The East Carolinian, November 8, 1988






Inside
EDITORIALS4
v-LifVij3inrjLo�n���n��ti����i����i��i�n��i�.�t�1mt��rj
FEATURES8
SPORTS10
Features
U2's "Rattle and Hum' the CD and movie both get
good grades for an excellent concert film and overall
bitchin' live music page 8.
Sports
The Pirates taste the 'thrill of victor as they roll
past the Temple Owls 34-17. Coach Rick Kobe chalks
up his 100th "W"as a result of the win, see page 10.
(She Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 33
Tuesday November 8,1988
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Ed Emory isn ft a candidate
ECU still searching for a coach
(AP) � Former East Carol ina
football coach Ed Emory says he'd
like to return to the Pirates as a re-
placement for his successor, but
school officials say they aren't
interested.
Coach Art Baker, who suc-
ceeded Emory, resigned Mondav,
effective at the end of this season.
The Pirates are 2-9 with one game
left to play.
"I never finished the goal that
I went to East Carolina for � to
make the Pirates one of the top
teams in the country Emorv told
The Charlotte Observer on
Wednesday. He compiled a 2b-29
record at East Carolina from 1980-
84 and now lives in Myrtle Beach,
S.C "I believe in that school so
much, in the area and in the
people.
"I'd be honored and thrilled if
I could be considered Emory
said. "I'd probably go back and
work for three hots and a cot
That, said Emory, is "three
hot meals and a place to sleep
Emory, an East Carolina gradu-
ate, was fired as coach on Dec. 10,
1984, and filed a $1.2 million law-
suit against the school for breach
of contract in March 1985. He
reached a $139,000 settlement
with the school the following
November.
East Carolina spent the 1986
season on a one-year NCAA pro-
bation without sanctions for mi-
nor violations that occurred dur-
ing Emory's tenure. Emory said
Wednesday he ran a clean pro-
gram and has no hard feelings to-
ward anvone at East Carolina.
Emory said he felt he would
have a chance at the job if new
athletic director Dave Hart and
Chancellor Richard Eakin "have
an open mind
Hart, however, said Emory is
not a likelv candidate.
"1 will not be contacting Ed
Emorv Hart said.
Also Wednesday, ECU
formed a search commi ttee to find
a replacement position, for Baker.
ECU officials have not identi-
fied any candidates for the but
several possibilities have ties to
the state or to ECU.
Former ECU assistants Frank
Orgel of South Carolina and
Wayne Hall of Auburn are con-
sidered possibilities, along with
Oklahoma offensive coordinator
Jim Donnan; Miami, Ha. offen-
sive coordinator Garv Stevens
and Penn State defensive coordi-
nator Jerry Sandusky.
"Id be interested Stevens
saidWhat would it take, I don't
know. You'd have to talk to some-
body and see what they're doing
and what they want
"I think they have a nice pro-
gram there. They're building a
new facility (sports medicine
building). Basically, they have all
the tools that you need
Orgel, who coached under
Pat Dye at ECU from 1974-1979,
said he is also interested in the
position.
"You bet Orgel said. "I love
East Carolina and I love that uni-
versity and the people. I have
some fond memories. I spent the
best years of my life at that univer-
sity (1974-1979)
"Everybody wants to be a
head coach. I certainly would be.
I'd like to be the head coach at
East Carolina.
"East Carolina has a national
reputation because of who
they've played. That makes it
easier to recruit the kids. Having
lived there six years, I know the
people. There is something spe-
cial about them
Durham attorneys adopt resolution opposing
drug tests, say defendants rights violated
Residents of Belk Dormitory lined up Monday and showed
pride for their dorm (Photo By Gretchen Journigan, ECU
Photo Lab).
DURHAM (AP)� A Durham
county proposal for the prctrial
drug testing of people charged
with crimes would violate the
rights of defendants, a group of
defense attorneys says.
The Durham County Asso-
ciation of Criminal Defense Law-
yers recently adopted a resolution
opposing such drug tests, which
also have sparked constitutional
questions in the minds of Chief
District Court Judge David Q.
LaBarre and others.
The resolution contends that
pretrial drug release testing pro-
gram can be implemented unless
the statutory and constitutional
rights of the person accused of
crime are violated
The program, if implemented
in Durham, would be the first of
its kind in North Carolina.
Drug screening often is or-
dered as a condition of probation
for people convicted of crimes in
Durham. The proposed program
would differ, however, in that it
would involve testing of people
who were not convicted and who
were awaiting trial.
The proposed testing is being
studied by Durham's War on
Drug and Alcohol Abuse.
If implemented, it probably
would be modeled on a program
in Portland, Ore said Peter J.
Haerle, executive director of the
War on Drug and Alcohol Abuse.
But defense lawyers say the
Portland program raises consti-
tuitonal questions because an
accused person may be kept in jail
or have his bond revoked if he
won't take a drug test. People
who agree to take the test and fail
it, on the other hand, are not kept
in jail but are referred to treatment
facilities.
"Pretrial drug ;sting of per-
sons detained under an arrest
warrant violates the due peocess
clause of the North Carolina and
United States constitutions be-
cause it presumes such persons
are guilty of a crime prior to their
trial or conviction savs the reso-
lution.
"What the program really is,
is a method to coerce people not to
take drugs because society prefers
that people do not, and to force
treatment. But the Bill of Rights
quarantees the freedom to make
uncriminal bad choices, even
though a person would be better
advised to exercise his or her free-
dom to make a good choice?� the
good choice most certainly and
unequivocally being the choice
not to abuse alcohol or drugs the
resolution says.
Defense lawyers also say in
their resolution that accused
people would be contacted about
drug testing before arraignment
and before a lawyer was ap-
pointed to represent them.
"Even if the accused signs a
consent or release form, the issue
is whether such consent is volun-
tary according to the resolution.
"We contend it is not because the
'carrot' of both pretrial release
and of better treatment is held out
to a person who otherwise would
remain in detention
LaBarre said Friday that he
attended a recent meeting in
which a general overview of the
drug-testing proposal was given.
But he said neither he nor Judge
Thomas H. Lee, Durham's senior
resident Superior Court judge,
"have been apprised of the nuts
and bolts of how it would work.
Before the court would consider
such a program, we'd have to be
furnished with the details. It
would require a substantial ex-
penditure of funds and man-
power
LaBarre also noted that North
Carolina statutes guarantee a
"reasonable" bond for all accused
persons except those charged
with first-degree muder. He said
the purpose of bond is to help
ensure a defendant's timely ap-
earance for trial and not to ad-
minister pretrial punishment.
To deny bond because some-
one refused to take a drug test, the
judge said, "seems to met to have
significant statutory as well as
constitutional problems
Haerle, from the War on Drug
and Alcohol Abuse, said pretrial
drug testing programs have been
successfully implemented not
onlv in Portland, but also in
Washington, D.C Milwaukee,
Wis Phoenix and Tucon, Ariz
and Delaware.
"I would assume that most if
not all of these places looked into
the legality of it before imple-
menting it Haerle said.
However, the Washington
program has been challenged in a
lawsuit titled Berry vs. District of
Columbia. The U.S. Court of
Appeals for the District of Colum-
bia Circuit in that case said man-
datory urine testing to detect
drugs "clearly implicates rights
secured under the Fourth
Amendment
The case is still under litiga-
tion.
In an Oct. 20 letter to James D.
"Butch" Williams Jr president of
the Durham County Association
of Criminal Defense Lawyers,
Haerle made it clear that his or-
ganization has not yet endorsed
pretrial drug testing. He said such
an endorsement would not be
make until an opinion was ob-
tained from the state attorney
general outlining the legality of
the program.
World peace could be
jeopordized by Russia
BOSTON (AP) � Nobel lau-
reate Andrei Sakharov, on his
first trip to the West, warned
Monday that Mikhail
Gorbachev's political restructur-
ing of the Soviet Union faces a
domestic backlash that could
endanger world peace.
The 67-year-old physicist and
father of the Soviet dissident
movement said political prison-
ers continue to languish in labor
camps while new laws have in-
creased police powers and re-
stricted public demonstrations.
"It seems to me that this is ex-
tremely dangerous and could de-
stroy the process of perestroika
(political and economic restruc-
turing) and turn it around
Sakharov said.
If Gorbachev's reforms do not
succeed, he warned, "Internal
failure could be accompanied by
external expansion. For the pres-
ervation of the system, expansion
would be a necessity It would
be a catastrophe from which
would arise a great threat to all
humanity
Sakharov spoke through a
translator at a two-hour news
conference promoting the Inter-
national Foundation for the Sur-
vival and Development of Hu-
manity, of which he is a board
member.
The foundation, formed in
January by Soviet and American
scientists and educators, is trying
to raise approximately $10 mil-
lion worldwide to support re-
search on global problems, in-
cluding arms control, hunger,
disease, energy conservation and
pollution.
Its Soviet chairman, Yevgeny
P. Velikhov, said the Moscow-
based organization already has
working groups on nuclear
weapons verification and envi-
ronmental protection and hopes
to sponsor an exchange visit of
2,000 children between the Soviet
Union and the United States next
year. Velikhov is vice president of
the Soviet Academy of Sciences.
Sakharov, who received the
1975 Novel Peace Prize for his hu-
man rights activities, portrayed
the current political climate in his
homeland in starkly contrasting
terms.
He said five "prisoners of con-
See SAKHAROV, page 2





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS, 1988
Sakharov warns LLS.S.R. could face backlash
Continued from page I
science" who were convicted of
anti-Soviet agitation and propa-
ganda have been released in re-
cent days, but listed eight others
who remain in prison camps or
exile.
He called percstroika "a genu-
ine, real process" but said the
crackdowns on demonstrations,
including the violent breakup of a
meeting in Minsk on Oct. 30, gave
him "very gTeat anxiety" over the
course of the reforms.
Asked to explain these con-
tradicitons, Sakharov said: "1
think it was not my words that
were contradictory but the situ-
ation itself. 1 have purposefully
accented the positive and negative
elements so that thiscontradiciton
would be clear.
Sakharov is scheduled to spend
two weeks in the United States
visiting relatives, undergoing
medical tests and attending the
new foundation's first board
meeting outside the Soviet Union
from Nov. 13-17 in Washington.
Sakharov's trip comes less than
two years after he was allowed to
return to Moscow from internal
exile in Gorky, an industrial city
dosed to foreigners. He had been
sent there in January 1980 because
of his outspoken opposition to the
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
one month earlier.
He is traveling without his wife,
Yelena Bonrter, who remained in
Moscow.
He had some kind words for the
United States, saving that he re-
spects America for its democracy,
work ethic, dynamism, self-criti-
cism and generosity.
"The phrase vou often hear in
the U.S. is, 'Can 1 help you? he
said.
"That is something you hear
mainly on the street or in stores
but it also appears (in U.S. behav-
ior) on the international stage
Sakharov, who helped develop
the Soviet hydrogen bomnb,
spoke against the U.S. strategic
defense initiative, saying that the
deployment of space-nased weap-
ons "could provoke the other side
to attempt to destroy them in a
pre-emptive attack I ie also said
"there is a lack of clarity about
what this (SDI) system is good
for
READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
In effort to curb AIDS epidemic, NYC
distributes needles to IV drug users
NEW YORK (AD�New-
York Citv on Monday began a
pilot program to stem the spread
of AIDS bv providing drug ad-
dicts new hypodermic needles in
exchange for their used ones.
addicts over age 18 who have
applied for drug treatment and
been denied immediate admis-
sion to the city's overcrowded
programs.
Anyone wishing to applv
Although the program aimed Monday had to locate a small
at reducing needle sharing among room down a first-floor corridor
addicts is intended to serve as marked "Employees Only No
proposal, but is was rejected by
the city council earlier this year; in
Portland , Ore plans for needle
distribution were delayed by
problems obtaining liability in-
surance.
New York's program "is an
attempt to find out whether an
exchange can be helpful in slow-
many as 200 intravenous drug sign annouced the location of the ing (AIDS) transmission among
abusers, by early afternoon no
applicant had appeared at Health
Department headquarters in
lower Manhattan.
"Today, we're going to have
only a handful said the health
commissioner, Dr. Stephen Jo-
seph. "We're going to build
slowlv up" over a period of weeks
or months, he predicted.
Under the $240,000 program,
which has drawn heated oppos-
tion from conservatives and some
minority group organizations,
addicts also will receive counsel-
ing on AIDS and drugs. Another
200 addicts will receive only
counseling; over time, their rate of
infection will be compared with
the infection rate of those receiv-
ing needles.
The program is open only to
room, and applicants had to ask the addicts and to their sex part-
for directions and pass several ners and unborn children that is
police officers to reach the having a devastating effect on
program's office. minority communities said Jo-
Applicants would be asked to soph.
fill out a consent form, learn about But two prominent black city
theprogramand take a blood test, officials, police commissioner
TTiev would receive a kit includ- Benjamin Ward and Special Nar-
ing a condom, sterile water and
pamphlets about safe sex and
needle hygiene.
An addict who tries to get a
new needle without returning the
old one will be expelled from the
program, Joseph said.
City officials say the program
is believed to be the first of its kind
in the United States, though simi-
lar programs have operated in
Europe. In Boston, Mayor Ray-
mond Flynn had backed a similar
COtics Prosecutor Sterling
Johnson, criticized the program,
as did the City Council's Black
and 1 lispanic Caucus.
"When the first needle is
given out by Stephen Joseph, he
ought to be indicted for murder.
It's genocide, pure and simple
said Councilman 1 lilton Clark of
Harlem.
Joseph termed such criticism
"outrageous adding: "When
you Uxk at who this crisis is hit-
ting hardest, it's the black com-
munity that's bearing the brunt.
The lives that can be saved if this
program works is the lives of
black women and babies
Originally, the needles were
supposed to be exchanged at
other sites around the citv But
when officials at a Manhattan
school complained that the school
was nex t door to one of those si tes,
the city announced that the pro-
gram would be limited to Health
Department headquarters for the
moment.
Of the nearly 17,000 AIDS
cases reported in the city since
1981, about 4,500 are believed to
have contacted the disease
through intravenous drug abuse.
More than half o the citv's
200,000 drug addicts are believed
to be infected with the AIDS virus,
according to oseph.
Meanwhile, in a speech to
corporate executives in Manhat-
tan, U.S. Surgeon General C. Ever-
ett Koop endorsed the concept of
a pilot needle exchange program,
although he said later he was un-
familiar with the details of the
New York program.
The East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since
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'
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8,1988
i-
Sakharov warns U.S.S.R. could face backlash
Continued from page 1
science who were convicted of
anti-Soviet agitation and propa-
ganda have been released in re-
cent days, but listed eight others
who remain in prison camps or
exile.
He called perestroika "a genur
me, real process" but said the
crackdowns on demonstrations,
including the violent breakup of a
meeting in Minsk on Oct. 30, gave
him "very great anxiety" over the
course of the reforms.
Asked to explain these con-
tradicitons, Sakharov said: "I
think it was not my words that
were contradictory but the situ-
ation itself. I have purposefully
accented the positive and negative
elements so that this con trad ici ton
would be dear.
Sakharov is scheduled to spend
two weeks in the United States
visiting relatives, undergoing
medical tests and attending the
new foundation's first board
meeting outside the Soviet Union
from Nov. 13-17 in Washington.
Sakharov's trip comes less than
two years after he was allowed to
return to Moscow from internal
exile in Gorky, an industrial city
closed to foreigners. He had been
sent there in January 1980 because
of his outspoken opposition to the
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
one month earlier.
He is traveling without his wife,
Yelena Bonner, who remained in
Moscow.
He had some kind words for the
United States, saying that he re-
spects America for its democracy,
work ethic, dynamism, self-criti-
cism and generosity.
"The phrase you often hear in
the U.S. is, 'Can I help you? he
said.
"That is something you hear
mainly on the street or in stores
but it also appears (in U.S. behav-
ior) on the international stage
Sakharov, who helped develop
the Soviet hydrogen bomnb,
spoke against the U.S. strategic
defense initiative, saving that the
deployment of space-oased weap-
ons "could provoke the other side
to attempt to destroy them in a
pre-emptive attack He also said
"there is a lack of clarity about
what this (SDI) system is good
for
READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
In effort to curb AIDS epidemic, NYC
distributes needles to IV drug users
NEW YORK (AP)�New addicts over age 18 who have proposal, but is was rejected by munity that's bearing the brunt.
York City on Monday began a applied for drug treatment and the city council earlier this year; in The lives that can be saved if this
r
Portland , Ore plans for needle
distribution were delayed by
problems obtaining liability in-
surance.
New York's program "is an
attempt to find out whether an
exchange can be helpful in slow-
pilot program to stem the spread been denied immediate admis-
of AIDS by providing drug ad- sion to the city's overcrowded
diets new hypodermic needles in programs.
exchange for their used ones. Anyone wishing to apply
Although the program aimed Monday had to locate a small
at reducing needle sharingamong room down a first-floor corridor
addicts is intended to serve as marked "Employees Only No
many as 200 intravenous drug sign annouced the location of the ing (AIDS) transmission among
abusers, by early afternoon no room, and applicants had to ask the addicts and to their sex part-
for directions and pass several ners and unborn children that is
police officers to reach the having a devastating effect on
program's office. minority communities said Jo-
Applicants would be asked to seph.
fill out a consent form, leam about
the program and take a blood test.
They would receive a kit includ-
ing a condom, sterile water and
pamphlets about safe sex and
applicant had appeared at Health
Department headquarters in
lower Manhattan.
'Today, we're going to have
only a handful said the health
commissioner, Dr. Stephen Jo-
seph. "We're going to build
slowly up" over a period of weeks
or months, he predicted.
Under the $240,000 program, needle hygiene,
which has drawn heated oppos-
tion from conservatives' and some
minority group organizations,
addicts also will receive counsel-
ing on AIDS and drugs. Another
200 addicts wilf receive1 only
counseling; over time, their rate of
infection will be compared with
the infection rate of those receiv-
ing needles.
The program is open only to
program works is the lives of
black women and babies
Originally, the needles were
supposed to be exchanged at
other sites around the city. But
when officials at a Manhattan
school complained that the school
was next door to one of those si tes,
the city announced that the pro-
gram would be limited to Health
Department headquarters for the
moment.
Of the nearly 17,000 AIDS
But two prominent black city cases reported in the city since
officials, police commissioner 1981, about 4,500 are believed to
Benjamin Ward and Special Nar- have contacted the disease
cotics Prosecutor Sterling through intravenous drug abuse.
Johnson, criticized the program, More than half of the city's
as did the City Council's Black 200,000 drug addicts are believed
to be infected with the AIDS virus,
according to Joseph.
Meanwhile, in a speech to
An addict who tries to get a and Hispanic Caucus,
new needle without returning the "When the first needle is
old one will be expelled from the given out by Stephen Joseph, he
program, Joseph said. ought to be indicted for murder.
City officials say the program It's genocide, pure and simple
is believed to be the first of its kind said Councilman Hilton Clark of
in the United States, though simi- Harlem.
lar programs have operated in Joseph termed such criticism although he said later he was un-
Europe. In Boston, Mayor Ray- "outrageous adding: "When familiar with the details of the
mond Flynn had backed a similar vou l��ai wh� thjs "?sis is hit" New York program.
ting hardest, it s the black corn-
corporate executives in Manhat-
tan, U.S. Surgeon General C. Ever-
ett Koop endorsed the concept of
a pilot needle exchange program,
The E�ist Carolinian
Serving tlic FZast Camlina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandl
Richard-Alan Cook Adarn Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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Shareh
WINSTON-SALEM (APJ
Many North Carolinians wl
hold shares in RJR Nabisco II
are apparently waiting to sec h
the company's board respond;
a $90-a-share offer, but brol
say some people are taking pro
as the stock hovers around i
share.
Stockbrokers in several N
Carolina cities are competing!
the consider business offered!
thousands of RJR Nabisco sh
holders selling. Kohlberg Kn
Roberts & Co. of New York ha
fered $90 a share.
Three brokerage compai
have run newspaper ads to atti
about 9,000 shareholders in "
syth Count) who have seen tl
stock value jump by as muc
$34 a share and are believe
control more that $1 billion w
of stock.
Morrison VV. Divine HI,
resident manager of the VVinsJ
Programs
FAYETTEVILLE (AD-
FBI ays that by the time a
molesters are caught and sei
jail, they have sexually abusei
average of 76 children. Four
pilot programs for adolescen
offenders in North Caroline
trying to stop that cycle beforJ
would-be assailant tries agaij
"Early adolescence is the
you make impacts� I don't rj
it's too late social vorker
Campbell told The Fayettej
Observer-Times. "When vq
40 years old and have had
victims, I think it's too late.
