The East Carolinian, November 10, 1988






Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDSZZI6
FEATURES8
SPORTSZ'aZ
Features
Big E gives advice to befuddled students on the
Clearly Labeled Satire Page and Chippy graces the
controversial page with some Bizarro poetry. Also,
check Pirate Comics for the Jimmy Olsen tribute.
Sports
The Pirates take a breather this weekend. Carolyn
Justice gives an in depth look at fullback Tim James
while defensive standout Robert Jones tells the key to
his success, see page 12.
�he SaBt (Eamlmtan
Vol. bl No. 34
Thursday November 10, 1988
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Sample poll of 50 shows little
over half of students voted
By KM HARRIS
Nrv �
A poll of 50 students con-
ducted by The East Can � ian on
Wednesday showed that only a
little over half, 28, actually voted
Ot the 28 students si voted
by absentee ballet and the rema i n
ing 22 made a special trip home to
cast their ballots.
1v conscience wouldn't let
me not vote. 1 feel like it ! don't
vote then I don r.o the right to
complain about the way things
are going in the country said
iohn Carter, a senior English ma-
jor who made two hour trip I i
Raleigh to vote
The 22 students who declined
to vote had various reason- for
not doing s, Fight ot the 22 said
they did not apply tor the
absentee ballot. The other 14 stu-
dents said they were not regis-
tered to vote One student inter-
viewed in front of the Student
Store said, "It's too much of a
hassle to get registered and all
that business
I wouldn't vote even it 1 was
registered said Meleah Cabhart
a chemistry student. I don't
think that the votes of the general
public have any effect on the elec-
tion The candidates didn't give
us much of a choice anyway
Many of the students inter-
viewed who were not registered
said they didn't follow the elec-
tion because as one student said.
Both candidates were miserable
choices by their respective par-
ties. It wasn't worth registering or
even voting tor either of the two
Students also expressed their
displeasure towards the negative
campaign used by Bush.
Brett Setzer. a general college
student and Dukakis supporter
said, "1 voted, but am glad to see
everything is over with especially
the negative Rush ads. I got sick oi
seeing both of them � in the
paper, on TV and on the radio
In a breakdown oi males and
females polled in terms who
voted for which candidate the
results were as follows:
Nine females voted. Six of
the nine voted a Democratic
ticket. All six cited abortion and
child care as the strong issues.
The remaining three
women said Bush's qualifications
swayed them to the Republican
ticket.
Nineteen males voted.
Sixteen oi the 19 chose the
Republican ticket. They cited
Bush's experience as vice presi-
dent, his stance on defense and
the death penalty as influential
factors.
� The threes male who chose
the Democratic ticket said
Dukakis' environmental and eco-
nomic policies were stronger than
those ot Bush
The No. 1 form of transportation for on campus students is also an easv target for thieves over
the holidays. (File Photo, ECU Photo Lab)
Age is no obstacle
1 ' ' fcrv- ' ' ���" " i ii i
Minors drink despite laws
Bv CONSTANCE WARD
staff VSnwr
This is this Hrst jxirt in a con-
tinuing series on the issue of drinking
underage at ECU.
Learning is not the onlv thing
going on at East Carolina Univer-
sity � underaged drinking is too.
There are 15,579 students
enrolled at ECL this fall semester.
The majority of these students are
below the age of 21.
Drinking occurs at parties,
downtown clubs and dormitory
rooms. ECU administrators and
campus police officers do what
they can to combat the problem,
but the students greatly outnum-
ber them.
Carolyn Fulghum is the direc-
tor of Residence Life and Housing
at ECU. Ms. Fulghum said her
main concern is "the effect abu-
sive drinking has on students
Abusive drinking occurs when
alcohol is used for recreational
purposes.
Ms. Fulghum said many stu-
dents have been taken advantage
of, placed on police records,
passed out outside of buildings
and have caused campus prop-
erty damage as a result of being
drunk.
Ms. Fulghum said money is
being wasted. She explained that
if she does not know who causes
property damage to a dormitory,
all residents living there have to
pay for the repairs.
Another person involved
with handling drinkers is Keith
Knox, a crime prevention officer
for ECU. Knox said there is not
enough campus police force to
watch all students for underaged
drinking. But he said the campus
police do issue citations to the
underaged drinkers that they do
find. K iox said 19 and 20-vear-
People have been
taken advantage of,
placed on police rec-
ords, passed out out-
side of buildings and
have caused campus
property damage as a
result of being drunk.
oldsare charged a $25 fine with no
permanent record if caught drink-
ing.
Knox said during the fall
semester of 1987 and the spring
semester of 1988, there were 328
citations issued to students for al-
coholic consumption and 299 cita-
tions written for possession of
alcohol. He emphasized that they
had put extra effort into issuing ci-
tations for alcohol use since they
Knox said underaged drinking
increased on campus after the 21 -
age drinking law came into affect.
The legal drinking age was
raised from 19 to 21 in North
Carolina on September 1, 1�86.
The change came about after the
U.S. Congress passed legislation
stating that any state that did not
have a minimum drinking age of
A by October 1, 1986, would lose
5 percent of its federal highway
funds for 1987 and an additional
10 percent in 1988.
The former drinking age for
North Carolina was 19 for beer
and unfortified wine and 21 was
the age for fortified wine of spiri-
tous liquor.
The drinking age legislation
stemmed from studies done on
auto accidents and deaths of
drunk drivers under the age of 21.
The studies, done in several
states, indicated that lowering the
drinking age increased the num-
ber of alcohol-related accidents,
while raising it decreased the
number.
Knox said the number of alco-
hol-related accidents for drivers
under 21 has decreased slowly in
North Carolina. He said there are
no exact statistics available.
Knox said ECU has more
underaged drinkers now than it
did before the law changed. He
said the underaged students only
changed the wavs in which they
obtain alcohol.
Despite low voter turnout on the national level, Pitt County voters set records for particinatio,
(Photo By Thomas Walters, ECU Photo Lab)
The Dukakis campaign failed
due to a plethora of reasons
ByJOK HARRIS
New Fditur
In an interview Wednesdav,
Dr. Tinsley Yarbrough talked
about the some factors that
doomed Dukakis to lose the presi-
dential election.
"If you want to look at
resumes, Bush clearly has the
more impressive of the two Yar-
borough said. "Bush has done
very little in his career. Granted,
he has held many positions, but
has done verv little in each of
them
He said neither oi the candi-
dates had a particularly strong
stand on any one subject. Accord-
ing to larbrough, Bush was
elected because of his experience.
Yarbrough said Dukakis' rec-
ord is impressive and has no black
marks on it (in reference to Bush's
involvement with the Irancontra
affair). "In looking at the Dukakis
record, it is easy to say that he
hasn't done much more than
manage Massachusetts
In reference to all four of the
candidates, Yarbrough said
Bcntsen was the most qualified to
be running. He said Bentsen was a
wise4 edition to the Democratic
ticket but Dukakis, despite his
knowledge and political back-
ground, was not.
"Dukakis was a v;i x d choice,
hut the image oi a Northeastern
liberal with an ethnic background
just didn't sit weli with a lot oi
people said Yarbrough.
He also said Dukakis' physi-
cal size was no asset to the cam-
paign, "1 le wasn't a powerful fig-
ure. I ledidn't radiate (he imageof
strength
Yarbrough said 1 flunk it is
sate to say that Bush won on
Reagan's appeal and a much more
professionally run campaign
According to Yarbrough, the
negative advertising played a big
part in the Republican victory. 1 le
said Bush used the negative ads to
define Dukakis as s,tt on crime
and soft on patriotism, referring
to the Pledge of Allegiance issue.
" 1 he Bush campaign manag-
ers really knew what thev were
doing Yarbrough said. "He had
tar more seasoned veterans from
other campaigns working for him
than the Dukakis camp. It you
look at 'he final half-an-hour pur-
chased by each candidate on
Monday. Bush's was just more
slickly put together
Another major factor that led
to Dukakis' downfall was the
Willie Horton ad. Yarborough
said the South, which has been
traditionally Democratic voted
Republican because oi the racial
undertone caused bv the ad. "By
using the Willie Horton ad. the
Republicans made an appeal to a
specialized group oi people, and
won.
Dukakis should have
started doing earlier, what he has
been doing in the last two weeks
Yarbrough said. "I'm not saying
he would have won. but it would
have been a closer race
Yarbrough said as a result of
the election the Senate and House
are under a Democratic majority.
He said, "It's going to be
tough going for Bush. He's going
to have a hard time getting any-
thing passed by either bodv with-
out it being thoroughly ques-
tioned and debated
AIDS is the topic at hand
By GARY SANDERSON
Staff Writer
AIDS victim Mike Miller, 42,
conducted an open forum in
Hendrix Theater Tuesday night
as part of ECU's AIDS Awareness
Week.
Miller willingly answered
questions from the audience as he
handed out pamphlets on the
prevention of the disease.
"When I first found out that I
had full-blown AIDS, my feelings
toward the gay community re-
flected getting even said Miller.
"I've found out that AIDS isn't a
gay disease if I can change my
opinion with AIDS, I don't see
why others are still so pig-
headed
He said attitudes are chang-
ing but that it's still "one step for-
ward, two steps back
Miller, a hemophiliac, said he
was exposed to AIDS through
transfusions following a sailing
accident in 1981. "It's a disease
that hides 1 had it for five to six
years before experiencing symp-
toms said Miller. "You're play-
ing Russian roulette when you've
got the disease inside you
Miller said tests conducted
showed three college students in
every 1000 nationwide have
AIDS.
"That may not sound signifi-
cant until vou find it to be vour
J J
boyfriend or girlfriend or room-
mate he said.
Miller stressed that those in-
fected have no way oi knowing
how many people they've trans-
mitted the disease to. "You've got
no way of knowing you have the
disease unless vou're tested said
Miller.
He told students the dis-
ease could be transmitted
through anv exchange of body
fluids. The fluids include blood,
saliva, feccs, semen or mucous.
"All the disease needs is an open-
ing said Miller. According to
Miller openings include sores or
cuts in the mouth, thus the disease
could be transmitted through oral
sex.
Presently, Miller is using
a variety of drugs including the
Food and Drug Administration-
around $700 monthly, down from
$1200 per month in 1986.
"1 don't think a cure a vac
cine is anywhere close, but they re
making progress said Miller.
I le is also taking a lot of supple-
ments and watching his diet.
"I don't know if they're
doing any good but I'm still
alive he said. "If I wanted to die,
I could do it tomorrow dying is
easy, it's living that's a bitch
Miller said since he got the
virus, he's had to take I new out-
look on life.
"I live one � ime be-
cause lite, ton . venture
Miller said that i takes a ter-
minal illness like AIDS to make
you appreciate what you have.
He said people "should look
around them it's a beautiful
world, a wonderful life
Student Health Center Edu-
cator Mary Elesha- Adams, the co-
ordinator of AIDS Awareness
Week said, "We felt that he would
be the perfect person to speak
since he's not a homosexual
She said many people are still
under the belief that AIDS is a de-
sease which only affects homo-
sexuals.





i
v I v Ki'l INIAN
NOV 1 Mm K 10
Condoms are the sale alternative
The East Carolinian
! m' boon hearing a lot aNmt tlon
�ndoms during the p�t year and
� week during M!1 Aware
� ess Week Uh.it s tin- sciH"�p on
.1- i means to nr I
against � � . � transmitted i
eases (STP s) Vt to ,ib
from intei i oui se i ond �
the Ix'st w.n to reduce v
chances ol getting oi spn
v ondom oi i ubhei is a
t i tike sheath that tits
the erect pents When used lOS rhea her
v the condom prevents tamvdia and other
ri . the pai tnei s
ii ing intercourse
Sin tdom prevents the
entei ing the pai tnei s
lorn can N- used to
To Your Health
By
Mary-Elesha Adams
�. ondoms tire
and v .in be bought v itlv
s iiption I i'f arc also
use
Whal features
KHk tvM inavind
I (H�k tor i ondi'ins that use
Nonoxynol-9 as i lubricant be
cause it is also spermu idal (kills
sperm) I ubri .ml also decreases
the possibility t condom break
agi
Never use Vaseline or min
nd that natural eral oil it will disintegrate the
am I stop the i ond m
� Don'l us , ondoms that .ire
� thai are not in sealed pa kagos 1 r i
N �i lapan I he destnn s latex
' � ' ndoms. Where i an 1 buy condoms?
- ondom has a i he Student I i. alth Servii c
i from sells a box ol 1 condoms for $2 .it
the pharmai
Ja
It M
i
J. lvl
Advf tl inj Repiesi
Ma
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Budget, Nato and arms reductions top
Bush's presidential agenda in 1989
DISPLAY AlJVi J I 1
Ml OR M) 1 U I
' leorge 1 su fxvt I I
I begin his presi will want a statt tl
mitn ol oedentia sports .is
nation s posed
�ficit to around avid keoni
AVO s p nonttos
with � -
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c bobbed across the Hush scai cl e
; - 1 up as s
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It ad� � � been I
in be sevretai v ol ns
k of a to l
an Reagan v ad .is
sorbed in the tan . -
t same time Bush is
itorot authorit in an
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. -
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ext week
Margaret
man
hi
talks
mong the fii
ems facing Bush are the bu I
i fii il and tin national debl
stem the red ink, Bush has pro
ised ! pei ill lead ncgi tia
u ie in tions u ithongi �. it
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i

BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
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CORDON'S
CAROLINA
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The Center Is Oven
Tues.
10 2
Wed.
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For an appointment or more infor
mation. call 24 Hour Helpline,
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(Next to Chicos in the Geogretown Shops)
Let's Do A Good Turn And End Hunger In America.
SUPPORT "SCOUTING FOR FOOD" � NOVEMBER 12-19, 1988
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10,1988
Condoms are the safe alternative
I've been hearing a lot about
condoms during the past year and
Jhis week during AIDS Aware-
ness Week. What's the scoop on
condoms?
A condom or "rubber" is a
thin rubber-like sheath that fits
over the erect penis. When used
properly, the condom prevents
sperm from entering the partner's
body during intercourse.
Since a condom prevents the
sperm from entering the partner's
body, the condom can be used to
serve two purposes:
1. as a method of contracep-
tion
2. as a means to protect
against sexually transmitted dis-
eases (STD's). Next to abstaining
from intercourse, condoms are
the best way to reduce your
chances of getting or spreading
AIDS, gonorrhea, herpes, ch-
lamydia and other STD's.
Condoms are inexpensive
and can be bought without a pre-
scription. They are also easy to
use.
What features should you
look for in a condom?
-Use only latex condoms. Sci-
To Your Health
By
Mary-Elesha Adams
entist have found that "natural
skin" condoms cannot stop the
AIDS virus.
-Look for condoms that are
made in the USA or Japan. They
are superior to other condoms.
-Make sure the condom has a
reservoir tip (to keep sperm from
leaking).
-Look for condoms that use
Nonoxynol-9 as a lubricant be-
cause it is also spermicidal (kills
sperm). Lubricant also decreases
the possibility of condom break-
age.
Never use Vaseline or min-
eral oil - it will disintegrate the
condom.
-Don't use condoms that are
not in sealed packages. Dryness
destroys latex.
Where can I buy condoms?
-The Student Health Service
sells a box of 12 condoms for $2 at
the pharmacy.
Budget, Nato and arms reductions top
Bush's presidential agenda in 1989
HOUSTON (AP) � George
Bush is likely to begin his presi-
dency with a blaze of summitry
on everything from the nation's
staggering budget deficit to
NATO's foreign policy priorities
and arms reductions with
Moscow.
Bush, whose political inclina-
tions have bobbed across the
spectrum, promises to brino to the
White House a less ideological
brand of leadership than Presi-
dent Reagan.
He likely will be more of a
hands-on manager than Reagan
but not as deeply absorbed in the
mechanics of government as
jimmy Carter was.
At the same time Bush is
known as a delegator of authority,
a student of the problems of gov-
ernance who believes that the best
way to chart goals and get things
done is to put the right people in
the right places.
"I suspect that George Bush
will want a staff that includes sort
of credentialed experts as op-
posed to ideological soul mates
around him said David Keene, a
Republican political consultant
who once worked for Bush.
James A. Baker III, the former
Treasury secretary who was
Bush's campaign chairman, is ex-
pected to wind up as secretarv of
State. Former Sen. John Tower of
Texas has been lobbying hard to
be secretary of Defense.
Bush is expected to keep
Nicholas Brady as Treasury secre-
tary, Dick Thornburgh as attor-
ney general, Lauro Cavazos as
education secretarv and Ann
McLaughlin as Labor secretary or
in another Cabinet post.
After a news conference here
Wednesday, Bush will return to
Washington for a victory rally
and then leave Thursday for a
four-dav Florida vacation.
CITY OF GREENSBORO
Police Officer
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�taApaadtaw�MMdb tpifptti
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���
"P I ST�0 !T
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City of Creeniboro Employment Offic
Mehrin Municipal Office Building
PUza Level - Room !20
Drawer W-2
Greensboro. NC 27402
(919)373-2080
�.
I � 'Mr i V
&
for The
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Ski Equipment
�The Latest In Skiwear
Fashions
�A Complete Certified Re-
pair Shop
GORDON'S
200 E Greenville Blvd. 756-1003
Open til 9 Wed. & Fri.
(Next to McDonald's)
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
The Center Is Open
Tues. Wed. Fri.
10-2 9-2:30 9-5
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
111 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Te�t-
. Confidential Counseling
COPIES 5
(Seh crvicc 8 12 x 11 white bond)
758-2400
Fast Copies For Fast Times
(Next to Chico's in the Geogretown Shops)
He will return to Washington
Monday for meetings next week
British Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher and West German
Chancellor Helmut Kohl.
Mrs. Thatcher would like to
see a NATO foreign ministers'
meeting scheduled for June in
London upgraded to a full NATO
summit conference to develop
strategy for dealing with the
Kremlin.
Bush already has proposed a
NATO summit, so it's likely
they'll be talking on the same
wave length.
A NATO meeting could pave
the way for Bush to meet with
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gor-
bachev. Bush said recently he
would like to meet the Soviet
leader at "the earliest time" so
they can size each other up and
determine how to move ahead
with strategic and conventional
arms talks.
Among the first major prob-
lems facing Bush are the budget
deficit and the national debt. To
stem the red ink, Bush has prom-
ised to personally lead negotia-
tions with Congress on deficit-
reduction.
The East Carolinian
Serving live East Carolina campus community since 1925
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenshlp
Ashley E. Halt on
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Sponsored by the Boy Scouts of America and The North Carolina Association of Convenience Stores.
HSU
Marti
RALEIGH (AP) - Pro
by a strong Republican tide
personal populantv, Go
Martin won re-election in a s
ning landslide that rewards
call for an endorsement of al
ord that Democrats had brand
failure.
"I am reassured and
charged by the results ot
day the beaming 52
governor told hundreds o
bilant supporter Tuesd
after declanng victor
Gov. Bob Jordan
"The people of North
lina have said with their
that they respect and suppo
leadership that we've
last four years and they wa
see us move forward tl
four years Martin said, pr
ing to seek an end to hi
feud with Democrati
Jordan, 55, who i
worst beating,of any North
lina Democratic gubernatj
candidate this ant
Martin's call for unr
phoning the winner to
gratulations.
"The voters have pla
trust in Jim Martin over the
four vears and I'm sur J
will work very hard to man
that trust Jordan said.
Standing with hi- wife, S
and hundreds of disappo
Democrats, the lieutenant t
nor acknowledged that, "it
to lose
"I may not like the ded
that was made, but 1 accep
decision Jordan said. "Ipre
you it will not keep me
working for the people of
Carolina for the rest of mv
With 2,368 or 99 perce
2,391 precincts re I
unofficial returns, Martin
1,197,897 votes or 56 percd
942,357 votes or 44 p. i j
Jordan.
Becoming the state's tiH
publican chief executive
election. Martin earned
geographical region excej
sparselv populated, rural
east.
He routed lordan bv
2OCM)00v oe�t thetTiednhc
rolled up big majorities in
counties such as Alamj
Buncombe,Forsyth. Guil
New Hanover and Wake.
Jordan's most staggeriii
back came in Mecklenburg
state's most populous o
where he made a concerted
to minimize his losses only
Martin win bv a 2-tD-l mart
An ABC' exit poll J
Read The Eas1
Carolinian. Eve
Tues. and Thi
5t
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O TURN
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10,1988 3
Martin buries Jordan in landslide
RALEIGH (AP) � Propelled
by a strong Republican tide and
personal popularity, Gov. Jim
Martin won re-election in a stun-
ning landslide that rewarded his
call for an endorsement of a rec-
ord that Democratshad branded a
failure.
"I am reassured and re-
charged by the results of this
day the beaming 52-vear-old
governor told hundreds of ju-
Martin favored by majorities of
the male and female voters and 17
percent of the black voters. His
campaign had hoped for 20 per-
cent black support.
It was a resounding vote of
case for a change in leadership, state.
Black said. Martin countered with a
"Jordan was forced into a campaign that effectively took ad-
position of trying, to argue that vantage of favorable economic
'we can do better7 without the statistics. Citing the state's low
ability to make truly convincing unemployment rate and the
ii
m
:y&�.
confidence for the former college arguments as to how it could be 300,000 jobs created during his
chemistry professor and six-term
congressman elected in 1984 de-
spite having no experience in
state government and whose rec-
ord of steering initiatives through
bilant supporters Tuesday night the General Assembly was spotty
after declaring victory over Lt. at best.
Gov. Bob Jordan. He had urged voters to re-
"The people of North Caro- elect him by a wide margin which
Una have said with their votes he said would give him a "man-
that they respect and support the date" and send the Legislature's
leadership that we've given these Democratic leaders a message to
last four vears and they want to cooperate.
done he said. "He started out
behind and stayed behind all the
way through
John Crumpler, Jordan's
campaign manager, acknowl-
edged that "it has turned out to be
a tough year to be a Democrat in
North Carolina. We ran a good
tenure, he said North Carolina
was "on a roll" and didn't need to
change course.
Jordan acknowledged the
state's growth but said it was con-
centrated in urban areas and
warned that the future was grim,
citing problems such as wide-
see us move forward these next
four vears Martin said, promis-
ing to seek an end to his four-year
feud with Democratic legislators.
Jordan, 53, who suffered the
worst beating.of any North Caro-
lina Democratic gubernatorial
candidate this century, echoed
Martin's call for unitv after tele-
phoning the winner to offer con-
gratulati6ns.
"The voters have placed their
trust in Jim Martin over the next
four vears and I'm sure that he
J
will work verv hard to maintain
that trust Jordan said.
Standing with his wife, Sarah,
and hundreds of disappointed
Democrats, the lieutenant gover-
nor acknowledged that, 'it hurts
to lose
"I may not like the decision
that was made, but I accept that
Martin avoided gloating in
his victory statement, praising -
Jordan's concession as "states-
manlike" and emphasizing the
need for unity.
He promised an early meet-
ing with Democratic leaders and a
concerted push for a better work-
ing relationship.
"I've said before, there's a
time for partisanship Martin
said. "That's when we have elec-
tions. And there'sa time for bipar-
tisanship. That's when the
election's over
Martin's victory appeared to
be more a product of his own
strengths than of shortcomings in
Jordan or his strategy, although
observers said the staid Demo-
cratic nominee wasn't the ideal
challenger at a time when cha-
risma and smoothness on televi-
campaign, a strong campaign, but spread illiteracy and coastal pol-
that's not always enough. lution.
Ken Eudy, executive director Martin deflected the "sitting
of the state Democratic Party who governor" label with a flurry of
spearheaded the effort to tarnish election-year initiatives ranging
Martin's image and coined the from a $450 million highway
decision Jordan said. "1 promise sion are priceless qualities.
"Martin is a very skillful poli-
tician said Merle Black, political
science professor at the Univer
vou it will not keep me from
working for the people of North
Carolina for the rest of my life
With 2,368 or 99 percent of
2,391 precincts reporting
unofficial returns, Martin had
1,197,897 votes or 56 percent to associated himself with jobs, edu
phrase "sitting governor attrib-
uted the outcome to the
governor's personal attractive-
ness.
"He'san incumbent governor
with a lot of hair and teeth and
one-liners Eudy said.
But Tim Pittman, Martin's
campaign spokesman, said Jor-
dan sealed his own doom by at-
tacking Martin with television
commercials including the cele-
brated ad in which chimpanzees
in business suits portrayed his
budget advisers.
"At that point the voters just
realized that he was being very
negative Pittman said. "People
realized that he was not going to
run a positive campaign and offer
an alternative
The nominees spent about
$10 million between them, a state
record for a gubernatorial cam-
paign.
From the outset, the race's
bond issue to a $5 million package
of services for the elderly.
Satire Page
overs
ctivate
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EVERY THURSDAY
Ramada Inn
(Formerly Shearton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
sity of North Carolina at Chapel JSt1?
Hill He was able to offset every-
thing Jordan threw at him. He
942357 votes or 44 percent tor
Jordan.
Becoming the state's first Re-
publican chief executive to win re-
election. Martin earned every
geographical region except the
sparselv populated, rural North-
east.
He routed Jordan by nearly
200,000 ces4 the redmoTrt and
rolled up big majorities in urban
counties such as Alamance,
Buncombe,Forsyth, Guilford,
New Hanover and Wake.
Jordan's most staggering set-
back came in Mecklenburg, the
state's most populous county,
where he made a concerted effort
to minimize his losses only to see
Martin win by a 2-to-l margin.
An ABC exit poll snowed
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
cation, roads to the point that
Martin and Jordan really did not
seem to differ very much in terms
of fundamental objectives
Failing to establish stark dif-
ferences between himself and
Martin, Jordan could not sell his
dan could convince voters Utat
Martin had done a poor job and
that replacing him would result in
substantial, demonstrable change
for the better.
Jordan portrayed Martin as
lazy and unimaginative, with no
comprehensive vision and more
interest in building the Republi-
can Party than in running the
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(Hilt Saat (ftar0ltman
Smq the Last , maft �� ������) � Jt,?5
Pete Fernald, gmwm�
Chip Carter, m-i m?
James F.J. McKee, Di�iw mmmj
oe Harris, Nnusunor
Kristen Halberg.e
Tim Hampton, r�r� �
M ici ielle England, &�. m.
Debbie Stevens, ���,
Stephanie Folsom, c u
Jeff Parker, m
TOM FURR, OrcuiMhon Mmrfn
Susan Howell, p M�j�r
John w. Medlin, wD�tor
Mac Clark, toPwMwy
Vt0W 1 4�unt tx& VOTE 0 v?n or uvr)
November 10. 1988
OPINION
Pag? 4
Voting
Fifty million people can be wrong
Dust settles. Smoke clears. Vul-
tures alight. Maggots are spawned
in rotting meat. Writers of editorials
dissect presidential elections.
Though he'd disagree, Bush's
victory is hardly a resounding
triumph of conservative values over
liberal ones, nor is it the "mandate
from mainstream America" he will
certainly try to claim. The same
people who elected Bush also
elected a mostly Democratic Con-
gress, so there has certainly been no
overwhelming endorsement of
whatever values Bush stands for this
week.
About fifty-five percent of those
who voted, which includes only
about fifty percent of eligible voters,
voted for Bush (the electoral college
results are deceptively large). A bit
of simple mathematics reveals that
this translates to: roughly a quarter
of the eligible voters voted for Bush.
Approximately the same
amount think the sun revolves
around the earth, and an even
higher percentage can't tell north
from south on a map of the world. It
is of course not necessarily true that
all those who voted for Bush believe
these things, but, regardless, it is
difficult to lend much weight to the
intellectual decisions of such per-
sons.
In fact, it verges on insanity to
believe that the American people �
or, for that matter, any randomly
selected group of humans � is actu-
ally capable of governing itself by
democracy. Voters now base theii
decisions largely or totally on how
they feel about a candidate, as op-
posed to what they think about tha1
candidate's positions. As a result
they are easily influenced by the
kind of advertising typified by
Bush's campaign.
The success of sleazy politics is
nothing new, of course; 1988 is spe-
cial only in that the political han-
dlers seemed to be willing to openl)
admit that the American populace
is, by and large, a bunch of easily-
gulled fools who don't mind being
led like asses on a rope, provided
that they are permitted to retain the
fiction that they are making rational
and informed decisions.
Time and time again, in election
after election, one is reminded that
the American populace, taken as a
whole, is quite stupid. Logical
thought on the subject leads inexo-
rably to the conclusion that the effec-
tive intelligence level of the group is
reduced at best to the average level,
or at worst to the lowest common
denominator.
It is senseless to presume that the
ordinary man is more fit to govern
than is the extraordinary man. Even
though a system such as the Ameri-
can one is supposed to catapult the
most-qualified candidate to office, it
is still the voters � the average per-
sons � who decide which candidate
is more qualified.
There are many who will claim
PUKAM5 TO WIN
Yew COULD eXAlAINt-
AKjp SAY THAT HE
�JST NIY BY A
SUM 0
that this system is quite justified, as
power derives from the masses. But
we do not let convicts vote on their
wardens. We do not let infants vote
on their parents. We do not let zoo
animals vote on their keepers. And
we should never, ever, ever again let
the American people vote on their
leaders.
They have been given the right to
vote, and they have been given
ample access to the facts, lies by
candidates notwithstandng. The
vast majority of voters have proved
themselves unwilling or unable to
avail themselves of these facts and to
make an informed decision based
upon them. The fundamental pre-
cepts of democracy � that the
people are capable of making the
right decision and that they will do
so at least most of the time � are
clearly in error.
Even those who would claim
instead that the fundamental pre-
cept of democracy is not that people
will make the right decision, but that
they have the right to make the deci-
sion, aren't off the hook. It has long
been agreed that a person's right to
freedom of speech, for example,
does not extend to shouting "fire" in
a crowded movie theater. Similarly,
the average person does not have
the right to decide who his leaders
will be unless he makes that decision
on the basis of clearheaded, logical
thinking.
It is quite likely that the oft-in-
voked Founding Fathers, were they
alive today, would be shocked and
revolted at the Frankenstein mon-
ster of a government that has been
sewn together out of the noble sys-
tem they had in mind. Their driving
concept was this: if the government
is not working properly, it must be
repaired or replaced.
The current state of affairs shows
a political system well beyond re-
pair; it must, therefore, be replaced.
There must be some method, pref-
erably a peaceful one, of implement-
ing an Ibsenian democracy � a
government ruled by an aristocracy
made up of those members of the
population most fit to rule.
Unfortunately, this is not likely
to happen unless the majority of the
people freely consent to it. Other-
wise the system would be no better
than tyranny.
But the majority of the people
won't consent to any such thing
until they are astute enough and
wise enough to realize that that sys-
tem is precisely what is necessary.
Catch-22: at that same point they
will be capable of carrying on an
actual democracy, and an Ibsenian
democracy will no longer be neces-
sary.
But in the meantime � in the
milennia until that happens �
American democracy will be an
unfair and inequitable system,
which rewards candidates who
pander to the whims of the least
intelligent voters. Yay, Bush.
IF Yof WANm
BvUM TO WIN
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Forum Rules
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Tuesday papers and 5 p.m. Tuesday
for Thursday editions.
Bush campaign 'kinder'
By HENDRICK HERTZBERG
The New Republic
DETROIT� It's 11:29 p.m. Most members of the
bloated, redundant Bush press corps (some 120
persons) are in their hotel rooms. At 11:30 eyes shift
from windows to TV screens. On comes ABC's
"Nightline
Ted Koppel asks Michael Dukakis how he feels
about the fact that the Bush campaign has been, as
Koppel puts it, "kicking you in the groin?"
Dukakis' answer banishes hope he might have
learned something from the debacle of the second
debate. He speaks of "expressing concerns" about
issues. He plans to "address the concerns of average
Americans He says his campaign "will do every-
thing we can to address those concerns
To be sure, Dukakis says many sensible things
over the next 90 minutes, but he says them in an
overpoweringly boring way. The drone is all. The
world "concerns" continues to get a heavy work-
out.
In the morning the Bush campaign assumes the
gargantuan proportions of a presidential entourage.
Secret Service men are everywhere. A huge motor-
cade is forming out front. Everyone is consulting
schedules full of numbing detail. There hasn't been
a press conference in 10 days. A press aide laughs as
my request for an interview. Obviously I'm not
going to get within a mile of the guy. It's as if he's
already won.
At 10:08 a.m trailing Walter Mears of the Asso-
ciated Press in an attempt to find the temporary
press center, I encounter a group of men is suits plus
one in a U.S. Olympic Team warm-up jacket and
sweatpants: If s George Bush. He greets Mears with
great friendliness.
"You missed my big press availability over
there he says, gesturing in the direction of the
hotel's health spa. "Missed a great opportunity to
see me naked Mears smiles. "Guy from Newsday
was next to me in the sauna Bush continues.
"Newsday guy says, 'I don't want to take advantage,
but I have to report to my colleagues. When are you
going to have a press conference?' I gave him my
207-press-conferences thing. 'We've had 207 press
conferences since the campaign began. Once every
10 days He said, Tou haven't had one in 10 days
I said, Hey, look at those numbers
An hour later Bush is dressd and reading a
speech to the Economic Club of Detroit. The text
contains this classic two-sentence non sequitur, this
haiku of self-refutation: "Let's cut through the
demagoguery. America is No. 1
After the speech Bush takes some questions. His
answers contain a few of the syntactical nuggets for
which I have grown used to panning the stream of
his spontaneous talk like an old-time prospector. On
the homeless, he admonishes: "Don't drum the pri-
vate sector out of the homeless business On drugs,
he observes: "Gov. Dukakis and I both have position
papers on this�mine, many pages
In the afternoon we fly to South Dakota for a
rally at the Sioux Falls stockyards. Three hundred
people are standing around in a makeshift corral. A
sign says WELCOME TO SIOUX FALLS STOCK-
YARDS. The podium is made of hay bales. The site
makes for good visuals. Good olfactuals, too. The
smell of bull, like the sound, is not wholly unpleas-i
ant. Bush gives his stump speech.
Then the whole entourage goes to Billings,
Mont so that Bush can give essentially the same
speech in a college gym. Eleven Sioux chiefs stand
behind him in full feathers. The speech yields only a
single nugget to the syntax prospector, but it's glit-
tering one: on gun control, Bush calls himself "a
violent opponent" of it.
Early the next morning, in Tacoma, Wash Bush
accepts the endorsement of the Marine Engineers
Beneficial Association, a pro-Reagan union. The
press corps is not in a particularly good mood.
Nothing resembling news has come its way on this
trip.
However, a scuffle breaks out. A respectable-
looking young man, his hands cuffed behind him, is
being hustled out of the hall by a couple of uni-
formed cops and a heavy-set plainclothesman in a
mudbrown jacket. The young man is bleeding from
the nose.
"A Bush supporter assaulted a man, and I com-
plained about it and I'm gettin' my head bashed
against the floor the young man is veiling. As
reporters pepper the young man with questions, he
gives his age (21), occupation (college student), and
political affiliation (Democrat).
"What's this guy under arrest for, officer?" I ask
one of the uniformed cops. "I have no idea savs the
cop. "What's he under arrest for, officer?" I ask the
plainclothesman. He says nothing. 'That man, in the
brown sports coat the young man is yelling. "He
was bashing my head against the floor, against the
cement floor "What's he under arrest for?" I again
ask the brown jacket. Brown jacket gives me long
look. Finally he says, "Failing to disperse when told
to
On the plane to San Jose, Calif where Bush will
toura Silicon Valley high-tech plant, we are told that
the young man was arrested for resisting arrest, a
favorite ontological puzzler of local law enforce-
ment agencies. A Bush press aide tells us that the
young man was a Bush supporter who got his
bloody nose from a Dukakis supporter's fist. "It isn' t
much of a story, but it'll have to do a reporter
remarks to no one in particular. "At least it's better
than these speeches
The trip ends in Los Angeles, with a party at the
home of Bob Hope. At one point Bush turns sincere.
"I'm not gonna bore you with all the issues he says.
"But Barbara and I do feel good about it We're not
going to be talking on the negative side any more.
I'm sorry Clint Eastwood isn't here. Remember how
he'd say 'Make my day'? Now my opponent say
'Have a nice vacation' as the prisoners come out of
the jails. But now it's gonna be a kinder and gentler
finish to this campaign-1 do feel good about it
For eight years we've been watching "Death
Valley Days with your host, Ronald Reagan. With
George and Barbara heading a kinder, gentler cast,
the next four years will be one long episode of "The
Love Boat
Demo
WASHINGTON (
Democrats bolstered their
ity control of the Senate bj
mg three-term GOP mi
Lowell Weicker of Conn
who refused to concede j
and by capturing Repu
seats in Virginia Nevada aj
bra ska
Democrats won fou
previously held by Repul
and the GOP captured twj
held by Democrats rai-
Democrats margin of co
56-44, a two seat gain it
crats hold on to Florida
Several races were dec
narrow tallies, and the co
Florida remained extreme
and too close to call "VV
have a couple of recount
w re done said 'Tom V
spokesman tor the Rep
Senatorial (ampaigr n
The GOPs wins c
Montana where torme
Managem
$92 a shan
WINSTOh
Forsyth County bv.
hoping anv sai'
stuff their Christmas
with cash
A management
RJR Nabisco chairman
lohnson has offer
to make the ompan I
leveraged buyout �'
offer bv the investmen
Kohlber Kravis R
ild giv e stk kholdeJ
share A special con
sidering buyout
will take sealed bids untili
At least one stock hrol
urging RJR Nabisco shar
to take halt the mon
Richard Stockton
of Norman Stockton In.
timing of the RiR Nab
will determine how tree
spend their capita! gauv
"People feel a lit tic1
their profit around Chn
Stockton said
cashmere sweat i
wool .
Stockton, like other
said he had not seen am
ers yet with RIR Nabi-
burning holes in their p
"I haven't heard
they've sold their i
Richard Pope, owner cj
jewelers. "I think folks
on it I don't see them gt t
less and spending it.
Car dealerships alrej
planned for a 12 fx reenj
in siles this season acd
the Winston Salem
chants Association
"1 would expect thai
that money around st
would spend it saidNij
the owner of Flo Motd
But Flow has not ind
inventory in anticipat
buying craze. "There s
of time tor that he saw
Neal Kaplan an ii
analyst with Interstate
lne, told shareholders!
wide telephone conferd
day night to sell halt ct
Nabisco stock now an
other half pending a res
Read The
Carolinian.
Tues. and Tl
WEDNESDAY
XI
CoMedY 2THE k CoMfd'
WED v.) WElJ
5th St.Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
D&D
2v6 Bunk Beds S
A Savii
Bunkies nj
available!
Use as
Various applial





