The East Carolinian, October 13, 1988






Inside:
EDITORIALS4
CLASSIFIEDS�6
FEATURES8
SPORTS12
Features:
The performance by the Ohio Ballet was dazzling,
see page 8.
Sports:
The Florida State Seminoles host the Pirates in
Tallahassee this Saturday, see page 10.
�Jte lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 27
Thursdav October 13,1988
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Last year's Buccaneer questionable in many aspects
ByKRISTINAMURDEN
Stiff Writer
The 1987 Buccaneer, which
sparked a letter to the editor in
Tuesday's East Carolinian w as the
result of "poor management and
conflict of interest, said the
Buccaneer's 1989 editor Mike
Daughtry.
The yearbook, which was a
year late, is currently being re-
viewed by the ECU Media hoard
under the stipulation that it the
books do not go out taster, their
budget will be lowered or the
book will be deleted tor a year,
said Daughtry.
The main problems last year
were due to the yearbook staff's
inability to meet deadlines and
failure to work together, lite ECU
Photolab also contributed to the
problems, in that there was a
problem with the quality and
quantity of photos submitted.
Daughtery said there was a "con-
flict of interest between the pho-
tography manager and the
Buccaneer's general managers
They didn't see eye to eye it was
too difficult tor them to work to-
gether, which created problems
"The media board is also at
fault said ex-staft member Tat
O Neil. He criticized them tor
their "get it out now" attitude.
Kim Kayos, the '88 editor,
added that the Media Board
threatened the '87 editor Beth
Davis to get the lxok out on time
or give back her salary.
Kayes said, "The '87book was
poorlv managed and thrown to-
gether in two week avis lied to
the staff about parts of the book
being sent to the printer when it
was really sitting in her apart-
ment she cheated the students
said Kayes.
Daughterv added that Davis
blatantly lied to her staff about
mating deadlines which was a
factor in the lxok's tardiness.
When Davis left ECU she
submitted materials unclear to
the Bue's publishers which de-
layed printing said Daughtry.
"There should have been a clear
understanding on production
details like page numbers, etc,
between the editor and the
printer
Daughtry said the '87 year-
book was "so bad" because of the
photos, and that the ECU Photo-
lab submitted a limited amount of
photos, many of which were un-
acceptable.
When Kayes became the '88
editor "she did one hell of a job
said Daughtry. "She proved that
the Buccaneer can stand on its feet
the superiority of the '88 Fuc
due to her efforts Kayes com
mended graphic artist Mike Iver-
son.
Daughtry said Kayes wan1
to produce a yearbook that she
could look back on in 20 years and
be proud of.
The new staff of the Buc said
that the'89 Buc will be as good as
'88's if not better. "Contributions
are encouraged and we want to
increase the group and individual
picture sections
Daughtry said, "The student
bodv needs to get involved. Let us
know what's out there we cai
ver what we don't know
- new slogan is, "It
trb� k until vou're in
it
� - 7 and WHS yearbooks
cam .in within a month of each
?ther and 3,000 of the 5,000 88's
ne in 2 days and only
5,00( 87s were picked
pint ks rhe Buccaneer is
free �? � harge
lndi i lu il pictures will be
taken in the back of the soda shop
in th student store from Oct. 31-
Nov. 4 from 9 am12 p.mand 1
p m 4 30 p m.
Wooten Award given
for quality of student
to SRA
life
By BEN SHELBY
Stiff Writer
The members of the Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity were "big brothers" to 22 young men from the
Greenville Area Boys Club (Photo By Gretchen Journigan, ECU Photolab).
ECU'S Student Resident As-
sociation (SRA) is the first SRA in
the state to receive the Dan
Wooten Award. Approximately
50 Universities and colleges
across the state (both privately
and publicly funded) were eli-
gible for the award.
The award is given to the
school's SRA that contributes
most to the quality of life for cam-
pus residential students and for
providing the best leadership de-
velopment opportunity.
The award, given in memory
of Dan Wooten who served as
Director of Housing Operations
at ECU for 25 years, was received
October 4th.
"Winning the award will give
us national recognition said
SRA President Mark Carroll.
The SRA serves as a collecrh e
voice for student residents. Last
year the SRA sponsored a campus
blood drive, collecting 392 pints
of blood. It assisted with the ECl
Telefund and supported Pirate
Walk. Also, it provided financial
support to individual resid
halls and monetary awards to
residence halls with the high st
percentage of residents voting
during campus elections.
The SRA had freshman o Kk-
out, encouraging students to be-
come involved in residential gov-
ernment. It provided leadership
workshops during spring and fall
semesters and sent delegates to
state, regional, and national con-
ferences. It hosted an awards din-
ner recognizing outstanding resi-
dence hall and their leaders.
As an administrative liason,
the SRA supported a $40 incn asc
in room rent which will provide
air conditioning and ether reno-
vations n the residence halls.
Carroll said the SRA stands a
good chanceof w inning next year.
vould like to see greater par-
ticipation among resident stu-
dents
udents don't real-
ize the opportunities that are
available tor them he said, "A
ibersh
� i rd cost only $8 a nci
� i pay for itself dur-
the year he added.
n Fulgham, asst
e chancellor and director ol
re sidiand housing, is the
tl ad isor t the SRA. "I'm
extrcmel) proud arid pleased that
the N.C. Housing Office Associa
� "� , gnized the SRA by pre-
sent them with the Dan
Wooten rward The students
oi - I' crj hard for it They are
tx - m d foi the work
aid
WZMB to appeal for emergency funding
By TIM HAMPTON
futures Kditor
WZMB has had nothing to be
excited about lately.
A faulty component called an
exciter has put the student radio
station in a state of airwave limbo
The silence may continue for a
month unless emergencv funding
can be allocated to WZMB.
The exciter, which keeps the
station on the correct frequency of
91.3 FM, failed Sept. 24, forcing
WZMB to sign-off indefinitely.
According to the station's man-
agement, the faulty component
was sent to an Illinois company
for repairs weeks ago.
"We are getting the runa-
round on the exciter Keith
Powe, General Manager of
WZMB said.
Powe said the company con-
tracted for the repair job, Versa
Count, has promised to return the
part on two different dates.
"A spokesman for the com-
pany assured me on Oct. 3 I'd
receive the exciter. I called back
and then he told me Oct. 10. We
have yet to see anything Powe
said.
Frustrated, Powe has sought
new avenues to solve the prob-
lem. The purchase of a new or
used exciter may be the best possi-
bility, Powe said.
Now Powe's mission is to
find the necessary funding to
purchase the part. Powe said he
must petition the Media Board,an
advisory committee consisting of
both students and faculty, for an
emergency appropriation.
"We are trying to set an emer-
gency meeting of the Media
Board Powe said. As of Wednes-
day, Powe said attempts to set the
emergency meeting have reached
some snags.
"Many members of the board
can't change their schedules.
Powe said. "But as far as I can see,
I will get a meeting even if 1 have
to cry and plead he said.
According to Powe, ECU pol-
icy concerning purchase bidding
may cause the station to remain
off the air for a month. During the
month, all respective companies
are given an opportunity to bid on
the price of the component, Powe
said.
In efforts to gauge the cost of
a new or an u s. d exciter, Powe has
received price quotes from sev-
eral electronics companies which
specialize in broadcast equip-
ment.
According to Powe. Broad-
cast Electronics, one oi the largest
such companies, quoted S3.51X1
tor an used exciter If purchas d.
the component would have a k
da warranty
Education is goal of awareness week
ByLYNNJOYNER
Staff Writrr
A host of events are sched-
uled for ECU'S third annual Alco-
hol Awareness Week which is
slated for Oct. 19-27. The purpose
of the week is to educate the
campus on the effects of alcohol
and alcohol abuse.
Mary Elesha-Adams, Health
Educator at ECU's Student
Health Service, said: "The pur-
pose of Alcohol Awareness Week
is to provide information and ac-
tivities that will help students,
staff and faculty develop an
awareness of alcohol issues and to
develop responsible alcohol us-
age
On Oct. 19, at 4 p.m a banner
judging will take place at Ficklen
Stadium. The contest is a new
event in which campus organiza-
tions, fraternities and sororities
will make banners that promote
alcohol awareness. The winning
group will recieve $50.
Thursday from 1-5 p.m a
demonstration featuring Vince
and Larry � the "Crash Guys" �
will be held on the central cam-
pus mall, concerning the use of
seatbelts and drinking and driv-
ing. The event, sponsored by Scott
Hall, will include volunteer stu-
dents or faculty testing out the
"condensor"� an automoblie
impact simulator.
Casino Night will be held on
Friday from 8-10 p.m. at Menden-
hall Student Center in room 244.
The event, sponsored by the Stu-
dent Union, Special Events, and
Pubicity and Public Relations
Committees, will include games
of chance such as blackjack and
bingo. Players will bet with play
money and at the end of the night
may use the money to bid on
prizes at an auction. Mocktails
(alcohol-free "mixed drinks") will
also be served.
On Saturday, winning ban-
ners will be on display at the
ECU Syracuse football game at
Ficklen Stadium.
Exhibits and displays will be
at Garrett Dormitory on Monday
from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The infor-
mation will be part oi the program
"Alcohol: The Fatal Attraction
Mocktails will also be served at
this event, which is sponsored by
the Central Area Council.
The program "Using Alcohol
Wisely: Methyl and Ethyl Speak
Out" will be held at Hetcher Hall
from 4-6 p.m. on Tuesday. This
event is sponsored by the West
Area Council. Also on Tuesday at
7 p.m the Inter-Fraternity Coun-
cil, Panhellenic, BACCHUS, and
244 Mcndenhall will sponsor a
talk by Mark Usry, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Business Law at James
Madison University, on "Risk
Management
See ALCOHOL, page 2
The Austin Building's duty has been taken by the new General Classroom Building; who
knows what takes place in there now (Photo By Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab).





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13, 1988
Stress needs to be prevented
Two senior nursing students
asked the Health Coordinator
about stress, and what some of its
possible contributing factors are.
ITU e� V u J, u r - ,i. .
By
Mary Elesha-Adams
Stress is your body's physical
and emotional reaction to change
or to a situation that may be dan-
gerous, confusing, irritating, or
boring. Stress is a part of everyday
life and can be good or bad.
Graduating from high
school, starting college, and de-
ciding on a major are examples of
"good stress" (oreustress). "Good
stressors" provide a positive,
motivating force.
"Bad stress" or distress, can
lead to serious health problems if
it continues. Examples of "bad
stress" are wrecking your car, fail-
ing a midterm, or breaking up
with a girlfriend or boyfriend.
We all would like to avoid
bad stress, but sometimes it's just
not possible. Since we can't avoid
stress, we should think about
stress positively; life would be
dull and purposeless without it.
Signs of Stress Can Include:
Grouchiness
Irritability
Inability to concentrate
Insomnia
Fatigue
Eating too much or too little
Diarrhea, cramps
Headaches
Neck and backaches
Butterflies in stomach
Chest pain
Ways to Reduce Stress
1. Organize your life! Redo
your room, apartment, or house
so that you know where every-
thing is.
2. Organize your time by set-
ting priorities. Decide each day
what is most important to accom-
plish and do it.
3. Plan to spend 15 minutes
alone each day. Clean your mind
of all thoughts and relax.
4. Find a quiet place to study,
and study on a regular basis.
Cramming and procrastination
will only increase your stress.
5. Take breaks from studying
� 10 minutes every hour should
re-encrgize you tor more. Don't
give in to peer pressure and take a
"let's go out for one drink break
6. Eat a balanced diet every
day; junk food, and too much
sugar, caffeine, and alcohol may
contribute to irritability or fa-
tigue.
7. Get enough sleep and rest.
Everyone's needs are different.
You've had enough sleep when
you wake up feeling refreshed.
Don't cut classes though!
8. Establish a balance be-
tween work, school and exercise.
9. Learn how to say no. Don't
over-extend yourself by trying to
do too much.
10. Talk about problems with
friends or family.
11. Stretching and progres-
sive muscle relaxation can help
you achieve a relaxation re-
sponse.
12. Keep your sense of humoi.
13. Learn to accept what vow
cannot change.
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD . . .
(Ka la shan. ka-) 1. the act. process, or
result of gathering (the sections of a book)
together in proper order for binding
IT'S OUR BUSINESS
We specialize in duplicating and binding
multiple page documents
&
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
We are open early & late (Next to Chico's in Georgetown Shops)
758-2400
Waste treatment plant halted
FAYETTEVILLE (AP) �
The U.S. government has put an
indefinite hold on proceedings
against the state over a new law
that effectively blocks a pro-
posed hazardous-waste treat-
ment plant in Scotland County,
but plant foes say they aren't
celebrating yet.
"An indefinite postpone-
ment is the next best thing to
saying, 'Let's turn out the lights,
the party's over said Richard
Regan, environmental coordina-
tor for the Center for Commu-
nity Action in Robeson County.
Alcohol awareness
Continued from page 1
"If You Wanna Get High Go
Fly a Kite the final event of the
week, is sponsored by Kitty Hawk
Kites and will take place on Col-
lege Hill. Kitty Hawk Kites will
decorate, and skits involving al-
cohol-related situations will be
performed.
A question and answer ses-
sion will follow each skit. Ms.
Elesha-Adams said: "We are
doing these alcohol-awareness
activities for thisone week, but we
want sufdehts" tobe aware"aTl the
time. Programs and classes are
given throughout the year, and
there are many sources of alcohol
information available on cam-
pus
Ms. Elesha-Adams said that
pamphlets and a film concerning
drinking and driving can be ob-
tained at the Student Health Cen-
ter. Other drug and alcohol infor-
mation resources and clinical
services are listed in "Alcohol
Drug Abuse a publication spon-
sored by The Division of Student
Life.
"It seems logical that the next
step would be for EPA to drop
the whole thing
But environmental leaders
fear that the federal government
will use the threat of a cutoff of
federal toxic-waste cleanup
money to force the state to accept
the facility.
The Environmental Protec-
tion Agency announced last year
that it was initiating action that
could strip the state of its ability to
manage its own hazardous waste.
The action came in the wake of the
General Assembly's passage of a
bill that greatly restricts the
amount of treated waste water
that hazardous-waste plants can
discharee.
Scning the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKce. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashlev E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0-49 Column InchesS4.25
50-994.15
100-149 4.05
150-199 3.95
200-249 3.85
250 and above3.75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rale)
One color and black�� SO.OO
Two colors and black 155.00
Inserts
5.000 or less ( each
5.001 - 10,0005.5c each
10,001 12,000 5c each
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
RocSports
SuperSports
DresSports
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
ProVValker
Cbrnforts
And - they're available in
a wide variety of sizes,
colors and shies
for both men and
women.
Phones
,757-6366757-6557
757-6558757-6309
Rockport
Headquarters.
Come in now and see .1 full range of styles for uien'mdlaetesfetfla iHi(,fcMi
walking shoe Rockports For over 10 vrars Rockport's
been making shoes that make walking a pleasure
With ali the unique comfort support and flexibility features you need.
j. Rockport The original walking shoe
Rockport @
The RACK ROOM
has as large a
selection of men's
and ladies' Rockport
as you will find in
this area.
� i
1 u 'J4J �
MONDAY
NIGHT
FOOTBALL
On Greenville's Largest
Wide Screen TV
This Week
Buffalo Bills
vs
New York Jets
8:00 until
$2.50 Pitchers
$1.00 Miller Long Necks
$1.50 Highballs
Stop by UBE before
or after any home
pirate football
game. Choose
from the world's
largest selection
of pirate souvenirs from
t-shirts, sweaters and hats to
megaphones, pom poms and
even E.C.U. tote bags.
And while you're at
UBE see our full line
of Russell Athletic
and Champion
Sportswear.
It's all at University
Book Exchange, downtown
Greenville the one for
the fans. Stop by today.
Ramada Inn
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
1988 PIRATE HOME SCHEDULE
Sept 3 Tennessee Tech. 7:00 PM
Sept. 24 Southern Mississippi (Parent's Day) 1:30PM
Oct. 1 Southwestern Louisiana 1:30 PM
Oct. 8 West Virginia (Homecoming)
Oct 22 Syracuse
Get 29 Miami
2 00 PM
1 30 PM
1 30 PM
7te OhB �bfTh& fhrtsl
Open Football Saturdays 9:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.Weekdays 9:00 A.M. - 5:30 P.M.
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville
Crime
George Bush and Mi
Dukakis appealed -
class Americans with pl
crack down on criminals and
first-time buyers purcha -
as the two V hite House coi I
its crammed for theii �
final presidential debate
The Republican president!
nominee, hammering a.
preferred toj
cused his rival
concerned ab
nalsthan their
a different apj roach 11
"1 m . - .
rude to tb �
more symr. il
enmr than I r
Bush told ai
a Knights
Trenton,
WhiW �
courted
American
Dukakis tr
built on th. ; I
able housing si
post-World �
The 1 �
used a � '
Levittown,
Marcos invesl

proa
in
- and offer
thatwoul 1 �
cost him mill
reported I
Citing a
Department cal
les Times s 1
the dep -
might "s � t
barrass
rials by all
condu
Under I
mod m
would ha � '
millioi
alleuedly I -
treasury b I
in
prison sentei
Soui
DTS officials ir -� m I
Marcos ma tl i
political!)
about his di.
era! governn ent I
White Houst
tion.
The cal
elabor that the -
merit is ned tha
.1
Kollar to chair
identity commiti
-
I
has been named
sitv - mmittee v
rktodc
syst m � �
sitv.
As East v -
has crown the irr
versirj been p
consistent
cellor Richard Eak
August ol this year
pointed an In
address a broad i
related sues I
University and to w �
with the vice chancellor
tional advancemenf I
the imace ECl I
The first issue to b f
under this charge from
cellor i- consid� i j
ECU is presented and
through
� mbt s
The subcomm
Ms. kollar is currently
input from all members
campus community
the visual image of I
trayed in internal and e
publications, stationer)
tisements and public
announcements Written
ments mav be address I
subcommittee at the c
University Publication
Racdale.
EdWheatky(Businesj
of the University Imacl
Force who appointed ti
committee, has emphasij
importance ot the croup
"Because of the multiplj
images representing the
sitv, there is no one ce
I imageofECL'portravedtv
" nal and external audierj
commented





