The East Carolinian, October 6, 1988






"
Coming Tuesday:
Larry Smith, director of the minority student Organ
12ation speaks. Also a look at the "Judges, Lawmakers
or Interpreters?" debate.

Features:
Scott Maxwell gives the Wednesday night perform-
ance of "Carnival" two thumbs up, see page 11.
Another undefeated foe, the West Virginia Moun-
taineers, come to Fkklen Stadium and face the Pirates
on Homecoming, see page 16.
�be lEast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 25
Thursday October 6,1988
Greenville, NC
20 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Strategic planning policy will determine
factors for future growth of ECU
Spectators at the 69th annual Pitt County Fair . The festivities
will end on Saturday (Photo By J.D. Whitmire, ECU Photolab).
Two North Carolinians
being held captive in Laos
BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) -
Police in Laos have captured two
North Carolinians who said they
planned to distribute dollar bills
stamped with a reward offer for
any U.S. military personnel still
held captive in Indochina.
Ross Petzing, a U.S. Embassy
spokesman, said Donna Long of
Jacksonville, N.C and another
American were being held at Ban
Sing Samphan in the southern
Laotian province of Champasak.
Jerry Kiley of the National
Steering Committee for American
War Veterans identified the sec-
ond American as Jim Copp of
Hampstead, N.C. Another
committee member, John Nevin,
said in Washington that neither
American had a visa to enter Laos.
State Department spokes-
woman Phyllis Oakley told re-
porters in Washington that the
U.S. Consulate in Udorn, Thai-
land, confirmed that Lao authori-
ties detained two Americans
Monday on the Thai-Lao border.
'The Americans had rented a
boat and were on the Mekong
River. The Thai-Lao border does
not run along the middle of the
river but evidently follows a vary-
ing line, and the Americans may
have accidentally floated into Lao
territory said Mrs. Oakley. "We
are waiting for the Lao authorities
to inform us whether the Ameri-
cans will be held and charged or
released. Our counsel has not yet
met with them
'They looked so sad said
Pornthipa Vajarabukka, a Thai
hotel manager who crossed the
Mekong River into Laos to see
them Tuesday. Ms. Pornthipa
said she took the Americans cloth-
ing, food and cigarettes but was
not allowed to speak to them.
Petzing said: "We have ad-
vised our embassy in Vientiane of
the arrest and our embassy is
checking with Lao authorities to
determine what has transpired
On Sunday, Ms. Long told
The Associated Press she and
Copp planned to drop plastic
bags containing stamped dollars
and other currency into the river
By SEAN HERRING
Auittant Ntwi Editor
A set of university-wide deci-
sions will provide ECU with an
overall direction, for the future.
These decisions for the advance-
ment of the university arc re-
ferred to as strategic planning.
Administration, faculty, staff
and students attended a Tuesday
meeting to review the strategy of
the strategic planning model,
which will be officially in effect
the summer of 1991.
The Director of Planning and
Institutional Research, Sue
Hodges said, "Strategic planning
shows where ECU is going; and
how it will get there
"The desire of the program is
to guide the university into a well-
planned future, so that it will have
some guidance in dealing with
and pass out money in villages
alorg Laotian bank of the
Mekong. She revealed the plan on
condition it not be revealed until
the two left Laos or were cap-
tured.
Each bill bears a message of-
fering a $2.4 million reward to
anyone delivering an American
prisoner of war to the Interna-
tional Red Cross.
Ms. Pornthipa said the
Americans were held in a small
house in Ban Sing Samphan. She
said Laotian authorities told her
Monday they would be freed
within three days.
She said the management of
her hotel in Ubon felt some re-
sponsibility because the Ameri-
cans made contact with it before
starting the trip to the Mekong,
which forms a boundary with
Thailand and flows to both Cam-
bodia and Vietnam.
The reward is being offered to
Cambodians, Laotians and Viet-
namese through the National
Steering Committee for American
War Veterans, a private group.
The committee says the money
was pledged by 21 congressmen
and the American Defense Insti-
tute, another group concerned
with missing soldiers.
The United States lists 2393
Americans as still missing in ac-
tion in the Indochina war which
ended in 1975. The governments
of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia
say no Americans are held in tneir
countries.
Kiley, project director for
American War Veterans, claimed
600 Americans are missing in
Laos.
"The reason why these two
peoples as private citizens are
jeopardizing themselves is be-
cause the United States govern-
ment has never acknowledged
the existence of those POWs in
Laos he said in a telephone in-
terview in New York.
Several activists, including
relatives of MIAs, floated bal-
loons down the Mekong from the
Thai shore last year with offers of
the reward, with no known result.
problems, like economic impact
and opportunities such as techno-
logical growth Hodges said.
Hodges said the program is
in the beginning stages.
"The program work groups
are being chosen and these
groups should begin a coordinat-
ing process by November 1 she
said.
"Chancellor Eakin will work
with vice chancellors, deans, fac-
ulty, staff, students, alumni, com-
munity leaders and others to
develop the strategic planning
model that will guide our (ECU)
program she said.
Hodges said the planning
will involve and affect everyone
on campus, "We will seek the
involvement of students in work
groups and consultation, as we
develop plans for the future
The process for developing
unit plans will be determined bv
individual departments of ECU.
Unit plans will be reviewed for
consistency with the overall stra-
tegic plan. A composite of the two
plans will result in ECU's strate-
gic decisions.
Chancellor Richard Eakin
said, "One of the benefits from the
strategic planning process will be
the potential for ECU to broaden
as a learning institution
"ECU hasa great deal to offer.
We would like to focus energy on
improving our learning environ-
ment at the universitv, so that we
can be more effective and respon-
sive to the needs of the state, its
citizens, and its educational sys-
tem Eakin said.
The strategic planning proc-
ess promises to be better than the
"fiasco of 1969 said Vice Chan-
cellor C.G. Moore in reference to
the former long-range plan.
Hodges stated, "The essence
of the strategic planning program
first and foremost is so that ECU
has more control over its fate, and
how it wants to move forward in
the future, as a university
She added, "We will set our
(ECU's) goals and directions
based on the needs of the
university's environment, its ca-
pabilities, the internal values and
its aspirations.
Because new developments
will occur, and the strategic em-
phasis will change constantly,
strategic planning for ECU will
never end.
lodges said Unit plans will
be reviewed and updated every
two years and the university-
wide strategies reassessed every
four years
Library cards will be obsolete
By TAMMY AYCOCK
Staff NMM
Students and faculty will
soon be able to use their ECU
identification cards to check out
materials from all ECU libraries:
Joyner, Music, and Health Sci-
ences, beginning in January.
This will be made possible
through the usage of the LS2000
system. 'The Health Sciences
Library has been circulating ma-
terials on this system for two
years as of January said Dr.
JoAnn Bell, Acting Director of
Academic Library Services.
LS2000 is "an automated
integrated system. When we use
the word integrated, we mean
that it will be used for all the vari-
ous functions that go on in a li-
brary from the time a book gets
ordered until it appears on the
shelves said Marilyn Miller,
assistant director of academic li-
brary services.
"What this will really means,
most of all, is a lot more conven-
ience Miller said. Library pa-
trons will no longer have to manu-
ally fill out charge cards for each
item they wish to check out; and
for ECU students, faculty, and
staff, library cards will become
obsolete.
Library materials (except
Dewey Decimal books) and all
ECU identification cards will
have bar codes affixed to them for
circulation purposes.
Also, patrons will be using
the LS2000 online catalog as
their primary source of informa-
tion opposed to using the card
catalog. "The major portion of our
collection (all Library of Congress
materials) will be online; Dewey
books will not. We will still have
some catalog cabinets out there
for a while Miller said.
For Dewey Decimal books,
the check-out procedure will
"take a little bit longer. We have
an ongoing reclassification sys-
tem. Anything going out in a
Dewey will be coming back in and
go immediately to reclass. The
next time it comes back, it's going
to be a Library of Congress book
and have a bar code on it Miller
said.
The LS2000 system will give
the status on all library books
(except Dewey Decimal books) in
regard to their availability and
location. Presently, the system
lists all materials (in Joyner and
Music libraries) as available, even
if they are checked out when the
system is fully implemented, it
will indicate whether or not the
materials are available. If the
materials are unavailable, it will
give their due dates.
"With this system, patrons
will be able to give their names
and find out if they have any
overdue books. Under the man-
ual system (in which checked out
books are filed by call numbers), it
is impossible to get this informa-
tion until their books are two
weeks overdue Miller said.
Anyone who has a hardware
terminal into the campus network
(Net 1) or anyone who has a com-
puter with a modem can gain
access into the LS2000 system. It
is not ready now for this type of
access, but it will be by January.
Information on how to dial in will
be issued later this semester.
"Anyone who isn't taking
Library Science 1000 or who
hasn't registered at the Health
Sciences Library needs to fill out a
registration form for LS2000 at
any of the ECU libraries. We en-
courage them to do this prior to
the end of this semester Miller
said.
The LS2000 system is mar-
keted by OCLC, a major library
vendor.
Although Bill and Miller had
individual and yearly figures,
they were unable to give an esti-
mate for the total cost of automat-
ing all three libraries.
Bell explained, "The univer-
sity very seldom buys things as a
whole package. The costs have
been sprea.ii.cn er a five year pe-
riod. We paid for a license to use
this software system; then we
paid a fee to OCLC to customize it
(LS2000); then we paid fees for
our tapes which are the biblio-
graphic records. So, there are
many different costs associated
with it and we haven't even men-
tioned the equipment costs
This summer, the 5280 system
was upgraded to a larger CPU
(the computer on which the auto-
mated system will run). The cost
for this was $449,000. The reason
we had to purchase the CPU is
that the computer we initially
See LIBRARY, page 2
Students are asked to vote for eight of the 44 Homecoming candidates. The finalists will be ann-
ounced �t Thursday night's pep rally (Photo By Gretchen Journigan, ECU Photolab).
Outstanding alumni award to be given at Homecoming gc.s
ECU Newt Bur
The ECU Alumni Association
recognized recipients of the 1988
Outstanding Alumni Award Sat-
urday during the University's
annual Homecoming celebration.
Honored were William Scott
Sawyer of Morehead City, Robert
Allen Ward of Burlington and
Henry G. Williamson, Jr. of
Wilson.
The three received engraved
pewter plates at an awards lunch-
eon hosted by Chancellor Richard
R. Eakin in Minges Coliseum.
They were also recognized on the
football field during half-time of
the ECU-West Virginia game.
'The field of nominees for the
1988 Outstanding Alumni Award
was large and varied said
Burney R. Rivenbark, president of
the ECU Alumni Association. "It
was a tough decision to choose
three winners, but Scott Sawyer,
Bob Ward and Henry Williamson
best exemplify the ECU spirit of
service and determination. I am
proud to share the ECU identity
with three such distinguished
individuals
Sawyer, a 1984 psychology
and political science graduate, is
afflicted with muscular dystro-
phy. At 32, Sawyer is confined to
his wheelchair, as he was during
his years at ECU. He spends his
days writing at his computer or
reading books on a wide range of
interests from science fiction to
current politics. Sawyer's pri-
mary goal is the completion of his
autobiography, which relates his
personal triumph over the tre-
mendous physical tolls of his dis-
See ALUMNI, page 2





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6, 1988
Despite arrests, demonstrators plan more action
ATLANTA (AP) - Abortion
protesters prepared for more
demonstrations after police ar-
rested more than 350 of them us-
ing get-tough tactics that organiz-
ers blamed for an injury and
caused civil libertarians to regis-
ter a complaint.
"1 could not believe the level
of brutality that was going on
here protest leader Randall
Terry said Tuesday as police
dragged or carried protesters
who resisted arrest by crawling
on hands and knees.
Today was to be the second
day of Operation Rescue's four-
day "siege of Atlanta" aimed at
temporarily shutting some of the
seven clinics that perform abor-
tions here. Last summer, the New
York-based group led demonstra-
tions at Atlanta clinics during the
Democratic National Conven-
tion, resulting in 700arrests, three
of whom remain in jail.
In demonstrations Tuesday
at three midtown clinics, 360
people were arrested, police and
Operation Rescue officials said.
Most clinics followed their
usual schedule, said Lynne Ran-
dall, executive director of one of
the clinics.
Most of those who arrested
were charged with criminal tres-
pass and identified themselves as
3abv Jane Doe or Baby John Doe,
said police spokeswoman Myrna
May. That identification tactic
was used in earlier protests.
At a rally Tuesday night at St.
Jude the Apostle Roman Catholic
Church in suburbs north of At-
lanta, Terry urged about 600
people to join today's protests.
But only about 75 people said
they would participate, and re-
mained for coaching on tactics.
Protesters complained that
police treated them with unneces-
sary harshness, twisting arms and
fingers and using pressure-point
holds just under the ears to force
them off the street and into buses.
Some screamed or cried as they
were taken away.
Police asked the protesters if
they would walk to the buses
before hauling them off when
they refused.
Gene Guerrero, executive
director of the Georgia chapter of
the American Civil Liberties
Union, said he asked the city to
abandon pressure-point holds.
However, he said, "I've been
toalotofdcmonstrationsand I've
seen a lot of police brutality. I
haven't seen that today
Guerrero, who joined abor-
tion rights advocates in helping
escort women through the dem-
onstrators to the clinics Tuesday,
said Operation Rescue was going
beyond the limits of free speech.
"There is a real interference
now he said. Protest organizers
complained that the police's tac-
tics, which they
had been warned about, led
to the injury of the Rev. Doyle
Clark, a demonstrator in his late
50s who is pastor of a church in
Hudson, Ind.
Clark said he was dropped on
his head as police carried him to a
bus, according to Grady Memo-
rial Hospital spokesman William
Breyer. Breyer said Clark, who
was being kept in the hospital's
detention unit, would probablv
be treated and returned to jail.
In addition to trespass
charges, participants in this
week's protests face fines up to
$500 for contempt of court if they
violate a Superior Court judge's
order limiting the demonstra
tions.