Campbell heads the
project at the Cumberil
County Mental Health Cef
one of four sites of the NC.
onstration Project for Adole
Sexual Offenders. The other
are at the Smoky Mountain
tal Health Center and in Pittl
Guilford counties.
Historically, there have
only two ways to punish juvi
sexual offenders in North
lina�put them in a traij
schcwheiKtheyi
therapy for tneir pro
are ususally free to roam the i
munity and commit the same
again, Campbell said.
"Do you send the of fendc
training school, realizing the j
they will get for their probler
be nothing, or do you keep
in the community where not
is set up to help them?" a
Patricia Timmions-Goodsoi
Cumberland County Di:
Court judge who often hears j
nile cases.
"There was a sense oi f rv
tion she said. "All of us
work in this area realize the
(for the new program)
Campbell said most coi
nities are unwilling to conj
teen offenders.
One reason, he said, is d
Add that to society's "boys wj
boys" and "boys will play d(
attitudes, and a general er
rassment about discussing
feelings, and "what you ge
teenager earning his diplor
an adult molester Cami
said.
"It"s the time of budl
puberty�they have urge
they don't know what to doj
and they run into inappro
sexual behavior he said.
"There are types of bel
that are indicative of inappj
ate sexual patterns, but M
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8, 1988 3
ash
used iveap-
�ke the other side
them in a
I so said
h about
- good
EAST
IAN
olinian
i s
? ?
�o
ore.
$465
58c
$169
UY ONE
� r. 1: z pi
Oven Fresh
linnamon Rolls
ETONE
I
Shareholders selling out for profit
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) -
Many North Carolinians who
hold shares in RJR Nabisco Inc.
ire apparently waiting to see how
the company's board responds to
1 50 a share otter but brokers
sa some people arc taking profits
as the stock hovers around S a
-hare.
Stockbrokers in several North
v arolina cities are competing for
the consider business offered as
thousands of RJR Nabisco share
holders selling. Kohlberg Kravis
Roberts ,v Co. ol New "i ork hasof
fered $90 a -hare.
rhree brokerage companies
have run new spa per ads to attract
about 9,000 shareholders in 1 or
s th County, who have seen their
stock value jump by as much ,b
$34 a hare and are believed to
control more that Si billion worth
of tock.
Morrison VV. Divine 111, the
resident manager ot the Winston-
Salem office ot Smith Barney
1 lams Upham & Co. Inc said the
company ran an ad three days
after RR Nabisco officers said
they might otter $75 a share for the
stock.
"The response we saw from a
grass roots level was the greatest
response that I have ever seen to
any newspaper ad that 1 have run
in the 20 years that I've been in the
business Divine said.
1 le said the response was
mostly from curious customers
who didn't intend to sell. But
several chose to sell some of their
stock to take profits while prices
were high, holding the rest to see
what happens with a buyout.
Divine said a member ot the
RJR Nabisco board told him that,
at high sale value of possibly $100
a share, the stock in Winston-Sa-
lem could easily be worth $2 bil-
lion.
1 lalf oi that stock, Divine esti-
mates, is in the hands of individu-
als. The rest is in the hands of the
Wachovia Bank trust department
and the foundations that RJR
Nabisco operates, including the
company employees' 401-K plan.
A former RJR Nabisco execu-
tive 'estimated that about 9,0M
registered shareholders live in
Winston-Salem. About 22,000
people are registered sharehold-
ers in North Carolina That is
thought to be the highest number
of individual shareholders in any
state, although the state with the
highest number of shares is New
York, with its shareholders.
Numbers like that bring dol-
lar signs to the eves of brokers,
who get a few cents tor every
share they sell for a customer.
The I. I.ee Peeler & Co. bro-
kerage ot Durham is offering
shareholders special discount
commissions for selling their
shares.
Chris llarrell, the vice presi-
dent of sales for Peeler, ran an ad
Sunday in the Winston-Salem
ournal offering the special
through November 30. The
commissions range from 50 cents
a share for 100 shares to as low as
c) cents a share for more than 2,000
shares.
"1 think it's a good offer to the
people who just outright want to
sell. We don't mean to be urging
them to sell 1 larrell said.
llarrell said that he urges
investors to be cautious when
seeking other places to put their
money if they sell RJR Nabisco
stock.
"My advice would be for
people to just take their time in
evaluating putting the money
somewhere else
ATTENTION, BRIGHT STUDENTS
Tired of falling asleep in crowded auditoriums during dull lectures?
Don t despair .
If you have a 3 4 GPA, stimulating teachers will challenge
you in these small Honors courses this Spring
SEMINARS:
The Power of Myth
Ijcpurre mythic themes such as the Creation, the Hero, the Goddess and the InxtMrj fnurney
Rocks, Landscapes, and Natural Parks
Sharpen uour enrnrxmment al awareness ctf issues facing our national parks
Appreciation of Performing Arts
In toy exciting guest lecturer's and see the Polish Sationai (.hchestra and Tokyo String Quartet
International Environmental Issues
1 earn uhr'ul the uxjrld's ozone problem the greenhouse effect and acid rain
Psychology
Investigate the complexities of human behavior
Vj)� AmmM WntramlKM.I 2XK)
�� Shuclry lKM.1 Myi)
HiAi.rvol Acrid OrOatum riliST 15531
rthio�!PHM 117S)
Wnmrr.iSMidififVVOST 20m
IlliaLiMQiO.
ani H wro
EDU 1200
rSC.l 1200
EM I USD
mi mono
I SSI
�r ii
MBS 3102
MATH 2172
a � . 2110
lllr HONORS choc.r�m iRK;in STl DENTS. Kr.ST i a HUS, MALI CLASSES
SI Mil Hjvid SjndrnlX 1MD
Programs set up to stop child molesting cycles
FAYETTEVH 1 E (AP) The
FBI ays that by the time adult
molesters are caught And sent to
fail, they have sexually abused an
average of h children. Four new
pilot programs for adolescent se
offenders in North Carolina are
trying to stop that cycle before the
would-be assailant tries again.
"Early adolescence is the time
you make impa ts 1 don't think
it s too late, social worker Tim
Campbell told The Fayetteville
Observer-Times. "When you're
40 years old and have had 100
ictims, 1 think it's too late
Campbell heads the pilot
protect at the Cumberland
County Mental Health Center,
one ol tour sites o the N.C. Dem-
onstration Project tor Adolescent
Sexual Offenders. The other sites
arc at the Smoky Mountain Men-
tal Health Center And in Pitt and
Cuilford counties.
Historically, there have been
only two va s to punish juvenile
sexual offenders in North Caro-
lina put them in a training
school, where t hey do not rccei e
therapv for their problem, or put
them on pmflatiort Whi6 -fhrnm
are ususally free to roam the com-
munity And commit the same acts
again, Campbell said.
"Do you send the offenders to
training school, realizing the help
they will get for their problem will
be nothing, or do you keep them
in the community where nothing
is set up to help them?" asked
Patricia Timmions-Goodson, A
( umberland County District
Court judge who often hears ju ve-
il cases.
"There was a x'tiv of frustra-
tion she said. "All of us who
work in this area realize the need
tor the new program)
Campbell said most commu-
nities are unwilling to confront
teen offenders.
()ne reason, he said, is denial.
Add that to society's "bovs will be
boys" and "bovs w ill playdoctor"
attitudes, And a general embar-
rassment a Knit discussing sexual
feelings, and "what you get is a
teenager earning his diploma as
an adult molester Campbell
said.
"It"s the time oi budding
pubcrtv�they have urges that
fhev don't know what to do with,
and they run into inappropriate
sexual behavior he said.
'There are tvpes of behavior
that are indicative oi inappropri-
ate sexual patterns, but parents
and schools have .1 real confusion
about what is appropriate he
said. 'To find two kids playing
doctor is not a problem, but to find
a 14-year-old playing doctor with
a 4-year-old is a problem
Dr. Paula Clarke, chief oi
child and adolescent services in
the state Department of Re-
sources' Division oi Mental
1 lealth, agreed.
"I'm not saying that the lack
oi education has made these kids
sexual offenders, but 1 am saving
it contributed, she said, adding
that parents and schools usually
discuss "bread and butter" repro-
duction, not sexual feelings or
behavior.
Also, the majority oi these
teens are "nice kids making offi-
cials hesitant to "ruin their lives"
by labeling them a sexual offend-
ers, thus keeping them from
needed treatment, Campbell said.
Campbell said he hopes the
program will change the miscon-
ceptjooft. Already counselors,
nidges and officers he works with
WtH? jirTPnnT cmfrl astern are
excited about the program, he
said Twenty-three teens are par-
ticipating in the program, which
can accommodate 30, Campbell
sud.
Once a teen has been admit-
ted to the program, he undergoes
group, individual and family th-
erapies.
On the first day oi group ther-
apy, the offender accepts respon-
sibility for his actions, Campbell
said.
"The first thing we do is go
around the circle, and everyone
explains why thev are there�
what was their crime he said.
"And we encourage details. We
believe very stronglv that people
should take responsibiltiv for
their behavior, and we also en-
courage their going through the
courts and paying for the crime.
We make a big deal oi it � we've
treated victims for years and are
aware of the years oi trauma it
causes
"We don't treat this as a dis-
ease because kids can use it as a
defense 'I'm a sickv, so this
behavior is out oi my control
Campbell said. "These are not
crazy, deranged people. They
have the ability to consciously
make decisions
Statistics show that only one
out oi 10 teenage offenders will
abuse again after going through
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the program, Campbell said, com-
pared to about six out oi 10 of-
fenders who are not treated.
"If you're counting 150 little
bovsor 100 little girls for each un-
treated offender, then that's a
good success rate Campbell
said. "You're talking about (sav-
ing) a lot oi victims
Student Union Special Concerts Chairperson
Job Description
1. To organize and direct the activities of the
committee (i.e. TI IE WAILERS, FHTCIILV BOMS,
BADC1IECKS, and CHAIRMAN" OF THE BOARD).
2. To call and conduct all meetings
oi the committee.
3. To serve on the Program Board
oi the Student Union.
Applications can be found in Room 236 - Mendenhall
Student Center or call 757-6611, et. 210.
Deadline For Applications, November 16
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Greenville Buyer's Market
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Fall Savings
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Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sundav 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Nike and Reebok)





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8,1968 3
ash
-ment of space-Dased weap-
rculd provoke the other side
tmpt to destrov them in a
tptive attack He also said
is a lack of clarity about
us (SDI) system is good
EAST
IAN
olinian
of Advertising
Intatives
:et Meymandi
kenship
USING
S4 25
4 5
4 5
3 93
3 85
j
SG RATES
s
5� i
RS;
�557
�6309
I
ore.
!2-Pak
12-oz.
Cans
.6 5-oz
$4
58
65
18 -oz
$1
69
'HE DEL! PASTRY SHOPPE
UY ONE
6-CT 12-OZ. PKG
Oven Fresh
linnamon Rolls
ETONE
I
i
M
I
m
s
3
Shareholders selling out for profit
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) -
Many North Carolinians who
hold shares in RJR Nabisco Inc.
are apparently waiting to see how
the company's board responds to
a $90-a-share offer, but brokers
say some people are taking prof i ts
as the stock hovers around $85 a
share.
Stockbrokers in several North
Carolina cities are competing for
the consider business offered as
thousands of RJR Nabisco share-
holders selling. Kohlberg Kravis
Roberts & Co. of New York has of-
fered $90 a share.
Three brokerage companies
have run newspaper ads to attract
about 9,000 shareholders in For-
syth County, who have seen their
stock value jump by as much as
$34 a share and are believed to
control more that $1 billion worth
of stock.
Morrison W. Divine 111, the
resident manager of the WinstQn-
Salem office of Smith Barney
Harris Upham & Co. Inc said the
company ran an ad three days
after RJR Nabisco officers said
they might offer $75 a share for the
stock.
"The response we saw from a
grass-roots level was the greatest
response that I have ever seen to
any newspaper ad that I have run
in the 20 years that I've been in the
business Divine said.
He said the response was
mostly from curious customers
who didn't intend to sell. But
several chose to sell some of their
stock to take profits while prices
were high, holding the rest to sec
what happens with a buyout.
Divine said a member of the
RJR Nabisco board told him that,
at high sale value of possibly $100
a share, the stock in Winston-Sa-
lem could easily be worth $2 bil-
lion.
Half of that stock, Divine esti-
mates, is in the hands of individu-
als. The rest is in the hands of the
Wachovia Bank trust department
and the foundations that RJR
Nabisco operates, including the
company employees' 401-K plan.
A former RJR Nabisco execu-
tive 'estimated that about 9,000
registered shareholders live in
Winston-Salem. About 22,000
people are registered sharehold-
ers in North Carolina That is
thought to be the highest number
of individual shareholders in any
state, although the state with the
highest number of shares is New
York, with its shareholders.
Numbers like that bring dol-
lar signs to the eyes of brokers,
who get a few cents for every
share they sell for a customer.
The J. Lee Tceler & Co. bro-
kerage of Durham is offering
shareholders
commissions
shares.
special discount
for selling their
Chris Harrell, the vice presi-
dent of sales for Peeler, ran an ad
Sunday in the Winston-Salem
Journal offering the special
through November 30. The
commissions range from 50 cents
a share for 100 shares to as low as
9 cents a share for more than 2,000
shares.
"I think it's a good offer to the
people who just outright want to
sell. We don't mean to be urging
them to sell Harrell said.
Harrell said that he urges
investors to be cautious when
seeking other places to put their
money if they sell RJR Nabisco
stock.
"My advice would be for
people to just take their time in
evaluating putting the money
somewhere else
ATTENTION, BRIGHT STUDENTS
Tired of falling asleep in crowded auditoriums during dull lectures?
Don't despair
If you have a 3.4 GPA, stimulating teachers will challenge
you in these small Honors courses this Spring:
SEMINARS:
The Power of Myth
Explore mytJuc thema tmhulht Crmtion,Iht Hero, tin Cnmimm.md the mvmd Joumtu.
Rocks. Landscapes, and Natural Parks
Sharpen your emronmantal amna of mum fmcinf our natntml emu
Appreciation of Performing Arts
Enjoy �JdtinueH lecturttn and me the Polish Stvmal Orchestraand lokyo Sirnt Quart.
International Environmental Issues
ljutmtbotd the world's oione problem, the greenhouse effect and and tmn
Psychology
Investigate the complexities of human Wunsr
Mifor Ansuai Writs (ENCL 2X0)
The Short Story (ENCL 3420)
Hutory of WorM Ovthxadon (HIST 1SKD
FthiailPHIl lim
Wanai Stud is CWOST OTO)
THTEFSMQ1F,
ANTHIOOB HIST 1 SSI
EDucnao UKiaoo
ENCL 1200 UBS 3102
ENCL 12SD MATH 2172
HLTH10D0 SOC12U0
THE HONORS PROCRAM IRICHT STUDENTS. REST TEACHER. SMALL CLASSES
SEE Pi Durtd Snd�n CC 1MB
Programs set up to stop child molesting cycles
FAYETTEVILLE (AP)�The
FBI ays that by the time adult
molesters are caught and sent to
jail, they have sexually abused an
average of 76 children. Four new
pilot programs for adolescent sex
offenders in North Carolina are
trying to stop that cycle before the
would-be assailant tries again.
"Early adolescence is the time
you make impacts� I don't think
it's too late social worker Tim
Campbell told The Fayetteville
Observer-Times. "When you're
40 years old and have had 100
victims, I think it's too late
Campbell heads the pilot
project at the Cumberland
County Mental Health Center,
one of four sites of the N.C. Dem-
onstration Project for Adolescent
Sexual Offenders. The other sites
are at the Smoky Mountain Men-
tal Health Center and in Pitt and
Guilford counties.
Historically, there have been
only two ways to punish juvenile
sexual offenders in North Caro-
lina�put them in a training
are ususally free to roam the com-
munity and commit the same acts
again, Campbell said.
"Do you send the offenders to
training school, realizing the help
they will get for their problem will
be nothing, or do you keep them
in the community where nothing
is set up to help them?" asked
Patricia Timmions-Goodson, A
Cumberland County District
Court judge who often hears juve-
nile cases.
"There was a sense of frustra-
tion she said. "All of us who
work in this area realize the need
(for the new program)
Campbell said most commu-
nities are unwilling to confront
teen offenders.
One reason, he said, is denial.
Add that to society's "boys will be
boys" and "boys will play doctor"
attitudes, and a general embar-
rassment about discussing sexual
feelings, and "what you get is a
teenager earning his diploma as
an adult molester Campbell
said.
"It"s the time of budding
puberty�they have urges that
they don't know what to do with,
and they run into inappropriate
sexual behavior he said.
"There are types of behavior
that are indicative of inappropri-
ate sexual patterns, but parents
and schools have a real confusion
about what is appropriate he
said. "To find two kids playing
doctor is not a problem, but to find
a 14-year-old playing doctor with
a 4-year-old is a problem
Dr. Paula Clarke, chief of
child and adolescent services in
the state Department of Re-
sources' Division of Mental
Health, agreed.
"I'm not saying that the lack
of education has made these kids
sexual offenders, but I am saying
it contributed she said, adding
that parents and schools usually
discuss "bread and butter" repro-
duction, not sexual feelings or
behavior.
Also, the majority of these
teens are "nice kids making offi-
cials hesitant to "ruin their lives"
by labeling them a sexual offend-
ers, thus keeping them from
needed treatment, Campbell said.
Campbell said he hopes the
program will change the miscon-
LptjuujL Alrgady counselors,
" dees arid officers he works with
tHP JLWfnir!1 ftrerT'sySIWrare
excited about the program, he
said. Twenty-three teens are par-
ticipating in the program, which
can accommodate 30, Campbell
said.
Once a teen has been admit-
ted to the program, he undergoes
group, individual and family th-
erapies.
On the first day of group ther-
apy, the offender accepts respon-
sibility for his actions, Campbell
said.
'The first thing we do is go
around the circle, and everyone
explains why they are there�
what was their crime he said.
"And we encourage details. We
believe very strongly that people
should take responsibiltiy for
their behavior, and we also en-
courage their going through the
courts and paying for the crime.
We make a big deal of it� we've
treated victims for years and are
aware of the years of trauma it
causes
"We don't treat this as a dis-
ease because kids can use it as a
defense� T'm a sicky, so this
behavior is out of my control
Campbell said. "These are not
crazy, deranged people. They
have the ability to consciously
make"decisions.
Statistics show that only one
out of 10 teenage offenders will
abuse again after going through
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the program, Campbell said, com-
pared to about six out of 10 of-
fenders who are not treated.
"If you're counting 150 little
boys or 100 little girls for each un-
treated offender, then that's a
good success rate Campbell
said. "You're talking about (sav-
ing) a lot of victims
Student Union Special Concerts Chairperson
Job Description
1. To organize and direct the activities of the
committee (i.e. THE WAILERS, FETCHIN' BONES,
BAD CHECKS, and CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD).
2. To call and conduct all meetings
of the committee.
3. To serve on the Program Board
of the Student Union.
Applications can be found in Room 236 - Mendenhall
Student Center or call 757-6611, ext. 210.
Deadline For Applications, November 16
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MAC Cl.ARK, Business Mmaa
Novembers, 1988
OPINION
Pago 4
Logic
Bush's campaign reaches no real conclusion
Many in the media and else-
whore have complained that the
1988 presidential campaign has
been devoid of intelligent, penetrat-
ing, logical debate. On the contrary,
this campaign is full of scintillating
examples of logic. Let's consider
some examples.
This syllogism is a favorite
among Republicans. One, Dukakis
is a Democrat Two, Carter was a
Democrat Therefore, Dukakis is, for
all intents and purposes, Carter.
Let's trv another. One, Boston
1 arbor is polluted, and has been for
many years. Two, Dukakis tried to
clean it up but the ReaganBush
administration thwarted his efforts.
Therefore, Dukakis is at fault for
Boston Harbor's being polluted.
