The East Carolinian, November 3, 1988






Inside
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS7
FEATURES8
SPORTS12
Features
According to Jim Shamlin, Wynton Marsal is was
;ood, but not all he was stacked up to be. See for your-
self on, see page 8.
Sports
Despite his resignation, Art Baker stays on at ECHLJ as
Hrector of Personal Development for Student Athletes
see page ll
�he iEafit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 32
Thursday November3,1988
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Mayor says 'The party's over'
By BEN SELB
Stiff Writer
In a City Council meeting
Tueday night Mayor Ed Carter
said the 1 Ulloween celebration on
Fifth and Cotanche Streets is over.
City Manager Greg Knowles
said the mayor made the state-
ment, "The party's over in what
Knowles called "the heat of emo-
tion
We'regoingtotryand talk to
the mayor about having an Octo-
berfest type of celebration next
year � someplace other than in
the street knowles said. 1 le said
everyone from the council does
not agree with the mayor's deci-
sion.
The mayor does not have the
power to veto without a vote from
?he City Council. The Citv Coun-
cil voting process is structured so
the mayor votes only in the event
of a tie.
"1 think a reason for the
mayor's decision ;s all the vio-
lence and arrests that took place
Monday night Knowles said.
According to police reports
teenagers and highschoolers
were responsible for most of the
increase in violence aad .rrti
during the Halloween celebration
which was half as large as las'
year. He said ECU students were
well behaved tor the most part.
"Overall, the FCC students
are to be commended tor their ac-
tions Knowles said. "1 won't
begin to name the fraternities
helped with theclcan-up,but thev
know who thev are he said.
At least 50 arrests, tor various
reasons, were made by Greenville
Police Monday i g Alcohol
Law Enforcement authorities
(ALE) issued 141 citations, most
of which were for possession of
alcohol by a minor.
An ALE officer suffered a
broken leg and ankle when he at-
tempted to stop a car thief, the
subject struck the officer with the
car, but was soon apprehended
and faces a list or serious charges.
He was proud of the way the
state, military, and local police
and ALE worked together to con-
trol safety during the event. Both
the citv manager and the chief
believe that security personnel
used unusual restraint in the face
of assault and verbal abuse.
Monday we didn't have as
big a crowd as last year; we did
have somewhat oi a different
mixture Tesmond said. "A
number oi assaults, these teen-
agers 1 mentioned, were the pri-
mary cause oi the trouble
Tesmond said officers esti-
mated the crowd at somewhere
between 8,000 to 10,000 people.
Some oi the teenagers were
walking through the crowd in
groups blmdsiding people inde-
scriminately, he said.
I'm very concerned about
the future oi this event said
1 esmond. "There was many
times throughout that event that
we could have had a tragedy
"This is one of the few times
throughout the school year that
the residents of our community
have the opportunity to interact
with ECU residents said
Tesmond. "I don't call them stu-
dents because they've got a re-
sponsibility as residents to this
community, too We're all
neighbors
The police department is put-
ting a critical analysis together
that will provide an overview of
the negative and positive aspects
of Greenville's Halloween. It will
be submitted to the citv council
and citv manager for review. The
future oi the festival will be deter-
mined by this analysis.
While downtown was busied
with assaults and celebration,
campus was relatively quiet, the
bands ot roving teenagers that
troubled downtown did not make
it onto campus.
"We had a marked decrease1
in the false fire alarms we re-
ceived said ECU Police Chief
f.R. Roe. "We had a big problem
with that last year
Trashing residence halls and
visitation violations were not
prevalent this year, Rose said.
Security guards Were placed at
Mendenhall's addition no longer seems a chaotic mass of steel,
but is finally taking shape (Photo By Thomas Walters, ECU
Photo Lab).
.
residence halls and students were
required toshowan IDor visitor's
pass. Rose feels the extra security
reduced the number of problems
that Public Safety encountered.
Student Health Services
(SHS) stayed open until 4 a.m.
seeing 14 students and visitors
with fractures, cuts, lacerations,
and bruises. Extra doctors,
nurses, and technicians were on
call.
Kay Van Nortwick, assistant
director for administration said
most oi the people that went to the
infirmary weren't participants in
any of the fights but happened to
be in the wrong place at the wrong
time.
"We had some people that
truly had too much to drink she
said. "Thev had drunk too much
in too short a period oi time
"The students that came in
here were happy, even though
thev were hurt. Thev were out
having a good time and this just
sort of stopped it for a while she
said.
Plans for next year are subject
to review of the critical analysis
the police department is putting
together. One oi the ideas tor next
year is to move ground zero from
downtown to the town commons.
"It the council suggests
something like an Octoberfest,
then we're going to try to invite
fraternities and other organiza-
tions back Knowles said, "and
ask them for their input about
how we might do this and what
role they may want to plav and
six1 if we can't organize something
that everyone can get involved
in with a little less tist cuffs
By holding I lalloween on the
town commons greater safety-
could be provided. With bands,
best costume contests and other
events Halloween would be more
than "let's go downtown, get
drunk, puke, and have a good
time Knowles said.
"We could get more adults
and kevp more of the minors
out he said.
Pollution poses
threat to N.C.
ASHEVILLE (AP) � Pollu-
tion is a growing threat to the
travel industry in western North
Carolina, harming mountain for-
ests and even historic buildings
like the Biltmore House, tourism
officials say.
"We are going to stop this
problem someday, somehow, or
else wc will not be in business in
the travel industry said Tony
Seamon, president of the Travel
Council of North Carolina.
"So we have to roll our
sleeves up and go to work Sea-
mon told officials gathered at the
Travel Council of North
Carolina's annual convention on
Monday. "This is a problem eve-
rywhere we go, from the atmos-
phere right on in to the soil
Acid rain is killing the trees
on mountain peaks and the fish in
rivers and lakes, speakers said.
Discarded plastics, sewage and
medical debris is washing up on
beaches. And air pollution creates
a thick haze that obscures the
view.
The group planned to travel
to Mount Mitchell later in the day
to see the effects of acid rain first-
hand. Scientists blame acid rain
for the death of many tees there
over the past several years.
"This beautiful view you've
got here in Asheville with all the
trees and mountains and every-
See TRAVEL, page 2
Monday night, for possibly the last time, partiers gathered on Fifth and Cotanche Streets to cele
brate Hallow een (Photos By Mark Love and Angela Pridgen, ECU Photo Lab).
AIDS week starts on Monday
By SEAN HERRING
Assistant News Editor
ECU'S first AIDS Awareness
Week is scheduled to begin Mon-
day. The five day event is spon-
sored by Student Health Services
to educate students about the dis-
ease.
The event scheduled on
campus from November 7th
through the 11th will correlate
with National AIDS Week.
SHS Educator Mary Elesha-
Adams stated that the event will
begin in Scott I tail, with a pro-
gram entitled: "Available In Dif-
ferent S'Jes: How Do You Meas-
ure Up?'
"We will provide informa-
tion in the program about the
transmission of AIDS. Also, we
will help individual people deter-
mine what their own personal
risk might be Miss Adams said.
Some people may be at a risk
of contracting the virus and do not
know enough about AIDS to take
precautions.
"There are some people who
generalize the disease by thinking
because they do not use drugs or
they are not gay, they cannot get
AIDS she said.
Miss Adams said, "We want
people to understand that being
in a high risk group is not neces-
sarily a factor, but the major factor
is high risk behaviors
Miss Adams stated that a
similar program will be presented
that week in Fletcher Hall.
Another event that SHS will
sponsor is an AIDS Expo, which
will be held at the Student Book
Store and Mendenhall Student
Center. There will be booths with
video showings and information.
"One of our concerns is that
people might avoid the informa-
tion booth, for fear of being la-
beled with having AIDS she
said.
"Because someone is inter-
ested in the information, we are
not going to assume that they
have AIDS. We should all be inter-
Some people may be at
risk of contracting the
virus and do not know
enough about AIDS to
take precautions.
ested in being further educated
about this illness Miss Adams
said.
Thirty-two students inter-
ested further education on the
subject were trained by SHS as
AIDS educators.
"W7e are very excited about
the peer concept of students
teaching students and feel that
this can be beneficial. We also
have other programs that we will
be doing in the future, in which
they will be involved Miss
Adams said.
Guest speaker Mike Miller,
who has AIDS, will give a presen-
tation, next week, at Hendrix
Theatre, entitled "Living With
AIDS
Miss Adams said, "The
speaker is not an ECU student,
but heisan AIDSactivist who has
travelled statewide
"He will describe the impact
that the illness has had on his life
and his family she said.
According to Miss Adams,
Miller plans to spend the major-
ity of his presentation answering
questions.
"He really wants people to
ask him a lot of questions that will
help to educate students, faculty,
and staff about the disease
"His wife will be there to
answer any questions that
people may want to ask a family
member she said.
Miss Adams said she foresees
Miller as being an inspiration to
people, whether they have AIDS
or not.
"A lot of people have heard so
much about this disease, but they
have only seen movies that depict
an AIDS patient negatively
"It is different to be able to
talk with someone who has AIDS,
and ask him questions she said.
Miss Adams stated that the
issue of AIDS is something that
should be addressed at all times.
"Next week there will be a lot
of emphasis on the subject of
AIDS to get people thinking about
it. We should be concerned about
its effect on the campus, commu-
nity, and nation all year around
she said.
SGA faces ambulance issue
By MICHAEL BARTLETT
Staff Writer
The question facing the the
SGA is whether or not emer-
gency medical transportation
should be provided to ECU .
The proposal is a resolution
for emergency medical transpor-
tation for students that would al-
lot funding for students needing
ambulance services during hours
in which the Student Health Cen-
ter is not open.
Legislator Steve Sommers
opened the debate by expressing
the need to create new services to
meet the needs of the students.
"This will broaden the student
services and promote a consistent
effort to update the services for
the ECU Community Sommers
said.
Sommers' debate was met
with a host of legislators citing in-
surance programs offering assis-
tance for students.
JohnNagy began this debate
by saying, "Insurance is offered
by the school and anyone can
purchase it
"Insurance is offered said
Susan Cooperman. "If a person
chooses not to get it then they
must pay the bills. It is a good idea
in concept but this isn't the way to
solve it stated Cooperman.
"Student Health Service
people are supportive of the
emergency service said Allen
Manning, author of the bill. 'The
health center has limitations and
it should be able to offer assis-
tance in problems that occur after
hours. The cost would only be
about 10-20 cents per student
Russell Lowe questioned the
use of the service. "What if it is a
Friday night, and you are drink-
ing. Does the school have to pay if
you get hurt? If so, that isn't fair
Lowe said.
Karen Smith rebutted Lowe's
comment by sayng: "I don't care if
you are drinking or on drugs. If
you need help then it should be
offered. I want someone to take
me to the hospital that knows
what they are dome '
'This univcr , is like a
community M Helms said.
"My home town doesn't pay my
bills. Your fees are for bettering
the SHC and its services. It is not
to pay for EMT costs.
Helms posed a question to the
legislative body by saying,
"Should our university pay for
drunken individuals off-campus
who chose to fight? We could
spend a lot of money wiuH thii
policy
Dillion Kalkhurst ended the
debate by saying, "I agree with
the resolution but it needs more
guidelines to clarify where and
when it is paid





f;
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3. 1988
g flu victims is effective prevention
I Flu, or influenza, is a group of
viruses that attack the respiratory
tract.
Most infections occur during
winter when humiditv is low so
that mucous membranes are left
dried out and easily penetrated.
One person can have repeated
cases of the flu because there are
so many different flu viruses al-
ready and new strains being cre-
ated naturally through genetic
mutation.
After exposure to one strain
of flu virus the person becomes
immune to that particular strain
but is still susceptible to other
strains.
Prevention can take several
forms. Since the flu virus is a res-
piratory "bug it is spread by
sneezing or coughing. The sneeze
or cough contains microscopic
moisture droplets of virus. The
droplets then are inhaled by un-
suspecting victims.
To Your Health
By
Mary-Elesha Adams
Therefore, simply avoiding
other students with flu-like symp-
toms will help. Also, try to avoid
stress because resistance to flu is
due to the integrity of the immu-
nological system. Eat and rest
properly. Avoid fatigue.
Fever, cough, sore throat,
headache, muscle aches, and fa-
tigue are some of the symptoms
that let everyone know a "bug" is
going around. Having these
means you may already have the
flu; the only treatment is sympto-
matic. Avoid exertion for 24-48
hours after your temperature has
returned to normal.
Tylenol helps for muscle
aches and headaches. Salt water
gargles are useful for sore throat.
Steam inhalation, from a vapor-
izer, prevents mucous secretions
from drying out. Decongestants
can be helpful for sinus symp-
toms.
Usually, complete recovery
occurs in uncomplicated cases.
However, complications can re-
sult; the most common are secon-
dary bacterial infections. These
are suggested by persistance of
fever and cough for more than
five days. Consult a doctor then
because antibiotics are needed to
cure this infection.
Visit the Student Health Cen-
ter "Cold Clinic" between the
lobby and the pharmacy if you
have questions concerning your
sore throat or cold symptoms.
You may also ask to talk with
a nurse concerning your symp-
toms to see if they are serious
enough for you to need to see a
health care provider.
America, nation of sex fiends?
LOS ANGELES (AP) - As
manv as b percent of Americans
mav be so obsessed with sex it
interferes with their lives, but
experts can't agree how to treat
these "sex addicts" - or even if
they're addicts.
EH Coleman, a pioneer in the
field, says there's rut question that
sexual addiction exists, and that
his patients includemen who are
"masturbating TO to 15 times a
day resulting in physical injury,
hiring prostitutes On a daily basis,
vlr Raving) multiple anonymous
sexual encounters without any
regard to risk of health or commit-
ments to family or relationships
The concept has become in-
creasingly popular in recent
vears, spurring the creation of
self-help groups modeled after
Alcoholics Anonymous. Mary
Ann Miller, a psychologist who
founded the Chicago chapter of
Sex Addicts Anonymous, has esti-
mated that up to 6 percent of
Americans are addicts.
However, sociologist Martin
P. Levine and Richard Troiden
wrote in the August issue of the
Journal of Sex Research that the
sex addict theory amounts to
"transforming sin into sickness
"There's no such disease as
sexual addiction or sexual com-
pulsion. It doesn't exist said
Levine. at "Bloomfield College in
Mew Jersey. "You can't be ad-
dieted to sex. Addiction is a
ahvsiological dependenev on a
s&Dstihce?�" 6"
J He and Troiden, of Miami
university in Oxford, Ohio, wrote
that "the invention of sexual ad-
diction and sexual compulsion as
diseases' threatens the civil liber-
ties of sexually variant peoples"
like homosexuals.
"Mental health professionals
must remain cautious about en-
dorsing concepts which may
serve as tilly clubs' for driving
the erotically unconventional into
the traditional sexual fold they
cautioned.
While not addictive in the
chemical sense, "these behavior
patterns are pathological, self-
defeating said Coleman, a psy-
chologist in the University of
Minnesota Medical School's
human sexuality program.
"These individuals display
hypersexuality in response to
feelings of anxiety, depression or
loneliness. Many describe a sex-
ual act as a 'fix' to some very nega-
tive feeling. But this relief is short-
lived and negative feelings re-
cur
Dr. Theresa Crcnshaw, a San
Diego physician and sex therapist
who served on President
Reagan's AIDS commission, said
the sex addicts she treats "want
help. They don't like the behavior.
It is not ordinarily a diagnosis
superimposed from the outside
"It's a compulsive behavior
pattern the person continues to
repeat in spite of disruption to
marriage or primary relation-
ships, in spite of self-disgust
Levine said self-help groups
like Sex Addicts Anonymous and
Sexaholics Anonymous simply
try "to shut down the sexual be-
havior and not deal with the
underlying problem" for those
who are unhappy because their
frequent sexual behavior violates
moral standards.
"It's their sense of worthless-
ness that pushes them to engage
in sexual behavior that violates
their, values. If you remove that
behavior, you remove the only
comfort or antidote they have for
their misery
Coleman said he and other
sexual addiction therapy pio-
neers agree that underlying feel-
ings of worthlessness must be
treated, and that "none of them
advocate simply suppression of
sexual behavior
'There is no unanimity of
treatment he said. "Some view
thisas a psychiatric condition and
treat it with medications. Others
treat it with psychoanalytic or
behavioral therapy. Others
adapted the methods of treating
alcohol addiction
Levine said the sex addiction-
compulsion concept "appeals to
most Americans because if
you're engaging in behavior that
traditionally has been defined as
sin, transforming it into a disease
absolves you of any moral fail-
mg
Coleman insisted that sex
addicts who seek treatment are
accepting responsibility, and self-
help groups "do not relieve them
of responsibility, but they do try
to relieve them of shame
Levine said when a disease-
like label like sex addict is applied
to people they can be forced to get
treatment, and that the notion of
addiction can be used to justify
attacks on homosexuality and
other sex outside of marriage.
Travel industry threatened by pollution
Continued from page 1
thing, if acid rain destroys it, this
place Ts out of business or hurt
drastically Seamon said.
"The state's fastest-growing
industry is tourism, and we are
determined that we are going to
try to do something to help solve
this problem he said.
Seamon said car engines
must be changed to produce less
air pollution. Countries in South
America need to be pressured to
quit burning down the forests,
which creates 30 percent of the
world's air pollution, he said.
The use of biodegradable
plastics must be mandated to cut
down on another large source of
pollution, said Sheldon Lantin-
berg, president of a company that
manufactures such plastics. The
technology exists to make plastics
that break down in sunlight
quickly, he said.
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HASTINGS FORD
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OVEBTON&
Suprn
Candil
Republican Gov. Jim Ma
and his Democratic opponent
Gov. Bob Jordan, began their f
week on the campaign trail to
as political observers conn
their analysis of the debati '
tween the gubernatorial cat
dates.
Meanwhile, newspape
dorsed candidates in races rj
ing from presidential to judiq
Martin himself said he
well in the debate but that ru i
side had landed the much-t
"knockout punch
Martin said, "1 thinl
probably scored sorrw
But Jordan told his
that the debate exemplified
strides that his campa
made in recent weeks
Jordan spoke ; i a j
about 200 chev ring supj I
the Hyatt Winston-Salem, te
them, "We opened up I
between 7 md � tonight, an
tide is going to come ii
right over them on N . -
"We were able to get a
issues out there that v
get out there, and he didn'
spond to them oi I!
the debate.
Brad Hays, Mart
consultant, said he saw
happen in the debate that
give Jordan anv lift in tl I
"Jordan had to have a k:
out and didn't get it he sail
the endorsements, The New
Observer of Raleigh I
dorsed two incumbent R.
cans for the N.C. Com
peals. The paper end I
bent Judge Robert Orr over
nor Court Judge John Fridaj
incumbent Judge Donald
over Superior Court ju
Lewis.
"Judge Smith ha- a
thoughtful and intelligent ru
in tough cases that voters sa
not ignore the newspaper
adding that "the edge is j j
the race.
In the Orr-Frida
newspaper said: The
here is between a youi
with a record of wisdi m an
ness and an older fudge '
reotrd raises questions
Also today, The Newi
Observer endorsed Dem
Rufus Edmisten over R
John Carnngtcn in the -
of state race.
"Rufus L. Edmisten de;
the support ot the voter- a�
Carolina's secrctar
no other reason than that h
only candidate running
most voters have -
READ
CAR
STEVE HARDY
4
EVERY
Fun A1
Stcc
Drink S
Hot Bu
f-EATURINC"
STEVE
(HARDY'S
r Oxupnat 1
BEACH PARTY
MTU
EDGERTON MANAOiHfNT





