The East Carolinian, November 1, 1988







Inside
EDITORIALSo4
CLASSIFIEDSt7
FEATURES8
SPORTS12
r
Features
Renowned trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis per-
forms tonight at Wright Auditorium as a part.of the
ECU 1988-89 Performing Arts Series, see page 8.
Sports
Pirates fall to the Hurricanes 31-7. Coming on Thurs-
day a look at Art Baker's new position as director of
Personal Development for Student Athletes see page
XL
(She �a0t darnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 31
Tuesday November 1,1988
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Baker resigns as head coach
Art Baker resigned as the Pirate Head Coach after four years at
the helm. (Photo bv Thomas Walters ECU Photo Lab.)
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports t'ditor
Art Baker announced Mon-
day his resignation as the ECU
Head Football coach effective at
the end of the season, ending
weeks of rumors and speculation.
The announcement was
made at Baker's Monday press
conference, as he read from a
prepared statement. The decision
was reached Sunday night during
a meeting between Baker and
Athletic Director Dave Hart, ac-
cording to Baker and Hart.
"In 1985, I accepted a four-
year contract here as Head Foot-
ball Coach Baker said. "My
contract ends in January of 1989
and in my conversations (with
administration), I have received
no assurances that my contract
will be renewed. Therefore, in
recent conversations with Dave
Hart, we have mutually agreed
the time has come to clear the air.
With this in mind, 1 am resigning
as Head Coach today to be effec-
tive at the conclusion of my con-
tract. My coaching duties will end
with the last snap of the Cincin-
nati game
Baker's resignation came
amid. a cloud of rumors and
speculation on whether or not he
would return as head coach next
season, and if not, who his re-
placement would be. "I've had a
lot of questions, again rumor mill,
if we had already interviewed
people, we had already talked to
people Hart said. "None of that
is true. My personal opinion is
that that would have been unethi-
cal until such time that this an-
nouncement was made
When asked when a new
head coach would be named,
Hart's only comment was, "As
soon as we possibly can He did
add that a press conference would
be called in the next week to 10
days to discuss the selection of a
new coach, and that Chancellor
Richard Eakin will name an advi-
sory committe by mid-week to aid
in the selection process.
Hart did say, however, that
Baker would not be leaving the
University. He will stay on in the
newly created position of Direc-
tor of Personal Development for
Student-Athletes. "The qualities
that Art Baker has exemplified
during his tenure as head football
coach, those are qualities any
university would be proud to
have in any person in its organiza-
tion Hart said. "That's why I'm
elated that Art has accepted a role
within our athletic program so
that he can utilize his skills for the
betterment of our total program.
"This (Director of Personal
Development) has been a part of
my personal 3-5 year plan for this
athletic program. Quite honestly,
I envisioned hat being eighteen
months a way. But as Art and I had
talked, particularly in the last
couple of weeks, it is apparent
that there isn't anyone better
suited, and all we have done is
expidite that so that Art can serve
in that capacity. When you have
quality people who have skills
that can help better your total
program, you would be foolish
not to try to keep those people
on
When asked if he had asked
for Baker's resignation, Hart re-
plied, "No. This was not a forced
issue. This was something that
was done on a mu tual basis in the
best interests of the program. It
was not a forced hand
Baker offered three reasons
for his resigning at this time:
1) "So that my nine full-time
assistant coaches can adequately
pursue employment in our pro-
fession. Dave has extended their
contracts to assist in this area
2) "To lift thecloud of rumors,
speculations and other distrac-
tions so that our coaches and play-
ers might have the 'air cleared' for
preparations for two important
football games
3) "To allow Dave the oppor-
tunity to begin his search for a
new coach
According to Baker, he has no
regrets about any of his decisions
over his four-year tenure. "I really
don't know of anything that I
would do differently he said. "1
do not regret any decision I've
made to make the moves we've
made. I think that the direction
that we took as far as being realis-
tic in our recruiting and the things
we had in front of us and the type
of offense and defense that we
ran, I wouldn't go back and
change them for anything.
"Football is a great profession
and I have loved every year I've
spent in it, especially the years at
ECU. East Carolina has a rich fu-
ture in football. I hope that it will
be remembered that Art Baker
helped during a very difficult
period of Pirate football to get
over a rough four vears
On his new position, Baker
said that "I am appreciative of the
opportunity that Daw Hart i
giving me to continue my em-
ployment here at East Carolina
The job has a great concept. I love
working with young people and
helping to make their lives more
meaningful and worthwhile. The
job will be a great challenge
During an emotional mo
ment, Baker thanked the people
with whom he worked, and to his
family, who he said had been
supportive of him and the pro-
gram. And finally, "To the great
Pirate fans and students who
have understood what we haw
worked so hard at doing and
supported us. ! wish to express
my heart-felt thanks
Fire forces residents to leap from windows
By JOE HARRIS
Newt Editor
A fire gutted apartments 1
and 6 at 810 Cotanche early Fri-
day morning causing damages
estimated by Captain James
Tyndall of the Greenville Fire De-
partment at between $30,000 and
$40,000.
The fire apparently started in
the downstairs apartment but the
source is still undetermined and
under investigation.
"I don't know if it was arson,
I doubt it was said Tyndall. "The
investigation will reveal what the
cause was
An ECU student, Edward
Yoder and a friend of his from Vir-
ginia Beach, Va Charlie Davis,
were the first people on the scene.
"We were walking around
looking for a party when we saw
the flames Yoder said. "We ran
over and started helping catch the
people who were jumping out the
windows
He also said they woke some-
one from the couch in the first
floor apartment.
Yoder said the family occupy-
ing the second floor apartment
had to jump out the window. Six
people were treated for injuries
suffered during the fire. Two
people, Jessica Brame, 20, and
Fidel Garcia, 34, had to be taken to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
for treatment.
Ms. Brame suffered first and
second degree burns to her face
and hands and was also treated
for smoke inhaliation said Batal-
lion Fire Chief Tony Smart. Garcia
sustained a two-to-three inch lac-
eration along his right wrist as a
result of jumping from a window.
Neither Ms. Brame or Garcia were
available for comment.
Both were treated and re-
leased on Saturday.
Tyndall said there was
extensive smoke damage through
every apartment in the complex
and all occu pan ts had to be evacu-
ated.
"The people who live in the
apartments that didn't catch fire
are very lucky they made it out
alive Tyndall said. "The smoke
was unusually thick
Tyndall said everybody in the
building could have been alerted
of the fire earlier if smoke alarms
had been installed in the apart-
ments. "A fivedollarsmokealarm
could have possibly prevented
the whole thing Tyndall said.
He added that the landlord
cannot be held liable for any
damages because the building
was built before the fire alarm
codes were adopted.
"The Greenville Fire Depart-
ment was dispatched to the scene
by a call from Greenville Police at
5:16 a.m. and had the blaze under
control 15 minutes after they ar-
rived on the scene Tyndall said.
Anti-apartheid activist speaks
Officials say a $5.00 smoke detector could have possibly prevented the whole fire (Photo By Thomas
Walters, ECU Photo Lab).
ECU student charged with felony
By JOE HARRIS
New Editor
By GARY SANDERSON
SUff Writer
Anti-apartheid activist and
former editor of The Daily Dis-
patch, Donald Woods, who has
been arrested seven times for his
remarks against the South African
government, spoke Thursday
night at Hendrix Theatre.
The last of these arrests, in
1977, was punished by his being
forbidden to write, speak pub-
licly, to be quoted in the press or to
talk to more than one person at a
rime. Armed guards and phone
taps were used to help enforce the
punishment.
"South African journalists are
not allowed to write anything
against the government said
Woods.
"In this country, (the U.S.)
blacks can point at the
Constitution and say let's act on
that South Africans don't have
that he said.
Woods' punishment only
lasted three months out of the
original five-year sentence. He
said his family received "threat-
ening phone calls" and that at one
time live bullets were fired into
his house. He felt his family's
safety was on the line and fled the
country disguised as a priest.
His family now resides in
London, England where Woods
and his wife work as freelance
writers, broadcasters and lectur-
ers. Since leaving South Africa,
Woods has written three books
including "Biko a biography of
the late anti-apartheid activist
Stephen Biko, "Asking for
Trouble and "Black and White
about the South African situation.
In 1987, Woods was por-
trayed by actor Kevin Kline in the
movie "Cry Freedom which
was based on Woods' tribulations
in, and escape from South Africa.
Woods told the audience that
27 million South African blacks
are suppressed educationally,
financially and in the job market
by the five million whites.
"Blacks never get farther than
elementary school educations un-
less they go to private acade-
mies said Woods. "Eight times
more money is spent on the edu-
cation of whites than blacks
"There are real horrors going
on in South Africa said Woods.
"Black carpenters can use the
pounding end of a hammer to
drive a nail, but cannot use the
clawed end to remove nails, that is
reserved for more skilled white
labor Woods said. "Racism
must be stomped on and stomped
on generation to generation he
said.
Woods said 87 percent of all
South African land was reserved
for whites, and blacks were forced
See APARTHEID, page 2
Saturday night Greenville
Police apprehended Cameron C.
Maxwell, an ECU student from
Kinston, who is the suspect in the
detonation of two tear gas cannis-
ters.
Sergeant T.V. Woolard of the
Greenville Police Department
said one cannister was set off in
the parking lot on the corner of
Second and Cotanche St. and the
other was recovered in the
wooded area behind the Elbo
Room.
Case, according to police re-
ports, was chased and arrested at
2:18 a.m. by local and military
police.
He ws charged with mali-
cious injury by detonating an in-
cendeary device and bail was set
Saturday night at $10,000. Detec-
tive Jackson of the Greenville
Police Department said the
charge against Case is a felony, or
a crime punishable by federal law.
Case was jailed and made his
first appearance in Greenville
District Court yesterday where
his bail was reduced to $5,000 and
later released from Pitt County
Jail.
Case was arrested
and charged with ma-
licious injury by deto-
nating an incendeary
device; bail was set
Saturday night at
$10,000.
"The kind of tear gas used
was a military type known as CS,
or pepper gas said Woolard.
"The difference between the pep-
per gas and the other types of gas
is that CS (the type used Saturday
night), is more incapacitating
than the others
He said pepper gas is acti-
vated when it comes in contact
with the moisture on the skin
"It irritates the mucus mem-
branes �makes your eyes wafer
and that type of thing Tyndall
said. "It really gets bad when you
start to rub yom Kin. it just makes
it worse
Tyndall i enolong
term effects fro . mg the gas.
aside from peopic who have seri-
ous respiratory proHcms.
According to police reports,
many people, civilian, military
and police personnel were af-
fected by the gas cloud which
loomed over the Cotanche St. area
until wind helped disperse it.
"We have no idea where he
got the stuff from or what his
motive was Tyndall said.
He also added that the infor-
mation they do have on the case
cannot be released because none
of it has been confirmed.





I
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMHIK 1 lss
WZMB broadcasting
again after silence
By SEAN HERRING
WZMB 91 3 has lots to be
excited about now that the exciter
mechanism has put the campus
station back in the airwa es
The 'alternative music sta
tion Kxan broadcasting ester
da) morning, after being forced to
stop operation on September 24
due to a fault exciter component
The exciter is one ot eight
mponents that is essential in
day afternoon. We installed ii
Sunday, which took about to
hours he said.
According to King a new
exciter and transmitter was r
ceivedby WZMB, after the modi,
boardappropitated 14.tHHito tru
station last week
The repaired exciter that th
station is currently transmittini
with will be used as a back u
system, after we get our new ex
citer and transmitter he said.
"It may take as long as 30daj -
before we get the new equipment
Individimtthoug
Like a circleym a rectangle, each of usas
to be uniqufc. Individual thought,
of expression.
Express yburself in The East Carolinian.
Positions are now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't b
beat.
Team effort.
fly today
putting the station's transmitter
n the ncht frequency said Kuso �� we are taking bid
iVZMB Musk Director Matt Kine. and assessing prices ot the equip
in mumc L'irev'ior xiau ixing
"Without the right fre-
quency, which is 91.3, the waves
are scattered, and the station can
not be tuned inbyanyonesradio
kmc said
King stated that the exciter
they are using now is the old one
vshich has been repaired by a
compan) called Versa Count.
e vId exciter, which the
station had been getting the run
arou.J about hnallv cameSatur-
ment, Kmi; said.
King is enthusiastic aboul
the station signing back on the aii
atter being otr tor over a month.
"The time that we were oh
the air gave everyone at the sta
tion time to reassess things and
clean up the station. We are com
ing back better thanever he said
King added Our new linei
saysit all. WZMB is the New Rod
sl "
Apartheid activist
visits ECU and speaks
HELP WANTED
News Editor for '89 Spring Semester
Copy Editor
(For Spring Semester & Immediately)
Asst. Sports Editor
Apply in Person Monday-Friday
10 a.m4 p.m.
at
The East Carolinian
No phone Calls Please
Experience Preferred
The East Carolinian
James F. J. McKee, Director oi Adv
Advertising Representatives
3 oil Makey ' ' '�'�
RJ hard Mani "� '� am l'1
Ashley E I) ill
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
o
i
i nX)R I)I kl ISlM, U VI I
: II' t I K
111 SINKSS HOI RS:
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10:00-5:00 p.m.

-6366
-655X
757-6557
757-6309
Continued from page 1
to (any identification cards at all
times. He added that two coun-
�� - in the United Nations have
sly prevented the sanc-
tioning or South Africa; the
United States and England. The
South African government
greatly tears sanctions from the
United States he said.
ods said that each and
ever) person in the U.S. could
help abolish apartheid by contact-
� g their senators ' Ot course the
fighting will take place in South
Africa. but Americans can help by
demanding sanctions, he said
Woods said that relic, u
leaders and consen ativesenaU u
from the US are constantly ii
vi ted to S ith frica and an
' wnied and dined ' and show
exactly what the govcrnmenl
would have them see and nothine
more '
When asked w horn he would
vote for if an American, Woods re
sponded: "I'd vote for the Duke
because he's said that he would
not only force nm nt sane
lions, he'd declare South Africa ,
terrorist state
iBienvenidos Amigos
?
Open 7 Days For Lunch & Dinner
Lunch Specials $3.95
Served MonFri.
1 lam till 3pm
Mexican Pizza Grande
Dinner Specials $5.95
Includes Dessert
Served SunThur
After 5pm
Sunday-Thursday At'er 10 00 PM
Friday & Saturday Alter 11 00 P M
Only$42
521 Cotanche Street
757-1666
5
Student Union Special Concerts Chairperson
Job Description
I. To organize and direct the activities oi the
committee (i.e. TI IE WAILERS, FETC1 II"
BOXES, BAD Cl IECKS, and
Cl AIRMAN OF Tl IE BOAR))
2. To call and conduct all meetings
of the committee.
3. To serve on the Program Board
of the Student Union.
Applications can be found in Room 236 - Mendenhall
Student Center or call 757-6611, ext. 210.
� r 29 1 ��� Cj.
� HE

r i ii i
MARATHON
RESTAURANTS
Greek Owned & Operated Since 1979
Pcli'rcn Hours
Mon. - Fri. 4-11
Sat. - Sun. 11-11
SUBS
GREEK DISHES
SANDWICHES
SALADS
PIZZA
GREEK PASTRIES
jst Deal in Town"
arr-c x
Polar Pack
Ice Cream
Coca Cola
Classic
$J09
2 Liter
f�
Kellogg's
Corn Flakes
Kroger
Large Grade
r.
752-0326
or
752-3753
560 Evans St.
�K.
48 oz.
Tide
Detergent
$59
42 oz. (40CReg. Price)
SV
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(AP) -
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sav the & �





7
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
V
NOVEMBER 1,1968
WZMB broadcasting
again after silence
By SEAN HERRING
WZMB 913 has lots to be
excited about now that the exciter
mechanism has put the campus
station back in the airwaves.
The 'alternative musk' sta-
tion began broadcasting yester-
day morning, after being forced to
stop operation on September 24
due to a faulty exciter component.
The exciter is one of eight
components that is essential in
putting the station's transmitter
on the right frequency said
WZMB Music Director Matt King.
"Without the right fre-
quency, which is 913, the waves
are scattered, and the station can-
not be tuned in by anyones radio
King said.
King stated that the exciter
they are using now is the old one
which has been repaired by a
company called Versa Count.
"The old exciter, which the
station had been getting the run
arour. J about, finally came Satur-
day afternoon. We installed it
Sunday, which took about four
hours he said.
According to King, a new
exciter and transmitter was re-
ceived by WZMB, after the media
board appropitated $14,000 to the
station last week.
"The repaired exciter that the
station is currently transmitting
with will be used as a back-up
system, after we get our new ex-
citer and transmitter he said.
"It may take as long as 30 days
before we get the new equipment.
because now we are taking bids
and assessing prices of the equip-
ment King said.
King is enthusiastic about
the station signing back on the air
after being off for over a month.
"The time that we were off
the air gave everyone at the sta-
tion time to reassess things and
clean up the station. We are com-
ing back better thanever he said.
King added "Our new liner
says it all. WZMB is the New Rock
91
Individ
houg
Like a circlein a rectangle, each of us
to be unique. Individual thought. Freed
of expression.
Express yourself in The East Carolinian.
Positions (are now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't bj
beat.
Team e:
ly today
Apartheid activist
visits ECU and speaks
Continued from page 1
to carry identification cards at all
times. He added that two coun-
tries in the United Nations have
continuously prevented the sanc-
tioning of South Africa; the
United States and England. "The
South African government
greatly fears sanctions from the
United States he said.
Woods said that each and
every person in the VS. could
help abolish apartheid by contact-
ing their senators. "Of course the
fighting will take place in South
Africa, but Americans can help by
demanding sanctions he said.
Woods said that religious
leaders and conservative senators
from the US. are constantly in-
vited to South Africa and are
"wined and dined" and "shown
exactly what the government
would have them see and nothing
more
When asked whom he would
vote for if an American, Woods re-
sponded: "I'd vote for the 'Duke'
because he's said that he would
not only force government sanc-
tions, he'd declare South Africa a
terrorist state
Student Union Special Concerts Chairperson
Job Description
1. To organize and direct the activities of the
committee (i.e. THE WAILERS, FETCHIN'
BONES. BAD CHECKS, and
mnrmni v-�i
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD).
2. To call and conduct all meetings
of the committee.
3. To serve on the Program Board
of the Student Union.
Applications can be found in Room 236 - Mendenhall
Student Center or call 757-6611, ext. 210.
MARATHON
RESTAURANTS
Greek Owned & Operated Since 1979
Delivery Hours
MonFri. 4-11
SatSun. 11-11
SUBS
GREEK DISHES
SANDWICHES
SALADS
PIZZA
GREEK PASTRIES
"best Deal in Town"
752-0326
or
752-3753
560 Evans St.
HELP WANTED
News Editor for '89 Spring Semester
?Copy Editor
(For Spring Semester & Immediately)
Asst. Sports Editor
Apply in Person Monday-Friday
10 a.m4 p.m.
at
The East Carolinian
No phone Calls Please
Experience Preferred
The East Carolinian
Serving tlw East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
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Phones
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�I -�



i
�Bienvenidos Amigos
Open 7 Days For Lunch & Dinner
Lunch Specials $3.95
Served MonFrl.
I1am till 3pm
Late Night Special
Dinner Specials $5.95
Includes Dessert
Served Sun. - Thur.
After 5pm
b
Mexican Pizza GrandeOnly A
Sunday-Thursday After 10:00 P.M.
Friday A Saturday After 11:00 P.M.
521 Cotancne Street
757-1666
rL
hopjfyttger
�VT3
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�E5E you to purchase the advertised item at the advertised price
j� within 30 days. Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per
item purchased.
m
5S
Polar Pack
Ice Cream
WSSXSS.
12 gallon
Coca Cola
Classic
$109
2 Liter
Kellogg's
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48 os.
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back in the biddinl
sets, asking U.Sl
Judge RufusReyno
his proposal alonl
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which was filed ir
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creditors said thei
dorsing Thomas'j
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consider a motion
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PTL's holding!
500-acre Heritage!
park near Fort mill
undevelooed land
York County and thj
TV network. 1
Mernick, of Tori
parently won the bi
when PTL trustee
Benton accepted his
offer and promised
ate further with
Other bidders can
to the court, but non
until Thomas filed
Wednesday.
In accepting MJ
Benton said he had
Sovi
MOSCOW (AJ
makers assembled
a budget running $J
red despite gover
slash deficit spenc
Finance Minis
tev, who presentc
lion dollar budget I
Supreme Soviet
mitted that the
MfkhauS.Gorbacli
4tfcufe4v bring
under control. The
began in previous
ments.
Gostev said thj
problem that has nc
now, but is a resulj
anced economy, of
extensive subsidizil
losses - of all that!
about by extensive
economic manager
attitudes and a pas
policy
As the 1,500
vened in the Granc
ace in Moscoi
parliament's reguU
which was expectc
days, one seat on
dais was vacant. It
diately clear whetl
chair heralded a
Kremlin hierarchy.
Politburo mer
Ligachev, who is
the major conservat
separated by the
from Gorbachev an
ister Nikolai I. Ryzl
In a maior shaj
ing his power. Cor
General Secretarj
replaced Andrei A.
president Oct. 1.
cancy on the 13-m
Politburo.
At that time, hi
Ligachev over froi
ogy chief to agricull
empty chair ma
Ligachev's diminish
As the Supremel
work today, the
named Politburo
I. Vorotnikov one o
15 vice presidents.)
month, Vorotnikov
Vladimir Orlov as
emment in the Ru4
tion, the largest of I
ent Soviet republics.
Gostev, in pi
state budget for next
deficit would be "
Percent of the total
official Tass news a;
The United Stat
ries a deficit of about
Gostev said a drop'
prices in recent yearl
Soviet Union almost
lost revenue.
The 1989 draft
is customarily at
Supreme Soviet in
vote, also allocates f
the country's
same amount as in
However, W�
say the Soviet





