "dorm As a rule- sccnity. By the way, foul mouthed
abiding ECU student, 1 feel that it and vulgar mean about the same
is my duty to report you to Dean thing, so there is no sense in say-
Speier, the associate dean of stu- ing it twice.
dent life. Yourallegationsofsexismare
The White Out deal com- unfounded. These guys may have
bined with "Doing his thing" unusually high hormone levels,
leads me to believe that you (the but whenever I have witnessed a
writer of this letter) is in fact a Rugger and a female converse, 1
female. My proof: Guys living in have taken special note that the
dorms don'town a bottle of White rugger always says a gentlemanly
Out. Also only sorority girls 'Please
named Judy and Patty use
phrases like "doing his thing
Advice: Why don't you just
come out of the closet and admit
that you are girl trying to imper-
sonate a guy.
Dear Big E,
1 have had several bad run-ins
with members of the ECU Rugby
team. Besides being all foul
mouthed and vulgar, these guys
are uncouth.
As far as your S and M game
- what did you call it � 'penis fly
trap'?l believe we invented that in
our own little head just to enter-
tain the Big E, now didn't we?
The Big E is bumming. Only
one more Clearly Labeled Satire
Page for the E, you see he is fi-
nally graduating after six ardu-
ous years.
So let's make the last "Just
They are disgusting and thev Ask Big E" the best by sending in
drink anal beers. Thev are also
very sexist and say sexist things to
women all the time. 1 have been
the victim of one of their sexist
ploys called the penis fly trap and
I didn't appreciate it Big E how do
1 eradicate Greenville of this vix-
enous group which I render to be
the scum of the earth?
Signed, Rugby Hater
I lev, Scrum Leader
your crazy problems to me.
Send to:
BigE
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Greenville, N.C 27834
Oi save the post and leg it to
the ugly brick building across
from Joyner Library and ask for
E.
Special precautions are taken as
yellow journalists meet Eakin
GREENVILLE, N.C. (EP)
Hold the phone, yellow journal-
ists Earlvis and Bonehead are
going to eat breakfast with ECU
Chancellor Richard Eakin Friday.
One of the Chancellor's aids,
I.M. Lackey, held a news confer-
ence in Spillman building today
to discuss the meeting between
the news paper refxrters and the
ECU head.
"There will be four uni-
formed campus police as well as
several undercover officiers there
at the breakfast to make sure no th-
ing gets out of hand Lackey said.
The extra precautions are
being taken in light of a recent out
burst at an area McDonalds which
left four injuried in the largest
food fight in ECU history. Earlvis
(alias Lumpy Rutherford) is al-
leged to have started theructusby
chucking a half eaten fish fillet at
SGA President l.arry Murphy.
While police arrested no one
in the incident, many bv-standers
say it was Earlvis who started the
ordeal. "We just don't want any-
thing like the McDonalds crisis to
happen in the Chancellor's
house Lackey said.
Lackey also mentioned that
offensive language will boa no, no
in the Chancellor's present. The
jest oi Lackey's admonition was
directed towards Bonehead, an-
other yellow journalist working
for a nearby newspaper who has
received various complaints for
his indept articles on tat giris and
art tags.
"Hey, (censored) that Lackev
guy, 1 am not offensive Bone-
head said in retaliation. Bonehead
said he planning on wearing his
infamous 'Can Man' outfit to the
breakfast.
When Earlvis was contacted
today, he said he didn't under-
stand the allegations. Earlvis said
he was no where near the
McDonalds when the scene oc-
curred
"So, 1 hear thev are having
grits Earlvis said before laugh-
ing an evil laugh. He then was
said to have run down the hall
saving "Dean Wormer, Dean
Wormer
Police will be swarming this location Friday morning when several yellow journalists from a
nearby newspaper eat grits and eggs with ECU Chancellor Richard Fakin.
Paper is the sole medium left
Squirrel man, Klicky, innocent
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) - an evil twin loose in Greenville,
Still in captivity, the squirrel man but no squirrel-related murders
continues to make headlines.
Klicky-Klicky, 21-year-old
specimen of what scientists are
calling Homo squirrelious, insists
that he is innocent of the murders
attributed to him. In an exclusive
interview with The East Carolin-
ian, Klicky explained that he was
once an actor in an animated car-
toon, somehow transported into
the world of three-dimensions.
"1 used to hang around with
this moose and this dog. Some-
times this goofy mountie would
hang out with us at the Big Rip-
Off Cafe. We were hot. They
called us The Rodent Pack
Klicky remembers.
"The media loved our mov-
ies. Me and the moose, we made a
ton of them together. The plots
were great. We'd drop things on
these two Russians all the time. It
never seemed to hurt them. I
didn't know that tearing people's
arms off would kill people here
have occurred since Klicky was
incarcerated. "Of course not he
snaps. His prominent front teeth
gnash together. "As long as he
stays quiet, they'll never catch
him
"But he'll slip up eventually.
It's in our blood. Actors have to
release tension somehow. Dis-
membering humans was our fa-
vorite hobby back where I come
from. 'Course, there it didn't have
the repurcussions this dimension
does he adds soberly.
When asked how he was
transported here, Klicky is at a
loss. "Me and Klacky (his evil
twin) were coming home from
this parry one morning. 1 was
driving. He was snorting some-
thing. When I turned to see what it
was, I lost control of the wheel. I
think we crashed he relates.
He doesn't remember any-
thing after that, except his capture
several weeks ago bv the
Klicky starts sobbing. "Hokcy Greenville police Squirrel Man
Smoke! I'd never intentionally Task Force- l's Possible that
hurt somebody! I thought it was Klacky woke up before I did. That
part of the script wou,d explain what happened to
Khcky maintains that he has thosc kids' " Kl,cky ���
The squirrel man's hearing is
set for Monday morning. The
judge is expected to set bail at
$100, 000. Klicky said, "I don't
know anyone here. They don't
know whether to give me a public
defender or put me to sleep.
There's no way I'll be able to pay
that bond
Klicky is led back to his cell
after our interview. He is obvi-
ously humiliated by the leash the
guard places around his neck. He
looks back at the interviewer as he
is dragged away. He says, "Tell
them my story! Tell the world I'm
innocent
A defense- fund is being set up
to defray court costs and pay bail
for the squirrel man. Those wish-
ing to contribute may drop off
donations at The East Carolinian
offices, on the second floor of the
Publications Building, across
from Joyner 1 ibrary.
If the bail can not be met,
Klicky insists the money be
turned over to the Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals,
and it will be.Satire Page readers
are urged to come to the defense
of the only animal on this planet
richt now that can speak in his
own defense.
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
With the sudden closure of "The
New, Weekly Buccaneer and
WZMB's continued technical
problems, speculators fear that
The East Carolinian will soon be the
only medium left on campus.
Justa Joshin, chairman of the
Media Board, said Thursday,
'The newspaper may well have to
carry on the functions oi the other
media if this trend continues
Expressions, which formerly
appeared twice a year, has shut
down temporarily while chang-
again bv December, but an insider
on the Media Board sneers, "De-
cember of 91, thev mean
'The New, Weekly Bucca-
neer switched to a weekly for-
mat this year in order to make
sure students recieved their year-
books. The publication was
closed down bv the Media Board
J
last week. No statement has been
issued yet concerning the cancel-
lation of the annual.
An alien dimension sucked
up the ECU Photolab last week. It
has resisted all attempts made by
ing their format. They will begin the university to contact the pho-
publishing again in 1990. Their tographers still trapped inside,
material will consist totally of The Media Board is on the verge
poorly-w ritten, anti-drug propa- of "just writing them oii as a lost
ganda disguised as poetry. cause Joshin said.
WZMB continued to have The Rebel, ECU's literary
equipment failure almost hourly, magazine, never really existed in
It finally shut down permanently the first place.
Tuesday after the automatic roc- joshin said, "I hope the paper
ord cleaner blew a fuse. The sta- can handle the extra burdens
tion insists it will be broadcasting we've been forced to place on it.
The staff of the newspaper have
done a top-notch job this year, and
certainly deserve paid vacations
from the university
"In fact, they really deserve
big pay increases, guest spots on
The Facts of Life and all the free
toilet paper we can give them he
added.
Starting next week, The East
Caroliniatt will begin reading
public service announcements
and news briefs from a public
address svstcm on top of Mcn-
denhall to replace WZMB. The
paper will also feature the "Babe
Spread a two-page photo mon-
tage oi all the girls who get their
pictures taken. These photos will,
of course, be taken by the staff of
The East Carolinian.
In addition, the newspaper
will present poetry and fiction
selections, especially any poems
about drugs and their horrible
effects on the young people of our
fine nation.
Greenville City Utilities now
located in Jarvis St. attic
own ueiense.
Greensboro changes name to
Greensboring after refendum
GREENSBORING, N.C. (EP)
� Citizens here in this piedmont
urbana are glad they changed the
name of their city from Greens-
boro to Greensboring.
"The city's name is now truly
indicative ot what really goes on
here Alderman Thurston Fames
said.
On election day, residents of
the city were asked to make the
decision in a referendum vote. An
astounding 65 percent of the vot-
ers wanted the city to renamed to
Greensboring.
"Nothing really happens here
so 1 feel like thecitiensof Greens-
boring made the right choice
Eames said
GREENVILLE, N.C (BP) �
The Greeenville Utilities
Commission moved its tempo-
rary offices today for the third
time in as many weeks.
The GUC building, which has
been under construction for over
a year, is scheduled to be com-
pleted sometime in 1993. For six
months, a temporary office was
set up in the building next to the
one under construction.
Unfortunately, that office
was demolished by an indiscri
to pay their bills.
Their offices are now located
in an attic apartment on the end of
Jarvis Street. While Eyell Un-
plugya, head of the Commission
admits that there is limited park-
ing available in their new offices,
he said, "The citizens of
Greenville should be used to that
by now
"We really don't care if
they're able to park or not. As long
as they pay their bills on time, we
to our offices in time Unplugya
said.
Unplugya insists that most
citizens' bills are still accurate
despite the many shifts in the
GUC's headquarters. He points
out that the bills are only printed
with the aid of computers the
actual figures are calculated by
their highly trained staff, and rec-
ords kept in an indestructable
safe.
"Of course, we keep all ECU
students' records in dumpster
don't give a fig if we are conven-
mate swing of a wrecking ball icntly located or not. In fact, I
three weeks ago. Sending the personally hope people CAN'T outside Mendenhall. Their par-
GUC employees scrambling for find us. Nothing gives me more of ents pay their utility bills anyhow,
safety, the building collapsed, a kick to see some old lady's so we treat the students and their
killing three and leaving Emear- power getting snipped off be- accounts like the subhuman chat-
aid City residents without a place cause she couldn't climb the step tel they are
Oveikill