Urn One, the Willie Horton
advertisement had elements of ra-
cism i"wo, Bush's campaign man-
agers and strategists pride them-
selves on knowing how to manipu-
late the media (especially television)
and how to use the media to their
fullest Therefore, it is reasonable to
assume that Bush's campaign man-
agers and strategists were com-
pletely unaware of any racist over-
tt �nes i n the Willie I Iorton advertise-
ment
Uh One, regarding the Iran-
Contra affair, which is arguably the
si:gVw orsf fore!grfJolicy mistake
oi the Reagan Bush administration,
Bush says he was "out of the loop"
� in other words, unaware of what
was going on. Two, in reference to
the matter, Bush himself said on na-
tional television if I erred, it was
on the side of getting those hostages
out of there " Therefore, one may
conclude that Bush didn't know
what was going on, and that he did
know what was going on.
One, being the incumbent vice
president is a better qualification for
the presidency than is being two-
term governor of a state (Bush vs.
Dukakis in N88). Two, being the in-
cumbent president is not a better
qualification for the presidency than
is being two-term governor of a state
(Carter vs. Reagan in 1980). There-
fore, being the incumbent vice presi-
dent is a better qualification for the
presidency than is being the incum-
bent president.
All right, try this: one, Bush has
been vice president for the past eight
years. Two, Bush has, by nearly all
accounts (even his own, when it
suits him), done virtually nothing as
vice president for the past eight
years. Therefore, being vice presi-
dent has made George Bush quali-
fied for the job of President.
Oh, no, wait, that last one goes:
one, Bush has had lots of experience
in politics, even disregarding his
having been vice president. Two, in
other political roles Bush's perform-
ance has been adequate at best.
Therefore, Bush would be a great
president.
No, no, it's: one, Bush has been
vice president, and in the perform-
ance of his vice-presidential duties
he has met with many world lead-
ers. Two, there is no clear evidence
that Bush has done much more than
pose for photographs with, thjgst,
world leaders. Therefore, Bush has
the foreign-policy experience
needed to be president.
No, no, no One, George Bush,
uh, he, uh well, he uh
Ah-ha! At last, here's one that
really does work: one, the foregoing
is typical of the logic underlying
Bush's political positions, and is not
typical of the logic underlying
Dukakis political positions. Two,
Bush's "logic" would be laughable if
it weren't for the minor fact that he's
serious. Therefore, vote Dukakis.
�AxtrvwrtvterstttF attfjiitfnrvcmu,i�frr-
HESNO HESNO
JACK HARRV
KENNEW TRUMAN
HE'S NO
LBd
HESNO HESNO
RONALD BETTER
REAGAN OFF
THfc NEW M YC Trie PRE6AME
T�Z
Image
To the editor:
I am getting tired of opening the now quite perturbed partiers into
rtoming newpaper and finding an- m streets I'm sure most of you
?ther story about drunken, riotous know the rest of the story.
uppenings involving ECU students.
My family moved to Greenville
when 1 was in the fourth grade and 1
attended ECU in the late 70's and
early 80's. Greenville has always
I believe that it is time to rid
ourselves, our town, and our fine
school of this undesirable reputation.
It is time for students throughout
(Ireenville and ECU to shift their
been a nice, small, pleasant town to focus from partying to studying.
live in and 1 found it an excellent When you are out looking for a job to
place to attend college. begin your career will be a sad time to
Unfortunately, through the realize that you should have invested
years, ECU has acquired a reputation more time in your textbooks and
as not just "a" party school, but 'The" vour school
party school in the Smith. 1 can't say Let's be proud to hold our heads
that we weren't proud of that title at high and proclaim that we are ECU
the time I attended ECU- -it was nice graduates
to ho referred to as something other
than "E-Z U It is a shame that be
cause of this, Greenville now seems
to attract a lot of bad apples from
other towns, generally people who
do riot now, nor have they ever at-
ytpHfdpCU. � jb.
I don't mean to imply that ECU
students are not involved in the re-
curring mishaps that we read about.
Yet, somehow it usually seems that
the more violent and damaging ac-
David N. Mitchell
Mom approves
To the editor:
1 have visited your campus twice
tions occur at the hands of people in the last month. On September 26th
who are not ECU students or alumni. I attended my fourth Parent's Week-
Thc campus security officer that end and had the usual, decked-out
was injured at the 1987 ECU-NCSU visit despite the last minute loss to
football game was struck not by an Southern Mississippi on Saturday
ECU student, but by a fan from Cary. afternoon. More importantly, I re-
Nor was the assault on an ALE officer
during last Monday nights' Hallow-
een party in Greenville by an ECU
student. Very often it is "outsiders"
who are instigating these shameful
incidents and inciting otherwise
peaceful students into unruly situ-
ations.
Even well-intending law offi-
cers can sometimes inadvertantly
cause bad situations. A prime ex-
ample is the infamous 1975
Greenville I lallowcen riot. Now 1
turned to Greenville on Monday,
October 3rd, to see a concert pre-
sented by the British reggae-rock
group UB40.
I obtained a ticket through my
ion's girlfriend to see the concert
Monday evening in Mendenhall Stu-
lent Center. My son Andrew is my
Jiird child to attend college so it
behooves me to establish the fact that
I have seen a whole lot of students, a
lot of college campuses and numer-
ous musical concerts I've heard folks
have no idea what was going on out like Mick Jagger, Jerry Garcia, Neil
on the streets of Greenville early mat Diamond, Kenny Rogers and even
frigid October night, because I was Donny Osmond!
inside the Attic nightclub enjoying I've also witnessed various types
the band and a peaceful Halloween of responses, behaviors and impro-
celebration. prietus. Therefore I think it's safe to
1 do, however, know one thing say that lam not a wide-eyed, paren-
for sure about that night. That is, the tal rookie who has never seen the flip
Greenville police made a major mis- side of rock 'n roll,
take by shooting tear gas into the ECU often gets what 1 call Bad
entrances of all the downtown night- Rep for just about every little skinned
dubs. This act very quickly brought knee between Raleigh-and Atlantic
hundreds of previously tranquil, Beach. Not this time.
The ECU students who attended
the UB40 concert not only behaved
themselves but also exhibited a ma-
ture, if melodic, demeanor. Thes
young adults were polite to me, the
oldest person in the Hall, and were
good-natured in all of their interac
tions
The local police kept a watchful
yet tolerable reign on the crowd and
for this they should be commended
A very good time was had by all
because1 the band was able to displa)
its remarkable energy, musical abil-
ity and rhythmic vibrance to a well-
mannered audience. I spoke to sev-
eral members of the UB40 group the
following morning at the Ramada
Inn and each politely echoed my
sentiments with a grateful, graceful
appreciation.
1 send a bunch of pats on the back
to the University the folks in charge
o. handling security and concert ar-
rangements and to the student body
itself 1 walked out of Mendenhall
once again with a prayerful thank
you towards the Greenville-blue
skies that Andrew chose to attend
ECU for his undergraduate studies.
Well done Pirates! ECU - UB FINE
Jeanie L. Sommers
Forum
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Hortonism' was a bad choice for an issue
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
Th� New Bgpublic
George Bush says he disapproves of a leaflet
distributed by Illinois Republicans, headlined: "All
the murderers and rapists and drug pushers and
child molesters in Massachusetts vote for Michael
Dukakis Perhaps he does. But this attempt to fine-
tune the viciousness of his campaign, even if sincere,
is unavailing. You can't adjust the dials of dema-
goguery with scientific precision.
Similarly, Bush denies that his campaign's re-
lentless focus on furloughed black rapist Willie
Horton is racist. Let us begin by conceding that Bush
himself is not a racist. But he's also not an idiot, and
the nuances of Hortonism are not subtle. Perhaps
Bush has seen "The Birth of a Nation If not, he
should ask Ronald Reagan to tell him the story.
Hortonism taps into a thick vein of racial para-
noia that is a quarter-inch below the surface of the
white American consciousness. The western con-
sciousness in general, for that matter. Maybe Dan
Quayle can loan Bush the Cliff's Notes for E.M.
Forster's "A Passage to India Or he can catch the
video version of Paul Scott's "The Jewel in the
Crown" next time it's repeated on PBS.
The Bush campaign strategists take justifiable
pride in their sophisticated understanding of the
voters. It's impossible to imagine that when they
were brainstorming months ago, and decided lb
make Willie Horton a centerpiece of their campaign
- hardly an obvious decision - they were unaware of
the special power of the image of a black man raping
a white woman. And it's impossible to imagine it
didn't occur to them that this power would make
their theme more effective. And they must K .e
known that by rubbing this cultural raw � r ve they
also would inflame it.
Now, there's a difference between knowing
your action will have a certain consequence and
intending that consequence. Perhaps race played no
part in the Bush people's calculations. Perhaps they
would have made just as big a deal cat of Willie
Horton if he had been white, or if h' s victim had been
black. Perhaps the Bushies even would have pre-
ferred that. (All this leaning over backward is killing
me). Should they have to give up a powerful cam-
paign theme because their motives might be misin-
terpreted, orbecauseof a racial innuendo they didn't
intend?
It's tempting to argue that racial offense should
be eschewed whether intentional or not. But thaf s
too high-minded a standard. In journalism, we face
judgments like this all the time. As a general rule, it
doesn't do to be overly prudish. Too many people
are (in the famous phrase) "masters of the fancied
slight
You'll rarely say anything interesting or impor-
tant if you let the hair-trigger offense takers have
veto power. What's more, these days the bonds of
liberal etiquette are more irksome than the bonds of
conservative etiquette.
However, Hortonism is not a question of giving
offense to blacks. It's a question of feeding racial
paranoia among whites. If that were an unfortunate
byproduct of the vivid presentation of some
unavoidably central campaign issue, it might be
excusable. When it's the spinoff of a highly optional
issue manufactured from scratch in the campaign
laboratory, the excuse that racial innuendo was not
intended is hard to stomach.
The Washington Post, in an editorial, notes that
Massachusetts was, after all, "the only state that
furloughed prisoners sentenced to life without pa-
role, and for 11 years Mr. Dukakis supported that
policy Pointing this out isn't racist, the Post argues.
True enough. But merely pointing out the flaws in
state prison furlough policy isn't a brilliant cam-
paign tactic, either.
What brought the furlough issue alive was per-
sonalizing it with Willie Horton and making it
symbolize something larger. "By the time this elec-
tion is over, Willie Horton will be a household
name said Bush campaign manager Lee Atwater
last summer. Media adviser Roger Ailes told Time
r
? $
V.
I
I
I
I
I
Magazine: "The only question is whether we depict
Willie Horton with a knife in his hand or without it
And what was that "something larger?" Well,
it's not necessarily hatred. You hardly have to be a
racist to be concerned about crime. But those who
play recklessly with powerful symbols (such as a
black rapist) shouldn't react with hurt innocence if
the symbolism runs away with itself.
Suppose Jesse Jackson had won the Democratic
nomination and decided to make a fall campaign
issue out of insider trading on Wall Street. Not a
terrible idea, but a bit narrow. So suppose Jackson
strategists decided to broaden it into a "values" issue
of "Reagan era greed Fair enough. Now suppose
they decided to "personalize" it by focusing on Ivan
Boesky.
Suppose that in speeches and commercials on
TV every day Jackson was denouncing "greedy New
York and Beverly Hills financiers like Boesky, Lev-
ine, Israel and Milken" who "suck the lifeblood from
loyal, hard-working Americans" like "John and
Christine Smith of Youngstown, Ohio When
would you say that this "values" issue had begun
tapping into values that are all too deeply rooted?
How long would the Republicans refrain from
pointing this out? Not until the end of October, that's
for sure.
Gover
RALEIGH (AP - In
paign that has cost $10.2
so far, Republican Gov. hi
tin and Democratic chaj
Bob Jordan appear to be
more on donations frord
viduals than on contnl
from political action comi
I leavy use ol u 1 visicj
mercials by both tampan
helped governors rao' in
In 1984, Martin and his
cratic opponent, for:
tomey General Rut
together spi nt$7.6n i
At least 80 backei
have contributed - :
to his campaign, a
campaign fir
this week with tl
Elections. Marti'
support rs w I
S4,i ' 0 or mon I
effort.
Indi idua!
make up
million that Mart
since April. Th -
percent came
contribution from y-
comn
Repul
$65 65i; fn m V �
"Dial-
will ces
WASHIN ' N
California firm a. i
pay a $" 00 i
mitting obscen
interstate telephi
which the govemm
rials all "dial-a-porn' I
they must act - I
rial inaccessible I
Audio Enti rpi
Valley, Calif and
Wendy King signed I
ment, entailing on
dial-a-pom fines nr.
Federal communi
sion.
'The $51 00 p
dial-a-pom oper.
pav to the govemn
that there will be a
tached to failure
scrupulouslv in
area said Gcrjld Frrn-k
the FCC's common c
reau.
"This sends a 5 .
some teeth in the
Enforcement of I
was done "qui -
compared with tl
extensive and
he said
FCC�
prises is effecth �,
ness. There was i
for the compar
formation
To resum
Audio Enter:
down the messag
cess codes i
blilng equipn
dren under 18 fi
operations will be m
the FCC, ac I I
ment.
rheFCClaun
tion oi Audio
mother in Catifon
her 13-year-old s
friends spent $74
listen 900-numt i
utes.
Also lister i
daughter, who w
bv two boys who had
tapes the woman wn
phone call damaged o
the woman wrote
The FCC inform
terpriseslastDecen
m apparent viola;
rules that require
restrict access of I
The commission also)
Intercarnbio Inc. ol
Calif, that it was in v
the law, and that case
ing.
The FCC determined
rial broadcast by the t
nies was obscene. I rj
preme Court's test
obscene if it depicts se'
a patently offensive w,
to the prurient intet
average person and 1J
literary or artistic valul
FCC officials estima
Enterprises collect!
$250,000 in revenues
year period.
Altogether, the diall
dustrv produces abol
hon annually in revet
viders and phone cai
cording to the Inform
try Bulletin.
The FCC has re
complaints to the )usi
ment. In May 1987,
porn providers plead!





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8,1988 5
AME
W
W WJNJ ?
ork
- ho attended
T'v behaved
bited a ma-
meanor. These
to me, the
and were
ir interac-
- pi a watchful
rowd and
�mmended.
- had bv all
ible to display
musical abil-
inee to a well-
spoke to sev-
B4 group the
the Ramada
j echoed mv
iteful, graceful
t pats on the back
! & folks m charge
nd concert ar-
the student bodv
s Mendenhall
rayerfu thank
e Greenville-blue
a chose to attend
iduate studies.
L - LB FINE
ie smmers
irum
ules
�' '�: tin the
icross from
' ' rification, a
name major,
� umber
'��'�' ' �� authoris).
are I united to WO words
s. double -spaced, typed or
t,r" ' � rsaresub-
� nity
' � nal attacks urill
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�- page are
i to one
:ne for
i Tuesday
issue
uestion is whether we depict
uf. in his hand or without it "
� thing larger?" Well,
ardly have to be a
about crime. But those who
rful symbols (such as a
I with hurt innocence if
ith itself.
n had won the Democratic
d to make a fail campaign
lading on Wall Street. Not a
Jrarrow So suppose Jackson
nit into a "values" issue
! air enough Now suppose
alize" it by focusing on Ivan
leches and commercials on
as denouncing "greedy New
financiers like Boesky, Lev-
ho "suck the lifeblood from
Americans" like "John and
leungstown, Ohio When
Is values" issue had begun
it are all too deeply rooted?
Republicans refrain from
�til the end of October, that's
a
5


I
5
Governors race fueled by donations
RALEIGH (AD - In a cam
paign that has cost $10.2 million
so far. Republican Gov. Jim Mar-
tin and Democratic challenger
Bob Jordan appear to be reiving
more on donations from indi-
viduals than on contributions
from political action committees.
I leavy use oi television com-
mercials by both campaigns has
helped governors race in history.
In 1984, Martin and his Demo-
cratic opponent, former state At-
torney General Rufus Edmisten.
together spent $7.6 million.
At least 80 backers of Jordan
have contributed $4,000 or more
to his campaign, according to
campaign finance reports filed
this week with the State Board of
Flections. Martin has at least 47
supporters who have contributed
$4,000 or more to his re-election
effort.
Individual contributions
make up 95.5 percent oi the $2.7
million that Martin has raised
since April. The remaining 4.
percent came including a $45,1X10
contribution from political action
committees,from the National
Republican Tarty and a total oi
$65,650 from 52 business PACs.
b
hi the Jordan campaign, individ-
ual contributions make up 96
percent of the $2,113,686 he has
raised over the same period. The
remaining 4 percent came from
PACs. including (6 representing
businesses. The News and Ob-
server of Raleigh reported.
Political action committees
are set up bv business, labor, pro-
'essional and ideological groups
as a way to raise money from their
supporters and to help finance
candidates tor public office. They
have become especially impor-
tant in congressional campaigns.
For the Martin campaign, to-
tal fund-raising now stands at
$5.8 million, while expenditures
are at $5.7 million based orrcam-
paign finance reports filed since
1984. Over the same period, Jor-
dan has raised $4.b million and
spent $4.5 million.
it is pure and simply the
costs oi television said John
Grumpier, manager of the Jordan
campaign. "It is just an incrediblv
expensive way to communicate.
Unfortunately, it is the wav a
large part of the voters get their
information. It's hard to even
have a campaign if you can't af-
ford to buy television time
Tim Pittman, press secretary
for the Martin campaign, agreed
that television advertising costs
had driven up campaign costs,
but attributed the increase also to
an inflationary cycle for all cam-
paigne expenses.
'Television is the single larg-
est expense Pittman said. "It
(the television cost) is going to be
a $4 million component in a $10
million race. But I don't find it
startling that this is the most ex-
pensive governor's race in his-
tory. The governor's race in 1992
will probably be more expensive
than this race
Jordan's finance report shows
an expenditure of $1.7 million to
his media consultant, Mike
McClister and Co. of Chapel Hill,
for production costs and the pur-
chase of television and radio ad-
vertising time. Crumpler said that
the campaign could spend as
much as $2.5 million on television
advertising before the race isover.
The Martin campaign re-
ported spending $1.4 "million to
specialized advertising.
Media Services Inc. of Char-
lotte, which buys television time
for it, and another $388,993 to
Ringe Media Inc. of Washington,
the campaign's media consulting
firm.
Pittman said that the Martin
campaign expects to spend $1.8
million for television alone by the
end of the campaign.
Among the political action
committees that contributed,
many gave to both the Martin and
Jordan campaigns. For instance,
both the Southern Bell PAC and
the N.C. Home Builders Associa-
tion PAC each donated $4,000 to
Martin and Jordan.
Crumpler said that the num-
ber of PACs giving to both cam-
paigns was an indication of the
closeness of the race.
'They (PACs) are astute ob-
servers of the political process
and they are likely to support the
candidates that they think are
going to win Crumpler said.
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"Dial-a-porn" service agrees to fine and
will cease transmitting obscene messages
WASHINGTON (AD A
California firm agreed Monday to
pay a $50,000 fine and stop trans
mitting obscene messages on
interstate telephone lines in a case
which the government said sig-
nalsall "dial-a-porn" services that
they must act to keep their mate-
rial inaccessible to children.
Audio Enterprises Inc of Mill
Valley, Calif and operator
Wendy King signed the agree
ment, entailing one of the first
dial-a-porn fines imposed bv the
Federal communication Commis-
sion.
"The $50,000 payment that the
dial-a-porn operator will have to
pay to the government shows
that there will be a high price at-
tached to failure to obey the law
scrupulously in this important
area said Gerald Brock, head of
the FCC's common carrier bu-
reau.
"This sends a signal there are
some teeth in the law Brock said.
Enforcement oi the civil penalty
was done "quickly and efficiently
compared with the alternative of
extensive and costly litigation
he said.
FCC officials said Audio Enter-
prises is effectively out of busi-
ness. There was no current listing
for the company in telephone in-
formation.
To resume operations, King or
Audio Enterprises must the
down the messages and use ac-
cess codes, credit cards or scram-
bling equipment to prevent chil-
dren under 18 from dialing. Such
operations will be monitored by
the FCC, according to the agree-
ment
The FCC launched itsinvestiga-
tion of Audio Enterprises alter a
mother in California wrote that
her 13-year-old son and his
friends spent $74 dialing a pay-to-
listen 9v -number for 211 min-
utes.
Also listening was the woman'
daughter, who was later molested
bv two boys who had heard the
tapes, the woman wrote. "This
phone call damaged our lives
the woman wrote.
The FCC informed Audio En-
terprises last December that it u as
in apparent violation of FCC 's
rules that require companies to
restrict access of obscene material.
The commission also informed
Intercambio Inc of San Jose,
Calif that it was in violation of
the law, and that case is still pend-
ing.