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NOVEMBER 1.1988 3
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PTL assets are still in limbo
COLUMBIA,S.C. (AD-Real
estate magnate Peter Thomas is
back in the bidding for PTL's as-
sets, asking U.S. Bankruptcy
ludge Rufus Reynolds to consider
his proposal along with fellow-
Canadian Stephen Mernick's.
Four of PTL's largest credi-
tors joined in Thomas's motion,
which was filed in federal bank-
rupts court Attorneys for two
creditors said thev weren't en-
dorsing Thomas's offer over
Mernick's, but that they want
Reynolds to be able to choose
from at least two competing bids.
Reynolds is scheduled to rule
on Thomas's motion Nov. 16,
which is the same day he has set to
consider a motion approving a
sale to Mernick. PTL, which has
been in bankruptcy proceedings
since June 1987, must sell all its
assets to pay debts that could
amount to more than $130 mil-
lion.
PTL's holdings include the
500-acre Heritage USA theme
park near Fort mill, 1.700 acres of
undevelooed land in northern
York County and the PTL satellite
TV network.
Mernick, of Toronto, had ap-
parently won the bidding Oct. 4,
when PTL trustee M.C. "Red"
Benton accepted his $115 million
otter and promised not to negoti-
ate further with anyone else.
Other bidders can come directly
to the court, but none had done so
until Thomas filed his motion on
Wednesday.
In accepting Mernick's bid,
Benton said he had rejected a $113
million offer that Thomas made in
September, because Thomas's$46
million cash down payment
would not be due until September
1989.
Mernick's offer provides for
$50 million cash by Dec. 31.
However, Mernick has until Nov.
15 to back out of the deal with no
penalty.
Thomas's new offer still has a
$113 million total price, but
matches Mernick's $50 million
cash. Thomas would have until
Feb. 28 to back out. and until June
30 to close the sale and come up
with the cash.
Thomas's offer is less attrac-
tive, but it all comes down to a
question of the credibility of both
of them Does Mernick have $50
million he can out on the table on
the closing date, and does Tho-
mas have $50 million? And
where's the proof? The Charlotte
(N.C.) Observer quoted one
creditor's attorney as saying.
Thomas announced his reen-
try in the PTL bidding in a news
conference at his Vancouver, Brit-
ish Columbia, headquarters.
"We're elated Thomas said.
"We didn't like being on the side-
lines. We always felt our offer was
one of the best
In a telephone interview with
The Observer. Thomas said he
tninks his offer may be more at-
tractive to Reynolds because he
promises to maintain Heritage
USA as a Christian retreat, while
Mernick makes no such pledge.
"I think Mernick's and my
offers are so dramatically differ-
ent that it's right the judge should
look at them Thomas said, "My
offer is committed to keep the
ambience of the site like it is and
Mr. Mernick's offer is more of
paving it and putting a shopping
center on it
Mernick said in a news con-
ference two weeks ago that he had
made no decision about what he
would do with Heritage USA, but
added that the undeveloped land
would be "excellent for condo-
miniums, shopping centers and
commercial buildings
Thomas said Wednesday he
had been planninganother bid for
PTL since Benton accepted
Mernick's offer.
"We just sort of sat and
planned the best way to handle
it Thomas said. "One way was to
just let the Mernick offer go
through and see if he docs close
But then, Thomas said, sev-
eral creditors contacted his attor-
neys and suggested he go to Rey-
nolds.
The motion Thomas filed
Wednesday included the signa-
tures of attorneys for Roe Mess-
ner, PTL's largest individual
creditor, who claims he's owed
$14 million; and for National City
of Minneapolis, Rock Hill Na-
tional Bank, and committees rep-
resenting unsecured creditors
and PTL lifetime partners.
However, Rock Hill National
Bank then filed another court
document withdrawing its signa-
ture.
Soviet Union in deep debt
Thomas said Wednesday he
plans a one-day visit to Heritage
USA on Nov. 7, "I'm going to
show my face, unlike Mr. Mer-
nick, who went down in a limou-
sine with the windows closed
Thomas said. "I'm going to be
talking to everybody who wants
to talk to me"
As individuals, Thomas and
Mernick could not be more differ-
ent. Thomas, a flamboyant super
salesman with a 12th-grade edu-
cation courts publicity. His inter-
ests include expensive cars,
yachts and airplanes.
He founded Century 21 Real
Estate of Canada, which he re-
cently sold for a price that he says
was $25 million down and $25
million over five years.
Mernick, who studied to be a
rabbi, shies away from the news
media, and, until he bid for PTL,
was little-known outside
Toronto's Orthodox Jewish com-
munity, where he has been active
in bringing Jewish young people
back to their traditional religious
roots.
Mernick's business interests
include a waste management
company, an import firm dealing
in high-tech equipment from Is-
rael, and several recent large real
estate acquisitions.
RAPE
IS FOR
REAL
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost. Preg-
nancy Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further Information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number : 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
MOSCOW (AP) - Soviet law- many times that figure, because
makers assembled today to adopt the armed forces also receive
a budget runningS58 billion in the money allocated for science, in-
red despite government efforts to dustry and other purposes. The
slash deficit spending.
Finance Minister Boris Gos-
tev, who presented the $804 bil-
lion dollar budget for 1989 to the
Supreme Soviet legislature, ad-
mitted that the government of
Mikhail S. Gorbachev is finding it
dttttcuU to bring4cA(tt spending
under control. The overspending
began in previous Soviet govern-
ments.
Gostev said the deficit "is a
problem that has not emerged just
now, but is a result of the unbal-
anced economy, of the policy of
extensive subsidizing, and huge
losses - of all that was brouoht
about by extensive methods of
economic management, parasitic
attitudes and a passive financial
policy
As the 1,500 deputies con-
vened in the Grand Kremlin Pal-
ace in Moscow for the
parliament's regular fall session,
which was expected to last two
days, one seat on the leadership
dais was vacant. It was not imme-
diately clear whether the empty
chair heralded a change in the
Kremlin hierarchy.
Politburo member Yegor K.
Ligachev, who is believed to be
the major conservative force, was
separated by the empty chair
from Gorbachev and Prime Min-
ister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov.
In a maior shakeup cement-
ing his power, Communist Party
General Secretary Gorbachev
replaced Andrei A. Gromyko as
president Oct. 1. creating a va-
cancy on the 13-member ruling
Politburo.
At that time, he also moved
Ligachev over from party ideol-
ogy chief to agriculture, and the
empty chair may symbolize
Ligachev's diminished role.
As the Supreme Soviet began
work today, the deputies also
named Politburo member Vitaly
I. Vorotnikov one of the nation's
15 vice presidents. Earlier this
month, Vorotnikov succeeded
Vladimir Orlov as head of gov-
ernment in the Russian federa-
tion, the largest of the 15 constitu-
ent Soviet republics.
Gostev, in presenting the
state budget for next year, said the
deficit would be $58 billion, or 7
Percent of the total budget, the
official Tass news agency said.
The United States budgetcar-
ries a deficit of about $100 million.
Gostev said a drop in world oil
prices in recent year had cost the
Soviet Union almost $65 billion in
lost revenue.
The 1989 draft budget, which
is customarily approved by the
Supreme Soviet in a unanimous
vote, also allocates $32.8 billion to
the country's armed forces, the
same amount as in 1988, Gostev
said.
However, Western experts
say the Soviet military budget is
CIA estimated that the Soviet
militarv budget is actually 15
percent oi the nation's total econ-
omy.
STUDENT UNION COMMITTEES ARE
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
Committees Include:
Public Relations and Publicity Committee
Special Concerts Committee
Major Concerts Committee
Coffeehouse Committee
Films Committee
Applications can be found in Room 236-Mendenhall
Student Center, 757-6611, ext. 210.
Deadline for Applications-Nov. 15.
Wed: Kappa Sigma's All
Campus Male Strip Off
1st $100.00
2nd $50.00
3rd $25.00
Ladies only till 10:30
$1 Members
$2 Guests
Specials All Night
Thur Ladies Night
Ladies Free All Night
REAL
IS FOR
HELP
7St-HiLP
'Vi'

nivV
'wxV
�� �
Student Union
Coming Attractions

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f
5Uje iEaat (Earoliman
Pete Fernald, c��r. �,?��
Chip Carter, M��r�f &�
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Vector oftiorrhSMf
Joe Harris, Nnwuuw
Doug Johnson, suto,
Tim Hampton, f��ow,�o,
Michelle England, creM.
Debbie Stevens, rr�y
Stephanie Folsom, can ��
JEFF PARKER, Staff ((�!�
TOM FlIRR,Circwiifu,MDM�r
Susan Howell, prod� m
John W. Medlin, Art d.�
Mac Clark, eium Muer
November 1.1988
OPINION
Page 4
Sex
America needs to grow up
Hurray for Winston-Salem, the
site of one of this year's presidential
debates! In their indefatigable effort
to hide from reality, many of the 654
Winston-Salem area businesses
which normally carry Spin maga-
zine have refused to stock the No-
vember issue and have in fact
stopped stocking the magazine
indefinitely. Spin is not as widely
distributed in Greenville, but sev-
eral businesses here have also de-
cided not to carry the latest issue
(notable exceptions: Record Bar and
Kerr Drugs).
What has Spin done to deserve
such widespread censorship? It
tried doing something to fight a
widespread disease: AIDS. In-
cluded with every copy of
November's Spun is a free condom.
With condoms so readily avail-
able � over the counter in conven-
ience marts, for example � one is
surprised to find such massive resis-
tance to what is, after all, such a good
idea. One is also hard-pressed to
think of a good reason for this resis-
tance, but the most likelv reason
why local businesses decided not to
carry the condom-laden publication
is linked to America's attitudes
towards Americans' sexual atti-
tudes.
Most of America's values are
based on Judeo-Christian beliefs,
which is to say beliefs that are thou-
sands of years old and often thou-
sands of years out of date. Why are
these beliefs so restrictive of sexual
practices?
The Christians inherited the sex-
ual mores of the Jews, so the answer
can be found in the latter's back-
ground. The Jews were, in their
early days as in many other times
throughout history, a minority fac-
ing a hostile world. In order to en-
sure their own survival, it was nec-
essary for the Jews to discourage
those sexual practices which were
not likelv to lead to children � fore-
most among them masturbation
and homosexuality. It was equally
important that the children be born
to parents who were married (to
each other, of course) in order to
maintain harmony within the cul-
ture.
By contrast, the Greeks had a
relatively high population distrib-
uted over a relatively small area; for
them, high population growth
would have been dangerous. Ten-
dencies to homosexuality and other
behavior considered "deviant" to-
day were not only allowed but were
in fact encouraged. Had they had
the same type of sexual restrictions
as the Jews and Christians, they
might very well have overwhelmed
the resources of their island.
The example of the Greeks
shows that cultures which have no
need to restrict sexual practices have
no excuse for restricting sexual prac-
tices. America is still overly restric-
tive, given that the days when
America needed a population in-
crease � for example, during the
days of expansion into the land that
was stolen from the American Indi-
ans � are past. A retreat from cur-
rent stands on sexuality is not likely
to lead to a descent into barbarism. It
will more likely lead to a saner and
more nearly rational country.
So grow up, America! Clinging
desperately to antediluvian atti-
tudes will do you no good. You can
only lose your virginity once.
Halwovieeti M(r ovzk?"
Teflon bullets explained
To the editor:
I am writing in response to the
article by Michael Newman concern-
ing Bush and the NRA. It is pretty
obvious for those who know me that
I lean to the political right and cringe
when I hear the word liberal. I also
wholeheartedly endorse the Na-
tional Rifle Association because I am
a proud gun owner and will defend
to the death my right to keep and bear
arms. But the purpose of this letter is
not to discuss my standings in the
gun control issue. What 1 want to
briefly discuss is the term "cop killer
bullets
The bullets in question arc prop-
erly known as KTW teflon coated
armor piercing bullets. The name
"cop killer" wasgiventothe bullet by
a liberal media because it iscapableof
penetrating the standard class B
body armor worn by the police. Let it
be known that it was the law enforce-
ment community itself that asked
that the KTW be developed so that
they would have a bullet that could .
penetrate automobiles of fleeing fel-
ons. It was not made for poking holes
in police officers. As a matter of fact,
not a single police officer has been
killed by a KTW bullet.
Armor piercing ammo is made in
small quantities for the police and
military, and is not readily available
to the public at all. Asa matter of fact,
it was mostly unknown to the public
(or criminals, for that matter) until
the media discovered it and made a
big deal out of it.
As a hopeful future member of
the Highway Patrol, I want to thank
the media for possibly endangering
my life with their untasteful naming
of the KTW. I would discuss plastic
firearms, but that is another story
Sean Magill
Freshman
Biology
No ego trip
To the editor:
To Mr. K. Blake Johnson: my
apologies for not being able to reply
to you Oct. 4 letter sooner. My time
has been taken up by midterms,
numerous papers, political activities
(wrhng press releases, campaign-
ing), and musical obligations.
Mr. Johnson, you claim that I
exercise my First Amendment rights
on this page to "1) stroke my 1 ego, 2)
to make others look bad and 3) to
splash (my) name abundantly across
the editorial page over letters that
few students read and even fewer
care about
You're totally wrong. I am not a
"fame-hungry personage" that
claims to have "infinite wisdom as
you say. No, I expose liberal hypoc-
risy and present my views about the
issues (and I have presented my
views many times� I have scrap-
books I can show you to prove it) to:
1) Get the liberals to present their
viewpoint so I can see where they are
coming from; 2) Exercise my Consti-
tutional right of free speech; 3)
Counteract the liberal biasof The East
Carolinian's editorial section; and 4)
Refineimprove my ability to debate
the issues, thereby learning more
about the issues from both view-
points as I do so.
Those are the reasons I write to
The East Carolinian, not because I am
on an "ego trip
Now, Mr. Johnson, I hope we can
be friends. I salute you as a fellow
conservative Republican, and I hope
I cleared up your "perplexity And
please, I like to think I'm comparable
in style (not in ability) to Pat
Buchanan, not William Buckley (al-
though I admire him).
You requested a list of my views
on the issues. Well, that will require a
Campus Spectrum � I can't possibly
present my case properly in a 300-
word letter. I'll honor your request as
soon as possible.
Justin Sturz
Senior
EnglishJournalism
'Economics ' hurts
To the editor:
Your recent article on "Econom-
ics" was so terribly contradictory to
economic theory and empirical real-
ity it is painful to reflect on its con-
tent. If the individual who wrote that
article learned economics at ECU, I
hold myself criminally culpable. I
will peacefully surrender to the ap-
propriate law enforcement agency.
Randy Parker
Economics
Faculty
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Pubications Building, across from
the entrance of joyner Library.
Tor purposes of verification, all
letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number, and signature of the
author(s). Letters are limited to 300
words or less, double spaced or neatly
printed. All letters are subject to ed-
iting for brevity, obscenity, and libel,
and no personal attacks will be per-
mitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are re-
minded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline, for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday's edition and 5 p.m. Tues-
day for Thursday's edition.
Campus
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the editorial
page, the East Carolinian features
the "Campus Spectrum This is
an opinion column by guest writ-
ers from the student body and
faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will
contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or
nation.
The columns are restricted in
content only with regard to rules
of grammar and decency. Persons
submitting columns must be will-
ing to accept byline credit for their
efforts, as no entries from ghost
writers will be published.
Political experience becomes disadvantage
BY MICHAEL KINSLEY
The New Republic
A new George Bush television commercial
shows the vice president posing with Mikhail Gor-
bachev outside the White House as a voice-over
intones: "This is not time to train somebody in how
to meet with the Russians. This is the time for
strength and experience
There is no question that Bush has a great deal of
experience in meeting with foreign leaders of every
stripe, posing for photographs with them, chatting
about the weather. He'd make a marvelous chief of
protocol. On the other hand, there's no evidence his
vice presidential experience actually extends to
negotiating with foreign leaders or formulating for-
eignpolicy.
The question of "experience" is one on which the
hypocrisy of political strategists is at its most hilari-
ously brazen. In 1976 Jimmy Carter ousted incum-
bent president Gerald Ford by campaigning� accu-
rately enough, goodness knows � as an ingenuous
outsider, a simple peanut farmer and nuclear physi-
cist, appalled by the muck in Washington. Then,
running for re-election in 1980 he adopted a "Rose
Garden" strategy� heavy on the photographs with
foreign leaders, often announcing through sur-
rogates that he was too burdened by the weighty
duties of his office to condescend to campaign.
The suggestion was that actual incumbency is,
in fact, the only valid qualification for the job of
president. Carter's opponent, Ronald Reagan, ran as
an outsider and then pulled a similar switcheroo
four years later.
In 1980, of course, Republicans did not express
the view that two four-year terms as governor of a
major state were insufficient qualifications for the
presidency. Well, George Bush did suggest this
during the primaries, but when Ronald Reagan
annointcd him as running mate, he changed his
mind. Now he has changed his mind again. We
cannot risk turning over the presidency to a man
who needs on-the-job training, he says.
The question of "experience" is another matter
(like the environment) that the Bush campaign has
done a brilliant job in inverting. Dukakis' eight-year
experience as governor, it seems to me, compares
favorable to Bush's mostly ceremonial "experience"
in Washington, which has left no noticeable mark on
anything.
The truth is that no particular qualification is
essential for the job of president, and none truly
suffices. A governor or former governor can claim
actual experience running a government; a senator
can claim deeper involvement with national and
international issues. A sharp intelligence is useful;
on the other hand, as Ronald Reagan has demon-
strated, firm ideological conviction can be an
adequate substitute. Honesty and integrity are a
plus; but an ability to lead and inspire is also impor-
tant, even though this talent rarely comes without a
modicum of snake oil.
Every path to the presidency is fortuitous, and
yet George Bush's may be unique in not involving
any special display of any of the qualities of experi-
ence, intelligence, ideological commitment, integ-
rity or inspirational ability one might hope to find in
a president.
Bush served two terms in Congress two decades
ago. In the 1970's he served barely a year each in four
prestigious appointed positions, which he left with-
out any record of significant achievement or a single
memorable word. He was Ronald Reagan's second
choice for vice president at the 1980 Republican
convention. Reagan picked Bush for the same rea-
sons of ideological balance for which Bush now ridi-
cules Dukakis' choice of Lloyd Bentsen, plus Bush's
special capacity for dogged loyalty. As an ironic
result, Bush stands today as the heir to Reaganism.
Nothing in Bush's eight-year record as vice
president gives evidence of presidential qualities.
The Reagan presidency has not been without its
successes, but the only association Bush can legiti-
mately claim to them is one of propinquity.
Regarding the administration's failures, Bush
conveniently denieseven that association (although,
in the most notorious case, the evidence is over-
whelming that Bush did know of the arms-for-hos-
tages swap and did nothing about it). Bush claims to
have had a special role in three areas: drugs, terror-
ism and deregulation. In none can he point to anv
sparkling success. In each, the record is tainted by
scandal.
This presidential campaign demonstrates that
genuine experience has become a disadvantage in
American politics. The richer your record, the more
material there is for your opponent's negative re-
searchers, looking for nuggets to blow out of propor-
tion or misrepresent (e.g Dukakis "raised taxes five
times although he lowered the overall tax burden).
Meanwhile, the more you've actually accomplished,
the harder it is for your own professional handlers to
remake you from scratch to fit current needs.
The ideal political candidate, from the profes-
sionals' point of view is an attractive empty vessel
into which their potions can be poured. Or so they
thought. In Dan Quayle, the pros may finally have
reached the reductio ad absurdum of this line of
reasoning � a vessel too empty to fill up. The Dan
Quayle "experience" is something we have to look
forward to.
RJR
NEW YORK (API
ing a buyout of RR
Kohlberg Kravis Rot
faces a decision that cc
the course of the pow
ment firm and sei 1
through corporate An
The high poi I
firm is considering la
firm hostile tender of!
billion bid for RJR Nab)
on Wednesday termij
of joining with Kol
a $90-a-share buy I
Since its foundii
Kohlberg Kravis I
a company witl
the target's b
firm gradually ha
aggressive in its
Typically, Kohlb i
li managemei I
ag d I -
ha � beo n
The si
Kravis's I .
forced
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awakening i �
that if deals il
successful it giv
Wha
BARROW, AJ
whales that 1
tention for wee
from their icy tr
cleared by a Sov� I
Eskimo chain
hoped the leviath.
the open sea.
"It's in natu
said Gary Hul i
Weather Sen i. ice .
The California gi
- a am off into the
day on what
a long journey I
home oii Baja Ca!
Offi
surveillanci I
they planned I
decide wheUv :
vhaJi.J il.ui SU��U�
Crossbca k and Bonne
But their fah
know � Si i( i I sts inci
rescue that cost
$800,000didn ta I
miners to the whales
cause of concern that
would only ad
stress, said federal ma
mal biologist Jim Han
A whale that Wi
with the pair nearly tl
ago apparc
But a major I i
sion against the transd
that a lot of people rej
want to know th.
whales' fate, Harvey
In a final frei
Eskimos using
new breathing k ;
nearly as man) I
two weeks. The I
grew accustomed to tl
repeatedly surfaced i
holes before the last b
was removed.
Hie anira
than halt a mi
carved through tne 11
ice by two Soviet i
Tuesday and early V
Then, the Eskimos
to retreat so the icebre.
mir Arseniev a
channel, already p
frozen.
r�
1 .





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1, 1988 5
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tssociation (although,
j&se, the evidence is over-
know o( the arms-for-hos-
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none can he point to anv
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come a disadvantage in
ut your record, the more
opponent's negative re-
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Hikalris "raised taxes five
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veactually accomplished,
n professional handlers to
to tit current needs.
indidate, from the profes-
an attractive empty vessel
can be poured Or so they
the pros may finally have
absurdum of this line of
emptv to fill up. The Dan
omething we have to look
RJR bids begin at $20.3 billion
NEW MIRK (AD � In eye-
ing a buyout of RJR Nabisco Inc
kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.
faces a decision that could change
the course of the powerful invest-
ment tirm and send shock waves
through corporate America.
The high powered buyout
firm is considering launching its
turn hostile tender offer - a $20.3
billion bid for RJR Nabisco, which
on Wednesday terminated talks
ot joining with Kohloero Kravis in
a $90-a-share buyout
Since its founding in 176,
Kohlberg Kra is has not acquired
a company without the support of
the target's Kurd, although the
firm gradually has become more
aggressive in its deal making.
lypically, Kohlberg Kravis works
with management in the lever-
aged buyout transactions that
ha . e become its forte.
The sheer size of Kohlberg
Kravis's bid tor Nabisco has
forced corporations to reassess
their own vulnerability.
"There's been a gradual
awakening over the past week
that if deals above $10 billion arc
successful, it gives credibility to
even larger deals, and it's getting
down to almost a handful of
companies that arc secure" based
on sheer size alone, said one top
takeover lawyer, who spoke on
condition of anonymity.
The failure of talks with Na-
bisco also appeared to set the
stage for a showdown between
Kohlberg Kravis and Shearson
Lehman Hutton Inc Nabisco's
financial partner, over what
would be the nation's biggest
corporate acquisition ever.
According to one takeover
specialist, who spoke on condi-
tion he not be identified, Kohlberg
Kravis is "attempting keep bid-
ding on bigger and bigger deals so
other people in leveraged buyout
business can't compete with
them. They'd like to be thought of
as the only ones that come to
mind when it's a super-big deal
List week, Nabisco's top
managers said they were consid-
ering offering stockholders $75 a
share, or $17 billion, to return the
company to private ownership.
Kohlberg Kravis announced
Monday that it was considering a
takeover bid and under federal
law has five business days in
which to begin a tender offer if it
decides to proceed.
Nabisco stock slipped 25
cents a share to $84.75 a share in
heavy trading on the New York
Stock Exchange.
The stakes are high with
Nabisco. Not only are the poten-
tial financial rewards astronomi-
cal, but there is the cachet that
comes with succeeding in a deal
that carries a gargantuan price
tag. And on a more subtle level are
the egos of those who are driven
to establish new benchmarks.
Supervising the firm's pro-
posal is Henry Kravis, as promi-
nent on the New York social cir-
cuit as he is in the takeover game.
He is widely expected to go the
distance to protect his company's
lockup of mega-sized leveraged
buyouts.
Kravis was particularly
miffed that Nabisco was working
with Shearso, because he had
been interested in the Atlanta-
based food and tobacco conglom-
erate for some time. Kravis first
broached the subject of leading -
Nabisco buyout a year ago over
dinner with Nabisco's Johnson.
Nabisco's decision to stick
with Shearson even after meeting
with Kravis Pits him against his
one-time skiing partner, Shearson
Chairman Peter Cohen.
The sometimes abrasive Co-
hen has let slip in the press his
astonishment that Kravis would
be such a tough competitor after
skiing and socializing with him.
But those who know them won-
der just how close the pair was.
"They are competitors in the
same arena. They know one an-
other, but 1 don't know if they are
good friends. They're both very
cool individuals a takeover spe-
cialist said.
Cohen is benefiting from
Shearson's more subtle ties to
Nabisco in addition to having the
support of the management team.
Nabisco's Johnson is said to be a
close friend of James Robinson,
chairman of American Express
Co Shearson's parent.
In an earlier era, Kohlberg
Kravis worked on the same side of
the fence as Shearson.
&fa
Tar Landing Seafood
v Restaurant
y)g�y
AAjjofAMtAL "Student Special"
fjftt
ALL YOU CAN EAT PRIED SHRIMP
Served with Krench Frtra or EJakcd Potato Cole Slaw. Hush Pupplc:
a v�y
I
SCRVLD THIS TUES WED. & THLRS 11 AM - 9 P.M.
758-0327105 Airport Rd.
REBEL 89
Prose & Poetry Contest
Deadline is 7 November 1988
Whales escape an icy death
BARROW. Alaska (AD-Two
whales that hold the world's at-
tention for weeks swam away
from their icy trap in a channel
cleared by a Soviet icebreaker and
Eskimo chain saws, and rescuers
hoped the leviathans would reach
the open sea.
'it's in nature's hands now
sud Gary Hufford a National
Weather Service ice analyst.
The California gray whales
am oft into the sunset Wednes-
day on what was hoped would be
a long journey to their winter
home oft Baja California.
Officials halted helicopter
sun eillance at nightfall, and said
y planned to meet today to
decide whether to trv to locate the
vt 1 uc thai scJgphfils. dubbed
CrossTeak and Bonnet.
Rut their fate may never be
known. Scientists involved in the
rescue that cost more than
$800,000 didn't attach radio trans-
mitters to the whales, in part be-
cause o( concern that the devices
would only add to the animals'
stress said federal marine mam-
mal biologist )im Harvey.
A whale that was trapped
with the pair nearly three weeks
ago apparently died last week.
But a major factor in the deci-
sion against the transmitters was
that a lot of people really didn't
want to know the surviving
a hales' fate, Harvey said.
In a final frenzy Wednesday,
Eskimos using chain saws cut 50
new breathing holes into the ice,
nearly as many as they had cut in
two weeks The whales, which
grew accustomed to the cutting,
repeatedly surfaced in the new
iiiles before the last block of ice
was removed.
The animals moved to less
than half a mile from a channel
carved through tne IS-inch-thick
ice bv two Soviet icebreakers late
Tuesday nd early Wednesday.
Then, the Eskimos were ordered
to retreat so the icebreaker Vladi-
mir Arseniev could reopen the
channel, already partially re-
frozen.
Alter two hours and no
movement by the icebreaker, the
Eskimos grew impatient. Their
years of experience with the Artie
Ocean told them that a rising
wind could begin stacking up the
ice and undo all the progress.
laced with a near revolt, res-
cue coordinators allowed the na-
tives back onto the ice, and they
quickly moved the whales to
withm one-quarter mile of the
channel the Soviets had cut Tues-
day.
Finally, the icebreaker ap-
peared out o the snowy squall
line ahead.
lust after 4 p.m. (9 p.m.
EDT), rescue coordinator Ron
Morns reported from his helicop-
ter lhat the whales had surfaced in
a small ptxil in the old channel.
They then slipped beneath the
surface. Moments later, the
whales appeared about 25 feet
away in open water left by the
icebreaker. The crowd cheered.
As darkness fell, the whales
were moving along the channel,
which the Arseniev continued to
clear, at least two miles from any
significant open water.
"They're in the main lead, and
I can't help but think they'll keep
on truckin Morris said. "I don't
know how much more we can
do
The rescue effort initially
bogged down with an attempt to
move a 185-ton ice-breaking
barge from the Prudhoe Bay oil
field 200 miles away.
The Alaska National Guard
then donated a huge helicopter
that dropped a 5-ton concrete
cylinder through the ice. But it
proved to be of little value.
The endangered California
gray whales have one of the long-
est migration routes of all mam-
mals, 6,000 to 8,000 miles from the
Arctic to the warm water off Baja
California.
Their population has risen to
about 20,000, growing at an an-
nual average of 2.5 percent for the
past decade, officials said.
"The human persistence and
determination by so many indi-
viduals on behalf of these whales
shows mankind s concern for the
environment President Reagan
said from the White House. "It
has been an inspiring endeavor
ECU
Winning submissions will appear in the
magazine & cash prizes will be awarded to
first, second, & third place winners.
All submissions should be:
� typed,
� double-spaced.
� previously unpublished. &
� ECU student work.
Submit no more than three entries to the Rebel or
Media Board Office
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes
Students To Come Bv And See
Our 2 Bedroom and 1 Bedroom
Garden Apartments.
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT COMMUNITY
953 E. 10th St.
Greenville, N.C. 27836
Phone:757-3760
"We Cater To Both The Needs Of The Catholic & Non-Catholic Community"
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE NOVEMBER 1-4
1st: Tuesday,
2nd: Wednesday,
3rd: Thursda
4th: Frida
Open House 10 a.m. -1 p.m.
Mass 5:30 p.m.
followed by fellowship dinner.
"Best $2 Meal In Town"
Open House 10 a.m. -1 p.m.
Talk Series 7:30 p.m.
"Wllxat a Catholic Christian Believes"
Ail Nighter -
games, movies, popcorn,
hot chocolate and a lot more.
(Bring your sleeping bag but be
prepared to stay up all nite.) -
BECOME AN ECU NEWMANITE
JOIN THE NEWMAN COMMUNITY
Father Paul Vaeth - Chaplain & Campus Minister





