The East Carolinian, October 25, 1988






Inside:
EDITORIALS .w 4
FEATURES7
SPORTS10
Features:
ChiPpy gives "Elvira, Mistress of Darkness" two
thumbs down, says it had one funny line and that
one is questionable, see for yourself on page 7.
Sports:
The Pirates extend their losing streak at 1-7 and the
Miami Hurricanes blow into Ficklen with hopes of
lengthening the streak, see page 10.
She iEaat (Earnltnian
Vol.63 No. 29
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Tuesday October 25,1988
Greenville, NC
Circulation 12,000
Knifing mars weekend for two students
By JOE HARRIS
ewt Editor
Two ECU students, Joseph L.
Molineauv and Christopher D.
Simpson, were knifed at 1:50 a.m.
Saturday in the wooded area be-
tween Greene Dormitory and the
ROTC building.
Chief Johnny R. Rose of ECU
Tublic Safety said, "Tony L. Sauls,
18, of Clayton, NC. was appre-
hended by ECU Public Safety an
hour-and-a-half later in a nearbv
apartment complex and charged
with two counts of assault with a
deadly weapon inflicting serious
injurv
Sauls was released Saturday
morning on $5,000 bond from the
Pitt County Jail.
Molmeux and Simpson were
taken to Pitt County Hospital
where they were treated for mul-
tiple lacerations to their heads,
faces and arms.
The incident, according to
Simpson, started when he and
Molineaux were in the lobby of
Greene Dorm and Sauls was at-
tempting to enter.
Simpson estimated
the number of
stitches rendered to
Molineaux at
30-40 in the facial
area and 30-35 in
his arm.
'The doors were ocked and
he was trying to get in said
Simpson. "We laughed at him for
a minute or two and then let him
in. Once he was in, he and Jomo
(Molineaux's nickname) started
arguing and they took it outside,
around to the east side of the
dorm. When 1 looked around the
comer he had punched Jomo and
ran
Simpson said he chased Sauls
and gave up to check on Molin-
eaux.
"Jomo was leaning up against
a tree when this guy came sneak-
ing up behind us with what
looked like a knife said
Simpson. "He swung at Jomo and
cut him from his car to his jaw to
the corner of his mouth. Jomo put
his arm up to block it and was also
cut on the arm.
"1 tried to push him away and
he hit me in the lip, arm and shoul-
der and then caught me in the
back of the head. He cut me on the
leg when 1 tried to kick him
Simpson estimated the num-
ber of stitches rendered to Molin-
eaux at 30-40 in the facial area and
30-35 in hisarm. Molineaux could
not be reached for comment.
"From what I saw he'll have to
have plastic surgery, he was re-
ally cut up said Simpson.
Simpson received three
stitches in his lip, 10 in the back of
his head and 15 in his shoulder
and arm.
Rose said Sauls was arrested
with a knife in his possession but
added the police arc not sure if it is
the same weapon used in the as-
sault.
Sauls told police that he was a
student at N.C. State but police
have not confirmed this either.
The police were able to appre-
hend and identify the assailant
with the help of eye witnesses
who saw Sauls when he was in the
lobby of Greene Dorm.
Sauls' court date is set for
Nov. 7 in the District Court of
Greenville.
Student and town leaders
set Halloween on Monday
By JOE HARRIS
Nam Editor
Amid rumors and controversy, the Halloween celebration is set for
Monday night. According to the panel that decided on Monday as
the date, this year's Halloween will be no different than last
year's(Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab).
As scheduled and empha-
sized by the Town Council,
Greenville Police Department
and SGA President Larry
Murphy the Halloween celebra-
tion will take place next Monday
Night.
The rumor of the celebration
taking place Saturday night is
not true.
'The Town Council, bar
owners, city and campus police,
SRA, SGA, Dean Speier, IFC and
the Panhellenic Council met and
all decided that Halloween will
be on Monday � it's as simple as
that Murphy said.
Murphy said that since the
celebration is on Monday, it will
cut down on the number of
people coming to Greenville for
the party. "It will be more of a
Greenville and ECU function
"We'll not tolerate people
drinking and congregating in the
streets on Saturday night said
Captain Randy Nichols of the
Greenville Police Department.
"They're (partiers) welcome to
come downtown in their cos-
tumes and patronize the bars and
do as they please, but Saturday
night is just another weekend
night
He also said the police de-
partment along with North
Carolina Alcohol Law Enforce-
ment (N.C.A.L.E.) officials are
aware that more people than
usual will be in Greenville on the
weekend prior to Halloween
because of the home football
game. "We have a contingency
plan in case things get out of
hand Saturday night, we won't
hesitate to deploy the people
Nichols said.
Nichols said the police arc
not expecti ng anything out of the
ordinary to happen, but are pre-
pared in case something does.
City Manager Gregory
Knowles said Monday night will
be a typical Greenville Hallow-
een. "Cotanche and Fifth Streets
will be barricaded off so the traf-
fic can't get through, people will
be allowed to gather and drink in
the streets as usual � this year will
be no different than any other
year Knowles said.
Knowles added that next year
the city wants to sponsor a Hallow-
een festival, that is if everything
goes well on Monday night.
"Each year Halloween costs
the city $32,000 said Knowles.
"This amount covers payment for
clean-up crews, barricading the
streets and paying the extra law
enforcement personnel.
"We would like to take that
money and sponsor a Halloween
festival out on the village green to
get the celebration out of the street.
See HALLOWEEN, page 2
I Students look at displays set up by the N.C. Highway Patrol on
Thursday as a part of Alcohol Awareness Week (Photo by Thomas!
l Walters, ECU Photolab).
ECU Democrats give
question to Bentsen
By BEN SELBY
Suff Writer
SGA faced with condom resolution
By MICHAEL BARTLETT
SU� Writer
A resolution concerning con-
dom vending machines in resi-
dence halls of universities in the
UNC system was the main topic
of the SGA's fifth meeting.
The resolution, submitted by
Student Welfare Chairman Lee
Toler, urged the Board of Gover-
nors of the UNC system to require
condom vending machines be
placed in all residence halls of uni-
versities in the UNC system. The
proceeds from the sale of con-
doms will go to the refilling and
maintenance of the vending ma-
chines.
In backing this issue, Toler
said 33,000 people are infected
with sexually transmitted dis-
eases (STUs) everyday.
"There have been 280 cases of
AIDS reported on college com-
puses nation-wide and that may
not seem like a lot. But if you
consider current growth trends
there will be approximately
280,000 cases in 1998. We can not
wait until 1998 to implement this
plan Toler said.
Also supporting the resolu-
tion Legislator Jim Layten, said,
"If you don't have condom ma-
chines there when the occassion
arises, then you have another
choice to make
Another Legislator, Karen
Smith, added, "You won't use it if
it's not there. There are a lot of
diseases going around and every-
one needs the protection
In a post meeting interview
Ms. Smith said she felt that there
was a need to increase the accessi-
bility of condoms. "We are ma-
ture people and parents need to
understand that college is differ-
ent Smith said.
Toler in the same meting said
college students are the target
group (age wise) being infected
by STD's. "If you do not promote
A similar resolution
was passed by last
year's SGA but it was
vetoed by Chancellor
Eakin. Even though it
was vetoed, last year's
resolution passed after
an hour of affirative
and negative debate.
This year's resolution
passed without any op-
position.
accessibility and communication
then to me you are placinga value
on human life
Toler went added, "If you
save one life you have accom-
plished your goal
A similar resolution was
passed by last year's SGA but it
was vetoed by Chancellor Eakin.
Even though it vetoed last year's
resolution passed after an hour of
affirmative and negative debate.
This year's resolution passed
without any opposition.
In a telephone interview after
the meeting, Eakin, declined to
comment on the condom issue
until he has had the opportunity
to view the legislation.
This SGA purposal will be
sent to Eakin; Chairman of the
UNC Board of Governors, CD.
Spangler and Director of ECU
Student Health Services, James
McCallum.
In other old business, a
constitution was passed for the
ECU Young Democrats Club.
The SGA meetings are open to all
students and they meet every
Monday at 5 p.m.
ECU made history last Thurs-
day by taking an interactive part
in the Democratic presidential
campaign. Broadcasting live from
Corpus Christi, Texas, vice-presi-
dential nominee Sen. Lloyd
Bentsen held a teleconference that
included 12 states and 21 univer-
sities nationwide.
Each school was allowed to
ask one question from preselected
subject areas. ECU's Bill Carroll,
president of the ECU College
Democrats asked Sen. Bentsen
'What economic advantages the
democratic ticket would offer
graduating students that a repub-
lican ticket wouldn't
Bentsen took the opportunity
to discuss the trade deficit and
how the government needs to
plant seed money in American
business so that we can compete
with economic consortiums that
are emerging in Japan and Eu-
rope. He said that a sound, do-
mestic economic base would offer
the greatest security for the fu-
ture.
During his discussion of the
Bush-Quayle ticket, Bentsen at-
tempted to clarify democratic
position on gun-control, the
homeless, the deficit, defense
spending, and the way of eco-
nomic reform.
He appealed for additional
support from the voters that were
tuning in "Don't think your vote
doesn't count Bentsen said "It's
terribly important
Former Democratic presiden-
tial candidates Albert Gore and
the Rev. Jesse Jackson spoke from
Memphis State University. Gore
said we didn't need an admini-
stration that depended on astrol-
ogy for our country's future suc-
cess, and Jackson added that it
was time for young Americans to
come alive and shift gears.
State Sen. Russell Walker was
at Mendenhall for the event. He
said that Dukakis had not con-
ceded North Carolina and that it
has been a "nip and tuck race in
N.C. since the beginning
Sen. Harold Hardison, from
Deep Run, N.C, said that we live
in a day and age of electronics. It
(the teleconference) is another
step in the political process. He
told the group of about 30 stu-
dents, that he was from a day
when leaders gave young people
opportunity. "This is serious
business he said. "Economic
opportunity for the future is
knocking. Think about you re-
sponsibilities as an american citi-
zen he said.
Hardison empahsized how
important voting was to the
democratic endeavor. "You are
the most important person here
Tell you self, he concluded, "If it is
to be, it is up to me
WZMB's silence comes
from several problems
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Stiff Writer
WZMB is still silent because
of complications in having the
damaged component, called the
exciter, returned from being re-
paired.
The exciter which maintains
WZMB's signal at a frequency of
91.3 MHz, burned out one month
ago on September 24.
Rather than risk losing its li-
cense to broadcast, WZMB was
forced to suspend operation until
the component was fixed. The
exciter was sent back to Versa
Count, which sold WZMB the
exciter five years ?. go, for repairs.
In the last month. Versa
Count has given General Man-
ager Keith Powe the runaround.
That is to say, they have not met
their promised deadlines on re-
pairing and returning the compo-
nent.
See'ZMB page 2





Illl EAS1 CARCH 1MAN
I VTOHFR 25, WSH
Stress can cause alcoholism
1 have a triend who seems to
have a drinking problem What
can 1 do to help her"
Each person deals with stress
and problems in their lives differ
ently Some withdraw and avoid
contact or closeness with outsid
ers while others increase their
personal contacts Others spend
more time than usual on
schoolu ork and then some turn to
alcohol and other drugs to help
them cope
It may not be the amount of
alcohol someone drinks that
causes a problem as much as the
reasons behind his or her drink
To Your Health
By
Mary-Elesha Adams
ing and the effect oi the drinking
on studies, relationships, future
plans, and )obs.
It you're concerned that a
friend has a drinking problem,
don't be afraid to bnng it up. Try
to show your concern so that you
don't cause your tnend to have a
defensive reaction It you tell the
friend that he or she has a drink-
ing problem they will most likely
deny it and become angry.
A good approach is to ask the
person it he or she is concerned
with the consequences of drink
ing or to ask it he or she has a
problem. IV prepared tor possible
outlashes from raising the ques-
tionofadrinkingproblem Hvenil
you raised the issue in an appro
priate manner the person may
react with detensiveness or de-
nial. It's important to remember
that you can't take control o
anyone's lite and you should not
feel guilty about not "helpingher
get better
The East Carolinian
Si-ruinq llie Eai,t Camlirvi campus � '
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer M
Ri hard-Alan Cook Adam ESIa
Ashley E. Dall
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
South
cuss alcohol use with you. I lie
Counseling Center provides re-
source materials about alcohol
and drugs.
MONTHLY HA
0-4') Column ln hes
50 99
100-149
150 109
20O-249
250 and above
3 I .
;
4
Halloween set for Monday
Continued trom page 1
The plan is to get th
groups like fraternities,
campus
ororities,
SRA. SGA and anyone else w
wants to help to pitch in and m
this thing go
Knowles said in order for the
citv to sponsor a Halloween festi-
blv.
am
This means no proporU
no val the participants in this year's age to the downtown businesses
ake celebration "need to act responsi- dispersing at 2:30 a.m. when the
cleaning crews becin their work
ZMB may need $14,000
Continued from page 1
Because ol the current prob-
lems and the fact that the exciter
has been a constant problem
station engineer Macon Dail s
u was purchased, WZMB is bm -
ing a new one. in addition, they
are buying a new transmitter and
power amplifier, mvA arc having
routine maintenance work per-
formed on their antenna.
WZMB will go back on the air
if and when their old exciter is
returned, but, due in part to Pur-
chasing Department policy, the
new equipment probably will not
be available tor a minimum of
thirtv days As soon as the
equipment is installed the old
exciter will be relegated to the role
of backup.
Although no one has yet de-
cided what company will provide
the new equipment, all compa-
nies currently under considera-
tion have 24-hour hotlines and
technical assistance available, so
no repeat of the Versa Count epi-
sode is likely.
The Media board moved
Monday to allot WZMB the funds
it needs to purchase its new mate-
rials and get back io the business
of broadcasting.
The final tab mav come to as
much as $14,000.
N.C.A.L.E. officials, are broken
each year at Halloween and they
want to stop the street celebration.
"It the the students help us this
year, we'll help them next year.
"he festival is something we
and showing respect toward the would really like to sponsor, but
police and property cooperation is the key Knowles
He said eight laws, set by said.
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
I (lharge in A i li!
One c. ilor and black
fwo col Iv and hUi k
Inserts
I �
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Frida
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones757-6366
757-655S
Trace
in milk
MB
, incy xjnsellng,Forfurthet nfonral -
; V y&ll between j t. ixw! S
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
MONDAY
Triple Tuesday and
Wednesday
with Pi Kappa Phi
$2.00 Frozen Drinks
$2,00 Teas
$1.00 Cans of Beer
Greeks: Bring 3 or
more people and all of
you will get in free!
t
iBienvenidos Amigos
Open 7 Days For Lunch & Dinner
Lunch Specials $3.95
Served Mon. -Frl.
1 lam till 3pm
Dinner Specials $5.95
Includes Dessert
Served SunThur.
After 5pm
Late Night Special C m
Mexican Pizza GrandeOnly Zj3
Sunday-Thursday After 10 CO P M
Friday & Saturday After 1100 PM
521 Cotancne Street
757-1666
:
if� TF
For
COP RIGH1 '988 EF
TFV AND PRICES G N ft �
23 THROUGH SA rURDAI r 29
RIGHT TO Lltv" " . AN riTIi Nl
search hre
I
JN(
SOl D
Eacl
I . � 1st
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m

ADVERTISEO ITEM POLICY
ertised ten � .
n each I" .�
f we d ' ' . � � �
� i mi �.� �:
ne vendoi

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tot-iil�-
� � �� Ae will
� available
9M
t � t
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k.i r .i. '�
BANACOL
Golden Ripe
Bananas
Pound
$
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� 1J.
m
dk
jGL
K
�.�j
k
Play
Daily S
10� Discc
R;jg - Prin
Iterr
With Stud'

CQST CUTTEft
(CASH SAVER AM A
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE,
CAFFEINE FREE DIET PEPSI
CAFFEINE FREE PEPSI,
Diet Pepsi
or Pepsi Cola
2Liter
Play Kroger s NEW
Match h Wine Game
"Cost Cutter Cash Saverama
And You Could Take Home
CASHl FREE PRIZES' A Trip
To The Carribbean1
ml u wm
� �
m. m -n
i
IImK
Si;
r-yT-tl�jV
aaR��'





V

I
y
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25. WM
Stress can cause alcoholism
I have a friend who seems to
have a drinking problem. What
can I do to help her?
Each person deals with stress
and problems in their lives differ-
ently. Some withdraw and avoid
contact or closeness with outsid-
ers while others increase their
personal contacts. Others spend
more time than usual on
school work and then some turn to
alcohol and other drugs to help
them cope.
It may not be the amount of
alcohol someone drinks that
causes a problem as much as the
reasons behind his or her drink-
To Your Health
By
Mary-Elesha Adams
ing and the effect of the drinking
on studies, relationships, future
plans, and jobs.
If you're concerned that a
friend has a drinking problem,
don't be afraid to bring it up. Try
to show your concern so that you
don't cause your friend to have a
defensive reaction. If you tell the
friend that he or she has a drink-
ing problem they will most likely
deny it and become angry.
A good approach is to ask the
person if he or she is concerned
with the consequences of drink-
ing or to ask if he or she has a
problem. Be prepared for possible
outlashes from raising the ques-
tion of a drinking problem. Even if
you raised the issue in an appro-
priate manner the person may
react with defensiveness or de-
nial. It's important to remember
that you can't take control of
anyone's life and you should not
feel guilty about not "helping her
get better
It would be helpful for you to
learn more about alcohol abuse
and alcoholism. The Student
Health Center has an excellent
brochure entitled "How to Help a
Friend With a Drinking Problem"
and additional information about
alcohol and drugs that you can
pick up. BACCHUS, a student
alcohol education group, located
in 301 Erwin Building has trained
student educators who can dis-
cuss alcohol use with you. The
Counseling Center provides re-
source materials about alcohol
and drugs.
Halloween set for Monday
Continued from page 1
this thing go
The plan is to get the campus Knowles said in order for the
groups like fraternities, sororities, city to sponsor a Halloween festi-
SRA, SGA and anyone else who vai the participants in this year's
wants to help to pitch in and make celebration "need to act responsi-
ZMB may need $14,000
Continued from page 1
Because of the current prob-
lems and the fact that the exciter
has been a constant problem for
station engineer Macon Dail since
it was purchased, WZMB is buy-
ing a new one. In addition, they
are buying a new transmitter and
power amplifier, and are having
routine maintenance work per-
formed on their antenna.
WZMB will go back on the air
if and when their old exciter is
returned, but, due in part to Pur-
chasing Department policy, the
new equipment probably will not
be available for a minimum of
thirty days. As soon as the new
equipment is installed, the old
exciter will be relegated to the role
of backup.
Although no one has yet de-
cided what company will provide
the new equipment, all compa-
nies currently under considera-
tion have 24-hour hotlines and
technical assistance available, so
no repeat of the Versa Count epi-
sode is likely.
The Media Board moved
Monday to allot WZMB the funds
it needs to purchase its new mate-
rials and get back to the business
of broadcasting.
The final tab may come to as
much as $14,000.
bly
This means no property dam-
age to the downtown businesses,
dispersing at 2:30 a.m. when the
cleaning crews begin their work
and showing respect toward the
police and property.
He said eight laws, set by
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to :lw�ksatdditi
Control, ind Problem Pregnancy Coua
call 832-0535 (toll free number. 1-800-S32-S3M) tx
p.m. weekdays. General anesthesia available.
Ik
! RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
DAPPER
DAN
"Let us Dress you up for Halloween"
' I INC
JLVVLLKY, COLIU 'iAHlls
AND TURN IT UKE
iu v-2 r
MONDAY
Triple Tuesday and
Wednesday
with Pi Kappa Phi
$2.00 Frozen Drinks
$2.00 Teas
$1.00 Cans of Beer
Greeks: Bring 3 or
more people and all of
you will get in free!
N.C.A.L.E. officials, are broken
each year at Halloween and they
want to stop the street celebration.
"If the the students help us this
year, well help them next year.
The festival is something we
would really like to sponsor, but
cooperation is the key Knowles
said.
The East Carolinian
Serving tlw East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Mcymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0-49 Column Inches��
50-994-15
100-14905
150-199?� J?
200-249J-JJ
250 and above375
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rate)
One color and black$9� ��
Two colon and black155 ��
Inserts
6� each
5.5e each
5.000 or 1cm
5.001 -10.000
10,001-12.0005 Mch
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
.757-6366757-6557
757-6558757-6309
�Blenvenldos Amlgos!
Open 7 Days For Lunch & Dinner
Lunch Specials $3.95
Served MonFri.
11am fin 3pm
Dinner Specials $5.95
Includes Dessert
Served SunThur.
After 5pm
Late Night Special
Mexican Pizza GrandeOnly
Sunday-Thursday Attar 10:00 P.M.
Friday 4 Saturday Attar 11:00 P.M.
521 Cotancne Street
25
757-1666
hopKroger
COPYRIGHT 1968 - THE KROGER CO. 3
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD SUNDAY. OCT. 5
23. THROUGH SATURDAY, OCT. 29. 1988. ft
IN GREENSVILLE. WE RESERVE THE H
RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE
SOLD TO DEALERS.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
� Each of these advertised hems is required to be readily
�2 available for sale in each Kroger Store, except as specifically
noted in this ad. If we do run out of an advertised item, we will
Sjjjj offer you your choice of a comparable item, when available,
ag reflecting the same savings or a raincheck which will entitle
5E you to purchase the advertised item at the advertised price
3S within 30 days. Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per
item purchased.
BANACOL
Golden Ripe
Banenes
Pound
Play

