The East Carolinian, October 27, 1988






Inside:
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS6
FEATURES11
SPORTS17
Features:
The Bonehead and Earlvis are back in offensive
form in the new and improved Clearly Labeled Satire
Page. This may be the end of decency as we know it,
judge for yourself on page 16.
Sports:
The Pirates are 35 point underdogs as they face
fourth ranked Miami on Saturday at Ficklen Stadium.
After the game, the basketball team holds an infra-
squad scrimmage open to the public, see page 17.
�he iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 Xo. 30
Thursday October 27,1988
Greenville, NC
20 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Is the "Buc" worth it?
By JOE HARRIS
Sen ditor
The Media Board lias ap-
pointed a special committee to in-
vestigate the Buccaneer and find
out win the last yearbook was
issued late and to make sure the
money is being used efficiently.
Media Board Chairperson 1111
Opdyke said that because of the
problems with the Buccaneer two
special sub committees were
formed to look at all media outlets
at ECU. One is to look at the The
East Carolinian, Expressions. The
Rebel and WZMB. Hie other is to
examine only the Buccaneer.
Part of the action taken by the
committees was to withold a per-
centage of each of the media
heads salary. She said this was
done to insure that requirements
of the job would be fullfilled.
"1 didn't want to have to
make themthe media heads)
work on an incentive program
Ms. Opdvke said. "But in the case
of the '87 Buccaneer, 1 feel like it
we had done this, we would have
had a better product that came out
as scheduled
"It you do it to one,tl you
have to do it to all si d Ms.
Opdvke on the subject of withold-
ing a percentage of the salaries.
She said that presentlv the
Media Board is having no prob-
lems with any oi the media heads.
"I'm not so concerned about
the other campus media outlets,
with the exception oi getting
WZMB back on the air, but 1 feel
like the Buccaneer needs to be
looked at Ms. Opdvke said. "1
was really angry with the tardi-
ness of the '87 Buc. We have to
insure that it is not going to hap-
pen again
Ms. Opdyke said her main
concern right now is to find out
whether or not the Buccaneer is
worth being published.
"People think the yearbook is
tree � well it's not Ms. Opdyke
slid. "It costs well over $50,000 to
publish each year. This money is
included in vour student fees
She said since 15,500 people
pay for the yearbook then each
one should have the opportunity
to get one. "We have 5,000 pub-
lished each year so that means less
than a third of the student body
canhavcone � that is if they want
one.
All 5,000of the '88 Buccaneers
were picked up in twodavs, in the
case of the '87 Buccaneer, an esti-
mated 2,000 still remain in the
Buccaneer office.
Ms. Opdyke said, "1 feel
we've redeemed ourselves with
the quality oi the '88 vearbook,
but the problem is many people
who wanted one didn't get one
She said the committee ap-
pointed to look at the Buccaneer is
taking student surveys to find out
if students want it published, and
if so what do they want in it. "It's
their vearbook. they should have
a say-so Ms. Opdyke said. She
added that she doesn't think the
students want to do an- with
the vearbook but also said the
survey will answer the questions
concerning this.
The Buccaneer is one oi the
few yearbooks in the state that is
included in student fees. Ms.
Opdvke said most yearbooks are
C.O.D that is they are ordered by
those who want them and paid for
upon arrival.
"This may be the solution, but
it's not up to me to make that deci-
sion. 1 assure you something will
be done Ms. Opdvke said.
The people at the Career Planning Placement Service encourage everyone who is interested in
Health Careers Day to attend the scheduled meetings from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Monday (Photo
By J.D. Whitmire ECU Photolab).
Students given opportunity
to look at careers in health
Bv BEN SELBY
Staff Writer
Seventy-five employer repre-
sentatives from across the nation
will participate in 1 lealth Careers
Day next Monday, Oct. 31, be-
tween 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. on the
first and second floors of the Carol
Belk (Allied Health) Building.
The representatives will beon
hand to answer students' ques-
tions concerning employee bene-
fits, salary, and application proce-
dures of the different institutions
they represent.
"This is a perfect opportunity
for our ECU students to learn
about opportunities and applica-
tion procedures in health care
institutions from across the na-
tion said James Westmoreland
assistant director of Career Plan-
ning and Placement Services.
He encouraged all ECU stu-
dents to attend this program to
talk with prospective employer
representatives. Interested stu-
dents need to sign in at the regis-
tration table for one of 12, $100
awards to randomly selected in-
dividuals in attendance. The list
of students who sign in will be
made available to those institu-
tions who participate.
Westmoreland is encourag-
ing students to "comeearly so you
can visit with as many employers
as possible and show them (em-
ployer reps) the fine quality of our
student population
"This is a perfect
opportunity for our
ECU students to learn
about opportunities
and application
procedures in health
care institutions from
across the nation"
Students will have a chance to
find out more about employment
opportunities, and the "employ-
ers will be able to learn about the
fine academic programs we offer
at ECU Westmoreland said.
Both large and small institu-
tions, public and private, will be
represented at the event.
Duke University Medical
Center, Brynn Marr Hospital, Pitt
County Memorial Hospital, Pin-
nacle Care Rehabilitation Group
of Nashville, Tennessee, George
Washington Hospital of Wash-
ington, D.C The U.S. Army
Nurse Corps, U.S. Air Force
Health Professions, and Baxter
Healthcare Corp. are just a few of
the many that will be here Mon-
day.
These employers are looking
for students with various special-
ized interest: nurses, physical and
occupational therapists, lab clini-
cians, rehabilitation counselors,
recreational therapists and the list
goes on.
Students will save the ex-
pense of time and money travel-
ing to be interviewed. "This is a
great opportunity to have that
many institutions represented in
that time period Westmoreland
said.
The employers want to see as
many students as possible. You
are encouraged to obtain as much
information as you can about the
employment process during
these four hours.
Westmoreland said, "If you
have resumes, you may wish to
bnng them
Sororities participated in cleaning up the Mall on Wednesday as a part of the campus beau-
tification effort (Photo By J.D. Whitmire ECU Photolab).
Sole Communist ever to be
imprisoned for beliefs speaks
By KRISTINA MUKDEN
Staff Writer
Junius Scales, former Com-
munist party leader in the South,
and only U.S. citizen sent to
prison for his Communist beliefs
reflected on his involvement with
the partv on Monday.
Scales was a member of the
Communist party from 1939 until
1958. In 1954, he was charged for
violating the Smith Act which
states it is unlawful to belong to
any organization advocating the
violent overthrow of the United
States government.
Scales was convicted and
sentenced to six years in prison.
In 1960, after serving his jail
sentence in full, he left the Com-
munist party and was again con-
victed in Greensboro in violation
of the Smith Act, the Supreme
Court upheld the decision and
Scales served only 16 months.
Several hundred people includ-
ing Martin Luther King Jr. and
Eleanor Roosevelt were influen-
tial in Scales' early release.
Scales admitted that he as an
individual, and the Communist
Party of the U.S. were considered
a threat to national security. He
said, "I was constantly hounded
and harassed by the FBI and
KKK Scales said during his ten-
ure as head of the party, three
crosses were burned in his yard
and he received death threats
almost weeklv.
Scales said he was never
charged with conspiracy or con-
sidered a threat to overthrow the
U.S. government, and "never ad-
vocated it
"Communism made the
world a better place said Scales.
"I am most proud of its fight
against fascism and racism
In the South, during his reign,
the Communists organized
unions with whites and blacks,
tobacco farms, and stood beside
the blacks before it was fashion-
able, said Scales. "We were con-
cerned and generous to people
Scales said that Gorbachev is
giving Communism, "A human
face since he is the first world
leader to agree with Einst in in
that nuclear power changes the
entire world and it must not and
cannot be tolerated in anyone's
plans
Scales said that his greatest
success as a Communist which he
would like to be remembered for,
is his involvement in freeing a
black man from a jail sentence
who was unjustly accused of rape.
The man was accused after
only looking at a girl from a dis-
tance of 75 feet Scales said. With
help from the NAACP and the
press. Scales brought justice to the
man. "This was my most satisfy-
ing experience, saving him from a
jail term said Scales.
While serving his sentence in
Louisville, Scales said he was har-
assed by administrators because
oi his Communist involvemer.t,
"the prisoners were rarely judge-
mental Scales said, "The most
widely used epithets against him
were "nigger lover, do gooder,
and bleeding heart
While dealing vith this,
Scales said, "You can't get subjec-
tive about those who put vou
there, or you give in to hate and
bitterness
Scales said the Communist
party poses no threat to the
United States. Currently, Scales
estimates there are 8,000 mem-
bers of the party in this country,
none of which he has been in
contact with. The strength oi the
Party reached its peak in 1938
with 120,000 members at one
time, and between 1940 and 1950
"more that 1,000,000 went
through Scales said.
Scales said the ultimate solu-
tion to fighting communism is
"coexistence and interplay, and
the free market of ideas. . . it
(communism) is losing now
Scales left the Communist
Party in 1958, while he was still in
prison, because of his disapproval
about Krushchev's revelations
concerning Joseph Stalin and the
invasion oi Hungary.
Man allegedly pushes wife
over cliff, faces murder charge
MARION, N.C. (AP) - As a
memorial service was held for his
sister-in-law, the brother of a man
charged with killing his wife and
her friend by pushing them over
a cliffside called his brother "a
victim during his moment of
grief
The two counts of first-degree
murder against James Clifton
Gibbs, 37, arc "outright lies
Gerald Gibbs of Fayettcville said
Tuesday.
Gerald Gibbs said he visited
the ledge Tuesday where the
women fell. Referring to his
brother't; statements to authori-
ties that he tried to rescue the
women, he said, "My brother was
very courageous for what he
did
Meanwhile, at a memorial
service at the Veterans Admini-
stration Medical Center in Fay-
ettcville, where Helen Bumette
Gibbs, 30 was a ward supervisor,
the Gibbses' children, parents,
sisters and brother, friends and
hospital staff honored her mem-
ory.
"Mrs. Gibbs was very de-
voted to her family as well as her
profession Medical Center Di-
rector A.G. Branch told about 100
people. "She was an outstanding
role model for family and career
women
Also killed in the fall from the
Chestoa View overlook along the
Blue Ridge Parkway on Oct. 17
was Susan White Haire, 32, of
Ladson, S.C.
Two tourists who stopped at
the overlook on the night tne
women died heard the voices of a
man and a woman far below the
overlook, National Park Service
ranger said.
'They said in their statements
that they heard a woman scream-
ing,
"Oh, my arm and then they
heard a man's voice, but they
couldn't hear what he was say-
ing said j. Russ Whitkvk oi Lin-
ville, a ranger on the parkway.
James Gibbs was charged
Monday in the deaths. A probable
causeheanr - � srt for Nov. 9 in
McDowell Superior
Court, aattorneys said
they piar so bring in more
than 6 witnesses.
Assistant District Attorney
Mike Edwards said during a brief
court appearance Tuesday that
the state would seek the death
penalty in the case Gibbs' first
court appearance was delaved
until today to give defense attor
neys Edwin L. Harris III and
Ronnie M. Mitchell of Fa yetteville
time to make arguments for bond
Whitlock said the witnesses,
tourists from Indiana and Illinois,
had stopped about 8:15 p.m. on
Oct. 17 and walked to the over-
See DEATHS, page 2





V
2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27, 188
South leaning towards GOP
RALEIGH (AP) - Aided by a
popular president and movement
toward the GOP across the south,
the Republican Party has grown
by 21.2 percent since the 1984 ela-
tion, while the Democratic Party
experienced a 1.8 percent decline
during the same period, figures
show.
And in a significant mile-
stone, the number of North Caro-
lina voters registered as Republi-
cans has topped the 1 million
threshold for the first time, State
Flections Director Alex Brock said
Tuesday.
The GOP's total was "Posi-
tively, without equivocation" the
highest in state history, Brock
said. They've made quite a
jump
The figures show that North
Carolina is moving closer to two-
partv state status, said Thad
Beyle, professor of political sci-
ence at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
But Beyle said the GOP will
remain a distinct minority until it
becomes more successful in win-
ning seats in the General Assem-
j blv and local offices.
Even if Jim Gardner becomes
the first Republican lieutenant
governor this century, Beyle said,
the victory will be somewhat hol-
low because the GOP is virtually
certain to be far outnumbered in
the Senate. Thus, Republicans
will lack the clout to block the
Democrats from stripping
Gardner's powers and leaving
him a figurehead Senate presi-
dent.
"You have to get to the point
where they have enough strength
- 15, 18, maybe 20 senators - to
form coalitions with theconserva-
tive Democrats Beyle said.
Significantly, new voters are
registering as Democrats and
Republicans in roughly equal
proportions, Beyle said. That
means the margin is likely to nar-
row in coming decades as the
generation of Franklin D. Roosev-
elt and Harry Truman gives way
to those who grew up with
Ronald Reagan in the White
House, he said.
"I don't see the Democratic
Party in this state really coming to
gnps with this he said. "They
need to look at their navels and
ih:nk about what th; v' v.c.i do to
cope with this significant
change
One move Democratic lead-
ers could make to solidify their
traditional base is to put blacks
and women in a position to win
statewide offices, he said.
According to statistics com-
piled by each of the state's 100
county elections offices, 3,432,042
North Carolinians are registered
to vote, including 2,247,759
Democrats and 1,016,546 Repub-
licans.
Another 167,724 voters are
unaffiliated, and 13 are registered
with the left-wing New Alliance
Party.
Both parties gained voters
since the last official count in
April, which showed democrats
with 2,152,952 voters and the
COP with 899,162. A total of
139,388 were unaffiliated.
But the GOP picked up 22,777
more voters than the Democrats
between April 4 and March 10.
And the number of registered
Democrats in the latest count is
41302 below the total for the
majority party in October 1984
which was 2,289,061. Republican
registration in October 1984 was
838,631.
Republican Gov. Jim Martin
hailed the figures, saying they
proved that the "Operation
Switch" campaign he and Sen.
Jesse Helms launched in 1985 to
lure conservative Democrats to
the GOP was paying off.
"Back then, a lot of people
laughed at us and ridiculed us be-
cause we didn't make the big
scores right away. It was sort of
slow getting going Martin said.
"But we kept it going and it's been
successful.
"What it's doing is saying to
people who are Republican in
philosophy, who support Repub-
lican candidates in principle,
come on and register where your
heart is
Martin said North Carolina
was becoming a two-parry state
even though the GOP remains
outnumbered by more than 2-to-l.
"It means we've got the two
political parties pushing to see
who can do the most for schools,
doing more for roads he said.
"This will be as prosperous and
productive a period as when the
Whigs were governors back in the
middle of the 19th Century
Margaret Lawton, communi-
cations director for the state
Democratic Party, said the Re-
publican jump was not overly
significant. "They started at such
a low point, the only way they
could go was up she said. "Any
gain the make is going to look
impressive
Most of the new Republican
voters are arch-conservative po-
litical newcomers who became
activists because of their support
for Pat Robertson and Rep. jack
Kemp, both of whom unsuccess-
fully sought the GOP presidential
nomination, Ms. Lawton said.
"They brought a lot of new-
people into the Republican
Party she said. "But I don't think
it's people defecting from the
Democratic Party. It's new, right-
wing people joining the Republi-
cans
The East Carolinian
Scninq the East Camlina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKce. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY ATES
�) 49 Column indiesS4.25
50-99 4 15
100-149 4 05
150 199 3.95
200 249 3.85
250 and above3 5
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition t. Regular Spac Rale)
One coloi and Mack S � LOO
Two colors a � 155
Inserts
5,000 oi !
I 12 �
' ; each
5 5c cji
5 ca.h
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phone:
,757-6366757-6557
757-655S757-6309
RACK ROOM SHOES
Investigation reveals jailer mistreated an inmate
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
VVINSTON-SALEM (AD - A
Forsy the County Sheriff's Depart-
ment jailer has been suspended
without pay pending the results
of a State Bureau of Investigations
probe into allegations that he mis-
treated an inmate.
Deputy Michael B. Barber
was placed on administrative
leave without pay Oct. 14 while
SBl agents determine whether he
violated department policy on
handling prisoners, county offi-
cials said.
On Oct. 13, the jailer placed
inmate Matthew Kevin Hender-
.son in a headlock while taking
him from a cell, Forsythe County
Sheriff Preston Old ham said,
quoting a preliminary sheriff's
department report.
Oldham would not confirm
or reveal the name of the sus-
pended jailer, but sources told the
Winston-Salem Journal Barber
had been suspended. Barber
could not be reached for comment
Tuesday.
Henderson, 25, was sen-
tenced Oct. 10 in Forsythe Countv
District Court to four years in
prison - two years for probation
violation and two years for lar-
ceny and misdemeanor drug vio-
lations, his attorney, Nancv L.
Wooten, said.
Henderson was in the For
sythe County Jail waiting to W
transferred to prison when, Hen-
derson charges, he was mt5
treated. According to Mrs.
Wooten, Henderson said that
there had been a disturbance in
the cell - "some general mouthing
off" - when a guard tried to quiet
things.
In a telephone interview from
McLeansville Prison Unit in
Guilford County last week, Hen-
derson told Mrs. Wooten that the
guard pulled him from the cell
and wrestled him into a crouched
position. The guard continued to
apply pressure, Henderson
claimed, and it aggravated a disc
in his back, causing extreme pain.
, . u HteW AWi$tfn to for-
sythe Memorial Hospital, given
Tylenol III and returned to jail
"Uldham said. '
Open
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sundav 1-6
Fall Savings
B
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Ntke and Reebok
Deaths may not have been accidental after all
Continued from page 1
look with their flashlights. He
said the tourists reported what
they heard to park officials.
"We have talked with them
briefly Maj. Don Ramsey, chief
deputy for the McDowell County
Sheriff's Department, sid Tues-
day. "We know who they are and
how to get in touch with them
The ranger said rescuers
found the bodies of the two
women before they heard Gibbs.
"We were suspicious from
the very outset' said McDowell
County Sheriff Bob R. Haynes.
"Things just didn't add up
Gibbs was held Tuesday in
the McDowell County Jail, and
proclaimed his innocence when
he arrived Monday night.
"I swear to God I didn't do it
he said as deputies led him hand-
cuffed inside the building. "I
don't know what happened.
You're all wrong. You're crazy. I
didn't do it. I tried to help mv
wife
Haynes said Monday that
Gibbs had takenouta$100,0001ife
insurance policy on his wife in
May. But Mitchell, one of Gibbs
attorneys, said Mrs. Gibbs took
out the policy, and that Gibbs did
not know the policy existed.
"He did not take out the pol-
icy on her life Mitchell said.
"Helen Gibbs did. She had
just become a head nurse at the
VA hospital and she was con-
tacted by an agent and she bought
the policy
lotrmnorrreD
rtrtiri
Store Hours
MonSat. 10-9
Sun. 1-6
$5.00 Off any pair of
sunglasses in our case
One Week Only!
Located In The Plaza Mall Entrance
Telephone
355-7695
SKIWEAR
FOR
THE
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GORDONS
200 GREENVILLE BLVD.
756-1003
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JAIL-A-THON
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CO

NOV. 3 9-4
ECU STUDENT STORE
For a $10 donation anyone may procure a "warrant" for the arrest
of anyone. Upon payment of $10, a "police officer" will proceed to
the suspects place of business or home and deliver him to the
"JAIL" at the ECU Student Store.
The "Jailce" will be allowed to use the telephone to entreat his
friends to post his "bond so he can be freed. The amount of bond
will also go to the American Cancer Society.
CALL ACS BEFORE NOV. 3, AT 752-2574 or come by the ECU
Student Store on Nov. 1-3, or CALL 757-1943 on November 3.
Don't be caught
without a gift for your goblin.
Large selection of Halloween Cards Masks � Gifts � Gift Bags &. Balloons
AvantiRecycled Paper ProductsCarlton Official Halloween T-Shirts & Sweat Shirts
lutee-
:
I
B
I
S
i
i
S
3
S
S
I
3
Impac
A bidding war of unpi
dented size mav be in the w
for RJR Nabisco Inc but exj
say Ty adverse effects
multibillion-dollar leveral
buyout of the tobacco and
giant should not be felt in N
Carolina.
"Nobody's going to do
thing to the goose that lav
golden egg said Universr
North Carolina-Charlotte
nomics
"The (tobacco) division i
plum professor John
naughton. everyone wants.
real money-maker "
One day after the New
investment firm Kohil
Kravis Roberts & Co oH
$20.28 billion for RJR Nal
Connaughton and other ot
ers said Tuesday there was
chance the company's hi
profitable tobacco dr
would be moved from Wi
Salem.
The stunning KKR bic
on the heels of last week'
nouncement by F. Ross Jor
RJR's president and chief ej
hve officer, and Edward
gan, the head of the tobacco!
Million
ATLANTA (AP) -
lawmaker vowed to seek
guns and even Confederatl
from 11 Klansmen to eolll
share of a $1 million award I
rights marchers pelted witl
in nearly all-white F
County
A federal jury found
Klux Klansmen and two
supremacist groups resp
for disrupting the 'an.
march north of Atlanta
awarded $948,650 in dam
49 demonstrators who fiU
"It is a message to the K
Klan nationwide that
happen to you said staj
J.E. "BillyMcKinney. or
demonstrators.
McKinney said he
other plaintiffs "are dt
we will get every dime thaj
get out of the Klan
The award, the secon
one involving a Klan
in two vears. includes
each from the Scuthcm
Knights of the Ku Klux KJ
the Invisible Empire Km
the Ku Klux Klan. David �
grand dragon of the
White Knights, was ord
pay $50,000, the highest
defendants.
"I guarantee if (Hoi
got a pick-up truck. I'm
take it. If he's got a shotj
back of (of the truck) I'm
take it. too - and I want H
federate flag' McKinnevj
Defense attorncv
stunned by the verdict
Tuesdav and said thevj
appeal. Holland s atton
frey Sliz, called it "grosslj
sonable"
Another defense
Jane Tlaginos said the
had no proof tor any ini
would mandate sucr j
damages
"Thev did not prove 1
m
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville
I
I