V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1. 1�8
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
male roommate to share new mobile
home 10 minutes from campus. Non-
smoker, please. Call Hugh at 756-6851
after 500 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male to share
2 bedroom apt. at the PLANTATION. Pri-
vate room and bath. $237.50 plus 1 2 utili-
ties. Tanning beds, Jacuzzi, and more.
Contact HARRY: 355-9164.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: To share a 3 bedroom 2 12
bath apartment at Tar River Estates.
$150.00 rent a month and utilities and
phone bill will be split 3 ways. Call 752-
1182, ask for Wayne or Jimmy.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa. Good condition,
only $45.00 negotiable. Call 758-9437.
FOR SALE: 9 band graphic equalizer
amplifier for car stereo. 150 watts low
front rear fader. Full illumination Led
meter excellent condition. Call Roy at 752-
4825.
FOR SALE: 78 MGB. No rust Excellent
mechanical condition. Asking $2800.00.
WiU finance. 756-2334.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
re'sume' production, and other business
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F for more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street fteside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC Done by
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933.
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING: Real
Cheap Affordable Rates! Call 752-5084.
NEED HELP? Phi Sigma Pi sponserred
Rent-A-Brother. Babysitting, housework,
and yardwork. Very reasonable rate Nov.
5, 1988. For information call 355-6217 9
am-10 pm M-F.
NEED HELP WITH HOUSE CLEAN-
ING OR YARD WORK?: You should
Rent-A-Cadet 12 November 1988. Call
757-6967 for information. 757-6974. $25 for
a half day. $35 for a whole day.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: 19 years ex-
perience. Work done on Apple computer
with letter quality printer. Low rates. Will
correct spelling. Call 756-8934 between 5-
9 p.m. and ask for Ginger.
HELP WANTED
coaches for the winter program. Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge of
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
9-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 p.m. - 7 p.m Monday thru
Friday, and some night and weekend
coaching. The program will extend from
December 1 to mid-February. Salary rate
is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour. Applications
will be accepted starting October 20.
Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
NEED MALE AND FEMALE DANCERS
FOR PRIVATE PARTIES: Also need
ladies 18-36 years of age for a legs video.
Earnings of $50 per hour and more. Apply
in person Monday through Friday, 4 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. to Promotions Co 2708-A E.
10th Street No phone calls
ATHLETIC MANAGERS NEEDED:
Contact Fred in Mmges Coliseum. 757-
6029
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take sign-ups for our FLORIDA tours. We
furnish all materials for a successful pro-
motion. Good PAY and FUN. Call CAM-
PUS MARKETING at 1-800-777-2270.
OPPORTUNITY IN THE TRAVEL IN-
DUSTRY: The 1 college tour operator is
looking for an efficient, responsible, and
organized campus representative to mar-
ket a Spring Break trip on campus. Earn
free trips, and good commissions while
gaining great business experience. For
more information, call 1-800-999-4300.
NEEDED: Part-time or on-call carpenters,
electricians, plumbers, carpet layers, ma-
jor appliance, roofers, linoleum layers for
local firm. $6 00-S10 00 hr based on skill.
Flexible hours. 758-0897.
VOLUNTEERS: ECU School of Medi-
cine, section of allergv, is conducting a
study. Needed for asthma study: Men,
age 18 or over, non-smokers, w mild to
moderate asthma & allergies. Study in-
cludes use of a new drug, skin tests and
pulmonary tests. Volunteers will also stay
overnight twice in hospital lodgings. Par-
ticipants will be well reimbursed. Please
call 551-3159 to volunteer.
ATTENTION ECU FACULTY AND
STAFF: Brodv's has part-time positions
for individuals interested in a flexible
work schedule to help stuff that special
Christmas stocking Call todav for an
interview appointment or applv in per-
son, Brodv's, Carolina East MalL M-W, 2-
4 p.m.
PERSONALS
from the movie, 'Staying
Alive Will pay cash for. Call Ramona at
758-9351.
TRANSFERRING TO UNC-CH?: La
dies: housing contract available, Gran-
ville Towers South. For Spring 1989. The
ultimate location to campus. Free parking
permit included. Call Donna, 933-7447.
BRIDGETTE: Hey cool chick! Thanks for
the sips at P.Bs. I owe you one! You're a
pretty decent lil" sis. 1 think I'll keep you
around! �Love, Kristi.
TICI A: Hey groovy chick! Just want to let
you know mat we are all pretty scared that
you'll be here in the spring. Oh, I'm only
kidding. We love you -your pseudo
roommates!
T. BRrTTON: Buck up camper! It's not so
bad. Here's our solution. . Spoogee �
Love, The Kooks.
PIKA LIL' SIS PLEDGES: The drinks
were flowing, the skates were rolling,
Jenni's bunny fall was great, and Don
scored a 10 on skates; Todd was confused
- we were amused Lee never mastered
his skates but the advanced Hokey Pokey
we did not hate! Cheers to the Daddy Frat,
a nicesurprise from all you guys! �Love, The
Pika lil' sisters. P.S. Keep up the grea
wok
THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CARO-
LINA: Invites you to consider graduate
school in Columbia, SC. Visit with Dr.
Wanzer Drane tomorrow, Nov. 2nd from
10 a.m. to 330 p.m. in Bloxton House.
SEXY THING: The pantry's been pretty
empty lately. It's time to stock it up again!
NEW DELI: Wants you to come jam with
the best. Friday welcome back the rocking
sounds of VALENCE. Saturday come jam
to the alternative rock of the CHANNEL
CATS. Don't forget Wed. open mike
nights and Thur. dead nights.
ALPHA PHI: Thank you, again for mak-
ing us a dominating force at your
stranger. 22 of us had The Best time
Thanx- the Pikes.
CONGRATULATIONS: To Ivtac Ken-
dall for tieing the ECU record for shut outs
in soccer. Way to keep up the Pi Kappa
Alpha standard.
TKE: At little Mexican last Thursday
night some of us dressed up and we were
a sight.
Snakebits and upside-downs were the
way to go. From the "kitchen" to the
basement, the crowd sure did flow. It
was a long time coming but the day did
arrive. Thanks to all the TKE's and we
hope the thrill never dies. The Sigmas.
SIGMA PLEDGES: Thanks for the
Halloween surprise. We had a real
SCARY time. You all are great! Love the
sisters.
HOPE EVERYONE HAD: A great time
last night. Carry on the party. Thursday is
Pi Kappa Alpha Fizz Day. Free Nacho's
and drink specials.
PI KAPPA ALPHA LITTLE SISTERS:
Thank you for our surprise skate. An
excellent time was had by all. Sportsworld
will never be the same. �Love, The Broth-
ers.
21 YEARS AGO TODAY: Vicky BrasweU
was born on a chicken farm far away.
Through majoring in art, music, and
Home Ec, miss Braswell needs to say
"What the heck?" Now an adult, she
needs to take a stand, to hell with J.E, the
flags, and the band. Memories of English
jam. Sessions, Biruta, and peg leg, let's
reminisce over a keg! This was a poem
from two friends that care, you need to
party and quit messing with your hair.
I lappy Birthday! Diane and Mary.
AOPi's: I lope that you had as greata time
at the 1 lo Down as we did with Sig Eps,
Zeta's and AOPi's sDortine the latest i"
country duds was quite a sight to see.
Hope to get together soon. Thanks. Love
the Sisters and pledges of Zeta Tau Alpha.
HEY ALL YOU SIG EPS! The Zeta's
would like to thank you for the terrific Ho
Down. With our overalls, straw hats and
flannel shirts we were ready for a great
social! Let's do it again soon. Love the
sisters and pledges of Zeta Tau Alpha.
BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA PHI: Con
gratulations to both the A-Tcam and B-
Team for their victories in volleyball. Let's
keep it up we're looking good.
PLEDGES OF PI KAPPA PHI: We hope
last week was inspirational but if it
wasn't, you can be sure this week will be.
Get tight guys and learn your material.
I lope you had a good time last weekend.
Get ready for a killer week! The Brothers.
PHI TAU LIL SISTERS: Bobbing, carv
ing, drinking, and much, much more' The
First Annual Halloween Pumpkin carv-
ing bashing party was a blast! Have a
great, safe Halloween! Love, The Broth-
ers.
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards? Call
Earlvis, the mad baseball buyer I pay
damn good money for cards of any year,
any shape, and any condition If you need
party money, Big E is the one to call 757
6366, leave a message.
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom �
� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. Sth Street
� Located Near ECU
� Acrou From Highway Patrol Station
Limited offer-S275 a month
Contact J T or Tommy Williams
76-71 5 or UO-1M7
Office open-Apt.�, 12-S-JO p.m
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month. 6 month
lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes In Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
a-TOfto
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 7��
I WALK-INS WELCOME
20 TEARS OP SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Eastgate Shopping Center
(Acroaa from Highway Patrol Station
Behind Car Quest Auto Parts
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318
Your Best Look
r
1 Specializing In: MANICURES:
1 French Manicures � Nail Tips �
I Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
I PEDICURES � SKIN CARE: Body
Wrapping � Face Ar Body Waxing �
Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products I or
Men & Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaa Dr. Greenville
Make Up To $1000 In One WeekM
Student Organizations,
Fraternities, Sororities needed for
Marketing Project on campus.
Must be motivated and organized.
Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 28.
$50 REWARD: For ID. and evidence of
person(s) stealing 8 wooden Halloween
yard decorations from residence near sta-
dium on Sat. night. Oct. 22. Large & small
black cats, large & small ghosts, hat, scare-
crow, jack-o-lantern face, plastic skeleton.
756-0800.
IN DESPERATE NEED: Of a 45 rpm rec-
ord by Frank Stallone. Title of song is 'Far
WANTED: Campus representative to
promote our low cost, high quality Spring
Break trip to Daytona Beach. Free trips
and money while gaining valuable busi-
ness experience. Call Kurt with Travel As-
sociates. 1-800-558-3002.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Recreation and Parks Department is re-
cruiting for part-time youth basketball
ABORTION
'Personal and Confidential Care'
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru S�L Low
Cost Termination to 50 wrrks of pregnancy
OUR RESUMES
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
rvsumt pm-Mptf ?�: you choosa (mAmma h I
��0ese;i"Xj '�se pnntang v tasc typiNnMP ongntlB
� ��or Ar oAv tm mtM 'Aof ofl imp' ml
FAST COPif S
for fast rmes
� H Host MMCi MMftMM
� Cwv fi' op- it
accu �;�
Twf a�Siiif PfOPic
758-2400
4e�! to Chtcos m ihe Get.geto�n Sopv
DO Oil HAVE ANY
QUESTIONS A30UT YOUR
LONG DISTANCE
SERVICE?
Interested in learning abjaut
calling plans and special
products that may save you
money?!
Contact Dana Dunlow,
Your AT&T
Student Campus Manager
Here at ECU
Call: 752-0856
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday-Friday
1-800-433-2930
The Secret Of Getting Rich
Amazing Book Tells All
Free Offer Details - Rush Stamped Self
Addressed Envelope
Wayne Humphries, Dept. L.M. - 1
Rt. 1 Box 215
Beulaville, NC 28518
HELP WANTED
� i �� u' io toon fn-
APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FJOtR
LAYOUT ARTIST
APPLY IN PERSON
MONDAY-FRIDAY
10 a.m4 p.m.
at
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
2nd FLOOR
PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
IN FRONT OF JOYNER LIBRARY
No phone calls please
'Layout Experience Preferred
Announcements
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
fflma WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LQST2
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
1
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
I CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance Class photographs will be taken
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 in the Student Store from 9
am til 12 pm and lpm. til 430 p.m each
day. The yearbook is not your yearbook
until you are in it
S WVNTON MARSAUS CON-
CERI
I
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present Wynton Marsahs in concert
Nov. 1 at 8:00 p.m in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets go on sale for this Pertorming Arts
Series event on Oct. 10. Winner of a
Grammy Award for both classical and
jazz performances, Mr. Marsalis is sure to
bring an energetic and entertaining show
to Wright Auditorium. For further details,
contact: The Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall, or call (919) 757-6611.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the Dec. issue. The maga-
zine is published twice a semester with the
first issue coming out in Oct. This special
issue will be a small magazine with
mainly general info whereas the Dec.
issue will be a larger size containing news
stories, short stories, editorials, poetry,
etc. Articles may be left at the office or at
the Media Board Secretary's Office in the
Publications Bldg.
INTENDED SLAP MAJORS
All General College students who have in-
dicated a desire to major in Speech Lan-
guage and Auditory Pathology and have
R. MuzzareUi as their advisor are to meet
on Nov. 2 at 500 p.m. in Brewster B-306.
Advising for early registration will take
place at that time. Others interested in
SLAP should contact the dept. - 757-6961.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting will be Nov. 3 at 7:00 in
GCB 1012. All members please attend.
ASSERTIVENFSS TRAINING
A three part workshop offered to students
at no cost by the University Counseling
Center. Nov. 3,10, and 17 (Thursdays). All
three sessions will be conducted from 3-4
p.m. in 312 Wright Bldg. Asscrtiveness
Training can sharpen your interpersonal
skills and help you target personal goals.
The workshop will focus on helping
members distinguish between their asser-
tive, aggressive, and nonassertive behav-
iors. Participants can learn how to express
themselves directly and openly, and re-
spond to interpersonal situations in a
manner which neither compromises indi-
vidual beliefs nor offends others. Please
call the Counseling Center (757-6661) for
registration.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL college
General College students should contact
their advisors the week'of Oct. 31 - Nov. 4
to make arrangements for academic ad
vising for spring semester, 1989. Early
registration begins Nov. 7 and ends Nov.
11.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Representatives of Ae Walt Disney World
Company will be on campus to recruit EC
students for their College Program. A
seminar presentation will be conducted
Nov. 9. Students from all majors are in-
vited to participate. Positions in guest
relations, attractions, merchandising, and
food services, among others are available.
Contact the Office of Cooperative Ed. in
the GCB for details.
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, structures and architectures of
North and Central American Earth as seen
by Ernst Habrichs. Oct. 24-Nov. 19. Recep-
tion Wed 7:00 p.m Mendenhall Gallery.
SUMMER IOBS
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be Nov. 21 at 10:00 a.m.
in 1029 GCB. The ten-week internship
program, in the Raleigh area, is open to
sophomores, juniors, and seniors cur-
rently enrolled in college. (Those entering
Graduate School as of May, 1989 are not
eligible).
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to our biDie
Studies every Tues. night at 7:00 p.m. in
Rawl 130. Bring a friend. For more info
call Jim at 752-7199.
AWT VOCAL ensemble
The National Gallery of Art Vocal En-
semble will perform in Hendrix Theatre
on Nov. 14 at 8:00 p.m. This event is part of
the Chamber Music Series. Four great
voices create one excellent sound, in jour-
ney exploring an almost limitless reper-
toire. Tickets go on sale Oct. 24. For further
details, contact The Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, or call 757-6611, ext 266.
SHOULD WE RECEIVE
THE OR THE - IN GPA'S?
The Credits Committee is currently
studying the question of whether the
undergraduate grading system should be
modified to allow the award and record-
ing of pluses and minuses, in addition to
the current letter grades. As the first step
in our study of this issue, the committee
has scheduled an open meeting to allow
faculty and students to present their feel-
ings, concerns, and Ideas. The meeting
will be held on Nov. 17 from 3:00-5:00p.m.
in room C-103, Brewster. Interested indi-
viduals are invited to attend the meeting
at any time during this period. The
committee will be available during the
entire two hours to listen to the comments
and recommendations of anyone who
desires to present his or her views. If you
have any questions or if you desire addi-
tional info you may contact Professor
Frank Wondolowski (3136 GCB, phone
757-6599) or myself (BN108C Science
Complex, phone 6306).
ARMY ROTC
Attention freshmen: This spring develop
important financial aid and career oppor-
tunities by taking MLSC 1001 (Intro to
ROTC and the Army). It's a one-hour elec-
tive with no uniform or haircut require-
ments and entails no future obligation.
Books are provided. For more info call 2nd
Lt Kevin Dunlevy at 757-69716974 or
stop by Room 343 Rawl.
SQCYWIUST
On Nov. 1 at 7 p.m. in AH-103 there will be
a meeting for MAJORS AND INTENDED
MAJORS, Soda) WorkJustice. The pur-
pose of this meeting will be to discuss
registration procedures for Spring '89.
Also, other important announcements
will be made. All majors and intended
majors should attend.
LSlIQQQ
Library Science 1000 instructors will be-
gin offering help sessions in Joyner's Ref-
erence Room beginning Oct. 24. These
sessions are designed to offer supplemen-
tal assistance to Library Sdence 1000 stu-
dents. Any student needing extra help
will find a schedule at the Reference desk
listing the name of the available instructor
at each designated time. The time slots are
12 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. Mon. through
Thur.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all Am-
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p.m. in Menden-
hall room 221. Remember that missing
over 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation.
FREE THROW CONTEST
Be sure to attend the Intramural free
throw contest registration meeting held
Nov. 8 from 3-6 p.m. in MG. Play begins
shortly afterward! Register when you can
and see if your team is the best on Cam-
pus!
NOW MEETING
The Greenville chapter of the National Or-
ganization for Women will hold its
monthly meeting Nov. 2 at 7 p.m at
Chico s Restaurant. The group will dis-
cuss issues and candidates in the upcom-
ing elections as well as plans for the March
for Women's Equality in the spring in
Washington D.C Students are especially
welcome. For more info call 756-1018.
PITT COUNTY ACLP
The next meeting of the Pitt County ACLD
will be Nov. 15 at St. James United Meth-
odist Church, 7:30 p.m If you are inter-
ested in becoming a member of the Pitt
County ACLD, would like more info or
would like to be on our mailing list, please
send your address to: Pitt County ACLD,
1 Dogwood Court, Greenville, N.C
FRESHMEN
All freshmen who intend to major in one
of the following: Bus. Ed Driver Safety
Ed Early Childhood Ed Health Ed In-
termediate Ed Mktg. and Distributive
Ed. Middle Grades Ed Physical Ed
!

1
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Special Ed and Technical anc
Ed Please be advised that
required to select a "Secorw
Major " It is imperative that
your advisor or chair of the ck
leam more about the second
quirement before you prereg
ond semester
AIPSEP.COMN
Students, staff and faculty St
Awareness Week. Listen to
speak on "Living With AlDSj
affects his family Questions i
Mendenhall, I lendnx Theatr
8:00 pm No charge Ca
more info
Have you pot STAR potenha
we invite you to audition fj
SEARCH competition on Nl
p.m in the Cultural Center
your talent fit one of the!
dance, music, drama or
winner of this Star Search
chance at $1 SO Everyone is
more info, call 830-5W Lm
SJCHi
We have two- and three- oar
available for eligible f reshmc
mores You need at least a
considered For more info ,
scholarship workshop at 5
room 305 Rawi, or call 757
sored by the Dept of Militai
MEN NEEP1
ECU School of Medicine,
lcrgy, is conducting a stud)
asthma study: men, age
smokers with mild to mc
and allergies Studv inc!ud�
drug, skin tests and puimonl
unteers will also stay ov
hospital lodgings Partial
well reimbursed Please
volunteer
PJZZAINTERESTl
Today, 6 p m in Wright Af
with Air Force officers aboi
reers in the Air Force
refreshments.
STUDENT
, If you have photographs frj
or some of a party you hav
ycir, bring them to the veJ
We are looking for good qua
show where you went forl
photo's of your partv RemJ
vour yearbook until you'rf
located in front of Joyner
2nd floor of the TubUcatifli
1 YfARtook'rj
Yearbook photographs I
taken! If you have never
book, now is your chance
not vour yearbook until yoi
are from 9 a m12 p.m ail
p.m this week onlv in the !
FACULTY
Faculty and staff vearbool
being taken this week tn tht
Hours are from 9 a m -12 d
4 30 p.m. Come out and �hc
you care about the veart
CQ�IS�J&J
N.C. Wesl
considerinj
RALEIGH (AD I
man of the board
N.C. YVesleyan Coll
board will consider
Japanese universii
buv a private collq
sity.
But the chan
Carlton, told The
server of Raleigh oi
that the chances wet
mote" that the 32-y
Mount college wo
the Japanese.
Leslie H. Garne
of N.C. Wesleyan,
came through letter
)ohn T. Henley,
N.C. Association of
Colleges and Univ
Officials from
fied Japanese uru veJ
they want to find
strapped private cd
versify they can buy
lure.
Henley said Ti
had received two ii
whether any privj
the state might be fl
The Japanese
cials want to "ace
control" of the coll
trustees, increase
of Japanese studc
faculty and studj
program Henley r
"1 knew we w
oi foreign invest
didn't know it wot
point where they
in the educational
ley said.
John E. Trail
of Lcnoir-Rhyne
ory is among coil
who has declined