GLX
EOSTCUTTCJ?
(CASH saveramaii
I IUJ � MWg���
South
WASHINGTON (AP) -
unpublished government
assessing the long-term imj
climate changes exoected
the "greenhouse effect" pr
that the Southeast will see si;
cant declines in its wetU
crops and forests by the midc
the next century.
The "greenhouse effectj
fers to the warming of the
from the growing atmospl
concentration of gases that
heat from being radiated
space. Most greenhouse exj
say the Earth will warm oi
average by three to eight dei
Fahrenheit by the middle of
next century.
Congress directed the
ronmental Protection Agen
develop major studies oi
greenhouse effect and whaj
be done about it.
Both studies are expecti
be submitted to the lawman
Traces ol
in milk
CANTON, N.C. (AP)
search released by the em
mental group Greenpeace
revived attempts to get
pion International Con
change the way it makes
milk cartons.
Greenpeace argues tha
bleaching process used at
mills pollutes rivers with
and that new research showj
packaged in bleached paj
tons also may contain diox
Dioxin nas been linl
cancer, liver and immune-sl
disorders and a serious skif
dition called chloracne.
Greenpeace's research
milk packaged in plastic
bleached paper cartons conl
0.04 parts per trillion dio
0.75 parts per trillion hart
other suspected carcinogel
research was conducted bj
Ryan, a researcher with tf
tario Ministry of Environt
i Ottawa.
- - 1 wotfMI love to see
proposalr"said MifTfeBul
of the Clean Water Fund oJ
Carolina, one of the ei
mental groups that orii
LUNC
C

II Daily Specialsj
II 10 Discount
I' Regular Price
Items
With Student U
Kink-
to
Sponsor oi





rolinian
umuru'ry since 1925.
r of Advertising
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25,1988 3
Southeast may be drying up
WASHINGTON (AP) - An
unpublished government study
assessing the long-term impact of
climate changes exoected from
the "greenhouse effect" predicts
that the Southeast will see signifi-
cant declines in its wetlands,
crops and forests by the middle of
the next century.
The "greenhouse effect" re-
fers to the warming of the Earth
from the growing atmospheric
concentration of gases that keep
heat from being radiated into
space. Most greenhouse experts
say the Earth will warm on the
average by three to eight degrees
Fahrenheit by the middle of the
next century.
Congress directed the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency to
develop major studies on the
greenhouse effect and what can
be done about it.
Both studies are expected to
be submitted to the lawmakers in
December, but The Associated
Press obtained a draft of the sum-
mary of the effects report last
week.
The report, based on current
scienti fie glaciers, causing a rise in
average sea levels of between 20
inches and six and a half feet.
"Rising sea level will drown
many coastal wetlands, inundate
coastal lowlands, increase coastal
flooding, erode beaches and in-
crease salinity in estuaries the
report said, noting that the South-
east would be hard hit because it
has 85 percent of the nation's
wetlands.
For a one-meter rise in sea
level � just over three feet �the
report estimates that 39 percent to
64 percent of the wetlands along
the South Atlantic coast would be
lost, depending on how much
effort is made to protect the coast
by building bulkheads and lev-
ees.
The same sea level rise would
result in the loss of seven percent
to 44 percent of the wetlands
along the Southwest Florida
coast, 77 percent along the Louisi-
ana coast and 75 percent to 85
percent along the rest of the Gulf
Coast.
The study also projects that
by the year 2100, a one-meter rise
in sea level would inundate 2,850
square miles of dry land along the
Southeastern coastline if no ef-
forts were made to protect the
shores, and 2,000 square miles if
developed coastal areas are pro-
tected.
Another major impact of the
greenhouse effect would be on
fishing and shrimping in South-
eastern waters, where 43 percent
of the finfish and 70 percent of the
shellfish in the United States are
harvested.
"Warmer temperatures could
exceed the thermal tolerance of
many marine finfish and shellfish
in Southern locations, although
the full impacts on marine species
is not known at this time the
study said. "Many fish and shell-
fish may be able to migrate north-
ward along coastlines.
"The loss of coastal wetlands
could lead to reduced popula-
tions of fish, especially shellfish.
Increased salinity in estuaries
could reduce the abundance of
freshwater soecies and increase
the presence of marine species
Agriculture and plant life in
the Southeast also would un-
dergo major changes as higher
temperatures reduce soil mois-
ture, change tne length of grow-
ing seasons and affect the fre-
quency and distribution of rain-
fall, the study said.
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Traces of dioxin found higher
in milk packaged in cartons
CANTON, N.C. (AP) - Re-
search released by the environ-
mental group Greenpeace has
revived attempts to get Cham-
pion International Corp. to
change the way it makes paper
milk cartons.
Greenpeace argues that the Canton Plant not dioxin, but re-
bleaching process used at paper ducing the plant's brown dis-
mills pollutes rivers with dioxin charge into the Pigeon River,
and that new research shows milk A coalition of environmental
packaged in bleached paper car- groups argued that the company
tons also may contain dioxin. could reduce the "color units" of
Dioxin nas been linked to its discharge into the river if it
rancer, liver and immune-system didn't bleach the paper manufac-
disorders and a serious skin con- tured for milk cartons, about 40 of
proposed unbleached milk car- money to meet them,
tons. "The company said As part of the proposed settle-
nodody'd buy unbleached milk ment, the company agreed to
cartons and they never went any spend $200,000 on pollution-con-
further with it trol equipment and $2 million on
When the proposal was first modernizing the mill,
made, the issue at Champion's
The EPA and North Carolina
have agreed to Champion's pro-
posal. Before EPA can grant a dis-
charge permit, Tennessee still
must approve a variance from the
state's water-color standards.
DO YOU HAVE ANY
QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR
LONG DISTANCE
SERVICE?
Interested in learning about
calling plans and special
products that may save you
money?!
Contact Dana Dunlow,
Your AT&T
Student Campus Manager
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Call: 752-0856
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday-Friday
STEVE HARDY'S ORIGINAL BEACH PARTY
dition called chloracne.
Greenpeace's research found
milk packaged in plastic-lined
bleached paper cartons contained
0.04 parts per trillion dioxin and
0.75 parts per trillion furan, an- dropped.
the plant's total production.
Champion officials said at the
time that dairy industry officials
would not buy brown milk car-
tons, and the proposal was
other suspected carcinogen. The
research was conducted by John
Ryan, a researcher with the On-
tario Ministry of Environment in
Ottawa.
"I would love to see this re-
proposal, said Millie Buchanan
After years of wrangling, an
agreement was reached recently
among Champion, the Environ-
mental Protection Agency, Ten-
nessee and urth Carolina that
woufd tfat colorunits going into
Champion fought stricter
of the Clean Water Fund of North standards, saying it would shut
Carolina, one of the environ- the plant rather than spend
mental groups that originally
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SUre lEaat (Earoliman
VfnwA itiim�
Pete Fernald, cmriM�i
Chip Carter, M�.rnf ��
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, OictorafAdrtamt
Joe Harris, n�- f
Douc Johnson, �, ��
Tim Hampton, f�h��EAor
Mia ielle England, c�i m�
Debbie Stevens, sy
October 25.1988
OPINION
Stephanie Folsom, oy &.��
JEFF PARKER,su7lii�r��or
TOM FJRR,CiTculHmMMHMgtr
Susan Howell, p�� MaMjr
JOI IN W. MEDLIN, Art Chrecto,
Mac Clark, Bmma�M�Myr
Page 4
Democracy
so what's the point?
For many years, America has
been the world's most vigorous
defender of democracy. But what's
the point?
After all, democracy isn't all it's
cracked up to be. Think about it: it is
based on the fallacious assumption
that the average citizen is as capable
of running a country as, say, people
who have been born and bred to the
job. As Henrik Ibsen put it, democ-
racy "places the common cur on the
level of the pedigreed pup
To demonstrate: Americans are
being asked to choose a president
who will make decisions in their
behalf about such issues as the Stra-
tegic Defense Initiative, acid rain,
the greenhouse effect and the space
race. To make an informed decision
about these subjects, they need to be
scientifically literate. But a nation-
wide survey conducted bv the Na-
tional Science Foundation shows
that 21 percent of voting-age Ameri-
cans think that the sun revolves
around the Earth; 17 percent thinks
it takes but one day for the Earth to
orbit the sun; 20 percent think atoms
are smaller than electrons (and a
whopping 37 percent had no idea
which was larger); 39 percent think
lasers work by focussing sound
waves (35 percent were unsure); 19
percent believe that sound travels
faster than light.
Americans must be able to make
informed decisions about these and
other issues. The key word is "in-
formed they show an increasing
reluctance to get involved in any
aspect of the political process, not
only voting but also simply gather-
ing information about the candi-
dates' positions. They are easily
persuaded by innuendo and insinu-
ation because they don't know
enough of the truth to see through
the lies. For example: did you know
that Michael Dukakis ended the
furlough program some time ago, or
that George Bush has not shown
nearly the sort of interest in educa-
tion he would have you believe?
Regardless of what they believe,
the common citizen actually has
virtually no voice in America
(which, strictly speaking, is a repub-
lic and not a democracy), and it may
very well be that this is not such a
bad thing.
As long as Americans are able to
cling to the fiction that they actually
have some power over the actions of
their government, they will com-
placently let their government do
just about anything it wants. They
want all of the privileges of democ-
racy without its attendant responsi-
bility. They even show themselves
willing to elect a man whose "cre-
dentials" include participation in
the most stupid foreign-policy ac-
tion of this decade, the Iran-Contra
affair. , . .
As long as they keep up this
behavior, Americans will be con-
tributing to the failure of a system
they claim to hold dear. How can
America expect to defend and pro-
mote democracy in other parts of the
world when Americans can't be
bothered to take part in it at home?
Mascot needs changing
To the editor:
Over fall break a few good
friends and I travelled down to Flor-
ida State to root on the Pirates against
the Seminoles. While we were there
we realized a few things that should
be changed, or at least brought to
someone's attention.
First of all, we decided to change
the Pirate mascot to someone more
menacing looking. We do have a
good looking Pirate costume. We will
keep that, but we want a mean look-
ing guy with a patch over one eye,
and a big knife in his mouth. He also
has to have a stump for a leg. Maybe
even a scar or two on his face. That's
what we have adopted as our mascot.
No more cartoon looking Pirates on
the stickers that you can buy, or
whatever other paraphernalia that
vou can buy.
look at Florida State for ex-
ample. A mean, lean, menacing fight-
ing machine. They had a guy in a
funny outfit, but they also had an
Indian riding on a horse with a spear.
Secondly, crowd participation.
East Carolina is way behind the times
in this department. Everyone at the
game was into it. When the Semino-
les scored, the whole crowd started to
make a hatchet out of their arms and
swing them up and down. It was
something to see.
What do we do? Slap a few high
fives, maybe a forearm bash here or
there, but nothing very unified. We
decided to make up something that
we could do. At first we were going to
have everyone take hands in front of
them and shake them back and forth
like we were shaking down a fence.
We decided against that though.
Maybe something along the same
lines as Florida State, but make a
motion like that of cutting someone's
head off with the knife that our new
mascot has.
Thirdy, the fight song. Do we
have one? "Hey Hey EC, You Look So
Good To Me does not cut it. We
could not decide on a fight song, we
thought we'd let someone else do
that. Hey, we did everything else.
Any ideas?
Matt Hermes
Senior
Communications
Jones replies
To the editor:
Mary Fordham, Nicolas Skotter-
gard, and Arielle Sturz: thank you for
your excellent response. We all share
the same concerns: where this coun-
try has been and where it is going. Give it a rest. After Bobby Jones,
Understandably, you feel Bush Nicolas Skottergaard, and Arielle
Quayle would be best for our country Sturz have pointed out all your mis-
while I feel the Republicans have run conceptions about both the Repubh-
the country agTOund. cans and Democrats, very few people
What those responding to myself on this campus take you or your
have failed to see is that while Con- opinions seriously. There are many
gTess does appropriate moneys, people who get quite a chuckle oft
those moneys are managed or mis- your letters though. Maybe next time
managed by ReaganBush appoint- you send something in you should
ees. To dump national and state try to get it published on the comics
problems on the Democrates is unre- page.
alistic.
ECU funding and statewide
improvements in education are due
to a Democratic legislative body in
Raleigh, NC. You can't blame Demo-
crats for everything. It's a bi-partisan
problem.
I also like the fact that with a new,
fresh DukakisBentsen administra-
tion, the 235 Reagan Bush political
appointees brought up on criminal
and unethical conduct charges will
be out of a job. Those appointees like
Meese, Nofziger, and Deaver will
have to get off the ReaganBush
"gravy train" and go somewhere else
to line their pockets.
The furlough program is an
impertinent issue to a president and a
presidential campaign. Republicans
continue, however, to run it into the
ground. O.K Dukakis does release
dangerous criminals. ReaganBush
have not and will not release crimi-
nals. They will, however, keep them
at the White House where they be-
long.
Having enjoyed this series of
written debate, I applaud you three
and other who have shared their
views. I hope that in some way, we
have motivated the readers to think
for themselves. Therefore, I hope
Americans will choose the Dukakis
Bentsen team and choose to do away
with political complacency.
Wyatt M. Jones, IV
Freshman
Political Science
Jones criticized
To the editor:
To Wyatt M. Jones:
Wyatt, haven't you had enough?
Aren't you tired of people writing
letters to you pointing out the many,
many times you've tried to pass lib-
eral hype off as facts? I certainly am
tired of reading your silly letters in
every other issue.
Face it, Wyatt. You don't know
everthing. That has definately been
proven by your misguided and mis-
informed liberal views.
Edith Smith
Freshman
Political Science
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Pubications Building, across from
the entrance of-royner-Library. V
For purposes ofwrificaiion, all $
letters must include the name, major.
and classification, address, phone-
number, and signature of the �
authoris). Letters are limited to 300-
words or less, double spaced or neatly i
printed. All letters are subject toed
itingfor brevity, obscenity, and libel,
and no personal attacks will be per- �
mitted. Students, faculty and stafj
writing letters for this page are re-
minded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday forg
Tuesday's edition and 5 p.m. Tues-
day for Thursday's edition.
Spectrum
Rules
In addition to the "Campus"
Forum" section of the editorial
page, the East Carolinian features
the "Campus Spectrum This is
an opinion column by guest writ-
ers from the student body and
faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum will
contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or
nation.
The columns are restricted in
content only with regard to rules
of grammar and decency. Persons
submitting columns must be will-
ing to accept byline credit for their
efforts, as no entries from ghost
writers will be published.
Bush's role in Irangate never questioned
By BARBARA THOMAS
CimpM Spwtniw
Vice President George Bush has succeeded in
doing what former president Richard Nixon utterly
failed to do: he has participated a major political
scam yet somehow avoided the heat of media cover-
age and litigation. How in the world did George
accomplish this?
Why hasn't the media more openly and aggres-
sively probed Bush's association with Irangate?
Why hasn't he been given a lie-detector test or at
least put on the stand during the Iran-conrra hear-
ings? But probably the most serious question of all is,
how does Bush have the gall to run for President
after his covert dealings with Noriega and the
Ayatollah?
George Bush's acknowledged support for the
secret arms shipments to Iran has been interpreted
as a sign of his loyalty to Presiden t Reagan's policies,
and the press seems to have accepted this association
rather easily. But there's other evidence that Bush,
far more than anyone else, actually coordinated the
arms-for-hostages negotiations, and that he con-
ferred upon Oliver North the power necessary to
carry it out.
Anyone who has read either Men of Zeal (an
account of Irangate by the bipartisan team of sena-
tors, William Cohen and George Mitchell) or The
Iran-Contra Connection (by a select team of investiga-
tors, including Peter Dale Scott, former senior fellow
at the International Center for Development Policy
in Washington) will have trouble believing Bush's
claim that he was only dimly aware of the Iranian
arms sale and had no idea that it amounted to an
arms-for-hostages swap.
According to these sources, based on the several
months of investigations following the scandal,
Bush was present at two meetings in January 1986
during which the president was briefed on, and
approved, the plan to swap arms for hostages. In
July 1986, Bush received a briefing on the arms sales
from an Israeli official. Bush's aide Craig Fuller, the
only other person present, took many notes and then
prepared a memorandum that has the Israeli official
referring to the release of hostages at least five times,
and noting at least once that that was a primary
purpose of the sale.
But the crucial evidence that Bush has been lying
about Irangate comes, curiously enough, from
George himself. After saying for more than a year
that he went along with the arms deal without any
knowledge of the hostage connection, he told Dan
Rather in their celebrated confrontation, "I went
along with it because I heard about Mr. Buckley
(a hostage) being tortured to death So if I erred, I
erred on the side of trying to get those hostages out
of there (Oops).
Yet Bush, a former CIA director, continues to
profess ignorance of this connection between arms
and hostages. Meanwhile, the American public and
mass media remain relatively mute on the issue.
Most politicians looking for reelection are either fed
up with Irangate or are hard-pressed to prod the
Reagan administration further. Unfortunately, if
Bush takes office, he will be immune from prosecu-
tion pertaining to his role in Irangate because such
litigation would only apply to his term as V.P.
Bush's knowing support for the Iran-Contra
Arms Deal is at least worth requesting a lie-detector
test, and if s a sad commentary on American politics
that Mr. Bush is even allowed to run for president
And it says a lot about Bush's spineless character
that he declined to engage Michael Dukakis in an-
other debate, not to mention in a "real" debate�that
is, without a panel of media interviewersmodera-
tors. Were it not for the power of America's consen-
sus-making machinery, were it not for the fact that
Bush is now hiding (and probably praying) froms
truth-seeking reporters, we would see a landslide
election in favor of Michael Dukakis.
Irangate was clearly the biggest political scam �
since Watergate, and stands out as the biggest blem-
ish on Reagan's otherwise shiny record. Bush didn' 11
learn from the errors of Nixon � he certainly failed
to prove himself a good liar. Had he been truly loyal I
to Reagan, Bush would have acknowledged his roleig
as key orchestrator of the Iran-Contra Arms Deal,�
and then followed North and Poindexter when they j
left the White House. Solely on the basis of his lack of
integrity, it would be a horrendous mistake to ek "
Bush as our next president.
Racial
(CPS) � It may have been
most frightening outbreak
campus racism of the year so f
Then, too, it could be a case
student newspaper misn portij
a simple fight
Or it could be an instance
university refusing to address I
kind of racial tensions present
many campuses and thus, as
nonty students contend, end
encouraging
"It's a cover-up' asserts
heen Murray, a black student
says that on Sept 18 he
chased from the State UniveH
of New York at Brockpor -
pus nightclub by about a dol
white students� most ot
members of the wrestling teai
wielding bats and club- and
ing racial insults at run i
had brawled with two t the
It is, in any case � .
kind of incident students anj
mirustrators have been
to avoid.
Exactly two year- j
October, 1986, in a stnkir
lar event, five white I nivers
Massachusetts at Ami �
dents topped off the
ment about the outcome
York Mets-Boston Rt
Series game by beating
classmate.
Since then, racial
spread alarminlv I
nationwide Fights
marches and even student
erupted at Farleigh Dickil
and Mississippi State uniJ
ties, at Dartmouth, Tompf
Cortland, Rodgers State
Hampshire colleges as well
universities of Cahfoi
Berkeley, Illinois and M I
to name but a few.
The unprecedented str
confrontations � probar.
ceeded in modern college hil
only by the violence and n
that marred the first tm
grate the universities ot Alal
and Mississippi in the late
and early sixties proi
fears colleges would reman
regated forever.
In response, manv ccj
-e Student Union
Special
Memorial
With
Special Guests
THE