I
� 1
I
ft





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,1988 3
rolinianX A
�iv 1925. i of AdvertisingImpact
�ontativesA
encer MevmandiA bidding war of unprece-
Adam Blankenshtp i 11dented size may be in the works for RJR Nabisco Inc but experts
RT1SINGsay sny adverse effects of a muitibillion-dollar leveraged
buyout of the tobacco and food
t4 J; 4 15giant should not be felt in North Carolina.
3 95"Nobody's going to do any-
3 S3thing to the goose that lays the
3 '5golden egg said University of North Carolina-Charlotte eco-
SING RATESnomics "The (tobacco) division is the
splum professor John Con-
naughton. everyone wants. Ifsa real money-maker One day after the New York
l eachinvestment firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. offered
f f
i. h$20.28 billion for RJR Nabisco, Connaughton and other observ-
( i RS: p.m.ers said Tuesday there was little chance the company's highly profitable tobacco division would be moved from Winston-Salem.
t 7?7-In7The stunning KKR bid came
on the heels of last week's an-
5 757-6309nouncement by F. Ross Johnson,
RJR's president and chief execu-
hve officer, and Edward Horn-gan, the head of the tobacco divi-
Impact of buyout will be little felt
sion, that they were considering
a $17 billion offer to take the
company private.
Neat Kaplan, who follows
RJR Nabisco for Interstate
Johnson Lane Securities in Char-
lotte, said even if a new owner
took over and sold the tobacco
division, it would likely stay put,
"whoever buys it, i t will make no
sense to move Tobaccoville he
said. "They (tobacco operations)
weren't all that affected when
they (RJR Nabisco) moved the
headquarters to Atlanta
Analysts also said they
didn't expect the change of own-
ership to have an impact on the
company's plans to build a large
bakery in Gardner.
When the two top RJR Na-
bisco managers announced last
week that they were considering
launching the $17billion, or $75 a
share, offer to buy the company,
some analysts said they might
have to sell off the tobacco'divi-
sion to finance the deal.
Since then, some analysts have
come to believe that they may
haveintended to keep the com-
pany intact.
Now with KKR increasing the
ante to about $90 a share, Kaplan-
believes it would be difficult for
new owners to turn a profit with-
out selling off some of its assets to
pay off the debt service for the lev-
eraged buyout.
"I think it's pretty certain now
that there's going to be a breakup
of the company he said. I sus-
pect they'll sell off the food com-
ponents because that's where the
money is
That situation could be benefi-
cial to North Carolina, he said.
"Separating it could restore the
tobacco division's status he said.
Connaughton agreed.
"Whoever emerges as head of
the cigarette operations will be
back in North Carolina he said.
"So we're no worse off than we are
right now The big blow hap-
pened last year, he said, when the
corporate headquarters moved to
Atlanta.
"The tobacco operations have
to be based here, so there's no
downside potential here in North
Carolina he said.
Campbell Harvey, an assistant
professor of finance at Duke
University's Fuqua School of Busi-
ness, described the tobacco divi-
sion as "the real cash cow
Tobacco is a recession-proof
industry he said. "While ifs ob-
vious that use is down in the VS.
markets, the international market
is huge. If s a real money-maker, so
no one would want to dump that
part of the business
Fred Nordenholz, president of
the Greater Winston-Salem Cham-
ber of Commerce, said RJR Na-
bisco has invested too much
money in the area to let it go to
waste.
They have invested literally
billions of dollars over the last
several years in modem, state-of-
the-art equipment he said. "I
think there's zero chance they're
going to do something with those
The State Department also
argued in the cable that any in-
dictment of Marcos should be
limited to alleged criminal acts
committed after he fled to Hawaii.
But prosecutors in Giuliani's
office have argued that the only
way to recover any of the ill-cot-
ten fortune in Manhattan real es-
tate and fine art that Marcos alleg-
edly has acquired is to charge him
with acts of fraud that began
while he was still president of the
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Swe.it shirtN
Million dollars awarded to protestors
ATLANTA (AP) - A state was hurt, literally, or lost wages, suit be dropped because it would ordered to pay $30,000but he said
lawmaker vowed to seek wages, anything. They did not prove any- impoverish the families of KKK the marchers may have a hard
guns and even Confederate flags thing she said,
from 11 Klansmen to collect his She said that within 30 days
share of a $1 million award to civil she would ask US. District Judge
rights marchers pelted with rocks Charles A. Moye Jr. to dismiss or
in nearly all-white Forsyth lower the damages.
County. The jury reached its verdict
A federal jury found the Ku Oct. 5, agreeing that the violence
Mux Klansmen and two white amounted to a violation of the
members.
Williams said he has forgiven
the Klan "and other white su-
premacists for brutalizing us"
during the march.
There had been 57.plaintiffs.
Williams and three others
supremacist groups responsible
spor
17,
for disrupting the Jan. 17, 1987,
march north of Atlanta, and
awarded $948,650 in damages to
49 demonstrators who filed suit.
"It is a message to the Ku Klux
Klan nationwide that this can
happen to you said state Rep.
J.E. "Billy" McKinney, one of the
demonstrators.
McKinney said he and the
oUcr vtaiMtiffs "awe iwci mined
we will get every dime that we can
get out of the Klan
The award, the second major
one involving a Klan organization
in two years, includes $400,000
each from the Southern White
Knights of the Ku Klux Klan and
the invisible Empire Knights of
the Ku Klux Klan. David Holland,
grand dragon of the Southern
White Knights, was ordered to
pay $50,000, the highest of the 11
defendants.
"I guarantee if (Holland's)
got a pick-up truck, I'm going to
take it. If he's got a shotgun in the
back of (of the truck), I'm going to
take it, too - and I want has Con-
federate flag McKinney said.
Defense attorneys were
stunned by the verdict unsealed
Tuesday and said they would
appeal. Holland's attorney, Jef-
frey Sliz, called it "grossly unrea-
sonable
Another defense attorney,
Jane Plaginos, said the plaintiffs
had no proof for any injury mat
would mandate such severe
damages.
They did not prove anybody
marchers' civil right. Moye or- dropped out during the trial and
dered the verdict sealed until four others dropped out Tuesday.
time collecting it.
"If the $30,000 holds up, and I
don't feel that it will hold up, they
would play the devil getting it
Stephens said. "1 don't have any-
thing such as that"
Stephens, an electrician, said
he rents his home.
In February 1987, an all-white
Weird, Wild, Colorful
Halloween Clothes
rpatvte
Tuesday to give those who The jury awarded $50 to each federal jury in Alabama awarded
brought the lawsuit time to de- plaintiffs in compensatory dam-
ride whether to join City Council- ages. The rest was in punitive
man Hosea Williams, who
wanted to drop it
Williams, who helped organ-
ize the march and was among
those who filed the lawsuit, urged
toward the end of the trial that the
damages. The lawsuit had sought
$1.5 million.
One defendant was found not
liable.
a black woman, Beulah Mae
Donald, $7 million from the
United Klans of America and six
members or former members of
the group after her son,Michael
Donald, was beaten, strangled
�Go1
We've Got Anything And Everything
Q�
CLOTHES
Ed Stephens, grand dragon of and hanged in a tree in 1981 at age
the Invisible Empire Knights, was 19.
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i 10:00-5:00 M-F
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Stfe iEaat (Earnltnian
PETE FERNALD, G�IM�1�
Chip Carter, vi�rM fa�
James F.J. McKee, ��� �rt�
Joe Harris, mmmh
Doug Johnson, sp et
Tim Hampton, j-� &.
Michelle England, c m-
Debbie Stevens, $�.
Stephanie Folsom, c &
Jeff Parker�
Tom FURR,c�.drf�mM�f�
Susan Howell, . m
John W. Medun, m ���
Mac Clark, hnaMMir
October 27,1988
OPINION
Page 4
Economics
A difficult language for politicians
Economics is a difficult language enough votes for any given budget
for most people to understand; it is to override the veto. Congress often
best understood by analogy. At the can't appropriate less than the Presi-
Republican Convention, George dent asks for, and most of the time
Bush likened the economy to a sick Congress is smart enough to know
man; this lesson is well taken. that more is needed than the Presi-
Imagine the economy as a sick dent requests. In addition, once tuj
man. His doctors (Drs. Reagan and funds are made available, they are
Bush) tell him that he needs to go managed � or, more frequently,
jogging to improve his health. So the mismanaged- - by Reagan appoint-
man goes jogging.
Scene change: seven years pass.
The man has kept up his habit of
jogging. He looks good � pulse rate
ees.
There is another side to the eco-
nomic issue, however, one which is
little-known but actually has more
low, heart feeling Hne, and so on. But bearing on the economy than the
the man is about to jog off a cliff. candidates' own policies. The head
Now, make no mistake; the man of the Federal Reserve Board, cur-
himself looks good. But his doctors, rently Alan Greenspan, is effectively
the Republicans, want him to keep in control of the economy. When
jogging. Right over the edge. Wall Street whines about the
Breaking awav from the analogy economy's being too strong and
for a bit, let's consider Michael heading for a recession, the Fed
Dukakis. Dukakis' record on the
economy is good but spotty. Massa-
chussets' economy is strong, due in
part to the ReaganBush
administration's military buildup.
Dukakis spread jobs around Massa-
chussets � spread the wealth � so
that as many people as possible
reaped the benefits.
Dukakis has been accused of
tightens the money supply, which
raises interest rates, which raises the
prices on virtually everything,
which leads to less consumer spend-
ing, which leads to lower inflation
all of which means that in the end
everything costs more but at least
the Fed has averted the threat of a re-
cession. For a while.
Most of those leading the charge
raising taxes in Massachussets five to have the moneY gW squeezed
times True, Massachussets' citizens (which, you should keep in mind,
are paying more in taxes than thev increases interest rates) are the most
were when Dukakis was first gover- wealthy persons and corporations,
nor, but most of the reason for that is including foreign investors such as
this: they have more money. Their
real income has increased despite
increased taxes.
The ReaganBush administra-
tion has found less direct ways of
taking money from the people�not
the Japanese, who, if they got pan-
icky and dumped their American in-
vestments, would ruin the economy
for certain. These wealthy concerns
also have heavy investments in such
items as government bonds and
by raising income tax, usually, but Treasury bills, which means that
the outcome is the same. For ex- Jheir return on � ltems gets
ample, many college students are larger as interest rates increase,
having much more difficulty in get- The bottom line is that the
ting educational loans these days. wealthy investors on Wall Street line
On the deficit, both sides are their pockets at the expense of the
about equal. Under Dukakis, Mas- rest of us- rWhlJe theX rea? ever
sachussets has run up a tab. Under greater Proflts f?m their rmv,est-
ReaganBush, America has gone � � rest of America finds it
from its status as the world's largest ever harder to purchase homes, cars,
creditor nation to the world's largest and everything else,
debtor nation; ReaganBush have The next president must take
tripled the national debt. control of the economy; a good first
And you're wrong if you object action would be to install a head of
that if s the Democrats in Congress me Fed who would not be so easily
who are "really" responsible for this influenced by affluent Wall Street
slide. First of all, the Republicans investors. Dukakis will be far more
controlled the Congress for the first likelY to replace Greenspan than
six years of the so-called Reagan will Bush; Greenspan is after all a
Revolution, which is when most of staunch conservative and a Reagan
the damage was done. But the sad appointee. Greenspan is even help-
state of the economy wasn't Con- mg Bush get elected by preventing a
gress' fault then, and ifs not Con- recession before the election,
gress' fault now. Returning to the analogy: if Bush
On the national level, the budget is elected, odds are that the formerly
is a horrendously complex and con- sick man will jog right off the cliff,
troversial monster. If Congress
doesn't give the President what he
asks for, Congress faces veto after
veto, and usually there are not
which means he'll end up a lot more
sick than he was before he was
"cured And if no one stops this
man, we're all going with him.
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Y&R CHIU) THE N�
1 miiiuirciii i� ii li
i
ANO Thats the BI&- DifpheNct Beweenifi�WPiw&
Assault story attacked
To the editor:
I can't believe the audacity of the
paper to print such a misinformed,
one-sided story as "Knifing mars
weekend for two students When I
read the article I was shocked to read
that the article portrayed Tony Sauls
as being totally at fault. Where did
you get your information?
If you so cleverly had his name
and where he was from, why
couldn' t you call him and ask his side
of the story? What Chris failed to tell
you was that he and Jomo provoked
the whole incident. If you had inves-
tigated the story you would have
found that there was an eyewitness
who admitted Jomo started the argu-
ment and he was the one who wanted
to take it outside, not Tony.
The readers need to know that
Jomo is almost twice Tony's size. Ifs
obvious that Jomo and Chris thought
since Tony is small they could have
fun or maybe he'd run scared, well
look where it got them! If Chris had
told the truth or if you had asked the
police you would have found out
they had thrown Tony to the ground
and were kicking him before Tony
pulled the knife.
Tony warned them that he had a
knife to try and scare them away. He
would not have used it either, unless
provoked, and I think being jumped
by two guys twice his size is reason
enough. There was nothing sneaky
about it and if they hadn't tried to
jump him, none of this would have
happened.
Also, the comment about the
knife should have been clarified. The
police were shocked to learn that it
was a pocket knife because of the
extent of the damage. But when a
person is scared that two guys twice
his size are going to beat liim too
death, don't you think it's only nor-
mal to try and defend yourself. Next
time a story is printed, make sure the
information's right. I'm sorry Chris
and Jomo were injured, but none of
this would have happened if they
hadn't tried to jump him in the first
place.
Susan Dunnigan
Freshman
Sociology
Education policies
To the editor:
Selfishness, and an inability to
think abstractly are "in" and fore-
sight, humanitarianism, and aware-
ness are "out "Quick fixes based
on the four-year election cycle, drive
foreign and domestic policy. Reform
needs are ignored unless those by-
passed by the "hot check good times"
are vocal, organized or too obvious
(the homeless).
Kids doing poorly in school are
environmentally deprived. Parents
of high-achievers provide computers
or books in the home, read stories,
and work with (or against) the
teacher. The "problem with educa-
tion" is a deeper problem of socioeco-
nomic inequality. "Solutions" like
merit pay or Bush's "parental choice"
and teaching "values" will do little
for student achievement. "Parental
choice" assumes parents can choose,
and which "values" will be taught?
These "solutions" are hypocritical
and they ignore the underlying prob-
lem. With more head start or early
educational intervention for under-
privileged kids, we might have fewer
people on welfare. The investment is
long-range and won't yield results
before the next election.
Long-range federal programs
advocated by "liberal" administra-
tions include Social Security, the
Older American's Act, the G.I. Bill,
federal deposit insurance, and feder-
ally supported mortgages. How
many of you soatifrii'wl'iMrVBft '
tives your parents, or grandparents
benefit from them? You and I benefit
from unions that fought for labor
laws against sweat shops and child
labor. How soon we forget.
"Fixing" education might mean
raising taxes so schools have what is
needed. Now we send our kids door-
to-door coercing people into paying
$8 for 12 cookies. A true democracy
requires an educated population
(resistant to manipulation by ideo-
logical rhetoric and the misrepresen-
tation or deliberate withholding of
information). I norant people can be
manipulated nd voting becomes
meaningless. Our best national de-
fense and economic policy is an edu-
cated population. Bush, in spite of his
rhetoric, has not supported educa-
tion.
Jim Mitchell
Faculty
Communist threat
To the editor:
I have written in response to
your article discussing Communist
government within a democratic
society when you stated: "Democ-
racy poses a threat to communism,
but communism poses no threat to
democracy
Democracy is "a form of govern-
ment in which the supreme power is
vested in the people and exercised by
them directly or indirectly through a
system of representation Commu-
nism is "a totalitarianism system of
government in which a single au-
thoritarian party controls state-
owned means of production with a
professed aim of establishing a state-
less society
The threat clearly arises when
communism has its power vested in a
authoritarian party that has no re-
spect to the rights of another govern-
ment and their goal is the "suppres-
sion of the masses Marxist philoso-
phy does not require one to live
under the context of a constitution
which reflects a majority rule by rep-
resentation of the states. Commu-
nism does not dictate a form of rule
which reflects that all men are cre-
ated equal and that the government
is "of the people, by the people, and
for the people" but a way of life
which governed of the few, by the
few, and for the few, -at the price of
many.
"Every 'right' is an application of
the same measure to different people
who, as a matter of fact, are not simi-
lar and are not equal to one another;
and therefore, 'equal right' is really
violation of equality, and injustice -
Marx
"If we are made in some degTee
for others, yet in a greater, are we
lfitttti(!lVfui,our,sefws. It wasrontrary to
feeling, and indeed ridiculous that a
man had less rights in himself than
one of his neighbors, This, to men
of certain ways of thinking, would be
to annihilate the blessings of exis-
tence, and to contradict the Giver of
life " - Jefferson.
A Concerned Student
Bryan Creech
Junior
Campus
Spectrum
Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Pubications Building, across from
the entrance ofjoyner Libra?y.
For purposes of verification, all
letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number, and signature of the
authoris). Letters are limited to 300
words or less, double spaced or neatly
printed. All letters are subject to ed-
iting for brevity, obscenity, and libel,
and no personal attacks will be per-
mitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are re-
minded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday's edition and 5 p.m. Tues-
day for Thursday's edition.
Bush is "slavishly devotecT'to the special interests ortheNRA
BY MICHAEL NEWMAN
Th� New Ktpublic
George Bush is a card-carrying member of the
National Rifle Association. Among the NRA's past
causes are opposition to a ban on plastic handguns (a
?osition shared with airplane hijackers) and a ban on
eflon bullets, able to pierce policemen's protective waiting period for anyone wanting to buy a hand-
flip and signed on. But a tew weeks ago, the NRA
reclaimed its customary place on the fringe of
American politics with its deft sabotage of the Brady
amendment.
The amendment � named after James Brady,
who was brain-damaged for life during the Reagan
assassination attempt - called for a seven-dav
lies. A mass-mail campaign warned millions of gun
owners that their representative was planning to
vote for a liberal effort to impose "total, strict gun
control on all America that could cost "billions" of
dollars. (The Congressional Budget Office estimate
was $5 million to $10 million.)
bear fruit. The national Fraternal Order of Police has
called it "unrealistic and unworkable and the In-
ternational Association of Chiefs of Police labeled it
a total sham The FBI had a letter ready explaining
to Congress exactly how silly the substitute was, but
the Reagan administration suppressed it. The irony
is worth dwelling on: Ronald Reagan, Mr. Loyalty,
The bill's sponsors, according to these letters, turned a deaf ear to appeals from Mrs. James Brady,
wanted "the police to visit your home before you can whose husband's head had absorbed a bullet in
vests. This may sound l.ke an attempt.a,Bush by gun. The idea was to d.scourage impulse buying, b firein�. ft � ,ice would have
�" -? 9 5?!Sr7iES WlUC m � .bUSme8S F� !2L2E!S �optal of reviewing the nameVand addresses of fcy JTis the number of politicians who
proudly stood by the NRA in opposing a plasbc consequences, and tog.vepol.ee a chance to make pros,jve g buye�. K a buyer turned out to be ,ined up with the NRA and should have known
Xhen. isn't Michael Dukakis talking more "SESSZZh- gT J �T XT 2
about Bush's ecial-interest problem - a lavish period enabledCalifornia, for example, to stop 1.500 S�if SinR A tactics It isn't so f"ouse wluMOT "ample. Perhaps most d.s-
devotiontomeTPartlybecausemeNRAbegan Snvic.ed felons from buying guns in Median, .JtuZCi tTSloSSS
a couple of years ago to revamp .ts .mage, reversmg Does a wa.tmg penod dampen commerce and hurt H (althou w tha, 228 House members v" CdaS�
itself on key issues a ter,� fa�.hasm beganto gundealersTacourseAndrequmngaprescnpbon who J�dwgh the NRA had received $1.1 million ZStoSSteSSO.
MrrSlSTesSS forampheUm.neshurtspharmaceut.ca.compan.es. � pAC ovef fc mree election ZStZSSlIwwlS
:��:� Kss-sr0 ,ttrfrtss: EisLrafeSiirtS
a plastic handgun ban had gained unstoppable n the Brady amendment, the NRA used s,ble nker on the subject opposed the McCollum occasionally, and holey, as majority leader, could
momentum in the Senate, the NRA did another back a 03�. The first phase consisted of amendment and why virtually no one expects it to have spent it to good effect.
Segregat
JOHANNESBURG, Soutl
Africa (AP) - Black, white, Asiai
and mixed-race voters cast ballot
under heavy guard today in segj
regated municipal elections, witl
the ruling party of President P
Botha expected to lose ground tj
right-wing opponents.
The balloting for 7,500 towi
council seats marked the first hm
all four major race groups 11
South Africa vote on the sai
day, but a low black turnout wa
expected.
State Radio South Africa saij
2,000 town council candidate
were elected unopposed and tl
fewer than half the 1339 blacl
seats were contested, with n
candidates for 138 of them.
In open defiance of state-oj
emergency regulations, Arcl
bishop Desmond Tutu and oth�
black anh-aParthcid leaders ha
advocated an election boycott
Anti-apartheid organizatio
called for a national day of protd
today.
Lowest voter
WASHINGTON AP - ThJ
turnout in the presidential eio
tion is expected to be one ot thj
lowest this century, continuing
trend of declining voter parucip
turn in a nation that prides itself �
a beacon of Western democrac
say political analysts.
Public interest groups ai
warning that only 50 percent
less of the eligible voters will go
the polls on Nov. 8, about th
same as the record low 49 percei
turnout in the 1924 president
election.
The declining turnout, dow
from a record high 79 percent
1S96, puts the United States at tl
bottom of the voter participati
list in the world's democratic
terns.
Belgium heads the averaj
voter participation list with
percent while the United Statj
ranks last with 53 percent ai
Ireland second to last at b2
cent, according to figures col
piled by Frances Fox Piven
Fresh Pork S
Heavy Westei
Chuck Roast.I
Heavy Weste
Beef Stew-
Fresh Ground
:Loin End Pn
First Cut Poii
Center Cut
Deli Special
Turkey Breaj
Baked Ham
Fresh Fryer
Whole or Ri
Sliced Free.
iarmt
FlAMWt





.

e.vr
1 An 5-
Rcjj
CtoJPtiXTes
I
ed
i real clearlv arises when
-m has its power vested in a
an party that has no re-
e rights of another govem-
their goal is the ' suppres-
le masses Marxist philoso-
p not require one to live
ke context of a constitution
It ects a maionty rule by rep-
lon of the states. Commu-
s not dictate a form of rule
fleets that all men are cre-
i and that the government
people, by the people, and
people" but a way of life
nerned of the few, by the
for the few, -at the price of
ty 'right' is an application of
measure to different people
matter of fact, are not simi-
re not equal to one another;
Jefore, 'equal right' is really
of equality, and injustice -
;e are made in some degree
frs, yet in a greater, are we
serves. It wasrontrary to
ind indeed ridiculous that a
less rights in himself than
is neighbors, This, to men
ways of thinking, would be
ulate the blessings of exis-
id to contradict the Giver of
Jefferson.
A Concerned Student
Bryan Creech
junior
ampus I
pectrum
ules
? East Carolinian welcomes
expressing all points of view.
n irop them by cur office in the
ations Building, across from
ranee of Joyner Libra;y.
for purposes of verification, all
Js must include the name, major
classiHcation, address, phone
her, and signature of the
Vr$). Letters are limited to 300
; or less, double spaced or neatly
ed All letters are subject to ed-
lor brevity, obscenity, and libel,
no personal attacks will be per-
Id. Students, faculty and staff
mg letters for this page are re-
led that they are limited to one
v two weeks. The deadline for
trial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
tday's edition and 5 p.m. Tues-
jhr Thursday's edition.
theNRA
Fraternal Order of Police has
land unworkable and the In-
n of Chiefs of Police labeled it
had a letter ready explaining
w silly the substitute was, but
j-ation suppressed it. The irony
: Ronald Reagan, Mr. Loyalty,
peals from Mrs. James Brady,
rad had absorbed a bullet in-
le number of politicians who
fRA and should have known
of Indiana, and Tony Coelho,
example. Perhaps most dis-
?rformance of Tom Foley. Sure
;rs out in the Washington state
1 v that they'd unseat the House
ise he made them drive to the
kiy each shotgun. The whole
litical capital is to spend it
ley, as majority leader, could
effect.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,1988 5
Segregated elections in South Africa
JOHANNESBURG, South
Africa (AP) - Black, white, Asian
and mixed-race voters cast ballots
under heavy guard today in seg-
regated municipal elections, with
the ruling party of President P.W.
Botha expected to lose ground to
right-wing opponents.
The balloting for 7,500 town
council seats marked the first time
all four major race groups in
South Africa vote on the same
day, but a low black turnout was
expected.
State Radio South Africa said
2,000 town council candidates
were elected unopposed and that
fewer than half the 1,839 black
seats were contested, with no
candidates for 138 of them.
In open defiance of state-of-
emergency regulations, Arch-
bishop Desmond Tutu and other
black anti-aPartheid leaders had
advocated an election boycott.
Anti-apartheid organizations
called for a national day of protest
today.
Truckloads of police were
posted as guards across the coun-
try, including the polling booth in
Mayfair, a white suburb of Johan-
nesburg where non-whites have
begun moving in illegally.
Police said gasoline bombs
were thrown during the night at
the homes of three candidates in
Soweto, the country's largest
black township, outside Johan-
nesburg. Also, a limpet mine ex-
ploded in a beer hall, but there
were no injuries.
In Soweto, police with rifles
stood around booths; soldiers and
police on motorcycles and horses
were stationed near the police sta-
tion.
There has been an average of
one bombing a day in South Af-
rica since the beginning of Sep-
tember in a campaign the govern-
ment blames on the outlawed
African National Congress. A car
bomb killed two black men and
injured 18 people on Monday in
the town of Witbank, east of
Johannesburg.
On Tuesday, riot police used
tear gas and clubs against more
than 1,000 activists at University
of the Witwatersrand in Johan-
nesburg who were calling for an
election boycott.
There were no injuries in that
incident, but about 30 high school
students in Cape Town similarly
protesting the elections suffered
slight injuries in a clash Tuesday
with club-wielding police, school
officials said.
The white-controlled govern-
ment, meanwhile, seeks a high
turnout to bolster its claim that it
is broadening democracy" in
South Africa.
In the white elections, Botha's
National Party was in a show-
down with the staunchly pro-
apartheid Conservative Party.
The Conservatives were predict-
ing they could capture the city
council in Pretoria, the capital,
and other long-time National
Party strongholds.
The Conservatives, who see
Botha's gradual race reforms as
capitulation to the black majority,
seek to reimpose strict segrega-
tion throughout South Africa.
The Conservatives won 26
percent of the vote in the national
elections of May 1987, and claim
they could seriously challenge the
National Party in parliamentary
elections expected by early 1990.
White anti-apartheid candi-
dates are active in only a handful
of cities, such as Johannesburg,
Cape Town and Durban.
In the black elections, less
than 500,000 of the country's 26
million blacks were expected to
vote despite a massive govern-
ment advertising campaign to
promote black turnout. About 2.4
million blacks are registered to
vote in municipal elections, but
blacks have no vote in national
elections.
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THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
Lowest voter turnout predicted for 1988 presidential election
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
turnout in the presidential elec-
tion is expected to be one of the
lowest this century, continuing a
trend of declining voter participa-
tion in a nation that prides itself as
a beacon of Western democracy,
say political analysts.
Public interest groups are
warning that only 50 percent or
less of the eligible voters will go to
the polls on Nov. 8, about the
same as the record low 49 percent
turnout in the 1924 presidential
election.
The declining turnout, down
from a record high 79 percent in
1S96, puts the United States at the
bottom of the voter participation
list in the world's democratic sys-
tems.
Belgium heads the average
voter participation list with 95
percent while the United States
ranks last with 53 percent and
Ireland second to last at 62 per-
cent, according to figures com-
piled by Frances Fox Piven and
Richard Cloward in their book,
"Why Americans Don't Vote
Most political scientists at-
tribute the low American partici-
pation to the requirement that
voters register days or weeks be-
fore they cast their ballot. In con-
trast, registration in West Euro-
pean democracies is generally
automatic, with the voter receiv-
ing a notice in the mail.
"In fact, American registra-
tion procedures are Byzantine
compared with those that prevail
in other democracies said Piven
and Cloward.
Walter Dean Burnham, an
expert on voter par ticipa tion, says
that without "the two-step
hurdle" of registration and vot-
ing, turnout would increase 8 to
10 percent. Figures show that 87
percent of those who do register
go to the polls on Election Day.
Other reasons cited by ana-
lysts for low participation include
the declining power of the politi-
cal party system, the generally
political nature of the electorate
and television, which tends to
focus on personalities rather than
parties.
"As a result, people don't feel
very represented and if s not very
important for them to vote said
Burnham, a professor of govern-
ment at the University of Texas at
Austin.
Political parties in Europe are
far more homogeneous than the
Democratic or Republican parties
in the United States, making it
easier for voters to take sides and
for the parties to target constitu-
ents, said G. Bingham Powell,
chairman of the School of Govern-
ment at the University of Roches-
ter.
Many Americans do not iden-
tify with either of the two major
parties, said Powell, who studies
the difference between the U.S.
and European political systems.
Scholars also note that among
the non-voters about 75 percent
are low-income, less educated
Americans who do not feel repre-
sented by the existing system and
are generally less likely to vote.
Others believe the decline in
voter participation stems from the
general attitude of many Ameri-
cans.
"Not voting is a reflection of
the fact that we're relatively con-
tent with life, sated with our life-
styles said Michael Robinson, a
Georgetown University scholar.
"People don't see any reason to
vote and change this
And many analysts contend
that the George Bush-Michael
Dukakis race has focused heavily
on negative campaigning, further
alienating voters.
"If all you see every night is
Dukakis bashing Bush or vice
versa, why would you rush out to
vote for them? They don't address
issues, what's the point?" said
Curtis Gans, who heads the non-
partisan Committee for the Study
of the American Electorate.
W� DARE YOU TO SCE THT UNCANNY F
.Straight From Your
Wildest Nightmares1. 1
!�&-
I Pi
kg
� W�r�wolv�� ' y - "Dys
� ZomblMl
12.1 EVAMS STR-EET �
OCT Z.7-31 4m�
7 OO PtA UNTIL.
3 ADULTS 41 :o UUPE�

Sponsored by Greenville Jaycees & WDLX
Thursday, October 27. College Night $2.00 wl.D.
� a. k . i �. t �� Jtkt i I � r I?
Tail-Gate With Overtoil's
Go Pirates!
Fresh Pork Spare Ribslb. 99'
Heavy Western First Cut
Chuck Roastlb.$1.09
Heavy Western Boneless
Beef Stewlb. $1.59
Fresh Ground Chucklb. $1.69
:Loin End Pork Roastlb. 89
First Cut Pork Chopslb. 99
Center Cut Chuck Roastlb.$1.29
Deli Specials:
Turkey Breastlb.$3.99
Baked Hamlb.$2.99
Fresh Fryer Leg Quarterslb. 38'
Whole or Rib Half Pork Loins
Sliced Freelb. 98'
Cheer Detergent
Giant 42 oz. box99'
Limit 1 box per customer per order with $10.00 food order
excluding advertised specials
Taste Great
Homogenized Milk99'
12 gallon plastic jug
Texas Style Biscuits
Large Can31.00
New Crop Florida
Jumb Seedless
Naval Oranges 371.00
Florida Grapefruit471.00
Local Collards3 lbs. $1.00
Yellow Onions3 lb. bag 79'
Green Cabbagelb. 19'
Tender Fresh
Snap Beanslb. 59'
Aberdeen Sausagelb. roll 79'
Bounty Towels
giant rolllimit 2 b'
Swiss Miss Hot Cocoa Mix
12 1 oz. envelopes79'
Coca -Cola
Regular, Diet, or Caffiene Free99'
Limit 2 per customer per order with MO.OO food order
excluding advertised specials
Duncan Hines
Cake Mix
Yellow or Butter Golden69'
17 oz. box
Gwaltney Franks
12 oz. pkg99'
Golden Bananaslb. 18'
Prices effective Wednesday,
October 26-Saturday, October 29,1988
STORE HOURS:
OPEN 8 AM - 8 PM
MON. THRU. SAT.
SUNDAYS 1-6 PM
Come by and visit our newly remodeled
laundromat!
New equipment and a fresh new look!
Watch for specials later!
SHOP WHERE THE PIRATES SHOP FOR PRICE,
QUALITY, AND CONVENIENCE!
.b
&
i
a&
A
fc


OVERTON'S SHOPPING CENTER IS
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED
WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE OF ECU
ON THE CORNER OF
3RD AND JARVIS STREETS! JUST
2 BLOCKS FROM ECUI
OVERTON'S
al





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: To share a 3-bedroom townhouse.
No deposit, private bedroom, private
bathroom. $183 33mo. 13 utilities.
Fireplace, tanning beds, sauna, weight-
room and more. Call 355-0700.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: Spacious 2-story apt private
bedroom, 112 bath. 5 min from campus
� on ECU bus route. $142.5mo, 12
utilities, quiet location. Call Wendy or
Tina (355-0761) antyime Avail Dec. 1,
sooner if necessary
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
male roommate to share new mobile
home. 10 minutes from campus Non-
smoker, please. Call Hugh at 756-6851
after 5:00 p.m.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE: To share
2 bed, 1 12 bath Townhouse. Non-
smoker. S18512 uhl. Located in Wil-
liamsburg Manor off Hooker St. Contact
Kathy, 756-7797.
ROOMMATE NEEDED Prefer male,
smoker to share large house S1Q0 month,
13 utilities. Freshlv painted. Close to
campus. Call: 758-0897.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share 2 bed-
room apt. near campus. Must be mature.
SI65 per month covers rent, utilities,
phone & cable TV. Call 757-3811.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE 1971 Cutlass, rebuilt 350
engine, 2 dr black over red, almost fully
restored $2300 or best offer. Call (S-5 757-
6611, Ext 271, (5-10 p.m.) 355-0363.
FOR SALE: SCUBA dry suite with mittes
and hood SI 50 B.C. S35 call 355-7tx38
IRATE: Tie-dves for sale Club logo shirts
also available. Contact any Fnsbee Club
member, look for us at the bottom of
College I Iill, or call 752-7588
AQUARIUM: 40 gallon with lighted
hood, undergravel filter and stand SI60
Call 825-0808 after 5.00.
COUCH FOR SALE: Full size vinyl
couch, folds down to bed, dark brown,
only S30. call Scott at 752-4S25.
FOR SALE: !VC car amp 50x50 w SI00;
Pioneer car amp GM-2000 100x100 w
S175; 752-7391 after 3:30 p.m.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, lnc, offers high-qual
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time Rates start at S2.00 per
page and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
Resume' production, and other business
and professional services Call 757-3111
M-F for more details'
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street Ox?side Cubbies) Greenville, NC
752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best best music available for
parties Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781. Ask for Morgan.
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES. Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
R'esum'e production, and other business
and professional services. Call 747-3111
M-F for more details!
HELP WANTED
HIRING! Federal government jobs in
your area and overseas. Many immediate
openings without waiting list or test. $15-
68,000. Phone call refundable. (602) 838-
8885. Ext. 5285.
NEED MALE AND FEMALE DANCERS
FOR PRIVATE PARTIES: Also need la-
dies 18-36 years of age for a legs video.
Earnings of $50 per hour and more. Apply
in person Monday through Friday, 4 p.m.
to 5:30 p m. to Promotions Co 2708-A E.
10th Street. No phone calls please.
ATHLETIC MANAGERS NEEDED:
Contact Fred in Minges Coliseum. 757-
6029.
HELP WANTED: Are you a college stu-
dent or faculty member in need of spend-
ing money? Brody's is accepting applica-
tions for part time sales and Customer
Service positions. Apply in person,
Brody's Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4 p.m.
WANTED: Campus representative to
promote our low cost, high quality Spring
Break trip to Daytona Beach. Free trips
and money while gaining valuable busi-
ness experience Call Kurt with Travel
Associates 1-800- 558-3002.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Recreation and Parks Department is re-
cruiting for part time youth basketball
coaches for the winter program. Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge of
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
9-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 p.m. - 7 p.m Monday thru
Friday, and some night and weekend
coaching The program will extend from
December 1 to mid-February. Salary rate
is $3.55 to S4.35 per hour. Applications
will be accepted starting October 20. Con-
tact Bpti lames at 830-4543.
PAPERS, RESUMES, SJC: Dane by
Desktop Publish ng or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted Call 752-1933.
PERSONALS
PSI CHI MEMBERS: There will be a
regular meeting on Thursday October
27th at 400 p.m. in room 302.
NIGHTMARE ON 5TH ST. HALLOW-
EEN SHIRTS ARE HERE: Contact any
Zeta or call 756-7357 or 757-0643
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Would like to wish
all Greeks a Happy I lalloween!
HAPPY HALLOWEEN: Hope everyone
has a happy and safe Halloween, and
remember DON'T DRINK AND DRIVE
The Sigmas.
GOOD LUCK: To the ECU Pirates
against Miami this weekend. Sigmas back
the Pirates!
PIRATE WALK: Would like to thank the
Zeta's and Theta Chi's for their help last
week.
WANTED: Black waterbed frame (&
poss. mattress) before Dec. 1. Also � inex-
pensive dresser wmirror wanted (Ap-
pearance doesn't matter). Call 355-7813
before 9 p.m.
ZETA SAE, AND ALPHA PHI: Thank
you for your help last week with Pirate
Walk.
AZD'S: Hovbout that road trip to the
fair? All we can say is we had a blast!
Let's get together again soon! Love, The
Kappa Sigs.
ATTENTION ALL FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES: Get psyched and
prepared to meet at the bottom of the hill
on November 5th at 1200 p.m. to be con-
tinued
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Would like to wish
Lisa Faulkner a happy birthday!
GREEKS: Theta Chi wants to thank all of
you for the support you gave us for our
installation. We look forward to some
great years again at ECU.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: From the broth
ers and pledges of Theta Chi: We can't
wait to party with yall Saturday morning
and we guarantee it won't be boring! The
champagne will flow until it is time for us
to go watch Miami lose 63 to oh
POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJORS: You
can help improve the system by joining
us. We are the North Carolina Student
Legislature. Please call 355-3152 or come
by 212 Mendenhall, Monday at 7:00
ADPI'S: What Thursday night has been
more complete? A poetry reading, some
great singing and everybody's favorite
beverage all made for a great time. Relo-
cating downtown did not hurt the party a
bit. It just kept rockin Thanks for an
awesome evening ladies! Love the Delta
Sigs
ECU RUGGERS: Invite everyone to come
tailgate before the game. Sat at 10:00 a.m.
behind Allied Health Building. ECU vs.
NC State for state championship.
PIKA: To Pikes peak we did go, where it
felt like 10 below. The fire kept us warm
till the cops put it out. But Apple Jack kept
us warm without a doubt. We had a blast!
Love the AZD's.
KAPPA SIGMA: Looking forward to
partying with you at the game. Love the
AZD's.
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo car-
tridges with instructions for re-sale. East
Coast Music & Video. 758-4251. 1109
Charles Blvd.
HEY KAPPA SIGMA: Down at the fair
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E-5�hS wet
� Located Near ECU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited of(er-$275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy William
7S6-781 S or 830-1W7
Office open Apt 8.12 530 p.m
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean and quirt one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV
Couples or singles only $195 a month. 6 month
lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couples or
singles Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
Hey Kappa Sigma, when we finally got
there The rain has stopped, but mud was
everywhere 1 ley Kappa Sigma, down at
the fair We had a blast, lets do it again ner
year. Love the AZD's.
TO ALL ALPHA PHI STRANGER
DATES: Get your costume ready, what
will you be7 Tonight's the night for Alpha
Phi! The busses will roll, Contemned
we're bound, so lets get ready to all throw
down! See you tonight1 Love, Your Alpha
Phi dates.
ALPHA PHI SISTERS & PLEDGES: Lets
get psyched � tonight's the night' Wh.) s
that strange man' He's outta sight'
$50 REWARD: For ID and evidena
person(s) stealing 8 wooden Hallo v.
yard decorations from residence near �
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru SaL Low
Cost Termination to 20 weeks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
DO YOU HAVE ANY
QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR
LONG DISTANCE
SERVICE?
Interested in learning about
calling plans and special
products that may save you
money?!
Contact: Dana Dunlow,
Your AT&T
Student Campus Manager
Here at ECU
Call: 752-0856
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday-Friday
WOULD YOU LIKE
TO LEARN TO SHAG?
5 Weeks
Tuesdays
$25.00
?SHAG LESSONS'
At the new
Ramada Inn
Starts Nov. 1
Beginner 7:00
Intermediate 8:00
Advanced 9:00
$NEED CASH? Loans On 4: Buying Cum$
TV, Stereos, Gold Jewelry, coin.
most anything of value
$Southern Gan 4c Pawn, Inc.
752-24646
Your Best Look
Specializing In: MANICURES:
French Manicures � Nail Tips �
Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
PEDICURES � SKIN CARE- Body
Wrapping � Face & Body Waxing �
Facials � Deep Fore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products For
Mon & Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaa Dr Greenville
The Secret Of Getting Rich
Amazing Book Tells All
Free Offer Details - Rush Stamped Self
Addressed Envelope
Wayne Humphries, Dept. L.M. - 1
Rt. 1 Box 215
Beulaville, NC 28518
LAMBDA CHI: We had an awesome time
at your house Thursday night. The cos-
tumes were a not Lets do it again soon.
Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
DELTA SIGS: Thanks for a great time at
the pre downtown get toether. We really
had fun Lets do it agains Love, Alpha
Delta Pi. PS We liked the poem.
BETA Xl'S: We love you! Love your AZD
sisters.
Make Up To $1000 In One Week!
Student Organizations,
Fraternities, Sororities needed for
Marketing Project on campus.
Must be motivated and organized.
Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 28.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Subscription Form
Name:
Address:
Date to Begin:
Complimentary.
Amount Paid:
Individual
Date to End:
Business:
Date Paid:
Rates: Individual US per year Buiinesa S35 per yet:
Ratum to Tto East Carolinian. Publication Bldg - ECU. Cwcnvulc. NC 27S -43SJ
L
Announcements
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career related work experi-
ence before you graduate We would like
to extend an invitation to ail students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase your
"fun" budget,
�opportur.ities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related expert
ence, when you graduate
Come by to see us today!
Thurs, Oct. 27, 4 p.m rm. 2006, Mon ,
Oct. 31,4 pm, rm. 2006
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester and or Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about oft-campus place-
ments Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fri.
night at 7 00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Attention all ECU students, faculty.
alumni and parents of ECU students!
Why spend another dull Thanksgiving
when you could be in the exciting city of
lights, New York City. Come join the Stu-
dent Union's Travel Committee excursion
to New York City, Nov. 23-27. For more
info, call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611.
CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance. Class photographs will be taken
Oct. 31 -Nov. 4 in the Student Store from 9
a.m. till 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
each day. The yearbook is not your year-
book until you are in it.
WYNTON MARSALIS CON-
CERT
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present Wynton Marsalis in concert
Nov. 1 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets go on sale for this Performing Arts
Series event on Mon Oct. 10. Winner of a
Grammy Award for both classical and
jazz performances, Mr Marsalis is sure to
bring an energetic and entertaining show
to Wright Auditorium. For further details,
contact: The Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall, or call (919) 757-6611.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stones for the Dec. issue. The maga-
zine is published twice a semester with the
first issue coming out in Oct. This special
issue will be a small magazine with
mainly general info whereas the Dec.
issue will be a larger size containing news
stories, short stories, editorials, poetry,
etc. Articles may be left at the office or at
the Media Board Secretary's Office in the
Publications Bldg.
ECU STUPENTSSTAFF
I.SS SOCIETY
Volunteers, old clothes it sheets are
needed DESPERATELY for the Pirate
dubLSS Society "Jr. Spooky Pirate
Night Halloween Carnival" to be held
Oct. 28 from 6-8 pm. at the Pirate Qub.
For marc info please contact Beth Smyth
or Ann Totaro at 830-9315, anytime!
A CHALLENGE
The East Carolina Biology Qub chal-
lenges ECHO ar d physics club to raise at
least $100 for ctoj. walk which is to be held
on Nov. 6th and t � challenge two other
organizations to do the same.
INTENDED SLAi MAJDM
All General College students who have in
dicated a desire to major in Speech Lan
guage and Auditory Pathology and have
R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to meet
on Nov. 2 at 5:00 p.m. in Brewster B-306.
Advising for early registration will take
place at that time. Others interested in
SLAP should contact the dept. - 757-6961
BADMINTON CLUB
The ECU Badminton Qub will have a
meeting at Memorial Gym, room 105, Fri
Oct. 28 at 5-6:00 p.m. Open to all students,
faculty & staff.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting will be Nov. 3 at 7:00 in
GCB 1012 All members please attend.
ASSERTiVENESS TRAINING
A three part workshop offered to students
at no cost by the University Counseling
Center. Nov. 3,10, and 17 (Thursdays). All
three sessions will be conducted from 3-4
p.m. in 312 Wright Bldg. Assertiveness
Training can sharpen your interpersonal
skills and help you target personal goals.
The workshop will focus on helping
members distinguish between their asfer-
tive, aggressive, and nonassertive behav-
iors. Participants can learn how to express
themselves directly and openly, and re-
spond to interpersonal situations in a
manner which neither compromises indi-
vidual beliefs nor offends others. Please
call the Counseling Center (757-6661) for
registration.
ESLCm
There will be a mandatory meeting and
initiation of new members to Psi Chi (The
National Honor Society in Psychology) on
Thurs. at 4.00 in the Psi Chi library in
Rawl, rm. 302.
HEALTH CAREERS DAY
All students in the Nursing and the Allied
1 lealth careers are encouraged to attend
this event in the Carol Belk Bldg. on Oct.
31 from 1-5 p.m. Over 75 health care insti-
tutions will be on the first and second
floors of the Allied 1 lealth Bldg. Come out
and learn of the opportunities in PT, OT,
Nursing, SOCW, Recreational Therapy,
PSYC, Music Therapy, Medical Records,
FNIM, CDFR, SPED, SLAP, Rehabilita-
tion Coimseling, and Clinical Laboratory
Science.
VA.F.
ITie VAF is holding its annual Beaux Arts
Ball Mon night at the Attic with musical
guests Big Kids and The Bond. Tickets are
S4 advance at Jenkins Art Bldg. or $5 at the
door. Door prizes and costume prizes will
be given out during the night's festivities.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
General College students should contact
their advisors the week of Oct. 31 - Nov. 4
to make arrangements for academic ad-
vising for spring semester, 1989. Early
registration begins Nov. 7 and ends Nov.
11.
Thurs. at 8:00 p.m. in Minges, room 142.
Please attend�plans about State Conven-
tion in Greensboro to be discussed 1 lope
to see you there.
TAILGATE PARTY
Come join the ECU P E. Major Qub in
celebrating the 1st Annual P.F. Majors
Qub Tailgate Party on Sat. at 11:30 am
for the Miami game. We will provide the
chicken�please bring your own bever-
ages. ALL HPERS STUDENTS AND
FACULTY ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
AND BRING FRIENDS We will be lo-
cated at the corner of Dmhurst Field-
behind the scoreboard of Ficklen Sta-
dium. 1IOPE TO SEE YOU Tl 1ERE!
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, structures and architectures of
North and Central American Earth as
seen by Ernst Habrichs Oct 24-Nov. 19.
Reception Wed 7:00 p.m, Mendenhall
Gallery
AMERICAN MKTG, ASSOC.
The American Mktg. Assoc. will be hold-
ing its next meeting Thurs. at 3:30 p.m.
The meeting will be held in the GCB in
room 1032. We will have a guest speaker
from Wal-Mart. All interested persons an
invited. All members are encouraged to
attend.
KARATE CLUB
COOPERATIVE
Representatives of the Walt Disney World
Company will be on campus to recruit EC
students for their College Program. A
seminarpresentation will be conducted
Nov. 9. Students from all majors are in-
vited to participate. Positions in guest
relations, attractions, merchandising, and
food services, among others are available.
Contact the Office of Cooperative Ed. in
the GCB for details.
P.E. MAJORS CLUB
WANTED ALL P E. Majors or intended
majors to help support our club. No
DUES�Just FUN Meeting to be held
ECU Karate Qub will meet Mon. & Wed
nights at 8:15 in Memorial Gym, for inter-
ested beginners, advanced students
Thurs 7:30
SUMMER JOB
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be Nov. 21 at 10:00 a.m.
in 1029 GCB. The ten-week internship
program, in the Raleigh area, is open to
sophomores, juniors, and seniors cur-
rently enrolled in college. (Those entering
Graduate School as of May, 1989 are not
eligible).
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to our Bible
Studies every Tues. night at 7.00 p.m. in
Rawl 130 Bring a friend. For more info
call Jim at 752-7199.
ART VOCAL ENSEMBLE
The National Gallery of Art Vocal En-
semble will perform in Hendrix Theatre
on Nov. 14 at 8 00 p.m This event is part of
the Chamber Music Series Four great
voices create one excellent sound, in jour-
ney exploring an almost limitless reper-
toire. Tickets go on sale Oct. 24 For further
details, contact The Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall, or call 757-6611, ext 266.
MINORITY STUDENTS
The North Carolina Student Legislation
needs vour voice Join us in representing
ECU around the state Everyone is wel-
come Monday at 7 p.m. 212 Mendenhall
or call 355-3152 for more info.
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
The Pledges of Gamma Sigma Sigma will
hold a bake sale on Oct 27 from 8 am. till
2 p.m All items will be $.25 Please come
by the Student Stores
VOLLEYBALL
The ECU Invitational will take place to
morrow at Minges The Ladv Pirates will
play James Madison at 10 a m At 4 p.m
they will play either UNCW or Winthrop
in the consolation or championship
match
FOOTBALL
The Pirates will host the Miami Hum
canes Sat at Ficklen Stadium Kickoff will
be at 1:30 pm. This is the last home con
test
STUDEN1 HELATH ORGJ
a nuN
The SI IS wii be H-n Frida)
a m to 12 midnight Sat - � . � ;
Sam Sun tt. 30,2 p.n
Mori, Oct 31 8 a rt to81 '�
socwyusi
On Nov 1 at 71 rm � "
� meeting foi v i
MAJOR
pose of this meet
Registi
Also other importai I i
be made All m.
stu
LS1000
libr u ' �
gin

tal i
���
li
-
121
Th
QVJ RSEAS ;
NETWOl
Jap cine
RAl :
from an ur
ers
North Carolina i
saying the.
dally slra;
uni - �
Heel state
far, th
found anv tak
John Hei pi
N.C. Associati
Colleges and I r
Tuesday that heh i
inquiries aboul
vate schools in tht si
for sale.
The Japanese
rials want I
control" of Ihe
trustees increasi I ertn
of Japanese stuck
faculty ar I
ARMY ROTC
Attention freshmen: This spring develop
important financial aid and career oppor-
tunities by taking MLSC 1001 (Intro to
ROTC and the Army) It's a one hour
elective with no uniform or haircut re-
quirements and entails no future obliga-
tion. Books are provided. For more info
call 2 LT KEvin Dunleuy at 757-69716974
or stop by Room 343 Rawl
t
Y
S
HEl
c t





�i finally got
. .yv. bul mud was
pa Sigma, down at
tsdc aainnext
-
PHI STRANGEI
read) what
I Alpha
ontentnea
to all throw
Alpha
DCES: Lets
ight! Who's
sight!
r�oe ol
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D YOU LIKE
ARN TO SHAG?
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Ramada Inn
00
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letting Rich
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d Self
1
ROLINIAN

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CXTTOBER 27, 1988 7
Announcements
STUDENT HELATH ORGANI-
ZATION
The SI I1- will be open Friday, Oct 28, 8
a m to 12 midnight Sat CVt 29, 2 p m to
8am Sun Sun (At ), 2 p.m. to 4pm.
Mon Oct 31 Sam to S p m on Tuesday
SOCWJUST
tn Nov 1 at 7 p m in Al 1 103 there will be
a meeting tor MAJORS AND INTENPLD
MAJORS Social WorkJustice The pur
pose ot this mooting will be to discuss
Registration proceedures tor Spring 89
Also other important announcements will
be made All majors and intended majors
should attend
LS1000
1 ibran Science UW instructors will be
gin offering help sessions in foyner s Rot
erence Room beginning Oct 24 These
sessions are designed to offer supplemen-
tal assistance to I ibrar) Science HW stu
dents An student needing evtr.i help
will find a schedule at the Reference desk
listing the name ot the available instructor
at each designated time The time slots are
12 to Spam and7tol0pjn Mon through
Thur
QV1 RSEAS DEVELOPMENT
NETWORK
The ODN is an organization focussed on
tho problems of Third World countries,
will be having a meetingpot luck dinner
at 5 30 p.m. on Oct 27 on 210 S Pitt St
(Near the Main Tost Office). We will bo
passing out packets for CropwaQc 88 and
choosing a protect to sponsor. Now mem-
bers are always welcome! Call Marianne
Exum 830-9450 757 6271 of Tonya Ba-
tnv 8304)881 757-6611 ext. 221 for more
into.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all Am
bassadors Wed at 5:15 p.m. in Menden-
hall room 221 Remember that missing
over 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation.
BUCCANEER
The 1987 yearbooks have come in Any
one who would like a copy ot it mav come
by the office and pick one up. We are
located in front of lovner Library, in the
Publications Building
SCHOLAR-1N-RES1 PENCE
Opportunities for American colleges and
universities to host a visiting scholar from
abroad tor all or part of the 1989aca-
demic year are available through the
Fulbright Scholar in Residence Program
A Fulbright Scholar in Residence may
teach regular courses from a foreign area
perspective, serve as a resource person in
interdisciplinary courses, assist in devel-
oping now courses, or participate in spe-
cial seminars. The program provides
roundtrip travel for the grantee and, for
full year awards, one accompanying
dependent; a monthy maintenance allow-
ance, and incidental allowances for travel,
books,a nd servies essential to tho assign
merit. The host institution is expected to
share some costs in tho form of supple-
mentary funding or in-kind support such
as housing. Tho deadline for receipt of
proposals is Nov 1 Detailed program
guideline's and proposal forms are avail-
able now and can bo requested at the
Office of International Studies, 1002 CCB,
757-6769.
CHRJSTMAS PARADE
The 1988 Earmville Christmas Parade,
sponsored by the Farmville Chamber of
Commerce, will be held Dec. 1 at 4) p.m.
Any group, business or individual wish-
ing to enter a float or unit in the parade this
year should contact tho Chamber of
Commerce office at 104 East Wilson Street
or call 753-4670. The Chamber is reaues!
ing that reservations bo made before (t.
31.
CLINIC HOURS
The Student 1 lealth Service Clinic 1 lours.
Don't miss the game Saturday! The Sat
Clinic will be held from 10 am. to noon
The Sun Clinic wnll be held as usual from
2 p.m to 4 p.m. Call the Student Health
Service at 757-6841 for more info or ques-
tions.
FREE THROW CONTEST
Be sure to attend the Intramural free
throw contest registration meeting held
Nov. 8 from 3-6 p.m. in MG. Play begins
shortly afterward! C Register when you
can and sec if your team is the best on
Campus!
r
Japanese look to buy college
RALEIGH (AP) - Officials
from an unnamed Japanese uni-
versity are putting out feelers in
North Carolina education circles,
saying they want to find a finan-
cially strapped private college or
uni rsirj they can buy in the Tar
leel state.
So far the Japanese haven't
found any takers.
ohn lenley, president of the
N.C Association of Independent
ges and Universities, said
Tuesday thai he had received two
inquiries about whether any pri-
vate schools in the state might be
for sale.
The 'apanese university offi-
cials want to "acquire majority
control' ot the college's board ot
trustees, increase the enrollment
of Japanese students, and start a
faculty and student exchange
LIGHT
program, t lenley said.
"1 knew we were getting a lot
of foreign investments, but 1
didn't know it would come to the
point where they were interested
in the educational process Hen-
lev said in an interview with The
News and Observer ot Raleigh.
The overtures did not name a
specific school of the amount of
monev the Japanese were willing
to spend.
In states such as California
and Tennessee, Japanese educa-
tors already have bought a college
and secondary school.
I .ist summer, Meiji Gakuin
University officials bought the
former Tennessee Military Insti-
tute in Sweetwater, Tenn for $2.5
million. The revamped school,
scheduled open in April 1989, will
educate children of Japanese
families that have been disap-
pointed by the quality of educa-
tion offered in the region's public
schools.
John Sylvester Jr director of
N.C. State University's Japan
Center, was the first to contact
1 lenlej about the interest abroad
in buying a private college.
Sylvester said he did not
know which Japanese college was
interested in making the pur-
chase, but was simply relaying in-
formation passed on to him by
officials at the N.C. Department of
Commerce's Tokyo office.
Henley said Tuesdav that he
had given Sylvester's letter, as
well as a similar one from a Flor-
ida businessman representing the
same Japanese University, to 22
college presidents across the
state'
RPP In.
Cards and Gifts
from
Recycled Paper Products, Inc.
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FOOTBALL
si the Miami Hum
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n - 5 the last home con
ARMY ROTC
freshmen This spring develop
financial aid and arevr oppor
I taking MLSC 1001 (Intro to
and the Armv It s a one hour
Itvtive with no uniform or haircut re-
juirements and entails no future obhga-
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2 T KEvin FHinleuv at 757 716�74
Ir stop bv Room H? Rawl
V
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xh
300 advance
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'w
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BEFOR
ctobcr 28
19 8
coolers welcome
no glass