ION
IWORD . . .
act, process, or
fctionsof a book)
' )i binding
SINESS
ind bmdmg
IPY
0
TIMES
�rgctown Shops)
: �
port
luarters.
for mn and Jaelks in f he original
� ears Rockport's
icing a pleasure
id tlcxibiiitv- eaturcs vou nood
� ing shoe.
:kport �
you're at
ir full line
II Athletic
Champion
lortswear.
ersity
ntown
one for
y today.
2:00 PM
1 30 PM
1 30 PM
5:30 P.M.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13,1988 3
Crime tops "promises"
lists
George Bush and Michael
Dukakis appealed to working
class Americans with pledges to
crack down on criminals and help
first-time buyers purchase homes
as the two White House contend-
ers crammed for their second and
final presidential debate.
The Republican presidential
nominee, hammering away at his
preferred topic � crime � ac-
cused his rival of being more
concerned about the fate of crimi-
nals than their victims and vowed
a different approach if elected.
"I'm going to bring an atti-
tude to the White House that has
more sympathy for the victims of
crime than for the criminals
Bush told an audience Monday at
a Knights of Columbus hall in
Trenton, N.J.
While the vice president
courted votes in Trenton's Italian-
American neighborhood,
Dukakis traveled to a community
built on the premise that afford-
able housing should be available
to post-World War II families.
The Democratic nominee
used a visit to a typical family in
Levittown, N.Y and a speech at
the local high school to introduce
his plan that would allow first-
time buyers to use up to $10,000 of
their IRAs or pension plans for a
down payment.
Dukakis was meeting with
Vietnam War veterans today in
Cambridge, Mass and deliver-
ing an economics speech at Tufts
University in nearby Medford.
Democratic vice presidential
nominee Lloyd Bentsen was cam-
paigning in New Jersey and Penn-
sylvania, two key electoral states
with 16 and 25 votes, respectively.
Bush was heading to Seattle
where he was giving another
t' gh-on-crime speech � white-
Cv ! that is � to business stu-
dents at Seattle University,
the Pauley Pavilion on the Uni-
versity of California at Los Ange-
les campus.
With Election Day exactly
four weeks away, the latest na-
tionwide poll showed the presi-
dential race too close to call.
Bush leads Dukakis 50-47
percent in the ABC News-Washi-
noton Post poll conducted Wed-
nesday through Sunday. The sur-
vey of 600 likely voters had a
margin of error of plus or minus
five percentage points, statisti-
cally negating the lead.
A Los Angeles Times poll re-
leased Monday found that Re-
publican vice presidential candi-
date Dan Quayle remains a drag
on the GOP ticket.
Bush-Quayle leads Dukakis-
Bentsen 44-41 percent, but Bush
alone leads his Democratic oppo-
nent 48-39 percent.
The weekend survey of 893
registered voters had a margin of
error of five percentage points.
But the poll also found that
Dukakis' negative rating was
higher than Quayle � 45 percent
to 40 percent.
Quayle, who campaigned in
Michigan and Ohio, gave what he
described as the "final word" on
his answer to last week's debate
question of what he would do if he
was suddenly propelled into the
presidency.
Quayle said he would make a
request to address the nation and
would consult with allies, but
other steps would depend on the
situation.
"Obviously you do different
things under an assassination.
The first thing you do in an assas-
sination � I would still say a
prayer for myself and the nation
�but the first thing you do is you
get on the phone and call the head
of the CIA and see what he thinks
it was Quayle said during a
question-and-answer session af-
ter an economics speech in De-
troit.
Quayle said he would have
"contingency plans under differ-
ent situations
The Democratic nominee on
Monday also marched in the Co-
lumbus Day parade in New York
City where he was joined by New
York Gov. Mario Cuomo, Mayor
Ed Koch and John F. Kennedy Jr.
Although he received a warm
reception from the thousands
who lined the streets in the tradi-
tional Italian-American event,
Dukakis received some disheart-
ening news from II Progesso, the
Italian-language newspaper.
In its Columbus Day edition,
the 85,000-circulation daily en-
dorced the candidacy of George
Bush.
Marcos investigation to come to a halt
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The
State Department wants U.S.
prosecutors to end their fraud
investigation of Ferdinand Mar-
cos and offer him a plea bargain
that would keep him out of jail but
cost him millions of dollars, it was
reported today.
Citing a confidential State
Department cable, the Los Ange-
les Times said feoeral officials fear
the deposed Philippine president
might "seek to involve and em-
barrass" U.S. and Philippine offi-
cials by alleging improper or ille-
gal conduct, if he is indicted.
Under the plea agreement
outlined in the cable, Marcos
would have to return hundreds of
millions of dollars in assets he
allcuedlv took from his country's
treasury before he fled to Hawaii
in 1986, but he would avoid a
frison sentence.
Sources familiar with the in-
tG�tj�JaR&.J�ld tte� T�mos that
U.S. officials are worried that
Marcos may threaten to reveal
politically damaging information
about his dealings with the fed-
eral government to pressure the
White House to block prosecu-
tion.
The cable also states, without
elaborating, that the State Depart-
ment is concerned that Marcos
Kollar to chair visual
identity committee
Voi Rel�.j�e
Joanne Kollar, director of the
Office of University Publications,
has been named to chair a univer-
sity subcommittee which will
work to develop a visual identity
system for East Carolina Univer-
sity.
As East Carolina University
has grown, the image of the Uni-
versity has not been portrayed
consistently, according to Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin. Thus, in
August of this year, Eakin ap-
pointed an Image Task Force to
address a broad range of image-
related issues concerning the
University and to work directly
with the vice chancellor of institu-
tional advancement to identify
the image ECU wants to portray.
The first issue to be addressed
under this charge from the chan-
cellor is consideration of the way
ECU is presented and received
through graphic designs and
symbols.
The subcommitte chaired by
Ms. Kollar is currently seeking
input from all members of the
, campus community concerning
the visual image of ECU as por-
trayed in internal and external
publications, stationary, adver-
tisements, and public service
announcements. Written com-
ments may be addressed to the
subcommittee at the Office of
University Publications, 122
Ragsdale.
Ed Wheatley (Business), chair
of the University Image Task
Force who appointed the sub-
committee, has emphasized the
I importance of the group's work.
"Because of the multiplicity of
images representing the univer-
sity, there is no one consistent
t image of ECU portrayed to its inter
nal and external audiences h�
commented.
may be attempting to destabilize
the current government of the
Philippines.
The classified cable from
Abraham D. Sofaer, the State
Department's chief legal counsel,
was relayed to other top depart-
ment officials and U.S. Ambassa-
dor Nicholas Platt in Manila.
Prosecutors and diplomatic
advisers disagree over when to
initiate plea bargaining in the
Marcos case, which is being
handled by U.S. Attorney
Rudolph Giuliani in New York
City.
The State Department wants
to give Marcos "a last chance,
prior to indictment to reach a
settlement, the cable said. Federal
prosecutors prefer to indict him
first to gain added leverage ac-
cording to the report.
"(The Department of) Justice
has presented no good reason
why we should not continue to
insist on offering Mr. Marcos a
chance to reach a voluntary plea
agreement prior to indictment
the cable said.
JOIN THE WINNING
COMBINATION
BE A RESIDENT
ADVISOR
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR
SPRING IMPLOYMENT 1989:
OCTOBER 19. 1988
All new application should attend an
organizational meeting during the week of
1010 12. Check bulletin boards for time
and place. For information contact the
departmental office in 214 Whichard,
757-6771 or any residence hall office.
SHEAR
HAIR
DESIGN
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�fj� iEafit QIaroltman
PETE FERNAL.D, OmmttMmagm
C UP CAR! ER, M�fmf EArlor
James F.J. McKee, ihndofof.jtiMng
Joe Harris, n� bm�
Doug Jot inson, sm em�
Tim Hampton r�.�Ma.
MICHELLE ENGLAND, Cr�i(Man-jr
Debbie Stevens, sk)
Jeep Parker �,��
POM FU RR , Ore uUt urn Manager
Susan HowELL,pr�i,rti0n.virr
JOl IN W. MEDL1N, An Dimtm
MAC CLARK, tusiruss Ma-uijCT
October 13, 1988
OPINION
P.ige 4
Drugs
Nothing but political fodder
Drugs.
The very word is enough to
strike terror into the vestigial hearts
of politicians, all oi whom seem
aghast at the prospect that they
might appear any less zealous about
the situation than their comrades.
Although it's been said, many
times, many ways, it apparently
hasn't vet been said loudly enough
that the whole purpose of the drug
"controversy" is to provide politi-
cians with a complete non-issue
about which thev can beat their
breasts. The drug "controversy" is a
beautiful example of empty politics:
no matter what his views on other
issues, any politician (or virtually
any other public figure, for that
matter) will look at drugs only one
way. No thought required.
The idea has gained widespread
support at home and abroad �
many other countries, including the
Soviet Union, have jumped on the
anti-drug bandwagon. There seems
to be almost universal agreement
that drugs are responsible for
America's problems � from the
federal deficit to the spread of secu-
lar humanism to the heartbreak oi
psoriasis.
But what, exactly, is wrong with
drugs?
One: they're bad for you. But
then, so are smoking, drinking alco-
hol and voting for Republicans. One
of the choices we face as adults is
how we want to kill ourselves �
whether by slashing wrists, or, as
Thoreau would put it, by "frittering
our lives away by degrees
Two: air traffic controllers and
railroad workers use them, thereby
endangering the lives of innocent
people. This line of thinking gener-
ally ignores the fact that people who
are deprived of one form oi self-de-
structive behavior will seek another
If forced to give up drugs, users
usually turn to alcohol or some other
form of self-destruction, and the end
result is substantially the same.
Three: drugs are responsible for
inner-city violence and gang wars.
True, drugs are a contributing fac-
tor, but poverty and frustration are
the major causes. Gang violence
existed long before drugs were such
a problem; the important difference
is that today the gangs can afford
bigger and better weapons. How-
ever, they wouldn't have access to
these weapons were it not for laugh-
able gun-control laws, and they
wouldn't be making such a hefty
profit in the first place if drugs were
not illegal. Therefore, the problem
exists more because of government
than in spite of it.
One good way to deal with the
problem would be to find out why
people take drugs � to escape, of
course, but to escape from exactly
what? Simple humdrum existence?
Reruns? The heartbreak of psoria-
sis?
If the government were to focus
but one-tenth the energy it is exert-
ing to "fight the war on drugs" on
this aspect of the drug problem, they
could conceivably win the battle
without bloodshed. But that would
be sensible and it would take time,
so it's obviously an unfit solution.
Besides, it's worth keeping in mind
that the drug "controversy" has a
symbiotic relationship with politi-
cians. If they actually solve the prob-
lem, that takes away the ultimate
political "issue a subject about
A'hich the candidates can posture
and talk tough while remaining
completely safe from the ravages of
intelligent criticism.
Politicians are currently being
selected for office largely on the
basis of their ability to impersonate
Rambo, to "get tough" on "issues"
like drugs. No politician who wants
to be elected (which included, at last
count, all politicians) would ex-
change "I'm for putting drug push-
ers behind bars and saving our help-
less little kids" for "I'm for finding
out why people use drugs, and I'm
for offering them more constructive
wavs to deal with the world
J
The 1980s, so much like the 1950s
in other ways, has at last generated
its own brand of McCarthyism. In
the '50s, the commies were lurking
around every corner, just waiting to
pollute your child's precious bodily
fluids; it was taken as self-evident
that the commies were the root of all
evil. In the the era of glasnost, the
word "commie" has been ex-
changed for "druggie" (or, in many
versions, "drug pusher"), but the
tone, style and content are virtually
identical. And the argument is still
as valid.
�'M 5wKf�5er Vme FTHo$e 5ToDem rWe Gutto rlofcT A�- Au T"hk Csikcvcn!
Dukakis a blatant liberal
The East Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Pubications Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all
letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number, and signature of the
author(s). Letters are limited to 3(X)
Forum
Rules
words or less, double spaced or neatly
printed. All letters are subject to ed-
iting for brevity, obscenity, and libel,
and no personal attacks will be per-
mitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are re
minded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday's edition and 5 p.m. Tues
day for Thursday's edition.
To the editor:
Many, including many liberals,
arc trying to portray Mike Dukakis as
a "conservative" or "moderate
Dukakis is neither, however. He's a
liberal who shares many of the views
of the ultra-liberal Jesse Jackson.
Why are some people trying to
present Dukakis as not liberal? Be-
cause the word "liberal" is a dirty
word in politics today. Liberal poli-
cies have proven to be tremendous
failures in every arena, from foreign
policy to social spending, from moral
issues to education.
A solid majority of the American
people identify themselves as con-
servative. Mike Dukakis's views do
not reflect the views, values, beliefs,
or needs of the vast majority of the
American people.
I challenge anyone who claims
that Dukakis is not a liberal to exam-
ine the simple facts. How could
Dukakis: want to kill our missile
defenses be against the Pledge of
Allegiance favor outlawing fire-
arms veto a bill that mandates
sentences for drug pushers favor
abortion-on-demand favor forced
busing, the ERA, quotas, and compa-
rable worth spend, spend, spend
and tax, tax, tax say Lt. Col. Oliver
North is not a hero.
Commute the sentences of over
50 murderers give vacations to
non-parolable rapists and killers
fund pro-communist enemies of the
U.S. toast the communist revolu-
tion in Red China try to repeal the
laws against blasphemy, fornication,
unnatural acts, crimes against nature
with "man or beast" and promote
lethal behavior with gay rights laws
� and be construed by any stretch of
the imagination as anvthing but an
ultra-lilvral?
James Thompson
Freshman
Political Science
Buccaneer racist?
To the editor:
To editor of 1988 Buccaneer,
Kimberly E. Kayes:
After viewing the 1988 Bucca-
neer ! became very disgusted that
there were no reviews of the activities
the black students on this campus
experienced and enjoyed the past
academic year. In the section entitled
"Performances" I couldn't believe
that one of East Carolina's biggest
concerts was not included.
I am referring to the Anita Baker
concert that was held last fall
semester. Ms. Kayes, you nor your
staff overlooked highlights from the
Fizz or the Jimmy Buffet concert. I am
aware that East Carolina if a pre-
dominately white school but then
are black students enrolled here.
The Bvrcaneer also includes
events such as Greek Week, Pi Kappa
Phi Toga Party, Phi Tau Chill Thrill
and even the incident which occured
on Biltmore Street. If fails to include
such events as Greek Step shows and
minority day. I am outraged that
every group of students cannot be
fairly represented.
In essence, I feel that the Bucca-
neer is a bad representation of the
student as a whole at ECU.
Adnarial Boot
Sophomore
Dukakis spends
To the editor:
The statement "the Reagan
Administration is responsible for the
federal deficit" is a politically moti-
vated lie. Let's look at the facts, not
Democratic rhetoric.
FACT: The percentage of the
GNP going toward defense spending
has declined since 1960�while wel-
fare outlays increased from 4.87 to
10.87c of the GNP.
FACT: The President doesn't
spend the money. Congress does,
and it's the liberal Democrat majority
in congress which is responsible for
the deficit.
FACT: Since 1980, federal reve-
nues, despite Reagan's tax cuts, have
risen 77, while spending has risen
79. Thus, 977c of the current deficit
is now the e' feet of pre-Rcagan liberal
Democrat spending-and-taxing
sprees.
FACT: During the last year of
Republican control of the Senate,
congress endorsed Reagan's eco-
nomic policies�policies responsible
for reducing the federal deficit for
1987 by $73 billion to 1.77c of the
GNP, the lowest proportion of GNP
since 1982.
FACT: Since then, the Democrats
have ignored the Republicans' ear-
nest actions on deficit reduction and
have ignored Reagan's budget plans.
Instead, they've spent $89 billion
more than Reagan requested, mostly
with pork barrel spending sprees,
and then blamed the Reagan admini-
stration for the huge deficit they cre-
ated!
FACT: Michael Dukakis has ru-
ined Massachusetts economy with
his huge tax-and-spend policies. In
1986, Massachusetts had a deficit
surplus of $912 million. Today, the
state faces a $600 million deficit.
Massachusetts has lost 90,000 indus-
trial jobs since 1984. The 1978-1983
"Massachusetts Miracle" occurred
because of Proposition 2 (a major tax
cut)and huge defense contracts, both
o( which Dukakis opposed.
The deficit will reniain until
Republicans control the presidency
and Congress.
Mary- Ford ham
Senior
Political Sciena
Jones rebutted
lo the editor:
ToWyattM. J�es IV:
Wyalt thank vou for vou- latest
I" tier. certainly confirmed mv a-
.sumptions about your information
coming from some bad dream. All of
your information came from the
Spectrum, one of the most liberal
media productions ever.
Vvatt you said that I was not
intelligent enough to debate the is
sues, that I could only cloud our dis-
cussion with mudslinging. that re-
ally hurt but I got over it partying
downtown rhursday night. You may
be right about my intelligence, but
everybody can' � be a freshman politi-
cal science major. I'm sorry about the
mudslinging, but ;s my ole Irish
Grandmother Maggie used to say, "It
vou can't handle the heat get out of
� tire
On the serious side VVyatt, n the
last lew weeks we have had a spree oi
people shooting our children at
schools in South Carolina and Flor-
ida. How can anvone vote for a man
like Dukakis who doesn't support
the death penalty for these people.
The unemployment rte has fallen
again to a new low. Major investment
firms are predicting lower interest
rates and low inflation coupled with
strong growth in the G"P next year.
We are the strongest country in the
world, no other countrv's people are
as free as ours.
Why should we risk all this on a
man whose idea or freedom is letting
murderers out on weekend passes. A
man who let a billion dollar surplus
turn into a four-hundred-million
dollar deficit in his state. A man
whose own police department en-
dorses his opponent. A man whose
smile looks like Jimmy Carter, when
we can have George Bush. A man
with good ole common sense and
Southern Christian ethics.
Bobby R. Hall Jr.
Senior Mgmt.
ECU Chairman for Bush 88
POWs existence still denied by Laotions
By BRYAN HASKINS
Campus Spcrtnim
With the recent arrest of two activists in Laos, the
POWMIA issue has once again been thrust into the
spotlight. It has been well over a decade since the
United States withdrew from the Indochina conflict,
yet people are still striving to learn the fate of their
brothers, fathers, husbands, and sons. Why? What is
it that leads them to believe that American, dead or
alive, are being witheld from returning?
In the years since the U.S. pullout, there have
been literally thousands of sightings by refugees
who have fled Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. A
good number of these have been proven to be fal-
sified, perhaps in the hopes of gaining preferential
treatment by U.S. immigration authorities. Many,
however, have neither been proved nor disproved,
thus casting a shadow of doubt on Vietnamese
claims that uVro are no Americans left a'ive. Still,
there has been a great deal of bureaucratic foot-
dragging on this sensitive issue; and the American
public has grown weary of looking backwards.
This does not, however, change the fact that
there are approximately 2,500 Americans listed as
missing in action. For years the government listed
almost all of the MI As "presumed dead until a
breakthrough occured in 1980. In April of that year,
a rebel patrol operating in Laos contacted the CIA,
claiming that 30 Americans were being held in an
open-air prison camp in Laos. In late 1980, a U.S.
reconnaissance satellite was "bumped" into an orbit
over the camp. The resulting photograph revealed
"30 non-Asian by measurable length of shadow"
means that the prisoners are Caucasians, which
could make them anything from French to Austra-
lian to American.
The "figure 52" is significant, because it was the
symbol that American POWs used during the war to
signal their presence to reconnaissance pilots. The
newly elected Reagan administration became con-
vinced of a U.S. POW presence, and the Joint Special
Operation Center was given the go-ahead to formu-
late a rescue operation. Helicopter pilots capable of
the mission were identified, and a model of the camp
was constructed at Ft. Bragg for training use by the
Delta Force. The operation, however, wasbegun too
late to avoid the monsoon season. Furthermore, a
private rescue mission failed to reach the camp, and
the prisoners were removed to a hidden location.
The offical mission was then dropped.
In July of 1981, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam
returned the remains of Commander Ronald Dodge.
Up until the time he was returned, the Vietnamese
claimed that they had never held him, even though
a Japanese news agency had filmed Commander
Dodge while he was being held alive as a POW
during the war. The U.S. know that the Vietnamese
were lying when they said that all the POWs and all
remains that they were holding have been returned
in "Operation Homecoming We knew that Com-
mander Dodge was still being held; yet the powers
thai be obliterated him with the stroke of a pen just
as surely as if the mountains of the central highlands
had fallen upon him and swallowed him up.
In 1954, the Geneva Accords were signed, the
French pulled out of Indochina, and North Vietnam
returned what it said were all of the POWs it was
holding. They were lying then, too. In 1980, a French
naval pilot escaped from Vietnam, having been held
for 26 years.
In 1969, Laos claimed to be holding over 158
American POWs. To this date, only one has been
returned (Emmit Kay � 1974), yet now Laos claims
that they are not holding any American POWs
Where are the rest of them, then? Have the moun-
tains fallen upon them as well?
Martfi
RALEIGH (AP)
Hatcher did not make anyl
demand on the federal g
ment during negotiations
lease hostages at The Robe)
newspaper Feb. 1, Go
Martin's chief of staff tej
today.
Phil Kirk, who earlu
testified for the prosecutio
called this morning b
"Did 1 ever make a d
that the government of the
States do anythii .
asked.
"Indirectly, vou did
you said you would rv I
to any local rst
said. But Kirk said he did
gest that Hatch. -
highway patr
law officers other th
Hatcher is chai
eral h � I
quires that son -
mand on the I
Timothy a - -J
fendant,
charge earlier I � -
The two si
manufacture I
conspiracv and
threat.
Under
Kirk said he str
federal in r 'tingj
Hatcher tv 1
ion the- ndef
one else, i va? trying
negotiations open a
side would say 'th
and break off :
cause who knows
have happened tl
Hatch. -
attorney Martha Get
Wolenskv oi '
Service in Lou -
whom testified tl
called them sa
that indicated
involvement in dr I
"Did Mr. H tell vf
11 of the pee:
map had aln
and charged with 1
tions?"
Assistant US - ' '
Bruce asked Wolc nsl
"No Wolensk
Hatcher's final �
j.T. Freeman, said he
maps Hatcher had and v a
to have them in hjs hous
"I said, 'Man ! d n I
see this Freeman said;
that he let Hatcher so, i
night in his home al
maps.
"I was seared to I
anywhere and scare !
there Freeman sa 1
earlv that morning anc
relief 1 had when Eddie
Attorneys f r qi
catcd thev have a few wl
left before they close then
On Tuesday
that he and hatcher agreed
one would get hurt dui
seigewould get hurt dui
siege.
"We didn t want ai
frontation with anybod)
testified. We ju
get in and get i
and Hatcher decided
The Robesonian office hcj
AIDS protesl
shut down F
ROCKVTLLE, Md.
Hundreds of demonstrajj
grv with the
government's response
AIDS crisis effectively shj
the Food and
Administration s heads
today.
Authorities had arrl
least 50 protesters bj
momino. Demonstrative
said thgy were aiming tej
rests bv earlv afternoon
Scores of federal ei
were stranded outsj
sprawling 17-story
when Montgomery Lot
lice stopped letting woj
side at 730 am.
The FDA had plannj
5,000 employees to an
and use a rear enfranci
For The Re
The East Carolinian w
acknowledge the for fel
the Brody Scholarship:
Lewis Cannon, Lauri
Peeples, Thomas J. Ellis
Mangum
A story was run
Tuesday's paper about
Scholars which did noj
fellows and we apologu
inconvenience.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER H, 1988 5
Martin's chief of staff testifies
l c N '
iberal
Ml
rebutted
the
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then" Have the moun-
RALE1CH (AP) - Eddie
1 latcher did not make any direct
demand on the federal govern-
ment during negotiations to re-
lease hostages at The Robesonian
newspaper Feb. 1, Gov. )im
Martin's chief of staff testified
today.
Phil Kirk, who earlier had
testified for the prosecution, was
called this morning bv 1 latcher.
"Did 1 ever make a demand
that the government of the United
States do anything?" Hatcher
asked
Indirectly, you did in that
you said you would not surrender
to any local or state officials Kirk
said. But Kirk said he did not sug-
gest that Hatcher surrender to
highway patrol troopers or state
law officers other than the SB1.
Hatcher is charged with fed-
eral hostage-taking, which re-
quires that someone make a de-
mand on the federal government.
Timothy Jacobs, Hatcher's co-de-
fendant, was acquitted on the
charge earlier this week.
The two still face charges of
manufacture o illegal firearms.
conspiracy and making a bomb
threat.
Under crossea mi nation,
Kirk said he stressed the word
federal in negotiating with
Hatcher because "it was my opin-
ion they would surrender to no
one else. 1 was trving to keep the
negotiations open so that neither
side would sav 'the heck with it'
and break off negotiations be-
cause who knows what could
have happened then
Hatcher also called Raleigh
attorney Martha Geer and John
Wolenskv of th ' U.S. Customs
Service in Louisiana, both of
whom testified that Hatcher
called them saving he had maps
that indicated law enforcement
involvement in drug trafficking.
"Did Mr. Hatcher tell you that
11 of the people named on that
map had already been arrested
and charged w ith narcotics viola-
tions" '
Assistant U.S. Attorney ohn
Bruce asked Wolenskv.
"No Wolenskv responded
Hatcher's final witness, the Rev.
IT. Freeman, said he saw the
map-1 latcher had and was scared
to have them in his house.
1 said, 'Man, 1 don't want to
see this Freeman said, adding
that he let Hatcher spend the
night in his home after seeing the
maps.
I was scared to carry him
anywhere and scared to leave him
there Freeman said. "He left
early that morning and what a
relief 1 had when Eddie left
Attornevs for Jacobs indi-
cated they have a few witnessc�
left before they close their case.
On Tuesday acobs testified
that he and hatcher agreed that no
one would get hurt during the
seigewould get hurt during the
siege.
"We didn't want any con-
frontation with anybody Jacobs
testified. "We just figured we'd
get in and get out Jacobs said he
and Hatcher decided to take over
The Robesonian office because it
AIDS protestors
shut down FDA
RCXKVILLE, Md. (AP) -
Hundreds of demonstrators an-
grv with the federal
government's response to the
AIDS crisis effectively shut down
the Food and Drug
Administration's headquarters
today.
Authorities had arrested at
least 50 protesters by mid-
mornino. Demonstration leaders
said thgv were aiming for 300 ar-
rests bv earlv afternoon.
Scores of federal employees
were stranded outside the
sprawling 17-story building
when Montgomery County po-
lice stopped letting workers in-
side at 7:30 a.m.
The FDA had planned for its
5,000 employees to arrive earlv
and use a rear entrance.
For The Record
The East Carolinian wishes to
acknowledge the for fellows of
the Brody Scholarship: Michael
Lewis Cannon, Laura Harris
Peeples, Thomas J Ellis and Kim
Mangum.
A story was run in last
Tuesday s paper about the Brody
Scholars which did not list the
fellows and we apologize for the
inconvenience.
would be a good way to draw at-
tention to their concern about
problems in Robeson County.
"We agreed that nobody
would be hurt at Hie Robe-
sonian Jacobs said. And we
agreed that we would be in and
out of there in two hours because
we thought Governor Martin
would call when Eddie wanted to
talk to him
Also Tuesday, U.S. District
fudge Terrence Boyle said he had
made a "written notation" during
a bench conference to cite one ot
Jacobs' attorneys, Lewis Pitts, for
contempt of court. Boyle did not
disclose what prompted the con
tempt citation, saving he would
decide punishment at the conclu-
sion oi the trial.
Pitts, asked what brought the
citation, said, "1 have no comment
on that. 1 am just very troubled
that the judge has ruled as irrele
vant every major defense we have
brought up to bring out the injus-
tice in Robeson County
Bovle has ruled that 1 latcher
and Jacobs cannot use the "neces
sitv defense which is an attempt
to justify their actions on the
premise that their lives were in
danger. Based on that ruling, the
judge has not allowed evidence
attempting to show that drug traf-
ficking was widespread in the
county prior to the Feb. 1 takeover
of the newspaper and that there
was discrimination against Indi-
ans and blacks.
acobs testified that Hatcher
told him two days before the Feb.
1 takeover that Robeson County
Sheriff Hubert Stone wanted to
kill him because of evidence he
had linking law enforcement offi-
cers to drug trafficking.
"I asked him why the sheriff
would want to do that Jacobs
testified. "He showed me some
maps with names on them and 1
said 'Oh mv God, with what
you've eot, thev will kill you
"There was no doubt in my
mind, just from my own knowl-
edge of drug kingpins in Robeson
County, th.it what he had was
hot Jacobs said.
Jacobs said he and Hatcher
considered takingover thecounty
courthouse, but decided it was
too large. 1 le said the two agreed
on I he Robesonian as their target
on Jan 30, and took over the
newspaper two days later.
YOUR SPORTS STATION
Professor
luting & Drinking
MONDAY NITE
Month of fundays
OKTOBERFEST 88
Come celel rate the sea �
good food and go d I
moi tl �1 �'�� ibelh -���
For a ;��:� I!
he evei ng meal,
- f � .�� �:� i jl �
FOOTBALL
AND ALL MAJ( )R SPORTING EVEN
Casual Dining at its Finest
! ! famous Il . I Margaritas!
.OCATED BEHIND QUIN SAND Ac E CLEANERS
l. THE FARM FRESH SI IOPPING CENTER
ll am-1 am Monday S . , 11 am 10 : rtday 355-2946
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WL-
fMl CfH$iKClcN!
iberal
i ge defense contracts, both
hikakis opposed.
deficit will remain until
:ans control the presidency
teress.
Mary Fordham
Senior
Political Science
es rebutted
he editor:
'vattM.J��?s IV:
tlunk you for your latest
I certainly confirmed my as-
ms about youfinformation
(from some bad dream. All of
formation came from the
one of the most liberal
'actions ever.
Ltt you said that 1 was not
nt enough to debate the is
it 1 could only cloud our dis-
with mudslingingr that re-
but I got over it partying
Ivvn Thursday night. You may
about my intelligence, but
iy can' � be a freshman politi-
nce major. I'm sorry about the
lging, but s my ole Irish
�ther Maggie used to say, "If
l"i handle the heat get out of
he serious side Wyatt, in the
p weeks we have had a spree of
shooting our children at
in South Carolina and Flor-
fw can anyone vote for a man
lkakis who doesn't support
ith penalty for these people,
employment rte has fallen
i a new low. Major investment
ire predicting lower interest
fid low inflation coupled with
growth in the GNP next year.
the strongest country in the
I no other country's people are
as ours.
iy should we risk all this on a
lose idea of freedom is letting
rs out on weekend passes. A
ho let a billion dollar surplus
tto a four-hundred-million
I deficit in his state. A man
own police department en-
I his opponent. A man whose
oks like Jimmy Carter, when
have George Bush. A man
ood ole common sense and
Irn Christian ethics.
Bobby R. Hall Jr.
Senior Mgmt.
ECU Chairman for Bush 88
ns
oming We knew that Com-
still being held; yet 'he powers
with the stroke of a pen just
kntains of the central highlands
md swallowed him up.
tieva Accords were signed, the
J Indochina, and North Vietnam
Id were all of the POWs it was
lying then, too. In 1980, a French
from Vietnam, having been held
Jaimed to be holding over 158
this date, only one has been
IV 1974), yet now Laos claims
riding any American POWs.
f them, then? Have the moun-
em as well?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13,1968 5
Martin's chief of staff testifies
RALEIGH (AP) - Eddie
Hatcher did not make any direct
demand on the federal govern-
ment during negotiations to re-
lease hostages at The Robesonian
newspaper Feb. 1, Gov. Jim
Martin's chief of staff testified
today.
Phil Kirk, who earlier had
testified for the prosecution, was
called this morning by Hatcher.
"Did I ever make a demand
would be a good way to draw at-
tention to their concern about
problems in Robeson County.
"We agreed that nobody
would be hurt at The Robe-
sonian Jacobs said. "And we
agreed that we would be in and
out of there in two hours because
we thought Governor Martin
would call when Eddie wanted to
talk to him
told him two days before the Feb. "There was no doubt in my
1 takeover that Robeson County mmd' M from my own knowl-
Sheriff Hubert Stone wanted to
kill him because of evidence he
had linking law enforcement offi-
cers to drug trafficking.
"I asked him why the sheriff
would want to do that Jacobs
testified. "He showed me some
maps with names on them and I
said 'Oh my God, with what
that the government of the United Judge Terrence Boyle said he had
States do anything?" Hatcher made a "written notation" during
asked. a bench conference to cite one of
"Indirectly, you did in that Jacobs' attorneys, Lewis Pitts, for
you said you would not surrender contempt of court. Boyle did not
to any local or state officials Kirk disclose what prompted the con-
said. But Kirk said he did not sug- tempt citation, saying he would
gest that Hatcher surrender to decide punishment at the conclu-
highway patrol troopers or state sion of the trial,
law officers other than the SBI. Pitts, asked what brought the
Hatcher is charged with fed- citation, said, "I have no comment
eral hostage-taking, which re- on that. I am just very troubled
quires that someone make a de- that the judge has ruled as irrele-
mand on the federal government, vant every major defense we have
Timothy Jacobs, Hatcher's co-de- brought up to bring out the injus-
fendant, was acquitted on the tice in Robeson County
charge earlier this week. Boyle has ruled that Hatcher
The two still face charges of and Jacobs cannot use the "neces-
manufacture of illegal firearms, sity defense which is an attempt
conspiracy and making a bomb to justify their actions on the
threat. premise that their lives were in
Under cross-examination, danger. Based on that ruling, the
Kirk said he stressed the word judge has not allowed evidence
federal in negotiating with attempting to show that drug traf-
Hatcherbecause"itwasmyopin- ficking was widespread in the
ion they would surrender to no county prior to the Feb. 1 takeover
one else. I was trying to keep the of the newspaper and that there
Also Tuesday, U.S. District you've got, they will kill you
edge of drug kingpins in Robeson
County, that what he had was
hot Jacobs said.
Jacobs said he and Hatcher
considered taking over the county
courthouse, but decided it was
too large. He said the two agreed
on The Robesonian as their target
on Jan. 30, and took over the
newspaper two days later.
negotiations open so that neither
side would say 'the heck with it'
and break off negotiations be-
cause who knows what could
have happened then
Hatcher also called Raleigh
attorney Martha Geer and John
Wolensky of the U.S. Customs
Service in Louisiana, both of
whom testified that Hatcher
called them saying he had maps
that indicated law enforcement
involvement in drug trafficking.
"Did Mr. Hatcher tell you that
11 of the people named on that
map had already been arrested
and charged with narcotics viola-
tions?"
Assistant U.S. Attorney John
Bruce asked Wolensky.
"No Wolensky responded.
Hatcher's final witness, the Rev.
J.T. Freeman, said he saw the
maps Hatcher had and was scared
; ;toih�veihem in his house.
I said, 'Man, I don't want to
see this Freeman said, adding
that he let Hatcher spend the
night in his home after seeing the
maps.
"I was scared to carry him
anywhere and scared to leave him
there Freeman said. "He left
early that morning and what a
relief I had when Eddie left
Attorneys for Jacobs indi-
cated they have a few witnesses
left before they close their case.
On Tuesday Jacobs testified
that he and hatcher agreed that no
one would get hurt during the
seigewould get hurt during the
siege.
"We didn't want any con-
frontation with anybody Jacobs
testified. "We just figured we'd
get in and get out Jacobs said he
and Hatcher decided to take over
The Robesonian office because it
AIDS protestors
shut down FDA
ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) -
Hundreds of demonstrators an-
gry with the federal
government's response to the
AIDS crisis effectively shut down
the Food and Drug
Administration's headquarters
today.
Authorities had arrested at
least 50 protesters by mid-
mornino. Demonstration leaders
said thgy were aiming for 300 ar-
rests by early afternoon.
Scores of federal employees
were stranded outside the
sprawling 17-story building
when Montgomery County po-
lice stopped letting workers in-
side at 730 a.m.
The FDA had planned for its
5,000 employees 10 arrive early
and use a rear entrance.
For The Record
The East Carolinian wishes to
acknowledge the for fellows of
the Brody Scholarship: Michael
Lewis Cannon, Laura Harris
Peeples, Thomas J. Ellis and Kim
Mangum.
A story was run in last
Tuesday's paper about the Brody
Scholars which did not list the
fellows and we apologize for the
inconvenience.
was discrimination against Indi-
ans and blacks.
Jacobs testified that Hatcher
YOUR SPORTS STATION
Professor
Eating 6i Drinking
MONDAY NITE J FOOTBALL
AND ALL MAJOR SPORTING EVENTS
Casual Dining at its Finest
Featuring our soon-to-be-famous Double-Shot Margaritas!
LOCATED BEHIND QUINCY'S AND ACE CLEANERS
IN THE FARM FRESH SHOPPING CENTER
11 am-1 am Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm Sunday 355-2946
Month of fundays.
OKTOBERFEST '88.
Come celebrate the season with
good food and good times this
month at Annabelle's Restaurant.
For a light breezy lunch,
k hearty evening meal,
or festive latenight
excitement, October at
Annabelle's is simply
wunderbar! Come join
the fun and get into
the spirit of
Oktoberfest '88.
Annabelle's
V RESTAURANT & PUB m
The Plaza
Greenville Blvd
756-0315
RESTAURANT & PUB
Mon-Thun 11 30 am 11 00 pm
Fn Sat 11 30 AM Midnight
Sunday 12 Noon 11 00 PM
(M don't want
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want
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The right choice.