ip
Red
nging
st After Bobbv Jones,
rgaard, and Arielle
pointed out all your mis-
- about both the Republi-
mocrats, very few people
pus take you or vour
seriously There are many
�ho get quite a chuckle oft
r though Maybe next tune
J something in vou should
t t it published on the comics
Edith Smith
Freshman
Political Science
orum
ules
"he East Carolinian icelcomes
- expressing all points of view.
or drop them by our office in the '�
tcations Building, across from
itrance ofoynerLibrary M
I
votes of aerification, allm
i must include the name, major I
rlassiHcation, address, phone
ber, and signature of the
horis). Letters are limited to 300-
- less. double spaced or neat.
tied. All letters are subject to ed-
Ig for brevity, obscenity, and libel, -
no personal attacks will be perx
h-J Students, faculty and staff j
wing letters I r this page are re-�S
I that they are limited to one .
two weeks. The deadline for J.
tonal material is 5 p.m. Friday fot
sday's edition and 5 p.m. fues
for Thursday's edition.
pectrum
ules
�x
In addition to the "Campus:
lm" section of the editorial
;e, the East Carolinian features
"Campus Spectrum This is
opinion column by guest writ-
from the student body and
ilty. The columns printed in
"Campus Spectrum" will
Main current topics of concern
the campus, community or
ion.
The columns are restricted in
itent only with regard to rules .
rammar and decency. Persons
mitting columns must be will-
; to accept byline credit for their
rts, as no entries from ghost
Iters will be published.
ed
worth requesting a lie-detector
imentary on American politics
allowed to run for president
Hit Bush's spineless character
igage Michael Dukakis in an
Mention in a "real" debate�that
media interviewersmodera
K power of America's consen-
ts, were it not for the fact that
Kand probably praying) fromv
�rs, we would see a landslide
Iichael Dukakis.
Irly the biggest political scam
stands out as the biggest blem-j
ise shiny record. Bush didn't I
)f Nixon � he certainly failed g
liar. Had he been truly loyal I
Id have acknowledged his role k
If the Iran-Contra Arms Deal,
rth and Poindexter when they j
lely on the basis of his lack i
la horrendous mistake to el
lident.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25,1988 5
Racial incident rips Brockport
SF2 Z may been the have tried to teach white students recalled, and interviewed "15 to
most frightening outbreak of to appreciate diversity and, as 20 witnesses" who verified
campus racism of the year so far. UMass race relations Prof. Meyer Murray's story of being chased bv
in a Case of Weinberg put it, ease black stu- club-brandishing white students
?S�2 Tl?aper misreP�rtin8 dents' s�� of isolation and al-
a simple fight ienahon
nnivL a?inCC�a T un.versities of Florida,
university refusing to address the M.chigan and Cal.forn.a-Santa
kind of racial tensions present on BwfcS as well as Duke and Penn
State, among others, have spon
many campuses and thus, as mi-
nority students contend, end up
encouraging.
"It's a cover-up asserts Sta-
heen Murray, a black student who
says that on Sept. 18 he was
chased from the State University
of New York at Brockport's cam-
pus nightclub by about a dozen
white students� most of them
But campus officials dispute
it all.
It "was not a racial incident
contends Brockport spokes-
woman Gloria Peterson. It was a
fight between two students, "and
members of the wrestling team� berg notes
wielding bats and clubs and yell- " And at the University of Mis
sored carefully integrated parties it just so happens that one is black
and "sensitivity" sessions to pre- and one is white
vent troubles this fall. "Friends of one of the stu-
But such efforts don't always dents got involved. Wrestlers
help. were never involved. The situ-
"Minorities are not streaming ation was quickly mediated and
to UMass even though the univer- everyone went out to dinner and
sity has done a lot of things to put the situation behind them,
make it more appealing Wein- The Stylus story was confused. It
was a garbled mess Peterson
ing racial insults at him after he
had brawled with two of the men.
It is, in any case, exactly the
kind of incident students and ad-
ministrators have been working
to avoid.
Exactly two years ago, in
October, 1986, in a strikingly simi-
lar event, five white University of
Massachusetts at Amherst stu-
dents topped off their disappoint-
ment about the outcome of a New
York Mets-Boston Red Sox World
Series game by beating up a black
classmate.
Since then, racial tensions
spread alarmingly to campuses
nationwide. Fights, sit-ins,
marches and even student strikes
said.
sissippi, for example, an un-
known arsonist in August burned
down a house that was about to
become the first Fraternity Row
building ever used by black stu-
dents.
In fact, officials quickly as-
signed any campus racial prob-
lems to The Stylus, not to any
simmering relations between stu-
dents. 'The story was not accu-
In early October, black Uni- "Si fSSS
versify of Texas math major Ken- dcntj2hn Vaide ?tenn8-
neth Avery filed a complaint �. mCM ha T
iti-t- a l- (t- more serious because of the article
against UT-Austin police officers, � -ru c i � u � n
in The Stylus, echoed Vice Presi-
who had detained him because
. . .� , , ueni lor ;
they were looking for a "black McC ,r
man with a briefcase �y
dent for Student Affairs John
Prof. Fred Powell, the paper's
advisor, defended his journalists.
"It was a good story. The staff did
its homework
Still others think public rela-
tions-conscious officials are blam-
And a SUNY-Brockport stu-
dent sensitivity seminar didn't
prevent the events of Sept. 18.
Murray recounts a scary story
of getting into a scuffle with two
wTestling team members after .
erupted at Farleigh Dickinson they bumped while dancing at the ing the paper as a way to protect
and Mississippi State universi- campus nightclub. Heeding ad- the wresUing team and, to deflect
ties, at Dartmouth, Tompkms- vice to go outside to "cool off he criticism of the campus, simply
Cortland, Rodgers State and then reportedly heard 15 white ignore the real fears of minority
Hampshire colleges as well as the students, mostly wrestlers, were students,
universities of California- looking for him, yelling racial
Berkeley, Illinois and Michigan, insults. McCray denies it, saying the
to name but a few. -Tm nol prejudiced or anv - mcidcnt wasn't serious enough to
The unprecedented string of thing a dorm resident assistant ,menl formaI discipline and be-
confrontations � probably ex- allegedly said in explaining why hev,ng Jt was better solved
ceeded in modern college history she initiallv wouldn't let the flee- throu8h "mediation" he helped
only by the violence and rioting jng panicked Murray take refuge
that marred the first tries to inte- in her building, "but he's black
grate the universities of Alabama Later that RA's bovfnend, also a
and Mississippi in the late fifties resident advisor, threatened to
and early sixties � provoked cut Murrav "up into pieces
fears colleges would remain seg- The Stylus, the campus's stu- telephone threats,
regated forever. dent paper, jumped on the story, "The president doesn't know
In response, many colleges Executive Editor Vince Gonzales what's going on Murray said.
arrange.
Murray, however, doesn't
agree it's solved, claiming one of
the wrestlers involved remains
hostile and that he's still getting
The Student 3non
Special
og i
u
Concerts Committee
PRESENTS
October
Hfe
ifli11 Ea
Memorial

