The East Carolinian, October 11, 1988






Coming Tuesday:
The story behind the mailbox break-in in Jones Hal
Features:
Jim Shamlim takes an in depth look at the 69th
annual Pitt County fair, see page 7.
Sports:
The Pirates meet defeat at the hands of West Virgina,
overall they are l-5 and things aren't going to get
easier, see page 9.
�he fSaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 26
Tuesday October 11,1988
Greenville, NC
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Medical transport for ECU a possibility
By SEAN HERRING
Assistant News Fditor
t�� III! I IN!
A resolution concerning
emergency medical transporta-
tion for students attending ECU,
was brought up at Monday's
weekly SGA meeting by Legisla-
tor Allen Manning.
Thv? student health service
does not offer medical aid be-
tween the hours oi 3 p.m. to 6 a.m.
during the summer terms and 8
p.m. to 8 a m. during the fall and
spring semesters, so students are
forced to turn to an emergency
room at a Pitt Co. Hospital
taxi service he said.
At the present, insurance of-
Manning said, "SGA decided fered by the Student Health Serv-
in the fall of 1986 to terminate the ice, which covers emergency
24-hour student health service, transportation costs, is only avail-
because the insurance liability to able through a fee. In addition, a
operate the service was extremely student must pay the regular
costlv
wise
and was not financially semester health fees.
"On campus, an average of
two students a month require
emergency transportation and,
campus police should not be ex-
pected to be a rescue unit nor a
Manning resolved that the
Student Government Association
of ECU supports the reimburse-
ment of emergency transporta-
tion costs to students who use the
service during regular school
terms after regular Student
Health Service hours.
"I would like to encourage
the students to get involved in the
SGA meetings, and vote for this
resolution he said.
The Student Government
Association believes that the Stu-
dent Health Service is responsible
for overseeing procedures and
providing funds concerning re-
imbursement for after hours
emergency transportation.
"The SGA felt that since we
are responsible for ending the 24-
hour student health service, we
should have another solution, for
the students that might need
medical attention, after the infir-
mary is closed Manning said.
According to Manning, he
suggested the transportation plan
to SHS Associate Director for
Business Affairs Kay Van-
Nortwick, and she supports the
idea.
VanNortwick said, "I think
that this is a good idea. The uni-
versity does not provide this serv-
ice and some students are reluc-
tant to call a city rescue unit, be-
cause they charge for the service
"This service would probably
help during intramural games,
when an athlete is injured, and the
SHS is closed. Also, it would be
helpful for students that have
acute illnesses she said.
According to Manning the
idea has been introduced, and
will be voted on next Monday, to
determine if it meets the needs of
the students.
Smith becomes vice chancellor of student life and minority affairs
By SEAN HERRING
AuttUnt News Editor
A new administrative posi-
tion has been added to the student
life program at ECU this semester.
The university now has an assis-
tant vice chancellor for student
life and minority affairs.
Dr. Larry T. Smith comes to
ECU from a post as associate dean
of students for programs and ac-
tivities and director of minority
affairs at Knox College in
Galesburg, Illinois.
Smith has a Ph.D. in higher
education administration and
supervision, which he received
from Bowling Green State Uni-
versity in Ohio.
His appointment as ECU'S
assistant vice chancellor for stu-
dent life and minority affairs was
announced by Dr. Elmer E. Meyer
Jr who retired as vice chancellor
of student life in August.
Smith said ECU is a promis-
ing environment for a minority
affairs program.
"I have a good feeling about
acceptingthis position at ECU, be-
cause of the university's attitude
and care that it seems to have for
its students. 1 can build on that
type of excitement. The atmos-
phere seems to be warm and open
to the idea of establishing an office
'ot minority affairs Smith said.
During his two months in
office, Smith stated that he is still
forming opinions about ECU.
He said, "I have made ef-
forts to find out what the
university's expectations are
from a standpoint of minority
affairs. ECU is just at a point now
that the university offers minor-
ity affairs, but it does not know
what is needed
According to Smith, there is
a need for students to participate
in minority affairs to show other
schools that ECU is united.
"I have gotten the impres-
sion from some of the students
that, white and black leaders on
ECU's campus do not work to-
gether. This should not be the case
in an atmosphere that shares a
common interest, such as being a
part of the ECU community
said Smith.
Smith stated that he be-
lieves that one of the most impor-
tant issues that ECU can address
is multiculturalism and plural-
ism.
He said, "Society is becom-
ing more diverse. Some students
need to learn that they will have to
work with people of different
backgrounds. They need to learn
to appreciate different cultures,
races, and ethnic backgrounds.
Also, students should try to avoid
sex discrimination. "
Smith said, "We (ECU)
would be doing the students an
injustice if they did not learn this
lesson. Because we would not be
challenging them to broaden their
horizon
He said that he has ob-
served an effort by the admini-
stration to increase the awareness
of minority student life at ECU
and in the community.
"It is evident to me that
ECU sees that the area of minority
students growth can be strength-
ened. So, they (the administra-
tion) took the mttiati ve by getting
a vice chancellor for minority ait-
fairs and student life to help
improve racial awareness for stu-
dents, faculty, towns-people, and
the community Smith said.
Smith stated that evidence
of a change will take time.
Student recreational center in the making
By JOE HARRIS
Newt Editor
The vice chancellor of student life and minority affairs. Dr.
Larry Smith (Photo Bv Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab).
McDowell, Dillenger debate "Judges:
Law makers or interpreters?" issue
By TON! PAGE
Staff Writer
The Jenkins Art Auditoruim
was crowded with both students
and faculty Thursday night as
guest speakers debated the ques-
tion: "Judges: Law makers or
Interpreters?"
On the right, Dr. Gary L.
McDowell, a former assisfant to
Attorney General Edwin Meese,
defended the fundamentalist
view that judges should leave leg-
islatures alone. He criticized the
modern courts' more liberal form
of decision making which was
successfully defended by Duke
Law Ptotesor Walter Dillenger.
fvL-Do well held his ground by
using Jud�;e Robert Bork as an ex-
ample of a traditionalist who held
a strict interpretation of the
constitution and the controversial
role of the court in law- making.
"Laws may be unjust at times, but
that does not mean they are un-
constitutional" McDowell said as
he stated his belief that judges
should have only those powers
deligated to them in the
constitution. McDowell said that
today's "Anti-Traditionalist"
thinkers make judgements based
on moral standards and stretch
the language of the constitution.
McDowell spoke out against
those who crucified Judge Robert
Bork and said that "Substantive
concern overrode credentials
when Bork lost the appointment
to the Supreme Court. He praised
Bork's faithfulness to the
constitution and defended past
controversial decisions of the
conservative court.
On the left, liberal Professor
Walter Dillenger who was once a
student of Judge Bork stated that
"conservatives such as Bork and
McDowell often extoll the text of
the constitution, yet they seldom
quote it Dillenger pointed out
the text of the constitution and ac-
knowledged the framers intent as
being a "general principal of law"
that would inevitably change
with the times.
Dillenger gave examples of
"bad laws" made us the past by
the court which confo; med to the
language of the constitution so
strictly that fundamental rights
were taken away in the process.
"A strict literal interpretation can
be dangerous" said Dillenger
"We must maintain fidelity to the
constitution and those who wrote
it, but validity of decisions must
be stressed. The framers gave us a
general principal and judges
must work with that to determine
law based on the facts of a case
A short question and answer
period followed the debate which
was moderated by political sci-
ence professor Tinsley Yarbough.
A new 165,000 square foot
student recreational center will be
the latest improvement on stu-
dent life at ECU.
The need for this type of rec-
reational facility at ECU was
noted in the university's long-
range planning document pre-
pared in 1982. The document indi-
cates that the lack of suitable
space will be resolved by the con-
struction of a new physical
education and intramuralrec-
reational facility
Last year the SGA initiated a
resolution in support of the con-
struction of a new facility, and
highly recommended to the ad-
ministration that a new recrea-
tional facility be placed on the
priority list for new construction
at ECU.
Vice Chancellor of Student
Life Dr. Alfred Matthews said,
"This is going to be a state of the
art facility. There are still a bunch
of 'possibles and maybes' as far as
what is going to be in this new rec-
center, but there is certainly
plenty of space to be filled up
"We're looking at space
enough for anywhere between 12
to 18 racquetball courts, five to six
volleyball courts, two swimming
pools � possibly one indoor and
the other outside. We're still very
much in the planning stages so
there is lots of room for changes
said Matthews.
The center will house courts,
which will provide facilities for
the following sports: racquetball
and squash; multipurpose area
for basketball, volleyball, tennis,
badminton and jogging; aerobics,
strength and weight training; ar-
eas for golf, archery and batting
practice; and a swimming pool.
There will also be equipment
check-out, locker rooms, laundry
facilities, seminar rooms, lounges
and administrative offices.
"Anywhere from six to eight
students and three to four faculty
members will make up the plan-
ning board that says what goes
inside. I would like to see two
sophomores, two juniors, and two
seniors on the board to give it
some continuity. The students
will know what they want and
need in this facility said Mat-
thews.
Operation and governance of
the facility will be primarily stu-
dents. "Students run the show
over at Memorial Gym, and this
will be no different said Mat-
thews.
An increase in tuition, which
may take effect as early as next
fall, will begin paying for the $14
million facility. "We estimate the
increase at around $75 for full
time students, but this is subject to
change, it may even be lower
said Matthews. Part time students
and summer session students will
pay a prorated fee, faculty and
staff utilizing the facility would
pay a similar fee.
There are three proposed
sites for the building: 1) adjacent
tobehind Mendenhall Student
Center, 2) the College Hill area,
where the tennis courts are pres-
ently located, and 3) the vicinity of
Minges Coliseum.
Matthews said, "All these
areas have the space for the build-
ing, which will be multi-story, but
the immediate problem facing
each site is parking. The Menden-
hall area would probably be the
best, simply because it would be
right there on the central campus.
It would be accessible to more
people, but parking is the main
problem with this site
The facility is geared toward
informal recreation. Matthews
said, "We plan to give priority to
informal recreation, this facility is
a place to go to exercise and have
fun
The priority then proceeds as
follows: organized university re-
lated, recreational programs, in-
structional programs, intramu-
ral s � when space is available
and the facility will be for rent to
the community when space is
available.
Matthews said the facility
will take about a year to design
and an additional 18 to 24 months
for construction.
A smile from, and a crown for ECU'S newest Homecoming Queen, Sonja Love (Photo By Mark
Love, ECU Photolab).





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11. 1988
Pinochet acknowledges defeat, extends rule
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP)
President Augusto Pinochet ac-
knowledged defeat in a referen-
dum on extending his rule but
again rejected opposition de-
mands for his resignation and
vowed to stay in power for an-
other 18 months.
A key opposition leader,
meanwhile, was quoted Sunday
as calling for talks with the mili-
tary government on the nation's
oolitical future.
In a surprise television ap-
pearance from his country home
at Bucalemu, Gen. Pinochet said
Sunday, "1 acknowledge the
opposition's victory, but I am not
going to change what the
constitution savs.
March 11,1990, is going to be
the day that the government is
handed over.
"The situation is very
simple he said. "We fulfilled
the constitution that was set up
so now that the opposition has
triumphed, why should we
change?"
The comments of the 72-year-
old commander-in-chief of
Chile's armed forces came during
a three-minute TV newscast. Pi-
nochet was dressed in a short-
sleeve blue shirt. He appeared
relaxed and spoke clearly and
firmly.
Nearly 7 million Chileans
went to the polls Wednesday to
vote on the armed forces' pro-
posal that Pinochet remain ore-
sident until 1997. Pinochet, who
ousted elected Marxist President
Salvador Allende in a 1973 coup
that left Allende dead, lost by
about 800,000 votes or a margin of
more than 11 percent.
The vote was carried out
under a 1980 constitution. That
document also calls for elections
for president and congress to be
held in December 1989, with the
winners taking office in March.
Opposition leaders have
pressed Pinochet's military gov-
ernment to move up the date of
elections and make other consti-
tutional changes.
Their proposals include
eliminating a constitutional ban
on Marxist gTOups, and allowing
the entire Senate � not just two-
thirds � to be elected rather than
appointed.
Jurisdictional dispute in hostage case
RALEIGH (AP) �A key
phase of the trial to two American
Indians accused of taking hos-
tages at a Robeson County news-
paper could come down to a juris-
dictional dispute over whether
the case should be in federal court
officials say.
U.S. District Court judge Ter-
rertce Boyle spent the weekend
considering whether to dismiss
federal charges against Eddie
Hatcher and Timothy Jacobs,
despite objections from prosecu-
tors.
The crowning irony in this
case is that the defendants chose
their jurisdiction on Feb. 1 and
now they want to throw out the
charge on a jurisdictional ques-
tion Assistant U.S. Attorney
lohn Bruce said Friday. "I think it
would be tragic for this prosecu-
tion to be terminated on what
we view to be an extremely strict
view of this matter
But while Bruce argued that
the two asked to surrender to FBI
agents and included in their writ-
ten list of demands a requirement
for a federal investigation of al-
leged corruption in Robeson
County, the defense urged Boyle
to take a narrower view.
'There is absolutely no proof
as to Timmy Jacobs making a
demand on the federal govern-
ment said Lewis Pitts of the
Christie Institute-South, defend-
ing Jacobs. He told Boyle the fed-
eral hostage-taking law was de-
signed to deal with international
seizures and that Congress had
specifically wanted strict limits
on its use in domestic cases.
Boyle appeared to be leaning
toward the defense's side on Fri-
dav.
"What may have been done
may have been conspicuously a
crime, but the question is whether
it's a criminal matter against the
United States Bovle said
?m
&
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Opposition leaders also want
to streamline the process by
which future constitutional
changes can be made.
"We will formally call on
those holding power now to talk
to reach an agreement opposi-
tion spokesman Patricio Aylwin
said in an interview published
Sunday in the newspaper La
Epoca. "We will take the initiative
by making a proposal and call to
the armed torces
Aylwin is spokesman for the
16-party coalition that urged
Chileans vote "no" in the referen-
dum.
A 4-man military junta acts as
the legislatureof this South Amer-
ica country, which has been ruled
by freely elected, democratic gov-
ernments for most of its 178-year
history as an independent nation.
The junta is empowered to
change the constitution, but Pino-
chet said in a speech broadcast
nationwide the night after the ref-
erendum that he had no intention
of doing so.
Ricardo Lagos, a prominent,
moderate Socialist, acknowlegcd
that negotiations, if they take
place, would take time. "The
people are mature enough to
understand that 15 years of dicta-
torship don't end in 15 hours
But other Pinochet opponents
already have served notice they
don't intend to wait long or pea i
fully. On Saturday, a coalition ol
leftist parties publicly called for
Pinochet's immediate resign.
tion.
The situation sets up poten
tial clashes between the govern
ment and its opponents
JOIN THE WINNING
COMBINATION
BE A RESIDENT
ADVISOR
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR
SPRING EMPLOYMENT 1989:
OCTOBER 19, 1988
All new application should attend an
organizational meeting during the week of
1010 12. Check bulletin boards for time
and place. For information contact the
departmental office in 214 Whichard,
757-6771 or any residence hall office.
Serving tin' East Carol � j �.
James F. -J. McKee. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer M ym m ll
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
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F .T Nona told To D
Govern
BELGRADE, Yugoslav
(AP) Workers put down � j
students went on a hunger Stril
and Serbs rallied to condemn
government crackdown on gro
ing protests, but the natio
president threatened tougher
curity measures.
In an unusual 30-minute
dio and television addr
day, President Raif Dizdare
also promised a shake-up
ommunistPartyleadersb.
called for economic reforn
national economic crisis has en
bined with tensions betw.
Serbs and ethnic Albaniai
three months of protests an I
for an overhaul in the partv hi
archv.
In the southern republic
Montenegro, hundreds I
grad University stud rttsb
hunger strike Sunday to pi
the use of force bv police. ThJ
also pressed their demai
overhaul of regional ar. -
Communist leaders?
In an unusual .
demand for democracy, tl �
rial Communist youth uni
called for "direct ar. I
Laotian authorities
acknowledge captui
BANGKOK, Thailand
� Laos has acknow ledgi -d arre
ing two Americans I -
the communist coui
cize a reward I
war prisoners
U.S. officials ir-i � -
the Laotian g -vemment h
formed the U.S. En .in V
tiane that it had arrested Do
! ong of Jacksonville N C
former Lin ton, Ind. -
James Copp. now of I lai
N.C.
It was the first
knowiedgment by I
forces had captured the p -
LLS. Embas- sp �
Ross Pet2 I Saturday
Laos informed the American F
bassy but added that we have
further word regarding t
cae" -�-
Ms Long and Copp
Thai fishing boat, crossed
Mekong River beundarv betw
Thailand and Laos and were ca
tured Oct. 3 in a Laotian
according to Thai- who v
to visit them.
Before setting oit Ms
told The Associated Pn ss t
they intended to pass
bills stamped with an of I -
million to an an Vi
ese or Cambodian who
produce a live American bei
held in Indochina.
Four American colleagues
Ms. Long and Copp dr
about $1,000 worth I
stamped bills on Fnda
same area of the Meki rig M uch
the money eventually ended
the hands of Thai chi
Meanwhile in the
States, five members ot the
family passed ou j
Saturday I ha t u rged pa j
the Laotian Embassy in Was
ton, D.C, to inquire about G
and Ms Long
The family was in Indiana)
lis to visit The Moving V.
model oi the Vietnam VeteraJ
Memorial that is on travelif
exhibit
The family said Copp and
Long had the appropriate pap
to visit Thailand but not Laos
"This wasn't a Rambo
sion Bill Copp said of
brother's activities. These wi
civilians and they were handi
out the currency. The)
tmng to make the govemmj
get something done about
soldiers who may be missingj
held prisoner
"He's not a renegade Sail
Copp said oi her brother w
served in the Army in Vietnai
1985. "He rust thinks it's at
time for those boys to I
home
The U S. government still ij
2,393 Americans as missing
action in the three lndochin
countries after the Vietnam
ended in 1975, but no solid
dence has emerged that any
still alive.
The reward is being offe
by 21 VS. congressmen and
vate American citizens
The six Amencans in Soi
east Asia seeking informatioi
MlAs are members of the
tional Steering Committee
American War Veterans, a pn
lobbying group.