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RFTRACTION:
Last week in the Jirrj
said that Jimmy ha
in fact he was done
admit when we en,
find a mistake in thj
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records in dumpster
ndenhaH. Their par-
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at the students and their
s like the subhuman chat-
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By Harris and Haselrig
WHAT KJND OF NAME
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that shif,
but he: an't
OPENING ThC DOOR.
KNOW WHAT I
MEAN. TTLLME
AFTER A
TOLKIEN CHWACTER
TOCAIEN W(AS A
LINGUIST. SO WAS
MY DAD SO WAS I. I
WAS RECORDING ALIEN
TRANSMISSIONS TO TW
TQ -mANS-ATC THf M � �
WHEN THE ATPCieO
BARING- I'VE
DE�M DOING SOME
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MADE AN OVER NIGH T
LEAP FTOM HICRO-
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MVKAAlD iOUTALK � YOUt-
S�LF TOO MUCH ALUM I At6
MFAUP TAW W FSCAfe'l
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PRESER.VER

By Rik
The Law
TATC.do
WU THItK
SHg'D 8s:
iNTEArSTED
'N PRESERVING
EARTH?
By Reid
oo
1 GIANT-SIZE PLAYDO
Hev
Big Head!
Bv Hardister
roLEte:

Hello ladies. Hello gentlemen. I am Howlin' Thurston,your host for
today's Random Fun and Games. Yes,there is no "theme" for today's
show, just an assortedbag of nuts. One of them being me! Ha! Ha! Ha!
Perhapssometime I'll sing one of my popular numbers for you!In the
meantime you can follow my adventures in therelatively unknown but
extremely hip comic, "Lloyd Llewellyn Now enjoy yourselves, and
remember . . . "This Thanksgiving, eat something that you normally
wouldn't Crazy! .
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Videos now available for rental:
"Two Men, Steve Guttenburg and a Baby"
"More Than Zero
Who do you think would make a
better Vice-President than Dan Ouayle?
The possibility of Dan Quayle fm y "mtbj
Howlin'
Thurston
being shot while in office is
very likely, and well need a
new VP. If you can think of
anyone famous (or sort of) who
isn't doing anything these days
and would fill the position,
send in their name to Fun and
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Stars Robert Downey Jr. and a cameo appearance by his Building. It's your civic duty.
father, Morton Downey Jr.
"Me and John and More Home Movies That He'd Kick My Teeth In For
If He Knew I Was Releasing Theman introspective film by Yoko Ono.
Larry Storch
would make
a better
vice-president
than
Dan Quayle
Coming in Two Weeks: WZMB Day!
No, really! We mean it this time!
The Updated Top Ten List of People
Who Should Be Dropped Off a Cliff
10. Steve Guttenburg
9. The Hogan Family
8. John Hughes
7. Bobcat Goldthwaite
6. Roy Orbisson
RFTRACTION:
L ast week in the Jimmy Olsen Cub Reporter's quiz, we
said that Jimmy had been killed by Lightning Lord, when
in fact he was done in by Braniac. We at Fun and Games
admit when we err, unlike so many of you. Should you
find a mistake in this section, feel free to point it out to us,
and we'll plast-r your name all over the Comics Page.
5. Will to Power
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3. Randee of the Redwoods
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AS
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Wvi s
Q
r u. O