ly
1988
With
Special Guests
chck
s
TICKETS HOW available AT Mendenhall Student Center
Record Bar
LIMIT BBSS jffij PERSON
BEgnig E1CSEQ0SEI of f66 Tte,so"he ���
"They did nothing for me. I'm
pissed. I'll always have to keep
my guard up
"They're not solving any-
thing said Yolanda Brisbane,
president of the Organization of
Students of African Descent
(OSAD). "Students feel like it was
swept under the rug
"What I know is what I see
said OSAD member Floyd
Wilmoth. "The wrestlers are still
on the team, and that looks like
the university condones what
they did
Regardless of what actually
happened Sept. 18, they say,
Brockport has had its break-
downs in racial harmony.
In a Student Affairs Office
survey taken last year � and
which Brockport officials in Sep-
tember initially refused to let the
Stylus see � a majority of stu-
dents said they thought there
were racial problems on campus.
Some students, asked how to
solve them, wanted to "ship
blacks back to Africa" and "kick
white students off campus Sty-
lus Editor Gonzales said.
Officials now dismiss the
survey results as "unscientific"
and not reflective of how Brock-
port students feel.
But the assertions, denials
and counter denials now being
hurled across the campus proba-
bly have become less important
than the perceptions�justified or
not� that the school can be dan-
gerous for its black students.
"If a black man sees a bunch of
wrestlers walking across campus,
he's going to think twice ex-
plained Tabatha Crayton, Brock-
port Student Government's mi-
nority affairs coordinator.
"One should be very careful
in downgrading these incidents
Weinberg warned. 'They're not
of incidental significance. They
can turn into a bigger onslaught of
racial violence. They can be a seri-
ous indicator of bigger prob-
lems
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758-7979
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1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25,1988
Classifieds
T Ht
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: To share a 3-bedroom townhouse.
No deposit, private bedroom, private
bathroom. $183.33mo.13 utilities.
Fireplace, tanning beds, sauna, weight-
room and more. Call 355-0700.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
male roommate to share new mobile
home. 10 minutes from campus. Non-
smoker, please. Call Hugh at 756-6851
after 500 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
$112.50 rent and 12 utilities. Call 758-
1480, ask for Tanya after 530. Needed
immediately.
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE: To share
2 bed 112 bath Townhouse. Non-
smoker. $185 12 util. Located in Wil-
liamsburg Manor off Hooker St Contact
Kathy, 756-7797
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Prefer male,
smoker to share large house. $100 month,
13 utilities. Freshly painted. Close to
campus. Call: 758-0897.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share 2 bed-
room apt. near campus. Must be mature.
$165 per month covers rent, utilities,
phone & cable TV. Call 757-3811.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: Need a
short-term lease while house being built
or renovated, looking for area to settle in
permanently, on temporary job assign-
ment in Greenville, or finishing intern-
ship or semester in school? Nice 2-stry, 2
bdrm. 112 baths, lndry hkup, liv rm w
bay win kit din area wbar, refrig,
stove, dshwshr, Fmch drs opn to priv
patio wstor rm, adj to prkng lot for easy
access, no pets, active hmownrs' assn.
355-6974 after 5.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1984 Mazda B-2000 Pick-up.
High road miles. Topper. New tires. Ex-
cellent condition $3400. Call 757-6281.
FOR SALE: Nice sifa, king size mattress,
twinsize mattress, kitchen chairs, round
table Make offer 752-3886.
FOR SALE: 1982 Vokswagon Jetta. 5
speed. Diesal 87K Excellent condition.
$2700. Call 757-6281
FOR SALE 1971 Cutlass, rebuilt 350
engine, 2 dr. black over red, almost fully
restored. $2500 or best offer. Call (8-5) 757-
6611, Ext. 271, (5-10 p.m.) 355-0363.
FOR SALE: Couch, matching chair and
rediner. In good condition. $300.00 for all
3 pieces. Call 752-7513 after 6:00 p.m.
AQUARIUM: 40 gallon with lighted
hood, undergravel filter and stand. $160.
Call 825-0808 after 5:00.
IBM PC: Loaded, 512 K, 20 MB Drive 2360
K Floppies. CGA, parallel, serial. $795.00.
Call Mike at 355-3247.
COUCH FOR SALE: Full size vinyl
couch, folds down to bed, dark brown,
only $30, call Scott at 752-4825.
FOR SALE: JVC car amp 50x50 w $100;
Pioneer car amp GM-2000 lOOx 100 w $175;
752-7391 after 3:30 p.m.
FOR SALE: Fisher studio-standard port-
able stereo system. Dual cassette, digital,
CDline in jack. Two months old In des-
perate need of money. Paid $250, will
negotiate. Call 752-9511.
FOR SALE: Government homes from
$1.00. "U Repair Also tax delinquent
property. Call 805-644-9533 Ext. 1052 for
info.
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Lexington Sq
(adj Athletic Club) - $42,500�2 bdrms, 1
12 bths, lndry hkup, liv rm wbay win,
kitdin area wbar, refrig, stove dshwshr,
Fmch drs open to priv patio wstor rm,
adj to prkng lot for easy access, active
hmownrs' assn. 355-6974 after 5.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
Re'sume' production, and other business
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F for more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC
752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC Done by
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933.
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING: Real
Cheap. Affordable Rates! Call 752-5084.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: 19 years ex
perience. Work done on Apple computer
with letter quality printer. Low rates. Will
correct spelling. Call 756-8934 between 5-
9 p.m. and ask for Ginger.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED Are you a college shi
dent or faculty member in need of spend-
ing money? Brody's is accepting applica-
tions for part-time sales and customer
service positions. Apply in person,
Brody's, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4
p.m.
WANTED: Campus representative to
promote our low cost, high quality Spring
Break trip to Daytona Beach Free trips
and money while gaining valuable busi-
ness experience. Call Kurt with Travel As-
sociates 1-800-558-3002.
HELP WANTED: Production assistants
needed for entry level full-time and part-
time position at local TV station Must be
dependable and work well with others.
TV production background helpful but
not essential. Send inquiries to
Production Manager, WNCT-TV, P.O.
Box 898, Greenville, NC. 27834. EOE.
YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES: The
Recreation and Parks Department is re-
cruiting for part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter program Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge of
basketball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people, ages
9-18, in basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 p.m. - 7 p.m Monday thru
Friday, and some night and weekend
coaching The program will extend from
December 1 to mid-February. Salary rate
is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour Applications
will be accepted starting October 20.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take signups for our FLORIDA tours. We
furnish all materials for a successful pro-
motion. Good PAY and FUN. Call CAM-
PUS MARKETING at 1-800-777-2270.
HIRING Federal government jobs in
your area and overseas. Many immediate
openings without waiting list or test. $15-
68,000. Phone call refundable. (602) 838-
8885. Ext. 5285.
NEED MALE AND FEMALE DANC-
ERS FOR PRIVATE PARTIES: Also
need ladies 18-36 years of age for a legs
video. Earnings of $50 per hour and more.
Apply in person Monday through Friday,
4 pm to 5.30 p.m. to Promotions Co
2708-A E. 10th Street. No phone calls.
ATHLETIC MANAGERS NEEDED:
Contact Fred in Minges Coliseum. 757-
6029.
PERSONALS
THE WAY CAMPUS FELLOWSHIP
TWIG FELLOWSHIPS: Are available
every Tuesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
at 2007 Tiffany Dr. in Heritage Village.
Call 355-5164 for details. Hot Bible! Great
fellowship!
THURSDAY IS FIZZ DAY Come to Pi
Kappa Alpha's happy hour. Free nachos
and drink specials.
PI KAPPA ALPHA LITTLE SISTER
PLEDGES: You are doing a great job. We
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
couldn't ask for a better group of girls.
Keep up the Pi Kappa Alpha standard. �
The Brothers.
PI KAPPA ALPHA AND AZD: Always a
great combination. Thanks for a Daddy
Time. �The Pikes.
I.A.K Thank you for an awesome fall
break. I'll never forget that kiss. I love you
now and forever. �J.E.L.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Congratulations
on the new improvements to the house.
Good luck in your continuous strive for
EXCELLENCE. (PS. Baltic Blue is the
DADDY!)
PS1 CHI MEMBERS: There will be a
regular meeting on Thursday October
27th at 4:00 p.m. in room 302.
NEW DELI WANTS YOU: To welcome
back the original sounds of UNCLE
GREEN on Friday. Come jam to the best
reggaerock of the AMATEURS Satur-
day. Celebrate Halloween with BAD BOB
& the ROCKINCHORSES on Monday
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
AMY LEE: Happy birthday and all that
mushy stuff �Love, Mother Mary and
the Boys
DONT FORGET TO BUY: The new
"Nightmare on 5th St T-shirt C onta
any Zeta or call 757-0643 and 75S 7357
WENDY, SARA AND TESSA
wanted you to know that we appreciate all
of the time and support you give us
Love, The Zeta Pledges
CANDYGRAMS FROM 1a
PLEDGES: $30 in front of Student -
Oct. 24-28 FREE DELIVERY! Don't h
mean on Halloween
NIGHTMARE ON 5TH ST HALLOW-
EEN SHIRTS ARE HERE Contact am
Zeta or call 756-7357 or 7S7 0M3
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards?
Earlvis, the mad baseball buyer !
damn good money for cards of an) �
any shape, and any condition If ou i
party money. Big E is the one to tali
6366, leave a message
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Your Best Look
Specializing In: MANICURES:
French Manicures � Nail Tips �
Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
PEDICURES � SKIN CARE Body
Wrapping � Face & Body Waxing �
Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products For
Men & Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaa Dr Greenville
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 7��
WALK-INS WELCOME
20 YEARS OF SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Kastgate Shopping Center
(Arroas from Highway Patrol Station
IVhlnd Car Quest Auto Part
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E.5th St reel
� Located Near ECU
� Acrou From Highway Patrol Station
Limited offer-$275 a month
Contact IT. or Tommy William
7-781� or 830-1W7
Office open-Apt 8,12-530 p.m
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartmenU, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month, 6 month
lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS-couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Can
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for a; � nt Mm Ami Ssrt. Lou
CostTeiimitation to 20 weeka C �� �
1-800-433-2930
The Secret Of Getting Rich
Amazing Book Tells All
Free Offer Details - Rush Stamped Self
Addressed Envelope
Wayne Humphries, Dept. L.M. - 1
Rt. 1 Box 215
Beulaville, NC 28518
Announcements
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase your
"fun" budget,
'opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
�a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
Thurs Oct. 27, 4 p.m rm. 2006; Mon
Oct. 31, 4 p.m rm. 2006.
ART VOCAL ENSEMBLE
The National Gallery of Art Vocal En-
semble will perform in Hendrix Theatre
on Nov. 14 at 8:00 p.m. This event is part of
the Chamber Music Series. Four great
voices create one excellent sound, in jour-
ney exploring an almost limitless reper-
toire. Tickets go on sale Oct. 24. For further
details, contact The Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall, or call 757-6611, ext. 266.
SHOULD WE RECEIVE
THE j OR THE - IN GPA'S?
The Credits Committee is currently
studying the question of whether the
undergraduate grading system should be
modified to allow the award and record-
ing of pluses and minuses, in addition to
the current letter grades. As the first step
- in our study of this issue, the committee
has scheduled an open meeting to allow
faculty and students to present their feel-
ings, concerns, and ideas. The meeting
will be held on Nov 17from3:00-5:00p.m.
in room c 103, Brewster. Interested indi-
viduals are invited to attend the meeting
at any time during this period The
committee will be available during the
entire two hours to listen to the comments
and recommendations of anyone who
desires to present his or her views. If you
have any questions or if you desire addi-
tional info you may contact Professor
Frank Wondolowsld (3136 GCB, phone
757-6599) or myself (BN108C Science
Complex, phone 6306).
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
2028.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CLASS FICTUKES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance. Class photographs will be taken
Oct. 31 -Nov. 4 in the Student Store from 9
a.m. till 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
each day. The yearbook is not your year-
book until you are in it.
3-ON-3 BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Free
Throw Contest registration meeting held
Nov. 1 at 5:00 p.m. in BIO103. Play begins
shortly afterwards! Interested in officiat-
ing? Attend the first officials clinic on Oct.
25 at 8:00 p.m. at MG102. For additional
info call Dave Hall at 757-6387.
CQ-REC FLAG FQQTPAU
Be sure to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
Flag Football meeting held Oct. 25 at 5:00
pm. in B1O103. Play begins shortly after-
ward! Interested in officiating? Attend the
first officials clinic Oct. 25 at 8:00 p.m. in
MG102. For additional info call Dave
Hall at 757-6387.
lNEER
The 1987 yearbooks have come in. Any-
one who would like a copy of it may come
by the office and pick one up. We are
located in front of Joyner Library in the
Publications Bldg.
WINDSURFING CLUB
There will be a meeting Oct 25 to organize
a group trip to Whichard's Beach over the
weekend. If you are interested, please
meet in conference room 105 Memorial
Gym at 6:00.
WYNTON MARSALIS CON-
CJEKT
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present Wynton Marsalis in conoert
Nov. 1 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets go on sale for this Performing Arts
Series event on Mon Oct. 10. Winner of a
Grammy Award for both classical and
jazz performances, Mr. Marsalis is sure to
bring an energetic and entertaining show
to Wright Auditorium. For further details,
contact: The Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall, or call (919) 757-6611.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the Dec. issue The maga
zine is published twice a semester with
the first issue coming out in Oct. This
special issue will be a small magazine
with mainly general info whereas the
Dec. issue will be a larger size containing
news stories, short stories, editorials,
poetry, etc. Articles may be left at the
office or at the Media Board Secretary's
Office in the Publications Bldg.
RESIfMF WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning k Placement Service
in Bloxton House is offering these one
hour programs on beginning a resume for
your job search. Handouts and samples
will be given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session. No sign up is re-
quired. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Oct. 11,21 & 26
at 3 p.m
FRESHMEN
An important meeting for FRESHMEN
who intend to major in the following:
Business and Distributive Ed , Driver's
Ed Early Childhood Ed I lealth Ed In-
termediate Ed Marketing Ed Middle
Grades Ed Physical Ed, Special Ed,
Technical Ed. and Vocational Ed. "The
Second Academic Major Required by the
University of N. C. Board of Governors
Oct. 25 from 3:00-5:00 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
ECU STUDENTSSTAFF
LSS SOCIETY
Volunteers, old clothes & sheets are
needed DESPERATELY for the Pirate
ClubLSS Society "Jr. Spooky Pirate
Night Halloween Carnival" to be held
Oct. 28 from 6-8 p.m. at the Pirate Club.
For more info please contact Beth Smyth
or Ann Totaro at 830-9315, anytime!
AMNESTY INT'L.
Amnesty International meets every
fourth Wed. at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Epis-
copal Church, 401 E. 4th St in the upper
floor - enter from the 4th street entrance.
Next meeting: Oct. 26.
A CONTEST
The Biology Club is sponsoring a t-shirt
contest. We are looking for "nifty" de-
signs relating to Biology (not Biology
Club). There will be a prize offered to the
best design on Oct 31. The designs are to
be turned in no later than 400 on Oct. 26 in
B-102 (under the stairs of Biology Bldg).
Please leave your name and telephone
number with the design. For more info
call Mamta Patel at 757 6286 or leave a
message in the Biology Club office.
A CHALLENGE
The East Carolina Biology Club chal-
lenges EC! IO and physics club to raise at
least $100 for crop walk which is to be held
on Nov. 6th and to challenge two other
organizations to do the same.
INTENDED SLAP MAIORS
All General College students who have in-
dicated a desire to major in Speech Lan-
guage and Auditory Pathology and have
R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to meet
on Nov. 2 at 5:00 p.m. in Brewster B-306.
Advising for early registration will take
place at that time. Others interested in
SLAP should contact the dept. - 757-6961.
II O OKTOBERFEST
The 1LO Oktoberfest will take place on
Oct. 26 from 6-9:30 p.m. in Mendenhall,
244. The ECU "Schmutrigs" band will
play from 7-9 p.m. The menu consists of
rolls, Knockwurst, Sauerkraut, German
potato salad and dessert. There will also
be beer (for anyone 21 or over) and other
refreshments. Tickets are $2.50 and are
available from 1LO representatives or the
Dept. of Foreign Languages and Litera-
tures. They will be on sale through Oct. 19.
No sales at the door.
BADMINTON CLUB
The ECU Badminton Club will have a
meeting at Memorial Gym, room 105, Fri
Oct. 28 at 5-6:00 p.m. Open to all students,
faculty & staff.
GAMMA BETA PHJ
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold a meeting today at 8 p.m.
in Jenkins Auditorium.
FCII LAW SOCIETY
Our next meeting will be Nov. 3 at 7:00 in
GCB 1012. All members please attend.
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
A three part workshop offered to students
at no cost by the University Counseling
Center. Nov.3,10, and 17 (Thursdays). All
three sessions will be conducted from 3-4
p.m. in 312 Wright Bldg. Assertiveness
Training can sharpen your interpersonal
skills and help you target personal goals.
The workshop will focus on helping
members distinguish between their asser-
tive, aggressive, and nonassertive behav-
iors. Participants can learn how to express
themselves directly and openly, and re-
spond to interpersonal situations in a
manner which neither compromises indi-
vidual beliefs nor offends others. Please
call the Counseling Center (757-6661) for
registration.
ESLCHJ
There will be a mandatory meeting and
initiation of new members to Psi Chi (The
National Honor Society in Psychology) on
Thurs. at 4:00 in the Psi Chi library in
Rawl rm. 302.
HEALTH CAREERS DAY
All students in the Nursing and the Allied
Health careers are encouraged to attend
this event in the Carol Belk Bldg. on Oct.
31 from 1-5 p.m. Over 75 health care insti-
tutions will be on the first and second
floors of the Allied Health Bldg. Come out
and learn of the opportunities in PT, OT,
Nursing, SOCW, Recreational Therapy,
PSYC, Music Therapv, Medical Records,
FNIM, CDFR, SPED, SLAP, Rehabilita-
tion Counseling and Clinical Laboratory
Science.
V.A.F,
The VAF is holding its annual Beaux Arts
Ball Mon. night at the Attic with musical
guests Big Kids and The Bond. Tickets are
S4 advance at Jenkins Art Bldg. or S5 at the
door. Door prizes and costume prizes will
be given out during the night's festivities.
CONSTRUCTION MGMT.
Dept. of Construction Mgmt. Fall Semi-
nar Series: Oct. 26�"Brick Masonry-
Design, Detailing 4 Construction Nov.
16�"Importance of the Critical Path
Method of Scheduling Construction All
seminars held at 630 p.m. in room 1031 of
the GCB. For more info call 757-6707.
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
Attention all Early Childhood Ed. Majors:
The next (EQ2 meeting will be held Wed
at 4:00 p.m. in Speight 308. Come and
make your flannel board!
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
General College students should contact
their advisors the week of Oct. 31 - Nov. 4
to make arrangements for academic
advising for spring semester, 1989. Early
registration begins Nov. 7 and ends Nov.
11.
COSTA RICAN PIANIST.
PJLAR AGU11AR
Pilar Aguilar will perform a solo recital
Oct. 26th at 8:15 p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. Her visit is jointly sponsored
by the ECU Latin American Studies
Committee, Office of International Pro-
grams, and the School of Music. The con-
cert and the reception are free and open to
the public.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
Everyone is welcome to attend the stu-
dent Financial Mgmt. Assoc. meeting on
Wed. The meeting will be held in room
3009 of the GCB at 4:30. The guest speaker
will be Jim Westmoreland. He is the Assis-
tant Director for Career Planning & Place-
ment.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
PJLVLAJDRS CLUB
WANTED" ALL P E Majors or inl
majors to help support our club N
DUES�Just FL'V" Meeting to N
Thurs. at 800 p m in Minges rex m 142
Please attend�plan1- about State i
tion in Greensboro to be discuss
to see vou mere.
TILGATJLPARTY
in
Representatives of the Walt Disney World
Company will be on campus to recruit EC
students for their College Program. A
seminarpresentation will be conducted
Nov. 9. Students from all majors are in-
vited to participate. Positions in guest
relations, attractions, merchandising and
food services, among others are available.
Contact the Office of Cooperative Ed. in
the GCB for details.
Come join the ECU P E. Major Club
celebrating the 1st Annual P.E Majors
Club Tailgate Partv on Sat at 11:30 a m
for the Miami game We will provide the
chicken�please bring vour own bevel
ages. ALL HPERS STUDENTS AND
FACULTY ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
AND BRING FRIENDS We will K to
cated at the corner of Elmhurst Field�
behind the scoreboard of Eicklen Ma
dium. 1 lOPE TO SEE OU 111LRE1
PHQiaGEAPHY SHOW
Faces, structure and architectures of
North and Central American Earth a
seen by Ernst Habrkhs Ct 24 Nov
Reception Wed, 700 p.m Mendenhall
Gallery.
AMERICAN MKTG, ASSCK,
The American Mktg Assoc will K hold
ing its next meeting Thurs at 3 p m The
meeting will be held in the GCB in room
1032 We will have a guest speaker from
Wal-Mart All interested persons are in
vited. All members are encouraged to
attend.
KARATE CLUB
ECU Karate Club will meet Mon & Wed
nights at B 15 in Memorial Gym, tor inter-
ested beginners, advanced students
Thurs. 730.
CQMMLZX1Q3
Worship God and celebrate Communion
this Wed night atpm at the Methodist
Student Center then eofd) a delicious, all
you-can eat home cooked meal and good
fellowship The meal is S2 at the door,
$1 50 for members Call 758-2030 for info
Sponsored by Presbyterian and Method
ist Campus Ministries
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to our Bible
Studies everv Tues night at 7:00 pm. in
Rawl 130 Bring a friend For more info
call Jim at 752-7199.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium
1
��
Elvira shows good taste in t
film. Unpleasant
Greenvilt
comic sh
B) i ARLVIS H MPUV
5j � � i I freak
Ann � g
bool
i
asked I i
perpk - �n.
-
little inflated th
asked
- � .
.lent t E ked
heprepared tot xplainbut i
was the oi
After the qirl purchased
X-men comics, Reid return�
seat behind his table
Greenville's first ba
j
- - '
bridg his nose, Reid
Some - she 11 unders
law- � scare
Reid wa-
ter up tables at the Rai
Inn banquet room. Ba;
cards, the latest entry to the w
oi outnumbl
coin - and com t - at tl
Once thought to be ju�
kids, baseball avered
reached investment status. i
ingb) showgoei -I
glimpse oi all the immol
Aaron Mays, Mantle. Re
Re ggie
ike a miniature Bai
Hall of Fame, ene glass sa
comer table held all the sultl
swat. There was a 11 Mj
Mai � ' " tag
w ith .i 56 ai nd
Yogi Berra at -
' While the kids milled
'Clean a
a sleep-i
Bv BKN SI LB
stj"lrB�-
CleanandSober may
most sobering and sleep-in
mo ie ol the year
It is an attempt to oj
thirty days in the life et
Pew nter I Michael Keaton),
mercial real estate sail
whose life has hit bottoml
of drug and alcohol abuse
The script is very assj
and character develop?
non-existent
The movie begins w�t
sheveled and hung-over
on the phone in bedrooi
abort-2.000 he emhezzW:
his agency. He snorts aca
lines - the camera backs up
ing the bared KM torn of al
fulby built blonde lavtn
down in his bed.
Payton sets � coke-hnl
ror on the pillow beside hj
joking that she'll need a
start. He is unaware thatj
the night she suffered a
tack from which she wi'
cover
Unfortunately, the
doesn't recover cither