'I
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
CXZTOBER 11,1988
Pinochet acknowledges defeat, extends rule
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) �
President Augusto Pinochet ac-
knowledged defeat in a referen-
dum on extending his rule but
again rejected opposition de-
mands for his resignation and
vowed to stay in power for an-
other 18 months.
A key opposition leader,
meanwhile, was quoted Sunday
as calling for talks with the mili-
tary government on the nation's
oolitical future.
In a surprise television ap-
pearance from his country home
at Bucalemu, Gen. Pinochet said
Sunday, "I acknowledge the
opposition's victory, but I am not
going to change what the
constitution says.
March 11,1990, is going to be
the day that the government is
handed over.
"The situation is very
simple he said. "We fullfilled
the constitution that was set up
so now that the opposition has
triumphed, why should we
change?"
The comments of the 72-year-
old commander-in-chief of
Chile's armed forces came during
a three-minute TV newscast. Pi-
nochet was dressed in a short-
sleeve blue shirt. He appeared
relaxed and spoke clearly and
firmly.
Nearly 7 million Chileans
went to the polls Wednesday to
vote on the armed forces' pro-
posal that Pinochet remain ore-
sident until 1997. Pinochet, who
ousted elected Marxist President
Salvador Allende in a 1973 coup
that left Allende dead, lost by
about 800,000 votes or a margin of
more than 11 percent.
The vote was carried out
under a 1980 constitution. That
document also calls for elections
for president and congress to be
held in December 1989, with the
winners taking office in March.
Opposition leaders have
pressed Pinochet's military gov-
ernment to move up the date of
elections and make other consti-
tutional changes.
Their proposals include
eliminating a constitutional ban
on Marxist groups, and allowing
the entire Senate � not just two-
thirds � to be elected rather than
appointed.
Opposition leaders also want
to streamline the process by
which future constitutional
changes can be made.
"We will formally call on
those holding power now to talk
to reach an agreement opposi-
tion spokesman Patricio Aylwin
said in an interview published
Sunday in the newspaper La
Epoca. "We will take the initiative
by making a proposal and call to
the armed torces
Aylwin is spokesman for the
16-party coalition that urged
Chileans vote "no" in the referen-
dum.
A 4-man military junta acts as
the legislature of this South Amer-
ica country, which has been ruled
by freely elected, democratic gov-
ernments for most of its 178-year
history as an independent nation.
The junta is empowered to
chang. he constitution, but Pino-
chet said in a speech broadcast
nationwide the night after the ref-
erendum that he had no intention
of doing so.
Ricardo Lagos, a prominent,
moderate Socialist, acknowleged
that negotiations, if they take
place, would take time. "The
people are mature enough to
understand that 15 years of dicta-
torship don't end in 15 hours
But other Pinochet opponents
already have served notice they
don't intend to wait long or peace-
fully. On Saturday, a coalition of
leftist parties publicly called for
Pinochet's immediate resigna-
tion.
The situation sets up poten-
tial clashes between the govern-
ment and its opponents.
Jurisdictional dispute in hostage case
RALEIGH (AP) �A key
phase of the trial to two American
Indians accused of taking hos-
tages at a Robeson County news-
paper could come down to a juris-
dictional dispute over whether
the case should be in federal court,
officials say.
U.S. District Court Judge Ter-
rence Boyle spent the weekend
considering whether to dismiss
federal charges against Eddie
Hatcher and Timothy Jacobs,
despite objections from prosecu-
tors.
"The crowning irony in this
case is that the defendants chose
their jurisdiction on Feb. 1 and
now they want to throw out the
charge on a jurisdictional ques-
tion Assistant U.S. Attorney
John Bruce said Friday. "I think it
would be tragic for this prosecu-
tion to be terminated on what
we view to be an extremely strict
view of this matter
But while Bruce argued that
the two asked to surrender to FBI
agents and included in their writ-
ten list of demands a requirement
for a federal investigation of al-
leged corruption in Robeson
County, the defense urged Boyle
to take a narrower view.
"There is absolutely no proof
as to Timmy Jacobs making a
demand on the federal govern-
ment said Lewis Pitts of the
Christie Institute-South, defend-
ing Jacobs. He told Boyle the fed-
eral hostage-taking law was de-
signed to deal with international
seizures and that Congress had
specifically wanted strict limits
on its use in domestic cases.
Boyle appeared to be leaning
toward the defense's side on Fri-
day.
"What may have been done
may have been conspicuously a
crime, but the question is whether
if s a criminal matter against the
United States Boyle said
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your
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fills your .
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while you v
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Items ami PMcas Iff�thy
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Sat. Octofear 15, 1
-4 � '�aj�r�
w0 0 �w'���
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X) Greenville Blvd Greenville
D
Govern
BELGRADE, Yugoslav
(AP) � Worjters put down tool
students went on a hunger stri j
and Serbs rallied to condemn)
government crackdown on groi
ing protests, but the natior
president threatened tougher
curity measures.
In an unusual 30-minute
dio and television address Sul
day, President Raif DizdareJ
also promised a shake-up
Communist Party leadership ai
called for economic reforms,
national economic crisis has coi
bined with tensions betw
Serbs and ethnic Albanians to fi
three months of protests and caj
for an overhaul in the party hi
archy.
In the southern republic
Montenegro, hundreds of Til
grad University students begai
hunger strike Sunday to prot
the use of force by police,
also pressed their demands for,
overhaul of regional and nahoi
Communist leadership.
In an unusually outspokJ
demand for democracy, the of
rial Communist youth union al
called for "direct and secret" el
Laotian authorities
acknowledge captui
BANGKOK, Thailand (.
� Laos has acknowledged am
ing two Americans who entei
the communist country to put
cize a reward to free Amerid
war prisoners.
VS. officials in Bangkok sal
the Laotian government has if
formed the U.S. Embassy in VU
tiane that it had arrested Doni
Long of Jacksonville, N.C, ai
former Linton, Ind. residei
James Copp, now of Hampsteal
N.C.
It was the first reported
knowledgment by Laos that
forces had captured the pair.
U.S. Embassy spokesmaj
Ross Petzig said Saturday tl
Laos informed the American Ei
bassy but added that we have;
further word regarding tl
Ms. Long and Copp hire
Thai fishing boat, crossed t
Mekong River boundary betw
Thailand and Laos and were ca
tured Oct. 3 in a Laotian villaj
according to Thais who were al
to visit them.
Before setting off, Ms. L01
told The Associated Press tl
they intended to pass out do
bills stamped with an offer of $
million to any Laotian, Vietnai
ese or Cambodian who coi
produce a live American beii
held in Indochina.
Four American colleagues j
Ms. Long and Copp dropj
about $1,000 worth of rewai
stamped bills on Friday into tj
same area of the Mekong. Muchl
the money eventually ended upj
the hands of Thai children.
Meanwhile in the Unitj
States, five members of the Co
family passed out strips of pa
Saturday that urged people to 1
the Laotian Embassy in VYashit
ton, D.C, to inquire about Coj
and Ms. Long.
The family was in Indiana
lis to visit The Moving Wallj
model of the Vietnam Vetet
Memorial that is on travelij
exhibit.
The family said Copp and N
Long had the appropriate paj
to visit Thailand but not Laos
This wasn't a Rambo
sion Bill Copp said of
brother's activities. These
civilians and they were hand
out the currency. They
trying to make the gove
get something done about
soldiers who may be missing
held prisoner
-He's not a renegade' Sa
Copp said of her brother,
served in the Army in Vietna
1985. "He just thinks it's al
time for those boys to
home
The US. government still
2,393 Americans as missing
action in the three Indochi
countries after the Vietnam
ended in 1975, but no solid
denee has emerged mat any
still alive.
The reward is being
by 21 US congressmen and
vate American citizens.
The six Americans in
east Asia seeking informa
Ml As are members o
Steering Committee
canWarV
lobbying group.
wd





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11,1988 3
rule
i; mochet opponents
ib -i! ved notice they
wait long or peace
� .i voalitton ol
parties publ s called foi
diate resigna-
�-iis up poten-
h tween the govern-
onents.
ING
liKS
'� ,00
.fr1
� �i mom
t � ; I in ��� � il-
Box
79�
'JN
rc
af
'�"�
� 6
iOURS E
Givd
VERYDAYJ
Greenville
Government toughens despite strikes
r
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia
t,AP) Workers put down tools,
students went on a hunger strike
and Serbs rallied to condemn a
government crackdown on grow-
ing protests, but the nation's
president threatened tougher se-
curity measures.
In an unusual 30-minute ra-
dio and television address Sun-
day, President Raif Dizdarevic
also promised a shake-up in
Communist Party leadership and
called for economic reforms. A
national economic crisis has com-
bined with tensions between
Serbs and ethnic Albanians to fuel
three months of protests and calls
for an overhaul in the party hier-
archy.
In the southern republic of
Montenegro, hundreds of Tito-
grad University students began a
hunger strike Sunday to protest
the use of force by police. They
also pressed their demands for an
overhaul of regional and national
Communist leadership.
In an unusually outspoken
demand for democracy, the offi-
cial Communist youth union also
called for "direct and secret" elec-
tions get leaders the people would
support.
Residents reported a heavy
police presence and roadblocks
around Titograd, the capital of
Montenegro located 280 miles
southwest of Belgrade. Riot police
wielding clubs broke up an over-
night rally there Saturday after
demonstrators called for the
ouster of regional Communist
leaders.
In the northern Montenegrin
town of Niksic, 15 miles to the
northwest, thousands of local
steel mill workers put down their
tools Sunday and marched to
protest what they view as police
brutality the day before, the state
news agency Tanjug said.
Police fired tear gas there
Saturday to break up another
crowd, and three people were
reported hospitalized Sunday.
In his speech, Dizdarevic,
who heads a nine-member collec-
tive presidency that also com-
mands the country's armed
forces, said if the protest persist,
they "could lead us to adopt
emergency measures He urged
all Yugoslavians to stay calm.
He did not elaborate, but it is
believed that if a state of emer-
gency were declared, it would
likely include a curfew, restriction
of movement and deployment of
troops in the streets.
Recent Serbian nationalist
rallies and worker protests "are
seriously jeopardizing public or-
der Dizdarevic said. "Thereisa
real danger that the actions which
are imperiling constitutional or-
der could continue and spread.
"The institutions and organs
of this country will do all that the
constitution laws permit to pro-
tect public order and peace, per-
sonal security and property, aned
the constitutional system he
added.
Dizdarevic promised un-
specified economic measures to
combat 217 percent inflation, a
$21 billion dollar debt and 15
percent unemployment.
He also said the policy-mak-
ing Central Committee, which is
scheduled to meet Oct. 17, will
make changes in the country's
leadership. But he did not say
who might be replaced.
Meanwhile, Tanjug said the
situation in Montenegro was
"extremely serious
In troubled southern Kosovo
province, about 20,000 people
rallied to press Serbian claims of
harassment by the ethnic Al-
banian majority.
Police did not report any inci-
dents, however, at the rally in
Titovo Mitrovica, 145 miles south
of Belgrade.
At dozens of similar rallies in
recent months, Serbs have railed
against the ethnic Albanian Com-
munist leaders in Kosovo, one of
two autonomous provinces in the
republic of Serbia. The mostly
Christian Serbs have long been at
odds with the Albanians, who are
mainly Moslem.
To head off ethnic violence in
Kosovo, Albanian Halit Trnavci
told the crowd Sunday that Serbs
and Albanians should protect
links forged through the centu-
ries.
About 10,000 other people
rallied in Subotica, a town on the
border with Hungary in Serbia's
other autonomous province,
Vojvodina, Tanjug said.
EVERY TUESDAY
NITE IS COLLEGE NITE 8-11
ONLY $2.00
ADMISSION WITH COLLEGE I.O.
.75$ SKATE RENTAL
104 E. RED HANKS RD. � GREENVILLE. NC � 756-6000
STEVE HARDY'S ORIGINAL BEACH PARTY
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Fun After Business Hours
Laotian authorities
acknowledge capture
BANGKOK, Thailand (AD
Laos has acknowledged arrest-
ing two Americans who entered
the communist country to publi-
cize a reward to free American
war prisoners.
U.S. officials in Bangkok said
the Laotian government has in-
formed the U.S. Embassy in Vien-
tiane that it had arrested Donna
Long of Jacksonville, N.C and
termer Linton, Ind. resident
James Copp, now of Hampstead,
IM.C.
It was the first reported ac-
knowledgment by Laos that its
forces had captured the pair.
U.S. Embassy spokesman,
Ross Petzig said Saturday that
Laos informed the American Em-
bassy butadded that, "we have no
further word regarding this
ca
Ms. Long and Copp hired a
Thai fishing boat, crossed the
Mekong River boundary between
Thailand and Laos and were cap-
tured Oct. 3 in a Laotian village,
according to Thais who were able
to visit them.
Before setting off, Ms. Long
told The Associated Tress that
they intended to pass out dollar
bills stamped with an offer of $2.4
million to any Laotian, Vietnam-
ese or Cambodian who could
produce a live American being
held in Indochina.
Four American colleagues of
Ms. Long and Copp dropped
about $1,000 worth of reward-
stamped bills on Friday into the
same area of the Mekong. Much of
the money eventually ended up in
the hands of Thai children.
Meanwhile in the United
States, five members of the Copp
family passed out strips of paper
Saturday that urged people to call
the Laotian Embassy in Washing-
ton, DC, to inquire about Copp
and Ms. Long.
The familv was in Indianapo-
lis to visit The Moving Wall, a
model of the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial that is on traveling
exhibit.
The family said Copp and Ms.
Long had the appropriate papers
to visit Thailand but not Laos
"This wasn't a Rambo mis-
sion' Bill Copp said of his
brother's activities. "These were
civilians and they were handing
out the currency. They were
trying to make the government
get something done about the
soldiers who may be missing or
held prisoner
"He's not a renegade Sandy
Copp said of her brother, who
served in the Army in Vietnam in
1985. "He just thinks it's about
time for those boys to come
home
The U.S. government still lists
2,393 Americans as missing in
action in the three Indochinese
countries after the Vietnam War
ended in 1975, but no solid evi-
dence has emerged that any are
still alive.
The reward is being offered
by 21 U.S. congressmen and pri-
vate American citizens.
The six Americans in South-
east Asia seeking information on
MI As are members of the Na-
tional Steering Committee for
American War Veterans, a private
lobbying group.
tating & Drinking
Steve Hardy Begins at 7 00
Drink Specials All Evening
Hot Buffalo Wings til 7 30
This coupon must be presented
ith shm ufder
SHIRT COUPON
We're Serious About Our World Series Party-
Catch All The Action At O'Cools T.Vs. Featuring
Our Soon To Be Famous Double-Shot Margaritas
LOCATED IN THE FARM FRESH
SHOPPING CENTER
1 1 a.m. 1 a.m. Monday-Saturday1 1 a.m. 10 p.m. Sunday355-2946
FEATURING
STEVE
IHARDY'S
BEACH PARTY
MTTF
RAMADA
EDO? - ' �.���"��
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes
New and Returning
Students
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
?Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
POSITION
AVAILABLE
The East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for an
advertising sales
representative.
Reauirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Good Personality & Professional Appearance
Excellent Communication Skills
Good Organizational Skills
Must Be Dependable & Show Initiative & Enthusiasm
Must Have Own Transportation
Must Have The Desire To Excel
Apply in Person at The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please!