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1988 3
ution
re ruwiiA. to
thCetv
vn the
- it ou
�eming your
uns
' i k vm t h
symp-
scnous
� d " i sec a
olinian
icnics
:cd 79'
Swiss Miss
1 coa Mix
jern Biscuit
elf-Rising
Parkay
rgarine
miL
inc
Candidates facing final week
Republican Gov. im Martin
and his Democratic opponent 1 t.
.o IVh Jordan, began their final
week on the campaign trail today,
as political observers continue
their analysis ol the debate be
tween the gubernatorial candi
dates.
Meanwhile, newspapers en
rsed candidates in races ran
g from presidential to judicial.
Martin himself said he did
a ell in the debate but that neither
side had landed the much-touted
knockout punch
Martin said 1 thank we both
�bably scored some points
ordan told his supporters
at the debate exemplified the
strides that his campaign has
made in recent weeks.
Jordan spoke to a group oi
ml 2 0 cheering supporters at
the Hyatt VVinston-Salem, telling
them We opened up the gates
en 7 and S tonight, and the
tide is going to come in and roll
it o er them on o 8
We were able to get all the
ssues out there that we wanted to
there, and he didn't re
sp � d to them ordan said after
the dx bate.
Brad Hays Martin s political
consultant said he sa v nothii
happen in the debate that will
give !ordan any lift in the p
'Jordan had to have a knock-
out and didn't get it he said In
the endorsements, IT�e Nt w s and
Observer ot Raleigh today en-
dorsed two incumbent Republi-
cans ' ' tl � N.C v. lourt ot Ap
v pa per e
d incum-
er S
bent ludge Robert
urt udge ohn Friday and
n bent Judge Donald Smi
�. rior Court judge ohn
-
"Judge Smith has a !egac I
; nt rulings
in tough cases that voti rs should
not igr n 'he newspaper said
edge is t" in
race.
the Orr-1 ridav rao
newsj per said The cho
here is betw een a oungi r jud
v ith a record of wis loi I fail
I �� Ige wh(
record raises questions
Also today, The News and
� � I rs d Democrat
er Republican
Carrington in the secretary
� -� it
ifus 1 I dmisten deserves
. tt rs as North
i - seen tary ol state it for
� er reason than that he's the
� . candidate running whom
ters have seen in the
flesh the newspaper said. "Re-
publican John H. Carrington has
spent a fortune on mean-spirited
tele ision and radio commercials,
but not much time on public-spir-
ited appearances
On Sundav. Massachusetts
Gov. Michael Dukakis was en-
dorsed by two North Carolina
newspapers, while The News and
Observer endorsed Democrats
Bob ordan for governor and
Tony Rand lieutenant governor.
The Charlotte Observer and
the Greensboro News & Record
endorsed Democrat Dukakisover
Republican Vice President
(leorge hush.
The News & Record said
Dukakis has "made a convincing
case tor election to the White
louse.
"1 le is right in so main' ways
in some east's courageously -
and he promises to see those is-
sues through with a blend of com-
passion and competence
The newspaper said Push's
"disappointing campaign based
on appeals to tear and shallow
patriotism otters little hope or
inspiration tor the future. 1 hs
appalling choice of DanQuayle as
his running mate raises serious
questions about his judgment
In its endorsement. TheChar
lotto Observer said Dukakis'
depth, intelligence .nd proven
ability to learn and to lead make
him the right choice
The Observer said America
' needs a skilled. intelligent
leader. Michael Dukakis is the
candidate best suited to meet the
major challenges our next presi-
dent will face
The newspaper said that
while Bush's campaign has been
impressive during his career he
has marched through a lot ol
high-level jobs without leaving
manv footprints. He has been a
valued staff man. a loyal adminis-
trator. But w hat does he stand for?
"Mr. bush may seem the sate
i oice, rheharlotte Observer
said. "But his first major decision
on his own was the awful, inexpli-
c ible choice of Danny Quayle as
his running mate
In state races, The News and
Observer ol Raleigh Sundav en-
dorsed Democratic It. Gov. Jor-
dan tor c nor and Rand, a
state senat r from Fayetteville tor
nt governor.
While the newspaper de-
scribed Martin as "decent, honest.
intelligent it added that he was a
"lesser covernor than North
Carolina needs and deserves.
"The state's topmost official
must be more than his party's
chiel cheerleader and opposition-
basher. He must be able to do
more than run a smooth cam-
paign. He must want to be gover-
nor because of what a governor
can accomplish in the people's
behalf.
"Those are the standards bv
which Mr. Martin comes up short
the same standards by which
his challenger, lieutenant Gover-
nor Jordan, proves superior.
The Raleigh newspaper said
lordan would "lead the General
READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
STEVE HARDY'S ORIGINAL BEACH PARTY
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Fun After Business Hours
Steve Hardy Begins at 7 00
Drink Specials All Evening
Hoi Buffalo W,ngs til 7 30
FEATURING
STEVE
I HARDY'S 1
BEACH PARTY
PRIZES
WfTff
RAMADA
N ������.�- t'
Asembly toward the fulfillment
of a shared agenda one that would
be of genuine benefit to the state
In endorsing Rand for lieu-
tenant governor, The News and
Observer called Republican Jim
Gardner a "throwback to the ra-
cial and cultural divisiveness that,
20 years ago, nearly ripped
American society apart. If he has
undergone a deep-seated change
ol values, he hasn't bothered to
brag about it
It added that while Gardner's
advocacy of legislative openness
has appeal, his "commitment to
doing the public's business pub-
licly remains suspect
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ntion
ise antibiotics are needed to
this infection.
Ksit the Student Health Cen-
("Cold aink" between the
and the pharmacy if you
questions concerning your
I throat or cold symptoms.
(ou may also ask to talk with
Irse concerning your symp-
to see if they are serious
Igh for you to need to see a
ih care provider.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMWK3lim 3
'olinian
nmunity since 1925.
lor of Advertising
ntatives
Spencer Meymandi
Adam Blankenship
Iton
tTISING
$4.25
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G RATES
r Space Rate)
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LRS:
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Picnics
Sliced 79
Swiss Miss
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or Marshmallow
ern Biscuit
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5 lb. bag
Parkay
irgarine
Inc
Candidates facing final week
Republican Gov. Jim Martin
and his Democratic opponent, Lt.
Gov. Bob Jordan, began their final
week on the campaign trail today,
as political observers continue
their analysis of the debate be-
tween the gubernatorial candi-
dates.
Meanwhile, newspapers en-
dorsed candidates in races rang-
ing from presidential to judicial.
Martin himself said he did
well in the debate but that neither
side had landed the much-touted
"knockout punch
Martin said, "I think we both
probably scored some points
But Jordan told his supporters
that the debate exemplified the
strides that his campaign has
made in recent weeks.
Jordan spoke to a group of
about 200 cheering supporters at
the Hyatt Winston-Salem, telling
them, "We opened up the gates
between 7 and 8 tonight, and the
tide is going to come in and roll
right over them on Nov. 8
"We were able to get all the
issues out there that we wanted to
get out there, and he didn't re-
spond to them Jordan said after
the debate.
Brad Hays, Martin's political
consultant, said he saw nothing
happen in the debate that will
give Jordan any lift in the polls.
'Jordan had to have a knock-
out and didn't get it he said. In
the endorsements, The News and
Observer of Raleigh today en-
dorsed two incumbent Republi-
cans for the N.C. Court of Ap-
peals. The paper endorsed incum-
bent Judge Robert Orr over Supe-
rior Court Judge John Friday and
incumbent Judge Donald Smith
over Superior Court judge John
Lewis.
"Judge Smith has a legacy of
thoughtful and intelligent rulings
in tough cases that voters should
not ignore the newspaper said,
adding that "the edge is slight" in
the race.
In the Orr-Friday race, the
newspaper said: The choice
here is between a younger judge
wih a record of wisdom and fair-
ness" and an older judge whose
retftd raises questions
Also today, The News and
Observer endorsed Democrat
Rufus Edmisten over Republican
John Carrington in the secretary
of state race.
"Rufus L. Edmisten deserves
the support of the voters as North
Carolina's secretary of state if for
no other reason than that he's the
only candidate running whom
most voters have seen in the
flesh the newspaper said. "Re-
publican John H. Carrington has
spent a fortune on mean-spirited
television and radio commercials,
but not much time on public-spir-
ited appearances
Cm Sunday, Massachusetts
Gov. Michael Dukakis was en-
dorsed by two North Carolina
newspapers, while The News and
Observer endorsed Democrats
Bob Jordan for governor and
Tony Rand lieutenant governor.
The Charlotte Observer and
the Greensboro News & Record
endorsed Democrat Dukakis over
Republican Vice President
George Bush.
The News & Record said
Dukakis has "made a convincing
case for election to the White
House.
"He is right in so many ways
� in some cases courageously -
and he promises to see those is-
sues through with a blend of com-
passion and competence
The newspaper said Bush's
"disappointing campaign based
on appeals to fear and shallow
patriotism offers little hope or
inspiration for the future. His
appalling choice of Dan Quayle as
his running mate raises serious
questions about his judgment
In its endorsement, The Char-
lotte Observer said Dukakis'
"depth, intelligence and proven
ability to learn and to lead make
him the right choice
The Observer said America
"needs a skilled, intelligent
leader. Michael Dukakis is the
candidate best suited to meet the
major challenges our next presi-
dent will face
The newspaper said that
while Bush's campaign has been
impressive during his career "he
has marched through a lot of
high-level jobs without leaving
many footprints. He has been a
valued staff man, a loyal adminis-
trator. But what does he stand for?
"Mr. Bush may seem the safe
choice The Charlotte Observer
said. "But his first major decision
on his own was the awjful, inexpli
cable choice of Danny Quayleji
his running mater- M-m-
In state races, The News and
Observer of Raleigh Sunday en-
dorsed Democratic Lt. Gov. Jor-
dan for governor and Rand, a
state senator from Fayetteville for
lieutenant governor.
While the newspaper de-
scribed Martin as "decent, honest,
intelligent it added that he was a
"lesser governor than North
Carolina needs and deserves.
"The state's topmost official
must be more than his parry's
chief cheerleader and opposition-
basher. He must be able to do
more than run a smooth cam-
paign. He must want to be gover-
nor because of what a governor
can accomplish in the people's
behalf.
"Those are the standards bv
which Mr. Martin comes up short
� the same standards by which
his challenger, Lieutenant Gover-
nor Jordan, proves superior.
The Raleigh newspaper said
Jordan would "lead the General
READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Fun After Business Hours
Playing the Very Best in Beach.
Top 40. Oldies and Dance Music
Steve Hardy Begins at 7:00
Drink Specials All Evening
Hot Buffalo Wings til 7:30
Asembly toward the fulfillment
of a shared agenda one that would
be of genuine benefit to the state
In endorsing Rand for lieu-
tenant governor, The News and
Observer called Republican Jim
Gardner a "throwback to the ra-
cial and cultural di visi veness that,
20 years ago, nearly ripped
American society apart. If he has
undergone a deep-seated change
of values, he hasn't bothered to
brag about it
It added that while Gardner's
advocacy of legislative openness
has appeal, his "commitment to
doing the public's business pub-
licly remains suspect
HELP WANTED
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t0
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�-�.
Hours: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 midnight SUN. - THU.
11:00 ftjfc - 1:00 sum FRI. - SAT.
Thursday Phi Kappa Tau L'il Sisters
Presents Ladies Night
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Friday: Free Pizza
$50 Cash for Sorority and Fraternity
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$2.00 Frozen
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ThursSun.
�f





�hz iEast (Eawlinran
NT �, t I a i v m m i�VM . MHHMl INK 195
Pete Fernald, - �i
O up Carter, mh hm.
)AMES F.J MCKEE, �frunMinj
oe Harris, r � m
Doug Joi inson, � h�
Tim Hampton, �����
Mia ielle England, cm m
Debbie Stevens, $��
STEPl IAN1E FOLSOM, cy u.tor
JEEFPARKERsmr
TOM FURR,CirCKiUwnM�uj�r
Susan Howell, ���� m.
Joi in VV. Medlin, ahoo
Mac Clark, ByMaMmugfr
w
ihct
OPINION
Page 4
Halloween
Violence proves partiers to be childish
To compare the behavior of the
partiers in downtown Greenville
Halloween night to that of elemen-
tary school children at recess would
be insulting to the elementary
schoolers. One assumes that it isn't
terribly unreasonable to expect col-
lege-aged students to be at least
slightly more mature than, sav, the
lower primates.
This paper's editorial position
once supported holding the official
Halloween celebration on Saturday
night rather than on Monday night,
but this is now difficult to defend. In
fact, this paper now finds itself in the
unenviable position of having to
rebuke the very students whose
cause it originally championed.
Editorials in this paper have long
assumed a certain intelligence and
sophistication on the part of its read-
ers. One of the functions of a news-
paper, however, is to adapt itself to
its audience's capabilities. As Tho-
mas Jefferson might have put it:
"People get prettv much the kind of
newspaper they deserve If dis-
plavs of immature, violent and oth-
erwise disorderly conduct on the
rp�fcofcsarients become common,
the editorial position of this paper
will be that ECU students deserve a
biweeklv edition of Clifford, the Big
Red Dog.
There is of course nothing wrong
with having fun, and rarely is there
anything wrong with a party, how-
ever large. But when the party gen-
erates approximately fifty arrests
and more than one hundred fights,
the situation is clearly out of hand.
Note well that this year's crowd was
half the size of last year's, and it
generated twice the violence.
Note also that there are more
culprits here than those who were
actually arrested or were actively
involved in fighting. Anyone who
let a friend get too drunk, or urged
combatants to ever-greater levels of
violence, or simply stood and
watched the fights and didn't get
involved, is guilty too. And it is a
sharr at they won't be arrested.
Simp. � non-involvement does not
equal innocence.
Excepted from this vitriol in-
clude the members of fraternities
who helped clean up after the bash
(another unenviable job) and those
few who did actively help prevent
immature conduct. The East Carolin-
ian commends this minority for their
responsible actions.
But this kind of responsibility
was definitely not very much in
evidence on the evening oi October
31st, 1988. And as a result, there may
be no opportunity for atonement in
October 1989.
LIE HM AS MUCH
EXPERIENCE AS
HAP WHEN
TOOK
!�AsK NOT WHAT VOW?
COUNTRY CLUB
CAN PO FORVQU
!0H M EIN
HOSIER.
PITT COVtiTY JAI L
ttALLOWtBN 3 I HAUoweEN&f
Mud flies in campaign
To the editor:
The election is drawing to a dose
and the mud is flying. I admit it is
coming from both sides whether you
have seen the Dukakis ad portraying
Bush as a drug dealer, or Bush's ad
shoving the dead fish in the Boston
Harbor. Even on the local level with
Jordan's portraying our Governor
Martin as a monkey, it seems that
negative ads are just a part of our
political culture. One thing though,
what the democratic leaders have
been saying about the Willie Horton
ad, has no place in our culture. They
are saying that the Republicans are
racist. This is just another sad attempt
to keep the black vote, which they
have used and abused so often be-
fore.
From Lincoln to Reagan the
Republicans have reached out not
just to white or black races, but to the
most important race in the world, the
American Race. Racism has no part in
politics or any other form of our cul
ture and the hypocritical democratic
leaders should have never brought it
up.
In this election year we have seen
Jesse Jackson just tossed to the side
and Bentsen taki ng his place. Bentsen
is a man with real differences with
Dukakis, not just the Black or White
issue that the Democratic leaders
have started. Jackson would have
been a 100 better pick based on
Dukakis and his views. Now I don't
pretend to agree with Jesse Jackson
on the issues but do agree with his
goals for world peace, a color-blind
America and stopping the drug flow
to our children. We do disagree
though on the way we reach 'hese
goals.
I encourage all people to vote
Tuesday whether you are Democrat
or Republican, and io vote for the
candidate that closely reflects your
values. If you do this, I believe that
man will be George Bush, because he
has the values and the Christian eth-
ics to keep America strong and be-
sides, deep down inside Bush is a
Pirate Fan.
Bobby R. Hall Jr.
Senior
Management
4Sex' offends
To the editor:
1 am writing concerning the ar-
ticle "Sex" in theNov. 1,1988 issue. It
amazes mc that under the broad
spectrum of free speech, one can hold
such a narrow-minded view. Obvi-
ously, the writer has no true knowl-
edge of scripture or the history of
Judeo-Christianity.
Those beliefs the writer sees as
out-dated are laws set down by God,
through His chosen people the Jews,
for the good of all people. To say the
laws of God are out-dated is to say
our Constitution no longer applies,
God forbid! God, who is unchanging,
did not create laws that would be-
come out-of-dace.
The people oi "a saner and more
rational country" would examine all
the facts, something the writer obvi-
ously did not. So often Christians are
accused of acting on emotions, per-
haps the shoe is on the other foot this
time.
Dorothy Tweedy
Freshman
Nursing
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian wel m
letters expressing all points oj
Mail or drop them by our office in I
Pubications Building, across from
the entranee ofjoyner I ibrary.
For purposes of verification al
letters must include the name, ma
and classification, address. ph �
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authc is). Letters are limited to 3
word. 7T less, double spaced or neai .
printed. All letters are subject � i i
iting for brevity, obscenity and libel
and no personal attacks will be per
milled. Students, faculty and staff
Writing WmHTfor iWMMU PL) f&
MhM vtonh'cy arirmm
every two weeks. The deadline ?
editorial material is 5 p m. Friu lyfot
Tuesday's edition and 5 p.m. TucSj
day for Thursday's edition.
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the editorial
page, the East Carolinian features
the "Campus Spectrum This is
an opinion column bv guest writ-
ers from the student Kk1 .ind
faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will
contain current topics oi concern
to the campus, community or
nation.
The columns are restricted in
content only with regard to rules
of grammar and decency. Persons
submitting columns must be will-
ing to accept byline credit for their
efforts, as no entries from ghost
writers will be published.