!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1,1988 7
car be sure this mack will be.
t guvs and learn vour material.
u had a good time last weekend
ror a killer week! The Brothers
II 111 SISTERS Robbing, carv
n and much much more' The
i . loween Tumpkm carv
s .art was a blast' Have a
loween! Love The Broth
vr lave baseball card Call
� bi buyer 1 pav
vl monev b ' mv war
t r- it u neov)
met Big E i- the ne to call
ve a message
a toro
Ins hairstyling
TYLE CUT 7��
K INS WELCOME
h"RARS OF SERVING ECU
OCKS FROM CAMPUS
g Center
wav Paro Star:on;
� - .v v.v farts
I i E 10th Stiwt
-eermlle
752-3318
In One Week!
zations,
les needed for
pn campus.
d organized.
18 ext. 28.
NTED
ICCEPTED FOR .
1ST
ST
IAN
R
Ililding
;r library
please
Preferred
�eneral meeting for all Am-
s Wed jt M; pm in Menden-
�am 221 Remember that missing
hneetings per semester mav lead to
EJHRQW CONTEST
Ito attend the Intramural free
test 'egistrahon meeting held
h m'tipin in MG Plav begins
�afterward' Register when you can
vour team is the best on Cam-
NOW MEETING
heenville chapter of the National I
wion for Women will hold its
llv meeting Nov 2 at 7 p m at
Is Restaurant The group will cbs-
sues and candidates in the upcom
rnons as well as plans for the March
men s Equality in the spring in
lgton D C Students are especially
ie For more info, call 756-1018
I meeting of the Pitt County ACLD
Nov 15 at St James United Meth
lurch. 7 30 pm If vou are inter-
becoming a member of the Pitt
ACLD, would like more info or
1M ke to be on our mailing list, please
?ur address to Pitt County ACLD,
�ood Court Greenville, N C.
ihmen who intend to major in one
I following: Bus Ed . Driver Safety
Iv Childhood Ed Health Ed , In
late Ed , Mktg and Distributive
liddle Grades Ed, Physical Ed
Announcements
Special Ed, and Technical and Vocational
Ed. Please be advised that you will be
required to select a "Second Academic
Major It is imperative that you contact
your advisor or chair of the department to
learn more about the second major re-
quirement before you prcregister for sec-
ond semester.
AIPSEP. COMMITTEE
Students, staff and faculty: Support AIDS
Awareness Week. Listen to Mike Miller
speak on "Living With AIDS" and how it
affects his family. Questions are welcome.
Mendenhall, Hendrix Theatre, Nov. 8 at
8 00 p m No charge. Call 757-6794 for
more info.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
Have you got STAR potential? If you do,
we invite vou to audition for our STAR
SEARCH competition on Nov. 8 at 730
p.m in the Cultural Center. We ask that
your talent fit one of these categories:
dance, music, drama or comedy. The
winner of this Star Search will have a
chance at $150 Everyone is welcome! For
more info , call 830-5391 Entry fee $5.
SCHOLARSHIPS
We have two- and three-year scholarships
available for eligible freshmen and sopho-
mores. You need at least a 2.5 GP A to be
considered. For more info, come to the
scholarship workshop at 5 p.m Nov. 2,
room 305 Rawl, or call 757-6974 Spon-
sored bv the Dept of Military Science.
MEN NEEPEP
ECU School of Medicine, section of al-
lergy, is conducting a study. Needed for
asthma study: men, age 18 or over, non-
smokers with mild to moderate asthma
and allergies. Studv includes use of a new
drug, skin tests and pulmonary tests. Vol-
unteers will also stay overnight twice in
hospital lodgings. Participants will be
well reimbursed Please call 551-3159 to
volunteer.
PIZZA INTEREST NIGHT
Today, 6 p.m. in Wright Annet 308. Talk
with Air Force officers about exciting ca-
reers in the Air Force FREE PIZZA &
refreshments.
A free mini class offered by the ECU
Counseling Center for students. You can
Identify sources of stress, make positive
changes, manage your response to stress-
ful situations, learn to relax, improve self
confidence. Nov. 7.9,11,14 in 329 Wright
Bldg. from 3-4 p.m. No advance registra-
tion is required. Call or stop by the Court-
seling Center for further info. (316 Wright
Bldg 757-6661V Plan on attending all four
sessions.
TURKEY TROT
Be sure to attend the Intramural Turkey
Trot registration meeting held Nov 15 at
500 p.m. in BIO 103. Make sure vou regis-
ter and learn what the Turkey trot is all
about!
CHALLENGE WEEK
Be sure to attend the Intramural Chal-
lenge Week registration meeting held
Nov. 14 from 1100 a m6:00 p.m. in MG
104. Challenge Week will be a challenge to
see who is the best among all of the chal-
lengers.
AUPITIONS
Auditions for a reader's theatre ("WE
WEAR THE MASK") to be performed
during Black History Month will be held
Nov. 8 from 5-7 p.m. in Jenkins Audito-
rium. Students interested in reading dur-
ing the auditions should be familiar with
"For My People" by Margaret Walker.
Copies are available in the Office of Mi-
nority Student Affairs, 204 Whichard
Bldg
FAMILY CHILD ASSQC
FCA will have a meeting on Nov 1. A
guest spcakei from the Play Therapy
Room at the hospital will be there. Meet
outside of the Conference Room (rm 143
- Home Ec. Bldg.) at 6:00 p.m.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications are now being accepted for
the David B. and Willa H Stevens Scholar-
ship for undergraduates enrolled in the
School of Social Work. Undergraduate
students in the SOCWJUST programs
are eligible for consideration. The recipi-
ent will be selected on the basis of aca
demic excellence, financial need, good
citizenship and dedication to the SOCW
JUST professions Students may nominate
themselves by completing the application
form which is available from the School of
SOCW, rm. 301, Belk Bldg. Applications
must contain the recommendation of the
student's academic advisor The deadline
for submission is Nov. 9. For more info
call 757-6961, ext. 219.
CLC TRANSIT
Are you a Pitt County resident, 60 years
old or older and need a ride to your medi-
cal appointment? The Creative Living
Center is offering transportation service
to the elderly for medical appointments
within Pitt County such as doctors, den-
tists, clinics, therapies and the Health
Dept. Arrangements for the service must
be made at least 24 hours before the sched-
uled appointment. Call the Creative Liv-
ing Center, 757-0303, to find out the day(s)
service is scheduled for vour area, then
make your medical appointment and res-
ervation for transportation.
ATLANTA SYMPHONY
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present the Atlanta Symphony on Nov.
17 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. The
concert promises to be most exciting as the
symphony is under the direction of their
new musical conductor, Yocl Levi Tickets
for this event go on sale Oct 31 For further
details, call 757-6611, ext. 266 or write
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall
SPANISH CLUB
Spanish Club will meet Nov 2 at 3 p.m. in
conference room of For Lang. Dept. in
GCB ! Bienvenidos!
S.A.M.
Society for the Advancement of Manage
ment meeting Nov. 9, 3 p.m, GCB 1028
Speaker will be Don Lewellyn, Depart
ment Head of Production scheduling at
Burroughs Wellcome. I lis topic will be
Time � The Next Competitive Advan-
tage. Members are encouraged to attend
and guests arc welcome.
VVES2FEL
Wes2fel is a Christian fellowship which
welcomes all students, and is sponsored
jointly by the Presbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries. Come to the Method
ist Student Center (S01 E Sth, across from
Garrett dorm) this Wed. night at 5 p.m
and every Wed night for a delicious, all
vou-can-eat home cooked meal with a
short program afterwards. This week, a
project for senior citizens The meal is S2,
SI.50 for members. Call 758-203Q more in-
formation.
YfARfeOOWp
CO
0�TT
JAIL-A-THON
NOV. 3 9-4
en
I
CD

If you have photographs from Fall Break
or some of a party you have been to this
year, bring them to the yearbook office.
We are looking for good quality photo's to
.�ihow where you went for Fall Break St
photo's of your party Remember, it's not
vour yearbook until you're in it. We are
iocated in front of Joyner Library on the
2nd floor of the Publications Bldg
�iVIICap Jhi'i? �YnallowF1 to use the telephone to entreat his
friends to post his "bond so he can be freed. The amount of bond
will also go to the American Cancer Society.
CALL ACS BEFORE NOV. 3, AT 752-2574 or come by the ECU
Student Store on Nov. 1-3, or CALL 757-1943 on November 3.
ECU STUDENT STORE
For a $10 donation anyone may procure a warrant' for the arrest
of anyone. Upon payment of $10, a "police officer" will proceed to
the suspects place of business or home and deliver him to the
"JAIL" at the ECU Student Store.
Yearbook photographs are now being
taken! If you have never been in the year-
book, now is your chance. Remember, it's
not your yearbook until you're in it Hours
are from 9 am12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30
p.m this week only in the Student Store.
FACULTY & STAFF
Faculty and staff yearbook portraits are
being taken this week in the Student Store.
Hours arc from 9 a.m12 p.m and 1 p.m
4:30 p.m. Come out and show the students
you care about the yearbook!
fOPlNC. WITH STRESS
N.C. Wesleyan
considering offers
RALEIGH (AP) � The chair-
man of the board of trustees of
N.C. Wesleyan College says his
board will consider offers from a
Japanese university seeking to
buy a private college or univer-
sity.
But the chairman, J. Phil
Carlton, told The News and Ob-
server of Raleigh on Wednesday
that the chances were "terribly re-
mote" that the 32-year-old Rocky
Mount college would be sold to
the Japanese.
Leslie H. Gainer Jr president
of N.C. Wesleyan, said the offer
came through letters received by
John T. Henley, president of the
N.C. Association of Independent
Colleges and Universities.
Officials from the unidenti-
fied Japanese university have said
they want to find a financially
strapped private college or uni-
versi ty they can buy in the near fu-
ture.
Henley said Tuesday that he
had received two inquiries about
whether any private schools in
the state might be for sale.
The Japanese university offi-
cials want to "acquire majority
control" of the college's board of
trustees, increase the enrollment
of Japanese students, and start a
faculty and student exchange
program, Henley said.
"I knew we were getting a lot
of foreign investments, but I
didn't know it would come to the
point where they were interested
in the educational process Hen-
ley said.
RECYCLED CLOTHING
Just In From New York
New Shipment of Fine Quality
Overcoats
London Fog Trench Coats from 12.95-29.95
Dress Overcoats 39.95-69.95
New Shipment of Jeans In!
Faded Levi's from $2.95-$5.95
Huge Variety of Jackets $7.95 & up
(Leather, Ski, Military, Denim, Wool & Windbreakers)
Layaway Plan Available
CLOTHES
10.00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
At
The Coin & Ring Man
400 S. Evans St.
On the corner below "Fizz"
Reacled Clothing (New & Used)
t
Crispeff's
Cover to Cover
tPaptrBack'Book'Lchangi
All Paperbacks 50 Off i
75 Off With Trade
412 Evans Si
!Nedt to Bissctte s)
830 8944
Mon -Fri 10 b
Sat 10-3
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
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I
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I

l

l
l
I
I
I
RECOVER PROM
HALLOWEEN
HUNGER WITH
SUBWAY
758-7979
S0METHW
FR0MSUBWAY
Buy One Sub Get
Another For 99 C
(With purchase of Medium Drinks)
Offer Expires Nov. 30.1988
(Not Valid with Delivery)
DELIVERY
SMALL
Cheese Pizza S4.95
Cheese and 1 ToppingS5.60
Each Additional Topping$ .65
SPECIALTY PIZZAS
Cheese LoversS6 90
Meat LoversS6.90
SupremeS6.90
Super Supreme $7 55
MEDIUMLA ROE
S6 85$8.95
$7 65$9 90
S.80$ 95
$9.25$11.80
$9.25$11.80
S.25$11.80
S10.05S12.75
L
JH. 33iffl.fWi
��tv
FAMOUS PIZZA HUTQUALITY
�GENEROUS TOPPINGS
�REAL CHEESE
�FRESH VEGETABLES
�DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY
NEVER FROZEN
DELIVERY HOURS
SUNTHURS, 4 PM TO MIDNIGHT
FRI.&SAT. 4PM TO 1:00 AM
DELIVERY CHARGE 75 f
DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PHONE 752-4445
752-3866
COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 7 DAYS!
PIZZA HUT
2 MEDIUM CHEESE PIZZAS FOR ONLY$9.
29 PER TOPPING COVERS BOTH
Nnnj; a Marine I orps Officer can open Ihednof toopporftmitie
vou nia hawe itimiglit were beyondyour reach li helped Manm
Officer! harks BoMen become a nxm astronaut tad ii you n-
willing! makemecommoment it codd lirlpyou atai tout n
get started �1uie you're m college win our Platoon Leaders
i Ijlss program Wirnuldukc
advantage ofgettmg
� 1100 a moodi wink in school
� Freshmen and Sophomores tr.un
durinj: two six-week summer ses
m ns each pan 11; m n thanI . KI
We want vou
to go as far
as you can
� uruor train m i�nt tri �eek mmmer session and earn
more man Jilot)
� Ir.r i ivtbanlh'ing lessons
� lajtmj; liarv ot more dun slx UOfl
tmrnediab h upon praduatnw -nt ctHudhecom a Marine
Offiu-r liNwuinh 'in
Mavhevou'remf ki:ui! j.
i wt n !t'kim:tir

Ikm �bokhm mrjki $dnKti.
�Mom are roundtrlp based on midweek travel. Tickets
are nonrefundobk with no changes allowed. Reservation
must be made a mlntenua of 14 days In advance. Price
are subject to change without notice.
John E. Trainer Jr president
of Lcnoir-Rhyne College in Hick-
ory is among college presidents
who has declined the offer.
reenville
tnvel center
200 Arlington Blvd Suite M
756-1521
Visit Capt Williams at the Student Supply Store
Nov 2-1, 1988 or call l-8(K)-722-r7io





I HI I Sl I AROI INIAN
Features
novemiu:k i, im
Marsalis performs tonight
ECU No�'H. a.
Trumpet virtuoso .Witon
Marsalis will pxrform i program
of jazz at ECU tonight at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. The concert
is part of ECUI988 R9P.rfon ling
Arts Series.
At 27 Marsalis lias won ac-
claim� and Grammy ,wai Is�
both for his classical .i .1 jaz, art-
istrv. Among his all .n s are "1
Mood "ThinkotfOne, ' Fathers
and Sons "Hot 1 louse Mowers"
and Masterworks n-cordings of
baroque, trumpet music.
Born in New Orleans to a
musical tar ily, Marsalis is tl son
of Ellis Marsalis, widt � r.
spected musician, compos. and
educator. In childhood, young
Marsalis received a variety oi
musical o: p rien e t- i irch
ing bands, jazz bands and rches-
tras. He was given his firs trum-
ps t at theageofsix bj Al . Iirt, his
father's employer at the tu. but
did not take the insti arm eri-
ously until his classical siudics
began at age twel � �
As a young student md pei
former, Marsalis received further
musical de elopmenl i � TV Mew
(hi msCivicOrchestra, the Berk-
shire Music Center at Tangle-
wd and the famed Juilliard
School in New , ork.
Later came night club en-
gagements with the Herbie Han-
cock Quartet Band tours to the
West Coast, the Newport Jazz
Festival even japan.
M ilis has toured widely as
a class I performer as well, ap-
pearing with orchestras through-
out Moi Ih Amcricaand Britain. In
1985 he set a precedent at the
Grammy ceremonies, winning
awar in both the categories of
jazz ("Best Soloist" for the album
"Hot House Rowers") and classi-
cal ("Best Soloist with Orches-
tra").
Other career milestones have
been appearance with Sarah
Vaughan at the 99th opening
night of the Boston Pops which
was televised worldwide, a
Memorial I �a cono rtat th� New
Orleans W orld's Fair, a command
performance al the White House
and, feature coverage in Time"
magazine and on he CBS "Eve-
ning News
Professor displays photos
Bv ALICIA FORD
Stilt VNntct
Ernest Habrichs, a free lance
photographer from Cologne, Ger-
many, presented his opening re-
ception oi North and Central
American Art at Mendenhall last
Wednesday night.
The photographs were taken
on a trip he made to the United
States and Central America in
1979 and they represent some of
his best work to date.
Habrichs attended the Acad-
eme oi Fine Arts and Design at
Cologue, where he studied inte-
rior architecture and design. He
graduated in 1958 and started
working in his family business oi
making furniture.
He has shown some oi his
work in several exhibitions in
Germanv. as well as a one-man
exhibition of his American pho-
tography in Scottsdale, Arizona
in 1963. He has also written essays
for the "Moebel-kultur a trade
journal for the German furniture
market.
The photographs Habrichs
presented were taken over a tour
month time span and they cover
twenty four states. Honduras.
Quebec and the Caribean Island.
They range from some beautiful
desert shots oi Utah and Arizona
to street shots of some big cities
like Chicago, New , ork, and New
Orleans.
The most impressive photo-
graphs were the ones that focused
on the people Habrichs encoun-
tered on his trip. Thev included
children, older people of the
Mexican villages, Indians, and
even one shot oi a topless woman
in Lone Island. New York.
1 le included one very realistic
photo entitled "Isabel of Manhat-
ten" which showed a close-up of a
black woman smoking a long
brown cigar.
Most of the photographs that
focused on the people include
some bright and colorful shots of
the markets in Sierra Marda,
Mexico.
Thesedesert photos stood out
from the rest because thev con-
trasted the cheap, plastic world of
the young people trying to sell
their goods to the more traditional
and rustic world oi the old people
of Mexico.
After his trip, Habrichs
wanted to return to the United
States and teach photography. "It
was that trip that made me decide
to come back to the US
could live here and teach ou.
people the importance of environ-
mental art Habrichs stated.
Since then he has taught art
and photography at several
American college campuses, in-
cluding the University of Texas at
Arlington, the University of
Montana, and Arizona State Uni-
versity. He now teaches environ-
mental art here at East Carolina.
It was obvious that a few of
the people at the presentation just
showed up for the minature egg
rolls on the buffet table, however,
the ones who were really inter-
ested in art and photography
were very impressed with
1 labrich's work. If you missed the
reception last week, the photo-
graphs will be on display on the
second floor of Mendenhall until
fsjovornb r 8.
By BETH ELLISON
Staif Writer

This fellow doesn't get into the costume spirit, but hey, at least his friend the Ace of Hearts does.
Once again, Halloween rocks Greenville as thousands mill around the downtown thoroughfares in
wild attire. (File Photo)
lalloween gala
attracts droves
An estimated 5,000 costumed
particrs were expected to flood
downtown Greenville streets
Monday in the annual Halloween
celebration.
One of the largest Elallowcen
parties on the east coast, the
Greenville Halloween gala at-
tracts people from all over North
Carolina. Last year's celebration
had an estimated 10,000 people
roaming downtown.
At press time Monday, many
were gearing up for the extrava-
ganza by placing the final touches
on costumes and meeting with
friends. Because of printing con-
siderations, the East Carolinian
Features page regretfully doesn't
have the real scoop on this day
after Halloween issue.
But coming Thursday, the
Features page will have an in-
depth look at Halloween includ-
ing the zany costumes and the
strange antics associated with this
great event.
Wynton Marsalis, the premier trumpet player in the new age of j.zz,
is set to perform tonight at Wright Auditorium. Marsalis won a 1985
Grammy award for best soloist.
Fetchin' Bones jams gym
despite sound problems
So they did great, for a little
while. Unfortunately, alter just a
couple of songs the sound went
out. The sound guys did sound
things trying to remedy the situ-
ation. They did get things going
again, but once was just not
enough.
The P.A. system had to screw
up again. People started leaving
and Fetchin' Bones were told Oka
were "out of time and had to
stop according to lead singer
Hope Nicholls.
However, the band did play a
iew jamming songs such as
"Chicken Truck A boisterous
crowd then requested "Stage
Coach
1 tried to catch up with the
Bones before the show. All I could
find though was a lot of people
who weren't in Fetchin' Bonces or
on the Special Concerts Commit-
tee.
The dismal scene almost re-
versed itself when the sound tech-
nicians made the scene, but they
were more concerned about get-
ting parking tickets than wonder-
ing when the bands would show.
My attempts to interview
Fetchin' Bones proved to be futile
until I got downtown later Friday
night. I found Hope Nicholls and
she said they were very disap-
pointed at how things turned out.
She explained that the micro-
phones were primarily the prob-
lem.
"Not only could no one sing,
but we couldn't explain to the
crowd what the problem was. It
was a drag said Nicholls.
It's probably safe to say that
Friday night's Fetchin' Bones
concert at Memorial Gym was
almost a flop. Because of tech-
nical problems Fetchin' Bones got
to play only a few tunes after
opening band Bad Checks.
But seeing as how tickets
were free, and thev weren't even
checking for those at the door, it's
kind of bad to complain about it.
Complaints and compli-
ments both could be heard about
the Bad Checks show even
though their set went off without
a hitch and most of the audience
thrashed, yelled, and sweated all
over each other. "The Checks
were hot, dude! That was awe-
some said one bitchen and
gnarly concert goer.
But on the same token, there
were those who didn't get too
much out of it. Some said they'd
heard Bad Checks sound better
and some weren't so kind. "The
Bad Checks sucked said one of
the more blatantly displeasi.
Nevertheless, those still in
mourning over the break up of
The Pressure Bovs were clueless
but happy to see ex-P boy Rob
Ladd on drums.
After a break of typical length
between bands,the Bones came
out and immediately ripped. The
audience was digging it hard and
comments about the songs they
actually got to play were nothing
short of fantastic.
NPR remakes War of Worlds broadcast
By JEFF PARKER
Stiff Illustrator
Last night, devastating Martian
forces invaded the planet Earth
again, much the way they did on
the 31st of October back'in 1938.
Fortunately for all of us Terrans,
the invading horde was defeated
by ordinary bacteria, just like the
first time.
Of course like before, the inva-
sion took place entirely on radio,
though some people didn't know
that back in 1938.
For the 50th anniversary of the
broadcast that panicked the na-
tion, a new updated production
was put together by several fans
of and. even people who worked
in the golden age of radio. The
original presentation of "The War
of the Worlds" by H. G. Wells was
adapted for radio by Howard
Koch and narrated by Orson
Welles for the Mercury Theatre.
The first CBS production was
intended as a special Halloween
show, and periodically it was
announced that what the listeners
were hearing was merely a
drama. That didn't clear up mat-
ters for many people who tuned in
to the show irregularly, as the
style (presenting various scenes
from the book as live news bulle-
tins with actual music inter-
spersed) gave an incredible au-
thenticity to the drama.
This new production used a
clever way of keeping the remake
close to the original. Instead of
playing modern music when in-
jecting the fictitious newsbreaks.
the female radio personality at the
beginning was supposed to be a
dec-jay for National Public Radio
doing an oldies big bands show.
Using this format, the producers
were able to play the exact same
music bites the original broadcast
did.
The updated War was directed
by David Osmond and starred
such performers as Jason Robards
and Steve Allen. Appropriately,
funding for the broadcast was
granted by the M&M Mars com-
pany.
Jason Robards played the part
of Princeton astronomer Richard
Pierson, one of the few survivors
of the alien's initial attack on
Grover's Mill, New Jersey. The
style of the show changes from the
live radio format to that of
Pierson's personal dilemmas in
dealing with the fact that Earth is
being taken over. A good acting
job was done on the part of Steve
Allen, a news reporter covering
the invasion who gets killed along
with thousands of others by poi-
sonous smoke released by the
Martian death machines.
This presentation wasn't
nearly as effective as the first,
which has nothing to do with the
fact that we now know there isn't
intelligent life on Mars or that
everybody has heard about the
infamous Halloween nightof fifty
years ago. No one expects the
public to be fooled anymore of
course, the audience of 1938
wasn't used to being "lied" to by
the media like they arc now.
The point in question is the
presentation of the new broad-
cast. Though the people who put
the new War together did a very
efficient job and tried meticu-
lously to stay true to the original
while making it valid for the
eighties, they shouldn't have.
It would probably be truer to
the original broadcast to change
the script more drastically to
make it sound more like present
day media. The beginning of the
show was effective this way, but
when Steve Allen's character
starts speaking, the suspension of
disbelief is strained. Allen did,
however, deliver his lines with a
greater believability than the
original actor.
Pierson's ordeals in the de-
stroyed city dragged too much
also. Not enough was taken ad-
vantage of, like the blasts of the
Martian death ray, or the jugger-
naut march of the tripod war
machines through the city.
In other words, what the origi-
nal show was able to do with sur-
prise and presentation, the new
one could have compensated
with updated premises and our
wider range of sound effects.
This question of objectivity is
best left up to the listening audi-
ence.
What is good is that people
were devoted enough to early
radio and the once popular form
of the radio drama to put this trib-
ute together, and hopefully this
kind of dedication will stir more
interest into bringing back more
of the medium that can still enter-
tain just as well if not better than
television.
Holy unloyal readers, Robin buys bat death
NEW YORK (AP) � He's
punched out the Penguin,
wrestled the Riddler and crushed
the Catwoman. But after 48 years
of crime-busting, Robin � yes,
the Boy Wonder, Batman's ear-
nest if excitable teen-age sidekick
� has been blown to bits by the
Joker.
Death comes next week for
Robin when DC Comics distrib-
utes Batman issue No. 428, the
third installment of the four-part
"A Death in the Family in which
the younger half of the Dynamic
Duo is dynamited by the clown
prince of crime.
"It was very odd. I realize all
this stuff is made up, but every-
body here felt like the family of an
accident victim, waiting for the
doctor to come out and say.
There's still hope" said Dennis
O'Neil, editor of the Batman se-
ries.
The Joker, by the way, is
doing more than undermining
the quality of life in Gotham City
these days; his incendiary eradi-
cation of Robin comes under his
duties as Iran's new ambassador
to the United Nations.
But it won't be the Joker, Bat-
man creator Bob Kane, or O'Neil
facing murder charges for the
killing of Robin � it's the readers
of the Batman comics who voted
in a phone-in Poll to off the teen
superhero born in 1940.
A 900 number was set up on
Sept. 15-16 by DC to allow fans to
phone in the fate of Robin, who �
in case you have forgotten � is
the ward of Gotham City million-
aire Bruce Wayne. It was the first
time DC has allowed its readers to
decide a character's future, said
O'Neil, who also killed off Batgirl
in the late 1960s.
The final totals: 5343 for the
death penalty, 5,271 against.
Oooof!
There is some good news. The
dead Robin is NOT Dick Grayson,
the original Robin and Barman's
campy cohort on the television
program: Grayson split with the
Caped Crusader in 1984, grabbed
a new costume and became
Nightwing, head of a new crime-
fighting team published under
the title "The New Teen Titans
"We're not going to pull a
Bobby Ewing. There will be no
dream sequence said O'Neil.
"He's dead. He's gone
Clam
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP)
The sex life of a hard-shell clam ll
nothing to write home about, bJ
the mollusk's lack of passion if
offset by its ability to producj
millions of fertilized eggs
That clam reproduction is ai
important aspect of a 4-year-ol
University of Georgia researci
project aimed at rejuvenahni
thestate's shellfish industry
The study also is focusing o
economical ways of producing
algae that clams siphon out of thl
water for food, on the effects a
nutrition, temperature and envJ
ronment on shellfish developf
ment and on ways of protecting
clams from predators such as thl
blue crab.
Through genetic sole I i
the scientists also are trying tj
develop fast-growing clams th�
would be rcad to harvest in lj
months, instead of the usual tw
and a half years tor clams thai
grow naturally on the sand ani
mud flats along the Georgia coa
'The technology is there i
can do it said Ed Chin, thl
university's marine science diret
tor in Athens. "The thing is to do i
so it is economically feasible, am
that's what we're working on
At the Marine Extensio
Service's shellfish laboratory o
Skidaway Island, university re
searchers are growing aigae i
tanks illuminated by sunshin
and by rows of fluorescent light
to find the cheapest way ot I I
ing clams in hatcheries.
Inlaboratoncscrammed witj
beakers, tubing and gurghni
tanks, they also encourage clam
to spawn by placing them
warm water.
Peter Heffernan, a manni
biologist from Ireland, noted thai
Herd thinm
outbreaks
BEAUFORT, N.C (AP)
1 fanning the herd of wild ponid
on Carrot Island should hell
improve the remaining ponu
health, say wrangers who ai
rounding up the animals.
"They're not the popuiai
conception of a herd oi wild Ara
bians, running free with the wire
i n their manes said Don Follmer
director of public affairs for tfy
state Department of Natural Rej
sources and Community Devel
opment, which is overseeing th
horses' removal.
'They're a mixed breed - r
oi hybrid mutt Follmer told Th
News and Observer oi Raleighl
"From a distance, they look a lo
like Tibetan vaks
The herd � which appear
healthy, if a little scruffy i
being thinned to prevent oven
population and starvation, whicl
killed 19 horses in 1987 and lefl
another 10 missing and presume
dead.
'There's just too many tpoj
nies) and not enough to cat sai
Keith Long, who took part in tbJ
roundup.
Twenty-seven horses wen
rounded up Tuesday evening ai
tcr workers set up a series of penl
and then found the animals morl
cooperative than they had ex
pec ted. The roundup wasn
scheduled to begin until Wedne
day.
lust after sunup Wcdnesda
the cowboys were back trying t
round up the rest oi the herd
that Beth Stevens, an animal be
haviorist who studied the Carre
Island horses before going M
work at the National Zoo u
Washington, could tell worker
which to take and which to leavd
Ms. Stevens has identified th
horses by bands, a group of mart
with a stallion, and kinship.
The plan is to reduce inbrecdl
ing in the herd by leaving a diver
sitv of genetic lines among the lj
or 20 horses that stay on the is
land. In addition, Ms. Stevens wil
pick out an even number of mal(
and females to remain, along witj
an even distribution of ages ran
ing from foals to 13-year-olds.
There are 52 horses living H
the Rachel Carson National Esti
arine Sanctuary � about 2,C
acres of land across Taylor I
Creek from the town of Beau for
� including Carrot Island, Hors
Island, Town Marsh and PirJ
Shoal.
"We looked at the colts. . It I
60 percent studs so that aint held
ing, see Long said. Thev ami
doin' nothing but gom agamj
each other. So you get nd M thr-
(studs), get you some good MM
(and) you'll see a difference tv