Tl It EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13,1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: To share a 3-bedroom townhouse.
No deposit, private bedroom, private
bathnxm S183 33mo.13 utilities.
Fireplace tanning beds, sauna, weight-
room and more Call 355-0700.
FEMAI E ROOMMATE NEEDED: For 3
bedroom apartment. 13 rent, 13 utili-
ties 1 3 deposit Call Wendy at 752-1321.
ROOM MA 1 b WAN 1 ED Christian male
roommate to share now mobile home. 10
minutes trom campus Non-smoker,
please Call Hugh at 756-6851 after 5:00
p m
FOR SALE
EOR SA1 E: 1982 Buick Century Limited,
Cruise PS PB High mileage but
sharp in good running condition. $2800
Call 758 7423 anytime.
FOR SALE: 1984 Kawasaki GPZ-1100. Ex-
cellent condition. Must see. $150000. 758-
5513
FOR SALE: 1984 Mada B-2000 Pick-up
I ligh road miles. Topper. New tires. Ex-
cellent condition $3400 Call 757-6281.
FOR SALE: 1982 Yokswagon jetta 5
speed Diesal 87K Excellent condition.
$2700 Call 757-6281.
STEREO FOR SALE Dual cassette, turn
table, digital receiver, 2 speakers Excel-
lent condition SI25 Call 756-9420 after 7
p m
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc. otters highqual-
t inexpensive word processing and
other services tor the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems vield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length ot time Rates start at $2.00 per
page and include paper and computer-
ized polling check We also offer
Resume' production, and other business
and professional services Call 757-3111
Ml for more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES We offer typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
sth Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
PARTTt It vou re having a partv and need
a D 1 for trie best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach Call 355-2781,
ask tor Morgan
AT YOUR SERVICE
TvpingTvpingTvping Affordable and
Protessional Call 355-6634 after 6.00 p.m.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC Done by
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted Call 752-1933
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING Real
Cheap. Affordable Rates! Call 752-5084.
HELP WANTED
ON CAMPUS TRAVEL REP. OR OR-
GANIZATION NEEDED: To promote
Spring Break Trip to FloridaTexas. Earn
money, free trips, and valuable work ex
perience. Call Intercampus Programs 1-
800-433-7747.
OVERSEAS JOBS Also Cruiseships.
$10,000-$105,000vr! Now hiring! 320
Listings' (1) 805-687-6000 Ext Oj-1166
MKTG. FIRM: Seeks individual to work
ft or pt marketing credit cards to stu-
dents on campus. Flexible hours Earn b
w $K) 00-5150 00dav Call 1-800-932-
0528, Ext. 25.
NEED OYSTER SHUCKERS AND CA-
TERERS: Applv in person at Riverside
Oyster Bar, 17N. Green St.
NEED MALE AND FEMALE DANC-
ERS FOR PRIVATE PARTIES Also
need ladies 18-36 vears of age for a legs
video. Earnings of $50 per hour and more.
Apply in person Monday through Friday,
4 p.m. to 530 p.m. to Promotions Co
2708-A E. 10th Street No phone calls.
PERSONALS
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards7 Call
Earlvis, the mad baseball buver. I pay
damn good money for cards of any year,
any shape, and any condition If you need
party money, Big E is the one to call 757-
6366, leave a message.
TO BUCK LAWSON AND BUCK
BOSCH: Thanks for the spedding week
end! You guys are so funny vou kept us in
tears' We'll never forget: an O.D. on cream
of broccolh; lockjaw margantas; late-
night alumni at Crumpeys; a toxic vodka
collins; beer spillage in the lap; tomato
soup bloody marys, hidden liquor bottles
without having to wear speedos, un
shelled peanuts and a harmonica at the
game; the national anthem serenade; sped
dancin with Willy T ; the desertion at
American Legion; and overall a rip- roar-
ing speddin time (PS - We hope you get
heckled for this, vou phone campers!)
Love, Betty Sumrell and Betty Peters.
TO THE LAMBDA CHI RADIO
SHACK PACK Oh God! Is there any
thing in that cup7 The trash can doesn't
have a liner Oh God' - BS and BP
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo Car
tndges with instructions for re-sale. East
Coast Music & Video, 758-4251, 1109
Charles Blvd
C. EDWARDS Hey. Guess who7 Re
member Oct 13, 19877 Kinda blows vour
mind, eh7 I just wanted to let vou know-
that vou are more special to me than ever.
and 1 wanted to thank vou for everything
A year ot love, friendship, and incredibly
fun times You're the best. See you at
lunch Love, CTinssy.
THE WAY CAMPUS FELLOWSHIP
TWIG FELLOWSHIPS: Are available
every Tuesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
at 2007 Tiffany Dr in 1 lentage Village
Call 355-5164 for details 1 lot Bible! Great
fellowship!
PIKA: Get psyched for our social next
Thursday night Love, the AZD's.
CONGRATULATIONS TO SON) A
LOVE: Chi becoming the new 1 lomecom-
ing Queen, also to Emily Proctor and
Chris Kelly on being 1st and 2nd runners
up
TO ALL FRATERNITIES AND SO-
RORITIES: 1 lave a great Fall Break Love
the AZD's
PAULA JONES: Congratulations on be
coming a new sister of Alpha Xi Delta.
Love the AZD's
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Congratulations
on winning "The 188 East Carolina
I lomecoming Spirit Award Let's con
tinue our quest for a Cup Rucannun this
summer in St. I ouis!
SIC EPS & DATES: It started Friday
when the float was constructed- at 1:11
"Boo-Ga-Ga" was conducted. "Column"
was crowned for the upcoming year - take
care of that queen oh she's so dear Satur-
day a m bv one "new" house we were
sane until, until the game we screamed
"The Plane The Plane We then rocked
the cabin all through the night with
hundreds of balloons and twinkly lights.
We awoke the next morning to the pop-
ping of Cores and that champagne smell -
no one was left standing - not even "The
Date from I lell �Thanks, lames'
DELTA ZETA: Congrats to our flag foot-
ball team on an awesome season. Way to
go girls'
SPAGHETTI DINNER: The infamous
Delta Zeta event is just around the corner.
Tickets are S3 and available from anv
Delta Zeta sister or pledge. Be there Octo-
ber 23 from 5 8 p m.
THETA CHI: Congratulations on your
chapter trom Delta Zeta
DELTA ZETA What a weekend' The
food was scrumptious, the house looked
great, and Ticia Pilati had a wiggjy date
Mane looked beautiful sitting in her chair,
mi glad we could all make it there. Slippin
and slidin on the kitchen floor, June Smith
must be sore. Shelley and Fred were on the
go, dancing to the DJ's bad disco We all
showed up with cool dates to make a
success of I lomecoming '88!
LOST: One parMlhTaTTKFChairi-
pagne BriincrTTrmtinrl pirate return to
shoeless, shadeless, shaky date.
HEY KRISTI The weekend started off
with a bang, too bad date 1 couldn't
hang Well, you found a new date but I
kept my Irate. Hope next year is just as
much fun, maybe by then you'll learn how
to fold your tongue. �TICIA.
W1GGLY AND DATE 2: We love you �
you know who
JAMES FORD GRIFFIN�A SIG-EP
LEGEND! Thank you so much for one
incredible 1 lomecoming weekend! Every
aspect was 100 first class! The best
Homecoming ever! Fraternally�your
Sig Ep Brothers.
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES Y'all are doing
an excellent job! Keep up the good work.
Miss Prez-Ann you should be proud! We
love you�The Alpha Phi Sisters. PS.�
When is the surprise social? 1 lint I lint
SOUND MIXTURES FALL NEWSLET-
TER: Oct. 1, Theta Chi and guests set new
maximum capacity record at Rotary Club
Once again the Rotary neighbors call cops
and cops pump down the volume Oct. 7,
another Alpha Omicron Pi bash MVP
award (most vicious partiers) goes to Sam,
Melinda, Teresa and Macon. Slip and
slide, snowballs, beer fights, what a mess.
Oct. 8, Sigma Phi Epsilon homecoming in
the woods Awesome party y'all,
Boogaga! Just please don't bump the
table! Special thanx to Bassetti, Peterson,
1 leim, Boone, Shell, Unchurch, and James
Keep the parties coming, Bob-Sound Mix-
tures DJ Service, 752-4916
THE BROTHERS OF SAE would like to
thank all of our guests and dates, we all
had a great time this weekend Waldo �
better keep an eye on your brother next
time. PS. Is Bolo in the house!
ALPHA XI DELTA PLEDGES We
would like to thank vou for helping us on
the I lomecoming float. �Pledges of Pi
Kappa Alpha
PI KAPPA ALPHA PLEDGE AUCTION:
To be held at the Attic Sunday, October 23.
All interested parties call 752 9168
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
CHI ALPHA OMEGA Congratulations
to our new little sisters Stephanie Folsom,
Missy Hargett, Betsy Hicks, Shannon
Kenley, Miti Mauldin, Cindi Move,
Kathy Orr, Rachael Seavey, Dana Shrum,
Susan Wallace, and Sherri Williams
Many thanks to Pam Martin for all your
hard work We love you all! �Your broth
ers and sisters in Chi Alpha Omicron and
in Christ.
PIRATE WALK: Would like to thank the
Pika's and Alpha Phi for their help with
Pirate Walk this week
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES ot
ETA TAU ALPHA; Would like to than)
Caroline McClelland for a memorabk u I
festive Founder's lay Weekend tor all
We love you!
ZETA'S: ongratulations on turning
"s0 " This year's Founder's !a celebra
tion in Chapd 1 lill will be the best one yet!
1 lave a great Fall Break'
Happv 20th B-dav. Jennifer Slotl
! ove, Kris BD I leath and Md
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
f
A Beautiful Place to live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 � 5th Street
� I-ocated r FCU
� Across Trom I hghwjy Pat rol St at lor
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Contact J T or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or aW 1937
Office open Apt 8, 12 - 5.V) p m
�AZALEA GARDENS'
Clean and quiet one bedroom fumiv-i d
apartments, energy eidrieni. (ree wati. and
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lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS - coup.es
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T56-781s '
ABORTION
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FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M F 8:30 4 p.m.
Sat. 10 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
� � � M
� Pern - � - - � i -�- . � � -
V14" ������ -
1-800 433 2930
Your Best Look
Specializing In. MANICURES.
French Manicures � Nail Tips �
Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
PEDICURES � SKIN CAREBody
Wrapping � Face & Body Waxing �
' Tacials Deep Pore Gcarising �
Acjm Treatment � Muscle To no t
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products For
Men & Women
355-29 - For Appointment
314 Plaa Dr Greenville
SALES POSITION AVAILABLE
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications for an
advertising sales representative.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Good Personality & Professional Appearance
Excellent Communication Skills
Good Organizational Skills
Must Be Dependable & Show Initiative & Enthusiasm
Must Have Own Transportation
Must Have The Desire To Excel
Apply in Person at
The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building"
(In Front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please!
�SBiHl
Announcements
CO-OP EDUCATION
v ooperative Education, a free service of-
vrt.i b, the University, is designed to
help vou find career related work experi-
before vou graduate. We would like
extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co op Information Seminar in the
CCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi-
narO The onlv bonuses we can offer you
tor taking time from your busv schedule
are
'extra ash to help cover the cost of college
enses or perhaps to increase your
fun" budget
'opportunities to test a career choice if vou
have made one or to explore career op-
tion1- it undecided about a future career,
and
a hifthlv marketable" degree, which
include- a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us todav!
Thurs Oct 13, 4 p.m. rm. 2006, Thurs
(A-t 20. 1 p m , rm. 2010; Mon Oct. 24,1
p.m rm 2010, Thurs Oct. 27, 4 p.m rm.
200b; Mon . Oct 31, 4 p.m rm 2006.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs at 6 00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to oin us.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
1 emester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments Call 77 6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028
LQST2
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
lenkans Art Auditorium EVERY Fri
night at 700.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If vou are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that vou find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Everv Fn night at 7 00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Business students interested in scholar-
ships should secure forms from one of the
following dept offices: Accounting �
CCB 3208, Decision Sciences � 3418, Fi-
nance � 3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414 All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210),
Chairman of School of Business Scholar-
ship Committee, by Oct. 14. Students may
applv for one or more of the scholarships
listed below Planters Bank Scholarship (3
at SI000 eacrO, University Book Exchange
( 2 at $500 each), NCNB ($500), J. Fred
Hamblen ($200) Credit Women Interna-
tional ($200), Cameron-BrownFirst
Union Scholarship (3 at $500 each), FOR
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY: Latney
W. Pittard Memorial, Raleigh-Durham
Chapter Institute of Internal Auditors
($350), National Association of Account-
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship ($500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
ONLY: Archie R. Burnette ($600), Ward
Real Estate Scholarship ($300).
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Attention till ECU students, faculty,
alumni and parents of ECU students!
Why spend another dull Thanksgiving
when you could be in the exciting city of
lights. New York City. Come join the Stu-
dent Union's Travel Committee excursion
to New York City, Nov. 23-27. For more
info call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
CASH, VACATION, & PRIZES: HOW?
By playing the hottest business game in
town sponsored by Wall Street and
AT&T. There are over 400 chances to win
The top 10 performers will receive a cash
prize, with first place performer receiving
$25,000 cash; and the top 100 performers
each month will receive athletic shoes
from Reebok and a wrist watch, courtesy
of Beneton by Bulova. You can participate
for only $49.95. Interested participants
can register on the first floor of the GCB on
Wed. and Thurs. between 10-2 p.m. or by
contacting Student Financial Mgmt. As-
soc. members or call the F1NA dept. 757-
6670.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Underwater Hockey games are scheduled
from 700 p m. thru 8:30 p.m. at Memorial
Gym pool. An approved Club Sport, new
members are welcome at any time �
equipment needs include: mask, fins,
snorkel. Come out and try the newest
sport on campus.
INJURY EVALUATION
Injury assessment will be performed by a
certified trainer each Wed. and Thurs.
from 630-7:30 pjn. in the Memorial
Gymnasium Sports Care Room A. Recom-
mendation for rehabilitative processes
will be given for all interested. For addi-
tional info call 757-6387.
PRE.PROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The Pre-Professional I lealth Alliance will
hold its first meeting of the 88-89 school
year, on Thurs. Oct 13, at 5:30 p.m. in
room 247 Mendenhall Anv student inter-
ested in a health related career is invited
to attend.
KARATE CLUB
If vou are interested in joining the ECU
Karate Club, come to Memorial Gym
Thurs Oct 13 at 8 00 p.m. for registration
and a free demonstration
MINORITY CAREER
EXPLORATION DAY
Wed Oct 19, from 3:00 p.m. to 5 00 p.m
in Mendenhall. Representatives from
various career fields will be available to
talk about career opportunities. Spon-
sored bv the Office of Minority Student
Affairs and Career Planning and Place-
ment Services.
Be sure to attend the Intramural Skiing
Tnp registration meeting from Aug. 22 to
Oct. 22. Now vou can ski the slopes and
learn the ropes in this fun filled trip!
3-ON-3 BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Free
Throw Contest registration meeting held
Nov. 1 at 5:00 p.m. in BIO103. Play begins
shortlv afterwards! Interested in officiat-
ing
Attend the first officials clinic on Oct
SUMMER JOB
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be on Mon Nov. 21 at
10.00 a.m. in 1029 GCB. The ten-week in-
ternship program, in the Raleigh area, is
open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
currently enrolled in college. (Those en-
tering Graduate School as of May 1989 are
not eligible).
CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance. Class photographs will be taken
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 in the Student Store from 9
am. till 12 p m. and 1 p.m to 4:30 p.m.
each day The yearbook is not your year-
book until you are in it.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will hold a business meet-
ing Oct. 13th from 7-7:30 p.m. in room 205
Austin. All those interested please attend.
We will discuss purchasing tee-shirts.
JUNIORS. SENIORS. &
GRAD. STUDENTS
Sign up this week for your own Visa or
Master Card with Sovran Bank The Soci-
ety for the Advancement of Mgmt. will
have a table set up in front of the student
store through Thurs. from 9:00-4:00.
Sovran Bank is offering great terms to full-
time students, so come by and apply this
week.
SKIING TRIP
25 at 8:00 p.m. at MG102. For additional
info call Dave Hall at 757-6387.
CO-REC FLAG FOOTBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
Rag Football meeting held Oct. 25 at 5:00
p.m. in BIO103. Play begins shortly after-
ward! Interested in officiating? Attend the
first officials clinic Oct. 25 at 8:00 p.m. in
MG102. For additional info call Dave
I lall at 757-6387.
SOCCER
Be sure to attend the Intramural Soccer
registration meeting held Oct. 19 at 6:00
p.m. in GCB 1026. Play begins shortly
afterward! For additional info call Dave
Hall at 757-6387.
VOLLEYBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Volley-
ball registration meeting held Oct. 19 at
5:00 p.m. in GCB 1026. Play begins shortly
afterward! For additional info call Dave
Hall at 757-6387.
BANNER CONTEST
Last chance to register your
organization's banner for the National
Alcohol Awareness Week Contest is 5
p.m. Fri Oct. 14 in 209 Whichard. Re-
member all banners will be judged at 4
p.m. Wed Oct. 19 at Ficklen Stadium,
East service entrance. Call 757-6823 for
more info.
WYNTON MARSALIS CON-
CERT
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present Wynton Marsalis in concert
Nov. 1 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets go on sale for this Performing Arts
Series event on Mon Oct. 10. Winner of a
Grammy Award for both classical and
jazz performances, Mr. Marsalis is sure to
bring an energetic and entertaining show
to Wright Auditorium. For further details,
contact: The Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall, or call (919) 757-6611.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting ptxtrv and
short stories for the Dec issue The maga
ine is published twice a semester with
the first issue coming out in Oct. This
special issue will be a small magazine
with mainlv general info, whereas the
Dec. issue will be a larger size containing
news stones, short stones, editorials,
poetry, etc. Articles mav be left at the
office or at the Media Board Secretary's
Office in the Publications Bldg.
INTERVIEWING WORK-
SHOPS
To help ECU people prepare for on and ot t
campus interviews, the Career Planning
& Placement Service in Bloxton ! louse is
offering these one hour programs to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search The pro
gram is open to the first 20 people to come
for each session. No sign up is required
These sessions are held in the Career Plan
ning Room on Oct. 12 & 20
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning & Placement Service
in Bloxton House is offering these one
hour programs on beginning a resume for
your job search. Handouts and samples
will be given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session. No sign up is re-
quired. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Oct 11,21 & 2b
at 3 p.m.
WOMEN VOTERS
The League of Women Voters ot
Greenville-Pitt County will sponsor a
public forum for state legislative candi
dates on Oct. 25, at 7:30 p m in the Willis
Bldg. at First and Reade Circle in
Greenville. On Nov. 1, a second forum
will be held, again at 7:30 p.m. in the Willis
Bldg for candidates for the Pitt Countv
Board of Commissioners.
Group photographs will be taken Sept 15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2. Please note that the
group listing with the name of everv per
son in the photograph MUST be pre
sented BEFORE the photographer films
the group. ORGANIZATIONS WITH-
OUT LISTINGS WILL NOT BE PHOTO
GRAPHED, and time does not permit the
scheduling of another session Call 757
6501 and leave date & time for the photo to
be taken. Please give two days notice for
the photographer.
BUCCANEER
The 1987 yearbooks have come in Any
one who would like a copy of it may come
by the orhce ana pick one up A ai
located in front ot ovner 1 ibrar in the
Publication- Bldg
AMBASSADORS
rhere will be a general meet gl lUAm
bassadors ed at 5 15 pm in Menden
hall room 221 Remember that missing
over 2 meetings p i at mestei ma lead to
probation
WINDSURFING CLl B
There will be a meeting Ot t 2" toorganiz
a group trip d1 Whichard s Beach o er the
weekend It you are interest) I ts
meet in conference room ' '
Gym at 6 I
FRESHMEN
An important n MEN
who intend to major in the following
Business and Distributive Fd Driver s
Ed Early Childhood Ed Health Ed In
termediate Ed Marketing Ed Mid
Grades Ed, Physical Ed Special Ed
Technical Fd and Vocational Ed rhc
Second Academic Major Required b) I
University of N C Board of Governors
Oct. 2 from 3:00-5:00 p.m in Wrig
Auditorium
LIBRARY SCIENCE 1000
LIBS 1000 (2nd block) began CVt 11th &
12th (Vt 11th Tues & Thurs, vt 12th
Mon At Wed
EPISCOPAL STUD1 NT
FELLOWSHIP
The Episcopal Student Fellowship will be
meeting on Wednesdays at 5 30 at St
Paul's Episcopal Church on 4th St AH art
welcome for Holv Communion dinner
and program For more into call Allen
Manning at 758 1440
ECU STUDENTSSTAFF
LSSSJQOETY
Volunteers, old clothes & sheets are
needed DESPERATELY for the Pirate
ClubLSS Society "Ir Spooky Pirate
Night Halloween Carnival" to be held
Oct 28 from 6-8 p m at the Pirate Club
For more info , please contact Beth Smvth
or Ann Totaro at 830-931 5, anvtime'
SEATJELLEQR SAFETY
If you drive a car, then this is for you' Seat
Belts For Safety: Don't Dnnk and Pnve A
presentation on the campus mall 1 -5 p m
Oct. 20 Ride the seat belt convincer (car
crash simulator) and be eligible to win
$100 See displays convincing vou to wear
seat belts Meet TV personalities Larrs
and Vince
Security
strikes, nc
Bl LGRADE i I
AP) Thousands t t
rndcxj strikes today in the
ghtened set urit) mo
but other pr t
mands tor ei onomic and
tnges and I
leader
The government strui
fuse the mushro -mini:
fueled by e om �?�
ethnic Serbian nat
� six national republic
tenegro and Serl
mmunist
two ol
Serbian
nse of l
Authority
specified emergi
' ' nda) in Monl
; to the offi ia I
Tanjug �
oi ndittoi
report! I ' '
-
sign � �
.ipttal
About
Nil

