The East Carolinian, November 15, 1988






Inside
CLASSIHEDS6
FEATURES8
SPORTS10
Features
Stoney's Pizza joins th? Greenville pie battle. Read
what it is like to cruise with tike "Emerald City's Fin-
est" on a Friday night see page 8
Sports
Blue Edwards ripp? down a backboard Saturday
night at Mihges Coliseum as the Pirate hoopsters held
an impressive intra-squad scrimmage, see page 10
She iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 35
Tuesday November 15,1988
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Students beat the system to drink
By CONSTANCE WARD
Suff Writer
Karen Ranis, 21, is an ECU
students who found wavs to get
around the drinking age law.
Ms. Rawls only recently
reached the legal drinking age
and now freely admits that she
owned four illegal identification
cards. She said she got the cards
by finding them on the ground,
getting them from friends and
having one made.
Ms. Rawls said that when the
law changed, her drinking behav-
ior did not change. "It was fun
getting away with it Ms. Rawls
said about drinking. She noted
that students are going to keep
getting away with it.
Ms. Rawls is only one of a
large percentage of students who
never planned to obey the drink-
ing age law. Jerry Lotterhos, di-
rector of Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Program at ECU, in 1986 con-
ducted a study on ECU students
to learn what they planned to do
when the drinking age increased
to 21.
Lotterhos found that the law
had little affect on students drink-
ing behavior. He learned that 83
percent of the students disagteed
with the new law. Onlv 6 percent
said they would stop drinking
and 9.5 percent said they would
drink more. Lotterhos found that
students who drank lightest (one
drink on occasion) were more
likely to stop drinking than those
who drank heavily (six drinks or
more on occasion).
Another finding was that 85
percent of the students had begun
drinking alcohol by age 18. Ms.
Rawls said she began drinking at
age 14 but her early drinking
came about because she lived in
Europe at the time and there are
no drinking age limitations there.
She said her parents knew about
her alcohol use and accepted it.
Lotterhos said, "We (United
States) believe laws make a differ-
ence but many societies without
drinking age limits handle alco-
hol situations better than the
United States. Lotterhos Mid
countries, like Israel for instance,
"teach positive models" for alcol-
hol use. He said they drink mod-
erately and they specify times and
places to drink. Knox said that
there was little accomplished by
raising the drinking age. He said
alcohol drinking and the use of
illegal identification cards in-
creased.
Knox said the drinking in-
creased because, instead ot stu-
dents paying for drinks at clubs.
they could get someone else to
buy alcohol for them. He said by
doing that, the students could get
more alcohol at a cheaper price.
"When they get downtown, they
are already drunk Knox added.
Knox said owning an illegal
identification card can bring
many problems. He said students
mav trv to use the card for bank
loans, job applications andin
other situations where an age
above 21 is required.
Knox said in North Carolina,
anyone caught with a falsified
driver's license can be imprisoned
for up to six months or be charged
up to $500 in fines. He said anyone
caught trying to sell or make fal-
sified licenses will be imprisoned
for up to three years and be
charged fines.
Ms. Fulghum said that the 21-
age law has created problems for
the residence-life staff. She said
the staff cannot ignore students
that they see drinking in the dor-
mitories. As a result, students
lock their doors to hide drinking
from the staff Ms. Fulghum said.
Knox said the residence staff
can write up underaged drinkers.
He said on the first offense, the
student is warned not to break the
law again. On the second offense,
the student is referred to the resi-
dent director for counseling and
on the third offense, the student is
fined $25. Ms. Fulghum said the
staff could deal with the drinking
situation better when the drink-
ing age was 18, but she added,
"I'm not advocating lowering it to
18
Ms. Rawl said if the age law
did go down to 18, there would be
a lot of parties. And if drinking
was allowed in the dormitories,
"things will go crazy again she
said.
Knox, Lotterhos and Ms.
Fulghum all said that education is
the only way the present drinking
age can be effective.
Knox said all students should
learn the dangers of alcohol and
how tobecareful with it. But some
students may not change their
views on alcohol use once on the
college level he added.
Lotterhos said, "We don't
teach a positive role model" for
youth. He said, "Adults should
behave better
Ms. Fulghum said we need to
be stricter on students and edu-
cate them. She said the laws are
not doing enough by just fining 19
and 20-year-olds $25. Ms.
Fulghum said the Department of
Resident Life and Housing ac-
cepts ideas from student organi-
zations that want to help fight fff-
cohol abuse.
Eyewitness account of Chernobyl
Shadowed by state and POWMIA flags,a sUute commerating
faTN?n "Civil War Confederates stands in silent memorium at
the Pitt County Court House. (File Photo, ECU Photo Lab)
Aftermath of disaster called 'spooky'
F.CU News Bureau
Vacant buildings, emptv
towns and a marred landscape
could provide the setting for a
science fiction novel. But such a
place is not science fiction. It is
real.
It is in the Soviet Union at
Chernobyl, the site of the world's
worst disaster involving a nuclear
generating plant.
"It was spooky. There was no
activity, no life in the towns and
villages says Dr. Trenton Davis,
an East Carolina University envi-
ronmental health professor and
acting dean of the School of Indus-
try and Technology. Davis visited
the Chernobyl site in October.
Within a 20-mile radius of the
plant, every structure, every
house, barn, apartment building
and soccer stadium, was de-
serted, according to Davis. Prip-
yat, the nearest town, built in 1971
and containing a population of
50,000 in 1986, is empty and bare.
Empty too is the town of Cher-
nobyl that once was home to
14,000 people. An older and heav-
ily contaminated village, where
7,000 people once lived, has been
destroyed in the cleanup.
Davis and a delegation oi 60
scientists from 19 countries vis-
ited the Chernobyl nuclear plant
and the deserted towns that sur-
round it while attending a Soviet
sponsored international confer-
ence, Oct. 24-28, to discuss envi-
ronmental problems.
The conference delegates
were among the first scientists
outside the Soviet Union to wit-
ness the massive cleanup efforts
that have been going on around
Chernobyl since 1986 nuclear ac-
cident. The delegates were also
among the first to hear the Soviets
speak openly and candidly about
their own environmental protec-
tion problems.
"I've never had a professional
or a personal experience equal to
this said Davis, describing the
conference acitivities that began
with meetings in Moscow. The
conference included a 500-mile
train journey to Kiev and a 60-
mile bus ride, through the rural
countryside to the Chernobyl
nuclear power plant.
The countryside stands in
sharp contrast to the bustling ac-
tivity at the center of the disaster
area the nuclear complex itself.
Here it's business as usual. About
3,000 workers arrive by train daily
to operate three reactors used to
generate electric power at the site.
The reactor that was dam-
aged in the accident has been
covered over by what the Soviets
call a "sarcophagus a concrete
lid embedded with hundreds of
monitoring probes. The core of
the reactor has not been removed
and probably won't be removed
until technology develops robots
sophisticated enough to do the
work.
The accident occurred on
April 26, 1986, when the cooling
system on one of the plant's four
nuclear reactors failed. As the
core of the reactor melted a
buildup of gas blew the roof off
the reactor building. A cloud of
radiation spread from the plant.
"We were told that 60 people
died in the accident and 127
people arc still being treated for
radiation said Davis.
He said the cleanup of what
the Soviet scientists describes as a
"biological mess has cost $6.4
billion and the work continues.
Thousands of Soviet troops
involved in the cleanup are sta-
tioned on the perimeter of ft
disaster area. "There may be is
many as 50,000 troops the i al-
though the authorities would not
tell us the exact number " Davis
said. The troops are working to
remove contaminated 'opsoil and
trees from parts of the landscape.
Davis was told tha the trucks and
bulldozers doing the work often
Ijave to be abandoned with the
soil they carry
Davis s d a latex material is
also being used in the cleanup. He
said the latex is sprayed on the
ground and onto the walls of
buildings to soak up radiation.
See CHERNOBYL, page 3
Tickets turn big
bucks off students
By SYLVIA BILLINGSLEY
SUH Writer
' he controversy between
' s traffic services office and
those under their regulationhas
grown with the department's
price increases this year.
The traffic services office, 609
E. 10th st is responsible for the
planning, budgeting, financial
management and control of all
traffic and parking activities on
campus.
So far this school year 2,034
decals have been sold for staff
parking, 3,147 for commuter
parking, 1,728 for resident park-
ing and 1,057 for freshman park-
ing. The total spaces for the four
types of decals is 8,166, which is
2,166 more decals than there are
spaces.
The amount of money park-
ing fines bring in has increased
more than $10 000 each year since
1985. Cars are ticketed and towed
by the ECU traffic department
every day. Cars are towed if
parked against regulation in
handicap and staff spaces, caus-
ing traffic problems or if they
appear on the tow list. This list is
made up of cars with three un-
cleared tickets.
Vehicle registration has
raised $408,300 since it began in
August for the 1988-89 school
year. In the 1987-88 school year,
penalties brought in $98,284 and
meters raised $6,716.26.
Pat Gertz, assistant director of
traffic services said, "We don't
miss a trick. We ticket everything.
We tow from the staff lot in front
of Spillman religiously every
morning. Students have until 7
a.m. to move their car, we tow
them by 8:30 a.m
"The department also tickets
for moving violations. If moving
violations are not cleared in 72
See TRAFFIC, page 5
Slowly but surely, the addition to Mendenhall Student Center begins to take shape. An exact
date of completion is not sure, but projections are for the summer of 1989. (File Photo, ECU
Photo Lab)
Laotians release captives
JACKSONVILLE (AP) -
While the sister of POW-MIA ac-
tivist Donna Long says she is bit-
ter because the U.S. government
didn't do more to get her sister
and another activist released from
detention in Laos, a former POW
says the pair may have done more
harm than good for their cause.
Retired Brig. Gen. Norman
Gaddis, who was a POW for al-
most six years in Vietnam, told
The Durham Morning Herald
that Ms. Long and Jim Coop had
impeded the Reagan
administration's efforts regard-
ing POWs in Southeast Asia.
"I'm confident that the U.S.
government is doing everything
it can to secure information con-
cerning those who are still miss-
ing in action said Gaddis, who
lives in Davie County. He said
efforts of private organizations
raise false hopes.
"It is very tragi� that they do
that to these families he said.
Gaddis said he has seen no
firm evidence that POWs are still
being held in Southeast Asia. He
said sightings of Caucasians there
may be of other nationalities or of
men who "deserted our armed
forces
Ms. Long and Coop, who
lives in Hampstead, were re-
leased Saturday and are expected
back in the United States Wednes-
day night.
"I'm relieved that Donna is
out of there Ms. Long's sister
Toni Tumlin said Saturday from
the Jacksonville home the two
share. "I feel like 50 tons have
been lifted off of my shoulders
Coop's wife, Pat, told The
Jacksonville Daily News, "I'm
very thrilled and excited
Mrs. Coop, speaking from
Washington where she attended
Veterans Day ceremonies at the
Vietnam Memorial on Friday,
said she does not have any feel-
ings of resentment toward the
Laotian government fur holding
her husband captive.
"I'm iust relieved they are
coming home, and I'm looking at
the positive side she said.
But Ms. Tumlin said she has
some bitterness toward the U.S.
government.
"They (Ms. Long and Coop)
should have never been left over
there in the first place she said.
Ms. Long and Coop were
captured by Laotian officials Oct.
3 while on a mission in search of
American prisoners of war. The
two illegally crossed the Mekong
River into Laos while attempting
to publicize a $2.4-million reward
to anyone who could produce a
live POW.
They were released, after re-
ceiving $1,500 fine incurred by the
pair and after veterans agreed to
cancel a planned demonstration.