Fiber is essential in diet
A faculty member who at-
tends the "Exercise Wisely"
lunchtime aerobics class at Me-
morial Gym asked me to write
about the benefits of fiber.
fluids you drink. If constipation should see vour health care pro-
lasts more than two weeks, or you vider.
develop abdominal pain you If you have any questions you
would like answered in the
Health Column, call Mary Elesha-
Adams at 757-6794 .
jw
-
By
Mary Elesha-Adams
Alumni name award recipients at Homecoming
Are you eating enough fiber
every day? The National Cancer
Institute recommends 30-40
grams per day, however, the
average American only eats 10-15
gramsof dietary fiber a day. If you
eat mostly white breads, white
rice, and fast foods you may not be
getting enough fiber in your diet.
Why is fiber important? High
fiber foods, such as whole grains,
raw fruits and vegetables, and
beans, can help you lose weight,
keep your heart and gastrointesti-
nal tract healthy, reduce your
chance of developing certain can-
cers, and reduce constipation.
Many high fiber foods have
low caloric density, which means
you can eat a large amount of
these foods yet consume fewer
calories than with low calorie
foods. For example, you can eat
two oranges instead of drinking a
cup of orange juice and end up
with the same number of calories.
Eating the oranges takes longer
and uses more calories to process.
Try to eat fiber foods every
day. You can have whole fruit,
whole wheat English muffins,
popcorn, peas, oatmeal, raw, or
slightly steamed vegetables- and
salads, bran cereals, and gar-
banzo beans.
Occasionally when people try
to increase dietary fiber, they may
complain of feeling bloated, and
having gas or constipation. If you
experience these symptoms, you
should increase the amount of
Continued from page 1
ease.
Robert Ward is the vice presi-
dent of finance and administra-
tion for Unifi, Inc a Greensboro-
based textile concern with proc-
essing facilities in North Carolina
and Ireland. Among other profes-
sional and civic involvements,
Ward serves on ECU's Business
Advisory Council for the School
of Business, the board of directors
of the ECU Foundation and the
executive committee of the Pirate
Club. He graduated from ECU
with a bachelor's degree in busi-
ness administration in 1962.
Henry G. Williamson, Jr. is
vice chairman of Branch Banking
& Trust, based in Wilson. N.C
and president of BB&T Financial
Corporation. I le completed both
bachelor's and master's degrees
at ECU in business administra-
tion in 1969 and 1972. Williamson
was an integral figure in the estab-
lishment of the BB&T Center tor
Leadership Development at ECU;
he currently serves on the center's
board of directors. He has served
on the curriculum advisory group
for East Carolina's Department of
Finance, and, in 1986, he served
on the Steering Committee for the
$2 million Golden Anniversary
Campaign for the School of Busi-
ness. He wascited in Outstanding
Young Men in America in 1983.
Library coming to computer age
Continued from page 1
started with (the 5280) was
smaller. The disk drive did not
have the capacity we needed and
the computer itself did not have
the capacity for the number of ter-
minals we need to have available
for the faculty, staff, and stu-
dents-more memory and more
terminal ports are the reasons for
having to upgrade Bell said.
All LS2000 purchases were
made from the libraries' regular
operating budget. "We haven't
received special funding to pur-
chase equipment Bell said.
Serving the East Curolina ccanpus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKcc. Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0-40 Column inchesS4.25
50-004 15
100- 140 4.05
150 100 3.05
200 2403.85
250 and above3.75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in AiUition to Regular Space Rale)
One color anJ blackS90.00
Two colors ami black 155
Inserts
5.000 or less (,c C-Kh
5.001 - 10,000 5 Si each
10.001-12,000 st cach
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones
757-6366757-6557
757-6558757-6309
CLIFFS
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Htgrfffty (NC. 33 xt.) Greenville, North Carolina
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Located In The Plaza Mall Entrance
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RESTAURANTS
Greek Owned & Operated Since 1979
Delivery Hoars
Mon. -Fri. 4-11
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GREEK DISHES
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'Best Deal in Town"
752-0326
or
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560 Evans St.
Stop by UBE before
or after any home
pirate football
game. Choose
from the world's
largest selection
of pirate souvenirs from
t-shirts, sweaters and hats to
megaphones, pom poms and
even E.C.U. tote bags.
And while you're at
UBE see our full line
of Russell Athletic
and Champion
Sportswear.
It's all at University
Book Exchange, downtown
Greenville . . . the one for
the fans. Stop by today.
1988 PIRATE HOME SCHEDULE
Sept 3 Tennessee Tech. 700 PM
Sept 24 Southern Mississippi (Parent's Day) 1 30 PM
Oct. 1 Southwestern Louisiana 1:30 PM
Oct. 8 West Virginia (Homecoming) 200 PM
Oct. 22 Syracuse 130 PM
Oct. 29 Miami 1 30 PM
7ie OhB FbrTke Fzmsl
Open Football Saturdays 9:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.AVeekdays 9:00 A.M. - 5:30 P.M.
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville
Bike
Bicycle riders whq
violators of state law
pus regulations hatj
problem on the 1 I
As the automobj
tion on campus has !n
has the bicycle papula
past month there hav
eral bicyclists who ha
with autos on campu
clist was at fault inea
I rtunatelv nor
ously injured R�
collisions were ri
way on a one wa
stop for a du .
and illegal p
several pedestriai
have had near n
sidewalks
Crime Colui
by
Captain Kn
ECU Police D
Effective in i
ECUPubli
servo Oft
monitoring b.
will beenforb
pus regulatior j
for violations and
bicycles w hi i
Violenc
SANTIAC
Power out amci
1st bombings plui
into darkness
yesterda) s nal -J
on whether Gc n �
chef should rema
Troops were pi -
polling places throuj
country and other
army units patl
late Tuesday
bers increased
struck Santiago ai
a 1,300-mile-�-
At least eig j
heard in Santiagi
the power outage
Police blamed the
a terrorist bomb
three electrical U 1
they had n reports ol
in Junes from the -
plosions, indicat
have been noise fcx n bi
to frighten but not ha
The blackout into
election eve marked
calm, with manv resid
theaters and restaui
Tuesday in anticipatio
off on election da
national holiday.
The nation's long-
hon machinerv has beej
in place for today s ra
on Pinochet, who lit!
gency rule and loosend
gnp on the oppositu
D
New
4 Drav
Ar
Sweet Wi
207 E. 5th �
11-7 Mo
15?r Ofl
We Also





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
(KTOBER 6,1988 3
ction
Ispital spokesman William
Breyer said Clark, who
trig kept in the hospital's
n unit, would probably
d and returned to jail.
addition to trespass
participants in this
rotests face tines up to
r ntempt of court it they
Supt rioi Court judge's
i nitine the demonstra-
crtising
It aives
.nun
1 iiD
SING
i RATES
Us:
r-6557
6309
ir$'
&&
Stock
Telephone
35S-7695
o
lyou're at
full line
Athletic
hampion
�rtswear.
rsity
ntown
one for
y today.
M
2:00 I'M
1 M) PM
1:30 PM

L- 5:10 P.M.
Bikers need to heed rules
Bicycle riders who are unsafe,
violators of state laws and cam-
pus regulations have become a
problem on the ECU campus.
As the automobile popula-
tion on campus has increased, so
has the bicycle population. In the
past month there have been sev-
eral bicyclists who have collided
with autos on campus. The bicy-
clist was at fault in each incident.
Fortunately none were seri-
ously injured. Reasons for these
collisions were: riding the wrong
way on a one way street, failure to
stop for a duly erected stop sign
and illegal passing. In addition,
several pedestrians and bicyclists
have had near misses on campus
sidewalks.
Crime Column
by
Captain Knox
ECU Police Dept.
Effective immediately, the
ECU Public Safety-Police and Re-
serve Officers will begin strictly
monitoring bicycle traffic. They
will be enforcing state laws, cam-
pus regulations, issuing citations
for violations and impounding
bicycles when applicable.
For those who may not know
the laws and regulations govern-
ing bicycles on campus, they are
as follows:
Sec. 1. North Carolina motor
vehicle laws consider a bicycle to
be a motor vehicle insofar as the
nature of the vehicle permits.
Traffic regulations must be
obeyed as bicycle riders. Traffic
citations will be issued to opera-
tors of bicycles violating traffic
regulations.
Sec. 2 Bicycles parked or
operated on the East Carolina
University campus shall be regis-
tered with the Traffic Office and
bear a bicycle registration permit.
All bicycles found on camp in
violation of this section oe
impounded until proof of o ner-
ship is determined.
Sec. 3 Bicycles will not be
parked inside administrative or
classroom buildings, in stairwells
or hallwavs of residence halls, on
sidewalks, ramps or outside stair-
ways. University Police are au-
thorized to use the force necessary
to remove and impound all bi-
cycles found in violation of the
Article.
Sec. 4 Unregistered bicycles
left on campus will be considered
to be illegally parked. Thev mav
be impounded and disposed of in
accordance with North Carolina
State Statutes.
Sec. 5 Bicycles will not be
operated on the sidewalks of
ECU. Bicycles will not be
operated in excess of 15 mph and
operators will observe and com-
ply with traffic regulations.
Sec. 6 Bicycles operated on
campus at night shall have lights
and reflectors in accordance with
North Carolina State Statutes.
Other facts to consider: bi-
cycles are no match for cars or
trucks in a collision. The car or
truck is going to win every time.
Yet, some bicyclists must thinl
differently about the way they
ride. Some bicyclists do not ride
safely and are just an accident
waiting to happen. Some even
daringly and blatantly ride as if
they own the road, expecting
autos to yield to them instead of
vice versa.
Some motorists look out for
the unyielding bicyclist (those
who will not yield to let traffic
J
pass safely). While pulling out to
go around the bicyclist, the mo-
torist puts himself and others in
danger of a head on collision.
We must remember streets
and highways were designed for
15-55 mph traffic with car and
truck traffic in mind. Although
there are some areas with bicycle
routes, the common sense thing
to do is pull off and let traffic by.
Most avid bicyclists will argue
they have as much right on the
road as cars and trucks. That may
well be true; however, in reality, if
there is a collision, who do you
think will walk away un-
scratched?
People constantly threaten to
sue the motorist. Maybe so, if it
can be proved that it was not the
bicyclists fault and that heshe
did not contribute to the accident.
Remember the same rules of the
road apply to bicyclists as to
motorists.
Furthermore, is it worth the
price of broken bones, scars, pa-
ralysis or death that is sometimes
associated with collisions be-
tween bicycles and autos? What
of the agony the driver of the auto
feels when heshe hits a bicyclist,
no matter who is at fault? Think
about it! Is it worth the chance?
Ride carefully and safely;
obey all state and campus regula-
tions concerning bicycles. With
your help it can be safer for you
and everyone concerned.
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Violence, bombings plague Chilean elections
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) -
Tower outages blamed on terror-
ist bombings plunged the capital
into darkness on the eve of
yesterday's national referendum
on whether Gen. Augusto Pino-
chet should remain as president.
Troops were posted at 1,000
polling places throughout the
country and other police and
army units patrolled the streets
late Tuesday night. Their num-
bers increased after blackouts
struck Santiago and other cities in
a 1,300-milc stretch of the country.
At least eight explosions were
heard in Santiago moments after
the power outage.
Police blamed theblackout on
a terrorist bombing of at least
three electrical towers, but said
they had n reports of damage or
"injuries from the subsequent ex-
plosions, indicating they may
have been noise bombs intended
to frighten but not harm.
The blackout interrupted an
election eve marked by relative
calm, with many residents filling
theaters and restaurants late
Tuesday in anticipation of a day
off on election day, declared a
national holiday.
The nation's long-idled elec-
tion machinery has been put back
in place for today's referendum
on Pinochet, who lifted emer-
gency rule and loosened his tight
grip on the opposition in the
months preceding the balloting.
Voting was scheduled from 8
a.m. to 5 p.m with the first
unofficial returns to be released
about an hour after polls closed.
A coalition of 16 opposition
parties, distrustful of the Interior
Ministry's tabulations, planned a
separate vote count. The group
says it will accept as official the
results of the National Electoral
Service, which are to be disclosed
on Friday.
Patricio Aylwin, president of
the centrist Christian Democratic
Party and spokesman for a oppo-
sition coalition, predicted
Pinochet's downfall.
"We are going to vote and we
are going to win he told report-
ers. Gen. Jorge Zincke. militarv
commander of Santiago, said in-
structions had been given to pro-
vide access at polling places to the
estimated 500 foreign observers.
"We have nothing to hide he
said.
About 150,000 members of
the armed forces and national
police have been on barracks alert
since Sunday. Paper ballots at
voting booths were marked only
with a "yes" and a "no
If most vote "yes Pinochet
will begin an eight-year term in
March. The military junta he
leads, which theoretically served
as the legislative branch of
Pinochet's government, will be
disbanded. A new Congress
would be seated in 1990, two-
thirds elected and the remaining
third appointed by Pinochet.
1 f most cast "no" ballots, open
elections arc to be held next year
and Pinochet is to relinquish
power in March 1990.
No matter what the outcome
of the referendum, congressional
elections will be held in 1990, but
the legislature will have limited
authority. It will be virtually
powerless to amend a 1980
constitution, which gives the mili-
tary autonomy and a supervisory
role in national policy-making.
Pinochet has pointed to an
improved economy in recent
years and the promise of growth
and stability if he is retained as
president. His critics say the rich
have benefited the most, and say-
human rights abuses continue
under his rule.
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T
V
olfje iEaat darnlttuan
Pete Fernald, Gnri Manage,
G ur Carter, M�r &�
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of AJverltmng
)oe Harris, Nb�Etitar
DOUG jOI INSON, Sport, id.tor
Tim Hampton, i-&
Michelle England,crM-
Debbie Stevens, $��
JEFF VMlKER.Staff Illustrator
TOM FURR, Circulation Manager
SUSAN HOWELL,Prodwrt.1mMaiig�T
JOt IN W. MEDLIN, Art Director
MAC CLARK, Business Manager
October 6, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Abortion
A thought experiment in alternatives
Much has been said about abor-
tion. The subject touches almost
everyone's life in some way: a friend
has an abortion, a group lauds or
lambaste a political candidate for his
views on the matter, and so on.
Most of the argument seems to
focus on the relative rights of a liv-
ing, breathing woman and those of a
fetus. Unfortunately, beliefs on both
sides have been constructed to con-
form with previously established
dogma. As neither side is likely to
change the other's fundamental be-
liefs, the debate is clearly unproduc-
tive; a better solution must be found.