Til
ricet
lanjug sai . j
ers ended theii i
n
� -
tiona!
eluding 21" pi
- tvent unerr .
billion foreion d
Protesters in Ni
manded Mon
Montenegn - �
tor allowing authority
tear gas ane.
weekend pi
tized their point by h
weanng a gas ma k
ders of the
ported.
"We are not d
gallov - � �' '
beating up I
are only demar 1
ing the ageno
Miloslav Michui
Tr j�
may
i





i w
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
i
-
OCTOBER 13,1986
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP: To share a 3-bedroom townhouse.
No deposit, private bedroom, private
bathroom. $l83.33mo. 13 utilities.
Fireplace, tanning beds, sauna, weight-
room and more. Call 355-0700.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: For 3
bedroom apartment. 1 3 rent, 1 3 utili-
ties, 1 3 deposit. Call Wendy at 752-1321.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian male
roommate to share new mobile home. 10
minutes from campus. Non-smoker,
please. Call Hugh at 756-6851 after 5:00
p.m.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Century Limited,
AC, Cruise, PS, PB. High mileage but
sharp: in good running condition. $2800.
Call 758-7423 anytime.
FOR SALE: 1984 Kawasaki GPZ-1100. Ex-
cellent condition. Must see. $1500.00.758-
5513.
FOR SALE: 1984 Mazda B-2000 Pick-up.
I Ugh road miles. Topper. New tires. Ex-
cellent condition $3400. Call 757-6281.
FOR SALE: 1982 Vokswagon Jetta. 5
speed. Diesal. 87K. Excellent condition.
S2700. Call 757-6281.
STEREO FOR SALE: Dual cassette, rum-
table, digital receiver, 2 speakers. Excel-
lent condition. $125. Call 756-9420 after 7
p.m.
SERVICES OFFERED
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
Resume' production, and other business
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F for more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 it beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
AT YOUR SERVICE:
TypingTypingTyping. Affordable and
Professional Call355-6634 after 600p.m.
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC Done by
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted Call 752-1933.
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING: Real
Cheap. Affordable Rates! Call 752-5084.
HELP WANTED
ON CAMPUS TRAVEL REP. OR OR-
GANIZATION NEEDED: To promote
Spring Break Trip to FloridaTexas. Earn
money, free trips, and valuable work ex-
perience. Call Intercampus Programs. 1-
800433-7747.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships.
$10,000-$105,000yr! Now hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
MKTG FIRM: Seeks individual to work
ft or pt marketing credit cards to stu-
dents on campus. Flexible hours. Earn b
w $90.00-$150.00day. Call 1-800-932-
0528, Ext. 25.
NEED OYSTER SHUCKERS AND CA-
TERERS: Apply in person at Riverside
Oyster Bar, 17N. Green St.
NEED MALE AND FEMALE DANC-
ERS FOR PRIVATE PARTIES: Also
need ladies 18-36 years of age for a legs
video. Earnings of $50 per hour and more.
Apply in person Monday through Friday,
4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. to Promotions Co
2708-A E 10th Street. No phone calls.
PERSONALS
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards? Call
Earlvis, the mad baseball buyer. 1 pay
damn good money for cards of any year,
any shape, and any condition. If you need
party money. Big E is the one to call. 757-
6366, leave a message.
TO BUCK LAWSON AND BUCK
BOSCH: Thanks for the spedding week-
end! You guys are so funny you kept us in
tears! We'll never forget: an O.D. on cream
of broccolli; lockjaw margaritas; late-
night alumni at Crumpeys; a toxic vodka
collins; beer spillage in the lap; tomato
soup bloody marys, hidden liquor bottles
without having to wear speedos; un-
shelled peanuts and a harmonica at the
game; the national anthem serenade; sped
dancin with Willy T; the desertion at
American Legion; and overall a rip-roar-
ing speddin time (P.S. - We hope you get
heckled for this, you phone campers!)
Love, Betty Sumrell and Betty Peters.
TO THE LAMBDA CHI RADIO
SHACK PACK: Oh God! Is there any-
thing in that cup? The trash can doesn't
have a liner. Oh God! - BS and BP
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo Car-
tridges with instructions for re-sale. East
Coast Music it Video, 758-4251, 1109
Charles Blvd. - - �
C. EDWARDS: Hey. Guess who? Re-
member Oct 13,1987? Kind a blows your
mind, eh? I just wanted to let you know
that you are more special to me than ever,
and I wanted to thank you for everything.
A year of love, friendship, and incredibly
fun times. You're the best. See you at
lunch. Love, Chrissy.
THE WAY CAMPUS FELLOWSHIP
TWIG FELLOWSHIPS: Are available
every Tuesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
at 2007 Tiffany Dr. in Heritage Village.
Call 355-5164 for details. Hot Bible! Great
fellowship!
PIKA: Get psyched for our social next
Thursday night. Love, the AZD's.
CONGRATULATIONS TO SONJA
LOVE: On becoming the new Homecom-
ing Queen, also to Emily Proctor and
Chris Kelly on being 1st and 2nd runners
up.
TO ALL FRATERNITIES AND SO-
RORITIES: Have a great Fall Break. Love
the AZD's.
PAULA JONES: Congratulations on be-
coming a new sister of Alpha Xi Delta.
Love the AZD's.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Congratulations
on winning "The 1988 East Carolina
Homecoming Spirit Award Let's con-
tinue our quest for a Cup Bucannun this
summer in St. Louis!
SIG EPS & DATES: It started Friday
when the float was constructed- at 1:11
"Boo-Ga-Ga" was conducted. "Column"
was crowned for the upcoming year - take
care of that queen - oh she's so dear. Satur-
day am by one "new" house we were
sane until, until the game we screamed
"The Plane-The Plane We then rocked
the cabin all through the night - with
hundreds of balloons and twinkly lights.
We awoke the next morning to the pop-
ping of Cores and that champagne smell -
no one was left standing - not even "The
Date from I lell �Thanks, lames!
DELTA ZETA: Congrats to our flag foot-
ball team on an awesome season. Way to
go girls!
SPAGHETTI DINNER: The infamous
Delta Zeta event is just around the corner.
Tickets are $3 and available from any
Delta Zeta sister or pledge. Be there Octo-
ber 23 from 5-8 p.m.
THETA CHI: Congratulations on your
chapter from Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: What a weekend! The
food was scrumptious, the house looked
great, and Ticia Pilati had a wiggly date.
Marie looked beautiful sitting in her chair,
so glad we could all make it there. Slippin
and slidin on the kitchen floor, Julie Smith
must be sore. Shelley and Fred were on the
go, dancing to the DJ's bad disco. We all
showed up with cool dates to make a
success of Homecoming '88!
hang. Well, you found a new date but I
kept my Irate. Hope next year is just as
much fun, maybe by then you'll learn how
to fold your tongue. �TICIA.
WIGGLY AND DATE 2: We love you�
you know who.
JAMES FORD GRIFFIN�A SIG-EP
LEGEND! Thank you so much for one
incredible Homecoming weekend! Every
aspect was 100 first class! The best
Homecoming ever! Fraternally�your
Sig-Ep Brothers.
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES: Y'all are doing
an excellent job! Keep up the good work.
Miss Prez-Ann you should be proud! We
love you�The Alpha Phi Sisters. P.S.�
When is the surprise social? Hint Hint.
SOUND MIXTURES FALL NEWSLET-
TER: Oct. 1, Theta Chi and guests set new
maximum capacity record at Rotary Club
Once again the Rotary neighbors call cops
and cops pump down the volume. Oct. 7,
another Alpha Omicron Pi bash. MVP
award (most vicious partiers) goes to Sam,
Melinda, Teresa and Macon. Slip and
slide, snowballs, beer fights, what a mess.
Oct. 8, Sigma Phi Epsilon homecoming in
the woods. Awesome party y'all,
Boogaga! Just please don't bump the
table! Special thanx to Bassetti, Peterson,
Heim, Boone, Shell, Upchurch, and James.
Keep the parties coming, Bob-Sound Mix-
tures DJ Service, 752-4916.
THE BROTHERS OF SAE would like to
thank all of our guests and dates, we all
had a great time this weekend. Waldo �
better keep an eye on your brother next
time. P.S. Is Bolo in the house!
ALPHA XI DELTA PLEDGES: We
would like to thank you for helping us on
the Homecoming float. �Pledges of Pi
Kappa Alpha.
PI KAPPA ALPHA PLEDGE AUCTION:
To be held at the Attic Sunday, October 23.
All interested parties call 752-9168.
CHI ALPHA OMEGA: Congratulations
to our new little sisters: Stephanie Folsom,
Missy Hargett, Betsy Hicks, Shannon
Kenley, Mitzi Mauldin, Cindi Moye,
Kathy Orr, Rachael Seavey, Dana Shrum,
Susan Wallace, and Sherri Williams
Many thanks to Pam Martin for all your
hard work. We love you all! �Your broth-
ers and sisters in Chi Alpha Omicron and
in Christ.
PIRATE WALK: Would like to thank the
Pika's and Alpha Phi for their help with
Pirate Walk this week.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Would like to thank
Caroline McClelland for a memorable and
festive Founder's Day Weekend for all
We love you!
ZETA'S: Congratulations on turning
"90 This year's Founder's Day celebra-
tion in Chapel Hill will be the best one yet!
Have a great Fall Break!
Happy 20th B-day: Jennifer Slothower
Love, Kris. B P I leath, and Mel
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom �
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
S32S a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8,12 - 5 JO p.m.
� AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom fu mis has
apartments, energy eilscwm. free watt; and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable W.
Couples or single, only. $205 a month, f month
lease. MOBILE HOME RENTAIS - couples or
singles. Apartrrrnt and mobile homes in Azale
Gardens near Brook Valley Country CJj'
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
. i
I
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Car
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
vall for appointment Mon thru Sat 1-ow
font Termination to 70 wr�-k� of pregnancy
.
1-800-433-2930
shoeless, shadeless, shaky date.
try
HEY KRISTI: The weekend started off
with a bang, too bad date 1 couldn't
SALES POSITION AVAILABLE
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications for an
advertising sales representative.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
tonality & Professional Appearance
client Communication Skills
iood Organizational Skills
triable & Show Initiative & Enthusiasm
.t Have Own Transportation
;t Have The Desire To Excel
Apply in Person at
e East Carolinian
ase Include Resume
ATicattmsliTalSg
Front of Joyner Library)
Phone Calls Please!
i
Security
strikes, n
BELGRADE, Yt
(AP) � Thousands of
ended strikes today in tht
heightened security mc
but other protesters presJ
mands for economic and
changes and forced out a rj
leader.
The government struj
defuse the mushrooming
fueled by economic turn
ethnic Serbian nationalisr
of six national republic;
tcnegTO and Serbia.
Communist Partv vs
two other republics ske
the Serbian cause camel
defense of the governmci
Authorities impos
specified emergency ni
Monday in Montenegro,
ing to the official newsl
Tanjug. Several Yugoslav
ing on condition of an4
reported Monday that
fense units in Belgrade
on a higher level of alert.
no sign of trouble surfa
capital.
About 15,000 pej
iksic, a town about
from the Montenegrin
Titograd, joined about 3
workers in a protest
Tanjug said. However, tl
ers ended their three-d
today.
Workers are angry
tional economic probll
eluding 217 percent inff
oercent unemplovment
billion foreion debt.
Protesters in Nil
manded Mondav
Montenegro's oolicechi
for allowing authority
tear gas and clubs to
weekend protests. Thel
tized their point by hoistj
wearing a gas mask on
ders of the crowd,
ported.
"We are not demaj
gallows for those whooi
beating up of our coi
are only demanding tl
ing the agency quote
Miloslav Michuncmch
AnnouiK
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase your
"fun" budget,
Opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
Thurs Oct. 13, 4 p.m. rm. 2006; Thurs
Oct. 20, 1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon Oct. 24,1
p.m rm. 2010; Thurs Oct. 27,4 p.m nn.
2006; Mon Oct. 31, 4 p.m nn. 2006.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6.00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WQRK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Business students interested in scholar-
ships should secure forms from one of the
following dept. offices: Accounting �
GCB 3208, Decision Sciences � 3418, Fi-
nance � 3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414. All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210),
Chairman of School of Business Scholar-
ship Committee, by Oct. 14. Students may
apply for one or more of the scholarships
listed below. Planters Bank Scholarship (3
at $1000 each). University Book Exchange
( 2 at $500 each), NCNB ($500), J. Fred
Hamblen ($200) Credit Women Interna-
tional ($200), Cameron-BrownFirst
Union Scholarship (3 at $500 each), FOR
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY: Latney
W. Pittard Memorial, Raleigh-Durham
Chapter Institute of Internal Auditors
($350), National Association of Account-
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship ($500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
ONLY: Archie R. Bumette ($600), Ward
Real Estate Scholarship ($300).
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Attention all ECU students, faculty,
alumni and parents of ECU students!
Why spend another dull Thanksgiving
when you could be in the exciting city of
lights, New York City. Come join the Stu-
dent Union's Travel Committee excursion
to New York City, Nov. 23-27. For more
info call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
CASH, VACATION, it PRIZES: HOW?
By playing the hottest business game in
town sponsored by Wall Street and
AT&T. There are over 400 chances to win.
The top 10 performers will receive a cash
prize, with first place performer receiving
$25,000 cash; and the top 100 performers
each month will receive athletic shoes
from Reebok and a wrist watch, courtesy
of Beneton by Bulova. You can participate
for only $49.95. Interested participants
can register on the first floor of the GCB on
Wed. and Thurs. between 10-2 p.m. or by
contacting Student Financial Mgmt. As-
soc. members or call the FINA dept. 757-
6670.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Underwater Hockey games are scheduled
from 700 p m. thru 8:30 p.m. at Memorial
Gym pool. An approved Club Sport, new
members are welcome at any time �
equipment needs include: mask, fins,
snorkel. Come out and try the newest
sport on campus.
INJURY EVALUATION
The Pre-Professional Health Alliance will
hold its first meeting of the 88-89 school
year, on Thurs. Oct. 13, at 5:30 p.m. in
room 247 Mendenhall. Any student inter-
ested in a health-related career is invited
to attend.
KARATE CLUB
If you are interested in joining the ECU
Karate Club, come to Memorial Gym
Thurs Oct. 13 at 8:00 p.m. for registration
and a free demonstration.
MINORITY CAREER
EXPLORATION DAY
Wed Oct. 19, from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
in Mendenhall. Representatives from
various career fields will be available to
talk about career opportunities. Spon-
sored by the Office of Minority Student
Affairs and Career Planning and Place-
ment Services.
Be sure to attend the Intramural Skiing
Trip registration meeting from Aug. 22 to
Oct. 22. Now you can ski the slopes and
learn the ropes in this fun filled trip!
VON-3 BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Free
Throw Contest registration meeting held
Nov. 1 at 5:00 p.m. in BIO103. Play begins
shortly afterwards! Interested in officiat-
ing? Attend the first officials clinic on Oct.
25 at 8:00 p.m at MG102. For additional
info call Dave Hall at 757-6387.
CO-REC FLAG FOOTBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
Flag Football meeting held Oct. 25 at 5:00
p.m. in B1O103. Play begins shortly after-
ward! Interested in officiating? Attend the
first officials clinic Oct. 25 at 8:00 p.m. in
MG102. For additional info call Dave
Hall at 757-6387.
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the Dec. issue. The maga-
zine is published twice a semester with
the first issue coming out in Oct. This
special issue will be a small magazine
with mainly general info whereas the
Dec. issue will be a larger size containing
news stories, short stories, editorials,
poetry, etc. Articles may be left at the
office or at the Media Board Secretary's
Office in the Publications Bldg.
Injury assessment will be performed by a
certified trainer each Wed. and Thurs.
from 6-30-7:30 pjn. in the Memorial
Gymnasium Sports Care Room A. Recom-
mendation for rehabilitative processes
will be given for all interested. For addi-
tional info call 757-6387.
PRE-PROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
SUMMER JOB
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be on Mon Nov. 21 at
10:00 a.m. in 1029 GCB. The ten-week in-
ternship program, in the Raleigh area, is
open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
currently enrolled in college. (Those en-
tering Graduate School as of May 1989 are
not eligible).
CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a class pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance. Class photographs will be taken
Oct. 31 -Nov. 4 in the Student Store from 9
a.m. till 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
each day. The yearbook is not your year-
book until you are in it
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will hold a business meet-
ing Oct. 13th from 7-7:30 p.m. in room 205
Austin. All those interested please attend.
We will discuss purchasing tee-shirts.
JUNIORS. SENIORS. &
GRAP. STUDENTS
Sign up this week for your own Visa or
Master Card with Sovran Bank. The Soci-
ety for the Advancement of Mgmt. will
have a table set ly in front of the student
store through Thurs. from 9:00-4:00.
Sovran Bank is offering great terms to full-
time students, so come by and apply this
week.
SKIING TRIP
SOCCER
Be sure to attend the Intramural Soccer
registration meeting held Oct. 19 at 6:00
p.m. in GCB 1026. Play begins shortly
afterward! For additional info call Dave
Hall at 757-6387.
VOLLEYBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Volley-
ball registration meeting held Oct. 19 at
5:00 p.m. in GCB 1026. Play begins shortly
afterward! For additional info call Dave
Hall at 757-6387.
BANNER CONTEST
Last chance to register your
organization's banner for the National
Alcohol Awareness Week Contest is 5
p.m. Fri Oct. 14 in 209 Whichard. Re-
member all banners will be judged at 4
p.m. Wed Oct. 19 at Ficklen Stadium,
East service entrance. Call 757-6823 for
more info.
tYYNTQN marsalis con-
CERI
The Dept of University Unions is proud
to present Wynton Marsalis in concert
Nov. 1 at 8:00pm. in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets go on sale for this Performing Arts
Series event on Mon Oct 10. Winner of a
Grammy Award for bom classical and
jazz performances, Mr. Marsalis is sure to
bring an energetic and entertaining show
to Wright Auditorium. For further details,
contact: The Central Ticket Office, Men-
denhall, or cafl (919) 757-6611.
EXPRESSIONS
INTERVIEWING WORK-
SHOPS
To help ECU people prepare for on and off
campus interviews, the Career Planning
it Placement Service in Bloxton I louse is
offering these one hour programs to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search. The pro-
gram is open to the first 20 people to come
for each session. No sign up is required.
These sessions are held in the Career Plan-
ning Room on Oct. 12 it 20.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning & Placement Service
in Bloxton House is offering these one
hour programs on beginning a resume for
your job search. Handouts and samples
will be given out to the first 20 people to
come to each session. No sign up is re-
quired. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Oct. 11,21 &26
at 3 p.m.
WOMEN VOTERS
The League of Women Voters of
Greenville-Pitt County will sponsor a
public forum for state legislative candi-
dates on Oct 25, at 7:30 p.m. in the Willis
Bldg. at First and Reade Circle in
Greenville. On Nov. 1, a second forum
will be held, again at 730 p.m. in the Willis
Bldg for candidates for the Pitt County
Board of Commissioners.
GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept. 15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec 2. Please note that the
group listing with the name of every per-
son in the photograph MUST be pre-
sented BEFORE the photographer films
the group. ORGANIZATIONS WITH-
OUT USTINGS WILL NOT BE PHOTO-
GRAPHED, and time does not permit the
scheduling of another session. Call 757-
6501 and leave dateJr time for the photo to
be taken. Please give two days notice for
the photographer.
BUCCANEER
The 1987 yearbooks have come in. Any-
one who would like a copy of it may come
by the ottice and pick one up SN'e arc
located in front ot Jovner Library in the
Publications Bldg
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeb n g for all Am
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p m in Menden
hall room 221. Remember that missing
over 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation.
WINDSURFING CLUB
There will be a meeting Oct 25 to organize
a group trip to Whichard's Beach over the
weekend. If vou are interested, please
meet in conference room 105 Memorial
Gvm at 6:00
I
r
1
r
FRESHMEN
An important meeting for FRESHMEN
who intend to mapr in the following:
Business and Distributive Ed, Driver's
Ed Early Childhood Ed Health Ed , In
termediate Ed Marketing Ed Middle
Grades Ed Physical Ed Special Ed ,
Technical Ed. and Vocational Ed "The
Second Academic Major Required by the
University of N. C Board of Governors
Oct. 25 from 3:00-500 p m in Wright
Auditorium.
LIBRARY SCIENCE 1000
LIBS 1000 (2nd block) began Oct Uth &
12th. Oct. 11th: Tues. & Thurs , Oct. 12th:
Mon. it Wed
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP
The Episcopal Student Fellowship will be
meeting on Wednesdays at 5 30 at St.
Paul's Episcopal Church on 4th St All are
welcome for Holy Communion dinner
and program. For more info, call Allen
Manning at 758-1440
ECU STUPENTSSTAFfl
LSS SOCIETY
Volunteers, old dothes it sheers are
needed DESPERATELY for the Pirate
aubLSS Society "Jr. Spooky Pirate
Night Halloween Carnival" to be held
Oct. 28 from 6-8 p m at the Pirate Club.
For more info please contact Beth Smvth
or Ann Totaro at 830-9315, anytime!
SEAT BELT fOR SAFETY
If you drive a car, then this is for you! Seat
Belts For Safety: Don't Drink and Drive. A
presentation on the campus mall 1 -5 p.m.
Oct 20. Ride the seat belt convincer (car
crash simulator) and be eligible to win
$100. See displays convincing you to wear
seat belts. Meet TV personalities Larry
and Vine.
Tryd
may
Noi
undo
make1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13.1988 7
I IKs SO PLEDGES OF
H VLPH A: Would like to thank
� elland for a memorable and
w eokend lor all
- Oil turning
Foundei - Da) celebra
e best one vet!
h B-Jjv ennifer Slothower
IMd
A Ci ASS1FIED
BORTION
' E Pregnancy
Testing
I - 30 1 p.m.
L .t. 10-1 p.m.
an pie Women's
fi 1th Center
U00 433 2930
L vVAILABLE
plinian
k a! u �ns U r an
i sentative
Is:
�n at
iinian
Lesume
'Icffnjf
Jbrary)
lease!
AMBASSADORS
WINDSURFING CLl B
1 Rl SI1M1.N
-
i
UK m SCIENCE 1000
tt 11th &
& Thur- I k �
If PIS( OPAI Sll DJ VI
FELLOWSHIP
� � -ill be
� rinesdays jt 5 30 at St
I il Church on 4th St Allare
�or Holy Communion dinner
Tor more info -ill Allen