I HI t S! t k( U isi N
Sports
xj �V I MM! R 17, 198� Page 12
Head Coach Art Baker analyzes the executi i i the Pirate
This will be the final game tor Baker as head coach of Easl
Carolina University (Photo by Mar Startai
Irates host frisbee
tournament at ECU
Baker's reign ends in Cincinnati
Pirates end their season on the road
By CHRIS Sli GEL
�. - . � ports Iditor
v ing last v't ek's open
tarolina will close out
n the road Saturda) at
i he game w ill also
lose the reign ot Art
d coa h Pirates.
whose resignation
(wing the game � n
: to tnd his
� I i the sai
I it with i victory.
v ei tain to he mv hist
date
v
I no.
P tki
I
take'
S� 1111
com
vvav
' io a
Jaker
game as the football coach here at Pirates recorded two school
East arolina, and 1 was fortunate marks against the Bearcats by
enough four years ago to come in rushing tor over 500 ards and
with a win over N. State, and I'd gaining 31 first downs. But Baker
sure like to go out with a win over does not see the game being that i
Cincinnati Baker said, at has final
press conference on Mondav.
I ins will be � �ur first trip to
i ait innati. We feel likeincin-
nari ITicir record is V-7 and ours is
v
! li
one sided this year. " I hey are a
better football t' .tin on del
than the) were a year ago 1 hey
are playing better offense and
thee have most ot their skill
we'll both be plav i gfora people back Baker said.
! t ot pride said Baker
want to end up with t w o wins in a
row so ' tball I m can following last weeks open dad-
end up mi .i w inning i I
Last i i n EC1 I featec
ti mr.au at hon ,� 56 2H 1 h(
ist( arolina hashadancxtra
week to prepare torincinnati
I he Pirates will also be tl . ing to
wm their second game in a row
4-17 in torv
! emple Ni .
" 1 emple was a vei
win t. 'r us, Bal er
kme things happened in
ootball game that ha1 i
tof the sea
Bak r said heisnol
plans followil . � i � -
"Right now, I'm
ward to finishing thi
then we'll s
then - -
� -ider 1 �
just wantl ind
n to pre pa i
shall came
Pirates rely on speed and shooting
By KKlsI! HA1 BERG
the � ' isoi
� - � � main
ki iteele.Th
i in hi I : ketball pro
I ;iuck
11 questior
� ,t strei ;th thi
.
ne
Hie Pirati � ff of
an 8 20 season from la-1 year, are
e pec ted to impi - �n
and an icked in
the i � . �' doto i
bv the CAA s rit( rs.
are bettei v than we
evei v ere last ycai
One of our 1 . last
V ear w a rebu
Stt i �� ho is in i nd
,� ir as head coa ites,
had. n i s niors oi ir's i
ti r. six fi lei two - ; ho
res and thn ins
war- sists i ii � en-
ar
. , rs, hve freshmen
� and ,
id (�f
IV 0 Wil
� :
'
i r a re ou i
rdsj, ' ' IKer
Murph I and
: � in lays of pi
vere ten dav s ahead ol a hat
. re last year and a 1. t f it
id to do with the fac t that our
in help �ur younger kids
ur 51 ni �
ha lone a i il b on and off
irt
?t( i le said that the t .
� prise this v. ar came from
Robin House, a freshman guard
who has been in the top seven
the first scrimn ag H
isketba
a walk on and v - lar-
ir.
� � � irning players ai
juniors C lus Hill
mmv I linton.
Pirates �
pred � � irth in the
� n f ei
� .
like then �
not a Nav)
c ex j
team that -vinst! � nferei
have to ���in all I I
Currenth
� ters hav � � .� rg Masoi
t p ith Amei rsit
Mad
'
Duke
the ' first
Bv GAItt HURI 1 i.
r e. j h the fa t Cat an.�
I he Irates finished their
son this oast � � - nd with
their biann
nt !he
II w a s
lute touxiui
nt, Ultimax
si in East
the three p
aidU Ul . UUC � �
for as .
Il itt
I '� all
i n
ns att
On S
.
I
� �� In
the i
defea
� i. � ; i worm i
Mama 7 a c r t;lomer-
ngl : D. and R tli igh
dt feated both East
Helios
a n ,l
gl n's No v ionflicks. In
� . ime of the day, 1 lelios
?d N Conflicks to avenge
a loss to the team earlier in the sea-
son.
Cool Mama 7 had to forfeit
theirgames nSunday. Fhisauto-
matically placed Helios and No
Conflicks in the finals. Helios
deteated No Conflicks 12-11 to
win the women's d � n and
bv V
that
d e
; I
Crunch fai
"i vas
tied 11-11
ivei � the
im ��� ' i ited licit
, 'all then � i 11 r in a row to
win the tr :
1 he Irates l k ahead I tl
spring seas Cai ha
made t to
t W I
Spikers recognized
tier
Bv KRISTEN HALBERG
The Lady Pirate volleyball
team mav have had a disappoint-
loniai
season w ith an I 5
Athletic Association record and
sixth in the CAA's, but for
lemma Holl) and Michele Mcln-
tosh there is still room f r r
1 lolly, a junior lx came the
first 1 ad) pirah in the hi ��
the - s to be named t
( A A All-Conference second
team. She finished off the season
as the l( hitter for the I
Pirates Hollv also led IL in
kill
h 4 � while

sue ther ways I Sh
r v ith
535 digs and

block a
I �
Pirates and thi CAA ii
sh.
e is rani A's
with a 4.22 d
Mclni
Smith, � is a irded i I
the � - ntoffi
si e a. ns
in t!it
i A � Mclni ' � . in
just '
Easl �rolina is urrentlv
rai � lerican
Vi i '� iation
tor
of 2 -
Pirate's Booty
ken I arley, of the ECU Irates, attempts to steal the frisbee away
from his opponent. The rates were the host for the Ultimax XII
Tournament over the weekend (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photo
Lab).
Wl I kf ND I CL SPORTS
UPDATE
Tonight 730 pam. -Men's
Basketball Exhibition game v
Marathon Oil
Minges Coliseum
Sat. 2 p.m. - Men ind women
vim and Dive team vs. UNO
Charlotte
Minges Pool
Sat. 7p.m. - Lady Pirate Alumni
game
Minges Coliseum
Pirates prepare for Alumni
in in .i s
ai �� will
' ' rmer
��. n Minges
at is set for 7 p m
I servi
une-up I i ECU, which
i
F O H U s oa s K i Oil I
nst a teai
( oli
as
alumni l homps n
v areei at E U in 1 i
ca � ints and
rebounds.
lished tier
with 2,352
83 career
Minges praised
klilsl I HAI Bl RG
t to hand it to left
irectoi � itions
I the rest ol � . -v- who
I I � reno ate Minges oli-
seum in time tor basketball soa-
ks great.
1 was in the n rhood the
. itl ler dav .ut I ded to drop by
and check out the improvements.
i he entire ci li - um had been
repainted, the floor was resur
ed and repainted, skyboxes
were pul foi use b only the
most prominent contributors of
E U athletics) and they even
went so far as to purchace new
moveable 1 lydra-Rib basket just
s that the court could look more
� � fcssional.
With East Carolina predicted
to do well in the conference and
Minges finally looking like a true
coliseum, there is only one thing
missing from this picture: You,
� loyal, or not so loyal, support-
ers ol East Carolina athletics
hast year's attendance, al-
though an improv ement from the
year before, was almost equiva-
lent to the amount oi people that
attended class the day after 1 lal-
loween. The Pirate team, under
second year head coach Mike
Steele, is psyched about the up-
. . . : : -
:
be for soi hei