8 THE EAST CAROLINA AN
OCTOBER 27, 188
Rand accused of abusing power
Republican officials say a
memo on state college stationerary
soliciting support for Tony Rand's
bid for lieutenant governor is a
"blatant abuse of power but a
spokeswoman for Rand says the
candidate was unaware of the
memo.
The memo from Helen Win-
stead, dean of students at Fay-
etteville Technical Community
College, sought staff volunteers to
make calls on Rand's behalf.
State Republican Party Chair-
man Jack Hawke said at a news
conference in Raleigh that he did
not know whether Rand solicited
the memo. But he said it was the
kind of activity fostered bv "a
member of the good ol' boy back-
room politicians
"1 have never seen a more bla-
tant abuse of power and intimida-
tion of public employees Hawke
said.
Stephanie Bass, a spokes-
woman for the Rand campaign.
sud Rand did not know of the
memo. She said the news confer-
ence was a smokescreen to help
Rand's opponent, Jim Gardner.
Tony had absolutely nothing
to do with that and Mr. Hawke is
desperately trying to take atten-
tion away from the record of
JimGardner that we are currently
addressing in this campaign she
said. "He is really gTasping at
straws
Craig Allen, president of the
college, issued a prepared state-
ment saying the college does not
support any political candidate.
"Employees need not feel
pressured in anv way to partici-
pate in anv fashion in the support
Layoffs may be
forthcoming
NEW YORK (AP) � The stag-
gering new corporate debt bur-
dens proposed in the wave of
multibillion-dollar leveraged
buyout bids could force compa-
nies to make big layoffs and re-
duce employee benefits to cover
debt payments, critics say.
The impact of these buyouts -
which rely largely on borrowed
funds - also could multiplv if the
U.S. economy enters a recession,
and the companies are unable to
generate the cash flow or asset
sales needed to raise money for
their debt payments, according to
labor economists and consultants.
In one of the latest develop-
ments, the buyout firm Kohlberg
Kravis Roberts & Co. has offered
to pay $20.28 billion - most of
which represents borrowed
money rather than equity - to ac-
quire food and tobacco giant RJR
Nabisco Inc.
Warnings about the leveraged
buyout wave come as manv U.S.
companies already are aggres-
sively cutting costs to survive in
an increasingly competitive
world economy.
"There is a casino societv at-
mosphere in thiscountry, because
shareholders want to make a
killing said Henry Schechter, an
AFL-CIO economist in Washing-
ton. "The end result is billions of
debt. We've already had cases in
which thousands of jobs are fears
of upheavals in the work force
that had not been widely envi-
sioned.
"I don't think this is good,
frankly said Edith Weiner, a
partner in Weiner, Edrich Brown
Inc a New York-based business
consulting firm that focuses on
long-range trends.
"If one company does this to
restructure and solve problems of
non-productivity, that's one
thing, but the evidence is that's
not the case anymore she said.
Some economists say these are
colliding trends that already have
caused management-labor fi-
nancing is having a major impact
on work forces said Richard
Belous, a senior economist at the
National Planning Association, a
Washington-based research con-
cern.
"You have to pay debt. If you
have a balance sheet which is
highly leveraged, you've lost fi-
nancial flexibility he said.
"How do you regain it? You
march into head of human re-
sources and regain flexibility that
way
For example, he said, many
companies are relying increas-
ingly on part-time, temporary
workers who receive less pay and
little or no benefits. The relatively
slow growth of wages during the
past few years is a partial reflec-
tion of this trend, he said.
of any particular candidate the
statement said. "Efforts on behalf
of individuals in the college are a
matter of right and freedom as citi-
zens of the United States. What
they do on their time is a matter of
their responsibility
Meanwhile, Gardner's cam-
paign Tuesday began running
television commercials criticizing
Rand, a lawyer, for representing
drug dealers.
"In the war on drugs, Tony
Rand sends the wrong message
the 30-second commercial con-
cludes.
"Tony Rand for years has
been the lawyer for major heroin,
cocaine and marijuana smug-
glers the ad says. "He even
represented accomplices of con-
victed drug dealer Ike Atkinson,
the man federal agents said
smuggled heroin into the U.S. in
the caskets of soldiers
Rand has said the U.S.
Constitution entitlesall citizens to
a defense and that his profession
should not be a campaign issue.
He points out that he has led ef-
forts in the legislature to provide-
tougher anti-drug laws and that
his candidacy is backed by 31 of
the state's elected district attor-
neys, who prosecute people ac-
cused of crimes.
In other political news,
Asheville and Charlotte are pre-
paring for a visit by COP vice
presidential candidate Dan
Quayle Thursday.
Republican Party officials in
Asheville say they received an
"absolutely incredible" response
when 800 tickets to the10-a-hcad
breakfast at the Grove Park Inn
went on sale last Friday.
"We put the tickets out Friday
and we were sold out in a day -
half a day really GOP activist
Katherin Kinney said Tuesday.
"My phone started ringing as
soon as it was in the paper
Quayle is expected to arrive
at the Asheville Regional Airport
between 7 and 8 p.m. tonight, but
won't do any campaigning until
Thursday, when he will make
appearances in Asheville and
Charlotte.
He is scheduled to campaign
with Gov. Jim Martin at the Mal-
lard Creek Barbecue at midday.
Republicans had something
to cheer about Tuesday as the
number of registered voters in the
GOP swelled to 1 million for the
first time in North Carolina his-
tory.
Updated voter registration
figures compiled bv the State
Elections Office show that
1,016,546 Republicans are regis-
tered in the state, said state Elec
tions Director Alex Brock. The
GOP has narrowed the margin
between itself and the Democratic
Party to roughly 2-to-l with
2,247,759 Democrats registered in
the state.
Another 167,724 North Caro-
linians are u naff ilia ted voters.
Also Tuesday, a dozen
Democratic candidates cam-
paigning in Orange County told
crowds that their unity showed
that their party protects the inter-
ests of everyone in society, while
the Republicans worry only about
the privileged.
"We're going to win because
we're united said Rep. David
Price in a rally at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
"What you see here today is an
example of that Democratic unity.
"We're the party that has
said that we are inclusive, that we
care about social justice in this
country Trice said.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 cxt.) Greenville. North Carolina
r1
i
i
i
i
L.
MonThurs.
Shrimp Plate $3.65
Frl. & Sat.
Weekend Specials
Beer, Wine Brown Baggin O.K.
752-3172.
ON
TOP
Of all the satiric funnies as Chij
and Earl take you to the land of
offensive slander.
Student Health Services
GET TO THE GAME ON TIME
The Saturday Clinic at the Student Health
Service will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
p.m. on Saturday. October 29. 1988.
The Sunday Clinic will be held as usual from
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Call the Student Health Services at 757-6841 for
more information or questions.
ttl wasn't rubbing
it in-1 just wanted
Eddie to know
the score of
last night's garnet
r
Go ahead and gjoat You can
nib it in all the way to Chicago
with AT&T Long Distance Service.
Besides, your best friend Eddie
was the one who said your team
could never win three straight.
So give him a call. It costs a
lot less than you think to let him
know who's headed for the Playoffs.
Reach out and touch someone
If youd like to know more about
AT&T products and services, like
International Calling and the AllST
Card, call us at 1 800 222-0300.
r
AT&T
The right choice.
Duk
Michael I .
thai "Perhaps i -
late" to rival I
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shru
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tender ren
that Dul tl
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then � �
per
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sinking
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shipj
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Ther
ports scon - �
reached safel
The 1 -
was cam,
g rs ir I
day in hea
southeast
Manila in
Ships and
the are I
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station �� " �
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said 12
managed to
reach tl
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lifemboat
In Cebu
Carlos G
sun
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chopp) &
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inform
ashore w
"I'm exp j
We have
operations
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"Let us
VINTAGE CUM I
JEWELRY. COLU
ANDFURNITURI
I
-�e't 1
LIFFTl
ON
POS:
Guara
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Quality Cai
HA:
lOtn Street





i

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,1988 9
yster Bar
fe v � h Carohna
I
65
I
lals J
lervices
ON TIME
alth
m. to 12:00
sual from
6841 for
d gl ut You can
t( Chicago
fetance Service.
friend Eddie
aid your team
e straight
b .ill It costs a
link m let him
j for the Playoff
ich someone.
w more about
d services, like
Ins and the AT&T
22-(rVK
choice.
Dukakis admits: "Perhaps I'm too late

Michael Dukakis admitted
that "Perhaps 1 responded toe
late" to rival George Bush's at-
tacks as the Democratic nominee
shrugged off a double-digit defi-
cit in new polls. The Republican
contender renewed his charge
that Dukakis lacks the necessary
experience to govern the nation.
With less than two weeks
remaining until Election Day,
Dukakis insisted in a lato-night
television interview Tuesday that
there was still time to overtake the
front-runner Bush.
But when asked shortly after
the program about the polls
showing him trailing bv 13 and 14
percentage points, the Demo-
cratic nominee simply replied,
"Forging ahead
In the 90-minute interview on
ABC's "Nightlme questioner
Ted Koppel asked Dukakis what
Bush had done to "nail vour hide
to the wall thus far The Demo-
cratic nominee failed to challenge
Koppel's assessment of the White
House race before answering the
question.
Two things Dukakis said.
"The Bush campaign made a very
careful and deliberate decision
way Kick in the spring to run a
tough, attacking, negative cam-
paign. And they've been doing it
ever since and perhaps I re-
sponded too late, perhaps I
should have been out there at-
tacking or counterattacking from
the beginning
He also criticized Republican
advertising and charged Bush
with running a campaign "loaded
with distortion and misrepresen-
tation and falsehoods
Earlier Tuesday, Bush de-
fended his campaign ads against
the Dukakis attacks.
"Because he was trying to un
away from his record, I have fac-
tually pointed out where he
stands on the record Bush said
during a campaign stop in Akron,
Ohio. "And 1 am not going to be
deterred. 1 am going to keepdoing
that honestly, factually
The vice president, targeting
a must-win Dukakis state, told an
audience in Lima, Ohio, that the
election is a referendum on peace
and prosperity and that Dukakis
is too inexperienced to be presi-
dent.
"We cannot gamble
America's future on a president
who hasn't had one single day's
experience in national defense
matters or foreign affairs Bush
said.
Bush was delivering a speech
on economics today in Detroit be-
fore traveling to South Dakota
and Montana. Republican vice
presidential candidate Dan
Quayle was in Florida, campaign-
ing for Senate candidate Connie
Mack III and touring Miami's
Little Havana community.
Dukakis was meeting with
Hispanic leaders in Denver before
traveling to Illinois while running
mate Lloyd Bentsen was stump-
ing in Montana and California,
the major electoral prize with 47
votes.
Foils released Tuesday sug-
gested that the Democratic ticket
faces a difficult task in its quest for
the White House.
A CBS News-New York
Times survey of 1,287 probable
voters showed Bush leading
Dukakis 54-41 percent while a
Gallup poll of 815 likely voters
showed Bush up by 14 points, 53-
39 percent.
The CBS-Times poll was con-
ducted Friday through Monday
and had a margin of error of three
points. The Gallup survey was
done Friday through Sunday and
had a four-point error margin.
As part of their uphill fight,
the Dukakis campaign released
four new TV ads which ask voters
to imagine a world where chil-
dren can play without fear of drug
dealers, where the elderly are no
longer a burden, where a single
paycheck pays the bills and where
America is No. 1 in competition
on foreign markets.
All four ads end with the
phrase, "Dukakis-Bentsen. The
best America is yet to come
The Bush campaign also re-
leased an ad alleging that Dukakis
misled 62 million Americans
when he denied during the last
presidential debate that he raided
his state pension system to bal-
ance the budget.
In addition to advertising, the
Dukakis campaign is filling the
airwaves with none other than
Dukakis and Bentsen. The Demo-
cratic nominee will appear on the
"CBS Evening News" Thursday
for a 14-minute interview with
Dan Rather and also appear on
NBC with anchor Tom Brokaw
for a series next week on the
candidate's positions.
Bentsen is scheduled to ap-
pear on the CBS program tonight.
Bentsen kept up his attack Tues-
day on what he called GOP distor-
tions of the Democratic record.
"The kind of campaign these
Republicans are waging woulc
tear the heart out of a democracy
he told a rally in Great Falls, Mont.
But Quayle, campaigning in
Georgia, said Dukakis is "doing
nothing to discourage" what he
described as the "political
sludge" produced by Dukakis
surrogates.
Meanwhile, the Republican
ticket picked up an endorsement
from a newspaper all too familiar
to Dukakis - the Boston Herald
Survivors of Ruby, shipwreck found
MANILA, Philippines (AP) -
At least 143 people survived the
sinking of a passenger ship dur-
ing the height of Typhoon Ruby,
shipping executives said today as
efforts continued to find hun
dreds more still missing.
There were unconfirmed re-
ports scores of others may have
reached safety on another island.
The 2,855-ton Dona Marilyn
was carrving about 518 passen-
gers and crew when it sank Mon-
day in heavy seas about 300 miles
southeast of
Manila in the Visayan Sea.
Ships and helicopters searched
the area today.
Bernardo Cabigon, Tacloban
station manager of Sulpicio Lines,
which owned the Dona Marilyn,
said 120 of the 143 survivors
managed to
reach the small, remote island
of Almagro with lifejackets and
iifem boats.
In Cebu, Sulpicio President
Carlos Go said the remaining
survivors had been found by res-
cuers on other islands and in the
choppy seas.
Cabigon said he had been
informed some survivors washed
ashore wearing two lifejackets.
"I'm expecting more survivors.
We have not called off
operations
He said the bodies of 26 vic-
tims washed ashore at Almagro.
The Coast Guard said another
bodv was found today in waters
near where the ship sank.
Almagro's mayor, Raul Es-
calante, said he had bur-i 13 of
the victims in a common grave
The Dona Marilyn left Manila
on Sunday bound for Tacloban
but was buffeted Monday by
strong waves and winds of up to
140 mph, Cabigon said. The coast
guard said the skipper reported
the vessel listing to the port side in
heavy seas in a radioed sistress
signal before the ship went down.
In a second smaller rescue
effort, the U.S. Navy said the USS
Blue Ridge found four crewmen
of the 300-foot Philippine
freighter Jet Nann Five, which
sank about 150 miles south ot
where the Marilyn if believed to
have gone down.
A U.S. Navy spokesman at
theSubic Naval Base said the Blue
Ridge was still searching for the
vessel's 15 other crewmen. He
quoted survivors as saving the let
Nann Five capsized 12 hours after
leaving Cebu Sunday for
Mindanao. Nobody had reported
any other sfcuftjjijng luifcil the
Blue Ridge RSffntTtTtt s'frfXlvors.
The Vavy said the four were
being t ated for decond-degree
sunburn, dehydration and mild
hypothermia.
President Corazon Aquino
told reports today she had or-
dered an investigation of the
Marilyn's sinking. "I'm telling
(the transportation and commu-
nication secretary) to investigate
this and find out why they still
sailed during very vad weather
Last December, another
Sulpicio ship, the Dona Paz, col-
lided with an oil tanker off Min-
doro island. Only 28 people sur-
vived, and more than 3,000 were
believed to have perished in the
DAN
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by Typhoon Ruby, the 18th tropi-
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this year.
The Philippine National Red
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said 103 people were killed on
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1

t
10
J IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27, 1988
FAA says pilot error caused
crash of RDU commuter
SAV A CENTER
WASHINGTON (AP) - A culties in the first officer's pilot-
divided federal panel has ruled ing, and inadequate FAA surveil-
that pilot mistakes caused the lance ot AVAir the board said
in its ruling.
Steve D. Green,
pilot
crash of a commuter plane at
Raleigh-Durham International
Airport, and that ii : ijuat �
oversight by both the airline ana
the Federal Aviation Administra-
tion contributed to the accident.
The Richmond bound
American Eagle plane crashed
into a wooded bank moments af-
ter takeoff in foggy conditions
Feb. 19, killing all 12 people
aboard. It was the worst accident
in RDU's history
a former
AY Air pilot and and representa-
tive of the Air Line Pilots Associa-
tion, said the union did not agree
with the board's ruling on what
caused the crash. When the stall-
avoidance system malfunctions,
he said, "it is a major distraction
and we question the ability of any
crew to cope with them
The NTSB ruling also was
disputed by H. Bruce Brandon a
In a 3-2 ruling on the cause of lawyer representing AV Air
the crash Tuesday, the National
Transportation Safety Board said
first officer Kathleen Digan
banked the aircraft too sharply
and at too low an altitude - about
a 40-degree bank only 250 to 270
feet off the ground, nearly twice as
sharplv as would have been ad-
vised.
Captain Walter R. Cole Jr.
"should have performed the take-
off" and conducted "inadequate
monitoring" of the flight, and
both pilots may have been dis-
tracted by a malfunction of the
plane's stall avoidance system,
the board concluded.
"We're blaming the actions of
the crew in not monitoring instru-
ments that would have told them
they were descending, not climb-
ing board chairman James Kol-
stad told The News and Observer
of Raleigh.
The board also criticized
AYAir Inc the Raleigh airline
that operated American Eagle at
the time of the crash and later
ceased its flight operations, for
We don't know what caused
the accident Brandon said. He
noted that both Cole and Ms.
Digan held Air Transport Pilot
certificatesthe highest rating
available in the country
Brandon also said that the
board "acknowleged a lot of un-
knowns
"There's no certainty who
was flying the plane, there's no
certainty there was a mechanical
problem Brandon said.
The NTSB, an independent
federal agency that investigates
tranportation accidents and
makes safety recommendations,
said the FAA should increase sur-
veillance of airlines such as
AVAir that are undergoing rapid
expansion and financial distress.
After the RDU crash, the FAA
issued guidelines telling inspec-
tors to give extra attention to air-
lines resuming flight operations
after bankruptcy, or in financial
distress. But the NTSB said in-
spectors also should be given spe-
cific indicators to look for among
not acting on problems Ms. Digan airlines that are expanding
exhibited during training and
proficiency checks after AYAir
hired her in May 1987.
In July 1987, Ms. Digan was
recommended for firing by a
check pilot, and another pilot
"In addition to financial prob-
lems, burgeoning growth should
be an indication of something to
the FAA said board member
James Burnett Jr as he moved to
attach 'he recommendation to the
companies to find pilots, it has
taxed everyone
The board also said the FA A's
surveillance of AVAir apparently
diminished when the airline's
headquarters were moved from
one FAA jurisdiction in Virginia
to another in North Carolina.
A. Barry Strauch, the NTSB
chief investigator of the crash,
said his staff was "unable to docu-
ment any inspections from the
time the (FAA) certificate was
transferred in August 1987
"When (AVAir) moved to
North Carolina, it was almost like
day and night in terms of over-
sight Strauch said. "There was
no discussion between North
Carolina and Virgina. I would ex-
pect communcation about what
AVAir was like
The majority of the board -
Kolstad, Burnett and Lemoine
Dickinson Jr. - said the probable
cause was "failure of the flight
crew to maintain a proper flight
path due to the first officer's inap-
propriate instrument scan, the
captain's inadequate monitoring
of the flight, and the flight crew's
response to a fault in the
airplane's stall avoidance stys-
tem
Dissenting were members
John Lauber and Joseph Nail.
In an interview, Nail said
there was no evidence to show
what pilot had or had not moni-
tored because the plane was not
equipped with a cockpit voice
recorder or flight data recorder.
Nail said he believed a faulty stall
avoidance system could have
caused the crash.
It is "more accurate to state
failure to maintain flight path was
for undetermined reasons said
Nail, of Smithfield.
NTSB investigators are un-
sure whether the stall avoidance
system malfunctioned. The sys-
tem automatically points the nose
down when tne plane's air speed
gave her poor evaluations that NTSB ruling. "We need a system drops below the level needed to
to make someone accountable keep the craft airborne. The
Kolstad said other problems plane's speed then increases,
keeping it aloft. A pilot would
disengage the system if it mal-
September, the board said
The FAA failed to adequately
monitor the financial and
operational problems of AVAir,
which expanded its pilot force
and flight schedule rapidly before
going bankrupt on Jan. 15, just
weeks before the crash, the board
ruled.
"Contributing to the accident
was the lack of company response
documented indications of diffi-
Insider trading
at AVAir - a decline in the average
flight experience of the pilots it
hired and a lack of FAA attention
- are part of "an industry-wide
problem
"There's obviously tremen-
dous growth in the industry he
said.
"It has taxed efforts of the
FAA, it has taxed efforts of the rrv�lfunrfir��;r,rr
functioned.
The investigation indicated
the system was disengaged when
the plane crashed, but because
some pieces of the system were
not recovered, investigators did
not determine whether it was
bill passed
READ THE EAST
CARPITNI AN
WASHINGTON (AD � Gor-
don Gekko, the ruthless inside
trader in the movie "Wall Street
had a motto � "Greed is good'�
that to many encapsulated the
philosophy of freewheeling cor-
porate merger speculators.
Members of Congress, after
passing the first legislative re-
sponse to the wave of insider trad-
ing scandals that erupted two
ears ago, are hoping to replace
the motto with another - "Greed is
dangerous
"Greed and fear are competing
emotions, but until now there has
not been a proper balance be-
tween the two. 1 think now the
fear of apprehension is going to be
at least as great as the lure of
greedsaid Rep. Edward J.
Markey, D-Mass chief sponsor
of the bill and chairman of the
House subcommittee that over-
sees the securities markets.
The bill passed the House 410-0
last month and by a voice vote in
the Senate early Saturday morn-
ing in the waning hours of the
100th Congress.
Its key provisions would:
-Increase the maximum criminal
penalties for insider trading from
five vears in jail to 10 years, and
boost fines from $500,000 to $2.5
million for a company and from
$100,000 to $1 million for an indi-
vidual. . ,
-Hold firms liable to fines for the
actions of their employees if the
firms "knowingly or reck lessly"
fail to detect and prevent insider
trading.
-Authorize the Securities ana
Exchange Commission to offer a
bounty to tipsters of up to 10 per-
cent of any fine collected.
-Codify the right of investors to
sue inside traders if they lost
money by trading in the same
securities and at the same time as
insiders.
Permit the SEC to issue subpoe-
nas and investigate inside trading
on behalf of foreign countries,
with the idea that foreign coun-
tries would offer reciprocal privi-
leges to the United States.
MAJORING
IN PREMED?
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VJHnave good news for you. You
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"some college expenses and $100 per aca-
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Call:
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
919-757-6597
I jeadrrship E��lnrc Starts Here
?
rmani
Shoes
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756-8182
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Fri. & Sat. 10.00 9:00
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AT U.S. POST OFFICE PRICES
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Prices Effective Thru. Sat October 29, 1988. Quantity Rights Reserved Not Responsible For Typographical Errors
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. � Monday thru Saturday 7:00 a.m12 Midnight
Band
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Fuium Fditor
Going to college whil I
ingina rock and roll banc
purple-capped dream I.ivl
that dream are Greenville's i
The Bond, who will be perfi
ing Halloween night at t
Beaux Art's Ball.
After three years
sweat and calloused fret tinj
the fimrmcmK'r Bond an
into their own. The I
1
members of the band,
Todd Askew, drumrru
Jimenez and rhythm guital
Annie ("till ipher, have come all
way since their 1985 au
Mendenhall's The Und
(Now The Coffee M. is
"We struggl d I
utes of stuff t ; the a
tion Askew said Neverthe
The Bond beat out the other
testants for the right to pla I
first gig 'that's musii iar
show).
Now, thr �
band has added ai other j
in the form of hat-wean
Askew, Todd - v rother, a j
beefed up their n pi rti ire w
host of new originals
I
J
Fetchin Bones, a ripping bai
tearing up Memorial Gym I
progressive Charlotte band
Student Union presentation
Coast Music.
Vampirl
BvMlCAH HARRIS
Sufi Wntet
An elderly archaeoloj
haunted bv strange pnmj
dreams of two beautiful
women engaging in cannabj
Regarding the visions as
marion oi his life's work, he)
mons his mysterious patrol
doesn't arrive until attel
death. But he has scribbled J
four words that herald a cn
the human race "In thejun
walking
Thus, begins the mystl
the twins, the unraveling off
constitutes the major plot
of Anne Rice's TheOueenl
Coming
in
Entertainmeni
Ihur&diy
Awareness Art Enseir
The Attic
Hammer
Susie's
Friday
Captain Kirk and the Ccj
The Attic
Uncle Green
New Deli
Saturday
Sidewinder
The Attic
The Amateurs
New Deli