I
Com
CHARLOTTE (AP) -
puter center officials at
Greensboro and UNC ChJ
are working to eradicate
puter virus - - believed to
originated in Pakistan � tl
been detected in disks at tl
schools.
The schools join doz
universities and busir
across the nation that havi
hit in the past few vear
computer viruses �pre
ming bugs intentionally pi,
computer programs to
damage
UNCC officials have
more than a dozen mfccted
"I teach a class, and 1
say out of 35 students
handed in a project in tH
week, seven of the disi
virus on it said UNCCao.
computing consult .1
derma n
The virus has fouled u
disks, and lCC
urging their microcon .
to take precaution; j
spread. "We've taken i
precautions that it i
spread much Sondermar
At UNCG, comp .
found infections in n
Marti
JACKSONVILLE. V
�- Both candidate
tory in the only telev
between Gov. Iim V �
Democratic chall
dan, sav they're inter
broadcasting the cor-
Jordan said M i
would pay half the
rebroadcast on the e i
tion, but Martin sa:d anv r
cast should also include
tenant governor's
Jim Gardner, the GOl
date for lieutenant i
earlier asked Sen. Tom R
Democratic oppor
broadcast their d
mencal television. V
Election is between lesser of two evils
BY MIKE HIGHSMITH
Campus Spcitrum
Well folks, it's about that time to once again
Choose the man we want to lead this country and
make our decisions for the next four years. It usually
boils down to choosing the lesser of two evils, but
this year it seems like we have to make a decision
between the greater of two boobs. Having to make a
choice between Bush and Dukakis is like having to
choose between Moe, Larry and Curly. It may actu-
ally come down to who scares von the least.
It has been said that Dukakis "lacks passion is
"soft on crime and has no previous foreign policy
experience; which by the way, never slowed down
Reagan once he was elected with no previous for-
eign policy experience. It has also been stated that
Bush is a "wimp he makes no decisions that his
advisors haven't first handed to him, and that he is
a "bold-faced liar" who either cannot remember
what was said about the Iran arms sale during the 16
meetings he was present during which the sales
were discussed, or is just plain lying to us. I don't
know about you, but I would feel more comfortable
having a president who either has a better memory,
and one that I feel is incapable of lying to us.
One thing for sure, Bush is the consummate
politician. He'll say anything he thinks you want to
hear in order to get elected, even if it means making
a few "fourth quarter conversions" on various is-
sues. He says he wants to be our 'education' presi-
dent, but where was he when his administration
ravaged the student loan program, supported pri-
vate and discriminatory schools, and left middle
class families to fend for themselves when it came to
sending their kids to college? Bush also says he is an
"environmentalist but why did he support so
strongly Mr. 'slash and burn' Watt? Mr. Bush has a
long record of saying one thing when his record
shows exactly the opposite.
Face it, Bush is riding on Reagan's coat-tails. He
attacks Dukakis on non-issues like the pledge of
allegiance, patriotism, and furlough programs; all in
order to deflect the peoples' attention to what he has
and hasn't done in the last 8 years. He won't say what
he did or didn't say when the Iran arms sales were
comingdown, all he'll say now is that'mistakes were
made He won't tell us why he supported and aided
Noriega over the course of the last two administra-
tions, even though memos were sent to him over 5
years ago telling him of Noriega's drug dealings.
All he will say is that it was his administration
that issued Noriega an indictment, but you won't
hear him mention that it was his administration that
resisted the indictment until overwhelming pres-
sure was applied by Congress to finally act. Even
after the indictment it was his administration that
offered Noriega a way ou t by asking him to just leave
the country for a while until the heat blew over. That
doesn't sound so tough on crime. Bush is so full of
contradiction and hypocracy that if he gets elected,
we only deserve what we get over the next four
years.
Bush has said that Dukakis has been against
every weapons system since the slingshot. What he
doesn't say is that he himself supports every weapon
the Pentagon can dream up. Maybe he could learn
from a great general and former president
Eisenhower's last warning to America: "Beware the
military-industrial complex Think of it this way. If
you had 16 guns and pistols in your home to protect
yourself from burglars, would you be more safe with
30? How about 50? Or would you feel less safe in that
there is more opportunity and chance that one of
your kids might get a hold of one and accidentally
hurt someone. Think about it, it's a fair analogy.
For the record, I am neither a Republican nor a
Democrat; I vote for the man, not the party. I do see
the faults and weaknesses of both parties and truly
wish that we had more alternatives other than the
two-party system. They are so locked into their
platforms that political reality seems to fall by the
wayside. The Democrats seem to want to help any-
body and everybody and pay for their programs
with taxes, they don't seem to take the attitude that
people should work for their benefits rather than
hand it to them on a platter.
They have even created a system that encour-
ages people not to work and to have as many babies
as they can. They don't seem to realize that human
nature will take advantage of such a situation. I
personally think that if a person is healthy and able-
bodied and needs government assistance, there is
plenty that can be done to help in their community
and their country.
On the other hand, Republicans make no bones
about being the "strong defense" party, so they tend
to end up giving a blank check to the Pentagon and
we end up ha ving a scandal the magnitude of which
hasn'tevenbeendetcrminedyet.Unblinkinglv,they
stand behind a policy that states if we give more
money to the rich and to the giant corporation the
country will be better off.
Their line of reasoning is that if they have more
money to deal with, then they will use it to create
more jobs, which will ultimately be good for Amer-
ica. What they don't seem to realize is that the extra
money will be used to pad pockets and fatten wal-
lets, and if any jobs are created, they will be overseas
where it is "cost efficient and matters will actually
worsen with all the money flowing out of the coun-
try.
This time around we may not have much of a
selection, but that is no excuse not to vote. If you
choose not to vote, you give up the right to bellyache
about who got elected. One thing is for sure, who-
ever gets elected will have hell to pay. The credit card
policies of this administration will hit the fan during
the next one. If polls are any indication, it looks like
Bush will be our next president; but that mav not be
so bad, at least when all hell breaks loose the right
man to catch the blame will be in office.
Actually the man most responsible will be on a
horse somewhere in California, but his lackey will be
the one on the powder keg. I feel personally that
Dukakis is the more honest and better man, as well
as a more accomplished administrator, but that is a
choice that each of you will have to make for vour
self. Just please vote your conscience, but at the very
least vote.
I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1988 5
Al L
10W�EN&I?
aign
Forum
Rules
: ��� m
Computer virus plagues UNCG
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Com-
puter center officials at UNC-
Creensboro and UNC Charlotte
are working to eradicate a com-
puter virus � believed to have
originated in Pakistan � that has
been detected in disks at the two
schools.
The schools join dozens of
universities and businesses
across the nation that have been
hit in the past few years with
computer viruses �program-
ming bugs intentionally placed in
computer programs to cause
damage.
UNCC officials have found
more than a dozen infected disks.
"1 teach a class, and I would
say out of 35 students who
handed in a project in the last
week, seven o( the diskettes had a
virus on it said UNCC academic
computing consultant Steve Son-
derma n.
The virus has fouled up some
disks, and UNCC officials are
urging their microcomputer users
to take precautions to prevent its
spread. "We've taken enough
precautions that it shouldn't
spread much Sonderman said.
At UNCG, computer officials
found infections in most of the
disks in two o( the university's 12
computer labs.
They plan to check disks of all
students and faculty members.
"We're going to have to go
through and check everything on
campus UNCG computer cen-
ter official Chuck Curry told The
Charlotte Observer. "So it's not
going to be pretty
Both schools believe their
computers have been infected
with a computer bug known as
the "Pakistan vims
At both schools, computer
experts used diagnostic programs
to detect the viruses. The pro-
grams found this message: "Wel-
come to the dungeon. "Beware of
this virus. Contact us for vaccina-
tion
In a recent article on com-
puter viruses, Time magazine
described the Pakistani virus's
origin.
According to Time, the bug
originated at Brain Computer
Services, a computer shop in La-
hore, Pakistan, run bv brothers
Amjad and Basit Farooq Alvi.
In 1986 and 1987, the store
sold bootleg brand-name com-
puter programs - which can cost
several hundred dollars - for as
littleas$1.50. Dozensof American
tourists stocked up.
But there was a catch: They'd
added the virus to the programs.
Later, they explained they
wanted to punish tourists for
buying bootleg programs.
UNCC business Prof. Kevin
Gorman discovered the bug 12
days ago when he checked a
student's malfunctioning com-
puter disk.
Gorman said the virus appar-
ently lodges in the memory of a
machine when a computer user
starts a computer using an in-
fected disk. If the machine is
turned off before a clean disk is
inserted, the virus won't spread.
But if the machine is left on, the
virus spreads.
UNCC and UNCG officials
aren't sure how the virus worksor
what damage it could cause.
"What we've seen Gorman said,
"is some of the files on the disk-
ettes that were infected lost their
data
Curry at UNCG said he's only
seen the virus spread itself. "If it's
doing nothing except multiplying
itself, it's not that bad he said.
"But the danger is you never
know for sure what it's doing
for instance, he said, it could be
programmed to destroy data after
multiplying a certain number of
times.
IBM officials are working
with UNCC to study the virus,
Gorman said. At least one Char-
lotte company, Duke Power Co
also is working with UNCC offi-
cials to identify which employees
are students at the university.
"We want to make them
aware of the virus, how to check to
see if they have a disk that has the
virus on it said Duke spokes-
man Joe Maher.
Duke wants to warn employ-
ees not to use suspicious software
so the virus doesn't spread to the
Charlotte-based utility's comput-
ers.
To guard against viruses,
computer experts suggest mak-
ing backup copies and only using
programs from reputable
sources.
They also recommend using
"write protect tabs which pre-
vent anything from being added
to a disk.
Gorman warns that anyone
deliberatly using a virus to de-
stroy UNCC's computer disks
could be charged with destroying
state propertv.
Martin, Jordan want rebroadcast
JACKSONVILLE, N.C (AP)
Both candidates, claiming vic-
tory in the only televised debate
between Gov. Jim Martin and
Democratic challenger Bob Jor-
dan, say they're interested in re-
broadcasting the contest.
Jordan said Monday he
would pay half the cost for the
rebroadcast on the eye oi the elec-
tion, but Martin said any rebroad-
cast should also include the lieu-
tenant governor's debate.
Jim Gardner, the GOP candi-
date for lieutenant governor, had
earlier asked Sen. Tony Rand, his
Democratic opponent, to re-
broadcast their debate on com-
merical television. Many observ-
ers from both parties said Gard-
ner out performed Rand in the
Oct. 2 debate on public television.
Rand had rejected Gardner's pro-
posal.
"We'd be happy to rebroad-
cast that debate campaign
spokesman Tim Pittman said
Monday. "If Jordan's campaign
will draw up the numbers and let
us look at them, we'll see if that's
the best way to spend our money.
That would be a lot of money right
at the end, but we'll give that
some serious thought
Jordan said the debate Satur-
day night "opened the flood
gates
"The tide is rising and we're
just going to wash him right out of
the way he said. .
At stops in Wilmington and
Jacksonville Monday, Jordan said
he believed he had outperformed
Martin in Saturday's debate,
which was broadcast statewide
on public television and several
commercial stations.
"The debate Saturday night
was a tremendous boost for us
Jordan said. "In a sense, I was
debating against myself and I was
disappointed I didn't get some of
the things out that we wanted.
"But I thought about it over
the weekend, and realized we did
a heck o( a job he said. "For the
first time, the people had the
chance to see Jim Martin not an-
swer the Jimmy Green question,
the education question and the
environment question
Jordan has accused Martin of
hiring Green as a consultant as a
payoff for Green's tacit support in
the 1984 gubernatorial campaign.
Green, a former lieutenant gover-
nor, was an unsuccessful candi-
date in the Democratic primary
and has served as a consultant to
Martin on legislation.
Jordan also has attacked
Martin for allegedly taking credit
for education and environmental
programs the Republican gover-
nor did not support when they
were debated in the legislature.
WALT DISNEY WORLD
COLLEGE PROGRAM
Walt Disney World representatives will present
an information session on the Walt Disney
World College Program on November 9, 1988
at 7:00 p.m. Attendance at this presentation is
required to interview for the SPRING '89 Col-
lege Program on November 10, 1988. Majors
considered: Recreation, Theatre Arts, Hospital-
ity Management, Business, Marketing, Com-
munications.
Contact:
Cooperative Education
Office
(919)757-6979
alt f)isney World
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY �MP IVEfl
CIMi TW Wait Di.ncy C�np.m
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
YOUR FIRST STEP
TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE YOU
COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
Army ROTC Camp Challenge. It's exciting
and it may be your last opportunity to grad -
uate with an Army Officer's commission.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
Contact Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
Spectrum
Rules
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sident but thai may not be
all hell t- - �e the right
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md better man. as well
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� .V
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,
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
male roommate to share new mobile
home 10 minutes from campus. Non-
smoker, please. Call Hugh at 756-6851
after 5:00 p.m.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE: To share
2 bed 1 12 bath Townhouse Non-
smoker $185 12 util Located in Wil-
liamsburg Manor off Hooker St. Contact
Kathy 756-7797.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Tar River
own bedroom. $130 a month - 13 utili-
ties. IMMEDIATELY - Call 830-6735 after
630.
SINGLE, FURNISHED APT Private
entrance. Utilities paid. $18000. Avail-
able immediately. Quiet, mature student
preferred 758-5171.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 9 band graphic equalizer
amplifier for car stereo. 150 watts low
frontrear fader. Full illumination. Led
meter excellent condition. Call Roy at 752-
4825.
FOR SALE: 78 MCB. No rust. Excellent
mechanical condition. Asking $2800.00.
Will finance. 756-2334
88 JEEP COMANCHE TRUCK: 4 sP air,
PS, PB, AMFM Cass 12,000 mi $10,500
Neg! Must sell, getting married. Call
Chris - 757-6700 wk 758-2882 hm. or 355-
0713 after 6 p.m.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES:
From $100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chevvs. Surplus. Buyer's Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S-l 166.
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Lexington
Sq (adj Athletic Club)-$42,50O�2-bdxms,
1 l2bths, Indry hkup, liv rm wbay win,
kitdin area wbar, rcfrig, stove,
dshwshr, Frnch drs open to priv patio w
stor rm, adj lo prkng lot for easy access, ac-
tive hmownrs' assn. 355-6974 after 5.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
resume' tmmdtkm, anothiftwmnejw
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F (or more details'
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NIC 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D 1 for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 at beach Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC- Done by
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933.
NEED HELP? Phi Sigma Pi sponsored
Rent-A-Brother. Babysitting, housework,
and vard work Very reasonable rate Nov.
5, 1988. For information call 355-6217 9
am-10 pm M-F.
NEED HELP WITH HOUSE CLEAN-
ING OR YARD WORK?: You should
Rent-A-Cadet 12 November 1988. Call
757-6967 for information. 757-6974. $25 for
a half day. $35 for a whole day.
TYPING SERVICE: Term papers, resu-
mes, etc. Very low rates, call 752-6375.
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Campus representative to
promote our low cost, high quality Spring
Break trip to Daytona Beach. Free trips
and money while gaining valuable busi-
ness experience. Call Kurt with Travel As-
sociates. 1-800-558-3002.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Recreation and Parks Department is re-
cruiting for part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter program. Appli-
cants iriust possess some knowledge of
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
9-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 p.m. - 7 p.m Monday thru
Friday, and some night and weekend
coaching The program will extend from
December 1 to mid-February. Salary rate
is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour. Applications
will be accepted starting October 20.
Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
NEED MALE AND FEMALE DANCERS
FOR PRIVATE PARTIES: Also need
ladies 18-36 years of age for a legs video.
Earnings of $50 per hour and more. Apply
in person Monday through Friday, 4 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. to Promotions Co 2708-A E.
10th Street. No phone calls.
ATHLETIC MANAGERS NEEDED:
Contact Fred in Minges Coliseum. 757-
6029.
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take signups for our FLORIDA tours. We
furnish all miterials for a sue.wfu pro-
motion. Cooa PAY and FUN. Call CAM-
PUS MARKETING at 1-800-777-2270.
VOLUNTEERS: ECU School of Medi-
cine, section of allergy, is conducting a
study. Needed for asthma study: Men,
age 18 or over, non smokers, w mild to
moderate asthma & allergies. Study in-
cludes use of a new drug, skin tests and
pulmonary tests. Volunteers will also stay
overnight twice in hospital lodgings. Par-
ticipants will be well reimbursed. Please
call 551-3159 to volunteer.
ATTENTION ECU FACULTY AND
STAFF: Brody's has part-time positions
for individuals interested in a flexible
work schedule to help stuff that special
Christmas stocking. Call today for an
interview appointment or apply in per-
son, Brody's, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-
4 p.m.
BE ON T.V Manv needed for commer-
cials. Casting info' (1) 805-687-6000 Ext.
TV-U66,
NATIONAL MARKETING FIRM
SEEKS: Ambitious Junior, Senior or
Graduate Student to manage on-campus
promotions for top national companies
this semester. Flexible hours with earn-
ings potential at $2500. Call Jill or l.tsanne
at 1-800-592 2121.
PERSONALS
MICHELLE: So you say its your birthday,
well I'm so happy for you. Just keep on
truckin towards 21. And love will see you
through! Love ya, Darlynne.
SUBARU: You're the greatest little sister
and I can't wait to party with you Satur-
day night! �Love, Judy.
LAMBDA CHI: Hey, whose designer tie
is this? Did anyone ever claim yours,
Beth? Well, we all had a cool time and look
forward to doing it again soon. �Love,
Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: We wish to thank every-
one for being a part of the very successful
spaghetti dinner. Look forward to doing it
again in the spring.
DELTA ZETA: Rose Formal time is com-
ing and we can't wait. Let's-get psyched to
party in Comfort with all our hot dates!
PI KAPPA ALPHA DREAM GIRL
COCKTAIL 1988: Coming soon, so get
your date.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: There may be a better
way to go through college, but it hasn't
been found yet.
THURSDAY IS FIZZ DAY: Come to Pi
Kappa Alpha's Happy Hour. Free nacho's
and drink specials.
THE LAMBDA MU CHAPTER OF
ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY INC Vis-
ited the Headstart on West 6th Street on
1 lalloween Day. They furnished Hallow-
een Goodies such as a Halloween cake
and Halloween treat bags. Games were
played too. The Zeta Phi Beta Sorority will
be underprivileged family in Greenville,
Thanksgiving Dinner. Please help sup-
port this worthy cause. The Booth will be
located in the Student Book Store. �
Thank you.
ALPHA XI DELTA PLEDGES: Get psy
ched for a great weekend. �Love the Sis-
ters.
KAPPA SIGMA: We had a great time at
the game and party afterwards. Let's do it
again soon. �Love the AZD's.
ATTENTION CREEK MALES: If you've
got the looks and you've got the bod.
You've got the chance to be AZD GREEK
GOD.
SAE: Looking forward to tonite. Can't
wait. �Love the AZD's.
THANKS TO DELTA ZETA AND PI
KAPPA PHI: For helping with Pirate
Walk this week!
PI KAPPA PHI PLEDGES. Ip PPak
Segdelp, eht emit sah emoc ot trats eht
krow dna pots eht nof. teg rvoy tihs
thgjarts dna od ton liab. S'tl ton oot gnol
erofeb eht keew fo lleh! �Brothers of Pi
Kappa Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI: We would like to thank
George for the killer party Saturday night
And thanks, Daryl, for picking up where
we left off at George's. It was great guys,
we appreciate it. �The Brothers and
Pledges.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
LYNN: Saturday will make one wonder-
ful year; and a continuation of the rest of
our lives together. I love you. 1 lere's to us.
�Bill.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO: Lesley, Leanne,
Roxanne and Scotty. It's Party time!
HELIOS: Good Luck & have a great time
in Pittsburg! �Love, Heidi. PS. Get ready
for Ultimax!
NEW DELI ROCKS Come check out
THE BOND Thursday, and Boogie down
with TI IE BOOMERS on Friday. On Sat-
urday welcome back 5 GUYS NAMED
MOE, and jam with the best music
around.
COUNTRY GIRL: After seeing you
weren't Pippi, I had a blast! This was my
best Halloween ever. By the way, where is
Kemersville? See ya soon! �Your surfer
buddy.
KAPPA SIGMA PLEDGE AUCTION:
Thursday, Nov. 3, 4:00 p.m. at the Kappa
Sigma I louse next to Darryl's Restuarant.
Buy a pledge to perform WHATEVER
task you see fit.
ALPHA OMICRON PI'S: Thanks for the
role in the Hay at the Barn Social. We had
an awesome time. �Love, the Sig Eps.
ZTA'S: The Sig Eps want to thank you for
the great time at last weeks Barn Social. It
was a blast. �The Brothers of SIGMA PHI
EPSILON.
ALPHA OMICRON PI'S & ZTA'S: The
social last week was a real "Barn Burner
Thanks for the awesome time and the long
role in the Hay. Sincerely�SIGMA PHI
EPSILON
ALPHA PHI'S AND STRANGERS: We
hope everyone had a great time at the
mixer. Once again, we pulled off the great-
est social event of the year.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
AHEA: Thanks to everyone who partici-
pated in the Halloween Party last week. It
was a great success!
RENEE H You are a super great Presi-
dent and we appreciate all that you do. We
love you! �The Alpha Phi's.
THETA CHI: We got together before the
game, everyone felt good, bubbles were to
blame. Angie's stewardess directions
were the best. Theta Chi once again,
you've out done the rest Thanxs for the
brunch! �Love, the AOPi's
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
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7 French Manicures � Nail Tips �
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1 EDICURES � SKIN CARE: Body
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Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
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355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaa Dr. Greenville
$ NEED CASH? $
Loans On & Buying Guns
TV's, Stereos, Gold Jewelry, coins,
most anything of value
Southern Gtin & Pawn, Inc.
$ 752-2464 $
ZTA: It was great to get together with you
- Let's get together again �Love the
AOPi's.
ALL ABOARD THE LOVE BOAT: Si
mas get ready for an awesome weekend
SIG EP: Thanks for the Ho Down'
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
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M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
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1-800-433-2930
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Wayne Humphries, Dept. L.M. - 1
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Beulaville, NC 28518
Make Up To $1000 In One Week!
Student Organizations,
Fraternities, Sororities needed for
Marketing Project on campus
Must be motivated and organized.
Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 28.
$50 REWARD: For ID. and evidence of
person(s) stealing 8 wooden Halloween
yard decorations from residence near sta-
dium on Sat night, Oct. 22. Large & small
black cats, large & small ghosts, hat, scare-
crow, jack-o-lantern face, plastic skeleton.
756-0800.
IN DESPERATE NEED: Of a 45rpm rec-
ord by Frank Stallone. Title of song is 'Far
From Over' from the movie, 'Staying
Alive Will pay cash for. Call Ramona at
758-9351.
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD
km ,i shan ka 1 ict process �
4 lafhGnno (the se ' � I
IT s OUR BUSINESS
We s"
rkipbi atinq and tw hi
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�T"�h H.
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758-2400
A Beautiful Place to Live
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� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th SJirct
� Uvjt.xi Near ECU
� Across From I Iighway Patrol Station
Limited offer-$275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy William
7S6-7813 or 830-1937
Office open-Apt. 8,12-5:30 p.m
� AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $205 a month, 6 month
lease. MOBII EI fOMF. RENTAIS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Subscription Form
Name:
Address:
Date to Begin:
Complimentary.
Amount Paid:
Individual:
Date to End:
Business:
Date Paid:
Rates: Individual $25 per yearBusiness $35 per year
Return to: The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg - ECU. Greenville. NC 27858-4353
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LQJSI2
Something missing in your bfe? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance. Class photographs will be taken
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 in the Student Store from 9
am til 12p m and 1 p.m.til430p.m.each
day. The yearbook is not your yearbook
until you are in tt.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the Dec issue. The maga-
zine is published twice a semester with
the first issue coming out in Od This
special issue will be a small magazine
with mainly general info whereas the
Dec. issue will be a larger size containing
news stories, short stories, editorials,
poetry, etc. Articles may be left at the
office or at the Media Board Secretary's
Office in the Publications Bldg.
REGISTRATION FQR
GENERAL COLLEGE
General College students should contact
their advisors the week of Oct. 31 - Nov. 4
to make arrangements for academic ad-
vising for spring semester, 1989. Early
registration begins Nov. 7 and ends Nov.
II.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Representatives of the Walt Disney World
Company will be on campus to recruit EC
students for their College Program. A
seminarpresentation will be conducted
Nov. 9. Students from all majors are in-
vited to participate. Positions in guest
relations, attractions, merchandising, and
food services, among others are available.
Contact the Office of Cooperative Ed. in
the GCB for details.
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, structures and architectures of
North and Central American Earth as seen
by Ernst Habrichs Oct. 24-Nov. 19. Recep-
tion Wed 700 p.m Mender hall Gallery.
SUMMER JOB
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be Nov. 21 at 10:00 am.
in 1029 GCB. The ten-week internship
program, in the Raleigh area, is open to
sophomores, juniors, and seniors cur-
rently enrolled in college. (Those entering
Graduate School as of May, 1989 are not
eligible).
ART VOCAL ENSEMBLE
The National Gallery of Art Vocal En-
semble will perform in Hendrix Theatre
on Nov. 14 at 8:00 p.m. This event is part of
the Chamber Music Series. Four great
voices create one excellent sound, in jour-
ney exploring an almost limitless reper-
toire. Tickets go on sale Oct. 24. For further
details, contact The Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, or call 757-6611, ext. 266.
ARMY ROTC
Attention freshmen: This spring develop
important financial aid and career oppor-
tunities by taking MLSC 1001 (Intro to
ROTC and the Army). It's a one-hour elec-
tive with no uniform or haircut require-
ments and entails no future obligation.
Books are provided. For more info call 2nd
Lt. Kevin Dunlevy at 757-69716974 or
stop by Room 343 Rawl
FREE THROW CONTEST
Be sure to attend the Intramural free
throw contest registration meeting held
Nov. 8 from 3-6 p.m in MG. Play begins
shortly afterward! Register when you can
and see if your team is the best on Cam-
pus!
PITT COUNTY ACLD
The next meeting of the Pitt County ACLD
will be Nov. 15 at St. James United Meth-
odist Church, 7:30 p.m. If you are inter-
ested in becoming a member of the Pitt
County ACLD, would like more info or
would like to be on our mailing list, please
send your address to: Pitt County ACLD,
1 Dogwood Court, Greenville, N.C.
FRESHMEN
All freshmen who intend to major in one
of the following: Bus. Ed Driver Safety
Ed Early Childhood Ed Health Ed
Intermediate Ed Mktg. and Distributive
Ed Middle Grades Ed Physical Ed
Special Ed and Technical and Vocational
Ed. Please be advised that you will be
required to select a "Second Academic
Major It is imperative that you contact
your advisor or chair of the department to
learn more about the second major re-
quirement before you preregister for sec-
ond semester.
AIDS ED. COMMITTEE
Students, staff and faculty: Support AIDS
Awareness Week. Listen to Mike Miller
speak on "Living With AIDS" and how it
affects his family. Questions are welcome.
Mendenhall, Hendrix Theatre, Nov. 8 at
8:00 p.m. No charge. Call 757-6794 for
more info.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
Have you got STAR potential? If you do,
we invite you to audition for our STAR
SEARCH competition on Nov. 8 at 7:30
p.m. in the Cultural Center. We ask that
your talent fit one of these categories:
dance, musk, drama or comedy. The
winner of this Star Search will have a
chance at $150. Everyone is welcome! For
more info call 830-5391. Entry fee $5.
MEN NEEDED
ECU School of Medicine, section of al-
lergy, is conducting a study. Needed for
asthma study, men, age 18 or over, non-
smokers with mild to moderate asthma
and allergies. Study includes use of a new
drug, skin tests and pulmonary tests. Vol-
unteers will also stay overnight twice in
hospital lodgings. Participants will be
well reimbursed. Please call 551-3154 to
volunteer.
STUDENTS
If you have photographs from Fall Break
or some of a party you have been to this
year, bring them to the yearbook office.
We are looking for good quality photo's to
show where you went for Fall Break &
photo's of your party. Remember, it's not
your yearbook until you're in it. We are
located in front of Joyner I ibrary on the
2nd floor of the Publications Bldg.
YEARBOOK PICTURES
Yearbook photographs are now being
taken! If you have never been in the year-
book, now is your chance. Remember, it's
not your yearbook until you're in it. Hours
are from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30
p.m. this week only in the Student Store.
FACULTY & STAFF
Faculty and staff yearbook portraits are
being taken this week in the Student Store.
Hours are from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m
4:30 p.m. Come out and show the students
you care about the yearbook!
COPING WITH STRESS
A free mini class offered by the ECU
Counseling Center for students. You can:
Identify sources of stress, make positive
changes, manage your response to stress-
ful situations, learn to relax, improve self
confidence Nov. 7, 9, 11, 14 in 329 Wright
Bldg. from 3-4 p.m. No advance rogisrra
rion is required. Call or stop bv the Conn
seling Center for further info (316 Wright
Bldg, 757 6661). Plan on attending all tour
sessions.
TURKEY TROT
Be sure to attend the Intramural Turkey
Trot registration meeting held Nov. 15 at
5:00 p.m. in BIO 103. Make sure you rcgis
ter and learn what the Turkey Trot i all
about!
CHALLENGE WEEK
Be sure to attend the Intramural Chal
lenge Week registration meeting hold
Nov. 14 from 11:00 am -600 p.m in MG
104. Challenge Week will be a challenge to
see who is the best among all of the chal-
lengers
Auditions for a reader's theatre ("WE
WEAR THE MASK") to be performed
during Black History Month will be held
Nov. 8 from 5-7 p.m in Jenkins Audito-
riumqrudents interested in reading dur-
ing the auditions should be familiar with
"For My People" by Margaret Walker.
Copies are available in the Office of Mi-
nority Student Affairs, 204 Whichard
Bldg.
SCHOLARSHIPS I
Applications are now being accepted for
the David B. and Willa H. Stevens Scholar-
ship for undergraduates enrolled in the
School of Social Work. Undergraduate
students in the SOCWJUST programs
are eligible for consideration. The recipi-
ent will be selected on the basis of aca-
demic excellence, financial need, good
A
citizenship and dedication to the S4
JUST professions Stud nts may nomj
thonwh es bv completing the applu t
form which i�. available from theSchJ
SOCW. rm 301 BetkBktg Applied
muM contain the rcvommr-ndation d
student's academic 3.K is r The dcj
for stibmissu o is Ncn 9 '�
call 757 6961 . 219
CIC TRANSIT
Arc- you a Pttl G lent, 6
(�1 or r�Idct and net d i rid
i a! appoii In � � �
( cut. r is offering I n
to the elderh ttr nv
w ihm Pitt C(MintV"fl
tisN clinics cs and I
! '� it �� rra
be made at 1'
ul( d appointi
inc
MTV P is Si
make
en a � ' �
ATI.AN! A SYMPHQ '
IV rvpi �
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17 at 8:00 pj
cor- rtpi
s mph �� . � �
new r � ��
tor Ihis.
deta
v . . . t Off
PHI BJ 1 A l AMBD I
The next meeting I
be N �� '�
Attendan
get the r �
be av i- led
3 sell �
COOPERATIV1 1 n.
i oopcrathe Ed ifi �
the Univi r il - des . � � ' I
find .e
fore you graduate ' uld
extend w P' I 'i' n to al j
Camp
(CPS) � In what may
outbreak of partisan fcelii
Election Day approa hes v
building of frustration
college papers, angn stu�
the University of South
Georgia Stato Universitj
California State 11
Long fVat-h' have fhtwiU
censor their campus pd
recent weeks.
The student governnj
Cal State-Long Beach, in t,
shut down the Union an n
cnt "alternative" student
for violating campus prohj
lewd, mdecenl or .�
havior "
To just cut off wl
offensive is no! fair, and 1
violates some rights
plained Union Asso
Ethel Powers
"Bv closing the I
they can silence an Of
voice EditorGarv Stark
There ha been a mi
campus new paper ccnij
episodes since lasl ' muar
the U S. Supreme Court i
Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeil
high school officials i
the content of student m j
if those papers are run as
ism class labs
Some colleges were
invoke the ruling In pr
ample Cal State-Los Angj
cials tired Joan Z dh the
newpaper advisor, becai
didn't like the content h
per
Offkals at Pima
College in Arizona I
College in California, S.uj
College in Texas. .ud
Kentucky University alsd
censor or halt student paj
cultural events in the a
court's decision in recent I
In the past, other stuj
not administrators n
qucntly tngd to censorj
papers "Most problem
University of Minnesot.
ism professor and hi
Collegiate Press ottic
Rolnicki, "involve stud
emments and money
Satire P
Powers -
Activat
Yes, those
Trashy Joi
are hack to p
you!
EVERY THURi





