The East Carolinian, October 20, 1988






Inside:
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS7
FEATURES12
SPORTS17
Features:
An ECU Senior, Jackie Padgette will carry the Miss
North Carolina to Alabama and compete for the Miss
U.S.A. title, see page 12.
Sports:
The Florida State Seminoles pummel the Pirates by
24. No relief is in sight, this Saturday the Syracuse
Orangemen bring their 5-1 record to Ficklen Stadium,
see page 17.
(Hire lEast Carolinian
TK j '
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 28
Tuesday October 20, 1988
Greenville, NC
20 Pages
Circulation 12,000
The state appropriated S26 million dollars for an addition to Joyner Library. Plans have
not been drawn up yet, but the money is there for expansion (Photo By Thomas Walters,
ECU Photolab).
Image and personnel changes
are in store for Catholic Center
By SEAN HERRING
Assistant News f'ditor
An image change is the goal
that board members of the New-
man Catholic Center (NCC) have
in store for the future of the or-
ganization.
A meeting was held this week
in order to workout some difficul-
ties within the center's structure.
NCC Outreach and Publicity
Minister Teresa Lee stated the
meeting was productive for the
center, since there were no docu-
mented rules for its growth.
"This meeting was a stepping
stone to progress here in this'faith
community Good ideas were
shared, and enthusiasm finally
was sparked with this meeting.
We started slow, but 1 feel that this
semester will be good she said.
Lee added, "1 hope that the
students on this campus will visit
the center, and experience for
themselves the warmth and fun of
Newman
Some board officials feel that
the ambiguity in the organization
should be cleared up in order to
recruit new members.
President Kevin Prevost said,
"We had some nostalgic rules that
we felt should be reassessed.
Once these rules are organized, I
foresee progress tor Newman
"Another purpose of the
meeting was to reaffirm the board
members' commitment, and to
motivate them to start recruiting
more members, " he said.
Prevost stated, "1 hope even-
tually we can get active participa-
tion from nearly all the Catholic
students on ECU's campus
The board evaluated its pres-
ent officers, and asked them, If
they are committed to the NCC?'
As a result four members re-
signed, and some new officers
were elected.
Karen Mustian resigned as
vice president, and Tim Seyfried,
who is also maintenance minister
for the center, was elected as the
new vice president.
Paul Hagwood resigned as
community service minister and
Mark Dunlap was elected to fill
the position.
Other vacancies on the gov-
erning committee at the NCC,
which have not been filled are the
fundraising ministry, and the
social activities ministry.
Seyfried stated that he sees a
need for the board to change di-
rection in the way the NCC is
operated.
"I want to see a lot more so-
cial programs for the center, and
make Newman more visible on
campus. One of the projects that I
would like to initiate is for New-
man to have a happy hour at the
Elbo
Seyfried stated that the first
impression ot the NCC ma v not be
favorable to some students, be-
cause they only see one side of the
center and its people.
"The way Newman is pro-
jected is fine, but the fun side is net
known. We are all college stu-
dents, and just because we are
involved in a faith community,
does not mean that we do not
know how to have a good time
he said.
'The first time that some
people visit Newman they get the
wrong impression of the center,
because they just come to Mass or
something of that nature. If they
visited other functions and got to
know the people, they would like
the other side of center Seyfried
said.
The NCC board members'
duties are to organize the NCC
calendar and coordinate events
for the center.
Other than Mass that is held
on Wednesday and Sunday, the
NCC has other social events, ac-
cording to Chaplain and Catholic
Campus Minister Father Paul
Vaeth.
"We hope that the activities
such as the Wednesday night din-
ners, and the Halloween Party,
and the all-nighters let students
experience the many facets of
Newman, " Vaeth said.
Whales still trapped under
ice, fate is questionable
BARROW, Alaska (AP) - Es-
kimo whalers wielding chain
saws donated by an oil company
cut new breathing holes for three
beleaguered whales trapped two
weeks in thick ice near the top of
the world.
The Eskimos on Tuesday cut
three holes 75 yards apart in a line
leading away from the larger of
two small breathing pools the
California gray whales have used
since being stranded in the
Beaufort Sea while migrating
south.
The rescuers, who received a
telephone pep talk Tuesday from
President Reagan, hope the new
holes will influence the endan-
gered marftmals to move in the
direction they must travel if they
are ever to escape their icy corral.
"It'll be interesting to see if it
works North Slope Borough
biologist Craig George said as he
dodged the slushy spray from
chain sawschewing through foot-
deep ice 18 miles northeast of this
Inupiat Eskimo community.
Standard Oil of Alaska do-
nated three chain saws, and
planned to send a digging ma-
chine by helicopter to speed the
work.
Meanwhile, a long-shot at-
tempt to free the whales with an
icebreaking barge was de-
layed until today.
Two Alaska Army National
Guard Skycrane helicopters have
been rigged to tow the 185-ton
hovercraft barge from Prudhoe
Bay, an oil field about 200 miles
southeast, in a tricky trip across
Arctic Ocean ice.
The trip, which is expected to
take 25 to 40 hours, was to have
started Monday, but was delayed
when the barge got stuck in the ice
and was slowed again by refuel-
ing. The barge was moved a short
distance from its dock Tuesday
night, but one of the helicopters
encountered some resistance.
Crews planned to work
through the night to lighten the
barge by 70 tons, National Guard
spokesman Mike Hallcr.
Hallcr said that if the barge
could not be moved bv noon to-
J
day (5 p.m. EDT), officials would
consider alternatives.
Officials hoped to use the
barge to carve a 40-foot path to
open water and freedom for the
whales. The barge pulverizes ice
with its bulk and the fans that
provide lift.
Leads in the ice that were as
close as five miles last weekend
have been plugged by shifting
winds, record low temperatures
and drifting ice.
See RESCUE, page 2
Ignorance keeps students from
voting in last six elections
BY JOE HARRIS
News Editor
The National Student Cam-
paign for Voter Registration
(NSCVR) released figures today
that showed only 40 percent of
voters 18-24 years old voted in the
last presidential election.
Of 23 democracies around the
world, the United States ranks 22
in voter turnout. Participation has
been on the decline in all presi-
dential elections since 1964 (Ken-
nedy versus Nixon). In 1984, a
little less than half of eligible vot-
ers exercised their priviledgc to be encouraged,
vote.
developed from position papers
provided by the Bush and
Dukakis campaigns, conversa-
tions with campaign staff and
newspaper articles.
'The guide is a useful tool for
any citizen who wants to see be
auy.cast a vote before Election
Day � in person. Early voting can
be completed in one step: the
voter goes to their election
official's office, applies and then
votes on the same da v.
The research portion of the
yond the hoopla of the campaigns plan outlines the voting criteria. It
to assess where the candidates
stand on critical issues that affect
our future Ms. Crane said.
Ms. Crane said students
must be made aware of the neces-
sary steps in registration and vot-
ing. "If away at school, use of the
absentee ballot process needs to
"Studies show that a signifi-
cant barrier to student voting is
the lack of information on candi-
dates and the issues said Andre
Dclattre chairperson of the Na-
tional Student Campaign for
Voter Registration. He also said
students need to take advantage
of the opportunity to vote, "They
may not realize it, but students
have the unprecedented opportu-
nity to shape our nation's course
on many issues of national and
student concern
A Voters Guide was devel-
oped by Ca t heri ne C ra ne, d i rec to r
of the NSCVR to provide students
with a source of information on
the candidates. The guide was
involves facts like when and
where, regulations, deadlines,
polling hours and locations and
how to use the absentee ballot.
"Communication may be the
most important portion of our
plan, said Ms. Crane.
"We have to educate and
motivate through communica-
tion to student voters. You have to
educate the students as to the
requirements of registering and
voting, then motivate him or her
to do so She said this is done
through
She outlined four specific
elements for voter registration
and participation: organization,
research, communication and im-
plementation.
In the organization process a
plan for registering both out-of-
state and in-state students is set
up, showing how to register by
mail and to vote bv absentee bal-
lot.
An absentee ballot is a ballot
marked and mailed in advance bv
a voter who is away from the
place of registration, or if the indi-
vidual cannot vote in person on
Election Day.
Another form of voting that
many individuals are unaware oi
is "early voting It is the process registered and vote, so whv not do
by which an individual can actu- jt?"
publicity and making
students aware of their voting
priviledgc.
"Implementing simplv
means to apply everything I have
talked about and getting the stu-
dents to come out and vote
Crane said
"We want voter participation
in this election and all upcoming
ones � WPJEMJUy from students
If you're registered there is no rea-
son not to vote. The absentee bal-
lot and earlv voting gives every-
one the chance. It's easv to get
Crash anniversary brings
prevention plan, no parties
NEW YORK (AP) - The world
faced the first anniversary of the
worst stock panic in history yes-
terday with cynicism, sullenness
and the long-awaited govern-
ment approval of automatic trad-
ing halts designed to foil another
crash.
"It's business, as unusual
said Arthur D. Cashin Paine
Webber Group Inc. broker and
governor on the floor of the New
York Stock Exchange, where
prices eked to a post-crash high
Tuesday despite less-than-bullish
attitudes.
Trading remained so slow
that dozens of brokers in the
nation's biggest stock market
stood around with little to do.
"If there's no fire, all you see is
guys polishing the engines
Cashin said. "There's a lot of
people not participating, a lot of
people on the sidelines. I would
say the mood is sober, bordering
on the sullen
The atmosphere in the heart
of this world financial center
Dow average and other key indi-
ces have recovered somewhat.
Late Tuesday, a buying burst
lifted the Dow average 19.38
points to 2,159.85, its highest post-
crash close.
But many Wall Street profes-
sionals say the stock market re-
mains uninspired, even though
some of the best-known firms
have exhorted investors to buy.
They blame continuing uncer-
tainty about the direction of inter-
est rates and the nation's general
economic health.
"I think people on Wall Street
are more concerned about the
economy said Earl Ellis, a mar-
ket maker on the New York ex-
change floor. "If you could assure
people that the economy would
be good, this market would take
off
The exchange, alarmed about
post-crash investor apathy and
underlying fear of another crash,
joined with other U.S. financial
markets in July in proposing "cir-
cuit breakers" - coordinated trad-
ing halts and price limits to avoid
another panic. Late Tuesday, on
the eve of the crash anniversary,
the Securities and Exchange
Commission approved these
proposals, as expected.
The measures, approved on a
one-year experimental basis, pro-
vide for a one-hour trading halt
across markets when the Dow
Jones average of 30 industrial
stocks plunges by 250 points or
more from the previous dav's
closing.h calls for a two-hour halt
when the Dow falls by 400 points.
Coordination among mar-
kets was a key recommendation
by a White House panel ap-
pointed to study the crash. But it
took months for the New York
exchange and other markets to fi-
nally agree on how to do it.
Members of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity participate in
a step-show outside the Croatan (Photo By Mark Love, ECU
Photolab).





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1988
Firm announces new anti-viral AIDS drugs
RESEARCH TRIANGLE
PARK,N.C (AD-Glaxo Inc. has
announced plans to conduct re-
search on a new anti-viral drug to
combat the AIDS virus, and hopes
to begin tests on humans within a
vear.
Glaxo officials announced
Tuesday that thev have signed a
letter of intent with the Universitv
J
oi Minnesota on the licensing and
development of dideoxycarbocy-
clie nudeoside, or Carbovir.
Hie agreement would give
Glaxo exclusive worldwide rights
to develop and market the com-
pound.
Jennifer McMillan, spokes-
woman for Glaxo, told The Dur-
ham Sun that research on the drug
is still in the very early stages and
has not progressed beyond the
test tube.
In laboratory tests on live vi-
rus, Carbovir has been found to
inhibit the reproduction of hu-
man immunodeficiency virus
(HIV) which causes AIDS (Ac-
quired Immune Deficiency Syn-
drome).
There is now no cure for
AIDS. One drug, azidothymidine
(AZT), has been found to inhibit
the virus' reproduction and
extend lives of patients.
Another pharmaceutical
company in the Research Triangle
Park, Burroughs Wellcome Co
produces and markets AZT under
the name Rctrovir.
Carbovir's effectiveness
against the virus was discovered
by Dr. Robert Vince, professor of
medicinal chemistry at the Col-
lege of Pharmacy of the Univer-
sity of Minnesota.
Vince, who began using the
drug in AIDS research last No-
vember, said Tuesday that the
National Cancer Institute was the
first to use the drug.
Since he began testing its ef-
fectiveness against HIV, the tests
have been limited to those done
on live vinis samples in test tubes.
'There are no animal models
for AIDS, so all you can do is test
to see if it's toxic to animals he
said.
Studies to see how the drug
acts on humans may be less than a
year away.
"It will be six to eight months
before we can begin studies in
man. "If all the studies before that
progress and go well and the
compund does what, we think it
will do Ms. McMillan said. "If
all goes well, the earliest the drug
will be available is two to three
years out
"This is a very important area
of research so we're working as
hard as we can to determine the
drug's effectiveness said Ms.
McMillan.
"Initially, we'll do the devel-
opment work and all further test-
ing to develop the compound. I'm
sure Vince will continue to work
on the product at the university
The testing will be performed
by researchers worldwide for
Glaxo Inc. and its parent com-
pany, kaO Glaxo Holdings p.l.c,
based in London.
Ms. McMillan said Glaxo, the
second-largest pharmaceutical
firm in the world, chose to study
Carbovir more closely because "it
seems the furthest along" of sev-
eral drugs being studied for use
by AIDS patients.
Carbovir is similar to AZT in
that it is an antiviral and not a
vaccine. Researchers believe its
method of action will be similar to
AZT in that it will interfere with
the virus replication.
Carbovir is designed to keep
the HIV virus from multiplying
into more individual AIDS vi-
ruses.
Tourists perish after falling
L1WILLE FALLS,N.C. (AP)
- Two women posing for a sunset
photograph on a ledge at a Blue
Ridge Parkway Overlook fell to
their deaths, and the husband of
one of the women was injured
trying to help, authorities said.
"Thev were going to take a
photograph of the two women
standing on the ledge said Sher-
iff Bob Havnes. "One of them
slipped and grabbed the other
one
Visitors to the Chestoa View
overlook about three miles west
of Linville heard screams coming
from below the ledge about 8 p.m.
Monday, and notified park rang-
ers.
It was early Tuesday before
rescuers scaling the rugged cliffs
could reach the bodies of Susan
White Hair, 32, of Summcrville,
S.C, and Helen Burnette Gibbs,
31. of Favetteville, said parkway
chief ranger Howard Parr.
"We think that one of the
ladies lost her balance and the
other lady attempted to grab her
and they both went over the rail
Parr said.
lames Clifton Gibbs, 37, also
of Favetteville, tried to climb
down into the gorge north oi
Marion to rescue his wife and
friend, but slipped and fell 150 to
250 feet, said McDowell County
Sheriff Bob Havnes.
"He turns around, leans
down to pick up his tripod and his
camera.
He hears a commotion be
hind him and by time he turns
around his wife and the good
friend of the family are already
down over the overlook, falling
said RussWhitlock, a park ranger.
Gibbs sustained onlv minor
injuries, however, and was
treated and released from Memo-
rial Mission Hospital in Asheville
on Tuesday.
Mrs. Gibbs was a registered
nurse at the Veterans Administra-
tion Medical Center at Favettev-
ille, and Ms. Hair was a registered
nurse in the Charleston area, a
family friend said.
"The women "were classmates
v'vetfevilTeTechnical Commu-
nity College, and Ms. Hair gradu-
ated from Fast Carolina Univer-
sity in Greenville, the friend said.
Major Don Ramsey said one
woman fell about 150 feet into a
gorge and the other fall about 700
feet.
Using lights, ropes, rappeling
lines and lifts, the rangers with
sheriff's deputies and rescue
squad members from McDowell
and Avery counties, searched the
higher reaches oi the approxi-
mately 2,000 Unit deep chasm
Monday night and early Tuesday.
"The terrain was so rough
they had to use ropes from below
and above Haynessaid. 'That's
why it took so long to get the
people out of there
Haynes said Chestoa View,
about 20 miles north of Marion on
the Parkway, overlooks a valley
2,000 feet below. He said a two-
foot rock wall at the Chestoa View
parking area borders a ledge
above a gorge.
The gorge ranges in depth
from 150 to 500 feet.
The effort involved nearly
100 Park Service rangers and res-
cue squad personnel from
McDowell and Avery counties.
Parr said that although seri-
ous injuries and deaths are com-
mon along the rugged trails of the
national forests, they are ex-
tremely rare along the parkway,
with its short and relatively level
trails and overlooks.
"This is one of the few serious
accidents I can remember in a
long, long time, thank the good
Lord he said.
Serving (lie East Carolina campus community since 1025.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
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Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Resue attempts being made
Continued from page 1
Bv Tuesday nint the nearest
open water was believed to be
idcrTffliK a'rttyrwffetdirsatEp'
The rescue effort, compli-
cated bv the harsh arctic condi-
tions, has become a race against
time.
The voting whales are tired,
and at least one has pneumonia.
Their barnacle encrusted snouts
have ben worn raw from grating
on the jagged ice surrounding the
breathing holeb the animals were
in shallow water only a
hundred feet from shore.
Last week, ice around the
holes was so thin biologists did
not dare walk on it. By Tuesday,
with a record low temperature of
minus 13 degrees, the ice was 18 to
24 inches thick.
The whales are 24 to 30 feet
long, but have shown no inclina-
tion to smash their way to free-
dom.
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71 IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1988 3
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K?S EVERYDAY
ivd Greenville
)
Working class wealthy are competitors
Michael Dukakis promised to
erase the nation's $150 billion
trade deficit in four years as the
Democratic nominee waged his
uphill fight for the presidency.
Republican front-runner George
Bush claimed the underdog label
in his battle with the notion that
the race for the White House is
over.
Dukakis portrayed the elec-
tion as a choice between a candi-
date for the wealthy and a nomi-
nee who is committed to working
class Americans as he took his
case to voters in Michigan.
The Democratic nominee re-
ceived an enthusiastic response
Tuesday in kalamazoo when he
told the crowd, George Bush
cares about the people on Easy
Street. I care about the people on
Main Street. He's on their side.
I'm on your side
Dukakis also accused the
Republican administration of fail-
ing to halt the growing trade defi-
cit and doing nothing to solve the
problems that led to the 1987stock
market crash, which occurred one
year ago today.
The vice president, who trav-
eled to Fulton, Mo site of former
British Prime Minister Winston
Churchill's famed "Iron Curtain"
speech, focused on ISSoviet
relations in his address at West-
minister College.
But in opening comments
and remarks to the students and
reporter Bush sought to convince
listeners he doesn't have the
presi iential election in hand.
The worst thing to do would
be to show a complacency I don't
feel or an overconfidence that I do
not feel said the GOP nominee,
who led by 17 points over in this
week's NBC News-Wall Street
journal poll.
A Dukakis aide, however,
said a new Harris poll put the gap
at about nine percentage points.
Barbara Winkour, a spokes-
woman for Louis Harris & Associ-
ates in New York, said Harris
would be releasing a poll today,
but declined to comment Tuesday
on its results.
Two other surveys found
J
Bush leads of about that size. In
the first poll of 1,002 registered
voters surveyed Saturday
through Monday, Bush led 49-39
percent. The second poll of 1,201
likely voters Friday through
Monday gave the GOP ticket a 49-
40 percent lead.
Both were ongoing tracking
polls - in which the newest day's
result is added and the last day's
is dropped - done by KRC Com-
munications Research in Cambr-
idge, Mass. They had margin of
errors of three percentage points
either way.
Front-runner Bush was
stressing his foreign policy
themes today at a series of appear-
ances in Dearborn, Royal Oak and
Saginaw, Mich. The industrial
state, with its 20 electoral votes, is
a key battleground.
Dukakis was traveling
through rural areas of Illinois and
Missouri, visiting a farm in Hull,
111 and attending a livestock auc-
tion in Mexico, Mo. The Demo-
cratic nominee is hoping to break
the Republican lock on the rural
vote in a year in which the farm
economy has suffered.
Democratic vice presidential
candidate Lloyd Bentsen was
spending his second day in Cali-
fornia, the biggest electoral prize
with 47 votes. Republican Dan
Quayle was campaigning in Mis-
souri and West Virginia.
Bensten, who has hinted at
dissatisfaction with his running
mate's limited response to GOP
attacks, accused the Republican
ticket of a "vicious campaign that
violates the public trust
"They've said things about
Mike Dukakis that in Texas we
wouldn't say about a rattlesnake
on a lawn at a church picnic
Bentsen told about 2,000 students
at the University of California at
Los Angeles.
For his part, Dukakis lashed
out at Bush, charging that his rival
has "no convictions, no ideas, no
plans
The Massachusetts governor
said his solution to the trade defi-
cit would be to reduce the budget
deficit, increase foreign trade,
invest in education and training
and place a greater emphasis on
research and development.
The vice president, expand-
ing on his own campaign ad sug-
gesting that only the Republican
nominee is experienced enough
to negotiate with the Soviets, told
the Fulton audience he would
remain wary of Soviet intentions
despite the reforms instituted
under the leadership of Mikhail S.
Gorbachev.
"Now is not the time to aban-
don realism about what moves
the Soviet Union Bush said.
Quayle also was warning
against overconfidence, but was
upbeat after greeting cheering
college students in Illinois.
"I'm beginning to feel what
it's going to be like on election
night Quayle said.
��
Student Health Services
GET TO THE GAME ON TIME
The Saturday Clinic at the Student Health
Service will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
p.m. on Saturday, October 22. 1988.
The Sunday Clinic will be held as usual from
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Call the Student Health Services at 757-6841 for
more information or questions.
WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
The
CoMedY
ZONE
WED
" "Hie
CoMedY
ZONE
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
Perfect
Strangers
Perfect
Strangers
Highball Special
Costa Rican
tour announced
A two-weeks-long studv tour
in Costa Rica next June will be
ottered by the East Carolina Uni-
versity School of Education and
the Central American nation's
Universidad Nacional.
The program, open to gradu-
ate and undergraduate students,
will focuson the theme of interde-
pendence between developing
nations- and the industrialized
world.
1 rartWpanH will W-Todd-rrT
the homes of Costa Rican families.
They will visit and observe in the
local schools, take field trips to
commodity fields and factories,
and engage in class sessions with
Universidad Nacional faculty.
Open to students at other cam-
puses and to non-stdents as well
as regular ECL students, the ECU
- Costa Rica program offers three
semester hours of college credit.
No more than 15 participants will
be admitted into the program
which runs from June 13 to June
27.
Cost of the trip is $980 for in-
state residents. This fee includes
housing and food with the Costa
Rican family, airfare from Miami,
tuition and planned travel in
Costa Rica. Application deadline
is February 15, 1989.
Further information about the
ECU - Costa Rica program is
available from Dr. Vila Rosenfeld.
ECU School of Education, Speight
Building, East Carolina Univer-
sity, 27858: telephone (919) 757-
4125 - office or (919) 757-3238 -
home.
COPIES 5 ?
(Self Service 8 12 x 11 white bond)
:�. (, 758-2400
Fast Copies For Fast Times
(Next to Chico's in the Geogretown Shops)
FRIDAY
Kody Lee
Kody Lee
Kody Lee
Kody Lee
Michigan's 1
Rock & Roll Band
SATURDAY
Billy Price
&
The Keystone
Rhythym
Band
Hot Rhvthvm & Blues
U C C I
'sm
' � . . C � � !
soHERNev
OAKLEY SALE!
Razor Blades Normally $75
Now Only $60
One Week Only!
Located In The Plaza Mall Entrance
Store Hours
MonSat. 10-9
Sun. 1-6
Telephone
355-7695
$
$
CASH IN A FLASH FOR
THE BIG GAME BASH
Southern Gun
& Pawn. Inc.
INSTANT CASH LOANS
ON
TVS, STEREOS, VCR'S. GUNS,
DIAMONDS. BICYCLES, CLASS RINGS.
ALL MOST ANYTHING OF VALUE
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
752-2464
$
NEW 14K GOLD
500 N. GREENE ST. � JUST ACROSS RIVER BRIDGE
; GREENVILLE
$
Student Union
Coming Attractions
'e ,�
.
.M � �
(0 I fjUJj (� I I O I LM li &) I I QJ
DELIVERY
SMALL
Cheese Pia $4.95
Cheese and 1 Topping$5.60
Bach Additional Topping$ .65
SPECIALTY PIZZAS
Cheese Lovers$6.90
Moat Lovers$6.90
S11 p re me $6.90
Super Supreme$7.55
MEDIUM LARGE
$6.85 $8.95
$7.65 $9.90
$ .80 .95
$9.25 $11.80
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FAMOUS PIZZA HUTQUALITY
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�DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY
NEVER FROZEN
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SUNTHURS. 4 PM TO MIDNIGHT
FRI.&SAT. 4PM TO 1:00 AM
DELIVERY CHARGE 75
DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PHONE 752-4445
COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 5 DAYS!
DELIVERY
LARGE MEATLOVER'S PIZZA
FOR $9.99
CYOU SAVE $1.80)
(coupon expires Oct. 24, 1988
Sports Psychologist U.S. Olympic Team
Asst. Professor, ECU Counseling Center
Consultatnt Sports Medicine
8 p.m. Thursday, October 20
M tht Cenreal Classroom Bldg rm 1026
Sponsored hy TV Student Union Fontm Committee in conjunction with tht F.CU Counseling Center and tht ECU Sports Medicine Pi
A FORMER COMMUNIST COMES HOME
JUN1US SCALES
Former head of the North Carolina and South Carolina Communist Party
He mall reflect on the Communist Party and it s faults
Monday, October 24 - 11:30 am-1:30 Brown Bag Lunch
In Mendenhall Rm 244
Lecture at 8:00 p.m. Mendenhall rm 244
Cponsored by The Student Union Forum Committee
COFFEEHOUSE PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS
SEAN HAYES
Soloist Guitarist at the Underground Mendenhall
Friday, October 21 at 8:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the Coffeehouse Committee and Student Union
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, structur s and architectures of
North and Central American Earth As seen by
ERNST HABR1CHS
October 24- November 18
Mendenhall Gallery
Opening Reception Wednesday, October 26 at 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the Student Union Arts Committee
MOVIE OF THE WEEK
THE GLASS MENAGERIE - PG
Wednesday, October 19 at 8:00 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
All movies are FREE to ECU student with valid ECU I.D.
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee
- - �

� - i �






Stye Saat (Earnltnian
vmv ih. t Cniim �
mk tmr 1925
Pete Fernald, cm�
Chip Carter, mm e
James F.J. McKee, wmmnf a�!
Joe Harris, n�� �.��
Doug Johnson, sp u
Tim Hampton, F.�,u�
Miqielle England, &�M��,er
Debbie Stevens, s�r�
Jeff Parker ��
TOM FURR,Circid�imM�nfl$�r
SUSAN HOWELUfVadwrt.� Manager
John W. Medlin, a w�rt0r
Mac Clark, bu� ���M��jrr
October 20. 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Communism
Paranoia destroys from within
"The people themselves are the
government's only safe depositories
� Jefferson.
"I heartily accept the motto, 'That
government is best which governs
least 1 also believe � 'Tliat govern-
ment is best which governs not at all
and when men are prepared for it, that
will be the kind of government which
they will have � Thoreau.
Democracy is a grand experi-
ment which will show whether the
common citizens are yet ready for
taking an active role in their own
government. Democracy is not the
last improvement that can be made
on government, but if it should
work it will pave the way for other
forms oi government that allow
even more freedom.
But democracy is yet young, and
its existence depends on a special
and rare set of conditions. In coun-
tries in which there is not a high level
of literacy and popular interest in
government � like, say, Nicaragua
� democracy cannot and will not
last. Though the very idea is anath-
ema to many Americans, it happens
to be true that more repressive forms
of government such as communism
are in fact best for many societies.
Very often, communism or some
other tyrannical system holds sway
in countries for several decades,
educating and training its people,
and when the people are ready for a
more open form of government,
they will find a way to get it. Witness
as examples Haiti, Chile, Korea, the
Philippines, and even the Soviet
Union.
Democracy poses a threat to
communism, but communism
poses no threat to democracy. There
is not one case�not one, not ever �
of communism "taking over" a free
and open society which guaranteed
its citizens freedom of speech, reli-
gion, the press, et alia � and whose
citizens acted to protect those rights.
It simply would not happen.
Why? Because democracy can
only be destroyed from within; it
dies when its spirit is lost. Believe it
or not, America faces a lesser threat
from its own Communist Party than
it does from its Republicans and
Democrats; the latter groups usually
equate political philosophy with
moral right, so that any challenge to
or question of the political status
quo is ipso facto an attack on God
and Man.
Those who would silence any
point of view � no matter how re-
pulsive they may find it � are the
true danger to democracy. They
commit the worst crime with the
best intentions. And so it seems that
a certain banner apparently put up
by the College Republicans on The
Mall � a banner which read "Keep
the commies out of our back yards
join the College Republicans" �
is likely to do more harm than good.
Freedom of speech exists in the
hope that all ideas will be given fair
and equal treatment, and that as a
result the best will naturally emerge.
One hopes that by advertising their
ignorance in such a fashion, the
College Republicans will alienate
more people than they attract.
Because if it works the other way
� if, in fact, such tactics are success-
ful � it will be one more indication
that our liberty is not nearly as safe
as it should be
"7JJE Pr�t3rea UaS5
Tm 7h�T-3& ClA9
Voters think Dukakis bad
To the editor:
Let's set the record straight
about Mike Dukakis's economic rec-
ord in Massachusetts. Wyatt M.
Jones IV, instead of quoting the na-
tional chairman of the Democratic
Party on Dukakis's record, should
instead listen to the people who live
in Massachusetts.
Jack Flood is the chairman of
the Massachusetts House Taxation
Committee and a Democrat. He has
this to say about the Democratic can-
didate for president: "Dukakis has
been on the wrong side of every
major economic policy issue. We're
right now driving business out of
Massachusetts, because Dukakis has
overspent so much. Business leaders
know taxes arc going to have to rise
again to cover the current mess
"Three years ago, there was a
$1 billion surplus. We spent it all, and
now we're borrowing just to meet
current payrolls. And not only has
this been the worst spending spree in
Massachusetts history, we have al-
most nothing to show for it in better
services
Small wonder that the voters of
"Taxachusetts" think Dukakis has
been bad for the state's economy.
Nicolas Skottergaard
Treasurer
ECU College Republicans
Fees! Fees! Fees!
To the editor:
Fees! Fees! Fees! Evertime 1 turn
around it seems like I have to pay for
something. If it is not a parking ticket,
it is some other outrageous fee. What
really got to me was not being able to
cash a check so I could pay for my
phone bill.
I was not able to cash this check
because the little sticker that had the
words "fall 88" printed on it evi-
dently had fallen off. Therefore, I am
unable to cash checks, get football
tickets, and do other activities which
require an identification card until I
get a duplicate. In order to get a
duplicate I have to pay five dollars.
This is ridiculous! How much
trouble can one little sticker be? Five
dollars is a rip off to me. Most fresh-
men and other students for that fact
need that money for other much
needed things.
Kelly Aycock
Freshman
Duke's policies bad
To the editor:
Wyatt M. Jones IV's Oct. & let-
ter was full of error and misrepresen-
tation. Jones seems to believe that
Dukakis' economic policies have
helped Massachusetts. Jones is
wrong.
The economic recovery that
Massachusetts enjoyed from 1978-
1983 (the "Miracle") occurred in spite
of Dukakis, not because of him. The
recovery was due to Proposition 2, a
major 1980 tax cut and large defense
contracts that resulted from Reagan's
defense buildir . Dukakis opposed
both.
The recovery continued until
Dukakis returned to the governor's
chair in 1983. He had been thrown
out of office in 1978 because he had
promised not to raise taxesbu t raised
them anyway � by $650 million, the
largest tax increase in Massachusetts
history (thus effectively negating bv
$150 million the $500 million in tax
cuts he had supposedly imple-
mented since then).
And Dukakis, because of his
huge spendingand taxing sprees, has
in five years ruined Massachusetts
economy. In June 1986, Massachu-
setts had a cash surplus of $912 mil-
lion (a result of the recoverv). In two
years, Dukakis has transformed this
surplus into a deficit of over $500
million! Massachusetts voters think
Dukakis has been bad for the state's
economy by a 2-to-l margin.
Since lVe , Massachusetts has
lost over 90,000 industrial jobs, down
13, while the nation gained 2.
Since 1983, Dukakis has raised
spending 78, the highest of any
state.
Dukakis' economic failures
are yet another example of the
failure of tax-and-spend liberalism.
Another example is the federal
deficit, created and maintained by
the liberal Democrats in congress!
ArielleSturz
Freshman
Psychology
THE SUPREME)
COURT 5 RE- '
eVAUJATTWe THE
�MAMCffIKM
PROCiAMATfOM,A
Media coverage focusing on wit, quotes
BY CLAY DEANHARDT
Campui Spectrum
Back in October of 1976, before I was old enough
to vote or even to know what my vote meant, one of
my elementary school teachers asked if anyone in
the class wanted to campaign for their favorite presi-
dential candidate. The choice, to me, was clear.
"Vote for Ford I screamed passionately.
"Carter's wishy-washy
Little then did I know that my young ideas
would represent a kind of rallying cry for campaign-
ing in 1988.
In today's world of sophisticated television
coverage, instant communication and the omnipres-
ent "sound bite campaigning has degenerated into
an extended process of name calling, issue ducking,
generalizing and quip manufacturing. More impor-
tant than the issues, it seems, is the good quote.
And because of that, the American public is
going to be the real loser in November.
The most frightening thing about this election is
not that the candidates are using these tactics, but
that the public is buying them. The candidates are
having more success skimming the suface of the
issues and centering their campaigns on personali-
ties than they are by setting their agenda.
This year, it appears, education, defense, eco-
nomics, social programs and the deficit have taken a
back seat to the Pledge of Allegiance, the ACLU, the
National Guard and the wimp factor.
The predominant practitioner of this kind of
public pandering seems to be the Republican party.
Indeed, after two elections of hawking the candidate
most suited for television, the GOP machine has
nearly perfected these modern campaigning tech-
niques.
In the past, candidates have had to talk directly
about the issues. They spoke vehemently about their
positions and their plans for America's future. They
answered questions, and they held news confer-
ences. At one point and time accessibility seems to
have been important for the man-who-would-be-
president.
How times have changed.
So far in this election George Bush's campaign
machinery has run like a fine tuned car. Following
the Republican national convention in New Orleans,
Bush deftly used smear tactics to paint Mike
Dukakis as a out-of-touch liberal somewhere left of
Nikolai Lenin.
Time and again we saw Bush draped in the red,
white and blue on the evening news as he pummeled
Dukakis with attacks on his patriotism, his beliefs
and his sensibilities.
Bush also took a card from his boss's deck and
limited his accessibility to the press, thus forcing
newsmen- to use the quotes his campaign team
manufactured rather than taking a chance on ad-
libbing. The public could see why when, almost
every time he did ad-lib, Bush began sticking his foot
in his mouth (remember Pearl Harbor Day).
At i he same time, the Dukakis camp was reeling.
They were doing everything that seemed right �
talking about the issues, giving the press time to
clarify the issues and avoiding direct attacks on a
very popular incumbent � but somehow the Duke
was still taking it on the chin. Dukakis was having to
n a defensive campaign, countering Bush'sattacks
of the day before, and it was killing him in the polls.
Until the Democrats learned a few tricks from
the Republicans. Word is now that it is becoming
increasingly difficult for reporters to get close to
Dukakis. Gone are the days when the governor of
Massachussetts would often fraternize with the
media during the campaign trips. Now Dukakis, like
Bush, gets his message out through the sound bite,
and, like Bush, he is more often than not attacking his
opponent.
And, like Bush, he has gained in the polls.
If this trend toward generalization and distor-
tion continues in the campaign, and if the media
continues to focus more on the campaigns than the
candidates, Americans will rapidly fall into a pat-
tern of electing candidates with the wittiest speech
writers. As complex as the world is today, that is a
nightmarish possibility.
Unless the American public wakes up and
demands more from its candidates, we can expect
this kind of whitewash campaigning to continue.
Like Tom Sawyer, campaign strategists are leading
us to the fence and getting us to perform for them
while they sit back and reap the benefits.
It's time we find out what Tom, George and
Mike are really doing.
Campus Spectrum Rules
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the editorial
page, the East Carolinian features
the "Campus Spectrum This is
an opinion column by guest writ-
ers from the student body and
faculty. The columns printed in
the "Campus Spectrum" will
contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or
nation.
The columns are restricted in
content only with regard to rules
of grammar and decency. Persons
submitting columns must be will-
ing to accept byline credit for their
efforts, as no entries from ghost
writers will be published.
Gard
RALEIGH AP) -
Gardner, the Republican
didate for lieutenar
nor, says he will ask m
television officials for pa
sion to rebroadcast his del
with Democratic nom
Tony Rand
Gardner said Tue;
that WSOC-TY oi Chan
had agreed to provide air
for the debate, oi I
broadcast Oct. 2, if GarJ
would cover the cos j
he said he was prepai
Rand said Moi I
would not give
have the debate rerun.
"I cannot ir g
science be a part
ulgationofthedi rl
misrepresental
forth in that del
said in a letter tc Gai
Gardner
neys were looking
legal ramitu.
the debate
consent and vs .
Center officials I - -
themselves or maV
able to oth i
Aging re;
COLL MB.
Three environmer
have called on Enerj
John Herringtor I j
environmental in j
before resta rt i n g a r ft
led Savannah River Pla
tors.
It the Depart me r I
refuses, the groups I
court injunction tost J
aging reactors from o
until the compreher
completed. Dan Reicher
nev for the Natural R
Defense Cour i Tu
The NRDC, Grce
U.S.A. and South Carohj
ergy Research Foui
planned to deliver a lettej
nngton today, req :
environmental impact
Meanwhile, a publi
port said Tueda 1
trained personnel and ini
safety procedures blamed
of 375,000 gallons oi wa
taminated bv radiation
year-old plant.
Officials with the
Co which operates thej
weapons facility- for the
ment of Energv, alsi J
sight caused underrepef
the amount of radioactl
taminant in the water
into a creek on I u! v 6 The
Ca.) Chronicle and the
Herald reported.
LA
x
Tl
m-
on the ri
earning aj
Clifton,
ARMY





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20,1988 5
s bad
I until
rnor's
n thrown
xrause lie had
ixcsbut raised
ilium, the
iachusetts
gby
tax
- I imple-
his
� es, has
- husetts s
16 M issachu-
- f S912 mil-
two
� ned this
margin
ssachusetts has
dllvtnal jobs, down
i the nation gained 2
- Dukakis has raised
thehighest et any

erexan' 10

federal
J and maintained by
s in congress!
Arielle Sturz
Freshman
Psychology
PREME
:s R�-I
?M THE
C!fWT?CAJ
AMATICAI1
;?-
Si
tes
:an public wakes up and
It- candidates, we can expect
h campaigning to continue.
gn strategists are loading
us to perform for them
reap the benefits.
out what Tom, George and
Mng-
Spectrum Rules
Ition to the "Campus
ption of the editorial
1st Carolinian features
i Spectrum This is
'lumn by guest writ
: student body and
rolumns printed in
)us Spectrum" will
rent topics of concern
lpus, community or
umns are restricted in
with regard to rules
and decency. Persons
.olumns must be will-
It byline credit for their
10 entries from ghost
be published.
Gardner wants debate rebroadcast
RALEIGH (AP) - Jim
Gardner, the Republican can-
didate for lieutenant gover-
nor, says he will ask public
television officials for permis-
sion to rebroadcast his debate
with Democratic nominee
Tony Rand.
Gardner said Tuesday
that WSOC-TV of Charlotte
had agreed to provide air time
for the debate, originally
broadcast Oct. 2, if Gardner
would cover the costs, which
he said he was prepared to do.
Rand said Monday he
would not give his consent to
have the debate rerun.
"1 cannot in good con-
science be a party to the prom-
ulgation of the distortions and
misrepresentations you put
forth in that debate Rand
said in a letter to Gardner.
Gardner said his attor-
neys were looking into the
legal ramifications of airing
the debate without Rand's
consent and would ask UNC
Center officials to rerun it
themselves or make it avail-
able to other stations.
Many observers have said
Gardner out-performed Rand
in the debate, but Gardner
said he was "amazed" that
Rand didn't want it rebroad-
cast. "I think this would only
help educate people to make a
good choice on Nov. 8 he
said.
Meanwhile Tuesday,
Marion G. "Pat" Robertson
called on his North Carolina
supporters to put aside hard
feelings from the presidential
primary and give full backing
to the Republican ticket.
"I'm doing everything I
can to see George Bush
elected Robertson said at a
news conference before a
fund-raiser and rally for Gard-
ner. "I would like to see our
supporters work for Mr. Bush
but (also) for local candi-
dates
North Carolina support-
ers of Robertson were at odds
with Bush supporters and the
state Republican establishment
earlier this year over apportion-
ment of delegate slots to the na-
tional party convention.
Many Robertson backers
boycotted the state Republican
convention, saying they had been
cheated.
Sue Wyatt, who was
Robertson's statecampaign direc-
tor, said in an interview she fully
supported Gardner and that he
"supports our viewpoint on is-
sues
She said she would vote for
Bush over Dukakis, but that the
vice president's North Carolina
supporters had not contacted her
to invite Robertson's supporters
to join the campaign-
Ms. Wyatt said she hoped
most Robertson backers would
support the ticket.
There has to be some animos-
ity still on the part of a lot of these
people who were so abused dur-
ing the delegate-selection proc-
ess she said. "But 1 think that
overall they realize, particularly
in the case of Jim Gardner and
George Bush, that they're more
conservative than their Demo-
cratic opponents
Asked about Republican
Gov. Jim Martin, she said, "I really
would not speak to that right
now. I just don't know. He also
has not contacted us or asked for
our help
Gardner said Robertson's
presence, "indicates the full sup-
port that we have of all the
Robertson people
"1 think that's the gTeat thing
about the Republican Party this
year Gardner said. "It's the
most unified that I've ever seen it
since I've been a Republican in
North Carolina
Robertson repeated familiar
Republican criticisms of Michael
Dukakis, saying voters "are very
suspicious of someone who is
probably the most liberal candi-
date ever put forward for the
presidency by any major party in
the history of America
The $50-per-pcrson fund-
raiser was held at a private resi-
dence. Tickets to the rally at a
Raleigh hotel sold for $10 per per-
son.
Campmeeting
We Love Jesus Ministries
Saturday, October 22nd -1 p.m.
Town Commons Ampitheatre
Good Gospel Music
Come And See The Resurrection
Power Of The Lord Jesus Christ
Evangelists:
Steve and Robin Ballanger
Todd Pierce
Joy Alford
For more information contact
Todd Pierce 758-4356
Aging reactors cause of controversy
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP-
Three environmental groups
have called on Energy Secretary
John Herrington to prepare an
environmental impact statement
before restarting any of the troub-
led Savannah River Plant reac-
tors.
If the Department of Energy
ret uses, the groups will seek a
court injunction to stop the three
aging reactors from operating
until the comprehensive study is
completed, Dan Reicher, an attor-
nev for the Natural Resources
Defense Council, said Tuesday.
The N'RDC, Greenpeace
U.S.A. and South Carolina's En-
ergv Research Foundation
planned to deliver a letter to Her-
ringtor today, requesting the
environmental impact statement.
Meanwhile, a published re-
port said Tuesday that poorly
trained personnel and inadequate
safety procedures blamed for leak
of 375,000 gallons of water con-
taminated by radiation at the 38-
vear-old plant.
Officials with the Du Pont
Co which operates the nuclear
weapons facility for the Depart-
ment of Energy, also said an over-
sight caused underreporting of
the amount of radioactive con-
taminant in the water released
mto a creek on July 8,The Augusta
C,a.) Chronicle and the Augusta
I lerald reported.
The amount of radiation
spilled into the water was too
small to pose a health or safety
threat, officials said. SRP's three
reactors were reduced to half
power last year when experts
questioned whether the emer-
gency cooling system could
handle a problem at full power.
Since April, all three reactors
have been shut down entirely for
maintenance and testing amid
additional safety questions. One
reactor was restarted for less than
a week in August.
When it was shut down, SRP
was the government's sole pro-
ducer of radioactive tritium and
plutonium used in nuclear weap-
ons.
An environmental impact
statement is required under fed-
eral law whenever there is a
major federal action signifi-
cantly affecting the quality of the
human environment
Reicher said restart of the
reactors qualifies as a "major fed-
eral action" because "revelations
about the SRP reactors" raise dis-
turbing questions about the envi-
ronmental and safety risks of their
future operation
Department of Energy Dep-
uty Secretary Joseph Salgado said
Oct. 10 that a "phased restart" of
SRP's K Reactor is planned in
December and restart the two
other reactors will be restarted bv
the middle of 1989.
Herrington said last week
that the department will operate
reactors in a safe and "environ-
mentally sensitive manner" while
still meeting the nation's defense
needs.
Enjoy a "TCBV" Sundae
ANY DAY OF THE WEEK.
& - Say goodbye to ice cream with a "TCBV sundae.
vPK. MTCBV. frozen vogurt has all the taste of
as
uoittoww,
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
premium ice cream with onlv about half
the calories and is 96 fat-free. Add
creamy whipped topping, nuts, spnnkles
natural fruit with no sugar added, or
fudge, caramel or anything vou choose.
Delicious!
all the pleasure.
None of the guilt.
TCBV
I hi Country fk-l hnjurl-
325 Arlington Blvd.
355-6968
FREE TOPPING
FREE TCBY STADIUM CUP
One Free Topping Of Your Choice- with purchase of any sundae
one discount per person per visit per order , one discount per person per visit per order
Why not come by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
E. 10th St; or call 758-HELP. For Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. a day. year
around, in order to assist you in virtually any problem area
you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quality of life for you and our com-
munity.
Licensed And Accredited By The State of North Carolina
Offer expires, October 31, 1988
Good While Supplies Last Offer expires. October 31, 1988
LADIES NIGHT
Every Wednesday
SI.50 Vodka Drinks
For your eyes . . .
HARDBODIES

rVfkf
RACK ROOM $H0�$
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
7
H Iton Inn Greenville 355
Sale Days
-?�
'�?
K"G
Js;

ALL THIS-
PLUS MANY
UNADVERTISED
SUPER VALUES!
ft
FIVE BIG
DAYS!
Thurs Fri Sat
Sun. and Mon.
Special Group
PUMPS
byTWB
Several styles and colors.
Reg. $34
2497

THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member oi the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
mmm not the exception. The gold bar
on the nght means you command respect as an Army officer. ft you re
earninc a BSN, wnte: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton N 07015. Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.
ARHY MHPff gQPP. BE ALL YOU CAN BE-
1
LAKGE GROUP
Men's, Ladies and children's
by EASTLAND
Compare At $35-$50
i97 �97
SPECIAL GROUP
DRESS SHOES
by Regency� Our
"1 fl Of Everyday
JLJ C Low Price
M
m
SPECIAL GROUP
DRESS PUMPS
by Capezic,
10-
SPECIAL GROUP
TWB
DRESSY FLATS
Several styles and colors
Reg. to $30
97
ENTIRE STOCK OF LADIES'
CHAMPION OXFORDS
by KEDS
All colors Reg. $27
1897
SPECIAL GROUP
FASHION BOO
by MIA and
WHITE MOUNTAIN
sReg.$49 and $60
lfn7d5097
SPECIAL GROUP
MEN'S CASUALS
by VILLAGE CREEK
Dirty Buc Reg. $40
2997