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS, 1988
Monday's unseasonably warm weather gives these two coeds a chance to relax in the sun
at the fountain and chat for a while. (Photo By Angela Pridgen, ECU Photo Lab)
Embassy must be
rebuilt for security
WASHINGTON (AP)
President Reagan said today the
United States has "no choice" but
to tear down the nearly complete
U.S. Embassy in Moscow because
the facility is riddled with eaves-
dropping devices.
Reagan, walking toward his
helicopter to begin a campaign
trip to Arkansas, Missouri and
California, was asked if he had
decided the embassy must be de-
molished.
"Yes he replied, "because
there's no way to rid it of the many
listening devices that were built
into it
"We have to do it. We have no
choice Reagan said. Asked
where the money would be found
for a replacement, he replied,
"We'll take it away from some-
thing else
"We're going to start and
have an American-built one he
said of the embassy.
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Israeli government facing reform
The East Carolinian
Serving tlic Ecul Carolina campu community since 1025.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising. Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
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JERUSALEM (AP) � Presi-
dent Chaim lerzog today asked
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's
hardline ikud Woe to form
Israel's next government, Israel
radio said.
However dissension broke
out in Shamir's party over Cabi-
net posts and concessions
granted small religious parties to
gain their support md with it a
governing coalition.
Part of the j. ri e of the ultra
Orthodox parties' endorsement.
secured late Sunday, was a prom
lse to amend Israel's controver-
sial 'Who is a )ev lav so Ortho-
dox rabbi hav . xritisive rights
to approve conversions to Juda-
ism
to form a new government, then net could at least delay, and possi-
21 days to put the new govern- bly sabotage his efforts to form a
Most Ai
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By i im'T has th� �
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ment in place. If necessary, he can
request an extension of 21 days
Likud and Labor have gov-
erned Israel since the deadlocked
1984 elections. In conclusive Nov.
I elections gave Likud 40 seats in
the 120 member parliment and
Labor 39. But with its new ultra-
Orthodox partners, Likud and its
allies on the far right would con-
tiol 63 seats.
Rafi Edri, who headed a La-
bor delegation that met with
Herzog earlier today, conceded
the (eft-leaning party's defeat.
This morning it's clear that
Shamir v ill form the next govern
ment
We did what we could and
we did not succeed, but we did
� Mais, our principles
fu . i r. poiters
I dKir Party leader Shimon
i i es said the partv had ' done
vhdt i! could and these aie the
never promised an)
government.
The agreements with one reli-
gious partv, Agudat Israel, also
remained to be finalized.
Likud legislator David Levy
angrily denounced the agreement
with two key religious parties,
Shas and Agudat Israel, that
yielded crucial Cabinet portfolios
to the ultra-Orthodox in exchange
for their support.
"1 think a very serious mis-
lake was made here, and 1 can
only be sorry about it said Levy,
adding that the party gave awa
too much dd would face "many
difficulties" in negotiations that
lav ahead.
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Levy is a longtime rival of
Shamir in the Likud, and has re-
acted bitterly to reports suggest-
ing he would be bypassed for the
post of foreign minister.
To woo Shas and Agudat Is-
rael into the coalition, Shamir
promised what Labor would not
the amendment to Israel's "Who
is a Jew or Law of Return, which
guarantees automatic citizenship
to all jews and converts. The
amendment would change the
law to recognize only conversions
performed by Orthodox rabbis.
Other concessions included a
promise to Shas party leader
Rabbi Yitzhak Peretz that he
would hold the key portfolios of
deputy prime minister and inte-
rior minister, the Jerusalem Post
said
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Coeds
(CPS) Female colle
dents too often suffer "p�
assment" from thtir male I
mates, a new report by thej
ciation of Amerit cin C
(AAC) in Washington
charges, and it makes it harj
them to go to college
The AAC , which in
years hiis sponsored nui
reports saying college
weather an inhibiting
mate" on campus, ti j
cape, defined "peer harass
as humiliating ntedi
comments and d r gatoryj
innuendoes in its reporl
I iarassemenl i la
on Campus
"These things I j
women all the time, but
ever looks at them
Sandier, director �
Project on tin ind
bon ot Women, u hi h iss
report.
"W imen i ften i
bad things but feel t
anything about it. V.
complain because tl
normal b -he'
are, or th�
will happen
"For I
tionships U
hostilil er md
even viol
dents
To a lesser c
fessors a
Effects
witnes
. mtinued from page
i he maternal is later remd
n buried at a disp
While visiting Ch
nuclear, plant the
lunched at the
administration buildi
windows enabled the
10 look out on the buil
houses the damagi j
"It was unusual
there eating caviar I
out atthe-itorn th (
me racIutiorTX elsal
were well within acceptal
and Davis never felt
about being exp
els of radiation
In the four and a ha
meetings Davis said
Soviet officials ii
mayor of Moscow
rvobyl accident 'an �
sis
"It was clear to i J
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1
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 15,1988 3
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Coeds suffering from harassment
(CPS) - Female college stu-
dents too often suffer "peer har-
assment" from their male class-
mates, a new report by the Asso-
ciation of American colleges
(AAC) in Washington, D.C
charges, and it makes it harder for
them to go to college.
The AAC, which in recent
years has sponsored numerous
reports saying college women
weather an inhibiting "chilly cli-
mate" on campus, that men es-
cape, defined "peer harassment"
as humiliating, unwanted sexual
comments and derogatory sexual
innuendoes in its report, "Peer
Harassement: Hassles for Women
on Campus
"These things happen to
women all the time, but no one
ever looks at them said Bernice
Sandier, director of the A AC'S
Project on the Status and Educa-
tion of Women, which issued the
report.
"Women often see these as
bad things but feel they can't do
anything about it. Women don't
complain because they see it as
normal behavior, as the way men
are, or they don't think anything
will happen
"For too many students, rela-
tionships be women experience
hostility, anger and sometimes
even violence from male stu-
dents
To a lesser extent, male pro-
fessors also use their power over
Effects of
witnessed
Continued from page 1
The material is later removed and
then buried at a disposal site.
While visiting Chernobyl
nuclear plant the delegate
lunched at the power plant's
administration building. Large
windows enabled the delegated
to look out on the building that
houses the damaged reactor.
"It was unusual to be sitting
there eating caviar and looking
out at the site of the world's worst
.jjactor acqdeut DavisaajdJSut
me raOTatiorTVvelsTn flleite
were well within acceptable limits
and Davis never felt worried
about being exposed to high lev-
els of radiation.
In the four and a half days of
meetings Davis said he heard
Soviet officials, including the
mayor of Moscow, call the Cher-
nobyl accident "an ecological cri-
sis
"It was clear to me that Cher-
female students to bribe or coerce
women to have sex with them,
Sandier said. Other male profes-
sors collude in sexual harassment
by allowing their male students to
berate women during classroom
discussions.
The report arrived as many
campuses were trying new ways
to combat sexual harassment of
students and campus employees.
Pennsylvania's Millersville
University, for example, formed a
committtee in October to educate
sutdents about sexual harass-
ment. "It will not be tolerated
said Doris Cross, the committee's
chairwoman. "This university
wants to move ahead and there is
no place for it here
Some schools require stu-
dents to participate in sexual
awareness seminars. Southern
Methodist University now for-
bids amorous student-faculty re-
lationships, as do the universities
of Pennsylvania and Delaware,
and Temple, Brown and Harvard
universities.
In fact, many campuses al-
ready are operating the kinds of
programs the AAC suggests to
help combat the problem.
"I never feel they're doing
enough Sandier said of the ef-
forts. "Institutions are just becom-
ing aware that this is a problem,
this is just a beginning
Students, too, have tried. A
University of Massachusetts fra-
ternity canceled a bikini contest
last spring when the event's spon-
sor, Miller Beer, was petitioned by
offended students. About 50 stu-
dents picketed a University of
Maryland fraternity where sev-
eral members had surrounded
and threatened a woman who had
complained about a song they
were chanting about gang rape at
a campus bar.
"There's no question that fra-
ternities and sports teams� in
particular football and basketball
teams� are the worst offenders
Sandier said.
The report accused fraterni-
ties of fostering "a crowd mental-
ity" that, when combined with
drinking, can "create a poten-
tially explosive situation (for
women)
The report cited other com-
mon examples: "scoping which
involves loudly rating passing
women's attractiveness on a scale
of one to ten, and yelling obsccnti-
tles at female passersby.
"The tragedy is that this is
seen as usual behavior Sandier
said.
Although peer harassment
probably is widespread, Sandier
said few schools have surveyed
their students to determine the
extent of the problem.
In 1966, however, Cornell
University found that 78 percent
of the female students it surveyed
had heard sexist commentsand. 68
percent had received unwelcome
attention from male peers.
In another study, 92 percent
of the women surveyed at the
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology had received unwelcome
sexual attention, while 70 percent
of the women surveyed at the
University of Rhode Island re-
ported they had been sexually
insulted.
Such harassment, the AAC's
report contended, tells women
they're always vulnerable, a mes-
sage that can undermine a
woman's self-esteem and damage
their academic careers. "Some
women may change classes or
majors, change schools, or drop
out altogether the report stated
It can cause many� although
less immediate� problems for
men, the report added. "When
men view women as objects to be
demeaned, men find it difficult to
relate to women as equal human
beings, much less as friends or
potential romantic partners. Men
who do not respect women are
not prepared for the working
world, where women are increas-
ingly likely to be their col
leagues
The report also asserted
schools with reputations for being
inhospitable to women may have
trouble getting funds from state
legislatures and convincing fe-
male students to register.
CD ETC SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
IIILL STUDENTS H0 NEED
MONEY FOR C0UEGE
Every Student it Eligible for Some Type of
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades or Parental Income.
� We have a data bank of ovr 200,000 titling of scholarships,
fellowships, grants, and loans, representing over S10 billion in private
sector funding.
� Many scholarships are given to students based on their academic
interests, career plans, family heritage and place of residence.
� There's money available for students who have been newspaper car-
riers, grocery clerks, cheerleaders, non-smokers . . . etc.
� Results GUARANTEED.
I
I
I
CALL
ANYTIME
For A Frea Brochure
(800) 346-6401
�'
!
STUDENT UNION COMMITTEES ARE
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
Committees Include:
"Public Relations and Publicity Committee
Special Concerts Committee
Major Concerts Committee
Coffeehouse Committee
Films Committee
Production Committee
Applications can be found in Room 236-Mendenhall
Student Center, 757-6611, ext. 210.
Deadline for Applications-Nov. 15.
Chernobyl disaster
by ECU professor
Join
Joe Harris and The
East Carolinian
News Department
for the latest devel-
opments in campus
news.
Every Tuesday and
Thursday.
nobyl was an event of such a mag-
nitude that it really scared the
average man and woman in the
street. And it shook up the gov-
ernment officials Davis said.
He said the accident along
with Soviet emphasis on open-
ness prompted the Soviets to hold
the conference. It also resulted in
the formation of a new state
commission on environmental
protection. He said it is clear Sovi-
ets "don't want an accident like
this to occur again
�� Tr� 6viets want the world
to know that they are serious
about addressing environmental
problem- They are also inter-
ested in I irning about ways to
prevei i ntrol and deal with the
probk. is they do wave he said.
"And th ire admitting that
he have thes problems said
Davis He said it was not just
Chernobyl that was emphasized
but other environmental issues of
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
the country that were discussed
too. For example, the Russians
told how Lake Aral, the fifth larg-
est fresh water lake in the world, is
dying and it may be too late to
save it.
'The way they are talking
about the environment sounds a
lot like the rhetoric used by politi-
cians here in the U.S. during the
1960's and early 1970V Davis
said.
The conference was spon-
sored by the Local Industries and
Public Services Workers Union
and the Medical Workers Union
of Moscow. Davis was one of
three Americans invited to
make presentations at the con-
ference. He spoke to the partici-
pants on how North Carolina
handles and manages hazard-
ous waste.
Put your lips around Rio's hottest
event in November. Perform
your favorite Lipsync to the tune
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to the finalist on November 30th.
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Physical Education
My first rime tutoring was a night
to remember. My stu Jem was some-
thing called Bone Crusher Rood, a.k.a.
Billy Jo, defensive tackle for the foot-
ball team.
I had the shock of my life when
he answered his dorm room door.
He was about six foot sevenin
diameter. And when he shook my
hand, I thought IH never get it back.
So there I w as, race-to-knee with
the big man on campus, wondering
how I was going to relate American
Literature to The Hulk.
jgr Rut then he pulled out a can of
Orange Cappuccino. I was shocked!
Could it be that this tough jcxk
liked its delicate taste? And when
Hone Crusher brought out the bone
china, I was beyond belief
Reading the expression on my
face, he said, "What can I say? I like it.
The Cafe Francais is pretty gtxxi,
nx)" Well, who's going ro argue, I
thought. As we sipped our Orange
Cappuccino, 1 discovered rhar Billy Jo
loves reading novels; his only problem
was poetry So I gave him tips on
reading Emily Dickinson, and he
gave me a cony of Ann Beanie's
"Falling in Place"
All I could think was, Dads never
going to believe this!
General Foods International Coffees.
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Pete Fernald, G�rWM-Mt�r
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lAMES F.). MCKEE, Dintof Advtrtmt
Joe Harris, nbm�
KRISTEN HALBERG,sFWf,FAi�
Tim Hampton, F-r-roFor
Michelle England, c��M��j�r
Debbie Stevens, s�r��ry
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Mac Clark, ��!��� Me�r
N.vcmherl5, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Dolphins
Tragedy proves American hypocrisy
A couple of weeks ago, the atten-
tion of millions of humans around
the world was focused on two
whales near the North Pole.
And more than attention:
money Millions of dollars were
spent freeing the whales as scien-
tists, researchers and volunteers
from many nations banded together
to save the icebound trio (later a
duo).
It was perhaps too expensive,
and if was definitely somewhat
hypocritical. Nevertheless, the ef-
fort showed how deeply even the
most cynical among us can be
moved by the plight of our mam-
malian brethren.
Meanwhile, back at the ranch,
there were allegations that the
United States Na v had beaten and
starved dolphins. The dolphins in
question were part of the Navy's on-
going secret underwater project
which trains dolphins and other
aquatic animals to carry out such
iJS"ks"asTc�catSng mines, recovering
torpedoes and locating enemy frog-
men. At least one dolphin trained in
this project has recently died in ac-
tion, in the Persian Gulf.
Whether or not Navy research-
ers "administered corporal punish-
ment" to the dolphins in its program
is as yet unresolved. Also unre-
solved is the question of whether or
not the Navy has any right to carry
on its research, regardless of how
well or poorly the animals are
treated.
It's a thorny issue, not to be taken
lightlv. Dolphins are obviously
well-suited to performing such
tasks. Even the most ardent animal
rights activists agree that with
proper training and guidance, the
Navy's animals might eliminate the
risk to humans in certain combat
situations.
The real problem is the same one
that arises with the introduction of
any new weapon, whether its intent
is for offense or for defense. Virtu-
ally anything that makes a war eas-
ier to fight makes the war that much
more likely to be fought. And a bet-
ter shield spurs the development of
a better sword.
In addition, dolphins may be the
second most intelligent species on
the planet (assuming humans are
the most intelligent). They are also
very friendly; they have been
known to help rescue swimmers in
distress and to play with swimmers
not in distress. No 111 B SUrl"V
dolphins are conscious of them-
selves in the way that humans are,
but nevertheless they are in a sense
our close cousins
The predicament is this: is it right
to drag other species into our petty
conflicts, even for the purpose of re-
ducing the danger to humans? If we
do indeed care about them as much
as the episode of the grey whales at
the North Pole attests, how can we
justify making them fight our
batts?
5TRAH6E,MTnlS5APS
IF TUB HI0IISMEDIA,
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Editorial deemed' insulting'
To the editor:
This is in response to the edi torial
in the November 10th East Carolinian.
I take great offense in the statement
that Bush was elected by the least
intelligent voters because he pan-
dered to their whims. Since you are
undoubtedly a Democrat and voted
for Dukakis, am I to believe that you
are the quintessence of human intel-
ligence and all those who voted with
you are a great intelligentsia? I don't
think so.
While I'm no mental heavy-
weight, I do believe that I'm fairly
well educated and competent about
what is going on in our world around
us. I voted for Bush, and I'm damn
proud of it! True, this was not the best
campaign that could have been run.
Had Dukakis won, you would proba-
bly be lauding over how "Educated
America" banded together and made
the right choice.
I can sentimentalize with the fact
that you are upset that your candi-
date lost (my favorite candidate
i�dwpped-out of the primaries), but
let's not yhige abouit arfd ifjsult
other people. After all, I believe that
those who went out and voted are
those who were intelligent enough to
know just what was at stake in our
country and voted because they felt
that they had an honor-bound right
to vote.
Sean Magill
Freshman
Biology
Hart attacked
To the editor:
I recently read with dismay a
story in the News and Observer in
which ECU Athletic Director Dave
Hart said he was not interested in
extending any kind of long-term
contract to the next Pirate football
coach.
Instead he proposed a "roll-
over" four-vear contract, where the
fifth year would be offered if the
coach was "successful" in his first
year.
Perhaps the university needs to
look at the length of Hart's contract.
ECU officials have long said they
are committed to building a winning
football program competitive in Di-
vision I-A. Their statements, how-
ever, have never translated into
deeds.
Few would argiie that Art Baker
really needed more time to turn the
Pirate program around. Four years is
just not long enough for a coach to
establish Himself and how many
players want to come to a school
where the coach that recruited them
probably won't be around as long as
they are (most college students today
take five years to complete school)?
There have been many top
rames jn�ntioned as feasible candi-
dates for the job including the offen-
sive coordinators at Miami and Okla-
homa and the head coach at Marshall
University. Almost all of the pros-
pects, however, have said they want
longer than four years to build a
program.
It only seems fair. ECU will never
build the athletic program everyone
keeps dreaming of if administrators
like Hart are unwilling to make the
financial and contractural commit-
ments to find a good coach.
I suggest that if Hart is serious
about a winning program at ECU, he
should re-examine his stance on sign-
ing a coach to an extended contract. If
he does not, then maybe he should be
serious about building a winning
program at some other school.
Clay Deanhardt
Graduate Student
English
Voice your view
To the editor:
This is a letter to all students of
ECU. You, as students, have the right
to have your views heard; your opin-
ions, voiced. The best way to do this
is through the Student Welfare
Committee. This committee is a
standing committee of the Student
Government Association's Legisla-
ture. Meetings are held every Mon-
day before legislature meetings,
which are at 5 p.m. in Mendenhall.
All issues pertaining to welfare
of you- the students of ECU - are
addressed. This committee meW-
bgrs, obviously,cover -a a?aJf'4SF3
topics at meetings or at least, they can
if they know the concerns of the stu-
dents.
Meetings are open to all stu-
dents, and visitors are welcomed.
Your attending is the best way to
have your voices heard and to make
suggestions concerning the better-
ment of student welfare. Please at-
tend. Student Welfare Committee is
for you - the students. Shouldn't you
offer some input to help your elected
representatives to the committee?
They are, after all, there for you.
Kelly Jones
President of the Legislature
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop themby our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance to joyner library.
For purposes of verification, ail
letters must include the name, major,
classification, address,phone number
and the signature of the authoris).
l�tters are limited to 300 words
or less, double -spaced, typed or
neatly printed. All letters are sub-
ject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will
be permitted. Students, faculty and
staff writing letters for this page are
reminded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday
for Thursday editions.
Afghanistan attack Soviet controlled fort
By ROBERT D. KAPLAN
The New Republic
Amid the ruins of Kandahar, a communist-held
fortress in southern Afghanistan, the rattle of light
machine-gun fire is so constant that the sheep,
scared away by the crash of a stone, don't flinch from
the sound of bullets. The city's population, once
180,000, is down to around 50,000 held hostage by
S vut and Afghan troops who are using the remain-
ing ci viiians as a shield against the mujahadeen. But
to no avail; the rebels are poised for an all-out as-
sault. Within months, or maybe weeks, Kandahar�
the southernmost bastion of a Russian army since
Czar Peter the Great's first southern campaign three
centuries ago� will fall.
The Soviet military gained control of Kandahar
by saturating the surrounding desert with tens of
thousa ndsof land mi nes,and then repeatedly bomb-
ing the city from the air; much of it now resembles a
vast archaeological site. What the Kremlin has got-
ten for its exertions is control of the airport and five
square miles of a city that is surrounded and unceas-
ingly harassed by mujahadeen units.
"We could capture Kandahar in 24 hours if we
didn't care about civilian casualties said Haji
Abdel Latif, who at 83 is the most revered
mujahadeen commander in the area. "But we have
already given God over a million shaheedan (mar-
tyrs). That is more than enough
The Soviets, hoping that Afghan troops could
hold the fort until the troop withdrawal deadline of
Feb. 15, pulled their own troops out of Kandahar in
late summer. Within days, however, the
mujahadeen captured the city's grain silo and sev-
eral government posts, drawing Soviet troops back
into the city.
With Gotterdammerung approaching for
Kandahar's occupying troops, American prestige
should be at an all-time high here. What one hears
instead is a lot of bitterness concerning an aspect of
America's Afghan policy that has baffled not only
the mujahadeen, but Western diplomats as well. It
seems that American policy-makers have created an
impression of spinelessness by allowing Pakistan to
promote the ambitions of Gulbudding Hekmatyar,
leader of the most radical, fundamentalist and anti-
American of the seven Afghan resistance parties.
The root of the problem is this: Though U.S.
taxpayers foot the bill, the weapons that the
mujahadeen get are distributed by the government
of Pakistan, and specifically by the Interservices
Security Agency, Pakistan's version of the CIA. ISI's
control of the arms pipleine is one of the many
concessions the United States made to Pakistan's
late President Zia ul-Haq in exchange for his provid-
ing the mujahadeen with a rear base inside his coun-
try.
In addition, it was hoped, the arrangement
would prevent the United States from becoming
entwined in the labyrinth of rivalries among the
Afghan guerrillas. But the distribution ratio worked
3ut by ISI furthered Zia's interests in Afghanistan
more than it did America's or even the
mujahadeen's. Zia� like theZia-installed clique still
running ISI� always tried to provide Hekmatyar
with a disproportionate share of arms and political
aid.
The Americans played along with this policy,
following logic that went something like this: If the
Pakistanis think they can impose their will on the
Afghans� something neither the British nor the
Russians could do� well, let them try; America is
certainly not going to get into a public shouting
match with Pakistan over an Afghan guerrilla leader
who is bound to falter.
After Zia's death in an Aug. 17 plane crash, it
was supposed that Hekmatyar would get less sup-
port from Pakistan. But several weeks after the
crash, as the fall of Kandahar looked imminent and
several mujahadeen parties were talking with the
communist governor of the city about a peaceful
surrender, the Pakistanis sponsored Hekmatyar on
a visit to the Kandahar region that led to the collapse
of negotiations.
This caused such diverse mujahadeen factions
as the National Islamic Front of Afghanistan (led by
Westernized, urban aristocrats) and less-extreme
peasant fundamentalists to start talking in one
tongue� against the Americans and the Pakistanis
for propping up Hekmatyar.
"Kandahar would fall with a lot less bloodshed
if the Pakistanis would just butt out said an angry
NIFA official. "Or if the Americans would just butt
in to keep the Pakistanis out
One reason the Americans are willing to back
Hekmatyar is that they, and the Pakistanis, fear a
transfer of power in Kandahar to a pro-royalist
group like NIFA. Were the Afghan communists to
deliver the city to NIFA, ex-king Zahir Shah might
conceivably be persuaded to return here, an event ,
that would tear the resistance apart, since the 73-
year-old king is anathema to all the fundamentalist
parties.
What gets lost in this preoccupation with Paki-
stani-American relations is Afghanistan itself, and �,
the real U.S. interests there. If Hekmatyar is in a
position of dominance after the Soviet puUout, the
nation will be plunged into a bloody civil war; he has x
no legitimate power base and is detested by other
rebel groups. I
American officials now supporting Pakistani
policy may try to console themselves with the
knowledge that a Hekmaryar-influenced Afghani-
stan is the ultimate Soviet nightmare. It is only from
Hekmatyar's mujahadeen that one hears talk about ?
extending the jihad over the Oxus River into heavily
Islamic sectors of Soviet terri tory once all of Afghani- B
stan is liberated. I
And while the American officials don't want '
massive civilian deaths when communist-held Af-
ghan cities start to rumble, they also don't want the !
communist defeat obscured by last-minute 6
mujahadeen compromised with Soviet-installed i
Afghans. So if it turns out that Kandahar and Kabul '
fall amid pitched street fighting, with Soviet soldiers
"clinging to the helicopters" a la Vietnam, there is 9
going to be a lot of chuckling in Washington and at
the American Embassy in Islamabad. I
The problem is mat while the Soviets richly
deserve such a fate, the Afghan people don't
r
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Continued from page 1
hours, the violator is
court and has to pay all
Anne Joyner, a senio
lives off campus and
purchased a commuter
Miss Jovner said,
less to pay $50, or any ai
money, for a parking stic
there are never parking
commuter. 1 park off
Mrs. Gertz said. "It
rather tight. Several veaj
were situated, but n"
days when everything i
The funds raised bv
tration, parking penal
parking meters are ux
struction and mamtei
parking facilities, stai
fie office and a rest-
The reseve account is t
parking lots and d
Clifton G. Moore, vi i
for business affairs, saii
the money raised is use
thing other than parku
issues.
The fines also incii
nance. Painting, pur .1
and working on parkin
all included in the buj
Envir
want
WASHINGTON
environmental comrrl
looking to President-ek
Bush to take action earl
to back up his cam:
claim to be an environq
"If he specifically pi
Congress half of what r
ised in the campaign, hi
a hell of an environi
ord says Gaylord Nell
selor to the Wildem -I
"Proclaiming hij
environmentalist is
says Robert SanGevj
tional Audubon Socij
president for public at: i
is the time for action. Hi
to prove
Shortly after gettu
publican nominate
moved to stake out
gipwwtr procJairrvrv?
environmentalist" an
Massachusetts Go
Dukakis on the deter
ads about the filthy
Boston Harbor.
In what amount-
rect repudiation of
ministration polici
pledged action on a
fronts, from convenmj
national conference
warming to protec
nation's disappearing
and cleaning up its po
Both Bush and Di
environmentalists, elej
issue to a higher levl
previous presidential
played to an increasi 11
cause.
A Gallup poll re
days before Bush - .i
that b5 percent of the r
Republicans and
Travel oppoj
GREENVILi E
East Carolina I'nivei
sored session or -rudv
tral American nation
has been scheduled I
June 18. The progn
ECU students the op
study Latin America!
and anthropology wf
with Costa Rican famil
Gassesare taughl
on the campus of C
UniversidadNacional
a city located near the
capital city, San Josti
will also take classes u
tional Spanish.
The program tea ti
field trips to both the
and Pacific Coasts
tropical forests and
rural interest. Option
pendent study are av
arrangements are noj
ress to enable students
second summer sessij
Rica beginning in latel
Cost of the progri
for North Carolina r
$2,570 for out-of-stat
The fee includes
airfare, tuition and I
fees, board and rooj
expenses of excursioi
Further infoi
the ECU-Costa Rica
available from the Of I
national Studies, Rooj
eral Classroom Buil
Greenville, N.C.27
(919) 757-6769.
Application deaJ
17,1989.