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1, 1988 9
k

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cs jams gym
problems
� i i i
gs SUl
m k tx isterous

ch-
it they
i
ler-
IW.
I
-
cast
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. :
I
-
� �
irlv
. .
rib-
- ind hop � tins

into brinj - Hire
tedium I i ter-
' � � � " han
. �n.
death
campy cohort on tl � levision
gram Grayson split with the
apt drusaderin 1984, grabbed
a new costume and became
Mightwing, head ol a new crime-
ting team published under
the title The New Feen Titans
"We're not going to pull a
Bobby Ewing. There will be no
dream sequence said O'Neil
He's dead. He'sBone
Clams have boring sex life
SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) �
e sex life of a hard-shell clam is
nothing to write home about, but
the mollusk's lack of passion is
offset bv its ability to produce
llions oi fertilized eggs.
That clam reproduction is an
mportani aspect oi a 4-year-old
niversity of Georgia research
Meet aimed at rejuvenating
state's shellfish industry.
The study also is focusing on
tnomical ways of producing
;ae that clams siphon out of the
. .ter tor food, on the effects of
nutrition, temperature and envi-
ronment on shellfish develop-
- nl and on ways of protecting
nis from predators such as the
ue crab
Through genetic selection,
scientists also are trying to
velop fast-growing clams that
uld be ready to harvest in 18
months, instead oi the usual two
and a half years for clams that
grow naturally on the sand and
mud flats along the Georgia coast.
The technology is there. We
can do it said Ed Chin, the
university's marine science direc-
torin Athens "The thing is to do it
so it is economically feasible, and
it s what we're working on
At the Marine Extension
� rvice's shellfish laboratorv on
� idaway Island, university re-
archers are growing algae in
ks illuminated by sunshine
by rows oi fluorescent lights
i find the cheapest way oi teed-
. clams in hatcheries.
In laboratonescrammed with
akers, tubing and gurgling
ks, thev also encourage clams
spawn bv placing them in
irm water.
Peter Heffernan, a marine
Cist from Ireland, noted that
hard shell clams do not mate. In-
stead, the female releases eggs in
the water and thev are fertilized
bv the male.
"It's not very exciting he
said. Who knows what the ani-
mal senses, but I doubt if it's very
stimulating
The microscopic eggs de-
velop into larvae which swim.
The larvae then settle to the bot-
tom, turning into miniature clams
no larger than a grain of sand.
Most of the clams never reach
the harvest stage because of
predators and other adversities,
and even in a hatchery, a survival
rate oi 5 percent is considered
good, noted Heffernan, a special-
ist on shellfish reproduction.
Randv Walker, another ma-
rine biologist, is conducting
growth studies and lohn Cren-
shaw, a retired Georgia Tech bi-
ologist, is doing the genetics
work.
"We're looking for strains oi
clams that grow fast and are resis-
tant to disease said Chin
Bv speeding up the growth,
scientists may be able to lessen the
effects of predators and reduce
the time it takes to supply con-
sumers with a new genera turn oi
clams
In the early 1900s, Georgia
had a thriving oyster industry,
but disease and a lack of suitable
habitat have all but wiped it out.
Within the last five years,
people have started digging
clams in the tidal flats along the
coast.
"I think the people have real
ized there's money out there
said Chin, noting that one clam
dealer in the Savannah area wants
to build his own hatchery.
"In the immediate future.
clams look like a very good bet
said Heffernan. "We feel that the
technology is at the stage where
with a hint of entrepreneurial ef-
fort, it can be taken into the com-
mercial sector
The research is being fi-
nanced by the state and by the
national Sea Grant program,
which promotes better uses of the
country's marine resources. The
program fosters collaboration
between industry, government
and more than 20 universities.
The goal oi the researchers on
Skidaway Island is to develop
techniques that could be used to
produce clams commercially.
Chin said the university has
tried to avoid creating unreason-
able expectations about shellfish
opportunities.
"The big goal here is to make
it economically feasible he ex-
plained. "You can do it com-
pletely inside, but you're talking
money. Sunlight is cheaper than
electricity. We know how to feed
them, but you're not going to
make any money if you raise a
clam that costs $5
Once the problems have been
overcome, Georgia should have
an opportunity to become a lead-
ing clam producer, said Heffer
nan.
THANKSGIVING SPECIAL
Ml GD&GG3 L�(Pff
112 S. MILL ST.
WINTERVILL E ACROSS FROM DIXIE QUEEN
Perm Special$30.00
Include Cut, Perm & Shle
Hair Cut$6.00
Cut & Style$9.00
Call Today For Appointment
355-5980
Student Receive an
additional 10 Off
through Nov. 19
Debbie Genske
Owner and
Operator
Precision Cuts
and Perming
Specials
LUNCH SPECIAL
MONSAT.
11AM-3PM
Daily Specials
10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student I.D.
12-8 oz. Round
Sirloin
Potato Bar
Sundae Bar
$2.99
Hot Bar and Salad Bar only
an additional $1.99 with a meal
FREE DESSERT BAR
"1 with All Steak Dinners
I TAKE-OUTS OKAY
Herd thinned to prevent
outbreaks of disease
J 2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
EMM
Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy'a)
1 Vanilla In U.S.A. 88-89
Delivery 758-0000
50 OFF ANY
BLEND IN
EXPIRES 1 1 08 88
BEAUFORT, N.C. (AP) �
inning the herd oi wild ponies
i m Carrot Island should help
mprove the remaining ponies'
health, sav vrangcrs who are'
mnding up the animals.
"They're not the popular
�rveption of a herd of wild Ara-
bians, running free with the wind
i n their manes said Don Follmer,
rector of public affairs for the
tale Department of Natural Re-
sources and Community Devel-
pment, which is overseeing the
-ses' removal.
"They're a mixed breed, sort
t hybrid mutt Follmer told The
News and Observer of Raleigh.
From a distance, they look a lot
ke Tibetan yaks
The herd � which appears
ealthy, if a little scruffy is
eing thinned to prevent over-
tpulation and starvation, which
silled 19 horses in 1987 and left
mother 10 missing and presumed
id.
There's just too many (po-
es�and not enough to eat said
ith Long, who took part in the
undup.
Twenty-seven horses were
rounded up Tuesday evening af-
r workers set up a series of pens
,md then found the animals more
ooperative than they had ex-
acted. The roundup wasn't
i duled to begin until Wednes-
day.
just after sunup Wednesday,
cowboys were back trying to
ind up the rest of the herd so
that Beth Stevens, an animal be-
haviorist who studied the Carrot
Island horses before going to
rk at the National Zoo in
Washington, could tell workers
which to take and which to leave.
Ms. Stevens has identified the
horses by bands, a group of mares
with a stallion, and kinship.
The plan is to reduce lnbreed-
ing in the herd by leaving a diver-
sitv of genetic lines among the 15
or 20 horses that stay on the is-
land In addition, Ms. Stevens will
pick out an even number of males
and females to remain, along with
an even distribution of ages rang-
ing from foals to 13-year-olds.
There are 52 horses living in
the Rachel Carson National Estu-
anne Sanctuary � about 2,000
acres of land across Taylor's
Creek from the town of Beaufort
� including Carrot Island, Horse
Island, Town Marsh and Bird
Shoal.
"We looked at the colts It's
60 percent studs so that ain't help-
ing, see Long said. "They ain't
doin' nothing but goin' against
each other. So you get rid of them
(studs), get you some good mares,
(and) you'll see a difference next
year.
Wild pony watching from
Beaufort's waterfront is part ot
the coastal town's attraction But
off-season tourists and cars lined
Front Street to watch federal,state
and local efforts to round up the
feral ponies.
The Carrot Island ponies are
described as feral because they
were domestic when turned out
on the island in the 1�40s, but
eventually became wild.
Members of the Carterct
Countv Humane Societv were
carried across to the island Wed-
nesday to observe the operation.
Member Rilla Could said there
have been some otters from resi-
dents to adopt the ponies at $125
each, but more volunteers arc
needed.
On Tuesday, local cowboys
wore wide-brimmed Stetsons as
they motored across Taylors
Creek in outboard powered
skiffs. Wranglers loaded riding
horses on a National Park Service
landing barge, then unloaded
because the barge became stuck
on the beach. A large sloop named
the Lone Star drifted at its moor-
ing to add to the incongruent
scene.
WHO
Herbert Powell
MAKES
OUR
LIFETIME GUARANTIEE
ON CAR REPAIRS
POSSIBLE.
. 'etcme
uuarantee on
tfer the
Ser. e
car re
airs my job as service
manager is a little
tougher I have to make
sure car repairs are done
nqht the first time Be
cause i? they re not. it s
ui problem, not yours
Here s how the Life-
time Service Guarantee
works I? you pay for any
covered repair and it has
to be none again we fix
it free That s free parts
and free labor For as
long as you own your
Ford. Lincoln. Mercury.
Merkur o' Ford light
truck
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MONDAY I'RIDAY '� IXI A M IK1 P M





10
Tt IE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1, 1988
"Triplets" owned by triplets
NEW YORK (AP) � Portions
are big enough for three, and what
else would one expect at a restau-
rant called Triplets?
What's remarkable is that
none of the three owners knew
they were triplets until age 19,
when they met and became best
fnends, roommates, classmates
and, eventually, business part-
ners.
Robert Shafran, Eddy Gal-
land and David Kellman were
born on Long Island 27 years ago,
adopted at birth and raised in the
area. Not even their adoptive
parents knew thev were triplets,
said Calland.
"We were all fat kids with
brown curly hair, and we knew
we were adopted. We were com-
fortable with it he said.
In 1979, Galland went to Sulli-
van Countv Community- College,
but transferred the next vear.
"Bobby came the next semester to
Sullivan, and my friends thought
I was back Galland said.
One friend asked Shafran his
birth date and whether he was
adopted, and then told him he
probably had a twin. News stories
were published about the broth-
ers, and when Kellman saw one,
he realized the twins were trip-
lets.
On Sept. 18,1980, they met.
"It was like we always knew
each other. It was instant � an
incredible feeling said Galland.
"We knew immediately that we
wanted to spend a lot of time
together
"It was total excitement said
Kellman. "It was electric
They all transferred to City
University of New York, rented
an apartment, got a parrot named
Zack, and turned down book of-
fers.
Thev earned degrees in busi-
ness and international marketing.
Eventually, they got jobs at
Sammy's Famous Roumanian
Restaurant, a boisterous, Lower
East Side institution known for
huge portionsand familial atmos-
phere.
They learned their lessons
well, and in January opened Trip-
lets Roumanian Restaurant in the
Soho section oi Manhattan, serv-
ing similar ambiance and abun-
dant, Eastern European food.
It seats 200, and while people
come in as strangers, the brothers
try to make sure they don't leave
that way.
Intentionally just a tad tacky,
Triplets has a big awning with
cartoon faces of the owners out-
side; inside, on three levels, there
are mauve banquettes, mirrors
and dozens of color photographs
of diners having the time of their
lives.
On each table is a light-
hearted, comic book-style version
of the brothers' story.
Sometimes, there are comedi-
ans, belly dancers, musicians, and
sing-alongs. The words to such
songs as "Hava Nagila" and
"New York, New York" are
printed in the menus.
Sitting recently around a
table in their restaurant, the
brothers are distinguishable �
Shafran's the largest, Kellman the
smallest.
Kellman also is reputed to be
the most level-headed, Galland
the most volatile. Shafran and
Kellman are married: Galland is
single.
But there's no doubt they're
triplets.
They're gregarious, show
signs of working out, and dress
fashionably- Each had a similar
upbringing with upper middle-
class Jewish families. They've
been studied by researchers look-
ing at similarities and differences
among separated twins and trip-
lets.
Galland said they are not in-
terested in finding their biological
parents, and won't discuss the
subject.
But they'll talk plenty about
the comforts of home they offer at
Triplets.
Huge portions of steak, veal
chops or chicken, stuffed cab-
bage, chopped liver, chicken
soup, mashed potatoes with
chicken cracklings and potato
pancakes.
Whv such fare when Amen-
cans are being urged to cut down
on fat and salt?
"We don't expect to see the
same people every night. Let
people have their whole-grain
rice and their sushi five nights a
week and then come here said
Galland. "I can't tell you how
many times people say, i haven't
eaten like this since my mother
was alive, or since my grand-
mother was alive
THE
SHOE OUTLET
corner of 9th and Washington St.
Dress and Casual Shoes
Athletic Shoes in All Sizes
Bass, Sperry, Topsider (Leather
and Canvas), Timberland, and
many others (Factory Returns)
Discount Shoes sold Below
wholesale
Ladies shoes by Bass, 9-West
Gloria Vanderbilt, and many others
(All First Quality)
'Leather Bucks $38.00
'Leather Topsiders $15.00-$35.00
Walking Distance From Campus (3 blocks)
Publisher plans killing
LOS ANGELES (AD � Larry
Flvnt offered a self-styled soldier
of fortune $1 million to kill rival
sex magazine publishers Hugh
Hefner and Bob Guccione, and
Frank Sinatra and Walter Annen-
berg, authorities said.
The purported hitman,
Mitchell WerBell, died oi a heart
attack in December 1983 about a
month after Flvnt gave him the
check, sheriff's Capt. Robert
Grimm said Wednesday night.
WerBell was in his bOs when he
died of natural causes, authorities
said.
Flvnt's alleged motive was
not disclosed and no charges have
been filed against him.
Grimm told a news confer-
ence that information about the
plot turned up recently in an in-
vestigation oi the 1983 murder-
for-hire slaving of New York thea-
ter producer Roy Radin, whom
authorities said was embroiled in
a soured finance deal for the
movie "The Cotton Club
A former Flvnt bodyguard,
William Mentzer, is one of four
defendants charged in Radin's
killing.
Investigators have not inter-
viewed the Hustler magazine
publisher and have not presented
a case to the prosecutor, Grimm
said. He declined to elaborate and
said Los Angeles County Sheriff
Sherman Block spoke about the
purported plot earlier in the day
because he had been approached
by the news media.
"Our investigation is con-
tinuing Grimm said.
Grimm identified targets of
the alleged plot as Hefner, Sinatra
and Guccione. He declined to
name a fourth person targeted,
but authorities told KNBC-TV
that person was Annenbcrg, the
publishing magnate and former
ambassador.
"Lan-y Flynt one evening
called an individual by the name
of WerBell to his home and alleg-
edly offered him $1 million if he
would arrange for the death of
these four individuals said
Block, adding he took the matter
seriously.
"I've been led to believe that
Larrv Flvnt has a propensity to try
to harm people he sees as his
enemies, whether (over) business
arrangements or whatever
A woman at Flynt'soffice told
The Associated Press Flynt "just
said he doesn't make comments
on trash like that
WerBell was an international
arms dealer who developed the
MAC-10 submachine gun. He
called himself a retired general of
the Royal Free Afghan Army,
according to promotional mate-
rial from his Georgia-based coun-
terterrorism firm, Sionics Inc
released by the sheriff's depart-
ment.
Block said a Flynt associate
immediately stopped payment
on the check so it never was nego-
tiated.
The year of the alleged plot,
Flynt claimed to have knowledge
of videotapes purportedly show-
ing Vicki Morgan, mistress of the
late Diners Club founder Alfred
Bloomingdale, engaged in sexual
antics with Reagan administra-
tion officials.
The tapes were never proven
to exist.
At the time, Flynt was heavily
sedated with drugs to assuage
pain from wounds that left him
paralyzed after a 1978 assassina-
tion attempt during an obscenity
trial in Georgia.
Hefner, publisher of Playboy
magazine, said his place on the list
was the price of celebrity. "It's
part of being famous in the later
part of the 20th century he said
in a statement. "I have no associa-
tion with those who made up the
list or those whose name appear
on it
Guccione, publisher of Pent-
house magazine, said he had been
informed about the alleged plot
by a Flynt bodyguard some time
ago.
Susan Reynolds, publicist for
Sinatra, said the entertainer had
no comment.
A telephone call to
Annenberg's Palm Springs home
was answered bv a woman who
said he was on the East Coast and
wouldn't be immediately avail-
able for comment.
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market F&U SclVillfS
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Monday-Saturday 10-9
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OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
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Kinko's wants you
to vote in'88
4
NBC
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Stadium Cleaners & Shirt Laundry
Located at Corner of 10th & Cotanche Streets
758-2701 (Next toHardee's &McDonald's)
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OH
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kinko's
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At The Stars
From the Dallas underground scene
to college radio darlings, Kdie
Bnckell and the boys bring their pop,
folk & jazz inspirations to this
delightfully irresistible debut.
Includes the hit. "What I Am
6"
LpTape
12"
JUDSON SPENCE
Judson Spence
Not since Prince's debut has a new
artist displayed such a contagious
soulfulness. Keep your eyes on this
guy cause with a groove this hot.
this young Mississipptansdestined
to become The Next Big Thing'
7?9 1199
lp Titfx
11
CD
CD
Hie Pkna � Carolina East Mai
On Sale Through November 16th
I HI tAM
Pirates
By KRISTIN HALBf.RG
Auiauoit Sports tditor
The ECU Pirates came up on
the short end of the stick in I
final home game of the I
rate football seas n again
powerhouse Miami Hurrk
But the No 4 Hurrica
though the final score read 3
7, bv no means rolled
Pirates. In fact, the deft i
have had their best sh
"I think it was an indi
what the entire season ha
said Head Coach Art Ba i
had a great effort. It �
effort of the year,
considenng the I
Miami has
And indeed it w
rates held the
17 points in the first hall
with seven of those poir I
with onlv 16 seconds I
half.
The Miami game
wrapped up the the fir
game in Ficklen Stadiun
seniors at East Carolina in front oI
an impressive fan tun I
29,400.
- 1
�M�
Tim James breaks awaj
out-score the potent M
Rams
(AP)�Kicker Mike Lar
didn't boot his chance to - I
Los Angeles Rams to the I
their division.
Lansford kicked four
goals Sundav to give the K i
12-10 victory over New Orleai
and a first-place tie with the S j
in the NFC West
"It's been a while since 1 h
four in a game he said It u:
allv takers me about five gam -
get four attempts
The loss snapped the Sa I
seven-game winning streak arJ
left both teams with 7-2 records
Lansford gave the Rams
their points on field goals of 37
4" and 30 yards. The Saints scord
on a 5-yard touchdow n pass troj
Bobby Hebert to Lonzel Hill am
33-yard field goal bv v'
Andersen
Elsewhere, it was New
land 30, Chicago 7 Atlanta 2'
Philadelphia 24 Clevelai
23, Cincinnati 16; Buttalo
Green Bav 0; Miami 17, Tamj
Bav 14: Phoenix 16, Dallas 10 t
New Y ork lets 24, Pitisburgh
the New "Wrk Giants 13. Detrsj
10 in overtime Seattle 1" Si
Diego 14, San Francisco 24 Mi
nesota 21: the Lxs Angeles Rai
ers 17, Kansas Citv 10; and Hoi
ton 41, Washington 17
Denver plavsat Indiana pel
tonight.
Falcons 27, Eagles 24
Chris Miller threvs the
touchdown passes as Atlail
snapped a fi ve-game losing stnj
and gave Marion Campbell i j
tory in his first game M M
coach at Veterans Stadium 9
being fired bv the Eaofes .i
1985 season.
The winning tcuicKv
a 49-yard pass from V' i
Michael Hay no itw 5 ss i
Philadelphia qua terbj