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20,1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: To share a 3-bedroom tovcnhouse.
No deposit, private bedroom, private
bathroom Sl83 33mo 13 utilities.
Fireplace, tanning beds, sauna, weight-
room and more Call 353-0700
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
male roommate to share new mobile
home 10 minutes from campus. Non-
smoker, please. Call Hugh at 756-6851
after 5:00 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
SI 12 30 rent and 12 utilities. Call 758-
1480, ask for Tanya after 5.30. Needed
immediately
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1964 Kawasaki CPZ-1100.
Excellent condition Must see SI 500.00.
758-5513
FOR SALE: 184 Mazda B-2000 Pick-up.
I ligh road miles Topper New tires. Ex-
cellent condition $3400. Call 757-6281.
FOR SALE: 182 Vokswagon Jetta. 5
speed Diesal 87k. Excellent condition.
$2700 Call 757-6281.
FOR SALE: Snow skis Pre Bectra 2000
w marker M46R bindings. Skied on
onlv 4 times Excellent cond. No dings or
scratches $600 00 new, seU for $250.00.
Call 752-1031 ask for John Leave mes-
sage.
FOR SALE: 1971 Cutlass, rebuilt 350
engine. 2 dr. black over red, almost fullv
restored S2500or best offer. Call (8-5) 757-
6611, Ext 271. (5-10 pm.) 355-0363.
FOR SAl E. Couch, matching chair and
recliner In good condition $300 00 for all
3 pieces Call 752-7313 after 6:00 p.m.
FOR SALE Nice sofa, king size mattress,
twin sie mattress, kitchen chairs, round
table Make offer
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time Rates start at S2 00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check We also offer
Resume' production, and other business
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F for more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC
752-36H
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan
AT YOUR SERVICE:
TypingTypingTyping. Affordable and
Professional. Call 355-6634 after 6:00 p.m.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC Done by
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933.
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING: Real
Cheap Affordable Rates! Call 752-5084.
HELP WANTED
NEED MALE AND FEMALE DANCERS
FOR PRIVATE PARTIES: Also need
ladies 18-36 years of age for a legs video.
Earnings of $50 per hour and more. Apply
in person Monday through Friday, 4 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. to Promotions Co 2708-A E.
10th Street. No phone calls.
HELP WANTED: Need someone to do
housedeaning with a local firm. About 15-
20 hours a week. Average of $5 00-S6.00
hr. Call 758-0897.
HELP WANTED: Are you a college stu-
dent or faculty member in need of spend-
ing money? Brady's is accepting applica-
tions for part-time sales and customer
service positions. Apply in person,
Brods, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4
p m.
WANTED: Campus representative to
promote our low cost, high quality Spring
Break trip to Daytona Beach. Free trips
and money while gaining valuable busi-
ness experience. Call Kurt with Travel As-
sociates. 1-800-558-3002.
OPPORTUNITY IN THE TRAVEL IN-
DUSTRY: The 1 college tour operator is
looking for an efficient, responsible, and
organized campus representative to mar-
ket a Spring Break trip on campus. Earn
free trips, and good commissions while
gaining great business experience. For
more information call 1-800-999-4300.
HELP WANTED: The New Ramada Inn
needs some good people to help provide
the best service in town. The positions that
are currently available are Bartenders and
Cocktail Waitresses. However, those with
experience in other areas of food and
beverage are welcome to apply. Applica-
tions will be taken in person only at the
Hostess Station in the restaurant. No
phone calls please.
HELP WANTED: Production assistants
needed for entry level full-time and part-
time position at local TV station. Must be
dependable and work well with others.
TV production background helpful but
not essential. Send inquiries to Production
Manager, WNCT-TV, P.O. Box 898,
Greenville, NC. 27834. EOE.
PERSONALS
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards? Call
Earlvis, the mad baseball buyer. I pay
damn good money for cards of any year,
any shape, and any condition. If you need
party money. Big E is the one to call 757-
6366, leave a message.
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo Car-
tridges with instructions for re-sale. East
Coast Music & Video, 758-4251, 1109
Charles Blvd.
CHI O, CHI O: It's off to Mexico we go. It
was a dare, to sit in the chair, with Tequila
shots, we couldn't stop. Frozen drinks
were next, but hitting the pinatas was
best! We had a blast � The Phi Taus.
HOPE EVERYONE HAD A GREAT
FALL BREAK: And good luck for the rest
of the semester. �The Sigmas.
ECU: We hope everyone had a safe and
happy Fall Break. �Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: Good luck to our awe-
some football team. We know you can do
it!
KIRSTIN EAKES: Your sisters are very
proud of you baby! �Delta Zeta.
TKE: Can't wait for tonite. It's been too
long! �The Sigmas.
THETA CHI: Congratulations on your in-
stallation. We are all glad to have you back
on campus. �The Sigmas.
KA'S: Had a good time at the social Tues-
day. Can't wait to do it again soon. �The
Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS: To James Ford
Griffin - Sig Ep Brother of the Week PS.
Nice camera appearance by the BRAIN. �
Your Fraternal Brothers of Sigma Phi
Epsilon.
CHI-OMEGAS: Be ready to GIG on
Thursday when we hop, skip, and go
naked - Birthday Suits Optional! �Love
the Sig Eps.
KA LrTTLE SISTERS: There is a Manda
tory Meeting Oct. 24th at 9:30. Bring
money for fund raiser. Plan to stay late for
one of those late sister socials
THE SIGMAS: We had a great timebuild-
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ing the float! We couldn't have done it
without you! Thanks a bunch! �Love,
The Kappa Sigs.
GREAT, AWESOME, DRUNKEN: We
scam, exhuberant, loose date, find date,
champagne, kegs, grain, find someone
elses date, plantation. Pike's Peak, Rotary
Club. What is this. Pi Kappa Alpha Home-
coming of course. 1988 The Year of the
Pike.
NEW DELI: Has the best music around
Friday come jam with MIKE EDWARDS
and the BANNED, and tap your toes with
MIKE 'LIGHTNIN' WELLS acoustic
sounds on Saturday.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THETA
CHI: For winning football championship.
�The Pike's.
ZETA'S: Hope that you had a great Fall
Break
M ANDY PARISH: Thanx for everything!
I'm so glad you're my big sis! You're
awesome! Get ready for a great semester,
let's support our "favorite pasttime" to
the maximum! I love ya! �YLS, Kelli.
PI KAPPA ALPHA PLEDGES: Our
pledge party together was a blast! Let's
keep the kegs flowing Your pledge class
is awesome - Good Luck! �Love, Delta
Zeta Pledges.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
HAPPY BIRTHDAY JOYCE We love
you! �The Sisters and Pledges of Zeta
Tau Alpha
HAPPY BIRTHDAY NECATHA 1 lope
your 21st birthday is as good as mine was
We shall party tonight �Bertha
ALPHA XI DELTA: Don't miss the bus to
Pikes Peak, and if you do, you better beat
feet. If you don't make it to tonigh t's party,
there will be many a Pike that will be
sorry.
CASINO NIGHT '88: Student Union Pro-
ductions and Public Relations Committee
presents Casino Night '88 - 8 p.m. Fri Oct.
21st, Mendenhall Student Center, rm. 244
Fr"e admission, prizes, mock tails and
refreshments.
Q: What do these have in common: Def
Leppard, Raleigh, $70, TAXI? A. Maria
ASW; From pumpkin snatching, to
Your Best Look
Specializing In: MANICURES:
French Manicures � Nail Tips �
Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
PEDICURES � SKIN CARE: Body
Wrapping � Face & Body Waxing �
Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products For
Men & Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaza Dr Greenville
EL-TOftO
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 7��
WALK-INS WELCOME
20 YEARS OP SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Eastgate Shopping Center
(AcToaa from Highway Patrol Station)
Behind Car Quest Auto Part
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318
-
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru Sat Low
Coat Termination to 20 weeka of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
drunken death ndes in the little red
wagon, to December 11th, to New Year's
Eve in Pa, to Spring Break skiing, to Rose-
ball, mixer, & cocktail, to under the Stars
in Sandestin, Honda, to the pig pickins
and Fall Break in Pa , we have been to
gether for 1 year Let's do it again' �With
all of my LOVE, TBF
SAE A AND B FLAG FOOTBALL
TEAMS It's hard to believe that six points
can be so many Both teams would like to
thank all our fans Get ready, though,
because basketball is right around the
corner
THURSDAY IS FIZZ DAY Come to Pi
Kappa Alpha Happy Hour 930 - till
Drink specials and tree Nacho's
PI KAPPA ALPHA BROTHERS AND
LITTLE SISTERS Big Brother -Little Sis
ter movie, Sunday, Oct 23 at Mendenhall
Get in touch with your Little or Big.
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E 5th Street
� I.ocjted Near ECU
�A ros� From Highway Ptrol Station
J32.S a month
Contact J T or Tommy Williams
7S6-7815 or 830-1937
Oilice open Apt 8. 12-530 pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
I . jn and rjuiet on bedroom fumuri-d
a: artmrn�. cnerfty eilKirnt. free watr. atd
vcr optional washers, dryers cabif -
' . uplfs or single, only $205 a month. 6 nopth
,rasc Mt 1B!1 i. 1 iOMF. RF-VTAJ -S � couples or
UAgln Apartrrrnt arc mobile liomes in AsA.e
Carders near Brook V alley Country C I
Contact J T or Tommy Williams
"S6-7&15 '
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Subscription Form
Name:
Address:
Date to Begin:
bmplimentary.
Amount Paid:
Date to End:
Individual:
Business:
Date Paid:
at�: Individual $25 pr yearBuainest $35 per vaar
jr to Th Easi Carolinian. Publication Bldg. - ECU CiceavUle, NC 27SS8-4353
SALES POSITION AVAILABLE
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications for an
advertising sales representative.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Good Personality & Professional Appearance
Excellent Communication Skills
Good Organizational Skills
Must Be Dependable & Show Initiative & Enthusiasm
Must Have Own Transportation
Must Have The Desire To Excel
Apply in Person at
The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please!
Announcements
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered bv the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co op Information Seminar in the
CCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi-
nars) The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are.
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase your
"fun" budget,
'opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come bv to see us today!
Thurs, Oct 20, 1 p.m rm 2010; Mon,
Oct 24, 1 p m , rm 2010, Thurs Oct. 27,4
p m , rm 2006, Mon , Oct. 31, 4 p.m , rm
2006
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs at 6 (X) in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757 6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028
LQSU
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the un com promised word of God.
Every Fri night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
frCHOI ARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Business students interested in scholar-
ships should secure forms from one of the
following depl. offices: Accounting �
GCB 3208, Decision Sciences � 3418, Fi-
nance � 3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414. All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210),
Chairman of School of Business Scholar-
ship Committee, by Oct. 14. Students may
apply for one or more of the scholarships
listed below. Planters Bank Scholarship (3
at $1000 each). University Book Exchange
( 2 at $500 each), NCNB ($500), J. Fred
Hamblen ($200) Credit Women Interna-
tional ($200), Cameron-BrownFirst
Union Scholarship (3 at $500 each), FOR
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY: Latney
W. Pittard Memorial, Raleigh-Durham
Chapter Institute of Internal Auditors
($350), National Association of Account-
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship ($500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
ONLY: Archie R. Bumette ($600), Ward
Real Estate Scholarship ($300).
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Attention all ECU students, faculty,
alumni and parents of ECU students!
Why spend another dull Thanksgiving
when you could be in the exciting dty of
lights, New York City. Come jr In the Stu-
dent Union's Travel Commit cursion
to New York City, Nov. 23- ror more
info call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
CASH, VACATION, & PRIZES: HOW?
By playing the hottest business game in
town sponsored by Wall Street and
AT&T. There are over 400 chances to win.
The top 10 performers will receive a cash
prize, with first place performer receiving
$25,000 cash; and the top 100 performers
each month will receive athletic shoes
from Reebok and a wrist watch, courtesy
of Beneton by Bulova You can participate
for only $49.95. Interested participants
can register on the first floor of the GCB on
Wed. and Thurs. between 10-2 pjn. or by
contacting Student Financial Mgmt. As
soc. members or call the FINA dept 757-
6670.
SUMMER IOB OPPORTUNE
XXfiS
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
-esentation will be on Mon Nov. 21 at
. 10 a.m. in 1029 GCB. The ten-week in-
tei hip program, in the Raleigh area, is
opt'�. sophomores, juniors, and seniors
currei. c enrolled in college. (Those en-
tering Graduate School as of May 1989 are
not eligible).
CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the y earbook now has that
chance. Gass photographs will be taken
Oct. 31 -Nov. 4 in the t lent Store from 9
a.m. oil 12 p.m. and 1 n. to 4 30 p.m.
each day. The yearbook i t vour year-
book until you are in it.
SKIING TRIP
Be sure to attend the Intramural Skiing
Trip registration meeting from Aug. 22 to
Oct. 22. Now you can ski the slopes and
learn the ropes in this fun filled trip!
3-ON-3 BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Free
Throw Contest registration meeting held
Nov. 1 at 5:00 p.m. in BIO103. Play begins
shortly afterwards! Interested in officiat-
ing? Attend the first officials clinic on Oct.
25 at 8:00 p.m. at MG102. For additional
info call Dave Hall at 757-6387.
CO-REC FLAG FOOTBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
Flag Football meeting held Oct. 25 at 500
p.m. in BIO103. Play begins shortly after
ward! Interested in officiating? Attend the
first officials clinic Oct. 25 at 8:00 p.m. in
MG102. For additional info call Dave
Hall at 757-6387.
WYNTQN MARSALIS CQN-
CERI
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present Wynton Marsalis in concert
Nov. 1 at 8:00 p.m in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets go on sale for this Performing Arts
Series event on Mon Oct. 10. Winner of a
Grammy Award for both classical and
jazz performances, Mr. Marsalis is sure to
bring an energetic and entertaining show
to Wright Auditorium. For further details,
contact: The Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall, or call (919) 757-6611.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the Dec issue. The maga-
zine is published twice a semester with
the first issue coming out in Oct. This
special issue will be a small magazine
with mainly general info whereas the
Dec. issue will be a larger size containing
news stories, short stories, editorials,
poetry, etc. Articles may be left at the
office or at the Media Board Secretary's
Office in the Publications Bldg.
INTERVIEWING WORK-
SHOPS
To help ECU people prepare for on and off
campus interviews, the Career Planning
& Placement Service in Bloxton House is
offering these one hour programs to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search. The pro-
gram is open to the first 20 people to come
for each session. No sign up is required.
These sessions are held in the Career Plan-
ning Room on Oct. 12 & 20.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning & Placement Service
in Bloxton House is offering these one
hour programs on beginning a resume for
your job search. Handouts and samples
will be given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session. No sign up is re-
quired. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Oct. 11,21 & 26
at 3 p.m.
WOMEN VOTERS
The League of Women Voters of
Greenville-Pitt County will sponsor a
public forum for state legislative candi-
dates on Oct. 25, at 730 p.m. in the Willis
Bldg at First and Reade Circle in
Greenville. On Nov. 1, a second forum
will be held, again at 730 p.m. in the Willis
Bldg for candidates for the Pitt County
Board of Commissioners.
GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept. 15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2. Please note that the
group listing with the name of every per-
son in the photograph MUST be pre-
sented BEFORE the photographer films
the group. ORGANIZATIONS WITH-
OUT LISTINGS WILL NOT BE PHOTO-
GRAPHED, and time does not permit the
scheduling of another session Call 757
6501 and leave date & time for the photo to
be taken. Please give two days notice for
the photographer.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all Am
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p.m. in Menden-
hall room 221. Remember that missing
over 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation.
WINDSURFING CLUB
There will be a meeting Oct. 25 to organize
a group trip to Whichard's Beach over the
weekend. If you are interested, please
meet in conference room 105 Memorial
Gym at 6:00.
FRESHMEN
An important meeting for FRESHMEN
who intend to major in the following:
Business and Distributive Ed Driver's
Ed Early Childhood Ed Health Ed In
termediate Ed Marketing Ed Middle
Grades Ed Physical Ed Special Ed,
Technical Ed. and Vocational Ed. "The
Second Academic Major Required by the
University of N. C. Board of Governors
Oct. 25 from 3:00-500 p.m in Wright
Auditorium.
ECU STUDENTSSTAFF
LSS SOCIETY
Volunteers, old dothes & sheets are
needed DESPERATELY for the Pirate
ClubLSS Society "Jr. Spooky Pirate
Night Halloween Carnival" to be held
Oct. 28 from 6-8 p.m. at the Pirate Club.
For more info please contact Beth Smyth
or Ann Totaro at 830-9315, anytime!
SEAT BELT FOR SAFETY
If you drive a car, then this is for you! Seat
Belts For Safety: Don't Drink and Drive A
presentation on the campus mall 1-5 p.m.
Oct. 20. Ride the seat belt convincer (car
crash simulator) and be eligible to win
$100. See displays convincing you to wear
seat belts. Meet TV personalities Larry
andVince.
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
STUDENTS FOR DUKAKIS
Come sec Senator Lloyd Bentsen today.
Come to Mendenhall, rm. 244 at 130 p m
and join the winners' For more into . call
752-5611.
AMNESTY INT'L.
Amnestv International meets ever
fourth Wed. at 8 p.m. at St Paul's Epi-
copal Church 401 E. 4th St in the upper
floor enter from the 4th street entrance
Ni.t meeting Oct. 26.
SPANISH CLUB
Spanish Club will meet todav in Confer
ence rm of Foreign Language Dept. in
GCB Topics of discussion are fund rais-
ers, dinners and entertainment Please
join us! Bienvenidos Todos!
A CONTEST
The Biology Club is sponsoring a t shirt
contest We are looking for "nifty" de-
signs relating to Biology (not Biology
Club) There will be a prize offered to the
best design on Oct 31 The designs are to
be turned in no la ter than 4 00 on Oct 26 in
B-102 (under the stairs of Biology Bldg)
Please leave your name and telephone
number with the design For more info ,
call Mamta Patel at 757-6286 or leave a
message in the Biology Club office
A CHALLENGE
The East Carolina Biology Qub chal
lenges EC1IO and physics club to raise at
least $100 for crop walk which is to be held
on Nov 6th and to challenge two other
organizations to do the same.
CORAL REEF DIVE CLUB
Coral Reef Dive Qub meeting will be Oct
24 in Mendenhall, rm. 248 at 8:00 p.m. For
more info, call David at 758-5132
INTENDED SLAP MAIORS
All General College students who have in
dkrated a desire to major in Speech Lan
guage and Auditory Pathology and have
R. Muzzarelli as their advisor are to meet
on Nov. 2 at 5.00 p.m in Brewster B-306
Advising for early registration will take
place at that time. Others interested in
SLAP should contact the dept. - 757-6961
meeting on Sun e �
Mendenhall, rm 24 j
in seeing what S F D
attend
BLACK PSYCHOLOf
MAJORS
Attentkx ' . �
Are you
nitv and what you an
leaving ECU? V
today u � . �
be glad that vou d I
LQ QKTOB1 HI! 5
The IK
� 2 �
244 The I
play from 7-9 pi
rolls f �
potal
be beer (for a
refn
ava
tuxes n � �
N sales at I
CJQLLEGJ
Neutrinol
STOCK r
- Three Ameri u
Prize in p I
work with part
tiny they car
surface
The B
ences cit
Melvin S hv n
berger for their
tnno bear
The an: �.
work wascan
and opened entii
tumties for research into
nermost structure and d
i 'natter "
The academj
diiscovery of the mu
Neutrinos, the n
ti les in narui
i rtts of mattt
have "gh
enable them I thro
surface.
"The v onti
warded consisted amo
things of trar
ghostly neutrino in!
tool oi research
ment said
I ederman 66
the Fermi Nationa
i bora tor in B
Schwartz, -
sor at Stan? - !
M president I
ways, Inc in Mo i i
i alif.
Bad Kissingen,
and is an American j
ever, the acaden -
his n.e
hevn a physic st at C
Geneva sine
On Iuesda) v'
whose idea- j
and demand he
iSa.
5e1
STUDENTS FOR EC. PEMQC-
RACY
Students for Economic Democracy will be
r
Whtn uruifiu I not owi
Otenv. HC I
�II M





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20. 1988 7
Announcements
little red
New ear's
ng Break skiing, to Rose-
indef the Stan
to the pig piokins
v t' have been to-
la it again! With
H FLA VOOTBALL
thai -i points
i teams would like to
Get readv though,
.mnind the
Come to Pi
��30 - nil
HERS AND
tile Sis
Mendenhall
oi By
a t to i ive
i - m �
Rent
Rl Ml TS
�1 NS"
iVAILABLE

anian
is for an
sentative.