Hall ' ' ' �
reservi
ts 1
fill M
are 15
attend East Carolina
nd Mingesonh '
ow logi with I
number ol students that att(
ECU vs the number of seats in the
coliseum, we should have sv
outs tor even game. ECU stu-
dents ha e been complaining I i
arsthat the athletic teams don't
wm. Now here is a team that is
predieted to have a ver success-
ful season and it would be a
shame if only a handful ol ;
are there to enjoy in the success
Being a supporter oi athletics is
like voting in the elections: if you
don't vote or support the team
vou have absolutely no right to
complain.
( ome support the Pirates It
will be a SHATTERING experi-
ence.
opens thi reeuiar s, ,e� n
t Ithers
alumni wil
(197 - 1 � i
i; presenting
the
Mail, la (. r en
lolds the ECU
t am handball club in the Olym-
pic lames in Seoul, South Korea.
Fran 1 looks 11979 53), a former
1 c I great who now coaches at
Goldsboro High School; Debbie
Freeman (1974-78), remembered
lor garnering 26 rebounds in one
game; billion Barnes (1978-82),
a
� tson in the Appala
utateSheraton Tournament
ii Bo ne.
Manx ol thi' all-time great
ason and career records for who went on to serve as an assis-
blocked shots; Delphinc Mabry
11 182 B7), who holds the E( I
record for areer steals with 110;
at history will Lisa Squirewell (1982-86), whose
plav Saturday No less than 15 509 ireer field goal percentage is
tou-r players w ill make up the Still listed hist in th record books;
alumni roster. Alma Bethea (1984-88), the fifth-
R � rhempson thecurrent leadii rer in school history.
EC1 assistant coach and the mosl Leora "Sam" fones (1980-82)
prolific scorer and rebounder in will n turntoECl Saturday after
si ool history, will yl.w tor the representing the United States
tant coach at E I ; Sheilah Cotton
(P71 75), who once scored 9
points in an ECU game.
( Hhers include Loraine Foster
l 1981 86), LydiaRoundtree(1977-
81), Brenda Dail i"C 7D)( and
Annette Phillips
Thecurrent Lady Pirate team
is under the direction of second-
year head coach Pat Picrson.
Ticket Info
Guidelines for East Carolina
University students to pick up
tickets tor the upcoming college
basketball season have been sot.
and there are several changes.
'students can pick up their
ticket with a validated IP and
activity card the day before a
game from 8 a m. to 5 p ni. at the
Minges Coliseum tic ket office her
games on Monday nights ticket
pick-up will be on 1 riday I or
games during Fhanksgiving
break (Nov. 26), tickets van be
pieked up on Wednesday, Nov.
23 For games during the Chris!
mas vacation (Dec 27 JO) tickets
can be pi ked up on Friday, 1 Kv.
23.
When students pick up their
tiekets the oa before the game,
they can also pick up one extra 1
2-price ticket tor a guest with a
valid ID. Any additional tiekets
are full-price Atter the supply of
guest tiekets are gone, all tiekets
become full-price. Also students
can use an extra student ID to get
a tree ticket tor a friend. Only one
extra tieket per person is allow ed
When students piek up their
tickets the day ol the game, only
one ticket can be given out ls
on the da) ol the came all studi nt
tiekets will be available tor am
one to bu students included.
1 his year, student sections
are colored purple. e,ra and
green. There are three entrances
tor student tickets Minges
I obby (purple & green) and the
southside ol the coliseum (gray )
Purple and green are floor level
seats while grav is second level
seating.
1 here are more student tuk
etsavailable on the floor tins year
due to the press row being moved
to the floor
For more information about
the availability ot student rickets
throughout the season, contact
the ECU Ticket Office at 757-6400
-
-
hav � �

-
tht i
not V
N
-
The

havi �
eh
C .
ti a
sh
fort
�. �
sevei v s
nuu
V w as
with three Is
915 p
Iowa h . h had - I
votes i ne poml I
S ra( use, S f
w hile Ne ada I as . j
team t I
rounded out I 1
points
Arizona I I
last year's 1 inal 1 our
Second ien with 'v p
was followed by Villani
gia Tech, Missouri �
idaState,Ohi N rth'
lina State, fen I