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iponsibie for Typograpfitca! Errors
lie Blvd. -
00 a ml2 Midnight
THEFAST CAROLINIAN
Features
OCTOBER 27,1988 Page 11
Band 'Bonds' diversity
By EARL VIS HAMPTON
Sharing the song writing re- out a lot of energy without break-
sponsibilitics, the four ECU stu- ing stuff Todd said.
dents say their music has truely Along with this mind-set, The
Going to college while play- become a part of themArnieand Bond believes in no frills stage
ing in a rock and roll band: a wild. ' come up with the general idea attire. "We rarely dress up, but for
niirrloin�v .rn. 1 ind thiTl IMP hfHinro rV��-� ennrr Hallrirr�r� uiq iiic minkt U ���.�
purple-capped dream. Living
that dream are Greenville's own.
The Bond, who will be perform-
ing Halloween night at the Attic's
Beaux Art's Ball.
After three years of sally
sweat and calloused tret fingers,
the four member Bond are coming
into their own. The original
members of the Kind, bassist
Todd Askew, drummer Ed
(imenez and rhvthm guitarist
and then we bounce the song
around to get it the way we want
it Todd Askew said.
A tape of their first originals,
which they label a demo, has sold
fairly well in Greenville, Char-
lotte and Chapel Hill. The Bond,
the first band to play Pan tana
Bob s, hope to produce another
recording in the near future.
As Jimenez and Todd
searched for a true definition of
�� � � � � 1111 mumi ii - - � - - - -
ArnieCullipher, have come a long tne band's playing style, the quiet
way since their 19S5 audition in
Mendenhall's The Underground
Now The Coffee House).
"We struggled to get 15 min-
utes of Stuff to play for the audi-
tion Askew said. Nevertheless,
The Bond beat out the other con-
testants for the right to play their
first gig (that's musician talk for a
show).
New, three years later, the
band has added another guitarist
in the form of hat-wearing Brvan
Askew, Todd's brother, and have
beefed up their repertoire with a
host of new originals.
and astute Bryan slipped in
'We're on the danccable side of
alternative-progressive music
The name. The Bond, resulted
from a quick flash of inspiration
by Jimenez. Cohesively, he ex-
plains "We all add something
different to the band and the
band's sound and we pull it all
together. We bond together
Rather than thrash around on
stage and destroy instalments
and amplifiers (like one former
Usual, David Brockman), these
guys prefer a more civil approach
to playing rock and roll. "We give
Halloween we just might have
to Todd said.
For the Halloween show, The
Bond will definitely play their hot
original "Vicious Circle" along
with many other hard-pumping
tunes. The band, which opens for
Big Kids on Monday, are very
excited about their new originals.
Besides originals, The Bond
play a wide-ranging assortment
of cover songs. Be prepared for a
diverse order of covers, from The
Mighty Lemon Drops to Conway
Twitty.
The future of The Bond is up
in the air. With Todd graduating
in December, the direction of the
band is unpredictable. "We don't
really know what will happen
next semester. Hopefully some-
thing significant will come
about Todd said.
So if you don't get a chance to
see The Bond on Halloween, you
can catch them Nov. 17 or Dec. 5 at
The Deli.
Union presents
several bands
By ALICIA FORD
SUH Writer
The East Carolina Student
Union is presenting a series of up-
coming entertainment events
called The Underground, located
in The Coffee House at Mendcn-
hall Student Center. Gypsy Rose,
a rock and roll band from Cary,
N.C will be performing Satur-
day, October 29 at 9 p.m. The band
plays blues-based originals as
well as rock covers from AC DC,
Bad Company and Led Zeppelin.
A group of local ECU stu-
dents comprise the gospel band
Vision and they will be perform-
ing at The Coffee House on No-
vember 4 at 8 p.m. Vision dishes
out some of today's most popular
rhythm-and-blues based gospel
hits.
Solo guitar sts Chris
Montgomery and Sean Hayes will
be on stage Friday nght, Novem-
ber 11. Hayes will be playing his
own music as well as covers rang-
ing from Bob Marley to Led Zep-
Fetchin Bones, a ripping band from the mold of X and REM, will be pelin.
tearing up Memorial Gym Friday night at 8 p.m. Opening for the The Coffee House will be
progressive Charlotte band are The Bad Checks. Free tickets for the presentinganeveningof jazz with
Student Union presentation are available at Quick Silver and East �ee ARIA, page 13
Coast Music.
Vampire chronicles scare
population to a handful (as
"breeders"), confident that the
world will become a better place
under "pure" feminine guidance.
Akasha is a psychological
study of the simplistic single
mindedness of self-justification of
the fanatic. The use of different
perspectives of her is used mas-
terfully by Rice to render
Akasha's character.
Akasha's dominance at the
expense of the other characters,
even Lestat, is understandable I
suppose, since she is "Queen of
the Damned However, this
alone doesn't excuse the struc-
tural flaws of the novel. To wit:
Much space is given to setting
up characters in the book's first
half who are regulated to the
background or done away with
altogether in the second half. Rice
passes the torch of focal character
to Lestate in the book's final chap-
ter and the result is a meandering,
anti-climatic finish: a far cry from
the page-turning ending of The
Vampire Lestat.
Lestat's introduction to the
book seems an attempt to force
this plot symmetry and only sabo-
tages the suspense (we know he
survives from the start). And the
fulfillment of the ancient proph-
ecy, building over 75 percent of
the book, is accomplished in two
pages!
Even at second-best, Rice's
vampre fiction is a sophisticated
alternative to the typical "Boo
school of horror fiction. Old fans
will want to read The Queen of
the Damned, but don't expect as
much trick or treat this go-round.
Greenville s very own, The Bond, will be playing their cohesive-progressive sound at The Attic on Hal-
loween. The Bond, who will open up for Big Kids at Beaux Arts Ball, consists of the followingfrom left
to right): Arnie Cullipher, Todd Askew, Ed Jimenez and the latest addition, Bryan Askew.
Masquerade at Arts Ball
By JEFF PARKER
Stiff Illustrator
The streets of Greenville aren't
going to be the only happenin'
spots this Halloween Monday; at
9 p.m. the Beaux Arts Ball is going
to happen at The Attic.
The Visual Arts Forum in con-
junction with The Attic is spon-
soring the 14th annual Beaux Arts
Ball, which will be a combination
masquerade ballconcert. For
four hours the disguised crowd
will be entertained by Big Kids
and The Bond, two quality bands
and a bargain for the ticket price.
First to play will be The Bond, a
local group (see Earl's article) and
a favorite of college students.
Then you'll be treated to the cfean
and clear sound of Big Kids, a
progressive band of three origi-
nally from Greensboro who have
been making a name for them-
selves all over the state. This will
be the second time they have
played Greenville, after their
appearance with Slurpee a short
while back at the New Deli.
Though this is touted as a mas-
querade you don't have to come
incognito; you can dress like you
want to. (But that kind of deviant
behavior will probably invoke the
wrath of some Celtic or Pagan
Earth-gods that often visit on
Halloween, so don't.)
In addition to the live music,
door prizes will be given out to
ticket-holders, and there will be
costume prizes for creative and
wrfl-crafted disguises. This is one
aspect of the show you don't want
to miss because the art students
are famous for their innovative
costumes. Balls of the past have
been host to some excellent and
elaborate works, such as The
Alien and Robot costumes of last
year.
This concert is a fundraiser �
507c of the profits made will go to
a scholarship for students in the
School of Art. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center for four dollars or for five
dollars at the door at The Attic. So
go "treat" yourself this Hallow-
een and remember, if you want to
go out and experience the outside
downtown world that night,
they'll stamp your hand at the
show � so go have the best of
both "otherworlds
Donald Woods speaks tonight
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Staff Writer
By MICAH HARRIS
Suff Writer
An elderly archaeologist is
haunted by strange primordial
dreams of two beautiful young
women engaging in cannabalism.
Regarding the visions as confir-
mation of his life's work, he sum-
mons his mysterious patron. She
doesn't arrive until after his
death. But he has scribbled a note;
four words that herald a crisis for
the human race: "In the jungles �
walking
Thus, begins the mystery of
the twins, the unraveling of which
constitutes the major plot thread
of Anne Rice's The Queen of the
Coming
in
Entertainment
Thursday
Awareness Art Ensemble
The Attic
Hammer
Susie's
Friday
Captain Kirk and the Coconuts
The Attic
Uncle Green
New Deli
Saturday
Sidewinder
The Attic
The Amateurs
New Deli
Damned. The current volume is
the latest of her "vampire chron-
icles" which began officially with
Interview with the Vampire
and properly with The Vampire
Lestat.
Rice apparently wrote Inter-
view with no intentions of start-
ing a series. It was nine years
before The Vampire Lestat ap-
peared. In Interview, Rice re-
stored the vampire as an ostenta-
tiously sensual creature. She
topped herself with The Vampire
Lestat, a delving into the vampire
myth featuring an engaging pro-
tagonist, Lestat, the "villain" of
Interview with the Vampire.
The Vampire Lestat was so
satisfving that even its cliff-
hanger ending was forgivable.
Fans have waited three years to
discover what would follow
Lestat's waking of the mother
vampire, Akasha, the queen of the
damned.
But Rice has not surpassed
the high standard of her previous
work, The Vampire Lestat. Her
use of third person narrative
allows The Queen of the Damned
the necessary scope, but it fbbs the
book of the singular, magnetic
personality of Lestat who, as with
his "autobiography is the ficti-
tious author of Queen.
Rice introduces new charac-
ters to take center stage but they
lack the presence of her previous
creations. The only exception is
Akasha, the vampire queen, who
must be considered the ultimate
radical feminist. Her plan for
world peace is to recuce the male
Last night, Cry Freedom, the
critically acclaimed film by South
African journalist Donald Woods,
played in Mcndenhall. Tonight at
8 p.m. in Hendrix Auditorium,
Mr. Woods will give a lecture.
The film frankly depicts the
overt brutality of the South Afri-
can racist dictatorship. It has been
called "shocking" and "power-
ful but it is no exaggeration.
South Africa under Aparthied is a
country in fear, where mass im-
prisonment, torture, and execu-
tion has become commonplace.
Perhaps more shocking than
the film will be Woods' first-per-
son account. Students from other
college where Woods has lec-
tured m?.dA the following com-
ments:
"His deeply moving sincer-
ity, along with the dynamic and
personable method of delivery,
combined to make his presence a
most notable one said John Bell
of Kent State University.
In addition to his stage pres-
ence, Donald Woods is perhaps
the most authoritative source of
unbiased information about the
situation in South Africa.
He was born in the colonial
Transeki Territory and grew up
with the native population. He
watched the situation degenerate
as he grew � from the beginning
of racist repression in 1948 to the
current atrocities. He studied law,
but took an apprenticeship in Brit-
ish journalism. As things turned
out, he became the editor of The
East London Dispatch, one of the
first South African newspapers to
hire black reporters.
Although he was trusted by
the government at first, his popu-
larity suddenly turned against
him. He found himself the target
of unwarranted harrassment, and
fled thecountry in 1973 to save the
lives of himself and his family.
All things considered, his lec-
ture will be an event which merits
attendance. Through his personal
experience and knowledge,
Donald Woods will certainly pro-
vide information which the mass
media has not been able to release
about the situation in south Af-
rica.
Return of
omething
imiliirlr
CHIPPY BONBHBAD
This week a BtfJe Hallow-
een treat Unpleasant dreams,
kids, as Elvira would say.
"What possessed you to ride
that?" Bonner Trixpen asked his
s&ifriend Janet Kandiski after she
off the Pirate. "You hate rides,
wouldn't even stand in lineat
" Annoyed, Boa-
tier rubbed the skin along his iaw.
Pti had found a budding
this morning, but he
it open, tsvery so
feltit a
completely scary
herasslieiu2un&r4schn. ��� y jpfe?
"lave home after the Hell Driver
"Love you too. Hey he "V?- �i
looked next to ifceltephant Ear f ft 8� f
oneeasiaiituttlorthe morirke? "
ing the ride attendant eight
ets. The attendant told him thatl
was supposed to tear the
out not Bonner. "Bey
they're still good, huhr
The attendant,
grey coveralls and a John
baseball cap, pulled a car
and held it steady as the
pot in. He slammed it shut, 1
Hand sat down on the stool i
the control box. He lit a
and pulled the lever, at
Bonner and futei upwards.
encasing their car
the Fab ft
,�t � u � Sh fookad at
don't know. I just feel safer ?�. nJrCZ outside ont of me cage,
on the fair rides Janet replied, J?2: Hack vinyl-padded barTon
taking out a brush and brushing per Minted wogw P�t j
. . . � town lirai iiiTirifinyMBiiilT iKir'miilii' litiiitr ��
her hair back. wrn nw wuw wm �w wit ��
Bonner quit rubbing his al- aatngitaeffln a vWlnu circle,
most-pimple. "Damn, these are frTS?. He
Border's attention
htem�cm�7rJdesJWhy would yjMf !5f
be scared of rides that stay in owa4" �. -
,mt
a snake on a waterbed
t for the racetrack. The
show would start in
20 minutes.
Janet Jogged to catch up to
wAww,idbn'tbemad,buiga-







12
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,188
A look at Halloween past
By JIM SHAMLIN
Staff Wtrtw
So what happened on Octo-
ber 31st? In 1517, Martin Luther
posted his infamous 95th thesis;
in 1860, John Keats was bom; in
1864, Nevada was admitted to the
United States; and in 1926, Hany
Houdini died before an applaud-
ing audience. Of course, most
people remember the day because
it's Halloween.
Halloween's origin is a poly-
glot. Long before November 1
was proclaimed "All Saints Day
it was celebrated by the Celtic
tribes of northwest Europe as
Samhain, a Gaelic word for
"summer's end
On Samhain, Arawn would
free the souls of the dead who
were allowed to visit their former
homes until dawn. They would
emerge at nightfall from the cave
of Cruachuan in Connaught. So
'Halloween The dates of these
that the people would not be at-
tacked by the hostile spirits, they
dressed in costumes in hopes of
looking like spirits themselves.
When the Romans invaded
Celtic lands, their festival in trib-
ute to Pomona blended with
Samhain into one large celebra-
tion. The Romans hated and
feared the Druidic priests, and
gave them a name borrowed from
Egypt�"Witches
Later, when the Christians
came to Europe, Samhain became
"All Hallows' (or Souls') Eve or
celebrations didn't originally co-
incide. Instead, Pope Gregory IV
changed the date oi All Saints Day
from May 13 to November 1, in
order to Christianize the pagan
holiday.
It was the Christian ideal oi
charitv which led to trick-or-treat-
mg. On All Souls' Eve, the poor
would wander to the homes of the
rich to beg for a "soul cake Give
me two soul cakes and a Pepsi.
Christian, too is the belief that
Halloween is a night of evil. Prior
to Christianity, it was looked
upon as a day of thanksgiving for
a bountiful harvest and for the
company of the spirits of ances-
tors.
The jack o' lantern is of Celtic
origin. An Irishman named jack
played a prank upon Arawn, and
was condemned to roam earth,
without ever finding rest, carry-
ing a lantern�hence, his name
became Jack O'l an tern.
Celtic too used the bonfire,
created as a beacon to the wander-
ing spirits. Another Celtic inven-
tion is playing tricks, the best part
of trick-or treat. It originated
from the frustrated spirits who
could not find their homes. They
would plav tricks on unwary trav-
ellers.
The only remnant of the
Roman celebration of Pomona is
the vegetation which is used pri-
marily in decoration. Originally,
this produce was prepared as a
sacrifice in thanks for a good har-
vest.
Halloween is a living holiday,
and is being changed as time pro-
gresses. Now, especially here at
ECU, it is primarily an occasion to
drink copious amounts of alcohol
L
Coming soon to the
ATTIC
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By JIM SHAMLIN
Staff Witter
STEVE HARDY'S ORIGINAL BEACH PARTY
Feminist irate over scripture
NEW YORK (AP) � Reli-
gious feminists fume at that old
passage in Genesis 3:16 about
women, "Your desire shall be for
your husband, and he shall rule
over you
However, no less a religious
authority than Pope John Paul II
savs the passage refers to a flawed
condition in humanity and it is
not supposed to be that way.
"This 'domination' indicates
the disturbance and the loss of the
stability of that fundamental
equality which the man and
woman possess in the 'unity of the
two" he says.
It results from original sin, he
says, from the human attempt to
be supreme and outrival God.
"The overcoming of this evil
inheritance is, generation after
generation, the task of every
human being, whether man or
women the pope says.
Although his recent letter on
women plainly kept them barred
from his church's Priesthood, it
CONSOLIDATED
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still hacked away at some of the
old religious biases against them.
In fact, he describes woman
as the "biblical exemplar from
the beginning of history to its
close.
"One can say she is a woman
of cosmic scale, on a scale wi th the
whole of creation the pope says
of the symbolism, marveling at
woman's high role. "God entrusts
the human being to her in a special
way.
The pope savs the exceptional
womanly prerogative also shows
up in a woman being the means
bv which divinity joined human-
ity in Christ "born to a woman
Mary of Nazareth.
"Thus there begins the central
event, the kev event in the history
of salvation the pope says. "A
woman is to be found at the center
of this salvific event
Although the pope's Sept. 30
teaching letter, "Mulieris Dignita-
tem" (The Dignity of Women)
drew scant attention and only
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Star of 'The Wonder Years'
teals parts from old movies
s
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Dan
Lauria believes that one reason he
works so much as an actor is that
few people in the film business
look at old movies.
He plays the overworked fa-
ther on ABC's "The Wonder
Years" and has had recurring
roles on two other series. He was
in the movie "Stakeout" and
played Bernadette Peters' boy-
friend in the TV movie "David
This Saturday, he plays the vet-
eran police sergeant in "Cop Kil-
ler the first installment of the
remake of the anthology series
"Police Story" on ABC.
"People don't watch the old
movies said Lauria. "Nobody
knows Richard Conte. I go in for a
part and do my Richard Conte or
Van Heflin. Nobody knows I'm
stealing. I steal from the best and I
don't feel bad about it
Lauria appears with Ken Olin
and Patricia Wettig, the husband-
and-wife stars of ABC's "thirty-
something in the premiere epi-
sode of "Police Story
ABC revived "Police Story"
last summer during the writers'
strike when it appeared the net-
works would not have new shows
ready for the fall season. The se-
ries, created by author Joseph
Wambaugh, ran on NBC from
1973-77. Lauria's role was origi-
nally played by Cameron Mitch-
ell.
"I'm the veteran police ser-
geant said Lauria. "Kenny Olin
is the young stud cop. Olin's part-
ner is taken hostage during a traf-
REBEL
fie stop. They're bank robbers and
it turns into a firefight His partner
is killed and Kenny kills a bank
robber and gets a medal. Even
though he did everything by the
book, Kenny goos through a psy-
chological change.
"1 loved working with
Kenny. He didn't walk through it.
We talked over the characters,
which is rare for television. This is
more of a drama about what hap-
pens to this man than an action
picture
Lauria grew up watching old
movies, and still watches them
regularly from his large collection
of tapes. His ambition is to work
with James Stew art.
Plaza Cinema
PlaM Shopping Clr 756 (XtfW
starts Friday
ROGER RABBIT
Hnldino Over
ELVIRA, MISTRESS OF
THE DARK
WILLOW
GORILLAS IN THE MIST
Prose & Pootry Contest
Deadline is 7 November 1988
'FarfTheatre
Held Over
NIGHTMARE ON ELM ST.
PART IV.

From the promotional poster,
"Betrayed" looks like it might be
about a couple of lovers, perhaps
even ma rned, one of whom has an
affair So what?
There have been plenty of
movies like that lately. But it is not
about an affair at all, or at least not
an affair of the usual type. The
story begins with a scene of a
radio-announcer at work.
The announcer is a talk show
host, and an obnoxious Jew who
abuses anyone who calls. He
leaves the station, dnves into a
garage, gets out of his car, and is
brutally murdered by a truck full
j q( men wearing ski masks and
ooting Mac-10s.
The next scene switches
ruptly from this urban violence
to a rural field where Katie (Debo-
rah Winger�"Terms of Endear-
ment") is driving a combine
through a field of golden wheat.
There, she meets Gary (Tom Ber
enger� Tlatoon"), a typical mid-
Aria performs
at Mendenhall
Continued from page 11
hast Carolina Professor of Music
Joe Distefano and Friends on
November 15. Distefano plays
saxaphone and clarinet and has
packed such artists as Buddy
Morrow, Jerry Coker and Marga-
ret Whiting. He has also scored
music for jazz ensembles, televi-
sion and the musical stage.
Among others to perform are
pianist Dick Cumberland, drum-
mer Mark Ford, Robert Link on
string and electric bass, Eddie
Thigpen on trumpet, and Carol
Bailv .is the vocalist for the group.
Fir-t runner up in The Bud
Band Wars, Aria, will perform on
November 19 at 9 pm Aria rocks
their way through originals and
cover tunes ranging from The
Smithereens and U2 to the Beatles
and the Rolling Stones. They will
also be opening for Jason and the
Scorchers October 28 at "Expose
Yourself" in Chapel Hill.
Don't forget the Halloween
Horror Movie Lock-in on Sunday
October 30, beginning at 1:30 pm,
�� hich will feature "The Texas
I Chainsaw Massacre "The
Omen and Stephen King's
See More
$50.00 less.
Right now at our Greenville office you can be
fitted for a pair of daily wear or extended wear
contact lenses and receive a $50.00 discount
off our usual package price
Usual Fee
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Dairy
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Extended
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50.00
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NOW SHOWING
AT HENDRIX
OCT. 27 - OCT. 30
8:00 P.M.
CLASS PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will be taken form Oct. 31 through
Nov. 4. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
IT ISN'T YOUR YEARBOOK UNTIL
YOU ARE IN IT!
So call us for an appointment and see how
seeing better can cost you less.
Contact Us
And Save.
Dr. John C. Molnar
Optometric Eye Care Center, OD, PA
The Plaza in Greenville
Greenville, NC
(919) 756-9771
@
anoMciNC
�Y�CAA�C�H!�R.
� Package include. Eye �xam, Contact Lens Evaluation
Eye Glasi Prescription, fitting and roMow-op, Contact,
Corn Kit and Instruction No other discount apply.
Oier. Offer expires Offer expires October 31,1988
arne.
Be sure to wear your Hallow-
een garb for the costume contest.
A $25 grand prize will be a warded
foY best overall costume, as well as
a $15 prize each for The Best Pi-
rate, The Scariest, and The Best
impersonation of a Famous Per-
f -son.
Pav $3.00 to get in, and if you I
last through all three movies, youj
get vour $3.00 back � plus a sou-
venir mug to show you survived
the Horror Movie Lock-m. For
more information on anv Univer-
sity Union event you can call the
union hotline at 757-6004.
Whale rescue
nears climax
ABOARD THE ADM1RA1
MAKAROV (AP) - Two Soviet
icebreakers flving U.S. and Soviet
; flags worked today to smash
through an ice ridge as daw
approached on what rescuer
hope will be freedom dav for twd
whales imprisoned in ice
nearlv three weeks.
"The whales seemed to
doing ;ine Rear Adm. Sigmun
; Petersen of the National Oceanij
and Atmospheric AdmimstrahoJ
said this morning. "It's like thej
expected something to be hat.
pening. Everything seems to L
corning together
Rescuers had one of their bet
days yet Tuesday as the unpreo
. dented international effort to s
the two California gTay whah
neared a climax. They succeedel
'in moving the huge mammal
around a shoal that had stymn
progress for three days.
As darkness fell Tuesday, tl
mammals were only about ti
miles from the water beii
opened by the Soviet ships.
The whales could be free
Slate this afternoon if things go
jwell today as they did the dj
before, said NO A A rescue coon
nator Ron Morris.
"The cooperation has
been fantastic Petersen
today. The Soviets came in
with a very positive attitude a
went to work immediately"