nthusiasrn
mian
t�sume
plding
lbrary)
please!
i
;n in r l.
-� in the upper
si .�( entrance
lit! CLUB
� ; i. 4 fer
pt in
an fund rais
unenl Please
A CON lib I
ring a t shirt
.
lesigns ar I
I Con Oct 26irt
I Btolog) Bldg )
ame and telephone
: sign Tor more info
H 757-6286 or leave a
g (lub office
A CHALLENGE
ib chal
�K3 tub to raise at
ilk which is to be held
� and to challenge two other
do the same
ORAL RkEFDJVE CLUB
1 "lub meeting will be Oct
D . - pm For
� :)awi �t7SI 5132
IhNDI Q SLAP MAJORS
ge students who have in
led a desire to maor in Speech Lan-
uditorv Pathology and have
irdli as their advisor are to m�t
1. . 2 a! "N 00 p m in Brewster B 306
psing for earl) registration will take
at that time Carters interested in
should ontact the dept 757 61
12HNT5 FQILEC QEMQCr
RAO
Kits tor Economic Democracy will be
meeting on Sun evening at 7:00 pan in
Mendenhall. rm 2-iS Anyone interested
in seeing what S ED. is about is invited to
attend.
BLACK PSYCHOLOGY
MAJORS
Attention" All Black Psychology Majors:
Are you concerned about your commu
nitv and what you are going to do after
leaving ECU? Well, come out and join us
today in room 2tO Kawl at 4 lit' You will
be glad that you did
ILO QKTOBERFF.ST
The ILO Oktoberfest will take place on
Oct 26 from 6-930 pm in Mendenhall,
244 The ECU "Schmutzigs" band will
play from 7-9 p.m The menu consists ot
rolls Knockwurst, Sauerkraut, German
potato salad and dessert There will also
be Nvr (tor an wine 21 or over) and other
refreshments Tickets are S2 50 and are
a ailable from 11 O representatives or the
Dept of Foreign Languages and Litera
rures Thev will be on sale through Oct. 1�
No salt a the door.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Urgent meeting for all members and other
interested Republicans. Tonight at 700
p.m. in 221 Mendenhall.
DANCE
Oct 21, wes2fel Christian Fellowship will
host a dance at the Methodist Student
Center, from 9 p.m. until midnight Bring
your own music (cassettes) if you desire,
refreshments provided Please, no alco-
hol. Sponsored bv Presbyterian and Meth-
odist Campus Ministries, 758-2030.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Will beholding meeting today at 400 p.m.
in room 1013 CCB. New officers will be
installed and yearbook pictures will be
taken, so dress appropriately All people
going to the Fall Membership Training
Conf please attend this meeting to make
final plans $25, si5, and $10 will be
awarded to the top 3 sellers of Tom Watt
Check the Bulletin Board on the 2nd floor
outside of room 2014 CCB for other an-
nouncements.
LIFE PLANNING WORK-
SHOP
This workshop is intended to provide as-
sistance to students unsure of the direc-
tion they wish their lives to take. The focus
will be on lifestyles for the future. Many
people do not think of themselves as
having influence on their futures, but
rather, just let the future happen. Partici-
pants in Life Planning will engage in a
process of self examination of present
behaviors, goal setting and decision mak-
ing. The Life Planning Workshop will
meet: Oct. 24, 26, 28 and 31 in 313 Wright
Bldg. from 3-4 p.m. (attend all 4 meetings).
Although advanced registration is not
required, we would appreciate advance
notification of interest to insure that we
have adequate materials on hand. Please
contact the Counseling Center in 316
Wright Bldg. (757-6661) for further info, or
to let us know you plan to attend.
E. C. HONORS ORG.
East Carolina I lonors Organization is the
student honors group at ECU; it works
closely with the Honors Program and is
affiliated with the N.C Honors Assoc,
Southern Regional Honors Council and
the National Collegiate Honors Council.
Meetings are held on alternate Thursdays
at 5:00 in room 1004 of the CCB. Meetings
for Oct. are on the 6th and 20th; contact Dr.
Sanders (757-6373) for more info
HEALTH SERVICE CLINIC
Don't miss the game on Sat The Sat
Clinic will be held from 10.00 am. to 12:00
noon. The Sun. Clinic will be held as usual
from 2:00 p.m. to 400 pm Call the Stu-
dent I lealth Services at 757 6841 for more
info, or questions.
"Greenville's Finest Bakery for over 63 ytmn. "
Happy Birthday
(buy your friends personalized
B-Day cakes at Dieners)
Phone: 752-5251
815 Dickinson Avenne
Greenville, N.C.
ow to runyour
own snow
Neutrino studies bag Nobel prize
STOCKHOLM, Sweden (AP)
Three Americans won the Nobel
Prize in physics today for their
work with particles that are so
tiny thev can pass through any
surface.
The Royal Academy oi Sci-
� rices cited Leon Lederman,
Melvin Schwartz and )ack Stein-
berger for their work with neu-
trino beams.
The announcement said their
work was carried out in the 1960s
and opened entirely new oppor-
tunities for research into the in-
nermost structure and dynamics
s matter
The academy also cited their
scovery of the muon neutrino.
Neutrinos, the most common
irticles in nature, are constitu-
tes of matter so tiny that they
have "ghostlike" qualities that
enable them to pass through any
surface.
"The contribution now
awarded consisted among other
tilings of transforming the
ghostly neutrino into an active
hl of research the announce-
ment said.
Lederman, 66, is director at
the Fermi National Accelerator
I aboratory in Batavia, 111.
Schwartz, 55, is a former profes-
sor at Stanford University and
now president of Digital Path-
ways, Inc in Mountain View,
Calif.
Steinberger, 67, was born in
Bad kissingen, West Germany,
and is an American citizen. 1 low-
ever, the academy officially lists
his nationality as Swiss. He has
been a physicist at CERN, in
Geneva, since 1968.
On Tuesday, Maurice Allais,
whose ideas on balancing supply
and demand helped rebuild the
French economy alter World War
II, won the Nobel Prize for eco-
nomics.
Allais said the poverty and
unemployment he saw in the
United States, on a visit during the
Great Depression of the 1930s,
turned him to economics from the
engineering career tor which he
had trained.
On Monday, American re-
searchers Gertrude B. Elion and
George H. Flitchings shared the
medicine award with Sir James
W. Black of Britain for helping
develop drugs to treat leukemia,
high blood pressure, AIDS and
other diseases.
U.N. peacekeeping forces
won the Nobel Peace Prize, an-
nounced Sept. 29 in Oslo, Nor-
way, and the award in literature
went last week to Egyptian novel-
ist Naguib Mahfouz, the first
Arabic-language writer to win it.
Economics is the only one of
the six Nobel prizes not stipulated
in the will of Swedish industrialist
Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dy-
namite, who died in 1896. This
vear's prizes are worth about
$390,000.
Riverbluff
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1
n
8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20,1988
(T
Jordan wants stiffer drug laws
Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan, flanked
by sheriffs from across the state,
blasted Gov. Jim Martin's record
on crime and called for stiffer
penalties against convicted drug
dealers.
For his part, Martin called
Tuesday for education reforms,
saying the state needs to put more
effort into education, with higher
salaries and a career ladder that
will give teachers a chance for ad-
vancement.
In the presidential race,
Democratic nominee Michael
Dukakis planned to discuss agri-
cultural issues with farmers and
other supoorters via a satellite
television linkup. The event was
scheduled for today at the state
fair.
Meanwhile former Gov.
Lester maddox called on North
Carolina Democratic leaders to
abandon Dukakis, saying he had
nothing to offer the party's con-
servatives.
"A lot of Democratic leaders
are refusing to go out and cam-
paign for Dukakis because they
know what the people feel
Maddox said at a news conference
outside the state Capitol. "The
people are frightened about
Dukakis and they're disap-
pointed in their Democratic lead-
ers
The Democratic Party "is
under the absolute control of the
revolutionary leftists in this coun-
try Maddox said. "They sup-
port (Nicaraguan leader Daniel)
Ortega, they support Jane Fonda,
they support (House Speaker) Jim
Wright
Maddox, who was Georgia
governor from 1967-71, said he
was traveling 1,000 miles per
week at his own expense, urging
Democratic officials to insist that
the partv move toward the right.
Jordan, the Democratic gu-
bernatorial nominee, charged
Tuesday that Martin has funncled
money into political payoffs in-
stead of fighting drugs in the
state.
"Jim Martin has not given the
war on drugs this kind of leader-
ship. As usual, he has been bring-
ing up the rear Jordan said in a
new conference at the Pitt County
Courthouse in Greenville. "Yes,
he made a television commercial
against drugs. Yes, he had some
press conferences about druos.
But we need action, not talk.
"Jim Martin chose to spend
over a quarter of a million dollars
in taxpayers money for a political
payoff he said. "I say we should
stop wasting money on political
debts and start spending it on a
Governor's Office on Drug
Abuse. Political payoffs and po-
litical rhetoric will not win the
war against drugs
Jordan said the "payoff" was
the job Martin awarded to former
Democratic Lt. Gov. Jimmy
Green. Jordan also said Reoubli-
cans who were defeated in local
elections in the state were given
prime jobs in the Martin admini-
stration.
"North Carolina is not going
to make any more excuses for why
we can't support our schools
Martin told about 250 people.
'This is the area where the most
effort and the strongest commit-
ment are needed
Martin said the career ladder
plan, which rates teacher per-
formance and offers teacher more
pay for higher ratings, was "of the
greatest importance to educa-
tion
'Teachers would be able to
receive promotions without leav-
ing the classroom he said.
Martin said he expected the
state's averages wages to con-
tinue increasing, reaching the
national average by the mid-
1990s.
"If we can continue to have a
strong market economy, a strong
job market and a strong business
climate, we can bid up the wages
of people across the board he
said.
Jordan also made a call for
stricter penalties against people
convicted on drug charges during
his news conference. About 20
sheriffs and law enforcement offi-
cers, including Pitt Sheriff Raloh
Tyson, lined the courthouse steps
behind Jordan during his news
;onference.
Possession of any amount of
cocaine or crack - even one vial -
should be a felony, Jordan said,
and any adult offender should
serve prison time for the offense.
Jordan said he supported
death sentences for "drug king-
pins" involved in murders, and
he said he would consider
extending the punishment to
other drug dealers, depending on
the size of their drug operation.
The state must build more
prisons to reduce overcrowding,
he said, and some misdemeanor
offenders should be kept out of
jail to alleviate the problem. More
money should also be made avail-
able for local governments to in-
crease community service pro-
grams so that some people do not
go to jail.
Vance County Sheriff Tony
McGee and Martin County Sheriff
Wille Rogers also spoke briefly in
support of Jordan.
"I can't imagine any law en-
forcement officer not supporting
Bob Jordan Rogers said. McGee
also said Jordan is the best candi-
date, but he declined to cite spe-
cific reasons Jordan could do a
better job than Martin.
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READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
A103
Art and reason
When Mark and I deckled to spend
the weekend at his mother's house.
I never imagined I won Mix walking
into a mouses nightmare. Ihciv were
eats everywhere.
( at plaques, cat statues, cat . locks,
even a eat mat. I couldn't begin to Juph
cate her collection of kittv litter iI I spent
a ear at a garage sale. Conspicuously
absent, however, w as a real cat. Strange,
I thought, and began to tear that a
weekend with cat woman coukl be a
lot less than purr-feet.
But then she came home. au
Mark intnxiuced her. She was
dressed surprisingly well no
leopard pants In fact, von
coukl sav she was the cats meow.
but 111 rather not.
She ottered me a cup of DutchIn k
olate Mint. Now that was something
I could relate to.Then she brought it
out in the most beautiful, distinctly
untelmcchma 111 ever seen. As wc
sipped. I found out that Mrsamplx
has my same weakness tor choc 'late.
lo es the theater as much as I do. but,
iXTcdibh; never saw "( ats So Mark
ak 1 are taking her next month
General Foods International Coffees
Share the feeling.
RAMADA INN PRESENTS
Costa
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica I AI
The government declared a I
I it emergency and began eva j
ing coastal resid i
loan spun toward enti I
tea alter leaving a tra j
tion in Colombia
At least 50 peopl
injured or missing in (
and tens of thousand
were destl
aals said.
puzzling f �
ratic course ' ar
the Colombian .
San Andre
Colombian coast
Manuel Obai
Costa Rica's
Committee ;
a the killer sti rm vs
Rica early toda
Th
homeless
Jren and s'
from Puerto I u
coast port cit
ab � 5 �;
Court o
� �
marijuai
V5
ils sa
Supreme Court is
tor law enter
nev General Lac) Th "
isked the I v
review the de
Fhe state Supren
ing said an -V. �.
was wrong - -
doned store torif tl
of a marijuana manul
plant.
The state Suprem
that because th
peek into the
lie interior
Newland w as not in plain
anyone pa
tino slights were j
According to a bru
forThornburgb) ss -
nev General lohn Wa
state Supreme Court - d
"hvporteehnical. ' unwoj
for law enforcement
void of an) practica
The decision coi j
principle that l.v.s enl i qj
officers should K i
verify informant
tore seek ng search
Watters writes
eluded that, even th
cers crossed se oral t i
defendant's p
barn, they were vv
to peer into it.
That was all th d
the Avery County case
claims in his brief he!
MONDAY
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FOOTBALL
On Greenville's Largest
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High Energy Music provided by Connie
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RAMADA INN
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r O
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1988 9
Costa Rica braces forhurricanei
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica (AP) -
The government declared a state
of emergency and began evacuat-
ing coastal residents as Hurricane
loan spun toward Central Amer-
ica after leaving a trail of devasta-
tion in Colombia.
At least 50 people were dead,
injured or missing in Colombia
and tens of thousands oi homes
were destroyed or flooded, offi-
cials said.
Packing 95-mph winds and
puzzling forecasters with its er-
ratic course, loan churned toward
the Colombian island resort oi
San Andres, 500 miles north of the
C olombian coast.
Manuel Obando, president of
Costa Rica's National Emergencv
Committee, predicted the brunt
of the killer storm would hit Costa
Rica early today.
The government evacuated
homeless elderly people and chil-
dren and 8f hospital patients
from Puerto Limon, an Atlantic
coast port city of 8,000 people
about 105 miles southeast oi the
capital, San Jose, Obando said.
He said 167 inmates also were
evacuated from a prison and that
authorities were prepared to
move another 30,000 coastal resi-
dents inland sheets of rain lashed
the coast.
If bv Mondav we observe that
there is a imminent danger, we'll
begin to evacuate Obando said.
Heavy rains pushed the Re-
ventazon and Parritas rivers over
their banks near the Pacific coast
port of Puntarenas, 80 miles
northeast of San Jose, radio re-
ports said.
In Panama, a hurricane watch
was in effect for the north coast
from Punta San Bias to Boca del
Toro and for San Andres.
Long lines formed at super-
markets and pharmacies in Pan-
ama Citv, the capital, as people
heeded warnings to stock up on
supplies. The government de-
clared a state of alert.
"Stay calm, don't become
alarmed and don't panic Colon
Mayor Juan Fidel Macias told
residents of that Atlantic port in a
radio broadcast.
Traffic in the Panama Canal
was not expected to be disrupted,
said Panama Canal Commission
spokesman Franklin Castrellon.
In Nicaragua, officials were
uncertain what impact Joan
would have. "We can't say if the
storm will directly affect Nicara-
gua at this moment said Pilar
Cruz, director of Nicaragua's
National Meteorological Service.
At midnight EDT Tuesday,
Joan was centered near latitude
11.3 north, longitude 77.5 west,
the National Hurricane Center in
Coral Gables, Ha said in a state-
ment. It said the hurricane's cen-
ter was about 290 miles southeast
of San Andres and 210 miles
northeast of Colon.
Joan's unusual southern path
had forecasters puzzling over its
possible landfall.
"Joan is one of a kind said
Jim Gross, a meteorologist at the
National Hurricane Center. "You
just don't see many hurricanes
that take this course and hug the
coast
Joan raked the northern Co-
lombian coast with heavy rains
and winds Monday, triggering
floods that inundated and de-
stroyed homes.
In the northern town of
Carmen de Bolivar, 360 miles
north of Bogota, the capital, at
least three people were killed
Monday and about 38 were miss-
ing, Victor Leon Mendoza of the
Bolivar state government said.
A child was killed and seven
people injured Monday in the
town of Uribia on Colombia's
Guajira Peninsula, police said in a
communique. About 75 percent
of the homes in Uribia, a town of
45,000, were destroyed or
flooded, police said.
Camilo Cardenas, president
of Colombia's National Emer-
gency Committee, said in a news
release that about 200 homes in
Carmen deBolivar were de-
stroyed or flooded.
Court overturns ruling in
marijuana production case
Beware! IT'S Coming Back.
Thursday, IT returns
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
b
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
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ICE CREAM
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ASIflEVILLE (AP) - State offi-
cials say a ruling by the state
Supreme Court is "unworkable
tor law enforcement and Attor-
nes- General Lacy Thornburg has
asked the U.S. Supreme Court to
review the decision.
The state Supreme Court rul-
ing said an Avery County deputy
was wrong to peek into an aban-
doned store to verify the existence
of a marijuana manufacturing
plant.
The state Supreme Court said
that because the deputy stooped
to peek into the cracks - because
the interior of the store near
Mewland was not in plain view to
anyone passing by - Joseph Mario
Tarantino's rights were wronged.
According to a brief written
for Thornburg by Assistant Attor-
ney General John Watters, the
state Supreme Court's decision is
"hvpertechnical "unworkable
for law enforcement" and "de-
void of any practical wisdom
The decision contradicts the
principle that law enforcement
officers should be encouraged to
verify informant information be-
fore seeking search warrants,
Watters writes.
eluded that, even though the offi-
cers crossed several fences on the
defendant's property to get to the
bam, they were within their rights
to peer into it.
That was all the deputy did in
the Avery County case, Watters
claims in his brief before the court
- peer between the cracks in a wall
to verify a marijuana growing
operation was going on inside the
store.
But 24th Judicial District At-
torney Tom Rusher said Tuesday
he doubts the higher court will
hear the case. Of the 1,000 cases
submitted for its consideration
this October term, the U.S. Su-
preme Court elected to hear only
about 100.
If it refuses to hear argu-
ments, North Carolina's case
against Tarntino will be dis-
missed, Rusher said. Tarentino's
attorney has argued the mari-
juana should be barred from court
because the deputy violated
Tarentino's rights to get it.
Without the marijuana, there
is no case, Rusher said. The
Tarantino case, Thornburg con-
tends, hinges on a previous ruling
by the U.S Supreme Court - U.S.
vs. Dunn - in which the court
decided that federal drug agents
peering into the open door of a
barn and discovering a drug lab
did not violate the owner's rights.
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1988 PIRATE HOME SCHEDULE
Sept. 3 Tennessee Tech. 700 PM
Sept. 24 Southern Mississippi (Parent's Day) 1:30 PM
Oct. 1 Southwestern Louisiana 1:30 PM
Oct. 8 West Virginia (Homecoming)
Oct. 22 Syracuse
Oct 29 Miami
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Open Football Saturdays 9:00 A.M. - 6:00 RM.Weekdays 9hX A.M. - 5:30 P.M.
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1988
I
-
-
-
Bakker says he can prove innocence
COLUMBIA,S.C. (AD-PTL
founder Jim Bakker says docu-
ments he's just received should
vindicate him against charges he
failed to repay the television
ministry money used for his own
benefit.
Appearing Tuesday to de-
fend allegations in a $52 million
lawsuit PTL filed against him,
Bakker told reporters he was "a
touch angry he was only now
receiving canceled checks and re-
imbursement receipts and
hinted they may have been pur-
posely withheld.
"I think somebody calcu-
lated they would hold all the ma-
terials until the middle of the
trial he said, though he did not
say who.
Bakker predicted his re-
search would satisfy at least 90
percent of the Internal Revenue
Service's concerns.
In its suit against Bakker, his
wife Tammy and former aide
David Taggart, PTL accuses
Bakker of mismanaging the min
first week of the trial in Septem- Court. A federal grand jury in unanimously in favor of bonuses
ber that the Bakkers received Charlotte, N.C has been investi- for Bakker.
about $9.5 million in bonuses, gating for more than a year the "If a bonus came up, I voted for
salaries and other compensation ministry raised money for one it said Ms. Spencer, pastor of The
from 1983 to 1987. purpose and it used it for one thing House ofTruth church in Oakland,
An IRS agent also testified he or another. Calif,
found cash advances to Bakker Bakker's other attorney, Ryan Under cross-examination by
and Taggart that apparently Hovis, said they asked for the in- PTL attorney Tom White, Ms.
served no legitimate business formation last week, once they dis- Spencer could not recall the pre-
purpose. Bakker called the case covered who the appropriate en- cise salary of Bakker during her
'literally a trial for my life.
"It may be business as usual
for everyone else, but this is my
life I'm talking about Bakker
during a lunch break in the hear-
ing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.
The ministry entered bank-
ruptcy protection three months
after Bakker left in March 1987
after he admitted to a sexual
encounter with former church
secretary Jessica Hahn.
The trial resumed Monday,
and Bakker is expected to testify
today for the first time this week.
Bakker attorney Jim Toms
said Bakker's comments about
possible sabotage "really reflect a
frustration" in trying to prove his
case based on records scattered
tity would be to ask. He would not
say who was asked.
In Tuesday's testimony, inde-
pendent financial analyst James
Wilson said PTL's finances from
1978 to 1986 showed it to be a
time on the board from November
1985 to March 1987, when the
board resigned.
As he began Bakker's defense
Monday, attorney Ryan Hovis
said he will try to show that
healthy, growing ministry without Bakker's salaries and benefits were
financial problems
According to Wilson, the
ministry's fixed assets grew at an
annual compound rate of 28 per-
cent during that time while reve-
nues increased 19 percent.
Also Tuesday, a former PTL
board member said Bakker de-
served every bonus he received
while at the helm of the Fort Mill-
based television ministry and reli-
gious theme park.
Evelyn Spencer told Judge
not only approved, but that he also
earned them.
And despite what he said was
a lack of records, Hovis said he
would present a pattern of ap-
proval for salaries and bonuses
and reimbursement for Bakker's
personal expenses.
During the first hal f of the trial,
PTL attorneys White and Brad
Lcggett presented financial rec-
ords and testimony from PTL offi-
cials and an IRS agent that PTL
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nakker or mismanaging uie iiwm- case udscu un rtvurus scattercu cveiyn opc-nc-i ii�u j"�-5� -tr�
istry. The ministry presented among PTL offices, a federal gTand Rufus Reynolds she and other claimed showed Bakker had mis
testimony and evidence in the jury probe, and U.S. Bankruptcy board members consistently voted managed the ministry.
Elderly man kidnapped by two women
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) - A
77 year-old man who was cov-
ered with blood was picked up by
a truck driver after he was kid-
napped by two women who
locked him in the trunk of his
Cadillac and later stabbed him in
the chest, authorities say.
James Howard Cardwell of
VVinston-Salem was abandoned
on the sideof a Surrv County road
Countv, Va Sheriff's Depart- phoned Cardwell and asked him
mcnt to drive her to Stanleyville to pick
'I don't know why it hap- up her car.
pened Cardwell said Tuesday in
an interview from Baptist Hospi-
tal, where he was listed in stable
condition.
Ms. Gibson and Ms. Ferguson
face extradition to Forsyth
County for trial on charges of
assault with a deadlv weapon
Monday, according to Forsyth with intent to kill, inflicting seri
County Sheriff's Major E.D.
Alston. Cardwell was robbed of
"I didn't really have time to
do it, but she asked me to do her a
favor, and I did said Cardwell,
who was acquainted with one of
the suspects.
They arranged to meet at a
church parking lot, Alston said.
When Cardwell arrived, he was
met by the two women and a tcen-
$100 and stabbed with a knife that
punctured and deflated a lung,
according to an arrest warrant.
Two women, Tammy Gibson,
ous injury; first-degree kidnap- age boy that Cardwell did not
ping; and larceny of an automo- know.
bile. Ms. Gibson also faces a
charge of armed robbery. Ms.
Ferguson also faces one count of
robbery with a dangerous
28, and Freda Diana Ferguson, 28, weapon. They were being held in
both of Winston-Salem, were ar- the Carroll County jail,
rested early Tuesday about two The incident began about 5:30
miles outside Hillsville, Va said p.m. in Winston-Salem, Alston
Det. Steve Williams of the Carroll said, when one of the women tele-
He said he drove to
Stanleyville, but they wanted to
keep going.
"So I pulled over and told
them I wasn't going to go any far-
ther Cardwell said. He said he
was then threatened with a knife.
He was later locked in the trunk of
his car.
"I reckon they kept me in that
trunk, just riding anywhere, but I
didn't know where they were
going Cardwell said. They
stopped about one-and-half
hours later on U.S. 52, somewhere
outside of Pilot Mountain, and
unlocked the trunk, Alston said.
"They unlocked the trunk
and stabbed me Cardwell said.
"I didn't even know that I was
stabbed. I just looked down, and I
was bleeding all over the place
The women drove away in
the Cadillac, Alston said, leaving
Cardwell injured by the side of
the road. He was picked up by a
truck driver late Monday night
and driven to a gas station in Pilot
Mountain. An ambulance took
him to Baptist Hospital.
You Can Take
Your Utility Bill
And
Mail It
Or
Pay It At A Local Bank
GUC is remodeling its main office, so the entire first
floor and the drive-thru window are closed. While
renovations continue, it will be more convenient for
you to just drop it in the mail, use our automatic Bank
Draft program, or pay it right on campus at the ECU
Student Bank. Other banks which accept GUC pay-
ment are as follows: Barclays of N.C Branch Banking
& Trust Co First Citizens Bank & Trust Co First
Federal Savings and Loan, Peoples Bank & Trust Co
Planters National Bank & Trust Co Wachovia Bank &
Trust.
When our remodeling is finished, we'll be able to
serve you better. If you have any questions, please call
us at 752-7166.
Gre nville cfTttS Utilities
South
SEOUL, South Korea I
South Korea will call on
United States to improve
tions with communist Nortr
rea in conjunction with sn
moves by the Soviet Union ai
allies to thaw ties with Seoul J
cials said.
South Korean President
Tae-woo, to meet Thursday
White House with rresidenl
agan, "will formally urgj
United States to take broad
ures as soon as possible t
prove ues with North Korea.
government official said
The official, speaking
dihon of anonymity, said RoJ
brief Reagan on nib new peat
tiatives on the Korean penil
and thank him for Washing
support for a successful host
the Seoul Olympics.
The United State- b I
its military presence in!
around the Korean pen
during the Seoul Olympic
warned North Kon j
Shrou
Science brought the
of Tunn into prominend
now science has shoved lj
toward obscurity
Despite the turn-abo
puzzling cloth doubt. j
remain to manv an obn J
nation.
However results
last week from radiocarbc
show the shroud is only al
vears old and could not
burial cloth of Jesus in
century.
Manv had believed thl
was the one used to wi j
body after his crucifixion
the time of his resurrect!
belief that had been stn i :
by previous scientific findl
But the latest tests
separate laboratories in
the U.S and Switzerland!
highly sensitive datin
niques, find the s'r
from between 12rn to P:

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,� in.ttifityrtf.n�.��-�i ii'
IheNeanderttaki
ANewt or Mi
;jj!�5Hjg
andaCDfor
Try a Macintosh today-you may
u
Now that a new school
year is under way, we have
an idea that'll make both
you and your parents feel a
bit more confident come
finals time:
Get a Macintosh
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homework.
Then you 11 never have
to spend another all-nighter
retyping a paper just to
purge a few typos and
dangling modifiers. You'll
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ments that look as though
you bribed a friend in art
school. And with an amaz-
ing new program called
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Enter: 0
EC