�L
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3,1988 7
� c t togclha with vou
�thor again - Love the
I KP 1H1 HUE BOAT: Sig
ad) foi an awesome weekend!
inks foe the o Down'
l'l A 11 ASS1FIED
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OPENING SOON AT OUR
NEWEST LOCATION:
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jizations,
;ies needed for
on campus,
ind organized.
28 ext. 28.
OLINIAN
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r sti p by Ihei tun
(316 A'ni;ht
rtduifi ji! tour
TURKE TROT
I "ho Intramural lurkey
It at
' ' � hi regis
learn what tho Turi I is all
CHALLENGE I EK
IntramuraJ Chal
n meeting hold
� i . - Dp m in MC
ngc Week will bo a challenge to
- the h�M among all of the chai-
rs
AUDITIONS
I ns for a reader's theatre (WE
AR THE MASK") to bo performed
ing Black Hitor Month will be held
m 5-7 p m in Jenkins Audito-
. Students interested in reading dur-
jtne auditions should be familiar with
Ir Mv People" bv Margaret Walker.
Mks are available in the Office of Mi-
itv Student Affairs, 204 Whichard

SCHOLARSHIPS
cations are now being accepted for
r�JMd B and Willa H. Stevens Scholar
fat undergraduates enrolled in the
lool of Social Work. Undergraduate
ients in the SOCWJUST programs
eligible for consideration. The recipi-
I will be selected on the basis of aca-
iuc excellence, financial need, good
Announcements
citizenship and dedication to the SXXTYV
IUST professions Stvidonts may nominate
themselves bv completing the application
form which is available from the School of
SOCW. rm .101, IV Ik Bldg Applications
must contain the recommendation of the
student's academic advisor. The deadline
for submission is Nov For more info
call 757 61, ext. 2W
CLC TRANSIT
Are you a Pitt County resident, 60 yean
old or older and need a ride to your medi-
cal appointment? The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the elderly tor medical appointments
within Pitt County-such as doctors, den-
tists climes, therapies and the Health
Popt Arrangements for the service must
be made at lo.ist 21 hours before the sched-
uled appointment Call the Creative I iv-
ingCentcr 757-03(0, to find out thedayfs)
service is scheduled for your area, then
make your medical appointment and res
ervation tor transportation
ATLANTA SYMPHONY
The rVpt of University Unions is proud
di present the Atlanta Symphony on Nov.
1" at 8 00 p.m in Wright Auditorium The
concert promises to be most exciting as the
symphony is under the direction ot their
new musiejl conductor. Yoci Levi Tickets
tor thiseventgoonsalcOct.31.lor further
details call 7'hpll, ext. 2f or write
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhatt.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The next meeting of the organization vll
bo on Nov. 8 at 4:00 in rm 1013 GCB
Attendance is mandatory for everyone to
get their pictures taken Also, prizes will
be aw arded at this meeting tor the highest
3 sellers of Tom Watt.
COOPEft AT1VE ED.
Cooperative Ed a free service offered bv
the University, is designed to help vou
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate We would like to
evtend an invitation to all students to at-
tend a Co op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Nov. semi
nars) The onlv bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
arc: 'extra cash to help cover the cost of
college expenses or perhaps to increase
your "fun" budget, 'opportunities to test
a career choice if you have made one or to
explore career options if undecided about
a future career, and a highly "market
able" degree, which includes a valuable
career-related experience, when vou
graduate. Co-op Seminars�Fall, W8S:
Thurs Nov 3, 1 pnv, rm. 2010, Mori
Nov. 7,1 p.m rm 2010, Thurs , Nov. 10, 4
p m , rm 200r, Man , Nov. 14, 4 p.m rm.
200fv Thurs Nov 17, 1 pm, rm. 2010;
Moiv, Nov. 21, 1 pm rm. 2010, Man,
Nov 28, 4 p.m , rm 200b, Thurs , Dec 1, 1
pm, rm 2010, and Mon , Dec 5, 4 p.m,
rm. 2006
ment I lead of Production scheduling at
Burroughs Wellcome. I Its topic will be
Time The Next Competitive Advan-
tage. Members are encouraged to attend
and guests .ire welcome.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
loin us for a time of tun, fellowship and
training on how to live a more effective
Christian life on a college campus Thurs ,
7:30 p m , Brewstcr C-103. Everyone Wel
come
STUDENTS FQR
DEMOCRACY
S ED will be meeting this Sun at 7 00
pm in Mcndenhall room 248. Anyone
wanting to tmd out what S.E.D. is a Knit is
invited to attend. S E D. would like to en
courage all registered voters to get out and
vote on election day A vote is a terrible
thing to waste
STUDENT PLANNING
AS'SOC NETWORK
CET A DECREE IN PLANNING! Come
to the question and answer session on
Nov. 7th at 400 p.m. in room D-209,
Brewster Bldg. Sponsored by the Student
Planning Assoc Network.
SIGMA XI LECTURE
On Nov. 15 at 7:00 pm. in CCB 1028, Dr.
Michael Dadswell of Acadia University in
Nova Scotia will speak on "Tidal Power:
The Dream and the Reality The talk is
sponsored bv the ECU Chapter of Sigma
Xi, the Scientific Research Society Dr.
Dadswell will describe a large hydroelec-
tric project being constructed to harness
the tremendous tidal power of the Bay of
Fundy. The project could have substantial
environmental effects � particularly
mortality of migratory fish that spend
part of the year off the coast of the south-
eastern U.S. It's free, open to the public,
and should be of interest to non-scientists
as well as to natural and social scientists.
Dr Dadswell is a supporter of the ECU-
Nova Scotia exchange program Mark
your calendar now � this should be a
good one.
Ei:UGQSE�L�tiOni
The ECU Gospel Choir is pleased to an-
nounce its Fall Concert on Nov. 13 at 3:30
p.m. Admission is FREE and everyone is
welcome.
LQGO CONTEST
Incorporate the "I" from the old Iluminia
logo on an 8 1 2 x 11 format & you could
win $50.00. For more info go by
Mendcnhall's front desk - entry dates
Nov. 7-10 Student Union Visual Arts
Committee
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold a meeting Nov. 8 at 8
p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium. Induction
ceremony for new members will be Nov.
7th from 6-8 p.m in Hendrix Theatre.
rOI.T.F.CE REPUBLICANS
College Republicans would like to take
this opportunity to remind everyone that
Tues. is election day DON'T FORGET TO
VOTE!
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Environmental Issues Seminar Spring,
1989. Mon, Wed. 10-11 (2 semester hours;
3 semester hours for ASLA 3060) (also of-
fered as an Honors course). This course
will include three major components. 1)
personal attitudes toward Nature and
how they affect the broad topic of environ-
mental ethics and how we think about
land and natural resources; 2) global envi-
ronmental issues such as the Greenhouse
Effect, acid precipitation and the ozone
problem; and 3) diverse, topical issues in
Europe, Asia, and Latin America stressing
the importance of national preserves
(parks) in conservation and environ-
mental activities. Visiting lecturers from
East Carolina and elsewhere will partici-
pate; the class will be taught by Richard C.
Maugcr (Geology). Please register for one
of the Area Studies Seminars: ASLA 3000
(Latin America), ASAS4000 (Asia), ASEU
3100 (Europe) or ASAF 4000 (Africa).
HONORS
Geology of the National Parks. HSEM
2014 (3 semester hours); HSEM 2015 (1
semester hour). Tues Thurs. 8-9:30; Wed
12-3 00 Richard Maugcr, Instructor. Geo-
logical features and histories and land-
scape evolution of selected national parks
(Yellowstone, Yosemite, etc.) will be stud-
ied from the viewpoint of a ranger or
naturalist who will have responsibility for
interpreting the geology for the park visi-
tor. Additional readings and discussions
will focus on the National Parks them-
selves-their past, present, and future and
their central role in educating the public
about environmental awareness, appro-
priate land use activities, and recreational
philosophy. See International Programs.
MASSAGE CLINIC
PT dub is having a massage clinic on
Nov. 18, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Buy tickets in
advance for SllOmin. or at the door for
$12510 min. First floor Allied Health
Bldg.
CLIFF'
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
r�
i
i
i
i
L
Mon. -Thurs.
Shrimp Plate $3.65
Fri. & Sat.
Weekend Specials
Beer, Wine Brown Baggin O.K.
752-3172
Campus papers receive threats
MONDAY
NIGHT
FOOTBALL
On Greenville's Largest
Wide Screen TV
This Week
Cleveland Browns
vs
Houston Oilers
8:00 tin til
$2.50 Pitchers
$1.00 Miller Long Necks
$1.50
(CrS) � In what may bo an
outbreak of partisan toolings as
Flection Dav approaches or just a
building ot frustration toward
college papers, angry students at
the University of South Dakota,
Georgia State University and
California State Lmversity , at
Long !V;rt:Vv have threatened to'
censor their campus papers in
recent weeks.
The student government at
Cal State-Long Beach, in fact, has
shut down the Union, an irrever-
ent "alternative" student paper,
for violating campus prohibits of
'lewd, indecent or obscene be-
havior
To just cut off what you find
offensive is not fair, and 1 think it
violates some rights com-
plained Union Associate Editor
Ethel Towers.
"Bv closing the Union down,
thev can silence an opposing
voice Editor Gary Stark added.
There has been a series of
campus newpaper censorship
episodes since last January, when
the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in
Hazel wood v. Kuhlmeicr that
high school officials can regulate
the content of student newpapers
if those papers are run as journal-
ism class labs.
Some colleges were quick to
invoke the ruling. In April, for ex-
ample. Cal State-Ixts Angelesoffi-
cials fired loan Zyda, the student
newpaper advisor, because they
didn't like the content of the pa-
per.
Officals at Pima Community
College in Arizona, Chapman
College in California, San jacinto
College in Texas, and Western
Kentucky University also tried to
censor or halt student papers and
cultural events in the wake of the
court's decision in recent months.
In the past, other students �
not administrators � more fre-
quently tneji to. censor student
papers "Most problems said
University of Minnesota jounal-
ism professor and Associated
Collegiate Tress official Tom
Rolnicki, "involve student gov-
ernments and money
In 1987, for instance, the St.
lohn's University student gov-
ernment refused to fund the cam-
pus paper, the Torch, because the
paper's finances were mis-
ma nged. Torch staffers, however,
said the action was retaliation for
their, endorsement of a rival slate
McaVrtxreftrtes in a previous elec-
tion.
At Cal State-Long Beach,
Union staffers say student politi-
cians, who hauled away the
paper's computer equipment and
cut funding, also are retaliating.
"We can't publish without
the equipment said Stark. "They
don't want the paper to publish
The student government, he said,
is getting even for the irreverent
Union's criticism of student gov-
ernment leaders.
"VVc won't parrot what the
Senate wants to hear Towers
said.
At issue is the Union's Sept.
26 issue, which contained a satiri-
cal supplement called the "Sexu-
ally Frustrated Male Issue" con-
taining a photograph of three
semi-nude men and several erotic
illustrations.
AUJtough Union staffers say
the parody was an attempt to help
students laugh at their frustraion
in an age of risky sex, student gov-
ernment leaders were not
amused. In the resolution that
closed the paper, the student gov-
ernment said the issue violated
campus obscenity and sexual har-
assment policies.
"We just felt that we could do
better things with the money
said student government Tresi-
dent Roger Thompson.
"This paper is degrading to
me and others as well agreed
Justino Aguila, president of the
Journalism Students Association.
"This degrading does not help
students in any way
Two yearsago, student politi-
cans blasted the Union for pub-
lishing a page of stick figures
engaged in sex. Last year, both-
ered by the newpaper's style and
content, the student government
cut the budget from $25,000 to
$10,000. Stark said it costs $40,000
to publish the paper annually.
The rest of the funding came from
advertising.
Ramada Inn
.(, n
(Formerly Shearton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
: 5th St.
I SUBWAY
I
j Delivers
! Call at 758-7979
I S0METMN'
Satire Page
Powers .� . o
Activate I
FR0MSVWM
I
I
I
I
I
I
Yes, those Twins of
Trashy Journalism
are back to plague
you!
EVERY THURSDAY
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Buy One Sub Get
Another For 99
(With purchase of Medium Drinks)
Offer Expires Nov. 30,1988
(Not Valid withJOrfiycr

I
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I

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CLASS PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will be taken form Oct. 31 through
Nov. 4. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
IT ISN'T YOUR YEARBOOK UNTIL
YOU ARE IN IT!
You are invited
to the first Worship Service of
Christ
(Presbyterian Church
Evangelical and Bible-believing
Praise singing with guitar accompaniment
Relevant and encouraging Bible teaching
This Sunday, November 6, at 11:00 a.m.
in the Banquet Hall of the Comfort Inn
on Greenville Blvd.
Join Us!