1

I I
i
r
Tf IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 15,1988 5
V
J
&
? xpnt
lting'
tuilding a v inning
� - tool.
Clay Deanhardt
Graduate Student
English
vour view
letter
lents of
lents, have the righl
s heard; your opin-
The best way to do this
the Student Welfare
This mmittee is a
nm � the Student
A- - lion's Legisla-
te held every Mon-
iture meetings
5 p m. in Mendenhall.
- pertaining to welfare
c students of ECU - are
This committee's mem
isJv rover a vtvtohiyC
stings or at least. they can
i ncerns of the stu-
S are open to all stu-
-itors are welcomed
tding is the best way to
ices heard and to make
concerning the better-
lent welfare. Please at-
lent Welfare Committee is
c students. Shouldn't you
input to help vour elected
es to the committee!1
all, there for you.
Kelly Jones
sklent of the Legislature
ry, obscenity
l and no personal attacks will
I Students, faculty and
iting letters for this page are
�d that they are limited to one
i eeks The deadline for
rial is 5 pm Friday for
ers and 5 pm Tuesday
- .v editions
fort
ex-king Zahtr Shah might
it-d to return here, an event ,
stance apart, since the 73-
Ima to all the fundamentalist
us preoccupation with Paki-
ns is Afghanistan itself, and
there If Hekmatyar is m a
after the Soviet pullout, the
linto a bloody civil war, he has
lase and is detested by other
now supporting Pakistani
nsole themselves with the
tmatvar-influenced Afghani-
net nightmare. It is only from
Jeen that one hears talk about
r the Oxus River into heavily
t territory once all of Afghani- s
nencan officials don't want
when communist-held Af-
ble, they also don't want the
obscured by last-minute
�used with Soviet-installed 1
lout that Kandahar and Kabul J
H fighting, with Soviet soldiers '
pters" a la Vietnam, there is
ickling in Washington and at
fcy in Islamabad. 1
that while the Soviets richly
k? Afghan people don't.
Where does the ticket money go?
Continued from page 1
hours, the violator is taken to
court and has to pay all costs.
Anne Joyner, a senior at ECU,
lives off campus and has never
purchased a commuter sticker.
Miss Joyner said: "It's sense-
less to pay $50, or any amount ot
money, for a parking sticker when
there are never parking spaces for
commuter. I park off campus
Mrs. Gertz said: "It's getting
rather tight. Several years ago we
were situated, but now there are
days when everything is taken
The funds raised by car regis-
tration, parking penalties and
parking meters are used for con-
struction and maintenance of
parking facilities, staffing the traf-
fic office and a reserve account
The reseve account is for future
parking lots and development.
Clifton G. Moore, vice chancellor
for business affairs, said none of
the money raised is used for any-
thing other than parking related
issues.
The fines also include mainte
nance. Painting, purchasing signs
and working on parking lots are
all included in the budget. The
university's archives do not have
the department's spending rec-
ord and Mrs. Gertz said she is
unable to give a specific amount
spent on maintenance, but ap-
proximately $5,000 was just spent
on new traffic signs for the cam-
pus. Ruts and stumps cover the
dirt lots on Third, Fifth and Ninth
Streets There is a need for paving
these lots, but there are no plans
for their improvement.
The traffic department's re-
serve account is used for con-
struction of parking lots on the
campus The prices were in-
creased to make tin account more
capable of expansion. Mrs. Gertz
said, Thechancelloi ha plans for
improving current pai king which
is limited to 6,000 spaces, but the
onlv specific plan is in the future
Andrea Cole, a resident decal
purchaser said 1 expected them
to expand parking spaces when
they started charging more but 1
know I'm not going to buy one
next year
There are plans I or a paved lot
at Minges coliseum with 900 plus
spaces for commuter, resident
and freshman spaces. Comple-
tion is planned for the fall of 1989.
The lot, however, will be approxi-
mately one mile from campus and
the freshman parking lot on 14 th
Street, behind Belk dormitory,
will be omitted upon completion
of the new lot. The increase of
spaces will be lessened with the
omission of the 149 space lot.
In 1986, after a previous decal
price increase from $10 to $25,
land was purchased for three lots
that added 285 spaces.
Two proposals were made by
the university at this time. One, a
proposal for the establishment of
a paved parking lot on the corner
of College Hill Drive and 10th
street, was cancelled this year due
to considerable opposition. The
other, a parking deck, was esti-
mated to cost $6,000 per space.
Mrs. Gertz said a rumor was
started that freshman parking
will be omitted, but the chancellor
is no ready for that.
Anyone wishing to utilize
campus parking spaces, includ-
ing metered spaces, are required
to register their vehicle with traf-
fic services. The cost of ECU park-
ing registration doubled this fall.
The price of decals for commuter,
resident, staff and handicapped
parking increased from $25 to $50.
Freshman decals were raised
from $15 to $50. All fines for viola-
tions on campus doubled also.
Unregistered vehicle fines are
now $20.
Ms. Gertz said said she has
not noticed a decrease in decal
sales. This year the price increase
brought a decrease in sales. Staff
and freshmen purchased ap-
proximately 500 fewer decals,
resident decal sales were down by
approximately 1,000 and com-
muter decal sales are down al-
most one-half from last years
6,231 figure to this year's 3,147.
Lee Sharpe, an ECU sopho-
more that purchsed a sticker last
year, aid: "They're crazy if they
think I'll pay $50 for a parking
sticker when I can park off of Fifth
street and it not cost me a dime.
It's a lot closer to my dorm than
the parking lots anyway
a
For The Finest
In Fresh Seafood
v A�� vii'SS " Fresh Seafood
e I : i ' Tar Landing Seafood
&
AVALjOfAMLAL
Restaurant
758 0327
105 A ort Rd.
Banquei Facilities Avamahle
Environmentalists looking for action,
want Bush to back-up campaign promises
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
environmental communitv is
looking to President-elect George
Bush to take action early next year
to back up his campaign-trail
claim to be an environmentalist.
"If he specifically proposes to
Congress half of what he's prom-
ised in the campaign, he will have
a hell of an environmental rec
ord says Gaylord Nelson, coun-
selor to the Wilderness Society.
"Proclaiming himself an
environmentalist is not enough
says Robert SanGeorge, the Na-
tional Audubon Society's vice
president for public affairs. "Now
is the time for action. He's got a lot
to prove
Shortly after getting the Re-
publican nomination, Bush
moved to stake out the green
ground proclaiming " .�� an .
environmentalist" and putting
Massachusetts Gov. Michael
Dukakis on the defensive with
ads about the filthy waters o
Boston Harbor.
In what amounted to an indi-
rect repudiation of Reagan ad-
ministration policies. Bush
pledged action on a variety of
fronts, from convening an inter-
national conference on global
warming to protecting this
nation's disappearing wetlands
and cleaning up its polluted air
Both Bush and Dukakis ran as
environmentalists, elevating the
issue to a higher level than in
previous presidential races. Thev
played to an increasingly popular
cause.
A Gallup poll released two
davs before Bush's election sai 1
J
that 65 percent of the respondents
Republicans and Derr.ocrats -
Travel opportunity
GREENVILLE - The annual
East Carolina L'niversity-spon
sored session of study in the Cen-
tral American nation Costa Rica
has been scheduled for May 8-
June 18. The program affords
ECU students the opportunity to
study Latin American biology
and anthropology while living
with Costa Rican families.
Classes are taught in English
on the campus of Costa Rica's
Universidad Nacional in Heredia,
a city located near the Costa Rican
capital city, San Jose. Students
will also take classes in conversa-
tional Spanish.
The program features regular
field trips to both the Caribbean
and Pacific Coasts, volcanos,
tropical forests and points of cul
rural interest. Options for inde-
pendent study are available, and
arrangements are now in prog-
ress to enable students to spend a
second summer session in Costa
Rica beginning in late June.
Cost of the program is $1,560
for North Carolina residents and
$2,570 for out-of-state students.
The fee includes round-trip
airfare, tuition and university
fees, board and room, and the
expenses of excursions.
Further information about
the ECU-Costa Rica program in
available from the Office of Inter-
national Studies, Room 1002 Gen-
eral Classroom Building, ECU,
Greenville, N.C. 27858; telephone
(919) 757-6769.
Application deadline is Jan
17,1989.
said the top priority of the next
president should be 'proposing
laws to increase protection of the
environment.
Nancy Light of the Sierra
Club said "the reason Hush got so
many votes was because he did
eliminate some oi the skepticism
about his earlier environmental
stands
She and other officials of na-
tional en ironmentand conserva-
tion groups said in interviews
with The Associated Pressthat the
skepticism came from Fash's role
tariv in the Reagan years as head
of the tort to scrap federal regu-
lations in luding some sacred to
the environmental lobbv
Bush worked to overcome
this by strong, although mainly
generalized, statements in favor
of a better environment.
"In many ways Bush set up
the expectation he's going to be
the best environmental president
since Teddy Roosevelt said Rick
Hind of U.S. Public Interest Re-
search Group. "But his past
leaves us puzzled as to whether
he will live up to this expecta-
tion
"He made a lot of promises
and commitment said Dan
Becker of Environmental Action.
"It would be cynical for him to
turn his back on them
They and others say the na-
tion won't have to wait until Bush
assumes office Jan. 20 to get a
sense of his environmental direc-
tion.
"The clearest indications will
be the appointments he makes to
the key environmental posts
said Brent Blackwelder of the
Environmental Policy Institute.
These jobs are the secretaries
of the interior and energy and the
administrator of the Environ-
mental Protection Agency.
"He needs to put in people
who are not like the James Watt
wrecking crew said David
Baker of Friends of the Earth, re-
ferring to President Reagan's first
and highly controversial interior
secretary.
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Fun After Business Hours
Steve Hardy Bcg!ns at 7 00
Drink Specials All Evening
Hot Buffalo W.ngs 'til 7 30
FEATURING
STEVE
HAROY'S
BEACH PARTY
PRIZES
WFTF
RAMADA
tDGERTON MAN r
HELP WANTED
VPPI ICA riONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR
( OPY EDITOR
&
ASSISTAN1 NEWS EDITOR
FOR
SPRING 1989
APPLY IN PERSON
MONDAY-FRIDAY
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
at
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
2nd FLOOR
PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
IN FRONT OF JOYNER LIBRARY
?Experience Preferred
No phone calls please
RACK ROOM $H0�$
HA�I A IFHISTA! �
With
Lunch Specials $3.95
Served Mon. - Fri. 11 am til 3 pm
Dinner Specials $5.95
Served Sun - Thur. After 5 pm
Late Night Special $4.25
Mexican Pizza Grande
Served Sun. - Thur. After 10 pm
Served Fri. - Sat. After 11 pm
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
PRE-THANKSGIVING
CAPEZIO
RIDING BOOT
Black or taupe
REG $90
6997
Great SUPER VALUES for the
entrlre family! Fantastic buy9
on shoes, boots, handbags
and accessories.
LARGE GROUP
Men's, ladies, and
children's leather
EASTLAND CASUALS
compare at $35-$50
1997 - 3697
Drink Specials
Sunday thru Thursday
Greenvilie
Georgetown Shops
321 Cotanche Street
757-1666
ENTIRE STOCK
WESTIES
25 OFF
Mfg. sugg.
Retail Price
!
SPECIAL GROUP
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2)
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Several styles and
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2997
CAPEZIO
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Med. or low heel.
Reg. $50 2997