Like most discoveries, the solu-
tion to the abortion controversy was
here all along, just waiting to be
found. And here it is:
First oi all, America is at least
nominally a democracy, so one
would assume that for the abolition
of abortion to be the law oi the land,
more than 50 percent oi the voters
would have to be against it.
To find out who is for choice and
who is against it, then, there must be
some sort oi national referendum on
the subject. For reasons that will be
made clear in a moment, the best
way to carrv out the referendum
would be to allow anyone who
wishes to declare himself or herself
against abortion to sign his or her
name to a list, including his or her
address and phone number.
If the number of names on the list
did not exceed 50 percent of the
number of legitimate American vot-
ers, we could simply throw the list
away, let abortion remain legal, and
end the whole thing there.
If, on the other hand, more than
50 percent oi the populace proved to
be against abortion, then abortion
would be abolished.
But there's a catch.
If abortion is made illegal, the
government keeps the list. And now
every time a baby is born to a woman
who would otherwise have had an
abortion, we take a look at the list.
And we pick a name. At random.
Like a lotterv.
And this person instantly be-
comes legally and morally respon-
sible for the care and keeping of that
infant. No matter the person's finan-
cial status, social status or marital
status. No matter whether the baby
is black or white; healthy or sick;
normal or hideously malformed;
KMS-v v
wanted or unwanted.
And this person would become
legally and morally responsible not
only for the baby, but also, to an
extent, for the mother. If she re-
quired physical or mental treatment
at any time in her life as a direct or
indirect result of having the baby,
the baby's new parents would be
required to provide it. They would
have to compensate her for lost
wages, if any. And, of course, if she
had died during childbirth, they'd
be guilty of murder.
Come to think of it, it wouldn't
be a bad idea to make this legal
moral parent responsible for the
mother's health from the moment of
conception. Heshe would need to
ensure that the mother had
adequate natal care, that she didn't
drink, smoke or do drugs, and - most
important - that she didn't have an
abortion.
If the legal moral parent refused
to accept the baby or went into hid-
ing to avoid it, heshe would be
sought by the police, or, if necessary,
the FBI; when found, heshe would
be charged with and prosecuted for
child abuse, neglect and abandon-
ment.
And it wouldn't be to the anti-
abortionists' advantage to make up
false names. If it were found that a
person whose name was on the list
had never in fact existed, the name
would be struck from the list and
some legitimate person would be
chosen instead. If at any point the
number of people "bn the list fell
below7 50 percent of the total popula-
tion, abortion would become legal
but those persons who had acquired
babies in the interim would still be
responsible for them.
Of course, to make this legally
binding, all those who signed the list
would have to be informed of pre-
cisely what they were getting them-
selves into, and they would have to
be made aware that by signing their
names to the list, they were accept-
ing anything and everything that
might befall them as a result of
"adopting" a child through this
process.
Granted, most people would not
declare themselves against abortion
if they were the ones who had to
suffer the consequences of having
the baby but then, that says it all,
doesn't it?
Response termed redundant
To the editor:
To the ECU Chairman for Bush
'88:
Thank you for your response
which I found to be ethereal and
redundant. While I did not take your
attacks upon my character person-
ally, those attacks only affirmed my
suspicions that you cannot intelli-
gently debate the issues. Your only
recourse has been to cloud our dis-
cussion with mudslinging. Appar-
ently, Bush has a great deal of influ-
ence on you. And you, like Bush, do
not have the ability to deal with the
real issues.
For example; Bush says he wants
to be the education candidate. But,
where was George while the Re-
aganBush administration turned its
back on the federal government's
commitment to education? The Re-
aganBush administration has aban-
doned young Americans who de-
serve a chance to attend college. Over
the last 7 years, more than 730,000
students have seen their chance for a
college loan disappear. (Kirk, Paul.
Spectrum, September988).
The Mike Dukakis record on
education is solid. Over the past 7
years, while he was governor, Mike
Dukakis quintupled funding for col-
lege scholarships in Massachusetts.
(Kirk, Paul. Spectrum, Scptember-
1988).
Although he claims to be a fiscal
conservative, George Bush sup-
ported the 2 largest tax increases in
the history of the nation: the 1982
deficit reduction tax increase and the
1983 Social Security tax increase.
(Kirk, Paul. Spectrum, Septcmbcr-
1988).
Mike Dukakis has cut taxes five
times in the last 5 years, providing
more that $500 million dollars in tax
relief. Only 15 states have a lower tax
burden than Massachusetts. (Kirk,
Paul. Spectrum, Septembcr-1988).
Mr. Hall, 1 will address another
issue concerning the jobs debate.
George Bush boasts a $22,000 a year
average pay rate for new jobs, not
$30,000 a year as you reported. This
figure comes from the Bureau of
Labor Statistics AFTER the early 80's
recession. In 1986, the Join t Economic
Committee of Congress issued a re-
port titled, "The Great American Job
Machines; The Proliferation of Low
Wage Employment in the U.S. Econ-
omy
The report said between 1979
and 1984 nearly three fifths of net
new jobs paid LOW wages, com-
pared with one fifth during the 1963-
79 period. George Bush says he is for
working families. Where was George
while annual job growth dropped
25 lower than levels during the
previous Democratic administra-
tion? (Kirk, Paul. Spectrum, Septem-
bcr-1988, p.20).
Over the last 5 years, while Mike
Dukakis has been governor, growth
in per capita income in Massachu-
setts has been the highest in the na-
tion. (Kirk, Paul. Spectrum.
Sepcmtber-1988).
i ?w&e
MORE JOBS,
5CH00CS,
STKoweef?
vmmw
AA1ATI0MAL I
MUTH
, PtAM J
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation passing the buck, making deals to try and keep insolvent thrifts alive
Again, 1 appreciate your re-
sponse to my letter. It was very inter-
esting to sec in print your obvious
perceptual impairment regarding
the real problems and issues facing
our country and state. And, given all
of the above facts, my position re-
mains the same.
Wyatt M. Jones, IV
Freshman
Political Science
Military criticized
To the editor:
If vou have a lot of moncv, vou
can just about do anything that you
want to do. You can find some other
people who want to foment a war
and buy an election. Or even if you
don't start a war, you can squander a
lot of monev on national defense
which both parties tell us that they
plan to do.
But I was in the National Guard
and when we were called to active
duty for two tornadoes, we were not
really too effective. It took so long to
get us activated that if the looters
were going to steal anything, it
would have been taken by the time
we got there.
The National Guard should have
just one small part of each unit that
works with the Sheriff's Department
and then when a large emergency
comes along they could go right to
work. I would think that the police
with the computer technology could
predict when i crime wave was
about to hit. T n a few of the Na-
tional Guard I ys might just stake
out businesses that might be robbed.
But I would like to see a panel of
military experts (not controlled by
the U.S. military) who would evalu-
ate each item that is procured by the
military. A layman is practically
powerless to keep from being robbed
by the big business concerns.
Years ago I lived near
MacDonald Air Craft Corp and I was
really taken in by thier propaganda.
But then I met an instructor at Cha-
nute who told me that he thought
that MacDonald turned out nothing
but garbage.
I talked to European military
experts about U.S. strategy in W.W.il
and they thought that there was some
insanity in the Pentagon since they
said that you could not get an army
through the Brenner Pass into Ger-
many. They also thought that the old
Army Air Force was more interested
in dropping bombs in order to make
U.S. bomb manufacturers rich than
trying to end W.W. II because all of
Germany runs on electricity and by
just bombing German power plants
we could have ended it. If General
Patton had not been such a yes man,
he would have landed in Southern
France and quietly proceeded into
Berlin.
But if I had a son who wanted to
become a professional soldier, 1
would tell him no and that I didn't
want him to beome a boot lickcr. The
military used to breed boot lickers
like flvs. The last time I stopped at
Fort Bragg at the N .CO Club, I heard
this guv say something about buying
a drink for the First Sergeant. Well, let
the First Sergeants buy their own
booze. They alwavs had a lot more
rank than I did and thus more moncv
The U.S. Navy wants more air-
craft carriers, but I dislike the U.S.
Navy. They kept my brother and a lot
of other guys imprisoned on war
ships during the war with Japan a lot
longer than was necessary� not to
mention that they got a lot more
Marines killed than was really neces-
sary at places such as Tarawa.
I also dislike the reports that I
have heard about the U.S.M.C. train-
ing men so hard that they practically
destroy their souls. During the war in
Vietnam, I had learned about some-
thing that is called the craft of intelli-
gence. I saw material printed that
could get out Marines killed, as well
as information printed that could get
the Marines being held in P.O.W.
camps killed.
I once knew a woman who was
married to a professional Navy man
and she was faithful to him, but I
think that she did this by becoming a
drug addict. But why couldn't the
Navy have a floating base that the
dependents of military people could
live on. Then their wives wouldn't
have to be unfaithful since the fleet
units could visit with their families
on weekends.
Some of these foreign countries
want to hold the U.S. up because we
want to have bases in the Philippines.
Well, why not put some people to
work here in the U S. designing ships
large enough to be floating bases.
There is a lot of good here in the U.S.
that I would like to rest of the world
to see Such as Disney World. I would
also like to have a comprehensive
study made of Eisenhower's cam-
paign.
Bill J. Bloomer
More Parrots ?
To the editor:
In response to my attack on the
lowdown character of the pirate.
Professor Daniel has suggested the
parrot as a substitute symbol. He
argues that phonetically and
orthographically the change would
be easy.
Good suggestion! 1 would like to
add that the parrot would make a
colorful logo and has the added vir-
tue of being a unique school totem.
As acting chair of the Luke
Plankwalker midcourse-correction
task force, I welcome futher sugges-
tions. Though it would be more ex-
pensive to change to, the bright crim-
son ladybug is getting votes. Appro-
priate face paintes and balloons are
readily available for this winning
pest destroyer.
Edith Webber
English Department, Emeritus
BY JAMES K. GLASSMAN
TheNev Republic
Here's the deal: You put up $10 million in cash.
A federal agency will put upanother$200million. In
return you get to own 70 percent of a billion-dollar
savings and loan association. Like the deal so far? It
been peddling this deal� and some even better. It's
finding quite a few takers, including Robert M. Bass,
the mild-mannered billionaire who ranks a mere
27th among the richest Americans.
But with 505 thrifts insolvent and another 435
with a dangerously low net worth, FSLIC needs to
gets better: If interest rates rise and it costs you more find a lot of buycrs. jn their haste to unload, FSLIC
to pull in deposits, the feds will pick up the tab. If and the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, which
rates fall, you get to keep the extra profits. Ditto for rcguiates S&Ls, are making quick and dirty deals-
assets: If loans go bad, the feds will handle it; if they that y go SOUTi leaving the taxpayer to clean
turn out to be in better shape than you thought, you Up the mess.
get the extra money.
The Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corp
the insolvent federal agency whose job it is to bail out
or shut down ' c hundreds of insolvent S&Ls, has
What everyone had thought FSLIC was sup-
posed to do when S&Ls (or "thrifts") got into trouble
was shut them down and pay off depositors of
$100,000 or less. The problem, however, is that
FSLIC doesn't have the money. So it sells the sick
thrift to a healthy thrift� or, more recently, it sells
the sick thrift to anyone who'll buy it. Since smart
buyers know that FSLIC is desperate, recent "sales"
have been giveaways, with the buyer barely at risk.
Its neatest deal was announced on Labor Day:
Robert Bass would put up $550 million to buy 70
percent of American Savings and Loan Association
of Stockton, Calif the country's largest thrift, with
$30 billion in assets. FSLIC would put up the equiva-
lent of $2 billion for the remaining 30 percent.
Bass got one especially nice arrangement: He
can use $1.5 billion of the thrift's deposits for doing
deals. What sort of deals will Bass do? This year, he's
already bought the Westin hotel chain ($1.5 billion
itself) and then sold off the Plaza to Donald Trump
for $410 million. He's bought Bell & Howell ($702
million), and he's been trying to buy Macmillan ($2
billion).
Now, the Home Loan Bank Board and FSLIC
have come up with a way of keeping insolvent thrifts
alive, maybe even through the start of the 101st
Congress in January. And (who knows?) by then
Robert Bass may be up to 20th or even 15th on the
billionaires' ladder.
Late
(CPS) � Boston Uniw
rejected student protests anl
sued strict new rules Septet
15 prohibiting students fl
ing overnight guests of the I
site sex in their dorm ra J
"All oi life after 11 .
been banned at BL sen
Sanbonmatsu told a 1
2,000 students that had
verged to protest the . j
rules the day before tl
approved.
BU's strict new ruk -
the closest a college has i
to the "in loco parent
ship schools maintain
their students up until tl
Under the doctrin
meaning adminis)
place oi the parei
set curfews for students,
ponded students for be! I
ways they didn't like ar I
students oi th
visit with each other
SAT scores
for third st
(CPS) � In sj
wave of school r
mostly at helj
better on st
Scholastic A:
scores have sta
third straight year tl �
Board annour
This year s fr I
average verb - -J
down two p nts fi
before�and av i
of 4m. the same as in 1987
"There's no medal r
ica in this new -
tan of Education '�"�
nett. "I said in April 1
absolute level in which I
provements are tak i .
unacceptablylowT J
lower and still not a rl
Come on team back ii
ing
College Boar
Donal Stewart chose to stj
positive: "It ib certainly r
ng to sec that the decline ii
on the SAT has leveled I
ccti years, because thi pr
means that some positive
are happening in the ru
schools
Average scores pi
1963, and various obs
blamed everything from tei
atmospheric nuclear restij
the decline since.
In the interim, verbal
reached a high of 4r ir
math scores a hij
Yet from the verbal 1 a A
the math low or 4rv - H
corded in 1981 - average
began to rebound modi j
thev leveled of! again in V
Although the O
sternly warns people t,
the test scores in the J
which the particular
were earned p
trumpet them as prooi j
thing
When score- turn j
in 1982, President Reag
thev vindicated his edl
policies
Education Polic)
feanne Alien of the
Foundation, an influent
WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
The
COMedY
ZONE
WED
The
CoMedY
ZONE
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
tt
Plus
126 Greenville 1





rt�
��
&
aidant
d boot tickers
e I stopped at
OClub heard
ng about buying
Sergeant Well, lei
nts buy their own
iys had a lot more
thus more money.