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SPCNCE
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11
99
IMF EASTCAROI INIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER l 1� P.igc n
Pirates fall to Miami
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Auburn Spurti I Jitm
The FCU Pirates came up on
the short end of the stick in their
final home game oi the 1988 Pi-
rate football season against the
powerhouse Miami Hurricanes.
Hut the No. 4 Hurricanes, al-
though the final score read 31 -
by nc� means rolled over the
Pirates In tact, the defense may
have had their best showing yet.
1 think it was an indication of
w hat the entire season has been
said 1 lead Coach Art Baker. "We
had a great effort. It was our best
effort oi the year, defensively,
considering the type of offense
Miami has
nd indeed it was as the Pi-
rates held the 1 lurricancs to onlv
1 points in the first half of play,
with seven oi those points coming
with only lb seconds left in the
halt.
The Miami game also
wrapped up the the final home-
game in Ficklen Stadium for the
seniors at East Carolina in front of
an impressive fan turnout of
29,400.
Miami opened the game with
a drive that might have been the
start of a bleak day for the Pirates
when in six plays I 2.10, the
Hurricanes scored a six van!
pass from quarterback Steve
Walsh to halfback I eonard Con-
ley. The extra point trv was good.
last Carolina gave a good
showing on their hrst possession
with quarterback Iravis Hunter
at the helm when flu drove the
ball all the wa to the Miami Is!
yard line before being halted by
the Canes
Instead ot going tor it en a
fourth and fi e baker sent in sec
ond- string kicker lake Fine, w ho
tared no better than Rob Imperato
had all season when he missed a
35-yard field goal, his first of two
misses tor the da
"We had a blocked Mint and
missed two field goals said i
woefull Baker. "1 teei sirv f r
those young men. We must h i c
the worst field goal kickers in
America
Miami's next drive proved
unsuccessful against the Pirate
defense and the Hurricanes had to
punt.
ECU s next possession was
immediately broken up when, af-
ter a five-yard interference penal-
ity against the Hurricanes on their
punt put the ball on ECU's 42,
1 lunter recovered hisown fumble
and lost two yards. On second-
and-12 Hunter's pass was inter-
cepted by Miami defensive back
Bubba McDowell on the Miami
�11.
The Hurricanes then went to
work but when Walsh's pass to
Conley was called back due to
holding, Miami had to settle for a
32-yard Carlos Huerta field goal.
Reggie McKinney made the
punt return, running the ball 18-
yards before being stopped at the
ECU 22. The Pirates again had a
powerful drive going when they
were again stopped, this time at
the Miami 29. Fine's second field
goal attempt, a 46-yarder, was no
good.
Hie ECU defense rallied after
the ball was handed over to the
Hurricanes when, as Miami ap-
proached the ECU end zone, cor-
ner back Junior Robinson inter-
cepted Walsh's pass at the ECU
eight-yard line and returned it for
The Pirate defense was all over t
performance of the season. (Phol
30 yards. Robinson intercepted
Walsh two times during the day.
But the Pirates could not gel a
successful drive going as this time
quarterback Charlie Libretto led
the offense to the Miami 39 before
turning the ball over to the Canes
when a fourth down and six try
was unsuccessful.
Again Miami took advantage
of the turnover and drove the ball
from the Miami 34 into the Pirate
end zone. With 16 seconds left,
Walsh connected with tight end
Randy Bethel and gave the 1 lurri-
cancs a 17-0 half time lead
The second half of the game
put the Pirates on the scoreboard
when Junior Robinson inter-
cepted Walsh for the second time
in the game and returned it 58
u Hurricanes from the outset in what may have been their best
o by Thomas Walters ECU Photo lab.)
yards all the way to the Miami 34
Travis Hunter, who started the
second half for the Pirates, led the
offense into the end zone and in
the final of seven plays, Hunter
thl extra point
Th final touchdown by the
Hurricanes came with h52 left in
the game when Walsh hit tight
end Rod Chudzinski. Huerta's
on a third and goal on the Miami extra point secured Miami's vic-
two, kept the ball and ran in for torv �
the touchdown, fmperato's extra
point was good.
It looked as if Fast Carolina
would make a comeback until'a
John Jett punt was blocked by
Miami's Bubba McDowell at the
ECU 21. McDowell returned the
punt for 13-yards and Miami was
quick to score a touchdown On
the next play, Walsh completed
his pass to wide reciever AnHrn
Brown and the Hurricanes were
'We were very sloppy said
Walsh ot Miami's performance
Saturday. "B t we played well
enough to win. There were too
man) ; ilities; that's what
stopped us today. "
Alter the contest, Baker made
an assessment of where the Pi-
rates lost the game. 'The turn-
around ,ts in the fourth quarter
when we had 'ist scored and were
receiving a punt Baker said.
upbyl7withl0:44lefttogointhe "Miami had fumbled the punt,
fourth quarter after Huerta made but it was called back
Cagers impressive in game
iw� "�
MM
�! �tW ' tt�'
Tim James breaks away from the pack as he looks for the end zone The Pirates were unable to
)ut-score the potent Miami offense, though (Photo by Thomas Walters - ECU Photo Lab.)
In only his second war as
head coach of the East Carolina
Basketball team, Mike Steele felt
very confident in lus players fol-
lowing the purplegold basket-
ball scrimmage on Saturday.
"We're making good prog-
ress said Steele after the scrim-
mage. "We're in a position where
we can teach and move on to new
things each day"
The purple team led the gold
team at the half 21-20 and went on
to win it in front of an enthusiastic
crowd with a final score of 40 6.
" We had a good turnout. The
crowd showed real enthusiasm
said Steele.
Steele felt he had good per-
fornianccs from junior Gus Hill,
senior Kennv Murphy and fresh
man Jay Schera, all on the purple
team. On the gold team, some
standouts were freshman Jeff
Pulick and senior Blue Edwards.
Steele felt Edwards, the pow-
erhouse leading scorer two vears
ago, had a reallv solid first halt but
wasn't as big a threat in the second
half.
"i eraU I could have placed
better said Edwards. "I'm used
to pie ing with the guys on the
purple team "
Edv ards is also confident
about the upcoming season. He
thinks there is a tremendous im-
provement iiver last year and at-
tril tes this to the freshman team
memrn i s
Most of the freshmen this
year have had good coaching be-
fore hard ' said Edwards. "Thev
didn't have to make as big oi an
adjustment
Rams top NFC West Notre Dame moves to the top
I AP) - Kicker Mike Lansford
didn't boot his chance to send the
s Angeles Rams to the top oi
their division.
Lansford kicked four field
ils Sunday to give the Rams a
12-10 victory over New Orleans
and a first-place tie with the Saints
in the NEC West.
"It's been a while since 1 had
f ur in a game he said. "It usu-
ally takes me about five games to
get four attempts
The loss snapped the Saints'
s.�ven-game winning streak and
left both teams with 7-2 records.
lansford gave the Rams all
their points on field goalsof 37,18,
47 and 30 yards. The Saints scored
(n a 5-yard touchdown pass from
Bobby I lebert to Lonzel Hill and a
33-yard field goal bv Morten
lersen.
Elsewhere, it was ew Eng-
i 30, Chicago 7, Atlanta 27,
Philadelphia 24; Cleveland
23 Cincinnati b; Buffalo 28.
Green Bav 0; Miami 17, Tampa
Bay 14 Phoenix 16, Dallas 10: the
New York Jets 24, Pitisburgh 20:
the New York C.iants 13, Detroit
10 in overtime: Seattle 17, San
Diego 14; San Francisco 24, Min-
nesota 21 the Los Angeles Raid-
ers 17, Kansas City 10; and Hous-
ton 41, Washington 17.
Denver plays at Indianapolis
tonight.
Falcons 27, Eagles 24
Chris Miller threw three
touchdown passes as Atlanta
snapped a five-game losing streak
and gave Marion Campbell a vic-
tory in his first game as head
coach at Veterans Stadium since
being fired bv the Eaoles after the
1985 season
The w inning touchdown was
a 49-yard pass from Miller to
Michael Hayncs with 5:58 left.
Philadelphia quarterback
Randall Cunningham threw a
pair ot TD passes in the fourth
quarter as the Eagles rallied from
a 10-point deficit to ! ike a 24 ?d
lead.
Pati lets 30 Bears 7
Doug Flutic threw four
touchdown passes against his
former
teammates, halting the Bears
five-game winning streak
Flu tie, traded to New Eng-
land last season,completed oof 18
passes for 165 yards and no inter-
ceptions. He threw an 80-yard TD
pass to Irving Fryar on the first
play from scrimmage, and added
a pair of scoring passes to I in
Dawson and (me to Stanley Mor-
gan.
Browns 23, Bengals 16
Herman Fotenot returned .�
blocked punt one yard tor a
touchdown and ran back a kickoff
84 yards to set up another score
for the Browns, who moved to
within one game of the first plat e
Bengals in the AFC Central
Die Browns, who entered the
gameas the top-ranked defense in
the conference, did not allow a
touchdown bv the Bengals' No. 1
ranked offense. Cincinnati sonl
touchdown came on a David Ful-
cher interception
Bilk 28, Packers 0
Erce safety Mark Kelso re
turned an interception 78 y.�rds
for a touchdown and offensive
end Leon Seals recovered a
fumble for another score as Buf-
falo improved its AFC East-lead
ing record to 8-1
The Bills sacked Green Bay-
quarterback Don Maikowski six
times and forced the Packers, 2-7,
into four turnovers
Buffalo outgained the Pack
ers on the ground 197-17.
Dolohins 17, Bucs 14
Dan Marino threw two touch-
down passes to Mark Clavton in
the third quarter and the Dol-
phins took advantage of Tampa
Bay turnovers to win for the
fourth time in their last five
games.
Marino completed 27 of 46
passes for 267 yards.
Joe Ferguson, starting at
quarterback in place of Vinny
Testaverde, threw two TD passes
for the Bucs.
Cardinals 16, Cowboys 10
A 42-yard pass from Neil
Lomax to Ernie Jones set up the
winning score, a 1-yard plunge by
Earl Ferrcll with 50 seconds left in
the game.
Ferrcll also caught a 14-yard
touchdown pass from Lomax and
ran 47 yards to set up a field goal
for the Cardinals.
Lomax, scrambling near
midficld, hit Jones crossing over
the middle at the Dallas 35 on the
winning drive. Jones bounced off
Dallas safety Michael Downs at
the 2 and raced to the 3-yard line
before Everson Walls shoved him
out of bounds. Ferrell scored two
plays later.
lets 24, Steelers20
Freeman McNeil's 5-yard
touchdown run following a
blocked punt helped the Jets beat
the Steelers for the first time ever.
John Booty blocked Harry
Newsome's punt with the Jets
leading 17-13 in the fourth quar-
ter. The Jets took over at the Pitts-
burgh 7 and scored two Plays
later.
Giants 13. Lions 10, OT
Detroit's Garry James
fumbled a handoff on the first
play of overtime, setting up the
winning 33-yard field goal by
Paul McFadden.
(AP) � The Fighting Irish just
may have battled their way to the
top in the race for college football
supremacy. Don't tell that to
Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz,
though.
"We are not a really good
football team right now Holtz
said after his Irish beat Navy 22-7
Saturday in Baltimore.
While No. 2-ranked Notre
Dame was improving its record to
8-0 for the 16th time in the school's
history and the first time since
1973 when it finished 11-0, top-
ranked UCLA lost to Washington
State 34-30.
Notre Dame took a 22-0 early
in the third quarter on a 10-yard
touchdown pass from quarter-
back Tony Rice to Derek Brown, a
22-yard touchdown run by Rod-
ney Culver, a 29-yard field goal by
Reggie Ho and a 1-yard run by
Ryan Mihalko.
But the Midshipmen played
Notre Dame evenly in the second
half and actually outscored the
Irish 7-6.
Notre Dame's last six posses-
sions ended with four punts and a
fumble as the Irish failed to get
inside the Navy 30-yard line.
Besides UCLA, the onlv other
Top Twenty team to fall Saturday
was No. 20 Oregon, who was
edged 21-20 by Arizona State.
In other games involving
ranked teams, it was No 3 South-
ern California 41, Oregon State 20;
No. 4 Miami 31, East Carolina 7;
No. 5 Nebraska 26, Missouri 18;
No. 7 West Virginia 51, Pcnn State
30; No. 80klahoma 63, Kansas 14;
No. 9 Auburn 16, Florida 0; and
No. 10 Wyoming 48, Colorado
State 14.
Also, it was No. 11 Arkansas
21, Rice 14; No. 12Oklahoma State
45, Kansas State 27; No. 13 Louisi-
ana State 31, Mississippi 20; No.
14 Michigan 52, Northwestern 7;
No. 15 Clemson 38, Wake Forest
21; No. 17 South Carolina 23,
North Carolina St. 7; No. 18 Geor-
gia 59, William & Mary 24; Md
No. 19 Alabama 53, Mississippi
State 34.
Sixth-ranked Florida State
and No. 16 Syracuse did not play.
Washington State 34, UCl A
30
A 19-point underdog, Wash-
ington State overcame a 27-6 defi-
cit early in the third quarter to
upset UCLA before 51,970 at the
Rose Bowl.
Rich Swinton's 1-yard touch-
down run with 6:21 remaining
capped Washington State's come-
back. Then the Cougars made a
goal-line stand in the final minute
to clinch the victory.
The Bruins got to Washington
State's 6 line with 35 seconds
remaining, but Troy Aikman
threw four straight incom-
pletions.
No. 4 Miami 31, E. Carolina 7
Steve Walsh threw four
touchdown passes for the fourth
consecutive game as the Hurri-
canes pulled away in the final
quarter at Greenville, N.C.
Miami, 6-1, took command
when Bubba McDowell blocked a
punt
and Sandy lack recovered the
ball at the East Carolina 8 early in
the fourth quarter. On the next
plav, Walsh hit Andre Brown
with a scoring pass to give Miami
a 24-7 lead.
No. 5 Nebraska 26, Missouri
18
A 49-yard run by Bryan Car
pentcr with 824 left helped the
Cornhuskers hold off Mis-
souri at Lincoln, Neb. Nebraska
improved 8-1 overall and 4-0 in
the Big Eight. Missouri fell to 2-5-
1 and 1-3.
The Cornhuskers, who had
lx - n averaging 420 yards rushing
a game, were held to 116 yards on
the ground ind 2h9 yards in total
offense
No. 7 West Virginia 51, Penn
State 30
Major 1 iarris ran 27 yards for
a touchdown and threw two long
scoring passes to lead West Vir-
ginia o e: Penn State at Morgan-
town V Va. and to the Mountain-
eers' first 8-0 start in history.
The 51 points were the most
ever scored against a Joe Paterno
team
No 8 klahoma 63, Kansas 14
At Norman, Okla , quarter-
back Charles ihompson ran for
118 yards and t no touchdowns to
spark Oklahoma over winless
Kansas
Oklahoma, which led 21-14 at
the halt, broke it open with a six-
touchdown second half. The vic-
tory left the Seiners 7-1 overall
ancl 4 0 in the Big Ten while
Kansas tell to 0-8 and 0-4.
Jamelle Holieway, who alter-
nated with Thompson, threw for
one touchdown and scored an-
other in the second half
No 10 VVvoming 48, Colo-
rado St 14
Quarterback Randv Welniak
ran for two second -quarter touch-
dowrts and passed for another as
VVvoming o- tended its regular
season winning streak to 18, long-
est in the nation.
Wyoming improved to 9-0
overall and 6-0 the Western Ath-
letic Conference.
No 11 Arkansas 21, Rice 14
Arkansas clinched its first
Cotton Bowl berth since the 1975
season when backup quarterback
lohn Bland made three big plays
in a game-winning drive. Tne
See NOTRE, page 13





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Sports
NOVEMBER 1. 1988 Page 11
Pirates fall to Miami
By KRISTEN HALBERG
AuUtant Sport Editor
The ECU Pirates came up on
the short end of the stick in their
final home game of the 1988 Pi-
rate football season against the
powerhouse Miami Hurricanes.
But the No. 4 Hurricanes, al-
though the final score read 31 -
7, by no means rolled over the
Pirates. In fact, the defense may
have had their best showing yet.
"1 think it was an indication of
what the entire season has been
said Head Coach Art Baker. "We
had a great effort. It was our best
effort of the year, defensively,
considering the type of offense
Miami has
And indeed it was as the Pi-
rates held the Hurricanes to only
17 points in the first half of play,
with seven of those points coming
with only 16 seconds left in the
half.
The Miami game also
wrapped up the the final home
game in Ficklen Stadium for the
seniors at East Carolina in front of
an impressive fan turnout of
29,400.
Miami opened the game with
a drive that might have been the
start of a bleak day for the Pirates
when in six plays and 2:10, the
Hurricanes scored on a six-yard
pass from quarterback Steve
Walsh to halfback Leonard Con-
ley. The extra point try was good.
East Carolina gave a good
showing on their first possession
with quarterback Travis Hunter
at the helm when they drove the
ball all the way to the Miami 18-
yard line before being halted by
the 'Canes.
Instead of going for it on a
fourth and five, Baker sent in sec-
ond- string kicker Jake Fine, who
fared no better than Rob Imperato
had all season when he missed a
35-yard field goal, his first of two
misses for the day.
"We had a blocked punt and
missed two field goals said a
woefull Baker. "I feel sorry for
those young men. We must have
the worst field goal kickers in
America
Miami's next drive proved
unsuccessful against the Pirate
defense and the Hurricanes had to
punt.
ECU's next possession was
immediately broken up when, af-
ter a five-yard interference penal-
ity against the Hurricanes on their
punt put the ball on ECU'S 42,
Hunter recovered his own fumble
and lost two yards. On second-
arid-12 Hunter's pass was inter-
cepted by Miami defensive back
Bubba McDowell on the Miami
41.
The Hurricanes then went to
work but when Walsh's pass to
Conley was called back due to
holding, Miami had to settle for a
32-yard Carlos Huerta field goal.
Reggie McKinney made the
punt return, running the ball 18-
yards before being stopped at the
ECU 22. The Pirates again had a
powerful drive going when they
were again stopped, this time at
the Miami 29. Fine's second field
goal attempt, a 46-yarder, was no
good.
The ECU defense rallied after
the ball was handed over to the
Hurricanes when, as Miami ap-
proached the ECU end zone, cor-
ner back Junior Robinson inter-
cepted Walsh's pass at the ECU
eight-yard line and returned it for
The Pirate defense was all over the Hurricanes from the outset in what may have been their best
performance of the season. (Photo by Thomas Walters � ECU Photo Lab.)
30 yards. Robinson intercepted
Walsh two times during the day.
But the Pirates could not get a
successful drive going as this time
quarterback Charlie Libretto led
the offense to the Miami 39 before
turning the ball over to the 'Canes
when a fourth down and six try
was unsuccessful.
Again Miami took advantage
of the turnover and drove the ball
from the Miami 34 into the Pirate
end zone. With 16 seconds left,
Walsh connected with tight end
Randy Bethel and gave the Hurri-
canes a 17-0 halftime lead.
The second half of the game
put the Pirates on the scoreboard
when Junior Robinson inter-
cepted Walsh for the second time
in the game and returned it 58
yards all the way to the Miami 34.
Travis Hunter, who started the
second half for the Pirates, led the
offense into the end zone and in
the final of seven plays, Hunter,
on a third and goal on the Miami
two, kept the ball and ran in for
the touchdown. Imperato's extra
point was good.
It looked as if East Carolina
would make a comeback until'a
John Jett punt was blocked by
Miami's Bubba McDowell at the
ECU 21. McDowell returned the
punt for 13-yards and Miami was
quick to score a touchdown. On
the next play, Walsh completed
his pass to wide reciever AnHm
Brown and the Hurricanes were
up by 17 with 10:44 left to go in the
fourth quarter after Huerta made
the extra point.
The final touchdown by the
Hurricanes came with 652 left in
the game when Walsh hit tight
end Rod Chudzinski. Huerta's
extra point secured Miami's vic-
tory at 31-7.
"We were very sloppy said
Walsh of Miami's performance
Saturday. "Brt we played well
enough to win. There were too
many penalities; that's what
stopped us today
After the contest, Baker made
an assessment of where the Pi-
rates lost the game. "The turn-
around was in the fourth quarter
when we had just scored and were
receiving a punt Baker said.
"Miami had fumbled the punt,
but it was called back.
Cagers impressive in game
Tim James breaks away from the pack as he looks for the end zone. The Pirates were unable to
out-score the potent Miami offense, though. (Photo by Thomas Walters - ECU Photo Lab.)
In only his second year as
head coach of the East Carolina
Basketball team, Mike Steele felt
very confident in his players fol-
lowing the purplegold basket-
ball scrimmage on Saturday.
"We're making good prog-
ress said Steele after the scrim-
mage. "We're in a position where
we can teach and move on to new
things each day
The purple team led the gold
team at the half 21-20 and went on
to win it in front of an enthusiastic
crowd with a final score of 40-36.
" We had a good turnou tThe
crowd showed real enthusiasm
said Steele.
Steele felt he had good per-
formances from junior Gus Hill,
senior Kenny Murphy and fresh-
man Jay Schera, all on the purple
team. On the gold team, some
standouts were freshman Jeff
Pulick and senior Blue Edwards.
Steele felt Edwards, the pow-
erhouse leading scorer two years
ago, had a really solid first half but
wasn't as big a threat in the second
half.
"Overall, I could have played
better said Edwards. "I'm used
to playing with the guys on the
purple team
Edwards is also confident
about the upcoming season. He
thinks there is a tremendous im-
provement over last year and at-
tributes this to the freshman team
members.
"Most of the freshmen this
year have had good coaching be-
fore hand said Edwards. "They
didn't have to make as big of an
adjustment.
Rams top NFC West Notre Dame moves to the top
(AP) � Kicker Mike Lansford
didn't boot his chance to send the
Los Angeles Rams to the top of
their division.
Lansford kicked four field
goals Sunday to give the Rams a
12-10 victory over New Orleans
and a first-place tie with the Saints
in the NFC West.
"It's been a while since I had
four in a game he said. "It usu-
ally takes me about five games to
get four attempts
The loss snapped the Saints'
seven-game winning streak and
left both teams with 7-2 records.
Lansford gave the Rams all
their points on field goals of 37,18,
47 and 30 yards. The Saints scored
on a 5-yard touchdown pass from
Bobby Hebert to Lonzel Hill and a
33-yard field goal by Morten
Andersen.
Elsewhere, it was New Eng-
land 30, Chicago 7; Atlanta 27,
Philadelphia 24; Cleveland
23, Cincinnati 16; Buffalo 28.
Green Bay 0; Miami 17, Tampa
Bay 14: Phoenix 16, Dallas 10: the
New York Jets 24, Pittsburgh 20:
the New York Giants 13, Detroit
10 in overtime: Seattle 17, San
Diego 14; San Francisco 24, Min-
nesota 21: the Los Angeles Raid-
ers 17, Kansas City 10; and Hous-
ton 41, Washington 17.
Denver plays at Indianapolis
tonight.
Falcons 27, Eagles 24
Chris Miller threw three
touchdown passes as Atlanta
snapped a five-game losing streak
and gave Marion Campbell a vic-
tory in his first game as head
coach at Veterans Stadium since
being fired by the Eaoles after the
1985 season.
The winning touchdown was
a 49-yard pass from Miller to
Michael Hayncs with 558 left.
Philadelphia quarterback
Randall Cunningham threw a
pair of TD passes in the fourth
quarter as the Eagles rallied from
a 10-point deficit to take a 24-20
lead.
Patriots 30, Bears 7
Doug Flutie threw four
touchdown passes against his
former
teammates, halting the Bears'
five-game winning streak.
Flutie, traded to New Eng-
land last season, completed 6 of 18
passes for 165 yards and no inter-
ceptions. He threw an 80-yard TD
pass to Irving Fryar on the first
play from scrimmage, and added
a pair of scoring passes to Lin
Da wson and one to Stanley Mor-
gan.
Browns 23, Bengals 16
Herman Fotenot returned a
blocked punt one yard for a
touchdown and ran back a kickoff
84 yards to set up another score
for the Browns, who moved to
within one game of the first-place
Bengals in the AFC Central.
The Browns, who entered the
game as the top-ranked defense in
the conference, did not allow a
touchdown by the Bengals' No. 1-
ranked offense. Cincinnati's only
touchdown came on a David Ful-
cher interception.
Bills 28, Packers 0
Free safety Mark Kelso re-
turned an interception 78 yards
for a touchdown and offensive
end Leon Seals recovered a
fumble for another score as Buf-
falo improved its AFC East-lead-
ing record to 8-1.
The Bills sacked Green Bay
quarterback Don Majkowski six
times and forced the Packers, 2-7,
into four turnovers.
Buffalo outgained the Pack-
ers on the ground 197-17.
Dolohins 17, Bucs 14
Dan Marino threw two touch-
down passes to Mark Clayton in
the third quarter and the Dol-
phins took advantage of Tampa
Bay turnovers to win for the
fourth time in their last five
games.
Marino completed 27 of 46
passes for 267 yards.
Joe Ferguson, starting at
quarterback in place of Vinny
Testaverde, threw two TD passes
for the Bucs.
Cardinals 16, Cowboys 10
A 42-yard pass from Neil
Lomax to Ernie Jones set up the
winning score, a 1-yard plunge by
Earl Ferrell with 50 seconds left in
the game.
Ferrell also caught a 14-yard
touchdown pass from Lomax and
ran 47 yards to set up a field goal
for the Cardinals
Lomax, scrambling near
midfield, hit Jones crossing over
the middle at the Dallas 35 on the
winning drive. Jones bounced off
Dallas safety Michael Downs at
the 25 and raced to the 3-yard line
before Everson Walls shoved him
out of bounds. Ferrell scored two
plays later.
Jets 24, Steelers 20
Freeman McNeil's 5-yard
touchdown run following a
blocked punt helped the Jets beat
the Steelers for the first time ever.
John Booty blocked Harry
Newsome's punt with the Jets
leading 17-13 in the fourth quar-
ter. The Jets took over at the Pitts-
burgh 7 and scored two Plays
later.
Giants 13. Lions 10, OT
Detroit's Garry James
fumbled a handoff on the first
play of overtime, setting up the
winning 33-yard field goal by
Paul McFadden.
(AP)�The Fighting Irish just
may have battled their way to the
top in the race for college football
supremacy. Don't tell that to
Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz,
though.
"We are not a really good
football team right now Holtz
said after his Irish beat Navy 22-7
Saturday in Baltimore.
While No. 2-ranked Notre
Dame was improving its record to
8-0 for the 16th time in the school's
history and the first time since
1973 when it finished 11-0, top-
ranked UCLA lost to Washington
State 34-30.
Notre Dame took a 22-0 early
in the third quarter on a 10-yard
touchdown pass from quarter-
back Tony Rice to Derek Brown, a
22-yard touchdown run by Rod-
ney Culver, a 29-yard field goal by
Reggie Ho and a 1-yard run by
Ryan Mihalko.
But the Midshipmen played
Notre Dame evenly in the second
half and actually outscored the
Irish 7-6.
Notre Dame's last six posses-
sions ended with four punts and a
fumble as the Irish failed to get
inside the Navy 30-yard line.
Besides UCLA, the only other
Top Twenty team to fall Saturday
was No. 20 Oregon, who was
edged 21-20 by Arizona State.
In other games involving
ranked teams, it was No. 3 South-
ern California 41, Oregon State 20;
No. 4 Miami 31, East Carolina 7;
No. 5 Nebraska 26, Missouri 18;
No. 7 West Virginia 51, Penn State
30; No. 8 Oklahoma 63, Kansas 14;
No. 9 Auburn 16, Florida 0; and
No. 10 Wyoming 48, Colorado
State 14.
Also, it was No. 11 Arkansas
21,Ricel4;No. 12 Oklahoma State
45, Kansas State 27; No. 13 Louisi-
ana State 31, Mississippi 20; No.
14 Michigan 52, Northwestern 7;
No. 15 demson 38, Wake Forest
21; No. 17 South Carolina 23,
North Carolina St. 7; No. 18 Geor-
gia 59, William & Mary 24; and
No. 19 Alabama 53, Mississippi
State 34.
Sixth-ranked Florida State
and No. 16 Syracuse did not play.
Washington State 34, UCLA
30
A 19-point underdog, Wash-
ington State overcame a 27-6 defi-
cit early in the third quarter to
upset UCLA before 51,970 at the
Rose Bowl.
Rich Swinton's 1-yard touch-
down run with 6:21 remaining
capped Washington State's come-
back. Then the Cougars made a
goal-line stand in the final minute
to clinch the victory.
The Bruins got to Washington
State's 6 line with 35 seconds
remaining, but Troy Aikman
threw four straight incom-
pletions.
No. 4 Miami 31, E. Carolina 7
Steve Walsh threw four
touchdown passes for the fourth
consecutive game as the Hurri-
canes pulled away in the final
quarter at Greenville, N.C
Miami, 6-1, took command
when Bubba McDowell blocked a
punt
and Sandy Jack recovered the
ball at the East Carolina 8 early in
the fourth quarter. On the next
play, Walsh hit Andre Brown
with a scoring pass to give Miami
a 24-7 lead.
No. 5 Nebraska 26, Missouri
18
A 49-yard run by Bryan Car-
penter with 8:24 left helped the
Cornhuskers hold off Mis-
souri at Lincoln, Neb. Nebraska
improved 8-1 overall and 4-0 in
the Big Eight. Missouri fell to 2-5-
1 and 1-3.
The Cornhuskers, who had
been averaging 420 yards rushing
a game, were held to 116 yards on
the ground and 269 yards in total
offense.
No. 7 West Virginia 51, Penn
State 30
Major Harris ran 27 yards for
a touchdown and threw two long
scoring passes to lead West Vir-
ginia over Penn State at Morgan-
town, W.Va. and to the Mountain-
eers' first 8-0 start in history.
The 51 points were the most
ever scored against a Joe Paterno
team.
No. 8 Oklahoma 63, Kansas 14
At Norman, Okla quarter-
back Charles Thompson ran for
118 yards and two touchdowns to
spark Oklahoma over winless
Kansas.
Oklahoma, which led 21-14 at
the half, broke it open with a six-
touchdown second half. The vic-
tory left the Sooners 7-1 overall
and 4-0 in the Big Ten, while
Kansas fell to 0-8 and 0-4.
Jamelle Holieway, who alter-
nated with Thompson, threw for
one touchdown and scored an-
other in the second half.
No.10 Wyoming 48, Colo-
rado St. 14
Quarterback Randy Welniak
ran for two second-quarter touch-
downs and passed for another as
Wyoming extended its regular
season winning streak to 18, long-
est in the nation.
Wyoming improved to 9-0
overall and 6-0 the Western Ath-
letic Conference.
No. 11 Arkansas 21, Rice 14
Arkansas clinched its first
Cotton Bowl berth since the 1975
season when backup quarterback
John Bland made three big piays
in a game-winning drive. The
See NOTRE, page 13