The FCC determined the mate
rial broadcast by the two compa-
nies was obscene. Under a Su-
preme Court's test, material is
obscene if it depicts sexual acts in
a patently offensive way, appeals
to the prurient interest oi an
average person and lacks serios
literary or artistic value
FCC officials estimated Audio
Enterprises collected about
$250,000 in revenues over a two-
year period.
Altogether, the dial-a-porn in-
dustry produces about $54 mil-
lion annually in revenue for pro-
viders and phone campanies, ac-
cording to the Information Indus
try Bulletin.
The FCC has referred some
complaints to the Justice Depart-
ment. In May 1987, two dial a-
porn providers pleaded guilty to
tailing to comply with the
commission's rule. The court
lined them each $50,000.
Earlier this year, Congress
passed a sweeping dial-a-porn
law that bans obscene and inde-
cent commercial messages. The around the definition of indecent
law has not been enforced be- material. The FCC deems material
cause of legal challenges in New indecent if it depicts or describes
York and California. sexual or excretory organs or ac-
tivities in a patently offensive
The principal issue centers way.
'tfc
East Carolina's
Finest Tea
East Carolina
Tea Party
Every Thursday ,
at 4:00 p.m.
Free Admission tl
All Night V
$3 First Iced Tea
$2 For 2nd, 3rd, & 4th
plus you keep the Mason Jar
Free non-alcoholic drinks for
designated drivers.
Must be 21 to enter and have valid I.D.
High Energy Music provided by Conni.
Rogers, Greenville's Hottest DJ.
RAMADA INN
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
i
��� �
�-s
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling, For further information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1 800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes
Students To Come By And See
Our 2 Bedroom and 1 Bedroom
Garden Apartments.
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
SMALL
Cheese Pizza S4.95
Cheese and 1 Topping$5.60
Each Additional ToppingS 65
SPECIALTY PIZZAS
Cheese Lovers$6.90
Meat Lovers$6.90
Supreme$6.90
Super SupremeS7.55
MEDIUM LARGI
$685
$7.65
S 80
S9.25
$9.25
S9.25
$10.05
$8.95
$9.90
$.95
$11.80
SI 1.80
SI 1.80
$12.75
-
DELIVERY
FAMOUS
?GENEROUS TOPPINGS
�REAL CHEESE
�FRESH VEGETABLES
�DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY - NEVER FROZEN
QUALITY
DELIVERY HOURS
SUNTHURS. 4 PM TO MIDNIGHT
FRI.&SAT. 4PM TO 1:00 AM
DELIVERY CHARGE 75
DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PHONE 752-4445
COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 7 DAYS!
A FREE
DELIVERY
PIZZA HUT DELIVERY
(YOU SAVE 75)
(coupon expires Nov. 14, 1988)
NO PARKING
at GUC!
Sorry, but it's true. Greenville Utilities' park-
ing lot will be completely closed from Nov. 14-
28 while the parking area is being expanded.
Even the dropository will be out of commission
while construction is underway.
During that time, it will be inconvenient for
you to do business at the main office. So, please
pay your utility bill, by mail, by automatic bank
draft or at most local banks (including the ECU
Student Bank).
After Nov. 28. we'll be able to serve you better
with an expanded parking lot, completely re-
modeled offices, and a new drive-thru window.
11 you have any questions, please call GUC at
752 7166.
Greenville
Utilities
GIVE YOUR CAREER THE SAME CAREFUL
ATTENTION YOU GIVE YOUR PATIENTS.
Making sure your own talents are
being fully utilized is an important
part of caring for others.
That's why you should consider
a career as a Navy officer We'll help
you reach your goals and develop
your potential faster than you
thought possible
You'll be part of a team of profes-
sionals- working on a wide variety
of challenging duty assignments -
in areas like general nursing,
cardiac care, and operating room
management
And as a Navy nurse, you'll find
we value vour ability to learn as
much as you do Many continuing
education courses are completely
paid for by the Navy to keep you up to
date with progress in your profession
You can work toward certification
in areas such as critical care and
obstetrics - or earn a higher degree
in nursing
You'll earn a top salary, with job
security and benefits that can't be
matched in the civilian workforce
For more information, send resume
to Navy Medical Programs, 801 Oberlin
Road, Suite 120, Raleigh, NC 27605
or call
LTCDR RON BOATRIGHT
1-800-662-7419
NAVY NURSE.
bu arelomorrow.
You are the Navy.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS, 1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
male roommate to share new mobile
home. 10 minutes from campus Non
smoker, please Call Hugh at 756-6851
alter 5:00 p.m.
ROOMS AVAILABLE: At the Methixlist
Student Center For more information,
call 758 2030.
FURNISHED APT Available tor Spring
Semester Bus service, lor more info , call
752 3941.
St ED FEMALE ROOMMATE: To share
2 bed, 1 12 bath Townhouse. Non
smoker S1S5 12 util. Located in Wil
bamsburg Manor off I looker St Contact
Kathv 756-7797
FOR RENT: Only two blocks from lovner
Library � one room of a two bedroom
apartment for sublease after December.
1 lardwood Boor, cable TV, fully fur
nished, etc. $150month plus utilities
757 0412
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female, non
smoker Own room, 1 3 rent, 1 3 utilities
Call 752-5630. Keep trying.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share a 4 bd.
room house Located a half block from
campus 4 wav rent, util . phone Avail-
able December 1 Call 752-1736.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom duplex, walk
to ECU. Avail immediately. 1 vr lease
reg S21X) 00 mo, 752-5778. Leave name &
no it no one is home.
FOR RENT: Sheraton Village, 2 bedroom
1 12 baths, fireplace, washerdrver.
S4 50 00 month 75t b223
FOR SALE
SS JFEP COMANCHE TRUCK: 4 sp air,
PS, PB, AMEM Cuss 12,000 mt (10,500
Neg ' Must sell, getting married Call
Chris 757-6700wk758-2882hm or355
0715 after b p.m
GOVERNMENT- SEIKED .VEHICLES:
Trom $100 Fords Mercedes Corvettes
.hes Surplus. Buyer's Guide (1) 805
ts 6000 Ext S 1 lrx
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Lexington
Sq (adt Athletic Club) $42,500 -2-bdrms,
1 1 '2 bths, Indry hkup, Bv rm wbav win,
kil din area w bar, refrig, stove,
dshwshr, Fmch drs open to pnv patio w
stor rm, adt to prknglot tor easy access, ac-
tive hmownrs' assn 555 674 after 5
FOR SALE: Can you buy loops. Cars. 4
4 s seized in drug raids for under $100.00?
Call for facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext.
711 � i OUi�i r
N.C 732-3694
PARTY If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach Call 555-2781,
ask for Morgan.
HELPWANTEP
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Recreation and Parks Department is re-
canting for part time youth basketball
coaches for the winter program Appli-
cants must possess MOM knowledge of
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
9 18, in basketball fundamentals Hours
are from 5 pm 7 pm , Monday thru
Friday, and some night and weekend
coaching The program will extend from
December 1 to mid February Salary rate
is S5 5 to S4 35 per h "ir Applications
will bo accepted starting October 20.
Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take sign ups for our FLORIDA tours We
furnish all materials for a successful pro-
motion Good PAY and FUN. Call CAM-
PUS MARKETING at 1 800 777-2270.
VOLUNTEERS ECU School of Medicine,
section of allergy, is conducting a study.
Needed for asthma study: Men, age 18 or
over, non smokers, w mild to moderate
asthma & allergies Study includes use of
a new drug, skin tests and pulmonary
tests Volunteers will also stay overnight
twice in hospital lodgings Participants
will be well reimbursed Please call 551-
3159 to volunteer
ATFENTION ECU FACULTY AND
STAFF: Brodv's has part time positions
for individuals interested in a flexible
work schedule to help stuff that special
Christmas Stocking Call today for an
interview appointment or apply in per
son, Brodv's, Carolina East Mall, M-W. 2
4 p m
BE ON T.V Mam needed for commer
cials Casting into (1) 805-687-6000 Ext.
TV-1166
HELP WANTED: Part time Counter Girl
wanted at Video-To Go located on N C.
11 beside Fast Fare (Bethel Highway).
Apply in person Sunday between 6 p.m.
and Sam I lours Flexible.
OVERSEAS JOBS:
S10,000-S105,000vr
Also cruiseships
Now Hiring! 520
1 istings' (1) 805 687 r000 Ext OJ 1166
SEMI-EASY MONEY: Clean my apart
ment well S4 per hour Close to campus
758-6998 Ask for Jay
" RESORT HOTELS: Cnris-1 mu Airlines'
FOR SALEc Qu�n s,z wter bod frame j .Jjmu-emwit P-V NUW
IN DESPERATE NEED: Of a 45 rpm rec
ord by Frank Stallone Title of song is 'Far
From Over' from the movie, 'Staying
Alive Will pay cash for. Call Ramona at
758-9351.
THE WAY CAMPUS FELLOWSHIP
TWIG FELLOWSHIPS ARE
AVAILABLE: Every Tuesday and Thurs-
day at 7:30 pm. at 2007 Tiffany Dr. in
1 leritage Village Call 355-5164 for details.
1 lot Bible' Great Fellowship!
S1GMAS, ADPl'S, ALPHA PHIS,
TKL S SIC. EPS AND DELTA S1GS:
Rocked 1 lalloween better than ever be-
fore The costumes were killer from drunk
vampires to a drunk can man and his wife.
All had the best time and hxk forward to
another Wild I lalloween next year. �The
Delta Sigs
AOPI'S: We all got nuked and a lot of us
were wasted We hope you enjoyed your
selves as much as we did. After a slow
start, the party kicked in and just kept
rockin! We can't wait to do it again. �
Love the Delta Sigs. PS We Sincerely
apologize for the various conflicts that
erupted that night. We are sorry.
ALPHA PHI: The group of us at the
Stranger Mixer could not have had a bet-
ter time From a nazi to a couple of shrubs
to an overblessed, green headed flasher,
the strangers certainly did look strange.
What a way to kick off 1 lalloween Week-
end! -Love the Delta Sigs
COUNTRY GIRL: After seeing you
weren't Pippi, I had a blast! This was my
best 1 lalloween ever. By the way, where is
Kernersville? See ya soon! �Your Surfer
Buddy.
NEW DELI ROCKS Come check out
Tl IE BOND Thursday and Boogie down
with Tl IE BOOMERS on Friday. On Sat-
urday welcome back 5 GUYS NAMED
MOE, and jam with the best music
around.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Happy
Founder's Day. Congratulations on 87
years of tradition ami excellence- Keep up
the good work.
S1G EPS: Celebrate your Fraternal
Founders on Nov. 12 at Founder's Dav
Formal. Blow it all out, you deserve it. -
Sigma Phi Epsilon Nov. 1, 1901 - Nov. 1,
1988, a continuous Tradition of Excel
knee Mr. William LazeU 1'hillips.
BASKETBALL OFFICIALS MEETING:
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
department will be having the first organ-
izational meeting for anyone interested in
officiating for the men's winter basketball
league. All interested officials should call
830-4543 or 850 4550 for the day and time
SIGMA PHI EPSILON PLEDGES:
Thanks'flit rescuing' IS from locked In
played too. The Zeta Phi Befa Sorority will
be sponsoring a Penny Drive Nov. 6, 7,8,
9,10, the money will be used to furnish an
underpriviledged family in Greenville,
Thanksgiving dinner Please help support
this worthy cause. The Booth will be lo-
cated in the Student Book Store. �Thank
you.
CLAY: I'M SORRY! Here's your per
sonal! 1 lappy Birthday a few days late. At
4east you got your presents. �Susan.
I SELL MARY KAY: Top line cosmetics at
low prices. Perfumes and gift sets are
great gift ideas. Contact Kim at 555-7711
for more details. Leave message.
CHRISTOPHER & J Thank you so
much. You guys mean the world to me. �
love ya, C
DANA: 1 can't thank you enough1 What
would I
Colleen.
do without you:
1.
yj-
ALPHA DELTA PI PLEDGES Ycv. guys
are the best! We are so proud and we love
you! Keep up the great work! �Love, The
Sisters.
STRANGERS IN THE NIGHT: The
party was great, with our awesome
stranger dates! Plantation said it wasn't
cool, to hang outside by the pool They
said go inside, but did we abide? But fun
was had by all of us, until we had to get on
the bus. �Love, The Alpha Delta Pi's.
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES: We want to
thank vou ail for the Halloween surprise
It was great and we think y'all are pretty
great, too' Keep up the good work! We
love you. �the sisters of Delta Zeta
"MAP (The Meisner, Punipm, Greasen,
lousting Man on Wood Lawn Street). The
1 louse of Flesh correspondents wish you
tremendous success with your Grip
Mama at the formal We love you on Jarvis
Street. �Your 1 luns.
THETA CHI PLEDGES: You guvs are
heart and soul and are ready to roll! Keep
the spirit and the best is vet to come Roll
Chi! -The Brothers.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Brunch Blast '88
was very unique. Let's get together soon
�Love and Bubbles, Theta Chi.
THE TREBLE MANIAX: Are back at
Susie's Treehouse on Wed Nov. 9th.
Music by REM, U2, the Cult and originals.
SCOTT HALL: 1 low suite it is! (The pre-
cecding has been a public service of the
new and improved Scott Flail House
Council).
AOPI: Right foot green, twister was a
scream At Win, Lose or Draw we couldn't
believe what we saw! The slumber party
was great, fun and grand' Thanks for the
good time! �Alpha Sigs.
AZD'S: Thursday Night was great The
P.J. got everyone going and the music got
everyone dancing Thanks for the great
time. �SAE.
PLEDGES OF PI KAPPA PHI: Your tests
are over and it's coming close to an end,
But it's not time to relax, the most impor
tant part is about to begin. All of you show
us you want it not just half! And we prom
ise you the time of your life You will soon
have It's time to show us you are together
as one or the seperate eleven will soon be
none. �The Brothers.
TKE, SIG EP AND ADPI: We had a great
time at the pre downtown 1 lalloween
party. Let's make it an annual tradition �
The Sigmas.
DEBBIE T A VIK: The Best Big SIS, 1 lappy
Birthday! Sigma Love,�Chris.
TAKE A BREATHER: Thursday,
November 17. Don't stay hooked. Prove
that you can do without cigarettes for 24
hours by giving them up for the American
Cancer Society's Great American Smoke-
out. The Sigmas say it's a great day to start
getting free from cigarettes
NEW DELI ROCKS: Come check out
Tl IE BOND Thursday, and Boogie down
with THE BOOMERS on Friday On Sat
urday welcome back 5 GUYS NAMED
MOE, and jam with the best music
around
LIZ, MICHELLE �V CHRIS: Thanks for
the use of the couch last weekend Good
friends like you three are hard to find �
Love, Bob.
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards' Call
Eartvis, the mad baseball buyer I pay
damn good money for cards of any vear
any shape, and any condition If you need
party money, Big E is the one to call 757
n366, leave a message.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
n
J Frt
Your Best Look
�. � I s
v Ms raw s
and rail Excellent condition - if not usecf
for waterbed, makes a great platform bed
$70 or best otter Call lkb at 830-8901.
EBSON COMPUTER: IBM Compatable
25b K RAM, 2 floppy drives, monitor,
manuals and software.
alter 4, ask for Donna
$500. 524 5570.
1983 HONDA 750 SHADOW: 15,000
miles, perfect condition, $1200 524 5570
after 4, ask for Donna
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro
gressive Solutions, lnc otters high qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time Rates start at S2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer resume'
production, and other business and pro-
fessional services. Call 757-3111 M-F for
more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPY 1NG SERVICES We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages SDF
Professional Computer Services. 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
plications tor summer jobs, mternsrur
and career positions. For more mlorrna
tion and an application, write National
Collegiate Recreation Service, PO Box
8074; 1 Iilton 1 lead. S.C. 29938.
CHILD CARENANNIES NEEDED:
loin our (Nannv Network) of over 800
placed bv us in the Northeast One year
working with kids in exchange tor salaries
up to $300.00 per week. Rxm and board,
airfare and benefits We offer Tl IE BEST
Cl IOICES in families and locations Con-
tact Maureen Carol, A 1 lEl.PING IIANDS
INC. Recruitment Counselor, 919 577
5154 (evenings) for brochure and applica-
tion. Featured on NBC's Today Show and
October, 1987 Working Mother magazine
as nationally recognized leader in Nanny
placement. Est 1984
NEED EXTRA BUCKS FOR THE
HOLIDAYS?: Wreath Makers will start
production soon � make X-mas wreaths in
your spare time between classes, studying
& partying perfect for students' sched-
ules bee. you work when, as long & as
often as you like $10 20.00 ph according
to how fast vou work HANDICAP
PERSONS WELCOME! -See this paper for
locations & times 10 of Wreath-Mak-
ers profits go to chanty.
PERSONALS
W lutLiMllia ap, $�� IbM.wflSVfW1 .XfvM we the best!
ibs internships - Love Alpha Nu Pledge Class of Alpha
Delta PI.
ALPHA DELTA PI SISTERS Thanks so
much for letting us use the house for the
weekend We wouldn't give up the time
we had to spend together for anything
We love you! �Pi Love and ours, Alpha
Nu Pledge Class of Alpha Delta Pi.
HAPPY HOUR: Thursday night at Fizz.
Sponsored by Alpha Nu Pledge Class of
Alpha Delta Pi. 9:00 p.m. 1 00a.m. S2 per
person. Great fun, great music and great
drinks. Come out and have a blast!
THE LAMBDA MU CHAFFER OF
ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY INC Vis
ited the I le.ulstart on West bth Street on
I lalloween Dav. They furnished I lallow-
een Goodies such as a Halloween cake,
and 1 lalloween treat bags. Games were
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Ron! �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E Sth Street
� located Near I CL'
� Acriiv. From I Bghwmy I'jtml Station
I imiti'd offor-S?7.S a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-781 or SMl 937
Office oron Apt 8, 12 S Jp m
�AZALEA GARDENS'
Clean ami quiet one bedroom furnished
apartn-k-rt energy efficient, Irct' water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable IV.
Couples or singlet only. S20t a month. � month
lease. MOB11 1.1 K Mi: RENTALS - couple or
singles. Apartment and mobile h.�mes in Aalca
Gardens r.ejr Prook alley Countiy 1 lub
CDntact .I. or Tommy Williams
76-781 5
ACCU
S3COPY
758-2400
Specializing In. MANICURES
French Manicures � Nail Tip- �
Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
. EPICURES � SKIN CARE Body
Wrapping � Face & Bod . Waxing �
Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products for
Men &t Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaza Or Greenville
a-TOfto
$ NEED CASH?
Loans On Sc Buying Guns
TV's, Stereos, Gold Jewelry, coins,
most anything of value
Southern Gun & Pawn, Inc
$ 7?2-24M
J
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 700
WALK-INS WELCOME
20 YEARS OP SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Eastgatc Shopping Center
(Across troin Highway Patrol Station)
Brhlnd Car Quest Auto Parts
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
EBEE Jfregnwacy
Testing � k
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru SaL Low
Co: t TcrrnlrnUlon !o JO Trks of prrgnancy
:�
1-800-433-2930
DO OU HAVE ANY
QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR
LONG DISTANCE
SERVICE?
Interested in learning about
calling plans and special
products'that tffty sae"yvu
money?!
Contact: Dana Dunlow,
Your AT&T
Student Campus Manager
Here at ECU
Call: 752-0856
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday-Friday
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
The Secret Of Getting Rich
Amazing Book Tells All
Free Offer Details - Rush Stamped Self
Addressed Envelope
Wayne Humphries, Dept. L.M. - 1
Rt. 1 Box 215
Beulaville, NC 28518
THfr rAST(
rife-
rrv
a
Two Ippies
'Rattle andl
BY CHIPPY
and
BIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Wrrtvn
Announcements
STUDENTS
The yearbook staff would like to say
Thank You" to everyone who came out
and had their class picture made. 1 laving
611 students show their caring about the
yearbook has given the Buccaneer staff a
new reason to fight to -eep this bx�k alive.
You have shown all the people who tried
to say the vearbook was not worth it, that
it really is worth giving a few minutes of
your time to sav "1 lev, this is my yearbook
because I'm in it
LQSI2
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fn
night at 7 00
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If vou are challenged everyday with prob
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God
Everv Fri night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the Dec. issue. The maga
zine is published twice a semester with
the first issue coming out in Oct. This
special issue will be a small magazine
with mainly general info whereas the
Dec issue will be a larger size containing
news stories, short stories, editorials,
poetry, etc. Articles may be left at the
office or at the Media Board Secretary's
Office in the Publications Bldg
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Representatives of the Walt Disney World
Company will be on campus to recruit EC
students for their College Program. A
seminarpresentation will be conducted
Nov. 9. Students from all majors are in-
vited to participate Positions in guest
relations, attractions, merchandising, and
food services, among others are available
Contact the Office of Cooperative Ed in
the OCB for details.