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i
I
IS
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10,1988 5
Democrats gain Senate control
WASHINGTON (AP) broadcaster Conrad Burns edged
Democrats bolstered their major- out Democratic Sen. John Mel-
ity control of the Senate by oust- cher, who was seeking a third
ing three-term GOP maverick term, and in Mississippi, where
Lowell Weicker of Connecticut, Rep. Trent Lott. the deputy House
who refused to concede defeat, Republican leader defeated Rep.
and by capturing Republican
seats in Virginia Nevada and Ne-
braska.
Democrats won four seats
previously held by Republicans
and the GOP captured two seats
held by Democrats, raising the
Wayne Dowdy for the seat being
vacated by Sen. John Stennis, the
Senate's senior Democrat.
Sen. Lloyd Bentsen, D-Texas,
who went down in defeat with
Michael Dukakis as the Demo-
cratic vice presidential candidate.
Democrats margin of control to did not end Election Day empty-
56-44, a two-seat gain if Demo- handed. He won re-election to a
crats hold on to Florida. fourth Senate term.
Several races were decided by The election decisions give
narrow tallies, and the contest in President-elect George Bush the
Florida remained extremely tight prosoect of opening his admini-
and too close to call. "We might stration with Congress solidly in
have a couple of recounts before Democratic hands,
we're done said Tom Mason, a "It's going to be tougher
spokesman for the Republican said Senate Minority leader Bob
Senatorial Campaign Committee. Dole of Kansas, conceding that
The GOP's wins came in the GOP's numbers in the Senate
Montana where former farm would be shaved in the 101st
Management group offers
$92 a share in buyout plan
W1NSTON-SALEM (AP) - the company's purchase. The
Forsyth County businesses arc highest offer so far is $92 a share,
hoping any sales of RjR stock will "We see nor nal reason for
stuff their Christmas stockings a higher offer Captan said in a
with cash. conference linking 33 brokerage
A management group led by offices in North Carolina and 13 in
RJR Nabisco chairman F. Ross South Carolina.
Congress. "We're going to have
fewer than we had last year
But Sen. Edward M. Ken-
nedy, D-Mass said he believes
that Bush will find a cooperative
spirit on Capitol Hill because "the
problems are too important for
Congress not to work with the
president
Connecticut Attorney Gen-
eral Joseph Lieberman edged
Weicker by a paper-thin margin
after a hard-fought campaign in
which he accused the senator of
pursuing his own brand of liberal
politics while ignoring home state
concerns.
Weicker, who first gained
national attention as a gruff, out-
spoken member of the Senate
Watergate Committee and who
became one of the Senate's most
liberal and independent mem-
bers, refused to concede.
"I wish 1 were here to declare
a victory or defeat Weicker told
supporters. "Unfortunately, I'm
not in a position to do either right
now
But he added: "No matter
how all this turnsout. I don't have
one single gripe
The Senate race in Florida
remained too close to call.
Republicans had high hopes
of picking up the seat of retiring
Democrat La wton Chiles in Flor-
ida. But Democratic Rep. Buddy
MacKay held a narrow lead over
conservative Republican Rep.
Connie Mack.
The race was so tight that a
decision might rest in the count-
ing of an estimated 100,000
absentee ballots. The Mack cam-
paign said they expected to do
better than MacKay since tradi-
tionally a large number of such
ballots are cast by military per-
sonnel, a group that Mack consid-
ers among his constituency.
LATE NIGHT
THE PLACE TO BE
SEVEN NIGHTS A WEEK!
7th Anniversary
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Thursday - November 10th
Super Anniversary Specials:
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Private Club
For Members & Guests
Johnson has offered $92 a share to
to make the company private in a
leveraged buyout. A competing
offer bv the investment firm oi
Kohlber Kravis Roberts & Co.
would give stockholders $90 a
share. A special committee con-
sidering buyout propsals says it
will take sealed bids until Nov. 18.
'That's what most people
seem to be doing said William C.
McGee Jr a vice president of In-
terstate-Johnson Lane. "They're
selling a portion and holding the
rest
Only two local investors at-
tended the teleconference at the
Winston-Salem office of Inter-
s��i
comes.
At least one stock brokerage is state-Johnson Lane. Local share-
urging RJR Nabisco shareholders holders are estimated to own
to take half the money and run. more than $2 billion of RJR stock.
Richard Stockton, president Brokers have suggested that
of Norman Stockton Inc said the shareholders worried about shel-
fiming of the RJR Nabisco deal tering their profits from capital-
will determine how freely people gains taxes consider making gifts
spend their capital gains. of their shares to children or other
"People feel a little looser with family members with low in-
their profit around Christmas
Stockton said, "Maybe buy a
cashmere sweater instead of
wool
r. r � , . - 11 ill �x ii � ij
Stockton, like other retailers,
said he had not seen any custom-
ers yet with RJR Nabisco profits
burning holes in their pockets.
"1 haven't heard a soul say
they've sold their stock said
Richard Pope, owner of Towne
jewelers. "1 think folks are sitting
on it I don't see them getting care-
less and spending it
Car dealerships already have
planned for a 12 percent increase
in sales this season, according to
the Winston-Salem Retail Mer-
chants Association.
"1 would expect that, with all
that money around, some people
would spend it said Victor Flow,
the owner of Flow Motors.
But Row has not increased his
inventory in anticipation of a
buying craze. 'There's still plenty
of time for that he said.
Neal Kaplan, an investment
analyst with Interstate-Johnson
Lane, told shareholders in a state-
wide telephone conference Mon-
day night to sell half of their RJR
Nabisco stock now and keep the
other half pending a resolution of
Read The East
Carolinian. Every
Tues. and Thurs.
Pantana Bobs
reminds everyone to come party
early now that we close
at 1:00 a.m.
Do Not Run Out of
PARTY TIME
Attention Fraternities &Sororities: Openings are still
available for Fall Semester Fund Raisers.
Contact Bob!
Pantana's is a private club for members and invited guests only.
ALPHA DELTA PI
INVITES YOU TO
HAPPY HOUR AT FIZZ!
Thursday,
November 10th
Free Nachos
and
Drink Specials
9:00 -1:00 p.m.
.itoo.h.L Driving A Ford-Built Vehicle?
ENGINE SALE
Ford Authorized Remanufactured Engines
C'mon In now and save big on a big selection
of Ford Authorized Remanufactured
Engines. You'll find powerful savings
on engines for almost any Ford-
built car or truck. We're offering
special Installation rates, too.
Every engine Is remanufactured In the
Ford tradition of quality. And backed
by a national limited warranty covering
parts and labor. Ask about our new
Extended Service Plan, too. It covers
you against unexpected repair costs for up to 36
months 36,000 miles, whichever comes first.
Get an engine for your Ford that's priced right,
backed right, and Installed right. See us today.
"Comp'slt truck engines
12,000 miles or 6 mos
(whichever comes first)
Complete passenger car
engines 12.000 miles or
12 mos
Reman utactureO

Engines Paris
FORD
302 V-8 Engine
$998
'Limited time offer
'Extended war-
ranty for $80.00
covers up to 36
months36,000
miles. Labor not
included.
Drive An Engine Bargain
HASTINGS FORD
10th Street & 264-Bypass � Greenville, NC � 919-758-0114
Toll Free 1-800-654-3429
YOUR DEALER P0R FORD AUTHORIZED REMANUFACTURED PARTS
vKr'Cs
WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
It I "lrie,u
CoMedYA CoMedt
tZPHE 7WE.
WED Vy Will)
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
NRG
NRG
Winner of the
Battle of the Bands
Highball Special
FRIDAY
T.X. Boogie
T.X. Boogie
T.X. Boogie
T.X. Boogie
T.X. Boogie
Z.Z. Top Tribute
i; i
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SATURDAY
D & D New And Used
Atlanta Recording Artist
1504 N. Greene St. Greenville
830-9262
Store Hours: M,T,Th,F 10-6p.m.
Sat. 8-6 p.m.
2x6 Bunk Beds $155.00 (Pine Finished) Couches and chairs start as low as $35.00
A Savings of $15.65 Pillows- top quality set $5.95
Bunkies not included, but 5 Piece Dinette (Pinewood) $139.95
available at a sale price. 3 Piece table sets (Walnut Finished)
?Use as 2 separate beds $95.99
Various appliances available wilh warranty (Refrigerators, Washers & Dryers, Ranges)
Bring this Ad in Before Nov. 15,hfor 10 Discount
90-day Layaway Plan
HEW MKHELOB DRV.
Available in Greenville Now at your Favorite Bar or Tavern





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10, 1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Only two blocks from Joyner
I ibrary � one room of a two bedroom
ap.irtment for sublease after December
1 lard wood floor, cable TV, fully fur-
nished, etc. $150month plus utilities.
757 0412.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female, non
smoker. Own room, 1 3 rent, 1 3 utilities.
Cai 752-500. Keep trying
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: For
Spring Semester SS). King's Row Apts. - 2
bedrooms. Contact Kris 830268
APARTMENT FOR RENT: 2 bedroom at
Tar River Includes wd hookup, cable
and water. $380.00a monthutilities. Call
758 9589 and ask for Folden.
WANTED: Male roommate. 500-H
1 astbrook Apts. $125 13 utilities. 758-
751 Call anytime.
FOR SALE
lOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Lexington
l (adj Athletic Club)-$42,500�2-bdrms,
I 1 2 bths, Indry hkup, hv rm wbay win,
kit 'dm area wbar, refrig, stove,
dshwshr, Frnch drs open to priv patio w
stor rm, adj to prkng lot for easy access, ac-
tive hmownrs' assn. 355-6974 after 5.
FOR SALE: Can vou buv Jeeps, Cars, 4 X
4 s seized in drug raids for under $100.00?
Call for facts today 602-837-3401. Ext.
711
I BSON COMPUTER: IBM Compatable
2(. k RAM, 2 floppy drives, monitor,
nanuals and software $500. 524-3370,
iftei 4 ask for Donna.
1983 HONDA 750 SHADOW: 15,000
miles, perfect condition, $1200. 524-3370
after 4, ask for Donna.
MONTE CARLO SS: Metallic blue
U � 0, call 7rv-874r
FOR SALE: 14 month membership to the
$150.00, must sell Call 830-6748.
1 OR SALE: Can vou buv Jeeps, Cars, 4 X
4 s seized in drug raids for under S100.007
for tarts today 602-837-3401. Ext.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
incxpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
ngtfa of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
. v and-m hide paper and computer-
rod spelling check We also offer re'sume'
production, and other business and pro-
fessional services. Call 757-3111 M-F for
more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPY1NG SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
I'r ifessional Computer Services, 106 East
ti Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
frl : 752-369.
PA RTY If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
HELP WANTED
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Recreation and Parks Department is re-
cruiting for part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter program. Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge of
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
9-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 p.m. 7 p.m Monday thru
Friday, and some night and weekend
coaching. The program will extend from
December 1 to mid-February. Salary rate
is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour Applications
will be accepted starting October 20.
Contact Ben James at 830-4543
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take signups for our FLORIDA tours. We
furnish all materials for a successful pro-
motion. Good PAY and FUN Call CAM-
PUS MARKETING at 1-800-777-2270.
ATTENTION ECU FACULTY AND
STAFF: Brody's has part-time positions
for individuals interested in a flexible
work schedule to help stuff that special
Christmas stocking Call today for an
interview appointment or applv in per-
son, Brodv's, Carolina East Mall, M-VV, 2-
4 p.m.
HELP WANTED: Part time Counter Girl
wanted at Video-To-Go located onN.C 11
beside Fast Fare (Bethel Highway) Apply
in person Sunday between 6 p.m. and 8
a.m. Hours Flexible
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also cruiseships.
$10,000-$lO5,000yr Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext OJ-1166.
RESORT HOTELS: Cruiselines, Airlines
& Amusement Parks, NOW accepting ap-
plications for summer jobs, internships
and career positions For more informa
tion and an application, write National
Collegiate Recreation Service, PO Box
8074; Hilton Head. S.C 29998.
CHILD CARENANNIES NEEDED:
Join our (Nannv Network) of over 800
placed bv us in the Northeast (Vie year
working with kids in exchange for salaries
up to $300.00 per week. Room and board,
airfare and benefits We offer TI IE BEST
CHOICES in families and locations. Con
tact Maureen Carol, A11ELPING 11ANDS
INC. Recruitment Councelor, 919-577-
5154 (evenings) for brochure and applica
tion Featured on NBC's Today Show and
October, 1987Working Mother magazine
as nationally recognized leader in Nannv
placement. Est 1984.
PART-TIME COLLEGE MAN: Delivery,
warehouse and clean up Larry's Carpet
land. 3010 East 10th Street
TRAVEL FREE SPRING BREAK! FRA-
TERNITIES & SORORITIES INVITED:
For information about being a Campus
Travel Rep call 800-826-9100 Ask for
Steve or Janet.
OPPORTUNITY IN THE TRAVEL IN-
DUSTRY: The 1 college tour operator is
looking for an efficient, responsible, and
organized campus representative to mar-
ket a Spring Break trip on campus Earn
free trips, and good commissions while
gaining great business experience For
more information call 1-800-999-4300.
PERSONALS
JEFF PRYS: I know it seems like you are
far away but our time will come. Love,
Rhonda.
THE PIKES ARE GOING ON THE
ROAD AGAIN: Duke's the word Stay-
tuned for more info Dribble, dribble.
WOULD YOU LIKE $100?: Then find a
Pike and buy a raffle ticket
TIM GOMEZ: The Phantom Awaits.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
J.P. CHILDS: CHICK'S. DIG HIM
SIG EPS: Celebrate your Fraternal
Founders on Nov. 12 at Founder's Day
Formal. Blow it all out, you deserve it. -
Sigma Phi Epsilon Nov. 1, 1901 - Nov. 1,
1988, a continuous Tradition of Excel-
lence. �Mr. William La.ell Phillips.
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS MEETING:
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department will be having the first organ-
izational meeting for anyone interested in
officiating for the men's winter basketball
league All interested officials should call
830-4543 or 830-4550 for the day and time.
SPEECH STUDENTS: Use what you've
learned in class by debating issues which
are important to you. For more informa-
tion call 355-3152 or come by 212 Menden-
hall, Monday at 7:00.
LISTEN UP EVERYBODY It's that time
of year to send your friends messages.
Watch out for the Kappa Alpha Lil Sister
Turkey Grams in the next week! Get psy-
ched to tell a friend hi in a special way.
LAMBDA CHI'S: I lad a great time at the
Elbo even though we were the only ones
there. How about that $50? Let's do it
again soon! �Love, the AZD's.
PI KAPPA PHI LITTLE SISTER
PLEDGES: 1 lope Sunday night was more
fun than shock The "R word Evans St.
and Pepe just to name a few, really helped
bring out the true you! �Love, Your Big
Sisters.
I STILL LOVE YOU: Just slightly,
slightly, more than 1 used too. 1 lappy An-
niversary. �Love, Mookie.
J.T Thanks for cheering me up Saturday
night. 1 had a great time, hope you did too.
I'll even forgive you for not finding me
when you should have - you know what I
mean. Let's do it again soon. �Melinda.
JIM: Thanks for the talk. �Renee.
J.P 1 love vou - you fool. �Renee.
MIL: Thanks date, it was great. I'm glad
we got things straight. Give me a call be-
fore next fall and we can relate. �V.H.
DONNIE W What a time we had Sat.
night Started with tea ended with
Seagrams We had our fill, thanks a mil. I
had a blast, we'll do it again. �Kelly.
DELTA ZETA: As expected, the formal
was a blast - too bad the night flew by so
fast! Partying in the rooms seemed the
thing to do, hanging out on the jungle gym
was pretty fun too. In a circle we all did
sing to find that Mandy had gotten an
engagement ring. To honor our Pledges,
we all did unite to make Rose formal a
very special night.
CHI-O: For all of us that went $p. your,
stranger We had a great time. �The
Pikes
THETA CHI: Congrats to Buddy "Mud-
I lound" sargent on his wrestling victory
at the Greek Olympics! Also to Gary M.
and Jere C. on their egg handling abilitiy.
Makes you wonder doesn't it.
ALPHA XI DELTA PLEDGES: We hope
you had a great time this weekend. We
sure did. We love you! �The Sisters.
ALPHA PHI: Looking forward to the luau
tonite. Cold liquid flowing will keep ev-
eryone knowing that Alpha Phi and Theta
Chi are outta sight Come dressed Hawai
lan style ready to party for a long, lonp
while!
ATTENTION GREEKS: Alpha Xi Delta
Greek God is coming Tuesday, November
15 at the Attic at 9:00. Please come help us
support the American Lung Association.
SAE'S: Thanks for a great time last Thurs.
at PJ-PJ! We had a blast. Let's do it again
soon! �Love the Alpha Xi Delta's.
LAMBDA CHI: We are all getting psy-
ched for tonite. Can't wait to party with
you guys. �Love the Sigmas.
TA E A BREATHER: . . Thursday,
November 17. Did you know lung cancer
is the number one cause of cancer death
among men and women. An estimated
93.000 men and 46,000 women will die of
lung cancer this year. Join Tri Sigma and
the American Cancer Society for the Great
American Smokeout. Start a new habit
you can live with.
TO ALL CHI-O BLIND DATES: What a
blast and no need to say any more. �Love,
the Chi Omega's.
CHI OMEGA PLEDGES: Keep up the
good work! You've made us proud! �
Love the sisters of Chi Omega.
BARB FROIO, CAROLINE AND
ELENA: You sent us on a hunt 1 lalloween
Night, With blindfolds and masks, we
were a sight! Trick or treating at the Plaza
and Theta Chi, We couldn't see a thing but
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
we got by with the help of clues and our
Zeta Big Sis that we found in the cemetary
in the night mist. Though we were scared
in the graveyard and we all threw a fit, We
still love you: The Cookie-Monster, Bozo
and Gumby-Dammit! �Love, you little
sister's Elizabeth B, April and Shannon
ATTENTION CREEK MALES: If you've
got the looks and you've got the bod,
you've got the chance to be Alpha Xi Delta
Greek God.
THETA CHI: The Zeta's would like to
thank you for our "ZTA" pumpkin.
Thank you
CHRISTA�CONGRATULATIONS
Brandon is very lucky to be blessed with
you as his mother and to come into a
wonderful family like yours. 1 can't wait
to see him. �Love, Susan
LISA ADCOCK: The Best Big Sister, get
ready for Friday night �Love your lil
sister - Rhonda.
ALL GROUPS INTERESTED IN
PAINTING THEIR LOGO ON THE
STREET IN FRONT OF THE STUDENT
STORE: Should attend an organizational
meeting Monday, Nov. 14 at 400 in New
Classroom Building 1028. Contact Tnpp
Roakes if you need more info 757 6611
LEM, HAPPY 21ST Let's get ready to gig
tonight. 6 kegs of beer for all the ere w - The
founding fathers of the 5th Quarter.
DELTA SIGMA PHI: What a nuclear
wasted time! Thanxs for inviting us over
for the festivities. �Love the AOPi's.
BETA LAMBDAS: You girls are the best.
What a lucky sorority we are to have you
all! Keep up the great work �Love, The
sisters of AOPi
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: We met you guys
with PJ'son. We weren't tired, no signs of
a yawn. We played pin the patch on the
pirate and twister. What a blast we had
with your brothers and our sisters
Thanxs to Gary's "Get Hugged Get
Kissed this is one social we're glad we
didn't miss �Love the AOPi's.
I HAVE A ROOMMATE: Jemma Holey
is her name. She plays sports, volleyball's
her game Today is her birthday, 1 wanted
to say, but she has an away game she has
to play Good luck at the game, I know
you'll do well. Just go out there and kick
some tail My roommate Jemma is such a
dear, and to top it off, she now can buy
beer! So when you get back we'll have
some fun, it's about damn time you're 21'
�HAPPY BIRTHDAY, LOVE YOUR
ROOMIE'
HAPPY HOUR: Tonight instead of
Thursday night at Fizz Sponsored by
Alpha Nu Pledge Class of Alpha Delta Pi
9:00 p.m. -1:00 am Great fun, great music
and great drinks. Come out and have a
blast!
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES:
Please call the Alpha Xi Delta house and
let us know who your representatives are
for Alpha Xi Delta Greek God Contest!
758-5677.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thni Sat Low
Co:t Termination to'2i7 wfcVh Ar pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
The Secret Of Getting Rich
Amazing Book Tells All
Free Offer Details - Rush Stamped Self
Addressed Envelope
Wayne Humphries, Dept. L.M. - 1
Rt. 1 Box 215
Beulaville, NC 28518
�4
LOOKING FOR A DYNAMIC CAREER???
Your Best Look
Wanted Spring Break
Representlve for
Natl. Tour Company
Great Benefits
Call Today
SI
L
TQi.OOO"?
r
Specializing In: MANICURES:
t French Manicures � Nail Tips �
rverlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
i EDICURES � SKIN CARE: Body
Wrapping � Face & Body Waxing �
Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products F or
M n & Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaa Dr. Greenville
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 5h Street
� Located Near FCU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited offer-$275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williama
7J6-7815 or 830-1937
Office open-Apt. 8,12-530 p.m
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficier.t, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $205 a month, 6 month
lease. MOBILE HOMF. RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near I'rook Valley Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
IfT
? -iiod !
If so, come and obtain more information on one of
the top 10 career professions in health car e today.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Join Staff and students at the Occupational Therapy
Mixer to be held at Mendenhall in Room 244.
November 14,1988
7:00-9:00 p.m.
For more information, call 757-6961.
Announcements
ALPHA PHI SIGMA
All members and potential members are
in' it vl to attend a dinner mtg. on Nov. 14
at 5 00 at the Western Sizzlin on 10th St.
SjGA
All groups interested in painting their
loo in front of the Student Store should
come to 1028 CCB Nov. 14th at 4:00. One
representative per group please.
PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Productions Commit-
tee is having a meeting Nov 14th at 5:30
P m in Mendenhall. Please plan to attend.
We will be discussing the Tree Trimming
I'artv Thanks.
MASSAGE-CLINIC
P.T. Club is having a massage clinic on
Nov 10, 5:30-930 p.m. Buy rickets in
advance for $1 lOmin. or at the door for
$1.2510 mtn First floor Allied Health
Bldg
FC COMPUTER CLUB
The East Carolina Computer Club will
meet in Austin 305 on Nov. 10 at 3:30 p.m.
Mrs Margaret Wirth will present info, on
the Co-operative Ed. program at ECU. Re-
freshments will be served.
SCHOLARSHIP