0.
r


6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 15,1988
Classifieds
A
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Only two blocks I on loyner
Library � one room of a two bedroom
apartment for sublease after December.
Hardwood floor, cable TV, fully fur-
nished, etc SI 50month plus utilities
757-0412
FURNISHED APT. AVAILABLE: Two
bodrooms. Bus service For info , call 752-
1M1
ROOM FOR RENT: Tar River Apart.
Monthlv rent $83.00. 14 utilities Fun
Roommates Good Study Habits. Aprt.
kept semi-clean to clean. 34 of a mile
from Central Campus. Prefer non-
smoker 0830-3819 Ask for Rob, Mike,
Phil or Dork
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Spring Semester, non smoker, Wilson
Acres, own room - furnished; wd in-
cluded, $190 mo1 il utilities. Call ML
38-690t - leave message
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Two bed
room apartment in Tar River Estates.
Washer, dryer hook up, cable TV $370.00
a month Avbl Spring Semester. Call 752-
3385.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female to share
2 bdrm new apartment Rent $145.00
month12 util (about S25.00) Avail-
able immediately. Call 758-0897 ask for
Leigh.
FOR SALE
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Lexington
Sq (ad) Athletic Club)-$42,500�2 bdrms,
112 bths, lndrv hkup, liv rm wbav win,
kitdin area wbar, refrig, stove,
dshwshr, Fmch drs open to pnv patio w
stor rm, ad) to prkng lot for easv access, ac-
tive hmownrs' assn. 355-6974 after 5.
EBSON COMPUTER: IBM Compatable
256 K RAM, 2 floppy drives, monitor,
manuals and software $500. 524 3170,
after 4, ask for Donna
1983 HONDA 750 SHADOW: 15,000
miles, perfect condition, $1200 524-3170
after 4. ask for Donna
FOR SALE: 14 month membership to the
SPA - SI 50 00, must sell. Call 830-6748.
FOR SALE: 1985 14 x 70 Fisher Mobile
Home 2 br2 ba Extra nice Asking pay-
off 524-4165
POOL TABLE FOR SALE 8 ft, 34" slate,
new cover, great condition. $395 00or best
offer Call 155-4833 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: AKC pups - Chows, Labs,
Cocker Spaniels, German Shepherds and
Shelhes Call 746-4328
FOR SALE: Refrigerator with cabinet -
Sf.5.00 Call 756-1415.
FOR SALE: Deutscaer Miester German -
Tournament Top Foots-Ball Table. $100
neg. Call 758-7364.
PUPPIES: Black lab golden mixed. All
black or black with white bib MF Avail-
able now. A great Christmas gift $25. Call
Mike 758-6912.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer re'sume'
production, and other business and pro-
fessional services. Call 757-3111 M-F for
more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed t ping on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville
N.C. 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach Call 355 2781,
ask for Morgan.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC: Done by
desktop publishing or word processing
Rush jobs ccepted. Call 752-1933.
HELP WANTED
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES. The
Recreation and Parks Department is re
cruiting for part time vouth basketball
coaches for the winter program. Appli
cants must possess some knowledge of
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with vouth. Applicants
must be able to coach voung people, ages
9-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 p.m. - 7 p.m , Monday thru
Friday, and some night and weekend
coaching. The program will extend from
December 1 to mid-February Salary rate
is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour. Applications
will be accepted starting October 20.
Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take sign-ups for our FLORIDA tours. We
furnish all materials for a successful pro-
motion. Good PAY and FUN. Call CAM
PUS MARKETING at 1-800-777-2270.
RESORT HOTELS: Cruiselines, Airlines
& Amusement Parks, NOW accepting ap
plications for summer jobs, internships
and career positions For more in forma
tion and an application, write National
Collegiate Recreation Service, PO Box
8074; Hilton Head, S.C 29938.
PART-TIME COLLEGE MAN: Delivery,
warehouse and clean up LarTv's Carpet
land 3010 East 10th Street.
TRAVEL FRFE SPRING BREAK! FRA-
TERNITIES & SORORITIES INVITED:
For informal.on about being a Campus
Travel Rep call 800-826-9100 Ask for
Steve t i tnet
Ai 1. N ON - HIRING Federal gov
ernment jobs in vour area and overseas.
Manv immediate openings without wait
ing list or test $17,840 $69 485 Phone call
refundable 602-818 8885 Ext 1-5285.
PERSONALS
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards' Call
Earhis, the mad baseball buver I pav
damn good money for cards of anv vear,
any shape, and any condition If vou need
party money. Big E is the one to call 757-
6366, leave a message
ATTENTION CREEK MALES: If you've
got the looks and you've got the bod,
you've got the chance to be Alpha Xi Delta
Greek God.
TO MY DEAR FRIEND K.P I hope
Bobby enjoyed reading vour rhvme as
much as I enjoyed writing it for you
Plenty of people got to read it, too bad it
was never able to be printed and the rest of
ECU had to miss it. Don't worry I won't
waste any more time to make more
rhymes. �From your old acquaintance.
ZTA SISTERS: The big night is almost
here. Let's make the Crown Ball the great-
est event of the year. �Love the ZTA
Pledges.
NEW DELI JAMS WITH THE BEST:
Attention DEADHEADS: Come jam with
LIQUID SOUND on Friday and reggae
down with ROLLY GRAY & SUNFIRE
Saturday. Don't forget open microphone
nights on Wednesdays.
LORI AND MISSY: We just got through
hell, now it's time for the cocktail. Put on
your party gear and be ready for our party
of the year Your dates are the true daddys
and you know we will outshine all others.
So TONIGHT. TONIGHT: Alpha Xi
Delta Greek God Contest is tonight at the
Attic at 9 00. Admission is $2 00. Come
have some fun and a few laughs and help
us support the American Lung Associa-
tion.
1 SELL MARYKAY: Top line cosmetics at
low prices Perfumes and gift sets are
great gift ideas Contact Kim at 155-7711
for more details. Leave Message.
ANGEL FLIGHT: Thanks Ed Keller and
"usan Toppin for being a great big brother
and sister, �vour little sister. Chris
SOMETHING IN THE CHICKEN: And
Chi Omega �- An Awesome Combina-
tion' We'll be styhn' s.v you at White
Carnation!
DFITA SIGMA THETA SORORITY
INC Will be having their annual Dating
Game on Fri Nov 18th in the Biology
Building Lecture Room directly behind
the main entrance on the right side of the
building All persons interested in partici-
pating in the Dating Game are asked to
contact Juanita Nicholson at 752-0752 by
Nov. 15th. Questions will be screened.
THFTA CHI: Thank you for helping the
Beta's with Pirate Walk last week!
PI KAPPA PHI PLEDGES: Just think It's
about half way over.
HAVE VOU EVER CONSIDERED
ADOPTING?: You probably know a
smoker who'd love to quit for the Ameri-
can Cancer Society's Great American
Smokeout sponsored by Sigma Sigma
Sigma, but needs a little help So, on
Thursday, Nov. 17th, "adopt" a smoker
and help him or her stay away from aga
rettes for 24 hours You'll both feel great
doing it'
TRI SIGMA SAYS JOIN I HE GREAT
AMERICAN SMOKFOUT: On Thurs-
day, November 17. Millions of smokers
across the country will take a break and
trv not to smoke (or 24 hours I low about
vou' Or, if you don't smoke, adopt a
smoker for the day and promise to help
that friend get through the day without a
cigarette! Vou C AN do it!
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS: No
thanks are gixvl enough for all of vour
time, effort, (approximately 2000 volun
teer hours), and support during the r.s ent
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
election. You are all fantastic You'll be
hearing from us soon about our social on
Nov. 18. Get psyched to kick some LBOC!
�Signed - Your 1st Vice-Chair.
SCOTT WALLER: I still think you look
like the Campbell soup boy. MMM-MMM
good.
LAMBDA CHI: Box and OX was the way
to go, to the Lambda Chi house we all did
flow. We didn't let the rain stop us, we all
had a great time. Can't wait to do it again,
thanks to all the Lambda Chi's. �Love the
Sigmas.
SIGMAS: From the cruise Friday night on
the New Spirit boat, we started the week-
end off right as we all did float Lavaliers
were abundant and the awards were re-
ceived. Virginia Beach will never be the
same, too bad we had to leave. Beth,
whose hero do you wanna be?
PLEDGES OF TRI SIGMA: We love you,
keep up the good work. �Love the Sis-
ters.
TO ALPHA XI DELTA, TKE fc KAPPA
SIGMA: We skated around the rink and
my bruise is really big. We had a lot of fun
and hated it had to end. The only ones left
were Jeff & Lem We partied down - didn't
even need a drink. Just rock-n-rolling
round the skating rink. We hokie pokied
high-shot the duck down low Let's do it
again! �Love the ChiOs.
SIG EPS: Wednesday night was great.
Golf and tennis and all the plaids - We had
a blast! �Love the Alpha Delta Pi's.
TO THE 88 PLEDGE CLASS OF CHIO:
We love you so much & just want you to
know. You're doing the best that a pledge
class could do. Get ready for WhiteCarna-
tion - We're doing it a! i for vou �Love the
Sisters.
CHI OMEGA'S. Want to wish everyone a
happy and safe Thanksgiving!
TO THE CHI OMEGA WHITE CARNA-
TION DATES: Get Psyched! We can
hardly wait �Love the ChiOs
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
LOOKING FOR A DATE?: The ladies of
Delta Sigma Theta and the Pyramid Circle
invite you to attend the 2nd annual dating
game to be held 111888 at 7:00 In the
Biology Building. Interested participants
contact juanita 752-0752. Door prizes will
be given.
PIK A LITTLE SISTERS: You are the Best!
Can't wait for our next gig. �The Broth-
ers.
HEY BROTHERS AND LITTLE SIS-
TERS: Dream Girl is coming soon, so get
your date.
DUKE, DUKE, DUKE, DUKE?: Dribble,
Dribble, Dribble, Dribble? Coming Soon!
Pike's the word.
ZETA'S: Get ready formal is Saturday!
CONGRATULATIONS: To the new
Brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha. You guys did
a great job.
HEY DZ'S: Where will you be tonight
Heaven, hell, or somewhere in between7
We shall see. � The Pikes
THANK YOU ALPHA PHI'S: Our sur
prise social was great' �The Pikes
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
EL-TOftO
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 700
WALK-INS WELCOME
20 TEARS OF SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS PROM CAMPUS
Eastgate Shopping Center
IActo�� from Highway Patrol Station)
Behind Car Quest Auto Part
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD
� ��� . .
IT'S OUR BUSINESS
ACCU
ftsr corns 'o�'�s- mtfi
758-2400
��
Your Best Look
MANICURES:
res � Nail Tips �
r
N Frcrch Maine
r�c.i.r,s � Wrapping � Acrylics �
! EOKJUPUS � SKIN CAKE: Body
Wrapping � Face ft BcHy Waving �
Tacia: � � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete line Of
Thofftpouttc Skin Case Products for
M "i & Women
355-2969 � For Appointment
:U4 Plaa Or Greenville
����tnr� � i.i � a �� wwm
I
ABORTION
I Personal and Confidential Care'
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru SaL l-ow
l "ost Termination to 20 week of pcrgnmivy
1-800-433-2930
HELP
WANTED
Credit Manager &
Asst. Credit Manager
I �jr'a fltifc J

�2.3 UFA Recommended
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2SJ I. & h ' n-et
� located War BCU
� Across Prvrr I Ughv jv I'ativ! Stati.w
! imiti-d , Her4Z75 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or aW-1937
Office open-Apt. 8,12-5:30 p.m
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Ciijn and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy etfioent, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV
Couples or singles only $205 a month, I month
lease. MOBILE 1IOME RENTALS- couples or
singles. Apart rwnt and mobile homes in Aalea
Gardens near I'rook Valley Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 '
DO OU HAVF ANV
QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR
LONG DISTANCE
SERVICE?
Interested in learning about
calling plans and special
products that may save you
money?!
Contact: Dana Dunlow,
Your AT&T
Student Campus Manager
Here at ECU
Call: 752-0856
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday-Friday
� Business Majors Preferred
�Experience A Plus
Apply at:
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Publications Building
(second Floor)
No Phone Calls Please!
Announcements
CHigTTASJ FeTLqwshtF"
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WORK STTJpy
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments Call 757-6979 or come by the CCB,
room 2028
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of Cod.
Every Fri. night at 7.00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Fas, structures and architectures of
N th and Central American Earth as
�. n by Ernst Habrichs. Oct. 24-Nov. 19.
Mendenhall Gallery.
SUMMER JOB
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be Nov. 21 at 1000 a.m.
in 1029 GCB. The ten-week internship
program, in the Raleigh area, is open to
sophomores, juniors, and seniors cur-
rently enrolled in college. (Those entering
Graduate School as of May, 1989 are not
eligible).
ATLANTA SYMPHONY
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present the Atlanta Symphony on Nov.
17 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. The
concert promises to be most exciting as the
symphony is under the direction of their
new musical conductor, Yoel Levi. Tickets
for this event go on sale Oct. 31. For further
details, call 757-6611, ext. 266 or write
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall.
COOPERATIVE ED.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered by
the University, is designed to help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. We would like to
extend an invitation to all students to at-
tend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Nov. semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are: extra cash to help cover the cost of
college expenses or perhaps to increase
your "fun" budget, opportunitie9 to test
a career choice if you have made one or to
explore career options if undecided about
a future career, and a highly "market-
able" degree, which includes a valuable
career-related experience, when you
graduate. Co-op Seminars�Fall, 1988:
Thurs Nov. 17, 1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon
Nov. 21,1 p.m rm. 201Q; Mon Nov. 28,4
p.m rm. 2006; Thurs Dec. 1, 1 p.m rm.
2010; and Mon Dec. 5, 4 p.m, rm. 2006.
SIGMA XI LECTURE
On Nov. 15 at 7:00 p.m in GCB 1028, Dr.
Michael Dadswell of Acadia University in
Nova Scotia will speak on 'Tidal Power:
The Dream and the Reality The talk is
sponsored by the ECU Chapter of Sigma
Xi, the Scientific Research Society. Dr.
Dadswell will describe a large hydroelec-
tric project being constructed to harness
the tremendous tidal power of the Bay of
Fundy. The project could have substanbal
environmental effects � particularly
mortality of migratory fish that spend
part of the year off the coast of the south-
eastern U.S. It's free, open to the public,
and should be of interest to non-scientists
as well as to natural and social scientists.
Dr. Dadswell is a supporter of the ECU-
Nova Scotia exchange program. Mark
your calendar now � this should be a
good one.
STATE GOV.T INTERNSHIPS
Each year the N.C. Internship office pro-
vides 150 paid summer internships with
state agencies. Positions are available for
students in all majors. On v. 17, a rep-
resentative of the prograi. will be on
campus to discuss these opportunities.
For info, on times and locations, contact
Co-op. Ed 2028 GCB
JAZ COLLECTION
Tom "The Jazz Man" Mallison recently
donated a wide variety of jazz cassettes
and CD's to the Mendenhall Music Listen-
ing Center. Come by anyday (2-1030
p.m.) and enjoy the sounds of jazz from
the classics to the latest in new age.
GRADUATE
STUDENTS
Academic Computing is in need of
Graduate Student Assistants to staff the
academic computing labs on campus.
These lab assistant positions will be avail-
able starting this spring semester and will
involve working 10-15 hours a week.
Duties will involve providing assistance
with users on various computer systems
and maintaining computing lab
operations. Experience with IBM PCs,
Apple Macintosh, or the IBM 4381 Aca-
demic Mainframe is preferred but not
essential. To apply, send your resume or a
letter detailing your computer skills to
Terry 1 larrision (Austin 216) or call 757-
6401.
WHAT-S YOUR OPINION
OF THE TEACHER?
During the week of Nov. 14-18, a survey of
student opinion of instruction will be
conducted at ECU. Questionnaires will be
distributed in every class with enrollment
greater than five. All students will have
the opportunity to express opinions on
the teaching effectiveness of their instruc-
tors in those dasses. The survey will be
conducted during class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes to complete.
Student participation is voluntary and no
identities are requested. Instructors have
been requested to leave the classroom
wnTIeTneuesrlormalresTmeuigcom
pleted. The teaching effectiveness ques-
tionnaire was created by the Faculty Sen-
ate Committee for Teaching Effectiveness
and the Office of Planning and Institu-
tional Research. The results of the survey,
along with other information and factors,
are used for administrative evaluation of
the instructor by the supervising adminis-
trator within the department or division.
ESICffl
There will be a mandatory meeting of all
Psi Chi members on Nov. 15 at 4:00 in
Rawl, room 102. Dr. Poteat will speak on
grad. school and careers in Psychology.
ALL STUDENTS ARE WELCOME TO
ATTEND!
BAHAMAS OR CANCUN?
Let the Student Union Travel Committee
take you to a new and exciting place for
Spring Break '89. Shop in the world's
marketplace, plan on eating 5-6 times a
day, dip in the pool, play shuf fleboard, get
a tan, just relax cruise the Bahamas for
5 days4 nights QR if cruising the ocean
blue is not for you, then come with us for
7 days and nights in Cancun, Mexico.
While in Cancun, stay in a hotel that is on
one of Cancun's finest beaches. Just relax
and enjoy the sun and beach on this gor-
geous island of paradise. Check out our
affordable prices at Central Ticket Office
at Mendenhall (757-6611).
ECU PLAYHOUSE
We need ushers for the next show "A
Moon far the Misbegotten which runs
Nov. 18-22. Ushers will get to see the show
free with the minimal work before the
show starts. For more info call 757-6390
or see the sign-up sheet on the main board
in Messick Theatre Arts bldg.
LD ASSOC. MEETING
(FORMERLY ACI p)
The Learning Disabilities Assoc. of Pitt
County (formerly ACLD) will meet on
Nov. 15 at 730 p.m at St. James United
Methodist Church, 2000 East 6th St,
Greenville. Psychologist Gary Stainback,
PhD, will speak on "Cognitive Strategies
for Improving Achievement and Self
Control This meeting is open to any
interested parent or professional For
more info contact Debra Kera walla 756-
2584.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all Am-
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p.m in Menden-
hall room 221. Remember that missing
over 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation.
STRESSED Q FT?
Come join members of Phi Eta Sigma hear
Dr. Hines speak on stress management.
The program will be Nov. 15th at 700 pjn.
in room 221 Mendenhall Refreshments
II flowing the program
Members will have picture taken foTyear-
book.and it is the last night to pay Wendy
for shirts. Bring a friend!
masnssBsasnMi
There will be a Minority Student Orgai
zation meeting on N'uv 15 in room
Speight at 5 00 p m
whatjbanpsdqyql;
WANTIQEFJ
Student Union Specia Concerts (
tee wants your opinion' What kinds
bands do vou want to see on caanpuJ
Suggestion box located in Mendenhall
the Info Desk
BROADCAST HQNQR SQcJ
The Broadcast I Jonor So
meeting tonight at 6 1 5 p m sr
Old Joyner All men - i
STRESS MOM r
Stress Mgmt For ! inals
increasingly "jitter) as fina
have trouble concentrating �
ing, avoid studying or i
won't help your test peri rn
you'll go blank am vs j
and there is hope'
include relaxation tr i
ched up" in a posit .
strategies of preparan.r and b
reduce stress ec 2 and 5
Wright Bldg , 3-4 p.u t is in
attend all three meetu I
hang and building r ir n si -
MIDDLLGRADESXL LB
The Middle Grades flub has a -
today at 12 10 The meeting wr - I
room 201 Speight j
mores, juniors and or sa j
not joined, pleas con
Remnar
up, jud
COLUMBIA. S.C. (AP)
Nearly a vear and a half after Til
filed for bankruptv reorgaru;
tion, a judge is expected to dec
this week who gets what s left
the religious empire.
U.S. Bankruptcy fudge Rut
Reynolds may choose from foi
bids for the theme park and oth
property near Fort Mill, about
miles north of Columbia.
Two bids, considered serioi
are mfrom Canadians Stepht
Memick and Pefer Thomas, twi
other bids came from group
known as, "Lexalt University
and, "Holy Celebration
Lawyers for the bicidtr
creditors, PTL contributors ani
people still involved in the mini
try and concerned about its futui
are planning to pack the courj
room for the heanng Wednesday
"I've been calling it a potei
tial zoo PTL lawyer R. Bradto
Leggett said late last week.
PTL trustee M.C. "Red
ton predicted the hearing wi
continue at least until Thurs
But he expects a buver will
chosen. "It's a matter of finances!
Benton said. "It has to be si d
PTL filed for protection frc
its creditors in June 1987, thr
months after founder iim Ba'kMJ
admitted having a sexualencoui
ter with church secretary fessai
Hahn and stepped aside
The Bakkers tried to bu tr
assets, but their bid fell througj
They are now trving to rais
money for a new TV ministrv
Earlier this month. Reynol
ordered the Bakkers and a torn
top aide to pav $7 million
PTL, who filed a lawsuit again!
them. The judge determined tlj
Bakkers and the aide were ove
payed during their last four yeaj
with the ministry.
Last summer the televiio
ministry was separated in a no
profit organization known
Heritage Ministries. The reman
ing for-profit organization, n
eluding the theme park hotel ai
shopping mall at Heritage US
has been under the court s Pu
dance pending the sale.
The future of Heritage Miml
tries and of the Heritage Villa
Church based at Hentage U!
depends largely on which buvj
is chosen.
Thomas of Samoth CapiJ
Coro. in Vancouver, British
lumbia, has submitted a$113
lion bid. He has said he woi
keep the theme park's family
entation and would consider
lowing the ministry and churcH
lease facilities and stay at H
tage USA.
Mernick, a Toronto businej
man who has offered $115
lion, has not said whether
would allow the ministry al
church to stay. Benton recoj
mended in October that Mem)
be allowed to buy the assets.
The $116 million bid fn
Lexalt University was made