THE EASTCAROI INIAN
Features
NOVEMBER 3,1988 Page 8
Beau
By BFTH ELLISON
Staff Writer
Marsalis mellows Greenville
ByJIMSHAMLIN
SUH Writer
VVvnton Marsalis and friends blew Wright Auditorium wide
open Tuesday night with mellifluence of jazz. Lven Mayor Ed
Carter was on hand to hear the quartet plus to saxophone players.
(Photolab)
Elvis trips through
the last Halloween
By JKFF PARKER
Staff lllu�trltor
For the sake oi clarifying that
is one person's perspective of this
1 lallowecti jjaCrjeo ille and not a
straight objective news feature,
let's rfftt'rtnartfrfr "WhwHffcw-
Downtown or, "1 Was Pressed
As Elvis and Nobody Gave Me a
Peanut Butter and 'Nana Sand-
wich
The citv of Greenville was a
cold and inclement place this
October 31st, unlike the more
welcoming conditions of Hal-
loweens past. This year the cele-
bration fell on a Monday, a god-
forsaken day that nothing fun
should ever happen on. The next
day classes were to be held all
over campus, by untoward teach-
ers who didn't recognize the
importance of this Celtic test. In
spite of these insurmountable
obstacles, we did it anyway!
Once properly attired as the
late, obese King of Rock and Roll,
(This is, after all, the new Year of
Elvis on the Chinese calendar) I
ventured to the hub of civiliza-
tion, downtown Greenville. The
streets were swarming with dis-
guised and unsavory roustabouts
wandering without purpose. And
now what I saw.
Lots of undead types. While
some looked really neat, this cos-
tume is a cop-out, because it takes
mere minutes to prepare. It's not
very funny either, which is a re-
quirement to making yourself
remembered in the Emerald City.
Eo better next year, kids.
Elviras. There's some pre-
requisites to being Elvira for Hal-
Coming
in
Entertainment
Thursday
Vixen
(special guest: Avalanche)
The Attic
Dead Head Janice
New Deli
The Beam
Susie's
Friday
The Kingpins (for charity)
The Attic
Valence
New Deli
Saturday
Nantucket
The Attic
The Channel Cats
New Deli
loween, and you know what they
are, girls. None of that imitation
Stuff, now. One young lady did
qualify immensely, however, and
has mv vote for being the new
horror hostess.
An ice-breaking barge with
two girls dressed as whales. Now
there's an innovative costume!
Not only is it timely, but it was
funny too. This one gets the
Greenpeace Award for 1988.
Ronald McDonald. Looked
just like him, too. Being a hungry
Elvis, 1 expected the red-crowned
Burgermeister to give me some
McFood, but he didn't. It was still
a good costume.
Many young ladies were
witches. Pretty original, huh?
Rastafarians galore. Either
everyone dressed as these Jamai-
can fun-seekers, or the same two
did a whole lot of walking
around. Some looked authentic,
others needed to go back to the Al
Jolsen School of Disguise in up-
state N.Y.
Priests, padres, nuns, you
name it. Clergy filled the streets
this time. This is no doubt a result
of a new moralism growing in
America. Especially the pregnant
nuns; what better way to take a
stand against abortion? Keep up
the good work, sisters.
The pope, in all his glory. He
abandoned his Popemobile for
one night to walk amongst the
students and impart wisdom and
blessings. It was the real pope, 1
know it. What would have really
been cool was if all the aforemen-
tioned clergy had followed him
around all night.
A few superheroes. While
most were unspecific heroes with
any old cape on, a few were actual
characters. The Punisher and Spi-
derman, from Marvel Comics,
made their downtown debuts,
ind there was even an Orpheus
from our very own Pirate Comics!
I encourage this kind of costume
whole-heartedly, and there
should have been more Hubies,
Uncle Lous, Undercover Cats,
The Laws, Avatars, and the like.
Local heroes are hip.
There were a lot of people
standing around on corners and
by doors dressed as policemen.
They looked so real, too. I know
they weren't real though,because
they weren't writing tickets or
earing doughnuts. I wonder what
would have happened if someone
dressed as a Krispy Kreme build-
ing had walked through the
crowd with a "Hot Doughnuts
Now" sign flashing?
Nerds ahoy. In preparation
for my costume of The King, 1
frequented many thrift stores and
saw many of you nerds buying
your tacky wares. Now, you can't
tell me that none of you had any
See ELVIS, page 9
Tuesday night, a full house
waited in Wright Theatre to see
Wynton Marsalis. There was a
twenty-minute delay before Dr.
George Butler, a vice-president of
Columbia Records, took the stage.
Butler spent fifteen minutes
telling the crowd of jazz fans
things most of them already
knew: the music's past, its pres-
ent, its roots, and its influences.
He also gave Marsalis an intro-
duction, mentioning his eight
Grammy Awards in both classical
and jazz music, information
which was readily available on
the first page of the program.
Finally, the band took the
stage. Anyone who had been
expecting a bunch of fat, middle-
aged men was surprised. Mar-
salis, a 25-year-old, led a group of
young musicians onto the stage.
He usually plays in a quartet
(trumpet, string bass, piano and
drums), but this time he brought
two saxophonists as well. He
immediately walked up to the
microphone and announced the
title of the first number. Like
almost everything else he said
during the show, however, it was
inaudible over the mumbling
audience.
The crowd grew silent as the
musicians began to play. It was
impossible to hear anything
through the thunder of the drums.
After finishing a solo, Marsalis
walked behind the trap set and
said something to the drummer.
Immediately, the storm dispersed
and a sweet, melodic tune shone
through. Its proper balance re-
stored, the music was much im-
proved. The song began in a
smooth melody, degenerated into
a barely-structured cacophony,
and returned to its former mellif-
luence. Was it supposed to hap-
pen that way? Sure � it's jazz.
The next number was much
more regular. It was full and
funky, like a spring night in the
city. The drummer alternated
between his snare and a wood
block, setting a beat which
seemed somewhat askew to the
melody. The piano plinked inter-
mittently, giving the music a
somewhat surreal effect.
Next was a piece which began
with a trumpet solo which was as
warm and golden as a sunrise.
Marsalis impressed the audience
with his full, vibrato tone. The rest
of the instruments followed this
technique, proving that music car.
be beautiful and fulfilling, even
when it's slow and lacks embel-
lishment.
After this jazzy pastorale was
a lively bouree. The bassist
plucked arpeggios in double-time
while each of the saxists and
Marsalis took turns at the micro-
phone. Marsalis played a quick,
bright solo before turning the
stage over to the alto saxophonist,
whose slipshod performance of
technic-book arpeggios and
scales fell somewhat short of
impressive. After that came two
impressive solos by the pianist
and the tenor saxophonist.
After the intermission, mayor
Ed Carter stood on stage, looking
nervously at the crowd as he
waited for Marsalis to return.
"Well he said, "I can't sing The
crowd laughed. "I cut a record for
Columbia one time he joked,
"and they released me
When Marsalis reappeared,
Carter presented him with a key
to the city of Greenville for his
contributions to the world
through music. "I wonder if it fits
the doors to some houses mused
the trumpeteer. He set the small
trophy on the piano, picked up his
trumpet, and began to play. one displayed remarkable talent
The tune was nasty and raw, a at one time or another,
blues song like those played in The drummer, although a bit
New Orleans nightclubs. It was rambunctious at first, managed to
filled with wails and moans, sheer keep his rhythms steady. More-
musical agony, but it fell awk- over, during the drum break in
wardly to pieces at the end. the final number, his amazing
After its painful death, all the dexterity won him round after
musicians except the pianist left round of applause,
the stage. He played a solo called The pianist, when he could be
"Sick Petal of a Rose with pas- heard, played artful variations
sion and emotion. In execution, it and counter-rhythms to balance
was a flawless solo, but it didn't the three-part harmony. His solo
seem to fit in well with the rest of during the second set established
the program; it was almost classi- njm as perhaps the second most
cal in style.
The final number was done in
the style of New Orleans funerals.
It was a new piece not yet re-
leased; Marsalis said it would be
recorded "around 1993 The first
movement was a dirge, slow and
mournful
talented musician in the sextet.
Not only was his tone on both
instruments mature and full, he
also performed well-integrated
solos with relative case.
As for Marsalis, his record
speaks for itself At age 25, he has
AY" i -j i i won eieht Grammies for his clas-
The saxes played low, musky w, & ,
. , r w ,� j sical and jazz musicianship. Jazz
while Marsalis cried , . ' , . , mJt '
legends such as Duke Ellington
notes
through his muted trumpet. Un-
like the other selections, it was
very structured, based upon the
heavy pulse � the footfalls of
pallbearers. When this lament
was almost silent, the drummer
exploded with a heavy rhythm.
The rest of the band watched him
for a few moments, nodding their
heads to the beat, before joining in
a brilliant allegretto which won
them a standing ovation.
Although the selections var-
ied widely in style, they were
have proclaimed him as, "a deco-
rated hero and a symbol of glam-
our His performance was flaw-
less and his stage presence cool
and commanding.
Outside of the musicians and
the music itself, there is little to
criticize � after all, it was a con-
cert. However, it was obvious that
stage lighting was being used to
emphasize the emotional content
of each selection and the fluctua-
tion of moods within the music.
This, when done, was done with
dreadfully repetitive in execu
tion. Each piece would invariably baldfaced incompetence
begin with a trio, followed by a
trumpet solo, then an alto sax
solo, next a piano solo, and an-
other sax solo (tenor or soprano)
before the trio rejoined to the end.
It was an effective way of allow-
ing each musician equal time to
display his talent on center stage,
but it was a monotonous way of
doing so.
This is not 4a say thai the .
musicians lacked polish. Every
Overall, the show was medi-
ocre. The six musicians showed
the full scope of their talents,
which necessarily included their
limitations. They are, after all,
onlv young musicians, with many
vears to play before they mature.
Each show they play will be in-
creasingly better as they slowly
attain the mastership of their in-
struments.
Granny ghostbusts Carolinas
W1NSTON-SALEM (AP) �
The two weeks around Hallow-
een are the only time of year when
Jayne Ware talks about ghosts.
'The rest of the year, during
research and for lecture purposes,
I prefer to call them 'energies' or
'vortexes said Ware, a soft-spo-
ken grandmother who shoos
away spooks, hassles haunts,
sends off shades, allays appari-
tions and gives ghouls the gate.
But the official license plate
on her van says: "GHOSTBUS
"I even went along with it and
had 'Granny Ghostbuster put on
my business card alongside 'Par-
apsychologist she said, chuck-
ling.
Ware has visited all the major
ghost locations in North and
South Carolina and many in other
states, too.
At the request of owners and
occupants who have "unexplain-
able happenings" in their build-
ings, Ware investigates the cause.
Then, if a spirit or manifesta-
tion � not a squirrel in the attic �
is causing the disturbance, she
clears the structure. She says she
can usually talk the ghost into
leaving.
She says she met her first
ghost at age 13 and has been on
speaking terms with them ever
since.
"As a child, I was close to my
grandfather. My parents lived in
Burlington. One night I stayed up
late, reading in my room. Shortly
after I turned my light out, a vi-
sion of my grandfather appeared
at the foot of my bed. It almost
seemed as if a spotlight was on
htm.
"He told me to tell my
mother, who he called 'Sis that
he was going away. Tell her not to
worry he said. Then he disap-
peared.
T went down the hall and
found my mother talking on the
telephone. I waited 'til she was
finished and when she turned to
me she had tears in her eyes.
'Jayne she said, Tm sorry to tell
you, but your grandfather just
died
In weeks to come, Jayne tried
to tell her mother and minister
what she had seen and heard,
"but in those days people didn't
like to talk about such things and
I never got an explanation
Since that day, Ware has read
and researched everything she
could find on the subject of the
paranormal, specifically the ap-
pearance and "presence" of
things that go bump in the night.
'During the past 10 days I
vices. It is surprising, she said,
what one sometimes gets in the
way of images and sounds that
might otherwise go undetected.
She interprets the material
and uses it to de-ghost the prem-
have been conducting local ghost isf- hc �df a teachinS c Jtifi
mj � . 5 . catefrom the American Academy
walks and meeting with students - Pa,�u� :� Nnw wJi
and the media. Farther afield, I
hosted a Georgetown, S.C, ghost
tour she said. "It's like a vaca-
tion from the serious work. I take
time to enjoy the popular concep-
tion of ghosts and haunted
houses
In checking out a house for
ghosts, she and a team of five fel-
low researchers install tape re-
corders, cameras and other de-
"I have some in progress right
now she said. Generally, when a
"ghostbusting" appeal is made to
the center, she or co-workers in-
terview the family or person who
reports the "haunting
The "recipe" for a true ghost,
Ware says, is one that stays at the
same place and does the same
of Parapsychology in New York
and the Academy of Parapsychol-
ogy. She also spent two months at thing or things over and over
Duke University where Dr. J.B. "Such as Joe Baldwin and the
Rhine did his famed psychic re- Maco light in eastern North Caro-
search on extrasensory percep-
tion and related fields-
She works with the nonprofit
International Center for Research
in Winston-Salem and handles
dozens of cases in the state each
year.
Una she said. "Baldwin was a
railroad man whose head was
severed in a rail accident and
people say they sometimes see
him walking where the railroad
used to be, swinging a lantern and
looking for his head"
Pickin' the express lane
Bonehead adventures grocery shopping
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Siaca 1W7 Only the Flnast in Quality Offending
The Bonehead's Rules Con-
cerning Grocery Shopping and
How to Avoid Leaving the Store
in a Homicidal Frenzy
1. For some reason, no matter
how many customers come out of
a grocery store, get in their cars
and appear to be leaving, they
really aren't. Either they sit in
their cars waiting for the radio
stations to change, or they're
meditating for the strength to pull
out onto Greenville Boulevard.
Either way, they are staying
put in their parking spaces and
neither the Rapture nor a shift to
the political left is gonna move
them. Thus, the First Rule is:
Develop a method of intra-di-
mensional parking. Failing that,
learn how to use your horn to its
fullest advantage.
Not even a Zen Buddhist can
transcend over thirty seconds of
constant blaring. They may not
move their car, but at least you've
released some of that built-up
tension that so often leads to stress
headaches.
2. Assuming you make it into
the store, now you have to con-
tend with two things: finding
what you want and carting it to
the car. Males, in a futile effort to
look as if they really just popped
in fof a six-pack and decided to
pick up a few things while they
happen to be there, will never use
a hand-held basket, and rarely
push a cart.
Thus, while trying to acheive
a casual attitude of "Hey. I feel
good about me and the sixteen
items I'm carrying in my arms,
pockets, pants cuffs, and no, I'm
not shoplifting, sir" they invari-
ably make utter fools of them-
selves as their assorted goods
tumble to the floor in the feminine
hygeine aisle.
In their quest to feign total
ignorance of the shopping proc-
ess, males steadfastly refuse to
remember where any product is
located in the store except for beer
and condoms. Perhaps this stems
from the embarrassing fact that
men are no longer the true food
gatherers in western society.
Females on the other hand,
born with an innate knowledge of
where canned artichoke hearts
might be located, wrest a cart
from the first bag boy they see,
rush aisle 7, grab two cans and
then head for the check out
counter.
After that, they become com-
pletely physically helpless. A bag
boy is needed to wheel the single
bag out to the curb. Many times
the female will then ask weakly if
the store doesn't employ a valet
service to get her car up to the curb
causing the guilt-stricken bag boy
to tote her groceries across the
asphalt for her.
While grocery store employ-
ees are supposedly employed to
help you find what you want and
then to get it to your car, there is
always the high probability that
the clerk you ask for help has just
gotten a speeding ticket, broke up
with their boy girlfriend mere
minutes ago during a tearful
phone c H and is busily taking out
their frustrations on the cereal
boxes with a price gun that won't
print properly.
Rule Number Two goes thus:
If one must purchase items, it is
helpful to know ahead of time
which items one can live without
in case of a) surly employees or b)
faulty carts.
3. The final obstacle is the
check out counter. As you debate
silently with yourself on whether
65 cents is too much to spend to
learn about amazing new alien
sex techniques guaranteed to as-
tonish your mate, you notice that
Gladys is having some trouble
ringing your purchases up.
While Gladys's name tag
says, "I'm smiling because of cus-
tomers like Y-O-U you may
notice that the expression on her
face is more of an evil glare saying
"I'd like to feed you to my pet
mutant iguanas" than a smile for
Y-O-U.
In any case, 93-year-old Gla-
dys is having trouble with the
See GLADYS, page 9
The streets of down
Greenville were not the
places rockin' Halloween nil
The Art School's annual Btf
Arts Costume Ball was tal
place at the Attic.
Three bands, a costume
test, and lots of door pr
up the evening's agenda.
night started ofi with new
Elvis, back
Continued from page
uglv clothes in your cl -
you could have used I
you're all such fashion platd
you actually had to go out
your friends, of course) ancj
uglv clothes. Yeah, right.
In passing I'll mention
more. A white witch, a me
Gladys embn
with grocery
Continued from page
ekctronk price scanner.
item she wafts over it retu
cough up its magnetic pru
into the register. She hasj
everv method possible
your bread over the glown
eve, and is now mashing tl
in between the conveyor he
the electric eye
When she tries to sc
apples, the register lauj
ciously at her and calls h -
old bat Enraged, she slai
still half-frozen bagels upsfl
digital readout of the regisU
machine responds by ejectij
cash drawer into her -�:
which causes her to starl
ing up blood.
Rule Numero Trez
get involved in fights
machines and grocery e
ees. It onlv infringes on the I
dignitv and the compute
remember your interfc
when its cousin the pavi
DEMOCRA'
1PERSONAL:
1Native of Farmvill
1 1N.C Married to K
Ellen Isley:
two sons: Ben an
!Thomas
i; Paid for by committd
L
A very limi
the "origii
able at U
these ar
years e
P.S. Call us
758-417





TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3,1988 9
Page
ville
nod remarkable talent
ic or another,
rummer although a bit
vtiousat first,managed to
U rhythms steady More-
luring the drum break in
(at number, his amazing
t won him round after
�t applau -
list when hecould be
� variations
. thms to balance
. His solo
hed
- thi se ond mosl
i the sextet.
. was 1 - tone on both
and full, he
I M ell integrated
i �o
- hi- record
25 he has
� r his clas-
inship azz
;i�;ton
s a deco-
� elam-
rmance was flaw-
stage presence cool
id "c
sici ins and
c its ere is little to
ifter a it was a con-
is obvious that
Ichtirc was g used to
il intent
md the flucrua-
the musk
� d ne with
d incompetence.
i the show was medi-
; i musician showed
t st ix1 oi their talents
lecessarily included their
lens They are. after all
ins, with many
re they mature
how they play will be in-
i - �� � : ,i- they slowly
E mastership ot their in-
�nts.
tnas
. some in progress right
e sa:d Cenerallv. whena
isting appeal is made to
r -he or co-workers m-
the family or person who
the "haunting
"roc � r a true ghost,
ys is one that stays at the
lace and does the same
r things over and over.
as Joe Baldwin and the
light in eastern North Caro-
;he said. "Baldwin was a
Id man whose head was
p in a rail accident and
thev sometimes see
. ng where the railroad
-winging a lantern and
i head"
hopping
for her.
lile grocery store emplov-
jsupposedly employed to
u find what you want and
et it to your car, there is
(the high probability that
k you ask for help has just
speeding ticket, broke up
jieir boygirlfriend mere
ago during a tearful
tail and is busily taking out
ustrations on the cereal
jnth a price gun that won't
loperly.
le Number Two goes thus:
lust purchase items, it is
to know ahead of time
Items one can live without
)f a) surly employees or b)
irts.
ie final obstacle is the
it counter. As you debate
with yourself on whether
is too much to spend to
ut amazing new alien
nques guaranteed to as-
lour mate, you notice that
I having some trouble
ur purchases up.
pie Gladys's name tag
smiling because of cus-
jl ke i-O-U you may
tat the expression on her
tre of an evil glare saying
to feed you to my pet
Iguanas' than a smile for
ny case, 93-year-old Gla-
wving trouble with the
k GLADYS, page 9'
a
?
Beaux Arts Ball lots of fun
By BETH ELLISON
Staff Writer
The streets of downtown
v reenville were not the only
places rockin' Halloween night.
fhe Art School's annual Beaux
Arts Costume Ball was taking
place at the Attic.
Three bands, a costume con-
test, and lots of door prizes made
up the evening's agenda. The
night started off with new band
Vacationing Firemen, who cov-
ered such songs as "Reptile
"Should I Stay or Should I Go"
and The New York Dolls tune
'Tills
Next up was a 3-year
Greenville veteran band, The
Bond. Some of The Bond's best
tunes included originals "Vicious
Circle" and "In My Mind" along
with Drivin 'n Cryin's "Can't
Promise You The World" and a
Ramones-like cover of Conway
Twitty's "It's Only Make Be- ,t-shirts
lieve
Not a negative word could be
uttered about any of the bands.
The crowd was a bit smaller than
last semester's ball, but people
danced and had a good time. A
big thanks goes to Rocket Bill for
doing an excellent job running the
sound board.
Attendance was down, but
the Beaux Arts Ball Monday night
was still a blast. It was also some-
what of a haven from the mob
Later in the evening, ticket
stubs were drawn for such door
prizes as hula hoops, frisbees and
outside. Maybe with a little en-
couragement, the organizers of
the Ball can be convinced to put it
together again in the Spring
Semester. It's a good excuse to put
on strange clothes and walk
around in public.
Elvis, back from the grave, reports on Greenville's Halloween
Continued from page 8
ugly clothes in vour closets that
ou could have used. 1 guess
. ou're all such fashion plates that
ou actually had to go out (with
vour friends, of course) and buy
ugly clothes. Yeah, right.
In passing I'll mention a few
nore. A white witch, a moon and
stars, a playing card, an alligator,
a banana, PeeVVee Herman, flap-
pers, gangsters, etc. One enter-
prising young man sported a tur-
ban and looked like a SG A presi-
dential candidate. Other than
these examples, the crowd was
not very creative this year.
What happened to all the
great costumes of la st year and the
Gladys embroiled in epic battle
with grocery's price scanner
Continued from page 8
electronic price scanner. Every
item she wafts over it refuses to
cough up its magnetic price code
into the register. She has tried
everj method possible of waving
your bread over the glowing red
eye, and is now mashing the loat
in between the conveyor belt and
the electric eye.
When she tries to scan the
apples, the register laughs mali-
ciously at her and calls her a senile
old bat. Enraged, she slams your
still half-frozen bagels upside the
digital readout of the register. The
machine responds by ejecting the
cash drawer into her stomach
which causes her to start cough-
ing up blood.
Rule Numero Trez � Never
got involved in fights between
machines and grocery employ-
ees. It only infringes on the clerk's
dig-itv and the computer will
remember your interference
when its cousin the payroll corn-
year before? In'87 there were such
classics as Fred Flintstone, The
Alien, the Couch Potatoes, and
more. This time, half the crowd
wasn't even dressed up.
The crowd overall was also
pretty nasty, threats and fights
were too prominent. This is sup-
posed to be a fun celebration that
we're famous for, not a place to
show off how obnoxious you can
be. If you're not going to be
friendly and cordial, then carry
your non-costumed butt back
home next time.
That was Halloween '88. I
was somewhat disappointed,
especially since none of the sand-
wich shops made Peanut Butter
and 'Nana Subs. Now you can go
ahead and look forward to Christ-
mas, since for the sake of shop-
ping convenience Thanksgiving
has been done away with. In the
meantime, go ahead and start
working on your costumes for
next year, and next time you see a
resurrected Elvis walking
around, give him some food. Uh-
huh-huh.
Student Union Special Concerts Chairperson
Job Description
1. To organize and direct the activities of the
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2. To call and conduct all meetings
of the committee.
3. To serve on the Program Board
of the Student Union.
Applications can be found in Room 236 - Mendenhall
Student Center or call 757-6611, ext. 210.
Deadline For Applications, November 16
puter at your office starts sub-
tracting your Social Security.
So there you go, My Rules Of
Grocery Shopping. May your
wheels never stick, and may the
prices be reasonable.
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LAST
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758-4176 1016 Myrtle Ave.





1
10
Tl 1C EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER . 1�88
The Clearly Labeled
7
S
Lb
c
Quote of the five minutes you
have left before class Any
minute now, something will
happen
Raymond Carver
JLSTASK
BIG E Sophomore has schedule sorrow
Dear Earlvis,
1 am a sophmore who has a
problem concerning the upcom-
ing final exams. Last semester 1
made honor roll by making A's in
Library Science and Intro Bas-
ket weaving. So, this semester 1
upgraded mv courses. Earlvis.
take a look at my present courses:
Biochemistry Seminar, Advanced
Calculus 111, Euclidean Geometry,
Mictobiology Seminar, Biophys-
ics and Chinese !I.
The problem is that final ex-
ams are just around the corner.
And 1 am not doing well in none of
mv subjects. 1 honestly do not
know w hy. What am 1 going to do
about the finals in those subjects?
Help me Earlvis.
Signed. In Big Trouble
(Editor s Note: This is a real
letter. Big E admits that he may
have made up a few of the letters
in the past, but please keep send-
ing in these gems.)
Dear Basket weaver.
Thanks tor the letter. We
printed here unedited. First oi all
you misspelled sophomore, but
what the hey. Secondly, ECU
doesn't offer a class in Bas-
ketwcavmg, or 1 would have
taken ;t a long time ago. Trust me.
Thirdly, 1 think the part about
your present schedule is full of
feces. Prove me wrong, bring me
an official copy of your schedule
and we'll print it, but until then let
me tell the bull patties, guy.
Now to your problem. Why
the tough schedule, guy? Learn
how to space your load out so that
vou'll only have one hard class
per semester. 1 suggest you blow
off this semester and spend this
last month at the Elbo. Your folks
won't be happy, but what the hey
� you can enroll at Pitt Confmu-
nitv College and lcam how to be a
industrial hygiencist.
Big
Dear Big E,
1 have been an avid reader of
your advice column for the past
few weeks and I think that you are
full of infinite wisdom.
That's why I am seeking your
advice. I want to know what the
hell is wrong with all the men in
Greenville?
1 am an intelligent, attractive
and well-rounded lady, measure-
ments 22- 58- 56, and as you can
see. 1 can't find a man.
1 haven't been out on a date in
over four years. I just can't under-
stand it. My acne has cleared up
tremendously since I started us-
ing OXY, except for a few linger-
ing blackheads on mv (censored
because of bad taste), but how do
men know this?
I went to the strip off at the
Elbo last night and the strippers
wouldn't come near me, even
when 1 tried to shove a $100 bill
down each of their g-strings. (As
you can guess I am also very well-
off).
I have my phone number
posted on every bathroom stall in
Scott dorm, but to no avail. 1 can't
get any, anywhere.
So, old great and wise Earlvis,
I am putting my love life (or lack
of) into vour hands. I know that I
J
can trust you to find me a MAN!
Signed, Desperately Seeking
Sex
P.S. Do you know if Chippy
Bonehead's bone is as big as he
thinks it is? If so, do you know his
phone number?
(Editor's Note: This is also a
real letter, if you don't believe me
come up to the office and 1 will
show it to you. The writer oi letter
actually paid a friend of hers to
deliver this beauty.)
Dear Desperate,
My, my. Let me say that
again. My, my. Listen, I have been
in college for six years now and I
have yet to see a girl so mispro-
portioncd as 22-58-56. But hey,
prove me wrong. On second
thought, I'll take your word for it.
I don't believe the bit about
the Elbo. If you would like a pri-
vate strip show with me, the Big E,
have the hundred dollar bills
ready and we'll put on a show.
The part about the black-
heads, come on, no one has them
there.
So you need a date. My, my.
Have you thought about wearing
an ad on your clothes, something
like "1 need a date" or "Take me
out I know there is that special
person for you; be patient, you
will find him.
Dear Big E,
My friends pick on me too
much. They call me Hce-Haw all
the time because of the wav I talk.
I guess I am kind of country, you
see 1 am from Bunn, N.C.
Everytime me and my friends get
comatose in Grog's, they start
saying "Bunn, North Carolina,
population 81, Salute
Man, Big E, 1 am tired of it.
One of my friends makes fun of
the way 1 say light, bright and
knife. What can I do? I am proud
of my southern heritage, but how
do I get these yankee talkers off
my back?
Signed, B.B.
Dear Big Bird,
Sorry dude, I guess you'll ei-
ther have to endure or find some
new friends.
Halloween party cancelled
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
Greenville's famed Halloween
Celebration is no more.
After approximately 50 out-
breaks of poor taste and hastily
thrown together costumes, city
authorities have declared the
decade-old celebration cancelled
indefinitely. The city council,
during a meeting Tuesday, did
not say if the festival will ever be
reinstated.
The Halloween festival be-
gins at 6 p.m. each October 31
when the downtown area streets
are roped off. This year the party
was held on a Monday night. At-
tendence and originality were at
an all time low.
Many organizations lobbied
to have the celebration pushed
back to Saturday the 29. The city
council and the Alcohol Law En-
forcement department struck
down the movement in its in-
fancy.
thus, many college students
from all over the east coast were
unable to attend the festivities
due to class schedules. At ECU,
Tuesday morning classes suf-
fered an incredible 97 absence
rate.
But City Council Chairman
Mean Oldguy says this is not the
reason the holiday has been
cancelled. "The costumes
absolutely sucked this year. I saw
15 Freddy Kreugers and not a
single Spuds MacKenzie he
pouted. "If the students of this
town won't play by mv rules, they
won't play at all
Rumors abound on and off
the ECU campus pertaining to
another reason the celebration
was cancelled. Senior Jay Garrick
saidThe city's mad because we
had more fun then they did at our
age
Falwell explodes during sermon
God creates His 900 number
HEAVEN, The Cosmos (BP)
� In an unprecedented move,
Cud opens up His first "900"
number today. The number, I-
00-i i AIL-MARY, will enable the
caller to hear an actual tape re-
corded message from The Lord.
The calls wiii cost throe dol-
lars for the iirt minute and SI.50
for each additional minute. Every
15th caller will get to talk to Him
live.
Most of the pre-recorded
messages contain a prayer, some
advice on dealing with stress and
some pleasant choral music in the
background, said Saint Gabriel,
spokesangel for God.
"His Highness has been look-
ing for a way to get back to the
common people Gabriel said.
"When he heard about these new
900 numbers, He thought, in His
infinite wisdom, that this might
be a pretty cost-effective way of
doing it
But being able to talk to God ?
"Well, I can't really say why
He decided to do that Gabriel
explains. "His advisors tried to
talk! lim out of that. But once I le's
made up I lis mind
"We just hope no one takes
anvthing He might sav the wrong
way. We've asked Him not to say
anything about birth control,
AIDS and Jodie Foster. But you
never know what He's gonna say
next he added.
LYNCHBURG, Va. (MP) �
The Reverend lerrv Falwell ex-
ploded today, to the delight of
opponents and the amazement of
onlookers.
"He was just standin' there,
preachin' eternal hellfire and
damnation, just like usual
when all of a sudden, he blew
right up said Kris Chin, who has
attended every sermon Falwell
has preached since 1983. "We all
thought it was a great ending �
verv mwuUive �
Spokesmen for the Reverend
Falwell were not making any offi-
cial comment on the cause of the
blast, but one who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity told The
Turtles get shelled
WASHINGTON. N.C. (BP)
� In an attempt to rum the ratings
of the new syndicated
cartoon "Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles W1TNJ, Channel Seven
admitted Tuesday that it aired the
half-hour program only at 7:30
a.m.Saturdavs, "Just to be mean
program director Facist Bullyboy
said.
While the cartoon and the
comic books that inspired it have
become cult favorites with the
college students who are the tar-
get audience of the show and its
advertising sponsors, Bullyboy
hates the innovative show and
wishes it would go the way of
'Oh, Svdnev mv personal favor-
ite
ECU students are gathering
forces to try and save the show.
"7:30, most of us are still in bed
Skip Jumprope, senior English
major and spearhead of the Save
the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Taskforce. "Late night parties and
all. Yeah, sure we tape it on the
VCR, but then it's got commer-
cials in it
The group wants the show to
be aired at a reasonable time "say
around the time those dumb
Smurfs are on said Jumprope. .1
Bullyboy responded with, "B
like the Smurfs. You can relate toj
them. Not like those slimy1
turtles
Associated Press, "We all think it
was Tammy Bakker, getting re-
venge for what Jerry done to her
hubby The spokesperson
pointed to mascara smears cvi-
"He was just standin'
there, preachin' eternal
hellfire and damnation
just like usual when
all of a sudden, he blew
right up We all
thought it was a great
ending very inven-
tlve"
dent on the remnants of Fal well's
clothing as clues to the possible
identity of his assailant.
Falwell's death by explosion
was not entirely surprising, con-
sidering that his family has a long
history of exploding on national
television. Falwell's father, the
Reverend Barry Falwell, ex-
ploded while filming an episode
of "Falcon Crest" last year (the
footage was never shown, how-
ever). His grandfather, the Rever-
end Larry Falwell, exploded dur-
ing an episode of "The Honey-
mooners on which he played an
encyclopedia salesman and trav-
elling preacher.
Spokesmen for People for the
American Way, a group which
has often criticized Falwell, were
laughing too hard to comment.
How to make your own Comics Page
Jeff Lynne produces
another group in
longest headline
NEW YORK, NY (BP) � Jeff
Lynne, ex-vocalist for the Electric
Light Orchestra and current pro-
ducer of The Traveling Wilburys,
unveiled plans for two similar
future projects today.
The Wilburys, consisting of
Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, George
Harrison, Roy Orbison and
Lynne, are all competent musi-
cians. The album has received
negative reviews due to its "ELO-
clone sound the trilling vo-
cals, the bubbly pop melodies
this album makes me want to
send Freddy Kruegcr after
schlockmeister Lynne" wrote
Rolling Stone critic Trendy Cur-
rent.
Nevertheless, Lynne is plan-
ning a new concept album, The
Evicted Twombley Sisters, featur-
ing Suzanne Vega, Tracy
Chapman, Melissa Etheridgeand
Stcvie Nicks. A movie and pos-
sible television mini series are in
the works for this project.
As with the Wilburys, who
took on names such as "Otis " and
"Lucky the Sisters will also
adopt new personas. Vega will
become "LaToya Chapman
"Priscilla Elheridge "Popeet
and Nicks "Wikki wikki ikki pa-
tang pa-tang 'how au courant' fire
engine thoroughbred
The Evicted Twombley Sis-
ters are expected to enter the stu-
dio sometime before Christmas.
The Sisters' sound is expected
to be not unlike the Wilburys'
but with more emphasis on wob-
bling vocals and lots of synthesiz-
ers. MTV expects to begin airing
the first video, tenatively titiled,
"All My Friends arc Homos (And
I Can't Get A Date).
Early spring will see Lynne
working with Water Works, an
instrumental group. Named after
the famous Monopoly� space,
the musicians will include Joe
"Bitchen Satriani, Wynton and
Branford Marsalis, "The Tornado
Twins" and Phil "Arm-Stay-On
Lad" Collins.
There is no word yet as to
whether either group will tour,
but tee- shirts and plastic beer
mugs are already in production.
Quayle speaks
LIZARD LICK, N.C. (BP) �
Vice presidential candidate Dan
Quayle, during a pep rally today,
remarked to Republican support-
ers, "I knew Loretta Lynn, I
served chicken fried in Crisco�
with Loretta Lynn, and Mike
Dukakis is no Loretta Lynn
The crowd surged with ap-
plause at the very apt statement,
perhaps the most intelligent opin-
ion Quayle has offered during the
campaign.
Bush speaks
AYDEN, N.C. (BP) � Presi-
dential hopeful George Bush,
during a pep rally today, re-
marked to Republican support-
ers, "I knew some facts about
Irangate once, I served in a gov-
ernment that knew some facts
about Irangate once, and Mike
Dukakis doesn't know any facts
about Irangate
The crowd surged with ap-
plause at this almost nonsensical
statement, perhaps the most
childish thing Bush has offered
yet during the campaign.
Marvel speaks
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
Freckles Marvel, managing editor
candidate for The East Carolinian
during a Media Board meeting,
remarked to members of the
Board, "I knew Chippy Bone-
head, I ran in fear from Chippy
Bonehead, and none of you are
Chippy Bonehead
The Board surged with ap-
plause at this, perhaps the most
comforting statement ever made
on the ECU campus.
Tired of having Fun and
Games� only once a week? Can't
wait to read the next installment
of your favorite unreadable car-
toon in The East Carolinian?
Now, with The Clearly Labeled
Satire Page�'s helpful guide, you
can make your own Pirate Com-
ics� page any day of the week that
you, the reader, feel like it!
Directions: Look at the num-
bers on the tiny, photocopied
fascimile of the Pirate Comics�
page reprinted here for your
convenience. Once the numbers
are located, find the paragraph in
this article that corresponds to
the number on the photocopied
fascimile page.
Follow the instructions and
Voila! Your very own Pirate
Comics� page!
DRAWING
6) The Avatar. To make your
own installment of this cartoon,
draw and write things that make
no sense even to yourself. It's a
karmic kind of thing, and it all
comes together after we die.
7) Inside Joke. Draw a cartoon
about drug use. W'ritc in a joke
that only your roommate under-
stands, but make sure it's about
drugs.
8) Hey, Big Head! To make
this strip, you only have to think
of a weird pen name for yourself.
Once you have that, it will write
itself!
9) The Law. Drawing this
strip requires that you be too busy
to ever advance the plotline of the
story. And an ability to draw
chainsaws week after week.
10) Fun And Games�. There
arc two steps to this. One, Xerox�
a lot of photo from old television
shows. Then, type out lots of in-
side jokes to go with them. These
inside jokes can be about drugs,
but they don't have to be.
And there vou have it!
1) The logo. This is the part of
the page that tells you what is on
the page. While the zip-a-tone in
the backgroundlthe little grey
dots) is fairly inexpensive, you
can acheive the same effect with a
grey Crayola�. So write Pirate
Comics� in big letters, draw half a
skull and then color in the back-
ground with your grey crayon.
It's that easy!
2) The quote. This is a hard
one. Kids, get permission to saty
up late one night and watch MTV.
Watch only the commercials.
Write down whatever the actors
on the commercials say, and then
paste it underneath the logo. And
there's your quote!
3) Overkill. This cartoon is
about a dead cow. So draw a dead
cow doing the things you do in
daily life like brushing your
teeth and eating at the Pizza Inn
Buffet�.
4) Orpheus. This cartoon is
very intellectual. Buy a dictionary
and circle all the words you don't
know. Write them in word bal-
loons and draw a man in ban-
dages.
5) Undercover Cats. To make
this cartoon, you just think of any
movie you've seen recently. Draw
some cats acting out the movie.
Warning: This serial is never sup-
posed to finish so right before
the end of the story QUIT
G
�� I l Mil MillLi11� m
Overkill

$
Undercover Cat:
W6BK SOMETHiNGrO MW
PHIL ANP PAVS HAVt ALtf
AjWASSBP ALL THE ftOPLES
70 a&nHRou theinsipic
-ThCYALSO QffT A CAbiLLAC
TWN6S UP. AND NOV
rS0 HHADWA THIkJK,
P�lVe?CANUee!�
HER A RID6 TO THE
PALACE, OR A6A&Y-J
"
$
.1
Classic
Inside Joke
M
Hey Bift Head!
It's disgusting, it
Yo







the five minutes you
before class �"Any
ut now, something will
happen
-Ra tnond Carver
rrow
. "it bright and
do? 1 am proud
ritage but how
�-v vankec talkers off
01-
no miio
lied
- is nol the
has been
costumes
is ear. I savt
- and not a
,e he
- ol this
- they
und on and off
- pertaining to
celebration
fa) Carrick
cause we
I tour
ermon
. ant.
b . y pi isior
rising con-
hasalong
' n national
- father the
Falwell, ex-
ng an episode
tsl year (the
" si tVk n how-
Ifather, the Rever-
tploded dur-
"1 he 1 lonev-
he played an
� in and trav-
� r People for the
ip which
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: I to mment.
wics Page
. tx too busy
ne of the
� to draw
-
- . There
us One, Xerox?
d tele ision
Is t in-
uh thi. m. These
it drugs,
�u have it:
J;dLJ
1
I
"You gonna finish that? Elvis, overheard in a sandwich shop in downtown Greenville
Overkill
By Friedrich Orpheus
TM I Ijf
ORPHfci ' M?0tJ,AD
j )Ov cSfJLL LOCATfi
P '� t .b�P ft 1 i
BVIiNUiNJAN f�fl,uil i
(Vo ismAR. flnou-
1W� t ft wo At Am fi-i i
Areslcv Veniceal
CONCEitT AMC liWN
frffACk, rSH�'$ FiRiaIG KAMAXA: w-AjTsej 'crAZiJ i
�"�'� '� I btt � (�'ROM l�K bee lUul6 � tA-
A