1

w
If
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 17,1988 Page 12
Baker's reign ends in Cincinnati
Pirates end their season on the road
By CHRIS SIEGEL
Ain�Unl Sport Kditor
Following last week's open
date, East Carolina will close out
its season on the road Saturday at
Cincinnati. The game will also
bring to a close the reign of Art
Baker as head coach of the Pirates.
Baker, whose resignation
takes affect following the game on
Saturday, said he hopes to end his
coaching career at ECU the same
way he started it with a victory.
'This is certain to be my last
game as the football coach here at
East Carolina, and I was fortunate
enough four years ago to come in
with a win over N .C. State, and I'd
sure like to go out with a win over
Cincinnati Baker said at his final
press conference on Monday.
'This will be our first trip to
Cincinnati. We feel like Cincin-
nati. Their record is 3-7 and ours is
2-8, so we'll both be playing for a
lot of pride said Baker. "We
want to end up with two wins in a
row so our football program can
end up on a winning note
Last season ECU defeated
Cincinnati at home, 56-28. The
Pirates recorded two school
marks against the Bearcats by
rushing for over 500 yards and
gaining 31 first downs. But Baker
does not see the game being that
one-sided this year. "They are a
better football team on defense
than they were a year ago. They
are playing better offense and
they have most of their skill
people back Baker said.
East Carolina has had an extra
week to prepare for Cincinnati
following last weeks open date.
The Pirates will also be trying to
win their second game in a row
following a 34-17 victory over
Temple Nov. 6.
'Temple was a very satisfy-
ing win for us Baker said.
"Some things happened in that
football game that have not hap-
pened for most of the season
Baker said he is not sure of his
plans following the season.
"Right now, I'm looking for-
ward to finishing the season and
then we'll see what goes from
there said Baker. "I'm not going
to consider beyond Saturday. I
just want to see if we can do every-
thing we can to prepare to win a
football game
Pirates rely on speed and shooting
Head Coach Art Baker analyzes the execution of the Pirate offense.
This will be the final game for Baker as head coach of East
Carolina University (Photo by Mar Startari).
Irates host frisbee
tournament at ECU
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
As the basketball season
draws near, one thing remains
certain for coach Mike Steele. The
strength in his basketball pro-
gram will lie in the team's quick-
ness and shooting.
'That, without question,
will be our biggest strength this
year Steele said.
Steele also explained that the
biggest key will be in winning the
close games. He said that last year
they fought just to stay close and
stay in the game, and now, this
year, instead of just being com-
petitive, his team will have to win
the close games to stay in the race
for the conference title.
The Pirates, who come off of
an 8-20 season from last year, are
expected to improve this season
and are picked to finish fourth in
the Colonial Athletic Accosiation
by the CAA sportswriters.
"We are better now than we
ever were last year Steele said.
"One of our biggest problems last
year was rebuilding
Steele, who is in his second
year as head coach for the Pirates,
had no seniors on last year's ros-
ter, six freshmen, two sopho-
mores and three juniors. This
year's roster consists of three sen-
iors, five freshmen, two sopho-
mores and two juniors.
"Our biggest thing we've got
this year are our seniors Blue
Edwards, Merf Kenny
Murphvl and Jeff Kellv Steele
said. "Within two days of practice
we were ten days ahead of what
we were last year and a lot of it
had to do with the fact that our
seniors can help our younger kids
through the drills. Our seniors
have done a great job on and off
the court
Steele said that the biggest
surprise this year came from
Robin House, a freshman guard
who has been in the top seven
since the first scrimmage. House
came to the basketball program as
a walk on and will be on scholar-
ship next year.
Other returning players are
juniors Gus Hill, Reed Lose and
sophomore jimmy Hinton.
Even though the Pirates were
predicted to finish fourth in the
league, bteele believes anyone
could win the conference this
year. 'There's not a Richmond
like there was last year and there's
not a Navy like there was two
yearsago Steeleexplained. "The
team that wins the conference will
have to win all of their home
games and split the away games
Currently, the CAA sports-
writers have George Mason on
top with American University
second and UNC-Wilmington
third. Richmond was predicted
fifth, Navy cixth, William and
Mary seventh and James Madison
eighth.
The Pirates have an exhibi-
tion game with Marathon Oil
tonight in Minges Coliseum.
By GARY HURLEY
Special to the East Carolinian
The Irates finished their fall
season this past weekend wUh.
their biannual ultimate
ment. The tournament, Ulrimax
XII, was the largest in East
Carolina's history with twelve
men's teams and three women's
teams attending the event.
On Saturday in the women's
pool, Cool Mama 7, a conglomer-
ate Wasington, D.C. and Raleigh
team, defeated both East
Carolina's Helios and
Wilmington's No Conflicks. In
the last game of the day, Helios
defeated No Conflicks to avenge
a loss to the team earlier in the sea-
son.
Cool Mama 7 had to forfeit
their games on Sunday. This auto-
matically placed Helios and No
Conflicks in the finals. Helios
defeated No Conflicks 12-11 to
win the women's division and
their first ever tournament cham-
pionship.
The men's teams were di-
vided into three pools on Satur-
day. Crunch, Y'all and Wut were
the three pool winners. The Irates
M Arwj nno lping to Y'all
for a second place fkwsh in their
pool.
In their first game on Sunday,
the Irates defeated Wut, a revival
team of Irates past. The Irates
were eliminated in the semi-finals
by Wilmington's Crunch. It was
the first time in three years that
the rival Wilmington team de-
feated East Carolina.
Crunch faced the tri-city team
Y'all in the finals. The score was
tied 11-11 when a Wilmington
player, Jay Coyle, had to leave the
game with a separated shoulder.
Y'all then scored four in a row to
win the trophy.
The Irates look ahead to the
spring season. East Carolina has
made it to Collegiate Nationals
two years in a row.
Spikers recognized
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
The Lady Pirate volleyball
team may have had a disappoint-
ing season with an 0-5 Colonial
Athletic Association record and
sixth place in the CAA's, but for
Jemma Holly and Michele Mcln-
tosh, there is still room for recgo-
nition.
Holly, a junior, became the
first Lady pirate in the history of
the CAA's to be named to the
CAA All-Conference second
team. She finished off the season
as the leading hitter for the Lady
Pirates. Holly also led ECU in
kills with 243 while she was
But Holly contributed to her
success in other ways as well. She
was the third leading digger with
335 digs and the second leading
blockcr with 20 block solos and 18
block assists.
The one who leads the Lady
Pirates and the CAA in digs this
year is junior Michele Mclntosh.
She is ranked tenth in the CAA's
with a 4.22 dig average.
Mclntosh, along with Traci
Smith, was awarded player-of-
the-wcek for their excellent offen-
sive and defensive contributions
in the CAA tournament. At the
CAA 's, Mclntosh had 44 digs in
just two matches.
East Carolina is currently
ranked fourth in the American
Volleyball Coaches Association
for digs as they have a dig average
of 20.402.
Pirate's Booty
Minges praised

KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
Well, I've got to hand it to Jeff
Davis (Director of Operations)
and the rest of the guys who
helped to renovate Minges Coli-
seum in time for basketball sea-
son. The place looks great.
I was in the neighborhood the
other day and decided to drop by
and check out the improvements.
The entire coliseum had been
repainted, the floor was resur-
faced and repainted, skyboxes
were put in (for use by only the
most prominent contributors of
ECU athletics) and they even
went so far as to purchace new
moveable Hydra-Rib baskets just
so that the court could look more
professional.
With East Carolina predicted
to do well in the conference and
Minges finally looking like a true
coliseum, there is only one thing
missing from this picture: You,
the loyal, or not so loyal, support-
ers of East Carolina athletics.
Last year's attendance, al-
though an improvement from the
year before, was almost equiva-
lent to the amount of people that
attended class the day after Hal-
loween. The Pirate team, under
second year head coach Mike
Steele, is psyched about the up-
coming season and the only thing, j
that would make it better would
be for someone to be there to see
them win.
Half of the tickets to the
games are reserved for students,
so it will be up to the students to
fill Minges to its capacity. There
are 15,000 some odd students that
attend East Carolina University
and Minges only holds 6,500.
Now, logically, with the
number of students that attend
ECU vs. the number of seats in the
coliseum, we should have sell-
outs for every game. ECU stu- i
dents have been complaining for
years that the athletic teams don't
wot Now here is a team that is
predicted to have a very success- j
ful season and it would be a
shame if only a handful of people
are there to enjoy in the success.
Being a supporter of athletics is
like voting in the elections: if you
don't vote or support the team,
you have absolutely no right to
complain.
Come support the Pirates. It
will be a SHATTERING experi-
ence.
Ken Earley, of the ECU Irates, attempts to steal the frisbee away
from his opponent. The Irates were the host for the Ultimax XII
Tournament over the weekend (Photo by Mark Love, ECU Photo
Lab).
WEEKEND ECU SPORTS
UPDATE
Tonight 730 p.m. - Men's
Basketball Exhibition game v
Marathon Oil
Minges Coliseum
Sat. 2 p.m. - Men and women
wim and Dive team vs. UNC-
Charlotte
Minges Pool
Sat. 7p.m. - Lady Pirate Alumni
game
Minges Coliseum
Pirates prepare for Alumni
Ticket Info
(SID) � East Carolina's
women's basketball team will
play against a team of former
Lady Pirates Saturday in Minges
Coliseum. Tip-off is set for 7 p.m.
The Alumni game will serve
as a tune-up for ECU, which
opens the regular season Nov. 25
against Stetson in the Appala-
chian State Sheraton Tournament
in Boone.
Many of the all-time great
players in Lady Pirate history will
play Saturday. No less than 15
rorter players will make up the
alumni roster.
Roiie Thompson, the current
ECU assistant coach and the most
prolific scorer and rebounder in
school history, will play for the
alumni. Thompson finished her
career at ECU in 1980 with 2,352
career points and 1,183 career
rebounds.
Others representing the
alumni will be Marcia Girven
(1977-81), who holds the ECU
season and career records for
blocked shots; Delphine Mabry
(1982-87), who holds the ECU
record for career steals with 110;
Lisa Squirewell (1982-86), whose
.509 career field goal percentage is
still listed first in th record books;
Alma Bethea (1984-88), the fifth-
leading scorer in school history.
Leora "Sam Jones (1980-82)
will return to ECU Saturday after
representing the United States
team handball club in the Olym-
pic Games in Seoul, South Korea.
Fran Hooks (1979-83), a former
ECU great who now coaches at
Goldsboro High School; Debbie
Freeman (1974-78), remembered
for garnering 26 rebounds in one
game; Lillion Barnes (1978-82),
who went on to serve as an assis-
tant coach at ECU; Sheilah Cotton
(1971-75), who once scored 39
points in an ECU game.
Others include Loraine Foster
(1981-86), LydiaRoundtree (1977-
81), Brenda Dail (1973-76), and
Annette Phillips.
The current Lady Pirate team
is under the direction of second-
year head coach Pat Pierson.
Guidelines for East Carolina
University students to pick up
tickets for the upcoming college
basketball season have been set,
and there are several changes.
Students can pick up their
ticket with a validated ID and
activity card the day before a
game from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the
Minges Coliseum ticket office. For
games on Monday nights, ticket
pick-up will be on Friday, For
games during Thanksgiving
break (Nov. 26), tickets can be
picked up on Wednesday, Nov.
23. For games during the Christ-
mas vacation (Dec. 27-30), tickets
can be picked up on Friday, Dec.
23.
When students pick up their
tickets the day before the game,
they can also pick up one extra 1
2-price ticket for a guest with a
valid ID. Any additional tickets
are full-price. After the supply of
guest tickets are gone, all tickets
become full-price. Also, students
can use an extra student ID to get
a free ticket for a friend. Only one
extra ticket per person is allowed.
When students pick up their
tickets the day of the game, only
one ticket can be given out. Also
on the day of the game, all student
tickets will be available for any-
one to buy, students included.
This year, student sections
are colored purple, gray and
green. There are three entrances
for student tickets� Minges
Lobby (purple & green) and the
southside of the coliseum (gray).
Purple and green are floor level
seats while gray is second level
seating.
There are more student tick-
ets available on the floor this year
due to the press row being moved
to the floor.
For more information about
the availability of student tickets
throughout the season, contact
the ECU Ticket Office at 757-6400.
ECU at Cincinnati
Penn State at Notre Dame
Syracuse at West Virginia
Miami, FLat LSU
South Carolina at Clemsor
Maryland at Virginia
North Carolina at Duke
USC at UCLA
Pittsburgh at N.C. State
Michigan at Ohio State
Duke
DURHAM. N.C. (AP)-mJ
college basketball coaches shl
the notoriety associated wf
being ranked No. 1, but
e's Mike Krzyzewski.
"You strive to be good, an
people recognize you as gc
that's good because you've
complished one of your goal
Krzyzewski said in an intervi
before The Associated Press
season college basketball
picked his team No. 1.
"Being ranked is OK.
should be a little bit of fun
said.
The Blue Devils, who
ished fifth in the final regul
season poll last season and wj
on to the Final Four and a sei
nal loss to eventual champl
Kansas, received 33 first-plf
votes and easily outdistanced 1
2 Georgetown, which had eij
first-place votes.
Duke, which last held the
ranking over the final three
of the 1985-86 season, another
which it reached the Final Fox
finished with 1,257 points fri
the nationwide panel of si
writers and broadcasters, v
ahead oi the Hoy as 1,107.
Krzyzewski takes a talenl
team into the 1988-89 season as
tries for his third trip to the Fi
Four in the last four seasons.
he acknowledges that there
pitfalls associated with bei
deemed "the best
"If you're ranked very h
early, there's a tendency to thj
you've already accomplish
something, and you real
haven't accomplished anythin
Krzvzewski said. "Those are
predictions. Then, in practice
tings, you have to be careful tl
there isn't a complacency t
comes about
He identified another prl
lem, playing to protect the raf
ing, in essence, to avoid losin
game and the prestige of No.
"What will happen if w
not No. 1? Nothing Krzvzew
said. "What has happened thatj
are No. 1? We're getting
interviews, more pictures
things like that
The offense is expected to hok
itsend of the bargain this year.
Krzyzewski says one player
have to emerge as King's suc
sor.
"We're not going to wi
championship without playl
good defense, and that's
goal Krzyzewski said.
Michigan, Louisville
Oklahoma, another Final
team from last season, rounj
out the Top Five in a voting
showed the quick rums of
fortunes in collegiate basket
programs.
Michigan received four tl
place votes and 1.090 pointsl
more than Louisville, which!
seven No. 1 votes. Oklahoma
nine first-place votes and 1
points.
North Carolina was
with three No. 1 selections
915 points, just four more
Iowa, which had two first-
votes. One point separated
Syracuse, 852 points, and Ilhi
while Nevada-Las Vegas, tl
nal team to receive a No. 1
rounded out the Top Ten wit
points.
Arizona - the final memt
last year's Final Four - k
Second Ten with 605 points
was followed by Villanova, I
gia Tech, Missouri, Florida,
ida State, Ohio State, North'
Una State, Temple, and Stanl





t
V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMHR 17,1988 13
oad
is a verj satisfy -1 aker said. ti � ned in that that have not hap-�� the season he is not sure of his son. 1 king for-season and es from
: cen not going rday 1 every-iro 1