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27, 1988 13
FLASH FOR GAME BASH$
prn Gun
pi. Inc.
t ASH LOANS
xS. GUNS, .ASS KINGS. NG OF VALUE D & SILVER 2464
4KGOLD p 5S RIYRR FRIDGF$
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:ACH
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ded wear
$50.00 discount
Extended
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oc
5.00
$195.00
50 DO
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infrnent arKj cq now
ou less
ctUs
e.
Molnar
e Center, OD, PA
� -enviiie
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C�MT�R,
Contact Lens Evaluation,
ana Foiow-up. Contacts,
other discounts apply
ece� discount at tm� at
s vtobor 31,1988
�R
must-see film
By JIM SHAM LIN
Stall Writer
From the promotional poster,
'Betrayed" looks like it might be
i about a couple of lovers, perhaps
I even married, one of whom has an
I affaii So what?
rhere have been plenty of
nun ieslike that lately But it is not
about an affair at all, or at least not
an affair of the usual type. The
-umv begins with a scene of a
radio announcer at work.
rhe announcer is a talk show
ost .nd an obnoxious Jew who
abuses anyone who calls. He
leaves the station, drives into a
garage, gets out of his car, and is
MutalK murdered by a truck full
men wearing ski masks and
Aooting Mac-10s.
rhe next scene switches
Sbruptly from this urban violence
oa rural held where Katie (Debo-
1 Winger� 'Terms of Endear-
�r) is driving a combine
ugh a held of golden wheat,
e, she meets Garv (Tom Ber-
ber Platoon "), atypical mid-
ria performs
at Mendenhall
Continued from page 11
ast v arolina Professor of Music
v Distefano and Friends on
?vember 15. Distefano plays
4xaphone and clarinet and has
ked such artists as Buddv
lorrow, lorn. Coker and Marga-
: Whiting He has also scored
music 'or jaz2 ensembles, televi-
and the musical stage.
rig others to perform arc
lanisl Dick Cumberland, drum-
.er Mark Ford. Robert Link on
tring and electric bass, Eddie
en on trumpet, and Carol
is the vocalist for the group.
I runner up in The Bud
Wars, Aria, will perform on
( mber 19 at 9 pm Aria rocks
way through originals and
over tunes ranging from The
Smithereens and U2 to the Beatles
and the Rolling Stones. They will
also be opening for Jason and the
Scorchers October 28 at "Expose
irselP in Chapel Hill.
Don't forget the Halloween
lorror Movie Lock-in on Sunday
Q� tober 30, beginning at 1:30 pm,
which will feature "The Texas
Chainsaw Massacre "The
Onion and Stephen King's
jfcarrie
Be sure to wear your Hallow-
� garb for the costume contest.
$2 5 grand pnze will bea warded
st overall costume, as well as
i $15 prize each for The Best Pi-
rn te, The Scariest, and The Best
�impersonation of a Famous Per-
son.
Pd $3.00 to get in, and if you
�st through all three movies, you
t our $3.00 back � plus a sou-
nir mug to show you survived
he Horror Movie Lock-in. For
re information on any Univer-
ity I nion event you can call the
n hotline at 757-6004.
Whale rescue
nears climax
ABOARD THE ADMIRAL
�' AKAROV (AP) Two Soviet
breakers flving U.S. and Soviet
igs worked today to smash
rough an ice ridge as dawn
ached on what rescuers
pe will be freedom day for two
iales imprisoned in ice for
arlv three weeks.
"The whales seemed to be
mg ine Rear Adm. Sigmund
torsen of the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration
-aid this morning. "It's like they
xpected something to be hap-
;ning. Everything seems to be
oming together
Rescuers had one of their best
lays yet Tuesday as the unprece-
iented international effort to save
the two California gray whales
fared a climax. They succeeded
in moving the huge mammals
round a shoal that had stymied
progress for three days.
As darkness fell Tuesday, the
mammals were only about two
miles from the water being
ipened by the Soviet ships.
The whales could be free by
late this afternoon if things go as
well today as they did the day
before, said NOAA rescue coordi-
nator Ron Morris.
"The cooperation has just
been fantastic Petersen said
today. The Soviets came in here
with a very positive attitude and
went to work immediately
western farmer, with whom she
falls in love. It isn't until she goes From there, her situation
to visit her sick mother in Texas worsens. She is taken to Klan ral-
that these scenes begin to mesh, lies, band robberies, and assasina-
Instead of going to Texas, she tions. The danger gets worse with
goes to Chicago, where she enters every turn, but her supervisors
a large, official building. "Katie" refuse to terminate the investiga-
is only her pseudonym, she is tion.
really Kathy Weaver, FBI. Her Even worse, she finds herself
mission is to find out what is falling in love with Gary, even
going on in the seemingly placid though he disgusts her. Her loyal-
midwestern country. Although ties get confused as the plot con-
she can find nothing awkward tinues, and it becomes
about Gary, her supervisors in- unavoidable that she will betray
struct her to continue the investi- Gary, the FBI, or herself.
�anon As evidenced by the plot,
Soon after her return from "Betrayed" is full of suspense,
Texas she agTees to go hunting both momentary and sustained,
with Gary. They leave at night, go Both Katie's life and morality are
out into the woods, and meet with threatened at every turn. Costa
a large group of farmers. Grava, the director, lands an out
They pass out machine pis- standing job of bringing a well-
tols and release their prey, an- written script and two outstand-
other human being. "He ain't a ing actors together,
man says one of the hunters, Aside from its sheer intensity,
"Just a nigger. They're made of the film is an artwork within itself
mud The next day she runs back The cinematography isoutstand
to the agency, begging to be set ing and the supporting roles are
free from the investigation, but played as convincingly as the
her supervisors still want more leads. Also artful is the juxtaposi
tion of violence and passion, nor-
mality and surrealism, sympathy
and antipathy, and love and hate.
Along with the repulsive na-
ture of the film is an element of
irony in both the overall plot and
in dialogue. This irony is essential
to such an intense film, but is not
done in a laugh-out-loud manner,
and thus does not detract from the
serious nature of the plot.
In sum, "Betrayed" is one of
the season's best films, one which
should be recognized in the next
Academy Awards presentation.
It's well worth the price of admis-
sion and a thirty-minute wait in
line with an obnoxious mob of
high-school buffoons waiting to
see Halloween 4.
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greenville.NC
Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St (Next to Wendy's)
�1 Vanilla In U.S.A. 88-89
Delivery 758-0000
25OFF A
WAFFLE
CONE!
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greenville.NC
GOOD IN STORE ONLY
Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
1 Vanilla In U.S.A. 88-89
Delivery 758-0000
250 OFF ANY
JACK-O-LANTERN
ORDER
GOOD IN STORE ONLY
EXPIRES 11 01-88
Looking for costume ideas? Look into this picture for some possibilities. If you don't find a workabh
idea here, check out "What to wear on Halloween" on page 14.
Regularity $39.95
Now $29.95
Friday & Saturday Only
200 Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
r
INSTANT REPLAYS
FALL
COLOR PRINT SPECIALS
FREE
2nd SET OF
PRINTS
AT ITMEOFPaCCFSSINGIJMrTJROLLS-
OM COUPON "ER VISIT
Expires 11-2-88
FREE
REPRINTS
ONE FREE REPRINT WITII EACH
TWO PURCHASED
ONE COUPON PER VISIT
-L
PERSONAL
PORTRAITS
by
INSTANT REPLAY
FREE
5X7COLOR
PORTRAIT
WITI I EACI l PAID SITTING
AND THIS CARD
Ci.i Saw ! or Appointmcr.il And Specul Pjck-
aes For Students And Senior.
1
h
"1
L
L
I Expires 11-2-88
"FREE"
ENLARGEMENT
WITH PURCHASE OF A N'T COLOR
F.NUARCEMENT UP TO 11" X 14"
Receive 2d EniaremrM
F"EE Expires
lnSSj
s INSTANT REPLAY
ONE HOUR PHOTOS AND PORTRAITS
Quality, Convenience and Personal Service'
The Plaza
(next to Annabcllc's)
355-5050
PARKER'S
DINNERS INCLUDE Brunswick Slow, Colo Slaw
Boiled Potatoes or F.i nch r c.s and Corn Slicks
PLATES INCLUDE Coic Stew and Corn Sticks
BARBECUE
1 MUl BARBECUE DINNER
SMAI I. BARBECUE DINN1 R .
LARGE BARBECUE PLATE
SMALL UAKULCL'li PLATE
CHICKEN
FRIED OR BARBECUED
LARGE OliCiCI S RINNI K
SMAI I CJIICKI N DINNER
IkU.DI.IVi . PLATE

Overtoil's Ski-Rifffic Salel
2 BIG DAYS
'Friday & Saturday, October 28 & 29
'Raleigh & Greenville Locations
�SAVINGS UP TO 50 �
i
Alperna Snow Ski Bibs
Men's & Ladies
Youth & Children's
50 Off Retail
Only $37.50
Only $17.50
3'
COMBINATIONS
LARGE COMBINATION
B�rhrcue and Chicken (White Me�t)
SMALL COMBINATION
Buhcue �ivil.icicn (D�k Mc�t)
FAMILY STYLE DINNERS(Each) 5.00
INCLUDES Barbecue, Fried Chicken,
Cote Slaw, Brunswick Stew, Boiled Potatoes
and Corn Sticks
CHILDREN Through 10 Years Old2.7S
Entire Table Musi Order Family Style
No Doggie Hag From Family Style
SEAFOOD
list I DINNER
OYSTER HtY
OYSTER STEW
SIlKIMPDtNNl K
ANY 1 W O COMHIN'A I IONS SEAFOOD
SFAJ OOO FLATTER (luh, Shrimp, Ojiter.)
PARKERS WILL CATER ALL YOUR NEEDS
Two Locations To Serve You
No. 1 S. Memorial Drive No. 2. 2020 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-2388 758-9215
V
Snuggler Stretch Pants 40 Off
Regular Price$149.95
This Weekend Only $8993
�df I
Sportcaster Sportcaster Jackets 40 Oil Retail
Tomic Ski Poles $18.9S Value Only $10.95
Ski Package Special
ATOMIC
Atomic Prisma Skis Marker M-23 Bindings
Koflach 200 Boots Tomic Fast-Track Pnias
koflach
$26995 ESDI
Only
'Sale applies to m stock merchandise
Overtoil's
111 Red Banks Road
Greenville
355-5783
SouthhilU
Shopping Center
Raleigh
1331 Buck Jones Rd
Your Complete Sporting Goods Store
Hours: Monday thru Friday. 9 to 7 pm � Saturday. 8 to 6 pm





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ASH LOANS
IS. VCR'S, GUNS,
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THING OF VALUE
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intment and see haw
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C�MT�R,
Contact Lens Evaluolton
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�eceedtocountalim�of
M October 31,1988

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
I
OCTOBER 27,1988 13
"Betrayed" a must-see film

ByJIMSHAMUN
9��H Writer
From the promotional poster,
"Betrayed" looks like it might be
about a couple of lovers, perhaps
even married,oneof whom has an
affair So what?
There have been plenty of
movies like that lately. But it is not
about an affair at all, or at least not
an affair of the usual type. The
I story begins with a scene of a
I radio-announcer at work.
The announcer is a talk show
host, and an obnoxious Jew who
I abuses anyone who calls. He
�) leaves the station, drives into a
; garage, gets out of his car, and is
I brutally murdered by a truck full
vat men wearing ski masks and
footing Mac- 10s.
The next scene switches
ruptly from this urban violence
fto a rural field where Katie (Debo-
lah Winger�'Terms of Endear-
' ment") is driving a combine
through a field of golden wheat.
rhere, she meets Gary (Tom Ber-
enger�"Flatoon"), a typical mid-
Aria performs
at Mendenhall
Continued from page 11
East Carolina Professor of Music
oe Distefano and Friends on
November 15. Distefano plays
saxophone and clarinet and has
packed such artists as Buddy
Morrow, jerry Coker and Marga-
ret Whiting. He has also scored
. music for jazz ensembles, televi-
sion and the musical stage.
Among others to perform are
pianist Dick Cumberland, drum-
mer Mark Ford, Robert Link on
. string and electric bass, Eddie
. Thigpen on trumpet, and Carol
� Baily .is the vocalist for the group.
First runner up in The Bud
Band Wars, Aria, will perform on
November 19 at 9 pm Aria rocks
their way through originals and
j cover tunes ranging from The
- Smi thereens and U2 to the Beatles
( and the Rolling Stones. They will
; also be opening for Jason and the
I Scorchers October 28 at "Expose
f Yourself" in Chapel Hill.
Don't forget the Halloween
Horror Movie Lock-in on Sunday
�-Qctober 30, beginning at 1:30 pm,
which will feature "The Texas
Chainsaw Massacre "The
Omen and Stephen King's
arrie
Be sure to wear your Hallow-
een garb for the costume contest.
A $25 grand prize will bea warded
for best overall costume, as well as
a $15 prize each for The Best Pi-
rate, The Scariest, and The Best
�impersonation of a Famous Per-
"son.
Pay $3.00 to get in, and if you
bst through all three movies, you
get your $3.00 back � plus a sou-
venir mug to show you survived
the Horror Movie Lock-in. For
more information on any Univer-
sity Union event you can call the
union hotline at 757-6004.
Whale rescue
nears climax
ABOARD THE ADMIRAL
MAKAROV (AP) � Two Soviet
icebreakers flying U.S. and Soviet
flags worked today to smash
through an ice ridge as dav
approached on what rescuers
hope will be freedom day for two
whales imprisoned in ice for
nearly three weeks.
"The whales seemed to be
doing fine Rear Adm. Sigmund
Petersen of the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Administration
said this morning. "If s like they
expected something to be hap-
pening. Everything seems to be
coming together
Rescuers had one of their best
days yet Tuesday as the unprece-
dented international effort to save
the two California gray whales
neared a climax. They succeeded
in moving the huge mammals
around a shoal that had stymied
progress for three days.
As darkness fell Tuesday, the
mammals were only about two
miles from the water being
opened by the Soviet ships.
The whales could be free by
late this afternoon if things go as
,well today as they did the day
i before, said NO A A rescue coordi-
nator Ron Morris.
"The cooperation has just
jbeen fantastic Petersen said
I today. The Soviets came in here
j with a very positive attitude and
j went to work immediately
western farmer, with whom she
falls in love. It isn't until she goes
to visit her sick mother in Texas
that these scenes begin to mesh.
Instead of going to Texas, she
goes to Chicago, where she enters
a large, official building. "Katie"
is only her pseudonym, she is
really Kathy Weaver, FBI. Her
mission is to find out what is
going on in the seemingly placid
midwestern country. Although
she can find nothing awkward
about Gary, her supervisors in-
struct her to continue the investi-
gation.
Soon after her return from
'Texas she agrees to go hunting
with Gary. They leave at night, go
out into the woods, and meet with
a large group of farmers.
They pass out machine pis-
tols and release their prey, an-
other human being. "He ain't a
man says one of the hunters,
"Just a nigger. They're made of
mud The next day she runs back
to the agency, begging to be set
free from the investigation, but
her supervisors still want more
From there, her situation
worsens. She is taken to Klan ral-
lies, band robberies, and assa sta-
tions. The danger gets worse with
every turn, but her supervisors
refuse to terminate the investiga-
tion.
Even worse, she finds herself
falling in love with Gary, even
though he disgusts her. Her loyal-
ties get confused as the plot con-
tinues, and it becomes
unavoidable that she will betray
Gary, the FBI, or herself.
As evidenced by the plot,
"Betrayed" is full of suspense,
both momentary and sustained.
Both Katie's life and morality are
threatened at every turn. Costa
Grava, the director, lands an out-
standing job of bringing a well-
written script and two outstand-
ing actors together.
Aside from i ts sheer i n tensi ty,
the film is an artwork within itself.
The cinematography is outstand-
ing and the supporting roles are
played as convincingly as the
leads. Also artful is the juxtaposi-
tion of violence and passion, nor-
mality and surrealism, sympathy
and antipathy, and love and hate.
Along with the repulsive na-
ture of the film is an element of
irony in both the overall plot and
in dialogue. This irony is essential
to such an intense film, but is not
done in a laugh-out-loud manner,
and thus does not detract from the
serious nature of the plot.
In sum, "Betrayed" is one of
the season's best films, one which
should be recognized in the next
Academy Awards presentation.
It's well worth the price of admis-
sion and a thirty-minute wait in
line with an obnoxious mob of
high-school buffoons waiting to
see Halloween 4.
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greenville.NC
Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
1 Vanilla In U.SJV. 88-89
Delivery 758-0000
25 OFF A
WAFFLE
CONE!
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greenville.NC
GOOD IN STORE ONLY
EXPIRES 11-01-88
Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
and Sorbet
321 B. lOth St. (Nest to Wendy)
1 Vanilla In U.S.A. 88-89
Delivery 758-0000
250 OFF ANY
JACK-O-LANTERN
ORDER
GOOD IN STORE ONLY
EXPIRES 11-01-88
INSTANT REPLAYS
FALL
COLOR PRINT SPECIALS
Looking for costume ideas? Look into this picture for some possibilities. If you don't find a workable
idea here, check out "What to wear on Halloween" on page 14.
r
;
Gl
Ski-Bibs
Regularlly $39.95
Now $29.95
Friday & Saturday Only
200 Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
h
?
u
For Big Goblins &
Little Goblins.
We Have All Your
Halloween Costumes
& Accessories.
c7 Warre, Lid.

1
1

644 Arlington Blvd Arlington Village
756-6670
"FREE
2nd SET OF
PRINTS
ATTTMEOFP�OCESSINCUMrr2ROUS.
Ofy-E COUPON PER VIST
Expires 11-2-88
PERSONAL
PORTRAITS
by
s INSTANT REPLAY
FREE
5X7 COLOR
PORTRAIT
WITII EACH PAID SITTING
AND THIS CARD
Call N'ow lor Appointments And Special Pack-
i ages For Students And Senior.
I
I
I
I
I
I
h
I
I
I
I
I
JL
FREE
REPRINTS
n
i
ONE FREE REPRINT WITH EACH
TWO PURCHASED
ONE COUPON PER VIST
I Expires 11-2-88
FREE
ENLARGEMENT
WITH PURCHASE OF ANY COLOR
ENLARGEMENT UP TO 11" XU"
Rectlvt 2nd Enlargement
J�B2 Expires
INSTANT REPLAY
ONE HOUR PHOTOS AND PORTRAITS
"Quality, Convenience and Personal Service"
The Plaza
(next to Annabelle's)
355-5050
PARKER'S
DINNERS INCLUDE Brunswick Stew, Cole Slaw
Boiled Potatoes or F c.nch Pries and Corn Slicks
PLATES INCLUDE Cole Slaw and Corn Sticks
lOverton's Ski-Riffic Said
2 BIG DAYS
x�V
&
BARBECUE
LARGE BARBECUE DINNER
SMALL BARBECUE DINNER
LARGE BARBECUE PI-ATE
SMALL BARBECUE PLATE.
CHICKEN
FRIED OR BARBECUED
LARGE C! HCKEN DINNER
SMALL CHICKEN DINNER
1RIED LIVER PLATE
COMBINATIONS
LARGE COMBINATION
Barbecue and Chicken (While Meat)
SMALL COMBINATION
Barbecue and Chicken (Dark Meat)
.4.25
.3.90
Friday & Saturday, October 28 & 29
Raleigh & Greenville Locations
�SAVINGS UP TO 50 �!
pcM)rr.rrs.
Youth & Children'sOnly $27.50
$�
J
-Snuilrppp
SKI WEAH
Snuggler Stretch Pant40 Off
Regular Price$149.tS
This Weoktnd Only $8993
FAMILY STYLE DINNERS �(Each) 5.00
INCLUDES Barbecue, Fried Chicken,
Cote Slaw, Brunswick Stew, Itoilcd Potatoes
and Corn Sticks
CHILDREN Through 10 Years Old2.75
Entire Table Must Order Family Style
No Doggie Bag From Family Style
SEAFOOD
FISH DINNER
OYSTER PRY
OYSTER STEW
SHRIMP DINNER
ANY TWO COMBINAllONS SEAFOOD
SEA! OOD FLATTER (Fi. Shrimp. Oyslcn)
PARKER'S WILL CATER ALL YOUR NEEDS
Two Locations To Serve Tou
No. 1 S. Memorial Drive No. 2. 2020 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-2388 758-9215
$$Sportcaster sP�rtcaster Jackets40 Off Retail
Tomic Ski Poles$ 18.es ValueOnly �1095
Ski Package Special
J ATOMIC
kofflach
Atomic Prisma Skis
Koflach 200 Boots
Marker M-23 Bindings
Tomic Fast-Track Pn��s
Only
$26995 rc�
"Sale applies to in-stock merchandise
Overtoil's
111 Red Banks Road
Greenville
355-5783
1331
Km
Sourhhill.
Center
Your Complete Sporting Goods Store
Hour. Monday thru Friday. 9 to 7 pm � Saturday. � to 6 pm





14
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27, 1988
What to wear
on Halloween
By BEN SELBY
Suit Writer
What are you going to be
when you grow up? Tough ques-
tion? Well then, what are you
going to be on Halloween?
Many students know, but
many more are undecided. For
some the decision is easv- They
dress in the same costumes year
after year. Others try to come up
with something original each
year. Costumes can be expensive,
but a couple of local businesses
mav offer relief to those in finan-
cial straits.
Dapper Dan's and the Coin
and Ring Man have a wide selec-
tion of used clothes and accesso-
ries that can be mixed and
matched to create that special
extension of your personality you
desire.
Sandra, of Coin and Ring
Man, says that you'll see a lot of
Morticias, Elviras, and flappers
downtown. Teople are going back
to the stvles of the '30s and '40s.
You'll also see the gangsters of
that era menacing the streets ot
Greenville Monday night.
Sandra said further that some
folks will be sporting dreadlocks
Bob Mariey will rise again, Mon-
day.
Oi course we'll see a host of
dead-looking people with pale
faces and black clothes represent-
ing the school of ghoul. The ques-
tion is whether these people will
dress up or simply slide into some
everyday clothes.
"People have spent as much
as $49 and as little as 25 cents
Sandra said.
Dan, of Dapper Dan's, said
that on the average most people
are spending between $15 and
$20. Trv to buy something vou
can use again. Not just for Hal-
loween Dan said.
Don't be surprised to see
Freddy Krueger, the California
Raisins, and the Blues Brothers.
Tee Wee Herman will show his
little face, big condoms will grace
manv scenes this weekend and
we'll see the resurrection of Man-
lvn Monroe
If it comes down to the wire
and you still haven't decided
what to wear � don't wear any-
thing. Tarty naked. It will be quite
appropriate and is never out of
style.
Scary story
Continued from page 11
to get vour finger stuck in that
when we start moving, he
laughed. Janet told him to stop it
and looked out her side of the car.
Bonner rubbed his face again. The
pimple was so close to the surface.
It had been all day, but every time
he mashed it, he felt so much pain
he had quit trying.
Thev had almost reached the
top when thev heard a shot. "Jesus
Christ Bonner screamed. His
voice became higher when he got
excited. "What the hell was that?"
Janet screamed and tried to hug
him, but the black vinyl bars pre-
vented both her arms from getting
past. When the car started tilting
backwards, farther than Bonner
remembered it tilting last year
when he rode on it, he realized
what must have happened.
"Shit! Shit! Goddamn shit
He clawed at his side of the cage.
trving to prevent it from swaying,
but he couldn't. They were upside
down, and hanging on by one
metal support. "Janet! Janet, shut
the fuck up! Janet! Damn She
had realized that the shot was one
of the chains snapping and now
she was crying in between her
squealing breaths.
"Don't move! Do you hear
me? Don't fucking move She
was clawing at the black vinyl and
the metal grille. Her press-on
nails broke off and started flutter-
ing to the ground. Bonner's face
filled with blood, and his pimple
throbbed. Jesus, 1 can almost feel it
aching now, he thought. "Jesus,
God, help us he screamed.
He could hear the ride atten-
dant yelling, saying something
about not moving. He could hear
people on the ground screaming
and crying. He looked down at his
feet and saw past them at the
cloudy sky. Above his head, just
out of the comer of his eye he
Could see the attendant strapping
on a belt and begin climbing.
There was another long
squeal and he jerked his head
towards Janet. "Goddamn, shut
up Jesus, please just shut up She
didn't but the squeal got louder
and closing. Oh God, he thought,
oh Godohgodohgodohgod
The squealing stopped and
the car fell into the soft mud.
& Trolls
Tuxedos
757-1007
Specializing In:
�Custom Screen Printing
As Well As Tuxedos For All Formal Occasions
Retail Store Carries:
-Tye Dye and Indian Tapestries
-A Full Line of imported Jewelry & 3rd world clothing from
Egypt, Aftrica, South America etc.
-Arriving Soon, Halloween attire & accessories, Mask, Makeup,
Soft Bizarre Pumpkin Heads
This Ad Acts As A 10 Off Coupon To All
Retail Sales Over $20.00
Good til December 1, 1988
Here are some of the ten thousand people who participated in Greenville's Halloween celebratior.
last year. This was the scene at 5th Street, near Rafters.
io.v
She's dressed as a bunny, not as a Playboy Hunny. Even at that, she can't escape the attentions of
nearby Romeo. It's amazing w nat a few beers can do to a guy.
Take a Break From
School and Work
Buy One Specialty Sandwich
andGet 2nd Sandwich
of Equal or Lesser Value
12 Price
Between 3 p.m. & 8 p.m. Expiration 12-22-88
Not Good With Any Other Special Offers
Entertainment For The Weekend
Friday. October 28, Uncle Green
Sat October 29. The Amateurs
Halloween Nite, Mon. Oct. 31, Bad Bob
& The Rockin' Horses.
Call Ahead For Takeouts 758-0080
Hours of Operations
Mon-Tue�
llam-lOpm
Wcd-Thur
lljm-ln-t
FrfcU)
Iam-2in
Saturday
' T noon T rr-
HELP
WANTED
APPLICATIONS BEING
ACCEPTED FOR
LAYOUT ARTIST
APPLY IN PERSON
MONDAY-FRIDAY
10a.m4 p.m.
at
KENTUCKY
FRIED CHICKEN
TAILGATE SPECIAL
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
2nd FLOOR
PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
IN FRONT OF JOYNER
LIBRARY
No phone calls please
Layout Experience Preferred
10 Pieces Chicken
1 Large Mashed Potato
1 Large Gravy
1 Large Salad
4 Biscuits
$1.00 of every tailgate
special sold is donated to
E.C.U. Educational Fund.
Special Available At Both Greenville Locations
(East & West Greenville Blvd.)
Back by papula
Sophom
Dear Big Earl
I amah- tasoi
at ole I � and 1 ha .
cial problem that m
help me .Mth
Yen see, n
of tight He sends m
week and expect
wash, tal
on this m- i .
.
wht i
egg ���� � �
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people only harp
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GREEN
one hero is gi
Halloween
cases of bar
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one except
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mid-term exam in
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FOR SALE: Complete set of Rapt.
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under Staff Illustrator � rom