� wants more air-
� I dislike the U.S.
brother and a lot
n prisoned on war
ir with lapana lot
necessary� not to
ey got a lot more
was really neces-
h as Tarawa,
ke the reports that I
it the L.S.M.C. train-
it they practically
ils During the war in
irned about somc-
d the craft of intelli-
aterial printed that
Marines killed, as well
�n printed that could get
. held in P.O.W.
a woman who was
fessional Navy man
� lithful to him, but I
this by becoming a
� why couldn't the
a ting base that the
ilitary people could
;r wives wouldn't
ful since the fleet
I with their families
- foreign countries
L S. up because we
is sin the Philippines.
� put some people to
S designing ships
� be floating bases.
. d here in the U.S.
- t i rest of the world
v World. I would
a comprehensive
�h(user's cam-
Bill f. Bloomer
lore Parrots ?
my attack on the
icter of the pirate,
)aniel has suggested the
' 'lite symbol. He
metically and
hange would
rv I would like to
le parrot would make a
d has the added vir-
inique school totem.
hair of the Luke
r mid nurse-correction
me futher sugges-
gh it would be more ex-
geto, the bright crim-
g is getting votes. Appro-
paintes and balloons are
nlable tor this winning
Edith Webber
h Department, Emeritus
nt thrifts alive
the thrift's deposits for doing
ils will Bassdo? This year, he's
testin hotel chain ($f.5 billion
fl the Tlaza to Donald Trump
bought Bell & Howell ($702
?n trying to buy Macmillan ($2
I oan Bank Board and FSLIC
Iva v of keeping insolvent thrifts
' rough the start of the 101st
And iwho knows?) by then
up to 20th or even 15th on the
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6,1988 5
Late night life banned
(CPS) � Boston Universitv
rejected student protests and is-
sued strict new rules September
15 prohibiting students from hav-
ing overnight guests of the oppo-
site sex in their dorm rooms.
"All of life after 11 p.m. has
been banned at BU senior Jamie
Sanbonmatsu told a crowd of
2,000 students that had con-
verged to protest the visitation
rules the day before thev were
approved.
BU's strict new rules may be
the closest a college has returned
to the "in loco parentis" relation-
ship schools maintained with
their students up until the l0s.
Under the doctrine�literally
meaning administrators acted "in
place of the parents" �campuses
set curfews for students, sus-
pended students for behaving in
ways they didn't like and forbade
students of the opposite sex to
visit with each other behind
closed doors.
Though the rules collapsed
under student protests for greater
autonomy, new drinking laws
and increasing numbers of stu-
dent lawsuits blaming colleges
for sexual assaults and other
crimes have moved many cam-
J
puses to tighten their control over
potentially litigious student be-
havior during the past few years.
St. Joseph's College in Maine,
the State University of New York
at Binghamton and North Caro-
lina State University, among oth-
ers, also have restricted or banned
overnight visits to dorms by
members of the opposite sex in re-
cent vears.
Virtually every campus in the
United States, moreover, has stiff-
ened its student drinking rules
since 1CS6, when the federal gov-
ernment threatened to cut off
funding to any state that still al-
lowed 18-year-olds to drink alco-
hol.
BU officials said they were
just trying to help students study.
The new rules, said BU
spokesman Kevin Carleton, ad-
dress "concerns stated by stu-
dents, staff and parents that resi-
dences too often have failed to
provide the kind of environment
where an individual can quietly
study and have his or her right to
privacy respected
Sanbonmatsu, on the other
hand, charged, "The administra-
tion is stunting our growth and
development by denying us the
right to make decisions
Under the new guidelines,
some of which go into effect in late
fall and others during the spring,
guests must display identification
cards and leave the dormitory by
11 p.m. on weekdays and 1 a.m.
on weekends.
Overnight guests of the same
sex are still allowed, but guests of
the opposite sex will not be al-
lowed to stay overnight.
Students older than age 21
can bring a six-pack of beer or a
liter of other kinds of alcoholic
beverages into the dorms, but no
more than that.
Carleton student protests of
the rules did not faze BU officials.
"1 don't think anv demonstration
J
would have an effect he said.
"What can have an effect is a rea-
sonable discussion
Professor
Lating tk Drinking
Come Home To Professor O'Cools
For The Idea Homecoming!
All Weekend Long
Drink Specials
Double Shot Lime Margaritas $2.50
All Imported Mexican Beer SI.50
Prime Rib Dinner S9.95 After 5 p.m.
LOCATED IN THE FARM FRESH
SHOPPING CENTER
11 am-I am Monday- Saturday i 1 am 10 pm Sunday 355 2 ��
SAT scores at standstill
for third straight year
(CTS) - In spite oi a huge
wave oi school reforms aimed
mostly at helping students to do
better on standardized tests,
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
scores have stayed flat tor the
third straight year, the College
Board announced Sept. 20.
This year's freshman had
average verbal scores of 428 �
down two points from the year
before �and average math scores
of 47b, the same as in 1987.
"There's no medal for Amer-
ica in this news said U.S. Secre-
tary oi Education William Ben-
nett. "1 said in April that the
absolute level in which our im-
provements are taking place is
urtacceptably low Today it's a bit
lower and still not acceptable.
Come on team back into train-
ing
College Board President
Donal Stewart chose to stress the
positive: "It is certainly reassur-
ing to see that the decline in scores
on the SAT has leveled oii in re-
cent years, because this probablv
means that some positive things
are happening in the nation's
schools
Average scores peaked in
1963, and various observers have
blamed everything from tenure to
atmospheric nuclear testing for
the decline since.
In the interim, verbal scores
reached a high of 466 in 1968 and
math scores a high of 493 in 1969.
Yet from the verbal low of 424 and
the math low of 466 � both re-
corded in 1981 � average scores
began to rebound modestly until
they leveled off again in 1987.
Although the College Board
sternly warns people to weight
the test scores in "the context in
which the particular test scores
were earned politicians always
trumpet them as proof of some-
thing.
When scores turned upward
in 1982, President Reagan claimed
they vindicated his education
policies.
Education Policy Analyst
leanne Allen of the Heritage
foundation, an influential con-
servative think tank, says the
Reagan administration can still
take credit tor improving SAT
scores.
A lot oi the dialogue by the
Reagan administration sparked
efforts to improve education she
said. "The states responded to
that dialogue, but improvements
that time. We'll see some real in-
novative successes
Still others don't see much
room for interpretation in the
scores.
lohn Katzman, president oi
Princeton Review, a New York
firm that coaches standardized
test takers, has fervently criticized
the SAT for what he says is a bias
against women and minorities.
Hie SAT, he savs, doesn't test
actual knowledge, just students'
ability to take standardized tests.
"It's a lousy test that doesn't
measure aptitude
Driving A Ford-Built Vehicle?
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Student Stores
Wright Building
East Carolina University
Offer Good October 6 thru October 24th
HOMECOMING
WEDNESDAY
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6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBERS 1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED Christian male
nximmate to share new mobile home. 10
minutes from campus Non-smoker,
please Weekends call Hugh 756-6851.
ASSUME LEASE: 1 bdr. apartment at
Riverbluff $230 per month. $100 deposit.
Call 830-1185.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP to share a 3-bedroom townhouse.
No deposit, private bedroom, private
bathroom. $183 33mo. 13 utilities.
Fireplace, tanning beds, sauna, weight-
room and more Call 355-0700.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Century Limited,
AC Cruise, PS, I'B High mileage but
sharp; m good running condition. $2800.
Call 758 7423 anytime.
FOR SALE: Beige St white love seat. Good
condition S50. Call today! 758-9264.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED Vehicles from
SI 00 Fords Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chews Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
687 (VkX) Ext. S-1166
FOR SALE: Honda CX500 Custom mint
condition 6000 mi must sell. Desperate.
Call David 758-5510 Leave message if not
in
FOR SALE Men's Jamis Earth Cruiser.
Excellent condition $10000 firm. 752-
510.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE: Papers, $1 50 per
page. Resume's written and typed, $20.00
Close to campus. Call Joy at 758-7423 be-
tween 6 and 9 p.m.
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc , offers high-qual-
itv, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
pjge and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
Resume' production, and other business
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F for more details!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes Term
Papers, Theses, etc. Great Rates Call
Becky 758-1161 before 5, 752-1321 after 5
AT YOUR SERVICE:
Typing'Typing'Typing. Affordable and
Professional. Call 355-6634 after 600 p m
HELP WANTED
ON CAMPUS TRAVEL REP. OR OR-
GANIZATION NEEDED to promote
Spring Break Trip to FloridaTexas. Earn
money, free trips, and valuable work ex-
perience. Call Intercampus Programs. 1-
800-433-7747.
BE ON T.V Many needed for commer-
cials. Casting info. (1) 805-687-6000 Ext.
TV-1166.
PART-TIME OFFICE POSITION avail-
able at Carolina Imprints, 715 Albemarle
Ave Greenville. 12:30-5:30 p.m M-F.
Tleasant phone voice a must. Light typing
and filing. $3.50 per hour. Call 830-1929
for appointment.
PERSONALS
LOST: Green velcro wallet. If found
PLEASE call Mike at 752-7307. Show your
honesty.
GREF:Thebig21 is here! Thursday nights
gonna be just a little wild. . . (Scrol me!)
Downtown won't be the same when you
get finished with it! Later, Steve P Bobbv
F, Rick S
PIRATE FOOTBALL TEAM: We believe
in you and are behind you all the way!
With Purple Pride, THE PIRATE CREW
COLEMAN: Get ready for a great
semester! You are the BEST! Love ya, your
Big Bro!
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS We warned
you about the forbidden fruit! Isn't that
my tie floating in the PJ7 We had a blast!
Thanx, the BROTHERS.
PHI TAUS: Get ready to ROCK the
HouseHomecoming 1988�Starting
early and ending late. Let's make this the
BEST ever!
PHI TAUS: Get ready for a STRANGE
Thursday night!
ALPHA OMICRON PI Cocktail is a day
away. Get ready to swing and swav We'll
be cruzin' to the American Legion. AOPi's
get ready, cause we're best in the region
Dates make sure you're feeling all right,
because we'll have vou giggin all night
Get excited to have a great time
THETA CHI: Congratulations on your
charter! You guvs really worked hard
Thanks for inviting us to a great celebra-
tion love the sisters and pledges of
Alpha Omicron Pi
HAPPY 21ST B-DAY SANDY BFALE
Since Joe already gave you such a BIG
present, I don't know what to get that
could beat it. I lave a great time at Va.
Tech E.D.
LOST: Men's I IS Class Ring Gold with
topaz stone. Virginia State seal on one
side Woodbridge I IS. written around
stone Name inside. Please call 752 9694.
ZTA'S: Get ready to roll up your sleeves,
build a float, and tap some kegs' We'll see
you at the party tonight! Love, Alpha Sigs.
LOST: If anyone found 4 rings (dassring.
shrimp ring, birthstone ring, sweetheart
ring) in the bathroom at Mendenhali Stu-
dent Center on Friday (930), PLEASE
CALL MICHELLE at 752 8463. RE-
WARD
CONGRATULATIONS to the new Zeta
Pledge Class officers of Zeta Tau Alpha�
Tracy, June, Missy and April. You guys
are the best pledge class. Love the sisters
of Zeta.
ALPHA SIGS: Get ready to party tonight
as we finish the float! The Zctas.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Theta
Chi's for receiving their charter and for
letting us be a part of it. Thanks Love the
Zetas.
ZETA'S: Get ready for an exciting week-
end, cause I lomecoming '88 is here. Let's
make this a great weekend for our
Alumni!
ALPHA PHI ALPHA Homecoming Ac-
tivities�Greek Step Show 5 pm. Friday at
Bookstore; Dance at Cultural Center Fri-
day, 10 p.m2 a.m Adm. $1.00; Super
Homecoming Day Celebration at the
Unlimited Touch Nightclub, Saturday
night, 10 p.m. - until. Students $2.00.
Inovation, dedication, and motivation for
future generations.
THANK YOU SIG EP AND AZD for
making the first week of Pirate Walk a
success.
TO ALL ALPHA PHI COCKTAIL
DATES: Get psyched! Friday is the night
for another outstanding homecoming
cocktail We can't wait because we know
our dates can't be beat. As usual, the best
for the best Love, your Alpha Phi dates.
ALPHA PHI SISTERS AND PLEDGES:
For the pledges, it's a first. But the sisters
can guarantee that this night will defi-
nitely be unforgettable so get ready for the
weekend. An Alpha Phi tradition.
ALL PIKA'S: Rest up for this weekend If
you didn't know what full throttle meant,
you will. Foosh, Foosh.
GOOD LUCK TO WENDY KLICH Pi
Kappa Alpha's 1988 Homecoming Queen
Candidate.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: 1 lappy 1 lour tonight
MMHHMHB
Why go anywhere else Drink specials
PIKE'S AND THEIR DATES The time
has finally come Time�Saturday 1000,
place�Pikas Peak, event�-Ribbon Cut
tins Ceremony 1988�the year of the Pike
FREE CARWASH from Delta Zeta Fri
day, Oct 7, 2 p.m6 p m.
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo car
fridges with instructions for re-sale East
Coast Music St Video 758-4251,1109 Char
les Blvd
$ NEED CASH? $
Loans On &. Baying Guns
TV's, Stereos, Gold Jewelry, coins,
most anything of value
, Southern Gun & Pawn, Inc
$ 752-2464

Your Best Look
Specializing In: MANICURES:
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Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne 7 atments � Muscle Tone
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Men St Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaza Dr Greenville
ABORTION
'Personal and Conjvdential Care'
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru SaL Lew
Coat Termination to 20 wrrki of pre�nanry
1-800-433-2930
CRUSTY'S
PIZZA
WE
DELIVER
Now Hiring Drivers
Starting Wage $4.00 per hr.
Earn Up To $9.00 per hr.
Flexible hours, Bonuses. Must
have own car and insurance.
Apply in person at 1414 Charles St.
wsrm
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Subscription Form
Name:
Address:
Date to Begin:
Complimentary.
Amount Paid:
Individual:
Date to End:
Business:
Date Paid.