If vou are considering a career in gov 't or
a pubbc service area and are currently a
freshman or sophomore with at least a B
average, you may be interested in the
Harry S. Truman Scholarship program
which provides up to $7000 annually.
Stop by the Office of International Studies,
1002 GCB for more info.
HONORS CLASSES
OFFERED
Tired cf falling asleep in crowded audito-
riumsQuringdull lectures? Don't despair!
If you have a 3 4 GPA, stimulating teach-
ers will challenge you in I lonors courses
this Spring. See the display ad in this issue
for more details, or call Dr. David Sanders
at 757-6373 in the 1 lonors Program Office
(CCB 1002)
INTERNATIONAL
:NT
You can take part in an active model of the
U.S. government. Come and learn how
democracy works Please call 355 3152 or
come by 212 Mendenhall every Mon. at
7:00 to find out more about the NC. Stu-
dent Legislature. Everyone is welcome.
STUDENTS FOR EC.
DEMOCRACY
S.E.D will be meeting this Sun. evening at
7:00 p.m in Mendenhall room 248. Atten-
dance required.
CHORALE CONCERT
The ECU Chorale, directed by Rhonda
Fleming, will perform its annual fall con-
cert Fit at 8:15 p.m. in Wright Audito-
rium. The concert is free and open to the
public.
EXPRESSIONS
"Expressions" would like to thank every-
one that submitted poetry or short stories
for the Dec. issue. Since production week
begins on Fri we are no longer accepting
entries The Dec. issue will feature three
sections entitled "Voices "On Campus"
and The Arts" so look for it soon.
ATTENTION FRESHMEN
This spring develop important financial
aid and career opportunities by taking
MLSC 1001 (Intro, to ROTC and the
Army). It's a one hour elective with no
uniform or haircut requirements and en-
tails no further obligation. Books are pro-
vided. For more info call 2 Lt. Kevin
Dunlevy at 757-69716974 or stop by
room 343 Rawl.
The American Marketing Assoc. will be
holding its next meeting this Thurs. at
3:30. The meeting will be in room 1032
GCB. Our guest speaker will be Don Pack
who is the mktg. director for the Empire
Brush Co. AH interested are welcome and
members are encouraged to attend.
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Alliance invites
all health related majors to attend our
membership drive meeting on Thurs. at
5:30 p.m. in MSC rm. 221. All interested
students are encouraged to attend. Your
presence will be welcomed!
The yearbook staff would like to say
"Thank You" to everyone who came out
and had their class picture made. Having
611 students show their caring about the
yearbook has given the Buccaneer staff a
new reason to fight to keep this book alive.
You have shown all the people who tried
to say the yearbook was not worth it, that
it really is worth giving a few minutes of
your time to say "1 ley, this is my yearbook
because I'm in it
"CAMPUS SERVICE"
Campus Service will be held in Jenkins
Aud. Nov. 13 at 10:30 devotion, 11:00
worship service. Rev. Rosemarie ONeal
will deliver the word of Cod.
"JOY NIGHT SERVICE"
There will be a "Joy Night Service" on
campus, Sat. 12 at 7:30 in Jenkins Aud.
(Art Bldg). Sponsored by ECU Christian
Fellowship. Minister Steven Pierce deliv-
ering the message.
FCU COSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir is pleased to an-
nounce its Fall Concert on Nov. 13 at 3:30
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. Admission is
free and everyone is welcome.
COSTA-RICA PROGRAM
There will be a mandatory meeting for all
Biology Club members on Nov. 14th at
5:00 p.m. in BIOL-109. Dr. Bellis will be
discussing the Costa-Rica program this
summer. All others interested are invited
to attend.
WATER SKI CLUB
The East Carolina Water Ski Club will
have its first organizational meeting Nov.
10 in room 105 Memorial Gym. The meet-
ing will be at 5:00. The purpose of the club
will be discussed and a short meeting will
be held. Anyone interested in Collegiate
Competition SkiingRecreational Skiing
is welcome. For more info contact
Tommy Lewis at 830-0137.
ART VOCAL ENSEMBLE
The National Gallery of Art Vocal En-
semble will perform in Hendrix Theatre
on Nov. 14 at 8:00 p.m. This event is part of
the Chamber Music Series. Four great
voices create one excellent sound, in jour-
ney exploring an almost limitless reper-
toire. Tickets go on sale Oct. 24. For further
details, contact The Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, or call 757-6611, ext. 266.
PITT COUNTY ACLD
The next meeting of the Pitt County ACLD
will be Nov. 15 at St. James United Meth-
odist Church, 730 p.m. If you are inter-
ested in becoming a member of the Pitt
County ACLD, would like more info or
would like to be on our mailing list, please
send your address to: Pitt County ACLD,
1 Dogwood Court, Greenville, NC.
TURKEY TROT
Be sure to attend the Intramural Turkey
Trot registration meeting held Nov. 15 at
5:00 p.m. in BIO 103. Make sure you regis-
ter and learn what the Turkey Trot is all
about!
CHALLENGE WEEK
Be sure to attend the Intramural Chal-
lenge Week registration meeting held
Nov. 14 from 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m. in MG
104. Challenge Week will be a challenge to
see who is the best among all of the chal-
lengers.
CLC TRANSIT
Are you a Pitt County resident, 60 years
old or older and need a ride to your medi-
cal appointment? The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt County such as doctors, den-
tists, dinics, therapies and the Health
Dept. Arrangements for the service must
be made at least 24 hours before the sched-
uled appointment. Call the Creative Liv-
ing Center, 757-0303, to find out the day(s)
service is scheduled for your area, then
make your medical appointment and res-
ervation for transportation.
ATTENTIONS GRADUATE
STUDENTS
Academic Computing is in need of
Graduate Student Assistants to staff the
academic computing labs on campus.
These lab assistant positions will be avail-
able starting this spring semester and will
involve working 10-15 hours a week.
Duties will involve providing assistance
with users on various computer systems
and maintaining computing lab
operations. Experience with IBM PC's,
Apple Macintosh, or the IBM 4381 Aca-
demic Mainframe is preferred but not
essential To apply, send your resume or a
letter detailing your computer skills to
Terry Harrision (Austin 216) or call 757-
6401
WHATS YQUR OPINION
OF THE TEACHER?
Duringthe week of Nov. 14-18, a survey of
student opinion of instruction will be
conducted at ECU. Questionnaires will be
distributed in every class with enrollment
greater than five. All students will have
the opportunity to express opinions on
the teaching effectiveness of their instruc-
tors in those classes. The survey will be
conducted during class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes to complete
Student par ha pa tion is voluntary and no
identities are requested. Instructors have
been requested to leave the classroom
while the questionnaires are being com-
pleted. The teaching effectiveness ques-
tionnaire was created by the Faculty Sen-
ate Committee for Teaching Effectiveness
and the Office of Planning and Institu-
tional Research. The results of the survey,
along with other information and factors,
are used for administrative evaluation of
the instructor by the supervising adminis-
trator within the department or division.
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Preside
for loss
RALEIGH (AP)-Norl
lina Democrats resurrect
complain! of four years
blamed the presidential
date for the outcome of sj
tests at the top of the ticl
"We need to go bad
drawing board to presenj
form to the voters that's!
ling said John Crumi
Gov. Bob Jordan's ca
manager.
A popular Repubn
cumbent governor, jim
combined with the we.
dential ticket of Michai I
and Lloyd Bentsen If
crats running for statewij
partv officials said
Martin defeated j
Democra ti c nomine
of 56 percent to 44 percenl
percent of the precin I
in an unofficial tallv
Rand, D-Cumbcrland, at
Mount businessman jim
were locked in a c
lieutenant governor wij
ner leading, 51 percent
cent, with 98 percei I
counted.
Democratic pre;
nominee Michael Di � �
too long to respond
from George Bush on gul
and furloughs for prison
Ken Eudv, Democrat
spokesman
"We in the South le
hard way from fesse H
the Congressional C
have to respond to th:
and pick it up and throwj
them Eudv said Tuevi
Crumplcr said the
Democratic ticket did n
state offices in 1984 whi
Mondale lost to Roi
or 1988
But some of the D
Partv faithful said tl
Democrats because I
platform.
Jacqueline Brown
Forest, a Dukakis volui
she was a Democrat be
believed the partv was
"in the individual, th
class common people
needs "
There s sometfc n
ervone in the Democra
said Mrs Brown a
teacher
Even with Dukaki�
said, "1 feel I am still on I
a winner. I can be proul
Sara Stohler of Raj
she had been a Dome
life because she belie
partv concerned aboi
rane,e of issues Repu
UNC activi:
receiving thi
CHAPEL HILL (Al
University of North Cai
dent activists say tN
ments have been an
what apparently were a
stop them from prot
police say Ihey arc
threats senoush
Anne S. Duehnnj
from Greensboro, sau
returned to her apart!
the street from the UTl
Hill campus Thursdav
telephone cord nppeo;
butcher knife ripped
mattress with a night d
of it.
Ms. Duehnng, w
has participated in a
tests against universil
said she later found a
freezer that said "Thi
bed. Next time youi
mouth
Joel R Segal a U
who organized protesj
of Indian activist Edc
during his trial tor
infc reported to policcj
that a threatening phc
followed bv a break-ij
his Chapel Hill apart
one, he said, scribbled I
his walls, "You're gon
helping Eddie
"We are not trl
lightly at all said CaJ
Pcndergraph of the
police department. P
said the department
poets but was pursui
the case.
Meanwhile, a
freshman hasorgani;
rally at 11 a.m. Wedj
rially as a reactior
"We want to bring it t
attention said
Christina E. Kendrot
Neither Ms.
Segal has been inv
most controversial
tests.





m � �
V
the great work
-Love, The
tlCMA PHI: We met vou guys
n We weren't tired, no signs at
Ve pla ed pin the patch on the
winter What a blast we had
brothers and our sisters
,ar s V.et Hugged - Get
i - me vxial we're glad we
ovvtheAOPTs
ROOMMATE: lemma Holley
C She plays sports volleyball's
1 oda) is her birthda 1 wanted
It she has an awav game she has
Kvxi luck at the game 1 know
Ivell Hist go out there and kick
I M) roommate lemma is such a
to top it oft she now can buy
ten you get back we'll have
s about damn time vou re 21'
PAN LOVE YOUR
It OL R Tonight instead of
ghi at fizt Sponsored by
edge Qass ol Alpha Delta Pi.
10 j m Great tun great music
s Come out and have a
V
IED
ting Rich
ells All
Stamped Self
�lope
t. L.M. - 1
5
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-4
MIC CAREER???
r.
I
prtation on one of
(health car e today.
Itherapy
ipational Therapy
lall in Room 244.
IS8
ill 757-6961.
�EXTIONS GRADUATE
STUDENTS
lie Computing is in need of
te Student Assistants to staff the
ic computing labs on campus
j lab assistant positions will be avail-
lartmg this spring semester and will
jre working 10-15 hours a week.
will involve providing assistance
lsers on various computer systems
maintaining computing lab
Irons Experience with IBM PC's,
Macintosh, or the IBM 4381 Aca-
Main frame is preferred but not
lal To apply, send your resume or a
etaihng your computer skills to
larnsion (Austin 216) or call 757-
LATS YOUR OPINION
OF THE TEACHER?
igtheweekofNov 14-18, a survey of
int opinion of instruction will be
pcted at ECU Questionnaires will be
uted in every class with enrollment
than five All students will have
��portunity to express opinions on
dung effectiveness of their instruc-
those classes The survey will be
ted during class tune and will take
ximatdy 15 minutes to complete.
it participation is voluntary and no
ues are requested Instructors have
requested to leave the dassroom
the questionnaires are being com-
The teaching effectiveness ques-
iire was created by the Faculty Sen-
jmmittee for Teaching Effectiveness
Office of Planning and Insbru-
Research The results of the survey,
with other information and factors,
for administrative evaluation of
uuctor by the supervising admims-
within the department or division.
Presidential candidate blamed
for loss on N.C. ticket outcome
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10,1988 7
CENTER
RALEIGH (AP) - North Caro-
lina Democrats resurrected their
complaint of four years ago and
blamed the presidential candi-
date for the outcome of state con-
tests at the top of the ticket.
"We need to go back to the
drawing board to present a Plat
interested in much more limited
issues
Of particular interest, she
said, are college loans because she
and her husband will have two
children in college next year.
"We're seeing what's hap-
pened since they cut the loans,
form to the voters that's compel- and it's going to make it difficult,
ling said John Crumpler, Lt.
Gov. Bob Jordan's campaign
manager.
A popular Republican in-
cumbent governor, Jim Martin,
combined with the weak presi-
dential ticket of Michael Dukakis
Mrs. Stohler said.
Sen. Marshall Rauch, D-Gas-
ton, also criticized the Democratic
presidential ticket.
To win an election, he said,
"you've got to knock your oppo-
nent out Dukakis was unable to
do that, he said. "Dukakis pro-
Mr. Sweet
and Lloyd Bentsen to hurt Demo-
crats running for statewide office, jected an image of
party officials said. Guy Rauch said.
Martin defeated Jordan, the But he said Jordan had an
Democratic nominee, by a margin image problem of his own - that of
of 56 percent to 44 percent with 98 "capable, intelligent gentleman,
percent of the precincts reporting, It's hard to win with that kind of
in an unofficial tally. Sen. Tony
Rand, D-Cumberland, and Rocky
Mount businessman Jim Gardner
were locked in a close race for
headline
In addition to problems with
the nat'onal ticket, Martin is "ar-
ticulate, smart and good-looking
lieutenant governor with Gard- and he hasn't done anything good
ner leading, 51 percent to 49 per-
cent, with 98 percent of precincts
counted.
Democratic presidential
nominee Michael Dukakis waited
too long to respond to charges
from George Bush on gun control
and furloughs for prisoners, said
Ken Eudy, Democratic Party
spokesman.
"We in the South learned the
or bad said Sen. Aaron Plyler, D-
Union. "He's just been an existing
governor
Plyler also said Jordan may
have hurt himself by being too
honest. Jordan "talked at times
when he would have been better
off not to answer some ques-
tions Plyler said.
Eudy agreed that Martin was
a tough opponent because he was
hard way from Jesse Helms and a popular incumbent
the Congressional Club that you "He's an incumbent governor
have to respond to that garbage with a lot of hair and teeth and
and pick it up and throw it back at one-liners Eudy said,
them Eudy said Tuesday. Crumpler praised both Jor-
Crumpler said the national dan and Martin for sticking to the
Democratic ticket did not help in
state offices in 1984, when Walter-
Mondale lost to Ronald Reagan,
or 1988.
But some of the Democratic
Party faithful said they were
Democrats because of the party's
platform.
Jacqueline Brown of Wake
Forest, a Dukakis volunteer, said
she was a Democrat because she
believed the party was interested
"in the individual, the middle-
class common people and their
needs
i There's "sometkmft for e
ervonc in the Democratic Party
said Mrs. Brown, a substitute
teacher.
Even with Dukakis' loss, she
said, "1 feel I am still on the side of
a winner. I can be proud
Sara Stohler of Raleigh said
she had been a Democrat all her
life because she believed ifs a
party "concerned about a broad
range of issues Republicans are
issues in campaign - something he
said didn't happen in the lieuten-
ant governor's race.
Martin he said, has "not come
up with something that's patently
false and out it on the air
The lieutenant governor's
race was close because Gardner
"is a glib, slick huckster Eudy
said. "We let him get by with too
much of the lies and distortions
for too long without hitting him
between the eyes
And Rauch issued a warning
of what was in store if Gardner
won.
"The Senate gives power
they choose to give he said of the
lieutentant governor position as
presiding over the Senate. "When
we adjourn and die there are no
rules
Wade Smith, former chair-
man of the state Democratic Party
and a Raleigh lawyer, said there
was nothing else Jordan could
have done to win the race.
"I think they did everything
that they could do Smith said.
"We had a very, very fine candi-
date who worked very, very hard.
It wasn't a night for Democrats to
win that race
Despite the two losses at the
top of the ticket, Crumpler said all
was not doom and gloom for
Democrats.
"In fact, the Democratic Party
has been, and I think will continue
to be, strong at and Smith said
everything could change in the
next election, and urged Demo-
crats to stay with the party. "Poli-
tics is incredibly fluid he said.
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U.S.D.A. CHOICE
ATTENTION, BRIGHT STUDENTS
Tired of falling asleep in crowded auditoriums during dull lectures?
Don't despair
If you have a 3.4 GPA, stimulating teachers will challenge
you in these small Honors courses this Spring:
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The Power of Mvth
Export wytto tkema nek � the Crmrwn, the Hmo, Ike Comimt, emm the hnrnd fovnuy.
Rocks. Landscapes, and Natural Parks
�)�yr�tw�d��qfl�JM ommomipmk.
Appreciation of Performing Arts
ittxrt:itfvlet!iirttrtmlkeMakSahtmalOrckalTamrekStfmjQHMrttl
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UNC activists
receiving threats
CHAPEL HILL (AP) - Two
University of North Carolina stu-
dent activists say their apart-
ments have been vandalized in
what apparently were attempts to
stop them from protesting, and
police say they are taking the
threats seriously.
Anne S. Duehring, a junior
from Greensboro, said she had
returned to her apartment across
the street from the UNC-Chapel
Hill campus Thursday to find her
telephone cord ripped out and a
butcher knife ripped through a
mattress with a night gown on top
of it.
Ms. Duehring, who recently
has participated in several pro-
tests against university actions,
said she later found a note in her
freezer that said, This time your
bed. Next time your face, big
mouth
Joel R. Segal, a law student
who organized protests on behalf
of Indian activist Eddie Hatcher
during his trial for hostage-tak-
ing, reported to police last month
that a threatening phone call was
followed by a break-in Oct. 29 of
his Chapel Hill apartment. Some-
one, he said, scribbled in pencil on
his walls, "You're going to die for
helping Eddie
"We are not treating this
lightly at all said Capt. Ralph V.
Pendergraph of the Chapel Hill
police department. Pendergraph
said the department had no sus-
pects but was pursuing leads in
the case.
Meanwhile, a university
freshman hasorganized a campus
rally at 11 a.m. Wednesday par-
tially as a reaction to the threats.
"We want to bring it to everyone's
attention said organizer
Christina E. Kendrot.
Neither Ms. Duehrino nor
Segal has been involved in the
most controversial campus pro-
tests.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
Why? Because Army ROTC teaches you
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need for success-in college and in life
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE TOD CAN TAKE.
For Further Information Contact
Capt. Steve L. Jone
(ErwinHall) 757-6967
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Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. � Monday thru Saturday 7:00 a.m12 Midnight
;al Errors