Ll IVb: Happ) btrtrui.iv and all that
hv stuff! Lov� Mother Mary and
: 1 FORGE1 rO BUi The new
-�t T shirt ' Contact
i � and 756-7357"
lPN sK XNH TESSA: ust
Ja � kr w that we appreciate �B
. time ami support you give vis. �
NDYCRIMS f ROM ZTA
�HEDGES - n front f Student Store
?428 Rl VERY! lVn t be
: la loween
bcHTMARI ON TH SI HALLOW-
Its SHIRTS Kf JUKI Contact any
r737 1643
i ED CASH? - t-jll cards? CaD
I s - mad baseball buyer 1 pjv
� Mr cards ot jp wear,
any condition If you need
I the one to rail 757-
DISPLA CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
indi onfidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10 1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
-v
1-800 433-2930
etting Rich
ik Tells All
ush Stamped Self
Envelope
Dept. L.M. - 1
x 215
iC 28518
r l. MAJORS CUB
IN '
led
No
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holp - port
;2
ven-
TAILGATl PARTY
Come pin the 1 '�' i in
nual T E Majors
Club Tailg � Sal i� " ; ! a m
Miami gar � vide the '
. � pleas own bever-
5 Ml HPERS 5T1 DENTS AND
MVn TO ATTEND
� � � � be lo
cated r - nhurst Field�
rd of Rcklen Sta
5EEYOUTHI
PHOTOGRAFHY SHQW
i . s � � a I tures ol
aj Central American Tarth as
nby Ernst 1 la i hs Oct 24 Nov Q
� � � 7 � p rr MendenhaD
AMERICAN MKTG. ASSQC
i VKtg As
its no! meeting Thurs at S p m The
be hold in the GCB in room
will have a guest speaker from
� All interested persons are in
members are encouraged to
KARATE CLUB
ill meet Mnn & Wed
n Memorial Gym for inter-
� ners advanced students
rs I
COMMUNION
d and celebrate Communion
�ht at p m at the Methodist
r then enjoy a delicious, ail-
vou can ea? home cooked meal and good
wship The meal is S2 at the door.
Hi � r members Call758-2030for mfo
iponsored bv Presbyterian and Mithod-
ist Campus Ministries
QAN1PU5 CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite vou to our Bible
Studies every Tues night at 7 00 pm. in
Rawl 10 Bnng a friend For more info ,
call Rm at 752-7199
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
it vou are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that vou find hard to overcome, join
us for the un com promised word of God
Every Fn night at 700 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
OCTOBER 25, 1988 Page 7
Elvira' movie gets
ig zero star rating
Elvira shows good taste in tee-shirts and toilet paper in her new
film. Unpleasant dreams!
Greenville's first card,
comic show is success
Bv EARLVIS HAMPTON
Sufi baseball card freak
Among thousands of comic
books, baseball cards and coins, a
precocious girl wearing glasses
asked the man behind a table a
perplexing question.
"Aren't these prices just a
little inflated the young girl
asked the comic book collector.
Steve Reid, an Art graduate stu-
dent at ECl , looked at the girl as
he prepare to explain but "Yeah"
was the only thing to come out
Alter the p,irl purchased two
X -men comics, Reid returned to a
seat behind his table, at
Greenville's first baseball card,
coin and comic show Sunday-
Pushing his glasses' rims to the
bridge ol his nose, Reid said
"Someday she'll understand the
laws of scarcity
Reid was among thirty collec-
tors to set up tables at the Ramada
Inn's banquet room. Baseball
cards, the latest entry to the world
of collectables, outnumbered
coins and comics at the show.
Once thought to be just-for-
kids, baseball cards have recently
reached investment status. Walk-
ing by, show goers could catch a
glimpse of all the immortals;
Aaron, Mays, Mantle, Rose and
Reggie
Like a miniature Baseball
1 iall of Fame, one glass case on a
comer table held all the sultans of
swat. There was a 1961 Mickey
intle with a $175 price tagalong
with a '36 Aaron, $150 and a '57
"i ogi Berra at $75.
While the kids milled around
the baseball cards and the comic
tables, the parents gawked at the
silver and gold coins. Tugging at
their sleeves for more money, the
kids couldn't understand how
anyone would pay good new
monev for old,old money.
ECU Dean Ron Spcier held
his table near the door with his
son. Speier stood patiently be-
hind his table as an Atlanta
Braves' fan bought a set of this
year's Braves cards. "That will be
. 6Q jeeots pled5CcdhlhjeL Braves
aren't worth that much Speier
said.
Returning to Reid'sbooth, the
comic book man took time out to
chow on a hamburger. Inbetween
bites, he tried to explain the law of
scarcity, an explanation he
couldn't relate to the young girl.
"As things become more
popular, people want to hold on
to them and their value goes up.
Right now it seems baseball cards
are hot and a lot of people are
wanting to collect, but comics are
still a good investment Reid
said.
"From a seller's standpoint,
the one difference between base-
ball cards and comics is the bulk.
Those guys (he points to a base-
ball card vendor) can carry most
of their stuff in one box while we
(comic book freaks) have to lug all
these boxes Reid said.
With the new craze over
nostaglia, investors are liquidat-
ing their stocks and bonds and are
buying cards and comics. And
finally, Greenville has had its first
show.
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Can Man
Okay. The basic plot of "El-
vira, Mistress of the Dark" goes
something like this. Horror movie
hostess inherits haunted house,
house burns down, she inherits a
fortune from the evil uncle that
burned her house in the first
place, and then uses the money to
finance her lifetime dream of star-
ring in a Las Vegas revue.
Now what? What does one
say about "Mistress of the Dark"
to fill up 18 inches of space that
hasn't been said in the preceding
paragraph? One interprets. One
expounds great truths about film
industry trends. One bullshits.
"Elvira" doesn't leave much
to interpret. Granted, it was in-
tended to be campy, like the B-
movies she shows on her syndi-
cated show. But camp movies fail
nine times out of 10 when the
producers don't try to make a
straight movie.
The "Batman" television
show was funny because Adam
West and Burt Ward really
thought they embodied the heroic
ideal. Cassandra Peterson (Elvira)
knows she isn't a goofy bimbo,
thus her Elvira comes off sound-
ing like a stereotypical goofy
bimbo.
And that is what ultimately
drags this film down more than
anything. If Elvira had played as a
hip hexmeister, or a supremely
brainless spellcasting slut, the
movie might have been saved.
The atmosphere of the movie
also lacked realism. Bringing her
character out into the daylight
was Peterson's first mistake.
While putting Elvira in the ultra-
moral setting of Fallwell, Mass.
has potential, Elvira really wasn't
shocking enough in appearence
or attitude to cause the reactions
she did.
But the town folk reacted
violently. Almost as whacked out
as the people in the small town
"Footloose" took place in. 1 have
yet to find a small town that really
outlaws dancing. Beer, maybe,
but not dancing.
One of the most disappoint-
ing things in this movie was the
hyped up special effects. Prom-
ised by the press releases to see a
High Noon' witchy warfare"
sequence during the climax of the
movie, I was let down hard when
I witnessed a few bolts of magic
lightning and a fiery sneeze.
Hardly a wizards' duel.
"Superman III" had better effects
than this.
The high points of the movie
are the inclusion of a Screamin'
Jay Hawkins song ("I Put A Spell
On You"�unfortunately sung by
some nobody session singer and
not Screamin' Jay) and when El-
vira turns to the audience after the
telegram concerning her inheri-
tance is received and says, "Is that
riming or what?"
Let us not forget the numer-
ous sexual double-entendres. The
filmmakers want us to believe
Elvira is the new Mac Wet, but
most of Elvira's one-liners fell flat
a condition you'd think impos-
sible with cleavage like that.
By far the best line in the
movie came after the theater
owner drops a marquee letter on
her head. When asked how her
head is, she calmly replies'Well,
I've never had any complaints If
more of her dialogue had been
that quick, I would have more
respect for her.
Onto the expounding. Peter-
son once belonged to the same
comedy troupe as Paul Reubens.
For $150, do we know who this is?
Survey says Pee Wee Herman.
Right.
Now, hasn't Pee Wee made a
few movies? Hasn't Jim Varney
(aka the unfunny redneck Ernest
P. Worrel) also just completed
another movie to be released
come Christmas? I think so. What
does all this mean?
Aside from the fact that my 18
inches is almost up, it means that
these people are parlaying their
character bits, which are admit-
tedly funny in small doses, into
big bucks in the movies. So what
does the future look like?
"Church Lady Got Married
where the lovable but tough on
Satan talk shoe hostess goes back
in time to rearrange her life and
prevent the coming of the Anti
Christ, 'Throw Rosie From the
Train where the bouncy diner
waitress is saved from her son's
plotting by super absorbent
Bounty� and "It's a Wonderful
Lie where the Lying Guy tries to
kill himself. An angel shows him
that he really will see Vanna
White naked, the Lying Guy de-
cides to live, but finds out the
angel was lying to him.
Elvira (Cassandra Peterson) mugs while talking on the phone in
her new film, "Elvira, Mistress of the Dark
Nesbitt, gallery director,
defines motivating force
Bv DEBRA BLAKE
Staff Writer
But my favorite is, of course,
"Bonehead � The Movie where
members of The East Carolinian
Revenge Squad break out of the
Phantom Zone and wreak havoc
in Greenville while a temporarily
unfunny Bonehead contemplates
whether sex is more important
than humor.
That's the review for now. I'm
the Bonehead and I am outta here.
'Clean and Sober' has
a sleep-inducive effect
By BEN SELBY
StaffWriler
"Clean and Sober" may be the
most sobering and sleep-inducive
movie oi the vear.
It is an attempt to observe
thirtv davs in the life of Darryl
Poynter (Michael Kcaton), a com-
mercial real estate salesman
whose life has hit bottom because
of drug and alcohol abuse.
The script is very assuming
and character development is
A very insincere Payton
checks into a drug treatment clinic
to hide from the authorities. There
he meets fellow patient Charlene
'Charli' Sanders (Kathy Baker), a
typical female crane operator.
As mysteriously as his co-
caine habit came about, his drug
recovery began. He substituted
his obsession for drugs with an
infatuation for an impossible rela-
tionship with the already at-
tached Sanders. The relationship
doesn't survive and neither does
the movie.
"Clean and Sober" gives us a
taste of Michael Keaton in a non-
non-t xistent.
IT�e movie begins with a di-
sheveled and hung-ovcr Payton
on the phone in bedroom lying comedic role. He's good. But the
about52,000 he embezzled from script is very bad. Hopefully we'll
his agency. He snorts a couple of see Keaton again soon in a funny -
lines - the camera backs up reveal- flavored jam of a different sort.
mg the bared bottom of a beauti- One redeeming quality of the
fully built blonde laying face- film exists, in that drug abuse is
down in his bed. shown as a miserable and dead -
Payton sets a coke-lined mir- end street; help is available, how-
ror on the pillow beside her head, ever, if you want it.
joking that she'll need a jump - Ron Howard produced this
start. He is unaware that during spine-softening gem and ifs clear
the night she suffered a heart at- that Opy was do,
tack from which she will not re- tempt. If anyone asks you to see
covcr. "Clean and Sober be smart,
Unfortunately, the picture
doesn't recover either. JUST SAY NO!
She will drive hundreds of
miles to pick up paintings for an
art show or work extra-long hours
to ensure a successful exhibit. She
is Perry Nesbitt, director of Gray
Art Gallery, and it is obvious she
defines the word "motivation
Nesbitt has been the director
for four years and is always opti-
mistic where the gallery is con-
cerned. She is always pushing and
striving to do better and feels sTTe"
docs a goad job with the budget
she has. Although she is grateful
to the Vice Chancellor and SGA
for providing additional funds,
money seems to be the only diffi-
culty.
Nesbitt says her peers con-
sider her shows to be the finest.
She says, "I try to show work
that's of interest to the commu-
nity and artists who wouldn't be
shown in North Carolina
The gallery has been re-
viewed in National Art Journals
and they do funding and catalogs
that are distributed nationally
each year.
Gray Art Gallery has an
average of seven or eight shows a
semester and a variety of work
throughout the year. The art stu-
dents show in the gallery twice a
year and the graduate students
have a Thesis Show, depending
on when they graduate.
In the summer they have a
show that is strictly voluntary.
"The gallerv is here to spark
people's imagination Nesbitt
said. "It's to show people what art
is and what art can be, and to push
them beyond what they're com-
fortable with.
At the present time the gal-
lery is "Celebrating Eastern North
Carolina Artists Nesbitt says,
"All the authors are very strong
artists, each of them in his own
wav"
e,Tc"?$vs SMnRBSttTrfBtivate
the audience and have soothing
work along with some that's
threatening. "We want everyone
to come Nesbitt said. The art
changes everv month and we
have a lecture series
The lectures are given by crit-
ics and visiting artists. They wel-
come the public and enable
people to understand the works
of an artist.
There is an Art Enthusiasm
Group that provides an outreach
to the community. It tries to pro-
vide film series, museum visits
and luncheons for fundraising.
Preparations for a show usu-
ally begin anywhere from six
months to a year ahead of time for
planning. Even though Nesbitt
savs she has no definite plans for
next year, she did say she hopes to
do an International Art Exhibit of
Contemporary Italian Artists
someday.
Halloween has long history,
known as Samhain by Celts
ECU Newt Bureau
GREENVILLE � Want to
glimpse the future? October 31
may be the best day for such vi-
sions if you can accept the beliefs rnarrY- BY going to a graveyard
of the ancient Celtic people who one might see the faces ot those
with visions of things to come.
Young women would sit on the
church steps in hopes of seeing
visions of the men thev would
lived in Britain, Wales, Ireland
and Scotland hundreds of years
ago, says an ECU professor.
It was the Celts, you see, who
brought us the old and honored
tradition of Halloween. But the
Celts didn't call it Halloween. To
them it was Samhain. It was a time
to celebrate the ending of the har-
vest season and the beginning of a
new year.
The Celts believed it was also
a time when spirit ancestors could
return to the physical world to "to
see how things are going says
Dr. Charles W. Sullivan, an ECU
who might be next to die.
There were also big celebra-
tions with food and drink, games
and costumes. Children roamed
the streets, just as they do today,
asking for treats and promising
mischief if none were given.
There were huge bonfires
which Sullivan said may be de-
rived from the words "bone
fires He said the older celebra-
tion, if traced back far enough,
probably involved sacrifices. It
was considered a way of making
amends and restoring bala ice.
One tradition that has be-
Fm anf!2J"r Look at these big kids trying to look up the nice ladies' dresses. Little
opey at mis ai �u�u��.�, u,� u. �, ;nt;n� n;� icid� � hand from c.rppn-
do they know that its just a painting. Big Kids, a band from Greens-
boro will be playing with The Bond Halloween at the Attic in a big
masquerade party called Beaux Arts Ball.
English professor who specializes come a part of Halloween began
in folklore and the myths of the with the carving of turnips and
Celts. other vegetables to make lanterns,
'There was a little bit of a some with faces. "Jack of the Lan-
break between the old year and tern" was an early folklore charac-
when the new year would begin ter, an unfortunate soul who lost
Sullivan says. "They believed that his head and periodically returns
the boundaries between our to look for it. Sullivan said the
world and the other world broke Halloween celebration adopted
down and the spirits of their an- this folklore character. The carv-
cestors could come into their ing of the jack o' lantern from a
houses. To make sure the spirits pumpkin is an American tradi-
felt at home the people left food tion.
out for them, so they wouldn't While these early celebra-
play tricks and raise any kind of a tions were pagan in belief they
ruckus Sullivan said. had nothing to do with the so-
It was a time, too, when the Sec SABBATH, page 9
spirits might provide the living





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25,1988
Koske's act is a living bomb
SHELBY, NC (AP) - Benny
"Boom Boom" Koske's work
place is like the eye of a hurricane.
All is calm and serene within
his tiny nucleus; but just across
the line, chaos prevails.
Koske is the "All-American
Human Bomb" who blows him-
self up for a living hundreds of
rimes each year.
He climbs in a box, ignites a
charge and everything around
him is blasted into smithereens
while he remains intact, more or
less.
But things can go wrong and
when thev do, he shifts out of the
hurricane's calm eye into its angry
body.
It is no fun place to be. One
time he got second- and third-
degree burns over bO percent of
his body.
The blasts have broken his
legs twice and cracked his ribs.
"I've got lacerations all over
my body Koske said recently.
"And 1 still have a little ring-
ing in my ears
More than one person has
asked Koske: "Isn't this a hell of a
way to make a living?"
The All-American Human
Bomb agrees.
"I respect the act he says,
hands shaking slightly as he
blinks through bloodshot eyes.
"I'm scared every time I get into
the box. I'd be lying if I didn't say-
that. No two shows are ever the
same. I never know what to ex-
pect
Koske also blows himself up
inside automobiles. The entire
vehicle is demolished and, if all
goes right, he steps out unharmed
- if a case of jangled nerves isn't
counted.
It is a scary, dangerous, com-
pletely unconventional way to
bring home the bacon; but Koske
has been doing it for 15 years.
On the plus side, he gets to
travel all over the world, enjoy
applause from appreciative audi-
ences and meet interesting
people
"I make a comfortable liv-
ing he said. "I'm going to keep
on going for five more years and
then get into promoting stunts. I
won't pass this one on. vVhen I'm
done, I'm hanging it up
The! lumanBoinbgrewupin
Talm Bay, Fla the only child of a
show business couple who ran
concessions at circuses and carni-
vals. He had two homes: Palm Bay
and the road.
Both places he had access to
old carney pros like the "Human
Torpedo It looked like great fun,
climbing into a cannon and get-
ting shot into the air over a tall
Ferris wheel.
The show biz bug sank its
teeth into Koske. He joined Joie
Chitvvood's Helldriversand later
ran his own thrill show called
Hollywood Death Dodgers.
On a thrill-show swing
through Canada, Koske caught a
carney act by a Russian per-
former. It was a corker. The Rus-
sian sat in a chair and blew him-
self up with dynamite.
"I watched him and got an
idea Koske recalls. "I didn't
think too much of sitting in a
chair. I thought I'd do it ina coffin-
like box
Koske debuted the act at a
benefit show for his church. The
blast kicked him out of the box
and soundly rattled him.
"I put it back on the drawing
board Koske said.
He came up with a five-
charge combination of low-grade
explosives which he packed in-
side the box.
"It's enough to blow up a
small safe or full-size automo-
bile he says.
Atmospheric conditions de-
termine the size of the explosive
charges.
"If it's too not, I've got to take
some out he says. "And if it's
colder, I add another cnarge
Four years ago in El Ccntro,
Calif the temperature hit 110
degrees and turned his trick into a
flirtation with death.
When the smoke settled, his
body was covered with golfball-
sized welts. After the severe
burns, he could no longer get in-
surance, although he carries in-
surance for the public and has the
appropriate federal licenses.
Koske is married, but his wife
stays home and looks after their
26cocker spanieis. VVhen she trav-
els, it is to dog shows.
The Human Bomb plays fairs
gjand openings and all sorts of
other events. Television is a big
outlet. He has been on such pro-
grams as 'The Mike Douglas
Show "What's My Line?" "Real
People a Bob Hope special on
HBO and "Thicke of the Night
The act takes him all over the
United States and Canada, Mex-
ico, Central and South America
and Japan.
The time arrives for Koske to
make his debut at the Cleveland
County Fair. His box sits atop a
trailer adjacent to the pig race area
and a crowd gathers to watch
behind a rope.
The Human Bomb appears in
a cape, helmet, leather suit, hoots
and gloves. He looks worried. His
hands are shaking.
As Koske climbs into the box,
spectators wisely put their fingers
into their ears.
The bang is a big one. Pieces
of the box fly in all directions.
"Is he allrioht?" someone in
the audience asks about the
crouching figure left on the stage.
Koske slowly moves to his knees
and then takes a bow. The whole
act has taken about four minutes.
"I'm a nervous wreck when
the show's over Koske says. "I
have to take a cold shower. It takes
me half-an-hour to get down to
earth again
fi
rs
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second floor, Publications Building.
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CLASS PORTRAITS
Portraits for all classes will be taken from Oct. 31 through
Nov. 4. Pictures will be taken in the Soda Shop at the
Student Store from 9 a.m12 p.m. and 1 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
This is the only opportunity to have your picture taken for
the 1989 Buccaneer Yearbook.
mi iiiii���f�t�w�'w?7w�TT"WTWTw;wwwTw'T,y�WTi?�
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It Isn't Your Yearbook Until You Are In It!
THENIGHT BEFORE
October 28,1988
� 5:00 until
� LOCALS ONLY
�SEE YOU
� 3QO advance TICKETS
� Bring any Coors Light Product &Get 1QQ OFF
coolers welcome � no glass
n
NSF
CHICAGO (AP) f
500 years after Copernicus
lated that the Earth rei
around the sun, milliol
Americans think otherwi:
gests a poll that found vast
bers of the nation's adults I
tifically illiterate
In the early 16th centuj
Polish astronomer Nichola
ernicus laid the foundatK
modern astronomy with hi:
centric theory.
Many Americans mist;
believe that laser beams
cused sound waves and ti
States
(AP) � Statesville's si
at luring production for
movies may seem to havi
pened overnight, but it real
the culimination of longj
work, officials say.
The city is hosting its
ever premiere partv this w
celebrate "A Stoning In J-
County a made-for-TY
filmed in July and August
dell Countv
The movie, starring kej
of "thirty-something,
Perlman of "Beautv an
Beast" and "LA. Law
Eikenberry, is about an
family who has its rehgiol
liefs tested when a babv i
dentally killed bv local teei
Paula Wynck oi the N.
Office in Raleigh recalk
Statesvillebecame the local
the S3 million movie
"We got a call from tl
ducer (Don Goldman), wl
looking for some Amish
Sabba
Continued from pag
called "Witches'Sabbath �
devil's holiday These are
that arose after Christ
"When the Christian:
up into western Europe thej
to take over the festival
found there. Rather than
stampout a popular festival
much easier to convert it,
van savs.
The church accepted
dition of Samhain festiv.
thev reorganized it so it wo
in with what thev establisl
"All Saints Day" on Novj
recognize the saints, anc
Souls Day" on Nov. 2, to ho
rest of those who had del
life on Earth. They also cl
the name for the festival oni
to "All Hallows (All Holy
Sullivan said the
made similar concession w
celebration of Christmas,
moving into northern an
em Europe the Christian
celebrated the birthday of
in January but then coi
their Christ Dav celebratioj
an ancient solstice festival
observed on Dec. 25.
Unlike Christmas whil
quicklv absorbed by thecj
the tradition for All Sainl
and All Souls Dav are alm
gotten. But the "Hallows
Halloween festival coni
with manv oi the same tra
and practices that were
ved in the earlv Celtic fj
always on Oct 31.
The devil was not a pai
original Halloween norl
witches a part of the Celtil
tion either, according to SJ
In fact the name "witchef
given bv the church to
who served as healers ill
societies. Sullivan said the
may have believed thai
women, somehow, det
from the power of the chui
its teachings.
He said that in all off
search on Celtic folklo
mythology he has seen nv
in the original Halloweet
tions.
"I think one of the nic
in recent years is that peoj
become more aware of tl
background of Hallow
the fact that it has come
us from an old, Celtic, pre
tian celebration he said.
But while many of
traditions continue todaj
are some exceptions.
Halloween is now a
businesses that sell car
costumes, a day for chile
have some fun, and a
Linus to look, once again,
Great Pumpkin he said.