Rates: Individual $25 p�r ycarBuiinrw $35 per year
Return to: Th East Carolinian. Publication Uldg . - ECU. Cnrcnvillc. NC 27KS8-4353
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Announcements
Season tickets are now on sale for the Per-
forming Arts Series at ECU. This year
there are 14 outstanding performances
starting in Oct and running through
April Some of the attractions include:
Wynton Marsalis, CABARET, The Acting
Company in Love's Labour's Lost, Nadja
Salerno-Sonnenberg, The Tokyo String
Quartet. Oregon, The Atlanta Symphony,
and the Ohio Ballet. For a free brochure,
and further details contact: The Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhali, 757-6611, ext.
266
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered bv the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before vou graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Coop Information Seminar in the
CCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi-
nars) The onlv bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase you "fun"
budget,
'opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
Thurs Oct. 6,1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon Oct
10,1 p.m. rm. 2010; Thurs Oct. 13,4 p.m.
rm 2006, Thurs Oct. 20,1 p.m rm. 2010;
Mon , Oct. 24, 1 p.m rm. 2010; Thurs
Oct 27, 4 p.m rm. 2006; Mon Oct. 31,4
p.m rm. 2006.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
: study for Fall Semester andor Spring
. Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments Call 757-6979 or come by the CCB,
room 2028
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fri.
night at 7 00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
i
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7.00 in the Jenkins Art
. Auditorium.
KAYAKINGCANQE
Be sure to attend the Intramural Kayak-
ingCanoe registration held from Sept. 15
to Oct. 7. Learn to canoe and kayak in a
fantastic trip. All you need to do is regis-
ter.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Ohio Ballet will inbate the 1988-89
Performing Art Series on Oct. 12 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. The program for
the evening includes: "Untitled" (first
performed by PHILOBOLUS in 1975),
"Summer Night" (choreographed by
Heinz Poll), "Gravity" (a new work by
Laura Dean), 'Triptych" (choreographed
by Heinz Poll to Mendelssohn's "Piano
Concerto No. 2, D Minor), Tickets for this
outstanding event are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhali Stu-
dent Center, 757-6611, ext. 266. This event
is sponsored by the Performing Arts
Committee and the Department of Uni-
versity Unions.
BANNER CONTEST
To participate in the banner contest, dur-
ing NATIONAL ALCOHOL AWARE-
NESS WEEK, register your organizations
entry, in 209 Whichard Building, by Oct.
14. Six divisional 1 st place winners will be
displayed during the ECU vs Syracuse
game and be awarded $50. Call 757-6823
for entry forms and additional informa-
tion.
CROPWALK88
Any individuals or groups interested in
participating in the 7th annual Cropwalk
for hunger should attend the ECU Re-
cruitment Rally Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. in room
244 Mendenhali. The walk will be held on
Nov. 6th. For more information contact
Marianne Exum (ODN) 757-6271 or 830-
9450.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Business students interested in scholar-
ships should secure forms from one of the
following dept. offices: Accounting �
GCB 3208, Decision Sciences � 3418, Fi-
nance � 3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414. All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210),
Chairman of School of Business Scholar-
ship Committee, by Oct. 14. Students may
apply for one or more of the scholarships
listed below. Planters Bank Scholarship (3
at $1000 each). University Book Exchange
( 2 at $500 each), NCNB ($500), J. Fred
Hamblen ($200) Credit Women Interna-
tional ($200), Cameron-BrownFirst
Union Scholarship (3 at $500 each), FOR
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY: Latney
W. Pittard Memorial, Raleigh-Durham
Chapter Institute of Internal Auditors
($350), National Association of Account-
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship ($500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
ONLY: Archie R. Burnette (S600), Ward
Real Estate Scholarship ($100)
ECU LAW SOCIETY
All students who intend to go to law
school after ECU are invited to pin the
ECU Law Society. The next meeting will
be at 600 in Mendenhali, rm 221 on Oct.
6th.
NEW POETRY CONTEST
Cameron Publishing Company an
nounces a new poetrv contest open to all
SI,500 First Prize plus other prizes For
contest rules, send self-addressed
stamped envelope to: Cameron Publish
ing Company, llfW S Plaza Way 422,
Flagstaff, AZ 86001 The contest deadline
is Nov. 10, 1988.
PURPLE & GOLD
PIG PICKIN' AND SOCIAL
The ECU Black Alumni Chapter cordially
invites alumni, students and their friends
to our 2nd Annual Pig Pickin' and Social
on Oct. 7 at the Pirate Club from 6p.m to
1 a.m. The menu will include BBQ and
fried chicken with all the fixins! Cost: $10
person for all that you can eat Mail check
to ECU Black Alumni Chapter, P O. Box
4021, Greenville, or contact Barbara 1 lines
(Psychology Dept.) at 756-6491. Come
enjoy an evening of good food, good com-
pany and live jazz! Proceeds will go to-
ward the Ledonia S. Wright Memorial
Scholarship Fund for Minority Students.
KAPPA DELTA PI
Organizational meeting Oct. 11 at 7:30
p.m rm. 129 Speight. For members and
any interested potential members.
HILLEL TAILGATE PARTY
Jewish students, see your old friends and
meet new ones when we have a Tailgate
Party on Oct. 8th from 11:30-1:30 p.m.
Meet by the playground in front of
Elmhurst Elementary School (across from
Rose High and behind the Freshmen
parking lot on 14th St.). Bring your own
food and drink. For more info , please call
Mike at 756-4930.
STUDENTS FOR DEMOC-
RACY
Students for Economic Democracy will be
meeting on Sun. evening at 7 00 in
Mendenhali. room 248. Attendance
is required
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Attention all ECU students, faculty,
alumni and parents of ECU students!
Why spend another dull Thanksgiving
when you could be in the exciting city of
lights. New York Qty. Come join the Stu-
dent Union's Travel Committee excursion
to New York City, Nov. 23-27. For more
info , call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611.
MINORITY STUDENT ORG.
ELECTION of officers for the MINORITY
STUDENT ORGANIZATION will be
held on Oct. 11 at 5:00p.m. in Speight 129.
Students interested in running for an of-
fice or nominating another student
should contact Dr. Smith (205 Whichard
or extension 6495) NO LATER THAN Oct.
7. Positions available are PRESIDENT,
VICE-PRES, SEC. AND TREASURER.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to our Bible
Studies every Tues. night at 7:00 p.m. in
Rawl 130 Bring a friend For more info
call Jim at 752-7199.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
CASH, VACATION, Si PRIZES: HOW?
By playing the hottest business game in
town sponsored by Wall Street and
AT&T. There are over 400 chances to win.
The top 10 performers will receive a cash
prize, with first place performer receiving
$25,000 cash; and the top 100 performers
each month will receive athletic shoes
from Reebok and a wrist watch, courtesy
of Beneton by Bulova. You can participate
for only $49.95. Interested participants
can register on the first floor of the GCB on
Wed. and Thurs. between 10-2 p.m. or by
contacting Student Financial Mgmt. As-
soc. members or call the FIN A dept. 757-
6670.
OLD YEARBOOKS
The yearbook staff has a few copies of the
1983-1986 Buccaneers left in the office. If
you would like to receive a copy of any of
these books, please come by the Bucca-
neer office and pick one up. They are in
front of the office door, and anyone is
welcome to receive a copy. We are located
in front of Joyner Library on the second
floor of the Publications Bldg.
BIOLOGY CLUB
There will be a meeting Oct. 10 in BN-109
at 5:00. The Dean of Med. School will be
speaking about Med. school and what it
takes to get in. Please try to attend.
SENIORS
Applications are now being taken for
seats on the Senior Class Council. Fill out
application in SGA office at Mendenhali
by 3 p.m. Oct. 7.
ECU FORENSIC SOCIETY
Interested in competing in Intercollegiate
Debate, Public Speaking, Oral Interpre-
tive Reading, or Dramatic Interpretation?
Well, the ECU Forensics Society is for you.
We meet every Tues. night af 8:00 fn 211
Messick Theatre Arts Bldg.
CAMPFIRE
Sing and roast marshmallows around a
genuine campfire, Fri Oct. 7, 8 p.m. -
until, in the amphitheatre behind Fletcher
Dorm Sponsored by Methodist St Presby-
terian Campus Ministries, 752-7240.
INT'L. STUDENT ASSOC.
Come and roller skate with International
Student Assoc. on Fri Oct. 7 at Sports
World from 800-10.00 p.m. If you need a
ride, meet at Mendenhali at 7:30.
KARATE CLUB
Important meeting Thurs Oct. 6, 7:30
Memorial Gym 208. If you were a mem-
ber, be there.
STUDENTS FOR MARTIN
Students working for the reelection of
Gov. Jim Martin will meet tonight and
every Thurs. evening at 7:00 p.m. in 221
Mendenhali. Martin HQ is now opened at
the corner of 4th St Reade Streets. Please
call 752-8359 for more information.
SME
The Society of Manufacturing Engi-
neers is having a called meeting
Oct. 11 in Rawl 106 at 400 Guest
speaker�Micky RL McDowell.
Dept head for AT&cT. Subject: New
Technology in Fiber Optics All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend!
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Underwater Hockey games are scheduled
from 7:00 p.m. thru 8:30 p.m. at Memorial
Gym pool. An approved Club Sport, new
members are welcome at any time �
equipment needs include: mask, fins,
snorkel. Come out and trv the newest
sport on campus.
INJURY EVALUATION
Injury assessment will be performed by a
certified trainer each Wed. and Thurs.
from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the Memorial
Gymnasium Sports Care Room A. Recom-
mendation for rehabilitative processes
will be given for all interested. For addi-
tional info, call 757-6387.
CROP
ODN is sponsoring a recruitment rally for
CROP which is interested in helping to
alleviate hunger in our world. All inter-
ested are invited to the rally, Thurs Oct.
6, 7 p.m room 244 Mendenhali.
A FISH CALLED WANDA
"A Fish Called Wanda" will show at
Hendrix Theatre this Thurs. thru Sun
(Oct. 6-9) This is free to all ECU students
with valid ID & faculty with films passes
PINK FLOYD: THE WALL
The Student Union Films Committee
proudly presents "Pink Floyd: The Wall"
this Fri. and Sat. at 11 00 pm T-shirts and
an original soundtrack recording will be
given away at each showing
FOOTBALL
It's Homecoming on Sat, Oct. 8. a tho
Pirates host one of the nations best foot
ball teams�the Mountaineers of West Va
Game time is 200 p m and the gates open
at 12:00 noon
SOCCER
The soccer team will end their home
schedule this Sun Oct. 9 at 12 00 The
will host the college of William & Mary
Let's end the season in stvle
WOMEN'S TENNIS
The Lady Pirates will take to the court
today at 2:30. They will host Campbell on
the courts at the south side of Minges
SPIRIT CHALLENGE
The Sports Spirit Challenge Contest has a
revised schedule. This schedule change
will be included in a memo to fraternity
and sorority presidents as well as head
residents of the halls. Your participation
in this competition is greatly appreciated
The next event will be Sun at 12:00 (soc
cer).
HONORS PROGRAM
East Carolina Honors Organization is the
student honors group at ECU; it work
closely with the Honors Program and i
affiliated with the NC Honors Asoo
Southern Regional Honors Council, and
the National Collegiate Honors Council
Meetings are held on alternate Thursday
at 5:00 in room 1004 of the GCB Meeting
for Oct. are on the 6th and 20th; contact Pr
Sanders (757-6376) for more info
CAMFUS CRUSADE
PRIME TIME; Everyone welcome Join us
for a time of fun, fellowship St teaching on
how to live a more effective Christian life
on a College Campus. 730 p.m on Thurs
days, Brewster C-103
Read The East Carolinian Classified Page
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WASHINGTON
three decades, serious
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THE HAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6, 19H8 7
. where else I Hink specials
ID LHF1R PATfS The time
come nme Saturday IftOO
ik event Ribbon Cut
m 188 the vear of the Pike
v sH
i Zeta En
0 Bl I -ii Nintendo cat
ctions tvT re sale Tast
"Char
JBORTION
dential Core
EE Pregnancy
Testing
F 8:30-4 p.m.
at. 10-1 p.m.
ngle Women's
.ealth Center
n s.1 iw
liI f pi fgnanrv
A4'
00-433-2930
1MAN
ISH CALLED WANDA
d Wanda will show at
� 5 Tl rs thru Sun
students
� - films passes
i FLOYD: THE WALL
m� Commitl i
� � id Tho Wall
FOOTBALL
S0CCI.R
team
Sun
rhe
dan
WOMEN'S TENNIS
the courts
rr i �
jSPIRIT CHALLENGE
rts Spirit Challcng � test has a
lule This schedule change
fraternity
y. v presidents as well as h id
�� ��
petition is greatly appreriat
nt will be "sun a 2:00 si n
IQNORS PROGRAM
it it works
h the Honors Program and is
led with the N.C Honors Assr
nal Honors Council � I
il Collegiate Honorsouncil
isr- �re held on alternate Thursd i) -
roon 04 rftheGCB Meetii
�n the 6th and 20th ontactDi
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CAMPUS CRUSADE
'T Everone welcome Join us
! of fun fellowship & teaching on
�. e a more effective Christian life
ampus 7 V) p m on Thurs
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Nuclear mishaps kept secret
WASHINGTON (AD - For
three decades, serious mishaps at
the Savannah River nuclear
weapons plant were kept secret
foe national security reasons and
in some cases not reported to
Washington, according to federal
officials who are trying to change
that attitude.
One senior Energy Depart-
ment official has compared the
approach to safety at the Savan-
nah River Plant, near Aiken, S.C
to that which led to the explosion
ol the shuttle Challenger on Jan.
28 1986.
And one member of Congress
says the facility, which has boon
closed since August should not be
allowed to reopen until tho situ-
ation improves.
An Energy Department
spokesman, Will Callicott, said
that since the federal government
began making atomic weapons in
World War II, "there has always
been a mind set, a culture, that wo
are doing work that is important
for national security and perhaps
that may override any obligation
toward public accountability.
"People have historically not
been sensitive to the importance
of disclosing things Callicott
sud. Clearly, there is a lot of in-
formation that did not make it up
th�" chain to top management hero
"�adquarters
'thout a detailed review of
the re jo. d, ho said, it would bo im-
possible to determine exactly
what information had reached
Washington and what had boon
released to the public.