- anyone
ference this
mond
v ta rand there's
ore was two
1. V.plained. "The
� � rence will
their home
iway games.
v A sports-
re Mason on

ingl r
s 1 � d
im and
' '
e an exhibi-
larathon Oil
�oum.
ised
ithu �,
- would
re to see
to the
lents,
� idents to
u"itv. There
students that
a L n; v i rsirv
� ; nts that attend
� imberofseatsin the
should have sell-
� game. lCL stu-
been complaining for
it th itl tic teamsdon't
i team that is
: � have a v ery suco
n id it would be a
i handful of peoj l
- in the success
supporter of athletics is
in the elections: if you
� iupport the team.
re al � ly no right to
port the Pirates. It
TERING ex pen-
Info
i
me full-price. Also, students
i student ID to get
� � Mora friend. Only one
er j rson is allowed.
When students pick up their
of the game, only
- � in be given out. Also
t the game, all student
ts will be available for any-
� uv students iru luded.
- year, student sections
colored purple, gray and
n. There are three entrances
student tickets� Minges
. purple & green) and the
ithside of the coliseum (gray).
Ii and green are floor level
i while gray is second level
ing.
There ar more student tick-
j available on the floor this vear
e to the press row being moved
Ithe floor.
For more information about
availability of student tickets
roughout the season, contact
ECU Ticket Office at 757-6400.
sXS�
Fearless Football Forecast
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Two Weeks Ago � (6-4)
Overall - (62-36-1)
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Two Weeks Ago �6-4)
Overall - (64-34-1)
ECU at Cincinnati
Penn State at Notre Dame
Syracuse at West Virginia
Miami, FL at LSU
South Carolina at Clemson
Maryland at Virginia
North Carolina at Duke
USC at UCLA
Pittsburgh at N.C. State
Michigan at Ohio State
ECUECU
Notre DameNotre Dame
WestVirginiaWest Virginia
LSULSU
ClemsonClemson
VirginiaVirginia
DukeDuke
UCLAUSC
PittsburghPittsburgh
MichiganMichigan
KRISTEN HALBERG Sports EditorDr. RICHARD EAKTN ECU Chancellor
Two Weeks Ago (0-0) Overall - (0-0-0)Two Weeks Ago - (9-1) Overall- (64-34-1-)
ECUECU
Notre DameNotre Dame
West Virginia MiamiWest Virginia Miami, FL
ClemsonClemson
Vkginia DukeMaryland Duke
UCLAUSC
N.C. StateN.C. State
MichiganMichigan
CHIPPY BONEHEAD EARLVIS HAMPTON
Managing Editor Features Editor
Two Weeks Ago - (5-5) Two Weeks Ago - (5-5)
Overall - (67-31-1) Overall - (63-35-1)
ECU
Notre Dame
West Virginia
LSU
Clemson
Virginia
Duke
UCLA
N.C. State
Michigan
ECU
Notre Dame
West Virginia
Miami
South Carolina
Virginia
Duke
UCLA
Pitt
Michigan
Duke on top 1 Sjgiggg
DURHAM. N.C. (AP) - Most
college basketball coaches shun
the notoriety associated with
being ranked No. 1, but not
Duke's Mike Krzyzewski.
"You strive to be good, and if
people recognize you as good,
that's good because you've ac-
complished one of your goals
Krzyzewski said in an interview
before The Associated Press pre-
season college basketball poll
picked his team No. 1.
"Being ranked is OK. It
should be a little bit of fun he
said.
The Blue Devils, who fin-
ished fifth in the final regular -
season poll last season and went
on to the Final Four and a semifi-
nal loss to eventual champion
Kansas, received 33 first-place
votes and easily outdistanced No.
2 Georgetown, which had eight
first-place votes.
Duke, which last held the top
ranking over the final three polls
of the 1985-86 season, another in
which it reached the Final Four ,
finished with 1,257 points from
the nationwide panel of sports
writers and broadcasters, well
ahead of the Hoyas' 1,107.
Krzvzevvski takes a talented
team into the 1988-89 season as he
tries for his third trip to the Final
Four in the last four seasons. But
he acknowledges that there are
pitfalls associated with being
deemed "the best
"If you're ranked very high
early, there's a tendency to think
you've already accomplished
something, and you really
haven't accomplished anything
Krzyzewski said. "Those are just
predictions. Then, in practice set-
tings, you have to be careful that
there isn't a complacency that
comes about
He identified another prob-
lem, playing to protect the rank-
ing, in essence, to avoid losing a
game and the prestige of No. 1.
"What will happen if we're
not No. 1? Nothing Krzyzewski
said. "What has happened that we
are No. 1? We're getting more
interviews, more pictures and
things like that
The offense is expected to hold up
its end of the bargain this year, but
Krzyzewski says one player will
have to emerge as King's succes-
sor.
"We're not going to win a
championship without playing
good defense, and that's our
goal Krzyzewski said.
Michigan, Louisville and
Oklahoma, another Final Four
team from last season, rounded
out the Top Five in a voting that
showed the quick turns of the
fortunes in collegiate basketball
programs.
Michigan received four first-
place votes and 1,090 points, 74
more than Louisville, which got
seven No. 1 votes. Oklahoma had
nine first-place votes and 1,001
points.
North Carolina was sixth
with three No. 1 selections and
915 points, just four more than
Iowa, which had two first-place
votes. One point separated No. 8
Syracuse, 852 points, and Illinois,
while Nevada-Las Vegas, the fi-
nal team to receive a No. 1 vote,
rounded out the Top Ten with 851
points.
Arizona - the final member of
last year's Final Four - led the
Second Ten with 605 points and
was followed by Villanova, Geor-
gia Tech, Missouri, Florida, Flor-
ida State, Ohio State, North Caro-
lina State, Temple, and Stanford.
"You're not defending any-
thing. You should still go about
the development of your team the
same way he said.
This year's development
starts with Danny Ferry, a 6-foot-
10 senior whose sprained knee
might have been the only reason
he didn't play on the U.S. Olym-
pic men's basketball team. Senior
guard Quin Snyder will direct the
offense with Phil Henderson back
at the second guard after an early
bout with mononucleosis. Greg
Koubek is in the wings, and was
impressive at times with his 3-
point shooting last year.
On the front line with Ferry,
ju nior Robert Brickey goes back to
the wing. Last season,
Krzyzewski used Brickey for the
opening jump ball and relied on
his athletic ability to aid with re-
bounding, and he responded by
averaging five per game.
Ala Abdelnaby played in 34
games for the Blue Devils, but
averaged just nine minutes per
game and started once. The 6-11
junior also averaged two re-
bounds per game, but came on
strong toward the end of last sea-
son and needs to produce more.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
.00
YOUR UNCLE WANTS
TO PAT FOR COLLEGE. BUT ONLY
IF YOU'RE GOOD ENOUGH.
Army ROTC scholarships pay full tuition
and provide an allowance for fees and
textbooks. Find out if you qualify.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE TOUCAN TAKE.
Contact Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
NO PARKING
at GUC!
Sorry, but it's true. Greenville Utilities' parking
lot will be completely closed from Nov. 14- 28 whil
the parking area is being expanded. Even the
dropository will be out of commission while con-
struction is underway.
During that time, it will be inconvenient for you
to do business at the main office. So, please pa
your utility bill, by mail, by automatic bank draf
or at Barclay's of N.C, BB &T. ECU StudentBank.
First Citizens. First Federal Savings & Loan.
Peoples Bank & Trust. Planters NaUonal Bank &