i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11,1988 3
rule
Eut other Pinochet opponents
dy have served notice they
't intend to wait iong or peace-
On Saturday, a coalition of
t parties publicly called for
Khet's immediate resigna-
The situation sets up poten-
ashes between the govern-
kt and its opponents.
?r of Advertising
lentatives
S i ncer Meymandi
Adam Biankenshlp
TISING
. SI 25 4.15 4.05 3.95 3 BS 3 75
NGRATES
j.
IS
5.5t each
:y" I'Jvh
1)1 KS:
la
,m.
id757-6557
N757-6309
i Ge to"
�L
JT
3
'�
$
1
Lb
Box
79�
su,
Ca
��
g?
).
��
�,
rO,
�fN
At Kroger. gg
your i u rT"
pharmacist j 1 ' !
liliM your ,
prescription
while you
fill your
shopping list
$
I0URS EVERYDAY
le Blvd Greenville
Government toughens despite strikes
r
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia
(AP) � Wooers put down tools,
students went on a hunger strike
and Serbs rallied to condemn a
government crackdown on grow-
ing protests, but the nation's
president threatened tougher se-
curity measures.
In an unusual 30-minute ra-
dio and television address Sun-
day, President Raif Dizdarevic
also promised a shake-up in
Communist Party leadership and
called for economic reforms. A
national economic crisis has com-
bined with tensions between
Serbs and ethnic Albanians to fuel
three months of protests and calls
for an overhaul in the party hier-
archy.
In the southern republic of
Montenegro, hundreds of Tito-
grad University students began a
hunger strike Sunday to protest
the use of force by police. They
also pressed their demands for an
overhaul of regional and national
Communist leadership.
In an unusually outspoken
demand for democracy, the offi-
cial Communist youth union also
called for "direct and secret" elec-
tions get leaders the people would
support.
Residents reported a heavy
police presence and roadblocks
around Titograd, the capital of
Montenegro located 280 miles
southwest of Belgrade. Riot police
wielding clubs broke up an over-
night rally there Saturday after
demonstrators called for the
ouster of regional Communist
leaders.
In the northern Montenegrin
town of Niksic, 15 miles to the
northwest, thousands of local
steel mill workers put down their
tools Sunday and marched to
protest what they view as police
brutality the day before, the state
news agency Tanjug said.
Police fired tear gas there
Saturday to break up another
crowd, and three people were
reported hospitalized Sunday.
In his speech, Dizdarevic,
who heads a nine-member collec-
tive presidency that also com-
mands the country's armed
forces, said if the protest persist,
they "could lead us to adopt
emergency measures He urged
all Yugoslavians to stay calm.
He did not elaborate, but it is
believed that if a state of emer-
gency were declared, it would
nkely include a curfew, restriction
of movement and deployment of
troops in the streets.
Recent Serbian nationalist
rallies and worker protests "are
seriously jeopardizing public or-
der Dizdarevic said. 'There is a
real danger that the actions which
are imperiling constitutional or-
der could continue and spread.
"The institutions and organs
of this country will do all that the
constitution laws permit to pro-
tect public order and peace, per-
sonal security and property, aned
the constitutional system he
added.
Dizdarevic promised un-
specified economic measures to
combat 217 percent inflation, a
$21 billion dollar debt and 15
percent unemployment.
He also said the policy-mak-
ing Central Committee, which is
scheduled to meet Oct. 17, will
make changes in the country's
leadership. But he did not say
who might be replaced.
Meanwhile, Tanjug said the
situation in Montenegro was
"extremely serious
In troubled southern Kosovo
province, about 20,000 people
rallied to press Serbian claims of
harassment by the ethnic Al-
banian majority.
Police did not report any inci-
dents, however, at the rally in
Titovo Mitrovica, 145 miles south
of Belgrade.
At dozens of similar rallies in
recent months, Serbs have railed
against the ethnic Albanian Com-
munist leaders in Kosovo, one of
two autonomous provinces in the
republic of Serbia. The mostly
Christian Serbs have long been at
odds with the Albanians, who are
mainly Moslem.
To head off ethnic violence in
Kosovo, Albanian Halit Trnavci
told the crowd Sunday that Serbs
and Albanians should protect
links forged through the centu-
ries.
About 10,000 other people
rallied in Subotica, a town on the
border with Hungary in Serbia's
other autonomous province,
Vojvodina, Tanjug said.
I
EVERT TUESDAY
NTTE IS COLLEGE NITE 8-11
ONLY $2.00
ADMIMION WTTH COUUI U.
.75$ SKATE RENTAL
104 E. RED BANKS RD. � GREENVILLE. NC � 756-6000
J
Laotian authorities
acknowledge capture
BANGKOK, Thailand (AP)
� Laos has acknowledged arrest-
ing two Americans who entered
the communist country to publi-
cize a reward to free American
war prisoners.
U.S. officials in Bangkok said
the Laotian government has in-
formed the U.S. Embassy in Vien-
tiane that it had arrested Donna
Long of Jacksonville, N.C and
former Linton, Ind. resident
James Copp, now of Hampstead,
NC.
It was the first reported ac-
knowledgment by Laos that its
forces had captured the pair.
U.S. Embassy spokesman,
Ross Petzig said Saturday that
Laos informed the American Em-
bassy bu t added that we have no
further word regarding this
catse�iiii.1 �- -� � �" - �w
Ms. Long and Copp hired a
Thai fishing boat, crossed the
Mekong River boundary between
Thailand and Laos and were cap-
tured Oct. 3 in a Laotian village,
according to Thais who were able
to visit them.
Before setting off, Ms. Long
told The Associated Press that
they intended to pass out dollar
bills stamped with an offer of $2.4
million to any Laotian, Vietnam-
ese or Cambodian who could
produce a live American being
held in Indochina.
Four American colleagues of
Ms. Long and Copp dropped
about $1,000 worth of reward-
stamped bills on Friday into the
same area of the Mekong. Much of
the money eventually ended up in
the hands of Thai children.
Meanwhile in the United
States, five members of the Copp
family passed out strips of paper
Saturday that urged people to call
the Laotian Embassy in Washing-
ton, D.C to inquire about Copp
and Ms. Long.
The family was in Indianapo-
lis to visit The Moving Wall, a
model of the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial that is on traveling
exhibit.
The family said Copp and Ms.
Long had the appropriate papers
to visit Thailand but not Laos'
"This wasn't a Rambo mis-
sion Bill Copp said of his
brother's activities. "These were
civilians and they were handing
out the currency. They were
trying to make the government
get something done about the
soldiers who may be missing or
held prisoner
"He's not a renegade Sandy
Copp said of her brother, who
served in the Army in Vietnam in
1985. "He just thinks it's about
time for those boys to come
home
The U.S. government still lists
2,393 Americans as missing in
action in the three Indochinese
countries after the Vietnam War
ended in 1975, but no solid evi-
dence has emerged that any are
still alive.
The reward is being offered
by 21 US. congressmen and pri-
vate American citizens.
The six Americans in South-
east Asia seeking information on
MIAs are members of the Na-
tional Steering Committee for
American War Veterans, a private
lobbying group.
1
Professor
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Fun After Business Hours
Playing the Very Best in Beach.
Top 40. Oldies and Dance Music
Steve Hardy Begins at 7:00
Drink Specials All Evening
Hot Buffalo Wings 'til 7:30
Utiivg&DriuWinfe
Were Seriqi
Catch All The
Our Soon To I
LOCA
11 a.ml a.m.
.
Riverbluff

Apartment
v
Welcome
New and Returning
Students
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015

AVAILABLE
The East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for an
advertising sales
representative.
Reauirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Good Personality & Professional Appearance
Excellent Communication Skills
Good Organizational Skills
Must Be Dependable & Show Initiative & Enthusiasm
Must Have Own Transportation
Must Have The Desire To Excel
Apply in Person at The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
.No Phone Calls Please'





yffiiFHi'fHf
�- �v
SJje iEast (Earoltnian
Pete Fernald, Gm�Mmia
Chip Carter, m smm
James F.J. McKee, ���� .��,
JOEHARR Nn�Etor
DOUG JOt DMSON, sort. �
Tim Hampton, fm m
Michelle England, cr�M�.�r
Debbie Stevens, s�T��y
October 11.1988
JEW PARKERMaff Illustrator
T()M FURR,e.rfyLHimM��jff
Susan Hovvell, product� m�
jOI IN W. MEDLIN, Art director
Mac Clark, ���M�Mer
OPINION
Pago 4
Culture
America lacking in cultural changes
Like all things, morality must saw the introduction of even more
:hange with the times. Often, a tech- efficient methods of mass murder.
nological innovation challenges tra
ditional patterns of thought and
forces a reevaluation of societal
morality. For example, mass availa-
bility of contraceptives, especially
In America, such technological ad-
vances as clean abortions and ge-
netic engineering have had massive
social impact.
And the changes are coming
the Pill, has helped lead to the weak- dangerously fast. Society can no
ening of earlier generations' taboos longer keep up with the demands
on sexual activity. placed upon it by its own technol-
But culture changes more slowly ogy. The cultural gap has widened
than science. For an idea to gain from a mere fissure to a giant chasm,
widespread acceptance may take Unfortunately, the society which
decades or even centuries, creating a has been most commonly in the lead
so-called cultural gap. Fortunately, in technological advancement is the
throughout most of human history, same one which takes the longest to
science did not progress so fast that update its outdated attitudes:
culture could not keep up, and so the America. Reactionary thinking, all
grew unman- too prevalent in this country, delays
society's acceptance of reality and is
itself a denial of reality � a wish to
live in a world that no longer is and
away; they will get worse. The last
best hope of America is intelligence
Congress doesn't pass
ban
By FRED BARNES
The New Republic
cultural gap never
ageably large.
By contrast, in the twentieth
century, science began to accelerate
at an alarming rate. World War I
brought with it chemical-bacterio- and free thought, both of which we
logical warfare, and World War II are sadly lacking

4np now
FORM
EXCITING,
SWNWIEOUS,
OFF 7H� CUFF,
KM0CRA77C
R6B0TWL,
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Biker angry at stickers
To the editor:
In response to the article pub-
lished on Oct. 6 entitled, "Bikers need
to heed rules who are you trying to
kid? Just look at the stupidity of the
second paragraph. How can both the
population of cars and bicycles in-
crease respectively when each one is
inversely proportional of the other.
Besides, lef s get to the meat of
the situation. How can there be an
increase of a car population on cam-
pus, when it cost an outlandish fifty
dollars to park your car? An excellent
example of this can be represented by
the numerous student parking
spaces that are left vacant. Maybe the
ECU traffic department has lost
thousands of dollars in parking dues
and needs some way to create reve-
nue, there fore using bikers as scape-
goats.
Maybe it's beyond the minds of
the ECU police and traffic depart-
ment to think that a single sticker will
automatically stop bicyclist from
driving into traffic, on the sidewalk
and committing other traffic viola-
tions. Also, has the ECU traffic office
lowered themselves to pull out their
trusty radar guns to clock bikers to
make sure they are traveling the
specified fifteen miles per hour?
It should be considered that not
all students fall into the rules men-
tioned, but all students must suffer.
Although it is reasonable to enforce
the laws, a mandatory bicycle sticker
is ridiculous. If ECU needs extra
revenue, try finding it somewhere
else instead of using a cover up.
Brent Hoggard
Industrial Technology
Senior
Gary Bauer, President Reagan's domestic policy
adviser, is the New Right remnant at the White
House. Bauer is responsible for blocking White
House support for a federal law banning discrimina-
tion against AIDS victims. He's convinced such
legislation is both unnecessary and dangerous.
The White House role in enacting a federal ban
on AIDS discrimination is pivotal. Congress has
refused to pass such a ban, but Republican opposi-
ton might dissolve if Reagan called for one. Chiefly
because of Bauer, he didn't
Here's how it happened. Bauer got bad news
one morning in late July as he was leaving the White
House on a family vacation. James Watkins, the
chairman of the president's commission on AIDS,
had already gone on record in favor of protecting
AIDS victims under federal anti-discrimination
laws. Now, Dr. D. Ian MacDonald, the White House
official who'd been asked to study the commission's
report, was going to do the same.
The afternoon before, at a meeting of White
I louse aides including MacDonald, the consensus
had been the other way, Bauer's way. Bauer had
argued his side strenuously. But MacDonald had
changed his mind, Bauer was told. A call to
MacDonald confirmed it.
Bauer was furious. His views that MacDonald's
recommendation was critical. If MacDonald
changed his mind, Bauer was told. A call to
MacDonald confirmed it.
Bauer was furious. His view was that
MacDonald's recommendation was critical. If
MacDonald joined Watkins in urging an anti-bias
law, the president would be put in a box, Bauer
figured. It would be awkward for him to buck both
Watkins and his own adviser.
Bauer called a White House aide. He said he'd
resign if the president was forced into backing a
federal anti-bias law. And he'd go public and ex-
plain exactly why he was resigning. Then he pro-
ceeded to the airport, and to his vacation in the
Kentucky woods.
Bauer didn't hear a word from the White House.
But a few days later he watched MacDonald's press
conference at the White House on CNN. He was
delighted. A new law may never be needed,
MacDonald said. "States and communities are
coming up with laws or already have taken care of
this problem he said. "And that should cover
people in the workplace
Bauer's forte is making the most out of what
appear to be insignificant assignments. In January
1987, for instance, the president's "legislative and
administrative message to Congress which is
mostly boilerplate, said the administration would
pursue "pro-family guidelines" in its "family re-
port Nine months later Reagan issued a "family
executive order" that called on Bauer to come up
with specific policies to implement the guidelines.
Bauer was more than happy to comply.
By early last summer Bauer had his recommen-
dations. He circulated his ideas to others on the
White House staff. He accepted dozens of suggest
changes. But when the suggestions kept coming anc
stylisitic changes in his draft were proposed
stiffened. He told Rhett Dawson, the White Hoi
staff secretary, that the proposals had to be dis
patched to Reagan. They were.
Reagan bought all of them. "Once you get soi
thing like this on his desk, he inevitably does th
right thing� in both meanings of the word, said
Bauer.
What Reagan signed was a series of memos I
members of his Cabinet. The secretary of agricultun
was ordered to test the use of housing vouchers I
the poor in rural areas. The attorney general .
instructed to draft legislation "requiring that no bill
be reported to the Senate or House oi Repres
lives by any committee of either house unless sucl
bill is accompanied by a Family Impact Statement
The secretary ofo education was told to "develop a
model policy that agencies could use to make the
receipt of federal funds contingent upon institul
taking appropriate steps to create a drug-free en i
ronment
Those memos drew little reaction. But the one U
Otis Bowen, the secretary of health and human
scrvcies, gut a lot. He was told to make sure that
government educational programs promote Sexual
abstinence among teens, and to bar the Use ot federal
funds for distributing contraceptives in schools
"without parental permission The touchiest or
dealt with fetal research, a new area of concern for
the anti-abortion movement. Bauer believes that iv
of fetal tissue or organs from aborted babies is mor
ally wrong.
The memo said Bowen must "develop options
such as an executive order to protect unborn or
newborn children from experimentation, researcl
and organ transplantation, except in cases where thi
unborn or newborn child would itself directly bene
fit by any such procedures to which it was sub
jected That doesn't require a total ban on the us,
fetal tissue, but it comes close. Bowen s agency is
none too keen on a bin.
To make matters worse, Bauer jumped the gun
Six days before the presidential memo went to
Bowen, Bauer sent a draft executive order to him It
was marked "eyes only" and "confidential but it
quickly got around HHSand was leaked to thepress
Bowen never answered Bauer's letter, but he com-
plained to a reporter that he didn't know if White
House instructions on the issue were coming from
Reagan or Bauer. This prompted Nancy Risque, the
Cabinet secretary, to call Bowen and assure him
Reagan wants to limit the use of fetal tissue.
An aide says Bowen will give the White House
a progress report in December when a advisory
committee of scientists gives him its findings on the
issue. Before that, he shouldn't act.
Housing prices need to take slow downturn
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
Th� New Kgpublk
The good burghers of Yonkers, N.Y say they
are not racists for opposing the construction of
public housing in their middle-class neighborhoods.
They say their real concern is real estate values.
Actually, I believe them. Or at least, I find it plau-
sible.
According to one Yonkers real estate agent, a
three-bedroom house purchased for $18,000 to
$30,000 in the mid-1950s would sell for 10 times as
much today. For these homeowners, this unex-
pected bonanza is their nest egg. (Nationally, real
estate is 60 percent to 70 percent of the average
person net worth)
If the realtor is right that public housing might
knock 10 percent � $25,000 or so � off of nearby
house prices, that seems reason enough for Yonkers'
panic. Thus the real significance of the Yonkers
episode may be to illustrate again how our society is
being twisted and torn by the enormous run-up in
real estate prices.
There are signs the run-up may be over, and
growing nervousness that real estate may be head-
ing for a crash. Nationally, house prices are just
barely rising. The median price of an existing home
rose 3.7 percent during the year ending in July.
That's less than inflation, and much less than the
average owner's mortgage rate.
The main reason to think a real estate crash
might be coming is the huge gap between the cost of
owning a house and the cost of renting one. For two
decades, house prices have gone up twice as fast as
rents. A four-bedroom house in a fancy Washington
suburb might cost $500,000 (up from $400,000 last
year). That house can be rented for $2,400 a month.
Figuring everything, the cost of buying a house in
Washington is more than double the cost of renting
one.
Why would someone pay twice as much to live
in the same house? Yes, there are tax benefits, but not
nearly enough to explain the differential. The ro-
mance of home ownership may be part of it. How-
ever, the main reason is clearly the belief that prices
will keep going up. When today's price is simply a
bet that tomorrow's price will be even higher, you
have a classic speculative bubble. As investors in
pyramid schemes throughout the ages have learned
�and as stock market investors were reminded last
year � the "greater fool" theory can't be right for-
ever.
Of course people have been saying this about
real estate for years, and have always been wrong, so
far. What's the evidence this time is different?
First, there's today's price slowdown, which
comes when times are generally good and interest
rates ae relatively low. A market that's counting on
future increases to support today's prices can turn a
slowdown into a rout pretty quickly. Second, there's
tax reform. Slicing marginal tax rates makes tax
deductions less valuable, thereby increasing the
after-tax cost of home ownership. This is still just
beginning to sink in.
Third, there are 28 percent more houses on the
market than a year ago. That's ominous. Comstock
Partners, a New York financial firm that is spreading
the real-estate crash scare, advises homeowners to
sell out and rent. I certainly lack the courage to take
this advice. But if even a few homeowners become
persuaded that prices are about to topple, then
they'll be right: Prices will topple.
A real estate crash would be far more traumatic
than the stock market crash. Not only do people have
more invested in their houses than in stocks, but that
investment is heavily leveraged through mortgages.
A 25 percent drop in prices (which Houston has
already suffered) would wipe out many homeown-
ers' entire investment. No one knows to what extent
the consumer boom of recent years has been fed by
people's belief that their houses were making them
rich. A real estate nosedive might easily lead to the
recession the stock market crash did not.
On the other hand a decline in house prices, if
not a crash, would be a healthy development. Who
would really be harmed? Not voung people who
haven't yet bought a home. In 1950, it cost 14 percent
of the average 30-year-olds's income to buy the
median home. Today it costs 44 percent. At those
levels, many can't even qualifv for a mortgage. The
fraction of young Americans owning homes has
dropped dramatically. Most people who ahead)
own homes are either going to live in them for main
more years or trade up. Regional variations ma
affect them, but in general the houses they sell and
the houses they buy will go up or down together
The group hurt by a downturn in house prices
would be older people selling their last house. But
these folks are likely to have bought for a small
fraction of today's prices. It's rough justice if thev
make a smaller profit and home ownership becomes
more affordable for young people.
The bloated prices of exisiting houses may make
the owners feel rich, but they add nothing to the
nation's wealth. A house is exactly the same house
after it doubles in "value In fact, as my favorite
economist, Henry George, pointed out a century
ago, inflated land values make the economy less
efficient. They operate like a tax on the truly produc-
tive factors, labor and capital. Housing inflation has
depressed our ecomony, frenzied our psyches, di-
vided our society. A turnaround would be ner-
vewracking, but no bad thing.
Riotin
ALGIERS. Algeria
Soldiers shet protesters am
helicopters buzzed riot at
quell unrest that killed
in coastal desert and rno
areas hit hard by high unefl
ment and spirahng prices
President Chadli Bern
prepared to address th
night while the countrv r�
under a stat. t emergenr
nighttime curtow
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said he would Hkeh app
calm in his s p.m
message
They suggested I �
tress this aj
the economic crisis
gered the violent i
worst in this, rtl
since its m I
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Bush and
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Democratic v
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ton
Statewide polls
Ohio New Mexico and
showed Bush
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ing Dukakis 49-37 pert
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cided
The poll had a mar,
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Bush led in e
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26-point advantage il
where despite th
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Both are high sd
toral College states H
21 electoral votes; lu
third biggest prize wU
The survey als
Alabama. Delaware
Maryland Mississii
homa. South Carolina
West Virginia Geoi
tacky. Arkansas and
hna
With his supped
the South Push turnoj
non Sunday to the M
the crucial state of llh
has 24 electoral votes
The vice preside)
wife, Barbara, rode
fashioned fire truck a
mile parade rout,
Cicero and Per win. u
Houbv Day parade. a
vakian celebration