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, structures and architectures of
North and Central American Earth as
seen by Ernst 1 labnehs Oct 24-Nov. 19.
Reception Weil, 7:00 p.m Mendenhall
Gallery.
SUMMER IOB
Dr Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be Nov. 21 at 10:00 a.m.
in 1029 GCB The ten week internship
program, in the Raleigh area, is open to
sophomores, juniors, and seniors cur-
rently enrolled in college. (Those entering
Graduate School as of May, 1989 are not
eligible)
ART VOCAL ENSEMBLE
The National Gallery of Art Vocal En-
semble will perform in Hendrix Theatre
on Nov 14 at 800 pm. This event is part of
the Chamber Music Series. Four great
voices create one excellent sound, in jour-
ney exploring an almost limitless reper-
toire. Tickets go on sale Oct 24. For further
details, contact The Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, or call 757fS611, ext. 266.
riTT COUNTY ACLD
The next meeting of the Pitt County ACLD
will be Nov. 15 at St James United Meth-
odist Church, 7:30 p.m. If you are inter-
ested in becoming a member of the Pitt
County ACLD, would like more info or
would like to be on our mailing list, please
send your address to: Pitt County ACLD,
1 Dogwood Court, Greenville, N.C.
A1DSELL. COJylMITTEE
Students, staff and faculty: Support AIDS
Awareness Week. Listen to Mike Miller
speak on "Living With AIDS" and how it
affects his family. Questions are welcome.
Mendenhall, Hendrix Theatre, Nov. 8 at
8:00 p.m. No charge. Call 757-6794 for
more info.
MEN NEEDED
ECU School of Medicine, section of al-
lergy, is conducting a study. Needed for
asthma study: men, age 18 or over, non-
smokers with mild to moderate asthma
and allergies Study includes use of a new
drug, skin tests and pulmonary tests. Vol-
unteers will also stay overnight twice in
hospital lodgings. Participants will be
well reimbursed Please call 551-3159 to
volunteer.
ILJEKEYJIBiZr
Be sure to attend the Intramural Turkey
Trot registration meeting held Nov. 15 at
5:00 p.m. in BIO 103. Make sure you regis-
ter and learn what the Turkey Trot is all
about!
CHALLENGE WEEK
Be sure to attend the Intramural Chal-
lenge Week registration meeting held
Nov. 14 from 11:00 a.m6:00 p.m. in MG
104. Challenge Week will be a challenge k
see who is the best among all of the chal
lengers.
Auditions for a reader's theatre ("WE
WEAR THE MASK") to be performed
during Black 1 listory Month will be held
Nov. 8 from 5-7 pm. in Jenkins Audito-
rium. Students interested in reading dur-
ing the auditions should be familiar with
"For My People" by Margaret Walker.
Copies are available in the Office of Mi-
nority Student Affairs, 204 Whichard
Bldg.
CLC TRANSIT
Are you a Pitt County resident, 60 year,
old or older and need a ride to your medi-
cal appointment? The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt County such as doctors, den-
tists, clinics, therapies and the Health
Dept. Arrangements for the service must
be made at least 24 hours before the sched-
uled appointment. Call the Creative Liv-
ing Center, 757-0303, to find out the day(s)
service is scheduled for your area, then
make your medical appointment and res-
ervation for transportation.
ATLANTA SYMPHONY
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present the Atlanta Symphony on Nov.
17 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. The
concert promises to be most exciting as the
symphony is under the direction of their
new musical conductor, Yoel Levi. Tickets
for this event go on sale Oct. 31. For further
details, call 757-6611, ext. 266 or write
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The next meeting of the organization will
be on Nov. 8 at 4:00 in rm. 1013 GCB.
Attendance is mandatory for everyone to
get their pictures taken. Also, prizes will
be awarded at this meeting for the highest
3 sellers of Tom Watt.
COOPERATIVE ED.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered by
the University, is designed to help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. We would like to
extend an invitation to all students to at-
tend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Nov. semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are: 'extra cash to help cover the cost of
college expenses or perhaps to increase
your "fun" budget, �opportunities to test
a career choice if you have made one or to
explore career options if undecided about
a future career, and a highly "market-
able" degree, uhich includes a valuable
career-re! . od experience, when you
graduate. Co-op Seminars�Fall, 1988:
Thurs Nov. 10, 4 p.m rm. 2006; Mon
Nov. 14,4 p.m rm. 2006; Thurs Nov. 17,
1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon Nov. 21,1 p.m rm.
2010; Mon Nov. 28, 4 p.m rm. 2006;
Thurs Dec. 1,1 p.m rm. 2010; and Mon
Dec. 5, 4 p.m rm. 2006.
S.A.M.
Society for the Advancement of Manage
ment meeting Nov. 9, 3 p.m GCB 1028
Speaker will be Don Lewellyn, Depart-
ment Head of Production scheduling at
Burroughs Wellcome. His topic will be
Time � The Next Competitive Advan-
tage. Members are encouraged to attend
and guests are welcome.
SIGMA XI LECTURE
On Nov. 15 at 7:00 p.m. in GCB 1028, Dr
Michael Dadswell of Acadia University in
Nova Scotia will speak on 'Tidal Power:
The Dream and the Reality " The talk is
sponsored by the ECU Chapter of Sigma
Xi, the Scientific Research Society. Dr
Dadswell will describe a large hydroelec-
tric project being constructed to harness
the tremendous tidal power of the Bay of
Fundy. The project could have substantial
environmental effects � particularly
mortality of migratory fish that spend
part of the year off the coast of the south-
eastern U.S. It's free, open to the public,
and should be of interest to non-scientists
as well as to natural and social scientists.
Dr. Dadswell is a supporter of the ECU-
Nova Scotia exchange program. Mark
your calendar now � this should be a
good one.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir is pleased to an-
nounce its Fall Concert on Nov. 13 at 330
p.m. Admission is FREE and everyone is
welcome.
Se� ANNOUNCEMENTS, page S
THE SCENE :
A darkened movie theate
The screen flickers to life and a
the grey and white images hegi
to focus, a voice-over is heard
On topof applause, the word
"This is a song Charles Manso
stole from the Beatles we
stealing it hack. " hoom out acros
the theater. L2 hegins plavinl
"Helter Skelter" as the earner
pans hack to the two reviewers i
the audience The lights go up
Chippy: 1 think that is total
the most pretentious thing 1
ever heard. Bono is the b
poser in the world.
Bippy.Hey. Lighten up, bab
Bono is a god, a sheer, veritabj
god of rock. 1 worship him
Chippy: Only you could thin
that. Hi, folks, I'm Chippv Bon
head of The East Carolinian ai
this is mv evil twin Bippv Bonj
head, from a parallel univers
where he is an overpaid lackt t
The Daily Ad Rag. He's also
Libra and enjoys trick or trcatr
in a convenient shopping mail
Bippy: Watch it bub Anvwal
today we'll be reviewing the nf
U2 movie, "Rattle an Hum" ai
Run D.M.Cs Tougher Tru
Leather
Chippv: No, we won't
Bippy. Why not?
Chippy: Because we haveJ
gone to see "Tougher thi
Leather" vet. Now let's get bad
"Rattle and Hum While mov
about bands generally porti
rock groups as minor deities
Bippy: As they so nghttuj
deserve.
Chippy: � or as menu
inept adolescents who never
beyond the Freudian phallic sti
.Qfrnental development,
nao vo d�w I say it � ,
Bippy: You will anyway,
throw in a plot twist now?
Chippy(glares at Bippv
combines both views and
ages to come up with an enterti
ing look at one of the forer
political bands.
Bippy. You managed to i
up with just about the lon$
sentence f veever heard How
. sustained that many words i
one breath is beyond me.
Chippv: Perhaps it vou CQ
be persuaded to say a few wrj
about this film, instead ot baij
me everv other second �
Bippy. Baiting What are;
a rainbow trout7 Sheesh.
Chippy:
Bippv: Okay, okay. I likedI
flick a lot' Most rocumentanes
pretty lame. "Rattle and Hi
has its cheesy moments. Esped
when Bono feels the need to)
plain politics to the audience
guv, we can read!
Chippy: How much do
know about Irish politics?
Bippy: What Bono tofcU
during the movie.
Adventure to
FCL New, Buicau
Little-known, off-thc-bcc
path places in Italy that the
ried tourist never sees willL
ited in a film, "Italy � The T
in Between to be screen
East Carolina University
dav, Nov. 21.
The film is part of the 1
ECU Travel-Ad vent ure Fill
ries and will be narrate
filmmaker Frank Mugno,
ning at 8 p.m. in Hendnx Th
Some of these seldom
places are the Southern ItJ
village of Matera where
Curator of "Mai
News Rclwuc
fa
rd
to .
iai

bo
-p
U
rjt
Ken Bloom, curator ol
exhibition, "Manifest Desi)
which is presently on view
Gray Art Gallery, will pre
lecture in Jenkins Auditorii
November 21st, at 7:30 p.mj
Bloom is currently the
tor of The Light Factory of
lotte, North Carolina.
The exhibition featui
photographs which focus oi
the "sacrifices and the ber
which are brought about
changing structure of the
can Agriculture business. II
contrast the differences bef





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SPLA CLASSIFIED
Vuir Best Look
Mit
�m
i'OU HAVE AN
-1 IONS A30UT YOUR
LONG DISTANCE
SERVICE?
in learning about
plans and special
' - that mY sarcytu
money?!
Contact: Dana Dunlow,
Your AT&T
ampus Manager
Here at ECU
Call: 752-0856
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Getting Rich
?k Tells All
kush Stamped Self
Envelope
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28518
THE EASTCAROl INI AN
Features
NOVEMBER 8. 1968 Page 7
Two Ippies review U2's
'Rattle and Hum' flick
pm.rm 2 Of
SiAJVL
r the Advancement of Manage
- 1pm, GCB 1028
be Don Lewellyn, Depart
f Pi ducnon scheduling at
me 1 hs topic will be
IMexl Competitive Advan
teed to attend
SIGMA XI LECTURE
� p.m in GCB 1028, Dr
t Acadia University in
,i Aiil speak on 'Tidal Power
and the Reality The talk is
nsored by the ECU Chapter of Sigma
enufk Research Society. Dr
.ul will describe a large hvdroelec-
� � being constructed to harness
� ial power of the Bay of
'he project could have substantial
� nmental effects � particularly
nortalit) of migratory fish that spend
jrt ot the vear off the coast of the south
ksten � i free, open to the public,
1 should be ot interest to non scientists
s well as to natural and social scientists.
Padswell is a supporter of the ECU-
i Scotia exchange program Mark
- calendar now � this should be a
�xi one
ECLLGQSPELCHQIR
Hie ECU Gospel Qhoir is pleased to an-
� ounce its Fall Concert on Nov 13 at 330
p m Admission is FRET and everyone is
welcome
See ANNOUNCEMENTS, page 8
BY CHIPPY
and
BIPPY BONEHEAD
Stiff Writer
THE SCENE:
A darkened movie theater.
The screen flickers to life and as
the grey and white images begin
to tocus, a voice-over is heard.
On top of applause, the words,
"This is a song Charles Manson
stole from the Beatles we're
stealing it back boom out across
the theater. U2 begins plaving
"Heller Skelter" as the camera
pans back to the two reviewers in
the audience. The lights go up.
Chippy: I think that is totally
the most pretentious thing I've
ever heard. Bono is the biggest
Chippy: Then it was neces-
sary. If you didn't know it, there's
probably a million other imbeciles
out there who don't either.
Bippy. There's also about a
million other imbeciles out there
who don't care, either. Anyway.
At the beginning of the movie,
thev asked the band what the
J
movie was about.
Half-jokingly, they said it was
a musical journey, but in a very
real sense, it was. They went to
America and discovered a lot of
new types of music.
Chippy: New to them. I be-
lievecountrymusicand blues have
been around for a while.
Bippy: You know what I mean.
Chippy: I think if one more
band writes a song or makes a
movie about going to Graceland
and reflecting at Elvis' grave, I'll
vomit. Besides, Elvis is still alive. I
poser in the world.
Bippy: Hey. Lighten up, baby, saw him during the movie. He's a
Bono is a god, a sheer, veritable roadie for B.B. King,
god of rock. I worship him. Bippy: No he's not, he works
U2's soundtrack bullets
the blue sky peacefully
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
SKi mbled and Ballad
U2 fans should be enthralled
with the new "Rattle and Hum"
motion picture and soundtrack.
Once again, this band from Ire-
land proves their lyrics and
screaming chords can cut through
the heart of any concert hall or in
this case, any movie theater.
In describing the soundtrack,
bassist Adam Clayton said "Its a
musical journey And although
the movie is said to be unhearsed,
it is structured around prue rock
and roll.
The "Rattle and Hum"
soundtrack is a collection of new
songs, U2 classics and get this,
covers. A combination of live and
dium.
The multitude of settings in
the movie from Tempe Arizona,
Dallas-Fort Worth, a studio in
Memphis, a church in Harlem to a
deserted train depot in Dublin,
Ireland, added a texture to the
work.
The studio in Memphis is the
same studio the Killer, jerry Lee
Lewis, used as well as the King
(and my all time idol) Elvis.
While in Memphis, U2 vis-
ited Graceland. Drummer Larry
Mullen commented he wished
Elvis' grave wasn't in the back-
yard. In a reflective sceen, Mullen
looks over the grave of the fallen
king.
From the Harlem church, U2
updated their super thematic hit
"1 Still Haven't Found What I'm
Chippv: Only you could think
that. Hi, folks, I'm Chippy Bone-
head of The East Carolinian and
this is my evil twin Bippy Bone-
head, from a parallel universe,
where he is an overpaid lackey for
The Daily Ad Rag. He's also a
Libra and enjovs trick or treating
in a convenient shopping mall.
Bippv. Watch it bub. Anyway,
today we'll be reviewing the new
12 movie, "Rattle an Hum" and
Run D.M.Cs "Tougher Than
leather
Chippv: No, we won't.
Bippy: Why not?
Chippy: Because we haven't
gone to see "Tougher than
Leather" yet. Now let's get back to
"Rattle and Hum While movies
about bands generally portray
rock groups as minor deities�
Bippy: As they so rightfully
deserve.
Chippy. � or as mentally
inept adolescents who never got
beyond the Freudian phallic stage
of mental development this
roovw, daxe I say it I I
Bippy: You will anyway, why
throw in a plot twist now?
Chippv(glarcs at Bippy) : �
combines both views and man-
ages to come up with an entertain-
ing look at one of the foremost
political bands.
Bippy: You managed to come
up with just about the longest
sentenceI'veeverheard. How you
sustained that many words with
one breath is beyond me.
Chippv: Perhaps if you could
be persuaded to say a few words
about this film, instead of baiting
me everv other second �
Bippy: Baiting? What are you,
a rainbow trout? Sheesh.
Chippy:
Bippy'Okay, okay. I liked this
flick a lot. Most rocumentaries are
prettv lame. "Rattle and Hum"
has its cheesy moments. Especially
when Bono feels the need to ex-
at the Taco Bell on Greenvile
Boulevard. But I'm glad you
mentioned B.B. He was cool.
Chippy: Yeah. "I'm not good
with chords
Bippy: "Edge will take care of
that That was pretty hilarious.
So was what the drummer said
about Edge always being off time.
Chippy. Yeah. Edge and him
are cool. I caught Edge doing some
Pink Hoyd riffs a couple of times
in this video � I mean this movie.
Bippy: Well, it really was kind
of a two-hour video. You're right,
I bet they have a blast on the road.
Chippy: Bono doesn't though.
I don't remember him smiling
once.
Bippy: Hey! He's a sensitive
guv-
Chippy : I'm a pretty sensitive
guv, but I don't go around mop-
ing all the time. I le needs to lighten
up.
Bippv: I already used that joke
man. Ixtok back at the fifth para-
graph
Chippy: Sorry. And Bono's
voice, when he tries to go too low,
he starts sounding like Jim Na-
bors. Bono may be more sensitive
than we thought. Does he have a
girlfriend?
Bi ppy: Y es! Of co u rse he d oes.
What are you, insane?
Chippy: That last Rolling
Stone cover had him putting his
head on Adam Clayton's shoul-
der.
Bippy: So?
Chippy: Well, it's not the
manliest pose in the world.
Bippy: You are just jealous.
WTiy can't you just admit that Bono
is a serious artist.
Chippy: Serious artists don't
wear pants jacked up higher than
their navels. That is just weird-
ness. But I admit it, the music was
great.
Bippy: What about the words?
Admit it, he is one of the best
Art of Indians to be on exhibit i�g��?oi ,he
Besides covering "Helter
tribal chiefs to maintain or en- Skelter U2 dug deeper into the
wealth and
studio productions, the album
has an unusual and refreshing Looking For- with the gospel help
song order. Only U2 can get away of the New Voices of Freedom,
with placing a John Denver The lead singer for the choir can
sound-alike song, "Van Diemen's flat out wail- she even nvales the
News Rctea
Objects for ceremonial and
practical uses created by the na-
tive Americans who inhabited the
Northwest coast of North Amer-
ica will be on view at the North
Carolina Museum of Art begin-
ning November 20 through Janu-
ary 15.
"Objects of Bright Pride:
Northwest Coast Indian Art from
the American Museum of Natural
History" presents 100 objects
from the largest and most impor-
tant collection of this art in the
world. Masks, headdresses, feast
implements, daggers, storage
hance their wealth and status.
Others were used by shamans to
represent spiritual alliances in
performances of magic. Some of
the objects were also used in the
winter initiation rites of secret
societies.
The exhibition's title is drawn
trom a passage written by Wil-
liam Rcid, a scholar In the field of
Northwest Coast Indian art and a
contemporary sculptor who cre-
ates works in the Northwest
Coast style:
'60's musical culture with a re-
make of "Along the Watch-
tower Although U2's remake is
as moving as the Bob Dylan writ-
ten-Jimi Hendrix classic, U2
didn't adhere to Hendrix's slur of
the word 'earth
This is pertaining to the lyrics
"See this mad man come take my
wine, come and take my earth
(which is unlike the Hendrix
"come and take my herb"), but I
guess U2 doesn't believe in get-
ting high, either that or they want
wailing of Pink Hoyd's singer on
"The Dark Side of the Moon
U2 enlisted the sound of B.B
King and his guitar Lucille on the
track "When Love Comes to
Town B.Bs free floating rythm
riffs fit in well with Edge's lead.
Stilladmittingly, B.B. said "I don't
play chords in the movie before
wiggling Lucille's fingerboard to
produce his distinctive sound.
Evident in the soundtrack
and film are the band's political
and moral ideals. But neither lead
singer Bono nor lead guitarist the
Edge have really ever tired to hide
their quest for Utopia. According
to them "We still haven't found
what we looking for
Bono drops off his vocals
These were objects of bright to stick with the original Dylan
pride, to be admired in the new- lyrics,
chests and pipes give a glimpse of ness of their crisply carved lines, Speaking of Dylan, the legend aunng �� song ana caus tor re-
the powerful flow of sure elegant rambles his scruffling voice on the form in South Africa and to the
curves and recesses � yes, and in track "Love Rescue Me Dylan
the brightness of fresh paint. They also contributes to the record by
told the people of the complete- playing organ on
the rich culture of six tribes that
inhabited the thin strip of land
between Yakutat Bay, Alaska,
and Puget Sound, Washington.
Created from wood, bone,
ivory, and animal hide, these
ness of their culture, the continu-
ing lineages of the great families,
brightly painted objects date from their closeness to the magic world
the 19th and early 20th centuries, of universal myth and legend
Some were meant for display by (Art of the Raven, 1967)
The boring history of
molasses is reviewed
"Hawkmoon
269
And speaking of Jimi Hen-
drix, the master guitarist's blister-
ing version of the national athem
is played on "Rattle and Hum
The athem is appropriately intros
to "Bullet the Blue Sky one of the
many jammers off of U2's mul-
timetal "The Joshua Tree
end of the fighting in their home-
land of North Ireland. "Am I
bugging you people, am I bug-
ging you a despondent Bono
said before saying "plays some
blues Edge
During another song, Bono
slams tclevangelists by saying
"The God I believe in isn't short of
cash
But bassist Clayton doesn't
think rock and roll and move-
Playing against a red lighted �nts ould live apart. Accord
ECU N�wi Bureau
plain politics to the audience. Hey, lyrisicts to come along in a while,
guy, we can read! Chippy: Ever heard of
' Chippy. How much do you Suzanne Vega? John Doe? Michael
know about Irish politics? Stipe?