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1988 11
US!
v Will
irate Balloons
PAPER"
Get
U - Cutlery
vers, Plates &
Briers
?on Bouquet!
h Our Exclusive
r k onvience
555-6212
so the entire first
are closed. While
lore convenient for
ir automatic Bank
i campus at the ECU
accept GUC pay-
'sC, Branch Banking
�sc Trust Co First
es Bank & Trust Co
o Wachovia Bank &
;rted, we'll be able to
questions, please call
l&s Uti
South Korea appeals for U.S. help
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -
South Korea will call on the
United States to improve rela-
tions with communist North Ko-
rea in conjunction with similar
moves by the Soviet Union and its
allies to thaw ties with Seoul, offi-
cials said.
South Korean President Roh
Tae-woo, to meet Thursday at the
White House with President Re-
agan, "will formally urge the
United States to take broad meas-
ures as soon as possible to im-
prove ties with North Korea one
government official said.
The official, speaking on con-
dition of anonymity, said Roh will
brief Reagan on his new peace ini-
tiatives on the Korean peninsula
and thank him for Washington's
support for a successful hosting of
the Seoul Olympics.
The United States beefed up
its military presence in and
around the Korean peninsula
during the Seoul Olympics and
warned North Korea against dis-
rupting the Games, which Pyon-
gyang unsuccessfully sought to
co-host. The Games ended with-
out incident on Oct. 2.
In a related development,
Roh, speaking at the United Na-
tions, called Tuesday for a sum-
mit meeting with North Korea's
president to sign a non-aggres-
sion pact. North Korea and South
Korea have been bitter enemies
since the division of the Korean
peninsula in 1945.
Relations between the United
States and North Korea have
never developed beyond the
symbolic stage. The United States
fought for South Korea in a three-
year war against the North Kore-
ans in the early 1950s.
As a conciliatory gesture, the
United States allowed limited
contact with North Korea in early
1987 but revoked the decision last
year after the communist Asian
state was implicated in the No-
vember bombing of a South Ko-
rean commercial jet with 115
people on board near Burma.
South Korea, the official said,
now hopes the United States will
change its policy again, easing
visa restrictions and allowing
limited personnel find trade con-
tacts with North Korea.
Such conciliatory U.S. ges-
tures are necessary to bolster
Koh's initiatives to improve rela-
tions with North Korea, the offi-
cial said.
Roh on Tuesday told the U.N.
General Assembly that South
Korea is ready to end its rivalry
and confrontation with North
Korea and would not oppose its
allies improving ties with North
Korea.
"It is our wish that our allies
and friends will contribute to the
progress and opening of North
Korea by engaging Pyongyang
(the North Korean capital) in
expanding relations he said.
"It is also our position that
those socialist countries with
close ties to North Korea continue
to maintain positive relations and
cooperate with North Korea even
as they improve relations with
us Roh added.
It is unclear how far South
Korea wants the United States to
go to improve ties with North
Korea, but the official said, "We
want the policies of our allies
commensurate with moves by
countries allied with the north
South Korea, bolstered by a
remarkable economic revival in
the last two decades, is actively
pushing to improve ties with
communist nations. Hungary and
Yugoslavia have already set up
trade offices in Seoul and the
Soviet Union and other major
communist nations are expected
to follow suit.
A few days before the Sum-
mer Olympics opened in Seoul
last month, Hungary made the
surprise announcement that it
would become the first commu-
nist nation to establish ambassa-
dorial-level relations with South
Korea.
Shroud of Turin age under question
Science brought the Shroud
of Turin into prominence and
now science has shoved it back
toward obscurity.
Despite the turn-about, the
puzzling cloth doubtlessly will
remain to many an object of fasci-
nation.
However, results disclosed
last week from radiocarbon tests
show the shroud is only about 700
years old and could not be the
burial cloth of Jesus in the first
century.
Many had believed the cloth
was the one used to wrap Jesus'
bodv after his crucifixion and at
the time of his resurrection - a
belief that had been strengthened
by previous scientific findings.
But the latest tests at three
separate laboratories in Britain,
the U.S. and Switzerland, using
highly sensitive datino tech-
niques, find the shroud dated
from between 1260 to 1390.
Nevertheless, the mystery of
the image on the cloth remains. It
shows, as in a photographic nega-
tive, the front and back of a
scourged, crucified man. Scien-
tists have been unable to deter-
mine how it got there.
A 32-mcmber U.S. research
team concluded in 1981, after
spending five days subjecting the
shroud to a wide range of tests,
that the image is not the product
of an artist and that it bears blood
stains.
But what caused "the image is
an ongoing mystery the report
said.
That question also remained
unanswered by the latest radio-
carbon tests.
The Rev. Adam Otterbein,
head of the Holy Shroud Guild,
says there are many other unre-
solved questions, such as previ-
ous research claims that the image
snowed first-century coins over
the victim's eyes.
Some scientists previously
had suggested that the image was
made by a sudden, intense blaze
of light, such as that mentioned by
Scripture at the time of the resur-
rection.
Others have theorized the
image was caused by radiation, or
by some sort of still unexplained
chemical reaction between body
secretions and the cloth, but that
they have not been able to dupli-
cate the effect by such processes.
The history of the 14-by-4-
foot-long linen shroud can be
traced to 1354, when it was depos-
ited in Lirey, France, by a French
nobleman who participated in
Crusades to the Holy Land.
The cloth has been kept since
1578 in Turin, Italy, where the
Catholic archbishop of Turin is its
official guardian.
It drew little attention until
scientific investigations of it be-
gan about the turn of the century,
starting with 1898 photographs
revealing the image on the shroud
had characteristics of a photo-
graphic negative.
Since that time, various stud-
ies accumulated so extensively
that they took on a technical
name, "siconology" (shroud
study). But testing of the cloth
itself was not allowed since its
keepers feared damage to it.
But that changed dramati-
cally in 1978 when scientists of the
U Q Shroud of Turin Research
Project were allowed to conduct
various chemical, photographic
and comouterized tests.
Taking three years to corre-
late their results, they concluded
in 1981 that the image of the cruci-
fied figure had not been forged by
an artist, but they were uncertain
how it got there.
It
rt
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The power to be your best
Enter: October 3rd-0ctober 21st
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
Greenville, NC





THE EAST CAROLirJ
THE EAST CAROI INI AN
Features
OCTOBER 20, 1988 Page 12
Padgette looks forward to Miss USA Pageant,
ECU senior carries N.C. crown to Alabama
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Assistant Feature Editor
address younger people and she
hopes that winning the Miss USA
and Miss Universe titles would
"the friendliest people in the
world Padgette enjoyed grow-
ing up in Hobgood and thinks
attend ECU in the upcoming
spring semester. As a result, she
will graduate a semester later
Jackie Padgette is a senior at allow her to speak to even more that everyone should be proud of than anncjpatecj but she has no
In the formal wear competition, Jackie Padgette fared well en-
route to winning Miss North Carolina.
'Blushing Brides'
Stone the Attic
By EARL V. HAMPTON
Features Kditor
Jagger kindsot things Thisguy is
a great impersonator. 1 le does the
hands on the hips Jagger strut.
Stumbling out of a shiny The hands on the head agger
black van, two men emerge into a comatose. The machine gun jump
ECU, majoring in Clothing and such groups.
Textiles and minoring in Child Padgette stopped short of
Development. She gets good saying that she thinksshe will win
grades, and education is impor- the Miss USA title. She did say
tant to her. She is five feet eight that she would go to the competi-
tnches tall, with blond hair and tion with a positive attitude and
blue-green eyes. that, with the invaluable assis-
Nothing is particularly tance of her mother, she has been
unusual about that, except that preparing for the Miss USA com-
Padgette is also Miss North Caro- petition since she became Miss
lina. In February she will be repre- NC-USA. She lists as her main
senting this state in the Miss USA strengths honesty and her ability
Pageant in Mobile, Alabama, the to be herself.
next step up in the Miss Universe Padgette says that, in addi-
Pageant. Should she win the Miss non to the formal aspects of the
USA Pageant, she'll go on to competition, there is much per-
compete for the title of Miss Uni- ai competition among the
verse as well. contestants � mostly friendly.
Unlike a certain other well- although she reports that some
known pageant, the Miss Uni- get too caught up in it. Wardrobe
verse Pageant does not include a js a large part of this competition,
talent competition. It does, how- but Padgette wishes it weren't,
ever, include a question-and-an- She hopes the judges look past the
swer session, and Padgette says outer trappings and see the inner
that the questions make or break person.
the contestants. Questions are Of pageants Padgette said, "If
directed at getting to know the a girl goes into it with the right
contestants; at the national level attitude it's a good experience
the judges also ask about the con- she went on to say that, as a result
testants' home states and about Df participating in pageants, she
politics. Says Padgette, "You have has gTown and matured as a per-
to be prepared for anything met people, and established
Winning in the various levels j0b contacts.
of the Miss Universe Pageant pays Pageants have opened many
off. Being selected as Miss NC- doors and opportunities for her.
USA garnered Padgette $2000, a For example, Padgette has al-
diamond ring and a fur coat, and ready had two job offers in the
' all;xAPonPaid triP lo thc Clothing and Textiles field from
people she's met in the two
where she's from and who she is.
Padgette was introduced to
East Carolina by her brother, a
former ECU student. This is her
fifth year here and she loves it.
However, since the Miss USA
competition requires four weeks
of preparation, practicing and
rehearsals, she will not be able to
regrets.
When it's all over, Padgette
plans to take a well-earned vaca-
tion in New Orleans. When that's
over, she'll go back to carrying out
the duties of her crown or
maybe crowns
young Thursday night as they
cross a can-littered downtown
Greenville parking lot.
The taller of the two carries a
beat up suit case held together by
an arrav of bumper sticker while
the shorter nun luggs a brown
guitar case. Stepping on the center
line of Reid St the one says to the
other in an English accent,
"Greenville looking pretty crazy-
tonight
Suddenly, a convertible Rab-
bit slams its brakes on the down-
town motorway. Astounded, the
two men stop in their tracks.
The driver of the car, an ECU
co-ed, gawks at the two strangers
as her jaw bone drops. And she
screams, "Stav right there, 1 want
vour autograph. Oh, I am going to
kill my roommate. She didn't tell
me the Rolling Stones were com-
ing to town
No, the Stones didn't play the
Emerald City and there wasn't
any girl in a Rabbit either. One
thing is for certain although, "The
Blushing Brides" Stoned several
hundred Attic patrons Thursday.
A Rolling Stones tribute
band, "The Brides" play nothing
but RS tunes and they do a good
job of doing just that, a damn good
job. Let's not be repetitive, but
they play like them, they sound
like them and they look like them.
The lead singer (the reviewer
must apolize at this point for his
ineptness and incompetence in
not finding out the band mem-
bers' names; he was very drunk at
the time) really looks like Mick
Jagger. Maybe a few inches, well
maybe four inches taller than
Mick but hey you can't always get
what you want.
And on stage, he does Mick
Coming
in
Entertainment
Thursday
Valence
Susie's
Friday
Colan Lee
Attic
Mike Edwards Band
"�eli
Saturday
Billy Price
Attic
Mike Lightening' Wells
Deli
Jagger ushi. Not to mention (no-
tice it is being mentioned anyway)
the one - hundred million agger
mouth-lip contortions.
This guv, we'll call him
Mickey, must have practiced
endless hours in front of a mirror
to reach this level of "lumping
Jack Flash-dom" and it's enter-
taining, flat-out damn entertain
ing.
And the other guv, we'll call
him Jack, had a strong resem
blance to Keith Richards and Ins
patented tired look. aA is a
couple inches shorter than Keith,
well maybe six inches, but hey
what do you want wicker.
Jack Richards burst into the
Attic scene with a white shirt,
black leather vest, permanent five
o'clock shadow, and a burning
Marlboro Unlike the real Keith,
Jack relinquished most of his lead
guitar roles to the real lead guitar-
ist of "The Brides
With mirror shades and a
receding hair line, the lead guitar-
ist was the true musical treat of the
evening as he matched the RS
sound lick for lick. But Jack had to
be given credit for good play on
the ascoutic guitar during the m-
tro and mid-part of "Angie
If this reviewer recollects
properly (no law suits please),
'The Brides" started out the show
with "Let's Spend the Night To-
gether They sent the crowd
dancing with "Under My
Thumb "Heartbreaker" and
"(Censored word for the name of
a female dog)
Mickey jumped around su-
perbly during "Bitch jumping
with the big fast car beat and
jumping to the flashing white
lights. After a short intermission,
the fellows came out with "One
hit to the body to your body to
your body to your body is one
straight shot to the heart
Providing the back beat for
'The Brides" was a bass player
who stood unexcited (kind of like
ZMB) in his portion of the stage
like a lot bass players do. With his
black attire, the bassist wore one
of those American Indian, two-
string ties with the turquoise
thing in the middle. (Tel! me the
name of that thing, piease)
There was something differ
ent about this guy, though. He
was missing a pinky finger, or
morepreciselyahalfofone,onhis
plucking hand. The pinky had a
lot of tape on it, so he may have
intentionally taped it back. Ac-
cording to an local expert on the
matter, bassist ManuteCain from
the Usuals, the pinky finger is
used little in the thump of the
thick bass chords.
A "The Blushing Brides
show wouldn't be complete with-
out playing "Satisfaction The
best song ever written and played
by the Stones, "Satisfaction" hits
all the nerves .
Miss USA competition; on the na-
tional and international levels, the
prizes are even better.
Padgette is using her title for
more than personal benefit, how-
ever. Most important to her is
actively using her title to help
adolescents and children.
She has spoken to high school
groups and 4-H clubs, telling
them to make the most of life; she
also endorses the "just say no to
drugs campaign. She is giad that
her title puts her in a position to
months she has held the Miss NC-
USA title.
She plans to take advantage
of and to make the most of all the
opportunities she gets. But she
cautioned that it is also important
to keep her experiences in per-
spective and learn from them.
Padgette hails from Hob-
good, North Carolina, a farming
community 40 miles north of
Greenville. According to Padg-
ette, lobgood has five hundred of
Wake Forest students
slosh in experiment
With flowers and trophy, Jackie Padgette, an ECU senior from
Hobgood is crowned Miss North Carolina
Group trek to NYC
during fall break
WiNSTON-SALEM (AP) �
Traci Piccolo, tennis racket in
hand, popped the fluorescent
green ball up four times before it
bounded away. She giggled.
Over on Super Hang-on, a
video game, Dennis Gregory,
steering wheel in hand, watched
as the motorcyclist on the screen
J
overshot and crashed. He shook
his head, his eyes red and bleary.
It was b p.m. Tuesday at Wake
Forest University, and Piccolo
sumption does to your coordina-
tion skills said Gregory, director
of residence life and housing, be-
fore starting a regimen of down-
ing a beer in 15-minute intervals
for more than two hours.
Gregory said he is mindful
of the ironies of a faculty member
at a school with a Baptist tradition
getting sloshed with a small
group of students while dozens of
others looked on. But he stressed
that one must be realishc in gaug-
and Gregory - one a student; the ing the extent of drinking among
other, a faculty member - were
well on their way to getting
drunk.
"1 can definitely feel it
Piccolo, 21, said after downing
five 12-ounce Coors Lights.
This was no afternoon party
on the Magnolia Patio of Rey-
nolda Hall, but rather a controlled
experiment to show how drink-
ing impairs motor skillscoordina-
tion, The Greensboro News &
Record reported
students, whether of legal drink-
ing age or not.
"It's real difficult when the
drinking age is 21 for us to say to
our students who are not 21 to
drink responsibly Gregory said.
"But we know students are
going to drink, regardless of age,
so we're trying to be an educa-
tional model
The program, held on the
back patio of Rey nolda Hall, had a
party atmosphere to it as a disc
The experiment was spon- jockey played loud rock music
sored by the Alcohol Task Force, a ancj onlookers milled around
student group that helps devise talking and laughing while sip-
campus alcohol policies and pro- ping non-alcoholic beverages
mote what Gregory described as provided by the Alcohol Task
Force.
'responsible drinking.
During the course of the
demonstration, Gregory and
three 21-year-old students -
Piccolo, Pat Easterly and Linny
Little - were served 12-ounce cans
every 15 minutes.
After several rounds, the four
were asked to bounce a ball on a
tennis racket, walk a straight line, around You-
hopscotch through a taped-off
pattern and play the video game,
which simulates driving a motor-
cycle.
Although some perform-
ances were affected, none of the
participants had a blood-alcohol
content of 0.10 percent, the state's
legal limit for intoxication, ac-
cording to a Breathalyzer test
Winston-Salem police admini-
stered after about an hour. East-
erly blew a 0.09; Piccolo, a 0.07;
Gregory and Little, each a 0.04.
"What we're trying to do is
havea controlled drinking experi-
ment to show what alcoholic con-
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Suit Writer
Going to New York is like going
to another country. The city, with
all of its diversities, played host to
nine members of ECU's Wefel
organization over Fall Break.
This city, otherwise known as
the melting pot, has many ethnic
groups and problems that the
YVefel group was interested in
learning more about. Their goals,
which there were at least nine of,
included finding out how mission
projects are working in New York
and how missions could work in
their lives.
The group was composed of:
Dan Earnhardt, Judy McLaw-
horn, Zhi Liu, Cindy Solomon,
Chuck Martin, Michael Cary,
Oscar Montiel, Stephanie Folsom,
and Bill Stanley.
They saw, some of them for the
first time, how each part of New
York City is a major contrast to the
next. In the midst of a rich skyline
of apartment buildings and cor-
porations, restaurants and thea-
ters, there are drugs and the
homeless, empty buildings and
corrupt politics.
In one neighborhood live the
Hispanics, in another the blacks,
and in yet another live the whites;
still segregated from those are the
subcultures of Little Italy, China-
town, and Harlem. It would seem
that the melting pot has not yet
been put on the stove.
Tolerance of the different ethnic
groups is varied. On some streets
no-one gives attention to what
race you are, while there is fear to
walk down another. On some
"Our job on the task force is to
promote awareness and educa-
tion said Scott DuBois, a senior
who heads the task force, "an
awareness of what overdrinking
is, what alcoholism looks like and
how to deal with drunk people streets you are left alone, while on
others you are harassed to buy
drugs. But on all streets, there are
the homeless.
One of the ECU group's first
stops was a visit to Harlem Resto-
ration Project's (HRP) founder
and executive director, Marie
York City. She said it was wicked
of Columbia to tear down good
buildings and force people to
move out.
She said she blames this prac-
tice as one reason wh the cost of
living is so outrageous in New
York City. She also said the prob-
lem is complicated because'there
has not been any leadership from
the top for the last fifteen years or
more.
Her explanation of the problem
was followed by a tour oi Harlem.
It was a Saturdav and there was a
kind of festival of street market-
ing on the sidewalk
Runyon said the HRP is dedi-
cated to helping restore and re-
vitalize buildings that are run-
down and already within the
Harlem community. In man-
power, ex-offenders are preferred
in order to help tram them with a
job skill and make it easier for
them to rejoin the community.
Runyon, who served a term in
the Albany legislature, said that
the city was not a good manager
of its buildings. She says of the
single-room occupancies, which
the HRP has made available. It
ain't good livin but it's better
than the streets She said she
feels that Harlem probably suffers
more than any other part oi the
city.
After seeing some of the worst
sections in the city, it was hopeful
for many in the group to see that at
least one woman's dream of help-
ing out had become a reality.
Sunday morning was spent at
Riverside Church, a huge church
built by grants from Rockefeller.
This church was important for the
group to visit, since it takes a very
active stance in missions.
Upon entering the church,
immediately there were signs an-
nouncing opportunities to help
out and learn more about such
problems as racism and educa tion
in the community.
In a skit by the children, every-
day problems, such as being of-
Responsible drinking is
knowing your limits and know-
ing when to say no DuBois said.
"Knowing when not to get behind
a wheel of a car
Before starting her drinking,
Piccolo said, "Most people just Runyon. Runyon lives on the
thinkOh, I just had four beers, j��yE fered drugs and bemg mugged,
apartments. She became inter- were given a child's perspective
"But this is really showing ested in housing and the homeless
them exactly what happens even after her landlord, Columbia Uni-
versity, tried to throw her out of
her home.
Runyon gave an interesting
perspective as to why there is
such a housing problem in New
with two or three beers she said.
"I just hopes it leaves some kind of
lasting impressions so people are
a lot less willing to drive after
they've been drinking
The last full day in the city in-
cluded a visit to the Interchurch
Center on Riverside Drive. This
visit provided members of the
group who were serious about
pursuing missions the chance to
See BUMS, page 13
State
RALEIGH (AP) -
among the funnel cakes,
vegetables and giant snake I
a tiny church waits silenj
those who want to get rein
just a little peace and qu 1
State Fair
"It just might do the ,
some good over here said
Jordan, 22, tugging on tht
wooden back ot a �
boy, hallelujah bend
had some good times in hej
A shrill voice interrupt
dan as a small bov gra
lectern, raised a beckoning
and belted out a gigg
gospel tune.
'The spirit s goir .
down and zap him said ij
grinning
The 91-year-old bu
served two Wake C
churches before it was mo
the fairgn tunds several I
Located in Heritage V ;
behind the Village of Yesu
the white frame structure
daily services during �
"Come Worship With'
the Spirit'of Yesteryi
ute worship experieno tl
outside beckons. Inside, al
local cor � ons ta
offering services that
elude costumes and m
Johnny
celebrah
LOSANGELES(AP)-
Carson and Fd McM
centlv celebrated the 2:
versary of "The Tonight
but their associate j
four more vears.
It was 30 vears ao wh�
started working together.
Carson was h st I a garni
called "Who Do You Trustl
McMahon was hired to
announcer.
"Our relationship wa-
ll shed the very first dav
hon recalled. "I mtrodud
show then 1 brought himi
of questions. He jumped,
'Lothar, you startled me
Lothar was the faithfi
kick to Mandrake the Maj
in the newspaper
When Mandrake's
enough. Lothar
muscle.
"That set oui
Lots oi humor and kidd s
of playing on mv s
hPPy-gO-lucky Irishman
things we ve done on
night Show were sot u
tested on Who Do ou Ti
"lohnnv s the boss
McMahon. " ou have to n
ber that, but 1 get mv tw
worth in there. His mam
nages - it s alv a s good tori
His wealth and his passij
privacy.
Actually, lohnnv k da
self He'll sa Somehodv c
see me. but thev got we1
they fell into the moat
Their association has
longer than am of Carson
riages
We e never had a du
ment. ne er had a problem
McMahon 1 think we
mutual respect tor each oj
respect his being the bos
spect his privacy. We hk
other
It was Pick Clarkl
brought them together, anoi
years later, McMahon and
teamed up for NBC's "Bl
and Practical lokes whid
Bums sight
Continued from pagej
find out about the opporti
open and have their qu
answered
Afterwards, the group t
active role by providing tl
needed for two shuts at Broi
Presbvtenan Church's
kitchen Members of the
commented that thev enjojl
chance to serve and help of
The trip, like the city. wa
contradictions. There wei
ments of experiencing thej
tourist scene, but there wi
moments of being humbj
not turning a deaf ear to th
people and their problei
instead recognizing th
people and being willing
them. Some street people
suiting, some just wanted
one to listen to them,
seemed to disappear ii
woodwork, and still other
entertaining.
Their echoes were haunt
the subway, a black maj
could not control his moi
hollered, "1 am not a thief