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11,1988 5
Ke.d
vRveK$

s ban
- ideas to others on the
i repted dozensol suggested
ions kept coming and
i wore proposed, he
awson the White House
proposals had to be dis-
re
I hem Once ou get some-
jsk, he inevitabl) does the
L inings of the word said
n as a series of niomos to
tarj of agriculture
housing vouchers for
ittomey general was
ion "requiring that no bill
or House of Kepresenta-
f either house unless such
amily Impact Statement
n was told to "develop a
mid use to make the
ntingent upon institution
to create a drug-free envi-
httle reaction. But the one to
Itarv of health and human
as told to make sure that
1 programs promote Sexual
and to baftHe' iise" M federal
contraceptives in schools
ssion The touchiest order
th, a new area of concern for
fment. Bauer believes that use
trom aborted babies is mor-
must "develop options
rder to protect unborn or
n experimentation, research
ion, except in cases where the
liid would itself directly bene-
piures to which it was sub-
quirea total ban on the use of
ks close. Bowen's agency is
In
rse, Bauer jumped the gun
presidential memo went to
(raft executive order to him. It
(ly" and "confidential but it
IS and was leaked to the press.
?d Bauer's letter, but he com-
that he didn't know if White
the issue were coming from
prompted Nancy Risque, the
call Bowen and assure him
It the use of fetal tissue.
pen will give the White House
December when a advisory
Its gives him its findings on the
lshouldn't act.
nturn
a healthy development. Who
ned? Not young people who
lome. In 1950, it cost 14 percent
?ar-olds's income to buy the
it costs 44 percent. At those
en qualify for a mortgage. The
jmcricans owning homes has
fy. Most people who already
going to live in them for many
up. Regional variations may
?neral the houses they sell and
ill go up or down together.
y a downturn in house prices
le selling their last house. But
to have bought for a small
Inces. It's rough justice if they
I and home ownership becomes
wung people.
fs of exisiting houses may make
but they add nothing to the
)use is exactly the same house
�alue In fact, as my favorite
eorge, pointed out a century
lues make the economy less
like a tax on the truly produc-
eapital. Housing inflation has
ny, frenzied our psyches, di-
tumaround would be ner-
id thing.
ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) �
Soldiers shot protesters and army
helicopters buzzed riot areas to
quell unrest that killed at least 200
in coastal, desert and mountain
areas hit hard by high unemploy-
ment and spiraling prices.
President Chadli Bendjedid
prepared to address the nation to-
night while the country remained
under a state of emergency and a
nighttime curfew was in effect in
the capital, Algiers. Observers
said he would likely appeal for
calm in his 8 p.m. (3 p.m. EDT)
message.
They suggested he could but-
tress this appeal by addressing
the economic crisis which trig-
gered the violence Tuesday - the
worst in this North African nation
since its independence from
France in 1962.
Unrest hit the western port
city of Oran to Annaba in the east.
Rioting also was reported in a
dozen provincial centers, includ-
ing in the southern desert, said
Interior Minister El Hadi Khediri,
appearing on state television over
the weekend.
"We have tried in vain to stop
the troubles Khediri said.
In Algiers, where the violence
started, clashesbetween the army
and rioters spread late Saturday
and early Sunday as protesters
defied a 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. curfew
and a ban on demonstrations.
Only brief volleys of gunfire
were heard early today. Kouba,
on the southern fringes of Algiers,
apparently suffered the largest
number of dead and injured.
Hospital sources reported more
than 60 people killed when the
army, according to witnesses,
fired into a crowd after it repeat-
edly ignored calls to disperse.
Information compiled from
hospital and police sources in
various parts of the country indi-
cated about 200 people killed and
several hundred injured. It
seemed likely the actual death toll
was higher.
No official death toll has been
issued.
The unrest began about 10
days ago with non-violent strikes
demanding higher wages to keep
up with inflation.
Algeria's annual unemploy-
ment rate is estimated at 40 per-
cent and food prices have risen by
at least 40 percent since January.
But the government so far has
vowed to stick to an austerity plan
prompted in part by the falling
price of oil, the nation's main
export.
Bendjedid proclaimed a state
of emergency Thursday. On Fri-
day, the Military Command or-
dered soldiers to shoot if demon-
strators failed to disperse.
At Mustapha Hospital in
Algiers, physicians moved pa-
tients out of the hospital to make
room for the hundreds of injured
demonstrators.
"It's terrible. Beirut. Like
Beirut. The same thing said a
Frenchman arriving Sunday in
Paris on Air Algeria's only sched-
uled flight of the day. He was
interviewed on French television.
He was not identified.
Algiers was mostly calm
Sunday as army helicopters
armed with rockets flew at low
altitudes, apparently to discour-
age the formation of crowds.
Algerian radio reported out-
breaks of violence had occurred in
the Kabyle mountain region east
of Algiers, as well as in Ouargla,
Djelfa and other centers of the
southern desert.
An Islamic fundamentalist
group calling itself the Movement
for Algerian Renewal on Sunday
demanded removal of the presi-
dent, Interior Minister Khediri
and the head of the ruling Na-
tional Liberation Front Party,
Mohamed Cherif Messaadia.
Gordon's
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Free Pregnancy Test-
. Confidential Counseling
Bush and Dukakis setting strategy for
second debate set onThursday
l
George Bush and Michael
Dukakis focused on strategy and
studied for their second presiden-
tial debate as state polls across the
nation indicated that the Republi-
can nominee is solidifying his
lea4 over the Democratic chal-
lenger.
The vice president spent sev-
eral hoursat his Washington, D.C.
home Sunday morning preparing
for the debate before traveling to
Illinois where he marched in a
Slavic parade and vowed never to
forget the Soviet presence in East-
ern Europe.
Dukakis was closeted for
about six hours with a dozen
advisers at the Park Plaza Hotel in
Boston where they discussed
strategy for the confrontation
scheduled for Thursday in Los
Angeles.
The Democratic nominee was
speaking at a Long Island school
today before marching with New
York Gov. Mario Cuomo in the
Columbus Day parade in New
York City.
Bush was addressing a
Knights of Columbus meeting in
Trenton, N.J where aides said he
would discuss crime and the
rights of victims.
The GOP nominee's running
mate, Dan Quayle, was cam-
paigning in Detroit and Farming-
ton Hills, Mich in addition to
Akron and Toledo, Ohio.
Democratic vice presidential
nominee Lloyd Bentsen was tend-
ing to Senate duties in Washing-
ton.
Statewide polls in Kansas,
Ohio, New Mexico and Missouri
showed Bush leading Dukakis
while a survey of voters in 15
Southern and border states found
the Republican nominee holding
a 12-point regional advantage
over his Democratic rival.
The poll of 2,102 registered
voters, conducted last week by
The Atlanta Journal-
Constitution, showed Bush lead-
ing Dukakis 49-37 percent with 12
percent of those surveyed unde-
cided.
The poll had a margin of error
of plus or minus two percentage
points.
Bush led in every state, in-
cluding Florida, where he held a
26-point advantage, and Texas,
where despite the presence of
Lone Star state Sen. Lloyd
Bentsen on the Democratic ticket,
the GOP nominee enjoys a 14-
point lead.
Both are high-stakes Elec-
toral College states. Florida has
21 electoral votes; Texas is the
third biggest prize with 29.
The survey also included
Alabama, Delaware, Louisiana,
Maryland, Mississippi, Okla-
homa, South Carolina, Virginia,
West Virginia, Georgia, Ken-
tucky, Arkansas and North Caro-
lina.
With his support strong in
the South, Bush turned his atten-
tion Sunday to the Midwest and
the crucial state of Illinois, which
has 24 electoral votes.
The vice president and his
wife, Barbara, rode in an old-
fashioned fire truck along a two-
mile parade route between
Cicero and Berwin, in the annual
Houby Day parade, a Chechoslo-
vakian celebration of bountiful
mushroom crops.
"This is the day we celebrate
family, we celebrate faith and we
celebrate freedom Bush said in
brief remarks before the parade
began. "And none of us will ever
forget there is not freedom in
Eastern Europe, and I have
pledged, as president, to never
forget that
Earlier, Bush prepared for
the nationally broadcast, 90-min-
ute debate scheduled for Thurs-
day in the Pauley Pavilion on the
University of California at Los
Angeles campus.
The date had depended on
the length of the American
League baseball playoffs, but that
series ended Sunday when the
Oakland A's completed a sweep
of the Boston Red Sox.
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6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11,1988
Classifieds
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ROOMMATE WANTED ChrisHan male
roommate to share new mobile home 10
minutes from campus Non smoker,
please Call 1 lugh at 75h-6851 after 5:00
p.m.
HOUSEMATE: Quiet MF, wanted by
faculty member 3 bedroom house, newly
remodeled, walking distance campus.
Rent and lease negotiable Call 752 3677
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 182 Buick Century Limited,
AC, Cruise, PS, PB High mileage but
sharp; in good running condition $2800.
Call 758-7413 anytime
FOR SALE: 184 Mada B-2000 Pick up.
High road miles. Topper. New tires. Ex-
cellent condition $3400 Call 757-6281.
FOR SALE: 182 Vokswagon Jetta. 5
speed Diesal 87K. Excellent condition.
$2700. Call 757-6281.
STEREO FOR SALE: Dual cassette, rum
table, digital receiver, 2 speakers. Excel-
lent condition $125. Call 756-9420 after 7
p.m.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE: Papers, SI 50 per
page Resume's written and typed, $20.00
Close to campus. Call Joy at 758-7423 be-
tween 6 and 9 p.m.
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2 00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check We also offer
Resume' production, and other business
and professional services. Call 757-3111
MF for more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes Term
Papers, Theses, etc. Great Rates. Call
Becky 758-1161 before 5, 752-1321 after 5.
AT YOUR SERVICE:
TypingTypingTvping. Affordable and
Professional. Call 355-6634 after 6:00 p.m
PAPERS, RESUMES, ETC. done by
Desktop Publishing or Word Processing.
Rush jobs accepted Call 752-1933
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING Real
Cheap. Affordable Rates! Call 752-5084.
HELP WANTED
ON CAMPUS TRAVEL REP. OR OR-
GANIZATION NEEDED to promote
Spring Break Trip to FloridaTexas Earn
money, free trips, and valuable work ex-
perience Call lntercampus Programs. 1-
800-433-7747.
OVERSEAS JOBS:
$10,000-$! 05,000 yr!
Also Cruiseships
Now hiring! 320
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
"Personal arid Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru Sat- Low
CmI Termination to 20 werka of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
Ustings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-llt6.
SPRING BREAK TOUR PROMOTER-
ESCORT: Energetic person, (MF), to
take signups for our FLORIDA tours. We
furnish all materials for a successful pro-
motion. Good PAY and FUN. Call CAM-
PUS MARKETING at 1-800-777-2270.
PART-TIME BABYSITTER NEEDED
on Tues. & Thurs. (call if can work either
day). 8:30 a.m4 p.m. Must have own
transportation. Call 756-6319.
MKTG. FIRM seeks individual to work
ft or pt marketing credit cards to stu-
dents on campus. Flexible hours. Earn b
w $90.00-$150.00day. Call 1-800-932-
0528, Ext. 25!
OPPORTUNITY IN THE TRAVEL IN-
DUSTRY: The 1 college tour operator is
looking for an efficient, responsible, and
organized campus representative to mar-
ket a Spring Break trip on campus Earn
free trips, and good commissions while
gaining great business experience. For
more information, call 1-800-999-4300.
NEED OYSTER SHUCKERS AND CA-
TERERS: Apply in person at Riverside
Ovster Bar, 17N. Green St.
PERSONALS
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards? Call
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMEN" j
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
� Acroaa From Highway Patrol Station
$325 a month
Contact J.T or Tommy WUliama
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8,12 - 530 p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clfan and quiet one bedroom furnlar-id
apartmenta, energy eificient, free watei and
sewer, optional washers, dryera, cable XV.
Couples or singles only. $206 a month, 6 month
lease MOBILF. HOME RENTAIS - couples or
singles Apartrrent and mobile home in Azale.
C.ardeiis near Brook Valley Country CJuV
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
Earlvis, the mad baseball buyer. I pay
damn good money for cards of any year,
any shape, and any ondihon. If you need
party money, Big E is the one to call. 757-
6366, leave a message.
LOST: If anyone found 4 rings (dassring,
shrimp ring, birthstone ring, sweetheart
ring) in the bathroom at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center on Friday (930), PLEASE
CALL MICHELLE at 752-8463. RE-
WARD!
CHRISTOPHER: You're doing a terrific
job! I'm so proud of you. I love you with all
my heart! Your Sweetheart, Joan.
THET A CHI. The Brothers and Pledges of
Pi Kappa Phi would like to congratulate
Theta Chi for regaining their charter. Glad
to have you back.
KA'S: Can't wait to see where you were
when the ship went down, tonite! Get
ready for an awesome time. The Sigmas
KAPPA SIGMA: We had a great time
building the float with you guys Thanks
for having us over! The Sigmas.
MARTA JOYNER AND KRIS KELLY
Congratulations on making the 1 lome
coming Court. We love you. The pledges
and sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
THE PLEDGES OF PI KAPPA ALPHA:
Would like to thank the pledges of Delta
Zeta for the great time we had with you
PI KAPPA ALPHA PLEDGE AUCTION
SUNDAY: Oct. 23 at the Attic Stay tuned
for details.
NEW DELI KEEPS J AMMIN! On Thurs
day come hear the SWAMP GYPSIES,
featuring Mike 1 lamer, Sue Ludeke & Bob
Gravelin. They play between 9-11, after 11
p.m. is DEAD HEAD JAM Fridav, don't
miss WIDESPREAD PANIC, or you'll be
sorry.
WAY TO GO MB Sure helps the Alpha
Xi Delta rep!
KA Thanks for all the tun' You gu) - -
know how tii do it right Love the
Omega's
CONGRATULATIONS On your new
charter Theta Chi l tin hi Omega's.
THANKS FOR ALL YOUR HH P JOHN
CARTER! Love the ("hi Omega's
CHI OMEGA PI UK.IS .t psyched.
Wecanhardlv wait Love the sisters of 'i
Omega
KAREN, STEVL. DA ID hanks i
guys for a most enlightening sctt.
Student Union forever! 1 ove, Karen i.
MASSAGE C1INR Physical therap�
students ar having .i m tssage lini
Tuesday, October II from 5 - �
at the Physical Therap) 1 al �
I lealth Bldg Advanced ti kets ai -
for 10 nun and SI 2 at the d
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
$ NEED CASH? $
Loans On tc Buying Guns
TV Stereo, Gold Jewelry, coins,
most anything of value
. Southern Gon & Pawn, Inc.
$ 752-2464 6