Bippy. What Bono told me Bippy: "My name is Puked-
during the movie. See CHIPPY, page 9
Adventure to Italy through film
houses were carved out of the
mountainside, the Valley of Aosta
with its Alpine panorama, the
marble quarries of Carrara � the
source of Michelangelo's marble
blocks, an Italian Riviera beach,
the walled city of San Gimignano
with its 15 towers and the medie-
val city of Assisi �home of St.
Francis.
Tickets for viewing the film
are $4 each and are now available
at the ECU central ticket office m
Mendenhall Student Center,
telephon? 757-6611, ext. 266. The
Ticket Office is open each week-
day from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Little-known, off-the-beaten-
path places in Italy that the hur-
ried tourist never sees will be vis-
ited in a film, "Italy � The Places
in Between to be screened at
East Carolina University Mon-
day, Nov. 21.
' The film is part of the 1988-89
ECU Travel-Adventure Film se-
ries and will be narrated by
filmmaker Frank Mugno, begin-
ning at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Some of these seldom-seen
places are the Southern Italian
where
DURHAM (AP) � During
these high-tech days of micro-
wave-quick, instant everything,
it's comforting to know that some
foods have stood the test of time.
Take molasses. Its American
history dates back to 1493, when
Columbus introduced it to the
West Indies. The sweetener be-
came the lifeblood of colonial
trade, and in fact some historians
argue that it was not the British
tax on tea that precipitated the
American Revolution but the
Molasses Act of 1733, which im-
posed a heavy tax on sugar and
molasses coming from anywhere
except the British sugar islands in
the Caribbean.
Molasses was so important
that the founders of the colony of
Georgia promised 64 quarts of it
to every man, woman and child
who endured there for a year.
Molasses remained the
country's most pooular sweet-
ener through the 19th century.
Used to sweeten drinks as well as
background, Bono sung the com-
pelling lyrics of "Bullet the Blue
Sky" with "I can see those fighter
planes" as the Edge roamed the
Wheeler are completing their
annual molasses harvest on their
132-acre farm. Molasses-making extended stage of Sun Devil Sta-
is a tradition handed down from
ing to Clayton from the movie,
"People say you shouldn't mix
politics and music. People say
you shouldn't mix politics and
sports. Well, I say that is bullshit
Wheeler's father and grandfather,
and, according to Mrs. Wheeler,
"there's no money in it. We just
enjoy doing it
Every fall the Wheelers har-
vest their sorghum cane, planted
with the help of their mule during
the full moon (or "the growing of
the moon as Mrs. Wheeler calls
Plant shakes and stirs
Dome with art of Zen
By JEFF GIBSON
�UffWtttor
most. But when bassist Doug
Boyle put down his electric axe
and sat down with a mandalin,
the two musicians started the
All right, Chuck Berry is said
it) to make it grow taller. The cane, to be its father, James Brown gave beautiful intro to "Going to Cali-
which the couple irrigates and it soul and Elvis is still its king. So fomia
this year grew to a height of 12
feet, is cultivated like corn. The
fodder, or leaves, is removed and
the stalks are harvested by hand,
using a corn knife
we have rock and roll's father, As far as Zeppelin songs,
soul and king, but who is the voice Robert Plant played six jammer
village of Matera where stone
Curator of "Manifest Destiny" to speak
Newt Re
Ken Bloom, curator of the
exhibition, "Manifest Destiny
which is presently on view at the
Gray Art Gallery, will present a
lecture in Jenkins Auditorium on
November 21st, at 7:30 p.m.
Bloom is currently the Direc-
tor of The Light Factory of Char-
lotte, North Carolina.
The exhibition features fifty
photographs which focus on both
the "sacrifices and the benefits"
which are brought about by the
changing structure of the Ameri
the family farm and agriculture as Una, especially this time of year.
for confections, it also was used to hours to cook a 55-gallon barrel of
flavor meats, especially pork. By juice Mrs. Wheeler said. "It has
the 1830s, a bride's popularity to vapor off a whole lot; 55 gallons
was measured by the number of of juice will make 5 gallons of
layers of molasses stack cake that molasses
she received from her guests.
And until the early 1900s,
molasses vied with sugar and
maple syrup as the sweetener of
choice. It was only after World
War I, when sugar prices plum-
meted, that molasses and maple
syrup took a back seat as popular
sweeteners.
The heritage of molasses li ves
on in some parts of North Caro-
of R and R?
It could only be one voice, a
voice which can wail with ambi-
After removing the head, or ance, a honky tonk voice dressed
seed-containing part, the cane is in the blues. The voice belongs to
ground in a mule-powered mill in one Robert Plant.
the Wheelers'back yard. The juice Robert Plant entertained a
is strained through cheesecloth near capacity crowd at the infa- during the show. Duringr a John
into a big, copper-lined barrel, mous Dean Dome Sunday with a Lee Hooker song called
then cooked over a wood fire. repretoir of songs ranging from "Dimples the band ripped into a
"It usually takes about four classic Zeppelin to Plant's lastest couple of measures of "Heart-
album "Now and Zen "
cuts which include 'Trampled
Under Foot "Immigrant Song
"Misty Mountain Hop" and
"Communicaton Breakdown
The latter two were encores.
Plant strategically inserted
what may be called Zep-teases
The molasses is strained
again and poured into stone
crocks, then taken to the Wheel-
ers' house where, still warm, it is
poured into pint and quart jars.
This year the couple made 57
Plant started the evening
with "Pink and Black" off his
"Shakin 1ST' Stirred" Lp. Then
jammed into "Burning Down One
Side" from his first solo release
"Pictures at Eleven
It wasn't long before Robert
reached in the closet and pulled
out some Zep-classics. First to
come out of the closet was "In the
gallons of molasses and all but 20 Light" which ran into "Nobody's
are gone, sold for $5 a quart and $3 Fault But Mine
a means of food production.
This exhibit is sponsored by
the Rural Advancement Fund in
commemoration of its 50th anni-
versary. There is a catalog pro-
duced in conjunction with the
show.
All lectures and events are
free and open to the public. For
more information, please call
(919) 757-6336.
On Nov. 6 a Colonial Molas-
ses and Colonial Living Festival
will be held in Snow Camp, west
of Chapel Hill in Alamance
County, at the Sword of Peace
drama site. Colonial molasses-
making will be demonstrated,
along with butter-churning, colo-
nial cooking, apple butter and
pressed cider-making, all in a 15-
a pint to neighbors and other lo-
cals who heard it advertised on
radio.
The Wheelers don't sell their
molasses in grocery stores, but
people who want the old-fash-
ioned taste in their recipes needn't
feel left out. Commercial molas-
ses, which is made from sugar
cane and not sorghum cane, is
available in three types: unsul-
fured molasses, first molasses and
black strap molasses.
According to Laura Hen-
drickson of the Molasses Informa-
Robert Plant excited the fans
during "Now and Zen's" "Dance
On My Own" by moving and
spinning only as Robert Plant can.
During this song, a video of
people dancing was projected on
to a white circular screen which is
actually a giant mobile consisting
of four rings around a small circle.
One of the highlights of the
concert came after "In The Mood"
as keyboardist Phil Johnstone, a
North Carolinian, picked up an
acoustic guitar and sat down near
center stage.
As the acoustic came out,
breaker" before returning to the
riffs of Dimples.
Robert also added some vocal
teases by uncorking his famous
"Ooooah" and "Puuush The
two phrases, which can be found
in many Zep songs, ignited the
crowd into a frenzy. In ending the
show before the call for encore,
Plant came out with "Tall Cool
One a tune full of Zep-teases.
After about five minutes of
fans almost shaking the Dean
Dome off its foundation, the band
reappeared with "Big Log fol-
lowed by "Misty Mountain Hop
Once more Plant reminised back
to the beginning of the Zeppelin
Era by thrashing "Communica-
tion Breakdown" for the final
encore.
In feeling the Robert Plant
revival, I almost forgot that there
was an opening band. Oh yeah.
Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, that
is why I forgot.
Joan Jett was what you ex-
pected, dressed in black while
hanging three cords on her guitar.
The audience did come to their
erv hours are Monday acre setting of restored colonial tion Network, based in Morris-
�Saturday 1000 am �500 buildings. town, N.Junsulfured molasses is many of the fans started chanting
o m excerjt Thursdav when the And northeast of Durham the pure syrup of the sugar cane, for "Stairway to Heaven one of during the hit "I Love Rock-n-
"TSre.n 'Bm near the Franklin County town of �fZV� fSlSTK �" only because the fans were
contrast the differences between p.m Louisburg, Joseph and Lila molasses she said. cuts. Could we be so lucky? Al- anticipating the end of Joan Jett.





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVi;MBER 8,1988
Announcements
LQGQ CONTEST
Incorporate the "I" from the old Uuminia
logo on an 8 12 x 11 format & vou could
win $50.00. For more info go by
Mendenhall's front desk entry dates
Nov. 7-10. Student Union Visual Arts
Committee.
GAMMA BETA THI
The National Gamma Beta Phi 1 lonor
Society will hold a meeting Nov. 8 at 8
pm in Jenkins Auditorium Induction
ceremony for new members will be Nov.
7th from 6-8 p.m. in Hendnx Theatre
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Environmental Issues Seminar Spring,
1999. Mon . Wed 10 11 (2 semester hours,
3 semester hours for ASL A .VJ60 (also of-
fend as an Honors course). This cotffse
will include three major components: 1)
personal attitudes toward Nature and
how they affect the broad topic of environ
mental ethics and how we think about
land and natural resources; 21 global envi-
ronmental issues such as the Greenhouse
Effect, aod precipitation and the ozone
problem; and ?) diverse, topical issues in
Europe Asia, and latin America stressing
the importance of national preserves
(parks) m conservation and environ
mental activities Visiting lecturers from
East Carolina and elsewhere will partici-
pate; the class will be taught bv Richard C
Manger (Geology). Please register for one
of the Area Studies Seminars. ASLA 3000
(Latin America). AS AS 4000 (Asia), ASEU
3100 (Europe) or ASAE 4000 (Africa).
HONORS
Geologv of the National Tarks. HSEM
2014 (3 semester hours); HSEM 2015 (1
semester hour). Tues Thurs. 8 9:30; Wed.
12-3:00 Richard Mauger. Instructor. Geo-
logical features and histories and land
scape evolution of selected national parks
O'ellowstone, osemite, etc.) will be stud-
ied from the viewpoint of a ranger or
naturalist who will have responsibility for
interpreting the geology for the park visi-
tor. Additional readings and discussions
will focus on the National Parks them-
sehes-their past, present, and future and
their central role in educating the public
about environmental awareness, appro-
priate land use activities, and recreational
philosophy. See International Programs
MASSAGE CLINIC
P.T. Club is having a massage clinic on
Nov. IS, 530-930 pm. Buy tickets in
advance for SI lOmin. or at the door for
SI 2510 nun. Eirst floor Allied Health
Bldg
EC COMPLTER CLUB
The Bast Carolina Computer Club will
iiioet in Austin 305 on Nov. 10 at 3:30 p.m.
Mrs Margaret Wirth will present info on
theCo-operatne Ed program at ECU Re
freshments will be served
SCHOLARSHIP
If vou are considering a career in govt or
a public service area and are currently a
freshman or sophomore with at least a B
average, vou mav be interested in the
1 laiTV S. Truman Scholarship program
which provides up to S7000 annually.
Stop bv the Office of International Studies,
1002 GCB for more info.
HONORS CLASSES
OFFERED
Tired of falling asleep in crowded
auditoriums dunng dull lectures? Don t
despair' If vou have a 3.4 GPA, stimulat-
ing teachers will challenge vou in Honors
courses this Spring See the display ad in
this issue for more details, or call E)r.
David Sanders at 757-6373 in the I lonors
Program Office (GCB 1002)
STATE GOVT INTERNSHIPS
Each vear the N.C. Internship office pro
vides 150 paid summer internships with
state agencies. Positions are available for
students in all majors On Nov. 17, a rep-
resentative of the program will be on
campus to discuss these opportunities.
For info on times and locations, contact
Co-op. Ed 2028 GCB.
JAZZ COLLECTION
Tom "The Jazz Man" Mallison recently
donated a wide variety of jazz cassettes
and CD's to the Mendenhall Music Listen-
ing Center Come by anyday (2 10:30
p m.) and enjoy the sounds of jazz from
the classics to the latest in new age.
GRADUATE STUDENTS
Academic Computing is in need of
Graduate Student Assistants to staff the
academic computing labs on campus.
These lab assistant positions will be avail-
able starting this spring semester and will
involve working 1015 hours a week.
Duties will involve providing assistance
with users on various computer systems
and maintaining computing lab
operations Experience with IBM PC
Apple Macintosh, or the IBM 4381 Aca
demic Mainframe is preferred but not
essential To apply, send your resume or a
letter detailing your computer skills to
Terry Harrision (Austin 216) or call 757-
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to our Bible
Studies every Tues. night at 700 p.m. in
Rawl 130. Bring a friend. For more info
call Jim at 752 7199.
WHAT'S YOUR OPINION
QETHE TEACHER?
During the week of Nov. 14-18, a survey of
student opinion of instruction will be
conducted at ECU. Questionnaires will be
distributed in every class with enrollment
greater than five. All students will have
the opportunity to express opinions on
the teaching effectiveness of their instruc-
tors in those classes The survey will be
conducted during class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes to complete.
Student participation is voluntary and no
identities are requested Instructors have
been requested to leave the classroom
while the questionnaires are being com-
pleted The teaching effectiveness ques-
tionnaire vas created by the Faculty Sen
ate Committee for Teaching Effectiveness
and the Office of Planning and Institu-
tional Research The results of the survey,
along with other information and factors,
are used for administrative evaluation of
the instructor by the supervising adminis-
trator within the department or division.
PSI CHI
There will be a mandatory meeting of all
Psi Chi members on Nov. 15 at 400 in
Kawl, room 102 Dr Poteat will speak on
grad. school and careers in Psychology.
ALL STUDENTS ARE WELCOME TO
ATTEND!
PIRATE CREW
Meeting tor Nov 10 has been cancelled.
Next meeting will he announced
WATER SKI CLUB
The East Carolina Water Ski Club will
have its first organizational meeting Nov.
10 in room 105 Memorial Cvm The meet-
ing will be at 5:00. The purpose of the club
will be discussed and a short meeting wall
be held Anyone interested in Collegiate
Competition SkiingRecreational Skiing
is welcome Eor more info contact
Tommv Lewis at 830 0137
TICKETS FOR NEW YORK
Tickets for the New York Trip over
Thanksgiving are still on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in Mendenhall. Rush
over and get a ticket for this exciting trip
before the tickets run out. (Only a limited
number left).
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
MEETING
The Student Union Travel Committee is
having a meeting today at 4 00 pm. Please
plan to attend It's possible we will be
having pictures made for the yearbook at
this meeting Thank vou
1 AH AM AS OR CANCUN?
Let the Student Union Travel Committee
take you to a new .ind exciting place for
Spring Break '89 Shop in the world's
marketplace, plan on eating 5 f times a
day, dip in the pod, plav shuffleboard,get
i t.in, iust relax cruise the Bahamas for
5 days4 nights QJ� if cruising the ocean
blue is not for you, then come with us for
7 days and nights in Cancun, Mexico.
While in Cancun, stay in a hotel that is on
one of Cancun's finest beaches. Just relax
and enjoy the sun and beach on this gor-
geous island of paradise. Check out our
affordable prices at Central Ticket Office
at Mendenhall (757-6611).
COSTA-RICA PROGRAM
There will be a mandatory meeting for all
Biology Club members on Nov. 14th at
5:00 p.m. in BIOL-109. Dr. Bellis will be
discussing the Costa-Rica program this
summer. All others interested are invited
to attend.
VQUEYBAU
The Lady Pirates end their regular season
tonight against the Tarheels of N.C. The
match will begin at 7:00 p.m. in Minges.
Anyone having their yellow spirit compe-
tition cards are urged to attend.
Students for Economic Democracy will be
meeting Wed. at 7:00 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 247. S.E.D. would also like to remind
all registered voters to vote today.
early cnapHQQP cure
Attention all Early Childhood Ed. Majors!
EX) you know what a Montessori School
is? Come to the next (EQ2 meeting to find
out. The meeting will be held Wed. at 4:00
in Speight 129. Remember to bring your
SI 5 for sweatshirts! Please join us!
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSQC.
The Financial Management Assoc. will
meet Wed. at 4:30 in room 3009 GCB. The
guest speaker will be Bernitta Demery.
Group photos will also be taken at the
meeting. All interested students are in-
ited to attend.
ECU PLAYHOUSE
We need ushers for the next show "A
Moon for the Misbegotten" which runs
Nov. 18-22. Ushers will get to see the show
free with the minimal work before the
show starts. For more info , call 757-6.390
or see the sign-up sheet on the main board
in Messick Theatre Arts bldg.
A.M.A.
The American Marketing Assoc. will be
holding its next meeting this Thurs at
3:30. The meeting will be in room 1032
GCB. Our guest speaker will be Don Pack
who is the mktg. director for the Empire
Brush Co. All interested are welcome and
members are encouraged to attend
SPANISH CLUB
Spanish Club will meet Wed. at 300 in
Conference Room or For Lang Dept of
GCB. Guest speaker will be Mr. Maryanne
Exum. Dues of $3 will also be collected
throughout the remainder of the
semester. IBienvenidos Todas!
BROADCASTING HONOR
SOCIETY
The ECU Broadcast Honor Society will
hold a meeting today at 6:15 p.m. in room
234 Old Joyner. All members please at-
tend.
PPHA
Pre-Professional Health Alliance invites
all health related majors to attend our
membership drive meeting on Thurs at
5.30 p.m. in MSC rm 221. All interested
students are encouraged to attend Your
presence will be welcomed!
COLLEGE WORK STUJ2Y
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off campus place
ments. Call 757-6979 or come bv the GCB,
room 2028.
See More
For
$50.00 less.
Right now at our Greenville office you can be
fitted for a pair of daily wear or extended wear
contact lenses and receive a $50.00 discount
off our usual package price.
Usual Fee
Discount
YourPrtco
Daily
Wear
$155.00
50.00
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Extended
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$195.00
50.00
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J
READ THE
EAST CAROLINIAN
STUDENT UNION COMMITTEES ARE
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
Committees Include:
Public Relations and Publicity Committee
SpeciaI Concerts Committee
Major Concerts Committee
"Coffeehouse Committee
Films Committee
Production Committee
Applications can be found in Room 236-Mendenhall
Student Center, 757-6611, ext. 210.
Deadline for Applications-Nov. 15.
TomTogs
is having a
Gigantic Warehouse Sale
Just For You
NOTHING OVER $10
FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY
Two f;
GREENSBORO (AD �L
the other 214 students
Greensboro's St. Pius X School
year-old Jason Dunn prays to
Virgin Mary, attends Mass refj
larly and learns Roman Cathc
doctrine in the classroom.
But there's one major diti
ence between jason and mos(
his classmates. Jason is Presh
rian
He is one of about 61
Catholic students at SI
where 12 non-Catholic I
were in the waiting list for
dergarten when i lass
ug 24
For main Protestant pare
what thev see as the stn
demic programs -ind caring!
mosphere ol atholic - I
outweigh concerns about
trinal different
The percentagi
Catholic children enrolled I
Triad's five Catholic
range from percent ol th
children at St. Leo El S
School in Winsl rn
percent of the 145
Immaculate Heart
in 1 ligh Point
"It's not anything I
Chippy an
"chillbum
( ontinued from page 7
up1 live inside the toilet bo
Buncha art fags. At least I
about important stuff
heid
Chippy:
couldn't pronounce it. Wei
wrap this up. 1 enjoyed the
thought the cinematograph
cool, if a bit confusing at t
and while I'm still not conv
Bono and his band are the cr
thing since White-Out! th
did have its moments
Especially good were th
dition oi "I Still Haven't FJ
What I'm Looking For
gospel chorus �
Bippy: Yeah,they sh ul
that one cluck a contract
some pipes.