1 IH � SI l KOI INIAN
Features
NOVEMBER 10, 1988 Page 8
Fantasy signs music
� i��,��k
By SII PHANIE FOLSOM
it VVntt'i
What would it he hkc to SCO
musi plaving on ttu radio in
stead ot g it" v )t to concen
trato on someone s hands when
tin v s,H.ik insteadol their
OK V
Lis a . i ip which pei
forms toi K'tii the hearing and.
d al v ultun - - ruvi trates on
acting musu AnA corned) to
show it- audience the art ot sign
language.
rhc phrase 'i ou hoar even
thine that is signed and you sec
everything that is said is found
on each of their programs as an
adequate description ot their to
cus
When asked w hal the group
represented Lara dcock
Fantasy's directoi said Fantas
is a lot ot thinj - It'sa deal advo-
cacy group A lot o: our students
van hoar enough or tool enough to
cnio the music Fantas) lets the
hearing audience know more
about doat people and thebeauty
ot sign language
On November 12,at 8 p.m. in
room ?44 Mondonhall. Fantasy
will present its hall performance.
Iho cost will be $2 and all pro
ceeds w ill be returned to the sign
language lubfoi its hoi pin fund-
ing.
1 ho program theme is ' Ian
tasv. relethon tor lost Causes
dvk said 'We wanted to
come up with something really
ditiv rent It will be a telethon tor
ail the lost duses.
v )ther members ot the group
include chairperson Donna
Fowler, Erk lottv. Scott Smith.
Cind Nicholson, Cindy Faust,
Michelle Burcher Martha Watts,
and Karin a lor
group consists ot three
members with and six members
without hearing impairments, so
an oral interpreter w ill boon hand
to help thoso three follow the
aiiMi
Skill level ot those portormers
range from people in the begin-
ning signing olass up to those who
aro already interpreters.
Fantasy presents smaller per-
formances throughout the
semoster at such places as
churches, elementary schools,
and dorms tor public awareness.
Susan Wallace, a hearing
unpaired student, emphasized
the importance of sign language
being looked at as a "real lan-
guage She said, "Sign language
was my first language as opposed
to English "
When Wallace and other
hearing impaired students come
to ECU they are guaranteed inter-
preters, notetakers, and tutors for
their classes. The sign language
club, aside from funding Fantasy,
lias also started paying tor inter-
preters tor outside of class activi-
ties.
Wallace encouraged people
to go and see the performance
Saturday night, saying that
Hearing people don't need to be
scared to go and watch Fantasy
because they will also have music.
It won't be a silent performance
i
Six members of the band Fantasy are practicing for a concert to be Saturday 8 p.m.
hall 224. The concert is open to everyone. (Photo by Mark Love�Photolab)
Camping the 'Big Flat'
By JOE HARRIS
��� Idttor
Ho you hate the unpredi table Greenville climate1 Instead of driving to Cleveland, why not
trip to the "Big Flat So give me Shelter Cove where the mountains exist beside the surf. (Photo
by Joseph Davidson Harris�Harrislabl
VAE comes
Monday
(Editor's note: This is part one
of a two part story. During the
summer, loo Harris and friends
adventured the country with a
tent. These are some of his experi-
ences.)
Do you enjoy the adventure
ot backpacking, camping, surf-
ing, secluded beaches and waking
up to see dear, bear raccoons and
other wild creatures drinking
from the nearest fresh water
spring ?
It so Big Hat m Shelter
(. ove, Calif, is the place tor you.
The Hat as the locals call it.
is a secluded section of beach and
prime surfing spot onl v accessible
by helicopter or a treacherous 15
mile hike
The name big Hat was given
to the spot by the legendary
surfer, Skip Fry. Fry, considered
one oi the fathers of surfing in
California, became famous in the
sixties for his custom surfboards
and surt adventures to exotic
places.
According to surf lore of the
area. Fry set out on foot over the
rocky, kelp covered beaches of
Shelter Cove because he saw,
through binoculars, waves break
ing on the furthest point north ot
the actual cove. After a full day's
hike around the heavily vege
tated mountain bases that pro
trude into the Pacific, Fry came to
anarea void of rocks, trees and the
rugged terrain an enormous
tlat area on a point which stuck
nit further than the rest. Thus ho
labeled it Big Hat.
Hie Hat, an almost h
hold word to people ot the (lar
berville, Arcata and Shelter Cove
(all small California towns lo-
cated 50 or so miles from the Ore-
gon border) is little known t
outsiders, and they want to keep it
that way. Actually, it you go there
asking for directions the locals
will send you south instead ot
north My friendsand 1 found out
about the spot from the uncle ot
one oi the guvs traveling with us
Wo set out on the first Satur
day m August not only toconquer
the uncrowded waves that the
point produces, bu' to seclude
ourselves from society and all its
modern amenities for a week
The journey begins simple
enough. The first type of terrain
encountered are hard-packed
black sand beaches which
absorb every ounce oi the sun's
heat as the dav wears on. Plentv i -t
water is ne i
cannot b can
�. rhu
how t' mak
m pills
men us fi
. � � �
:
in
sa i i � i
11 he i . I
� � es stra
. �
-
dai .
In this n
i � i
hike r wi
heav sol
Stump d I
surfer, come
area as a ��� - -
rock to I
the win
bel
rhi m
tl
mi r se
and si �
The hike h ��
tidedoesn I
the mam I � i
See SI
11 I Vev. rU, rcau
PicMnl the Rones
The Evils of Chungism
National Gallery of Art Vocal Arts Ensemble will be coming
to W i ight Auditorium, Nov. 14 at 8 p.m.
Be the third caller
BylEFl GIBSON
Under the now logo "The
Now Ro I � WZM Bis bringing
you more music and more gifts!
That's rig! I free gifts tart
Coming
in
Entertainment
Thursday
'vG
The Attic
The Bond
New Deli
Triple Maniacs
Susie's
Friday
T.S. Boogie
The Attic
The Bcomers
New Deli
Saturday
Kicks
The ttic
Five Guys Named Moe
New Deli
ing Friday, November 11, it is
WZMB's annual "Christmas In
November
Everyday this month WMB
w ill be giving listeners a chance to
win one of many fabulous prizes
e cry two hours. On the sound of
igh bells listeners can call the
station al 757 6913 for a chance to
win.
lust lx the third caller and
win.it s that easy All v ou have to
do is listen and call.
No! only o you hear great
music, you get great gifts ranging
from free passes and tee-shirts to
tree food. Some of the sponsor's
include 1 he Attic, The New Deli,
Record Bar, East Coast Music and
Video, Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Subway and Little
( easar's
But that isn't all WMB is
planning a concert at the Attic
sometime this month featuring
1 Martell and more prizes.
Other give-aways include free
major concert tickets, so Ozzy
Osbome and Bad Company fans
listen to The New R(Kk 91" be-
cause they may have something
to make you a happv WZMB lis-
h nor
The National Gallery oi Art
Vocal Arts Ensemble will perform
at ECU Nov. 14, at 8 p.m. in Hen-
drix Theatre. The concert is part of
the 19S8-89 Chamber Music Se-
ries, co-sponsored by the HC.L
Department oi University Unions
and the ECU Sohool oi Music.
The ensemble consists ot
Rosa Lamoreaux, soprano; Bev-
erly Benso, contralto; Samuel
Gordon, tenor and Robert Ken-
nedy, baritone. George Marios is
the ensemble's artistic director
and pianist
The ECU program will in-
clude a set of 16th century madri-
gals, five selections by Felix Men-
delssohn, Benjamin Britten's
"Canticle II Abraham and Isaac
Tchaikovsky's "live Duets for
Soprano and Contralto" Charles
lves' "American Sentimental Bal-
lads" and four selections by
Rossini.
Founded just three years
ago, the Ensemble has been fea-
tured in numerous concert ap-
pearances at the National Gallery
oi Art in Washington, D. C. The
gallery hasoffered a weeklyseries
of tree concerts continuously
since 1942.
Earlier this year, the en-
semble appeared at leading sum-
mer music festivals in Europe. Its
1988 tour schedule comprises
appearances in Maryland and
Virginia as well as North Caro-
lina
Hie National Gallery of Art
Vocal Arts Ensemble has received
critical acclaim for its interpreta-
tions of music for two, three and
four voices, ranging from medie-
val balladry to contemporary
pieces.
Tickets to the Ensemble's
ECU concert are $8 each and may
be purchased at the campus Cen-
tral Ticket Oiicv in Mendenhall
Student Center, telephone (919)
757-6611,0x1. 2r6
BY GERALDO BONEHEAD
Not A Tmah Journal!
Hello. I'm Geraldo Bone-
head. Today, I am here to pres-
ent shocking evidence of a grave
danger facing our young
people. This column is not for
the squeamish.
I will present startling evi-
dence of a new cult that is tak-
ingoverthemindsofouryoung
people. Our young people, per-
haps your very own young
people, may have had contact
with this shocking, startling
new cult � Chungism.
Startling as it may seem, lit-
erally thousands of young
people are worshipping NBC
newsperson Connie Chung.
While Ms. Chungdeniesknowl-
edge of this shocking cult, there
is startling evidence that proves
she is the object of many shock-
ing rituals designed to bring
teenagers power over their fel-
low man.
David B. is a sophomore at
East Carolina University. He
was a loner, as many of our
young people are when they
first arrive at college. Like many
young people his age, he en-
joyed watching television.
He remembers the first time
he saw Connie Chung on TV. "1
was in my dorm room. My
roommate told
me there was someone 1 should
watch on channel seven
"I wasn't sure I should. My
parents always told me not to
watch NBC. But I wanted to by
it you know, just to see what
it was like. Now 1 wish 1 hadn't
David has been under psy-
chiatric care for three months
now. Before that, he actively
participated in many of the bi-
zarre and shocking rituals that
Chungists perform. It wasdur-
ing one of these ntuals that he
realized the startlingly cruel
nature of his fellow Chungists.
"My roommate and I had
been worshipping Connie for a
while by ourselves. Then he told
me some of the other guys on
the hall worshipped her too.
and that 1 should come over
and pray with them sometime
he recalls.
"1 just figured it would be a
good way to meet some more
people. I went to this guy's room
one night during the NBC
Nightly News. He was dressed
in kimono, and he had a black
wig on. His face was all made
up to resemble Connie
"I went in. There was about
15 guys in there. They were all
chanting, 'Conniechung, Con-
niechung, Conniechung in real
low voices. There was a big out-
line of a peacock drawn on the
floor in chalk, with candles
burning at each curve
I asked David if he had been
shocked by this startling turn of
events. David stops for a mo-
ment before continuing, "it's
hurts to remember all this. The
doctors say I should talk about
it but I keep remembering
how shocked I was and how
much I wanted to do it at the
same time
"Anyway, I kneeled down,
and the priest kneeled in front
of the TV. He began asking
Connie for the strength to over-
throw his teachers, and the
answers to their macro-econom-
ics test Then he - he
David, obviously shaken by
the shocking ordeal, has to
pause a moment. Readers, avert
your eyes at these next para
graphs if you are easily upset.
The event David descril
is shocking and startling to say
the verv lea st Paren ts a re urged
to send their young people
oi the rexur before i ntinuing.
"He took an economi
textbook and he ripp d
pages out c ripped them
and then smeared some kind
stuff on them ho said
theholvbuHKlotv onr .
Itsmelledliki stalt ducksai
warmed over in ed
bird fat
"He burned t:
started - r aming
sacrifice. Pow ;s - � .
ing! O Dark Goddess . ! tiu
Nightly News! (lift th humbk
voung people with the I
of Media Vengeance! In the
name oi Savitch, Rather and
Chung 1 summon the
David remembers littl�
tcr that He claims that a 'mistv
form appeared in the room and
it spoke to us Startled bv the
turnofevents, he fled and a!Ud
his parents that night, hogging
them for permission to come
home.
1 informed police later that
David had heard startling ru-
morsof a Chungist church built
near a cemetery in Greenville
Police searched, but found no
evidence of such a shrine
But this is not an isolated
case. 1 have interviewed many
other young people all (nor
America. Everywhere, but �i
pecially in the Bible Belt, our
voung people arc turning to
Chungism As a form oi rebel
lion, as a way to meet people or
even to seek revenge on others
this shocking problem is not
going away.
This has been Geraldo
Bonehead, wishing you and
your young people a safe, and
Chung-free lite.
At
ASHEBOF(' fcP)
first, it could pass for a people's
hospital. Then yo . admit
ting door
Zoo ha
It's big em
u
��
ailing grizzl) �-
And it leads to a ward with s.
creature com! �
stocked with can � .
nnmate food and feline food A
pool that runs wa mal
sick alligator le
t a a homosM k p
equipment thai u
30-inch spar � i , r
a small bir I
recovery room
It'sa � �
where
It is tat
r rederick M ir 11 i
ennarv M
Zoological I
Officials at trv z -
porters a pi
new $2 mill
that is the first pr -
pleted in the a
expansion
The S
. . pansion. wl
exhibit an
for the
MacLai
LOS - �
Make me
MacLaine told I
mmakers ai
her word
The result
new film, 'Madame
� � hich has been ha
few dissent- asM
mphant debut a- �
!SS. Some ma)
been a
that - r �
In the
she plav
who bullu-
gifted pup
greatness
soon, she ci ts - I
life.
Tlu
i ' reientingJv, Oreafhn4 urc it
anyone who opposes h - he
oks several years �
own r4
I : � take I
I
wrong
When the 5 vas
proposed to her -he admitted it
gave her pause1
"But I decided there au
many wond rl
out there tor mo to worn
image Mv imag n
:em me much
hearty la
1 did S utsatzk.
od her i ve ha .
ing teachers -
teacher v h
that if you
teacher, sh( d
her life she s.
To prepan
the usuall) d
allowed hers.
She collected ch �
aged costumes to tit the' -
instructed the techi
Turn off the k
makes actresses
me from the side I need all
help I can get I
gamin look '
Mad aine pr
look from the time pi
kVallis spotted her oi
1- Carol Hanev - i
"Pajama Game
Althoue
variety of roles
seemed to prefer her
granting nomination
Came Runr
ment" and Irma La D
ter another nomination in
"The Turning Point i
won the big pri2
Endearment in 1
1
Surf
I and
camp
Continued frompage 8
ated bv these mam mouth b
ders It not timed properly hikers
will find themselves sprinting
around these boulders to escape
the rising tide
Once the tide made it impos
Sibletohikearoundoneofthcout-I
crops and we were forced to climb
one of the barnacle encrusted
moss carpeted boulders an esti
mated 50 feet to the top lugging
30-40 pound backpacks and suii
boards. Once at the top hikers au
not safe from the onslaught oi
waves






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
Fantasy signs music
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Sut! Writer
of sign language.
ning signing class up to those who
On November 12, at 8 p.m. in are already interpreters.
What would it be like to see
music playing on the radio, in-
stead of hearing it? Or to concen-
trate on someone's hands when
they speak, instead of their voice?
Fantasy, a group which per-
forms for both the hearing and
deaf cultures, concentrates on
acting, music, and comedy to
show its audience the art of sign
language.
The phrase "You hear every-
thing that is signed and you see
everything that is said" is found
room 244 Mendenhall, Fantasy
will present'its Fall performance.
The cost will be $2 and all pro-
ceeds will be returned to the sign
language club for its help in fund-
ing.
The program theme is "Fan-
tasy Telethon for Lost Causes
Adcock said, "We wanted to
Fantasy presents smaller per-
formances throughout the
semester at such places as
churches, elementary schools,
and dorms for public awareness.
Susan Wallace, a hearing
impaired student, emphasized
the importance of sign language
being looked at as a "real Ian-
"on up with something really guage" She said, "Sign language
different. It will be a telethon for wasmyfirstlanguageasopposed
a� the lost causes �� Bnghsh-
Other members of the group hearing impaired students come
include: chairperson Donna to ECU they are guaranteed inter-
Fowler, Eric Totty, Scott Smith, preters, notetakers, and tutors for
U Cl V limit ni� �� ��� �� �" ��" ' � " � J � "I . ,
on each of their programs as an Cindy Nicholson, Cindy Faust, their classes. The sign language
adequate description of their fo-
cus.
When asked what the group
represented, Lara Adcock,
Fantasy's director, said, "Fantasy
is a lot of things. It's a deaf advo-
cacy group. A lot of our students
can hear enough or feel enough to
enjoy the music. Fantasy lets the
hearing audience know more
Michelle Burcher, Martha Watts,
and Karin Naylor.
The group consists of three
members with and six members
without hearing impairments, so
an oral interpreter will be on hand
to help those three follow the
music.
club, aside from funding Fantasy,
has also started paying for inter-
preters for outside of class activi-
ties.
Wallace encouraged people
to go and see the performance
Saturday night, saying that
"Hearing people don't need to be
scared to go and watch Fantasy
k
Zoo
Six members of the band Fantasy are practicing for a concert to be Saturday 8 p.m. in Menden
hall 224. The concert is open to everyone. (Photo by Mark Love�Photolab)
Skill level of these performers because they will also have music,
about deaf people, and the beauty range from people in the begin- It won't be a silent performance
Camp
By JOE HARRIS
Newt Editor
� ��4
through binoculars, waves break- water is needed for this hike, but it
ing on the furthest point north of cannot be carried it is too
the actual cove. After a full day's heavy. Thus, we quickly learned
how to make use of water purifi -
hike around the heavily vege-
tated mountain bases that pro-
trude into the Pacific, Fry came to
an area void of rocks, trees and the
rugged terrain � an enormous
flat area on a point which stuck
out further than the rest. Thus he
labeled it Big Hat.
The Flat, an almost house-
editor's note: This is part one
of a two part story. During the
summer, Joe Harris and friends
adventured the country with a
tent. These are some of his experi-
ences.)
Do you enjoy the adventure
of backpacking, camping, surf-
ing, secluded beaches and waking hold word to people of the Car
berville, Arcata and Shelter Cove
(all small California towns lo-
cated 50 or so miles from the Ore-
gon border) is little known to
outsiders, and they want to keep it
that way. Actually, if you go there
asking for directions the locals
will send you south instead of


up to see dear, bear, raccoons and
other wild creatures drinking
from the nearest fresh water
spring?
If so "Big Flat in Shelter
Cove, Calif, is the place for you.
The "Flat as the locals call it,
is a secluded section of beach and
cation pills (iodine) and the nu
merous fresh water springs flow-
ing down from the mountains
After the first three to foui
miles, the sandy beach turns c
one littered bv car-sized boulder
sanded smooth from centuries o
weathering and entire driftwood
trees, strays which escaped thl
log floatillas that jam the rivers o
Northern California.
The journey gets extremeh
dangerous from here to the end '
In this particular stretch, th.it v
came to call "boulder heaven
hiker without steel shanked
heavy soled boots is in troubfc
Do you hate the unpredictable Greenville climate? Instead of driving to Cleveland, why not
trip to the "Big Flat So give me Shelter Cove where the mountains exist beside the surf. (Photo
by Joseph Davidson Harris�Harrislab)
National Gallery of Art Vocal Arts Ensemble will be coming
to Wright Auditorium, Nov. 14 at 8 p.m.
Be the third caller
By JEFF GIBSON
Staff Writer
Under the new logo "The
New Rock 91 WZM B is bringing
you more music and more gifts!
That's right, free gifts. Start-
Coming
in
Entertainment
Thursday
NRG
The Attic
The Bond
New Deli
Triple Maniacs
Susie's
Fxiday
T.S. Boogie
The Attic
The Bcomers
New Deli
Saturday
Kicks
The Attic
Five Guys Named Moe
New Deli
VAE comes
Monday
ECU Newt Bureau
The National Gallery of Art
Vocal Arts Ensemble will perform
at ECU Nov. 14, at 8 p.m. in Hen-
drix Theatre. The concert is part of
the 1988-89 Chamber Music Se-
ries, co-sponsored by the ECU
Department of University Unions
and the ECU Sohool of Music.
The ensemble consists of
Rosa Lamoreaux, soprano; Bev-
erly Benso, contralto; Samuel
Gordon, tenor and Robert Ken-
nedy, baritone. George Manos is
the ensemble's artistic director
and pianist.
The ECU program will in-
clude a set of 16th century madri-
gals, five selections by Felix Men-
delssohn, Benjamin Britten's
"Canticle II: Abraham and Isaac'
Tchaikovsky's "Five Duets for
Soprano and Contralto" Charles
Ives' "American Sentimental Bal-
lads" and four selections by
Rossini.
Founded just three years
ago, the Ensemble has been fea-
tured in numerous concert ap-
pearances at the National Gallery
of Art in Washington, D. C. The
gallery has offered a weekly series
of free concerts continuously
since 1942.
Earlier this year, the en-
prime surfing spot only accessible n�rttv �Y menJs anc ' rouruJ ouj Stumped toes, the enemy of ever
by helicopter or a treacherous 15 about the sppt from thejuyjf of- c- rf come vcrv eSsnVin tty
I nic ftte , , one of the guys traveling with us.
- The name Big Flat was given We set out on the first Satur-
to the spot by the legendary day in August not only to conquer
surfer, Skip Fry. Fry, considered th� uncrowded waves that the
one of the fathers of surfing in point produces, bu to seclude
California, became famous in the ourselves from society and all its
sixties for his custom surfboards modem amenities for a week.
and surf adventures to exotic The journey begins simple
places. enough. The first type of terrain
According to surf lore of the encountered are hard-packed,
area, Fry set out on foot over the black sand beaches � which
rocky, kelp covered beaches of absorb every ounce of the sun's
Shelter Cove because he saw, heat as the day wears on. Plenty of
0
.areVi asrSSult iffpiiqJMgMrP1111
rock to rock in an effort to avok
the winding maze of driftw(o
below.
The mountains come strati
down into the ocean, thus, in
mense outcrops of granite jut oi
and serve as impassible obs tucle
The hike has to be tuned so tl -
tidedoesn'tmaroor you on one J
the many beaches that are sepei
See SURF, page 9
�n:
tfrtt'th Kones
The Evils of Chungism
i
BYGERALDOBONEHEAD
ing Friday, November 11, it is
WZMB's annual "Christmas In
November
Everyday this month WZMB
will be giving listeners a chance to
win one of many fabulous prizes
every two hours. On the sound of
sleigh bells, listeners can call the
station at 757-6913 for a chance to
win.
Just be the third caller and
win, it's that easy. All you have to
do is listen and call.
Not only do you hear great -
music, you get great gifts ranging semble appeared at leading sum
from free passes and tee-shirts to mer music festivals in Europe. Its
free food. Some of the sponsor's 1988 tour schedule composes
appearances in Maryland and
Virginia as well as North Caro-
lina.
The National Gallery of Art
Vocal Arts Ensemble has received
critical acclaim for its interpreta-
tions of music for two, three and
Hello. I'm Geraldo Bone-
head. Today, I am here to pres-
ent shockirevidimeeofejpve
danger facing our young
people. This column is not lor
the squeamish.
I will present startling evi-
dence of a new cult that is tak-
ing over the mindsof our young
people. Our young people, per-
haps your very own young
people, may hams had contact
with mis shocki startling
new cult�Gismjpam.
Startlingasit may seem,lit-
erally thousands of yoi
(people ere
newsperson
VtWeMs.C
include: The Attic, The New Deli,
Record Bar, East Coast Music and
Video, Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Subway and Little
Ceasar's.
But that isn't all WZMB is
planning a concert at the Attic
ing rituals designed to bring
teenagers power over their lei-
low man.
David B. is a sophomore at
East Carolina University. He
was a loner, as many of out
young people are when they
first arrive at college. Like many
young people his age, he e�r
joyed watching television.
He reineners the first time
he saw Connie Chung on TV. 1
was in my dorm room. My
roommate, -� tola,
me there was someone I should
ing or. of these rituals that he
resized the startiinidy cruel
nature of his feSow Chungjste
"My roommate and I had
been worshipping Connie for a
while by ourselves. Then he told
me some o( the other guys on
the hall worshipped her too,
and mat ! should come over
and pray with them sometime'
he recalls.
"I Just figured it would be a
good way to meet some more
peoptelwerutomisguy'sroorn
one night during the NBC
Nightly News. He was dressed
, and he had a black
wig on. His face was all made
up to resemble Connie
1 went in. There wasabout
15 guys in there. They were ail
chanting, Xnniechung, Con-
tedxurCormiechungtnrea
towvoice. There wasabigout-
Une of a peacock drawn on the
floor in M with candles
burning at each curve.
iaatodDavidifhehadbeen
sometime this month featuring four voices, ranging from medie-
T.J. Martell and more prizes.
Other give-aways include free
major concert tickets, so Ozzy
Osborne and Bad Company fans
listen to "The New Rock 91" be-
cause they may have something
to make you a happy WZMB lis- Student Center, telephone (919)
iener 757-6611, ext. 266.
val balladry to contemporary
pieces.
Tickets to the Ensemble's
ECU concert are $8 each and may
be purchased at tlie campus Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall
parents always told me not to
WatohNBC But I wanted to try
k you know, ton to tat moil
to nc�ift� NkMvIwaahl hdarL
Da vid hat bean under ���
cmatrk cut tor tfwee mo&Mi
firvMT Htnrm tihttlL Wt
tHrF'V � tirWtr� rSTrOT nttt
BSdaSt
even David stops for a mo-
rnent before continuing. "It's
hurts to rismenibwau this. The
doctors say I should talk about
It but I keep lemernbermg
how shockad was - and how
much I wanted to do k at the
sameume.
"Anyway, I kneeled down,
awitheprte kneeled m front
ot the TV. He tog asking
Ccnteforthemthtoover
mrow his teachers, and the
katoetThtnhe-he
itfltat
The event David describes
is shocking and startling to say
the very least. Parentsare urged
to send their young people out
of the room before continuing.
"He took an economics
textbook and he ripped the
pages out He ripped them out
and then smeared some kind of
stuff on them he said it was �
rheholybloodofConnieChung. L-n
It smelled like stale duck sauce,
warmed over in micro waved k
bird fat
"He burned the pages, and
sta, "d screaming, Accept our i
sacrince, Powers of Broadcast t
ing! O Dark Goddess of the i .
Nightly News! Gift thy humble j
young people with the Powers
of Media Vengeance! In the 4.
name of Savitch, Rather and f
Chung I summon thee "
David remembers little af-
ter that. He claims that a "misty
form appeared in the room, and
it spoke to us Startled by the
turnof events, he fled and called
his parents that night, begging
them for permission to come
home.
1 informed police later that
David had heard startling ru-
mors of a Chungist church built
near a cemetary in Greenville.
Police searched, but found no
evidence of such a shrine.
But this is not an isolated
case. I have interviewed many
other young people all over
America. Everywhere, but es-
pecially in the Bible Belt, our
young people are turning to
Chungism. As a form of rebel-
lion, asa way to meet people or
even to seek revenge on others,
mis shocking problem is not
gomgaway.
this has been Geraldo
Bonehred, wishing you and
your young people a safe, and
ASHEBORO, N.C. (AP) � At
irst, it could pass for a people's
tospital. Then you see the admit-
ing door.
If s big enough to handle an
ailing grizzly bear � or three.
And it leads to a ward with some
creature comforts: a kitchen,
stocked with cans of "Zu Preem"
.rimate food and feline food. A
jool that runs warm to make a
ack alligator less snappy. Or cold,
for a homesick polar bear. X-ray
equipment that can capture the
30-inch span of a gorilla's chest, or
small bird's wing. A padded
recovery room
It's a zoo, but it isn't St Else-
where.
It is � take a breath � the
Frederick Moir Hanes, M.D Vet-
erinary Medical Center at the N.C
Zoological Park.
Officials at the zoo gave re-
porters a preview Tuesday of the
new $2 million veterinary center
that is the first project to be com-
pleted in the zoo's North America
expansion.
The $30 million, 200-acre
expansion, which will double the
exhibit area of the zoo, is named
for the continent whose animals,
MacLai
LOS ANGELES (AP) �
"Make me look bad Shirley
MacLaine told the astonished
filmmakers, and they took her at
her word.
The result can be seen in the
new film, "Madame Sousatzka
n which has been hailed � with a
few dissents � as MacLaine's tri-
umphant debut as a character
actress. Some may argue that she
has been a character all her life,
but that's neither here nor there.
In the John Schlesinger film
she plays an aging piano teacher
who bullies and browbeats her
gifted pupils until they approach
greatness: if they leave her too
soon, she erases them from her
life.
The actress plays the role
unrelentingly, breathing tire at
anyone who opposes her will. She
looks several years beyond her
own 54.
"1 didn't take my makeup
off she said. "I just put it in the
wrong places
When the Sousatzka role was
proposed to her, she admitted it
gave her pause.
"But I decided there are too
many wonderful. eccentric parts
out there for me to worry about
my image. My image never did
concern me much She gave a
hearty laugh.
"I did Soutsatzka because I
loved her. I've had so many danc-
ing teachers like that the kind of
teacher who was so proprietary
that if you went to another
teacher, she'd just put you out of
her life she said.
To prepare for "Sousatzka
the usually disciplined MacLaine
allowed herself to gain 25 pounds.
She collected clunky jewelry and
aged costumes to fit the role. And
she instructed the technicians:
'Turn off the key light (which
makes actresses look good). Light
me from the side. I need all the
help I can get to get rid of this
gamin look
MacLaine profited from that
look from the time producer Hal
Wallis spotted her on Broadway
as Carol Haney's replacement in
"Panama Game
Although she has played a
variety of roles, the Academy
seemed to prefer her as a tart,
granting nominations for "Some
Came Running 'The Apart-
ment" and "Irma La Douce Af-
ter another nomination in 1977 for
"The Turning Point she finally
won the big prize for Terms of
Endearment" in 1983.
Surf
and
camp
Continued frontpage 8
by these mammouth boul-
. If not timed properly, hikers
find themselves sprinting
md these boulders to escape
i rising tide.
Once the tide made it impos-
i to hike around one of the out-
and we were forced to climb
the barnacle encrusted,
carpeted boulders an esti-
i 50 feet to the top lugging
I pound backpacks andsurf-
js. Once at me top hikers r
safe from the onslaught
of