Pageant,
bama
seme
coming
s a she
��. ; Liter
is no
m Orleans V hen that
�?v �
'Hifr A
s ��-�
g .jmff&t
te, an ECU senior from
to NYC
reak
I was wi Ked
nbia tear od
I gs n d force people to
out.
aid she blames this prac-
� one reason v In the cost of
- s . rageous in New
I tls viid the prob-
ated because' there
t been any leadership from
p for the last fifteen yearsor
ition of the problem
i tour of Harlem,
a Saturday and there was a
� festival of street market-
n the sidewalk
b n said the HRP is dedi-
to helping restore and re-
lize buildings that are run-
in and already within the
�m community. In mau-
ler, ex-offenders are preferred
rder to help tram thorn with a
and make it easier for
i reji c rrtmunit)
mvon, who served a term in
my legislature, bdid that
:ity was not d manager
s buildings. She savs of the
lie-room occupancies which
1RP has made available, "It
good iivin but it's better
the streets She said she
.that Harlem probably suffers
le than anv other part of the
Jfti r seeing some of the worst
ports in thecity, it was hopeful
any in the group to see that at
one woman s dream of help-
Dut had become a reality.
nda morning was spent at
jrside Church, a huge church
I by grants from Rockefeller.
urch was important for the
ip to visit since it takes a very
stance in missions.
n entering the church,
jediately there were signs an-
icing opportunities to help
. nd learn more about such
lemsas racismand education
�e communitv.
a skit by the children, every -
problems, such as being of-
drugs and being mugged,
given a child's perspective,
he last full day in the city in-
led a visit to the Interchurch
ter on Riverside Drive This
provided members of the
m who were serious about
fumg missions the chance to
See BUMS, page 13
r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1988 13
SAV-A-CENTER
State Fair gets religion
RALEIGH (AP) - Nestled the turn of the century.
among the funnel cakes, mutant Pearl Wood, 75, of Samaria
egetabies and giant snake house, Baptist Church in Raleigh, sewed
a tiny church waits silently for her long skirt and bonnet to wear
those who want to get religion or when her choir sang to an audi-
just a little peace and quiet at the ence of about 85 on Friday.
State Fair. She sang "Amazing Grace"
It just might do the people and it brought back memories of
no me good over here said Terry attending Hephzibah Baptist
Jordan, 22, tugging on the loose Church near Lizard Lick, vhere
Road Baptist Church are taking a
break from the hot sun and the
crying lost children, whom
they're supposed to help as offi-
cial fair chaplains.
"Walking your legs off, that's
about what it amounts to said
Reynolds, wearing sneakers of
clerical black.
'Farm animals don't turn my
wooden back of a pew. "Yeah
boy, hallelujah benches. They've
had some good times in here
A shrill voice interrupted Jor-
dan as a small boy grabbed the
lectern, raised a beckoning arm,
and belted out a giggling falsetto
ispel tune.
"The spirit's going to come
down and zap him said Jordan,
grinning.
91-year-old
two Wake
she grew up. crank grumbled Wickham, who
It won't hurt the fair goers to said he and the other roaming
see a little old-time religion, Mrs. pastors were there to help with
Wood said. practical problems, like lost kids,
"So many children today and to help spread the Word,
don't even know what the inside Axut 65 pastors have taken
of a church looks like she said in four-hour shifts at the fair, accord-
ing to the Rev. Charles L. McMil
The
served
churches before it was moved to
the fairgrounds several years ago.
Located in Heritage Village just
behind the Village of Yesteryear,
the white frame structure offers
daily services during the fair.
"Come Worship With Us in
the Spirit'of Yesteryear15-min-
ute worship experience the sign
outside beckons. Inside, about 10
local congregations take turns
offering services that often in-
clude costumes and music from
an interview with The News and
Observer of Raleigh.
The church is a popular spot
for older fair goers to stop in, sip
building cold water from Coca-Cola cups,
County and reminisce about the way it
Ian of the Raleigh Baptist Associa-
tion, which helps coordinate the
chaplain program at the fair.
The Rev. Bill Furr of Trinity
Baptist Church in Raleigh put in
used to be. When things are quiet, fur hours Monday
they sit alone with their memo-
ries.
But before the building gets
too quiet, two young Baptist pas-
tors bound in, wearing red-and-
white baseball hats with a black
cross and the word "CHAP-
LAIN" emblazoned across the
front.
The Rev. Ray Wickham of
Ephesus Baptist Church and the
Rev. Jim Reynolds of Ayersboro
It was real nice he said.
"We didn't really get too many
people to talk seriously about reli-
gion or anything, but we had a lot
of people come up and talk to us
about church, people coming up
to ask directions, which we didn't
know
"The church needs to go
where the people are McMillan
said, "and obviously this week in
Raleigh, North Carolina, people
are at the fair.
Johnny Carson, Ed McMahon
celebrate 30th anniversary
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Johnny still do occasionally as a special
Larson and Ed McMahon re-
cently celebrated the 26th anni-
versary of "The Tonight Show
but their association goes back
four more years.
It was 30 years ago when they
was my next-door
in Philadelphia
recalled. "One day
Murrow interviewed
Dick
neighbor
McMahon
Edward R
Dick on the CBS show 'Person to
Person He had a party, and I
started working together, when entertained. Dick's producer told
me I was pretty good. The
producer's office was in New
York in the next office to Johnny's
at the Little Theater. When he
heard they were looking for an
announcer he suggested me
McMahon took the train to
NeOojlndinetwithCarson,
Carson was host of a game show
called "Who Do You Trust?" and
McMahon was hired to be the
announcer.
"Our relationship was estab-
lished the very first day McMa-
hon recalled. "I introduced the
show, then I brought him the list
of questions. He jumped.andsaidv �
'Lothar, vou startled me
Lothar was the faithful side-
kick to "Mandrake the Magician"
in the newspaper comic strip.
When Mandrake's magic wasn't
enough, Lothar supplied the
muscle.
"That set our relationship.
Lots of humor and kidding. A lot
of playing on my size, being a
happy-go-lucky Irishman. All the
things we've done on The To-
night Show' were set up and
tested on 'Who Do You Trust?'
"Johnny's the boss said
McMahon. "You have to remem-
ber that, but I get my two cents'
worth in there. His many mar-
riages - it's always good for a joke.
His wealth and his passion for
privacy.
Actually, Johnny kids him-
self. He'll say, 'Somebody came to
see me, but they got wet when
they fell into the moat
Their association has lasted
longer than any of Carson's mar-
riages.
"We've never had a disagree-
ment, never had a problem said
McMahon. "I think we have a
mutual respect for each other. I
respect his being the boss. I re-
spect his privacy. We like each
other
It was Dick Clark who
brought them together, and many
vears later, McMahon and Clark
teamed up for NBC's "Bloopers
and Practical lokes which they
Bums sighted
Continued from page 12
find out about the opportunities
open and have their questions
answered.
Afterwards, the group took an
active role by providing the help
needed for two shifts a t Broadway
Presbyterian Church's soup
kitchen. Members of the group
commented that they enjoyed the
chance to serve and help others.
The trip, like the city, was one of
contradictions. There were mo-
ments of experiencing the usual
tourist scene, but there were also
moments of being humbled by
not turning a deaf ear to the street
people and their problems but
instead recognizing them as
people and being willing to help
them. Some street people were in-
sulting, some just wanted some-
one to listen to them, others
seemed to disappear into the
woodwork, and still others were
entertaining.
Thei r echoes were haunting. On
the subway, a black man who
could not control his movements,
hollered, "I am not a thief.
"He asked me a few questions and
we stood by the window and
watched them put up a sign at the
Shibert Theater across the street
he said. "It was for Judy Holliday
in 'Bells Are Ringing
"Johnny said thank you, and I
left figuring I didn't get the job.
Two weeks later the producer
called me and said, 'Look, when
you start Monday, wear a suit.
Johnny likes to wear sports
clothes I said I didn't know what
he was talking about. He said,
'Didn't anybody tell you? You got
the job
'
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LIMIT ONE WITH MIN. s10 PURCHASE
Old South
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Juice
LITE�GENUINE DRAFT
Regular
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DELICIOUS
Lay's
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NOW AVAILABLE! AMERICAN EXPRESS
Money
Orders
AMERICAN
EXPRESS
I
AT U.S. POST OFFICE PRICES
Postage
Stamps
Prices Effective Thru Sat. Oct 22, 1988 Quantity Rights Reserved Not Responsible For Typographical Errors
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. � Monday thru Saturday 7:00 a.m12 Midnight






14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20,1988
Preacher boxes for the Lord
CHARLOTTE (AP) - Charlie
Hopkins, pastor of Solid Rock
Ministries, will take on Mike
Tyson's chief sparring partner in a
four-round bout Sunday night,
but he says it wasn't his idea.
Hopkins, 42, has never had a
sanctioned fight, amateur or pro-
fessional. But 14 months ago, he
heard a voice. The voice, says
Hopkins, came straight from the
Lord. And it told him he would be
heavyweight champion of the
world.
"I heard it says Hopkins,
"but it didn't make sense
So Hopkins will fight heavy-
weight Fred Whitaker of Win-
ston-Salem in the bout Sunday at
the VVinston-Salem Convention
Center. Whitaker has an 8-3 rec-
semi-pro teams, Hopkins has terian Church. The church is
punched people before. When he owned by a group of London-
was in the Army, he and his bud- based investors.
Hopkins thought he could
raise $60,000 through a fight with
former heavyweight champion
George Foreman. But Foreman,
also a minister, told Hopkins to
prove himself first.
"A victory against Whitaker
will keep me going says
dies used to bring their argu-
ments into the ring. There were no
judges or referees.
"I never lost Hopkins says.
But as he grew older, the
sweet science became the sweet.
Ties, desserts - "my metabolism
went crazy he says. Hopkins is
about 6-0in January, he weighed Hopkins
278 pounds. "And a knockout over Fore-
He realized he needed more man will get me a fight with Mike
than faith. So he began running 5 Tyson. I can talk enough trash to
miles in the morning and again at get him to fight me
night. He lifted weights, hit the Bill Reynolds, manager of
big bag, sparred. Now he weighs former Charlotte champion Kel-
a lean, mean 215. vin Seabrooks, talks trash with the
"I'm going to fight Whitaker best of them. Reynolds, who will
like he's trying to steal my be in Hopkins's corner Sunday,
ord and a reputation as the only familyHoPkins says. was asked if he believed.
Tvson sparring partner who does Solid Rock is housed at Cos- "l beh� rhc � a ?'
not back away. mopolitan Community Church in ding, tough fighter with a lot of
"My fnenajp say that 1 can t do Charlotte.On Saturdays, Hopkins
it says Hopkins. "They say I'm and teacher Loil Covington leave
biting off mor? tjjpn I can chew, it to go into tough neighborhoods
and knock on doors.
'The Lord called me to get the
lost souls from the city says
Hopkins.
Because the lost souls are
many and the square feet few,
Hopkins believes the Lord told
him to find a bigger church. He is
Desire enough to beat Tyson?
"He'll beat Tyson easier than
he will Whitaker says Reynolds.
"On this basis: Tyson is ready
to be taken
A man reminds Reynolds that
these words are being written
down.
"What are the first two letters
in Charlie Hopkins?" Reynolds
"Ch he is told.
"What are the first two letters
in champ?" asks Reynolds.
"Ch he is told.
Silence follows.
A point has been made.
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doesn't make -sense, I'm too
old They don't believe the Lord
told me this
Hopkins, sweating after a
two-hour workout at the Police
Athletic Leaguegym,iscalmas he
says this. He is articulate and
engaging. He i$ not crazy. He
heart, determination and good
says Reynolds. "You know, 1 tried
to talk him out of it. But the more
we talked, the more I saw how
sincere he was
Sincere enough to beat
Whitaker?
"Yes says Reynolds. "He
has the heart, the desire
Crispetf's
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believes.
A former football player with
the Carolina Chargers and other
trying to raise $60,000 for a down
payment on the fire-damaged
First Associate Reformed Presbv-
Queen loses crown
after 13 hours
GREENSB0RO (AP) - Ha-
vden Fields wasn't even queen for
a day. It was more like 13 hours.
the 17-year-old senior was
crowned queen at Western
Cuilford High School during
halftime of the school's Friday
night homecoming game against
Rockingham County.
But about 11 a.m. Saturday,
Assistant Principal Denese Smith
called Ms. Fields to tell her the
homecoming committee had
C3te.They"wrote down
ie queen
like it should have been all along.
"There are no hard feelings
said Ms. Muscat, 17 and also a
senior. "1 felt bad for Hayden
because she's one of mv best
friends
So at Saturday night's home-
coming dance, the five girls on the
homecoming court were pre-
sented. But this time the court was
in order.
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Soft Bizarre Pumpkin Heads
This Ad Acts As A 10 Off Coupon To All
Retail Sales Over $20.00
Good til December 1,1988
PERSONAL
PORTRAITS
by
INSTANT REPLAY
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INSTANT REPLAY
ONE HOUR PHOTOS AND PORTRAITS
"Quality, Convenience and Personal Service'
The Plaza
(next to Annabcllcs)
355-5050
.wa-
rm mes
or
and maid of honor.
Ms. Fields was elected maid
of honor. Shelly Muscat, Ms.
Fields'friend for six years, was
chosen as queen.
The committee felt bad about
the mishap, and didn't see any
harm in having two queens, Ms.
Smith said. That idea made Ms.
Fields downright mad.
"1 didn't want it that way
Ms. Fields said. "I mean, 'cause
she already had enough taken
away from her Friday night
So Ms. Fields called Ms. Mus-
cat even as members of the home-
coming committee were on their
way to Ms. Fields' house to dis-
cuss the matter. At first Ms. Mus-
cat thought her friend was joking.
She couldn't believe the school
made such a mistake.
The two decided that Ms.
Muscat would be queen and Ms.
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2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
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1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
LUNCH SPECIAL
10 Pieces Chicken
1 Large Mashed Potato
1 Large Gravy
1 Large Salad
4 Biscuits
STUDENTS
Get ready to joti� America's number
one name in temporary help. Kelly
Services can help you make the most
of your free time this semester by
offering the flodbility to earn some
great cash while still being able to
earn good grades. We have a variety
of short and long term assignments,
Tiany of which do not require special
skills or experience.
�Secretaries
�Typists
� WP and DE Operators
� General Clerical
�Light Industrial
Call or stop in and let us tell you about our
comprehensive benefit package.
204 E. Arlington Blvd Suite E
Arlington Center
355-7850
SERVICES
The First And The Best
U.& Law require all applicant, to show proof of
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MONSAT.
11AM-3PM
12-8 oz. Round
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$2.99
r
ll Daily Specials
I 10 Discount on
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I Items
I With Student I.D.
Hot Bar and Salad Bar only
an additional $1.99 with a meal
FREE DESSERT BAR
"1 with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
$1.00 of every tailgate
special sold is donated to
E.C.U. Educational Fund.
Special Available At Both Greenville Locations
(East & West Greenville Blvd.)

J 2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
Mobi
(AP) � Television spej
nouncer John Madden ha
his private bus, the Mi
cruiser
Singer Willie Nelson
collapsible one atop his
Honeysuckle Rose
The firefighters at the
fire camp along the vest
der of the Shoshone
Forest in Wyoming got
while away the hours durn
time off.
Mickey Mantle has
them.
An estimated 2 millionl
in America have satellite
terns, with access to so
channels of programminj
Chuck Hewitt, president
Satellite Broadcasting am
munications Associati
America (SBCA), who est!
Couple n
to pay ga
WILMINGTON (AP)
and Suzan Thacher sai
shouldn't be billed I r z
collection, because th
have any garbage to colle
The Thachers recycle
post most oi their garbagj
they take the rest to a land!
the bi-monthlv trash bill
the city have continued to
and the city took the Thacj
court.
"Ecology is somethii
we've been concerned abol
number of years said i
acher, who said she and hi
band have practiced rej
since the late 19H3s.
"We've never used
removal service. All we a
the city to take this into con
hon. We would like id
people on how they can
and compost
The citv filed a cor
against the Thachers Scp
collect $321 in unpaid tra
Magistrate Nancy Du'al
in the city's favor Tue-
listening to Assistant Cm
TV fine tu
for the futu
(AP) � The tdeviskH
future will be a high del
svstem with the clarm 1
film and the sound of c
discs, sav representative!
broadcast and electronic-i
tries.
ITie Federal Comr
rions Commission recenl
dorsed the advanced telj
systems, declaring them
public interest, and ap
some preliminary rules foi
mg them into American h
But the commissioi
manv technical and pro
problems still must be in
and the systems probablv
be available from the IS
cast industrv before W0'
U.S. broadcaster-
cemed that L S. research ej
develop an industrv tram
standard tor high detimd
mav not bo moving tast enj
head off a probable apane
sion oi the new technologj
The lapanese hav
working on an advanced I
for two decades and ex
introduce high detinitioi
homes in their countrv in
The picture on a �i
television set in the Unite!
is produced bv a signal thJ
more than 200.000 dots
lines. The lapanese systj
1,125 scanning lines.
Michael Rau, Nahor
ciation oi Broadcasters i
dent for science and ted
said the FCC made a
commitment to bring a
TV to the public They se
reaffirm support for fr
the-air broadcasting,
commission must solve tl
culties of delivering the
over broadcast outlets'
In a series of prelimii
ings, the FCC said:
- Existing broadcast
stations are best equij
bring the new system to
- Advanced televisij
grams must be received
ing television sets so
won't have to replace th�j
ment.
- If additional
space is needed, it
found within existing
UHF television bands.






II If I.AS IAKOUNIAN
OCTOBER 20. 1�8 15
)(Ml
JmL
i i E
P
11 v L&YJ
:ken
Potato
ad
die
ated to
i Fund.
Mobile satellite units are in
P Television sports an
ei lohn Madden has one in
private bus the Madden
�ei
Singei Willie Nelson has a
ipsible one atop Ins bus, the
suckle Rose
firefighters at the remote
amp along the western n
der ol the Shoshone National
Forest in Wyoming got one to
le e-N a the hours during their
Mantle has two of
stimated 2 million honu's
i have satellite TV sys
s with access to some 150
� programming, says
vitt, president of the
adt asting and Com-
ssociation of
B ho estimates
there could be 10 million by the
mid 1990s
By then, he says, today's 10
fool will have given way to
smaller IS to 24-inch dishes
Ihe cost tor an average sys-
tem, says Hewitt, is about $2,500
1 iewitl says satellite TV own
ers can receive 5,300 sporting
events a year, as well as movies,
children's and family programs
news weather, concerts, stock
market information and college
courses.
Private homes (or buses)
aren't the only receivers. Many
private television networks have
Ixvn established to provide out-
lets for business and non profit
corporations.
"I've been amazed at how
many churches have used memo
rial funds to purchase a satellite
Couple recycles, refuses
to pay garbage bill
dish said Pal orrt II ol ll
I nited Methodist � hurt h's nel
work in Nashville fenn Shesaid
25 (XXI Sundav sv hool l .tders re
centl viewed a three-session
workshop aired at 50 sites na
tionw ide (Tie IPenney mer
chandising chain is equipping 650
of its largest stores with satelliu
dishes
IT re are l: , ,n.
sites w ith satellite dishes around
the country, up from several
hundred a few years ago, said
Elliott Gold, publisher ot Business
r magazine in Altadenaalii
I le pr di( ts 12,1 H10 lo iti n is b
Rec ei ing sites i tst about
1 0 apie e to build, sendinj
sites to beam the signal to a satel
lite run $200,000 to S � said
Louis Bransford ol the I'uhlu
Sen i e satellite v imis,irtium
i,
�omp
risrd ol
nun iirs t; ad
i.nips edm ators and health or
ganizations using t lev ision
l iu' obstac le to the gn th of
the home satellite industry has
� n the issue ol pira j
Federal i ommunications
c ommission official Richard
smith recently estimated that
nearly half of the satellite lishes
used to receive pay TV pn grams
have illegal dc i(S that un
scramble the picture, and let the
vlower watch tr free
"If un hecked 1( Cl
nnis R Patn k has s I
� e growth of the illegal chips
� re iten "th� v i ibility of thi satel
lite to home program market
Patru k has iid the de i i
i t only steal from those who
cated the programming, but
from viewers who pa foi the
srv ice and may lose it it the prob
lem is not broucht under control
GTON (AP) - I .am
an rhacher say they
be billed for garbage
tion because they don t
bagi to collect
hers rec cle or cm
ol their garbage and
rest to a landfill but
thlv trash bills from
ontinued to pile up,
took the Thachers to
gy is something that
rned about for a
said Mrs Hv
aid she and her hus
practiced recycling
, er used a trash
All we ask is for
� i take this into considera-
� ould like to tutor
� they can recycle
I compost
ITie citv filed a complaint
rs Sept 26 to
� - trash bills
. . will ruled
u sday after
� i it Attor-
ney Robert Oast, city sanitation
inspector Jen Lewis and the l"h
achers, who operate a chiroprac
tic center from their residence.
1 thmk it's wonderful thai
you're doing this but 1 m bound
by the ordinance ou might want
to follow up on this with the (ity
manager. Ms. DuVall said
The Thachers said they trans
port their trash that cannot be
recycled or composted to the ew
Hanover County landtill every
tour to six months. Ihe annual
cost is about ss to $6, they said
Mitzi York, special assistant
to the city manager, said the city
code does not include any provi
sions for exemption from trash
collection and disposal fees
The ordinance, howevei
says the v. itv Council can make
adjustments to charges based on a
recommendation by the citv
manager. The Thachers re-
quested an "adjustment" after
luesdav s hearing in
Magistrate s C ourt, Ms fork
said
rmani
Shoes
Ladles Outlet and Quality Shoes
A-l Quality Prices
Greenville Square Shopping Center
(Next to K-mart)
756-8182
Open MonThurs
10:00-8:00
Fri. ft Sat. 10:00-9:00
Attention All
Students
The Association
of
Student Organizations
requests the honour of
your presence
at a
reception honouring
Dr. Alfred Matthews
Vice Chancellor of Student
Life
to be held in the
Gray Gallery
in the
Jenkins Building
on
October 27,1988
5:00-7:00 p.m.
R.S.V.P
Ihe Student Union
757-6611, Fxt.210
bv I riday, October 21, 1988
TV fine tuned
for the future
n of the
h definition
�. ith the clarit) of movie
nd of compact
itives of the
Ironies indus-
li ral i ommunica
n recently en-
I ihe advanced tele ision
le laring them in the
interest, and approving
i liminary rules tor bring-
m inti American homes
Bui I mmission said
meal and procedural
till must be ironed out,
he S) stems probably will not
ailable from the I V broad
industry before 1993
i ; , are eon
n � ltl el S research efforts to
. p an tndustn transmission
presents
S'lT.P INTO 1 Nil N I I II I
LVi)lVsT�i
lr
YOUR SPORTS STATION
Professor
high definition TV
t be mov ing fast enough to
� . robable Japaneseinva
� the new te hnology.
lapanese have been
rkini on an advanced system
r tv 1 ide; and expect to
: . high definition TV to
in their 11 untry in 1990.
rhe pi ture on a standard
i ion set in the United States
luced by a signal that scans
� � k 00 dots on 525
� s rhe lapanese system has
1 1 25 scanning lines
Mil hael Ran, National Asso
ition of Broadcasters vice presi
nt for scien e and technology
,ud the R made a "strong
mnitment to bring advanced
rv to tin public 1 hey seemed to
.(firm support tor free, over
the air broadi .isting But the
mmission must solve the difh
culties of delivering the system
er broadcast outlets "
In a serii l preliminary rul-
ings, the 1 said
f risting broadi asters and
itions are best equipped to
ing the nev system to viewers
Advanced television pro
ims must be received on exist
g television sets so viewers
n't have to replace their equip-
ment
It additional frequency
span is needed, it should be
(�Mind within existing VHF and
IMF television bands
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:eplay
rtMD PORTRAITS
d Personal Service'
Ibcllcs)
150
KY
ICKEN
PECIAL
?
ken
Potato
d
ilgate
ated to
Fund.
Locations
fd.)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOWXKUttt 15-
Mobile satellite units are in
(AP) � Television sports an-
nouncer John Madden has one in
his private bus, the Madden-
cruiser.
Singer Willie Nelson has a
collapsible one atop his bus, the
Honeysuckle Rose.
The firefighters at the remote
fire camp along the western bor-
der of the Shoshone National
Forest in Wyoming got one to
while away the hours during their
time off.
Mickey Mantle has two of
them.
An estimated 2 million homes
in America have satellite TV sys-
tems, with access to some 150
channels of programming, says
Chuck Hewitt, president of the
Satellite Broadcasting and Com-
munications Association of
America (SBCA), who estimates
there could be 10 million by the
mid-1990s.
By then, he says, today's 10-
foot will have given way to
smaller 18-to-24-inch dishes.
The cost for an average sys-
tem, says Hewitt, is about $2,500.
Hewitt says satellite TV own-
ers can receive 5300 sporting
events a year, as well as movies,
children's and family programs,
news, weather, concerts, stock
market information and college
courses.
Private homes (or buses)
aren't the only receivers. Many
private television networks have
been established to provide out-
lets for business and non-profit
corporations.
"I've been amazed at how
many churches have used memo-
rial funds to purchase a satellite
Couple recycles, refuses
to pay garbage bill
dish said Pat Correll of the
United Methodist Church's net-
work in Nashville, Tenn. She said
25,000 Sunday school leaders re-
cently viewed a three-session
workshop aired at 350 sites na-
tionwide. The J.C. Penney mer-
chandising chain is equipping 650
of its largest stores with satellite
dishes.
There are 12,000 receiving .
sites with satellite dishes around
the country, up from several
hundred a few years ago, said
Elliott Gold, publisher of Business
TV magazine in Altadena, Calif.
He predicts 42,000 locations by
1992.
Receiving sites cost about
$5,000 apiece to build; sending
sites to beam the signal to a satel-
lite run $200,000 to $300,000, said
Louis Bransford of the Public
Service Satellite Consortium,
comprised of churches, trade
groups, educators and health or-
ganizations using television.
One obstacle to the growth of
the home satellite industry has
been the issue of piracy.
Federal Communications
Commission official Richard
Smith recently estimated that
nearly half of the satellite dishes
used to receive pay TV programs
have illegal devices that un-
scramble the picture, and let the
viewer watch for free.
"If unchecked FCC Chair-
man Dennis R. Patrick has said,
the growth of the illegal chips
threaten "the viability of the satel-
lite-to-home program market
Patrick has said the devices
not only steal from those who
created the programming, but
from viewers who pay for the
service and may lose it if the prob-
lem is not brought under control.
WILMINGTON (AP) - Larry
and Suzan Thacher say they
shouldn't be billed for garbage
collection, because they don't
have any garbage to collect.
The Thachers recycle or com-
post most of their garbage, and
they take the rest to a landfill. But
the bi-monthly trash bills from
the city have continued to pile up,
and the city took the Thachers to
court.
"Ecology is something that
we've been concerned about for a
number of years said Mrs. Th-
acher, who said she and her hus-
band have practiced recycling
since the late 1960s.
"We've never used a trash
removal service. All we ask is for
the city to take this into considera-
tion. We would like to tutor
people on how they can recycle
and compost"
The city filed a complaint
against the Thachers Sept. 26 to
collect $321 in unpaid trash bills.
Magistrate Nancy DuVall ruled
in the city's favor Tuesday after
listening to Assistant City Attor-
ney Robert Oast, city sanitation
inspector Jere Lewis and the Th-
achers, who operate a chiroprac-
tic center from their residence.
" I think it's wonderful that
you're doing this, but I'm bound
by the ordinance. You might want
to follow up on this with the city
manager Ms. DuVall said.
The Thachers said they trans-
port their trash that cannot be
recycled or composted to the New
Hanover County Landfill every
four to six months. The annual
cost is about $5 to $6, they said.
Mitzi York, special assistant
to the city manager, said the city
code does not include any provi-
sions for exemption from trash
collection and disposal fees.
The ordinance, however,
says the City Council can make
adjustments to charges based on a
recommendation by the city
manager. The Thachers re-
quested an "adjustment" after
Tuesday's hearing in
Magistrate's Court, Ms. York
said.
Attention All
Students
The Association
of
Student Organizations
requests the honour of
your presence
at a
reception honouring
Dr. Alfred Matthews
Vice Chancellor of Student
Life
to be held in the
Gray Gallery
in the
Jenkins Building
on
October 27,1988
5:00-7:00 p.m.
R.S.V.P
The Student Union
757-6611, ExUlO
by Friday, October 21,1988
TV fine tuned
for the future
(AP) � The television of the
future will be a high definition
system with the clarity of movie
film and the sound of compact
discs, say representatives of the
broadcast and electronics indus-
tries.
The Federal Communica-
tions Commission recently en-
dorsed the advanced television
systems, declaring them in the
public interest, and approving
some preliminary rules for bring-
ing them into American homes.
But the commission said
many technical and procedural
problems still must be ironed out,
and the systems probably will not
be available from the U.S. broad-
cast industry before 1993.
U.S. broadcasters are con-
cerned that U.S. research efforts to
develop an industry transmission
standard for high definition TV
may not be moving fast enough to
head of f a probable Japanese inva-
sion of the new technology.
The Japanese have been
working on an advanced system
for two decades and expect to
introduce high definition TV to
homes in their country in 1990.
The picture on a standard
television set in the United States
is produced by a signal that scans
more than 200,000 dots on 525
lines. The Japanese system has
1,125 scanning lines.
Michael Rau, National Asso-
ciation of Broadcasters vice presi-
dent for science and technology,
said the FCC made a "strong
commitment to bring advanced
TV to the public. They seemed to
reaffirm support for free, over-
the-air broadcasting. But the
commission must solve the diffi-
culties of delivering the system
over broadcast outlets
In a series of preliminary rul-
ings, the FCC said:
- Existing broadcasters and
stations are best equipped to
bring the new system to viewers.
- Advanced television pro-
grams must be received on exist-
ing television sets so viewers
won't have to replace their equip-
ment.
- If additional frequency
space is needed, it should be
found within existing VHF and
UHF television bands.
presents
-� Thf Umiouf Shc
The Unique Shoes
O 1989