THE LASTCAROI iNIAN
NOVEMBER 15, 1988 7
Dl Kt PL kk, Dl KE PL KE?: Dnbble
Prbb!? Dribble Pnbble1 Coming Soon!
� � i v,ord
HAs Gel read) formal is Saturday!
N RATULATION& To the new
Kappa Alpha on guvs did
P S iVhere writ vou he tonight
aven hell r somewhere :n between?
see rhe Pikes
NK H ALPHA PHI s � sur
- - 'i'jt' lies
I SsIFlED
COLLATION
OUR BUSINESS
ACCU
SSCOPY
�4oo
LP
TED
anager &
lit Manager
jmmended
fiors Preferred
e A Plus
1 at:
4ROLINIAN
s Building
i Floor)
alls Please!
Minimal work before the
- on re info caJD 757-6390
� ti the mam board
rsbldg
I Q ASSQCM tETING
�FORMERLY ACLDJ
Disabilities As60C of Pitt
CLD) will meet on
p m at St James Unil
Chun . � East 6th
�gist Gary Stainback.
� :c on "Cognitive Strategies
mprw ement and Self
- meeting is open to
�sted parent or ; nai For
info �-�, � Debra Kerawalla 75t
AMBA5SAL2QRS
"here will be a general meeting for all Am
-jssadors Wed at 5 15 pm m Menden
hall room 221 Remember that missing
ver 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation
(MM pin members of Phi Eta Sigma hear
Nines speak on stress management
ne program will be Nov. 15th at 7�) p m
n room 221 MendenhaU Refreshments
vtll be served following the program
Members will have picture taken for year-
!v�k and it is the last night to pay Wendy
for shirts Bringafnend'
Announcements
here will be a Minority Student Organi
ition meeting on Nov. 15 in room 129
ghl at 5 iX) p m
n H ATB ANDSDQ YOU
orosEEz
ulent Union Special Concerts Commit
. wants your opinion' What kinds of
db do ou want to see on campus7
�uggestkw box located in Mendonhall at
Info Dosk
H RQADC. AST HDKQILSQC.
he Broadcast 1 lonor Society will hold a
ig tonight at 6:15 p m in room 234
oyner All members must attend.
STJU;SNIGMT.
- Mgmt 1 or Finals Do vou become
� asingly "jittery" as finals approach,
trouble concentrating while study
ig avoid studying or fed like studying
� help your tet performance because
go blank any way? You're not alone
there is hope' This workshop will
le relaxation training, getting "psy
hed up" in a positive way for finals and
gies of preparation and test taking to
stress Nov 30, Pec 2 and 5, 329
� ig 3-4 pm It is important to
n I all three meetings. We will be prac-
and building relaxation skills
MID QliGRADESXLUB
e Grades Club has a meeting
da (rat 12 30. The meeting will be held in
room 2 0 Speight. Any freshman, sopho
- . res Riniors and or seniors who bave
� � ined, please come. We are having a
can food drive tor Thanksgiving. Please
bring the food to our meeting. 1 lope to see
vou.
door. We are located on the 2nd floor of
the Publications Bldg. m front of Joyner
Library.
our Spanish Pinner, Thurs, 5 8:00 p.m. at
Methodist Student Center on 5th St Bien
venidos.
CHRJIIANJFLOWSHlE MSTJEiXLlZ01EMBERS ALL LITTLE SISTER ORC
CCF would like to invite you to our Bible
Studies every Tues night at 7 00 p.m. in
Raw! 130 Bring a friend For more info
call Jim at 752-7199.
CHRISTMASBQN1JS
Come support the ECU Gospel Choir and
win some cash We are giving away $25
lust in time for the holidays. Your chance
at the big money is only25 Tickets are
on sale in the Student Store MonFri. 9-3.
Drawing will be held Nov 18 at 3 p.m.
Good Luck'
ECU LAw SOCIETY
(it next meeting will be at 7 30 on Nov 17
in theGCB. rm 1012
GROUPS
Group photographs will not be taken after
Dec 5. If your org. has not had their pic-
ture taken by Dec 5, they will not appear
in the 1989 BUCCANEER Call 757 6601
and leave date & time for the photo to be
taken Please give two days notice tor the
photographer
CLASS PICTURES
There will be another session for students
to have their class pictures taken for the
1989 Buccaneer it vou were turned away.
� r did not get the chance to have them
taken LiM time, you may have them taken
an 23 27, 1989 Come by the Buccaneer
office & sign up on the sheet posted on the
All Past Key dub Members and anyone
else interested are invited to attend the
Grcle-K organizational meeting on Nov.
30 at 7:00 pm. in room 212 of MendenhaU.
Officers will be elected and the upcoming
ski trip will be discussed. If you . e in
Key Club, Key wanettes. Beta Club, Inter-
act, YOU, or Junior Civitans - then this is
the college organization for you. Call 756-
9783 for more info.
AMNETXINTTL.
Amnesty International usually meets
every 4th Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's
Episcopal Church, 401 E. 4th St in the
upper flvr - enter from the 4th St en
trance Due to the Thanksgiving holiday,
the next meeting will be on Nov. 30.
EDUCATIONJdAIQRS
The School of Education is sponsoring a
workstudy trip to Puebla, Mexico dur
ing spring break (March 4-12, 1989).
Opportunities are available to observe ed
in Mexico, teach, and travel. Ailed, majors
are invited to participate. Applications
are in the Dean's office, Speight Bldg For
more info, contact Marianne Exum at 757-
6271 Application deadline � Dec 12.
SPANISH CIA IB
Spanish Club will hold its weekly meeting
Wed in Conf. Rm. of Foreign Lang. Dept.
in GCB. The semester is quickly coming to
an end and we would like to make our last
events successful Please join us to discuss
Get your group photo taken for the Bucca-
neer today. Call 757 6501 to set up an appt
The last day to get a picture taken is Dec
5.
CHRISTMAS DANCE
West Area Residence Council Christmas
Dance Dec. 5th 8:00-12:00 midnight at the
Moose Lodge. Tickets on sale Nov 14th,
15th, 21 st & 22nd in front of Student Store
All campus is welcome.
HOLIDAY LIBRARY HOURS
ECU Joyner Library operating hours dur
ing the Thanksgiving 1 loliday season will
be as follows: Wed 11 23 - 8 am. - 5 p.m
Thurs. & Fn 1124 & 1125 - CLOSED,
Sat 1126 9 am. 6 p.m. Normal fall
semester operating hours will resume on
Nov. 27.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
East Carolina Friends thanks the mem
bers of Alpha Xi Delta Sorontv, Clement
Dorm and all others who helped make the
I lalloween party a success.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
Come and enjoy an evening of great enter
tainment while supporting your favorite
entry in our STAR SEARC11 competition
The excitement begins at 7:30 pm Nov. 22
in room 244 MendenhaU. Admission is SI
at the door.
T
�!Ei Z3
SP0BTSW0RID
EVERY TUESDAY
NITE IS COLLEGE NITE 8-11
Only $1.50
ADMISSION WITH COLLEGE I.D.
.75 SKATE RENTAL
104 E. RED BANKS RD. � GREENVILLE, NC � 756 6000
Remnants of PTL being divided
up, judge chooses from four bids
COLUMBIA. S.C. (AP) -
Nearly a year and a half after PTL.
tiled for bankrupty reorganiza-
tion, a judge is expected to decide
this week who gets what's left of
the religious empire.
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Rufus
Reynolds may choose from four
bids for the theme park and other
property near Fort Mill, about 70
miles north of Columbia.
Two bids, considered serious,
are hfrom Canadians Stephen
tVfernick and Peter Thomas: two
other bids came from groups
known as, "Lexalt University"
and, "Holy Celebration
Lawyers for the bidders,
creditors, PTL contributors and
people still involved in the minis-
try and concerned about its future
are planning to pack the court-
room for the hearing Wednesday.
"I've been calling it a poten-
tial zoo PTL lawyer R. Bradford
Leggett said late last week.
PTL trustee M.C. "Red" Ben-
ton predicted the hearing will
continue at least until Thursday.
But he expects a buyer will be
chosen. "It's a matter of finances
Benton said. "It has to be sold
PTL filed for protection from
its creditors in June 1987, three
months after founder hm Bakker
admitted havinga sexual encoun-
ter with church secretary Jessica
Hahn and stepped aside.
The Bakkers tried to buy the
assets, but their bid fell through.
They are now trying to raise
money for a new TV ministry.
Earlier this month, Reynolds
ordered the Bakkers and a former
top aide to pay $7.7 million to
PTL, who filed a lawsuit against
�hem. The judge determined the
Bakkers and the aide were over-
payed during their last four years
ith the ministry.
Last summer the television
ministry was separated in a non-
profit organization known as
Heritage Ministries. The remain-
ing for-profit organization, in-
luding the theme park hotel and
hopping mall at Heritage USA.
has been under the court's Pui-
iance pending the sale.
The future of Heritage Minis-
tries and of the Heritage Village
Church based at Heritage USA
depends largely on which buyer
is chosen.
Thomas of Samoth Capital
Coro. in Vancouver, British Co-
lumbia, has submitted a $113 mil-
lion bid. He has said he would
keep the theme park's family ori-
entation and would consider al-
lowing the ministry and church to
lease facilities and stay at Heri-
tage USA.
Mernick, a Toronto business-
man who has offered $115 mil-
lion, has not said whether he
would allow the ministry and
church to stay. Benton recom-
mended in October that Mernick
be allowed to buy the assets.
The $116 million bid from
Lexalt University was made by
the Rev. Edward J. Brown ot At-
lanta, who has said no university
actually exists. He has said he
would return Bakker to Heritage
USA.
The fourth bid was for $120
million by a Christian business
association known as Holv Cele-
bration. Its trustees are Herbert T.
Nelson, a lawver from Greenbelt.
I
Md and Sandi Kalez of Seattle.
Benton said he has yet to see
proof that the Lexalt or Holy Cele-
bration groups can back their of-
fers. He called the Mernick and
Thomas bids the only viable offers
so far.
Terry Steen, chief financial
officer for Heritage Ministries,
said the 135 people who work for
the television ministry and
church and the 250 workers re-
maining dt the for-profit
operations at Heritage USA are
anxiously awaiting a decision on
a buvcr.
But, he added, "We've gone
through so many deadlines in the
last 18 to 20 months that we're
kind of immune to it
Triple Tuesday and
Wednesday
with Pi Kappa Phi
$2.00 Frozen Drinks
$2.00 Teas
$1.00 Cans of Beer
Greeks: Bring 3 or
more people and all of
you will get in free!
One Campaign
That Never Ends
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for All
kinko's
the copy center
Exertise Your Freedom of Choke
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Copies
or
2'2
Copies
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Mon-Fri 7am-12 pm �
Sat 9 am-6 pm
Sun 2 pm-12 pm �
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DELIVERY HOURS
SUNTHURS. 4 PM TO MIDNIGHT
FRI.&SAT. 4PM TO 1:00 AM
DELIVERY CHARGE 75 �
DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PHONE 752-4445
COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 7 DAYS!
Travel Values at ITG are
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Check out our low airfares and vacation packages
to the surf and sand, or the ice and snow, and ev-
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NEW YORK
BUFFALO
ATLANTA
ORLANDO
CHICAGO
CHARLOTTE
WASH .DC
DALLAS
MIAMI
$178 LOSANGELES $358
$168 HOUSTON $248
$188 SEATTLE $348
$210 CLEVELAND $168
$203 ST LOUIS $218
$78 PHOENIX $348
$168 DENVER $268
$288 BOSTON $201
$220 NASHVILLE $168
HtAD
THE
FINE
PRINT
�'� ov�' Thar.sg og r(j Chr slmas n.gh�f Mm.rnufn stay '�qu d
SPECIAL VACATION PACKAGES
LAS VEGAS
2 Niyhls With.Air
Hotel From Raleigh From
LONDON
t Nights With Air Hotel
il;i Subwa Pd- Tax &
Mure Krom
Greenville From
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NASSAU
FREEPORT
298
770
from
$234
$239
$199
NEW YORK
2 Nights With Air
Hotel From KinMon Fnmi
PARIS
t. ight With Air Hotel
Sightseeing Cruise Shopping
Discounts Krom
Greenville From
219
KEY WEST
CAYMAN IS.
SKI KEYSTONE
774
from
$334
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READ
THE
FINE
PRINT
Tese cacages iude aa'e Kiei �nj mo'e Packages a'� o' va'�mg ie'gs
vtnee 'esoa'tons ae 'equ'ed P"ces vt Subject to. :hange Rates ae n�gh
loi'da, "avet penofls peak t-avet dates and �eee -ts ca,e5 based on G'eei-vi
depa'tues Hotel pg-ades and tcnge stas are avatiaoie u 'ates based o per ?e'S'
when 2 t'avei togethet
TRAVEL CENTER
355-5075
MONDAY FRIDAY lMK)AM S (Hi P M