By Harris and Gurganus
7r' ohesc Stage!
WO S� . � r : .� ; f yf I
WIN Ht&
POME
Undercover Cats
� H��JAJ5 UNLOCKING
WBBK S0METH IN frOR-ANOTHER'
PHIL ANP PAV� HAV6. ALMOST
Ajwssep all The Ftones cfmqhdo
td weKThRow ths insidious MiHK
TMCY 4LSO QffT A CAtILLAC TO SP9E0
THIH6S UP. A NO NOUJ
By Parker
The Avatar
By Harris and Haselrig
THfc rRONT Of THAf
"Pi r QoTr
Farewell
Chauncey
Well, all good things must
come to an end, even the
Funmeister. It's been a gas
hosting this excellent bit of
humor, and I'll be back the
next time festivities arise.
Until then, tally-ho, all!
((In
Hey Kids! Fun and Games presents the
"Make Your Own East Carolinian Satire Page" kit!
It's easy and fun to do! Follow these five simple
instructions:
1. First, make sure the page is "Clearly Labeled" as a satire page. Otherwise, it may be
mistaken as a Nichol's insert, and immediately discarded.
2. Now pick your writers. Just two, now, and don't let anybody else work on the page! Remember,
this is your baby!
3. Start writing. The important thing here is quantity, not quality. While you write, keep
thinking- inches, inches, inches!
4. The humor. Being funny is okay, but not necessary. Try to offend people, that's the key to
successful satire! (Also- lots of inside jokes, aimed at specific people, with different names.)
5. Pictures. Don't use too many of these, they balance out the page too well, and get in the way
of all those precious inches you can earn dinero from.
Now you're headed for the big time! Just create your own page, sit back, and watch the letters
to the editor roll in!
lGRrW
It's disgusting, it's blasphemous it's the new Peanuts adventure-
You're a girl, Charlie Brown
Coming Next Week .
Jimmy Olsen Day! And also to soon appear in
Fun and Games, the All WZMB page! Chauncey
would like to welcome the hippest radio station
back to the airwaves- on 91.3
AL
WILLIAMSON
BRET BLEVINS
ALIX TOTN
MURPHY
ANDERSON
ARCHIE
GOODWIN
BO
HAMPTON
SCOTT
HAMPTON
PANELS, rtlMS, Dl UllltS ROOM
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER � 10 AM TO S PM
AIRPORT HILTON � GREENSBORO, NC
IN AT �OUfOtO UKUIOtK �o�o
ADMISSION St.M
Acxt cohki � ih tovra n� tram
That's right, America's favorite 0 . , .
loser has his voice done by a girl. Sponsored by Dolly
these days. Good Grief! Madison Products
The Kill The Law Contest
No, we're not talking about actual police, we mean the hero just above this in Pirate Comics,
The Law! Send in your plot ideas for the Bubblemeister to destroy The law, and the best ones
will be used, and we'll make you famous. How about that Drop 'em by The East Carolinian, in
Jheweird building across from Joyner Library real soon.
Things To Watch Out For
MTV is now showing a really hip video that all Fun and Games fans must
see. It's a remake of Prince's "Kiss" done by Art of Noise with a special guest
singer Tom Jones! It must be seen to be believed.
The upcoming movie, "Ernest Saves Christmas Nahhh, just kidding.
The upcoming Peanuts special, "You're A Girl, Charlie Brown"