LL STUDENTS SIAEft
LSS SOCIETY
Id dothea S sheets are
ESP1 RATELY for the Pirate
SL- - � � !r Spooky Pirate
t Halloween Carnival" to he held
I from K.8 p m at the Pirate CTvib
�re info please contact Beth Smvth
nTotaro at 830-9315 anytimel
MM BHLTFQRSAFHJY
L drive � � ar then this is tor von' Sat
ForSafer) Pon't Drink and Drive A
en ration on the campus mall 1 -5 p m
Ride the seat belt oanvinccf (car
simulator) and be eligible to �in
See display s com Dicing von to wear
Kits Med fV personalities 1 arr
Security measures quell
strikes, not opposition
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia A member of Montenegro's
(AP) � Thousands of workers ruling Presidium, RadivojeBrajo-
pnded strikes today in the face of vie, told a rally in Titograd in an
heightened security measures, emotional address that he was
but other protesters pressed de- resigning, and the regional party
mands for economic and political leadership held an emergency
changes and forced out a regional meeting.
leader.
The government struggled to
defuse the mushrooming protests
hieled by economic turmoil and
ethnic Serbian nationalism, in two
Later Monday, 1,000 con-
struction workers in Titograd
ended their strike there.
Meanwhile, two of
Yugoslavia's six republics
of six national republics, Mon- Slovenia and Bosnia Herzegovina
tenegro and Serbia. � issued statements supporting
Communist Party leaders in the national government's de-
two other republics skeptical of nunciation of nationalist protests.
the Serbian cause came to the "We reject models of a
defense of the government. strong state and imposition of
Authorities imposed un- socialism and democracy as tai-
specified emergency measures lored by the Serbian leadership
Monday in Montenegro, accord- Communists from liberal Slov-
ing to the official news agency enia said Monday.
Tanjug. Several Yugoslavs speak- But the leadership of Serbia
ing on condition of anonymity defended its drive for more con-
reported Monday that civil dc- trol of its two provinces, which
fense units in Belgrade were put are nominally autonomous. The
on a higher level of alert, although Presidium of the Party and the
no sign of trouble surfaced in the Presidency of Serbia denounced
capital. Monday unidentified politicians
About 15,000 people at and journalists in Slovenia who it
Niksic, a town about 30 miles said "are spreading fear of Ser-
from the Montenegrin capital of bia
Titograd, joined about 3,000 steel
workers in a protest Monday,
Tanjug said. However, the work
Ethnic tensions, never far
from the surface in this country
with numerous rival nationali-
ers ended their three-day strike ties, have increasingly come for-
today. ward in the growing number of
Workers are angry about na- protests this year,
tional economic problems, in- Many have centered on one of
eluding 217 percent inflation, 15 Serbia's autonomous provinces,
oercent unemployment and a $21 Kosovo, which borders Albania,
billion foreion debt. Ethnic Albanian, who are mostly
Protesters in Niksic de- Moslems, outnumber mainly
manded Monday that Christian Serbs there, and the
Montenegro's oolice chief be fired Serbs claims rncy arc being har-
for allowing authorities to use assed and forced to leave.
tear gas and clubs to put down However, many Yugoslavs
weekend protests. They drama- elsewhere worry about the grow-
tized their point by hoisting a man ing nationalism of Serbs, the larg-
wearing a gas mask on the shoul- est minority in this nation of about
ders of the crowd, Tanjug re- 23 million,
ported. The policy-making Commu-
"We are not demanding the nist Central Committee of Serbia
gallows for those who ordered the were to meet today to discuss a
beating up of our comrades, we drive of the republic's leader, Slo-
are only demanding their sack- bodan Milosevic, for more control
ing the agency quoted worker of Serbia's two provinces.
Miloslav Michunovich as saying.
Attention All
Students
The Association
of
Student Organizations
requests the honour of
your presence
at a
reception honouring
Dr. Alfred Matthews
Vice Chancellor of Student
Life
to be held in the
Gray Gallery
in the
Jenkins Building
on
October 27,1988
5:00-7:00 p.m.
5th street
Subway
Delivers!
Give us a call
758-7979
S0METHIY
FROM SUBWAY
R.S.V.P
The Student Union
757-6611, Ext.210
by Friday, October 21,1988
Buy One Sub Get
Another For 99 $
(With purchase of Medium Drinks)
Offer Expires Oct 31 1988
L - �m� mmhm mmmKfiL
Get Afc and Bs fa your parents,
and a CD fix yourself
Try a Macintosh today-you
mav win a Sony Discman.
Now that a new school year is
under way, we have an idea that'll
make both you and your parents
'riffi�iititi
ft tasrirs
khGGffsc
feel a bit more confident come
finals time:
Get a Macintosh computer to
help with your homework.
Then you'll never have to spend
another all-nighter retyping a paper
just to purge a few typos and
dangling modifiers. You'll be able to
crank out assignments that look as
though you bribed a friend in art
school.
And with an amazing new
program called HyperCard�
which just happens to come
packaged with every Macintosh�
you can easily store, organize, and
cross-reference research notes to
your heart's content.
And if that isn't enough reason
to look at a Macintosh today, here's
another:
Right now, you have three
chances to win one of Sony's
Discman CD players�includ-
ing the exciting Sony Pocket
Discman, which also plays
the new 3-inch CDs. And
even if you miss out on
the CD player, you may
still win one of 15 Apple
T-shirts. No strings attached
�just fill out a registration
form at the location listed
below.
So come in and get your
hands on a Macintosh.
If not foryoui'solf. do it tor
your folks.
The power to be your best
j�
k
Enter: October 3rd-0ctober 21st
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
Greenville, NC
Applr thcAppkkur. HyperCard jnd �tamk-Ji jrr rrgiirt�J trxtmurks and TV xiwo whr yrwhW �J�
.offjpleC�pMKf.lnc Sl�iMnl���raiMrto�SonyC�Tirtt� No parchar tcuy Od pmd I
I of ounntt S� vow. imou Apr.) rrxeWti U irtpltir v far d��H �T nu ��r linn pnv -





Hey man, Freedom Rocks "Turn it up, dudeBurnt-out hippies from the "Freedom Rocks" commercial
Overkill
p too "JO � -
! A MIRK �� JVt
j OS -v. � .if . .
v .
By Friedrich Orpheus
'f�l AlRl SHAIKH (1 DOM
'UB.t
'It 7 .vtKt ��!�?
By Harris and (guest artist) Parker
AS
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wh;R. DID frtlS "1AO o�i
.�

iuK'i co �� i I .its
Kite; � � ?7�K"5 � T "
jg .pfctceoR'rM
by Parker
The Avatar
15v Harris ,mJ laselriu
what ir irs Booer TiKttF
Quoits to Livt By
"Oh my God'
-Big Al, upon being shown an
enormously obese naked woman
'fCNWL.s,
Chauncey The Funmeister
Hello! Welcome to Fun and Games! I'm
your host, Chauncey the Funmeister!
So glad you could all make it to our little
show. I'll be hosting this all throughout
Rocktober, so be festive, will you? There
are no games today, but nobody plays them
anyway. So as long as I'm here, it will be
one big party! And now . Enjoy!
Top Ten People Who Need to Be Pushed off a Cliff
10. Lumpy Rutherford
9. The Preaching Strode Brothers
8. Vance Scoy (and his diamond mines too)
7. Yoko Ono
6. Freddy Freaker (from MTV)
5. Rick Astley
4. Keisha Knight-Pulliam
3. George "Goober7' Lindsay
2. Dick Jones, The Country Rover
1. It's a tie! Dan Quayle and Jesse Helms
Hifie Lost Recordings of
Jim 9a6ors
(( IN STEREO ))
This collection contains some of the greatest never-before heard cuts of the
melodic master himself. Praised as the greatest voice since Pavorotti, Nabors
has recieved acclaim from all the musical giants-Slim Whitman Boxcar
Willie, Zamfir, and the list goes on. And now you can own these lost
treasures for only $19.95. Order yours today.
Contains these songs!
Hey Andy, the squadcars' fixed
Shazam, Shazam
I
f Golly Miss Bunny, I don't do that
Duke, Duke
( What if the Sergeant sees us)
Between Rock and a Hard Place
Citizen's Arrest
,
REWARD: For anyone who can satisfactorily explain why the cartoonist of
Hey Big Head calls himself The Boo-man.
WANTED: More readers like: Chuck Harrell, Krissy Muth, "Rats Joe Harris,
Luke Whisnant
Pee
Continued from payr v
The first caller was i
named Ra from Greenville
said that he was a compi
gambler and that he needed.
(gamblers termini ford
urn) or Cuidi a m I
lor a book -maker ivoul i
ger his life
In trying to aid the - I
vidual named Rav Earl saj
knew nothing of sp i
the Mountaineers n(
rhis is Mkk ag�er and Keitl
do the look tike the Rolling
Micah Uk
( ontinued from p.ij'
nly aliens that .
ones
Of course tor the I
� �r fictional
work that is
shou dnotl
film ring much mor
f disb
ivorld of the r
and
tilm s
in tl emits

it
'�
ird
not sugges
s �� � - - tealk
iivi m�-re than 5
READ
CARC
Take
Schol
Buy One
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of Equ.
1
Not Good
Entertainj
Thurs . Oct
Dead)
Fn . Oct
Sat Oct
Call Ahea
Hoi
Moo Tu�
,lm lOprr





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13, 1988 9

LTJ
Pee Wee calls Big E on Z-103
( untinued from page )
I he first caller was a cat
ed Ray from Greenville. Rav
that he was a compulsive
nbler and that he needed a lock
tlers terminology for a sure
01 Guido (a ficticious name
i N�ok maker) would endan-
lis hte
In trying to aid the poor mdi-
rtamed Rav. Earl said he
in nothing of Sports. But take
Mountaineers ot West Vir-
ginia giving up 20 and a halt
points against ECU' came the
game wisdom of E.
That proved to be the worst
adv ice The Big E has ever gi ven as
West Virginia won the game 30-10
and Rav lost his life over a half of
a point.
After a few more songs, the
phone lines lit up again. This time
it was an ECU student named Gil
who knew that E is a world trav-
eler. Gil asked where he should
spend lushpring Break.
"When 1 hear the name Gil, I
think of gills and when I think of
gills, 1 think of fish, when 1 think of
fish 1 think of fishy smelling
things at the beach. Hey Gil, go to
the Bahamas and have a good
time E said.
Calling next was another
ECU student. Bradford's predica-
ment was one of stepping in dog
loaves left by the neighbor's
pooch. Bradford said the dog
t -wx o
��-1
' a4
I his is Mick larger and Keith Richards right? Wrong. These gins are members of the Blushing Brides. Not onh
In the) look like the Rolling Stones, the play and sound like them, the Brides rot ks the Vttic tonight.
Micah likes new movie 'Alien Nation
looked like a horse.
Hearing that the dog re-
sembled a horse lead Big E to ask
"Where do you live in Greenville,
Bradford?" With the answer
"hallucinogenic highway' Earl
knew instantly the disturbed lad
was speaking of the dog of
BUtmore St.
"Hey man, you are talking
about that horse-dog on Biltmore
St. I kind of like that dog, why
don't you leave him alone? E
said as his temper started to flare.
Dee-jay Doug added "Yeah
Bradford, maybe you arc the one
we need to get rid of
The next caller came at 2:30.
Hager, also from Greenville,
asked The Big E how he could stop
his friends from calling him Pee
Wee.
"Are you small, are you
small? E asked. Haggar said no.
"Have you been taking stcriods
like Ben Johnson?" Haggar said
no. "Have you thought about
buving a pit bull and sic-ing the
dog on vour friend's legs every
time they call you Pee Wee?"
"You could also improve vour
image by wearing a lot of gold
jewelery like the Fat Boys was
E's advice.
Before the guy with the stick-
ligure complex hung up, Doug
came on with, "Hey Hay wood,
Haywood, what is vour name
Haggar? Well, see you later Pee
Wee'
A fisherman from Beaufort
proved to be the next caller. He
said his wife had been cruel to
him He said he had wandered
into the neighbor's sheep flock to
satisfv his lust.
"You are sick, 1 am truly dis-
gusted was the only thing E
could say. Even Big E has some
standards of bad taste. Doug and
E, with no help from a drunk
Parker, decided not to air the
demented call from the fisher-
man.
As F and Tark walked out of
the station at 4:30 a.m Doug
threw them a tec-shirt and invited
them back. And back to the "dead
medium" E must go.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 cxtGreenville, North Carolina
r
i
i
i
i
L
MonThurs.
Shrimp Plate $3.65
Fri. & Sat.
Weekend Specials
i
i
i
i
.J
�Beer, Wine Brown Baggin OK.
752-3172
GET YOUR
FUTURE OFF
THE GROUND
Imagine the thrill of fly-
a jet aircraft! Air Force
ROTC offers you leadership
training and an excellent start to a ca-
reer as an Air Force pilot. If yrxi have what
it takes, check out Air Force ROTC today
Contact
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
WRIGHT ANNEX, RM 312
757-6597
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. 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
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TarkJIheatre
RATED R
NIGHTMARE OF ELM ST. PART 4
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15 9:15
RATED R
Y
yf
( untinued from pae l)
aliens that exit are the
vou see on camera.
Of course, tor the film's sec-
fictional "world" to
that is exactly how vou
nld not feel Roger Rabbit a
, liring much more sus-
n of disbelief, presented a
is world of the human
he other " It seems this
nity ti real life (il ssel
. uldbe in itsfavor
rhaps that worked against
ithei robk m is thai there
II) a sense of scope here I'm
. sting the movie should
focuss that theahensare
m re than stock figures but
that we get a better peripheral
picture of how the aliens' arrival
has effected the national scene.
In their "Watchman" graphic
novel, Alan Moore and Dave
Gibbons effected a subplot that
turned a New York street corner
into a microcosm of the world. It
was an economic move of story-
telling that allowed a sense of
resonance to the main plot line.
"Alien Nation weighing in at
just over 90 minutes running time
could've stood an extra thirty
minutes to grant a similar sense ot
scale.
Although entertaining, the
movie's Haws don't allow it to
come across a any more than a
glorified TV show. My ad cl is to
wait until it comes on iV and
make the popcorn yourself. Two
cat heads.
Plaza Cinema
HaiU Shopping Cir. 756 OOHH
nqiv shouting
A FISH CALLED WANDA
GORILLAS IN THE MIST
Starts Fiiilaj
BULL DURHAM
Ends Thursdau
LICENSE TO DRIVE
Starts Fridau
CADDYS HACK II
YOUNG GUNS
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
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Blushing
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Blushing
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Tribute To
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JimThe Point
ThackeryThe Point
&The Point
TheThe Point
Assassins
Rhihm & Blues
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$1.00 ECl
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13.1968 9
Li id (guest artist) Parker
i.J Mi