(
I
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
NOVEMBER 15,1988 Page 8
Cruising in a Greenville police car
for three hours on a Friday night
By ALICIA FORD
Staff Writer
(Editor's Note: While most
college students spend their Fri-
day nights trying to avoid the
interior of a Greenville Folice car,
this brave reporter spent three
hours cruising with a cop.)
From 10 p.m. until 1 a.m.
Fridav night. 1 rode along with
Sergeant Matthew Cleary in a
marked, white police car as he
sought to deter crime. Much to my
surprise, we frequented Krispy
Kreme donut palace on 10th St.
onlv twice.
Entering the Greenville Po-
lice Department, Desk Sergeant
VV.T. McCarter asked who I was
waiting tor. Upon hearing my
reply, Carter said in a sarcastic
tone "Oooo, you're gonna have a
good time
Wo began our crime fight-
ing crusade by responding to an
emergency iCall fapm the
McDonalds on Greenville Boule-
vard. Several oi the McDonalds
employees had reported two vi-
cious-looking suspects stealing
stuffed Muppet animals from
behind the counter.
The Muppet thieves were
reported to have used a white
Cherokee jeep as their get away
car. Sergeant Cleary and I looked
for the alleged criminals in the
immediate vicinity of Kingston
Flace Apartments, but the stuffed
animal abductors were no where
to be found.
Back on the beat, Sergeant
Cleary told me a little about him-
self. A Vietnam veteran, Cleary
has served 22 years on the
Greenville police force. On this
particular Friday night, Cleary
was in charge of six squad units or
patrol vehicles.
Clearv was excited about
upcoming weekend. He and sev-
eral other police officers were
planning a camping trip. In order
to iron out the plans for the trip,
we made several stops to meet
with Cleary's camping buddies to
discuss drinkim
plies.
Our next call was at approxi-
mately 10:45 p.m. with a report
that a caucasion male who had
passed out in his car at the inter-
section of Memorial Drive and
Greenville Blvd.
Sergeant Cleary immedi-
ately ditched his Krispy Kreme
coffee into a trash can (police
don't litter) and took off at 85 mph
in pursuit of the suspect. How-
ever, when we arrived at the
scene, the suspect was G.O.A.
(Gone On Arrival).
We then proceeded to cruise
downtown. As I sunk lower and
lower in the seat so as not to be
recognized by the herds of people
hanging outside the Elbo, Ser-
geant Cleary stopped in the
middle of the street to give a
couple of out-of towners direc-
tions to the 264 bypass.
At approximately 11:17
p.m a 1060 (robbery) was re-
ported to be in progress at Glen-
dale Court Apartments. When we
arrived on the scene, Sergeant
See ALLEGED, page 9
By day, they look for parking violators. By night, they try to catch Muppet thieves and cookie eat-
ing would-be-rapists. For the people in blue, protecting Greenville is all in a day s work. (File
photo)
New pizza entry is Stoney's
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Assistant Future Editor
comfortable seating, and the store just paid for something that was
generates just the right atmos- whipped up in a Betty Crocker
phere for eating pizza. Also, you Baking Set. The first bite lays to
Fear not, food fans! At long can Pnone ahead (757-0581) and rcst such suspicions, however;
last, the pizza reviews return with Pick UP vour ordcr within about Stoney's pizza tastes good. It's not
a look at Stoney's, a new business minutes.
Like most pizza places,
Stoney's also offers several types
of subs. The same sign which
located at 216 East 5th Street,
across from the Stop and Shop.
the best in the area � Little
Caesar's and Pizza Hut still share
that title � but it's worth a trv.
(Side note for both of you who advertises their current products
are interested: this is the same
locale that once housed Susie's
pizza.)
At Stoney's, one either takes
the meal out or eats in � no deliv-
ery available. However, the sev
also promises:
draft beer
'Coming soon
eral wooden booths provide glance not to think that you've
What setsStoney's apart? The
main attraction is a 9-inch, $2.59
pizza. Don't be misled by the
price, however � i n terms of price
The pizza itself has a very thin per square inch this pizza costs
crust. Its major weakness is its ap- only slightly less than pizzas from
pearance - - it's difficult at first most other area businesses.
On the other hand, this deal
provides a chance to get a pizza
for about the same cost as a meal
at, say, McDonald's. If you're get-
ting sick of burgers but you're on
a limited budget (and who isn't?),
Stoney's has a meal for you.
Adding in the cost of a Coke
(which is served in 16-ouncc plas-
tic bottles), the entire meal tops
out at a little over $3.
As a refreshing break from
fast food, Stoney's is worth look-
ing into. And if you can manage
not to judge the pizza by its cover,
Stonev's is a winner.
I 1 �M 1 1
�l,i . ��-� �
Swing with "An Evening of Jazz'
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
hezture Editor
Located across from the Stop Shop, Stoney's becomes
Greenville's latest pizza pub. (Photo by Angela Pridgen�Photo-
lab)
Heavy metalists Kix
kicks up the volume
If swinging and bopping is
your forte, you may want to check
out an 'Evening of Jazz' tonight at
Mendenhall's Coffee House.
"An Evening of Jazz with Joe
Distefano and Friends" will crank
up their brass and strings at 8
p.m the concert is free of charge.
The five piece band, comprising
of several ECU school of music
faculty, will feature the Dixieland
sound, Swing and Bop.
On saxophone and clarinet
will be the band's captain, Joe
Distefano. Distefano has played
with the likes of Buddy Morrow,
Jerry Coker and Margaret Whit-
ing. Distefano, the chairman of
the department of basic studies
for the school of music, has scored
music for stage, outdoor dramas
as well as studio work for com-
mericials and television.
Hitting the ebonies and ivo-
ries, Dick Cumberland will be
performing the piano. Cumber-
land, who has played extensively
in the L.A area, has jammed with
Warren Covington, Bob Crosby
and Cozv Cole. He now lives at
Atlantic Beach.
At drums will be Mark Ford, a
member of ECU school of music.
Ford has recorded with several
Nashville studios while perform-
ing Latin percussions, steel drum
and mallet instruments.
Another member of the music
faculty, Robert Link, will be
plunking the string bass and the
electric bass. Link also performs
in Wasabi Brothers, a jazz quartet.
George Broussard, who
teaches The History of Jazz and
directs the Jazz Ensemble at ECU,
plays trombone in the band.
Broussard has toured with Roger
Pemberton's orchestra, the Billy
Mav Band, Bob Crosby and Ralph
Materie.
In addition, "Joe Distefano
and Friends" will have the help on
vocals from Carol Bailey, a ECU
music major. Alos EddieThigpen,
an ECU gTad, will beef up the
brass section with trumpet play.
By ALICIA FORD
Stiff Writer
It's been a while, Lut those
heavy metal roek-and-rollers Kix
are back in action promoting their
new album, "Blow My Fuse
The band put on a great show
for a packed house at the Attic on
Saturdav night. Kix opened
around 11:30 p.m. with "She
Dropped the Bomb" and then
went into the high-energy title cut
off their new album. They per-
formed the song from their first
video on MTV, "Cold Blood and
continued to rock their way
through mostly new material.
kix, a five-man band origi-
nally from West Virginia, features
Steve Whitman on lead vocals.
Whitman has a powerful, raspy
voice, much like Brian Jonson of
ACDC. Other members include
lead guitarist Ronnie Younkins,
rhythm guitarist Brian Fortsight,
bass player Ronnie Turnell, and
Jimmv Shaffant on drums.
Although some of the Kix
fans who followed the band may
have been disappointed because
Kix didn't play more of their old
music, "Blow My Fuse" has
many. The band did perform
"Cold Shower" from that album,
and Whitman did not forget the
umbrella he always pulls out
when the band kicks into song.
In Jimi Hendrix fashion, the
band played the National An-
them towards the end of the
show. Younkins performed a ten-
minute guitar solo with a style
similar to Chuck Berry's.
Kix played straight through
until around 1 a.m then came
back on stage for an encore with
the title cut from "Midnite Dyna-
mite The show ended as all Kix
shows have ended in the past,
with Whitman unleashing a giant
bag filled with beach ball-size
balloons into the screaming audi-
ence.
If you missed the show last
Saturday, or failed to get a bal-
loon, Kix will certainly be back in
town again sometime in the near
future. Whitman told the audi-
ence, "North Carolina has been
great to Kix and we won't forget
it, even if we are on the way to be-
coming nationally known
Violinist takes star gazers on journey
PRINCETON, Fla. (AP) �
One need not be an astronaut to
travel in space, visit the stars or
get a closer view of the planets.
Richard Fagin, a concert vio-
linist, can help stargazers take a
celestial journey � not through
heavenly music, but via the magic
of parabolic mirrors.
Fagin is a telescope maker �
one of a handful in the country
who still make � by hand � the
integral mirrors that enable us to
view the outer worlds.
"Anyone can make a tele-
scope if they have the patience
says Fagin.
Fagin, 31, a Chicago native, is
owner and only employee of
Summit Instruments, which has
provided telescopic optics for
professional and amateur as-
tronomers since 1981.
He made his first telescope at
age 13.
"I was studying music at
Lane Technical High School in
Chicago and went to a sky show at
Adlcr Planetarium. That as it
recalls Fagin.
At a planetarium workshop
there, Fagin made a 6-inch mirror
for his first telescope.
"I still have it and use it
Soon after, he finished a 10-
inch mirror for another teen-ager,
and he's been making custom
optics ever since.
"I think I charged him $10. I
didn't care about the money he
says.
What determines the quality
of a telescope is the exactness and
uniformity of a concave mirror
used to reflect light to a single
point � that which is to be
viewed. ,
"Accuracy is to a millionth of
an inch. That's the tricky part
says Fagin, who uses an over-
turned 55-gallon drum as a work-
bench.
'They can get close with a
machine, but there's no compari-
son to handmade
Fagin makes custom mirrors
ranging from 6 inches in diameter
to 20 inches � the larger the mir-
ror, the greater resolution and
detail.
The mirrors are made from
Pyrex blanks. A curve-generating
machine puts the initial shape to
the glass; the hand grinding fol-
lows, using abrasive silicon car-
bide and a convex-shaped tool.
"It can take up to three days of
hand rubbing to get it right
Fagin says. As the mirror ncars
completion, the grinding process
becomes more delicate. Repeti-
tive measuring is a must.
Near completion, minute bits
in the glass must be rubbed away
and a film of aluminum, only one
or two molecules thick, is coated
onto the mirror. This is done in a
vacuum chamber where a small
amount of aluminum is vapor-
ized under intense heat.
The final check is done in a 14-
foot wooden chamber where a
special machine reflects a beam of
light off the polished surface.
The prices of Fagin's mirrors
range from $175 for a 6-inch mir-
ror to $2,000 for 20-inch one.
For those who wish to make
their own choices, the cost is much
less.
Fagin recommends alumi-
num tubing for the shell. The
remaining parts required to com-
plete a telescope are available
through specialty companies.
Fagin continues to follow
both careers � music and optics.
Having studied music for four
years at the Chicago Musical Col-
lege, he often plays professionally
with south Florida symphony
orchestras.
"This is more important to
me he says, checking a 10-inch
mirror, "and I make more
money
Eat good shrooms
Detective tracks art thieves
NEW YORK (AP) � Mush-
rooms are a popular food and
their flavors range from buttery to
beefy while their textures range
from tender to chewy.
Here's a rundown on mush-
rooms from Family Circle maga-
zine:
� White Button: Easy to pre-
pare, these are all-purpose mush-
rooms. Their meaty taste and firm
texture are a plus in soups, stews,
casseroles and stuffings. They can
be prepared using any cooking
method.
� Shiitake: This exotic Orien-
tal variety has a smoky taste. The
dark brown cap with its creamy-
white underside can grow to be as
large as 8 inches in diameter. Per-
fect for soups, sauces and stir-fry
dishes, shiitake can be bought
fresh or dried.
LOS ANGELES (AP) �
Auguste Renoir, Mary Cassat,
Toulouse-Lautrec, Aphrodite.
Not names that normally
appear on a police blotter. Yet
they have all crossed the cluttered
desk of police Detective Bill Mar-
tin.
With Los Angeles now a
world-class art center, the soft-
spoken officer has developed an
art theft investigative unit similar
to New York's, the only other one
in the country. Today the two-
member department boasts a re-
covery rate more than three times
the national average.
During his nearly 20 years
with the Los Angeles Police De-
partment, the New York City na-
tive hasdonea littleof everything,
from gangs to burglary and auto
theft. He discovered his calling in
1980 when he was first assigned to
the burglary and auto theft divi-
sion.
"I kept seeing reports for a lot
of high-dollar artwork stolen, but
I never saw any being recovered
he said in a recent interview. "No
one specialized in it, no one even
knew about art or the art commu-
nity
So Martin began a cross-in-
dex system to make it easier to
track the stolen art.
"Lo and behold, we started to
recover some he says.
Today the cross-index system
is a computerized program that
lists more than 900 art-theft cases
in Southern California. He esti-
mates that more than $2 million in
art is stolen annually in Los Ange-
les.
Nationwide, only about 12
percent of all art thefts are solved,
but in L os Angeles, the average is
about 45 percent, Martin says.
"Yes, it's very high, but
there's a certain amount of luck
involved Martin says.
f A
UB40, arguably the best-1
UB40,
(AP)�"We've never
anything by design. It's as
bunch of angels are saving,
that's okay � go ahead an
ft savs James Brown, thedi
mer for the melodic reggae
UB40.
Those angels have good
stincts. UB40 is the large sd
reggae act in music The
comes from Birmingham,
land. Most of the members
on the dole when thev go
gether. Thev borrowed
name from the unemployi
form used in Great Britain.
That was eight years and
top 10 albums ago they've h�
top 20 singles. Their latest re
"UB40 on A & M Records,
Allege
Continued from pagei
Clearv went inside and founJ
that the report was not a rob
but an attempted rape.
According to the woi
report, a large black man we
a butcher knife had enten
apartment and awaken hd
laying on top of her
The man allegedly tol
woman to take oii all her cl
While she disrobed, the suj
became enticed by a bag oi
ies which was laying oi
woman's nightstand besid
bed.
Putting down his knifd
suspect paused to have a
snack. As the hungry wouil
rapist grubbed on the Oreoj
woman was able to escarxf
call the police. The suspect n
the back door in such a hui
he left his clothes behind.
Two other patrol cai
rived on the scene and the of
continued to question the wi
RESERVE 0FFI
THE M01
THE MORE M0!
Enrol! it
and�erve
NanonaK
$4000 ai
Guard oil
SlOOOgraJ
Add
college
I
Steve L. Jones





I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 15.1968 9
5 988 Page 8
�te
!?P1?