t

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Baker accepts position
Sports
NOVEMBER 3, 1988 Page 12
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Art Baker, Head Coach of the
ECU football team for the past
four years, announced Monday
his resignation from this position.
Baker will not be leaving the
University, however. He will
begin in February as the Director
of Personal Development for Stu-
dent-Athletes, a position created
by Athletic Director Dave Hart in
an effort to improve the educa-
tional and personal development
options open to the student-ath-
letes here at ECU.
'This program has been a
part of my personal three-to-five
year plan for this athletic-pro-
gram Hart said earlier this
week. "Quite honestly, I envi-
sioned that being 18 months
away, and all we have done is
expedite that
Baker accepted the position
with the understanding that if
another opportunity in coaching
presented itself, he would pursue
that course. But as of this date,
Baker is the sole candidate for the
Director's position.
According to an outline of
the program's purpose and the
director's responsiblities, the pro-
gram will make a contribution to
che total develc; ;ient oi the stu-
dent-athlete in the areas of (1)
guidance related to specific edu-
cational needs, (2) assistance in
the development of a system of
values emphasizing goal setting
and attainment, and (3) informa-
tion related to the development
and enhancement of overall so-
cial and communication skills.
The program went on to state
that each student-athlete will go
through hisher career at ECU
carefully tested, evaluated and
given professional guidance.
Each student will be administered
a series of evaluation and diag-
nostic tests to better understand
and assist in dealing with college
life.
The program will be super-
vised by the Director, who will be
working closely with the Assis-
tant Athletic Director for Aca-
demic Counseling in the areas of
reading, career counceling, tutor-
ing, psychology and academic
progress. Also working with the
director will be the Director of
Sports Medicine, who will be
working with him in the areas of
health, nutrition, rehabilitation,
drug testing and education and
residential life.
Baker came to ECU in 1985,
after serving as assistant head
coachquarterback coach at Flor-
ida State in 1984. Since becoming
head coach here at ECU, Baker has
compiled an 11-31 record. His
best season as head coach here
came in 1987, when the Pirates
went 5-6.
Before coming to ECU, Baker
served as head coach at The Cita-
del, and Furman, and as an assis-
tant at Texas Tech and Clemson,
as well as ECU, when, in 1983, the
Pirates finished 8-3. In all, Baker
has served 14 years as a collegiate
head coach.
ECU has already taken one of
the preliminary steps in the selec-
tion of a new head coach to re-
place Baker in naming an 11-
member advisory search commit-
tee.
According to Chancellor
Richard Eakin, the committee
"will serve in an advisory capac-
ity" to Hart, who will chair the
committee. Appointed to serve
were: Jarrod Moody, a senior on
the football team as a representa-
tive of the team; jack Edwards,
president of the ECU Foundation;
Pam Penland, academic coun-
selor for the Athletic Department;
Wayne Peterson, chairman of the
trustee committee on athletics;
Wayne Dempsey, vice president,
and Charlie Carr, executive direc-
tor of the Pirate Club; Henery
VanSant, associate athletic direc-
tor for internal affairs; Dr. Ernie
Schwarz, faculty chairman of ath-
letics; SGA president Larry
Murphy; Bob Ward, a alumnus,
and Craig Souza, a member of the
ECU board of trustees and an
alumnus.
According to a News Bureau
release, the committee will assist
Hart in the formal interview proc-
ess of those candidates who are
brought to campus, a process
which is to begin immediately.
The Pirates hope to see a repeat of last season's victory over the Owls of Temple when they travel to
the "City of Brotherly Love" this Saturday, the first of two road games to end the season.
Race for Chancellor's
heats up as end draws
Cup
near
ECU student in kick boxing tournament
(IRS) � Tony George, a so-
phomore at East Carolina L'r.iver-
sitv and the vice president of the
ECU Karate Sport Club, tias been
chosen to participate in a a inter-
national kick boxing event. The
event will be held in Paris, France
on November 12. Tony was se-
lected to participate in this event
during a series of tryouts held
during the months of September
and October.
The French International
team located in El Beuf, initiated
contact with an official kick box-
ing association in the United
States, requesting that the U.S.
provide participants with the skill
and ability to participate in this
fWcontact event. Tht Karate In-
ternational Council of Kick Box-
ing then contacted Mr. Bill
McDonald and John Omisby,
representing the McDonald
School of Karate, who in turn,
arranged the tryouts and selected
the participants. Participants
came from across the southeast to
compete.
George, along with his coach
and trainer, will leave Tor France
on November 6 for the bout and
have plans to return on Novem-
ber 14.
(IRS) � "The boys are back in
town This popular tune hits
home for the men from Sigma Phi
Epsilon as they battle for a fifth
Chancellor's Cup victory within
the fraternity division. At the
midway point however, a very
similar group (in name only)
leads the point totals as Sigma
Alpha Epsilon enjoys a six-point
lead over the Sig Phi Eps.
Tau Kappa Epsilon and
Lambda Chi have taken the third
and fourth spots with point totals
of 218.5 and 197, respectively.
Those familiar with this years
newly organized point system are
pleased with the results, as totals
have been established from sev-
eral intramural sporting events.
As these men head into soccer and
volleyball, the race will no doubt
tighten.
The sorority ladies have also
set themselves apart from the rest
as they have initiated a new intra-
mural point system under the
leadership of Sigma Sigma Sigma
Debbie Tavik. At the conclusion
of flag football, Delta Zeta and
Zeta Tau Alpha remain tied with
65 total points. Alpha Phi and
Sigma Sigma Sigma follow
closely with 60. Delta Zeta, the
sorority flag football champion,
suffered a devastating 46-0 loss
but still remains number one in
the point total.
CHANCELLOR'S CUP
POINT TOTALS
FRATERNITY
' � TOTALS
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 290
Sigma Phi Epsilon 284
Tau Kappa Epsilon 218.5
Lambda Chi 197
Pi Kappa Alpha 176
ThetaChil52
Phi Tau 137
Pi Kappa Pi 137
Sigma Tau 112
Delta Sigma 90
Kappa Sigma 80
Chi Alpha Omega 59
Alpha Sigma 58
SORORITY
TOTALS
Delta Zeta 65
Zeta Tau Alpha 65
Alpha Phi 60
Sigma Sigma Sigma 60
Alpha Xi Delta 55
Alpha Delta Pi 55
Alpha Crnicron Pi 25
Walsh unhappy with game
GREENVILLE, N.C (AP) �
Fourth-ranked Miami may have
taxen a 31-7 victory over East
Carolina, but Hurricane quarter-
back Steve Walsh wasn't celebra-
ting.
It was the fourth straight
game in which Walsh has thrown
four scoring passes, raising his
career total to 42 and placing him
behind Vinny Testaverde's 48 on
the all-time Hurricane list.
But that appears to have
meant little to Walsh.
"When you play sloppy like I
did today, it doesn't really mean
too much Walsh said.
The Hurricanes pulled away
in the fourth quarter to raise their
record to 6-1, but he suggested
that his offense could have shown
a lot more.
"We may have taken things
for granted after moving the ball
downfield so easily Walsh said
of Miami's opening drive. "We
got a little sloppy
Miami went 70 yards on its
first possession, scoring on
Walsh's 31-yard touchdown pass
to Leonard Conley with 12:50 left
in the tirst quarter. Carlos Huerta
kicked a ?2-yard field goal late in
the first period to extend the lead
to 10-C. When the Pirates failed to
convert fake punt, Walsh moved
the team 66 yards for a 17-0 lead
on a 19-yard scoring pass to
Randy Bethel with 16 seconds left
before hilftime.
The Pirates we1 2 ruggling
to get on the scoreboard despite
moving the ball well against the
Hurricane defense.
Answering Miami's opening-
drive score, East Carolina used
three offside penalties to march
from its own 20 to the Hurricane
18, bu: Jake Fine's first collegiate
field goal attempt, a 35-varder,
was short.
The Pirates mounted another
drive in the second quarter, goin
from their 22 to the Hurricane 24.
But a fumble on an end around
play lost five yards, a third-down
pass fell incomplete and Fine
missed a 46-yard fie' 1 goal.
East Carolina faked a punt on
a fourth-and-6 and gained five
yards to the Miami 34. Regaining
possession with 1:05 left before
halftime, Walsh directed the six-
play drive capped by the touch-
down pass to Bethel.
Using a 58-yard interception
return by Junior Robinson, the
Pirates closed the gap to 17-7 on
quarterback Travis Hunter's 2-
yard run late in the third quarter.
It appeared that East Carolina
was ready to turn an expected
rout into a close contest when it
recovered Darryl Spencer's
fumbled punt in Miami territory.
But offsetting penalties forced
John Jc. 10 punt again and the
Hurricanes took advantage.
Bubba McDowell blocked the
second kick, and Sandy Jack re-
covered at the East Carolina 8
early in the fourth quarter.
On the next play, Walsh hit
Andre Brown with a scoring pass
with 10:44 remaining to raise
Miami's lead to 24-7 after
Huerta's conversion kick.
"I thought we'd be able to
block a punt today, but I thought
it would come from the outside,
though McDowell said. "On the
block, I moved inside and I just
came free
The block was just one more
moment of frustration for East
Carolina coach Art Baker, whose
team is 1 -8. Still, Baker put the best
face on the loss.
"I think it was an indication of
what the entire season has been.
We had a great effort. It was our
best effort of the year, defensively,
considering the type of offense
Miami has Baker said.
"We had Miami confused foi
most of the game
Walsh added a fourth touch
down pass to Rod Chudzinski fo
the final Miami score.
Hinton turns tide on the Wolfpack
Students caught trying to smuggle alcohol into Saturday's game
were met with a disturbing sight. (Photo by Mark Love.)
Duke winning season
DURHAM (AP) � Duke is
assured of its first winning season
in six years, but Blue Devil coach
Steve Spurrier is aiming higher
for the rest of the seasaon.
"We want to win more than
six Spurrier said Monday at his
weekly press conference. Duke is
6-2 following a 31-21 win at Geor-
gia Tech Saturday, a victory that
evened its ACC record to 2-2.
Not since 1962, when the Blue
Devils were 8-2 under Bill Mur-
ray, have they wonmore than six
games in a seasonDuke hasn't
earned a trip to a post season bowl
since 1960.
Scouts from the Peach and All
American bowls will be on hand
to see Duke Saturday when the
Blue Devils host Wake Forest.
"I think we've got a renewed
spirit around here he said. "We
realize we weren't playing with as
much emotion
Georgia Tech rallied from a
21-7 third-quarter deficit to tie the
score at 21-21 early in the fourth
quarter. Duke went on to score the
game's final 10 points and domi-
nate the fourth quarter with its
offense. The Yellow Jackets ran
only seven plays, one of those a
punt, in the final 13:33 of the
game.
RALEIGH (AP)�On a night
everyone was reminded to set
Jheir clocks back one hour, 17th-
ranked South Carolina was the
keeper of Father Time.
The Gamecocks' offense,
known mostly for Todd Ellis' aeri-
als, wore down the nation's top-
ranked defense by attacking it on
the ground for more than 40 of the
game's 60 minutes in recording a
23-7 victory over North Carolina
State Saturday night.
Linebacker Patrick Hinton set
the tone for the nationally tele-
vised game on the Wolfpack's
first series when he intercepted
Shane Montgomery and raced 83
yards for a score.
"We hate to put the blame on
one play (Hinton's touchdown)
but any time you turn the ball
over, it hurts N.C. State coach
Dick Sheridan said. "We hurt
ourselves on both sides of the
ball
Before the night was over, the
sophomore from Atlanta terror-
ized the Wolfpack offense for two
more interceptions and a fumble
recovery.
"Coach told me to fake my
blitzes and drop into three-zone
coverage said Hinton, explain-
ing his night of success. "What 1
did was fake my blitz and drop
off
"Patrick Hinton has a way of
being around the football most of
the time South Carolina coach
Joe Morrjson said.
"This was a great win
added Morrison, who recorded
his 100th victory as a college head
coach. "I'm so proud of our young
men. It's been a long couple of
weeks for us, but they worked
hard and came up here and
played with a lot of emotion
Ellis threw a 20-yard touch-
down pass and Collin Mackie
kicked three secpnd-half field
goals to complement a rugged
defense which allowed N.C. State
a season-low 27 yards on the
ground.
The Gamecocks exploited
N.C. State's defense, which had
averaged giving up about 210
yards a contest, for more than 360
yards 184 on the ground - to run
their record to 7-1. N.C. State fell
to 6-2.
"I can tell you this - we
played against a great football
team tonight, one with a lot of
talent Morrison said.
In each of South Carolina's
first three scoring drives of the
second half, Ellis completed a key
pass.
After Damon Hartman mis-
sed a 47-yard field goal attempt
with 10:02 left in the third quarter,
Ellis hit Robert Brooks with a 43-
yard pass to set up Mackie's 44-
yard field goal and a 10-0 lead.
Two series later, Ellis found
ECU at Temple
UNC at Clemson
California at USC
UCLA at Oregon
Arizona at Washington
Oklahoma at Oklahoma Statt
LSU at Alabama
Wake Forest at Duke
Florida State at South Caroh
Georgia at Florida
IDuke Blu
take top
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP)
Mike Krzyzewski has promi�
to give honest appraisals of hil
Duke basketball team whenevc
necessary, but in describing hJ
1988-89 team to reporters, he ma
have told them what they alread
believe.
"I've told you when we'vi
been bad and I'll tell you whej
we're good Krzyzewski said
the Atlantic Coast Conferencet
Operation Basketball.
Krzyzewski's opinion wa
upheld by the media poll whicl
gave the Blue Devils the nod ovi
North Carolina.
Duke received 660 points an
was chosen first on 72 of the
ballots cast. North Carolina re
ceived the other 12 first-placj
votes and received 593 pointi
Last year, North Carolina edge
Duke in preseason balloting by
few points.
But even before the ballotmj
was comolete, Krzyzewsk
hedged on whether the teai
could live up to the selection
that poll, as well as other whicl
have listed Duke at or near the toi
of the national rankings.
"1 don't know if we're the be:
in the league. I don't know ho
any of you can know that
I said. "I just think we need to
about business the right wai
have fun with what we're doinj
experiment, and somewherl
around the end of February, firs
of March, hopefully all the dec!
ions we made will be gooj
nes and we'll be healthy"
The Blue Devils, who lost
Kansas in the semifinals of tl
Final Four last season, lost Kevi
Strickland and Billy King, but vi
return Dannv Ferrv in the froi
court and Quin S'nyder in tl
backcourt. Robert Bnckey, tl
team's best athlete, will roam tl
wings and provide reboundn
help.
From Krzvzewski's freshm
ACC ranking:
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP)
The order of finish in tne Atlant
Coast Conference's oreseaso
basketball poll with team, firs
place votes in parentheses ar
total points. A total of 84 balloj
were cast by sports writers ar
broadcasters at Operation Bask(
ball.
1. Duke (72) 660.
2. North Carolina (12) 593.
3. Georgia Tech 449
4. North Carolina St. 444
5. Clemson 282
6. Wake Forest 274
7. Virginia 223
8. Maryland 99
Hardin Brown on a 21-yard side-
line pattern that moved the ball to
the N.C. State 13. Three plays later
Mackie kicked a 24-yard field goal
with eight seconds left in the
quarter.
The Wolfpack's only score
came one minute into the fourth
quarter and cut the margin to 13-
7.
Shane Montgomery hit
Danny Peebles with a 50-yard
pass down the middle that set
Montgomery's 1-yard scoring
keeper.
But Ellis marched the Game-
cocks 75 yards in 11 plays, cap-
ping the drive by hitting Eddie
Miller on a corner pattern over the
outstretched arms of Joe Johnson 1
with 8:54 remaining.
Mackie added a 32-yard
field goal late in the contest.
"Obviously it was a game J
both teams wanted to
win'Sheridan said.
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-aid
Fearless Football Forecast
ECU at Temple
i NCat Clemson
California at USC
I CLA at Oregon
Arizona at Washington
Oklahoma at Oklahoma State
SU at Alabama
Wake forest at Puke
Honda State at South Carolina
v leoreia at Honda
BRIAN BAILEYDEAN BUCHANDOUG JOHNSON
WNCT-TV Sports DirectorECU Sports InformationSports Editor
Last Week - (7-3)Last Week (7-3)Last Week - (8-2)
Overall - (56-32-1)Overall - 58-30-1)Overall(58-30-1)
TempleECUTemple
ClemsonClemsonClemson
USCUSCUSC
UCLAUCLAUCLA
WashingtonWashingtonWashington
OklahomaOklahoma StateOklahoma
LSUAlabamaAlabama
DukeDukeDuke
Florida StateFlorida StateHonda State
FloridaGeorgiaGeorgia
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week (6-4)
Overall - (55-33-1)
ECU
Clemson
USC
UCLA
Arizona
Oklahoma
l.SU
Duke
Honda State
(leorgia
CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
Last Week - (7-3)
Overall(62-26-1)
EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week (5-5)
Overall (58-30-1)
TempleTemple
ClemsonClemson
USCUSC
UCLAOregon
ArizonaWashington
OklahomaOklahoma
AlabamaLSU
DukeDuke
Honda StateHonda State
HondaFlorida
Duke Blue Devils picked to
take top ACC honors in '88
89
;reensboro, N.C (AP) -
Mike Krzyzewski has promised
to give honest appraisals of his
s.ike basketball team whenever
necessary, but in describing his
$8 39 team to reporters, he may
lave told them what they already
eve.
'I've told you when we've
been bad and I'll tell you when
a e re good Krzyzewski said at
the Atlantic Coast Conference's
ration Basketball.
Krzyzcvvski's opinion was
Id by the media poll which
the blue Devils the nod over
irth Carolina.
I Hike received 660 points and
a.is chosen first on 2 ot the 84
ts cast. North Carolina re-
ed the other 12 first-place
- and received 593 points.
year, North Carolina edged
ike in preseason balloting by a
. points.
But even before the balloting
. is comolete, Krzyzewski
Iged on whether the team
d live up to the selection of
that poll, as well as other which
i. e listed Puke at or near the top
i the national rankings.
"1 don't know if we're the best
in the league. I don't know how
i can know that he
t think we need to go
about business the right way,
have fun with what we're doing,
experiment, and somewhere
around the end o! February, first
March, hopefully all the deci-
� 5 we made will be good
ind we'll be healthy
The Blue Devils, who lost to
Kansas in the semifinals oi the
nal Four last season, lost Kevin
cklandand Billv King, but will
n turn Danny Ferry in the front
and Quirt Snyder in the
. kcourt. Robert Brickey, the
tm's best athlete, will roam the
ngs and provide rebounding
From Krzyzewski's freshman
ACC rankings
;reensboro, n.c. (ad �
I e order of finish in tne Atlantic
oast Conference's oreseason
asketball poll with team, first-
place votes in parentheses and
total points. A total o 84 ballots
were cast by sportswriters and
broadcasters at Operation Basket-
ill.
1 Duke(72)660.
2 North Carolina (12) 593.
?rgia Tech 449
; North Carolina St. 444
5lemson 282
� Wake forest 274
7. Virginia 223
- Marvland99
class, 6-foot-10 Christian Laettner
might become a valuable addition
from a crop that includes 6-10
Crawford Palmer and 6-6 Brian
Davis.
"Christian Laettner looks like
a youngster who can help us a
little bit more than the other two at
the beginning Krzyzewski said.
"He is a more versatile. He can
play inside he can go outside a
little bit
North Carolina will imple-
ment a faster tempo under vet-
eran coach Dean Smith. But the
Tar Heels will be without junior
forward R. Reid for eight weeks.
Reid underwent surgery last Fri-
day for a stress fracture in his left
foot.
Instead of the extensive pass-
ing which has been the trademark
of the Tar Heel offense, Smith
wants his team to look for the shot
more quickly.
"Wc generally lead the ACC in
field goal percentage Smith
said.
"This year, we will not unless
1 change mv mind after we get
killed in the first three games
Georgia Tech, bolstered by the
addition of three junior college
transfers, was chosen third in the
poll. The Yellow Jackets, coming
off a 22-10 season, got five votes
for second place for 449 Points.
With the possibility of 6-11
lames'Munlyn being redshirted,
Coach Bobby Cremons will look
to 6-9 Maurice Brittian to spell
senior Tom Hammonds from his
pivot responsibilities. But
Cremins said Brittian is not in
shape and must lose more weight
before the season begins.
North Carolina State, which
lost its center when Charles
Shackleford forfeited his final
year of eligibility, was chosen
fourth with 444 points. Coach Jim
Valvano said he would use the
trio of freshman Byron Tucker,
and juniors Brian D'Amico and
Avie Lester to share the load and
produce the same amount as
Shackleford's 16 points and nine
rebounds last season.
Valvano admitted that he had
dreamed of a lineup this year that
would have included Shackle-
ford.
"We would have had one of
the better starting fives he said.
"I think we had visions of the
championship in our heads
Clemson was picked fifth.
Loaded with frontline experience
but without any experience at the
guards, the Tigers received 282
points and one vote for a third-
place fnish. Wake Forest, trying
to keep a healthy team on the
court for the first time in several
seasons, was sixth in the balloting
with 274 points.
Virginia was chosen seventh.
The Cavaliers got three votes for
third place and 223 points. Mary-
land, whose team was decimated
by transfers and departures dur-
ing the last six months, was
picked on 73 of the 84 ballots to
finish last and received 99 points.
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m 12
"emple when they travel to
end the season.
up
tear
Lambda Chi 197
Pi Kappa Alpha 17l
rheta ehi 152
hiTau 137
Kappa Pi 137
na Tau 112
ta Sigma 90
pa Sigma 80
xap
Jhi Alpha Omega 59
Alpha Sigma 58
RORlTi
TOTALS
Delta Zeta 65
Zeta Tau Alpha 65
Alpha Thi 60
Sigma Sigma Sigma 60
ia V Delta 55
Alpha Delta Pi 55
Alpha Cmicron Pi 25
ame
On the next play, Wa'sh hit
ndre Brown with a scoring pass
ith 10:44 remaining to raise
liami's lead to 24-7 after
luerta's conversion kick.
I thought we'd be able to
lock a punt today, but I thought
would come from the outside,
lough McDowell said. "On the
lock, I moved nside and 1 just
ime free
The block was just one more
ment of frustration for East
irolina coach Art Baker, whose
jam is 1 -8. Still, Baker put thebest
:e on the loss.
"I think it wasan indication of
mat the entire season has been.
e had a great effort. It was our
?st effort of theyear, defensively,
msidenng the type of offense
Jliami has Baker said.
We had Miami confused foi
ost of the game
Walsh added a fourth touch
iwn pass to Rod Chudzinski fo
me final Miami score.
rpack
iardin Brown on a 21-yard side-
line pattern that moved the ball to
(the N.C. State 13. Three plays later
dackie kicked a 24-yard field goal
nth eight seconds left in the
juarter.
The Wolfpack's only score
:ame one minute into the fourth
uarter and cut the margin to 13-
Shane Montgomery hit
anny Peebles with a 50-yard
ass down the middle that set
(Montgomery's 1-yard scoring
(keeper.
But Ellis marched the Game-
kocks 75 yards in 11 plays, cap-
Iping the drive by hitting Eddie
Miller on a corner pattern over the
(outstretched arms of joe Johnson
jwith 8:54 remaining.
Mackie added a 32-yard
field goal late in the contest.
"Obviously it was a game
both teams wanted to
winSheridan said.
Fearless Football Forecast
ECU at Temple
UNC at Clemson
California at USC
UCLA at Oregon
Arizona at Washington
Oklahoma at Oklahoma State
LSU at Alabama
Wake Forest at Duke
Florida State at South Carolina
Georgia at Florida
BRIAN BAILEYDEANBUCHANDOUG JOHNSON
WNCT-TV Sports DirectorECU Sports InformationSports Editor
Last Week - (7-3)Last Week -(7-3)Last Week-(8-2)
Overall - (56-32-DOverall - 58-30-1)Overall - (58-30-1)
TempleECUTemple
ClemsonClemsonClemson
USCUSCuse
UCLAUCLAUCLA
WashingtonWashingtonWashington
OklahomaOklahoma StateOklahoma
LSUAlabamaAlabama
DukeDukeDuke
Florida StateFlorida StateFlorida State
FloridaGeorgiaGeorgia
Dr. RICHARD EAKINCHIPPY BONEHEADEARLVIS HAMPTON
ECU ChancellorManaging EditorFeatures Editor
Last Week (6-4)Last Week - (7-3)Last Week - (5-5)
Overall - (55-33-1)Overall - (62-26-1)Overall - (58-30-1)
ECUTempleTemple
ClemsonClemsonClemson
USCUSCUSC
UCLAUCLAOregon
ArizonaArizonaWashington
OklahomaOklahomaOklahoma
LSUAlabamaLSU
DukeDukeDuke
Florida StateFlorida StateFlorida State
GeorgiaFloridaFlorida
Duke Blue Devils picked to
take top ACC honors in '8889
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP)� class, 6-foot-10 Christian Laettner Crernins said Brittian is not in
Mike Krzyzewski has promised might become a valuable addition shape and must ldse more weight
to give honest appraisals of his
Duke basketball team whenever
necessary, but in describing his
1988-89 team to reporters, he may
have told them what they already
believe.
"I've told you when we've
been bad and I'll tell you when
from a crop that includes 6-10 befpre the season begins
Crawford Palmer and 6-6 Brian North Carolina SUte, which
Davis. lost its center when Charles
"Christian Laettner looks like Shackleford forfeited his final
a youngster who can help us a year of eligibility, was chosen
little bit more than the other two at fourth with 444 points. Coach Jim
the beginning Krzyzewski said. Valvano said he would use the
"He is a more versatile. He can trio of freshman Byron Tucker,
we're good Krzyzewski said at piav inside he can go outside a and juniors Brian D'Amico and
the Atlantic Coast Conference's
Operation Basketball.
Krzyzewski's opinion was
upheld by the media poll which
gave the Blue Devils the nod over
North Carolina.
Duke received 660 points and
was chosen first on 72 of the 84
ballots cast. North Carolina re-
ceived the other 12 first-place
votes and received 593 points.
Last year. North Carolina edged
Duke in preseason balloting by a
few points.
little bit Avie Lester to share the load and
produce the same amount as
North Carolina will imple- Shackleford's 16 points and nine
ment a faster tempo under vet-
eran coach Dean Smith. But the
Tar Heels will be without junior
STUDENTS
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204 E. Arlington Blvd
Suite E Arlington Center
355-7850
forward J.R. Reid for eight weeks.
Reid underwent surgery last Fri-
day for a stress fracture in his left
foot.
rebounds last season.
Valvano admitted that he had
dreamed of a lineup this year that
would have included Shackle-
ford.
"We would have had one of
the better starting fives he said.
"I think we had visions of the
But even before the balloting quickly
Instead of the extensive pass-
ing which has been the trademark championship in our heads,
of the Tar Heel offense, Smith T
wants his team to look for the shot
was comolete, Krzyzewski
hedged on whether the team
could live up to the selection of
that poll, as well as other which
have listed Duke at'or near the top
of the national rankings.
"I don't know if we're the best
in the league. I don't know how
any of you can know that he
said. "I Just think we need to go
about busmess the right way,
"We generally lead the ACC in
field goal percentage Smith
said.
"This year, we will not unless
I change my mind after we get
killed in the first three games
Clemson was picked fifth.
Loaded with frontline experience7
but without any experience at thd
guards, the Tigers received 281
points and one vote for a third
place fVush. Wake Forest, trying
to keep a healthy team on thi
court for the first time in several
seasons, was sixth in the balloting!
with 274 points.
Virginia was chosen seventh
Georgia Tech, bolstered by the
addition of three junior college
transfers, was chosen third in the
poll. The Yellow Jackets, coming
have fun with what we're doing, off a 22-10 season, got five votes The Cavaliers got three votes ft
experiment, and somewhere for second place for 449 Points. third place and 223 points. Mar
around the end of February, first land, whose team was decimate
of March, hopefully all the deci- Wi,m the possibility of 6"11 by transfers and departures du
sions we made will be good James Munlyn being redshirted, ing the months, wi
ones and we'll be healthy Coach Bobby Cremons will look rfcM on 73 of the 84 ballots �
The Blue Devils, who lost to to 6"9 Maurice Brittian to spell finish last and received 99 points.
senior Tom Hammonds from his
pivot responsibilities. But
Kansas in the semifinals of the
Final Four last season, lost Kevin
Strickland and Billy King, but will
return Danny Ferry in the front
court and Quin Snyder in the
backcourt. Robert Brickey, the
team's best athlete, will roam the
wings and provide rebounding
help.
From Krzyzewski's freshman
ACC rankings
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) �
The order of finish in tne Atlantic
Coast Conference's oreseason
basketball poll with team, first-
place votes in parentheses and
total points. A total of 84 ballots
were cast by sportswriters and
broadcasters at Operation Basket-
ball.
1. Duke (72) 660.
. North Carolina (12) 593.
Georgia Tech 449
North Carolina St. 444
Clemson 282
6. Wake Forest 274
7. Virginia 223
8. Maryland 99
2.
3.
4.
5.
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER .1,1988
After exhibition season, the
Hornets feel good about chances
SAV-A-CENTER
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
(AD � With victories in two of
their six preseason games,
Charlotte's Tim kempton savs the
expansion team has made some
strides toward being respectable.
'We're progressing, and we
are progressing quicker than
people expected of us Kempton
said despite the team's 110-102
exnibition loss to the Cleveland
Cavaliers.
"It's a great tribute to the
coaching staff and how hard we
work at practice Kempton said.
Before losing their fourth
game in the preseason, Charlotte
made a fourth-quarter run at
Cleveland that wiped out all but
mx points of a 20-point lead with
9.42 remaining after a Larry
Nance basket.
The Hornets then put on their
last surge, getting within 106-100
on a free throw with Michael
Holton with 2:06 remaining. But
in trying to get closer in the last
two minutes, Tyrone Bogues
committed a turnover, Holton
missed a drive to the basket in
traffic and Darnell Valentine
came back with Cleveland's last
two baskets to seal the victory.
The problem stemmed from a
third-quarter breakdown in
which the Hornets hit 33 percent
of their field goal attempts, were
outscored 32-20 and were outre-
bounded 18-5.
"Tonight, we buried our-
selves again Kempton said. "We
got down in that third quarter.
The good thing that came out of it
is we worked hard on our pres-
sure defense. We got out of the
hole
Both teams meet tonight in an
exhibition in Fayetteville, their
last preseason game before they
meet again in the regular-season
opener in Charlotte.
Cleveland center Brad
Daugherty said Charlotte's youth
would serve it well in the first
season, but he said the seven play-
ers with two years' experience or
less on the Cavalier roster will
help them.
"We've got some good young
players that are going to help us
out this year Daugherty said.
"All you can ask of a young player
is to come in and do a good job. He
won't be able to carry a team like
this, but they can make a good
contribution
Mike Sanders, Mark Price
and Chris Dudley had 12 apiece
for Cleveland. Daugherty had 11
and Valentine 10 for the Cava-
liers.
Holton had 16 points, with
center Tim Kempton scoring 14,
Brian Rowsom 12 and Robert
Reid 10 for the Hornets.
Lohr wins on 5-footer
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla.
(AD The Walt Disney World
Classic was dominated bv birdies
J
but won with a par after the sun
had set.
Bob Lohr made a five-foot par
putt on the fifth plavoff hole to
beat Chip Beck in the longest
sudden death extension of the
year. The last two holes on Satur-
day were played with sunlignt at
a minimum and pressure at a
premium.
"I was able to deal with the
pressure pretty well said Lohr, a
four-year tour veteran who be-
came the 11 th first-time winner on
the PGA Tour this season. "It's
hard even to remember all the
putts I made to stay alive
He had to remember one.
Beck bogeyed the 72nd hole
oi the $700,000 tournament to
give Lohr a chance and he took it
by making a three-foot birdie putt
to force the playoff.
Both golfers birdied the first
and fourth plavoff holes.
Lohr was over the green of the
par-4 17th hole and Beck was on
the putting surface about 45 feet
from the cup. Lohr chipped
within five feet and Beck missed
his first putt by about eight feet
and his second by about a foot.
Lohr then drilled his putt for the
victory.
Lohr and Beck, who agreed to
continue the playoff in the dwin-
dling daylight, both finished
regulation play at 25-undcr-par
263, breaking Larry Nelson's
tournament record of 266 set in
1984. Lohr, who led after everv
round, also set scoring records for
18, 36 and 54 holes and finished
with 30 birdies.
"If anybody in my position
says that they're not nervous,
they're lying Lohr said. "Every-
body that's ever had a chance to
win a tournament gets nervous.
I'm just fortunate that I was able to
deal with it
Lohr earned $126,000, nearly-
doubling his winnings this year to
$286,536. He scored from 69th to
34th on the money list, and with a
good showing this week at the
Tucson Open, could qualify for
the following week's $2 million
Nabisco Championships of Golf.
The top 30 money winners com-
pete in the Nabisco event to be
held at Tebble Beach, Calif.
Beck's runner-up check of
$75,600 boosted him from second
to first on this year's money-win-
ning list and brought him closer to
becoming the first golfer to win $1
million in one year. He has won
$770,258 and will play at Tucson.
joey Sindelar dropped be-
hind Beck on the earnings list with
$708,532 after finishing tied for
44th and collecting $1,896.
Beck shot a closing round of
66 to catch Lohr, who had a final-
round 68.
Bruce Lietzke and Fuzzy
Zoeller tied for third at 269, six
shots off the pace. Lietzke shot a
final-round 68 and Zoeller had a
70.
ACC names top players
GREENSBORO, N.C. vAP) �
lohn Howell of Duke and Matt
D'Amico, linebackers who turned
in outstanding performances as
their teams claimed conference
victories, have been named defen-
sive players of the week in the At-
lantic Coast Conference.
Howell, a 6-foot-2, 236-
pound junior, was in on 14 tack-
les, had two quarterback hurries
and caused a fumble as the Blue
Devils defeated Georgia Tech 31-
21. With the victory, Duke, 6-2,
clinched its first winning season
since 1982.
D'Amico, a 6-foot-2, 235-
pound senior, was in on seven
tackles as the Terrapins defeated
North Carolina 41-38. His inter-
ception with 41 seconds left to
play set up Dan Plocki's game-
winning 41-yard field goal and
enabled the Terrapins to move
into a three-way tie for first place
in the ACC.
Earlier, Maryland quarter-
back Neil O'Donnell and
Clemson center Jeff Bak were
named offensive players of the
week in the ACC.
ODonnell, a 6-foot-3, 221-
pound junior from Madison, N.J
completed 17 of 28 passes for a
season-high 259 yards and three
touchdowns in Maryland's 41-38
come-from-behind victory over
North Carolina. O'Donnell also
ran for 18 yards on four carries as
Maryland moved into a three-
way tie for the ACC lead at 4-1
with Clemson and North Caro-
lina State.
Bak, a 6-2, 265-pound senior
from Darien, Conn anchored the
offensive line in the 15th-ranked
Tigers' 38-21 victory over Wake
Forest. Bak graded out at 87 per-
cent on game films and his block-
ing was a key as Clemson rolled
up 349 yards rushing.
The selections were made by
a special committee of the Atlan-
tic Coast Sports Writers Assc.a-
tion.
Cleveland downs Hornets
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (AP)
- Forward Craig Ehlo scored 21
points in the final three quarters.
sparking Cleveland to a 100-87
exhibition victory over Charlotte
Monday as the Cavaliers com-
pleted the preseason schedule
with an unblemished record.
Ehlo, who grabbed 12 re-
bounds and hit 8 of 14 field goals
during the stretch, teaming with
reserve center Tree Rollins to
dominate the smaller Hornets
inside.
The Cavaliers opened the
game with six straight points,
building the lead to 9-2 on Larry
Nance's dunk with 8:59 left in the
first quarter.
Charlotte responded with a
15-8 rally, tying the score at 17 on
two free throws by Kelly Trioucka
with 3:57 left in the period.
Cleveland took a 24-20 edge
into the second quarter. But guard
Tyrone Bogues drove the length
of the floor for a layup and added
a free throw to give Charlotte its
first lead at 31-28 with 8:48 left in
the half.
Cleveland regrouped, taking
a 48-43 lead at halftime.
Ehlo and Rollins combined
for 14 points in the third quarter,
leading Cleveland to a 71 -65 edge.
The Cavaliers opened the
fourth period with an 11-4 run, as
a free throw by Bruce Douglas
gave Cleveland an 82-69 advan-
tage with 8:45 left.
Charlotte could not come
closer than nine points from that
stage, as Chris Dudley's baseline
jumper gave the Cavaliers their
largest lead at 92-77 with 5:49 left.
Guards Rickey Green and
Michael Holton scored 12 points
each to lead the Hornets, and Tim
Kempton added 11.
Cleveland was 8-0 in the pre-
season, and Charlotte finished 2-
4.
Wolfpack not looking to future
in bowl bid before season's end
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina State coach Dick Sheri-
dan says the Wolfpack must keep
a focus on the game at hand, not
on whether they will be going to a
bowl game.
The Wolfpack, 6-2 and tied
with Maryland and Clemson for
the Atlantic Coast Conference
lead at 4-1, has lost its last two
games to Virginia.
"And they're stronger this
season Sheridan said Monday at
his weekly news conference.
"They've lost three games by a
total of nine points. That's how
close they are to having a great
record
The Cavaliers, though a two
point underdog against N.C.
State, have won consecutive
games over Wake Forest and Vir-
ginia Tech since slipping to a
disappointing 2-4 record at mid-
season.
Much of the improvement
can be traced to the emergence of
sophomore quarterback Shawn
Moore as a dual threat as a runner
and a passer.
"He's just an excellent
athlete Sheridan said. "There
are no easy solutions for stopping
or containing him
Saturday's 23-7 loss to South
Carolina last Saturday dimmed
the Wolfpack's hopes of landing
the host berth for the Jan. 2 Citrus
Bowl. But All American Bowl
director Bill Oakley said Monday
that N.C. State is high on the Bir-
mingham, Ala game list.
"We see State as a very attrac-
tive team Oakley said. "They
could fit into our plans from either
side as a potential 'hosf team or
as a 'visitor' against a team from
the Southeastern Conference
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 3, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.638
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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