f
f
12
Tl JE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1988
Charlotte in hunt for center
VAD -Fourmonthsatterthe
Charlotte Hornets failed to
choose a big man in their first
NBA draft, thev are keeping an
ear to the ground and an eve on
the two players in camp thev hope
will fill their needs.
So far, no big men have
emerged as trade bait or even
appeared expendable on current
preseason rosters as the opening
oi the season approaches. That
means the Hornets could start the
igSS-S season wjm Dave Hop-
pen and Tim kempton, neither
household names nor unheralded
stars but both willing to provide
the most from their skills.
"There's no question that we
are checking everyone's roster to
see, big or little or middle-sized,
which players might bo avail-
able Hornets coach Dick Harter
says. "Every team always wants
to improve themselves. I'm sure
right now. the team plaving the
best in the league is talking with
evervone in the league to see
what's going on
Hoopen. 6-foot-ll, was one of
the three players chosen bv the
Hornets in the expansion draft
last June. A third round draft pick
Hornets get win
over Mavericks
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) �
Charlotte Hornets coach Dick
Harter has been looking for help
in the middle. On Saturday, hegot
it.
Center Dave Hoppen scored
10 points and krt Rambis added
lh points and pulled down 12
rebounds to lead Charlotte to a
104-93 NBA exhibition victory
over Dallas.
Five Charlotte players scored
in double figures and 5-foot-3
guard Tyrone Bogues came oii the
bench in the fourth quarter to get
six assists and three steals, which
helped the Hornets offset Mark
Aquirrc's 31 points.
'We got good aggressive
board play " Harter said, citing
the 19 and bo-point performances
by centers Hoppen and Tim
Kempton.
The Hornets victory came on
the team's first appearance in the
new 23,000-seat Charlotte Coli-
seum.
"Their (the Mavericks) rota-
tion was not the same as it will bo
during the regular season said
Harter. "But tlusdcvsa lot for our
attitude. Playing well on our first
night in this building helps us
Charlotte held a 76-73 lead
when the fourth quarter began
and built its "largest lead of 92-77
on two free throws by Rambis
with 6:20 left.
Two free throws by Steve
Alford capped a 12-2 Maverick
rally, pulling Dallas within 94-89
with 3:41 mark.
Rambis then scored six of the
final 10 points to hold oii the
Mavericks.
"You nave to give them
credit said Dallas coach John
MacLeod.
"It didn't surprise me 1
knew that thev would be aggres-
sive. They outhustled us
Dallas scored the game's first
six points and built a 16-8 lead on
Roy Tarpley's jumper with 3:32
left in the first quarter.
Rex Chapman's jumper
brought the Hornets within 16-12
with 303 left, but the Mavericks
gradually pulled away to take a
26-15 lead at the end oi the first
period.
Charlotte rallied early in the
second quarter, as Michaei
Holton's jumper brought the
Hornets within 32-27 at the 8:32
mark.
But the Mavericks responded
with a 19-8 run, capped by
Aguirre'slayup to provide a 46-35
advantage with 3:42 loft in the
half
A steal �nd dunk bv Hoppen a
tied the game at 4b with 1:28 left,
and Dallas took a 48-46 load at
ha If time.
Hoppen hit a jumper to give
Charlotte its first lead at 52-51
with 9:52 left in the third quarter.
The Hornets extended the lead to
59-53 on a Rambis jumper with
6:28 left.
Aguirro, who scored 18
points and hit seven of the Maver-
icks' nine field goals in the third
period, scored on a jump shot to
tie the score at 61 with 4:51 left.
Kelly Tnpucka added 15 for
Charlotte and Michael Holton
had 14. f x.
Tarpley scored 22 points, and
Rolando Blackman added 10 for
Dallas, as James Donaldson
grabbed a game-high 14 re-
bounds.
of Atlanta in 1986, the former
Nebraska player was hampered
by a knee injury and missed what
was to have boon his rookie sea-
son.
After one month in Spain,
Hoppen saw action in six games
for Topeka in the Continental
Basketball Association in the
1987-88 season after being re-
leased from the Hawks. Ho fin-
ished the same season split be-
tween Milwaukee and Golden
State before the expansion draft.
kempton was signed as a free
agent last August after spending
the previous season in Italy. The
6-10 Notre Dame graduate played
his rookie year for the Los Ange-
les Clippers, averaging 4.4 points
per game in 66 appearances. Ho
gained notoriety by becoming the
lowest draft choice�sixth round,
124th overall � to stick with an
NBA team.
Both have heard the talk oi
the Hornets' need for experience
in the middle. Neither will take
the time to worry.
"You can't. It's a situation
where you hear the talk but until
something happens, there's noth-
ing to do Kempton says. "You
just go out and work hard every
day and try to be the best that you
can be. If that's not what they
want, well, that's not what they
want
"Obviously, they have some
form of confidence in us or else
they wouldn't have brought us
into camp and we still wouldn't
be around he says. "Every day
that we're here in practice, we just
have to work a little bit harder to
improve our games because we
know that we're more or less in an
underdog situation, being that
there has boon so much talk abou t
the big people
kempton recognizes that he's
had his good moments and his
bad times. He says the first project
is to work on defense, especially
after meeting the Chicago Bulfs
last weekend with their newest
acquisition, Bill Cartwright.
For Hoppen, it's a matter of
reality when it comes to sticking
with any team.
"You know that the chances
of you staying with one team
throughout your whole career is
just about impossible. The chance
SP0RTSW0RLD
EVERY TUESDAY
N1TE IS COLLEGE N1TE S-ll
ONLY $2.00
ADMISSION WIT COLLEGE ID.
.75 SKATE RENTAL
104 E. RED BANKS RD - GREENVILLE, NC � 7!V- OOOO
RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
Ji
YOUR FIRST STEP
TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE YOU
COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
Army ROTC Carup Challenge. It's excitmq
and it may be your last opporninity to grad-
uate with an Army Officers commission.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
Contact Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
8
3
R
v-rvij-
&&&&oa 88&�&
R
-Pc

East Carolina
Finest Tea
� East Carolina
Tea Party
rl
o?
k2��
sp
wgSjjjKgttg
3?.�
ot you always being a starter and
always being the No. 1 man are
pretty much impossible too
Hoppen says. "You just have to go
out there and try your hardest
every day
Should another center come
in, beat out Kempton and Hoppen
and lead the Hornets to sudden
success, Hoppen would accept it.
But he said it doesn't mean he and
Kempton plan to give up the tight.
"I feel that, as everybody on
this team does right now, that you
have a shot on the team and
you're going to be on the team the
whole year Hoppen says.
"We're just trying to blend to-
gether right now. If it's the coach's
aecision or the general manager's
decision that they want to bring in
a new guy and release me or Tim,
we'll just have to pick up the
pieces from there and go on
Hoppen says his confidence
is growing, and the presence of
such veterans as Rickey Green
and Kurt Rambis helps. He is not
as comfortable with the fact that
i t's not expected for the Hornets to
do well in 1988-89 whether he is
there or not.
EER DAY
November 2,1988
3:80 PM - 5:30 PM
Regional Rehabilitation Center at PCMH
Junior and Senior college students from the surrounding area
who have declared a major or are interested in nursing or allied
health are invited to tour the Center and to meet the staff Depart-
ments participating are Nursing. Physical Therapy. Occupational
Therapy. Speech & Hearing Therapy. Social Work. Therapeutic
Recreation, Psychology and Medical Records
There will be representatives from nursing and allied health re-
cruitment who will be available to answer questions pertaining
to employment and personnel benefits
Join us at Career Day from 3:00 to 5:30 p.m November
2. 1988.
PCMH
People Care More Here
PITT COUNTY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
itantonstj
Ro.i � � :
"AMERICA'S FAVORITE OIL CHANGE
In 10 Minutes with no appointment
Heres what the J-Team can do for you:
�C hange vour 'will. r bi
� Adl a iv I fill �
� I .nbrit ate tl �
�Check and fill ti
differential ral � �
� !nl �
Plus FREE Car Wash with full service!
$2.00 Oil (with this ad)
26 Greenvilli Blvd. Phone 756 2579 Hours: Mon
Sal
Tom Togs
welcomes students, parents and fans
to come by cneck our always
low prices on
famous maker fashions!
ja:k
x
Factory Outlet
Every Thursday
at 4:00 p.m.
Free Admission
All Night "
$3 First Iced Tea
$2 For 2nd, 3rd, & 4th
plus you keep the Mason Jar
Free non-alcoholic drinks for
designated drivers.
Must be 21 to enter and have valid I.D.
High Energy Music provided by Connie
Greenville's Hottest
Roger;
j.
RAMADA INN
o
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666 0 ,
1900 Dickinson Ave
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Trocadero Tom Togs Fashions
Come Visit A New Image Featuring
1st Quality At Off Prices Originals From
Panama Jack & Other Exclusive Name Brands.
Located Next to Tons of Toys - S. Memorial Drive
Hours: 10-6 Mon. - Sat. (Fri. & Sat, til 9)
Hwy. 70 West
Oo
o
c
Visit Our Other Locations
Hwy. 64 East Between
Bethel and Tarboro Mo City, N.C.
ConetNC Wed-Sat.9-5
Wed. -Sat. 9-5
J
McMe
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va
(AD �By all accounts, Virginia's
Keith McMeans does not fit the
profile of a player who is closing
in on the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence career interceptions mark
with nearly two and a half seasons
to play.
Coach George Welsh says the
5-foot-ll, 184-pound redshirt
phomore "doesn't have t
quickness or speed
And McMeans admits he
tends to be timid in tl
second a r
Unlike some defend i
doesn't taunt opposing r
for fear of making them ai
So the question rema
McMeans led the nation with i
interceptions last
accumulated five
"I have no idea v
McMeans "Luck ha i
with it as well ash,
place at the right tin
Welsh also isi
aerial thiev �
McMeans. who la I
the ACC single �
Notre Dame
Continued from page 11
victory, coupled
Tech's victor
Houston's rout I
tian, assured the Ra;
Jan. 2 date in Dal
No.Is LSI
Tommy Hodson threw I r
249 yards and thi lowns
as LSU improved its r rdl 5-2
No. 14 Mich -
western 7
Tailback T rushed
for 153 yards and thi
downs as Michigan r
western. Boles
5 and 1 vards.
The victory kept '
atop the Big ten with a
mark. The V - are
overall.
No. 15 Clemson v- tke
Forest 21
��m Riwiiwy Wi�iams-nm for f�-o
touchdowns and passed for a
third to load Clemson to the At-
lantic Coast Conference victory.
Tcrrv Allen, the ACC's rus
leader, rushed 154 yards and one
touchdown as Clemson beat
Wake Forest for the 12tl
time.
The Tigers are 6-2 o
3-1 in the league. Wake For -
to 4-4 and 2-3
No.17 South Car lir i 2; N
Carolina St. 7
Tood Ellis threw a -
touchdown pass and Collin
Mackie kicked thre -
field goals as South Carolina
gained 356 yards aga nst the
nation's top defense. The Carre-
cocks improved their n-
1, while N.C State fell to
No.18 Georgia 3s1, Wi
Marv 24
Tim Worley ran for
; touchdowns and Greg Talley
threw for two others as Georj
scored 35 points in the second
quarter.
Tine Bulldogs, 6-2, took con-
trol after battling its Division 1-
AA opponent to a 7-7 tie atter one
I quarter. William & Mary dropped
i to 4-3-1.
No. W Alabama
Mi
1SS1S-
sippi St. 34
David Casteal scored tour
touchdowns and David Smith
threw for 290 yards and two
touchdowns to pace Alabama to a
6-1 record overall and 4-1 in the
Southeastern Conference
Mississippi State pulled
within 40-34 but Casteal gave
Alabama a cushion when he
scored on a 28-yard run with h 44
to play.
Mississipoi State fell to 1-7
and 0-5.
Arizona St. 21, No. 20 Oregon
20
Arizona State got a 39-yard
touchdown run from Bruce IYrk
ins in the third quarter, then held
on to upset Oregon in a Pac-10
game.
Oregon pulled within a point
On a 27-yard pass from Tote Nel
son to Latin Berry with 356 to
play, but Nelson's pass toff the
two-point conversion wa incom
pdete.
Oregon fell to 6-2 over all aivi
3-2 in the Pac-10. Arizona 5H
5-3 and 2-2





T
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1,1988
Charlotte in hunt for center
V.
(AP)�Four months after the
Charlotte Hornets failed to
choose a big man in their first
NBA draft, they are keeping an
ear to the ground and an eye on
the two players in camp they hope
will fill their needs.
So far, no big men have
emerged as trade bait or even
appeared expendable on current
preseason rosters as the opening
of the season approaches. That
means the Hornets could start the
1988-89 season with Dave Hop-
pen and Tim Kempton, neither
household names nor unheralded
stars but both willing to provide
the most from their skills.
"There's no question that we
are checking everyone's roster to
see, big or little or middle-sized,
which players might be avail-
able Hornets coach Dick Harter
says. "Every team always wants
to improve themselves. I'm sure
right now, the team playing the
best in the league is talking with
everyone in the league to see
what's going on
Hoopen, 6-foot-ll, was one of
the three players chosen by the
Hornets in the expansion draft
last June. A third round draft pick
Hornets get win (
over Mavericks
CHARLOTTE, N.C (AP) �
Charlotte Hornets coach Dick
Harter has been looking for help
in the middle. On Saturday, he got
it.
Center Dave Hoppen scored
19 points and Krt Rambis added
16 points and pulled down 12
rebounds to lead Charlotte to a
104-93 NBA exhibition victory
over Dallas.
Five Charlotte players scored
in double figures and 5-foot-3
guard Tyrone Bogues came off the
bench in the fourth quarter to get
six assists and three steals, which
helped the Hornets offset Mark
Aquirre's 31 points.
"We got good aggressive
board play Harter said, citing
the 19 and 16-point performances
by centers Hoppen and Tim
Kempton.
The Hornets victory came on
the team's first appearance in the
new 23,000-seat Charlotte Coli-
seum.
"Their (the Mavericks) rota-
tion was not the same as it will be
during the regular season said
Harter. "But this does a lot for our
attitude. Playing well on our first
night in this building helps us
Charlotte held a 76-73 lead
when the fourth quarter began
and built its largest lead of 92-77
on two free throws by Rambis
with 6:20 left.
Two free throws by Steve
Alford capped a 12-2 Maverick
rally, pulling Dallas within 94-89
with 3:41 mark.
Rambis then scored six of the
final 10 points to hold off the
Mavericks.
"You have to give them
credit said Dallas coach John
MacLeod.
"It didn't surprise me I
knew that they would be aggres-
sive. They outhustled us
Dallas scored the game's first
six points and built a 16-8 lead on
Roy Tarpley's jumper with 3:52
left in the first quarter.
Rex Chapman's jumper
brought the Hornets within 16-12
with 3:05 left, but the Mavericks
gradually pulled away to take a
26-15 lead at the end of the first
period.
Charlotte rallied early in the
second quarter, as Michael
Holton's jumper brought the
Hornets within 32-27 at the 8:32
mark.
But the Mavericks responded
with a 19-8 run, capped by
Aguirre's layup to provide a 46-35
advantage with 3:42 left in the
half.
A steal and dunk by Hoppen
tied the game at 46 with 1:28 left,
and Dallas took a 48-46 lead at
half time.
Hoppen hit a jumper to give
Charlotte its first lead at 52-51
with 9:52 left in the third quarter.
The Hornets extended the lead to
59-53 on a Rambis jumper with
6:28 left.
Aguirre, who scored 18
points and hit seven of the Maver-
icks' nine field goals in the third
period, scored on a jump shot to
tie the score at 61 with 451 left.
Kelly Tripucka added 15 for
Charlotte and Michael Hoi ton
had 14.
Tarpley scored 22 points, and
Rolando Blackman added 10 for
Dallas, as James Donaldson
grabbed a game-high 14 re-
bounds.
of Atlanta in 1986, the former
Nebraska player was hampered
by a knee injury and missed what
was to have been his rookie sea-
son.
After one month in Spain,
Hoppen saw action in six games
for Topeka in the Continental
Basketball Association in the
1987-88 season after being re-
leased from the Hawks. He fin-
ished the same season split be-
tween Milwaukee and Golden
State before the expansion draft.
Kempton was signed as a free
agent last August after spending
the previous season in Italy. The
6-10 Notre Dame graduate played
his rookie year for the Los Ange-
les Clippers, averaging 4.4 points
per game in 66 appearances. He
gained notoriety by becoming the
lowest draft choice�sixth round,
124th overall � to stick with an
NBA team.
Both have heard the talk of
the Hornets' need for experience
in the middle. Neither will take
the time to worry.
"You can't. Ifs a situation
where you hear the talk but until
something happens, there's noth-
ing to do Kempton says. "You
just go out and work hard every
day and try to be the best that you
can be. If that's not what they
want, well, that's not what they
want
"Obviously, they have some
form of confidence in us or else
they wouldn't have brought us
into camp and we still wouldn't
be around he says. "Every day
that we're here in practice, we just
have to work a little bit harder to
improve our games because we
know that we're more or less in an
underdog situation, being that
there has been so much talk about
the big people
Kempton recognizes that he's
had his good moments and his
bad times. He says the first project
is to work on defense, especially
after meeting the Chicago Bulls
last weekend with their newest
acquisition, Bill Cartwright.
For Hoppen, it's a matter of
reality when it comes to sticking
with any team.
"You know that the chances
of you staying with one team
throughout your whole career is
just about impossible. The chance
of you always being a starter and
always being the No. 1 man are
pretty much impossible too
Hoppen says. "You just have to go
out there and try your hardest
every day
Should another center come
in, beat out Kempton and Hoppen
and lead the Hornets to sudden
success, Hoppen would accept it.
But he said it doesn't mean he and
Kempton plan to give up the fight.
"I feel that, as everybody on
this team does right now, that you
have a shot on the team'and
you're going to be on the team the
whole year Hoppen says.
"We're just trying to blend to-
gether right now. If it's the coach's
decision or the general manager's
decision that they want to bring in
a new guy and release me or Tim,
we'll just have to pick up the
pieces from there and go on
Hoppen says his confidence
is growing, and the presence of
such veterans as Rickey Green
and Kurt Rambis helps. He is not
as comfortable with the fact that
i f s not expected for the Hornets to
do well in 1988-89 whether he is
there or not.
ir
ER DAY
November 2.1988
3:00 m � 5:30 m
Regional Rehabilitation center at PCMH
Junior and Senior college students from the surrounding area
who have declared a major or are interested in nursing or allied
health are invited to tour the Center and to meet the staff. Depart-
ments participating are Nursing, Physical Therapy, Occupational
Therapy, Speech & Hearing Therapy, Social Work, Therapeutic
Recreation, Psychology and Medical Records.
There will be representatives from nursing and allied health re-
cruitment who will be available to answer questions pertaining
to employment and personnel benefits.
Join us at Career Day from 3:00 to 5:30 p.m November
2, 1988.
People Care More Here
PITTCOUNTY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
200 Stantonsburg Road � P0. Box 6028 � Greenville, NC 27835 � (919)551-4100
EVERY TUES1
NTTE IS COLLEGE N
ONLY $2.
ADMISSION WITH COLLS
.75$ SKATE RI
104 E. RED BANKS RD. - GREEN
RESERVE OFFICERS' T
"AMERICAS FAVORITE OIL CHANGE"
In 10 Minutes with no appointment
Heres what the J-Teani can do for you:
�Change your of with a rrrnjoi brand!
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differential, brake, power steering,
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:EE Car Wash with full service!
2.00 Oil (with this ad)
tone 756-2579 Hours: MonFri. 7:30 a.m6:30 p.m. Sat. til 5:30
mm "
TOUR
TOWARD SO
COULD TAKE THIS SI
Army ROTC Camp Challenge. Its exciting
and it may be your last opportunity to grad-
uate with an Army Officers commission.
mm
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE TOUCAN TAKE.
Contact Captain Steve L. Jones
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
bm Togs
welcomes students, parents and fans
to come by check our always
low prices on
famous maker fashions I
� -
R
ioi
�ft3fc.
& & 0 "O'f0r�c
O a � & �
�V
a
.?
o a
CO
fceSfcttlriTbN
East Carolina's
Finest Tea
East Carolina
Tea Party
Every Thursday
at 4:00 p.m.
Free Admission
All Night
$3 First Iced Tea
$2 For 2nd, 3rd, & 4th
plus you keep the Mason Jar
Free non-alcoholic drinks for
designated drivers.
Must be 21 to enter and have valid I.D.
High Energy Music provided by Connh
Rogers, Greenville's Hottest DJ.
RAMADAINN
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
20� W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
Tom Tog's
r
Factory Outlet
o
O �r
1900 Dickinson Ave
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Trocadero Tom Togs Fashions
Come Visit A New Image Featuring
1st Quality At Off Prices Originals From
Panama Jack & Other Exclusive Name Brands.
Located Next to Tons of Toys - S. Memorial Drive
Hours: 10-6 Mon. - Sat. (FrL & Sat til 9)
Vfoit Qir Qfter locations
Bethel and Tarboro 7
Conetoe, N.C.
Wed. -Sat. 9-5
Morehead City, N.C.
Wed. - Sat 9-5
McMe
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
(AP) � By all accounts, Virginia's
Keith McMeans does not fit the
profile of a player who is closing
in on the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence career interceptions mark
with nearly two and a half seasons
to play.
Coach George Welsh says the
5-foot-Il, 184-pound redshirt so-
phomore "doesn't have great
quickness or speed
And McMeans admits he
tends to be timid in the Cavalier
secondary.
Unlike some defenders, he
doesn't taunt opposing receivers
for fear of making them angry.
So the question remains how
McMeans led the nation with nine
interceptions last year and has
accumulated five so far in 1988.
"I have no idea why saiu
McMeans. "Luck has a lot to do
I with it as well as being at the right
place at the right time
Welsh also is mystified at the
aerial thievery success of
McMeans, who last year missed
the ACC single-season intercep-
Notre Dame
Continued from page 11
rictory, coupled with Texas
Tech's victor over Texas and
louston's rout of Texas Chris-
tn, assured the Razorbacks of a
in. 2 date in Dallas.
No.13 LSU 31, Mississippi 20
Tommy Hodson threw for
149 yards and three touchdowns
is LSU improved its record to 5-2
No. 14 Michigan 52, North-
I western 7
Tailback Tony Boles rushed
For 153 yards and three touch-
iowns as Michigan routed North-
restem. Boles scored on runs of 7,
and 1 yards.
The victory kept Michigan
itop the Big Ten with a 4-0-1
mark. The Wolverines are 5-2-1
overall.
No. 15 Clemson 38, Wake
'21 - �
f
4k
umia
tmrhn imj
uchdowns and passed for a
Ihird to lead Clemson to the At-
tic Coast Conference victory,
ferrv Allen, the ACC's rushing
ader, rushed 154 yards and one
uchdown as Clemson beat
ake Forest for the 12th straight
The Tigers are 6-2 overall and
3-1 in the league. Wake Forest fell
4-4 and 2-3.
No.17 South Carolina 23, N.
Carolina St. 7
Tood Ellis threw a 20-yard
touchdown pass and Collin
Mackie kicked three second-half
iSeld goals as South Carolina
gained 356 yards against the
nation's top defense. The Game-
cocks improved their record to 7-
while N.C State fell to 6-2.
No.18 Georgia 59, William &
Mary 24
Tim Worley ran for two
touchdowns and Greg Talley
j$irew for two others as Georgia
scored 35 points in the second
quarter.
The Bulldogs, 6-2, took con-
trol after battling its Division 1-
AA opponent to a 7-7 tie after one
quarter. William & Mary dropped
to 4-3-1.
No. 19 Alabama 53, Missis-
sippi St 34
David Casteal scored four
touchdowns and David Smith
threw for 290 yards and two
touchdowns to pace Alabama to a
I 6-1 record overall and 4-1 in the
Southeastern Conference.
Mississippi State pulled
Within 40-34, but Casteal gave
Alabama a cushion when he
stored on a 28-yard run with 6:44
to play.
Mississipoi State fell to 1-7
Sjnd 0-5.
20
Arizona St. 21, No. 20 Oregon
Arizona State got a 39-yard
touchdown run from Bruce Perk-
ins in the third quarter, then held
to upset Oregon in a Pac-10
Oregon pulled within a point
a 27-yard pass from Pete Nel-
to Latin Berry with 336 to
but Nelson's pass for the
conversion was incom-
Oregon fell to 6-2 overall and
in the Pac-10. Arizona State is
land 2-2.