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
EL-TOftO
���
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 700
IWALK-INS WELCOME
20 TEARS OP SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Eastgate Shopping Center
(Acroaat from Highway Patrol Station)
Behind Car Quest Auto Part
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318
SALES POSITION AVAILABLE
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications lor an
advertising sales representative.
Requirements:
Previous Sales Experience
Good Personality & Professional Appearam e
Excellent Communication Skills
Good Organizational Skills
Must Be Dependable & Show Initiative & Enthusiasm
Must Have Own Transportation
Must Have The Desire To Excel
Apply in Person at
The East Carolinian
Please Include Resume
Publications Building
(In Front of Joyner Library)
No Phone Calls Please!
Announcements
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help vou find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase your
"fun" budget,
�opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
Thurs Oct. 13, 4 p.m. rm. 2006; Thurs
Oct. 20, 1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon Oct. 24,1
p.m rm. 2010; Thurs, Oct. 27,4 p.m rm.
2006; Mon Oct. 31, 4 p.m rm. 2006.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fri.
night at 700.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 700in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Ohio Ballet will initiate the 1988-89
Performing Art Series on Oct. 12 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium The program for
the evening includes: "Unhtled" (first
performed by PHILOBOLUS in 1975),
"Summer Night" (choreographed by
Heinz Poll), "Gravity" (a new work by
Laura Dean), 'Triptych" (choreographed
by Heinz Poll to Mendelssohn's "Piano
Concerto No 2, D Minor), Tickets for this
outstanding event are now on sale in tne
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 757-6611, ext. 266. This event
is sponsored by the Performing Arts
Committee and the Department of Uni-
versity Unions.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Business students interested in scholar-
ships should secure forms from one of the
following dept offices: Accounting �
GCB 3208, Decision Sciences � 3418, Fi
nance � 3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414. All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210),
Chairman of School of Business Scholar-
ship Committee, by Oct 14. Students may
apply for one or more of the scholarships
listed below Planters Bank Scholarship (3
at SI000 each), University Book Exchange
( 2 at $500 each), NCNB ($500), J. Fred
Hamblen ($200) Credit Women Interna-
tional ($200), Cameron-BrownFirst
Union Scholarship (3 at $500 each), FOR
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY: Latney
W. Pittard Memorial, Raleigh-Durham
Chapter Institute of Internal Auditors
(S350), National Association of Account-
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship ($500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
ONLY: Archie R. Bumette ($600), Ward
Real Estate Scholarship ($300).
KAPPA DELTA PI
Organizational meeting Oct. 11 at 7:30
p.m rm. 129 Speight. For members and
any interested potential members.
The yearbook staff has a few copies of the
1983-1986 Buccaneers left in the office. If
you would like to receive a copy of any of
these books, please come by the Bucca-
neer office and pick one up. They are in
front of the office door, and anyone is
welcome to receive a copy. We are located
in front of Joyner Library on the second
floor of the Publications Bldg.
ECU FORENSIC SOCIETY
Interested in competing in Intercollegiate
Debate, Public Speaking, Oral Interpre-
tive Reading, or Dramatic Interpretation?
Well, the ECU Forensics Society is for you.
We meet every Tues. night at 8:00 in 211
Messick Theatre Arts Bldg.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Attention all ECU students, faculty,
alumni and parents of ECU students!
Why spend another dull Thanksgiving
when you could be in the exciting city of
lights. New York City. Come join the Stu-
dent Union's Travel Committee excursion
to New York City, Nov. 23-27. For more
info, call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611.
MINORITY STUDENT ORG.
ELECTION of officers for the MINORITY
STUDENT ORGANIZATION will be
held on Oct. 11 at 500 p.m. in Speight 129.
Students interested in running for an of-
fice or nominating another student
should contact Dr. Smith (205 Whichard
or extension 6495) NO LATER THAN Oct.
7. Positions available are PRESIDENT,
VICE PRES SEC. AND TREASURER.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to our Bible
Studies every Tues. night at 7:00 p.m. in
Rawl 130. Bring a friend. For more info
call Jim at 752-7199.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
CASH, VACATION, & PRIZES: HOW?
By playing the hottest business t,ame in
town sponsored by Wall Street and
AT&T. There are over 400 chances to win.
The top 10 performers will receive a cash
prize, with first place performer receiving
$25,000 cash; and the top 100 performers
each month will receive athletic shoes
from Reebok and a wrist watch, courtesy
of Beneton by Bulova. Ypu can participate
for only $49.95. Interested participants
can register on the first floor of the GCB on
Wed. and Thurs. between 10-2 p.m. or by
contacting Student Financial Mgmt. As-
soc. members or call the FTNA dept. 757-
6670.
m n YEARBOOKS
SMI
The Society of Manufacturing Engineers
is having a called meeting Oct. 11 in Rawl
106 at 4:00. Guest speaker�Micky R.L.
McDowell, Dept. head for AT&T. Subject.
New Technology in Fiber Optics. All
members and interested persons are
urged to attend!
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Underwater Hockey games are scheduled
from 7:00 p.m. thru 830 p.m. at Memorial
Gym pool. An approved Club Sport, new
members are welcome at any time �
equipment needs include: mask, fins,
snorkel. Come out and try the newest
sport on campus.
INJURY EVALUATION
Injury assessment will be performed by a
certified trainer each Wed. and Thurs.
from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the Memorial
Gymnasium Sports Care Room A. Recom-
mendation for rehabilitative processes
will be given for all interested. For addi-
tional info call 757-6387.
SNCAE
There will be a meeting on Tues Oct 11 at
5 p.m. Joan Shappley will speak to us on
how to arrange our classrooms. ALL
EDUCATION MAJORS ARE WELCOME
TO ATTEND!
PRFPROFESSIONAL HEALTH
ALLIANCE
The PreProfessional Health Alliance will
hold its first meeting of the 88-89 school
year, on Thurs Oct. 13 at 530 p.m. in
room 247 Mendenhall. Any student inter-
ested in a health-related career is invited
to attend.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
The Student Financial Management As-
soc. will meet Wed Oct. 12 at 430 p.m. in
room 3009 of the GCB. The guest speaker
will be Dorson White, V.P. for Business
Services at BB&T. All interested students
are invited to attend the meeting.
Program, is coming to ECU to speak on
summer jobs in state government. The
presentation will be on Mon Nov. 21 at
10:00 a.m. in 1029 GCB. The ten-week in-
ternship program, in the Raleigh area, is
open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors
currently enrolled in college. (Those en-
tering Graduate School as of May 1989 are
not eligible).
CLASS PICTURES
Any student wishing to have a dass pic-
ture taken for the yearbook now has that
chance. Qass photographs will be taken
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 in the Student Store from 9
a.m. till 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 430 p.m.
each day. The yearbook is not your year-
book until you are in it.
ECU SURF CLUB
The Surfing Club will have a meeting
Tues Oct. 11 at 7:00 p.m. in Mendenhall
rm. 221. The meeting is very important.
Everyone is welcome.
NTF (SPECIALTY AREA)
The National Teacher Exam�Specialty
Area�will be offered at ECU on SAT.
NOV. 12,1988. Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to the Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 911-R, Prince-
ton, NJ 08541. Applications must be post-
marked no later than OCT. 14, 1988.
Applications may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, Room 105, Speight
Bldg ECU.
AHPAT
The Allied Health Professions Admission
Test will be offered at ECU on SAT NOV.
12, 1988. Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to The Psychologi-
cal Corp 555 Academic Court, San Anto-
nio, TX 78204-0952 to arrive by OCT. 11,
1988.
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
Have you started working on your PRO-
FESSIONAL FILE yet? Come see com-
pleted files and get some great ideas at the
next (EQ2 meeting! Everyone is welcome
to come on Wed Oct. 12 at 4:00 p.m. in
Speight 129. Please join us!
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will hold a business meet-
ing Oct. 13th from 7-730 p.m. in room 205
Austin. All those interested please attend.
We will discuss purchasing tee-shirts.
MINORITY CAREER
EXPLORATION PAY
Wed Oct. 19, from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
in Mendenhall. Representatives from
various career fields will be available to
talk about career opportunities. Spon-
sored by the Office of Minority Student
Affairs and Career Planning and Place-
ment Services.
Thurs, Oct. 13 at 8:00 pm. for registration
and a free demonstration
ADVANCEMENT
OF MANAGEMENT
Society for the Advancement of Mgmt is
sponsoring a tour of the DuPont plant in
Kinston on Wed Oct. 12. We will meet in
GCB room 1026 at 3:00 and depart shortly
after. Anyone interested in going should
see Dr. Koulamis in GCB 3111 or contact
Angela Dixon.
JUNIORS. SENIORS. &
GRAD. STUDENTS
Sign up this week for your own Visa or
Master Card with Sovran Bank The Soci-
ety for the Advancement of Mgmt. will
have a table set up in front of the student
store thrcugh Thurs. from 9:00-400
Sovran Bank is offering great terms to full-
time students, so come by and apply this
week.
GAMMA PET A PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold a meeting Tues Oct. 11
at 8:00 in Jenkins Auditorium. New
members are welcomed.
SNCAE
Do you know all you need to know about
taking the NATIONAL TEACHER
EXAM? There will be a workshop for the
NTE Professional Knowledge area Wed
Oct. 12,4:30-8:00 p.m. Cost is $5.00 Regis-
ter in Speight, room 154. First 25 people to
register will be taken, so hurry! See Sherry
Tripp. It's worth your time to know!
SKIING TRIP
Be sure to attend the Intramural Skiing
Trip registration meeting from Aug 22 to
Oct. 22. Now you can ski the slopes and
leam the,ropes in this fun filled trip!
VON-3 BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Free
Throw Contest registration meeting held
Nov. 1 at 5:00 p.m. in B1O103. Play begins
shortly afterwards! Interested in officiat-
ing? Attend the first officials clinic on Oct.
25 at 8:00 p.m. at MG102. For additional
info call Dave Hall at 757-6387.
CO-KEf FLAG FOOTBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
Flag Football meeting held Oct 25 at 5:00
p.m. in BIO 109. Play begins shortly after-
ward! Interested in officiating? Attend the
first officials clinic Oct. 25 at 800 pm in
MG102. For additional info call Dave
Hall at 757-6387.
SOCCER
Be sure to attend the Intramui il
registration mooting hold Oct 19 at 6 �
p.m in GCB 1026 Play begins shorl
afterward! Interested in officiating? V'
tend the first officials clinic Oct - �
p.m. in MG 102 For additional int.
Dave Hall at 757-6387
RHO EPS I ION
Members or anyone interested in Rho Ep
silon National Real Estate Fratemit) aro
reminded of a mandatory meeting
Wed , Oct. 12 at 3:30 p m. in GCB 3009 I
vou cannot make the meeting or have ar y
questions, please call Todd Kirkpatrick a:
752-3642
WYNTON MARSALIS CON-
CERT
The Dept. of University Unions is proud
to present Wynton Marsalis in concert
Tues Nov. 1 at 8:00 p m in W right Audi
tonum. Tickets go on sale tor this Per
forming Arts Series event on Mon , CX I
10. Winner of a Grammy Award tor both
classical ami jazz performances Mr Mar
salis is sure to bring an energetic and en
tertaining show to Wright Auditorium
For further details, contact The Contra
Ticket Office, Mendenhall. or call I
757-6611.
SUMMER IOBS
Dr. Jack Vogt, a representative from the
Institute of Government Summer Intern
KARATECLUB
If you are interested in joining the ECU
Karate Club, come to Memorial Gym
BANNER CONTEST
Last chance to register your
organization's banner for the National
Alcohol Awareness Week Contest is 5
p.m. Frf Oct. 14 in 209 Whichard. Re-
member all banners will be judged at 4
p.m. Wed Oct. 19 at Ftcklen Stadium,
East service entrance. Call 757-6823 for
more info.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the Dec issue Themaga
zine is published twice a semester with
the first issue coming out in Oct This
special issue will ho a small magazine
with mainly general information
whereas the Doc issue will ho a larger -
containing news stones short stories
editorials, poetry, etc Articles ma be left
at the office or at the Media Board
Secretary's Office in the Publications
Bldg
VOLLEYBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural Voile)
ball registration meeting held (.Vt 19 at
5:00 p.m in GCB 1026 Play begins shortly
afterward! Interested in officiating? Tor
additional into, call DAve 1 lall at 7
6387.
WERE YOU A.BQ.Y-SCQLI?
East Carolina Council's Oder of the Ar
row Lodge, Croatan Lodge 117, is cole
bratingits50th Anniversary on Now 4 6 at
Bonner Scout Reservation All past mem
bers of Croatan Lodge are invited "Green
Bar Bill William 1 larcourt (Author of the
Boy Scout Handbook), will be our hon
ored guest In order to attend, vou must
preregister by Oct. 14 The cost will he
$12.00 for Sat and S15 for Fn Sun Regis-
tration includes all meals, acnvibes, and a
beautiful special edition patch Send
check with name and address to East
Carolina Council, O A 50th Annivcrsarv,
P.O. Box 1698, Kinston, N C 285(13 or call
(919) 522-1521.
ECU
0
m
'Hi
'fy
The headloss women is only
Shamlin had a good tirr�
Origin o
the irivet
By JIM SHAMI IN
��� w, -
Did ou t �
floated abo' c lh
Ferris wh �
fairs N .
Ono
can remember I
county fair in each count) i -
fair in each state and The V
Fair whi
planet I I it all b
Th
from Old French term I -
combination
"forum m n - nd
tae' h lida fhus a I
spe ial sort of mars j
on holidays rhis d
hardly befits the modem J
which is better de$cr�reti .
carnival a festivity il
purely for amusemc
Like that
the origin of the I
nebulous It is likely tl i I
aproductofapre-li stij
Before the exister
mative tribes would gather al
good hunt or much later a d
harvest. There would he a q
feast and a trad
skills
lne itablc a few of the w ar
would g: I istedandei .
spear-chuckling contest muej
the amusement of their I
non wives and offspring Or
haps the tarn - uld sa)
yeah, well m pig s bigj
you pig and they would bj
the animals out for a more
tne comparison.
A more reasonable expl
might derive from the overj
trade routes of Eastern
chants who drove their w
across Europe to ped
wares lor satet s sake
went in caravans, later c
Gypsy trams through the cl
nent. To attract customer
would bring musicians jugs
belly-dancers sv� ord-s all
ers and so forth
A documented theon
origin of fairs is provided In
nelious Walford. In hi;
Railroa
,