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ave All Your
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accessories.
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r 56-6670
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25,1988 9
NSF says Americans illiterate
CHICAGO (AP) � Nearly
500 yeare after Copernicus postu-
lated that the Earth revolves
around the sun, millions of
Americans think otherwise, sug-
gests a poll that found vast num-
bers of the nation's adults "scien-
tifically illiterate
In the early 16th century, the
oms are smaller than electrons,
said Jon Miller, director of the
Public Opinion Laboratory at
Northern Illinois University, who
conducted a nationwide survey
for the National Science Founda-
tion.
In a July telephone survey,
2,041 adults 18 or older were
Americans are scientifically illit-
erate Miller said Sunday. "It's a
fairly dire situation
Polish astronomer Nicholas Cop- asked about 75 questions on basic
ernicus laid the foundation for science, Miller said. The survey
modern astronomy with hishelio- had a margin of error of plus or
centric theory. minus 3 percentage points.
Many Americans mistakenly ,
believe that laser beams are fo- I! rJuhs show that �"
cused sound waves and that at- very basic ,dcas' vast numbers of
The results indicate many
Americans have little idea of what
presidential candidates are talk-
ing about when they list key is-
The results of the survey sues such as the Strategic Defense
haven't been fully tabulated yet, Initiative, acid rain, the green-
but it appears that 93 percent to 95 house effect and the space race, he
percent would have to be consid-
ered scientifically illiterate, lack-
ing fundamental knowledge of
3
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scientific vocabulary, methodol-
ogy and an understanding of
science's impact on the world,
said Miller. The group's 1985 sur-
vey found a 95 percent illiteracy
rate.
said.
Leon Ledcrman, who last
week was named co-winner of the
1988 Nobel Prize for physics and
is director of the Fermi National
Accelerator Laboratory in Bata-
via, called the latest findings
"pretty devastating
Statesville made site of three films
(AP) � Statesville's success
at luring production for three
movies may seem to have hap-
pened overnight, but it really was
the culimination of long, hard
work, officials say.
The city is hosting its first-
ever premiere party this week to
celebrate "A Stoning In Fulham
County a made-for-TV movie
filmed in July and August in Ire-
dell County.
The movie, starring Ken Olin
of "thirtysomething Ron
Tori man of "Beauty and the
Beast" and "L.A. Law's" Jill
Eikenberry, is about an Amish
family who has its religious be-
liefs tested when a baby is acci-
dentally killed by local teenagers.
Paula Wyrick of the N.C. Film
Office in Raleigh recalled how
Statesville became the location for
the $3 million movie.
"We got a call from the pro-
ducer (Don Goldman), who was
looking for some Amish coun-
Sabbath
Continued from page 7
called "Witches' Sabbath" or "the
devil's holiday These are names
that arose after Christianity
tvedinto western Europe
try she said. Danny Heam,
president of the Greater
Statesville Chamber of Com-
merce, informed her there was an
Amish community in the north-
em part of Iredell County.
"Danny and his committee
dropped everything, ran out and
shot some photos, brought them
to a one-hour developer and
shipped them overnight to Los
Angeles she said.
Statesville is currently the
location of a third movie, "The
Feud a comedy being produced
by a New York film company.
Make Up To $1000 In One Week!
Student Organizations,
Fraternities, Sororities needed for
Marketing Project on campus.
Must be motivated and organized.
Call 1-800-932-0528 ext. 28.
x
&
a a
We couldn't hold them back any more! Run! Flee for your lives,
your sanity and your good taste! The Bonehead and Earlvis have
wormed their disgusting Clearly Labeled Satire Page back into The
New and Improved Non-Offensive East Carolinian If The East
Carolinian Revenge Squad couldn't stop them how can we?
This may be the end of decency as we know it
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page Since 19SS, Tlte Leader in Offensive Humor.
Void Where Prohibited by Law.
o
' �
East Carolina's
Finest Tea
East Carolina
Tea Party
Every Thursday
at 4:00 p.m.
Free Admission
All Night
$3 First Iced Tea
$2 For 2nd, 3rd, & 4th
plus you keep the Mason Jar
Free non-alcoholic drinks for
designated drivers.
Must be 21 to enter and have valid I.D.
High Energy Music provided by Connie
Rogers, Greenville's Hottest DJ.
RAMADA INN
Cr
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
y
Mind tfiw AD.
"When the Christians came
up into western Europe they tried
to take over the festivals they
found there. Rather than try to
stampout a popular festival it was
much easier to convert it Sulli-
van says.
The church accepted !he tra-
dition of Samhain festival but
they reorganized it so it would tie
in with what they established as
"All Saints Day" on Nov. 1, to
recognize the saints, and "All
Souls Day" on Nov. 2, to honor the
rest of those who had departed
life on Earth. They also changed
the name for the festival on Oct. 31
to "All Hallows (All Holy) Eve
Sullivan said the church
made similar concession with the
celebration of Christmas. Before
moving into northern and west-
ern Europe the Christian Church
celebrated the birthday of Christ
in January but then combined
their Christ Day celebration with
an ancient solstice festival being
observed on Dec. 25.
Unlike Christmas which was
quickly absorbed by the culture,
the tradition for All Saints Day
and All Souls Day are almost for-
gotten. But the "Hallows Eve" or
Halloween festival continues
with many of the same traditions
and practices that were obbser-
ved in the early Celtic festival,
always on Oct. 31.
the devil was not a part of the
original Halloween nor were
witches a part of the Celtic tradi-
tion either, according to Sullivan.
In fact the name "witches" was
given by the church to women
who served as healers in rural
societies. Sullivan said the priests
may have believed that these
women, somehow, detracted
from the power of the church and
its teachings.
He said that in all of his re-
search on Celtic folklore and
mythology he has seen no "evil"
in'the original Halloween tradi-
tions.
"1 think one of the nice things
in recent years is that people have
become more aware of the deep
background of Halloween and
the fact that it has come down to
us from an old, Celtic, pre-Chris-
tian celebration he said.
But while many of the old
traditions continue today there
are some exceptions.
Halloween is now a day for
businesses that sell candy and
costumes, a day for children to
have some fun, and a day for
Linus to look, once again, for the
Great Pumpkin he said.
ATLANTA
BOSTON
CHARLOTTE.
CWCAOO �
tJtjLUI
LAQUARWA.
UK ANGELES.
t18�
�1M
� $7�
$198
.�178
- tas�
Money
NEWARK$196
ORLANDO�$218
PWLAOELPHA�91M
PITTSBURGH $178
SAN FRANCISCO�$378
SAVANNAH�$58
WASHINGTON$148
.8218
?ASK ABOUT OUR COMPANION FARES!
i are roundtrlpb�td on midweek travel. Tickets are nonrefundable with
no charges allowed. RcacrvsOonamustbe made a mtnteium of7 days In advance.
Mom we aubject to change without noace.
CTreenville
�& travel center
nf) Arlington Blvd Suite M
756-1521
Student Union
m
Coming Attractions
��L,
EER DAY
November 2.1988
3:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Regional Rehabilitation Center at PCMH
Junior and Senior college students from the surrounding area
who have declared a major or are interested in nursing or allied
health are invited to tour the Center and to meet the staff. Depart-
ments participating are Nursing, Physical Therapy. Occupational
Therapy, Speech & Hearing Therapy, Social Work, Therapeutic
Recreation, Psychology and Medical Records.
There will be representatives from nursing and allied health re-
cruitment who will be available to answer questions pertaining
to employment and personnel benefits.
Join us at Career Day from 3:00 to 5:30 p.m November
2, 1988.
People Care More Here
PITT COUNTY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
200 Stantonsburg Road � P0 Box 6028 � Greenville NC 27835 � (919) 551 4100
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, structures and architectures of
North and Central American Earth As seen by
ERNST HABRICHS
October 24- November 18
Mendenhall Gallery
Opening Reception Wednesday, October 26 at 7:00 p.m.
MOVIE OF THE WEEK
CRY FREDOM - R
Wednesday, October 26 at 8:00 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
DONALD WOODS
Anti-Arpartheid Activist
CRY FREEDOM is based on his life story
He will speak Thursday, October 27 at 8:00 in Hendrix Theatre
COFFEEHOUSE PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS
GYPSY ROSE
Saturday, October 29 at 9:00 p.m.
In Mendenhall, in the Underground
HORROR MOVIE LOCK-IN
CARRIE THE OMEN TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE
Costume Contest, Prizes, Shrieks and Howls
Sunday, October 30-1:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre





1HI I ASI CAROI INIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 25, 1W8 Page U)
Pirates continue their losing streak as
they fall to the Orangemen of SU 38-14
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports 1 ditor
With the Pirates dropping
their sixth game in as man) out-
ings, one question seems to be on
the minds (it main Pirate fans
When will this madness end ?
On Saturday the Pirates were
pummelled by the Orangemen of
Syracuse 38-14 in what may verj
well have been ECU'S poorest
showing this season "1 thought
thev (Syracuse) did a good job of
stopping our option Pirate
Coach Art Baker said. "We didn't
throw the ball weli. I am disap-
pointed about the offense and the
way we moved the ball.
The Pirates started the game
at a disadvantage. They were
penalized ten yards before a sec-
ond had ticked off the clock as a
result of two sucessive Robb
Emperato kick-offs that dribbled
along the turf before going out of
bounds As it tm ned out, this was
merelj a harbingei for the rest o(
the d
Aftci a successful kick-off by
the Pirates, Svracuse started the
tnst drive of the d.w on thcirown
41-aid line. 1 he Orangemen
took the ball down totheone-yard
line behind the running ol Robert
Drummond, who accounted tor
29 of the ' yards of the series.
including a one yard plunge tor
the s. ore.
Drummond carried 10 times
in the first halt for 103 yards, and
amassed 117 ards on the d.iv, a
career best. KM Ireene added the
extra point, and S racuse held the
early 7 0 lead.
Flu- Pirates moved the ball
well on their first possession,
driving down to the S racuse 25
before turning the ball over on
downs, when, on a fourth and
three, Travis 1 lunter tumbled the
ball (Mi the exchange. Although
Tim lames recovered the ball, it
still went over to the Orangemen.
Taking advantage of the turn-
over, Svra( use drove the ball 74
vards in seven plays, scoring
when Michael Owens went in
from lb yards out. Greene added
the extra point, giving Svracuse a
14 Oedge.
Hie Pirates mustered their
only successful drive of the halt
on their next series, taking the ball
74 vards down to the 20 behind
the running and passing of
Hunter, who hit Al Whiting and
Walter Wilson on passesof 19and
12 yards, respectively. Willie
Lewis capped the drive with a 20-
yard scamper around the right
side tor the touchdown. Imperato
added the extra Hunt, and the
Svracuse lead was cut in half, 14-
7. It was the first time this season
that Svracuse had given up a
touchdown in the first quarter.
This situation changed
quickl) , how ever, when Syracuse
scored on their next possession,
Willie lewis escape!
on the dav. The Pirate offense struggled all afternoon. (Photo b "I homas Walters- Photo 1 ab.)
IRS crown champs
taking the ball 63 yards down to
the ECU three before Daryl
Johnston took the ball up the gut
for the score. 21-7, Orangemen.
Hunter was intercepted on
the Pirates' next possession by
Syracuse linebacker Terry
Wooden at the Syracuse 30-yard
line, and he returned it 16 yards to
the 46 before being pulled down.
Two plays and :32 later, the Or-
angemen had their fourth touch-
down of the day, after quarter-
back Todd Philcox hit Deval
Glover for a 44-yard gain and then
Owens for the 11-yard score.
Greene added the point after, and
the Orangemen held a command-
ing 28-7 lead.
The Pirates were forced to
punt after three plays on the ensu-
ing series, and the Orangemen
once again began a drive for the
end zone, but the drive stalled as
the defense stiffened behind two
tackles by rover Flint McCallum
for a loss of 15 yards. Svracuse
was forced to attempt a 40-yard
field goal, which soared through
the uprights, giving SU a 31-7
half time lead. These 31 points
were the most scored on the Pi-
rates in a first half since the 1986
season, when the Nittany Lionsof
Penn State amassed 35 points in
the half.
The second half of the game
was much more subdued that had
been the first, with only one
touchdown coming from each
squad. This was due in part to a
much stingier Pirate defense.
ECU had a chance to score
first in the second half after mov-
ing the ball 56 vards to the
Svracuse 24. Thev stalled here,
and Imperato came in to try a 41 -
yard field goal. The attempt
failed, and the Pirates came away
empty.
The sole SU score of the half
came in the wanning moments of
the third quarter when, with :17
left, Drummond capped a 29-yard
drive with a three-yard run off
right tackle for the score. The extra
point was good, giving SU a 38-7
lead.
The look on Junior Robinson's tace expifssos i :�
than words could hope to. (Photo by Mar Startari
The Pirates once again denied
themselves of a score late in t!
fourth period when Charlie 1 i-
bretto fumbled at the SU 12. rhej
did, however, score on their next
possession when, with :19 left to
play, Libretto hit Jarred Moody in
the end zonefora five-yard tou h-
down.
"1 would be remiss it 1 didn't
say the reason for the results for
today were that we were playing a
good football team Baker said
after the game. "People thoughl
thev would come out here and be
flat, but they are a well-coached
football team and they were ready
to play.
ghl
d efforl ' .
linst thn e
weeks �
have been.
V e ha .
� I . k and
tough, e. O
are at '
don t have an) thi 1
it "
! ra is (lunter i �. st sun
up the Pirati - t- � ti
poml: us getting truUvO-u.
We're talkii il ut it all thetim
wc jusl need to do it It's a in nl
thing. We ha1 I
wav to lose
(IRS) The intramural tlag
football season came to a close last
Thursday evening in two forms:
rout and rumble. The rout at the
hands of the women's champion,
the Enforcers and rumble as 4th
Ay cock upset Theta Chi in the
men's all-campus game.
In the ladie's contest, Jodi
Rodriguez forced her way into the
end zone four times for the En-
forcers. Add two more touch-
downs from lody Hite and an
additional Laura Conway score
and vou come up with a 43-0
spanking.
On the other side oi the score-
board were sorority champions
Delta Zeta, 5-0, who were able to
pass the 50-yard line only once in
the contest. Beth Hopkins and
Melissa Lord gave a gallant effort
but were unable to capitalize. The
D.Zs admitted going in to the
competition that their ultimate
goal was "just to score" against
the perennial Enforcer power
house.
Cheryl Curtis and Laura BYl
los shared Enforcer quarterback
duties. The only weak element of
the Enforcer attack was in their
attempts to score the point after
Thev missed on seven attempts,
but. at 43-0, this weakness seemed
non-existent. Congratulations
Enforcers.
The men'scontest wasaction-
packed from the outset. A
pumped up and heavily favored
Theta Chi squad hit the field full
of confidence, towering over the
underdog 4th Aycock, it not onk
in stature, but fan power as well.
Chris Jones lead the Theta Chi
attack but soon fell into trouble as
he threw crucial interceptions
early on.
Joel Saunders, captain and
quarterback for 4th Avcock, an-
swered with key pass comple-
tions to Eric Williams and Louis
Presurti. This all freshman squad
was in peril of ever completing
the regular season as mismanage-
ment and lack oi organization
ended in a last minute admittance
to the league. In the semi-final
contest versus the Mutant Surf
Doctors, 4th Aycock found them-
selves on the losing end oi a 26-6
half time score. A miraculous
comeback for this "team of des-
tiny" brought them into the land
of Theta Chi.
4th Aycock intercepted six
passes in the final contest. Jerry
Gouveia scored the only points in
the contest during the first half for
4th Aycock as defense ruled over
the rest oi play. Congratulations
4th Aycock squad members: Jerry
Gouveia, Greg Rosen, Louis Pre-
sutti, Mark Harris, Ant Andujar,
Brian Huffman, Joel Saunders,
Eric Williams and George Mazza.
4th Aycock upset Theta Chi to sweep the men's finals victory, defeating Theta Chi by a single scon
ECU swimmers set for season
after a record setting meet
�UWTl'l JW
The Enforcers, pictured here, took the title of champions after defeating Delta Zeta in the finals.
By KR1STEN HALBERG
Assistant Sportt rdttor
The East Carolina Swimming
and Diving team is off to a roaring
start as they ended their pre-sea-
son schedule last Thursday in the
Purple and Gold meet, setting
nine meet records.
"We swam very well said
Head Coach Rick Kobe. "We are
much faster than last year. 1 feel
very confident going into the
opener on Nov. 5 against Ameri-
can University
The Purple and Gold meet, a
meet where the Pirates compete
against themselves, saw the gold
team reign for both the men and
the women as the final for the men
was 100-86 and for the women, 88-
71.
Kobe and the diving coach
Jon Rose were equally as pleased
with the ECU divers as one of the
nine Purple and Gold meet rec-
ords came from the divers.
"The squad is coming along
real well this early in the season
said Rose.
Returning senior and number
one diver last year, Sherry
Campbell dominated both the
women's one-meter and three-
meter boards capturing first in
each event.
Celeste Cordova set a new
freshmen record in the one-meter
dive event capturing second place
while Jennifer Grove snagged
second on the three-meter board.
Terry Smith gave a solid per-
formance for the men as he placed
first in both the one and three-
meter diving events.
Freshman Sean Kennedy was
described by Kobe as having
"good potential" as he placed
second in both diving events.
Returning sophomore Scott
Milligan did not dive Thursday
due to a broken finger.
In the swimming compel
tion, the meet ku ki d off with th
first Purple and (. Jold re rd in t!
men's 400-yard medley rela
when the team of Mark O Brien
Raymond Kennedy, red Chris
tensen and Billv 1 laughton swan
it in 3 41.0.
The team of 1 eslie o Wilsoi
Meredith Bridgers, Patrici �
Walsh and Chris 1 utker came i
at 4:13.38 to give them first in th
women's 400-yard medley relax
Next on the list for the nut
was the 100-yard freestyle. This
time Andy Jeter came out on top
in 10:15.5. The women sav
Carolyn Green swim tor first in
10:57.2.
The next Purple and t
record was set in the 200 ard
freestyle. Page Holt was th
proud victor when she came in at
2:00.7. Walsh followed in 205.0.
See EC, page 11
State pull
(AP) - orth C arolina
finds itself in the position it
wanted to be in all season long,
but the Wolfpack also has some
unexpected company in its bid for
the Atlantic I
title.
Saturday's 10-3
the ninth ranked Tigers led the
Wolfpack to the top of the confer
once with a 4-1 mark N C Stah
has two ACC games left aN
trip to Virginia and a home date
with Duke on the t. 1 lowing v
end. It must win those v
take the title, and at the sam
hold off the Tigers and a su-
ing Maryland team, both
are 3-1 in the ACC
'This one was thi -
Wolfpack linebacker - Aue:
said. "But we've got
ones still in front
two more conl
against teams that usual
a lot oi troubli
Tailback Or
for a 5-yard touchdov
10:04 left to plaj
to victory. Ther.
defense didn I
penetrate pat the N
EC swimmers
Continued from page 10
The men s30-) ard fre I
saw John Farrell shine
grabbed first b hall a second ii
1:47.8. Mark.
ond with his tim
Wendy Smith claime 1 I
the women s I rd fre
w hen she touched the wa
while Lutker, w ith a time i
came in second
For the mer - 5
rvle, Enck PL .
of the pack to claim first ir 22
Billv Haughton came in second al
23.1 and Andv Johns reo
third in 23.2.
Jennifer Muench set
record in the women - - �
individual medly event wh
swam in at 2:16.9 Nc
later was Wilson at 2 17.6
Tom Holsten won the n
200-yard individual me
his time of 2 02 3 w rule Ra)
Kennedy secured second n
2:02.5.
Yet another record was s
this time in the women's 200-yan
butterflv when Shelly Mick,
claimed victory in her time i
2:13.S. Soon to follow was Robi
Wicks in 2:14 2
Andv Ichns hole.
able lead in the mer s
butterfly when he swam in a
2:004. Four seconds later (
tensen touched the wa
him the second place title
Page Holt's time of 55
enough to break the old Purpl)
and Gold record as well as
her a first place title in
women's 100-yard freest
In the same ever: i
a close race decided the �
it was Enck Hovos who came o
on top with his time of
three tenths of a second beri
Hovos was Billy Haug
his time oi 50 6
The men broke the i
ord when George Wall
for 2.01.94 in the 200-yai
stroke. Shelly Mica w or I
women in 2 21 3.
No one was near
Morns in the women -
freest vie when she came
5:24.4. giving her an easj l
over second place finisher I e-
lo Wilson who came in at 5 M
It was closer tor
when Mark Cook swam a 4 - I
500-yard freestyle givir
� place. Soon to follow was
place time of 4 59 2 b ohn
roll.
Meredith Bridgers cru a
the rest of the swimmers il
earned herself a ne
Gold record when she swam
women s200-vard hreasttrok
2 24
Ravmond Kenned)
closer race tor first in the me)
200-vard breaststroke emerj
victorious with his time of 2:1
Onlv two seconds behind
John Springer when he came
2.18.4.
The men ended the meet
high note as thev set a new Put
and Gold record in the 400-vj
freestvle relay. The team of Tf
Stebbins, Tim Boyd. Bl
Haughton and Mark Cook
ished off the meet w ith their
rung time and new record!
320.05.
And finally, for the wool
the 400-vard freestyle relay enl
w!th Chantal Morns, Rcj
Wicks, Wendy Smith and 1
Holt claiming first place
their time of 3:55 4.