& Trolls
Tuxedos
757-1007
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,1988 15
in:
frttng
irmal Occasions
ies:
Tapestries
d work) clothing from
terica etc
essories Mask Makeup,
r leads
t Coupon To All
r $20.00
Ik From
Work
�t m ��� m �� MB �"� I
v Sandwich
andwich
ser Value
rice
ial Otters
he Weekend
le Green
Amateurs
:t. 31, Bad Bob
orses.
:s "F8-0080
(tions
KY
ICKEN
ECIAL
en
otato
y
lgate
ted to
Fund.
cations
Back by popular demand The Clearly Labeled
Quote of the Minute-and a
half-you-actually-think
about-these-quotes:
this is the game
that moves as you play
-X
Sophomore ain't got no money
you all shutting the hell up?"
Snoring Roommate
Dear Elvis,
I have a roommate who
snores. He wakes me up every
night. I have tried everything
to
Dear Big Earlvis, little reverse psychology. The
I am almost a sophomore here next time someone says "Are you
at ole EC and 1 have a little finan- stoned say "Yeah, man I just
cial problem that maybe you can smoked some killer green harvest
help me with. bud You quickly find out that
You see, my old man is kind people will stop bugging you.
of tight. He sends me 20 bucks a Better yet, why not use some
week and expects me to eat, do my reverse physics. Try taking a
wash, takeout girls and buy beer couple of bingers before class and
on this measly sum. see if your eyes are still red. In at ing seems to allow me to sleep
When I ask for more dough, least one experiment held at Liz- try to wake him, but all he does is
it's always the same old "Back ard Lick University, seven out of say "Hey Martha" and returns to
when I was in school, I lived on ten people with chronic allergies snoring.
egg whites and bread crusts had clear eyes after consuming My school load is suffering
I will say one thing for the old illegal substances,
man, he does pay my rent but that �-��
is because he owns the apartment
complex I live in. Mom is no help
because she has to pay for her
massive drug habit.
What am going to do, it's
Thursday and I have $2.47 for the
weekend?
Signed, Broke
'Squirrel Man' caught
GREENVILLE, N.C (BP) � six-foot tall organism with the isnot known whether a trial
Greenville's dreaded "squirrel mental facilities of a somewhat date will be set for Klicky yet, as
man" has finally been captured! sow human and the physical criminal charges have never been
r � .uk �ar nlui The creature was walking characteristics of a squirrel, " re-
PT dnfnlp.rdnoth- Past Joyner Library on the ECU ports Dr. Intra Venous. "He is brought against another species
inFmsto I campus around noon Wednes- quite likable, and seems psycho- before. Uw experts agree that the
mp seems to allow me to sieep. i . c . . . . i�iit ili (ltn n ii,u cmimii mm w a
day. Students fled in terror as the
beast kept walking towards the
center of campus.
Finally stopping at the cross-
walk in front of the new General
logically incapable of the violent fate of the squirrel man will be a
Just Ask
BigE
and I am always tired. I have re-
sorted to taking amphetamines to ciassrooin Building, he amazed a
stay awake during the day. What paralyzed student by asking di-
can I do? rections to the Biology building.
Signed, Sleepless
Dear Sleepy,
Once again my name is not
crimes he's accused of commit-
ting
Greenville police disagree.
Chief Gordon CHara, who
has been instrumental in the for-
mation of the Task Force and the
precedent setting affair. Already
Marvin Mitchelson, still em-
broiled in the Tyson-Givens legal
battle, has offered to defend the
squirrel man.
Whatever happens, the case
While the unidentified stu-
dent stammered to give him cor-
rect directions, the ECU Campus
protection of Greenville citizens of the squirrel man will not be
during the Squirrel Man crisis of forgotten. CBS and NBC are al-
the last few months, said, " I seen ready drafting screenplays based
that thing take off an officer's on Klicks story, and the man-
hand. I seen it decapitate a livin squirrel has received offers from
Dear Broke,
Here are four words of ad-
vice; Baloney, Borrow, Beg, Bet.
Red Eyes
Dear Big E,
I have really bad allergies
whichmakemyeyes red. I u se eye
drops, but to no avail. Everyone I
know always asks "Are you
stoned?" It really makes me mad
because I am an ardent anti-drug
supporter.
My favorite anti-drug com-
mericial is "Yo, alcohol is a drug
too, Word I am a member of
Nancy Reagan's Just Say No club.
I believe that the drug problem is
the single biggest problem facing
our country, surpassing the issue
of national defense and the defi-
cit.
So you can see why I am really
upset when people say that I look
like I am stoned. Even one of my
professors embarrassed me in
front of the whole class the other
day. "Miss, are you stoned?" he
asked. Mad, 1 stormed out of class.
What can I do?
Signed, Taking the Red Eye
Elvis. I am a big fan of the fallen Security Squirrel Man Task Force breathin' person. It's a damn ro- Oprah Winfrey, Bob Costas and
Just Ask
BigE
king, but my name is Earlvis. Sec-
ond of all, you are definitely igno-
rant. Sleeping pills are sedatives,
therefore it is redundant to say
sedatives and sleeping pills in the
same sentence.
Now to your problem. So
your roommate snores. I used to
have a roommate who snored.
This is what I did. Before going to
sleep, I would line up every pair of
shoes I owned beside the bed.
When he started snoring,
boom, shoe to the side of the head.
This wouldn't stop the snoring,
but it altered the annoying sound
pattern which is similiar to the
noise of hogs mating. Eventually,
the loud snores would recur,
boom, black sole Sunday shoe to
the kidney.
Although my experiment
didn't stop his snoring, he often
wondered how all my shoes
ended up on his bed. He always
drove up behind the creature and
captured it.
Proving to be a most eloquent
captive, the squirrel creature,
who insists on being called
"Klicky-Klicky is being held at
the Pitt County jail. While he
seems to be an actual cross be-
tween the species of rodent and
human, the more scientists dis-
cover about him, the more baffled
they become.
dent, and if justice prevails, it'll Geraldo Rivera to appear on their
end up fryin in the chair shows. The NBC screenplay (the
working title is "Eight Weeks of
Klicky-Klicky had only this to Terror: The Klicky-Klicky Story)
say in his defense. "I have been will star Barbara Eden and Mal-
out of the country for many colm Jahmal Warner as Klicky.
months. These violent crimes you East Carolinian readers are
refer to can only be the work of my asked to call in and register their
evil twin brother Klacky- votes: 757-6366 if you believe the
Klacky and our not-so-evil-but- squirrel man has an evil twin and
nobody-you'd-lend-money-to - 757-6367 if you don't care, all
either twin cousin Clicky- them squirrel types look the same
anyway, fry him.
"He is a living, functioning, Clacky
Fountain's Police car really does have engine
FOUNTAIN, N.C. (EP) � In a
surprising move today,
Fountain's official police vehicle
was seen parked several hundred
yards from its usual position in
front of the court house.
"I think if s a total waste of
municipal funds. The sheriff
could have walked to the barber-
Loud Co-Workers
Dear Big Earl,
I work with some incredibly
loud people. I mean, these people
are loud. They talk with volume
on high. They laugh as loud as
hyenas. You can hear them
breathe fifty yards away.
It wouldn't be that bad, but
some of us have to concentrate up
here. It is particularly one girl and
one guy who do must of the talk-
ing and gigling. Why are they so
inconsiderate? Help me please
complained about having a pain shop to get a soda, but no he had to
in his neck. It must have been the a bi shol and drive the d Manning said
months (since Mary Jean
Watson's calf had udder prob-
lems) and the valves were starting
to stick Skoog said.
But Skoog's explanation
wasn't enough for Manning. "I
have to sell a lot of donkey har-
nesses to pay that vehicle's up
keep. Come on, this is blatant
misuse of the taxpayer's dollar
Dear Red Eye,
It has been my experience that
people only harp on things that
others don't like to hear. It is just
human nature for people to say
things they know will piss an-
other person off. When I first re- Big E.
ceived my nickname Earl, I hated Signed, Distracted
it and as you see the legacy still
remains. Dear Distracted,
So here is my advice. Use a Try this, say "Any chance of
Professor to hold test day after Halloween
boot to the thorax.
Gotta problem? Do you hal-
lucinate without the use of
drugs? Do you pass gas fre-
quently? Are you really Johnny
and Connie's boy?
Write me, the Big E, I am suf-
fering from a severe case of
empty mail box phobia. All let-
ters will be printed, but please
lay off of the excessive profanity
and don't wear used condoms.
So throw me a line at:
BigE
Tast Carolinian
Publications Building
Greenville, N.C, 27834
car Jack Manning, proprietor of
Manning's Mule Wear, said.
At his own defense, Sheriff
Chris Skoog said the police car
needed to be warmed up and
driven around the town. Foun-
tain, which has a population of 98,
has only one main road with one
stop light.
"Man, I was just warming the
car up, it hasn't been driven in two
Impartial to the scene was
townbarber Rod Phelps, owner of
Phelps' Hair Cuttery. "Ah, I saw
the whole thing, the whole thing,
I didn't think Andy, I mean Skoog
did anything wrong Phelps
said.
Phelps said he was cutting
one of his customer's hair, one
police car. Sartin speculated on
the reasons Id. Manning's up-
heavel.
"It all comes down to racin
Car racin you know Winston
Cup racin See Skoog here likes
Rusty Wallace and Jack over there
likes that varmint Dale Waltrip
Sartin said.
Sartin said that when Wallace
overtook Waltrip for the point
standings, Manning became jeal-
ous.
Manning said he will file suit
on Skoog tomorrow at the Foun-
tain Court House. Back at the
barbershop, the atmosphere was
filled with laughter.
Jack's lawsuit ain't going to
Dale Sartin of Saratoga, when g� very far. You see, Skoog here is
Sheriff Skoog drove up in the the judge too Phelps said.
Students sick of same old short stories
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) � A11 4 were released under
A group of students calling them- $5,000 bail apiece,
selves Students Sick of the Same Monty Tresor, leader and
Old Short Stories (SSSOSS) were spokesperson for the group ex-
arrested Wednesday night after plained to reporters what the
they vandalized and defaced SSSOSS aims are. "We want to
nearly 400 English textbooks. systematically destroy all copies
GREENVILLE (EP) �Every-
one here is gearing up for the big
Halloween celebration by buying
cases of barley-drink, gathering
costume attire and stocking up on
time, all he wants to do is study Uganda religion. I feel like this
why people fall in love with
green, liveless people said an-
other student in the class.
Other students say Dr.
various illegal substances. Every- Wormer has a strange fascination
with the dead. He is said to have
given detailed stories of encoun-
ters which he has shared with
persons who have passed the
rigamortis stage.
"He gets all excited when he
talks about them, his eyes get real
glassy, his words are intense. It's
almost like he carries on relation-
ships with them said the stu-
dent.
From his home at a local fu-
one except Dr. Wormer's PSYC
4715 class.
"Dr. Wormer can suck a gal-
lon of tapioca pudding, I am not
going to take his test said one
disgruntled Psychology major
who wished to remain nameless.
The controversey surrounds
Dr. Wormcr's scheduling of a
mid-term exam in his Tuesday-
Thursday Necrophilia class. Stu-
dents say he unfairly placed the
would be the first day to take the
test he said.
Wormer, who lives with his
mother (Lila, 1929-1985), said he
doen't understand the big beef
with having a test on the day after
After an anonymous tip, po-
lice arrived at the Student Store
shortly after midnight to find 14
students ripping pages out of
textbooks. One student evaded
security and ran outside but was
captured later while spray paint-
ing "Stop the madness" on the
walls of the General Classroom
of certain short stories. We have a
long list of the most offensive sto-
ries, but some of the top 10 include
Poe's "Cask of Amontillado
Flannery O'Connor's "A Good
Man Is Hard to Find Updike's
"A&P Conrad's "Secret Sharer,
" and of course, Hawthorne's
"Young Goodman Brown
"While all these stories un-
doubtably contain literary merit
Tresor explained, "there's not a
freshman alive that hasn't read
them all by the 10th grade. Yet
there are still professors who
force juniors and seniors to dis-
cuss the symbolic decline of the
Old South in Faulkner's 'A Rose
for Emily
Tresor, shaken by the night's
events, went on. "Edgar Allan Poe
wrote scores of short stories. Can't
these publishers and teachers find
anything else to read besides The
Tell-Tale Heart?
He added in a choked voice,
"1 just can't read Bartleby The
Scrivener' again I can't
exam date on the day after Hal- neral parlor, Wormer answered
loween. a �tne allegations. "I wanted to
"He hates us, all he thinks have the test on the first of No-
about is his dead bodies. He vember because it is the day to
doesn't want us to have a good honor the dead in an ancient
FOR RENT
SMALL BLUE FUZZY CREATURE
FROM ALPHA CENTAURI NEEDED:
To share small viral culture. No deposit
required Call 757-6366.
SLIGHTLY BURNED ACCIDENT VIC-
TIM WITH LONG NAILS: Seeks young
boys and girls to share basement apart-
ment Heat included. Last house on Elm
street.
ROOMMATE WANTED:Satan wor-
shipper seeks companianable roomie.
Non-smokers please. 752-HELL.
Halloween. "It's just another day Building
in the year he said.
McCartney announces take over of world
SUSSEX, England (BP) � himself "the best Beatle for the Paul and I inda were given out
Paul McCartney, now an Honor- job while inside the Palace, Queen
ary doctor of the University of "Ever since John died, the Elizabeth and Prime Minister
Sussex and namesake of a kinder- world has been looking for a new Margaret Thatcher formally
garten in Cracow, Poland, an- Beatle to lead them spiritually and signed over rule of the British
nounced his bid for a complete politically, " he said over BBC Commonwealth to the McCart-
takeover of the world Monday radio Monday. "Since I've had
night. another band and the most profit-
According to an article pub- able solo career, I'm obviously the
lished in Club Sandwich, the offi- best Beatle for the job of King of
cial quarterly fan magazine de- the World
voted to reporting every tooth During a Club Sandwich spon-
McCartney and his wife Linda sored rally outside Buckingham
brush, McCartney has declared Palace, autographed posters of
The disgruntled psyche ma-
jor still can't believe the schedul-
ing of the test. "I am going down-
town on Monday, I don't care if I
feel like feces the next day. From a
psychological standpoint, I think
I can leam much more about
human behavior from a
Greenville Halloween ex-
travganza than any PSYC class
he said.
Siast Carolinian. Must be non-Greek, no
history of majoring in dance or accounting
neys.
McCartney could not be
reached for comment, but Club
Sandwich reports that he does
have a new album in the studio
and it is slated for a spring or
summer release.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Six Macintosh Apple com-
puters. All in good condition except thay
have system errors every seven minutes
on the minute. Will accept trade. Call 757-
6366, quickly.
FOR SALE: One slightly used frat boy. A
dance major, gauranteed to break the ice
at parties.
FOR SALE: Complete set erf Rapidograph
& design pens. Stolen right out from
under Staff Illustrator's nose.
CONDOM TESTERS: Worried that your
protection might fail you and your best
friend at that crucial moment? Bring your
prophylactics and girlfriend's address to
our offices before you go out on your date.
JVellrush to her house and let Earl "The
houc foot-long condom stretcher
, testoSrproduct and grade it on a scale
of one (tissue paper) to six (steel-belted
radials) ALL FREE OF CHARGE. Call
757-6366.
TERM PAPER AND TEST SERVICE
Need an A? Well, we can't promise that.
But we can give you five double-spaced
pages of pure gibberish to turn in so you
don't look like the complete fool that you
are. Only $150 a page, Trippin' Galaxies
Inc.
HELP WANTED
INTERESTED in a career based on re-
venge? The The East Carolinian Revenge
Squad may be just the thing for you. No
experience necessary, just a sincere desire
to complain about things you know noth-
ing about and a complete lack of a sense of
humor. No phone calls please.
WANTED: New General Manager for the
and believe in the motto, "Anything for
YOU, Chip Apply in person to Chippy
Bonehead, somewhere on the astral plane.
PFRSONALS
Quayle admits to not being human
HUN KY but lonely frat boy desires se nsi-
tive relationship with dance majors who
love to touch and feel. Call 757-6309 and
ask for The Big Guy.
SIC SEMPER REVENGIS: You thought
we were gone Revenge Squad. But we're
back and you're goin' down Thus always
to those who oppose TECCLSP. WORD!
YAY1 Robin's dead. By 72 votes, the Boy
Blunder has flown to the big Bat Cave in
the sky. We thank all those who voted to
do the spotty little bastard in.
SUPERMAN FAMILY LOVERS: If you
believe that "Superman Family" was in-
deed the greatest comic book of all time,
join the new Superman Family apprecia-
tion dub. We will meet every Tuesday
night and discuss the significance erf Lois
Lane's trips to the bottle city of Kandor
FIRST AMENDMENT LAD: Come
home. All is forgiven. Take back your
place as rightful ruler of the universe.
BOY, It's hard work thinking up all these
satiric classified ads.
was wom about the same number
of times as Jack Kennedy's uni-
form when he got elected
WASHINGTON, D.C. (BP) date was validated by dental rec- chances at the vice presidential
�Republican vice presidential ords and the esteemed geneticist spot. "After all, " heit says, '
candidate Dan Quayle, in a cam- Dr. C. Lonezone, who helped the
paign speech Tuesday night, jacket assume a human appear-
admitted that he is not a human ance. The dental records con-
firmed that the real Danforth
Quayle died at age 14 in a mastur-
batory accident.
The sports jacket that was his
only friend, persuaded Lonezone
being at all, but a highly-evolved
plaid sports coat.
The shocking news came
during a campaign dinner at the
Jesse Helms Retirement Home
For Old People Who Have Been that � could take Quayle's place
Thoroughly Checked By The CIA With some subtle genetic boosts,
For Communist Affiliations. "I it did.
figured it was time for me to come Political analysist Michael
out of the closet for real Quayle Bleekfuture said, This certainly
said. explains a lot about the vice presi-
The mostly deaf, Republican dential hopeful. No wonder he
constituents of the home laughed opted not to to Vietnam
politely as Quayle quipped, '1 everyone knows plaid and
never had a mommy and daddy
just Inspector Number 57
The shocking news concern
ing the vice presidential candi
camoflauge are an incredibly
tacky combination
Quayle is convinced that his
confession will not harm his
Leapin' lungfish, kids! The
Bonehead's back and he's
brought his two lovely Bon-
ettes, Win and Cathy. They'll
be assisting him from time to
time in his battles against the
forces of E-E-E-E-EVTL. So torn
in next week, same bone day,
same bone column.





1
Overkill
'Yeah, they're dead-they're all messed up Sheriff from Night of the Living Dead
By Friedrich Orphous
Bv Harris and Gurganus
Undercover Cats
By Parker
The Avatar
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By Hardister
JFflg 37 Gft-mss from
11
Special
!sdlQw
Edition
Hosted by Dark Chauncey
Hello, the Funmeister here for the last week of Rocktober, and what better way to cap off
the festivities than a special Halloween Fun and Games! All your favorite monsters are here
today to give you some good costume ideas for Monday night. (Even though the Funmeister
wanted it on Saturday night.) If s been a blast hosting this forum of comedic excellence, and I
hope to see you good people again. And now I'd like to close with some Halloween safety tips
for you who will be in the Emerald City celebration! Ho!
1. Wear dark clothing. In Greenville (the hub of Western Civilization) we rope the town streets
off so mad drivers can't get to you, so forget that reflective costume nonsense. Wear something
SCAA-RY!
2. Don't carry bottles downtown. Those chaps with badges will make you pour out your good ale
if they see you with a bottled drink. You might try to deter them with some doughnuts, but take,
cans anyway.
13. Keep your hands to yourself. If s quite undignified and un-Chaunceylike to handle stranger's
naughty bits as you wander around, so keep it clean, eh?
Fun"
6AM�S
RAPS.
With a cape, some funky
jewelry and a little dip-
pety do, you can be the
freshest chilly-dcf rapper
on Evans Street this year!
Chauncey's Costume Ideas
Frankin' Stein
rave foods
Sweet little
girls, pez
lightning, dead TurrHTffci
women Fire, sequels
Measurements:
Turn-ons;
Before that weeni? Broadway
play, the Phantom of the Opera
looked like this. Good 'stume.
Here's an easy one kids- just get
a top hat, pancake make-up, and
a frizzy wig, and there you are-
Alice Cooper!
Suggested by Chuck "The
Chuckster" Harrell and
Sandy B Pirate Comics
Fans and swell kids.
Ladies! Here's a great costume for
you! Fix your hair in a B-52 doo and
you can go as everyone's favorite
horror woman: Patti Labelle!
wprrHAuoueeN
The Boy Wonder -
DEAD
AT
LAST
Yes, thanks to all of you concerned students and readers of Fun and Games who responded to the
DC Robin Dead or Alive phone-in poll, the annoying, brightly plumed sidekick has painfully
bitten the Bat-DusL Thanks for your cooperation and contribution to the comics world. Your vote
does make a difference. Fun and Games by Scott Parker (Jeffs Evil Twin)
llll
Tim James
good role m
By DAVID MONROl
Si�i vsnwr
East Carolina ha�
ers on this year's squad tl
a chance of playing prol
football, but none with a m
promising future than
Tim James
A native
Tim moved south in &
football. Settling in
South Carolina
parents, Tim -
uncle, who played
for Western Carolina, rr
him to play football an:
aged Tim to impr
Bv Tim's sei
school he was v-
cruited by some of tl
in the country sucl
Georgia, Tenness �
College.
A fullback b)
passed these - h
to convert himinl
headed instead I
One of the reaa
traded to East ir
cause the sch
lacked the "Big
Everyone was
quickly adopted EC I
away from home.
Now a sei
Communications with
sisonBroadc.
Social Work, Tim K
graduating in May ai
allv pursuing
industry as a prod u i
Speilberg. Don't :�
though, Tim still concc
football and someda
the NFL.
j �x M
The Pirates hope to stay
another top team. (Photo!
Pirates
out for
By DOUG JOHNSOl
Spor�i tditor
Hurricanes
Just the name evokes i
of destruction and chaol
when the Hurricanes btoj
Ficklen Stadium from 1u
Saturday, the Pirates will r
ing to turn the gale into
Carolina breeze.
"Miami is a very goo
ball team said Pirate Co
Baker during a Monday
conference. They lost sor
athletes last year, but they
very tough. They arc ver
cal I watched the Notnl
game on film a couple o
and that was a great
game.
"Coach Jimmy Johns)
a great job in getting th
pared. They never havi