SPENCER, N C.
Dressed in traditional rail
clothes retired machinist J
Ruble and a handful oi othel
unteers are trying to resto
glorv what once was the 1
repair facility for steam lo"
lives in the South.
"What we're doing is fj
next generation Ruble
the restoration of Spencer
"We want them to be able td
something about their pastj
The railroad buffs he
turn the 57-acre site and its
ing buildings into a tran�
tion museum surpassed b
The Southern Ral
opened the Spencer Shops lj
because of its strategic lo1
halfwav between Washi
DC. and Atlanta. By 19:
facility employed nearly!
men and was capable of ser
100 steam locomotives a dJ
"In its heyday, one
pletely rebuilt locomotive





tefun
ruiht Love thehi
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XI I VIKHH I' OH
IM ;
tl P-Wlt
hod
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AVAILABLE
linian
UK 'i is It r an
i ksentative.
hits:
n at
lim'an
esume
klding
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'lease!
SOCCl K
RHO I PSJ1 ON
cu
i
rON MARSAI S CON-
CERT
��� 3rd for txjth
Mr Mar
an enerj ri indei
aim
� ntral
I XPRESSIONS
ie coming oul
short si
VOLLEYBAL1
d the Intramural
� meeting held Oct 19 at
B1 2 i'lav b
� dating
ii! DAve i Lall al 757
IEJCQ1 A liO) SCQUJJ
lina I i Ol ler of ttv
itai K' 1'
I. Oth Anniversary on N
1 ut Reservation All paM mem
It afan Lodge are invited "Green
l William riarcourt (Author of the
nut Handbook), wall ho our him
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
OCTOBER 11,1988 Page 7
Doing the county fair hop
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Sufi Writer
It's another ten minutes before
you reach the booth by the gate,
and another fifteen in queue for
tickets. "Two, please feeling the
It's Friday afternoon, classes are tingle of excitement returning,
over, and it's time to relax. Down-
town is the same old scene; some-
thing different is wanted, a
change of pace.
Thumbing through the pages of
The East Carolinian the answer is
minute ride.
After the ride is over, you de-
cide to eat some food from the
concession stand. Paying$7.50 for
two comdogs, an order of fries.
Six says an old woman in a and two cokes, you stand there
stained pink sweatshirt. She looks eating, you look at the crowd.
tired, as if she hasn't left the ticket
window for three days.
After buying the tickets, we
wade into another line which
found: the Pitt County Fair. So moves only a little faster. An old
you call a friend and say "Hey, man in a satin baseball jacket and
In the crowd, there are red-
necks, crying toddlers in K-Mart
jumpsuits, dazed-looking pre -
teens in plaid polyester pants,
obnoxious teenagers in baseball
caps and black tee-shirts, young
want to cruise the fair?" a John Deere cap takes the tickets punks in leather jackets, and
At 7:30 p.m you pick up the and lets you pass. Shuffling middle-aged people dressed in
date and cruise east towards through a throng of bewildered cellulose and baseball caps. It's
highway 256. A few miles down onlookers and uninformed depu- like double-coupons day at Farm
256, you see an array of neon and ties, the fair-goers veer to the left, Fresh. Bored, and perhaps dis-
flourescent lights in the distance away from the motor show and gusted, by the penny public, you
The headless women is only one of the big attractions at the annual Pitt County Fair. Reviewer Jim
Shamlin had a good time, but spent too much money. (Photo by Mark Love�Photolab)
Origin of fairs goes beyond
the invention of Ferris Wheel
before stopping in a queue of traf
fie in the left lane.
"Ooh the friend says, in child-
like anticipation, "The Ferris
Wheel
There are many attractions
which rise above the labyrinth of
booths below. The steam from
towards more civilized amuse-
ments.
"Let's ride the ferris wheel
suggests your date as you weave
through an arcade, ignoring the
calls of the red-faced carnies. You
nod and look around for a ticket
look around for a trash can. You
realize that you're standing on it.
After a gourmet junk food din-
ner, the 'Tilt-A-Whirl" ride looks
appealing. Then comes Sea
Dragon, "The Round-Up, The Oc-
topuss, and a few other rides
whose names soon blend in
among the rest.
Being the average male fair-
By JIM SHAMLIN
Staff Writer
Pai you ever wonder, as you
floated above the crowds inthe
Ferris wheel, how the tradition of
lairs began?
Once a year, for as long as you general area
can remember, there has been a
county fair in each county, a state
fair in each state, and The Worlds
Fair which encompasses the
planet. Where did it all begin?
The word "fair" itself comes
from Old French term "foire a
combination of Latin
nn "(marketplace) and "fer-
(holiday). Thus, a fair is a
special sort of marketplace held
on holidays. This definition
hardly befits the modem fair,
which is better described�1�-
"carnival"� a festivity held
purely for amusement.
Like that of many traditions,
Fairs, Past and Present (written
in 1863), he suggested that fairs
originated from the masses of pil-
grims who traveled to holy places
on holy days. Since the site itself
could not accomodate all pil-
grims, tents were pitched in its
And since money is easier to
carry than food, especially on a
long trek, they bought provisions
from the local peasantry. In order
to maximize their profits, these timc' disbanded when the plague
Lord Mayor of London, invested
over 500 marks (about 245 lbs. of
silver) to improve the roads in
specific consideration of fair-
goers. Of course, riots, crime, dis-
ease, and fires were always a risk
when people amassed, but the
benefit of commerce and taxes far
outweighed these dangers.
There was much legislature
over fairs. They were limited in
booth. When you find one, you
concession booths rises slowly have to wait in another queue to
towards the starless sky, visible purchase ten tickets for $3.50.
only in the faint light. The traffic Thereisalongerlineattheferris
begins to move; a Pitt County wheel. You're lucky that you
Deputy is directing the line of cars bought ten tickets; that's exactly 80cr' vou feel compelled to ask-
across the highway, into the park- what you need for the two of you vour date if she would like a
ing lot. to ride. As the wheel spins suffed animal. She tugs at your
Twenty minutes later, you're around, she looks at the array of sleeve, pointing to a four-foot
led to an available space which is amusements below. You smile at stuffed Gumby. It hangs in an
a 15-minute hike from the gates, her fervor, even though you're attractive display, along with six
So you begin the trek, navigating thinking about the twenty-min- others just alike,
puddles and squidgy spots. ute wait vou endured for the five- See EATING, page 8
Seventh daughter of seventh
daughter looks back on years
peasants began to set up booths in
the pilgrims' campsites.
One such early fair held on the
feast of Saint Bartolomew in
Smithfield, English Historians
struck, and moved out of the cit-
ies. Laws of the polity were ex-
tended to fairs, so that such things
as prostitution and gambling,
once popular events, were illegal-
wrestle. Eventually, the two
in of the fair is highly events grew together into a huge
nebulous. It is likelv that fairs are celebration.
a product ofapre-historic festival. Regardless of the precise on-
Before the existence of gods, pri- gins, the primary element of early
mative tribes would gather after a fairs was commerce. While a
good hunt or, much later, a good single person would not be will-
harvest. There would be a great ing to travel fifty miles to buy a
recognize Smithfield as the site ized at fairs as well. The English
where many tournaments were Courts of Piepowder arose with
held: The nobiliJty .would oust faU and disbanded with their
white tha pmnnrry, m anyana dissolution ThPSP courts fifiEMfld
else who couldn't afford shiny to settle disputes among the mer-
armor and gallant steeds, would chants and customers. They also
WHITEV1LLE, N.C. (AP) -
Hope Bennett was born 90 years
ago, the seventh daughter of a
seventh daughter and the middle
child among 13 in a family named
Formyduval.
She was 14 years old before
she visited a town, traveling by
least and a trade of crafts and
skills.
Inevitable, a few of the warriors
would get toasted and engage in a
pear-chuckling contest, much to
the amusement of their Cromag-
non wives and offspring. Or per-
haps the farmers would say, "Oh,
yeah, well my pig's bigger than
set standards of measure, quality,
and price. In fact, many of the
statutes of common law concern-
ing commerce originated in these
fair courts.
Since Walford's book was writ-
ten some time before the inven-
tion of the Ferris Wheel, the evolu-
tion of fairs since the mid-nine-
teenth century is left to specula-
tion. But the decline of mercentile
in fairs is apparent.
vou pig and they would bring as a standard forbidding
the animals out for a more objec-
tive comparison.
A more reasonable explanation
might derive from the overland
trade routes of Eastern mer-
single ounce of spice, a merchant
would gladly travel that distance
to sell a large quantity to throngs
of customers. Livestock sales,
once an individual event, soon :ourse
came to the fairs. There, judges such as candy.appies and
would rank livestock (including carmc, which are sti1
slaves captured in combat) to specifically sold at fairs. These
rank quality, whic would serve goods by and large arerV t ncces.
sities. Thus fairs, by and large, arc
no longer an event which is cru-
cial to world commerce.
Amusements, however, did not
fall by the wayside. There were
theatrical booths, competitions,
performances by artisans, and
even public executions. Fairs pro-
chants, who drove their wagons vided the opportunity for a single not sold, but the prizes they win
increase their value. Still, this
Live stock judging is still held at
fairs. The animals themselves are
across Europe to peddle their performance to attract a large
wares. For safety's sake, they audience, and hence a large sum
went in caravans, later called of admissions. Even though these
Gypsy trains, through the conn- amusements were many, they still
nent. To attract customers, they did not replace trade as the focus
would bring musicians, jugglers, �f the fairs,
bellv-danccrs, sword-swallow- Politicians, of course, could not
crs and so forth. ignore the fairs. An event of such
A documented theory of the proportions, properly taxed,
origin of fairs is provided by Cor- could generate much revenue for cantilism as the primary function
nelious Walford. In his book, a policy. Sir William Littlebury, of fairs.
event is of relatively minor impor-
tance to the general public.
There are still special events
such as motor shows and con-
certs. And there are a plethora of
mechanical contraptions which
whirl fairgoers about. Thus, en-
tertainment has surpassed mer-
�wagwraluug a iinnhiy luad-riom
her home in the Nakina commu-
nity to Vineland, now part of
Whiteville. It was enough to let
her know she was not going to
stay down on the farm.
At 16, she impetuously mar-
ried a railroad man three times
her age. Her family told her it
wouldn't work. It was 14 years
later, while living in Savannah,
Ga that she realized they were
right.
Freeing herself from a stifling
marriage, she enrolled in a cosme-
tology school in New York City,
arriving during Prohibition to
find herself sharing an apartment
building with some other enter-
prising North Carolinians who
had brought some home-grown
skills north with them. They were
operating stills in the apartment
building.
"I never knew what hospital-
ity was until I went to New York
she said in an interview with the
Wilmington Morning Star. She
befriended a manager at the Met-
ropolitan Opera House and got
season tickets for two years. She
also caught a stage show intro-
ducing a new act: a kid named
Bing Crosby.
In 1934, she returned to
Savannah to start a beauty shop
business. Between cutting hair
and giving permanents, she be-
gan dabbling in real estate, buy-
ing old houses and renovating
them, doing a lot of the work her-
self.
She can still recall the amaze-
ment olajjuildjngcojoiracior wJaa
arrived at a job site to discover
that she had already put down the
foundation herself.
"I can't believe I'm 90 years
old she said. "I can't do the
things 1 used to, but my mind and
my attitude toward life are the
same as they always were
Her second marriage was
happy and lasted 14 years before
her husband died of heart disease
She was alone for seven years
until one day she was sitting in a
supper club in Savannah when a
man playing the piano asked her
if she had any requests. He played
every tune she named.
James H. Bennett was his
name.
"They called me 'Red' for
years and years, but I lost most of
my hair so now they call me
Jimmy he said.
Bennett grew up in South
Carolina, enrolling at the Univer-
sity of South Carolina at the age of
15, the youngest freshman the
school had ever had.
Bennett played in the bands
of Tommy Dorsey and at the
Grand Ole Opry. During World
War II, while serving in the 3rd
Army, he once performed for the
troops, including Gen. George S.
Patton. An old shoulder injury
hampers his musical pursuits, but
he can still belt out old tunes on an
accordian.
He says he once knew 1,000
songs and played in a place where
the owner promised a $10 bill to
anyone who could name a rune
Bennett didn't know.
"Hhink he only lost one $10
bill he said. "My memory's not
as good. I can't remember but
about 800 of them
Bennett was on the way from
New York to play at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel in Miami when he
stopped in Savannah for a two-
week gig at the supper club.
He walked Hope to her car
one night. He never did make it to
Miami.
They were married 21 years
ago. This time, she married a
younger man. He's 66.
Back in 1957, Mrs. Bennett
was diagnosed with anemia and a
nerve disorder that temporarily
confined her to a wheelchair. She
overcame the problems, however,
and she's still going strong, devot-
ing a lot of time to making quilts
for nieces and nephews.
The Bennetts have no chil-
dren of their own, but they have
other relatives in Columbus
County. About six and a half
years ago, they returned to
Whiteville, where they live in a
mobile home they moved into
after Mrs. Bennett was told she
could not live in an apartment
with her two dogs, both dead now
and still missed, remembered in
pictures produced by Bennett's
hobby of photography.
Railroad clothing are in vogue
SPENCER, N.C. (AP) -
Dressed in traditional railroad
clothes, retired machinist Milton
Ruble and a handful of other vol-
unteers are trying to restore to
glory what once was the largest
repair facility for steam locomo-
tives in the South.
"What we're doing is for the
next generation Ruble said of
the restoration of Spencer Shops.
"We want them to be able to learn
something about their past"
The railroad buffs hope to
turn the 57-acre site and its decay-
ing buildings into a transporta-
tion museum surpassed by none.
The Southern Railway
opened the Spencer Shops in 18
because of its strategic location
halfway between Washington
DC. and Atlanta. By 1938, the
facility employed nearly 3,000
men and was capable of servicing
100 steam locomotives a day.
"In its heyday, one com-
pletely rebuilt locomotive would
come out that door every day
said Charlie Peacock, a former
brakeman and conductor who is
president of the non-profit N.C.
Transportation History Corp
which leases the facility from the
state.
With the introduction of die-
sel locomotives in the 1940s, activ-
ity waned. The shops were closed
in I960, leaving only a skeleton
crew.
In 1977, Southern donated the
Spencer Shops to the state as the
eventual site of the N.C. Trans-
portation Museum. But little state
funding has materialized and
most of the progress at the site is
credited to the small band of eld-
erly volunteers.
Ruble and his crew has
logged thousands of hours restor-
ing old trains, repairing tracks
and performing countless other
grimy duties.
"My wife likes to tell every-
one that she saw me more often
when I was working said Jim
Mesimore, who also put in 47
years at the shops.
The 37-stall roundhouse is
serviced by a 100-foot turntable
which rotates to permit locomo-
tives to move into and out of the
roundhouse for repairs. The vol-
unteers got the turntable working
again, much to the amazement of
a state official who considered it a
total loss.
Ruble and the other volun-
teers wonder aloud if the Spencer
Shops can survive the elements
long enough for the state to fund i t
as a full-fledged museum.
Five years ago, the state De-
partment of Cultural Resources
opened an exhibit on the history
of transportation in the old Mas-
ter Mechanic's Office storehouse.
Thousands of students visit the
Spencer Shops each year, where
they get a chance to take a ride on
an old steam locomotive.
This is one of Frank Diener's works of art which will be on exhibit Thursday at Gray Art Gallery,
elephant will join other big top sculptures in "Diener's Circus





V

I

8 THE EAST CAROL INI AN
OCTOBER 11,1988
Eating at the Pitt fair
Continued from page 7
"Two dollars for three darts
the man shouts as you approach,
knowing only too well that you're
already interested. You hand him
the money, take your darts, and
miss miserably. The date looks
unimpressed, so you reach into
vour pocket. This time, you man-
age to burst one balloon, a score
which merits a blue snake made
out of fake fur. "You can trade him
in for bigger prizes the crony
reminds you, so you buy another
chance, and another, and another.
Several minutes later, you walk
awav from the booth. Your date
clutches a stuffed white Hon. It's
no Gumby but it cost you over
twenty bucks. She seems satis-
fied, but vou feel lousy. As a con-
solation, you take her to another
concessions stand. There, you buy-
two caramel apples and a bag of
cotton candy to take home.
"Seven-fifty says the middle-
aged woman at the window. You
reach into your pocket, finding
only two fives and three
crumpled ones. You hand her
eight dollars and pocket the
change, wondering where the rest
of your eighty-dollar bankroll
went.
On your way out, you decide to
investigate the two large alumi-
num buildings near the gate.
There aren't any lines there, and
no-one appears to be collecting
money from the people who
wander into them.
The first building has four rows
of booths. Some of them are com-
mercial displays for not - profit
organizations and local busi-
nesses, others are businesses in
themselves - selling everything
from baked goods to porcelain
figurines to automotive stereo
speakers, and others are propa-
gands centers for political fac-
tions.
As vou enter the next building.
Painter adds
dreams to art
� N EW YORK (AD - To under-
standhe paintings of Vicky
Montesinos is to know her
dreams.
"We all have our own uni-
verse said Montesinos, a Mexi-
can artist whose work has been
shown throughout the world. "It
belongs to you only. Sometimes
you allow others to be in your
universe and sometimes you
don't
The 44-year-old Montesinos
is on show this fall at the Circle
Gallery in Soho.
"1 feel like my own universe is
full of dreams. A fantasy, nothing
that is quite visible she says.
That world of fantasy seems
to be in Montesinos' blood. Her
father, Fernando Rivero, was a
film director in Mexico City and
worked with such actresses as
Susan Havward and Hedv
Lamarr.
And Montesinosrecallsbcing
in awe o those women.
"1 was surrounded by this
kind of fantasy. They were so
beautiful. I was thinking, '1 wish 1
could be like that Montesinos
said, adding that she doesn't tind
women as beautiful today.
"1 don't know why. Maybe
it's me. I'm sure there are beauti-
ful women around but I don't find
what I used to find in those
people
The women in Montesinos'
paintings are often colorfully
dressed with their hair hidden
under elaborate hats.
"Basically, in all my paint-
ings, the women have a nostalgic
look
she said. "If I could choose to
be in another life, I would choose
the 1900s in Europe. I have a lot of
feelings for those places. I have a
read a lot history books about
what happened there
One of her paintings is called
"The Venetian
"I get a lot of inspiration every
time I go to Venice. I try to go
every year. It's a very serious
place. I get inspired and try to
bring what Venice was in the
1900s to my paintings. I imagine
people dressed in a lot of gold
Montesinos is concerned that
people are more interested in
material gains than in developing
their imagination.
'The values ha ve been chang-
ing little by little. I find people
have really all their attention on
making a lot of money; that takes
a lot of time and energy. Maybe
that's one of the reasons they re-
ally don't have time to dream
you want to turn around right
away - the smell of the pigs and
goats overwhelms you from
acress the room. But your date
cries, "look - bunnies and strolls
across the hay-matted floor. You
follow her as she looks at rabbits,
ducks, pigeons, and other inno-
cent-looking animals in chicken-
wire cages.
As for yourself, you are inter-
ested in a particular fellow who is
looking at chickens from several
feet awav. Though he is dressed in
a denim jacket and a baseball cap
bearing the infamous "CAT"
logo, there is something different
about him.
Tcrhaps it's his distinguished
posture, or his designer spec-
tacles, or the gTey sideburns,
which identifies him as a bastion
of intelligence in this asylum for
the mentally insufficient. He
cocks his head, walks up to the
cages, and barks loudly.
An hour later, you walk your
date to her door. She is smiling a
tired but satisfied smile. You feel
exhausted and depressed, think-
ing of your $25-an-hour evening.
"I really enjoyed tonight she
says.
"Yeah you say, "We should
do it again sometime
"Next year she says.
"Next year you think, and so
the first time that night, you smile.
-���"�
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1989.
The Air Force has a special pro-
gram for 1989 BSNs If selected,
you can enter active duty soon
after graduation without waiting
tor the results of your State Boards
To qualify you must have an overall
2 75GPA After commissioning,
you'll attend a five-month intern-
ship at a major Air Force medical
facility Its an excellent way to pre-
pare for the wide range of experi-
ences you'll have serving your
country as an Air Force nurse of-
ficer. For more information, call
MSgt Nick Nero (919)850-9549
Station to Station Collect
L
VINTAGE CLOTHING
JUST IN FROM D.C.
Dresses, Hats, Gloves, etc. from
the 30's, 40's, and 50's
Most Items Priced BELOW $10
Winter Jackets $7.95 & Up
(Leather. Military, Members Only. Denim, etc.)
$5 OFF Our Already Low Priced
JEAN JACKETS
CLOTHES
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
400 S. Evans St.
On the corner below "Fizz"
'Recycled Clothing (New & Used)
752-3866
'
- o
� East Carolina's
Finest Tea
- � East Carolina
Tea Party
� Every Thursday &
at 4:00 p.m.
� Free Admission
All Night
� $3 First Iced Tea
$2 For 2nd, 3rd, & 4th A
plus you keep the Mason Jar
� Free non-alcoholic drinks for
designated drivers.
� Must be 21 to enter and have valid I.D.
� High Energy Music provided by Connie
Rogers, Greenville's Hottest D.J. I
RAMADA INN ;
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666 0 ,
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Open
Monday-Saturday 10 9
Sundav 1 -6
Fall Savings
U
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Nike and Reebok)
i i i I L l
FANTASTIC
FALL AIR FARES
FROM
GREENVILLE
NEW YORK$178
BUFFALO$168
ATLANTA$188
ORLANDO$210
CHICAGO$203
EL PASO$378
WASHINGTON$168
BALTIMORE$168
DALLAS$288
OMAHA$238
MIAMI$220
DES MOINES$298
LOS ANGELES$358
HOUSTON$248
SEATTLE$368
CLEVELAND$168
DETROIT$178
PHOENIX$348
PHILADELPHIA $194
DENVER$268
COLUMBUS OH $158
ST. LOUIS$218
Call Us For The Lowest Fare To Your Destination
Read the Fine Prtat: These fares are subject to change Sears a'e limited 7 Day � � �
based on oft pea trave Ti ivel on other days slightly Signer Fares are nor ���� indatoM
chased within 24 hours o' 'eservanons Fares over Tha-rsgiving and Crsj m : ���
CALL ITG FOR HOLIDAY RESERVATIONS NOW!
(T.
vt-y)
TRAVEL CENTER
THE PLAZA-GREENVILLE
MOffFRI. 9 A.M. 'TIL 5 P.M.
355-5075
?m�
'TllvV