Energy Secretary John Hcr-
nngton, since taking office in
1985, "has given heightened at-
tention to the area of environ-
mental safety and health and for
the first time placed these issues
in the hands of an assistant secre-
tary, Callicott said.
The Savannah River facility
produces plutonium and tritium,
which are used in making nuclear
weapons. It is run by E.I. du Pont
Nemours & Co. under contract
from the Energy Department.
A Du Pont inspector, G.C.
Ridgcly, wrote in a recently re-
leased August 1985 memoran-
dum that 30 "reactor incidents of
the greatest significance" oc-
curred there.
One of the most serious mis-
haps at Savannah River was the
melting in November 1970 of a
rod used to start an atomic chain
reaction, causing radioactive con-
tamination of an adjacent room. It
took 900 people throe months to
clean up the contamination, ac-
cording to tho memo.
"Serious radiation exposure
could have occurred because no
outside alarm existed" and an
"alarm was ignored for two
hours tho memo said.
Last Friday, Energy Depart-
ment officials said the depart-
ment had not been informed oi
the incidents, but on Monday sen-
ior department spokesman C.
Anson Franklin said those state-
ments were incorrect and that tho
incidents had been reported to the
department's regional office in
Aikcn.
He said the information ap-
parently had not boon relayed to
headquarters in Washington
from the regional office.
The reactors at Savannah
River were closed down after the
most recent incident, in August,
and had been scheduled to reopen
Tuesday. But Energy Department
officials assured fnembers of Con-
gress last week that production
would not resume until safety
was assured, possibly after 30
davs to 45 davs.
"If they restart those things
without having briefed us and
without having convinced us they
have solved the saety and health
issues, they will be in serious
trouble in the Congress said
Rep. Mike Synar, D-Okla.
Synar, chairman of the En-
ergy, Environment and Natural
Resources subcommittee of the
Government Affairs Committee,
held hearings on the Savannah
River facility last Friday.
The most blistering charge
last week came from Richard
Starostecki, deputy assistant sec-
retary for safety, health and qual-
ity assurance, in a memorandum
discussing the most recent inci-
dent, a small power pulse in Au-
gust.
"The issue was not whether
the reactor was out of control; this
time it was not Starostecki said
in the memo, which was released
at a congressional hearing.
"The more serious issue deals
with an institutional problem and
attitudes toward safety' Staros-
tecki said.
MALPASS
MUFFLER
BRAKE SERVICE
METRIC HARDWARE
SPEEDOMETER SERVICE
AUTO PARrS
758-7676
2616 E. 10th St. Greenville. NC

Tobacco products removed from shelves
LOS ANGELES (AP) -
California's largest supermarket
chain began removing cigars,
pipe tobacco and chewing to-
bacco from shelves because the
products are not labeled as can-
cer-causing in compliance with a
tate la
, igarettes are not involved in
the action announced Tuesday by
Vons Cos. Inc. because they al-
roady carry a federally mandated
warning label. Several brands of
chewing tobacco that carry such
labels also are exempt.
"It's the first time we are
aware of that a supermarket has
taken product oii the shelves in
response to Proposition 65 said
Deputy Attorney General Craig
C. Thompson, the state enforce-
ment cixrchnator tor the law cre-
ated by the November 1986 ballot
initiative.
The law requires the state to
identify products and substances
that can cause1 cancer, birth de-
fects and sterility. Businesses
must warn the public of "signifi-
cant" amounts oi the substances.
Vons has 336 stores in the
central and southern parts of Cali-
fornia. It recently acquired 172
Safeway supermarkets in South-
ern California.
The removal of 17 tobacco
products produced by five com-
panies was designed to comply
with Proposition 65, said Vons
spokeswoman Vickie Sanders.
On Friday, state Attorney
General John K. Van do Kamp
filed a civil lawsuit against 25 to-
bacco manufacturers and eight
food store chains, including Vons.
The suit claimed the companies
failed to warn consumers of the
cancer risk of certain products.
However, Ms. Sanders told
the Los Angeles Times that the
decision to pull the products had
nothing to do with the lawsuit.
"We did not do it without
warning or notice to manufactur-
ers. This is not a sudden move on
Vons' part she said.
Tobacco manufacturers and
distributors were told in August
that Vons would require warning
labels on products by Sept. 17, Ms.
Sanders said. That deadline later
was extended until Monday, she
said.
The tobacco industry hoped it
could comply with the law by
posting signs in stores and other
measures short of attaching warn-
ing labels to their products.
This Friday
Afternoon
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with
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757-3616 757-1816
John's Flowers and Gifts
503 E. 3rd St.
752-3311
Order Early for
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$5.00 plain
$10.00 fancy
$7.50 with Greek Letters
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8
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6, 1988
Air pollution is toi
congressional problem
SAV-A-CENTER
WASHINGTON (AP) - A trie utilities and the auto industry,
Congress split by economic and domestic and foreign,
regional differences has proven Sen. Robert Stafford, R-Vt a
again that cleaning up air pollu- veteran of clean air wars, pointed
tion from vehicle tailpipes and his finger at Senate Majority
industrial smokestacks remains Leader Robert Byrd, D-W.Va
the nation's toughest environ- who held the Environment
mental problem Committee's bill off the floor for
ronmental lobby's Clean Air Coa-
lition also criticized the plan say-
ing thay no bill was better than a
weak one.
Southern lawmakers were
unhappy because the proposal
would have forced some of their
power plants to install scrubbers
uai LMiiL'ii'iii. � ri
Onlv once since the Clean Air 11 months while he pushed for to solve what is generally seen in
. -� ;�- f AJrl t�M�MMA ll- "Il.1 �� mUam n( AA-
Act was enacted in 1970 has Con
gress been able to agree on major
amendments to strengthen the
basic law, and that occurred 11
years ago.
Two years ago, environmen-
talists in the House and Senate
concessions for West Virginia's
coal.
The bill's death left the nation
with no new tools to combat the
ozone and carbon monoxide -
chiefly from vehicle emissions -
that has grown to the point that
the Capitol as a problem of Mid-
west utilities polluting the North-
east.
For its part, the utilities'
lobby, the Edison Electric Insti-
tute, consistently said "no" to acid
rain controls. It cited scientific
Id I IMA III IIIC 1 Hiuac 0"U -Aiai o � �
renewed the campaign to escalate upwards of 100 urban areas are disagreements over the problem
the battle against urban smog, violating air quality standards
acid rain caused by coal-burning designed to protect human
factories and power plants and health.
toxic fumes from chemicals. Also left in the dust was any
On Tuesday, they tossed in new plan to deal with toxic fumes
the towel, vowing to try again from chemical plants and the
next year. 'There has not been acid-rain chemicals produced by
sufficient willingness to compro- coal-burning power plants and
mise said Sen. George Mitchell, factories.
D-Maine,whospentmuchofl988 month' M,tchc11
and said controls should await
development of clean-coal tech-
nology, which is expected to be
cheaper than scrubbers.
Byrd issued a statement say-
ing he was "disappointed" that a
compromise on acid rain could
not be reached this year that
would both enhance the environ-
ment and protect the economies
u-Maine, wnospentmucnoi ioo ' .j �.u mem �iu pw. ��. vw�
trying to put together a consensus Rhard Trumka president of the of coai-producing states like West
n. ? 1 T.ifrw-1 Mino Workers union. "i n ��;� i rr
on a clean air bill. "As a result, we
will do nothing
Mitchell, citing this summer's
smog alerts around the country,
said the technology exists to con-
trol air pollution. "All we lack is
the political will to do so
Among those he cited as re-
sisting compromise were the
environmental lobby and the two
behemoths that would be most
affected by such legislation: elec-
United Mine Workers union,
worked out an acid rain plan that
favored West Virginia's high sul-
fur coal industry and mandated
the use of expensive stack gas
scrubbers by about two dozen
large utilities.
The proposal infuriated sena-
tors from Western states with
cleaner burning, low sulphur
coal. Alan Simpson, R-Wyo
threatened to filibuster. The envi-
Virginia. "I will continue to work
to resolve this issue
The fight over acid rain was
just part of the complicated
closed-door negotiations over the
clean air bill.
Another major factor in its
demise was a proposal to help
combat urban pollution by forc-
ing reluctant automakers to pro-
duce vehicles with cleaner ex-
haust emissions.
Supporters of trade restrictions vow to keep trying
WASHINGTON (AP) - Sup-
porters of a bill to impose tougher
restrictions on textile imports, af-
ter failing to override President
Reagan's veto, promise to renew
their efforts when Congress re-
turns next year.
"Well be back Sen. Emest
F. Hollings, D-S.C, said Tuesday
after the House voted 272-152 to
override Reagan's veto but fell 11
votes short of the two-thirds
needed to enact the measure over
his objections.
The action appeared to close
the book on the battle for textile
legislation this year, with two
weeks at most remaining before
lawmakers adjourn to campaign
full time.
The bill, designed to protect
American industry from foreign
competition, would freeze cur-
rent textile and apparel imports at
1987 levels and limit future in-
creases to 1 percent annually. The
same would apply to non-rubber
footwear except that no future
growth would be allowed.
Countries that increase their
purchases of U.S. farm goods
would get larger shares of the U.S.
textiles market. A pilot program
would be established, allowing
the government to auction off
import licenses. A special quota
would be created for imported
silk neckties.
Reagan vetoed the measure
Sept. 28, saying it represented
"protectionism at its worst" and
would not only narrow consumer
choices but inhibit trade and cost
America overseas sales. Sponsors
said it would save American jobs
now in jeopardy because of a
wave of Asian textiles and ap-
parel crowding U.S. merchandise
out of stores.
House Speaker Jim Wright,
D-Texas, lobbied furiously for the
override and sponsors said they
were close to two-thirds at one
point, "But we had some guys we
just couldn't pull across" said
Rep. W. G. Hefner, D-N.C.
"Obviously, I'm disap-
pointed Hollings said in a state-
ment. He claimed the bill was
similar to provisions endorsed by
Reagan several years ago before
the president became critical of
"this protectionism nonsense
"The failure to override the
veto means that the next Congress
or the next administration must
act to restructure our current inef-
ficient textile policy Sen. Strom
Thurmond, R-S.C, said after the
vote.
Textile and apparel workers
bused in for the occasion from
various East Coast cities held a
flag-waving rally on the steps of
the Capitol at noon, chanting,
"Save our jobs, save our jobs
Some then watched glumly from
the House galleries as the legisla-
tion met its doom.
Critics portrayed the meas-
ure as guaranteed to spur price
increases that would amount to a
fresh tax on consumers.
"Stand up for consumers,
stand up for America, support
your president's veto urged
Rep. William Frenzel, R-Minn.
Rep. Sam Gibbons, D-Fla
another of the bill's fiercest critics,
said "it imposes a tax on consum-
ers of about $20 billion a year
Rep. Ed Jenkins, D-Ga some-
times said to occupy .the textile
seat" on the House Ways and
Means Committee, scoffed at the
notion of new price hikes under
the bill and added that import
Across from U.B.E.
758-0080
October Entertainment
Bad Bob & The Rockin' Horses
Open Mic Night
Deadhead Jam
Blues Defenders
The Lemon Sisters & The Rutabaga
Brothers
Open Mic Night
Swamp Gypsies (9 pm-11 pm)
Featuring: Mike Kamer, Sue Ludeke
& Bob Gravelin
(11 p.m. on) Deadhead Jam
Widespread Panic
Closed Fall Break
Open Mic Night
Deadhead Jam
Mike Edwards Band
Mike Lightnin' Wells
Open Mic Night
Deadhead Jam
Uncle Green
The Amateurs
Bad Bob & The Rockin' Horses
Sat1
Wed5
Thur6
Fri7
Sat8
Wed12
Thur13
Fri14
Sat15
Wed19
Thur20
Fri21
Sat22
Wed26
Thur27
Fri28
Sat29
Mon31
SPECIALIZING IN ROCK N
ROLL MEMORABILIA
SINCE 1980
FOR DEAD z
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ONLY
LICENSED CONCERT
T-SHIRTS NOW ON SALE
Large Selection of Grateful Dead Officially Licensed Concert Tee
Now On Sale for $13.75
"Baseball-Spring Training" White Tee
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"Exploding SamTour Dates" White Tee
Touch of Grey" Black Tee
"Surfer Skeleton" White Tee
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"Blues for Allah" White Tee
ALSO THE LATEST TYE DYE FOR DEAD HEADS "BLUES FOR ALLAH"
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ORDERING INFO:
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SHIPPING CHARGES:
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All Items sent Inusred UPS
ITS NOT TOO EARLY TO SHOP FOR CHRISTMAS
L
P.O. Box 1803
Drpt.E
Ciwnvtlk, N.C 27835-1803
(919)355-2747
Call or Write about your Favorite Art wt
curbs arc common in Asian coun-
tries.
Imports surged into the U.S.
market in the early 1980s, and
Congress responded with a textile
bill that Reagan vetoed on similar
grounds in December 1985. An
override attempt failed in the
House in August 1986.
DOUBLE
COUPON
SAVINGS
On Manufacturer's
Cents-Otf Coupons Up to 50"
See Store For Details1
U.S.DA. CHOICE�8-10 LB. AVG
Boneless Whole
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SLICE�MTN. DEW�PEPSI FREE
Regular or JDiet
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LIMIT TWO WITH MIN. $10 PURCHASE
Starkist
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cans
LIMIT ONE WITH MIN. $10 PURCHASE
Northern
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Old South
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COORS LIGHT�COORS EXTRA GOLD
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i
AT US POST OFFICE PRICES
Postage
Stamps
Prices Effective Thru. Sat Oct. 8, 1988 Quantity Rights Reserved Not Responsible For Typographical Errors
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. � Monday thru Saturday 7:00 a.m12 Midnight
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nc
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Rev en
CINCINNATI (APM
Rev. Clarence Riven
pump life and music intd
Catholic services, which
have become boring nti
parishioners endure rat!
enjoy.
"What's wr J
It's a perfectly good w
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about 250 priests in
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J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBZR 6 1988 9
OUBLE
OUPON
AVINGS
facturer s
I is Up to 50c
� � Details!