Chippy. -andthediMi
B.B. King, and the colorized
or Without You It
chillbumps
Bippy: Was that one in
I can't remember. This n
like the damn "Wizard oi
vou were in Kansas it was
and white, it you were any
else it wascolor. 1 wonder if
to Kansas, Id look blac
white?
Chippy: x, ou d still h
though.
Bippy: You re so incr
funny. Why don't you writ
own humor column?
Chippv: 1 do. i give
and Hum a big three rev
SETTLE
FOR AN
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Served 11:00 am 3:00 pm
Monday through Friday
SEAFOOD QUESADILLA
Our mt tjiant flour tortilla chock ful ol
dek'ctabie seafood cheese and Ran
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3.95
BARBEQUE CHICKEN
A delicate breast of thicken smothered in
bar be q lie auce and served with a fresh
tossed salad and trench fries Give it a
try
3.95
STEAK A LA MEXICANA
Tender strips of beef sauteed with
onions tomatoes and beer la little
spicv'l Served with rice and beans Trv
3.95
PLUS
Daily Lunch Specials at S3.95
Served Pronto
521 Cor tanche St
Greenville
757-1666
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Factory Outlet
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&
THE EAST CAWOUNIAN
NOVEMBER 8, t8 9
Two faiths have one purpose
GREENSBORO (AD� Like actively pursuing said Roberta
the other 214 students at Hutchcraft, principal at
( rvnkro s St Pius School, 8- Greensboro's Our Lady of Grace
year-old Jason Punn prays to the School, where 22 percent of the
Virgin Mary, attends Mass regu-
larly and learns Roman Catholic
doctrine in the classroom.
But there's one major differ-
ence between ason and most oi
his classmates ason is Presbvte-
t ian.
He is one oi about Kl non-
Catholic students at St. Tins,
where 12 non-Catholic families
ere on the waiting list for kin-
dergarten when
uc 24
! or main Protestant parents,
what the) see as the strong aca-
demic programs and caring at-
mosphere ot Catholic schools
outweigh concerns about doc-
trinal differences.
1 he percentages oi non-
Catholic children enrolled in the
Triad's five Catholic schools
range from 7 percent oi the 320
dren at St. 1 eo Elementary
S hool t. Winston-Salem to 40
percent ot the 145 students at
immaculate 1 leart of Mary School

��
340 students are non-Catholic.
"These people are coming to us.
They want their children to have a
Christian atmosphere and strong
academic program
Ellen Curlee, a Southern Bap-
tist, enrolled her son Matthew at
Our Lad v of Grace when he was in
the first grade.
The teachers were very
warm and caring toward the stil-
uses began dents she said. "The first eight
years of a child's school life are so
important
Today Matthew is 12, and
Curlee has no regrets about her
decision. When she first visited
the school, she was impressed
with its firm, but kind, discipline,
the commitment oi its faculty, and
the overtly Christian environ-
ment, she said.
"A great deal of it was very
similar to what he was learning in
his own Trotestant background
Curlee said.
Curlee admits she worried
initially that Matthew might feel
not anything that we're pressured toward Catholicism.
Chippy and Bippy get the
"ch illb u mps " from U2
( ontinued from page 7
I live mside the toilet bowl
Buncha art tags t least Bono talks
about important stuff, like apart-
id.
i. hippy: Yeah too bad he
ildn t pronounce it. Well let's
rap this up. 1 enjoyed the film, I
thought the cinematography was
i it a bit confusing at times,
and while I'm still not convinced
noand hisbandarethegreatest
thing since White-Out�, the film
did have its moments.
I specially good were the ren-
on of "1 Still Haven't Found
What I'm Looking For" with the
iiorus
fiipp) xi eah, they should give
i nechi k a contract. She's got
in
ncn I
unt.
Those fears were unfounded, she
said.
"They do not try to encou rage
children to change from their cwn
religious background to the
Catholic faith Curlee said.
Every day at Our Lady of
Grace begins with prayer. The
children recite grace before lunch
and often pray again just before
school adjourns. A statue of the
Madonna and a Bible adorn a
"prayer table" in each classroom
A crucifix hangs on the wall.
The school has 16 full-time
teachers � 12 Catholic and four
non-Catholic. Protestant teachers
are required to take courses in
Catholicism. No nuns are on the
faculty.
Jonathan Smith, a Presbyte-
rian who has two children, said he
considered public, private r:nd
Catholic education before choos-
ing Our Lady of Grace. He was
impressed with the nurturing,
Christian atmosphere and the
ethnic and economic mix of stu-
dents. Of the students, 18 are
black, 19 Hispanic and four Ori-
ental.
. ,p
ceiling fans.
Bippv: Revolving ceiling fans?
What kind of rating is that?
Chippy: An original one.
Bippv: True. Anyway. Even if
you don't worship the ground that
Bono has flown over, you will like
this movie. The soundtrack is
pretty boss too, though it lacks the
hard-hitting version of "Sunday
Bloody Sunday I give it five
Stevie Nicks caved-in nostrils.
Chippy : Now vou're getting
sillv. Well, that's it for now. I'm
Chippy�
Bippy: � and I'm Bippy �
Chippv and Bippy: saying
"Seat Belts Pay Off '
Chippy . and the duet with
B B King,andthecolorized"With
Without You It gave me
chillbumps
Bipp) Was that one in color?
�. � r member. This movie was
ike the damn "Wizard of Oz if
you were in Kansas it was black
and white, if you were anywhere
else it w as color. 1 wonder if I went
to Kansas I'd look black and
white?
( hippy: You'd still be ugly
though.
Bippv: You're so incredibly
funny. Why don't you write vour
own humor column?
C hippy: 1 do. 1 give "Rattle
and Hum a big three revolving
Now Showing
At Hendrix Wednesday,
Nov. 9 - 8:00 p.m.
"MAGNIFICENT:
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"I really feel they wind uj
leaving the school with a more
balanced view of w ho c Jod is and
a more accepting view of theii
friends Smith said "The) knov
the Catholic folks love Christ in
the same way the Presbyterian
folks do"
Occasionally,atholk pra
tices can puzzle a voting Protes
tant. Beth Dunn a termer public
school teacher and ason'
mother, remembers the VI
Wednesday her son came homo
crying. That da) the children had
participated in a service where
ashes were dusted on the ir fon
heads in the form it a (ross
Dunn called (ason's teachei
who reassured her that her son
could remain in his st.it during
Mass.
"I don't think thej 're i
pressured to do ,uiv of that
Dunn said
Dunn explains U as i and
his 5-year-old sister Hayle thai
Catholics areas. Christian .is Pr
byterians, although they practi( i
pray through Mar) to talk t
Cod' Dunn said.
Kinko's wants you
to vote in '88
4
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'Em lusivc of tram or organized sjort participation.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Pirates break streak
Sports
NOVEMBER 8, 1988 Page 10
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports Editor
The East Carolina Pirates
broke an eight game losing streak
Saturday when they beat Temple
University 34-17 at Veterans Sta-
dium in Philadelphia.
And they did it without the
help and experience of senior
slotbacks Jarrod Moody and
Denell Harper.
"1 had some questions about
how we would come out today, "
sud head coach Art Baker. "After
a light practice on Thursday, we
lost Jarrod Moody and Denell
Harper to freak accidents
Moody did not play due to a
reinjured hamstring and Harper
was hit in the knee.
East Carolina now leads the
series witlvthe Owls 4-3.
"All of the praise belongs to
the players and the assistant
coaches said Baker. "Ithasbeen
a difficult month and week for us.
We came in here to face a team
that just defeated Rutgers. It was a
great effort
The Pirates exploded right
from the start when Anthony Th-
ompson intercepted Temple on
the first play of the game and re-
turned 16 yards for a touchdown.
From there ECU would hold the
lead for the entire game.
Travis Hunter then took over
the Pirate offense and. on their first
drive of the game Hunter con- not enough, when Temple came
nected with Reggie McKinney on
a 55-yard pass to give the Tiratcs a
two touchdown lead. Hunter
passed for 134 yards for the day.
Temple again tried to make
ammends against a tough Tirate
defense but ECU would not
budge, holding the Owls to just
three points in the first half.
The Pirates got another break
in the first period oi play when a
Temple fumble on their 49-yard-
line was recovered by Joe Bright,
setting up the next ECU touch-
down. This time Willie Lewis
rushed through the Temple de-
fense for a two-yard touchdown
and an East Carolina 21-0 lead.
Lewis played an awesome
game as he scored two touch-
downs and rushed for 80-yards.
The only score coming in the
second period of the game was
from a Temple field goal cutting
the Pirate's lead to 21-3.
"Whenever you jump out of a
21-0 lead, you're not as sharp as
you would like explained Baker.
"We tried and blew some scoring
opportunities
The Pirates received the ball
first in the second half of play and
began an 80-yard drive to open
the half with touchdown again bv
Willie Lewis, his second oi two
touchdowns for the day.
The Owls were soon to strike
back, although their efforts were
back and scored their first touch-
down of the day, tightening
ECU'S lead to 28-10.
The Pirate defense did not
give up, though, and after a
Temple pass was intercepted by
Luke Fisher on the Temple 29,
ECU kicker Robb Imperato put
the ball through the uprights
extending the Pirate's lead to 31-
10.
Imperato made two field
goals for the day, one for 37 yards
and another for 18 yards.
The final period of play began
with another Temple touchdown,
again tightening ECU'slead to 31-
17 as the Owls tried to play catch-
up. But the final scoring opportu-
nity came from the Pirates as it
was again Imperato, to make his
final field goal capping the score
34-17.
"We played great football
from the beginning Baker said.
"The special teams really did play
well and a lot of credit goes to John
Jctt (punter) and Robb Imperato.
Robb had faced so much adver-
sity during the season and he
came back todav to hit two field
goals
"The team and coaches de-
serve all of the credit in the
world
Volleyball team falls to 0-5 in
the CAA conference play
Bv CAROLYN JUSTICE
SUfi Writer
Facing the leagues top team,
ECU's women's volleyball team
fell p7-16 overall and 4-5 in Colo-
nillrtlhlrtir Conference play this
past weekend as it took losses
from Willam and Mary and James
Madison University.
ECU traveled to Harri-
sonburg, VA with hopes of win-
ning their first conference match
of the season. Instead, The Lady
Tribe and the Lady Dukes handed
ECU their sixth and seventh con-
secutive losses for the season.
In the first match of
Saturday's play, the Lady Pirates
faced M U. The Lady Dukes were
out to get their second win over
ECU for this season. JMU de-
feated the Lady Pirates last week-
end at the ECU Volleyball Invita-
tion in Greenville. This time, the
win counted in the CAA stand-
ings as ECU fell 12-15, 3-15, 3-15.
"We controlled the first game
with JMU and then lost it. In the
second and third games, our serve
receive was poor and our offense
was never initiated said ECU
coach Judv Kirkpatrick.
Down from their first match
of the day, the Lady Pirates wen
then faced with the challenge of
William and Mary. The Lady
Tribe, the reigning CAA Champi-
ons, and now nationally ranked,
handed ECU their next loss, 1-15,
3-15,2-15.
"We're not in the same class
as William and Mary Kirkpa-
trick said. "We have not yet
reached that level of skill. I think
we can play with them and have
better scores next time
Before the Lady Pirates travel
to the CAA tournament, they will
face UNC-Chapel Hill in their last
home match of the season tonight
at 7 p.m. in Mingcs Coliseum.
The Lady Tarheels defeated
ECU earlier this season at the All-
Carolina Classic in Chanel Hill
but the Ladvtotesareiopking to
break their- losing- streak, and
what better team to do it with.
"Beating UNC in one or two
games would be great. Our goal is
seeded sixth in the tournament
this coming weekend at Ameri-
can University. They will face
George Mason University in first-
round action.
"We can beat GMU. We had a
great game against them earlier
this year Kirkpatrick said.
'They blocked well against us so
we are looking to stop that. GMU
is the best team to start the tourna-
ment off with and we're looking
forward to it
Tigers earn UNC win
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) �
Clemson tailback Terry Allen had
his best game of the season
against struggling North Caro-
lina, but the sophomore said he
had to earn every yard.
"The offensive line blocked
real well, but it wasn't any easier
to run against North Carolina
than anybody else Allen said.
"The game was very physical up
front. They were reallv hitting out
there
Allen avoided many of those
hits while rushing for 167 yards
and one touchdown to lead 17th-
ranked Clemson past the Tar
Heels 37-14 on Saturday at Death
Valley.
The victory, coupled with a
19-14 loss by North Carolina State
to Virginia, means the Tigers can
clinch their third straight Atlantic
Coast Conference title with a vic-
tory at Maryland on Saturday.
Clemson is now 7-2 overall
and 5-1 in the league, while the
Terrapins, who lost to nonconfer-
ence foe Penn State 17-10 Satur-
day are 4-1 in the league. N.C.
State is 4-2.
North Carolina fell to 1-8 and
1-4, but first-year Coach Mack
Brown said he's convinced his
team is improving.
"We're a much better team
than we were three weeks ago
Brown said. "But we've got to run
on all pistons to win a game. We
had a lot of people banged up
coming in and we got more
banged up. They just wore us out
on both sides of the ball
Clemson was its own worst
enemy early on.
An estimated crowd of 80,000
watched the Tigers turn the ball
over three times in the first 12
minutes on a cool, partly cloudy
and windy afternoon. The Tigers
had made just nine turnovers in
their first eight games.
Clemson fumbled on its
opening drive at the North Caro-
lina 19-yard line. The Tigers had
to settle for a 20-yard field goal by
Chris Gardocki on their second
drive.
Quarterback Rodney Wil-
liams threw an interception on his
team's third possession. And then
Arlington Numm inadvertently
touched the ball on a punt mo-
ments later. North Carolina's
Leonard Dempsey recovered at
the Clemson 37. It took the Tar
Heels only one play to score as
tailback Kennard Martin, who
rushed for 116 yards, burst up the
middle for a 37-yard touchdown
with 12:36 left in the half.
The Tigers countered with a
nine-play, 82-yard drive keyed by
a 48-yard end around pass from
wide receiver Chip Davis to Gary
Cooper that put the ball on the Tar
Heels' 15. Three plays later, Wil-
liams hit Ricardo Hooper for a 13-
yard TD to give the Tigers a 10-7
lead with 8:26 left.
Clemson upped its lead to 17-
7on its final possession of the half,
driving 68 yards in 11 plays. Al-
len, who went over the 100-yard
mark for the fourth time this sea-
son on the drive, capped the
march with a three-yard run with
28 seconds left.
"One of the things that killed
us was their long drive at the end
of the first half Brown said.
"That gave them a lot of momen-
ECU rallied Saturday to beat Temple 34-17 at Veterans Stadium. Last year the Pirates were just as
for tunate, beating the Owls at home 31-26. Now ECU leads the series with the Owls four games
to three.
Swim and
great start
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Sports F.ditor
Coach Rick Kobe celebrates
his 100th victory as a result of last
weekend as head swim and dive
coach for the East Carolina Pi-
rates.
The victories came as a result
of wins from both the men and
women against American Uni-
versity and James Madison Uni-
versity.
The Pirate swimmers first
traveled to Washington, D.C to
swim against American Univer-
sity on Saturday where thev had a
fairly easy victory.
'They were good but we were
just too fast said head coach
Rick Kobe. "We just had a lot of
fun
The guys won the meet with a
Dive team off to a
after weekend action
score of 137-106, while the yard butterfly beating both
women won it with a score of 132- American and James Madison
100. with times of 1:57.86 and 1:58.82.
From Washington, the Pirates Raymond Kennedy was equally
traveled to the 'Home of the as awesome in the 200-yard
Dukes' where they romped past
James Madison University on
Sunday.
"For the guys, it was probably
the most convincing victory
ever said Kobe. "We beat them
bad
And indeed they did as the
men won eight of the 11 events
against James Madison.
The Lady Dukes were more
competitive against the lady
swimmers of East Carolina as the
final was decided in the last relay
of the meet.
There were several outstand-
ing performances by ECU swim-
mers. For the men, Andy Johns
had a terrific weekend in the 200-
breaststroke as he also defeated
both AU and JMU in times of
2:14.0 and 2:14.78.
Freshman Page Holt had a
spectacular showing in the first
two meets of her collegiate career
as she didn't lose an event the
entire weekend.
"She was just incredible
Kobe said.
Sherry Campbell also fared
nicely on the diving boards as she
won both the one-meter and
three-meter diving events at
Amcan University and took
first pu�ce in the one-meter and
second in the three-meter boards
See SWIMMING, page 11
New club comes to ECU
turn going into the second half
The Tigers put the game away
on their first possession of the
second half, using up 7:41 on a 15-
play, 76-yard drive culminated by
fullback Tracy Johnson's three-
yard run with 5:10 left.
The drive was typical of the
Tigers' ball control masteiy
against the Tar Heels. Clems- n
didn't punt and had the ball f
40:09 compared with 19:51 for th
Tar Heels, who were 23-point
underdogs.
Still, Clemson coach Danny
Ford wasn't totally pleased.
"I don't think our football
team took advantage of all of our
opportunities early in the game
Ford said. "But I thought the turn-
ing point was right before the half
when we had a drive and scored
for the second straight time
"We looked like we weren't
ready to play in the first half. But
the offense played very well in the
second half
Overall, the Tigers had 500
yards in total offense, including
336 yards on the ground. Nh
Carolina finished with 191 yards
total offense.
It was a record day for Allen,
the ACC's leading rusher, and
Williams.
Allen, who has now rushed
for 956 yards this season, broke
the school record for yards rush-
ing by a sophomore. KenCallicutt
set the record in 1974 when he
rushed for 809 yards.
Allen, whose best previous
effort this year was 154 yards last
week against Wake Forest, also
became the first sophomore to
reach the 2,000-yard mark in all-
purpose yardage.
(IRS) � So it's election day.
Everyone waits with baited
breath to see if Mr. Mike can put
out the burning Bush. Well, take a
break and catch up on the intra-
mural action.
The latest burning question is
- what is underwater hockey? Isit
like water polo? Is it like ice
hockey or maybe scuba diving?
The answer is yes. More specifi-
cally, they all have characteristics
common to the newest club sport,
underwater hockey.
It is played like hockey in that
the offense attempts to score a
goal against the defense. How-
ever, there is no ice, the teams play
under water in Memorial Pool. Six
co-ed team members arc equiped
with a 'Y' shaped stick, fins and
mask. The puck, composed of
lead surrounded by plastic, slides
along the bottom of the pool.
A little curious, intrigued or
find this hard to believe? Head
out to Memorial Pool Friday from
7-8:30 p.m. and all of the equip-
ment and fun will be waiting.
The latest polls have Lucky 7
leading the men's volleyball
league. For the ladies party, the
Enforcers look like the shoc-in
victor. Here are highlights from
other games across the courts of
Minges Coliseum.
Belk DPI fell in the third game
to opponent Delta Sigma 'C' 14-
16, 16-14 and 11-5. In sudden
death, time ran out on the DPI as
they found their first loss.
Second place flag football fin-
ishers, Theta Chi took it out on the
Alpha Sigs in a 15-3 defeat of
game number two. Phil Palermo
and John Giammotti put in a
strong performance for Theta Chi.
In other men's independent
action, the Animals bit the bullet
in two as the Scruff men posted 15-
3 and 15-13 match victories. Frank
Cahoon spiked his team to vic-
tory. Todd Daniel served an excel-
lent second game but The Ani-
mals were unable to catch up soon
enough.
In fraternity action, Tau
Kappa Epsilon standouts, Trey
Park and Gary Hurley, posted
consistent serving games. Cam-
pus government leader, Larry
Murphy had a landslide serving
game as he served 15 straight
points against Delta Sigma.
Be sure to catch the Turkey
Trot action mid-November. Reg-
ister November 15 at 5 p.m. in BIO
103 for this years run. Men and
women student, faculty and staff
divisions will be set up with the
victories walking away with the
bird. Yes, if you win, you may win
a holiday turkey or pumpkin pie.
"If we only had one minute
left
"If I had only caught that pass
Well, the ifs can be
answered during Intramural
Challenge Week. This is an oppor-
tunity for every team or individ-
ual to set up that 'grudge' match
with a favorite, or not so favoirite,
person or team. Register Novem-
ber 14 from 11 a.m. � 6 p.m. in
Memorial Gym 104. The IRS De-
partment will get officials, equip-
ment and facilities during the
time you wish to play.
N.C. State lessens ACC bid as
UVA edges the Wolfpack 19-14
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
(AP) � Virginia's 19-14 Atlantic
Coast Conference victory left both
coaches shaking their heads, but
for different reasons.