tt !��"�
��
Student Union
Coming Attractions
��
jU��j
(O 1 O S I (� I � Q I I (O I 4) I I g
k
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, Structures, and Architectures
of North and Central American Earth
as seen by
ERNST HABR1CHS
Mcndenhall Gallery, October 24-November 8
Opening Reception - October 26 - 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the Visual Arts Committee and Student Union
Movie of the Week
REPULSION - R
Wednesday, October 12 8:00 p.m. Hendnx Theatre
All films are FREE to ECU students with valid ECU I.D.
HORROR MOVIE LOCK-lJ
CARRIE THE OMEN
TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE
Costume contest, prizes, shrieks and howls
Sunday, October 30 -1:30 p.m.
Sponsored by the Films Committee and Student Union
'z
) .
5
TAKE A BITE OF THE BIG APPLE
Thanksgiving in New York
November 23-27
Sponsored by the Travel Committee and Student Union
For more information contact the Central Ticket office at 757-661
ircxMG out to 5�v� au
Hl
Willie I ewis looks for a hand
but were unable to put it toee
The year
the ECU
Bv KRISTIN HALBERG
v � mj ni " rti
The Pentathlon h-
Thurda ma) indi I
ing season for the Ft I
team as eve r) time in I
squad meet was improved
from last
We are ver)
though it is still earh xud H
Coach Kick Kobe
The overall -
Pentathlon c i -1
women put fr
Maunch in th
captured first pla i
3525 points
For tl M
nedy den
year's Pentathlon, kept h -
uV second year in a row a
with V�: point
. �nd place in th.
Standings tor the women
claimed by last year - I
Meredith Bridgers with her
point total Tom H
had 2839 t. tal p nts
fortable second p i
men
FTurd, fourth and fifl
ocrall stand gs for the
w ere claimed b Marc v �
points) nd hns 227
and Mark O Brien 226
For the women, it wasShell) M
(3299 points) Robin Wicks 3
and Page H 2812 securing
third, fourth and fiftl
specti eh
Clems
� No 11 Qems
Virginia tor the 28th straigri j
and North Carolina matched
worst start in 21 years with a 1
to Wake Forest to highlight V,
tic Coast Conference act:
weekend
mson cot a scare fl
Virginia before a Rodney
hams touchdown pass to C
Davis with 152 left gave the
gets a 10-7 icton
We played well enoughj
wm but we didn't saidVirgi
coach George Welsh We plaj
K minutes of football tor the 1 j
time all season
They're getting better - al
Mountai
Special to ���� iMtt iTMrehntmm
The ECU Rugby Club
eied to Boone last Sarurda
meet the Mountaineers of
The Mountaineers, last ve,
State Champs, showed how hcj
held can have its advantages
The Tirate Ruggers staj
slow and couldn't seem to
their game plan Both teJ
moved the ball effectively,
neither team was able to
earlv. The Mountaineers set
first on missed plays by ECU
could never open the game ul
Fhillip Ritchie scored fii
ECU with an assist from
Tobin and Greg Roche. The
version kick for two was





V
'(
I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11.1988
Eating at the Pitt fair
Continued from page 7
Two dollars for three darts
the man shouts as you approach,
knowing only too well that you're
already interested. You hand him
the money, take your darts, and
miss miserably. The date looks
unimpressed, so you reach into
your pocket. This time, you man-
age to burst one balloon, a score
which merits a blue snake made
out of fake fur. "You can trade him
in for bigger prizes the crony
reminds you, so you buy another
chance, and another, and another.
Several minutes later, you walk
away from the booth. Your date
clutches a stuffed white lion. It's
no Gumby but it cost you over
twenty bucks. She seems satis-
fied, but you feel lousy. As a con-
solation, you take her to another
concessions stand. There, you buy
two caramel apples and a bag of
cotton candy to take home.
"Seven-fifty says the middle-
aged woman at the window. You
reach into your pocket, finding
only two fives and three
crumpled ones. You hand her
eight dollars and pocket the
change, wondering where the rest
of your eighty-dollar bankroll
went.
On your way out, you decide to
investigate the two large alumi-
num buildings near the gate.
There aren't any lines there, and
no-one appears to be collecting
money from the people who
wander into them.
The first building has four rows
of booths. Some of them are com-
mercial displays for not - profit
organizations and local buisi-
nesses, others are businesses in
themselves - selling everything
from baked goods to porcelain
figurines to automotive stereo
speakers, and others are propa-
gands centers for political fac-
tions.
As you enter the next building.
Painter adds
dreams to art
you want to turn around right
away - the smell of the pigs and
goats overwhelms you from
across the room. But your date
cries, look - bunnies and strolls
across the hay-matted floor. You
follow her as she looks at rabbits,
ducks, pigeons, and other inno-
cent-looking animals in chicken-
wire cages.
As for yourself, you are inter-
ested in a particular fellow who is
looking at chickens from several
feet away. Though he is dressed in
a denim jacket and a baseball cap
bearing the infamous "CAT'
logo, there is something different
about him.
Perhaps it's his distinguished
posture, or his designer spec-
tacles, or the grey sideburns,
which identifies him as a bastion
of intelligence in this asylum for
the mentally insufficient. He
cocks his head, walks up to the
cages, and barks loudly.
An hour later, you walk your
date to her door. She is smiling a
tired but satisfied smile. You feel
exhausted and depressed, think-
ing of your $25an-hour evening.
"I really enjoyed tonight she
says.
"Yeah you say, "We should
do it again sometime
"Next year she says.
"Next year you think, and so
the first time mat night, you smile.
fNEVV YORK (AP) - To under-
5tom the -paintings -xA - Vicky
Montesinos is to know her
dreams.
"We all have our own uni-
verse said Montesinos, a Mexi-
can artist whose work has been
shown throughout the world. "It
belongs to you only. Sometimes
you allow others to be in your
universe and sometimes you
don't
The 44-year-old Montesinos
is on show this fall at the Circle
Gallery in Soho.
"I feel like my own universe is
full of dreams. A fantasy, nothing
that is quite visible she says.
That world of fantasy seems
to be in Montesinos' blood. Her
father, Fernando Rivero, was a
film director in Mexico City and
worked with such actresses as
Susan Hayward and Hedy
Lamarr.
And Montesinos recalls being
in awe of those women.
"I was surrounded by this
kind of fantasy. They were so
beautiful. I was thinking, T wish I
could be like that Montesinos
said, adding that she doesn't find
women as beautiful today.
"1 don't know why. Maybe
it's me. I'm sure there are beauti-
ful women around but I don't find
what I used to find in those
people
The women in Montesinos'
paintings are often colorfully
dressed with their hair hidden
under elaborate hats.
"Basically, in all my paint-
ings, the women have a nostalgic
look
she said. "If I could choose to
be in another life, I would choose
the 1900s in Europe. I have a lot of
feelings for those places. I have a
read a lot history books about
what happened there
One of her paintings is called
"The Venetian
"I get a lot of inspiration every
time I go to Venice. I try to gp
every year. If s a very serious
place. I get inspired and try to
bring what Venice was in the
1900s to my paintings. I imagine
people dressed in a lot of gold
Montesinos is concerned that
people are more interested in
material gains man in developing
their imagination.
"The values have been chang-
ing little by little. I find people
have really all their attention on
making a lot of money; that takes
a tot of time and energy. Maybe
that's one of the reasons they re-
ally don't have time to dream
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1989.
The Air Force has a special pro-
gram for 1989 BSNs. If selected,
you can enter active duty soon
alter graduation�without waiting
for the results of your State Boards
lb qualify you must have an overall
2.75 GRA After commissioning,
you'll attend a five-month intern-
ship at a major Air Force medical
facility Ifs an excellent way to pre-
pare for the wide range of experi-
ences you'll have serving your
country as an Air Force nurse of-
ficer For more information, call
MSgt Nick Nero (919)850-9549
Station to Station Collect
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PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, Structures, and Architectures
of North and Central American Earth
as seen by
ERNST HABRICHS
Mendenhall Gallery, October 24-November 8
Opening Reception - October 26 - 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the Visual Arts Committee and Student Union
Movie of the Week
REPULSION - R
Wednesday October 12 8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
All films are FREE to ECU students with valid ECU LD.
HORROR MOVIE LOCK-IN
CARRIE THE OMEN
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Costume contest, prizes, shrieks and howls
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Sponsored by the Rims Committee and Student Union
TAKE A BITE OF THE BIG APPLE
Thanksgiving in New York
November 23-27
Sponsored by the Travel Committee and Student Union
For more information contact the Central Ticket office at 757-661'
THE I
Willie Lewis looks for a hand
but were unable to put it toge
The year
the ECU
By KRISTEN HALBERG
AMlataat Sport. Editor
The Pentathlon held lal
Thursday may indicate a proi
ing season for the ECU s
team, as every time in this int
squad meet was improved uj
from last year.
"We are very pleased, evi
though it is still early said He
Coach Rick Kobe.
The overall standings in
Pentathlon competition for
women put freshman Jem
Maunch in the spotlight as
captured first place with a total
3525 points.
For the men, Raymond K�
nedy, defending champion of i
year's Pentathlon, kept his title
WITH JWZ JJLMMlS.
Second place in the over
standings for the women
claimed by last year's title hole
Meredith Bridgers with her
point total. Tom Holsten,
had 2839 total points, had a coj
fortable second place lead for
men.
Third, fourth and fifth pl�
overall standings for the
were claimed by Marc Cook (2:
points), Andy Johns (2279 poii
and Mark O'Brien (2265 poinj
For the women, it was Shelly Ml
(3299 points), Robin Wicks (28
and Page Holt (2812) securing I
third, fourth and fifth spots,
spectively.
Clems
(AP) �Nc. llOemson
Virginia for the 28th straight til
and North Carolina matched
worst start in 21 years with a 1
to Wake Forest to highlight AtlJ
tic Coast Conference action t
weekend.
Clemson got a scare
Virginia before a Rodney
Hams touchdown pass to Cl
Davis with ' 't gave the
gers a 10
"We playea well enough!
win, but we didn't said VirgiJ
coach George Welsh. "We plai
60 minutes of football for the '
time all season
"They're getting better - al
Mountai
The ECU Rugby Club
eled to Boone last Saturda)
meet the Mountaineers of
The Mountaineers, last
State Champs, showed how 1
field can have its advantages.
The Pirate Ruggers
slow and couldn't seem to
their game plan. Both
moved the ball effectively,
neither team was able to
early. The Mountaineers
first on missed plays by
could never open the game
Phillip Ritchie scored!
JECU with an assist from
j Tobin and Greg Roche. The
version kick for two