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Suggested by Chuck "The
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Fans and �.vell kids.
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led sidekick has painfully
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THEEASTCAROIINIAN
Tim James embodies leadership, is a
good role model for younger siblings
Sports
OCTOBER 27, 1988 Page 17
By DAVID MONROE
Staff Writer
East Carolina has many play-
ers on this year's squad that have
a chance of playing professional
football, but none with a more
promising future than fullback
Tim lames.
A native of Philadelphia,
Tim moved south in search of
football. Settling in Hartsville,
South Carolina with his grand-
parents, Tim began his quest. His
uncle, who played collegiate ball
for Western Carolina, motivated
him to play football and encour-
aged Tim to improve.
By Tim's senior year in high
school he was being highly re-
cruited by some of the top schools
in the country such as Clemson,
Georgia, Tennessee and Boston
College.
A fullback by design, Tim by-
passed these schools that wanted
to convert him into a tailback and
headed instead to East Carolina.
One of the reasons Tim was at-
tracted to East Carolina was be-
cause the school was big but
lacked the "Big School" attitude.
Everyone was friendly and Tim
quickly adopted ECU as his home
away from home.
Now a senior majoring in
Communications with an empha-
sis on Broadcasting ar ,i a minor in
Social Work, Tim looks forward to
graduating in May and eventu-
ally pursuing a career in the film
industry as a producer � look out
Speilberg. Don't be confused
though, Tim still concentrates on
football and someday plaving in
the NFL.
When asked which team he
would like to play for, he chose
Denver and San Diego because of
their need to establish a running
game - something he feels that he
would be instrumental in doing.
But Tim was quick to point out
that he would be excited about
playing for any team regardless of
their record. "Just to have the
chance would be more than I
could ever ask for
Being 511" and 230 pounds,
Tim James is someone to be taken
seriously, but don't. He describes
himself as a fun loving, easy-
going kind of guy�somewhat of
a practical joker. "Yeah, I really
enjoy pulling practical jokes.
Once my roommate and I tied a
rubber snake to our dorm door.
When someone opened the door
the snake would be pulled out
from underneath the bed. The
expressions and reactions that
people would make were hilari-
ous. They practically fell over
themselves in an effort to get out
of the room. It was great
Having a sense of humor is
almost a necessity these days for
Tim. With a schedule that has him
on the run from 8:30 a.m. to 11:00
p.m. every day, even the most
punctual of individuals would
have trouble finding time to
spend with friends. Yet still, Tim
seems to manage. With his girl-
friend, Kim Smith, also in broad-
casting, they find time to break the
monotony of Tim's schedule.
An avid bowler with a per-
sonal high in the 180's, Tim enjoys
just being himself. Not everyone
would want their last meal to be
buffet, but hey, Tim's not like
everyone else. Soft spoken, Tim
doesn't want to be remembered as
being selfish, but instead as some-
one who would go out of their
way to help another individual
regardless of the circumstances.
With qualities and character as
this, it is no wonder why Tim
James is admired and respected.
Be careful though. Once on
the playing field and dressed for
battle, Tim James becomes a war-
rior � one with deceptive quick-
ness and bruising strength. Solid
as a rock, Tim fears few and in-
timidates many. With speed to
dash around the corner, Tim still
finds many of his battles straightt-
up the middle; "Rough Yards he
calls them.
Although known to snack on
linebackers, Tim prefers to dine
on defensive backs. Once Tim
breaks through the line and enters
into the secondary, he actually
seeks out defensive backs (the
little 5' 9" 175 types). "The thrill of
running over these guys is awe-
some � too great to describe
With a determination of astro-
nomical proportions and a size
that often has him at a 50-pound
advantage, you find it hard to
envy anyone that has to stop Tim
James in the open field, head on.
I guess you could call it the classic
case of a hit-and-run: no wit-
nesses, no survivors.
Tim contributes much of his
success to his mother, who is
constantly bringing him back to
earth. "Whenever I have a good
game my mother is quick to point
out my weaknesses and to remind
See JAMES, page 19
Tim James catches a breather as he receives instructions from Coach Steve Shankweiler. James is
one of the Pirates' most promising pro prospects. (Photo by Angela Pridgen - ECU Photo Lab).
Pirates to scrimmage
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sport Editor
The ECU basketball team will
be holding its annual intra-squad
scrimmage on Saturday, October
29th at 4:30 p.m following the
ECU-Miami football game. The
game will feature such Pirate
standouts as Theodore "Blue"
Edwards, Gus Hill, Reid Lose and
Jeff Kelly. It promises to be an
exciting prelude to one of the
most promising seasons ever for
ECU's basketball program. And
at the half, as an added bonus, the
beautiful and talented Pure Gold
Dancers will be performing at
half-time. There will be two fif-
teen-minute halves with a five-
minute half-time, and there will
be someone on hand to answer
any questions. Tickets for the
regular season will also be avail-
able.
The public is cordially invited
10 attend. There is no charge for
admittance.
Following is an itenerary for
the afternoon:
4:30 � Pre-practice drills.
4:45 � Scrimmage begins.
5:00 �Half-time.
5:05 � Second period begins.
5:20�Scrimmage ends, post-
practice drills.
5:30 � End.
Tarheels now have to worry about two
quarterbacks, instead of just opponent
. . v cIi-l f��iuii� UU mAA (rr V5Q cVimtl�1 or naHi nd shortS.
The Pirates hope to stay cool under the pressure of playing yet
another top team. (Photo by Thomas Walters - ECU Photo Lab).
CHAPEL HILL, N.C (AP)
Twe quarterbacks -will he- on
Mack Brown's mind when North
Carolina faces Maryland this
weekend.
The first to come to mind will
be freshman Todd Burnett, the
Atlantic Coast Conference rookie
of the week who helped the Tar
Heels end their six-game losing
streak with a 20-17 victory over
Georgia Tech. Burnett will start
against the Terrapins on Satur-
day.
"There will probably be more
pressuc on Todd this week be-
cause of the media, because of the
people on campus Brown said
Tuesday. "The level of expecta-
tion is very much higher this week
on him by our fans than it was last
week. If s a tougher game for him
than last week
The other quarterback is
Maryland's Neil O'Donncll, who
directed the Terrapins to a 34-24
victory over Duke and moved
Maryland into a tie for second
with 15th-ranked Clemson in the
ACC title race. Both are 3-1.
"I can't say enough about
him Brown said. "I'm a fan of
his. He keeps impressing me each
week
"When you get a multi-pur-
pose quarterback�a guy that can
run and throw � it is so danger-
ous. What do you stop Brown
said. "Going into Maryland, basic
fundamental football says you season. He has also rushed for 250 shoulder pads and shorts.
Slop their running aarne But with yard�4n leading thcTrapwtoa "We're, just really beat up,
that or boy, the play-action pass, 43 mark: �' BrfnVn sSWT
he can kill you and the running A third matter on Brown's "We will leam more about
game, he can kill you mind is the health of his football our football team this weekend to
O'Donncll has completed team. For the first time this sea- see if they can bounce back and if
58.7 percent of his passes this son, the Tar Heels practiced in this will be a lift to them he said.
Pirate tournament
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
ECU'S Volleyball team will
host the ECU Invitational on Fri-
day, resuming play of the five-
year old tournament which was
held annually at ECU from 1978-
1982.
The Lady Pirates, now 7-11 on
the season, are looking to boost
their record and win their tourna-
ment on their home court at
Minges.
The tournament, which be-
gins at 10 am on Friday, will fea-
ture East Carolina, James Madi-
son, UNC-Wilmington and
Winthrop. Championship and
consolation matches will be held
at 4pm on Friday.
ECU will square off with
C AA opponent James Madison in
non-conference action in the first
round play. It will be the Lady
Pirates and Lady Dukes first
meeting of 1988, and the Lady
Pirates are looking to gain the
advantage over JMU before the
two meet on November 5, at the
Lady Dukes home court in Harri-
sonburg, VA.
In the second match of the
first round play, the Lady
Seahawks of UNC-Wilmington
will face Winthrop College. The
two teams met earlier in the sea-
son at the Winthrop Invitational
with UNC-W defeating Winthrop
in three games, 15-2,15-7,15-7.
"I'm going to be realistic and
say that we have a good chance of
finishing second. I pick Wilming-
ton to win because we've seen
them play and know how good a
team they are ECU volleyball
coach Judy Kirkpatrick said.
ECU and Wilmington, which
is now in first place of the CAA,
met earlier this season in confer-
ence play at Minges Coliseum.
UNC-W defeated the Lady Pi-
rates in three games 15-8, 17-15,
15-6.
UNC-Wilmington partici-
pated in the Invitational in 1981,
playing in four matches and win-
ning none, while Winthrop, a
two-time participant of the Invita-
tional, won the tournament in
1979.
ECU has won the tournament
two times, in 1978 and 1982. In the
other three years of play, ECU
finished in second place all three
times.
In 1982, the last year of the
tournament, ECU defeated Duke
University in two matches, both
of which went to three games.
"Being my first year at ECU, I
was unaware that the tournament
had not been played since 1982,
but its a tradition that we need to
continue as we build a winning
tradition for ECU volleyball
Kirkpatrick said.
PiratesThave their work cut
out for them against Miami
By DOUG JOHNSON
S potts Wit or
Hurricanes.
Just the name evokes images
of destruction and chaos. But
when the Hurricanes blow into
Ficklen Stadium from Miami this
Saturday, the Pirates will be hop-
ing to turn the gale into a soft
Carolina breeze.
"Miami is a very good foot-
ball team said Pirate Coach Art
Baker during a Monday press
conference. "They lost some great
athletes last year, but they are still
very tough. They are very physi-
cal I watched the Notre Dame
game on film a couple of times,
and that was a great football
game.
"Coach Jimmy Johnson does
a great job in getting them pre-
pared. They never have a let-
down.
The Hurricanes have looked
very impressive thus far this sea-
son, touting a 5-1 record with an
upset victory over Florida State in
their season opener, and most
recently pummeling Cincinnati, a
future ECU opponent, 57-3. Quar-
terback Steve Walsh completed 19
of 23 passes for 286 yards and five
touchdowns against the Bearcats.
The Hurricanes' sole loss
came at the hands of Notre Dame,
in a game many have proclaimed
as the best football game of me
season.
Last season, the Hurricanes
came to Greenville and thrashed
the Pirates 41-3. Walsh threw for
212 yards and three touchdowns
to lead the eventual national
champions to the victory.
Walsh seems to be on a roll
again tlas year. In the last three
games, Walsh has thrown 13
touchdown passes, accounting
for 19 on the season. He is ap-
proaching several Miami records
held by either Bemie Kosar or
Vinny Testaverde, both of whom
now are in the NFL.
Joining Walsh in thebackf ield
is Cleveland Gary, the Hurri-
canes' fullback. Gary is the lead-
ing rusher for Miami, gaining 253
yards on the ground and catching
passes for 476 more. He has six
touchdowns on the season. An-
other player to look for to perform
well is tight end Rod Chudzinski,
a good blocker and one of Walsh's
favorite targets.
On defense, middle line-
backer Bernard Clark may pose a
problem for the Pirate offense.
Clark led or tied the team in tack-
les in the last four games, and he
had 19 tackles last season against
ECU.
The ECU Volleyball team, pictured here, will be hosting their own tournament, where their major
competition will come from the team from UNC-Wilmington. (Photo courtesy of SID).





f
I
18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,1988
Fearless Football Forecast
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week �(3-7)
Overall - (49-29-1)
Miami at ECUMiami
Maryland at UNCMaryland
Texas at Texas TechTexas
Penn State at West VirginiaWest Virginia
Duke at Georgia TechDuke
South Carolina at N.C. StateN.C. State
Clemson at Wake ForestClemson
Auburn at FloridaAuburn
USC at Oregon StateUSC
Washington State at UCLAUCLA
DEAN BUCHANDOUG JOHNSONDr. RICHARD EAKINCHIPPY BONEHEAD
ECU Sports InformationSports EditorECU ChancellorManaging Editor
Last Week (4-6)Last Week - (4-6)Last Week- (5-5)Last Week (6-4)
Overall - (51-27-1)Overall - (53-25-1)Overall (49-29-1)Overall (55-23-1)
ECUMiami�CUMiami
MarylandMarylandMarylandMaryland
Texas TechTexasTexasTexas
West VirginiaWest VirginiaWest VirginiaWest Virginia
Georgia TechDukeDukeDuke
South CarolinaSouth CarolinaN.C. StateN.C. State
ClemsonClemsonClemsonClemson
AuburnAuburnAuburnAuburn
USCUSCUSCUSC
UCLAUCLAUCLAUCLA
EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week - (4-6)
Overall -(53-25-1)
Miami
UNC
Texas
West Virginia
Duke
N.C. State
Clemson
Florida
USC
UCLA
Old Timers a hit in the
ECU Classic contest
Carolina for 10 years during the
196Cs and 1970's, coached the
Gold team. James Mallory, who
also coached 10 years at ECU,
coached the Purple team.
Players from as far away as
California, and graduates from as
far back as 1947 played in the
game.
The Old Timer's Classic was
a real success today East Caro-
lina present-day head coach Gary
Overton said. "We had a great
turnout and everyone really en-
joyed themselves.
The players are real excited
about this becoming an annual
event. They saw former team-
mates and coaches today that they
(SID) � The Purple team
overcame a 4-0 deficit to win the
first annual Pirate Old Timer's
Baseball Classic 17-4 at Harring-
ton Field here today.
The Purple team, consisting
of former East Carolina players
and coaches from 1980-87, and
from 1954-62,sent 14 batters to the
plate in the 10-run fourth inning
to put the game out of reach.
Just under 50 players repre-
senting five decades of East Caro-
lina University baseball took part
in the first Classic.
Among those participating
were Butch Davis, a 1980 ECU
graduate who finished the 1988
season with the Baltimore Ori-
oles. Davis went l-for-2 on the
day while playing left field.
In attendance but not play-
ing, was Bob Patterson, a former
Pirate pitcher who hurled open-
ing day in 1987 for the Pittsburgh
Pirates.
Winfred Johnson, the only
player in NCAA history to hit 70
career home runs and pitch 35
career victories, started on the
mound for the victorious Purple
team.
�w Bari Smith, who coached East
Sale On All Boots
New Arrivals
for the
contemporary woman
hnoePLcfri;
ARLINGTON VILLAGE SHOPS � GREENVILLE 355-3060
PELLETKR HAflBOB SHOPS � UOREHEAD CITY 726-7882
haven't seen in vears.
ERDAY
r
ECU hosted the Old Timers' Classic this past weekend, and had
almost 50 past ECU baseball players. (Photo courtesy of SID).
ECU volleyball team
names players-week
GTt�vitit's Fimum J�� Jbr ovtr 3 r�n
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
ECU Volleyball Coach Judy
Kirkpatrick has named Kelley
Malara and Trad Smith as the
ECU Volleyball Players-of-the
Week for the week ending Octo-
ber 30.
Malara, a sophomore outside
hitter, from Bullville, N.Y was
named theoffensiveplayer-of-the
week after her performance for
the Lady Pirates in last week's
action against Catawba and Pres-
bytrian Colleges.
"Kelley was coming off the
bench and starting. In both situ-
ations, she performed well at
whatever role we needed her at
Kirkpatrick said.
Malara combined five kills, 11
digs and one service ace in her
weekend action.
Smith, a senior outside hitter
from High Point, N.C, earned the
honor of defensive player-of-the-
week, for the second time this
season.
"We switched Traci from the
inside to the outside position. At
both places there's opportunity
for big blocking and she has really
come through for us Kirkpatrick
said.
Smith had one block solo,
four blocks assists, 13 digs and 11
kills for the Lady Pirates in their
weekend action. For the year,
Smith has 17 block solos and 16
block assists.
Pgjgl
Happy Birthday
(buy your friends personalized
B-Day cakes at Dienert)
Phone: 753-5381
�15 Dickinson Atave
Greenville, N.C.
November 2,1988
3:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Regional Rehabilitation Center at PCMH
Junky and Senior college students from the surrounding area
who have declared a major or are interested in nursing or allied
health are invited to tour the Center and to meet the staff. Depart-
ments participating are Nursing. Physical Therapy. Occupational
Therapy, Speech & Hearing Therapy. Social Work, Therapeutic
Recreation, Psychology and Medical Records.
There will be representatives from nursing and allied health re-
cruitment who will be available to answer questions pertaining
to employment and personnel benefits.
Join us at Career Day from 3:00 to 5:30 p.m November
2, 1988. rv
'WELCOME CLASS OF 1992"
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$2.00 OFF
All Haircuts With This Ad
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PITT COUNTY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
200 SBntorebutg Road � P0 Box 6028 � Greenville NC 27835 � 919i 5SM100
IRS na
(IRS) -What do Halloween
and Intramurals have in com
mon? Not much, but several
crazed East Carolina students
have recently found their names
I in the record books of champion-
One-on-one basketball re
cently crowned its champions as
Mark (.aines came through in th
"short man division" j'll" andl
under) with the overall champi
onship. Rob Sheldon pla I
in the giant division for Sign
I Epsiloninthe5'll"and
sion.
In swinging singli
tion, Kent Smith
Wells 7-6, 3-6, 7
men's tennis open chamj
S In the men's intern
sion. Silent Attack star
teusanio took top hi r
Intramural bowling alk .
are howling in Mendenhall
several individuals battle it i
:for the top four individual
eligible to parl
NCSU
GREENSBORO
.supervisors in the at 1 j
:ment at North an lina
University impi I
versity equipment while � J
improvements to their hom
according to a report filed by sta
auditor Ed Renfrovs
The report found
sistant athletic director and
maintenance super
emolovees tor different : i
improvement projects while thj
employees were being paid by thj
state. The assistant AD a
paid for lending friends
sity equipment.
Renfrew's report, which
eluded findings by the Sta:
reau of Investigation, conclude!
an audit bv the state auditor
office that began after all I
were received oi impropriety
within the athletic department.
The report was -nt to WakJ
� Cm � Oysutf
h-Mmu Aueuu nmlttf
Satisfy
Your
Munchies
At Subway
Go Pirates
SOMETHEV
IUI
FROMSVmjQ-
Buy One Sub Get
Another For 99
(With purchase of Medium Drinks)
Offer Expires Oct 31 1988
Sot Valid with Delivery)
��������������tfiai
5
jan.es leader
Continued from page 17
! methari rJbuJd have played b
ter. She keeps me fr
i big head
i Tim's most m n i
j was against Virginia
yearinBlacksburg B
i yards for a t
: screen pass, Tim
i Carolina to not
win in three y
memorable game
; weeks ago against
1 Although the Pirates
: Tim had 21 carries I i
i and 2 touchdown -
burst straight up the mid
Football to Tim has been
gravy of his five years
' Carolina His mam coal has
ways been to get
graduate, and to make as
himself. With a little brothei
sister living with his r -
in Philadelphia, Tim '
not have given them a fcx
model.
It is with this in mind
should thank Tim lames.
him for representing East C
Una University with such c
both on and ott the field.
! Cross Count
s

S

8

s
8
s
s
1
Ann Mane Welch and
Schweitzer took center stacj
the Firate cross country teai
the last two tournaments in j
the Pirates participated.
In the State Champioij
meet held in Wilmington, V
was the top finisher forj
women's team, coming in wj
time of 18:29 to finish eighth
field. Kim Griffiths was the
highest finisher for the Pi
with a time of 2009 to givl
28th. The women's team tinl
forth overall in the toumanj
In the men's divi
Schweitzer was the highei
isher for the Tiratcs, cominj
33rd place with a time ot
The men finished seventh o
out of the field of nine.
Last weekend, in the
Invitational, Welch finishej
for the women with a tij
19:05. Kim Griffiths, Judy A
and Dawn Sweeney finish
13th and 14th, respectivelj
the team finished third ovi
Once again the top ti
for the men was Schweitcj
finished in 14th place withl
of 2150. Jim Layton was thj
highest finisher for the Pit!
33rd place. Overall, the rrj
ished fifth in the team stM
I
1





I -KLA'IS HAMILTON
Features Editor
Last Week �(4-)
Overall (53-25-1)
Miami
UNC
Texas
West Virginia
Duke
N State
Clem son
rida
fH
'IIIMtHMIililM
Is

1
t
X16S
ni-iiiilllliililiil
IEER DAY
mber 2.1988
PM - 5:30 PM
Center at PCMN
from the surrounding area
terested n nursing or allied
id to meet the staff. Depart-
ical Therapy. Occupational
Social Work, Therapeutic
Records
irsg ana allied hearth re-
swer questions pertaining
:o 5:30 p.m November
H6P6
HAL HOSPITAL
lr . '835 � (919) 551 4KX3
fy
r
way
ub Get
lor 99
tium Drinks)
31 1988
iDclivcry)
� m m m m a
THE EAST CAROUN1AN
f
OCTOBER 27,1988 19
fIRS names victors in many sports
(IRS) What do Halloween
and Intramurals have in com-
jjg mon? Not much, but several
& crazed East Carolina students
have recently found their names
2 in the record books of champions
One-on-onc basketball re-
' cently crowned its champions as
year's ACU-I Johnson City, Ten- fraternity powerhouse Pi Kappa
nessee Competition
In the ladies lane, Jennifer
Slothower for the Gutter Girls
leads all with a current 184
average. Following closely are
Donna Pender (165), Kimberly
Kincheloe (162) and Julie
� Mark Gaines came through in the Turnbaugh (161). But watch out
short man division" (5'11" and ladies, intramural pollster IMA
under) with the overall champi- Reck sees yet a fifth competitor in
j: onship. Rob Sheldon placed first your future as Cindy Vahle, a
I in the giant division for Sigma Phi member of the infamous Alley
: Epsilon in the S'll" and over divi- OOPS rolled a whopping 212 to
sion. give her squad the highest
In swinging singles competi- women's team total on record
: tion, Kent Smith defeated Shane vvith a 1031.
. Wells 7-6, 3-6, 7-5 to capture the Other top ladies teams in-
" men's tennis open championship, elude: The Spritzers with a recent
t In the men's intermediate divi- 948 two-game series and sorority
I sion, Silent Attack star Chris San- Alpha Omicron Pi with a 931.
teusanio took top honors. On the men's ticket, Jeff
- Intramural bowling alley cats Griggs leads the others after two
rare howling in Mendenhall as matches with a high 205 roll. Fol-
. several individuals battle it out lowing closely are Jeffrey Shearin
for the top four individual spots (203), Richard Geibert (202) and
eligible to participate in this Darryl Flippin (200). In team play,
Phi A leads in a single series with
a high 1283 bowl � that means
that each man averaged a 160 in
both games. Outstanding. This
week's men's power team award
goes to Theta Chi A with 1134 and
1123 rolls in their first two trys at.
the all campus gold.
Volleyball and soccer kicked
off their seasons this week and
IMA RECK, after thoroughly
scouring each squad, has once
again come up with the likely
picks.
VOLLEYBALL
MEN
WOMEN
1. Lucky 7
1. Good, Bad and the Ugly
2. TKE A
2. Enforcers
3. Our Prerogative I
Silver Bullet
4. Day Old Bread
Fe Fi Fo
5. Sig Ep B
Alpha Omicron Pi
SOCCER
MEN
WOMEN
l.CSOMF
1. Alpha Omicron Pi
2. Tau Kappa Epsilon A
2. GDI's
3. Full Rasta
3. TKE lil' sisters
4. Sigma Phi Epsilon A
4. Delta Zeta
5. Pi Kappa Alpha B
5. Chi Omega
This year's women's volley-
ball competition is probably the
toughest in recent years. Peren-
nial favorite Good, Bad and Ugly
go in with confidence as they
have a roster of only 4 players.
However, Enforcers and Silver
Bullet have squads full of power
players and could upset Good,
Bad and Ugly if the teams meet in
regular season competition.
In the men's league, Lucky 7
has come out on the all-campus
winner's court several rimes.
Their victory should be of no
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divisional playoffs.
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NCSU under scrutiny by state
GREENSBORO (AD - Two
j supervisors in the athletic depart-
" ment at North Carolina State
niversity improperly used uni-
v ersity equipment while making
f improvements to their homes,
according to a report filed by state
. auditor Ed Renfrow.
The report found that an as-
sistant athletic director and a
5 maintenance supervisor used
emoloyees for different home
improvement projects while the
County District Attorney Colon helped the assistant athletic direc- supervisor's knowledge and ap-
Willoughby for review and pos- tor in construction of his personal proval, they were paid for these
sible action. The allegations did residence, and in most instances, hours by the university,
not include university coaches or they were paid by the university "We don't think the taxpay-
athletes. for their time. The assistant ath- ers in this state will stand still for
The Greensboro News & Rec- letic director denied awareness much of that Renfrow told the
ord could not reach Valvano for that the employees submitted newspaper. "If there's no statute
comment Tuesday, and he was time sheets to the university and governing this or dealing directly
unavailable for comment this worked on his residence. wUh this, then it's something the
morning. The newspaper re- The report also said the assis- rcceived pay for the hours they
ported, however, that Valvano tant AD checked out a front-end general assembly will want to
had already suspended Bobby loader from an equipment busi- look at. If you use employees and
Stocks, a maintenance supervisor ness in Raleigh and instructed an equipment for the benefit of other
employees were being paid by the f�r Carter-Finley Stadium and athletic department employee to people, then that's misappropri-
state. the assistant AD also got Reynolds Coliseum, without pay drive it to his residence, where it ating dollars
paid for lending friends univer- pending the state auditor's inves- was operated by the employee.
sity equipment. tigation. He was paid for his time by the
Renfrew's report, which in- Howard Hink, the coordina- university.
eluded findings by the State Bu- tor of athletic facilities at N.C Several athletic department
reau of Investigation, concluded State and one of six assistants employees revealed instances in
an audit by the state auditor's under Valvano, declined com- which they were instructed by the
office that began after allegations ment when reached by the news- supervisor to mow grass, clean
were received of impropriety paper Tuesday and referred all gutters, move furniture and per-
telephone calls to Valvano. form other personal favors for a
Among the findings in there- former employee of the athletic
port, Renfrow said several em- department, according to the re-
ployees of the athletic department port. They all stated that, with the
within the athletic department.
The report was sent to Wake
James leader
Coming soon to the
ATTIC
�s
Continued from page 17
me mart Sould have played bat-
ter. She kcc 3 me from getting a
big head
Tim's most memorable play
was against Virginia Tech last
year in Blacksburg. By dashing 74
yards for a touchdown off of a
screen pass, Tim enabled East
Carolina to notch their first road
win in three years. His most
memorable game came two
weeks ago against Florida State.
Although the Pirates lost 45-21,
Tim had 21 carries for 97 yards
and 2 touchdowns (one a 23 yard
burst straight up the middle).
Football to Tim has been the
gravy of his five years at East
Carolina. His main goal has al-
ways been to get an education,
graduate, and to make a success of
himself. With a little brother and
sister living with his mother back
in Philadelphia, Tim James could
not have given them a better role
model.
It is with this in mind that we
should thank Tim James. Thank
him for representing East Caro-
lina University with such class,
both on and off the field.
I Cross Country
Ann Marie Welch and Matt
Schweitzer took center stage for
the Pirate cross-country teams in
the last two tournaments in which
the Pirates participated.
In the State Championship
meet held in Wilmington, Welch
was the top finisher for the
women's team, coming in with a
time of 18:29 to finish eighth in the
field. Kim Griffiths was the next-
highest finisher for the Pirates
with a time of 20:09 to give her
28th. The women's team finished
forth overall in the tournament.
In the men's division,
Schweitzer was the highest fin-
isher for the Pirates, coming in at
33rd place with a time of 26:36.
The men finished seventh overall
out of the field of nine.
Last weekend, in the VCU
Invitational, Welch finished first
for the women with a time of
19:05. Kim Griffiths, Judy Wilson,
and Dawn Sweeney finished 12th,
13th and 14th, respectively, and
the team finished third overall.
Once again the top finisher
for the men was Schweitzer, who
finished in 14th place with a time
of 21:50. Jim Layton was the next-
highest finisher for the Pirates in
33rd place. Overall, the men fin-
ished fifth in the team standings.
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i
20 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27,1988
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 27, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 27, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.636
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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