Harris ,md laselriu
50O8Y Twmo:
IAT If iTS FULL Or uiVB AMD Wl
i-ASSEO iT JK THEN wE'O B�
TwL SOCSiES
V
�Ht OTMCR WAV J
)uieautc' s

r
In Reid
V
10M
of the
labors
Boxcar
fee lost
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V

Pee Wee calls Big E on Z-103
Continued from page 9
The first caller was a cat
named Ray from Greenville. Ray
said that he was a compulsive
gambler and that he needed a lock
(gamblers terminology for a sure
win) or Guido (a ficticious name
tor a book-maker) would endan-
ger his life.
In trying to aid the poor indi-
vidual named Ray, Earl said he
knew nothing of sports. "But take
the Mountaineers of West Vir-
ginia giving up 20 and a half
points against ECU came the
game wisdom of E.
That proved to be the worst
advice The Big E has ever given as
West Virginia won the game 30-10
and Ray lost his life over a half of
a point.
After a few more songs, the
phone lines lit up again. This time
it was an ECU student named Gil
who knew that E is a world trav-
eler. Gil asked where he should
spend hisbpringBreak.
"When I hear the name Gil, I
think of gills and when I think of
gills, I think of fish, when 1 think of
fish I think of fishy smelling
things at the beach. Hey Gil, go to
the Bahamas and have a good
time E said.
Calling next was another
ECU student. Bradford's predica-
ment was one of stepping in dog
loaves left by the neighbor's
pooch. Bradford said the dog
This is M ick Jagger and Keith Richards right? Wrong. These guys are members of the Blushing Brides. Not only
do the look like the Rolling Stones, they play and sound like them. The Brides rocks the Attic tonight.
Micah likes new movie 'Alien Nation
looked like a horse.
Hearing that the dog re-
sembled a horse lead Big E to ask
"Where do you live in Greenville,
Bradford?" With the answer
"hallucinogenic highway Earl
knew instantly the disturbed lad
was speaking of the dog of
Biltmore St.
"Hey man, you are talking
about that horselog on Biltmore
St. I kind of like that dog, why
don't you leave him alone? E
said as his temper started to flare.
Dee-jay Doug added "Yeah
Bradford, maybe you are the one
we need to get rid of
The next caller came at 2:30.
Hager, also from Greenville,
asked The Big E how he could stop
his friends from calling him Pee
Wee.
"Are you small, are you
small? E asked. Haggar said no.
"Have you been taking steriods
like Ben Johnson?" Haggar said
no. "Have you thought about
buying a pit bull and sic-ing the
dog on your friend's legs every
time they call you Pee Wee?"
"You could also improve your
image by wearing a lot of gold
jewelery like the Fat Boys was
E's advice.
Before the guy with the stick-
figure complex hung up, Doug
came on with, "Hey Haywood,
Hay wood, what is your name
Haggar? Well, see you later Pee
Wee
A fisherman from Beaufort
proved to be the next caller. He
said his wife had been cruel to
him. He said he had wandered
into the neighbor's sheep flock to
satisfy his lust.
"You are sick, I am truly dis-
gusted was the only thing E
could say. Even Big E has some
standards of bad taste. Doug and
E, with no help from a drunk
Parker, decided not to air the
demented call from the fisher-
man.
As E and Park walked out of
the station at 4:30 a.m Doug
threw them a tee-shirt and invited
them back. And back to the "dead
medium" E must go.
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
i
r1
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MonThurs.
Shrimp Plate 3.65
Fri. & Sat.
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GET YOUR
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Contact
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
WRIGHT ANNEX, RM 312
757-6597
� �
Leaderrfiap ExxUence Starts Here
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $2�'W
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME $2�
3
BUCCANNER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
RATED R EVIL LAUGH
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:05-9:00
'FarkJThtatrc
� � � � wm
( ontinued from page 9
the only aliens that exist are the
ones vou see on camera.
Of course, for the film's sec-
ondary, fictional "world" to
work, that is exactly how you
should not feel. "Roger Rabbit a
him requiring much more sus-
pension of disbelief, presented a
credulous world of the human
and "the other It seems this
tilm's proximity to real life (it's set
in the 1990s) would be in its favor.
But perhaps that worked against
it
Another problem is that there
is I udlv a sense of scope here I'm
not suggesting the movie should
se its focus so that the aliens are
no more than stock figures but
that we get a better peripheral
picture of how the aliens' arrival
has effected the national scene.
In their "Watchman" graphic
novel, Alan Moore and Dave
Gibbons effected a subp1 that
turned a New York strt omer
into a microcosm of the .orld. It
was an economic move of story-
telling that allowed a sense of
resonance to the main plot line.
"Alien Nation weighing in at
just over 90 minutes running time,
could've stood an extra thirty
minutes to grant a similar sense of
scale.
Although entertaining, the
movie's flaws don't allow it to
come across as any more than a
glorified TV show. My advice is to
wait until it comes on TV and
make the popcorn yourself. Two
cat heads.
Plaza Cinema
llazj Shopping Or. 756-008H
Now Showing
A FISH CALLED WANDA
GORILLAS IN THE MIST
End? ThvrfdM
LICENSE TO DRIVE
Starts Fridau
CADDYSHACK II
RATED R
NIGHTMARE OF ELM ST. PART 4
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
RATED R
YOUNG GUNS
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
1
Starts Fridau
BULL DURHAM
WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
The I 'Ue-
CoMcdiA CoMedl
7PHE 2PNE
WED W WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
Blushing
Brides
Blushing
Brides
Tribute To
Rolling Stones
FRIDAY
Jim
Thackery
&
The
Assassins
Rhythm & Blues
Formerly of the Nighihawk
READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
SATURDAY
The Point
The Point
The Point
The Point
$1.00 ECU
Take a Break From
School and Work
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Buy One Specialty Sandwich j
andGet 2nd Sandwich
of Equal or Lesser Value
12 Price
Expiration 10-22-88
Not Good With Any Other Special Offers
"Entertainment For The Weekend
Thurs Oct. 13. Swamp Gypsies (9-11)
Deadhead Jam (11-close)
Fri Oct. 14. Widespread Panic
Sat Oct. 15. Closed For Fall Break
Call Ahead For Takeouts 758-0080
Hours of Operations
I
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Mum lues
11 am 10pm
Wed-Thur
Ham-lam
Friday
Ham- 2am
Saturday
12-noon-2am
Thursday Pi Kappa Phi L'il Sisters
and Phi Kappa Tau L'il Sisters
Presents Ladies Night
All Ladies Free All Night
Come Early Drink Specials All Night
Friday The Famous
"Late Dav Tea Bash"
5 p.m. - 2 a.m. $2.00 Ice Teas And
Free Admission For All Until 9:00
$2.00 Frozen
16 oz.
Specials
ThursSun.
;





10
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
CXTTOBER 13, 19S8
SAVACENTER
Trip to the 'BigApple'
By ALICIA FORD
Sulf Writer
Do you have a strong desire
for the fast-paced, bright lights
and active nightlife oi a big city?
How would you like to spend
Thanksgiving in The Big Apple'?
The Student Union is sponsoring
a trip to New York City from
November 23 until November 27.
Accomodations for the trip
are at the Hotel Edison and trans-
portation will be provided by the
La Grange bus. Trices per person
arc $115 quad, $135 triple, $165
double, and $249 for a single. The
deadlone for sign-up is Novem-
ber 1 at theCentral Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Thc former head oi the
North and South Carolina com-
munist Party, lunius Scales, will
be lecturing on the pros of com-
munism October 24 at 8:00 pm. If
you're interested in eating with a
communist, you can brown bag
lunch with Mr. Scales from 11:30-
1:30, room 244 Mendenhall.
A photography show pre-
sented bv Ernest Habrich will
begin on Occtober 24 and run
through November 8 at the Men-
denhall Art Callers The central
theme of the photography pre-
sented bv Habrich is the faces and
structures of North and Central
American Earth.
ln addition, the Student
Union is presenting a number of
free movies for the rest of October.
One of Tennesse William's most
famous work "The Glass Menag-
erie is being shown on Wednes-
day October 19. Directed by Taul
Newman, the film stars Joannne
Wotxiward as a mother who tries
to impose her own dreams into
her daughter's life. The daughter
is portraved by Karen Allen.
A remake of the 1930's sus-
pense thriller "D.O.A starring
Dennis Quaid and Meg Ryan is
being presented on October 20-23.
Dexter Cornell (Quaid), is an
English professor who discovers
he has been poisoned and only
has 24 hours to find his killer. One
oi his students and prime sus-
pects, Ryan, is forced into helping
him, and she soon falls in love
with her sexy professor. "D.O.A
is a good mystery but you can
pretty much guess the ending.
On October 26 "Cry Free-
dom a movie about the life oi
African journalist Donald Woods,
will be presented. The film is
based on two oi Wood's biogra-
phies about South Africa: "Biko"
and "Asking tor Trouble Kevin
Kilme portrays the author in a
"true story of a friendship that
shook South Africa and awak-
ened the world
Just in t ne for Halloween,
"Serpent and he Rainbow" will
be shown from October 28-30. A
Wes Craven film, "Serpent" is
based on the true story of Harvard
anthropologist Wade Davis.
Davis travels to Haiti where he
discovers an ancient voodoo
powder that puts the people who
inhale it into a deep coma. They
have no pulse or blood pressure,
and these "corpses" can only be
awakened late at night. "Serpent
and the Rainbow" is a good hor-
ror flick filled with walking zom-
bies, cursed, evil and black magic.
If that's not enough blood and
guts for you, check out the pre-
Halloween horror movie lock-in
on Sunday October 30 at 1:30 pm.
Three horror-buff favorites are
being presented: "Carrie "The
Omen and "Texas Chainsaw
Massacre Be sure to wear your
Halloween garb for the costume
contest.
"Coming in November: Tom
Hanks box office smash "Big" is
being shown on Novemeber 3-6.
On November 2, "The Unbear-
able Lightness of Being" and the
award-winning "The Last Em-
peror" will be presented from
November 10-13.
The movies are free for stu-
dents with ID and valid activity
stickers. All shows start at 8:00 pm
are screened in Hendrix Theatre.
Female faculty fight hiring practices
(CPS)� Female faculty mem-
bers on two separate campuses
have opened the new year with
critical salvos at the men who run
their schools.
A group of Univeristv of Iowa
faculty members announced in
August it would trv to pressure UI
to hire more women, a move
which prompted UI to release a
report defending its efforts to re-
cruit female teachers and deans.
On Sept. 7, moreover, a simi-
larlv new group at the University
of New Mexico held a press con-
ference to publicize the condi-
tion of women working on this
campus
UNM History Prof. Jan Foe-
buck said she helped form the
group after President Gerald
Mav's April, 1988, explanation
that he has not appointed any
women to high-level administra-
tive posts on the campus because
there were no women qualified
for them.
"We need to get together on
this issue and get our voices
heard Roebuck told the Daily
Lobo, UNM's campus paper. "It's
been going on long enough
She said the new group
would pressure May to hire more
women and form a task force to
recruit them.
A similar press conference
inspired the University of Iowa,
which formed an "affirmative
'Norwegian Saga'
tonight on campus
�' EjCU News Bureau
"Norwegian Saga the first
film in East Carolina University's
1988-89 Travel-Adventure Film
Series, will offer a glimpse of the
historical and legendary scenes of
Norway tonight in ECU'S Hen-
drix Theatre beginning at 8 p.m.
Through the eyes of
filmmaker John Roberts, the audi-
ence experiences a cruise to the
"top of the world" at Molde and
visits the jagged chain of moun-
tains of the Lofoton Islands, trav-
eling back down by narrow,
winding mountain roads to see a
Norwegian wedding in tradi-
tional costume.
Other highlights of the film
include a salmon fishing excur-
sion, a pony trip to Glacier and a
number of museums - the Monk,
Oslo Folk and the Viking.
Also featured are spectacular
views of the famed Norwegian
fjords and newly renovated his-
toric fjord homes.
The Travel-Ad venture Film
Series is one of ECU's most popu-
larevents,and frequently sellsout
early. Single tickets to "Norwe-
gian Saga" are now available at
the Central Ticket Office in Men-
denhall Student Center, tele-
phone 757-6611.
Also on sale are season tick-
ets, priced at $18, guaranteeing a
seat at all six of the 1988-89 Travel-
Adventure Films.
The remaining films are
"Americans in Paris Oct. 25;
"Italy - Places in Between Nov.
21; "Safari Jan. 19; "Bermuda Is
Another World Feb. 6 and
"Nova Scotia, Newfoundland,
Labrador March 23.
Discounts are offered to per-
sons in groups of 20 or more.
action task force" in 1984 to re- more" male tenured professors
cruit women, to release an inter- on campus than female � gender
nal report purporting to show no longer seems to be a factor in
that - although there are
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Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. � Monday thru Saturday 7:00 a.m12 Midnight
i
Members (it 7
American
night (Photola
'Gorillas
doc inner
By JEFF FARKl R
now I
lure has come l taV
It's the si r
Dun Foss
M
. I
k the

cape,
shot wore K
give tl
-
dear us to then
creatun
little was g
paint ai
part tmd a
What '
istic and -
intothecai
her dedical
. ed in to the j
p film beg -
se p
Wc
her si
author
Leake tvork
Ge - .
thai
this stud

her track r
Omira '
aboul �
to the
Fosse) N gins
even
the K ��
and thcgoi

gorill �s
andb
mimit -
beha rs
Sic
.
Biz E goe
B 1 Rlls HW1

other i
for Big
a -v rt am
of the news ro
Yeah n
col ami
Coming
in
Entertainmei
Thursday
The Blushing Bri
Attic
Swamp Gypsiej
New Deli
Triple Maniac
Susie's
Friday
JimThackery and the
Attic
Wide Spread Va
Deli
Saturday
The Point
Attic





UBLE
UPON
VINGS
I Ml I S I K( 'I INI-XN
Features
Ballet dazzles crowd
IK IM SHAMI IN
SUM Vnltr
The Ohio Ballet practice their movements during a dress rehearsal Wednesday. One of
s premier ballet companies, 1 he Ohio Ballet performed at Wright Auditorium Wedne
itolab)
'Gorillas in the Mist' entertains,
documents Dian Fossey's life
Slowly, a warm, blue
light filled the stage. In die center
of the itage, two voung women in
Victorian dresses nonchalantly
.n i.m ,t their hats. 1 heir hats
arranged,the) stood. Much to the
audience's amazement, they were
ovei � ight f el tall.
No, tins was neither The-
ft the Absurd or 1 )adaist
i it wa- the opening dance
the( hio Ballet at Wright Audi-
torium last night. I lutr program
� I of four seperatc pieces
hit h w ere modern and
tin i ther two lassical.
rhe opening scene was
from Untitled a dance origi-
nally composed for the bizarre
and artful Pilobolus company
Although the first appearance
nt foot tall women and man in
little more than g strings startled
e of peple w ho came
prepared to see ball t the st i
11 fold itself.
� t i a me a dance; en-
titlt i Summer Night, which
� 1 iduced in the program
. ith .i uui te from Shellev. 1 he
theme ol the dance was roman 1
evident by the stt. slow motions
of the dancers (choreographed by
1 teinz Poll, their own artistic di-
re tor) as well as that oi the music
(Chopin's "Romanze)
I nlike its predecessor, the
second piece followed classical
ballet style: rwocouples danced
on stage, alternately and simulta-
neously, using the entire area ter
their graceful flourishes. The
stage itself was lit by a pa� hwrk
oi white and a subdued blue
glow, winch enhanced the grave
and beauty of the dance itseit
" iravirv another fine
example of modern dance, fol
lowed. It filled the stage with ten
dan( ers w hose mo ements capti-
vated the audience. Although
their movements were, at times,
identical and monotonous, there
were times of what seemed to be
wild abandi n.
The interplay and the juxta-
position of the two completeh
filled the stagi with moti
"Gravity" was danced to the
heavy rhythm : primitive
drums, w hich only served to fur-
ther entrance the audience.
The last dance was en-
titli d
�r .1 thr
unfolde Iuiral 1 rue
to tins definiti was
done in thn � sep rate
buteachasma
integrated w I
tych, this ;
The musi
in the 19th entun, 1
delssohn 1 Piano
ber 2 in D1

� 11
brown and tl
first time n I
� �� � .
iway froi 1
into th� lancu
merited th
atti � �
istance fi
1 a prol

. 1
nati nsact
� their
the ��
il in
Men
� I
.
PARK I R
job in studving the film footage of
Fosse inaction Most of the earl
footaee VVea er saw was shot bv
forn
unelt
uir
P
a� e
the
try to
11 wi th 1
� the jungles-
big location

V
en-
d us the
� . )ian
us a
ion
a National Geographic photogra
adven pherBobCai played in the
nit le b Australian a ti r Bryan
a n.
As in real life ampbell
became ! )ian 11 sse s 1 t t
beir I to ��� rk with her
- films show ed the rest
of the world of 1 osse s wi �rkdur-
ing the late Sixties, prompt:
tifu! It did not much of the public to label her
hundreds the Gorilla Woman
What real-lite concept)
�d as being a strange relatii n
ship the movie gives a more ob
jectivc view I Fossev spent
much of her vi.no life with
uj ; gorillas, and did
come to respect them as familv. In
the almost twenl vears sh
in the Congo, the determined
nan and anthropologisl fought poachers
� she be- and trappers to insure the safer)
of the animals.
'Fight' is meant literal!)
here. Fossc carried out a small
level of warfare against the
Batwa, natives who regarded her
las under the as a wit h because of her reddish
ius Dr Louis tire hair. She takes to 'fighting
y with National fire with fire" by creating a taboo
� finds ouf svmbol of herself to use against
. in charge of the superstitious hunters.
ik departs Her Struggle to protect the
ery is that is makes her other enemies
mb 1. in hn along the wa making her mur-
� knows nothing der in 1985 a mystery. (And that
las Unfamiliar shouldn't ruin the film for you
�and it's inhabitants, becauseit'scommonknowledg
irnev that will The film gives us unbiased depic-
her the ruler of tions of characters that would be
lin where she suspect; trapper Van Vecten, th
Batwa, and the research assis
group of tants, and leaves the actual mur-
1 rves them dervague, to be taken as you want
. them by to
� gestures and ;il notice tins review
lent here that does not say much about the tech-
did a careful nical side of the mo ie. Well, the
sets were all on I v in. �n in the
Kenvan mountains, so the were
realistic. I 11. hi iel animated
gorillas were done bv spe ial ef-
fet tsw izard Rick Baker, and most
people will probabh not be able
itch them. Nothing lex hi
will stand out to draw vour atten-
tion, win h is as it sh iuld I
Direct iel A
w iselv let most 1 l the weight I
the film be arried on th l
dersof the lead at tress,Sigournt
V ea er, I he f us �n her hara
' � 11 id . '
apesai
to he
of mterac tion v ith
itesl
lint some calle-d
"� tian
irney
1 to beein
me
rkn
A'atch � � , � tion
from the � id w ho nei
herblowdrver to the no nons 1 e
keeper of the mountain, it seems
her role as th ' 1 h "Ripli � " �
;ht have hi
pn I
her.
The su i ess of tins mo ie
ms to beattributi I to)
cast's and crew's belief in wl
thev were doing.
cheap attempts t. get sympatl
1 Man Fi �sse 's pa 11 I I :
cation are I �. 1 1 � alisticalh I
Weavi r
M -st e ervone invol
with Fossev during her 1 1
Africa were consultants to :
film, and approved of everything
shown, a rarity in biograj
films, rhe gorillas Sigourne
worked with w ere even the acl
ones Fossev studied.
hat is so spectacular about
the film is the realism captured
without sacritu ing any entertain
ment value. Instead of laps
into documentary straightness,
the mo ie re read s the fer or
Fossev herself had, and no mo
ments drag. At least once a yi ar
you should go set a film that
matters, so go see this one be
cause it dt
Hie K goes radio, gives advice to derelicts
IK I ARLVIS HAMPTON
urei niter
: � jockey on the
ne line asked
e for yi u Earl
from the den- ail
� h. real1 � like the
: � � phone.
s


ht
Coming
in
1 nterlainment
I hursday
I he Blushing Brides
Attic
Swamp (iypsies
New I )eli
I riple Maniacs
Susie's
I rid ay
im rhackery and the Assassins
Attic
Wide Spread Panic
Deli
Saturday
The Point
Attic
rhe excited voi e of the Dee-
jay blistered the phone wires with
praise. And then came the ques-
tion
"so 1 , the infamous advii e
umnist that you are, how
would you like to come on a radio
talk show? I )oug Warner from Z
? I d
E paused and tried to ontrol
his slobber as he contemplated
tame Well let me think about it
e.ih what the hay E said.
It was set for Thursday. Iran
scending the so called 'dead
medium of print journalism,
Earl's voice would soon be
blasted into thehomesof millions.
( into b autiful Beaufort N (
we went. Earl and Parker tanked
up theaddy, bought two quarts
1.( 1 il and a twelve pa k ot
drinks m( we were off down a
misty high way 43 Alter nine false
accusations, Parker finally posi
lively identified The Mistv Blue
I ounge At that point, Parker
agreed to write a feature on The
Misty Blue I ounge.
By 12 45 a m , comedian and
super Dee lav Doug Warner in-
troduced The Big I "Welcome to
the , E. 1 have read some of your
advice columns in the East
( arolmian " Warner started
out.
Warner, a transplant vankee
fn im Washington D. came to
103 two vears ago. His first assign
ment was to spin inyl on the
dreaded graveyard shitt, during
the hours of midnight to 6 a.m.
Rather than be peeved about the
shift, Warner brought the grave
yard shift alive.
I told my boss 1 wanted to get
at least one lawsuit slapped on the
station because of the show
Warner said. In other words,
Warner's style can be compared
to the now defum t C learly I .1
beled lastarolmian Satire Page
As the I hursday's show pro
grossed, the rambling disc jo ke)
had Earl and Park in hysterics
Warner slammed the E 1 tat
ulty, Ann Landers and
Greenville's own, jim Whitting-
rON.
During a Robert Plant song,
Warner, a coffee baron and a nico
tine craver, confided that he still
hasn't become accustomed to
Eastern North ('arolina. "I have to
drive a whole hour to go to an in
door mail he said.
Back on tin-air, Warner asked
Big E if he would mind advising
some of the troubled listeners
After agreeing to the request, the
phone lines instantly lit up
Sec PEE WEE, page 10
Sigourney Weaver stars as Dian Fossev , a controversial anthropologist who devoted nearly 20 years
hei life to saving the mountain gorillas of Rwanda, in 'Gorilas in the Mist.
Face the 'Alien Nation'
By MiCAH HARRIS
Suit Writer
"Alien Nation" offers an in-
teresting variation on the "crea-
tures from beyond" theme. The
extraterrestials here (dubbed
New timers") are neither hell
bent invaders or angelic visitors,
but pitiful refugees. Thus, the
inspire neither fear or wonder but
contempt on the part ot the hu-
man race.
But the aliens (humanoid
beings with complexions not un
like the pallor of a marshmallow
peanut) are quick learners They
have been genetically engineered
and are in fact our superiors
mentall) and physically. They
begin to carve out a place tor
themselves in human society
And some ot the "Newcomers"
don't mind carving that niche out
of their fellow aliens' bodies
Alien Nation" was scripted
by Rockne S. O Bannon. ot the
revived Twilight Zone In such
Twilight Zone stories as
Shadow Man ' and a moon-
lighted episode ol the then-con-
current "Amazing Stones" (in
which Patrick "happy feet"
Swayze played a death's row
inmate suddenly granted the
power to heal), O Bannon dis-
played a knack tor setting up an
intriguing premise He does the
same tor Alien Nation yet he
tails to follow it through satisfac
torily
jamesCaan plays S) kes,acop
whose personal life is on the
downhill side He suffers another
emotional blow when his partner
and best friend, higgle, is killed
during an exchange ot tire be-
tween the cops and some aliens
trying to knock o er a convenient
store.
The general hostility of
Americans to the E.T. refugees is
mirrored bv Svkes reaction to his
new pa si the first
alien to become a d tective S k. s
and t rancis s wan 1 each
other is the film s hi d the
characters are likable but some
how the relationship com. -
across as superficial
rhe relationship's develop
ment seems too forced Grant
Svkes has Kvn established as a
man capable ol rising over pn
dice Sykes is white arid his K st
friend is black
But when that best tru nd is
killed by an alien Sykes proj�
his anger to all of the New comers.
so his acceptance of an alien part
ner should be extremely diffk
That it occurs apparently within a
week is unlikely 1 nata single all-
night drunk male bonding expe-
rience establishes it is unbeliev-
able given the circumstance.
What is most irksome, how
ever, is that the humanalien soci-
ety is not convincing You feel that
Sec MICAH, paiie 10