��f

I
rday 8 p.m in M n
2 Flat"
I ' me vcrv rilv in th

ngism
The event David describes
shocking and startling to say
ie very least Parents are urged
to send theii g peopk
rf the roi re continuing.
"He look an economics
srtbook and he ripped the
ages out. He ripped them oul
ind then smeared some kind of
ktuffontheoi rw said it was
�tehoiyfc odo( . Chung.
It smefled like stale dm k sauce,
armed ver in n
t"
"He bumtd the f ages, and
Halted screai
Kriria
ng! O Dark G ddc - of the
tightly News' Gift thy humbk
poung people with the Powers
Media Vengeance! In the
�me of Savitch. Rather an.1
"hung T summon thee
David remembers little at
lerthat He claims that a "mtsrv
lorm appeared in the room, and
It spoke to us Startled by the
irnof events, he fled and railed
Jus parents that rught, begging
hem for permission to come
me.
f informed police later that
)avid had heard startling ru-
xrsof a Chungist church built
kear a cemetary in Greenville
Pohce searched, but found no
Evidence of such a shrine
But this is not an isolated
base. I have interviewed many
Kher young people all over
merica. Everywhere, but es-
rially in the Bible Belt, our
ung people are turning to
Thungism. As a form of rebel
ion, as a way to meet people or
ken to seek revenge on others
is shocking problem is not
)ing away.
This has been Geraldo
nehead, wishing you and j
Iwr young people a safe, and i
i-hung-free life
v � ��


THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10.1988 9
Zoo has hospital for bears
FREE
ASHEBORO, N.C. (AP) � At
first it could pass for a people's
hospital. Then you see the admit-
ting door.
It's big enough to handle an
ailing grizzly bear � or three.
And it leads to a ward with some
creature comforts: a kitchen,
stocked with cans of "Zu Preem
On Thursday, donors and
state officials will be on hand to
dedicate the new center and hold
an open house for the public.
When the doctors and technicians
birds, flora and fauna will popu-
late it. North America follows
Africa as the second continental
exhibit at the zoo.
The equipment and its sepa-
rate facilities for quarantine and set up shop, the center won't be
for breeding make the new veteri- open to the public,
nary center one of the finest in the N.C. Zoo officials worked
nation, said Les Schobert, the with their counterparts in San
pnmate food and feline food. A zoo's general curator. The facility Diego, Washington and Balti-
SSi1?8 Warm �? J replaces a temP�rary treatment more to fine-tun?thedesign of the
kalhgatorlesssnappy.Orcold, unit that is smaller than the new
for a homesick polar bear. X-ray exam room
equipment that can capture the 'It's kind of like moving from
j .V mchspanofagonlla'schest,or an efficiency apartment into the
a small bird s wing. A padded Taj Mahal said Schobert, who
recovery room
The breeding facility also will
be a place of respite for some ani-
mals and birds that simply get
nettled by all the people watching
them � such as the Victoria
Crown pigeon, Morris said.
Eventually, the breeding
space will enable the zoo to in-
crease its involvement in the Spe-
cies Survival Program, a national
program of captive breeding,
from gorillas to other species,
Schobert said.
Nearby is a special quaran-
tine building where most animals
will be placed when they arrive at
SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION FOR
STUDENTS WHO NEED
HONEY FOR COLLEGE
Every Student is Eligible for Some Type of
Financial Aid Regardless of Grades or Parental Income.
�W� have a data bank ot over 200,000 llatings of scholarships,
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It's a zoo, but it isn't St. Else-
where.
It is � take a breath � the
Frederick Moir Hanes, M.D Vet-
eri nary Medical Center at the N.C.
Zoological Park.
Officials at the zoo gave re-
porters a preview Tuesday of the
new $2 million veterinary center
j hat is the first project to be com-
pleted in the zoo's North America
evpansion.
The $30 million, 200-acre
expansion, which will double the
l vhibit area of the zoo, is named
for the continent whose animals,
center, which is tailor-made for
the mix of animals-that will live at
the state-supported zoo, about six
miles south of Asheboro.
v.v �v, Under construction for 18Kvv.�, � ;
was sporting a tie decorated with months, the 12,000-square foot the zoo. It has separate spots for
white gorillas. hospital features a surgical unit, large, powerful animals such as
This, frankly, is our pay- an indoor and outdoor nursery chimps and gorillas, for hoofed
back to the animals Schobert for newborns, a veterinary library
said, as he stood inside the light- and a necropsy � or animal au-
filled special breeding facility that topsy � unit,
is part of the center. "We've had The 3,400-square foot breed-
the animals on exhibit all this ing facility for mammals and
CALL
ANYTIME
For A Free Brochure
(800) 346-6401
f
1
rime Now it's time for us to pay
the animals back
The opening of the center
coincides with the arrival of the
zoo's new veterinarian, R. Wil-
liam Torgerson. Torgerson, 40,
was most recently senior veteri-
narian at Chicago's Brookfield
Zoo.
birds will further the zoo's efforts
in captive breeding, said Schobert
and Ron Morris, the zoo's curator
for birds. They're hoping the pri-
vacy and the quiet will promote
breeding among some of the zoo's
shyer inhabitants � such as the
dik-dik and the gerenuk, two
African antelopes.
animals, such as bison and elk,
and for birds, fish and sea ani-
mals.
The state of North Carolina,
through appropriations made by
the General Assembly, paid most
of the $1.95 million price tag for
the center. b
MacLaine
with role
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Las Vegas and Broadway revues,
1ake me look bad Shirley author of best-selling books and
.
MacLaine told the astonished
filmmakers, and they took her at
her word.
The result can be seen in the
new film, "Madame Sousatzka
� which has been hailed � with a
few dissents � as MacLaine's tri-
umphant debut as a character
actress. Some may argue that she
has been a character all her life,
but that's neither here nor there.
In the John Schlesinger film
she plays an aging piano teacher
who bullies and browbeats her
gifted pupils until they approach
greatness: if they leave her too
soon, she erases them from her
j life.
The actress plays the role
unrelentingly, breathing tire at
anyone who opposes her will. She
looks several years beyond her
own 54.
"I didn't take my makeup
off she said. "I just put it in the
wrong places
When the Sousatzka role was
proposed to her, she admitted it
gave her pause.
"But I decided there are too
many wonderful, eccentric parts
out there for me to worry about
my image. My image never did
concern me much She gave a
hearty laugh.
"I did Soutsatzka because I
loved her. I've had so many danc-
ing teachers like that the kind of
teacher who was so proprietary
that if you went to another
teacher, she'd just put you out of
her life she said.
To prepare for "Sousatzka
the usually disciplined MacLaine
allowed herself to gain 25 pounds.
She collected clunky jewelry and
aged costumes to fit the role. And
she instructed the technicians:
Turn off the key light (which
makes actresses look good). Light
me from the side. I need all the
help I can get to get rid of this
camin look
MacLaine profited from that
look from the time producer Hal
V allis spotted her on Broadway
as Carol Haney's replacement in
Tajama Game
Although she has played a
variety of roles, the Academy
seemed to prefer her as a tart,
granting nominations for "Some
Came Running "The Apart-
ment" and "Irma La Douce Af-
ter another nomination in 1977for
The Turning Point she finally
won the big prize for "Terms of
Endearment" in 1983.
Surf
and
camp
Continued frompage 8
a ted by these mammouth boul-
ders. If not timed properly, hikers
will find themselves sprinting
around these boulders to escape
the rising tide.
Once the tide made �t impos-
sible to hike around one of the out-
crops and we were forced to climb
one of the barnacle encrusted,
moss carpeted boulders an esti-
mated 50 feet to the top lugging
30-40 pound backpacks arefsurt-
boards. Once at the top hikers are
not safe from the onslaught of
waves.
ru of soul-seekers. She is per-
ectly willing to spoof her own
claims of reincarnation � but on
her own terms.
Asked about her life today,
she responded with a giggle:
"Where am I? Who am I? Maybe
I'll be Sousatzka for a year.
Plaza Cinema
11.t.i Shiit�iiiC I Ir 7'� OOmn
Ends Thursday
FEDS
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GORILLAS IN THE
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Starting Friday
NOW SHOWING AT
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Thursday, Nov. 10
thru Sunday Nov. 13
8:00 p.m.
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Get ready to join America's number
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POSSIBlf.
Because we offer the
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Here s how the Life-
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�Thur Nov.10The Bond
Fri Nov.1 1The Boomers
Sat Nov.12Rve Guys Named Moe
Fri Nov.18Liquid Sound
Sat Nov.19Roily Gray & Sunfire
Closed for Thanksgiving November 24-27
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The Lemon Sisters & The
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The Patterson (R&RRfcB)
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Thurs Nov. 10 The Bond
Fri Nov. 1 1 The Boomers
Sat Nov. 12 Rve Guys Named Moe
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10,1988
The Clearly Labeled
��ft (S�ff�llfiEiil�tfm
aftfiff� IPas
Quote of this week's epi-
sode of -Batmen" � "ton
greedy bone In my body
eries ooVHnssah, ��"
�ah
� The Rlddler
In with 'Mr. Fall' are the layered look,Bush
i�inrtainint and verv
rr
Dear Earl,
Why did Bush win?
Signed, Foli Sci Major
Dear Polly,
1 don't mean to sound chau-
vinistic, but the election came
down to advertising and the male
vote. What do most guys do dur-
ing the weekend?
They lounge, watch ball and
watch beer comrnericials. And
while Busch isn't spelled like
Bush, it sounds the same, so guys
got this image that hey, George
likes to lounge around on Satur-
days and let Barbara bring him
beers.
The word bush has histori-
cally always been on men's
minds. Whether it's doing yard
work or going downtown, guys
have always thought about bush,
Busch and Bush.
Tickets
Dear Big E,
I tried to register today for
next semester and they wouldn't
let me get my courses because 1
owned $60 in parking tickets.
What gives E? What is the deal?
Signed, Moneyless and Class-
less
Eear Classy,
What gives? Your wallet.
What is the deal? Did somebody
say deal?
Friendless
Dear Bill,
Nobody likes me. In grade
school, kids use to spit at me. Now
I'm in college and people play
pranks on me all the time. One
morning 1 had a physics exam and
some penny locked me in. They
always steal my towel when I take
a shower, causing embarassment
when I have to run down the
dorm hall nude only to find my
room locked.
Bill, 1 eat all by myself in the
cafeteria and talk to the licnaise
potatoes.
Unsigned
Dear Lienaise,
My name ain't Bill. Having a
little pity party aren't we? 'No-
Signed, Rawl de LaVonganza
ECU Alumni, 1987
(Editor's Note: This is a real
letter. The writer, who says his
name is Rawl but is really Ralph,
even had the nerve to write his
own advice. Come on Ralph. All
right here is his advice to himself)
Dear Rawl,
You ignorant (censored,
come on Ralph, we can't print
that). The layered look is an an
Very entertaining and very
insightful. So why does everyone
pick on fat girls these days, any-
way? Come on people, can't
someone pick on the neo-hippies
for just once.
Neo-hippies are those guys
who wear tye-dyes and go un-
bathed to protest the status quo.
Visually and odorously, they
achieve their objective of being
different. They wish the 8(ys were
the 6Crs and for the return of radi-
cal causes. Most neo-hippies say
body likes me Boo Roo, I'm
crying for you. Maybe I'mbeing a
little hard on you, Beav, I'm sorry.
What the hey, I'll be your friend. v
Maybe we can guzzle some nual ritual performed by heavy t wigh jrd Nixon were
Jonestown Pepsi together and talk girls around the world. They are presicjent they could ha ve
on our walkee-talkee. Hey, celebrating the end of Mr. Sum- 4U;��fav��
maybe we can collect pine cones
together. For starters, could you
lend me $500 so I can pay my
bookie?
Layered Look
Dear Big E,
mer (aka the season of bikini and
skimpy clothing).
It is not uncommon for fat
girls to go entirely without sex
during Mr. Spring and Mr. Sum-
mer. However, with the arrival of
Mr. Fall and Mr. Winter, heavy
girls can cover (hide) their fat with
As I was walking down the baggy clothing. (My editor says
street, I heard two large (rather we can't print the rest of Ralph's
heavy) girls saying "Mr. Fall has advice, all except "whence dis-
arrived. The layered look, the lay- robing, he sees a warthog")
ered look, yeah What do you
think this means? Dear Ralph,
something to riot about.
Gee-whiz, come on Ralph,
come on people, the fat girl jokes
are no longer chic. Why not harp
on people who drive Chevettes or
friends who constantly bum
money or people who frequent
buffetswhich of course brings
us back to fat girls. (Ralph 1, Earl
0)
E"
Publications Building
Greenville, N.C 27834
Student depossesses spirit-filled Ouija Boards
GREENVILLE, N.C (BP) �
A rash of possessed Ouija Boards
in the Emerald City has prompted
an ECU occult major to go into the
ghostbusting business.
Thuibton Eames, or "Bippy"
as "friends and other dead folk
call me he said, started Give Up
the Ghost Inc. after several friends
asked him to exorcise their Ouija
boards.
"I was eating lunch one day
and this girl in my Intermediate
Demonology class told me her
board had been bleeding every
time she used it Eames said. "1
told her I'd take a look at it, and
that's how it all started
According to Eames, the board
was possessed by the soul of an
irate mother of two, hit over the
head by the board and killed.
"During a seance, she told us that
a clerk at the toy store biffed her
upside the head while she was
trying to shoplift a Cabbage Patch
doll a couple of years ago
"I reasoned with her. I told
her I'd find the clerk's address if
she'd get out of the board. She did,
and my friend didn't have any
trouble after that he added.
And the clerk? "Man, ghosts
are really dumb. You can tell them
anything. I didn't even pick up the
phone book to look for the guy.
How am I supposed to find some
guy that worked at a toy store
back in 84?" Eames asked.
Despite this unusual method
of putting the dead to rest, Eames'
reputation grew. More and more
local ci tizens began requesting his
services. Eventually, he quit
school, hired long-time friend II-
lyana Blomquist as his assistant
and opened up Give Up The Ghost.
located on 1313 13th Street,
the business takes on almost any
request of the supernatural na-
ture. As he lights up a Marlboro
light, Eames recalls one of his
weirdest cases.
"We got a call from this old
lady. Said she had quails in her
shower. I told her it was a job for
the SPCA, but she told me it was
an very scary quail he said.
"Well, we got there and sure
enough, Vice President-elect
Quayle's astral body was floating
around her bathroom, watching
her take showers. The trick was to
get rid of the ghost, without harm-
How did he get around that
little problem? "I used .44 Moore-
Bissette spectral magnum on it. It
may have had some physical re-
percussions on his brain over the
next four years. We'll just have to
see he added with a chuckle.
Even dumber than most earth
art smacks of Svlvia Plath.
Jody, Buffy and Mr. French return
Surprise party held
EMERALD CITY, N.C. (EP)
� Two renters of an area house
had a small surprise when they
came home Saturday night. Three
hundred people were partying in
their homestead.
"I couldn't believe it. I came
back from downtown and there
were people drinking beer on my
roof David Sanderson said.
Sanderson said his stereo was
on full blast as people danced on
his bed while eating his fried
chicken. Several individuals were
said to be passed out in the
house's shower with the water
running. Other partiers urinated
on the carpet, according to police
reports.
"I don't care if they wrecked
the place, but man they didn't
have to go and eat our chicken
tendant Rob Phipps said.
Police estimate the damage to
be $150 for the cost of cleaning the
carpets and replacing the internal
components to two comodes.
"Why did they have to steal
the insides of our Johns? I mean
they took the ball, the lever, the
chain, the stopper, everything.
Only someone cruel will do that to
a man Sanderson said in rage.
Sanderson and Phipps said
they would have called the cops
earlier, but one of the partiers had
thrown the phone in the trees.
"These guys had no mercy
Phipps said in disgust.
After police broke up the
party, the cops issued a $50 fine to
Sanderson and Phipps for hold-
ing a disruptive meeting. Irate,
the two ECU students had only
obscene words to say in reference
to the police.
Finally at 4:30 a.m the room-
mates were able to sleep.
"Right when I hit the sack,
some dimwit came pounding on
my bedroom window. He wanted
to know where the party was. Out
of the graciousness of my heart, I
threw him a cold Busch and told
him to go the hell home Sander-
son said.
HOLLYWOOD, Calif. (BP) �
With the success of the revived
"Munsters" syndicated television
show, other popular black and
white reruns are getting a second
shot at life.
"The New Munsters which
features all new actors in the roles
of Herman, Lily, Eddie and
Grandpa Munster, supplies the
plot device that the family fell
asleep 20 years ago, and is woken
up in the 80s to "laugh and charn
their way through more modem
misadventures as the press re-
lease said.
The high ratings the show
received on its premiere last week
has prompted studio heads to
scavenge their vaults in hopes of
finding some more oldies but sel-
laWes. High on the list of most
probable shows are:
"The New I Love Lucy"�
Already in pre-production, this
color version will have Ricky,
I ucv, Fred and Ethel step through
a time warp and end up in 1989.
The laughs will flow as they try to
cope with technology, MTV and
the loss of Li'l Ricky, who
swept up into limbo during their
trip.
"The All New My Three Sons"
� Chip, Emie,Robbie, Uncle
Charlie and the son nobody ever
remembers, return after twenty
years of space flight. Seems they
were picked to be the first average
family to voyage at faster than
light speeds. Playing Ernie will be
Axl Rose with a haircut.
"Return of Family Affair" �
Jody, Dad and Mrs. Beasley re-
turn for more tender humor. Out
of reverence for the dead actors
who poitaayed Buffy and Mr.
French (explained as dying when
thawed out too quickly when their
cryogenic capsules opened), their
parts will not be recast.
"The New OLDER Patty Duke
Show" - An aging Patty again
plays those lovable twin cousins
with a new and exciting twist
they're both married and their
husbands can't tell them apart!
It's way out, wacky and kinky
humor for the whole family.
Redskins lose spread on purpose
WASHINGTON D.C (EP) �
For the seventh time in nine
games the Washington Redskins
have again failed to beat the bet-
ting spread. Some gamblers say
the Redskin front office is doing it
on purpose.
In the dwindling moments of
Sunday's game between Wash-
ington and the New Orleans
Saints in RFK stadium, Washing-
ton had the ball on the 10 yard-
line, first and goal. After three
consecutive running plays, the
"They could of
scored a touchdown
Skins offense had to settle for a
game winning field goal.
"That's just great, but geez
they could of scored a touchdown
and beat the four-point and beat the four point line, but no cently purchased BMW.
Some of the �
line, but no they had to
kick a field goal and
make me lose the family
ranch'
was
they had to kicka field goal and . " or ine cntcism
make me lose the family ranch Plaf on e shoulders of Full-
loesph L. Oser said. Oser had t�ck Timmy Smith, who carried
$30,000 bet on Washington. th �" tw,ce Pn�r to the field
"This ain't the first time they g01 klck
done it. They did it up in Green- "Hey man, I got hit. When I
bay, they done it seven times this g h,t fal1 down-l ain' tr�g to
JoeSph L. User, season. Something is fishy. Some-
Disgruntled gambler x k� thHe make if y�u �
me Oser said.
Bizarro pomes
Jimmy Olsen am dumb.
Even dumber than most earth
peeples.
But me like him as Porcupine
boy.
That am better super power than
Bizarro Freeze Vision.
Maybe Jimmy Olsen is really
Sylvia Plath.
Me never know for sure.
Am me through yet?
� Bizarrol
Wow! Me
am poet!
Me am Bizarro.
number one.
Me write pome. It not rime
like stoopid Earth peeples
pomes.
Me pome not full of adjejectives
Me think them am stoopid.
Just like earth peeples.
Me can express self fine
with pronouns.
Me. you. dog named blue.
Uh-oh.
me rhyme like earth peeple.
Me kill self now.
Hello.
Hello.
Uh-oh. Killing Bizarro self for
art smacks of Sylvia Plath.
Better come back to life now.
Good-Bye.
Good-Bye.
-Bizarro 1
Three suffer from lack of grilled cheese
1
No one asked for Mr. Oser's
opinion. Hey, we won the game
didn't we? Head Coach Joe
Gibbs said as he started his re-
fix no game Smith said. "You
like my new chains? Smith said
showing off a multitude of
shi ny, 24 carrot necklaces.
OSSIPEE, N.C. (EP) � At
least three people have become
sick in this small rural community
from the lack of grilled cheese
sandwiches. Residents say the
epidemic started after Lee's Mart,
the primary sandwich supplier of
Ossipee, was officially closed
Tuesday.
Lee E. Lee, the owner of Lee's
Mart (also called the Altamahaw
Mall), filed for bankruptcy Mon-
day after a history of credit prob-
lems. Affectionately known as
Tee to the second power or 'Lee
squared' by patrons, Lee had to
fight back the tears when discuss-
ing the closing of his business.
"I started this place back in
1951 as a grill and on November
10,1951, exactly 37 years ago to-
day, I sold my first grilled cheese
sandwich Lee said before
breaking down in sorrow.
Disgruntled customers of
Lee's protested the store's closure
Tuesday by carrying signs and
chatting "Bring Back Lee's" in the
gravel lot in front of the store. One
sign was reported to have said "I
want a Lee's grilled cheese
One protester took time out to
talk with EP. "First it was them
revenuers coming down from
Raleigh on us Ossipee people, but
now it's the communist bankers
"Hey, think about this, you
city people, where am I going to
buy a quality grilled cheese sand-
wich now that Lee's is closed
down? Resident Scott Walker
said.
Although Lee sold more than
greasy sandwiches from his store
(at one time Lee offered quality
clothing, three for a dollar and
attractive lawn ornaments), most
customers say they will miss the
grill the most.
Lee wouldn't release his fa-
mous method for preparing his
grill, but would say "I used an pig
organ for grease
Still Walker isn't happy with
the closing. "My wife Carole has
developed a dependency on them
grilled cheese sandwiches. My
kids are addicts too. I tried to
make some sandwiches myself to
stop their trembling, but they
went into convulsions and said
"Daddy, it ain't a Lee's grilled
cheese
While doctors at nearby Ala-
mance County Hospi rial work on
a serum to help the Walker clan,
vigilante Jim Walton plans to reo-
pen Lee's Mart whether the au-
thorities like it or not.
"If we don't open Lee's,
Ossipee's youth will resort to
crime and misbehavin The Alta-
mahaw Mall is more than just a
little rural store, it's a way of life
for these here people Walton
said.
Temperatures in Florida
not on Emeralites' minds
GREENVILLE (EP) � Do
people in Greenville really care
how warm it is in Florida? Ac-
cording to a recent poll conducted
by EP, Greenvillians don't give a
flying damn about the heat of
Florida.
A reported 96 percent of those
polled said they were more con-
cerned about Dan Quayle's hair-
spray than the climate in the or-
ange juice state. Another one per-
cent of the people said they had
never heard of Florida.
1 thought it was part of
Cuba was one of the responses
to the polled question. 'There are
just a whole lot of other things to
be concerned about I don't really
care how hot it gets in Florida,
said another Emerald City native.
EP conducted the poll after
receiving a letter from Ex
Greenvillian Pat Mollory who
said it was 89 degrees in Key
West. One polle commented
"Who the hell does this Mollory
guy think he is, anyway?"
Instead of thinking of the
Florida weather, citizens of the
Green City think more about:
�Who is going to be the next
ECU head football coach, 41 per-
cent :
The sorry state of ECU'i
campus roads, 22 percent
The endless lines at the beef
stores, 20 percent I
J
Overkill
;�;
I
h � �
fi9RC -� ' .
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Undercover Cats
FLA'
Old BOY WCAj
AUM HAS DCS-
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BREAK. HUH ?
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Inside joke
u
f�j fyEt&iT'&'py
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ro&iE THEKBi A
To m'S M)
own 5iriRE
Cub Reporte
Answer these questions to
Olsen trivia knowledge!
1. Jimmy was sometimes ki
What was his identity?
2. Who was the girl Jimnv
got brushed off by? (Hint-I
3. Jimmy had a signal wat
summon his pal Supermai
sound it made.
4. Besides being "Superm
another nickname. What
5. Who were the youths
and occasionally helped hi
(Not the Jimmy Olsen Fanj
6. Easy- What colors were
bow tie?
7. Difficult- Before he wa�
was Jimmy's job at the D�
8, What did Jimmy alwa?
that got the old editor so
,9. Name the homosexual
i-Jimmy in the Superman mi
10. How did Jimmy die in
line before John Byrne du
I Superman continuity?
paoi SuiiquSn q pan
put 11913-9 uoiSaiXoqi