AREER DAY
lovember 2.1988
iQ PM - 5.30 PM
Ition Center at PCMH
1 3rP
fct
allied
ft Depart-
� . rtbnal
. � euttc
ilth re-
taining
30 p.m November
i More Here
ORIAL HOSPITAL
OIL CHANGE
Mt
: on
II service!
s

�on A
A
ashions
aturing
1 r-
From
line Brands
l2 Drive
v. N.C
-5
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1988 13
McMeans
ap-R ' Va tlon nwk by one and needs just didn't consider any school that
-�v an accounts, Virginia's three more to tie the league career wanted me to play defensive
mark. back
"It's really unusual what he But getting playing time at
did last year Welsh said. "I'm Virginia meant switching to the
not sure how he did it secondary.
McMeans, who played quar- "I was nervous McMeans
terback at Kempsville High said of the change. "I didn't know
in Virginia Beach, was what was going on. I didn't know
Keith McMeans does not fit the
profile of a player who is closing
in on the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence career interceptions mark
w ith nearly two and a half seasons
to play.
Coach George Welsh says the
toot-11. 184-pound redshirt so-
phomore "doesn't have great
quickness or speed
And McMeans admits he
tends to be timid in the Cavalier
secondary.
Unlike some defenders, he
loesn't taunt opposing receivers
r tear oi making them angry
switched to eornerback as a Cava-
lier freshman.
Welsh said McMeans wel-
comed the switch. McMeans
doesn't quite concur.
"Even if I hated the idea, what
was I going to do? Say no?" he
said.
what to expect. All you can do is
hope for good things to happen
Welsh said McMeans is "a
fine athlete. He was a great base-
ball player in high school. He
could have played quarterback
here in a certain kind of offense.
He could have been a running
back. He's just one of those ath-
leader
by the Demon Deacon quarter-
back.
"Maybe I should send him a
thank-you note McMeans
joked.
McMeans said he watches
game film for tendencies in oppo-
nents' passing games, and tried to
concentrate on the quarterback's
eyes. Other than that, "I really
don't know how to explain it
Then, joking again, McMeans
said the receivers also play a role
in his success. "I pay them off he
said. "Twenty-five bucks a shot
PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
McMeans said he came to
So the question remains how Virginia because he envisioned letes who can do a lot of things,
tion with nine becoming a Cavalier quarterback That helps in the secondary
in the mold of Don Majkowski, McMeans, who was switched
who now starts for the Green Bay from comerback to free safety
Packers. McMeans said his deci- earlier this season when Kevin
sion to attend Virginia was solidi- Cook when out with continuing
tied when he watched a Cavalier shoulder problems, intercepted
game that featured Majkowski two Mike Elkins passes last week
running the ball. in Virginia's 34-14 victory over
"I decided, That's the type of Wake Forest. It marked the sec-
offense where a short quarterback ond time in as many years that
can play" McMeans said. "I McMeans picked off two passes
iterceptions last year and has
cumulated five so far in 1988.
I have no idea vvhv said
l Means. "Luck has a lot to do
ith it as well as being at the right
ice at the right time
Welsh also is mystified at the
erial thievery success of
McMeans. who last year missed
( C single-season intercep-
Notre Dame
Continued from page 11
tory, coupled with Texas
ech's victor over Texas and
Houston's rout of Texas Chris-
n, assured the Razorbacks of a
2 date in Dallas.
No.13 LSU 31, Mississippi 20
Tommy Hodson threw for
yards and three touchdowns
as LSU improved its record to 5-2
No. 14 Michigan 52, North-
stern 7
Tailback Tony Boles rushed
r 153 yards and three touch-
ns as Michigan routed North-
western. Boles scored on runs oi 7,
5 nd 1 yards.
The victory kept Michigan
atop the Big Ten with a 4-0-1
mark. The Wolverines are 5-2-1
overall.
No. 15 Clemson 38, Wake
Forest 21
- Rodmry WiihamsTa-n for two
touchdowns and passed for a
third to lead Clemson to the At-
lantic Coast Conference victory.
Terrv Allen, the ACC's rushing
leader, rushed 154 yards and one
touchdown as Clemson beat
V ake Forest for the 12th straight
time.
The Tigers are 6-2 overall and
in the league. Wake Forest fell
to 4-4 and 2-3.
o.17 South Carolina 23, N.
- na St. 7
Tood Ellis threw a 20-yard
nchdown pass and Collin
Mackie kicked three second-half
Id goals as South Carolina
ned 356 yards against the
� n s top defense. The Game-
cks improved their record to 7-
1, while N.C. State fell to 6-2.
No.18 Georgia 59, William &
' try 24
Tim Worlev ran for two
J
ichdowns and Greg Talley
threw for two others as Georgia
scored 35 points in the second
quarter.
The Bulldogs, 6-2, took con-
trol after battling its Division 1-
AA opponent to a 7-7 tie after one
quarter. William & Marvdropped
to 4-3-1.
No. 19 Alabama 53, Missis-
sippi St. 34
David Casteal scored four
touchdowns and David Smith
threw for 290 yards and two
touchdowns to pace Alabama to a
6-1 record overall and 4-1 in the
Southeastern Conference.
Mississippi State pulled
within 40-34, but Casteal gave
Alabama a cushion when he
scored on a 28-yard run with 6:44
to play.
Mississipoi State fell to 1-7
and 0-5.
Arizona St. 21, No. 20 Oregon
20
Arizona State got a 39-yard
touchdown run from Bruce Perk-
ins in the third quarter, then held
on to upset Oregon in a Pac-10
game.
Oregon pulled within a point
on a 27-yard pass from Pete Nel-
son to Latin Berry with 3:56 to
play, but Nelson's pass for the
two-point conversion was incom-
plete.
Oregon fell to 6-2 overall and
3-2 in the Pac-10. Arizona State is
5-3 and 2-2.
Local and Out of
Town Newspapers
Fuil Selection of 1989 Calendars
Greeting Cards For All Occasions
Balloons For All Occasions
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Oj:en 7 Days A Week
BUSCH GARDENS � THE OLD COUNTRY I
AUDITIONS '89
The Stars Are Out All Day!
i
? America's premier
theme park inWil-
liamsburg, Va. is con-
ducting auditions tor
over 250 singers, danc-
ers, musicians, varierv
artists, actors, techni-
cians, and supervisors.
You could be part of the
magic that truly makes
Busch Gardens an enter-
tainment "experience
So get your act together
and 'shine at our 1989
auditions.
Vutimnrn 1 ro Hi miru For additional
��itrr-njtion jll I-WO-2S.VYM2
Audition Dates:
GREENSBORO, N.C.
Wednesday, Nov. 1. 1988
1:00-4:00 p.m.
I nivcrsitv of
North Carolina
Elliott I nivcrsitv Center
Alexander and Phillips Rmv
WILLIAMSBURG
VIRGINIA
Sunday, Dec. 11. 1988
12:00-5:00 p.m.
Busch Gardens
Festhaus Rehearsal Hall
-Busch
Gardens
SJSnSSSESE.
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n ffirmativc Vtion kiual Opporrunitv Rmplover. M F II
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STUDENTS
Get ready to join America's number
one naem in temporary help. Kelly
Services can help you make the most
of your free time this semester by
offering the flexibility to earn some
great cash while still being able to
cam gcxid grades. We have a variety
of short and long term assignments,
many of which do not require
special skills or experience.
�Secretaries
�Tvpists
�WPand DE Operators
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OU or stop in and lot us tell you about our conv
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Suite E Arlington Center
355-7850
klw
'The First And The Best"
U-S. Ijw requires all applicants to show proof of
idenity and right to work, in the LJi.
Junior Robinson, THIS WEEK'S PLAYER OE THE WEEK
HOMETOWN- High Point, NC
ECU vs. Miami -Against the Hurricanes, junior made two key
interceptions to stop Miami deep in ECU territrory, returning the,n
for a combined total of 88 yards. He also accounted for seven
tackles and broke up another pass attempt.
PERSONAL INFORMATION- Robinson is a junior majoring in
Physical Education. He is the son of David and Betty Robinson.
CONGRATULTIONS TO junior Robinson, FROM PEPSI-COLA.
MUCH CONTINUED SUCCESS.
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they re both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the lett
means you Ye part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an A rmv officer. It you re
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, N 07015. Or call toll tree i-800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
CLASS PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will be taken form Oct. 31 through
Nov. 4. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
UNTIL
YOU ARE IN IT!
You are invited
to the first Worship Service of
Christ
Presbyterian Church
4
Evengelical and Bible-believing
Praise singing with guitar accompaniment
Relevant and encouraging Bible teaching
This Sunday, November 6, at 11:00 a.m.
in the Banquet Hall of the Comfort Inn
on Greenville Blvd.
Join Us!






i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1,1988 13
LiU
ER DAY
ember 2.1988
PM � 5:30 PM
in Center at PGMH
its from the surrounding area
interested in nursing or allied
and to meet the staff. Depart-
'hysical Therapy. Occupational
fapy. Social Work. Therapeutic
ncal Records.
r. nursing and allied health re-
answer questions pertaining
benefits.
:00 to 5:30 p.m November
iMore Here
K3RIAL HOSPITAL
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shions
featuring
als From
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lorial Drive
I til 9)
hvy. 70 West
head City, N.C.
fed. - Sat. 9-5
McMeans
back.
But getting playing time at
Virginia meant switching to the
secondary.
"I was nervous McMeans
have great
APCHnRI;?TTESVII:iE' Va- tkn mark ty one d needs just didn't consider any school that
I iTAi acCOJunl8,Vir?via'$ threemoretoHetheleaguecareer wanted me to play defensive
Keith McMeans does not fit the mark.
profile of a player who is dosing "It's really unusual what he
in on the Atlantic Coast Confer- did last year Welsh said. "I'm
ence career interceptions mark not sure how he did it
with nearly two and a half seasons McMeans, who played quar-
toply- ur terback at Kempsville High said of the change. 1 didn'ttknow
Coach George Welsh says the School in Virginia Beach, was what was going on. I didn't know
S4-pound redshirt so- switched to comerback as a Cava- what to expect. All you can do is
Her freshman. hope for good things to happen
Welsh said McMeans wel- Welsh said McMeans is "a
corned the switch. McMeans fine athlete. He was a great base-
doesn't quite concur. ball player in high school. He
"Even if I hated the idea, what could have played quarterback
was I going to do? Say no?" he here in a certain kind of offense.
doesn t taunt opposing receivers said. He could have been a running
for fear of making them angry. McMeans said he came to back. He's just one of those ath-
So the question remains how Virginia because he envisioned letes who can do a lot of things.
McMeans led the nation with nine becoming a Cavalier quarterback That helps in the secondary
interceptions last year and has in the mold of Don Majkowski, McMeans, who was switched
accumulated five so far in 1988. who now starts for the Green Bay from comerback to free safety
"I have no idea why said Packers. McMeans said his deci- earlier this season when Kevin
McMeans. "Luck has a lot to do sion to attend Virginia was solidi- Cook when out with continuing
with it as well as being at the right fied when he watched a Cavalier shoulder problems, intercepted
place at the right time game that featured Majkowski two Mike Elkins passes last week
Welsh also is mystified at the running the ball. in Virginia's 34-14 victory over
aerial thievery success of "I decided, That's the type of Wake Forest. It marked the sec-
McMeans, who last year missed offense where a short quarterback ond time in as many years that
the ACC single-season intercep- can play McMeans said. "I McMeans picked off two passes
phomore "doesn't
quickness or speed
And McMeans admits he
tends to be timid in the Cavalier
secondary.
Unlike some defenders, he
Notre Dame
Continued from page 11
victory, coupled with Texas
Tech's victor over Texas and
Houston's rout of Texas Chris-
tian, assured the Razorbacks of a
fan. 2 date in Dallas.
No.13 LSU 31, Mississippi 20
Tommy Hodson threw for
249 yards and three touchdowns
as LSU improved its record to 5-2
No. 14 Michigan 52, North-
western 7
Tailback Tony Boles rushed
for 153 yards and three touch-
downs as Michigan routed North-
western. Boles scored on runs of 7,
5 and 1 yards.
The victory kept Michigan
atop the Big Ten with a 4-0-1
mark. The Wolverines are 5-2-1
overall.
"Local and Out of
Town Newspapers
?Full Selection of 1989 Calendars
'Greeting Cards F
Balloons For
Central Book
Greenville Square Sh
Open 7 Days A Mi
All V1-
i
No. 15 demson 38, Wake
Forest 21 -v.
a�Hwlway Williams ran-fur
touchdowns and passed for a
third to lead Clemson to the At-
lantic Coast Conference victory.
Terrv Allen, the ACC's rushing
leader, rushed 154 yards and one
touchdown as Clemson beat
Wake Forest for the 12th straight
time.
The Tigers are 6-2 overall and
3-1 in the league. Wake Forest fell
to 4-4 and 2-3.
No.17 South Carolina 23, N.
Carolina St. 7
Tood Ellis threw a 20-yard
touchdown pass and Collin
Mackie kicked three second-half
field goals as South Carolina
gained 356 yards against the
nation's top defense. The Game-
cocks improved their record to 7-
1, while N.C. State fell to 6-2.
No.18 Georgia 59, William &
Mary 24
Tim Worley ran for two
touchdowns and Greg Talley
threw for two others as Georgia
scored 35 points in the second
quarter.
The Bulldogs, 6-2, took con-
trol after battling its Division 1-
AA opponent to a 7-7 tie after one
quarter. William & Mary dropped
to 4-3-1.
No. 19 Alabama 53, Missis-
sippi St 34
David Casteal scored four
touchdowns and David Smith
threw for 290 yards and two
touchdowns to pace Alabama to a
6-1 record overall and 4-1 in the
Southeastern Conference.
Mississippi State pulled
within 40-34, but Casteal gave
Alabama a cushion when he
scored on a 28-yard run with 6:44
to play.
Mississippi State fell to 1-7
and 0-5.
Arizona St. 21, No. 20 Oregon
20
Arizona State got a 39-yard
touchdown run from Bruce Perk-
ins in the third quarter, then held
on to upset Oregon in a Pac-10
game.
Oregon pulled within a point
on a 27-yard pass from Pete Nel-
son to Latin Berry with 356 to
play, but Nelson's pass for the
two-point conversion was incom-
plete.
Oregon fell to 6-2 overall and
3-2 in the Pac-10. Arizona State is
33 and 2-2.
AllfllTU
"a I ftUUI M
The Stars Arc
BUSCH GARDENS
America's premier
theme park in Wil-
liamsburg, Va. is con-
ducting auditions for
over 250 singers, danc-
ers, musicians, variety
artists, actors, techni-
cians, and supervisors.
You could be part of the
magic that truly makes
Busch Gardens an enter-
tainment "experience
So get your act together
and 'shine' at our 1989
auditions.
Auditions: 1 to lh mins .For additional
mformaoon c�il I-WO-2S.VU02
1:0-
University of
North Carolina
Elliott University Center
Alexander and Phillips Rms.
WILLIAMSBURG
VIRGINIA
Sunday, Dec. It, 1988
12:00-5:00 p.m.
Busch Gardens
Festhaus Rehearsal Hall
'Busch
Ga
An Affirmative ActionEqual Opportunity Employer. MFH
Driving A Ford-Built Vehicle?
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Engine. YouH And powerful savings
on engines for almost any Ford-
built car or truck. Wa'r offering
special Installation rates, Joo.
Evsry engine Is remanufactured In the
Ford tradition of quality. And backed
by s national limited warranty covering
parts and tabor. Ask about our now
Extended Service Flan, too. It covers
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months36,000
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included.
leader
by the Demon Deacon quarter-
back.
"Maybe I should send him a
thank-you note McMeans
joked.
McMeans said he watches
game film for tendencies in oppo-
nents' passing games, and tried to
concentrate on the quarterback's
eyes. Other than that, "I really
don't know how to explain it
Then, joking again, McMeans
said the receivers also play a role
in his success. "I pay them off he
said. 'Twenty-five bucks a shot
PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Mva An Engine Bargain
HASTINGS FORD
KXftStrwt A 2t4VPMt � GrMnvMt.NC � t19-7S8-0114
Ton Free 1
STUDENTS
Get ready to join America's number
one naem in temporary help. Kelly
Services can help you make the most
of your free time this semester by
offering the flexibility to earn some
great cash while still being able to
earn good grades. We have a variety
of short and long term assignments,
many of which do not require
special skills or experience
�Secretaries
�Typists
�WP and DE Operators
�General Clerical
�Light Industrial
CaQ or atop In and let ua tell you about our eoov
prehenuve benefit package.
204 E. Arlington Blvd
Suite E Arlington Center
355-7850
SERVICE S
The First And The Best"
US. Law requires all applicants to ahow proof of
tdenity and right to work in the V S.
Junior Robinson, THIS WEEKS PLAYER OF THE WEEK
HOMETOWN- High Point, NC
ECU vs. Miami -Against the Hurricanes, Junior made two key
interceptions to stop Miami deep in ECU territrory, returning the;
for a combined total of 88 yards. He also accounted for seven
tackles and broke up another pass attempt.
PERSONAL INFORMATION- Robinson is a junior majoring in
Physical Education. He is the son of David and Betty Robinson.
CONGRATULTIONS TO Junior Robinson, FROM PEPSI-COLA.
MUCH CONTINUED SUCCESS.
ERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
ING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
t means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
iBSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
07015. Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.
11
IURSE CORPS. BEALLYOUCANBL
LASS PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will bo taken form Oct. 31 through
Nov. 4. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
IT ISN'T YOUR YEARBOOK UNTIL
YOU ARE IN IT!
You are invited
to the first Worship Service of
Christ
Qrtsbytirian Church
Evengelical and Bible-believing
Praise singing with guitar accompaniment
?Relevant and encouraging Bible teaching
This Sunday, November 6, at 11:00 a.m.
in the Banquet Hall of the Comfort Inn
on Greenville Blvd.
Join Us!





1
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1,1988
Gamecocks give State a taste of own medicine
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)
ception 28 yards for a score last
season against Virginia.
Late in the quarter South
Carolina drove inside the
Wolfpack 10, but Ellis was intcr-
drive that started at the N.C. State
41.
South Carolina gave the nation's
top defense got some of its own
medicine Saturday night, holding Carolina drove inside the Early in the second quarter
North Carolina State to only 27 Wolfpack 10, but Ellis was inter- Hinton intercepted another
yards on the ground while play- ceptcd by Corey Edmond to end a Montgomery pass near his team's
ing a dominating defensive style
20 and rambled 60 yards to give
South Carolina excellent field
position. But a clipping penalty
nullified the return and brought
the ball to the South Carolina 18.
With about four minutes left
in the half, the Gamecocks the first half.
mounted another drive from its
own 20, but the drive stalled near Representatives from seven
midfield after two incomplete different bowl games attended
passes from Ellis, who was held to the contest.
four of 11 passing for 31 yards in
of their own
But South Carolina's offense,
which struggled in the past two
games, came alive on the arm of
quarterback Todd Ellis and the
leg of kicker Collin Mackie.
Ellis threw a 20-yard touch-
down pass and Mackie kicked
three second-half field goals to
lead the 17th-ranked Gamecocks
to a 23-7 victory over North Caro-
lina State.
'This was a great win said
South Carolina coach Joe Morri-
son, who recorded his 100th vic-
tory as a head coach in college.
"I'm so proud of our young men.
It's been a long, couple of weeks
for us, but they worked hard and
came up here and played with a
lot of emotion
The Gamecocks exploited the
na lion's top defense for more than
360 vards to run their record to 7-
I. N.C. State fell to 6-2. South
Carolina dominated, hanging to
the ball for more than 40 of the
game's 60 minutes.
"1 can tell you this � we
played against a great football
team tonight, one with a lot of
talent Morrison added.
In each of South Carolina's
first three scoring drives of the
second half, Ellis completed a key
pass.
After Damon Hartman mis-
sed a 47-yard field goal attempt
with 10:02 left in the third quarter,
Ellis hit Robert Brooks with a 43-
yard pass to set up Mackie's 44-
yard field goal and a 10-0 lead.
Two series later, Ellis found
Hardin Brown on a 21-yard side-
line pattern that moved the ball tc
theN.C. State 13. Three plays later
Mackie kicked a 24-yard field goal
with eight seconds left in the
quarter.
The Wolf pack's only score
came one minute into the fourth
quarter and cut the margin to 13-
7.
Shane Montgomery hit
Danny Peebles with a 50-yard
pass down the middle that set
Montgomery's one-yard scoring
keeper.
But Ellis marched the Game-
cocks 75 yards in 11 plays, cap-
ping the drive by hitting Eddie
Miller on a corner pattern over the
outstretched arms of Joe Johnson
with 8:54 remaining.
"Our line did a very good job
of blocking Morrison said. "The
screen passes we ran tonight
worked very well
Mackie added a 32-yard field
goal late in the contest.
N.C. State was held to a sea-
son-low 27 yards rushing. Last
week, 15th-ranked Clemson held
the Wolfpack to 47 yards on the
ground.
"Obviously it was a game
both teams wanted to win N.C.
State coach Dick Sheridan said. "It
was a very emotional game and
for the most part a good defensive
struggle
"South Carolina played dif-
ferently defensively than they
usually do Sheridan said. "They
blitzed early and played a lot of
zone
Linebacker Patrick Hinton
led the Gamecock defense, pick-
ing off three passes and recover-
ing one fumble.
South Carolina's best of-
fense of the opening half was
Hinton.
N.C. State drove deep into
Gamecock territory on its first
possession, but Montgomery's
second-down pass intended for
Nasrallah Worthen was picked
off by Hinton. The sophomore
from Atlanta broke away from an
attempted tackle by Worthen and
raced 83 yards for the opening
score.
Hinton also returned an inter-
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There is a Food Lion conveniently located near you:
FOOD LION





t
14THEEASTCAKftfrBfN
NOVEMBER 1,196
i
Gamecocks give State a taste of own medicine
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) ception 28 yards for a score last
South Carolina gave the nation's season against Virginia.
drive that started at the N.C. State
41.
in
top defense got some of its own
medicine Saturday night, holding
North Carolina State to only 2
yards on the ground while play-
ing a dominating defensive style
of their own.
But South Carolina's offense,
which struggled in the past two
games, came alive on the arm of
quarterback Todd Ellis and the
leg of kicker Collin Mackie.
Ellis threw a 20-yard touch-
down pass and Mackie kicked
three second-half field goals to
lead the 17th-ranked Gamecocks
to a 23-7 victory over North Caro-
lina State.
This was a great win said
South Carolina coach Joe Morri-
son, who recorded his 100th vic-
tory as a head coach in college.
"I'm so proud of our young men.
It's been a long, couple of weeks
for us, but they worked hard and
came up here and played with a
lot of emotion
The Gamecocks exploited the
nation's top defense for more than
360 yards to run their record to 7-
1. N.C. State fell to 6-2. South
Carolina dominated, hanging to
the ball for more than 40 of the
game's 60 minutes.
"I can tell you this � we
played against a great football
team tonight, one with a lot of
talent Morrison added.
In each of South Carolina's
first three scoring drives of the
second half, Ellis completed a key
pass.
After Damon Hartman mis-
sed a 47-yard field goal attempt
with 10:02 left in the third quarter,
Ellis hit Robert Brooks with a 43-
yard pass to set up Mackie's 44-
yard field goal and a 10-0 lead.
Two series later, Ellis found
Hardin Brown on a 21-yard side-
line pa t tern that moved the ball to
theN.C. State 13. Three plays later
Mackie kicked a 24-yard field goal
with eight seconds left in the
quarter.
The Wolfpack's only score
came one minute into the fourth
quarter and cut the margin to 13-
7
Shane Montgomery hit
Danny Peebles with a 50-yard
pass down the middle that set
Montgomery's one-yard scoring
keeper.
But Ellis marched the Game-
cocks 75 yards in 11 plays, cap-
ping the drive by hitting Eddie
Miller on a corner pattern over the
outstretched arms of Joe Johnson
with 854 remaining.
"Our line did a very good job
of blocking Morrison said. "The
screen passes we ran tonight
worked very well
Mackie added a 32-yard field
goal late in the contest
N.C. State was held to a sea-
son-low 27 yards rushing. Last
week, 15th-ranked Gemson held
the Wolfpack to 47 yards on the
ground.
"Obviously it was a game
both teams wanted to win N.C.
State coach Dick Sheridan said. "It
was a very emotional game and
for the most part a good defensive
struggle
"South Carolina played dif-
ferently defensively than they
usually do Sheridan said. They
blitzed early and played a lot of
zone
Linebacker Patrick Hinton
led the Gamecock defense, pick-
ing off three passes and recover-
ing one fumble.
South Carolina's best of-
fense of the opening half was
Hinton.
N.C. State drove deep into
Gamecock territory on its first
possession, but Montgomery's
second-down pass intended for
Nasrallah Worthen was picked
off by Hinton. The sophomore
from Atlanta broke away from an
attempted tackle by Worthen and
raced 83 yards for the opening
score.
Hinton also returned an inter-
Late in the quarter South
Carolina drove inside the Early in the second quarter
Wolfpack 10, but Ellis was inter- Hinton intercepted another
cepted by Corey Edmond to end a Montgomery pass near his team's
20 and rambled 60 yards to give
South Carolina excellent field
position. But a clipping penalty own 20, but the drive stalled near
nullified the return and brought
the first half.
the ball to the South Carolina 18.
With about four minutes left
the half, the Gamecocks
mounted another drive from its
Representatives from seven
midfield after two incomplete different bowl games attended
passes from Ellis, who was held to the contest,
four of 11
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 1, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 01, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.637
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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