UBLE
UPON
iVINGS
Manufacturer s
Coupons Up to 504
t For Details!
H
"Z
'VSAVEy
:FICE PRICES

"SiD'e Por Typographical Errors
illeBlvd.
i 7 (XI a m12 Midnight
THE EAST CAROl INIAN
Features
OCTOBER 13. 1988 Page 11
Ballet dazzles crowd
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Stiff Writer
Menbers of The Ohio Ballet practice their movements during a dress rehearsal Wednesday. One of
American's premier ballet companies, The Ohio Ballet performed at Wright Auditorium Wednesday-
night (Photolab)
'Gorillas in the Mist9 entertains,
documents Dian Fossey9s life
Slowly, a warm, blue
light filled the stage. In the center
of the stage, two young women in
Victorian dresses nonchalantly
arranged their hats. Their hats
arranged, they stood. Much to the
audience's amazement, they were
over eight feet tall.
No, this was neither The-
atre of the Absurd or Dadaist
drama, it was the opening dance
of the Ohio Ballet at Wright Audi-
torium last night. Their program
consisted of four scperate pieces,
two of which were modern and
the other two classical.
The opening scene was
from "Untitled a dance origi-
nally composed for the bizarre
and artful Pilobolus company.
Although the first appearance of
eight-foot tall women and man in
little more than g-strings startled
the audience of peple who came
prepared to see "ballet the story
began to unfold itself.
Next came a dance en-
titled "Summer Night which
was introduced in the program
with a quote from Shelley. The
theme of the dance was romance,
evident by the soft, slow motions
of the dancers (choreographed by
Heinz Poll, their own artistic di-
rector) as well as that of the music
(Chopin's "Romanze)
Unlike its predecessor, the
second piece followed classical
ballet style: Two couples danced
on stage, alternately and simulta-
neously, using the entire area for
their graceful flourishes. The
stage itself was lit by a patchwork
of white and a subdued blue
glow, which enhanced the grace
and beauty of the dance itself.
"Gravity another fine
example of modern dance, fol-
lowed. It filled the stage with ten
dancers whose movements capti-
vated the audience. Although
their movements were, at times,
identical and monotonous, there
were times of what seemed to be
wild abandon.
The interplay and the juxta-
position of the two completely
filled the stage with motion.
"Gravity" was danced to the
heavy rhythm of primitive
drums, which onlv served to fur-
ther entrance the audience.
The last dance was en-
titled "Triptych an artistic term
for a three-paneled cabinet which
unfolded to create a mural. True
to this definition, the dance was
done in three parts, each scperate,
but each a smaller portion of their
integrated whole. Like the trip-
tych, this piece was classical in
stvle: Th.? music itself was written
J
in the 19th century bv Felix Men-
delssohn (Piano Concerto Num-
ber 2 in D minor.)
The dancers wore traditional
costumes of neutral white and
brown and the lights were, for the
first time, not used to create mood
or setting. This called attention
away from the accoutrements and
into the dancing itself, which fully
merited the audience's undivided
attention.
The company itself has
grown over the 20 years oi its ex-
istance from a small group of
dancers to a a professional tour-
ing group which has played in 162
cities in 36 states, not to mention
tours of Europe and South Amer-
ica. Newspapers from Seattle to
New York have called the Ohio
Ballet "a credit to the entire dance
community which "bedazzles
nations across the countrv
By JEFF PARKER
Stiff Illustrator
Move over "Born Free a
new biographyjungle adven-
ture has come to take your place.
It's the Story oi anthropologist
Dian Fossev, "Gorillas in the
Mist
"Gorillas" did not try to
knock the viewer out with mag-
nificent panoramasof the jungles-
cape, though the big location
shots were beautiful. It did not
give the audience hundreds of
shots of cute, lovable apes to en-
dear us to them, it showed us the
creatures as they really are, very
little was glorified. And it did not
paint an idealist's picture of Dian
Fossey, the film showed her, bad
parts and all.
What it did do was give us a
realistic and very insightful look
into the career of this woman, and
her dedication to a cause she be-
lieved in to the point some called
obsession.
The film begins with Dian
Fossev (portrayed by Sigourney
Weaver) going to Africa to begin
her study of the gorillas under the
authoritv of the famous Dr. Louis
Leakey, working with National
Geographic. She soon finds out
that she is left solely in charge of
this study, as Dr. Leaky departs.
Her next discovery is that
her tracker, Sembagare, (John
Omirah Miluwi) knows nothing
about finding gorillas. Unfamiliar
to the jungle and it's inhabitants,
Fossey begins a journey that will
eventually make her the ruler of
the Rwanda mountain where she
and the gorillas lived.
After finding a group of
gorillas, Fossey observes them
and becomes accepted by them by
mimicking their gestures and
behaviors. It is evident here that
Sicourney Weaver did a careful
job in studying the film footage of
Fossey in action. Most of the early
footage Weaver saw was shot by
National Geographic photogra-
pher Bob Campbell, played in the
movie by Australian actor Bryan
Brown.
As in real life, Campbell
became Dian Fossey's lover after
being sent to work with her.
Campbell's films showed the rest
of the world of Fossey's work dur-
ing the late Sixties, prompting
much of the public to label her
"the Gorilla Woman
What real-life conceptions
tagged as being a strange relation-
ship, the movie gives a more ob-
jective view of. Fossey spent
much of her daily life with
"Group 4 the gorillas, and did
come to respect them as family. In
the almost twenty years she spent
in the Congo, the determined
anthropologist fought poachers
and trappers to insure the safety
of the animals.
'Fight' is meant literally
here. Fossey carried out a small
level of warfare against the
Batwa, natives who regarded her
as a witch because of her reddish
'fire' hair. She takes to "fighting
fire with fire" by creating a taboo
symbol of herself to use against
the superstitious hunters.
Her struggle to protect the
gorillas makes her other enemies
along the way, making her mur-
der in 1985 a mystery. (And that
shouldn't ruin the film for you
because it'scommon knowledge).
The film gives us unbiased depic-
tions of characters that would be
suspect; trapper Van Vecten, the
Batwa, and the research assis-
tants, and leaves the actual mur-
der vague, to be taken as you want
to.
You'll notice this review
does not say much about the tech-
nical side of the movie. Well, the
sets were all on location in the
Kenyan mountains, so they were
realistic. The very brief animated
gorillas were done by special ef-
fects wizard Rick Baker, and most
people will probably not be able
to catch them. Nothing technical
will stand out to draw your atten-
tion, which is as it should be.
Director Michael Apted
wisely let most of the weight of
the film be carried on the shoul-
ders of the lead actress, Sigourney
Weaver. The focus on her charac-
ter and growth of interaction with
the apes are what relates the audi-
ence to her.
Watching her transition
from the young lady who needs
her bio wdryer to the no-nonsense
keeper of the mountain, it seems
her role as the tough "Ripley" in
"Aliens" might have helped the
producers in their decision to cast
her.
The success of this movie
seems to be attributed to the entire
cast's and crew's belief in what
they were doing. There are no
cheap attempts to get sympathy.
Dian Fossey's passion and dedi-
cation are shown realistically by
Weaver.
Most everyone involved
with Fossey during her years in
Africa were consultants to the
film, and approved of everything
shown, a rarity in biographical
films. The gorillas Sigourney
worked with were even the actual
ones Fossey studied.
What is so spectacular about
the film is the realism captured
without sacrificing any entertain-
ment value. Instead of lapsing
into documentary straightness,
the movie recreates the fervor
Fossey herself had, and no mo-
ments drag. At least once a year
you should go see a film that
matters, so go see this one - be-
cause it does.
Big E goes radio, gives advice to derelicts
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
The radio disc jockey on the
ithcr end of the phone line asked
for Big E. "Line one for you Earl
a scream came from the dense air
oi the news room.
"Yeah, really, so you like the
column E said into the phone.
Coming
in
Entertainment
Thursday
The Blushing Brides
Attic
Swamp Gypsies
New Deli
Triple Maniacs
Susie's
Friday
Jim Thackery and the Assassins
Attic
Wide Spread Panic
Deli
Saturday
The Point
Attic
The excited voice of the Dee-
Jav blistered the phone wires with
praise. And then came the ques-
tion.
"So E, the infamous advice
columnist that you are, how
would you like to come on a radio
talk show? Doug Warner from Z
- 103 asked.
E paused and tried to control
his slobber as he contemplated
fame. "Well let me think about it.
Yeah, what the hay E said.
It was set for Thursday. Tran-
scending the so-called 'dead
medium' of print journalism,
Earl's voice would soon be
blasted into thehomesof millions.
Onto beautiful Beaufort N.C.
we went. Earl and Parker tanked
up the Caddy, bought two quarts
of oil and a twelve pack of
drinks and we were off down a
misty highway 43. After nine false
accusations, Parker finally posi-
tively identified The Misty Blue
Lounge. At that point, Parker
agreed to write a feature on The
Misty Blue Lounge.
By 12:45 a.m comedian and
super Dee-Jay Doug Warner in-
troduced The Big E. "Welcome to
the Z, E. I have read some of your
advice columns in the East
Carolinian Warner started
out.
Warner, a transplant yankee
from Washington D.C,cametoZ-
103 two years ago. His first assign-
ment was to spin vinyl on the
dreaded graveyard shift, during
the hours of midnight to 6 a.m.
Rather than be peeved about the
shift, Warner brought the grave-
yard shift alive.
"I told my boss I wanted to get
at least one lawsuit slapped on the
station because of the show
Warner said. In other words,
Warner's style can be compared
to the now defunct Clearly La-
beled East Carolinian Satire Page.
As the Thursday's show pro-
gressed, the rambling disc jockey
had Earl and Park in hysterics.
Warner slammed the ECU fac-
ulty, Ann Landers and
Greenville's own, Jim Whitting-
TON.
During a Robert Plant song,
Warner, a coffee baron and a nico-
tine craver, confided that he still
hasn't become accustomed to
Eastern North Carolina. "I have to
drive a whole hour to go to an in-
door mall he said.
Back on the air, Warner asked
Big E if he would mind advising
some of the troubled listeners.
After agreeing to the request, the
phone lines instantly lit up.
See PER WEE, page 10
Sigourney Weaver stars as Dian Fossey, a controversial anthropologist who devoted nearly 20 years of
her life to saving the mountain gorillas of Rwanda, in 'Gorilas in the Mist
Face the 'Alien Nation'
By MICAH HARRIS
su f Writer
"Alien Nation" offers an in-
teresting variation on the "crea-
tures from beyond" theme. The
extraterrestials here (dubbed
"Newcomers") are neither hell-
bent invaders or angelic visitors,
but pitiful refugees. Thus, they
inspire neither fear or wonder but
contempt on the part of the hu-
man race.
But the aliens (humanoid
beings with complexions not un-
like the pallor of a marshmallow
peanut) are quick learners. They
have been genetically engineered
and are in fact our superiors
mentally and physically. They
begin to carve out a place for
themselves in human society.
And some of the "Newcomers"
don't mind carving that niche out
of their fellow aliens' bodies
"Alien Nation" was scripted
by Rockne S. O'Bannon, of the
revived "Twilight Zone In such
"Twilight Zone" stories as
"Shadow Man" and a moon-
lighted episode of the then-con-
current "Amazing Stories" (in
which Patrick "happy feet"
Swayze played a death's row
inmate suddenly granted the
power to heal), O'Bannon dis-
played a knack for setting up an
intriguing premise. He does the
same for "Alien Nation yet he
fails to follow it through satisfac-
torily.
James Caan plays Sykes, a cop
whose p?rsonal life is on the
downhill side. He suffers another
emotional blow when his partner
and best friend, Tuggle, is killed
during an exchange of fire be-
tween the cops and some aliens
trying to knock over a convenient
store.
The general hostility of
Americans to the E.T. refugees is
mirrored by Sykes reaction to his
new partner, Francisco, the first
alien to become a detective. Sykes
and Francisco's warming to each
other is the film's heart, and the
characters are likable, but some-
how the relationship comes
across as superficial.
The relationship's develop-
ment seems too forced. Granted,
Sykes has been established as a
man capable of rising over preju-
dice. Sykes is white and his best
friend is black.
But when that best friend is
killed by an alien, Sykes projects
his anger to all of the Newcomers,
so his acceptance of an alien part-
ner should be extremely difficult.
That it occurs apparently within a
week is unlikely. That a single, all-
night drunk male-bondi ng expe-
rience establishes it is unbeliev-
able given the circumstance.
What is most irksome, how-
ever, is that the humanalien soci-
ety is not convincing. You feel that
See MICAH. page 10





I HI t-ASl CAROI INIAN
Sports
OCTOBHK Page H
-

Odds against the Pirates

(AD - The momentum
seems to be going against East
Carolina as the Pirates have
amassed a 1-5 record, while Flor-
the Mountaineers.
Ernie Logan moved to line-
backer from defensive end and
joined Robert Jones and Anthony
ida State has mirrored that per- Thompson, who was coming off
formance, winning five and los-
ing just one.
And Tirates Coach Art Baker
says there's little reason to think
the Pirates can turn the tide on
Saturday when they take on the
Seminoles in Tallahassee.
"Florida State has one of the
arthroscopic knee surgery the
week before. Chris Hall started at
cornerback. Junior Robinson
moved from cornerback to safety
Shannon Boling moved from de-
fensive tackle to defensive end.
James Singletary moved from
linebacker to defensive end and
ahead and start him
While an assistant at Florida
State, Baker helped recruit cur-
rent Seminole quarterback Chip
Ferguson, who is from Charlotte
and played his high school ball in
Spartanburg, SC.
Ferguson has thrown for
1,204 yards,compared to tht I 3
yards Libretto and Hunter have
combined for in six games
Last year, Florida State took a
44-3 win over the Pirates in
Greenville as tailback Sammie
Smith ran for 244 yards and one
touchdown
Look At Us Now wins
best combinations of physically Greg Gardill started at defensive
strong players and talented skill tackle for the first time this season,
position players in the country "The way our defense had
he said. I don't think there is a been playing, to hold them to 30
(IRS) - Intramural flag foot-
ball season is winding down as
playoffs conclude this week. In
semifinal action, Look At Us Now
team with a better group of skill points was an accomplishment took on Our Perogativeina tough
plavers than Florida State. Baker said.
"The last three weeks they East Carolina used both
haven't plaved all that well, yet Charlie Libretto and Travis
still managed to win Baker said Hunter at quarterback with var-
at his weekly news conference ied success against West Virginia.
Monday. "That tells you some- Baker said he had not vet decided
thing about how strong they are who would get the start Saturdav.
East Carolina dropped a 30- i'm not sure he said. "I
10 decision to seventh-ranked don't know whether Travis
West Virginia last wcvkend. FSU, piaved that much better that he'll
meanwhile, came from behind to start or whether Charlie will con-
It will take a good deal of coaching from Art Baker to propel
the Pirates of ECU past the Seminoles of Florida State.
(Photo by Thomas Walters ECU Photo Lab.)
take a 28-10 win over Division I-
AA Georgia Southern last Satur-
day.
The Pirates have had their
problems on defense in recent
weeks, prompting a number of
changes prior to the game against
rinue to start. We're going to have
to continue to use both quarter-
backs as we did the other da v. I
think they understand that. It's
not a problem wi th either of them.
If one was head and shoul-
ders better than the other, we'd go
Frisbee golf appeals to variety of players
Special to tht fast Clllim'�
As you step up to the tee. a tail
wind makes the long par 3 look a little
shorter. Your dnve takes oft'at a good
pace, levels off, and sails. The shot
breaks slightly to the left as it loses
power and falls to earth. The hole is
tantalyzingly near, but just outsid
your comfort zone. You're in den
range, but if you oi'ershLXt, your
birdie hopes can easily turn to bogie.
Doyou play it safe and lay uporgo for
it
Frisbee golf is a relative new-
comer to ECU. The Intramural
Frisbee golf course is located off
Charles Boulevard between the
ECU track and the women's soft-
ball field. Builtby the ECU Frisbee
club, the nine hole course was
opened in the summer of 1986. A than others. Most "golf discs" are
joy the game, which combines the
(light characteristics of Frisbee
with the style o play of ball golf.
The object ot the game is to
land the disc in the hole with the
least amount oi strokes. Plavers
"tee off" at the designated tee
marker. Each player then shoots
from the place where his previous
throw landed, starting with the
nor farthest from the hole.
rK n everyone has completed
the hole, the player with the low-
est total on the hole has "the hon-
ors and throws first on the next
hole Each hole has a par, but bird-
ies, bogies, and the occasional
"cc also come into play.
Any fiving disc will work for
Frisbee golf, but some are better
suited to the rigors oi the game
discs which can be borrowed
from the equipment checkout
room in Memorial Gvm.
second nine was added last sum-
mer, and improvements continue
this year with a nineteenth hole
for "Around Nine a putting
practice game.
Frisbee golf, or "folf as it is
occasionally called, appeals to a
wide range of players. Young and
old, novice and pro alike can en-
aerodynamically shaped, about 8
inches in diameter, and made of
heavy plastic. Bright colors make
it easier to find stray shots and
riccochets in the woods. There is a
wide variety of golf discs avail-
able through mailorder houses
and fanatic disc golfers. Intramu-
ral Recreational Services has golf
"Brooklyn" side of the chains, so a
certain amount of finesse (or luck)
is required. A successful putt will
hit the chains and fall with a char-
In Frisbee golf, the disc serves acteristic "ching which is music
as both your ball and your club, to the golfer's ear.
Many players carry more than
one disc in order to take advan-
tage oi the different flight charac-
teristics inherent in different
discs. There are some less esoteric
reasons to carry more than one
disc with you on the course,
however. Frisbees get stuck in
trees; they get lost; they break.
The target in Frisbee golf is
the "pole hole Invented by an
imaginative Califomian named
Ed Headrick, the pole hole looks
somewhat like a cross between a
crab trap and a bird bath. A series
oi spokes radiate from the top of
the pole, about chest-high, at-
tached to the spokes are chains
which are tethered in the center of
a basket about six inches deep and
three feet across. The chains de-
flect the disc down into the basket
where it comes to rest, completing
the hole. The pole hole can be
fickle, though. A putt can rim out
of the basket or spin off the
battle in the men's independent
division. Look At Us Now used
the short passing game and a
stone wall defense to take a 13 to 2
lead at the half.
Dannv Allen took over the
quarterbacking duties in the sec-
ond half for Our Perogative and
marched to a quick touchdown,
tightening the contest up to 13-8.
However, Look At Us Now was
not finished. They pulled the de-
fense together and used the quick-
ness of Derek (Cap) Smith on of-
fense to get another score which
brought the final to 19-8 for Look
At Us Now.
In women's sorority action,
the Turtles of Delta Zeta took on
the Sailboats of Sigma Sigma
Sigma. Melissa Lord and Beth
Hopkins of Delta Zeta shared
quarterbacking roles and helped
take the wind out oi the Sigma
Sails. They rolled to a 12-0 halt-
time score.
In the second half of play
Sigma Sigma Sigma was still
unable to stop the passing attack
oi Delta Zeta. Sigma Sigma Sigma
did manage a score late in the
game bringing the final tall) to26-
6.
In other action, one-on-one
basketball moves into the quarter
finals. In the 5'11" and under divi-
sion, Jim Bolognosi and Blair
Wiggins advanced along with
Mark Games and Mike Graves
Tina Ferrara and Garry Williams
will battle head-to-head m the
hopes of meeting the Bill Rice
Rob Sheldon game winnerUher
quarter finalists include C harles
Dawson, Mike Kotarba, Frankie
Calhoon and Larry Murphy all in
the 5'11" and ver bra -
Volleyball and si i regis-
tration will he held on Wedrw s-
dav, October 19 at 5 md 6 p.m
respectively, in (a B I Inter-
ested officials should eont
Dave Hall in 204 Memorial C iym
Aerobic fitness class registration
for second fall session continues
through October 14 in 204 Memo-
rial Gymnasium A cor .
class schedule isa his
location.
Outdoor Re real Ski Trip
adventure to Salt Lake City, Utah
from Dec. 31-Jan 4 will be h
registration through October 22 in
204 Memorial Gymnasium
involved in Outdoor Recreat
� Intramural style, lor ad
tional information, call ;
Oakland prepares for series
5!r . .
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) -
Storm Davis waved a bat menac-
ingly and yelled "Everybody out
of the way out there to his team-
mates deep in the outfield as he
stepped into the Oakland Coli-
seum batting cage.
Then he hit a ground ball.
If the Athletics' pitchers are
taking batting practice, it must bo
World Series time.
At Oakland's first pre-Series
workout Tuesday, A's manager
Tonv La Russa announced that
Dave Stewart, Storm Davis and
Bob Welch will start the first three
games. Coincidentally, all three
are ex-National Leaguers with
hitting experience that could
come in handy in Games 1, 2, 6
and 7 when designated hitters
will not be used in the National
League park.
"They won't be able to do
enough (batting practice) in the
next couple of weeks to overcome
the disadvantage we have La
Russa said. "But our starters are
all good athletes, so I think they'll
be all right
La Russa is more focused on a
couple of decisions he will have to
make this week.
Regular second baseman
Glenn Hubbard, who was left off
the playoff roster due to a ham-
string pull, will be back for the
scries if his leg is healthy by
Friday's world series roster dead-
line, according to La Russa. Oth-
erwise, Mike Gallego and Tony
Phillips will again share the sec-
ond-base duties.
The manager also hasn't
made up his mind whether to play
Dave Parker or LuisTolonia in left
field against right-handed start-
ers in the first two games. Because
there is no DH in those games,
whoever doesn't start will have to
sit on the bench.
"If it's Luis we don't have our
leadoff guy, and if it's Dave we
don't have our number four hit-
ter l.a Russa said. "So it will
affect our plans either way
La Russa said he won't
commit to a fourth-game starter
until he sees how the first three
games go. He said left-hander
Curt Young, who spent the play-
offs in the bullpen, could get a
start.
Stewart, who started twice in
the playoffs and won Sunday's
finale 4-1, hit some line drives and
longflyballsduringhisturninthe
batting cage, but said he's not
looking forward to hitting in the
World Series.
"I'm looking forward to
pitching, because that's what I do
besthe said.
In 1983, his last season in the
National League, Stewart had one
hit in seven at-bats for the Los
Angeles Dodgers before being
traded to Texas. But like most
pitchers, he clearly remembers
the few hits he has had.
"In 1981, 1 hit a three-run
triple against Cincinnati he said.
As for his lifetime average, he
only knows that it's "two-some-
thing Sorry, Dave, it's actually
.196. Stewart said he's also a "real
good hunter
Davis is a worse hitter, going
only 1-for-l 6, .063, last year for San
Diego in his only NL season. But
he enjoyed taking his whacks on
Tuesday, lining one shot to Jose
Canseco that brought whoops
from his teammates.
"Hit it a little harder, man
teased Canseco, standing in at
third base.
Welch, a career .151 hitter
with the Dodgers, doesn't figure
to get an at-bat early in the scries
because he's scheduled to start
Game 3 at Oakland.
The IRS flag football season came to an end this week, and the champions were crowned.
Tyson refractures right hand
Block tickets for ECU Syracuse contest
Attention students! Ticket pick-up for blocking seating for the ECU - Syracuse game will be on
Thursday (13th) and Friday (14th), instead of Monday and Tuesday, because, as you may have
heard, we are on Fall Break thosedaysconsumertipfr
NEW YORK (AP) - Heavy-
weight champion Mike Tyson has
reportedly refracturcd his right
hand, possibly putting a crimp in
his scheduled title defense on
Dec. 17 against Frank Bruno.
Bill Cayton, Tyson's man-
ager, confirmed Tuesday that he
had been called by promoter Don
King from Cleveland with the
news that may affect the
champion's fight schedule.
The latest revelations were
contained in a story in
Wednesday's edition of the New-
York Daily News.
According to reports, Tyson
was hitting the heavy bag in a
gym on King's farm in Orwell,
Ohio, when the injury occurred.
Tyson originally had been
scheduled to start training Mon-
day in Catskill, N.Y.
Cayton said he could not be
positive whether the apparent
hairline fracture on the third
metacarpal of the right hand,
which Tyson injured in a street
fight with Mitch Green in August
in New York, was new or old.
That original injury forced
postponement of the fight with
Bruno until October. Further
problems moved the fight back
two more times, to December.
According to the. News, Cay-
ton said he spoke to the doctor
who treated Tyson in Cleveland
and was told the injury was
"minor
Cayton said it is still possible
for Tyson to keep his four-times
postponed date with Bruno.
"There are nine weeks to the
fight and a hairline fracture usu-
ally takes only three weeks to
heal Cayton said.
Cayton said Tyson was ex-
pected to arrive in New York
today or tomorrow to be e
ined bv Dr. David Chiu. Chiu
treated Tyson after the fight w
Green.
"1 think they want to keep
him (Tyson) in Cleveland because
they're afraid oi papers being
served on him Cayton was
quoted a saying.
East Carolina seventh
(SID) - C A. SPIYEY-
WACHESAW PLANTATION
TOURNAMENT
Murrels Inlet, SCWachesaw
PJantationOct. 8-9
TEAM SCORES
Clemson 588
South Carolina 601
North Carolina 603
Maryland 605
Duke 608
Augusta 611
East Carolina hi5
Virginia Tech 625
Furman 626
Coastal Carolina 635
Appal. State 653
The Citadel 660
EAST CAROLINA
Tee Davies 74-77�151
Doug Hoey 77-79�156
John Maginnes 78-76�154
Francis Vaughn 82-76�158
JimManos 84-75�159
INDIVIDUALS
�Chris Patton (Clem 75 f-0
144
ohn Reynolds (Duke) 70-
74�144
Siim Olson (Clem.) 76-71
147
Oswald Drawdy (Clem.)
70 147
Neil Sullivan (UNC)71 76
147
Jeff Hull (SO 77-71 US
ECU HEAD COACH HAl
MORRISON
"1 think we are playing better
than we did earlier in the fall.
much steadier. This tournament
was held on a beautiful, but very
difficult golf course - I think the
high scores reflect that "
NEXT TOURNAMENT: Fri-
day-Saturday at John Ryan Me-
morial in Durham, hosted bv
Duke
ECU at Honda St
N.C. State at I (
Duke at Clems
Alabama at feni
Wake Forest
Oklahoma
Miami at N ti ime
Michigan at
Washing'
Honda at Vai
Fulch
I A'
draft, a coupl
personnel
about David
230-pound
State who
thing from i
fifth
"What -
defensive 1
pro pir - n
"I d
we'd play hire I
the set �
slow fort I
strong en.
r the �
playing stroi
cinnati rk i
the third
one of the best at r
the NFL - stn i
the run. fleet
receivers like th
Al Toon. ��.
fly pattern in Cine
victory on Sund
If blond
Esiason.theNFI
is gettir tiie ink and I
Chapman
CHARLOTTE N.C
Rex Chap mar tl
nets' top draft pi - I
practioi with the -1
nets lOday, after sieni-
year contract worth m -
million ds s
Chapman s sigi
culminated a maratl
tion session which bej
Monday between
eral manager Carl E
owner
Chapmar
"I'm read) I
ball said Chapmar
uptw
at Kentucky I
is behind us
Open a mu
for Watson
SAN ANTON
purse is down b - -
the Texas Op n
make a claim
TGA Tour - dua
champions
Tom Wats
hafrey oo
position- M
was the last man I
nament under its
Texas Open.
The last two )
nament. on the Oak 1
Club course, was
multi-milhon-dollar N
Championships I
Watson won
ing all the way as he b k
vear victor) droi
Nabisco, howevi l
taken its $2-million eJ
Pebble Beach
next month' and the San
tournament reclaime
first used in 1922 tl
Open
While Mahaffe) is
winner of that title Watso
back in a role he se �
defender.
1 won there It s or
that 1 go back and detent
the six-time Haver oi the'
five-time Pntish Open
said earlier this season
He 11 face a course
undergone some slight
unplanned - alterations
holes, trees have been lo
nadoes spawned bv F
Gilbert on Sept. 17
"It doesn t chai
course's plavabilitv thai
Mahaffey said Other tj
the course is n greaj
mavbe the best I've seed