i
I
v
t
US
y
entertaining and verv
ll So why does everyone
at girls these days, any-
one on people, can't
pick on the neo-hippies
hice.
-hippies are those guys
lar rye-dyes and go un-
li protest the status quo.
and odorously, thev
their objective of being
t They wish the 8(ys were
ind for the return of radi
j�s. Most neo-hippies say
Ish Richard Nixon were
ident so they could have
rc. to riot about,
-whiz, come on Ralph,
i people, the fat girl jokes
jnger chic Why not harp
le who drive Chevettes or
who constantly bum
li r people who frequent
.which of course brings
to fat girls. (Ralph 1, Earl
itions Building
�lie. N.C 27834
)ards
did he get around that
Jblem? 1 used 44 Moore
xvtr.il magnum on it. It
n had some physical re-
Ions on his brain over the
r years. We'll just have to
ladded with a chuckle
dumber than most earth
:ksof Svlia Plath.
turn
incc for the dead actors
rtayed Buff) and Mr.
(explained as dying when
out too quickly when their
uc capsules opened), their
li il not be recast
Le New OLDER Patty Duke
- An aging Patty' again
lose lovable twin cousins
It ew and exciting twist
both married and their
Ids can't tell them apart'
ly out, wackv and lanky
for the whole family.
ose
Mo one asked for Mr. Oser's
p. Hey, we won the game
we? Head Coach Joe
said as he started his re-
purchased BMW.
me of the critcism was
on the shoulders of Full-
immy Smith, who carried
ill twice prior to the field
lick.
ley man, I got hit. When I
1 fall down. I ain't trying to
game Smith said. "You
ly new chains? Smith said
jng off a multitude of
24 carrot necklaces.
cheese
and misbehavinThe Alta-
w Mall is more than just a
(rural store, it's a way of life
Kse here people Walton
Florida
les' minds
wther Emerald City native.
conducted the poll after
ring a letter from Ex-
kvillian Pat Mollory who
it was 89 degrees in Key
One polle commented
the hell does this Mollory
link he is, anyway?"
istead of thinking of the
a weather, citizens of the
City think more about:
fho is going to be the next
?ad football coach, 41 per-
sorry state of ECU's
is roads, 22 percent
� endless lines at the beer
20 percent
Undercover Cats
By Parker The Avatar
By Harris and Haselrig
Big Head!m
OH Ml
SAT AM,
ANfrmtfG
to WE MY
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fitJitime You
pRWrSOMErHICr
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THE VERWExrOtf FAce it SKtPPY, YoU
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IMPORTANT:
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flCTiaoos. AM
t�SF5iMC� TO
ACTOHL PERWS
15 ASSit�UY
"QOHAFIEt'
Cjac ibENcE
Cub Reporters Quiz
r It's better than Clint Howard Day!
- It's more important than Groundhog Day!
Look in Fun and Games, it's Superman's Pal
Answer these questions to test YOUR
Olsen trivia knowledge!
1. Jimmy was sometimes known as a superhero.
What was his identity?
2. Who was the girl Jimmy loved but always
got brushed off by? (Hint- If s Lois Lane's sister
3. Jimmy had a signal watch that he could
summon his pal Superman with. Describe the
sound it made.
4. Besides being "Superman's Pal Jimmy had
another nickname. What was it?
5. Who were the youths that admired Olsen
and occasionally helped him out of jams?
(Not the Jimmy Olsen Fan Club.)
6. Easy- What colors were Jimmy's jacket and
bow tie?
7. Difficult- Before he was a cub reporter, what
was Jimmy's job at the Daily Planet?
8. What did Jimmy always call Perry White
that got the old editor so steamed?
19. Name the homosexual actor who portrayed
Jimmy in the Superman movies.
10. How did Jimmy die in the Alan Moore story-
line before John Byrne changed (destroyed) the
Superman continuity?
a From "The Ki.
iBi
No, Jimmy isn't being conceited, he really did g ,yot MEAH 1 AH characters copyright DC Comics. Word,
have fans all over; the world, outer space, i ive got fans
Dimension-X, the bottled city of Kandor, and
even Atlantis! The Jimmy Olsen Fan Club
often stepped in to control his life.
Kid With the Golden Touch"
Day!
From "Jimmy Olsen, Freak!
Jimmy often got the cold shoulder
from Lucy
But sometimes the shoe was on the
other foot!
Like many of us, Jimmy
got depressed and lost
interest in living. Though
Superman wasn't around,
he was saved by Lori
Lemaris, the mermaid!
From "Jimmy Olsen,
Wolf-Man
pjoi 9uiuir9ii Xq painaoipaia s�m h 01 wnQajM n�W 6 WHD '9 JUfcalllfffg pa
jpue uaajo 9 uoiSaq XoqsMafuupj
During his misadventures, Jimmy met up
with lots of beautiful famous starlets!
From "Jimmy
the Soda-Jerk'
Jimmy's pal Superman would often
take time out from his busy world-
saving schedule to hang out at
drugstores and have a good laugh at
young Olsen's misfortunes!
Fun and Games by Jeff Parker,
Beppo the Supennonkey's Pal





�:
THE HAST CAROi INI AN
Sports
NOVEMBER 10, 1988 'age 1 2
7 am the key to my success
Fullback meets challenge
The Temple front line is flattened by the Pirate offensive line as Tim James scrambles for
extra yardage (Photo by Neil Johnson).
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
SUff Writer
Tim James, East Carolina's
senior fullback, has never been
one to back away from a chal-
lenge. He meets each defender
with the same grunt, the same
intensity, the same desire. The
rewards, especially this year,
have been small. The Tirates are 1 -
8 but James is having a banner
season as the ECU fullback.
"I am the key to my success
said James. "No one can do the
work for me. My coaches may be
very helpful in one aspect of my
career, but it's me that has to con-
tinue to work hard and stay in
shape. That has allowed me to
rush for 1,000 yards in my career
James hit the 1,000 yard pla-
teau against Miami, rushing for 74
vardson 17 carries. For his career.
yards per game.
James came to East Carolina
after a stellar career at Hartsville
High School. A four-year letter-
man, he rushed for 1,570 yards as
a senior and was named to the
South Carolina Shrine Bowl team.
Having a great high school, or
college career, was just a dream in
1980, when James was a freshman
at Hartsville.
It was then that, while wres-
tling in P.E. class, he seriously
injured the fourth and fifth verte-
"No one can do the work
for me Tim James
by the Tampa Bay Buccanneers
last year. Simpson, who goes
down as one of the best fullbacks
in ECU history has nothing on
James, said ECU fullback coach
Jeff Fela of James.
"Tim has great football
sense adds Fela. "He is strong
enough to run over you and quick
enough to get arou nd you. He also
has soft hands that make him an
outstanding receiver
James and Simpson are also
compared equally by many oth-
ers, but James feels that he'll sur-
pass Simpson because of his ver-
satility.
"We are two very different
types of runners said James.
"Although we both are very-
strong and able to get the yards
when thev count, I am versatile
brae in his back. The injury was so
serious that his doctor made a
diagnosis that James would not be
able to play football again. Weigh- and capable of plaving the outside
ing 185 at the time, James got a and finding the openings as well
second opinion at the Duke Medi- as the inside. Anthony was more
he has 1,065 yards on 227 carries, cal Center. After surgery and one an 'up-the-middle' type of runner
a 4.7 yard per carry average. For
the season, the Hartsville, S.C
native, has rushed for 536 yards
on 115 carries, a 4.7 yard per carry
average. Against the five Top-20
schools on the ECU schedule this
year, James has rushed for 72.6
ready to play
year off, he was
football again.
After a successful high school
career, James came to East Caro-
lina. He plaved for three years
behind standout fullback An-
thony Simpson, who was dratted
who never saw much action any-
where but the inside
Being prepared when oppor-
tunity knocks is what James is
striving for when the season ends.
And, with his work ethic, he
should have no problem.
Jones measures up to tough
'88 Pirate Football schedule
Tim lames outruns the Hurricane defense for an East Carolina first down. James hit the 1,000
yard rushing mark after rushing for 74 yards on 17 carries against Miami.
Dream match-ups for NBC
IAP � - Picture this scenario:
On Nov. 26, No. 1 Notre
Dame beats No. 2 Southern Cal
assuming the Trojans are still No.
2 after playing UCLA on Nov. 19.
Meanwhile, No. 3 Miami
wins its last three regular-season
games, which also may be assum-
ing too much because the Hurri-
canes play LSU, Arkansas and
Brigham Young.
1 That would send Notre Dame
and Miami into the bowl season
ranked 1-2
Now, picture thii scenario:
You re NBC. You've just lost
the nch. glamorous Rose Bowl to
ABC. But you now have the Fiesta
Bowl in the same time slot.
If you've shelled out $300
million for the Summer Olympics
and the right to televise such
spine-tingling, audience-grab-
bing events as rhythmic gymnas-
tics and synchronized swimming,
surely you can come up with
another few million for a Notre
Dame-Miami rematch which,
given Notre Dame, given Miami
and given the ill-will between the
two schools, would blow the Rose
Bowl right out of the TV ratings
box.
Forget it. It won't happen.
As of Tuesday evening, Notre
Dame apparently had not made
up its mind which bowl to grace
its presence, even though the Irish
have more suitors than Zsa Zsa
Gabor had husbands.
"Anybody that plays Notre
Dame is going to fill the stands
and the airwaves from Rome to
Tokyo Florida State coach
Bobby Bowden said. "Especially
Rome
The most popular scenario
has Notre Dame playing No. 4
West Virginia in the Fiesta Bowl.
Both the Fiesta Bowl's executive
director and president will be in
East Rutherford, N.J on Saturday
to see West Virginia play Rutgers.
Remember, this is the weekend
when bowl invitations become
semi-official, one week ahead oi
the Nov. 19 "official" selection
date.
Notre Dame is idle on Satur-
dav, which means there should be
seats on flights in and out of South
Bend if the Fiesta Bowl is inclined
to send someone in that direction.
But, says Fiesta Bowl bigwig
Bill Shover, "There's no deal.
We've talked very seriously to
both of them, they've talked to
each other, but there's no deal
It seems that where Notre
Dame and Miami are concerned,
"This town ain't big enough for
both of us And it doesn't matter
whether the town is South Bend,
site o this year's game; Miami,
where thev arc scheduled to meet
next year (remember that Notre
Dame coach Lou Holtz suggested
See NBC, page 13
Spikers defeated
The East Carolina University
women's volleyball team will
begin play in the Colonial Athletic
Conference tournament tomor-
row. They enter the tournament
on a down note, however, follow-
ing Tuesday nights defeat at the
hands of the University of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill.
The women played a tough
match, but fell prey to the stronger
Tarheel squad 2-15,5-15 and 1-15.
The loss gave the Tirates a record
of 7-17 for the regular season and
the win moved the Tarheels to 24-
8.
The Tirates and first year head
coach Judy Kirkpatrick will travel
to American University in Wash-
ington D.C to participate in the
CAC tournament. The tourna-
ment runs from Nov. 10 to Nov.
13. Fast Carolina enters tourna-
ment play �vith a league record of
0-5, placing them in sixth place.
By CHARLES BLOOM
Sports Informjtion Director
For a true freshman, East
Carolina's Robert Jones has surely
measured up to the task oi the
Pirates' tough schedule.
One year ago, the 6-2, 218
pound Blackstone, Va. native,
was playing at Fork Union Mili-
tary Academy. Two years ago,
Jones was knocking heads in
Virginia's AA Southside District.
Today, he leads the Pirate
defense against teams like South
Carolina, West Virginia, Florida
State, Syracuse and Miami.
"1 play football. It doesn't
matter the competition said
Jones. "You do your best. 1 don't
care how big or how small my
Opponent is, I'll play them as they
come
Jones is currently tied for fifth
in tackles on the squad with 39,25
of them coming by himself. He
had 13 tackles and one tackle for
loss against top 10 ranked West
Virginia. Ik' had 10 tackles, one
pass deflection and one forced
tumble against Southwestern
Louisiana. Six tackles in an earlier
game against South Carolina gave
ECU coaches a glimpse of what
was to come.
Hie Freshman All-America
candidate started his first game
against South Carolina at defen-
sive end. He also started there the.
next week against Southern Mis-
sissippi. The next week, against
LSL, found him starting at inside
linebacker - a position where he is
currently situated.
"I was surprised at starting so
early said Jones. "Due to the
injuries we had on defense, the
coaches told me I had to start.
Coach (.Richard) Bell (defensive
coordinator) came to me and
wanted me to play linebacker. I
never say 'no' to any of the
tches. But, I had only one week
to learn to play the position
The season was going well for
onesuntil the Honda State game.
He -uttered a twisted knee
against the Seminoles in the first
quarter and had to sit the rest of
the contest. He also missed the
Syracuse game.
"1 hated it a lot said Jones. "I
wanted to play real bad. The
sports medicine staff told me to
stay out. They said that I had three
years to go and thev didn't want
me to jeopardize my career
The future looks bright for
Robert Jones. Not only does he
have great football skills, but he
has his academic goals in sight as
well. He is majonng in business
management and has his sights
set for a career after his playing
davs are over.
"1 still have a lot of work to do
on the field, but I'm here to get an
education said lones.
The East Carolina women's volleyball team will be entering the Colonial Athletic Tourna-
ment with an 0-5 record in the CAC. The Pirates are 7-17 for the regular season.
WEEKEND ECU SPORTS
UPDATE
Sat. 2 p.m. - Men and women
Swim and Dive team vs. Old
Dominion
Minges Pool - Minges
Coliseum
Sat. 7:30 p.m. -Men's
Basketball Scrimmage
Minges"Coliseum
Sat. and Sun. lla.m5p.m. -
Ultimax Men's and Women's
Frisbee Club Tournament
Intramural Fields behind
Ficklen Stadium
The Pirate Booty
Where have all the Pirate fans gone?
Inexperi
(AP- The score at halftime
was Giants 26, Cowboys 0, and
the Dallas fan was talking about
how the C owboys ought to bag
the seas in, get the first pick in the
draft and take UC1 A quarterback
Troy Aikman as their rebuilding
block.
Then Kevin Sweeney ent �
the game th (iiants started play-
ing perfectoffense and Sv i
threw tor thre I ichd wns Dal-
las lost 29-21 hut, for the moment
at least, their quarterba I
lems seemed less pressing
It's hardly fa r �
Sweetv v an insta
stellar performance in a wmi ai
ready lust "I'm sure the Giants
didn't know what ' h
said. "1 didn't knovv what I
pect
But ad ' -
replacement from Fr
the list
Hornets
( H '�
The Chai tl
rirst NBA vn I i
ling carei r, and tl
the man who p� 1 the
fight to win tl �
pital bed sufferii .
"Thisone is i �
Charlotte Hon -
Tri pucka
team to a I
over tl i
"We'll brii
row. Get
The team s l
Georoe Shinn, -
str k
was listed in - i
the neur
unit at Charlom '
pita!
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sport Fditor
Hello sports fans.
Welcome to the new and
improved Pirate Booty, just in
time for the close of football sea-
son and the beginning of basket-
ball season. This is Kristen Hal-
rg, your very own sportseditor,
be:
coming to you from the East Caro-
linian. Doug Johnson, your old
sports cditoj, won't be with us
any longer due to the end of the
semester senior cram. I'm sure
you seniors can relate to that.
After all, we all want to graduate
sooner or later.
So, for now, you will have to
settle for me.
Now some of you may feel a
little uneasy about a female in
charge of the en tire sports section.
Some are prone to think that
women simply don't know that
much about sports.
Well, let me reassure you
otherwise. As an avid East Caro-
lina sports fan and an active ath-
letic participant, my interest and
knowledge in the area of sports is
comparable to that of any sports
crazed fool, male or female.
But my goal here is not to
compare myself to the work of a
man, but to simply do my very
best to give you total coverage of
all aspects of East Carolina Sports.
After all, The East Carolinian is for
the students.
Having said that, there is one
thing that I would like to bring to
you, the students, attention. This
gripe is in the area of attendance.
To my dismay, I noticed, as the
football season progressed, the
diminishing attendance at the
home games.
What's the deal folks?
Now I know how frustrating
it can be to continuously witness
fumbles on the goal line, missed
field goals and various other bro-
ken up scoring opportunities, but
come on guys! I know that a 2-8
season isn't anything to get psy-
ched over, but give the football
players a break. It's not like they
went out there wanting to lose. 1
know for a fact that around 12,000
people at the Syracuse game was
only a third of what could fill the
35,000 seat capacity at Ficklen
Stadium. That's less than the at-
tendance at the university. (I'll
have to admit though, Miami was
an improvement).
So now that you sit and won-
der what the point is that I write
this column when football season
is nearly over and we don't even
have any more home games to
redeem ourselves, I'll tell you
Why not get out there and sup-i
port the Pirate Basketball pro-
grams? With the new season ap-
proaching and the chance of
ECU's first winning season in a
long time, fan support will be
crucial to the success of the team.
Now what better way to increase
the moral of our players than to
pack the newly renovated Minges
Colliseum? Why not get out there
this Saturday at 7:30 p.m. for the
second men's basketball scrim-
mage and the the following Satur-
day at 7 p.m. for the women's
alumni game? We'll see you out
on the court!