?T$T
-
OFFICE PRICES f
ige M
ips U5L

I or Typographical Errors
1 im-i: Midnight
Reverend wants to spice-up church
CINCINNATI (AP) - The
Rev. Clarence Rivers wants to
pump life and music into Roman
Catholic services, which he says
have become boring rituals that
parishioners endure rather than
enjoy.
"What's wrong with enjoy?
It's a perfectly good word he
said.
One ot two blacks among
about 250 priests in the Archdio-
cese of Cincinnati. Rivers said he
seeks to inject some oi the livelier
feeling and music of black
churches into the celebration of
Mass
A liturgist. musician, drama-
tist, lecturer and teacher of Eng-
lish literature, he emphasized that
he is not advocating doing away
with traditional Catholic rituals.
"I'm not an anti-traditional-
ist Rivers said in an interview.
"I'd keep everything A demon
strative man with an easy laugh,
he added
"1 trv to ep'tin to people, it
you're not entertained, you're
Wired. To entertain them doesn't
mean you're standing on your
head, spitting, nickels
"Where 1 was first ordained, I
noticed that ushers were the
greatest watch-watchers in the
world. If the service was longer
than it was supposed to be, the
ushers were the first in the congre-
gation to go (look at their wrist-
watches)
"They don't do that at a ball-
game. If it goes 14 innings, they
don't get up and say, 'It was only
supposed to go nine innings
The bearded priest, clad on a
hot day in shorts, unbuttoned
shirt and high-top sneakers, has
founded a non-profit organiza-
tion called Stimuli, based in his
home, to push his efforts to enli-
ven church services.
A veteran of 10 years as a
parish priest after his ordination
in 1956, he no longer is assigned to
a parish, but is financially sup-
ported by the archdiocese - al-
though not totheextenthewould
like.
Rivers, 56, who also has pur-
sued studies in Europe, said the
black communit) has something
to co ntribute to worship services
in what he refers to as "the Euro-
pean church In a 1987interview,
he told The Community News, an
inner-city neighborhood news-
paper in Washington, D.C
"I am interested in transport-
ing to the Catholic Church some
small part of the black spirit. The
Catholic Church has good rituals
and ceremonies, but they are done
without style, without beauty and
without grace
"In the Western world the
word 'churchv'meansdcad,butif
blacks say 'we had church' it
means they could have parried all
night long
Rivers, a native of Selma,
Ala moved to Cincinnati as a
child and stayed. He was or-
dained there in 1956 and has since
traveled widely to study, lecture,
and produce and oversee plays
and musical presentations.
His credits include founding
and directing a theater companv
that specialized in Shakespeare.
He said the clergy needs to
learn techniques of acting to con-
vey messages to the congregation
while entertaining them and
holding their attention. He said
that message wasn't lost on the
ancient Greeks, whose dramas
that formed a foundation for
today's theater took on the fervor
o( religion.
Unfortunately, the clergv is
not often trained in the perform-
ing arts, Rivers said.
"You'd probably do much
better if you got a Hollywood
producer who knew about wor-
ship he said. "People don't real-
ize that worship drama. It's verv
difficult for people to accept
that
Rivers proposes to instruct
the clergy in acting and drama as
well as enlivening worship music.
He said he is disappointed
that the archdiocese has not f man
daily supported his ideas to liven
up the Mass. Rivers said a 1 lolly-
wood agent once asked him to
come to I.os Angeles and market
his ideas in search of support 1 le
said he turned dov n the proposal
out of loyalty to the archdiocese
The Rev. Ted Kosse, a spokes-
man for the Archdiocese oi Cin-
cinnati, said the archdiocese sup
ports and appreciates the work of
Rivers.
"I le basically wants to go full
steam ahead in his enterprise ef-
forts, and we're not in a position
to fund him as fully as he would
like Kosse slid.
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� Next to The Piaza
GREENVILLE NC
SIMMONS
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� ����
Britain, Iran restore relations
UNITED NATION'S (AD -
Britain's foreign secretary says he
will meet Iran's foreign inminstcr
this week to discuss restoring
diplomatic ties between the two
nations after a year of chilly rela-
tions.
"Certainly we are seeking
normal relations Sir Geoffrey
Howe told reporters Tuesday.
' That is one oi the purposes of the
meeting" with Iranian Foreign
Minister AH Akbar Velayati, he
said.
When asked if he might an-
nounce restoration of relations
after the meeting, Howe smiled
arid replied: "Watch this space
Officials at the British Foreign
Office in London said the meeting
would be held Friday at U.N.
headquarters in New York.
In New York, U.S. Secretary
oi State George Shultz said Tues-
day that U.S. diplomats have no
plans to meet with Iranian envoys
in the city for the 43rd U.N. Gen-
eral Assembly.
Last week, Britain's Foreign
Office said other likely topics of
discussion between Howe and
Velayati include the fate oi Brit-
ons missing in Lebanon and U.N.
efforts to end the 8-year-old Iran-
Iraq war.
A Foreign Office spokesman,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity, said Britain would main-
tain its policy of not negotiating
for the release of hostages.
The missing Britons include
Anglican Church envoy Terry
VVaite, journalist John McCarthy,
and teacher Brian Kccnan who is
also an Irish national. All arc be-
lieved held by pro-Iranian Shiite
Moslem extremists, although no
claim of responsibility has been
made for Waite's disappearance.
Britain withdrew its embassy
staff from Tehran last year after an
Iranian diplomat was arrested on
shoplifting charges in Britain and
after Iranian militants beat a Brit-
ish diplomat in Tehran, the Ira-
nian capital
But British-Iranian relations
have thawed with Iran making
overtures to Britain and other
Western nations alter agreeing to
an August cease-fire in the Per-
sian Gulf War. London sent a Brit-
ish trade officer to Tehran's trade
fair this month, and British diplo-
mat David Redda way visited Iran
for three weeks in August.
Scott's
tor Dotn
Don't Just
Buy Clothes,
Reward Yourself
With A Clothing
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Union Bay
Quicksilver
Duckheads
Liz Claiborne
B.D. Baggies
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KENTUCKY
FRIED CHICKEN
HOMECOMING
TAILGATE SPECIAL
10 Pieces Chicken
1 Large Mashed Potato
1 Large Gravy
1 Large Salad
4 Biscuits
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Special Available At Both Greenville Locations
(East & West Greenville Blvd.)





f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6. 1088 9
OUBLE
OUPON
AVINGS
On Manufacturer s
Off Coupons Up to 50�
Store For Details!
le
12 pack
oz. cans
1ST OFFICE PRICES
ge
ips
fponsible For Typographical Errors.
Blvd.
100 a.m12 Midnight
Reverend wants to spice-up church
i
CINCINNATI (AP) - The
Rev. Clarence Rivers wants to
pump life and music into Roman
Catholic services, which he says
have become boring rituals that
parishioners endure rather than
enjoy.
"What's wrong with enjoy?
It's a perfectly good word he
said.
One of two blacks among
about 250 priests in the Archdio-
cese of Cincinnati, Rivers said he
seeks to inject some of the livelier
feeling and music of black
churches into the celebration of
Mass.
A liturgist, musician, drama-
tist, lecturer and teacher of Eng-
lish literature, he emphasized that
he is not advocating doing away
with traditional Catholic rituals.
"I'm not an anti-traditional-
ist Rivers said in an interview.
"I'd keep everything A demon-
strative man with an easy laugh,
he added:
"1 try to explain to people, if
you're not entertained, you're
bored. To entertain them doesn't
mean you're standing on your
head, spitting nickels
"Where I was first ordained, I
noticed that ushers were the
greatest watch-watchers in the
world. If the service was longer
than it was supposed to be, the
ushers were the first in the congre-
gation to go (look at their wrist-
watches)
"They don't do that at a ball-
game. If it goes 14 innings, they
don't get up and say, 'It was only
supposed to go nine innings
The bearded priest, clad on a
hot day in shorts, unbuttoned
shirt and high-top sneakers, has
founded a non-profit organiza-
tion called Stimuli, based in his
home, to push his efforts to enli-
ven church services.
A veteran of 10 years as a
parish priest after his ordination
in 1956, he no longer is assigned to
a parish, but is financially sup-
ported by the archdiocese - al-
though not to the extent he would
like.
Rivers, 56, who also has pur-
sued studies in Europe, said the
black community has something
to co ntribute to worship services
in what he refers to as "the Euro-
pean church In a 1987 interview,
he told The Community News, an
inner-city neighborhood news-
paper in Washington, D.C
"I am interested in transport-
ing to the Catholic Church some
small part of the black spirit. The
Catholic Church has good rituals
and ceremonies, but they are done
without style, without beauty and
without grace
"In the Western world the
word 'churchy' means dead, but if
blacks say 'we had church' it
means they could have partied all
night long
Rivers, a native of Selma,
Ala moved to Cincinnati as a
child and stayed. He was or-
dained there in 1956 and has since
traveled widely to study, lecture,
and produce and oversee plays
and musical presentations.
His credits include founding
and directing a theater company
that specialized in Shakespeare.
He said the clergy needs to
learn techniques of acting to con-
vey messages to the congregation
while entertaining them and
holding their attention. He said
that message wasn't lost on the
ancient Greeks, whose dramas
that formed a foundation for
today's theater took on the fervor
of religion.
Unfortunately, the clergy is
not often trained in the perform-
ing arts, Rivers said.
"You'd probably do much
better if you got a Hollywood
producer who knew about wor-
ship he said. "People don't real-
ize that worship drama. It's very
difficult for people to accept
that
Rivers proposes to instruct
the clergy in acting and drama as
well as enlivening worship music.
He said he is disappointed
that the archdiocese has not finan-
cially supported his ideas to liven
up the Mass. Rivers said a Holly-
wood agent once asked him to
come to Los Angeles and market
his ideas in search of support. He
said he turned down the proposal
out of loyalty to the archdiocese.
The Rev. Ted Kosse, a spokes-
man for the Archdiocese of Cin-
cinnati, said the archdiocese sup-
ports and appreciates the work of
Rivers.
"He basically wants to go full
steam ahead in his enterprise ef-
forts, and we're not in a position
to fund him as fully as he would
like Kosse said.
1 FACTORY MATTRESS &
WATERBED OUTLETS
GUARANTEED
LOWER
PRICES
�'
&
LARGE SELECTION OF 1st QUALITY SLEEP PRODUCTS
30 � 60 � 90 OAYS SAME AS CASH
FINANCING � INSTANT DELIVERY
Located at 730 Greenville Biva
(Next to The Piazai
GREENVILLE NC
SIMMONS
355-2626
M
Britain, Iran restore relations
Scott's
tOTDOtrT
UNITED NATIONS (AP) -
Britain's foreign secretary says he
will meet Iran's foreign mminstcr
this week to discuss restoring
diplomatic ties between the two
nations after a year of chilly rela-
tions.
"Certainly we are seeking
normal relations Sir Geoffrey
Howe told reporters Tuesday.
"That is one of the purposes of the
meeting" with Iranian Foreign
Minister Ali Akbar Velayati, he
said.
When asked if he might an-
nounce restoration of relations
after the meeting, Howe smiled
and replied: "Watch this space
Officials at the British Foreign
Office in London said the meeting
would be held Friday at U.N.
headquarters in New York.
In New York, U.S. Secretary
of State George Shultz said Tues-
day that U.S. diplomats have no
plans to meet with Iranian envoys
in the city for the 43rd U.N. Gen-
eral Assembly.
Last week, Britain's Foreign
Office said other likely topics of
discussion between Howe and
Velayati include the fate of Brit-
ons missing in Lebanon and U.N.
efforts to end the 8-year-old Iran-
Iraq war.
A Foreign Office spokesman,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity, said Britain would main-
tain its policy of not negotiating
for the release of hostages.
The missing Britons include
Anglican Church envoy Terry
Waite, journalist John McCarthy,
and teacher Brian Kecnan who is
also an Irish national. All are be-
lieved held by pro-Iranian Shiite
Moslem extremists, although no
claim of responsibility has been
made for Waite's disappearance.
Britain withdrew its embassy
staff from Tehran last year after an
Iranian diplomat was arrested on
shoplifting charges in Britain and
after Iranian militants beat a Brit-
ish diplomat in Tehran, the Ira-
nian capital.
But British-Iranian relations
have thawed with Iran making
overtures to Britain and other
Western nations after agreeing to
an August cease-fire in the Per-
sian Gulf War. London sent a Brit-
ish trade officer to Tehran's trade
fair this month, and British diplo-
mat David Redda way visited Iran
for three weeks in August.
ECU
v
Don't Just
Buy Clothes,
Reward Yourself
With A Clothing
Experience
Men's Clothing
includes:
Tommy Hilfiger
Union Bay
Quicksilver
Duckheads
Liz Claibome
B.D. Baggies
Generra
Capture Us At The Plaza
756-3484
KENTUCKY
FRIED CHICKEN
HOMECOMING
TAILGATE SPECIAL
10 Pieces Chicken
1 Large Mashed Potato
1 Large Gravy
1 Large Salad
4 Biscuits
$1.00 of every tailgate
special sold is donated to
E.C.U. Educational Fund.
Special Available At Both Greenville Locations
(East & West Greenville Blvd.)





i
10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6. 1988
PTL sells for $115 million
CHARLOTTE, N.C (AD -
PTL's trustee has accepted a $115
million bid from a Canadian busi-
nessman for the Christian
ministry's assets, but the buyer,
who is Jewish, hasn't said what he
will do with the remnants of Jim
Bakker's empire.
The decision Tuesday came
down to who ottered "the most
money and the best terms said
bankruptcy trustee M.C. "Red
Ben ton.
"I'd hoped we could get a bit
more for it. But this is not a bad
price s.ud Benton, who spent
nearlv six months talking with
bidders.
One of them was Bakker, who
nearly a month ago failed to se-
cure the financing for his$172 mil-
lion offer.
Bakker gave a conditional
blessing to the winning bid bv
Stephen R. Mernick of Toronto,
fammv and I remain
committed to the restoration ot
the ministry oi TTL, Bakker said
in a statement. If the present offer
is agreeable to the creditors, the
partners I PR's major donors)
and the court, and Cod's will is
satisfied with respect to the minis-
trv of PTL, we will be happy with
that outcome
Mernick, 34, will pay $50 mil-
lion at closing, which the contract
set at no later than Dec. 31, and the
balance over five wars, said his
attorney, Joseph Kluttz.