)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 25,1988 Page 10
Pirates continue their losing streak as
they fall to the Orangemen of SU 38-14
By DOUG JOHNSON
Spam Editor
With the Pirates dropping
their sixth game in as many out-
ings, one question seems to be on
the minds of many Pirate fans.
When will this madness end?
On Saturday the Pirates were
pummelled by the Orangemen of
Syracuse 38-14 in what may very
well have been ECU'S poorest
showing this season. "1 thought
they (Syracuse) did a good job of
stopping our option Pirate
Coach Art Baker said. "We didn't
throw the ball well. I am disap-
pointed about the offense and the
way we moved the ball
The Pirates started the game
at a disadvantage. They were
penalized ten yards before a sec-
ond had ticked off the clock as a
result of two sucessive Robb
Imperato kick-offs that dribbled
along the turf before going out of
bounds As it turned out, this was
merely a harbinger for the rest of
the day.
After a successful kick-off by
the Pirates, Syracuse started the
first drive of the day on their own
41-yard line. The Orangemen
took the ball down to the one-yard
line behind the running of Robert
Drummond, who accounted for
29 of the 51 yards of the series,
including a one-yard plunge for
the score.
Drummond carried 10 times
in the first half for 103 yards, and
amassed 117 yards on the day, a
career best. K.J. Greene added the
extra point, and Syracuse held the
early 7-0 lead.
The Pirates moved the ball
well on their first possession,
driving down to the Syracuse 25
before turning the ball over on
downs, when, on a fourth and
three, Travis Hunter fumbled the
ball on the exchange. Although
Tim James recovered the ball, it
still went over to the Orangemen.
Taking ad vantage of the turn-
over, Syracuse drove the ball 74
yards in seven plays, scoring
when Michael Owens went in
from 16 yards out. Greene added
the extra point, giving Syracuse a
14-0 edge.
The Pirates mustered their
only successful drive of the half
on their next series, taking the ball
74 yards down to the 20 behind
the running and passing of
Hunter, who hit Al Whiting and
Walter Wilson on passes of 19 and
12 yards, respectively. Willie
Lewis capped the drive with a 20-
yard scamper around the right
side for the touchdown. Imperato
added the extra point, and the
Syracuse lead was cut in half, 14-
7. It was the first time this season
that Syracuse had given up a
touchdown in the first quarter.
This situation changed
quickly, however, when Syracuse
scored on their next possession,
Willie Lewis escapes Syracuse defenders in route to the end zone for one of the Pirates' two scores
on the day. The Pirate offense struggled all afternoon. (Photo by Thomas Walters- Photo Lab.)
IRS crown champs
taking the ball 63 yards down to
the ECU three before Daryl
Johnston took the ball up the gut
for the score. 21-7, Orangemen.
Hunter was intercepted on
the Pirates' next possession by
Syracuse linebacker Terry
Wooden at the Syracuse 30-yard
line, and he returned it 16 yards to
the 46 before being pulled down.
Two plays and :32 later, the Or-
angemen had their fourth touch-
down of the day, after quarter-
back Todd Philcox hit Deval
Glover for a 44-yard gain and then
Owens for the 11-yard score.
Greene added the point after, and
the Orangemen held a command-
ing 28-7 lead.
The Pirates were forced to
punt after three plays on the ensu-
ing series, and the Orangemen
once again began a drive for the
end zone, but the drive stalled as
the defense stiffened behind two
tackles by rover Flint McCallum
for a loss of 15 yards. Syracuse
was forced to attempt a 40-yard
field goal, which soared through
the uprights, giving SU a 31-7
halftime lead. These 31 points
were the most scored on the Pi-
rates in a first half since the 1986
season, when theNittany Lions of
Penn State amassed 35 points in
the half.
The second half of the game
was much more subdued that had
been the first, with only one
touchdown coming from each
squad. This was due in part to a
much stingier Pirate defense.
ECU had a chance to score
first in the second half after mov-
ing the ball 56 yards to the
Syracuse 24. They stalled here,
and Imperato came in to try a 41-
yard field goal. The attempt
failed, and the Pirates came away
empty.
The sole SU score of the half
came in the wanning moments of
the third quarter when, with :17
left, Drummond capped a 29-yard
drive with a three-yard run off
right tackle for the score. The extra
point was good, giving SU a 38-7
lead.
The look on Junior Robinson's face expresses his feelings better
than words could hope to. (Photo by Mar Startari - Photo I ah.)
The Pirates once again denied
themselves of a score late in the
fourth period when Charlie Li-
bretto fumbled at the SU 12. They
did, however, score on their next
possession when, with :19 left to
play, Libretto hit Jarrod Moody in
the end zone for a five-yard touch-
down.
"I would be remiss if I didn't
say the reason for the results for
today were that we were playing a
good football team Baker saii
after the game. "Pecqjle thougrjk
they would come out here and be
flat, but they are a well-coached
football team and they were ready
to play.
"1 thought our player gave
good effort. It's tough to go up
against three opponents in thn. -
weeks that are as physical as the
have been.
"We have another touj h
game next week and anotht i
tough week of practice. Our kid
are a tough group, and they jusl
don't have anything to show h
it
Travis Hunter best summed
up the Pirates' seasdta �' 0
pbidLilts feettrngc frt&uanfe�
We're talking about it all the time
we just need to do it. It's a menial
thing. We have been finding a
way to lose
(IRS) � The intramural tlag
football season came to a close last
Thursday evening in two forms:
rout and rumble. The rout at the
hands of the women's champion,
the Enforcers and rumble as 4th
Aycock upset Theta Chi in the
men's all-campus game.
In the ladie's contest, Jodi
Rodriguez forced her way into the
end zone four times for the En-
forcers. Add two more touch-
downs from Jody Hite and an
additional Laura Conway score
and you come up with a 43-0
spanking.
On the other side of the score-
board were sorority champions
Delta Zeta, 5-0, who were able to
pass the 50-yard line only once in
the contest. Beth Hopkins and
Melissa Lord gave a gallant effort
but were unable to capitalize. The
D.Zs admitted going in to the
competition that their ultimate
goal was "just to score" against
the perennial Enforcer power-
house.
Cheryl Curtis and Laura Bel-
los shared Enforcer quarterback
duties. The only weak element of
the Enforcer attack was in their
attempts to score the point after.
They missed on seven attempts,
but, at 43-0, this weakness seemed
non-existent. Congratulations
Enforcers.
The men's contest was action-
packed from the outset. A
pumped up and heavily favored
Theta Chi squad hit the field full
of confidence, towering over the
underdog 4fh Aycock, if not only
in stature, but fan power as well.
Chris Jones lead the Theta Chi
attack but soon fell into trouble as
he threw crucial interceptions
early on.
Joel Saunders, captain and
quarterback for 4th Aycock, an-
swered with key pass comple-
tions to Eric Williams and Louis
Presutti. This all freshman squad
was in peril of ever completing
the regular season as mismanage-
ment and lack of organization
ended in a last minute admittance
to the league. In the semi-final
contest versus the Mutant Surf
Doctors, 4 th Aycock found them-
selves on the losing end of a 26-6
halftime score. A miraculous
comeback for this "team of des-
tiny" brought them into the land
of Theta Chi.
4th Aycock intercepted six
passes in the final contest. Jerry
Gouveia scored the only points in
the contest during the first half for
4th Aycock as defense ruled over
the rest of play. Congratulations
4th Aycock squad members: Jerry
Gouveia, Greg Rosen, Louis Pre-
sutti, Mark Harris, Ant Andujar,
Brian Huffman, Joel Saunders,
Eric Williams and George Mazza.
4th Aycock upset Theta Chi to sweep the men's finals victory, defeating Theta Chi by a single score.
ECU swimmers set for season
after a record setting meet
The Enforcers, pictured here, took the title of champions after defeating Delta Zeta in the finals.
By KRISTEN HALBERG
AmWuI Sports Editor
The East Carolina Swimming
and Diving team is off to a roaring
start as they ended their pre-sea-
son schedule last Thursday in the
Purple and Gold meet, setting
nine meet records.
"We swam very well said
Head Coach Rick Kobe. "We are
much faster than last year. I feel
very confident going into the
opener on Nov. 5 against Ameri-
can University
The Purple and Gold meet, a
meet where the Pirates compete
against themselves, saw the gold
team reign for both the men and
the women as the final for the men
was 100-86 and for the women, 88-
71.
Kobe and the diving coach
Jon Rose were equally as pleased
with the ECU divers as one of the
nine Purple and Gold meet rec-
ords came from the divers.
"The squad is coming along
real well this early in the season
said Rose.
Returning senior and number
one diver last year, Sherry
Campbell dominated both the
women's one-meter and three-
meter boards capturing first in
each event.
Celeste Cordova set a new
freshmen record in the one-meter
dive event capturing second place
while Jennifer Grove snagged
second on the three-meter board.
Perry Smith gave a solid per-
formance for the men as he placed
first in both the one and three-
meter diving events.
Freshman Sean Kennedy was
described by Kobe as having
"good potential" as he placed
second in both diving events.
Returning sophomore Scott
Milligan did not dive Thursday
due to a broken finger.
In the swimming compcti
tion, the meet kicked off with the
first Purple and Gold record in thr
men's 400-yard medley relav
when the team of Mark O'Brien
Raymond Kennedy, Ted Chris
tensen and Billy Haughton swam
it in 3:41.0.
The team of Leslie Jo Wilson.
Meredith Bridgers, Patricia
Walsh and Chris Lutker came in
at 4:13.38 to give them first in the
women's 400-yard medley relay
Next on the list for the men
was the 100-yard freestyle. This
time Andy Jeter came out on top
in 10:15.5. The women saw
Carolyn Green swim for first in
10:57.2.
The next Purple and Gold
record was set in the 200-yard
freestyle. Page Holt was the
proud victor when she came in at
2.O0.7. Walsh followed in 2:05.0.
See EC, page 11
State pull:
(AP) � North Carolina State
finds itself in the position it
wanted to be in all season long,
but the Wolfpack also has some
unexpected company in its bid for
the Atlantic Coast Conference
title.
Saturday's 10-3 victory over
the ninth-ranked Tigers led the
Wolfpack to the top of the confer-
ence with a 4-1 mark. N.C. State
has two ACC games left, a Nov. 5
trip to Virginia and a home date j
with Duke on the following week-
end. It must win those games to
take the title, and at the same time
hold off the Tigers and a surpris-
ing Maryland team, both of which
are 3-1 in the ACC.
"This one was the best yet'
Wolfpack linebacker Scott Auerl
said. "But we've got a lot of tough
ones still in front of us. We've got
two more conference games!
against teams that usually give usI
a lot of trouble
Tailback Chris Williams rani
for a 5-yard touchdown withj
10:04 left to play to lead N.C. State
to victory. Then the Wolfpackl
defense didn't allow Clemson tol
penetrate past the N.C. State 30-1
EC swimmersi
Continued from page 10
The men's 200-yard freestylej
saw John Farrell shine as he
grabbed first by half a second u
1:47.8. Mark Cook settled for sec-
md with his time of 1:48.3.
Wendy Smith claimed first n
the women's 50-yard freestyU
hen she touched the wall in 37.
hile Lutker, with a time of 27.7J
me in second.
For the men's 50-yard fre
tyle, Erick Hoyos sprinted ahea
of the pack to claim first in 22.71
Billy Haughton came in second a J
23.1 and Andy Johns receive
third in 23.2.
Jennifer Muench set the nex
record in the women's 200-yarc
individual medly event when she
swam in at 2:16.9. Nearly a seconc
later was Wilson at 2:17.6.
Tom Holsten won the men i
200-yard individual medly wit!
his time of 2:02.3 while Raymone
Kennedy secured second ii
2:02.5.
Yet another record was set
this time in the women's 200-yarc
butterfly when Shelly Micki
claimed victory in her time
2:13.8. Soon to follow was Robu
Wicks in 2:14.2.
Andy Johns held a comfort
able lead in the men's 200-yare
butterfly when he swam in
2:00.4. Four seconds later, Chris
tensen touched the wall to gi1
him the second place title.
Page Holt's time of 55.29 w�
enough to break the old Purplj
and Gold record as well as givj
her a first place title in
women's 100-yard freestyle.
In the same event for the mei
a close race decided the victor, bi
it was Erick Hoyos who came oi
on top with his time of 50.3. Ju
three tenths of a second behin
Hoyos was Billy Haughton wit
his time of 50.6.
The men broke the next re
ord when George Walters swi
for 2:01.94 in the 200-yard bac
stroke. Shelly Mica won it for �
women in 2:21.3.
No one was near Chant
Morris in the women's 500-ya
freestyle when she came in
5:24.4, giving her an easy victoj
over second place finisher LesT
Jo Wilson who came in at 5:34.
It was closer for the
when Mark Cook swam a 4:
500-yard freestyle giving him fij
place. Soon to follow was a secoj
place time of 4.59.2 by John �i
rell.
Meredith Bridgers crust
the rest of the swimmers �I
earned herself a new Purple
Gold record when she swam
women's 200-yard breaststrok
2:26.4.
Raymond Kennedy, u
closer race for first in the mc
200-yard breaststroke, emers
victorious with his time of 2:lj
Only two seconds behind
John Springer when he came
2:18.4.
The men ended the meet i
high note as they set a new Pd
and Gold record in the 400-y
freestyle relay. The team of Td
Stebbins, Tim Boyd, Bl
Haughton and Mark Cook
ished off the meet with their
ning time and new recoi
320.05.
And finally, for the woi
the 400-yard freestyle relayr
with Chantal Morris, 1
Wkks� Wendy Smith and
Holt claiming first place
their time of 355.4.





I '


10 19
rseason
meet
i intl
rela
i R
I
I'at:
. e thfm fi r- t n
� ' ard medley relay
n the li-t for the nm �
I ird freestyle. Ih
ter came out on I
The women sav
reen swim tor hrt ii
Purple and (
; in the 200 yard
le Tage Hlt was th
l ia h�. n she v ame in a;
-h followed in 2 05.0
See EC, page 11
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25,1988 11
State pulls upset, in hunt for ACC crown
(AP) � North Carolina State
finds itself in the position it
wanted to be in all season long,
but the Wolfpack also has some
unexpected company in its bid for
the Atlantic Coast Conference
title.
Saturday's 10-3 victory over
the ninth-ranked Tigers led the
Wolfpack to the top of the confer-
ence with a 4-1 mark. N.C. State
has two ACC games left, a Nov. 5
trip to Virginia and a home date
with Duke on the following week-
end It must win those games to
take the title, and at the same time
hold off the Tigers and a surpris-
ing Maryland team, both of which
are 3-1 in the ACC.
This one was the best yet
Wolfpack linebacker Scott Auer
said. "But we've got a lot of tough
ones still in front of us. We've got
two more conference games
against teams that usually give us
a lot of trouble
Tailback Chris Williams ran
for a 5-yard touchdown with
10:04 left to play to lead N.C. State
to victory. Then the Wolfpack
defense didn't allow Clemson to
penetrate past the N.C. State 30-
EC swimmers
Continued from page 10
The men's 200-yard freestyle
saw John Farrell shine as he
grabbed first by half a second in
1:47.8. Mark Cook settled for sec-
ond with his time of 1:48.3.
Wendy Smith claimed first in
the women's 50-yard freestyle
when she touched the wall in 37.1
while Lutker, with a time of 27.7,
came in second.
For the men's 50-yard frees-
tyle, Erick Hoyos sprinted ahead
of the pack to claim first in 22.7.
Billy Haughton came in second at
23.1 and Andy Johns received
third in 23.2.
Jennifer Muench set the next
record in the women's 200-yard
individual medly event when she
swam in at 2:16.9. Nearly a second
later was Wilson at 2:17.6.
Tom Holsten won the men's
200-yard individual medly with
his time of 2:02.3 while Raymond
Kennedy secured second in
2.02.5.
Vet another record was set,
this time in the women's 200-yard
butterfly when Shelly Micka
claimed victory in her time of
2:13.8. Soon to follow was Robin
Wicks in 2:14.2.
Andy Johns held a comfort-
able lead in the men's 200-yard
butterfly when he swam in at
2:00.4. Four seconds later, Chris-
tensen touched the wall to give
him the second place title.
Page Holt's time of 55.29 was
enough to break the old Purple
and Gold record as well as give
her a first place title in the
women's 100-yard freestyle.
In the same event for the men,
a close race decided the victor, but
it was Erick Hoyos who came out
on top with his time of 50.3. Just
three tenths of a second behind
Hoyos was Billy Haughton with
his time of 50.6.
The men broke the next rec-
ord when George Walters swam
for 2:01.94 in the 200-yard back-
stroke. Shelly Mica won it for the
women in 2:21.3.
No one was near Chantal
Morris in the women's 500-yard
freestyle when she came in at
5:24.4, giving her an easy victory
over second place finisher Leslie
Jo Wilson who came in at 5:34.1.
It was closer for the men
when Mark Cook swam a 4:56.2
300-yard freestyle giving him first
place. Soon to follow was a second
place time of 4:59.2 by John Far-
rell.
Meredith Bridgers crushed
the rest of the swimmers and
earned herself a new Purple and
Gold record when she swam the
women's 200-yard breaststroke in
2:26.4.
Raymond Kennedy, in a
closer race for first in the men's
200-yard breaststroke, emerged
victorious with his time of 2:16.3.
Only two seconds behind was
John Springer when he came in at
2:18.4.
The men ended the meet on a
high note as they set a new Purple
and Gold record in the 400-yard
freestyle relay. The team of Todd
Stebbins, Tim Boyd, Billy
Haughton and Mark Cook Fin-
ished off the meet with their win-
ning time and new record of
3:20.05.
And finally, for the women,
the 400-yard freestyle relay ended
with Chantal Morris, Robin
Wicks, Wendy Smith and Page
Holt claiming first place with
their time of 3:55.4.
yard line.
'This is by far the biggest win
we've had over them Wolfpack
quarterback Shane Montgomery
said. "We thought we'd be able to
score more, but this is the tough-
est defense we've played
against
Clemson coach Danny Ford
suffered the rare indignity of los-
ing to one team for the third
straight time.
"We made some critical, criti-
cal mistakes Ford said. "In our
kicking game, we had a high snap,
we missed two field goals that
were makeable. But I'm in charge
of the kicking game, so that's my
fault
Maryland joined the chase for
the title and a berth in the Florida
Citrus Bowl with a 34-24 victory
over Duke. Wake Forest fell from
contention with a 34-17 loss to
Virginia. North Carolina snapped
four losing streaks at once and
perpetuated another with its 20-
17 victory over Georgia Tech.
After spotting Duke a 16-0
lead, the Terrapins got within 16-
14 at halftime, then rallied with a
Neil ODonnell touchdown pass
and two Dan Plocki field goals.
Dennis Spinelli scored a fourth-
quarter touchdown to seal the
victory, raising Maryland's rec-
ord to 4-3 overall.
"We're right in the heat of it
O'Donnell said. "We've just got to
keep playing hard week in and
week out
"I tried to stay away from
reading all the preseason stuff. I
knew when we came back and
went through our two-a-day
practices that we had a good foot-
ball team he said. "We'll just
keep playing hard and see what
happens
Duke's bid for the league title
was virtually ended with the loss,
which dropped their record to 5-2
and 1-2.
"It is disappointing. We were
in position (in the ACC race) if we
would have played a lot better
Duke coach Steve Spurrier said.
"Now, we are going to try and
regroup and play better
Wake Forest couldhave been
part of the tie for second place
with a victory over Virginia. But
Cavalier quarterback Shawn
Moore ruined those ideas, pass-
Haunted House
sponsored by Greenville Jaycee's
1121 Evans Street
October 27-31
7:00 p.m. until
$3 adults $1 10 & under
Freak'em Out!
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Hwy 43 South
355-621 2
PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Hint McCallum, THIS WEEKS PLAYER OF THE WEEK
HOMETOWN-Rowland NC
East Carolina vs Syracuse - Against The Orangemen, Flint had 9
tackles, 4 of these accounting for a loss of 2" yards for the SU
offense.
PERSONAL INFORMATION- Flint is a senior majoring in Indus-
trial Technology emphasizing electronics He is the son of Mary
McCallum, he is nicknamed Flintstone
CONGRATULTIONS TO Hint McCallum, FROM PEPSI-COLA.
MUCH CONTINUFD SI JCCFSS
ing for two touchdowns and run-
ning for a third. The Virginia de-
fense intercepted Mike Elkins
four times in shutting down the
Demon Deacon attack, and the
Cavaliers also recovered a
fumble.
Virginia is 3-4 and 2-2, and
Wake Forest dropped to 4-3 and 2-
2.
At Chapel Hill, the Tar Heels
ended a nine-game losing streak
stretching back to last season, an
eight-game losing streak in Kenan
Stadium, Mack Brown's personal
six-game losing streak and a five-
game ACC slide.
The Tar Heels, 1-6 and 1-2 in
the ACC, were not assured of the
victory until Georgia Tech
placekicker Thomas Palmer mis-
sed a 48-yard field goal with the
clock running out in front of
42,000 homecoming fans. Georgia
Tech fell to 2-5 and 0-5.
"This doesn't mean we're any
better than we were Brown said.
"It just means we put things
together for one afternoon and
won our first football game. That
takes some pressure off, but also
puts some on.
Weird, Wild, Colorful
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STUDENTS
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' Services can help vou make the most
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offi ring the flexibility to earn some
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BUSCH GARDRNS � 1 HE Oi I) COUNTRY
AUDITIONS'89
The Stars Are Out All Day!
? Auk rica's premici
theme park in Wil
liamsburg, Va. is con-
ducting auditions foi
over 250 singers, dan
ers, musicians. arict
artists, actors, techni-
cians, and supen. isors
You could be part �t the
maic that trul rn ikes
Rnsch Gardens an enter
tainment "ep rience
So u;et your act together
and 'shine' ar �ur 1989
auditions
Vulitic.ns It i !
mfi nm ("�
i idition I )atcs:
I .RKKNSBORO N.C.
V lnesda 1. )XH
' 00 4 on p ii:
' ri� v crsit i I
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K11 ii 111 I n i v ersitv C le n
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WII t i VMSR1 K(,
H A
Sunda- I k 1 1. 1988
12 00 r. 00 p.m.
Bus. Ii rjnicn-s
Ksth n h hearsal Hall
V '
Gamins jQ�
� �� t & .�
SALES POSITION AVAILABLE
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications for an
advertising sales representative.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Good personality & professional Appearance
Excellent Communication Skills
Must be Dependable & Show Initiative & Enthusiasm
Must Have The Desire to Excel
Apply in Person at The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
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����' , � -