fully

intentii
from the in � s
v ard. "we knew
ything w
(leoi
Most of the
Shinn's stroke onl) minuti
tore the game during a I
announcement to the
18,865 at the Charlotte (
The Hornets respon 3
ing their hearts out.
The 1 lomets tool
the third quarter an i rtRei
finished the job, & -
16second-half pointsin the I
period
Tripucka sc red a gan i
24 points for the Hon I
eran forward Kurt Kan
17 points and pulled 1 :
Charlotte s 62 reboui
"Before the came Trip Id
said. 'Dick came over and sak
Twenty-five points I i
won't accept anything less
he was serious as hell
that: Serious as heck
Rex Chapman scored
points Bogues navig
through full-court pressure I ll
points and three assists Micha
Holton made two third-quart
steals to build an 11-point .
Reid. the 33-year-old i I
who plaved for 10 seasons a
Houston, scored
the last two minute- 14 -
secure the victor)
NBC bids for
Fiesta Bowl
Continued from page 12
both schools consider dreppn
the remaining two games oi th
contract1 or Phoenix.
A Fiesta Bowl official quetj
Holtz as saying his playa
oouldn'tspend a week in the sai
town with the Miami team w
out uglv incidents
This is all somewhat stranj
All the animosity seems to be
Notre Dame's part apparenj
having sprung from Miami -
rout of the Irish in Coach Gei
Faust's 1985 swansong
Holtz's party line is that
beat them (Miami) once and
have nothing to gain bv plav
them again Besides, no rcmaj
has ever been real good 1 havd
qualms about who we play , n
whatsoever. I'm not afraid to
Miami again, but that's not
decision
Don't weep for NBC, thoi
It may have Notre Dame in
Fiesta Bowl, followed by Miai
the Orange Bowl That's the
est thing to a rematch you
expect.





!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10,1988 13
llenge
) Buccanneers
- n who goes
best fullbacks
r ha nothing on
back coach
it football
I le is strone
C
ou and quick
ridou. Me also
make him an
on are alo
by manv oth-
- that he'll S
- a ise of his ver-
rj different
said lames
oth are very
cot the vards
m vc rsatile
the outside
. enings as well
. was more
I runner
much action anv-
o
j w hen oppor-
i lames is
ion & season ends
rk ethic he
loush
edule
id ruy one week
p ation
ring well for
State game.
a � : knee
- in the first
il the rest of
- missed the
� said ones I
� real bad. The
staff told me to
�hat I had three
id they didn't want
ize my career
oks bnght for
I only does he
skills, but he
s in sight as
in business
and has his sights
r his plaving
� ' work to do
ut I'm here to get an
lid � s
letic Tourna-
lar season
lie?
ind we don't even
am more home games to
- -es, I'll tell you
� n ' ' ut there and sup-
the Pirate Basketball pro-
vVith the new season ap-
i hmg and the chance of
- first winning season in a
tinu fan support will be
ial to the success of the team.
a hat better way to increase
noral of our players than to
newly renovated Minges
sewn? Why not get out there
Saturday at 7:30 p.m. for the
tad men's basketball scrim-
�e and the the following Sarur-
at , p.m. for the women's
mi game" We 11 see you out
he court!
Inexperienced quarterbacks start
(AP) � The score at halftime
was Giants 26, Cowboys 0, and
the Dallas fan was talking about
how the Cowboys ought to bag
the season, get the first pick in the
viraft and take UCLA quarterback
rov Aikman as their rebuilding
block.
Then Kevin Sweeney entered
the game, the Giants started play-
ing perfectoffense and Sweeney
threw for three touchdowns. Dal-
las lost 29-21 but, for the moment
at least, their quarterback prob-
lems seemed less pressing.
It's hardlv fair to make
Sweeney an instant hero after a
cllar performance in a game al-
ready lost. "I'm sure the Giants
lidn't know what to expect he
said. "1 didn't know what to ex-
pect
But add the one-time strike
placement from Fresno State to
the list oi youngsters and the
NFL's quarterback shortage sud-
denly looks less drastic than when
the season started.
Rookies Chris Chandler of
Indianapolis and Kelly Stouffer of
Seattle are currently starting and
while Stouffer may go back to the
bench now that Dave Krieg is
healthy, he has looked oood
enouqh to hold out some hope for
the future.
Beyond them is a group of
second- and third-year men, led
by Chris Miller of Atlanta, who
are beginning to establish them-
selves in the way that Jim Everett
of the Rams, another third-year
quarterback, already has.
Others include Bubby Blister
of Pittsburgh, Steve Beuerlein of
the Los Angeles Raiders. Mark
Rypien of Washington and Don
Majkowski of Green Bay, plus
Bobby Hebert of New Orleans,
who after three seasons in the
USFL and three in the NFL, has
finally harnessed his physical
talents into Jim Mora's control
game.
Miller is almost universally
admired. "I don't think there's
any question he'll be a star in this
league General Manager Jim
Finks of the Saints said.
In fact, while the Falcons are
3-7, they are 3-4 in games in which
Miller has played. One of those
defeats was a 26-20 loss to Dallas
which Atlanta may have won had
Miller not sprained his ankle in
the third quarter, and another was
a 23-16 loss to the Giants, in which
New York scored 17 points in the
last five minutes to erase a 16-6
Atlanta lead.
There's also a bit of irony to
the quarterback situation.
Beuerlein, on injured reserve
as a rookie last year, is fourth in
the AFC quarterback ratings. But
after starting the season, he sat on
the bench for four games in favor
of Jay Schroeder, for whom the
Raiders have up two high draft
choices and Pro Bowl offensive
tackle Jim Lachey, whom they
could use desperately right now.
Schroeder, meanwhile, was
supplanted by Rypien, who in the
five games he played while Doug
Williams was out with an appen-
dectomy, threw 13 touchdown
passes and got himself a rating of
114.1, by far the best in the league.
Unlike Schroeder, Rypien is re-
maining silent now that he's back
on the bench. In fact, they're
selling sweatshirts in Washington
with pictures of Williams and
Rypien and the caption "United
Together
Then there's Vinny Testav-
erde, whose 22 interceptions lead
the league and whose rating of
50.8 is last among the 31 quarter-
backs rated. Schroeder, at 52.8,
ranks 30th.
TONIGHT IS RIGHT
� FOR DINNER AT
t ANNABELLE'S.
Escape from the world of ordinary cuisine and
discover the extraordinary tastes of Annabelle's
Restaurant. At Annabelle's
'ou'll find a variety of
delectable dinner entrees,
including your favorite
, chicken and
food dishes, as well
pasta and stir fry
specialties. So treat
yourself right.
Make tonight the
night. For dinner
at Annabelle's.
Hornets win one for ailing owner
CHARLOTTE. N.C. (AP) � Grant Gondrezick's layup Norm Nixon's free throw
he Charlotte Hornets won their with 41 seconds left pulled the with 1:43 left pulled Los Angeles
rst NBA victory of their fledg- Clippers within 57-55 at halftime, within 106-100, but Reid scored
ng career, and they did it while but Charlotte gradually pulled the next six points for Charlotte.
the man who spearheaded the away in the third quarter on a 15- Quenton Dailey paced the
light to win the team lay in a hos- 9 run to take a 72-64 lead with 7:04 Clippers with 18 points,
pital bed suffering from a stroke, left in the period.
This one is for you, George,
rebounds.
"A great crowd witnessed a
great win, said Tripucka, who
scored six of his points during a
decisive third quarter run.
'This gives a message to the
harlotte Hornets forward Kelly
rripucka said after leading his
a m to a 117-105 victory Tuesday
ver the Los Angeles Clippers.
We'll bring you the ball tomor-
?w. Get well fast
The team's principal owner,
ieoroe Shinn, suffered a mild
stroke Tuesday afternoon and
was listed in serious condition in
the neurological intensive care
unit at Charlotte Memorial Hos-
pital.
Doctors expect him to recover
fully.
Charlotte coach Dick Harter
intentionally shielded his players
from the news of Shinn's stroke
before the game, explaining after-
ward, "we knew there wasn't
anything we could do for
George
Most of the plavcrs heard
shinn's stroke only minutes be-
fore the game during a general
announcement to the crowd of
18,865 at the Charlotte Coliseum.
The Hornets responded by play-
ing their hearts out.
The Hornets took control in
the third quarter, and Robert Reid
finished the job, scoring 10 of his
16 second-half points in the fourth
period.
Tripucka scored a game-high
24 points for the Hornets and vet-
eran forward Kurt Rambis added
7 points and pulled down 14 of
Charlotte's 62 rebounds.
"Before the game Tripucka
said. "Dick came over and said
Twenty-five points tonight! I
won't accept anything less And
he was serious as hell. Correct
that: Serious as heck
Rex Chapman scored 18
points. Bogues navigated
through full-court pressure for 14
points and three assists. Michael
Holton made two third-quarter
steals to build an 11-point lead.
Reid, the 33-vear-old veteran
vho played for 10 seasons with
Houston, scored seven points in
the last two minutes 14 seconds to
secure the victory.
NBC bids for
Fiesta Bowl
Continued from page 12
both schools consider dropping
the remaining two games of their
contract), or Phoenix.
A Fiesta Bowl official quoted
Holtz as saying his players
couldn't spend a week in the same
town with the Miami team with-
out ugly incidents.
This is all somewhat strange.
All the animosity seems to be on
Notre Dame's part, apparently
having sprung from Miami's 58-7
rout of the Irish in Coach Gerry
Faust's 1985 swansong.
Holtz's party line is that "we
beat them (Miami) once and we
have nothing to gain by playing
them again. Besides, no rematch
has ever been real good. I have no
qualms about who we play, none
whatsoever. I'm not afraid to play
Miami again, but that's not my
decision
Don't weep for NBC, though.
It may have Notre Dame in the
Fiesta Bowl, followed by Miami in
the Orange Bowl. That's the clos-
est thing to a rematch you can
expect.
18 points, while
Benoit Benjamin added 17. Reggie NBA that when you come into our
The advantage grew to 90-79 Williams scored 15 points, and place, we are going to scrap and
by the end of the third quarter. Ken Norman had 15 points and 15 hustle and play you hard Reid
said.
RESTAURANT PUB
Theftn Mnn-Thurc 11:50 AM-11:00 PM
Orwnvilt Blvd. Fn-Sar 11:50 AM - Mdrnghf
756-0515 Sunday 12 Noon � 11 fl) PM
UI wasn't rubbing
it in-1 just wanted
Eddie to know
the score of
last night's garnet
.

u
J5VO
Go ahead and gloat. You can
nib it in all the way to Chicago
with XT&lT Long Distance Service.
Besides, your best friend Eddie
was the one who said your team
could never win three straight.
So give him a call It costs a
lot less than you think to let him
know who's headed for the Playoffs.
Reach out and touch someone�
If youd like to know more about
AJSlT products and services, like
International Calling and the AT8T
Card, call us at 1 800 222-0300.
Alex Sum � University of Washington � Class of 1990
AT&T
The right choice.





n
14
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 10,1988
AARGH, MATEYS!
The Fearless Football
Forecast will be
back NEXT WEEK!
Georgia Tech looks for win
READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
ATLANTA (AP) � Wake news conference that Wake ment the two.
Forest's experience-laden secon- Forest's secondary, with senior "They'r experienced, they're
dary stands between Georgia cornerbacks A.J. Green and Tony au gOOCj athletes, they run well
Tech and its last chance at win- Mosley, could prevent Tech from ancj they're very tough and ag-
ning an Atlantic Coast Confer- seeing its first 1988 ACC victory, grcssive Ross said. 'They can
ence game this season, Tech "I think they are two of the
Coach Bobby Ross said Tuesday, best cover people in the league
The two ACC teams square Ross said. "They can really play
the pass exceptionally well
really play the pass exceptionally
well
off Saturday in Winston-Salem,
N.C. Georgia Tech goes into the
game with an 0-6 record in the
ACC and 3-6 overall, while Wake
Forest is 3-2 in the ACC and 5-4
overall.
Ross said during his weekly
Ross said Wake Forest Coach
Bill Dooley has a tight defensive
combination in Greene and Mos-
ley, and three-year starting free
safety Ernie Purnsley compli-
"I think that this has been the
best secondary in the league
Ross said. "Bill Dooley teams
always play good defense
Ross said senior cornerback
Cedric Stallworth will miss
Saturday's game with a knee in-
jury, but inside linebacker Don
Lear, who has been out with a
sprained knee, should be ready to
Last season, Wake Forest
forced nine turnovers and seven
interceptions on its way to a 33-6 play,
victory. Ross said that game gave
his players "first hand" knowl- Junior Gerald Chamblin will
edge of Wake Forest's defensive replace Stallworth in the lineup,
capabilities.
Ross said.
UNC-W Hoopster assaults officer
WILMINGTON (AP) � An
18-vear-old freshman basketball
player at the University of North
Carolina at Wilmington pleaded
gn il tv Tuesday to assaulting a law
officer and three other charges
stemming from a September inci-
dent at WrightsviUe Beach.
Under the terms of a plea Washington, Iowa, is
agreement, Matt Fish has to per- Seahawks' tallest player
form 80 hours of community serv- averaged 15.2 points
G. Tucker signed the agreement McPherson's first recruit last fall.
Tuesday. WrightsviUe Beach police
Seahawk coach Robert were called to a party Sept. 16, and
McPherson said Fish would have tried to arrest Fish, who was
to abide bv special rules to remain drinking a beer on the street, ae-
on the basketball team. The sea-
son will begin Nov. 25.
Fish, a 6-foot-10 native of
the
He
15.2 points and 10.7
ice, pay a WrightsviUe Beach law
officer $152 for breaking his eye-
glasses, and counsel youths as
part oi a New Hanover County
schools' substance abuse pro-
gram. He also has to write a public
letter of apology to be printed in
the UC-Wilmington
student newspaper.
If Fish complies by May 3, his
record may be cleared, New Ha-
nover District Court Judge Elton
ECU signs
ers
rebounds per game as a high
school senior and was
cording to police reports.
Charles Lineberry, Fish's
lawyer, said Fish turned and ran
when police approached him.
Fish collided with Officer J.N.
Smith, who is about a foot shorter
than Fish, Lineberry said.
The collision, Lineberry said,
gave the officer a mild concussion
and broke Smith's eyeglasses. The
police report said Fish committed
the assault by "throwing and
knocking Officer Smith to the
pavement causing serious bodily
iniury
Fish was charged with assault
on a law officer, resisting arrest,
drinking alcohol in public and
underage drinking.
�Prices are roundtrip based on midweek travel. Tickets
are nonrefundabte with no changes allowed. Reservations
must be made a minimum of 14 days In advance. Prices
are subject to change without notice.
Crreenville
travel center
200 Arlington Blvd Suite M
756-1521
-
play
GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) �
East Carolina signed two junior
college players - one from North
Carolina and another from South
Carolina - and a Raleigh prep star
on the first day of the early signing
period Wednesday, school offi-
cials announced.
All three of the players
signed are six-foot-six.
Darrell Overton averaged
12.4 points and 11.6 rebounds per
game last season as a freshman at
Craven Community College. The
190-pounder was a three-year
starter at Edenton Holmes High
School.
At North Greenville Junior
College in Rock Hill, S.C, last
season, Jon Hardin averaged 14.0
points and 8.5 rebounds in lead-
ing his team to a 24-6 record.
Forward D.J. Morgan of
Raleigh Athens Drive High
School averaged 13.0 points and
8.0 rebounds per game last season
as a Junior in leading his team to a
21-4 record.
Wednesday was the first day
of the week-long early signing
period, during which high school
seniors and junior college players
may sign national letters of intent
with four-year schools.
TVestern Steer
Family
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High Energy Music provided by Connie!
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 10, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 10, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.640
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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