tel thieves and cookie eat-
vn a dav s work. (File
ys
a chance to get a pizza
the me cost as a meal
maid's. It you're get-
:r gers but vou're on
and who isn't?),
- a meal for you.
in the cost of a Coke
a n ed in 16-ounce plas-
- the entire meal tops
ver$3
ing break from
Si ney'sis worth look-
And it you can manage
he pizza by its cover,
�. inner
? Jazz'
Broussard, who
story of Jazz and
Ensemble at ECU,
e in the band.
toured with Roger
- rchestra, the Billy
�rosbv and Ralph
addition, "Joe Distefano
will have the help on
Carol Bailey, a ECU
r Alos Eddie Thigpen,
- id, will beef up the
n with trumpet play.
rney
check isdoneina 14-
I n chamber where a
i hine reflects a beam of
polished surface.
prices of Fagin's mirrors
m 175 for a 6-inch mir-
00 for 20-inchone.
r those who wish to make
. choices, the cost is much
n recommends alumi-
bing for the shell. The
lainii irts required to eon-
e a icope are available
cialty companies.
n continues to follow
- music and optics.
ing d music for four
it the Chicago Musical Col-
I heoften plays professionally
h south Florida symphony
This is more important to
he says, checking a 10-inch
nrror, and I make more
tone1
teves
a computerized program that
K re than 900 art-theft cases
Southern California. He esti-
ates that more than $2 million in
innualryin Los Ange-
Nationwide, onlv about 12
arcentofaUart thefts are solved,
it in I os Angeles, the average is
oul 4 percent, Martin says.
"Yes, it's very high, but
- s a certain amount of luck
�olved Martin savs.
Student Union Special Concerts Chairperson
Job Description
1. To organize and direct the activities of the
committee (i.e. THE WAILERS, FETCHINr BONES,
BAD CHECKS, and CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD).
2. To calland conduct all meetings
of the committee.
3. To serve on the Program Board
of the Student Union.
Applications can be found in Room 236 - Mendenhall
Student Center or call 757-6611, ext. 210.
Deadline For Applications, November 16
UB40, arguably the best-known reggae band, attribute their success to an unusual style of songwriting.
UB40, still largest reggae act
(AD�"We've never done
anything by design- It's as if a
bunch of angels are saying, 'Yeah,
that's okay � go ahead and do
ft says lames Brown, the drum-
mer for the melodic reggae band
UB40.
Those angels have good in-
stincts. UB40 is the largest-selling
reggae act in music. The band
comes from Birmingham, Eng-
land. Most of the members were
on the dole when they got to-
gether. They borrowed their
name from the unemployment
form used in Great Britain.
That was eight years and nine
top lOalbumsago. They've had 18
top 20 singles. Their latest record,
"UB40 on A & M Records, was
54 on the Cashbox magazine Nov.
5 pop chart.
The release of the first single
from the album has been delayed
because "Red Red Wine a song
from their 1984 album, "Labourof
Love entered the popchart. It hit
No. 1 on Oct. 15, was 18 on Nov. 5.
A disc jockey in Phoenix, Ariz
began playing the song and other
radio stations picked it up.
That also didn't happen by
desion.
What has made this inte-
grated English band so successful
at reggae?
"We are geared to a pop audi-
ence says Brown. "We listened
to reggae and to pop. Some of that
has drifted into our music. We've
learned to adapt for the public,
something we're still learning.
There could be some cri ticism that
we aren't pure reggae but we are
as pure as we can be. We are using
all of our musical influences
That blend of musical influ-
ences was responsible for their
collaboration with Chrisse Hynde
of the Pretenders. They first
worked together on a reworking
of the old Sonny and Cher tune.
"I've Got You Babe which be-
came a hit in 1985. The single from
the new album is another collabo-
ration, "Breakfast in Bed
Brown said, Breakfast in
Bed' is actually an old reggae tune
by someone called Lauren Ben-
ton. The song might be older than
that. It's the only remake on the
album.
"I think this record is more
upbeat in tempo and beat. The
others were a bit more contempla-
tive. In this one we aren't contem-
plating our navels
Except for the single, the
songs on the album were written
by the entire band.
"We all sit around with our
instruments and play until we
hear something we like. We work
on that bit until everybody has a
piece of it. Then Ali Campbell
does the lyrics. We only have as
many words as are absolutely
necessary. Ali goes through the
songs and picks out what suits the
music.
See More
$50.00 Less.
Right now at our Greenville office you can be
fitted for a pair of dairy wear or extended wear
contact lenses and receive a $50.00 discount
off our usual package price
Usual Fee
Discount-
Your Met
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Wear
$155.00
50.00
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Extended
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$195.00
90.00
$44100
Alleged rapist grubs on cookies
Continued from page 8
deary went inside and found out
that the report was not a robbery,
but an attempted rape.
According to the woman's
report, a large black man welding
a butcher knife had entered her
apartment and awaken her by
laying on top of her.
The man allegedly told the
woman to take off all her clothes.
While she disrobed, the suspect
became enticed by a bag of cook-
ies which was laying on the
woman's nightstand beside her
bed.
Putting down his knife, the
suspect paused to have a little
snack. As the hungry would-be-
rapist grubbed on the Oreos, the
woman was able to escape and
call the police. The suspect ran out
the back door in such a hurry that
he left his clothes behind.
Two other patrol cars ar-
rived on the scene and the officers
continued to question the woman
while Sergeant Geary and I pa-
troled the neighborhood.
We decided that it shouldn't
be too difficult to spot the naked
suspect, but we were unable to
locate him. Sergeant Cleary con-
cluded that he must have lived
nearby and probably made his get
away into a neighboring house or
apartment.
We returned to our crime
fighting mission and patrolled the
Tar River area (the river, not the
apartments). We drove around in
circles until we decided it was
time for another Krispy Kreme pit
stop. Once there, we talked with
other police officers eating do-
nuts.
At approximately 12:25 a.m.
two suspicious vehicles were re-
ported to be parked at opposite
ends of The Carolina East Mall
parking lot.
The occupants of the ve-
hicles allegedly drove to the
middle of the parking lot where
they appeared to have a suspi-
cious conversation .
Towards the end of the
night, Sergeant Cleary said it had
been an unusually slow Friday
night for fighting crime. As the
patrol car stopped in front of the
Police Station, I was glad to be
only an observer in Geary's pa-
trol car and not a handcuffed
Muppet-doll thief.
So call us for an appointment and see how
seeing better can cost you less.
Contact Us
And Save.
Dr. John C. Mdnar
Optometric Eye Care Center, OD, PA
The Plaza in Greenville
Greenville. NC
(919) 759771
e
UI'IUMONC
�Y�CAft�03TCR.
' Package include Eye Exam,CookxjMkxon
Eye Glass Prescription, RtHng and FoSowHjp. Contacts,
Core Kit and Instructions. No other discounts apply.
CcAjponrTHJstbepiesented�oreteiast:oijriollmeqi
oSer. Offer axp�es Offer expires November 30. 1988
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
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THE MORE MONET T0U CAN GET FOR COLLEGE.
Enroll in Army ROTC as a college elective
and serve pan-time in the Army Reserve or
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Add it at up, and you'll graduate with a
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Its IJBE for quality Russell Athletic sports-
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But you better hurry. Classic Russell Athletic
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sportin' Russell Athletic today only at UK
516 S- Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville
Exclusive of team or organized sports participation.






THE EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
NOVEMBER 15, 1988 Page 10
Blue shatters the backboard
Hoopsters give impressive performance
By MARK BARBER
st�ft Wntrr
In a game with Longwood last year, Senior Guj. Hill, a guard and
forward for the Pirate hoopsters, rebounds the basketball off the
backboard. The ECU basketball team looks ahead with great opti
mism for the 19SS-19S9 season.
The East Carolina men's bas-
ketball team held their second fall
scrimmage this past Saturday
night, and the backboards came
tumbling down.
ECU's senior forward, Theo-
dore "Blue" Edwards shattered
the Cold team's defense to score
21 points, leading the Purple
squad to a h8-54 victory, and took
advantage of a halftime dunking
contest to shatter a backboard
with a powerful side-arm dunk.
Overall, the Pirates put on an
impressive performance with
strong play from returning plav-
ers Edwards, Stanley Love (21
points) and Kennv Murphv (12).
Equally strong were the showings
from first-year Pirates Kevin
Staples, a junior college transfer
who scored 17 points and fresh-
men lav Scherer and Robin
1 louse, v ho each scored nine
points.
Hie Purple squad consisud
ot last year's svonng leader Gus
Hill, senior Kit Kelly, Edwards
and first year players Staples,
House and Scherer. Hie Cold
team was made up of vetera
Reid use. immy Hint on
Murphy, Love, as well as first-
year players Casey Mote, Jeff Per-
lich and Brooks Bryant,
A crowd of approximately
500 showed their approval of the
Pirates' play as the team ran its
last public scrimmage before the
beginning of the season Thursday
night with an exhibition game
against Marathon Oil.
Both squads started off cold,
with Love breaking the ice two
and a half minutes into the contest
with an inside drive over Staples.
Blue Edwards countered the Gold
score on the next trip down the
court, tying the score at 2-2.
From there, both teams began
to score freely and Jay Scherer
iced a three-pointer from the left
baseline to put the Purple squad
up, 10-7. Freshman Perlich got his
only points of the night to counter
S herer's basket by hitting a
three-pointer for the Gold, knot-
ting the score at 10 apiece.
I he Pur pie squad went up for
good at 13-12 asStaplesdropped a
Trc e throw with 8:56 remaining in
the h ilt. Edwards reinforced the
lead with a strong rebound dunk,
showing his dunk ability and set
the stage for the dunking contest
during halftime.
Thanks to hot outside shout
ing from Scherer and 1 louse and
tough inside play from
and Edwards, the Purple
wei I into the intermission
comfortable 38-25 lead
ics
.ad
h a
Fans at the game were enter-
tained first by a 3-point shooting
contest between ECU's strongest
outside shooters Murphy, Kelly,
Lose and Scherer. The players
were given 30 seconds to shoot as
many of the 3-point goals as they
could. Murphy outshot kelly in
the first heat, 9-7, while Reid Lose
used a hot streak of six straight to
pace himself by a cold Scherer, 11-
3.
Second on the agenda for the
half was a slam-dunk contest be-
tween Edwards and Staples, the
team's premier jammers.
The players took a warmup
round, with Staples using a hot,
double-pump reverse slam for his
"practice" shot, and Edwards
using a long, one-handed glide
for his warmup.
Then came the real thing:
Staples, looking to win the ap-
plause-metered competition,
slammed a windmill dunk home.
Ed wards looked a little weak with
a missed 360 slam. Staples took
his second dunk, an in-your-face
dunk to Edwards, with a nice 360
slam.
Edwards, egged on by his
teammates, showed Staples a
httle in-your-face dunk of his
own, as he came in from the left
baseline with a one-handed
power slam which ripped off the
rim and shattered the backboard.
Edwards, who at first had not
wanted to enter the contest be-
cause of a knee problem, said he
had no idea he could break a back-
board. "It was exciting Ed-
wards said. "I've seen the pros do
it before on TV. Now, 1 guess I feel
kind of like one of them. I hope it
happens again
Head coach MikeSteele, who
let his assistant coaches lead the
two squads during play, made his
way to the microphone and jok-
ingly announced that a collection
would be taken for a backboard
Later, during an interview, Steel
said he hoped the school would
see the need to purchase extra
backboards in case one was ever
broken again.
After the standingovation for
Edwards quieted down, the glass
was swept off the court and the
second half began with Lose hit-
ting a long goal to pull the Gold
team to within 11, 38-27.
Edwards, a little warv to
break another backboard, made a
soft break-away layup to counter
Lose'sgoal. Lose, who scored all
eight of his points in the second
half, tried to keep the Gold squad
in the contest with another quick
basket, but a strong showing by
Gus Hill in the half kept the
Purple team out oi reach
The second half was I
lighted by lOpointsfrom Hill arid
See SCRIMMAGE, page 11
Minges undergoes renovations
for the upcoming '8889 season
Hi CHRIS SIEGEL
ttwtant Sport Editor
When the Pirates take the
court en Nov. 17 against Mara-
thon Oil, things will bo slightly
different It won't be the coach or
new 'mi!onus.
i ver the past several months,
Minges Coliseum has undertaken
some major renovations to the
i ing floor and the gymnasium.
fl avis, Director of Operations,
said the changes make Minges a
belter facility and a more attrac-
tive place to play basketball and
other -ports.
ITie 6,500 seat gymnasium
was in need of repair and im-
provement and Henry VanSant,
Associate Director of Internal
Affairs, headed up the process of
getting Minges ready for the up-
coming season. VanSant said the
gym iscompletely fini �hed and he
hopes that the improvements will
make Minges Coliseum a better
basketball facility.
Several changes have taken
place in Minges, with the most
notable being the playing floor.
Under the watchful eye of Bob
Webb, Plant Engineer, and Gene
Howell, Building Superinten-
dent, the floor was sanded and
repaired. Almost one-fourth of
the floor was replaced to elimi-
nate dead spots and bad boards
Hie floor was then repainted with
a darker purple paint and new-
logos. Also a new jump circle was
in the center of the court. Fhe
circle includes the words East
Carolina Universitv Pirates,
rather than just Pirates said
Davis.
Davis and others hope this
will bring the school more recog-
nition.
The baselines no longer have
the word Pirates printed across
them. They now have a script
Pirates in one corner and an ECl
logo in the other. Thiswasdoneto
open the center of the baseline so
the Hvdra-Kib baskets could be
used this season. These are
moveable baskets which will be
set up before the game 'These
baskets make the floor look more
professional and the gym look
more like a coliseum is.
Improvements we
strictly to the playing
wooden bleachers
faced bv Charron I r
J
with the help of C. G
Rod Seymour. Old boards were
removed w replaced and all the
bleachers were coated with a
wood sealer to make them Iook
polished. Along with this, sk.
boxes were also constructed on
the upper deck on the north sid
of the. coliseum. VanSant said
these boxes were built for those
people who make "generous con
tributions to the general athletic
fund
Other changes, such as the
repainting oi the coliseum walls,
the repainting oi the visiting team
locker rooms and the moving of
the press table to the opposite of
the court have also aided in the
improvement of Minges Coli-
seum. Msoa new lighting system
is being installed and Davis and
VanSant hope that it will be fin-
ished bv the start oi conference in
January.
With some major polls pick-
ing ECU to finish as high as sec-
ond in the Colonial Athletic Con-
ference, this season looks like it
will be an exciting one. The reno-
vations to Minges Coliseum will
be the icing on what appears to be
a victory cake for the Pirates bas-
ketball team.
MWElfcsWBBW6' 0s "�� �" vv-
rhe Minges basketball court underwent a complete renovation before the start of the basketball
season. Officials hope the newly refurnished facility will give ECU more recognition.
Bridgers sets new varsity record
Swimmers give good showing
Charlotte outscored bv Atlanta
ATLANTA (AP) Reggie
Theusscored 27 points and Moses
Malone added 20 as the Atlanta
Hawks outscored Charlotte by 15
points in the fourth quarter Satur-
day night and beat the Hornets
132-111.
Charlotte, which has lost four
of i ts first fi ve games, pulled to 96-
93 with 10:31 lei
Tripucka 3-pointer.
who snapped a two-game li sing
streak, outscored them 36 1 8 the
rest of the way.
Cliff Levingston had 8 p lints,
Malone 6, Theus 4 and Domin-
ique Wilkins 4 in the final 10
minutes.
I evingston scored 20 points
iverall, Wilkins 19 and Glenn
livers 14 for the Hawks.
The Hornets had seven play-
in double figures led by
i ripucka with 18, Michael Holton
had 17, Dave Hoppen and Brian
Rowsom 14 each, Robert Reid 13,
Rex Chapman 12 and Tim Kemp-
ton 10.
The East Carolina football team prepares for their bout with the University of Cincinnati. This is
the final game of the 1988 season.
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
The East Carolina Swim and
Dive team had another successful
weekend of back to back dual
meets. Although the women lost
their second meet on the road to
William and Mary, Meredith Br-
idgers emerged as a powerhouse
in the 200-yard breastsrroke.
Bridgers not only set the var-
sity record in the 200-yard
brcaststroke in a time of 2:20.71,
but she is a little over a second
away from the NCAA cut which is
2:19.21.
"She broke the record in the
first meet against Old Dominion
University and then broke her
own record again the next day'
head coach Rick Kobe said.
This now gives Bridgers the
fifth fastest time in the country.
The Pirates swam at home on
Saturday against Old Dominion
University in a packed Minges
Aquatic Center where both the
men and the women clearly domi-
nated the nonconference oppo-
nent.
The men had an easy victory
defeating ODU 142-102 by win-
ning eight of their 13 events.
The women won the meet
against ODU in a slightly closer
fashion than the men had in their
final score of 130-110. The Lady
Pirates won seven of their 13
events.
After Old Dominion, it was
off to Williamsburg, VA where
the Tribe could not hold off the
men of East Carolina, and conse-
quently, the Pirates tacked on
another win for themselves
against William and Mary, 139-
102.
It came down to the last relay,
the 400-yard freestyle relay, but
the women were unable to take
first place and unable to re,gn
over the Tribe as the victory was
handed to William and Mary. The
final, 117-128.
"We swam great but we were
a little tired after the win over
ODU Kobe explained.
The weekend results leave
the men undefeated as the; are 4-
0 in the league and 3-0 in the con-
ference The record for the w men
now carries one loss as they stand
at 4-1, 2-1 in the conference
"We can't he happier with
where we are now Kobe said.
In the diving events Pat
Smith took first place in both the
one and three-meter boards for
the men against ODl whilegrab-
mg second in both events against
William and Mary. Sherry
Campbell gave her usual flawless
See SWIMMING, page 11
New ticket info
Guidelines for East Carolina
University students to pick up
tickets for the upcoming college
basketball season have been set,
and there are several changes.
Students can pick up their
ticket with a validated ID and
activity card the day before a
game from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the
Minges Coliseum ticket office. For
games on Monday nights, ticket
pick-up will be on Friday, For
games during Thanksgiving
break (Nov. 26), tickets can be
picked up on Wednesday, Nov.
23. For games during the Christ-
mas vacahon (Dec. 27-30), tickets
can be picked up on Friday, Dec.
23.
When students pick up their
tickets the day before the game,
they can also pick up one extra 1
2-price ticket for a guest with a
valid ID. Any additional tickets
3re full-price. After the supply of
guest tickets are gone, all tickets
become full-price
Also, students
can use an extra student II to get
a free ticket for a friend. Only one
extra ticket per person is allowed.
When students pick up their
tickets the day of the game, only-
one ticket can be given out. Also
on the day of the game, all student
tickets will be available for any-
one to buv, students included.
This year, student sections
are colored purple, grav and
green. There are three entrances
for student tickets� Minges
Lobby (purple & green) and the
southside of the coliseum (gray).
Purple and green are floor level
seats while gray �s second level
seating.
There are more student tick-
ets available on the floor this vear
due to the press row being moved
to the floor.
For more information about
the availability of student tickets
throughout the season, contact
the ECU Ticket Office at 757-6400.
r
Date s
t� KKlslt H
1 hi'l f .��
griuu; anuind
w hi the in w
ill N In
I i e 11.ii i
da th.it the �
will not iW .t v m
chosen if �
tltst J.
l .11. tl .
the rest of tl
1 V.( �
applied ti
posith'ii but I
there is n,
names will K
final ai
Excell
Continue
perforn .
board the er I
Page I
as the fn
superb we k
Thurma
(SI
women's bask
Pierson ann.
Tom Lynn
Hallsboro, N
of intent to plaj for I
rates nexl vear
Thurman, a
forward, is expe ted I
ECU signee durinj
ing period, which be,
day
Thurman, a Hall
School senior, av -
and 15 rebound
year as a junior Sh
all-Eastern North I ii
Conferen
County. She was a
Hallshnrn's T� an P I
Flaw r
ITT