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Overkill
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Hosted by
Chauncey
The Funmeister
Chauncey's Octoberfest Party Tips
While celebrating Octoberfest, be sure to observe these helpful points that
the ultimate party gentleman, CHAUNCEY THE FUNMEISTER has outlined
for you. His wisdom and experience can save us all a lot of grief and boring
times. Here are the five major rules to follow when going to ritzy social .
gatherings. P
5. Guys: Find yourself a
Queen!
Fellows, nothing will improve
YOUR social stature more than
being seen with a fabulous babe!
ECU has a fine selection of these.
Stay away from this one, though,
she's all mine!
Tally-Ho! The Funmeister here again to
continue the festivities! Read my rules to
party by and your Rocktober will be
heightened immeasurably. And remember
kids, overindulgence is for chumps.
1. Don't take this!
Never EVER take your
wallet when socializing.
You may wake up with
the whole town thanking
you for all the free drinks!
2. Carry your own mug
A must. There's nothing more
disgusting than picking a cup
of ale you THOUGHT was
yours, only to ingest cigarette
butts and strangers' saliva!
3. Goes without saying
4. Girls: Stay away
from Rednecks
Just in case, because during
Rocktober, you never know.
EDITOR'S NOTE: Chauncey
does not advocate casual sex;
but he knows how kids can be
and cares about them.
Nothing will damage your
social stature more than being
seen with one of these cretins,
ladies. Hang out with well-
groomed and mannered fellows
like Chauncey for instance!
ALSO: NO JARHEADS.
Come-
To T�r
Comic Fans! The Ramada Inn of Greenville will be hosting
a Baseball Card, Coin ancf COMICS show Sunday Rocktober
23, from 10:00a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Admission will be $1.00 and
there will be door prizes! Come one, come all, come on y'all.
j
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Red
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A
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Pirates cl
look for
By DOLC JOHNSON
Spurt i d
Tim lame- r
touchdow ns and
added an -
enough to N
State team, v.
place r . -
21 vict( �
James �
in the d
times I �
touchdov n
on one pla)
reaching trw
(
Pirates
tailbai
Chris Park r
for ' I
Seimr
who v
shoul 1
25 urr
touchd
Chris Parkei
Bobb)
back
and I
did a
never d
la. - riei
After last
ing tr
tor Part r u
The �
an early ' :
ter on
run b
Drug
(SID
Universirj '�
along with Pi;
of Eastern N r�l
sponsoring �'
cludii .
ECU athletes.
ECU football pla) - n
Moody, Shannon :
MichelandF
ECU basketb
Kenn r
Lose Th
and v

our dru$
campaign K
invoh -
Smith,
to the M
so pumped uj
prime I
three houi
went or ar :
times before the or
ve never doru
that's not like m
being credited 2 xi
the Bui
tir-t M � da
1984 :� a
14

garru
- -
Pro A m
for Nov.
- i i '��
Pirate Pro-Am
will he hel .
Brook Valley Countn
Greenville Theevenl
fund-raiser for tru
Inner- mi.
'The inaugural Pro-Al
highl successful due to ti
tieipants involved and wi
that this event will gr
Kts and exposure as the y
bv said ECl -thletie I
Dave Hart. Ir "It'salways
hackers to nib elbows wi
tossionals. It creates a ti:
atmosphere
Already secured for th
�reprofessionalsJ.C Sneaj
Hulbert and Bobby Watfca
more professional is to Kj
before the event The foj
best-ball with tee time sl
noon
The fee tor playing
with a social following th�
of golf, involving parhci pa
invited guests Rain date!
event is Nov. 8, also at th
Valley Country Club.





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PHI
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e selection of these,
n this one, though,
THE HAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 20, 1988 Page 17
Pirates drop to 1-6 at Florida State,
look forward to Syracuse at home
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports tditor
Tim lames rushed for two
touchdowns and Travis Hunter
added another, but it wasn't
enough to beat a tough Florida
state team, v ho kept their fifth-
place ranking intact with the 45-
21 victory.
lames was the one bright spot
in the defeat, carrying the ball 21
times for 7 yards and the two
touchdowns. A loss of three yards
on one plav denied James of
reaching the 100-yard mark.
Once again the thorn in the
Pirates' side was a back-up
tailback this time by the name of
Chris Parker, who was filling in
tor the injured Sammv Smith, the
Seminoles' number one tailback,
who was out with a separated
shoulder. Parker earned the ball
25 times tor 158 yards and two
touchdowns.
'We were depending on
Chris Parker Seminole Coach
Bobby Bowden said of his young
back. "He had to come through
and he did. Our offensive front
did a lot to help him. But we've
never doubted his ability. He just
lacks experience and confidence
After last weekend's show-
ing, this should not be a problem
tor Parker any longer.
The Seminoles rolled out to
an early 14-0 lead in the first quar-
ter on a seven-yard touchdown
run bv Parker on the opening se-
ries of the game, and later on a
two-yard run by fullback Marion
Butts.
The Pirates struck back
quickly, however, with James
scoring twice in the first seven
minutes of the second quarter,
first capping a 77-yard drive with
a one-yard punch, and again
crossing the goal line minutes
later on the Pirates' next posses-
sion when he rumbled 23 yards
for his second touchdown to tie
the score 14-14 on a series set up
by an interception by Brian
Hay wood.
The tic was short-lived, how-
ever, as the Seminole offense
struck again on the ensuing series,
this time when quarterback Chip
Ferguson found receiver Ronald
Lewis in the corner of the end
zone for a 17-yard touchdown.
Ferguson was not finished,
though, and on the Seminoles'
next series, he hooked up with
Terrv Anthonv for a 23-yard
touchdown strike, giving Florida
State a 28-14 halftime lead. "Chip
had some timely passes Bow-
den said after the game. "His
touchdown passes were very
important
The Pirates avoided two more
possible first half scores on the
play of Junior Robinson, who re-
covered a Seminole fumble at the
ECU 33, and minutes later inter-
cepted a half-back pass by Butts at
the ECU 4-yard line.
The Pirates had the ball to
begin the second half, but after
taking the ball from their own 20
down to the Seminole 17, they
were denied a score when a bad
snap on a Robb Imperato field
goal attempt ended the drive.
The only scoring in the third
period came on a 20-yard field
goal by Seminole kicker Bill Ma-
son after a stalled drive down to
the ECU four-yard line, to boost
the the Seminole lead to 31-14.
The Seminoles pulled away
in the final period, scoring at the
ten minute mark when Parker
went over from 10 yards out, and
again with three seconds to play
when Peter Tom Willis hit tight
end David Roberts on a six-yard
touchdown pass to give Florida
State the final 45-21 victory.
Travis Hunter closed out the
scoring for the Pirates when he
scored from two yards out with
2:07 remaining in the game.
Hunter rushed 16 times for 20
yards, and was three for 11 for 88
yards passing.
"Florida State has a good
football team Pirate Coach Art
Baker commented after the game.
"I thought we gave a good ac-
count of ourselves, however
When asked about the
Syracuse Orangemen, who will
be coming to Ficklcn Stadium this
weekend, Baker said "They are
always a good football team. We
will have to improve on today's
performance quite a bit to have a
chance to beat them
The Orangemen, 5-1 on the
season, have defeated ECU foes
Temple and Virginia Tech, and
will come to ECU having upset
Penn State 24-10 last week.
In the last two games,
Syracuse quarterback Todd
Philcox completed 38 of 59 passes
for 554 yards and six touchdowns
and just one interception. Philcox
will be looking for wideout Deval
Glover, who last week caught
eight passes for 101 yards and the
touchdown that gave Syracuse
the final lead. Add to this offense
Daryl Johnston, an All-America
fullback and Heisman candidate,
and you have a full package of
explosive talent.
But just as serious for the Pi-
rates is the talented Orangemen
defense. Three of Syracuse's top
six all-time sack leaders arc on this
year's squad in Terry Wooten,
Rob Burnett and Keith Friberg. In
the secondary, Marcus Paul, a
two-time Jim Thorpe Award
nominee, is the NCAA active ca-
reer leader in interceptions, and
he already has three on the year.
Along with Thorpe will be
All-America Candidate Chris In-
gram, who has two interceptions
on the season. The Orangemen
are also strong at linebacker, with
Butkus Award Candidate Terry
Wooten shoring up the outside.
Travis Hunter rushed for one touchdown against the Seminoles,
but he and his teammates hope to improve on their performances
when they face Syracuse on Saturday. (Photo courtesy of SID).
Drug awareness program started at ECU
(SID) � The East Carolina
University Athletic Department
along with Pizza Hut Restaurants
of Eastern North Carolina, arc
sponsoring an Anti-Drug and
Alcohol Awareness Program, in-
cluding trading cards featuring
ECU athletes.
The trading cards feature
ECU football players Jarrod
Moody, Shannon Boling, Billy
Michel and Reggie McKinney and
ECU basketball players Gus Hill,
Kenny Murphy, Jeff Kelly, Reed
Lose, Theodore "Blue" Edwards
and coach Mike Steele.
"We're truly excited about
our drug and alcohol awareness
campaign because it enables us to
involve our community and
school systems in a collective ef-
fort to combat drug and alcohol
abuse said ECU Athletic Direc-
tor Dave Hart, lr. "Having our
student-athletes serve as such
positive role models certainly
enhances the image our program
would like to project
The trading cards will be
available beginning Oct. 23 at
Pizza Hut Restuarants in Eastern
North Carolina. Each week, a dif-
ferent ECU player's card will be
available with each card having
an anti-drug and alcohol aware-
ness message on the back, with
join the East Carolina University
Athletic Department with the
fight against drugs said Theron
Riley of Pizza Hut.
Special promotions arc
planned with the use of the
cards. The Oct. 29 Miami, Ha.
football game will serve as a kick-
off for the campaign with 20,000
Jarrod Moody and Blue Edwards
cards being given away.
receive a half-price ticket for that
game.
If you show a fill set of foot-
ball cards at a participating Pizza
Hut between Nov. 20-26, you will
receive a free mug. A full set of
basketball cards at a Pizza Hut
between Feb. 19-25 will get you a
free mug also.
At halftime of the Feb. 25 ECU
basketball game against UNC-
name of East Carolina's basket-
ball MVP to the Pirate Club.
All of this is in an effort to
educate the people of Eastern
North Carolina about the prob-
lems of the use and abuse of drugs
and alcohol. It is a battle that has
ettorts to educate young people
regarding the adverse effects of
drugs on vouth and citizens in our
community said Ed Carter,
Mavor of Greenville. "I look for-
ward to working with ECU to
develop a successful strategy to
Individuals showing a full set Wilmington, Pizza Hut will give
of football cards at the Nov. 28
ECU basketball game against
UNC-Greensboro, will receive a
half-price ticket for the game
away a full scholarship in the
been fought for a long time by deal with the drug abuse problem
in this area"
The campaign starts Monday,
Oct. 17 with ECU athletes present-
ing cards to the children at the
Elmhurst Elementary School.
city, regional, state and national
campaigns.
"I'm extremely pleased that
the East Carolina University Ath-
letic Department is joining in our
information about the player also And, individuals showing a full
included. set of basketball cards at the Feb.
"Pizza Huts of Eastern North 20 ECU basketball contest against
Carolina are pleased to be able to the U.S. Naval Academy, wil
Hornets have fifteen days to
cut from fifteen to twelve
Smith, Bills look to make it
to the biggest game in football
(AP)
SO pumped
prime time
Bruce Smith was
up about playing in
that he was dressed
three hours before the game and
went on and off the field seven
times before the opening kickoff.
"I've never done that before,
that's not like me he said after
being credited with 2 1 2 sacks as
the Buffalo Bills, playing in their
first Monday night game since
1984, beat the New York Jets 37-
14.
"To me, it was the biggest
game of my career
Smith needed to look just 90
Pro-Am set
for Nov. 2
(SID) The Second Annual
Pirate Pro-Am Golf Tournament
will be held on Nov 2 at the
Brook Valley Country Club in
Greenville. The event is held as a
fund-raiser for the East Carolina
University golf program.
'The inaugural Pro-Am was
highly successful due to the par-
ticipants involved and we hope
that this event will grow in num-
bers and exposure as the years go
by said ECU Athletic Director
Dave Hart, jr. "It's always nice for
hackers to rub elbows with pro-
fessionals. It creates a fun-filled
atmosphere
Already secured for the event
are professionals J.CSnead, Mike
Hulbert and Bobby Watkins. One
more professional is to be added
before the event. The format is
best-ball with tee-time slated for
noon.
The fee for playing is $500
"It would be an understate-
ment to say we were pumped up
said Smith, ebullient and talkative
for the first time since returning
three games ago from a four-
game substance abuse suspen-
sion. 'This was a chance to show
what the Buffalo Bills can do and
we did
'The sky's the limit he re-
miles down the New Jersey Turn-
pike to see the danger that pres-
ents.
just six days after the Phila-
delphia Eagles, in their first na-
tional showcase since 1981, beat
the New York Giants 24-13, they
bottomed out against Cleveland.
They scored just three points, al-
lowed Don Strock to throw two
touchdown passes in his first start
in five years while Monday night plied when asked if the Super
hero Randall Cunningham was Bowl is what the Bills can ulti-
sacked nine times. matcly do. Then he smiled.
But Levy is more practical
I've coached high school, (coachly).
college and in the pros, and it He pointed out that the eu-
happens at all levels Eagles phoria was over the instant the
Coach Buddy Ryan says. 'That's game ended and the Bills have to
one of the reasons I don't like the prove what they can do against
Monday night game. It gives us New England this week. As the
the short week Eagles learned Sunday, it won't
But it's not just the short week be easy to get up again, particu-
for teams like the Eagles and the larly for the young, budding All-
Bills.
CHARLOTTE (AP) - The
Charlotte Hornets have 15 days to
cut their roster from 15 to 12 play-
ers, but coach Dick Harter says he
probably will wait another week
before deciding who stays and
who goes.
"We'll go two more games
and then make some adjust-
ments Harter said Monday.
That will take the team
through two more exhibitions,
Saturday against the Chicago
Bulls in Chapel Hill's Dean Smith
Center and Sunday against the
Bulls in Richmond. The Hornets
go into those games with a 1-1
exhibition record after losing
Friday's opener to the New Jersey
Nets 118-97 and defeating the
New York Knicks 126-113 Sun-
day.
"I've changed my mind some
on my original assessments
Harter said. "Maybe I'll change it
again
Four of the 15 players swing- down. It brings out the best mail
man Robert Reid, center-forward of us, because you can't sit down
Jerome Henderson and forwards now and say what's going to
Larry Spriggs and Brian Rowsom happen
-are in camp without guaranteed Hornets vice president Carl
contracts. Scheer said the team could wind
But the team is still looking up with a roster of three centers,
for help for centers Dave Hoppen four forwards and five guards,
and Tim Kempton, either through "Some teams carry five
trades or picking up players put guards he said. "The beauty of it
on waivers. is we have a guv like Robert Reid
Counting Dell Curry, out wno can plav several different
until late December with a broken
wrist, Charlotte has six guards,
seven if you put Reid in the
backcourt. The others are Rex
Chapman, Tyrone "Muggsy"
Bogues, Rickey Green, Michael
Holton and Ralph Lewis.
"All the camps I've been in
have had a lot of guards Holton
said. 'There's nothing unusual
about this camp
"What makes this an unusual
situation is that, unlike a veteran
team, the spots aren't locked
positions.
"I've been talking to general
managers, trying to keep abreast
of what's going on, having meet-
ings with scouts who have seen
NBA games and really just stand-
ing bv, waiting for some move-
ment he said.
'The kev is timing, to be there
when a team makes a decision on
someone you might want.
"Certainly, guards have to
figure in our conversations. But at
this point, we're just waiting
The Eagles treated the New
York game as a Super Bowl - a
chance for national exposure. To
the Giants, who had been on
prime time 11 times since
Philadelphia's previous appear-
ance, it was ho hum.
After the Bills beat the Jets on
Monday night, their locker room the 31-year-old nose tackle who
had that same kind of Super Bowl knows what it'slike to go through
Pros like Smith and Cornelius
Bennett, who are suddenly full of
themselves.
Other Bills know differently.
"Winning like we did on
Monday night makes you a tar-
get tight end Pete Metzelaars
said after the game.
Then there's Fred Smerlas,
Kings start Gretzky
atmosphere.
It wasn't that they are now 6-
1 and two games ahead in the AFC
East; it was that they had won in
front of the nation. In fact, they
interrupted their shower to
award owner Ralph Wilson the
game ball and serenade him with
a bit of off-color verse.
Coach Marv Levy played
down the importance of the na-
tional television showcase. But he
with a social following the round also said, "You'll have to ask the
of golf, involving participantsand team about that
invited guests. Rain date for the
event is Nov. 8, also at the Brook But the team, almost to a man,
Valley Country Club. contradicted him.
two seasons (1984-85) in which
the team had fewer victories
(four) in 32 games than it has in
seven this year.
"We have a great mix he
says. "The front office went out
and got us veterans like Art Still
and Leonard Smith. The players
and the coaches get along fine and
we've got great young guys like
Bruce Smith and Shane Conlan most dominant player over the
and Cornelius Bennett last decade.
"But I think this team knows "There are a lot of emotions
itself. I think it can keep an even here Gretzky said. "The things
keel. We're never too high and you think about now that the
never too low game is here are all the memories
EDMONTON, Alberta (AP) -
- Wayne Gretzky will be getting
together with a few of his friends
tonight. Only this time, they'll be
on the other side of the ice.
"This one is going to be pretty
hard on me, pretty hard on the
Oilers and pretty hard on the
fans Gretzky said of his first
game in Edmonton since the
Great Trade that sent him from
the Oilers to the Los Angeles
Kings over the summer.
While the Kings will play 80
games this NHL season, it's ap-
parent that none will have the
significance to Gretzky that this
one has. Nor to the Oilers and the
Oilers' fans who have watched
Gretzky develop into the NHL's
and all the fun. volved five players, three drafts
"We had something that very picks and millions of dollars,
few teams had (in Edmonton). We Gretzky, everyone's All-
were the Green Bay Packers of our Star center for the last decade,
time. We were in a small city and was dealt to the Kings along with
we grew up together and we had Marty McSorely and Mike
a great relationship with each Krushelnyski for Carson, Martin
other and the city. Those are the Gelinas, the Kings' No. 1 draft
things I'm thinking now pjck this vear, three future first-
Gretzky also will be thinking roUnd picks and cash estimated
about playing against some old
friends, not with them.
"I think about going one-on-
one with Kevin Lowe and being
knocked down in front of the
net he said. "This game is not
going to be easy on any of us. Not
the three of us who went to Los
Angeles, not Jimmy Carson
(who came to Edmonton in the
trade), not to any of the Oilers or
the Kings, too
Things just haven't been the
same in Edmonton since
Gretzky was traded in the block-
buster deal on Aug. 9 that in-
in the neightborhood of $15 mil-
lion.
Gretzky has been a factor in
the early success of the Kings,
who have a 4-2 record. Gretzky
is in his accustomed spot among
the scoring leaders with seven
goals and eight assists.
His totals this year give him
career figures of 727 goals and
1,339 assists in regular-season
and playoff games.
All but 10 of his goals and 11
of his assists have come with the
See GRET2XY, page 18