I
f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
t
OCTOBER 11, 1988 Page 9
�I
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d Reebok)
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C
IES$298
II ES$358
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$268
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stination
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m.
Ident Union
leatre
�CLID
CRE
�� Union
I
Pirates drop to 1-5
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sport Editor
Willie Lewis looks for a hand up after being tackled. The Pirates were looking for something all day,
but were unable to put it together. (Photo by Thomas Walters - ECU Photo Lab.)
The year looks promising for
the ECU men'swomen's team
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Asi�Unt Sports Editor
The Pentathlon held last
Thursday may indicate a promis-
ing season for the ECU swim
team, as every time in this intra-
squad meet was improved upon
from last year.
"We are very pleased, even
though it is still early said Head
Coach Rick Kobe.
The overall standings in the
Pentathlon competition for the
women put freshman Jenny
Maunch in the spotlight as she
captured first place with a total of
3525 points.
For the men, Raymond Ken-
nedy, defending champion of last
year's Pentathlon, kept his title for
the second year in a row as he won
wtrh 3092 points.
Second place in the overall
standings for the women was
claimed by last year's title holder
Meredith Bridgers with her 3406
point total. Tom Holsten, who
had 2839 total points, had a com-
fortable second place lead for the
men
Third, fourth and fifth place
overall standings for the men
were claimed by Marc Cook (2326
points), Andy Johns (2279 points)
and Mark O'Brien (2265 points).
For the women, it was Shelly Mica
(3299 points), Robin Wicks (2838)
and Page Holt (2812) securing the
third, fourth and fifth spots, re-
spectively.
The women exploded as
three new pentathlon records
were set. Veteran sophomore
swimmer Meredith Bridgers
broke her own record in the 100-
yard breaststroke when she swam
it in 1:07.0. Freshman Jenny
Maunch took second in 1:13.4
while Shelly Mica, who is also a
freshman, secured third in 1:16.4.
Bridgers again claimed a title
when she broke the record in the
200-yard individual medley (IM),
turning in a time of 2:16.0.
Maunch was again in second
place, swimming the 200 IM in
2:18.3, and Mica repeated her
third place performance again in
this event, touching the wall in
2:19.0.
The 100-yard freestyle was
the next record breaking event for
the lady swimmers, and this time
it was freshman Page Holt who
put her name in the Pentathlon
record books as she posted a win-
ning time of 55.3. Coming in sec-
ond was Maunch in 58.7, while
sophomore Carolyn Green took
third in 59.10.
Freshman Shelly Mica was
next to shine for the Pirates as she
swam to a first place finish in the
100-yard butterfly in a time of
1:02.7. Junior Robin Wicks fol-
lowed to take the second place
slot in 1:03.2 and Maunch held on
for third in 1:03.3
Finally for the ladies, it was
freshman Wendy Smith taking
first in the 100-yard backstroke in
1:05.8. Soon to follow was Mica in
at 1:07.5 and bringing up the rear
was Maunch in 1:09.2.
The men were impressive in
their performances as well, as a
new Pentathlon record was estab-
lished in the 100-yard
breaststroke. Raymond Kennedy,
a junior and veteran to the ECU
swimming program, swam a rec-
ord breaking time of 1:01.23. John
Springer claimed second with his
time of 1:05.08, while Hoppy
Hopkinson managed third in
1:06.54.
Next up for the Pirates was
Tom Holsten, just barely captur-
ing first from Kennedy in the 200-
yard individual medly in his time
of 2:02.93. Kennedy swam in at
2:02.93 while third place went to
Ted Christensen.
Eight-hundredths of a second
separated John Farrell and Mark
O'Brien as Farrell came out on top
with his time of 56.70. George
Walters claimed third inthisclose
race with a time of 56.84.
The 100-yard butterfly
proved to be another close race,
but it was Andy Johns who led the
pack with a time of 54.61. Holsten
closely followed with 54.75 and
Erick Hoyos came in third in
56.71.
Finally for the men, John Far-
rel won the 100-yard freestyle
with his time of 49.38 and Billy
Haughton swam for second in
50.10. Hoyos secured third with a
time of 50.18.
The Pirates of ECU really
weren't beaten Saturday by a
team from West Virginia. Rather,
they were beaten by two things.
Themselves and Undra
Johnson.
Perhaps we should begin
with Johnson, a back-up tailback
who came in when the Mountain-
eers' leading rusher Anthony
Brown went out with a hamstring
injury. Johnson ran over, under,
around and through the Pirate
defense for 167 yards and two
touchdowns on 25 carries. The
defense seemed to be able to limit,
if not contain, everyone but
Johnson, who time and again
came up with good yardage
whenever the Mountaineers
needed it.
Then we have the Pirates
themselves. A team that can't
seem to be able to get both the
offense and the defense clicking at
the same time. A team that had a
touchdown called back on a pen-
alty, and had two more touch-
down passes dropped. Add to
this two missed field goals, and
you may very well have the differ-
ence between beating a top-ten
team and losing another game
that they had the ability to win in
front of 33,876 fans, the fourth-
largest crowd in Ficklen history.
The Pirates had possession of
the ball to open the game. Junior
Robinson took the kick-off on his
own goal line, and returned it 65
yards to the West Virginia 35 yard
line. After a three-yard run, Reg-
gie McKinney got open over the
middle and caught a Charlie Li-
bretto pass for a 20-yard gain
down to the twelve-yard line. But
the offense was unable to pick up
the first down, and were forced to
try a 30-yard field goal. Robb
Imperato came on for the attempt,
but it drifted wide left of the up-
rights, and the Pirates came up
empty.
The Pirate defense played
well on its first series out, holding
the Mountaineers to three plays
and forcing them to punt, but
West Virginia got the ball back
two plays later when Darrell
Whitmore picked off a Libretto
pass at the ECU 37-yard line.
However, the Mountaineers were
unable to move the ball, and were
forced to bring Charlie Bauman in
to kick a 49-yard field goal, giving
West Virginia the early 3-0 lead
with 9:31 left in the first period.
The Pirates were unable to
score on the ensuing drive, and
the Mountaineers took posses-
sion on their own 33-yard line.
Johnson took over at this
point, coming in for the injured
Brown. Johnson accounted for 54
of the 60 yards that it took for the
Mountaineers to find the end
zone. Johnson capped the drive
when he went over from five
yards out. Bauman hit the extra
point, and West Virginia went up
10-0 with 2:38 remaining in the
first quarter.
The Mountaineers scored
again in the opening minutes of
the second period,after driving 58
yards in seven plays. The touch-
down came when the Mountain-
eers' much heralded quarterback
Major Harris hit tight end Adrian
Moss for an 18-yard touchdown
strike. Bauman added the extra
point, giving the Mountaineers a
17-0 edge.
The Pirates finally got a break
mid-way through the second
when Mike Applewhite fell on a
Major Harris fumble on the ECU
36-yard line. Travis Hunter en-
tered the game for the Pirates, and
took them down to the six-yard
line before the drive stalled. Im-
perato came on and hit a 22-yard
field goal with seven minutes left
in the half to make the score 17-3.
The Pirate defense held the
Mountaineers on their next two
possessions, and with time run-
ning down the Pirates got the ball
on their own 22-yard line. After
gaining but three yards on the
ground in two plays. Hunter went
to the air for Al Whiting. His pass
bounced off Whiting's chest, and
Walter Wilson snagged it out of
the air for a 24-yard gain out to the
49-yard line.
Volleyball team slides
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
East Carolina's women's vol-
leyball team was unable to come
up with their first conference win
this weekend as it lost to Ameri-
can University and George Ma-
son University in a double match
in Wilmington.
In a close first match, ECU
went four games with the Lady
Eagles of American. American
won the first two games 15-9,15-
10 but the Lady Pirates were able
to take the third game from them,
15-13. To cap off the win, Ameri-
can won the fourth game 15-9.
"We had four good games
with American said Coach Judy
Kirkpatrick. "The match was not a
runaway match. We played well,
but had a few errors that knocked
us out of each game. American
was a surprise over last year's
team
With only a fifteen minute
break, ECU then took on George
Mason University, who had lost
earlier in the day to Wilmington.
In the words of Coach Kirkpa-
trick, it was a "flat match
" The Lady Pirates were unable
to generate offense in a match that
George Mason walked away
with, 2-15,8-15,7-15.
In an effort to boost the of-
fense, setter Kerry Weisbrod sat
out one game against the Lady
Patriots as Debbie Tate stepped
in, but the win was out of the Lady
Pirate's reach.
"With George Mason, we
never really had anything going. I
believe we could have beat them
had we played as well as we did
against American
The Lady Pirates are now 6-9
overall and 0-3 in CAA play.
Kirkpatrick says the conference
record is not a problem at this
point in the season because there
is a lot of time for improving be-
fore the conference tournament in
November.
"Although we are 0-3 in the
CAA now, finishing in a decent
place in the conference is not be-
low our reach. There is a Kne that
can be drawn between UNC-
Wilmington and William & Mary,
then the other four teams are
pretty even said Kirkpatrick.
"We are still progressing and will
have everything put together by
conference tournament time
ECU, who has lost four con-
secutive games, will look for a win
tonight night as it travels to
Campbell University to take on
the Ladv Camels, who they de-
feated earlier this season, 156,15-
7,15-4 in a match at Minges.
Clemson plays just well enough to get win
(AP) � No. 11 Clemson beat
Virginia for the 28th straight time
and North Carolina matched its
worst start in 21 years with a loss
to Wake Forest to highlight Atlan-
tic Coast Conference action this
weekend.
Clemson got a scare from
Virginia before a Rodney Wil-
liams touchdown pass to Chip
Davis with 1:52 left gave the Ti-
gers a 10-7 victory.
"We played well enough to
win, but we didn't said Virginia
coach George Welsh. "We played
60 minutes of football for the first
time all season
They're getting better - a lot
better said Clemson coach
Danny Ford. "Virginia kept us
from making the big play and
made us earn it
Virginia went ahead, 7-3,
with 5:27 to play when quarter-
back Shawn Moore found Her-
man Moore in the right corner of
the end zone for a 14-yard scoring
pass to top an 11-play, 76-yard
Cavalier drive.
Clemson took the ensuing
kickof f and drove the length of the
field in eight plays. Included in
the series was tailback Terry
Allen's 39-yard run on a third
down that put the ball at the Vir-
ginia 22-yard line. Two plays
later, Williams found Davis alone
down the left sideline for the
game-winning score.
Virginia ran eight plays in the
closing seconds, but lost the ball
on downs at the Clemson 45 with
16 seconds left. The Cavaliers
dropped to 2-3 and 1-2.
North Carolina, in dropping a
42-24 game to Wake Forest, fell to
victories over North Carolina in
back-to-back seasons, and in the
1967 triumph, Tar Heel first-year or four times now this season. We
coach Bill Dooley was struggling seem to bring out the best in the
with an 0-5 start that led to a 2-8 �PP�sin� team's quarterback
finish. Never has North Carolina
started a year 0-6.
This time, Dooley is the Wake
Forest coach in his second year,
and he watched Mike Elkins
ioach Mack Brown said of Elkins. with Danny Peebles on an 85-yard
"We've seen guys like him three touchdown play.
"Everybody was going out
there to pay them back N.C.
State strong safety Jesse Campbell
said. "We really paid them back
Georgia Tech dropped to 1-4,
all of its losses coming in league
0-5 in its ACC opener with North complete 18 of 22 passes for 233
Carolina State lying in wait after yards and three touchdowns.
its 49-0 shutout of East Tennessee
State.
Maryland defeated Georgia
Tech 13-8 in the other ACC game.
It had been 21 years since
Wake Forest has been able to take
Ricky Johnson scored on a 1-
yard run in the second quarter
and Dan Plocki kicked two field
goals to give Maryland its second play.
ACC victory and a 3-2 record Next weekend, all ACC
overall. teams go back to work. Unbeaten
The Wolfpack held East Ten- Duke goes for its sixth straight
nessee State to 80 yards total of- victoryatClemson,N.C.Stateisat
fense. Piling up a 35-0 lead at North Carolina and Wake Forest
halftime, Chris Williams and Ty- is at Maryland in league games,
rone Jackson scored two touch- Outside the conference, South
was probably the top quarterback downs aptece for the Wolfpack, 4- Carolina is at Georgia Tech and
the ACC North Carolina 1 and Preston Poag connected Virginia is at Louisville.
Ricky Proehl caught one of those
scoring passes, and had eight
catches in all for 114 yards.
"We knew in preseason he
in
Mountain men in green jersey's defeat the ECU Rugby team
Special to the Eat CmroHmimm
The ECU Rugby Club trav-
eled to Boone last Saturday to
meet the Mountaineers of ASU.
The Mountaineers, last year's
State Champs, showed how home
field can have its advantages.
The Pirate Ruggers started
slow and couldn't seem to find
their game plan. Both teams
moved the ball effectively, but
neither team was able to score
early. The Mountaineers scored
first on missed plays by ECU but
could never open the game up.
Phillip Ritchie scored first for
ECU with an assist from Bob
Tobin and Greg Roche. The con-
version kick for two was good.
Eric Mussler took one in to score
and with the conversion the game
was tied at 12.
Missed tackles and penalties
were the downfall of ECU. ASU
scored late in the second half and
the game ended 18-12. weak areas in time for the hardest
The Pirate Ruggers took the part of their schedule,
loss well, and have found their In "B" side action, the Pirates
were too much for ASU. The Kil-
ler "B's" ran all over the Moun-
taineers and posted a 41-7 victory.
Tennis team continues their winning streak
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
East Carolina's women's ten-
nis team continued its winning
streak Thursday as it won its fifth
match of the season, defeating
Campbell University 7-2.
ECU swept the singles, win-
ning all six matches over the Lady
Camels. In number one singles,
ECU's Holly Murray defeated
Campbell's Karen Poole in three
sets, 7-5, 1-6, 6-4 for ECU's first
win of the day.
Jill Hobson recorded a win in
the number two singles as she de-
feated Laura Ross easily, 6-3,6-3.
ECU's Susan Mattocks also
took an easy win over Dina
Gaskins, 6-4, 6-0, while Wendy
Simpson went three games with
Minako Ishida, 2-6, 6-2, 6-2, for
her win.
Melyanee Morgan and Kathi
Messer finished out ECU's singles
sweep, each winning their
matches in two games over their
Campbell opponent.
ECU was only able to come
up with one win in doubles action
with Campbell. Hobson and
Simpson recorded the win for
ECU as they defeated Gaskins
and Antionette Burkman, 7-5,7-5.
Messer and Mattocks lost a
close match to Poole and Ross of
Campbell, losing 7-5, 6-4, while
Ellen Harrell and Morgan were tor the season with their win over
also unable to take a win for ECU Campbell, and will look to con-
as Campbell's Ishida and Laura tinue their winning as they travel
Cannata won 7-5,6-3. to Eton College on Tuesday for a
The Lady Pirates are now 5-1 3:00 p.m. match.
Special te the Eaat C�mimt
Women take first, men third in cross country
in Lynchburg, again finished in
third place with 98 points with
Matt Schweitzer ECU's best fin-
isher in ninth position,
and Pembroke had 93. Methodist John Storms of Methodist set
was unable to score in the meet. a new course record for the 8-
Methodist "A" team won the kilometer run, finishing in 23:18.
men's division with 17 points. The Pirates will be traveling
while their "B" team finished with to Wilmington on Thursday to
79. ECU, who took third last week compete in the state meet.
18:44, which betters the old course
mark.
� East Carolina finished with 27
The Lady Pirates, coming off points while St. Augustine had 41
a win last week in Lynchburg, Va
took first place at a cross country
meet held at Methodist College
Saturday.
ECU's Ann Marie Welch took
first place with an official time of






)
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11,1988
ECU loses to the Mounties
Continued from page 9
Hunter then connected with
Bojack Davenport for a gain of
eight, and two plays later with
Jarrod Moody for a gain of 10
down to the 33. On the next play,
Hunter found a streaking Wilson
in the end zone on a 33-yard
touchdown strike with :14 re-
maining. Imperato added tru-
extra point, cutting the Mountain
eer lead to only a touchdown, 17-
10.
The Mountaineers had the
ball to begin the second half, but
after driving 56 yards down to the
Pirate 13, West Virginia came up
empty when Bauman missed on a
30-yard field goal attempt. It was
only his second miss of the year.
The Pirates moved the ball
well on the next possession, with
James and McKinney bearing
most of the load on the 51-yard
drive. They stumbled at the 29,
though, and Imperato came on to
attempt a 45-yard field goal. He
missed, and West Virginia took
over at the 30.
The Mountaineers took ad-
vantage of the good field position,
scoring when Johnson capped a
70-yard drive with a 26-yard
touchdown run. Bauman missed
the extra point, and the Moun-
taineers led 23-10 with 1:46 left in
the third quarter.
The Pirates were unable to
put together a successful drive,
and after three palys were forced
to punt. John Jett, under a heavy
rush, shanked the ball, and it
drifted out of bounds at the ECU
46-yard line.
Again taking advantage of
the good field position, West Vir-
ginia drove the remaining 46
yards down to the one-yard line
before Harris went over on a
keeper off left tackle. The extra
point was good, and the Moun-
taineers led by the final 30-10
margin with 13:25 left in the game.
As you may have guessed,
neither team scored for the re-
mainder of the game, although
the Pirates threatened twice, both
times moving down within the
West Virginia 30-yard line. But
they turned the ball over both
times, once on downs and once on
a Libretto interception. Pirate re-
serve quarterback Jeff Blake got
into the game in the wanning
moments and made a good show-
ing with his mobility.
"1 thought it was a rough day
for our kids Coach Art Baker
said after the game. "We were
closer today to being what I
thought we'd be than any other
time this year. I thought we
played well against the seventh-
ranked team in the nation.
"It was a close game where
we couldn't make mistakes and
we dropped passes, dropped
touchdown passes and missed
field goals. The two missed field
goals played a big part. We could
have played a much different type
of game at 17-16 than 17-10.
"We continue to move the
ball well, we just have to take
advantage of scoring opportuni-
ties
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RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
Volleyball team names the Players- of-the-Week
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
Donna Davis and Michelle
Macintosh have been named the
East Carolina Volleyball Players
of the Week by ECU coach Judy
Kirkpatrick for the week ending
October 16.
Davis, a senior outside hitter
from Rockville Centre, N.Y was
named the offensive Player of the
Week after the Lady Pirate's
weekend of conference play.
Davis led ECU offensively
with 14 kills, 11 in ECU'S match
against American University. She
added to her effort five service
aces against the Lady Eagles.
"Donna came off the bench
and led us offensively with kills
Coach Judy Kirkpatrick said.
"She had a good all-around
match, offensively and defen-
sively, blocking and hitting well
Davis was the Lady Pirate's
block assist leader with five block
assists for the weekend.
Macintosh earned the title of
defensive Player of the Week for
the second week in a row as she
continues to lead the Lady Pirates
in digs. Macintosh, a junior out-
side hitter from Morehead City,
NC, leads ECU with 233 digs on
the year.
This past weekend, Macin-
tosh added 48 digs in two matches
to boost ECU defensively. She
also added one block solo and two
CrispeCCs
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block assists. "This weekend she got into block-
"Michelle has been great. She ing for usand that makes hereven
has been consistent on defense more valuable for us
and offense Kirkpatrick said.
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HOMETOWN-Henderson, NC
East Carolina vs West Virginia - Applewhite had 7 tackles against
the Mountaineers, two of these for a two yard losses. He also de-
flected two passes and recovered a fumble that led to ECU's first
score.
PERSONAL INFORMATION- Mike is an Industrial Tech major
whose most admired is Howie Long of the L.A. Raiders. He is the
son of Jeff and Daisy Allen.
CONGRATULTIONS TO Mike Applewhite, FROM PEPSI-COLA.
MUCH CONTINUED SUCCESS.
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with Pi Kappa Phi
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$2.00 Teas
$1.00 Cans of Beer
Greeks: Bring 3 or
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you will get in free!
Stop by UBE before
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And while you're at
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It's all at University
Book Exchange, downtown
Greenville . . . the one for
the fans. Stop by today.
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Sept. 3 Tennessee Tech. 7:00 PM Oct. 8 West Virginia (Homecoming)
Sept. 24 Southern Mississippi (Parent's Day) 1:30 PM Oct. 22 Syracuse
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 11, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 11, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.632
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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