Ml
sn





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 15,1968 11
1988 Page 10
mance
enter the contest be-
lt a knee problem, said he
Ikiea he could break a back-
it was exciting Ed-
aid. Tve seen the pros do
i on TV Now, I guess 1 feel
hke one of them. I hope it
i again
ad coach MikeStetie, who
sistant coaches lead the
i tads during plav. made his
the microphone and jok-
Innounced that a collection
1 be taken for a backboard.
a ring an interview, Steele
fc hoped the school would
need to purchase extra
wrds in case one was ever
again.
FtiT the standing ovation for
ids quieted down, the glass
ept oft the court and the
half began with l.oso hit-
wig goal to pull the Gold
h within 11, 38-27.
.sards, a little wary to
I other backboard, made a
n ak-away lavup to counter
Lose, who scored all
his points in the second
d to keep the Gold squad
J ntest with another quick
It but a strong showing by-
ill in the half kept the
team out of reach.
v second half was high-
ly 10 points from 1 hil and
iCRIMMAGE, page 11
le start of the basketball
re recognition.
howing
men undefeated as they are 4-
thc league and 3-0 in the con-
e The record for the women
U carries one loss as they stand
-1,2-1 in the conference.
We can't be happier with
icre we are now Kobe said.
In the diving events Pat
ith took first place in both the
and three-meter boards for
men against ODL while grab-
second in both events against
flliam and Mary. Sherry
mpbell gave her usual flawless
ISee SWIMMING, page 11
t info
use an extra student ID to get
Jree ticket for a friend. Only one
tra ticket per person is allowed
When students pick up their
kets the day of the game, only
c ticket can be given out. Also
the day of the game, all student
kets will be available for any-
jie to buy, students included.
This year, student sections
le colored purple, gray and
Jeen. There are three entrances
student tickets� Minges
)bby (purple & gTeen) and the
Hithside of the coliseum (gray),
irple and green are floor level
ats while gray is second level
fating.
There are more student tick-
Is available on the floor this year
le to the press row being moved
the floor.
For more information about
availability of student tickets
kroughout the season, contact
ECU Ticket Office at 757-6400.
Date set to announce new coach
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
There are many rumors lin-
gering around the campus over
who the new head football coach
will be. But Athletic Director
Dave Hart announced Wednes-
day that the selection committee
will not release who they have
chosen to succeed Baker until the
first week in December.
"We are trying not to disrupt
the rest of the season Hart said.
Dozens of applicants have
applied for the head coaching
position, but Hart stressed that
there is no one person in mind. No
names will be released until the
final announcement.
Hart explained that the selec-
tion committee has developed a
certain profile to use in picking
the new coach. The profile in-
cluded being a motivater and an
outstanding recruiter. He should
also be able to assemble a quality
staff.
In addition, Hart said that the
new coach does not have to have
previous head coach experience
nor come from a Division 1-A
team.
If a coach created or is con-
nected to a less than credible or-
ganization, his chances for the
position will be tarnished. "It's an
automatic elimination to anyone
with a stain in coaching Hart
said. "We will continue to run a
clean program
In terms of income, Hart said
the coach must "produce first,
then we will reward him
The coach will receive a kind
of roll-over contract where there
will be continued renewed agree-
ments instead of just one long
contract.
Hart explained that a four-
year contract is "the norm" and
the new coach will probably re-
ceive aproximately the same
agreement.
The schedule for the new
coach has been completed
through 1992 and Hart explained
that the schedule is tough but not
impossible. "We've played a
good schedule but it is not as
impossible a dream as some may
perceive Hart said. "If you con-
vince the team and the fans that
the schedule is too tough, then
they won't win. We're not going
to tell anyone not to call us if
they're in the top 20
As far as rehashing the series
with N.C. State, Hart explained
that he hopes the series can be
resumed and sees it happening in
the future. There must be an un-
derstanding however that some
games must be played in
Greenville at Ficklen Stadium.
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Excellent weekend for swimmers
Continued from page 10
performance as she won in every
board the entire weekend.
Page Holt is also one to watch
as the freshman athlete had a
superb weekend excelling in both
the 100-yard freestyle (54.73) and
the 200-yard freestyle (1:58.39) at
William and Mary. At Old Do-
minion, she placed first in the 200-
yard freestyle (1:56.17) and sec-
ond in the 100-yord freestyle
(54.45). y
J.D. Lewis had an excellent
weekend for the men when, at
ODU, he placed first in the 1000-
yard freestyle (9:48.50) and in the
500-yard freestyle (4:46.19). He
fared just as well at William and
Mary placing first in both the 200-
yard freestyle (1:48.36) and again
in the 500-yard freestyle (4:54.50).
Kobe said the team still has a
tough schedule ahead of them as
they face the likes of Duke and
UNC when they return after
Christmas.
Thurman tO play Scrimmage ends on good note
(SID) � East Carolina
women's basketball coach Pat
Pierson announced Thursday
Toni Lynn Thurman, of
Hallsboro, NC, has signed a letter
of intent to play for the Lady Pi-
rates next year.
Thurman, a 5-11, 145-pound
forward, is expected to be the only
ECU signee during the early sign-
ing period, which began Wednes-
day.
Thurman, a Hallsboro High
School senior, averaged 25 points
and 15 rebounds per game last
year as a junior. She was named
all-Eastern North Carolina, all-
Conference, and all-Columbus
County. She was also named
Hallsborn's Team Most Valuable
Player.
"We're very excited to sign a
player the caliber of Toni, espe-
cially during the early signing
period said Pierson, who is be-
ginning her second season at ECU
and 11th year of coaching in the
college ranks.
'Toni is not only an outstand-
ing athlete, but a very good stu-
dent as well. She comes from a
nice family, and is really the type
of student-athlete that we look for
in recruiting
Thurman holds a 3.8 grade
point average (on a 4.0 scale), and
plans to major inbusiness admini-
stration at ECU. Her coach at
Hallsboro, Kern Dudney, at-
tended graduate school at East
Carolina.
Continued from page 10
quick play from 5'7" Hinton.
Hinton had several steals and
showed poise as he made crisp
passes and made nice drives in the
lane against the much taller
Purple players.
The Pirates showed they also
have outside shooting capabili-
ties, making five three-point bas-
kets on the night. Robin House
had two, with Scherer, Murphy
and Perlich hitting one each.
Another good show was put
on by 6'9" freshman Bryant, who
displayed sure hands for a big
man, and didn't hesitate to hit the
floor chasing a loose ball along-
side of Hinton. Bryant played
aggressively, and should be a big
threat on the inside as he gets
more experience under his belt.
Coach Steele said he was
pleased with the scrimmage, but
that there were also some things
the team will need to work on
before the season begins. "It was
good for us to put on the uniforms
for the first time and get under the
lights like this Steele said. He
pointed out that the nervousness
of the younger players was also a
factor.
Coach Steele was hesitant to
say how the scrimmage would
reflect on the upcoming season.
"It was just a scrimmage. We'll
learn a lot more about the team
after the Marathon Oil game
Steele said.
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Student Union
Coming Attractions
'n,�
tiiagisi
Alll io i j (� I i u i I il -i I & I r o
BLOODMOBILE
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16
AND
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
12.00 noon - 600 pm
SPONSORED BY
STUDENT RESIDENCE ASSOCIATION

American Red Cross ssL
Tidewater Regional Blood Services M
Coffeehouse Productions Presents:
Joe Distephano and Friends for a night of Jazz
Tuesday. November 15 at 8.00
ARIA
Saturday November 19 at 8 00
Sponsored by the Student Union Coffeehous Coi n.itiee
Movies of the Week
Jack Nicholson Night
"ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOOS NEST R
"CHINATOWN-R
Wednesday. November i R
'TRONWEEDR
November 17-20
All films are shown at 8 00 pm i Hrad
Theatre unlessotherwise stated and are FRI I
to ECU students with valid ECU ID
Sponsored bv the Student Union Films CommM
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee wants
to know what concerts you would like to have at ECU.
An opinion box is located next to the information
desk in Mendenhall Student Center.
Stop by and help us to bring you
13 the concerts of your choice.
tour soi







12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 15, 1988
Volleyball falls short of goal I lunch special
� I MONSAT.
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Suit Writer
ECU'S women's volleyball
team was one game away from
reaching its season goal as they
fell in the fifth game of the match
deciding fifth place in the Colo-
nial Athletic Association this
weekend at the CAA tournament
in Washington, D.C.
The Lady Pirates, who have
finished the season at 7-19 and
sixth in the conference for four
consecutive years, were playing
the season with hopes of a fourth
or fifth place finish in the CAA.
But American University, host of
the 1988 tournament, took the
hope away in the fifth game of the
hard fought match.
"We played the best that
we've played all season said
ECU head coach Judy Kirkpa-
trick. "We played as a team and
everyone contributed to the
games we won and the ones we
almost won
The Lady Eagles won two
close games to begin the match 15-
13, 15-13. In game one, ECU
jumped out to an 8-2 lead over the
Lady Eagles but let the lead slip
and American went on for the
win. The Lady Pirates then took a
5-1 lead in game two, but, again
American slowly fought back for
a 15-13 win.
ECU, determined not to fall
easily, continued to battle with
American and emerged the win-
ner in game three and four, 15-13,
15-8. ECU had to fight its way
back several times in the two
matches as the two teams had an
abundance of defense but offense
was scarce.
The fifth place in the CAA
was to be decided in game five.
American jumped to a 7-2 lead
over the Lady Pirates and the lead
proved too much for ECU as they
could only take advantage of their
sideouts for six more points.
American capped off the week-
end with a 15-8 win in game five
capturing fifth place in the CAA.
ECU, who ended the season
Saturday, faced third-seeded
George Mason University in first-
round action earlier on Saturday.
The Lady Pirates dominated
play in the first game, winning 15-
12 and broke an 11 game losing
streak. Senior Traci Smith re-
corded nine kills in the first game
leading the Lady Pirates to what
looked like a conference upset.
GMU did not let this happen
though as they came back in the
second game playing the Lady
Pirates point for point and win-
ning 15-13. Unable to generate
offense in the third and fourth
games, ECU lost the last games 2-
15, 6-15, and George Mason
would advance to second-round
action against UNC-Wilmington
and ECU would face American
for the fifth place fight.
"I still contend that we are as
good as the number four and five
time said Kirkpatrick. "It was so
equal and the coaches in the con-
ference agree that those spot
could have gone either way. We
could have easily been fourth, but
ended up in sixth place
George Mason would lose to
the Lady Seahawks and face
James Madison in Sunday's battle
for third place in the CAA. JMU
fell to reigning CAA champs Wil-
liam and Mary in the second
round action.
11 AM - 3 PM
12-8 oz. Round
Sirloin
Potato Bar
Sundae Bar
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I1
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10 Discount on
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an additional $1.99 with a meal
FREE DESSERT BAR
with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
Phoenix wins but Lomax injured
2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
(AP) � Phoenix reached the
top of the NFC East, but if the
Cardinals stay there, it probably
will be without Neil Lomax.
Lomax threw for 353 yards
and two touchdowns Sunday but
injured his left knee in the fourth
quarter as Phoenix beat New York
24-17 Sundav and tied the Giants
J
for first place.
'The doctors tell me it's a
partial tear of the ligament
Lomax said. "I've been told to
keep the knee levated for the
next 10 days and I might be out
anywhere from three to four
weeks
Lomax, who already has had
problems this season with an ar-
thritic left hip, twisted his knee on
a 44-yard touchdown pass to Roy
Green with 13:16 left that put
Phoenix ahead 21-7.
Cliff Stoudt came in for Phoe-
nix, 7-4, which won its third
straight.
"Cliff can do the job if I'm not
in there said Lomax, who com-
pleted 23 of 35 passes. "We de-
serve to be in first place. We've
beaten a lot of good football
teams. We beat a great team to-
dav
In other games, Chicago beat
Washington 34-14, Kansas City
beat Cincinnati 31-28, Indianapo-
lis beat Green Bay 20-13, New
England beat the New York Jets
14-13, Philadelphia beat Pitts-
burgh 27-26, San Diego beat At-
lanta 10-7, Tampa Bay beat De-
troit 23-20, the Los Angeles Raid-
ers beat San Francisco 9-3, New
Orleans beat the Los Angeles
Rams 14-10, Denver beat Cleve-
land 30-7, Seattle beat Houston
27-24 and Minnesota beat Dallas
43-3. Buffalo is at Miami tonight.
Cardinals 24, Giants 17
New York closed to within
21-14 on Ottis Anderson's 1-yard
run with 8:15 remaining, but Al
Del Greco kicked a 28-yard field
goal with 4:03 left.
"They made the plays they
had to Giants coach Bill Parcell
said. "Green hurt us. He's their
biggest weapon. He's a game-
breaker
Paul McFadden's 40-yard
field goal with 1:50 to plav cut the
deficit to a touchdown but New
York couldn't get the ball back.
Bears 34. Redskins 14
Mike Tomczak and Matt
Suhey ran for first-half touch-
downs as Chicago, 9-2, took a 20-
0 halftime lead in coach Mike
Ditka's return to the sidelines fol-
lowing a heart attack 11 days ago.
"I admit I got a little tired in
the first half. I think it was the sun
and the sweater said Ditka, who
left the actual coaching to Vince
Tobin. "I felt terrific in the second
half
"He doesn't have to stand up
and coach, he has a tremendous
presence Bears safety Dave
Duerson said.
Doug Williams completed 6
of 19 passes for 68 yards for Wash-
ington, 6-5, before leaving early in
the third quarter. Mark Rypien
came in and threw two touch-
down passes but was intercepted
four times.
Chiefs 31, Bengals 28
Albert Lewis blocked a punt
and recovered a fumble in the
final six minutesas Kansas City, 2-
9-1, overcame a 28-19 deficit. The
Chiefs won on Nick Lowery's
fifth field goal, a 39-yarder with
two seconds left.
Lewis blocked a punt out of
the end zone to pull the Chiefs to
within 28-21 with 6:06 remaining.
After Christian Okove's 1-vard
J J
run tied the score 28-28, Lewis
recovered a fumble by
Cincinnati's Marc Logan on the
kickoff at the Bengals' 28.
Cincinnati, 8-3, took a 28-16
lead in the third quarter on Stan-
ford Jennings' club record 98-
yard kickoff return.
Colts 20, Packers 13
Chris Chandler threw touch-
down passes of 24 yards to Mark
Bover and four yards to Matt
Bouza, both after Green Bay
fumbles, and Harvey Armstrong
batted down Don Majkowski's
pass on the final play as the Colts
won their fifth straight.
Green Bay, 2-9, pulled to
within 20-13 with 42 seconds left
on Majkowski's 3-yard pass to
Aubrey Matthews, the Packers'
first touchdown in 13 quarters.
Green Bay then recovered an
onside kick at the Colts' 49 and
moved to the 4. Indianapolis is 6-
5.
Patriots 14, Jets 13
Doug Flutie threw a 19-yard
touchdown to Stanley Morgan on
the second play of the second half
to give New England a 7-3 lead
after Larry McGrew intercepted a
Ken O'Brien pass.
John Stephens made it 14-6
when he scored on a 3-yard sweep
with 6:48 remaining to cap a 58-
yard, 10-play drive. New York, 5-
1, made it close on Freeman
McNeil's 6-yard touchdown run
with 206 left. New England, 6-5,
won its first road game this year in
five tries.
Eagles 27, Steelers 26
Philadelphia's Luis Zen-
dehas kicked an 18-yard field goal
with 1:15 left as Pittsburgh, 2-9,
lost for the ninth time in 10 games.
Eagles quarterback Randall
Cunningham ran 12 and 7 yards
for touchdowns on broken plays,
then passed 41 yards to Cris Car-
ter to set up the game-winning
field goal.
Reggie Singletary preserved
the victory by blocking Gary
Anderson's 57-yard field goal at-
tempt on the final play. Anderson
had kicked four field goals.
Chargers 10, Falcons 7
Rod Bernstine ran 57 yards
with a short pass from Mark Vla-
sic to set up Barry Redden's 5-
yard touchdown run with 4:32 to
play that gave the Chargers a 10-
point lead.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
oo0 nuts
$2750.0O
YOUR UNCLE WANTS
TO PAY FOR COLLEGE. BUT ONLY
IF YOU'RE GOOD ENOUGH.
Army ROTC scholarships pay full tuition
and provide an allowance for fees and
textbooks. Find out if you qualify.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
Contact Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
Ea&f Carolina �
(Playhouse.
I "88-89 season
1'
iNovemoer
1819, 21 and 22
8:15 p.m.
McGinnis Theatre
(Corner of Fifth k. Eastern)
Genera Public: $5.00
ECU Students: $3.00
Call: 757-6390
�,
ATVANTA
BOSTON
CHARLOTTE.
CHICAGO
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LA GUARDU
LOS ANGELES.
.$1M ORLANDO
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.$17 SAVANNAH.
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�179
m
$17
�art
.$14
$21
�Prices are roundtrip baaed on midweek travel. Tickets
are no nre fund able with no changes allowed. Reservations
must be made a minimum of 14 days In advance. Prices
are subject to change without notice.
crreenville
travel center
200 Arlington Blvd Suite M
756-1521
Tom Togs
is having a
Gigantic Warehouse Sale
Just For You
NOTHING OVER $10
FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY
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1900 Dickinson Ave
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We have added irregulars to this location
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Located Next to Tons of Toys - S. Memorial Drive
Hours: 10-6 Mon. - Sat (Fri. & Sat til 9)
Visit Our Other Locations
Hwy. 64 East Between � AtI
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CTN?ro MoreheadCity.N.C.
SS WedSa, 9-5





Title
The East Carolinian, November 15, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 15, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.641
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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