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25. IMS 11
Page 10
tpresses his feelings better
Mar Startari - Photo I ab )
"1 thought our players gave i
id effort It's tough to go up
nnst three opponents in thn c
ks that are as physical as tlu-v
fee been.
We have another tough
ne next week and anotlu i
igh week of practice. Our kid -
a tough group, and they ju
n't have anything to show for
Travis Hunter best summed
the Pirates' soakto -�& th
iixl: ite fcet tinge tntilr-zan
re talking about it all the time.
just need to do it. It's a mental
ng. We have been finding a
iv to lose
i ' -a
Theta Chi by a single score.
r season
meet
In the swimming compel:
Jn, the meet kicked off with trV
t Purple and Gold record in tri-
m's 400-yard medley relav
en the team of Mark O'Brien.
ymonu Kennedy, Ted Chris
isen and Billy Haughton swam
n 3:41.0.
The team of Leslie Jo Wilson.
?redith Bridgers, Patricia
ilsh and Chris Lutker came in
4:13.38 to give them first in the
men's 400-yard medley relay
Next on the list for the men
is the 100-yard freestyle. Thi
e Andy Jeter came out on top
10:15.5. The women saw
krolvn Green swim for first in
57.2.
The next Purple and Gold
ord was set in the 200-yard
?style. Page Holt was the
ud victor when she came in at
7. Walsh followed in 2:05.0,
See EC, page 11
State pulls upset, in hunt for ACC crown
yard line. and two Dan Plocki held goals, ing for two touchdowns and run-
This is by far the biggest win Dennis Spinelli scored a fourth- ning for a third. The Virginia de-
kj(MMk�.�uwfc�-t �� . LJ . fense intercepted Mike Elkins
four times in shutting down the
(AP) � North Carolina State
finds itself in the position it , . . . .
wanted to be in all season lone. �m had over lhem' Wolfpack quarter touchdown to seal the
but the Wolfpack also has some nMlrt�ack Shane Montgomery victory, raising Maryland's rec-
urexpectedcompanymitsbidfor said. We thought we'd be able to ord to 4-3 overall,
the Atlantic Coast Conference score more, but this is the tough- "We're right in the heat of it
title. est defense we've played ODonnell said. "We've just got to
Saturday's 10-3 victory over a8i�?" ' keeP Playing hard week in and
the ninuVrtiked Tigers led the JTf� "�? F?"
Wolfpack to the top of the confer- suffered the rare indignity of los-
ence with a 4-1 mark. N.C State " ff team for " "
has two ACC games left, a Nov. 5 straight time
week out
trip to Virginia and a home date
with Duke on the following week-
end. It must win those games to
take the title, and at the same time
"I tried to stay away from
reading all the pre-season stuff. I
knew when we came back and
went through
our
Ve made some critical, criti-
cal mistakes Ford said. "In our
kickinggame,wehadahighsnap, practices that we had a good foot- Stadium, Mack Brown's personal
we missed two field goals that ll eam he said. 'Wll just
Demon Deacon attack, and the
Cavaliers also recovered a
fumble.
Virginia is 3-4 and 2-2, and
Wake Forest dropped to 4-3 and 2-
2.
At Chapel Hill, the Tar Heels
ended a nine-game losing streak
stretching back to last season, an
two-a-day eight-game losing streak in Kenan
i good f� .
"W e 11 just six-game losing streak and a five-
game ACC slide.
The Tar Heels, 1-6 and 1-2 in
the ACC, were not assured of the
victory until Georgia Tech
placekicker Thomas Palmer mis-
sed a 48-yard field goal with the
clock running out in front of
hold off the Tigers and a surprise wrmkeable. But I'm in charge ppjaying hard and see what
ingMarylandteaZbomofwWch the kicking game, so thafs my happens.
are 3-1 in the ACC. ftult Duke's bid for the league title
"This one was the best yet was virtually ended with the loss,
Wolfpack linebacker Scott Auer Maryland joined the chase for which dropped their record to 5-2
said. "But we've got a lot of tough the title and a berth in the Florida and 1-2.
ones still in front of us. We've got Citrus Bowl with a 34-24 victory
two more conference games over Duke. Wake Forest fell from "It is disappointing. We were 42,000 homecoming fans. Georgia
against teams that usually give us contention with a 34-17 loss to in position (in the ACC race) if we Tech fell to 2-5 and 0-5.
a lot of trouble Virginia. North Carolina snapped would have played a lot better "This doesn't mean we're any
Tailback Chris Williams ran fo" losing streaks at once and Duke coach Steve Spurrier said. better than we were Brown said,
for a 5-yard touchdown with popetuated arwther with its 20- "Now we are coine to try and "It just means we put things
10:04 left to play to lead N.C. State 17 victory over Georgia Tech. reerouD and Dlav better" together for one afternoon and
to victory. Then the Wolfpack 5 WaKke Forest could have been won our first footba11 S3�6-That
defense didn't allow Chanson� ter spotting Duke a 16-0 part of the tie for second place tak Pressure off'but also
penetrate past the N.C. State 30- lead, the Terrapin! got within 16- with a victory over Virginia But P�tssomeon.
14 at halftime, then rallied with a Cavalier quarterback Shawn
Neil CDonnell touchdown pass Moore ruined those ideas, pass-
Weird, Wild, Colorful
Halloween Clothes
rpatvte
GoVJvs
We've Got Anything And Everything
o�
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat. 400 S. Evans
752-3866
EC swimmers
Continued from page 10
The men's 200-yard freestyle
saw John Farrell shine as he
grabbed first by half a second in
1:47.8. Mark Cook settled for sec-
ond with his time of 1:483.
Wendy Smith claimed first in
the women's 50-yard freestyle
when she touched the wall in 37.1
while Lutker, with a time of 27.7,
came in second.
For the men's 50-yard frees-
tyle, Erick Hoyos sprinted ahead
of the pack to claim first in 22.7.
Billy Haughton came in second at
23.1 and Andy Johns received
third in 23.2.
Jennifer Muench set the next
record in the women's 200-yard
individual medly event when she
swam in at 2:16.9. Nearly a second
later was Wilson at 2:17.6.
Tom Holsten won the men's
200-yard individual medly with
his time of 2:02.3 while Raymond
Kennedy, secured second in
2:025.
Yet another record was set,
this time in the women's 200-yard
butterfly when Shelly Micka
claimed victory in her time of
2:13.8. Soon to follow was Robin
Wicks in 2:14.2.
Andy Johns held a comfort-
able lead in the men's 200-yard
butterfly when he swam in at
200.4. Four seconds later, Chris-
tensen touched the wall to give
him the second place title.
Page Holfs time of 55.29 was
enough to break the old Purple
and Gold record as well as give
her a first place title in the
women's 100-yard freestyle.
In the same event for the men,
a close race decided the victor, but
it was Erick Hoyos who came out
on top with his time of 503. Just
three tenths of a second behind
Hoyos was Billy Haughton with
his time of 50.6.
The men broke the next rec-
ord when George Walters swam
for 2:01.94 in the 200-yard back-
stroke. Shelly Mica won it for the
women in 2:213.
No one was near Chantal
Morris in the women's 500-yard
freestyle when she came in at
5:24.4, giving her an easy victory
over second place finisher Leslie
Jo Wilson who came in at 5:34.1.
It was closer for the men
when Mark Cook swam a 456.2
500-yard freestyle giving him first
place. Soon to follow was a second
place time of 459.2 by John Far-
rell.
Meredith Bridgers crushed
the rest of the swimmers and
earned herself a new Purple and
Gold record when she swam the
women's 200-yard breaststroke in
2:26.4.
Raymond Kennedy, in a
closer race for first in the men's
200-yard breaststroke, emerged
victorious with his time of 2:163.
Only two seconds behind was
John Springer when became in at
2:18.4.
The men ended the meet on a
high note as they set a new Purple
and Gold record in the 400-yard
freestyle relay. The team of Todd
Stebbins, Tim Boyd, Billy
Haughton and Mark Cook Fin-
ished off the meet with their win-
ning time and new record of
3:20.05.
And finally, for the women,
the 400-yard freestyle relay ended
with Chantal Morris, Robin
Wicks, Wendy Smith and Page
Holt claiming first place with
their time of 3554.
Haunted House
sponsored by Greenville Jaycees
1121 Evans Street
October 27-31
7:00 p.m. until
$3 adults $1 ini
�V� ��! "��-
I
STUDENTS
GeJ ready to join America's number
one name in temporary help. Kelly
Services can help you make the most
of your free time this semester by
offering the flexibility to earn some
great cash while still being able to
earn good grades. We have a variety
of short and long term assignments,
nany of which do not require special
skills or experience.
�Secretaries
�Typists
�WP and DE Operators
�General Clerical
� I ioHfr Tru-incH-il
i P!
FreakN
Tinsel Wig
Avail
Anything
Bells Fq
Party Decorat
Freaky Iti
H allowed
Remeber E
Receive A Discount
With Your I.D.
BUSCH GARDRNS � THE OLD COUNTRY
AUDITIONS c89
The Stars Are Out All Day!
America's premier
theme park in Wil-
liamsburg, Va. is con-
ducting auditions for
over 250 singers, danc-
ers, musicians, variety
artists, actors, techni-
cians, and supervisors.
You could be part of the
magic that truly makes
Busch Gardens an enter-
tainment "experience
So get your act together
and 'shine' at our 198�
auditions.
Auditions: I to n mins f-Of jikiuionjl
infomianon call l-80O-2M-Vi.
Audition Dates:
GREENSBORO, N.C.
Wednesday, Nov. 2, 1988
1:00-4:00 p.m.
Iniversiry of
North Carolina
Elliott I niversiry Center
lexander and Phillips Rms.
Wll.I IAMSBURG
VIRGINIA
Sunday. Dec. II, 1988
12:00 S.00 p.m.
Bus. h Gardens
Festhaus Rehearsal Hall
oS
Jty'u. ham
n ftirmatnc ction F.ual Opportunity Kmpbiver M
Hwy 43 South
355-6212
PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Hint McCallum, THIS WEEK'S PLAYER OF THE WEEK
HOMETOWN-Rowland, NC
East Carolina vs Syracuse - Against The Orangemen, Flint had 9
tackles, 4 of these accounting for a loss of 23 yards for the SU
offense.
PERSONAL INFORMATION- Flint is a senior majoring in Indus-
trial Technology emphasizing electronics. He is the son of Mary
McCallum, he is nicknamed "Flintstone
CONGRATULTICWS TO Hint McCallum, FROM PEPSI-COLA.
MUCH CONTINUED SUCCESS.
POSITION AVAILABLE
nian is now accepting applications for an
ertising sales representative.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Good personality & professional Appearance
Excellent Communication Skills
Must be Dependable & Show Initiative & Enthusiasm
Must Have The Desire to Excel
Apply in Person at The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
No Phone Calls Please!
FANTASTIC
FALL AIR FARES
FROM
GREENVILLE
NEW YORK$178
BUFFALO$168
ATLANTA$188
ORLANDO$210
CHICAGO$203
EL PASO .$378
WASHINGTON$168
BALTIMORE$168
DALLAS$288
OMAHA$238
MIAMI$220
DES MOINES$298
LOS ANGELES$358
HOUSTON$248
SEATTLE$368
CLEVELAND$168
DETROIT$178
PHOENIX$348
PHILADELPHIA$194
DENVER$268
COLUMBUS OH$158
ST. LOUIS$218
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TM.sej.





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25,1988
Mountaineers extend streak
r
(AP) � There's been no stop-
ping West Virginia's running
game this season, but quarterback
Major Harris says his throwing
arm is getting itchy.
"We were winning earlier in
the season running, so we were
sticking with that Harris said.
"But now I think we're going to
start opening up a little bit more
and let me throw.
"I've proven I can throw the
bail. I just want to keep on throw-
ing and keep on improving my
parsing
Harris was 15 of 21 passing
tor a career-high 297 yards and
three touchdowns Saturday in the
sixth ranked Mountaineers' 59-
19 rout of Boston Colleg?. The
sophomore also ran for 75 yards
and two touchdowns, giving him
a total of 372 yards � nine more
than the Eagles gained in the
game.
Top-ranked UCLA also won
easily, defeating Arizona 24-3.
But four ranked teams lost Satur-
day.
North Carolina State beat No.
9 Clemson 10-3, Kentucky topped
No. 11 Georgia 16-10, No. 20
Michigan downed No.14 Indiana
31-6, and Oregon beat No. 17
Washington 17-14.
In other Top Ten games, it
was No. 2 Notre Dame 41, Air
Force 13: No. 4 Miami 57, Cincin-
nati 3; No. 5 Nebraska 48, Kansas
State 3; No. 7 Florida State 66,
Louisiana Tech 3; No. 8 Okla-
homa 17, Colorado 4, and No. 10
uburn 33, Mississippi State 0.
In the rest of ' .e Second Ten,
it was No. 12 Wyoming 61, Utah
18; No. 13 Arkansas 26, Houston
21; No. 15 Oklahoma State 49,
Missouri 21, and No. 19 Syracuse
38, East Carolina 14.
No. 16 Louisiana State and
No. 18 South Carolina did not
play.
No. 1 UCLA 24, Arizona 3
Quarterback Troy Aikman,
� ho passed for 283 yards and
three touchdowns, led UCLA, 7-0.
But he said, "It's too early to.
be caught up in winning the na-
tional championship. We still
have a few more games to play
UCLA's defense shut out
Arizona until Doug Pfaff kicked a
35-yard field goal with 55 seconds
left.
No. 2 Notre Dame 41, Air
Force 13
At South Bend, Tonv Rice and
Ricky Watters provided the offen-
sive punch and Notre Dame's
defense shut down Air Force's
powerful wishbone attack as the
Irish improved to 7-0.
Rice passed for one touch-
down and ran for another, while
Watters caught two touchdown
passes. Rice's 36 rushing yards
gave him 404 for the season,
breaking Joe Theismann's school
quarterback record of 384, set in
1970.
No. 4 Miami 57, Cincinnati 3
At Miami, Steve Walsh threw
five touchdown passes as the
Hurricanes, 5-1, rebounded from
last week's one-point loss to
Notre Dame.
Walsh threw scoring passes
to five different receivers, tying
Bernie Kosar's school record for
touchdown throws in a game. The
Miami quarterback completed 19
of 23 passes for 286 yards with no
interceptions.
No. 5 Nebraska 48, Kansas St.
3
At Manhattan. Kan Tyreese
Knox scored four touchdowns as
Nebraska set an NCAA record
with its 27th consecutive winning
season.
Nebraska, 7-1, had shared the
Division I-A record with Ala-
bama and Penn State. Penn State
established the major college
mark of 26 straight winning years
from 1939 through 1964 and Ala-
bama matched it from 1958
through 1983.
Knox scored on runs of 2,6,2
and 26 yards.
No. 7 Florida St. 66, Louisiana
Tech 3
At Tallahassee, defensive
backs Deion Sanders and Dedrick
Dodge scored on interception re-
rums, and Terry Anthony and
Bruce LaSane each caught two
touchdown passes for Florida
State.
But the Seminoles, 7-1, suf-
fered a setback when senior quar-
terback Chip Ferguson, ranked
sixth nationally in passing, left the
game in the second quarter with a
mild separation of the left shoul-
der.
No. 8 Oklahoma 17, Colorado
14
At Boulder, R.D. Lashar's 22-
yard field goal with 8:15 left gave
Oklahoma the Big Eight victory.
It was the first successful field
goal of the season for Oklahoma,
which had missed its only previ-
ous attempt. The Sooners, 6-1
overall and 3-0 in the conference,
extended their winning streak to
12 games over the Buffaloes.
No. 9 Clemson 3, N.C State 10
At Raleigh, Chris Williams'
5-yard touchdown run with 10:04
left in the fourth quarter gave
North Carolina State its third
straight victory over Clemson.
It was the first time Clemson
has lost three games to the same
team under Coach Dany Ford.
N.C. State is 6-1 overall and 4-1 in
the Atlantic Coast Conference.
No.10 Auburn 33, Mississippi
St.O
At Auburn, James Joseph ran
for 126 yards and Shane Morris
intercepted three passes as the Ti-
gers handed the Bulldogs their
sixth straight loss.
The Tigers, 6-1 overall and 3-
1 in the Southeastern Conference,
have beaten State seven consecu-
tive times.
At Lexington, a 48-yard dash
by Alfred Rawls for a third-quar-
ter touchdown sparked Ken-
tucky.
The touchdown by Rawls,
who finished with 128 yards on 15
carries, gave Kentucky a 13-10
lead as time expired in the third
period. Kentucky's victory ended
a 10-game losing streak against
Georgia and improved its record
to 3-4 overall and 1-3 in the SEC.
No.12 Wyoming 61, Utah 18
At Laramie, Randy Welniak
threw three touchdown passes
and ran for another score, helping
Wyoming remain undefeated.
Wyoming, 8-0 overall and 5-0
in the Western Athletic Confer-
ence, checked the nation's top-
ranked offense with a tenacious
rush that repeatedly forced quar-
terback Scott Mitchell from the
pocket. Utah, 2-5 overall and 1-4
in the WAC, gained 356 yards �
186 below its nation-leading
mark.
21
No. 13 Arkansas 26, Houston
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Kentucky 16, No.11 Georgia
At Houston, Arkansas' Ken-
dall Trainor kicked four field
goals and senior quarterback John
Bland guided the offense in his
first career start.
Trainor extended his field
goal string to 15 in a row with
kicks of 29,46, 23 and 49 yards as
the Razorbacks improved to 7-0
overall and 4-0 in the Southwest
Conference.
No. 20 Michigan 31, No. 14
Indiana 6
At Ann Arbor, fullback Leroy
Hoard ran for three touchdowns,
including a pair of 54-yarders, as
Michigan handed Indiana its first
loss of the season.
The victory moved the Wol-
verines into first place in the Big
Ten with a 3-0-1 conference rec-
ord. They are 4-2-1 overall.
No. 15 Oklahoma St. 49, Mis-
souri 21
At Stillwater, Hart Lee Dykes
of Oklahoma State caught two
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757-6731
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 25, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 25, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.635
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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