For Virginia's George Walsh,
it meant another step in his team's
bid to salvage a successful season
out of a 2-4 start. Saturday's
triumph was the Cavalier's third
in as many weeks and moved
them to 5-4 overall and 3-2 in the
ACC with games against North
Carolina and Maryland remain-
ing.
"If we win seven, we've had a
helluva year, based on where we
were Welsh said.
Dick Sheridan's Wolfpack
had entered the game tied with
Clemson and Maryland for the
ACC lead, and the N.C. State
coach was predictably upset over
his squad's lost opportunity.
"We were in a position to win
the ACC championship Sheri-
dan said, "and this hurts quite a
bit
The loss was the second
straight for the Wolfpack, 6-3 and
4-2.
N.C. State came to Charlot-
tcsville ranked first in the ACC
and third in the nation in total
defense.
But several Virginia players
said they used the Wolfpack's
defensive credentials as motiva-
tion, a claim they backed up with
their own defensive performance
early, holding N.C. State to just
four yards on its first four posses-
sions.
"It was time to circle the
wagons, and that's what we did
said Virginia linebacker Jeff Lage-
man, who had one interception,
blocked a field-goal attempt and
made seven tackles, including
one for a loss.
In the first half, the Cavaliers
fumbled five times, losing two,
and quarterback Shawn Moore
was intercepted twice. In addi-
tion, Virginia had one punt
blocked and another one go for
just 10 yards.
Nonetheless, the Cavaliers
led 9-7 at the halftime.
"Our defense kept us in the
game said Welsh, whose team
held the Wolfpack to just 88 yards
in first-half offense.
"We made more mistakes in
the first half than in our other
games combined Sheridan said.
"We were tense, no doubt about
it. I wish I was smart enough to
know why
The Wolfpack did not capital-
ize until the final Virginia miscue
of the half, an errant pitch by
Moore that was recovered by N.C.
State's Fernandus Vinson at the
Virginia 10-yard line. Two plays
later, tailback Tyrone Jackson
scored on a 5-yard run that gave
N.C. State a 7-3 edge.
Citadel
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) -
To the average fan, the twisted
and bent goal posts at cither end
iof Johnson Ha good Stadium told
the story of The Citadel's stun
ning 20-3 upset over Marshall, the
No. 1 team in Division I-AA col-
lege football
But to theitade! faithful, the
magnitude of the victory could
better be gauged by the fact that
even freshmen cadets at the mili-
tary college were given overnight!
liberty Saturdav night to
brate.
Like tearing down the
posts, overnight liber
freshmen don't come often at Thel
Citadel.
And d feats like the one the
Thundering Herd suffered at I
hands of The C itadel's rambl
wishbone offense and tena
j defense don't happen often i
ther.
But there was some d
after the game as to whethe
Saturday's win was bigger than
42-35 victory over Navy earlier ii
; the season.
"It seems like this is th
gest win of the season everyi
I week said Citadel coach Charli
I Taffe. "It demonstrated
bunch of guys can do b
ingupand hangii � n
defense was just it standing an
offensively wet
ness
Swimmer
dominate
Continued from paye 10
at James Madison.
Other good performance!
from the ECU men at America-
University were in the
backstroke where the Pirate
swept the event taking all three
places. Mark O'Brien was first t
touch the wall with a time 0
2:01.65. Nearly a second later
George Walters swam in at 2
to claim second and again a s
ond. later, Tom Holstei
pletoLiheivt?op with his c
2:0337. ' '
The result of the 500-yar
freestyle w as nodifferent than thy
200-yard backstroke as again th
men claimed first, second am
third place victories. ID. 1 ewij
came in first in4:51.93, Mark I
grabbed second in 4:52.84 an�
Andv leter settled for third
4:53.49.
Perry Smith claimed first
both the one-meter and three-me
I ter boards at American but couU
only establish a fourth pla
I showing at JMU on both boards
Page Holt won the 100-yarc
freestyle, and 50 freestyle tor th
women at American University
I with times oi 54.23 and 2 -
I while Meredith Bridgerstook firs
� in the 200-yard breaststroke i
I 2:24.05.
The 200-yard freestyle be
I longed to Carolyn Green with hej
1:59.03 first place performance
iSome lames Madison highf
lights for the ladies were a fil
I place showing for Holt in the 200
I yard freestyle (156.), the 3d
I yard freestyle(25.14) and the 100
yard freestyle (54.61). Bridgert
again took first in the 200-yarf
breaststroke in 2:24.07 and al
came out on top in the 100-yanj
breaststroke (106.53) as well
Robin Wicks captured firs
place in the 200-yard butterfl
with her time of 2:13.06.
For the East Carolina guyi
the 500-yard freestyle was ti
another sweep for the weekend
J.D. Lewis. Mark Cook and ik
Jeter took first, second and thii
places respectively.
Kennedy also came up
the win in the 200-yard individuj
medley with his rime of 201 i
and Mark O'Brien claimed first
the 200-yard backstroke with
time of 2:00.25.
"We swam very fast thl
weekend said Kobe. "The swii
season is off to a great start
STAY
ON
TOP
f all the satiric funnies as Chil
id Earl take you to the land o(
f f enstvfe slander.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8,1988 11
10
r the Pirates u ere just as
the Owls tour games
to a
d action
y boating both
fames Madison
s and 158 82.
Kennedy was equally
me in the 200-yard
is u also defeated
in times oi
m:
nan Page Holt had a
r showing in tho first
er collegiate career
s� an event the
isl incredible
mpbell also fared
kardsasshe
tho ono-motor and
living events at
can University and took
a the one-meter and
� meter boards
e SWIMMING, page 11
ECU
- Hurley, posted
games. Cam-
ment loader, Larry
I a landslide serving
- ho served 15 straight
it Delta Sigma.
catch the Turkcv
nid-November. Reg-
mber 15 at 5 p.m. in BIO
is years run. Men and
r student, faculty and staff
ons will bo sot up with tho
ies walking away with the
if you win, you mav win
turkey or pumpkin pie.
nl had one minute
' had only caught that pass
' Well, the lfs can be
rered during Intramural
I' Week. This isanoppor-
r every toam or mdivid-
set up that 'grudge' match
i favorite, or not so favoirite,
I am. Register IMovem-
t 11 a.m. � 6 p.m. in
)rial Gym 104. The IRS De-
�ent will got officials, oquip-
and facilities dunng the
i wish to plav
bid as
k 19-14
uarterback Shawn Moore
ptod twice. In addi-
rginia had one punt
led and another one go for
0 yards.
onetheless, the Cavaliers
7 at tho ha If time.
ur defense kept us in the
said Welsh, whose team
ho Wolf pack to just 88 yards
)t- ha If offense.
o made more mistakes in
rt half than in our other
� mbined Sheridan said.
rere tense, no doubt about
ish I was smart enough to
whv
� Wolfpackdid notcapital-
htil tho final Virginia miscue
half, an errant pitch by
� that was recovered by N.C.
Femandus Vinson at the
ua 10-yard line. Two plays
tailback Tyrone Jackson
on a 5-yard run that gave
tate a 7-3 edge.
Citadel upsets No. 1 Marshall
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) �
To the average fan, the twisted
and bent goal posts at either end
of Johnson Hagood Stadium told
the story of The Citadel's stun-
ning 20-3 upset over Marshall, the
No. 1 team in Division I-AA col-
lege football.
But to the Citadel faithful, the
magnitude of the victory could
better be gauged by the fact that
e on freshmen cadets at the mili-
tary college were given overnight
liberty Saturday night to cele-
brate.
Like tearing down the goal
posts, overnight liberties for
freshmen don't come often at The
Citadel.
And defeats like the one the
rhundering I lord suffered at the
hands of The Citadel's rambling
wishbone offense and tenacious
defense don't happen often ei-
ther.
But there was some debate
after the game as to whether
Saturday's win was bigger than a
42-35 victory over Navy earlier in
the season.
"It seems like this is the big-
t win oi the season every
week said Citadel coach Charlie
laffe. it demonstrated what a
bunch of guvs can do by not giv-
ing up and hanging together. Our
defense was just outstanding and
offensively we took care of busi-
ness
Swimmers
dominate
Continued from page 10
at James Madison.
Other good performances
from tho ECU men at American
University wore in the 200-yard
backstroke whore the Firates
swept tho event taking all three
places. Mark O'Brien was first to
touch the wall with a time of
2:01.65. Nearly a second later,
George Walters swam in at 2:02.34
to claim second and again a sec-
ond later, Tom Holsten com-
pletaduthtiibAveop with lus time of
2:0337. '
Tho result of the 500-yard
freestyle w as no different than the
200-yard backstroke as again tho
men claimed first, second and
third place victories. J.D. Lewis
came in first in 4:51.93, Mark Cook
grabbed second in 4:52.84 and
Andy Jeter settled for third in
4:53.49.
Perry Smith claimed first for
both the one-meter and three-me-
ter boards at American but could
rtly establish a fourth place
showing at JMU on both boards.
Page Holt won the 100-yard
freestyle, and 50 freestyle for the
women at American University
with times of 54.23 and 25.12,
v hile Meredith Bridgers took first
in the 200-yard broaststroke in
2:24.05.
The 200-yard freestyle be-
l nged to Carolyn Croon with her
1 39.03 first place performance.
Some James Madison high-
lights for the ladies were a first
place showing for Holt in the 200-
vard freestvle (1.56.96), the 50-
yard freestyle (25.14) and the 100-
yard freestyle (54.61). Bridgers
again took first in the 200-yard
broaststroke in 2:24.07 and also
came out on top in the 100-yard
broaststroke (1:(K53) as well.
Robin Wicks captured first
place in the 200-yard butterfly
with her time of 2:13.06.
For the East Carolina guys,
the 500-yard freestyle was yet
another sweep for the weekend as
J.D. Lewis, Mark Cook and Andy
Jotor took first, second and third
places respectively.
Kennedy also came up with
the win in die 200-yard individual
medley with his time of 2:00.84
and Mark O'Brien claimed first in
the 200-vard backstroke with a
time of 2:00.25.
"We swam very fast this
weekend said Kobe. "The swim
season is off to a great start
The win gave No. 19, The
Citadel, a 7-2 mark on the season
- their best start since 1969.
Marshall fell from the ranks oi the
undefeated to 8-1.
The contest also clouded the
race for the Southern Conference
championship and the league's
automatic berth in the Division I-
AA playoffs. Three teams in the
loop - Marshall, The Citadel and
Furman � each have one confer-
ence loss.
Marshall Coach George
Chaump simply said "1 have no
excuses. Their spider web defense
made it hard for us to throw on
third and long. They did a good
job of playing it straight defen-
sively and blitzing when they had
to "
Citadel fullback Adrian
Johnson rushed for 106 yards and
two touchdowns for The Citadel
and is only 10 vards shv of a 1,000-
yard season.
Meanwhile, the Bulldog de-
fense forced Marshall quarter-
back John Gregory into three
interceptions, the most in his ca-
reer for a single game, and sacked
him three times as well.
-Marshall converted only one
of nine third down attempts and
controlled the ball only seven
minutes during the second half.
"We were ready for every-
thing they threw at us said Cita-
del defensive tackle David
Russinko. "After the first series of
the game, we came back to the
sidelines and said 'they're not
unbeatable We knew we could
FREE
Johnson scored on one-yard
touchdown plunges in the second
and fourth quarters. Split end
Phillip Florence also scored on a
33-yard reverse in the third.
Marshall's only score was a
23-yard Dewey Klein field goal in piay7hemand stop anything
the second period. After that score
when a drive stalled at The Cita-
del six, Marshall's deepest pene-
tration would be to the Citadel 38.
The numbers tell much of the
story:
-Marshall, which had been
averaging over 400 yards of of-
fense per game was held to 247,
the club's lowest output of the
season.
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12
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8,1988
Atlanta shuts out Packers
ATLANTA (AP) � Atlanta
defensive end Mike Gann said the
Falcons turned to something dif-
ferent � the blitz � against the
Green Bay Packers and were
rewarded with their first shutout
in nearly six years and their sec-
ond straight victory for the first
time since the start of the 1986
season.
The Falcons managed only
one quarterback sack. But the
storming defense forced a har-
assed Green Bay offense into
seven turnovers en route to a 20-0
NFL viciury before a slim gather-
ing of 29,952 at Atlanta-Fulton
County Stadium on a crisp, clear
Sunday afternoon.
It was the first time in 56 vears
that Green Bay had been shut out
two consecutive games.
Chris Miller guided Atlanta's
attack by throwing for 177 yards,
including a 45-yard touchdown
strike to Gene Lang midway
through the opening quarter as
the Falcons built a 17-0 half time
lead. John Settle, who rushed for
93 yards, added a one-yard TD
run in the second period and Greg
Davis kicked field goals of 52 and
43 yards. The 52-varder equalled
the club record set by Mick
Luckhurst.
"We saw on film that we
could blitz, something we usually
don't do said Gann. "We're not a
blitzing team. But we did today
and it was successful
The defenders came up with
four interceptions of Green Bay
quarterbacks Don Ma jkowski and
Randy Wright, and three fumble
recoveries. Scott Case had two of
the interceptions, and Tim Gor-
don and Robert Moore had the
others while Gann, nose guard
Tony Casillas and end Rick Bryan
had the fumble recoveries.
The shutout was the first for
Atlanta, 3-7, since a 35-0 triumph
against New Orleans on Dec. 12,
1982. It was also the first time the
Falcons had won two in a row
since opening the 1986 season
with four consecutive victories.
For the Packers, 2-8, it was
their third straight loss and sec-
ond consecutive shutout after
being blanked last week 28-0 by
Buffalo. The last time Green Bay
was shut out in consecutive
games was in 1932.
Case agreed with Gann that
the blitz was the key to the success
of the defense.
"We got the seven turnovers
because we blitzed a little more
today than usual. We had seen it
on film and felt we could do it and
we did he said.
"As for the shutout, hopefully
we'll see more of them. I think
you're looking at a hungry de-
fense, especially in the second
half said Case. "When we saw
the goose egg on the scoreboard,
we wanted it to stay and the guys
said, Tet's go get it"
Miller, who hit on 15 of 25
passes on the day, said the two
victories in a row were important,
but hopefully only the start of
something better.
"Now next Sunday we've got
to make it three in a row and build
something here. We're capable of
doing it. I had a good start with
the quick TD, but I made some
mistakes later on said Miller,
who was intercepted twice in the
second half.
"But the defense did a great
job, we scored 20 points and came
out winners, and that's the bot-
tom line. We're on the right
track he said.
"The next step we had to take
was to learn how to win back-to-
back said Falcons' offensive
guard Bill Fralic. "That means
we're headed in the right direc-
tion. It's a good sign when you
don't have to play great to win.
We should have scored more to-
day but we made some errors, but
the more you win, the easier it is to
put pessimism behind you
Green Bay managed 284
yardsoffensively,but never really
threatened to score because of the
turnovers. The Packers only at-
tempt at a score came in the first
period, but Dale Dawson's 45-
yard field goal sailed to the left of
the goal posts.
"You can't go out there and
throw interceptions and fumble
the football and make the mis-
takes we made and expect to be a
very good football team said
Green Bay Coach Lindy Infante.
"We were not a very good
football team offensively again. If
I had the answers or had a magic
wand, believe me I would have
waved it a long time ago. I'm not
into magic but we'll just keep
working hard until we get it
done he said.
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Hornets, Heat plan to lose
NBA Commissioner David
Stern has two words of advice for
fans of the Charlotte Hornets and
Miami Heat:
"Patience. . atience
Judging from the opening-
night performances of the two
expansion teams, victories in their
didn't matter how I performed, I uncommon in professional sports, rookies Rony Seikaly, Kevin
wouldn't play. It didn't matter if Miami is playing in the Western Edwards and Sylvester Gray will
Kareem missed 40 shots in prac- Conference, which means that the play key roles,
tice, he was going to start. Here, two expansion teams will meet
it's been exciting getting in shape only twice.
because here 1 get rewarded (with Despite the inevitable corn-
playing time) parisons,bothsidessay they won't
Veterans on both teams say worry what the other expansion
first season will await those nights that keeping a positive attitude team is doing,
who the opposition is overcome will be the most important factor "We want to compete with all
bv complacency or travel-weari- in winning an occasional game. teams, not Miami Tripucka said,
ness. Or both. "(The Lakers) tended to play "We want to leave the locker room
The Heat lost bv 20 points to well foeeight minutes, then poorly every night thinking we can win
the Los Angeles Clippers one day for four, and we still won Ram- "We won't be looking at the
after Cleveland routed the Hor- bis said. "It's hard to get out of standings to see how Charlotte is
nets by 40. that mind-set. But we have to doing Miami's Pearl Washing-
That doesn't necessarily mean here ton saidWe have to worry about
that Miami is twice as good as "We can't have guys going different teams every night
Charlotte. In the Clippers, the Heat hard to two defensive plays, then Miami coach Ron Rothstein
faced a team that won three of 41 feelinggood about themselves. We said the Heat will have it tougher
have to have all players playing than Charlotte because of their
on all cylinders all the time travel difficulties. Miami has a
"The veterans can help in $500,000 travel budget, almost
January and February when we've double the league average.
lost a few in a row and the ten- "How can you compare the
dencv is to go on vacation Mi- two teams?" Rothstein asked.
ami's Pat Cumminos said. "The "We're in different conferences.
veteran can settle evervone down We live in the East and travel in
and tell them how tough the NBA the West. The philosophies of the
is and they have to keep pushing two franchises are completely
Reminded that the most opti- different. They have veterans and
mistic prediction has the Hornets
winning 20 games, Charlotte's
RobertRcid said. "That's62 losses.
That's a lot of losing for anybody.
We have our pride. I've never had
to go through that in 10 seasons at
Houston
In a quirk of geography not
Charlotte's Tripucka, Reid,
Rambi Rickey Green and Earl
Cureton all have at least six vears
in the NBA. But age and lack of
size will torture the Hornets de-
fensively.
In the preseason they were
ourreboundedby 12 per game and
in the opener they were outre-
bounded 62-39 and Pave up 133
points to the Cavaliers.
Asked who is Charlotte's best
defensive player. Coach Dick
Harter said, "We don't have one
Such is life on an NBA expan-
sion team.
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games on the road last season and
had as manv rookies and second-
year players as either exoansion
team.
But what the Hornets and the
1 leat lacked in talent and cohe-
sivenes, they had a surplus in
enthusiasm, not only among the
players, but also coaches, man-
agement and fans.
' These two teams will be a
good example for Orlando and
Minnesota to follow'Stern said,
referringto next year's NBA ex-
pansion entriesI couldn't be
more pleased with the way thev
have handled things
Of course, the players - veter-
ans no one else wanted and rook-
ies - are glad to be in the NBA.
Manv of them know the alterna-
tives are the end some other team's
bench,retircment. Europe or the
Continental Basketball Associa-
tion.
"Many players say they'd
rather play on the bench for cham-
pionship team said Hornets for-
ward Kelly Tripucka, who plaved
5 minutes in the opener, "but I'm
not one of those guys. I'd rather
play
"Evervbody's goal is to win a
chamoionship. We're not going to
win one this year or the year after
or the year after. But that doesn't
mean we won't be striving to build
a championship team
Miami and Charlotteeach has
a player that wason the Los Ange-
les Lakers as thev won NBA titles
the last two vears.
Miami's Billy Thompson
played 59 games as a reserve in
1986-87, but saw action in onlv
nine games last season because of
a knee injury. He also was a
member of Louisville's national
collegiate champion in 1986.
"It was enjoyable being on the
Lakers - two chamoionships and
playing with great players Th-
ompson said. "That experience is
great, to learn early in your career
what it's like to winIf I hadn't
been hurt, I would have loved to
stay. If I hadn't been hurt,I think I
would have stayed. But they had
to leave three players unprotected
and I was the one taken. Now, I'm
with a team where I have a chance
to start fresh
The departure of Charlotte's
Kurt Rambis, a member of four
championship teams with the
Lakers, was not so amicable. He
was signed by the Hornets as an
unrestricted free agent after essen-
tiallv being cast aside by the Lak-
ers. "I can see light at the end of
the tunnel here Rambis
said'Before, there was no light. It
we're younger.
"I'm not saying our way is
right and theirs is wrong, but it
will take five years to make a fair
comparison
Cummings and Rory Sparrow
are the only Heat players with
plenty of NBA experience, and
'�
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 8, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 08, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.639
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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