I
18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20,1988

Fearless Football Forecast
Syracuse at ECU
Virginia at Wake Forest
Clemson at N.C. State
Maryland at Duke
Georgia Tech-a UNC
Mississippi at Vanderbilt
Michigan St. at Illinois
Penn State at Alabama
Oklahoma at Colorado
UCLA at Arizona
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week - (7-2-1)
Overall (46-22-1)
ECU
Wake Forest
Clemson
Duke
Georgia Tech
Vanderbilt
Illinois
Alabama
Oklahoma
UCLA
DEAN BUCHANDOUG JOHNSON
ECU Sports InformationSports Editor
Last Week - (6-3-1)Last Week - (7-2-1)
Overall - (47-21-1)Overall - (49-19-1)
ECUECU
Wake ForestWake Forest
ClemsonClemson
DukeDuke
Georgia TechGeorgia Tech
MississippiVanderbilt
IllinoisMichigan St.
AlabamaAlabama
OklahomaOklahoma
UCLAUCLA
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week - (6-3-1)
Overall (44-24-1)
ECU
Wake Forest
Clemson
Duke
Georgia Tech
Mississippi
Michigan St.
Alabama
Oklahoma
UCLA
CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
Last Week - (6-3-1)
Overall - (49-19-1)
Syracuse
Wake Forest
Clemson
Duke
UNC
Mississippi
Illinois
Alabama
Oklahoma
UCLA
EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week-(7-2-1)
Overall (49-19-1)
Syracuse
Wake Forest
Clemson
Duke
UNC
Vanderbilt
Illinois
Penn State
Oklahoma
UCLA
Penguins beat Flyers
PITTSBURGH (AP) - The
Pittsburgh Penguins figured out
how to beat the Philadelphia
Flyers: play just like the Flyers.
The Pengiijns adopted a
tight-checking defense-oriented
style and ended the Flyers' sea-
son-opening four-game winning
streak with a 4-2 victory Tuesday
night.
Of course, it helped that
Mario Lcmieux was around to
score three goals and set up the
other.
"Our ace came through
again Penguins coach Gene
Ubriaco said.
Lemeiux's 14th career hat
trick was the obvious difference,
but Pittsburgh also showed more
discipline than it had in its first
four games. The Penguins al-
lowed 21 goals in four games and
owed their 3-1 record largely to
their abilitv U in shootouts. It
was different against the Flyers.
"It was a well-disciplined
game and it was nice to see we can
play that way Penguins de-
fenseman Paul Coffey said.
"You alwavs want the 1-0 or
2-0 game defenseman Rod
Buskas said.
'You play a tight-checking
game and it gives everyone confi-
dence
Did the Flyers expect a defen-
sive game from Pittsburgh?
"I don't know if they ex-
pected that kind of defensive
game, to be honest Philadelphia
center Dave Poulin said. "I,ve
been reading the box scores and it
seems like they've been in a lot of
high-scoring games
The Penguins didn't deviate
from the plan until the third pe-
riod, when Lemieux already had
helped them to a 3-0 lead.
Gretzky faces
his old friends
Continued from page 17
Oilers, a team he led to four
Stanley Cups this decade. He
scored three goals in eight games
with the Indianapolis Racers of
the old World Hockey Associa-
tion before Peter Pocklington
bought Gretzky for the Oilers,
also in the WHA at that time.
Ironically, it is almost 10
years to the day that Gretzky
scored his first two professional
goals against the Oilers. That
happened with the Racers on
Oct. 20,1978.
As he was on opening night
in Los Angeles with the Kings,
Gretzky is just as nervous facing
hisold teammates in the familiar
Northlands Coliseum.
"In every other game I've
disliked the guys on ttye other
team because I wanted to win so
badly Gretzky said Tuesday at
a press conference. "It will be
different (tonight). That will be
on my mind throughout the
game
It will be admittedly differ-
ent for many of Gretzky's former
teammates as well.
"It sure is on a lot of peoples'
minds said Lowe, one of
Gretzky's closest friends in
hockey. "Anyone who gets to
this game should consider him-
self lucky to witness the whole
thing. If s history in the mak-
ing
Philadelphia had only four
shots in the first period and six in
the second. The Hyers broke out
in the third, firing 17 shotsatSteve
Guenette and scoring twice.
'They started to run around a
little bk at the end Hyers coach
Paul Holmgren said. "1 think we
picked it up, too, when we real-
ized we weren't playing to our
strength
After Ron Hextall stopped his
first-period breakaway, Lemieux
scored twice in the second period.
During a 5-on-3 power play, he
knocked in a loose puck from the
side of the net. He then succeeded
on a breakaway after Rob Brown
got the puck at center ice.
Lemieux set up Bob Errcy's
third-period goal by using just
one arm to push a pass to him.
Guenette stopped 23 Phila-
delphia shots before Tim Kerr and
Ron Sutter scored in less than two
minutes of the third period.
Lemieux completed his hat
trick by firing into the open net
with five seconds left.
Elsewhere, it was Detroit 4,
Chicago 3 in overtime and the
New York Islanders 3, Vancouver
Red Wings 4, Blackhawks 3
At Detroit, "Stevie Wonder"
came through.
Yzerman, the Red Wings'
captain, picked up a puck from a
scramble in front of the net and
lifted a wrist shot over rookie
goaltender Ed Belfour as the
scoreboard clock expired. Chi-
cago protested the goal, but refe-
ree Bob Myers allowed the score
to stand, spoiling Belfour's NHL
debut.
The dramatic goal capped a
late rally for Detroit, which had
trailed 3-0.
Steve Larmer, Troy Murray
and Duane Sutter scored for Chi-
cago.
Islanders 3, Canucks 2
New York handed visiting
Vancouver its fourth one-goal
loss of the season. Steve Konroyd
had a goal and an assist in the first
period, while Bryan Trottier
scored the winner for the Island-
ers, winners of three straight.
Trevor Linden, Vancouver's
top draft pick and the No. 2 selec-
tion overall, got his first NHL
goal. Larry Melnyk also scored for
the Canucks.
'Minor Money
ATLANTA �188
BOSTON $1�B
CHARLOTTE S78
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2U0 Arlington Blvd Suite M
756-1521
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THE SKY'S YOUR ONLY LIMIT.
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Career Placement Center. For more information, call 1-800-662-7419 or contact
Date: Oct. 24,1988
NCI MITCH WELCH
Place: ECU Career Placement Center
SSi- �??�
NAVY. YOU ARE TOMORROW. YOU ARE THE NAVY.
i
Tarhe
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)
In an effort to jump start the T
Heels' struggling passing atta
Jorth Carolina football coa
Mack Brown says he may
freshman Todd Burnett at qu�
terback Saturday against Georj
Tech.
"Our problems on offense a
very obvious Brown said Tu�
day.
"We will look at Todd Burr.j
this week in practice I don't kn
that he'll definitely play San
day, but we are not throwij
anybody out
Brown had origins
planned to redshirt Burnett, a
foot-5, 195-pounder from J
Va. But after the Tar He - ti
Semin
TALLAHASSEE, Ha I
ida State University officil
wondered whv their team
two notches in The Associal
Press weekly football poll al
the Serrunoles won their si1!
straight game over the weekei
It turned out that one meml
of the AP's 60-member panel I
advertantly left the Seminoles
his ballot, accounting for a dj
from fifth to seventh.
The poll was the subjec
talk shows on Tallahassee re
stations and a number of new
per stories in the state TuescU
"It was an oversight on
part of the voter and an o ersj
on our part for not double-chj
ing AP Sports Editor Daj
Christian said Tuesday "Wei
to ensure it's as honest, of coq
and as accurate as such an ui
entific survey can be
The voter who forj
Seminoles blamed the overs
on preoccupation with decic
where to rank Miami afterI
previously No. 1 Hurricanes
to Notre Dame 31-30 on Saturd
It was "totally a slip on
part the voter said. 1 wot
from last week's Top Twenty
I think what happened was tr
Hying to decide how fat U.
Miami, I somehow overloc
Florida State
The voter, not identified
der poll guidelines, said he prj
blv would have voted the Sent
J L
les seventh, enough to keep t
No. 5 in the final tabulation
Christian said this wi
poll would stand, adding
unfortunate, but it probably
rectify itself next week.
However, the poll eo
versy continues to cause
concern among the school's
licity people.
"We feel, quite frankl
hurts the integrity of the
said Florida State Sports InK
ubn Director Wayne Hoganj
Hogan said the error
perpetuate itself because j
often work off the pre
week's poll table. Once listf
No. 7, the Seminoles are Iim
Wake Fore:
look to Cav
WINSTON-SALEM
(AP) - Wake Forest will hJ
beat Virginia Saturday to rj
in the running for the Af
Coast Conference title, but t j
feat the Deacons haven t a
plished in four years.
Deacon coach Bill Doole
Tuesday.
"I was told that not a
on our squad has been pal
team that has defeated Yij
It's been quite a while
said.
"This is a big game toi
that we're 2-1 in the confer
we expect to stay in the raj
contend for the ACC chat
ship, we must win
The Deacons will
overcome the Cavaliers' sij
speed, Dooley said.
"Virginia has the fas
ceiver in the ACC in lohn
Dooley said at his weekh
conference. Tim Finkelstc
big-play football player.
Wilson is averaging air
yards a game rushing and.
Moore is an excellent optioj
terback. He is a threat it
and throwing the football
This is the biggest
defensive team that I can
bcr. On top of their size I
experience Three out
starters return to the secoj
i
-





II IE HAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1988 19
: p
)TL CHANGE"
MIT.

R
f
VS
j
Tarheels in search of win
CHAPE1 HILL,N.C. (AD
n an effort to jump start the Tar
Heels struggling passing attack,
North Carolina football coach
Mack Brown says he may use
treshman Todd Burnett at quar-
terback Saturday against c Georgia
ech
Our problems on offense are
r obvious Brown said lues
i
We will look at lodd Burnett
week in practice. 1 don't know
at he 11 definitely play Satur-
bul we are not throwing
bodj out
Brow n had originally
armed to redshirt Burnett, a h-
vot : 195-pounder from Burke,
i But after the lar Heels' 48-3
loss to North Carolina State last
Saturday, Brown reconsidered.
"People asked me 'Why play
Todd and give up his freshman
season?' Well, we are not giving
up the ship. If Todd can improve
us in that area, let s go ahead and
play Todd now
North Carolina is off to its
worst start ever.
"I am not having fun now
Brown said. "1 don't like being 0
o. 1 don't enjoy the jokes. Unless
you've been through it. you tan
not imagine what it does to your
family
Brown said the Tar 1 leels
rivkv start has led to some press
ing
"Our team is down and struc
gling he said. "When you trv so
hard to force something to hap
pen, you can try too hard and
mess things up
But the attitude of the team is
still positive, Brown said.
"We've got no dissension as
tar as 1 can tell he said. "There is
still hope. I didn't come here for
one year. 1 didn't come here to run
from a challenge. 1 knew when I
took the job we had some prob
iems to deal with, some rebuild
ing to olo
Brown said support from
within the university community
has been helpful.
It the tans were up there in
the stands booing and saying we
want to fire the coach, that would
lx a negative Brown said "But
they are not doing thai
I ast week, quai tei ba ks t �n
a than 1 la II and Deems Ma) com
pleted onh seven ol 28 passes for
)ust 62 yards, no torn hdow ns and
four interceptions lln w realso
sacked ti�� limes
It Burnett plays Saturday it
will mean nineol the I .u I leel;
true freshman have played this
season.
Brow n .�'� � annoum ed tart
ing offensive guard Steve Stein
bacher was "very doubtful" foi
the (Georgia lech j im iftei suf
fcring i pulled hamsti i linst
the Wolfpa k 1 hat would !� i
junior v ail W atts as tlv tartei
Seminoles drop on oversight
1 Al LAHASSEE, Fla Flor-
State University officials
vlered v In their team slid
notches in f"he Associated
ss weekly football poll after
Seminoles won their sixth
U game over the weekend.
It turned out that one member
the AB's 60-member panel in-
ertantly left the Seminoles off
ballot accounting tor a drop
m fifth to seventh.
Hie poll was the subject of
� shows on Tallahassee radio
stationsand a number of newspa-
per stories in the state Tuesdaj
It was an oversight on the
I of the voter and an oversight
Mir part for not double-check-
ng -XT Sports Editor Darrell
ristian said Tuesday. "We try
nsure it's as honest, of course,
md as accurate as such an unsci-
entific survey can be "
The voter who forgot the
Seminoles blamed the oversight
on preoccupation with dividing
where to rank Miami alter the
previously No. 1 Hurricanes lost
toNotre Dame 31 30 on Saturday.
It was "totally a slip on mv
part the oter said 1 worked
from last week's Top Twenty, but
I think what happened was that in
trying to decide how tax to drop
Miami, 1 somehow overlooked
Honda State
ITie voter, not identified un-
der poll guidelines, said he proba-
bly would have voted the Semino-
les seventh, enough to keep them
No. 5 in the final tabu ition.
Christian said this week's
ill would stand, adding, "It's
unfortunate, but it probably will
rectify itself next week
However, the poll contro-
versy continues to cause great
oncern among the school's pub
ity people.
"We feel, quite frankly, it
hurts the integrity of the poll
said Honda State Sports Informa-
n Director Wayne Hogan.
Hogan said the error could
rpetuate itself because voters
ften work off the previous
week's poll table. Once listed as
No. 7, the Seminoles are likely to
Wake Forest
look to Cavs
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.
V) - Wake Forest will have to
Ivat Virginia Saturday to remain
the running for the Atlantic
�asti inference title, but that's a
feat the Deacons haven't accom-
plished in four years, Demon
�eacon coach Bill Poolev said
I uesday.
"I was told th.it not a player
on our squad has been part of a
am thai has defeated Virginia.
it's been quite a while Doolev
sdl.l
"This is a big game for us in
thai we're 2-1 in the conference It
we expect t stav in the race and
-intend for the AC( champion-
hip, we must win
Hie I )eacons will have to
overcome the Cavaliers' size and
speed, Doolev said.
"Virginia has the fastest re-
eiver in the AC C in ohn Ford
Doolev said at his weekly press
i onferonce. Tim Finkelston is a
big-play football player. Marcus
Wilson is averaging almost 90
yards a game rushing and Shawn
Moore isan excellent option quar-
terback. He is a threat running
and throwing the football.
"This is the biggest Virginia
defensive team that I can remem-
ber. On top of their size they have
experience Three out of four
starters return to the secondary
remain No. 7 unless a higher-
ranked team is upset, he said, and
that could keep Honda State from
being invited to one ol the major
postseason bowl games
"This little quirk (it fateould
work in the long run to be a detri-
ment 1 logansaid. "We want it to
be made right. A lot ol things
could change, but you never
know
After a 45-21 victory over East
Carolina on Saturday, Florida
state fell two places, behind Ne
braska and undefeaU d West Vu
ginia.
Nebraska, 6-1, moved from
seventh to fifth after defeating
No. 10 Oklahoma State 62-42
West Virginia, 6 0, was idle and
remained No. 6.
"We've won six straight ball
games West Virginia moves in
front ol us and they didn't play
1 logan said.
Florida State coach Bobbv
B' d n said s tht i
despite th
"I've always I I tht
polls and I've i be-
he er in the I I've
alwa) s �� ikei I the
playoffs I" i Id e in
the polls
"It the n i ��
that someb
the I op i wenty, I d think that
would take care ol itsell if it is
corrected he added
i t v � w '
te us in
Month of fundays
OKTOBERFEST '88
Come celebrate the season with
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nth at Annabelle's Restaurant
For a light breezy lunch,
hearty evening meal,
or festive latemght
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Annabelle's s simply
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the fun and get nto
the spirit of
Oktoberfest '88
Annabelle's
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r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20.1968 19
EARLY IS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week - (7-2-1)
Overall - (49-19-1)
Syracuse
Wake Forest
Clemson
Puke
UNC
Vanderbilt
Illinois
Tenn State
Oklahoma
UCLA
OIL CHANGE"
pointment
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1 service!
s ad)
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;ment Center
"HE NAVY.
Tarheels in search of win
CHAPEL HILL, N.C (AP) �
In an effort to jump start the Tar
Heels' struggling passing attack,
North Carolina football coach
Mack Brown says he may use
freshman Todd Burnett at quar-
terback Saturday against Georgia
Tech.
"Our problems on offense are
very obvious Brown said Tues-
day.
"We will look at Todd Burnett
this week in practice. I don't know
that he'll definitely play Satur-
day, but we are not throwing
anybody out
Brown had originally
planned to redshirt Burnett, a 6-
foot-5, 195-pounder from Burke,
Va. But after the Tar Heels' 48-3
loss to North Carolina State last
Saturday, Brown reconsidered.
"People asked me 'Why play
Todd and give up his freshman
season?' Well, we are not giving
up the ship. If Todd can improve
us in that area, lef s go ahead and
play Todd now
North Carolina is off to its
worst start ever.
"I am not having fun now
Brown said. "I don't like being 0-
6.1 don't enjoy the jokes. Unless
you've been through it, you can-
not imagine what it does to your
family
Brown said the Tar Heels'
rocky start has led to some press-
ing.
"Our team is down and strug-
gling he said. "When you try so
hard to force something to hap-
pen, you can try too hard and
mess things up
But the attitude of the team is
still positive, Brown said.
"We've got no dissension as
far as I can tell he said. "There is
still hope. I didn't come here for
one year. I didn't come here to run
from a challenge. I knew when I
took the job we had some prob-
lems to deal with, some rebuild-
ing to do
Brown said support from
within the university community
has been helpful.
"If the fans were up there in
the stands booing and saying we
want to fire the coach, that would
be a negative Brown said. "But
they are not doing that
Last week, quarterbacks Jon-
athan Hall and Deems May com-
pleted only seven of 28 passes for
just 62 yards, no touchdowns and
four interceptions. They were also
sacked five times.
If Burnett plays Saturday, it
will mean nine of the Tar Heels' 20
true freshman have played this
season.
Brown also announced start-
ing offensive guard Steve Stein-
bacher was "very doubtful" for
the Georgia Tech game after suf-
fering a pulled hamstring against
the Wolfpack. That would leave
junior Carl Watts as the starter.
Seminoles drop on oversight
Month of fundays
OKTOBERFEST '88
Come celebrate the season with
P good food and good times this
month at Annabelle's Restaurant.
For a light breezy lunch,
hearty evening meal,
or festive latenight
excitement, October at
Annabelle's is simply
wunderbar! Come join
TALLAHASSEE, Ha.� Flor-
ida State University officials
wondered why their team slid
two notches in The Associated
Tress weekly football poll after
the Seminoles won their sixth
straight game over the weekend.
It turned out that one member
of the AP's 60-member panel in-
advertantly left the Seminoles off
his ballot, accounting for a drop
from fifth to seventh.
The poll was the subject of
talk shows on Tallahassee radio
stations and a number of newspa-
per stories in the state Tuesday.
"It was an oversight on the
part of the voter and an oversight
on our part for not double-check-
ing AP Sports Editor Darrell
Christian said Tuesday. "We try
to ensure it's as honest, of course,
and as accurate as such an unsci-
entific survey can be
The voter who forgot the
Seminoles blamed the oversight
on preoccupation with deciding
where to rank Miami after the
previously No. 1 Hurricanes lost
to Notre Dame 31 -30 on Saturday.
It was "totally a slip on my
part the voter said. "I worked
from last week's Top Twenty, but
I think what happened was that in
trying to decide how faj: .to drop �
Miami, I somehow overlooked
Honda State
The voter, not identified un-
der poll guidelines, said he proba-
bly would have voted the Semino-
les seventh, enough to keep them
No. 5 in the final tabulation.
Christian said this week's
poll would stand, adding, "It's
unfortunate, but it probably will
rectify itself next week
However, the poll contro-
versy continues to cause great
concern among the school's pub-
licity people.
"We feel, quite frankly, it
hurts the integrity of the poll
said Florida State Sports Informa-
tion Director Wayne Hogan.
Hogan said the error could
perpetuate itself because voters
often work off the previous
week's poll table. Once listed as
No. 7, the Seminoles are likely to
Wake Forest
look to Cavs
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.
(AP) Wake Forest will have to
beat Virginia Saturday to remain
in the running for the Atlantic
Coast Conference title, but thaf s a
feat the Deacons haven't accom-
plished in four years, Demon
Deacon coach Bill Dooley said
Tuesday.
"I was told that not a player
on our squad has been part of a
team that has defeated Virginia.
It's been quite a while Dooley
said.
"This is a big game for us in
that we're 2-1 in the conference. If
we expect to stay in the race and
contend for the ACC champion-
ship, we must win
The Deacons will have to
overcome the Cavaliers' size and
speed, Dooley said.
"Virginia has the fastest re-
ceiver in the ACC in John Ford
Dooley said at his weekly press
conference. Tim Finkelston is a
big-play football player. Marcus
Wilson is averaging almost 90
yards a game rushing and Shawn
Moore is an excellent option quar-
terback. He is a threat running
and throwing the football.
'This is the biggest Virginia
defensive team that I can remem-
ber. On top of their size they have
experience. Three out of four
starters return to the secondary
remain No. 7 unless a higher-
ranked team is upset, he said, and
that could keep Florida State from
being invited to one of the major
postseason bowl games.
"This little quirk of fate could
work in the long run to be a detri-
ment Hogan said. "We want it to
be made right. A lot of things
could change, but you never
know
After a 45-21 victory over East
Carolina on Saturday, Florida
State fell two places, behind Ne-
braska and undefeated West Vir-
Bowden said he likes the polls
despite the mistake,
ginia. "I've always supported the
Nebraska, 6-1, moved from polls and I've always been a be-
seventh to fifth after defeating liever in the polls he said. "I've
No. 10 Oklahoma State 62-42. always spoken out against the
West Virginia, 6-0, was idle and playoffs because I do believe in
remained No. 6. the polls
"We've won six straight ball "If the reason we dropped is
games West Virginia moves in that somebody didn't vote us in
front of us and they didn't play the Top Twenty, I'd think that
Hogan said. would take care of itself if it is
Florida State coach Bobby corrected he added.
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20
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 18
Ford wary of the Wolfpack
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) �
ure, Clemson was impressive in
whipping previously unbeaten
Duke, but Coach Danny Ford is
hesitant to praise the No. 9 Tigers
too much.
"They haven't turned the
corner yet Ford said Tuesday at
his weekly news conference.
They have it in 'em to play well.
11 they show up and play well that
would be what we'd like.
Whether we can get it out of them,
as coaches, remains to be seen
Saturday
The Tigers have a chance for
some revenge Saturday against
North Carolina State or they
could accomplish a dubious first
under Ford.
Clemson has never lost to the
same team three straight seasons
under Ford since he took over as
head coach in 1978. That could
change when Clemson goes to
Raleigh, N.C to face the
Wolfpack.
N.C State has beaten the Ti-
gers two straight years and is
coming off an impressive 48-3
victory over arch-rival North
Carolina. A year ago, N.C. State
grabbed a 30-0 half time lead and
held on to defeat the Tigers 30-28
in Death Valley. Clemson was
ranked seventh in the nation at
the time and had won 11 straight
games.
While Ford insisted the streak
isn't on his mind, he clearly would
like to end it Saturday.
"If I could block and tackle
and go in there, I could break it
Ford said. "But 1 don't get to play
you know. I'd be very competi-
tive; I'd do my durndest to break
it. But all I can do is sit over there
on the sidelines with my hands in
my pockets and see if our football
team can do it
"Everything that we've ever
done at Clemson our football
team's done anyway. I hope
they're ready to play. I haven't
had to block anybody yet, or
tackle anybody. I've been run
over a couple of times when I
couldn't get out of the way on the
sideline
"Our football team is capable.
Three in a row, that ain't bad.
Somewhere down the road it
might be 10. Then I'd be in bad
trouble. I know that Coach (Dick)
Sheridan is an excellent coach and
all that, but I'm really not con-
cerned about him blocking me or
tackling me. I'm concerned about
how our people respond to play-
ing against an excellent football
team who has beaten our fanny
the last two years and done it
well
Ford said his Tigers should
have no trouble getting ready this
year to play the Wolfpack.
"We really shouldn't have a
reason to go up there and not be
fully prepared to play he said.
"You've got to be a double idiot to
have been beaten twice and think
you can go up there and win by
just showing up
The Tigers, who have won
two straight Atlantic Coast Con-
ference titles are coming off a 39-
17 victory over previously unde-
feated Duke at Death Valley to
push their record to 5-1 overall
and 3-0 in the ACC. N.C. State is 5-
1 and 3-1.
Instant replay for colleges?
(AP) � In the wake of the flap
that arose following Notre
Harne's controversial 31-30 vic-
tory over Miami, might college
football go the way of the NFL and
adopt the instant replay? "I hope
not says Dave Nelson, secre-
tary-editor of the NCAA Football
Rules Committee.
Not only is Nelson, former
head coach and athletic director at
the University of Delaware and
now the dean of the school of
physical education there, the
nation's guru when it comes to
football rules, he also was an aer-
ial photographer during World
War 11.
So he knows whereof he
speaks when he says that "the
camera atop the press box ma v be
75 feet up in the air, the camera in
the end zone may be 35-40 yards
away, and they're subject to unbe-
lievable distortion and unbeliev-
able parallax problems
"I'm not enamored with re-
plays. To begin with, they're not
absolute. You can't assume the
camera is perfect
Nelson says the instant replay
has never been seriously dis-
cussed because it would have to
be available for every game and
the cost would be cxhorbitant.
The NFL needs it for onlv 14
games a week.
What he would like to see is
an end to split officiating crews.
He has proposed it before, to no
avail, and he will include it when
he sends out his annual question-
naire to coaches before their Janu-
ary convention.
"I've been concerned more
than once about split crews and
this year I've heard more com-
plaints than any ever. One team
thinks the other team's crew is
incompetent and thinks they're
not going to get a fair shake
Certain nonconference
games have eliminated split
crews. When Penn State visits
Alabama this weekend, all the
officials will be from the South-
eastern Conference. When Ala-
bama risited Penn State last year,
they came from the Collegiate
Independents Football Officiat-
ing Association.
That was the agreement
when Bear Bryant and Joe Paterno
contracted for the long-term se-
ries.
The Notre Dame-Miami
game had four CIFOA officials
and three from the Southern Inde-
pendents (SIFOA), the gTOup
Miami uses. The CIFOA supplies
officials for nine Eastern schools,
plus Notre Dame.
Rudd fined $6,000 for actions
DAYTONA BEACH, Ha.
(AP) - NASCAR officials fined
eky Rudd $6,000 Tuesday after
reviewing Sunday's Holly Farms
A0Q Winston Cup stock car race in
North Wilkesboro, N.C.
Rudd, a native of Chesai
cake, Va and Dale Earnhardt of
Kannapolis, N.C, had been in-
volved in a pair of bumping inci-
dents with about 40 laps left in the
400-lap race. Both were warned
and sent to the rear of the field for
a restart after a caution period.
Rudd and Earnhardt got to-
gether again late in the race.
Earnhardt spun sideways on lap
395 and was hit by a Ford driven
by Mark Martin of Batesville, Ark.
Officials determined Rudd's dri v-
ing was responsible.
Rudd drives a Buick owned
by Kenny Bernstein of Indianapo-
lis, Ind.
Earnhardt drives a Chevrolet
fielded by Richard Childress of
Winston-Salem, N.C.
5th street
Subway
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Limit one box per customer per order with SI0.00
food order excluding advertised specials
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OVEPTONS
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 20, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 20, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.634
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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