Trust & Wachovia Bank & Trust.
After Nov. 28. we'll be able to serve you better
with an expanded parking lot, completely remod
eled offices, and a new drive-thru window.
If you have any questions, please call GUC at
752-7166.
Greenville
UUlities
gas
Student Stores
Wright Building
East Carolina University
How to make a hit
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 17,1988
i
Graf wins in Virginia Slims
NEW YORK (AP) - Steffi Graf
lost a set, but kept her composure.
The world's No. 1 player
overcame a shaky second set
Monday night to beat Claudia
Kohde-Kilsch 6-1, 4-6, 6-1 in the
opening round of the Virginia
Slims tennis championships at
Madison Square Garden.
Graf stretched her winning
streak to 45 matches, but it wasn't
a intage performance bv the
defending champion, Grand
Slam winner and Olympic gold
medalist.
Asked to describe the second
set, which she lost after blowing a
4-2 lead, Graf said: "1 would use
the word 'disgusting It was sim-
ply awful
Graf regained control in the
final set, winning the last six
games after Kohde-Kilsch opened
by holding serve.
"She never thinks she's going
to lose Kohde-Kilsch said.
"Even if she's down, she always
thinks she will win. That's the
difference between her and the
rest of us
Graf was obviously frus-
trated after losing her 11th set of
the year, throwing her arms up in
disgust and yelling at herself in
German.
"When I play bad, I get real
mad at myself she said.
Graf took her anger out on
Kohde-Kilsch in the final set, giv-
ing up only 13 points as she beat
her fellow West German for the
eighth straight time.
"I knew I still had to win one
more set said Kohde-Kilsch,
ranked 11th in the world. "I guess
I shouldn't have thought about
that
Graf hasn't lost a match since
April, when she was beaten in
Florida by Gabriela Sabatini. Her
only other loss in 73 matches this
year also was to Sabatini.
Sabatini is seeded fourth in
the $l-million Slims champion-
ships, just ahead of Pam Shriver,
who beat Sylvia Hanika of West
Germany 6-3, 6-4 in Monday's
opening match.
Second-seeded Martina
Navratilova plays Stephanie
Rehe tonight while No. 7 Manuela
Maleeva faces Lori McNeil and
No. 6 Natalia Zvereva meets He-
len Kelesi.
Third-seeded Chris Evert,
Sabatini and No. 8 Helena Sukova
play their opening-round
matches Wednesdav night.
Shriver broke Hanika once in
each set, while holding her own
serve throughout the match.
Hanika had four break points
early in the second set, but
couldn't convert any of them.
"I think that was an extremely
important point in the match
said Hanika, who upset Evert in
the first round of last year's tour-
nament.
Bills have chance to clinch title
MIAMI (AP) � The Buffalo
Billsare closing in on the AFC East
title and trying to keep their emer-
gence as one of the NFL's better
teams in perspective.
The Bills improved the
league's best record to 10-1 Mon-
day night with a 31-6 victory over
the Miami Dolphins and can
clinch their first division champi-
onship since 1980 by beating the
New York Jets next week.
Ronnie Harmon and Robb
Riddick scored two touchdowns
apiece and Cornelius Bennett led
a defense that limited Miami's
sputtering offense to 257 net
yards as Buffalo extended the
club's longest winning streak
since 1974 to six games.
"The sky's the limit for this
team defensive end Bruce Smith
saidAll we've got to do is keep
our heads and not get carried
away with what we've done
We play the New York Jets
next week. That's the most impor-
tant game of the season he
added, refusing to be drawn into
speculation about how far the
Bills can go in post season. "That's
all we can think about. Everything
else will take care of itself
Harmon and Riddick, sub-
bing for injured tailback Thurman
Thomas, combined for 229 yards
total offense and Jim Kelly com-
pleted 18 of 26 passes for 211
yards and one touchdown for
Buffalo.
The Bills lead the Indianapo-
lis Colts and New England Patri-
ots by four games in the AFC East
and are two games up in the race
to claim the homefield advantage
throughout the playoffs.
The Dolphins, on the other
hand, were virtually eliminated
the playoff picture after falling to
5-6, including an 0-5 record
against AFC East opponents.
The Bills won a September 11
meeting between the teams 9-6
and have won three straight in a
series Miami once dominated.
"I would not have guessed
we would come away with this
kind of margin (of victory), and if
we played again tomorrow it
probably wouldn't be said Bills
Coach Marv Levy. "The Dolphins
are a good football team. They're
better than what the score indi-
cated
Dan Marino, held without a
touchdown pass in the September
game, threw a 4-yarder to Mark
Clayton in the second quarter, but
he also was intercepted three
times while completing 19 of 30
passes for 224 yards.
"I thought at halftime we
could win the football game said
Miami Coach Don Shula. "We
had some scoring opportunities
but couldn't capitalize. "We had
to have this one. As it turned out,
we didn't challenge. It's a big
disappointment
Buffalo led 10-6 at the half
behind Kelly's 16-yardtouch-
down pass to Harmon and Scott
Norwood's 30-yard field goal.
The Bills scored 14 third-quarter
points to break the game open
after a defensive holding penalty
against Jackie Cline cost the Dol-
phins a fumble recovery near
midfield.
The ruling that Cline held
Bills fullback Jamie Mueller on the
ground and wouldn't allow him
to try to recover his fumble pro-
longed an 11-play, 80-yard drive
leading to Riddick's 1-yard touch-
down run and a 17-6 lead.
"The big play was the
fumble call They said it was
defensive holding Shula said.
"It's the first time I've seen it
called
Join Kristen Halberg and The East Carolinian
Sports team as they bring you the best in campus
sports coverage every Tuesday and Thursday.
m
The Finest In
Ski Apparel
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in
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Ski Equipment
And Ski
Accessories for the
Entire Family.
GORDON'S
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
Open til 9:00 Wed. & Fri.
756-1003
Driving A Ford-Built Vehicle?
ENGINE SALE
Ford Authorized Remanufactured Engines
C'mon In now and save big on a big selection
of Ford Authorized Remanufactured
Engines. You'll find powerful savings
on engines for almost any Ford-
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Every engine Is remanufactured In the
Ford tradition of quality. And backed
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CHRISTMAS IN NOVEMBER
Over 200 Christmas presents
through the month of November
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ECU
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JOIN THE SPIRIT AND CALL
757-6913
When you hear them sleigh bells
ringin' be the right caller
&
WIN
WZMB wishes to thank these area merchants
for making a November Christmas possible
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
Attic
Marathon
Mendenhall Student Center
Flamingo Records
New Deli
JefTery's Beer and Wine
Grogs
The Shirt Printery
Pepsi Bottling Company
Substation II
Record Bar
Mojo Sportswear
Little Caesar's
BLTs





Title
The East Carolinian, November 17, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 17, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.642
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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