I

1988 PR 1-
tes
I

�omparedtothel,0! 1
h- Libretto and Hunter have
kbined tor m six games.
a-t year Florida State took a-
over the Pirates in
it He as tailback Sammie
t in tor 244 yards and one
dow n
ov wins
� bringing the final talk to 26-
thei action one-on-one
etball moves into the quarter
� In the 5 11" and under divi-
hm Bolognosi and Blair
� - advanced along with
�.Hie- and Mike Graves
any Williams
battle head-to-head in the
�s of meeting the Bill Rice �
Sheldon game winner Other
- include: Charles
M k Kotarba Frankie
in Mun hv all in
j soccer rcgis-
t be held on ednes-
ttober 19 at 5 and 6 p.m
elv in GCB 1026. lnter-
s si �u d contact
II in 2 A M n rial Gym.
� gist rat ion
a - continues
in 204 Memo-
complete
ble at this
uch Octotx
- ki i np
- City, Utah
-Jan 4 will beholding
Oration through October 22 in
Memorial Gymnasium. Get
I in Outdoor Recreation
I imural style. For addi-
i! information, call 757-6387.
ins were crowned.
ht hand
r � morrow I be �,mv
Dr. David Chiu. Chiu
� ' . ht with
"I think the) want to keep
in Cleveland because
re afraid of papers being
him Cayton was
seventh
)i
S'att
5-69-
ohn Reynolds (Duke) 70-
144
im Ol - lem.) 76-71 �
Oswald Drawdy iClem.) 77-
:4
Meil Sullivan (UN071-76�
l ft Hull (SC) 77-71 -148
HEAD COACH HAL
RRISON:
I think we are plaving better
r we did earlier in the fall,
ju h steadier. This tournament
s held on a beautiful, but very
ult golf course 1 think the
h scores reflect that"
NEXT TOURNAMENT: Fri-
t-Saturday at John Ryan Vic-
inal in Durham, hosted by
Ike

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
I
OCTOBER 13,1988 13
Fearless Football Forecast
ECU at Florida State
N.C. State at UNC
Duke at Clemson
Alabama at Tennessee
Wake Forest at Maryland
Oklahoma State at Nebraska
Miami at Notre Dame
Michigan at Iowa
Washington at USC
Florida at Vanderbilt
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week (8-2)
Overall - (38-20)
Florida State
N.C. State
Clemson
Alabama
Wake Forest
Oklahoma State
Notre Dame
Iowa
USC
Florida
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week(9-1)
Overall (41-18)
ECU
UNC
Clemson
Alabama
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Michigan
USC
Horida
DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Last Week - (10-0)
Overall - (42-17)
Florida State
N.C. State
Clemson
Alabama
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Miami
I' .igan
USC
Florida
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week (7-3)
Overall - (38-23)
ECU
N.C. State
Clemson
Alabama
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Miami
Michigan
USC
Florida
CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
Last Week-(9-1)
Overall - (43-16)
Florida State
UNC
Duke
Alabama
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Michigan
USC
Florida
EARLV1S HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week �(9-1)
Overall � (42-17)
Florida State
UNC
Clemson
Alabama
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Michigan
USC
Florida
Fulcher a find for 6-0 Bengals
(AP) � Just before the 1986 sion spcis, there is far more to
draft, a couple of the NFL's best Cincinm ti'sresurgencefrom4-ll
personnel cvaluators were asked last seas m to 6-0 this season as the
about David Fulcher, a 6-foot-3, league's mly unbeaten team.
230-pound safety from Arizona In fa. t, winning is turning the
State who was projected as any- Bengals from one of the league's
thing from a first-rounder to a most ma igned organizations to
fifth.
sive offense. called "unheralded" that he's
Another is right tackle Joe become heralded just for that.
Walter, a 6-6, 290-pounder taken Krumrie's backup and eventual
on the seventh round in 1985.
"What is he, a linebacker or
defensive back?" asked the first, a
pro personnel director.
'I don't know what position
He keeps Brian Blados, a 1984
first-rounder on the bench. Walter
has shut down two of the league's
premier pass rushers, Reggie
White of the Eagles and Mark
Gastineau of the Jets, and is being
compared favorably to Anthony
Munoz, his All-Pro counterpart
on the left side.
replacement is David Grant,
taken this year oa the fourth
round.
one of tie most respected. Like
teams such as the Bears, Redskins,
49crs and Giants, the Bengals
have pa;laved chcic.s in �e
lower rounds of the draft into
we'd play him at if any said functional players
the second, a coach. "He's a step And this with an organiza-
slo w for the secondary, maybe not tion, headed by Paul Brown, that
strong enough for linebacker often is ri.liculed for i penury.
For the record, Fulcher is It has just one ft il-time scout
playing strong safety for the Cin- compared to up to a dozen for
cinnati Bengals, who took him on some teams; if s frequently the a good player
the third round. He's becoming last team to sign its first-draft
one of the best at his position in pick, and it's paying ju�t eight
the NFL � strong enough to jam players on injured reserve com-
thc run, fleet enough to stay with pared to 26 for Washington, one
receivers like the New York Jets' of many team that "stashes" de-
Al Tcon, whom he thwarted on a velopmental players such as
fly pattern in Cincinnati's 36-19 quarterback Mark Rypien with
victory on Sunday. suspect injuries.
If blond, articulate Boomer Fulcher is one ingredient, the pick in 1983 whose developed
Esiason, theNFL'sleadingpasser, glue to a maturing defense that's into one of the best at his position
is getting the ink and the televi- supplementing the already explo- in the league-in fact, he's so often
Chapman signs with the Hornets
"He's as good as Anthony,
just ask Anthony Esiason says.
Munoz, when asked, replies:
"He's improved every year. He's
There are a lot of Walters on
the Bengals, particularly on de-
fense, the kind of guys you look at
and ask: "Where did he come
from?"
The most notable is nose
tackle Tim Krumrie, a lOth-round
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - No financial details were dis-
Rex Chapman, the Charlotte Hor- closed by team officials at a hastily
nets' top draft pick, is expected to called news conference to an-
practice with, the .Charlotte Hor- nounce the deal. But one source
nets today, after signing a four- told The Charlotte Observer that
Chapman joins the first-year
expansion team just two days
before it takes on the New Jersey
Nets in its first pre-season game at
Madison Square Garden in New
year contract worth more than $2 the contract was for four years, York. The Hornets open the regu-
million, officials say. and another placed Chapman's lar season Nov. 4 against Cleve-
Chapman's signing Tuesday annual salary in the vicinity of land,
culminated a marathon negotia- $650,000 a year.
tion session which began on
Monday between Hornets gen-
eral manager Carl Scheer, team
owner George Shinn, and
Chapman's attorney David Falk.
"I'm ready to play basket-
ball said Chapman, who gave
up two years of college eligibility
at Kentucky to turn pro. "All this
is behind us
Open a must
for Watson
SAN ANTONIO (AP) - The
purse is down by $1.4 million, but
the Texas Open this week can
make a claim rarely seen on the
PGA Tour - dual defending
champions.
Tom Watson and John Ma-
haffey occupy that (or those)
position(s). Mahaffey, in 1985,
was the last man to win this tour-
nament under its current title, the
Texas Open.
The last two years, the tour-
nament, on the Oak Hills Country
Club course, was host to the
multi-million-dollar Nabisco
Championships of Golf.
Watson won it last year, lead-
ing all the way as he broke a three-
year victory drought.
Nabisco, however, now has
taken its $2-million event to
Pebble Beach, Calif, (to be played
next month) and the San Antonio
tournament reclaimed the name it
first used in 1922 - the Texas
Open.
While Mahaffey is the last
winner of that title, Watson will be
back in a role he sees as that of a
defender.
"I won there. If s only right
that I go back and defend there
the six-time Player of the Year and
five-time British Open winner
said earlier this season.
He'll face a course that has
undergone some slight - and
unplanned - alterations. On three
holes, trees have been lost to tor-
nadoes spawned by Hurricane
Gilbert on Sept. 17.
"It doesn't change the
course's payability that much
Mahaffey said. "Other than that,
the course is in great shape,
maybe the best I've seen it
"I'm just happy to have all
this behind us so I can concentrate
on basketball said Chapman, a
6-foot-4 guard.
See More
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fitted for a pair of daily wear or extended wear
contact lenses and receive a $50.00 discount
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Optometric Eye Care Center, OD, PA
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Greenville, NC
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What's ahead for Chapman is
some very quick studying on the
differences between college and
pro basketball.
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13,1988
America's Cup yacht seized
STEVE HARDY'S ORIGINAL BEACH PART
MIAMI (AP) - A Cuban gun-
ship seized a U.S. merchant ship
with eight people and New
Zealand's America's Cup race
yacht aboard, saying the vessel
was in its waters, a claim the cap-
tain flatly denied, the Coast
Guard said.
The eight, at least seven
Americans, were detained Tues-
day in Punto Cayo Malo, Cuba,
said Coast Guard spokesman Dan
Vogelcy.
The disassembled sloop New
Zealand was aboard the 160-foot
U.Sregistered merchant ship
Tampa Sea Horse, officials said.
The 133-foot yacht was en
route from Long Beach, Calif to
New York City for a tour of East
Coast cities.
The Cubans seized the vessel
off the southeastern tip of Cuba
without firing shots or using
force, saying it had violated the
communist country's 12-mile ter-
ritorial limit, the Coast Guard
said.
Capt. Jeff Jappe radioed an
urgent appeal Tuesday at 3 p.m.
EDT to the Coast Guard, insisting
he was in international waters,
but Coast Guard officers advised
him to comply with the Cubans,
Vogeley said.
Lowell Oswald, a spokesman
for the Tampa Sea Horse's agent,
Zapata Marine of New Orleans,
said he didn't know why the ship
was seized
"Hopefully, they'll let us go
and they'll keep going to New
York he said. "There's no way
to really tell
The merchant ship was es-
corted to the Cuban port for in-
spection, said Maggie Kerrigan, a
spokeswoman at the New Zeal-
and consulate in Los Angeles.
She said one New Zealander
was aboard, but a list supplied to
the Coast Guard by Zapata listed
all eight on board as Americans.
Cuba detains foreign ships as
often as once a month for trespass-
ing in its waters, but the vessels
and crewmen usually are quickly
released, said Coast Guard Lt.
Wayne Ball in Miami.
"We feel that after a brief in-
spection they will probably be
'released said State Department
press officer Ben Justesen in
Washington.
If the crew is detained for an
extended period, the State De-
partment would seek to contact
the crew through the U.S. diplo-
matic mission in Havana, he said.
San Diego-based Sail Amer-
ica managed the successful U.S.
defense of the America's Cup race
by sailing the catamaran Stars &
Stripes against the single-hulled
New Zealand last month off San
Diego.
Michael Fay, chairman of the
New Zealand Challenge, forced
the San Diego Yacht Club into an
early defense of the cup this year
after winning a court order that
validated his challenge of race
rules.
The New Zealand was twice
as long as the traditional 12-meter
yachts used in cup competitions.
The San Diego club responded by
building a dual-hulled catamaran
to defend the Cup, and Dennis
Conner skippered the Stars &
Stripes to two easy victories to
sweep a best-of-three series.
Oswald estimated the Tampa
Sea Horse's value at $3 million,
but said he didn't know what the
sailing vessel was worth.
fcVl
BIAS
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Fun After Business Hours
Playmi- �; � . � � � Best m Beact"
Top 40. O lies � � Music
Steve Hardy Begins at 7 00
Drink Specials All Evening
Hot Buffalo Wings til 7:30
Bluebonnet Bowl cancelled
HOUSTON (AP) - The finan-
cially struggling Bluebonnet
Bowl has elected to punt this sea-
son, canceling the 1988 New
Year's Eve game and trying to
resume play in 1989 with a corpo-
rate sponsor.
"Suppose we take some time,
really do our homework, put to-
gether a series of events sur-
rounding the ball game, and come
up with a first class bowl game
Bowl President Al Warrington
said Tuesday night.
The bowl's board of directors
voted to skip the 1988 game un-
less they quickly find a sponsor
who insists on playing in Decem-
ber.
"The feeling of the board is
that it would not be practical to
play the game this year War-
rington said. "If a title sponsor
appeared and insisted we go on
this year, we'd try to do it
Warrington said, however, it
AP top four
Miami, UCLA, Southern Cal
and Notre Dame are the top four
teams in this week's Associated
Press college football poll and
several of them have to play each
other.
The first test comes this week
when Miami visits Notre Dame.
Southern Cal visits UCLA on
Nov. 19 and the following week
Notre Dame visits Southern Cal.
Miami was idle over the
weekend and held onto first place
for the sixth week in a row. The
Hurricanes received 52 of 56 first-
place votes and 1,115 of a possible
1,020 points from a nationwide
panel of sports writers and
sport scasters.
UCLA remained No. 2 for the
fifth consecutive week by defeat-
ing Oregon State 38-21. The
Bruins received one first-place
vote and 1,051 points.
Southern Cal is third for the
third straight week following a
42-14 victory over No. 18 Oregon
which knocked the Ducks out of
the Top Twenty. The Trojans re-
ceived the remaining three first-
place votes and 1,012 points.
West Virginia rose from sev-
enth to sixth with 811 points
thanks to a 30-10 triumph over
East Carolina:
Nebraska's 63-10 rout of
Kansas pushed the Comhuskers
from ninth place to seventh with
747 points. They passed South
Carolina, which remained No. 8
with 704 points after edging Vir-
ginia Tech 26-24.
Oklahoma went from 10th to
ninth with 663 points by downing
Texas 28-13 and Oklahoma State
cracked the Top Ten for the first
time since 1985 by defeating Colo-
rado 41-21. The Cowboys, 13th a
week ago, rounded out thr Top
Ten with 599 points.
The Second Ten consists of
Clemson, Auburn, Georgia, Wyo-
ming, Michigan, Washington,
Arkansas, Indiana, LSU and Flor-
ida.
Last week, it was Clemson,
Alabama, Oklahoma State, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Wyoming, Michi-
gan, Oregon, Washington and
Arkansas
Alabama, a 22-12 loser to
Mississippi, joined Oregon in fall-
ing out of the Top Twenty.
Indiana moved in for the first
time this season after trouncing
Ohio State 41-7 and LSU reap-
peared after a one-week absence
thanks to its victory over Auburn-
would be difficult to get a bowl
game organized by December.
He said the bowl still had not
heard from the NCAA, which is
considering decertifying the
game because it still owes
$400,000 to participating teams
from the last two years.
Warrington said there was no
negative feedback from the board
of directors.
"There was not one negative
vote to hang it up he said. "I
think the people went away with
the determination to make this
thing work. The NCAA is work-
ing with us to try to help
Warrington said the bowl is
seeking $500,000 from prospec-
tive sponsors to pay off its debts
and to revive the game, which
was played in the Astrodome last
year.
The bowl actually had landed
a sponsor last year, but the deal
fell through at the last minute,
Warrington said.
"I think it came as a shock to
everybody because it had been
approved by all the committees
Warrington said.
The bowl also has considered
combining several corporate
sponsors and currently has a firm
commitment for a $100,000 spon-
sorship, Warrington said.
The NCAA's Post Season
Bowl Committee was meeting
through today in Kansas City.
"EATURING
STEVE
HARDVS
BEACH PARTY
WPTF
RAMADA
EDGERTON MANAGEMENT COR�
K&K TOYS 'THE
HALLOWEEN
PARTY PLACE"
HAS ALL YOUR HALLOWEEN
PARTY COSTUMES
AND
MAKEYO
NIGHT A
SCREAM!
60U&9
YOU'LL FIND A SUPER SELECTION AND GREAT
PRICES AT 'THE HALLOWEEN 'PARTY' PLACE"
M$M 7���
THE PLAZA





Title
The East Carolinian, October 13, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 13, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.633
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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