If approved by a US Bank-
ruptcy Court judge in Columbia.
S.C, Mernick will own the 500-
acre Heritage USA, a Christian
retreat and theme park south oi
Charlotte in York County, S.C;
the PTL satellite TV network; and
1,700 undeveloped acres in York
County.
PTL's religious functions
have been separated from its
other operations, and the 1 Ion
tage USA Church is leasing back
its facilities from PTL to continue
on-site worship and Christian
broadcasting.
Mernick, an Orthodox Jew
who was celebrating the holiday
Simchat Torah, did not travel to
Charlotte to attend Tuesday's
new conference announcing the
winning bid.
Kluttz said Mernick has inter-
ests in real estate, clothing, gar-
bage collection and landfills.
"His primary interest as a
businessman is to get a maximum
return on his investment Kluttz
said.
In a Sept. 15 letter to Benton,
Mernick said he would welcome
the opportunity to meet with rep-
resentatives of any group or
groups that are seriously inter-
ested in exploring ways of pre-
serving or enhancing the Chris-
tian orientation of parts or all of
the existing developed assets
Gun control advocate, Carl Rowan is being
tried on weapons violations, after shooting
WASHINGTON (AP) - Syn-
dicated columnist Carl T. Rowan.
a longtime gun control advocate
now being tried on weapons
charges, says he thought the pistol
he used to shoot a baekvard in-
truder was exempt from local
registration laws.
Closing arguments were set
to begin today in Rowan's trial on
charges of using an unregistered
handgun in the June 14 shooting
oi a teen-ager who had taken an
uninvited dip in the columnist's
backyard swimming pool.
It convicted of the misde-
meanor charges, the 63-vear-old
Rowan could ico up to two years
in prison and a $2,000 fine.
District of Columbia Superior
Court Judge Arthur L. Burnett
said Tuesday that jurv delibera-
tions would begin immediatelv
after prosecutors and defense
lawyers finished summarizing
their cases.
Rowan told the jury on Tues-
day that in 1982 his son, then an
FBI agent, left the .22-caliber pis-
tol in his father's bedroom after
the columnist received death
threats trom persons purporting
to be members of the Ku Klux
Klan.
"I was getting a lot oi threats
ifter Vernon Jordan (former head
oi the National Urban League)
was shot. They said, Tou're next,
nigger Rowan testified.
Rowan said his son was told
by District police officials that he
had a "blanket exemption" from
the city's tough handgun registra-
tion laws because he was a federal
agent.
He said police also told his
son there would be no problem"
if Rowan Sr. handled the weapon.
Earlier, Rowan's son, Carl Jr
testified that twice in 1982 and
once when he was preparing to
leave the FBI in 1983 he was told
by police that he did not have to
register weapons he had pur-
chased tor personal use.
After telling police that other
members of his family might
handle the weapon, "they told me
that as long as it was where it
lawfully should be, if others have
Reynolds has said a firm bid
must be submitted by Oct. 14 or
he would order PTL's assets sold
to pay creditors, who are esti-
mated to be owed more than $130
million. He is expected to hold a
hearing on the bid in about a
month.
An assistant to Reynolds,
Susanne Robiscek said the judge
doesn't a have any comment" on
J
the offer.
PTL has been in bankruptcy
reorganization since June 1987.
Three months earlier, Bakker re-
signed after he admitted having a
sexual encounter with Jessica
Hahn in 1980 and disclosed that
money was paid to silence the
access to it, it isn't a problem
Rowan Jr. testified.
Rowan's attorney's have
maintained that the columnist
and his son were given inaccurate
advice by members of the police
department' s gun control unit
about the city's gun registration
policy, which stipulates that a
weapon can be used only by its
registered owner.
Police Inspector James R. Lev,
introduced by Rowan's attorney
as an expert witness on gun regis-
tration matters, said Tuesday that
while Rowan broke the law by
using the unregistered weapon,
he should no! have been prose-
cuted because he thought he was
acting in self-defense.
Detective Charles . Jones,
who arrived at Rowan's house
immediatelv after the June 14
shooting, told thecourt that a slid-
ing glass door at the rear of the
house showed signs that someone
had tried to force it open.
However, Jones could not say
when the door was damaeed
Rowan has said he shot Ben-
jamin Smith, 18, of Chevy Chase,
Md because he was afraid Smith
was trying to enter his house.
Smith, who was shot in the wrist,
has said he was trying to leave the
property when Rowan shot him.
Dining Comments from Bob
"Go with the
Pirates
and dinner at the Beef Barn. Opening at 5:00
p.m. Sat Oct. 8 & we'll be here late after the
game. ECU &: the Beef Bama winning
tradition
BEEF
BARN
Bob Simon
Manager
400 St. Andrews Dr. � 756-1 Ibl
Mrs.
Mon. -Tlirus. 6-10 p.m.
Fri. & Sal. 6-10:30 p.m.
Sun. 530-9 p.m.
jffrr
in:
��1i
4111
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MONDAY
NIGHT
FOOTBALL
On Greenville's Largest
Wide Screen TV
This Week
New York Giants
vs
Philadelphia Eagles
8:00 until
Hot Dog Buffet 5-8
Buffalo Wings 8-until
$2.00 Pitchers
Ramada Inn
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
Aaron Grubncr, Mernick's
attorney in Toronto, told The
Charlotte Observer last month
that Mernick wanted PTL because
"it's a large tract of land, and I'm
not sure those types of parcels are
readily available
Mernick, who entered the
negotiations a month ago, outbid
fellow Canadian Peter Thomas of
Vancouver. Thomas offered $113
million, $46 million of it in cash,
but not all would have been pay-
able until September 1989.
By signing Mernick's con-
tract, Benton agreed to stop nego-
tiating with any other bidders and
to file a motion with Bankruptcy
Judge Rufus Reynolds recom-
mending Mernick's offer by Fri-
day.
Other bidders may still pres-
ent offers directly to the court, but
Benton said his recommendation
gives Mernick the upper hand.
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I HI I ASI I Rel INIAN
Features
IH'IUMLK 1988 Pa�a
�l SSERT BAR
k Dinners
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;dae
Two thumbs up for 'Carnival
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Auutant Folura Idnor
TC8V
i.tiis is a scene t
p laving a
B lanton is seek
! ove Photol
torn "Carnival ECU
t Mc( iinnis Theatre,
ing Grobert, played b
ab)
Playhouse's curren
Here, Lili, protra
v Chris Brown. (Ph
t production
ed by Nina
oto bv Mark
Something about going to the
theater is magical. Ot "Carnival"
this is doubly so.
Set in (what else?) a "Carni-
val the musical follows the ex-
periences and growth of a stun
ningly beautiful small town girl,
I ili (Nina Blanton), who comes to
the C irque de Paris looking tor a
friend of her recently deceased
lather.
Unfortunately tor the naive
1 ill. her lather's friend turns out
to be less help than she had hoped.
lo make matters worse, the poor
girl is spotted by the slick and
opportunistic magi ian Man n
the Magnificent (Jeffrey 1 largett),
who dazzles her with tricks and
invites her back to his trailer for a
spot ot lunch.
Fortunately for I ili (although
she doesn't see it ,h particularly
fortunate), she has also been spot
ted by Paul Berthalet (Stuart
Maxwell), a bitter ex-dancer
turned puppeteer, who tries des
peratelv to rescue her from
Marco's clutches without reveal
ing too mu h ol himself in the
process.
1 he greater portion ot the
show hu usses on Paul's inner
struggle as he tries to save Lili
from Marco. Marco is more expe-
rienced in wooing women, and he
finds iteasy toattract Lili with his
magic.
Paul, on the other hand, finds
that he cannot be as direct as the
magician. He can use his own
magic his delicate charm in
Lili only w hen deludes behind his
puppets. When he confronts her
face-to-face, he can show Lili
nothing but lus rage and frustra-
tion at his own inability to open
up to her. She interprets his feel
�ngs as anger towards her, and she
sees him as a monster. In tact,
without meaning to do so. Paul
almost drives Lili out of Marco's
arms and into those oi Paul's as-
sistant facquoi (Billy Sharpe).
Marco's assistant and oft be-
trayed lover, Rosalie (Janice
Schreiber), unwittingly helps
Paul. She, too, has a stake in de
fleeting Mano's attention away
from the lovely Lili. (Incidentally,
the hilarious scene between
Rosalie and the quintessential
ringleader Mr. Schlegel (Vandy
Behr), in which the pair drink and
sing to Marco's many mistresses,
is worth the price of admission in
itsell I
I he major problem with a
premise such as this is that it is too
easy to take the "sitcom ap-
proach to it to skim thesurface
not to probe too deeply Happily,
"( arnival ' avoids this trap It
walks a treacherous tightrope
without ever falling into the abyss
ol predictable shallowness on on
side or overblow n tearjerking on
theother It retains the semi mys-
tical atmosphere ol a v arnival
and combines it with deeply
moving human drama
Some of the best moments in
the play are those in w hich Mavis
Ray's skillful choreography
See NOT, page 12
Micah does alien rental flicks review
in psyching - up for Halloween
IUI PI I Sl"F
I I HI (iULT.
TC8V"
Bv MIC All HARRIS
we� n arounci the
nsumers ma
� ie mam spa e
available.
g v 1 se en ounters
I iti � � �n Octo
ioimih to Hallow-
een seems appropriate when you War of the' Worlds'
consider the tradition of alien C .eorge Pals beautifully crafted
invasion via mass media begun film seems dated today, but that's
by Orson Welles' "War ol the hardly a fair criticism. However,
Worlds" broadcast. it's hardh excuse fo the hokey,
1 lalloween became as mut h a single1 glimpse ol the aliens we're
night when aliens slither over the given. I hey are lcsseffe ti e than
earth as the ghouls. You can celc- their battleships that float
brate the event by checking out through the skies with the malign
the video versions tor the misad- mem ot aerial sharks.
aliens less benign The ships design crackle
than
swee
tol' E.T
l i STADIUM CUP
dse or am sundae
HOBS
et
IDMONDA
I
J
h
J)
WESTIES
Id c ofi
i
PL MI'S
PI ZIO
Ol i
IORDS '
See INVADERS, page 12 More scenes from theECU's Playhouse latest production, "Carnival (Photo by Mark 1 eve -Photolab)
UB40 reggaesMinges
ByJEl I GIBSON
Stiff Writci
1 hrough a smokey Minges stage, LB40 shines. Feeding the crowd's appetite for Reggae, this 12-some
froml ngland played in Greenville Monday. (Photo By Mark Love� Photolab)
Fields, Hanks line up the punches
Bv AI 1C IA I OR1)
Sufi Vntp
ill (iod sown ani-
i i arto� ins insists l.ilah
a '��� is portrayed by
i ield in the new mo ie
i hline
VSUAI S � ,
J IP
COMING 1 ll ERTAINMENT
1 hursday
1 ampaign, Attic Black a k, Susie's
Friday
f h lix, Attic Blu - 1 H'tendeT, New 1 oll
� rday.
1. i W ate-r Mansion 1 ennon Sisters and the Rutabeger Brothers. New I eh
"Punchline" was presented
by TheStudcnt Union on Tuesday
night. Even after sitting on the
floor tor two hours, watching this
movie from an extreme angle and
straining to hear it over the
packed house in 1 lendrixTheatre,
1 was still able to thoroughly enjoy
it.
"Punchline" is a film about
two wanta - be comedians who
pel form nightly at a New York
(lub called The (ias Station.
I om 1 lanks, Sally Field and
flu- other twenty or so comics in
the movie- had everyone in the
audience laughing out loud.
Lilah Krysick is the mother
ot three-children who, against her
family's wishes, performs nightly
at comedy house. She wants so
desperately to be funny that she
secretly spends $500of the house-
hold cookie jar money on some
really bad jokes. After she realizes
she has wasted the money and the
jokes bomb on stage, she tries to
enlist Tom I kinks' character into
giving her a few pointers on how
to be- a better comedian.
Everyone agrees that
1 kinks' character, Steven Cold, is
the best comic at the club. After
flunking out of medical school
without the knowledge oi his fa-
ther (a heart surgeon), he spends
all ol his time performing and
perfecting his routine. The reason
that Cold is such a successful
comedian is that he is able to
apply his jokes to the audience
and the situation.
After he teaches Krysick
that everyone has the potential to
be funny, she is able to overcome
her insecurities and use- her own
life as a housewife and a mother.
She starts making up her own
material and becomes a sue cess at
The Gas Station.
In fact, she gets a little too
good, maybe even better than
Gold himself.
Tom 1 lanks deserves the
real credit for the best portrayal of
the life oi a lonely comedian 1 Ie
makes Cold more realistic by
showing how he uses humor to
hide his real feelings. He falls in
love with Lilah and after she fi-
nally convinces him that she re-
ally loves her husband , he makes
up jokes to try and hide the pain.
In one scene Cold's father
and brother show up at the club
unexpectedly, just before Gold is
getting ready to perform. He is
overcome with fear and the audi-
ence senses this. 1 le tries too hard
See PUNCHLINE, page 12
It there ever was a night to
forget about the drudgery of
homework and studying and ust
enjoy life, it was Monday night.
Why? Answer: UB40wasintown.
Playing their unique sound ol
reggae in Minges Coliseum,
I 'B40. in their firsl Greenville gig,
more than satisfied the swaying-
to-the-beat crowd.
By 9:30 p.m the white lights
shone on the smoke-filled stage.
And the stage came alive with the
sounds oi UB40.
Along with a good show of
reggae, IB40 brought with them a
great production which consisted
oi a three level stage, an adequate
light show and ot coursea reeling-
12-member band.
As expected, UB40 played all
oi their popular hits such as "Red
Red Wine" and "Rat in the
Kitchen" and "Maybe Tomor-
row" which is a single they re-
corded in ihc United Kingdom.
In "Sing Our Own Song off
their 1986 album "Rat in the
Kitchen UB40 demonstrated
they seek to end apartheid in
South Africa. "Sing Our Own
Song" is dedicated to the black
South Africans population who
have seen their leaders jailed and
their human rights disregarded.
Singer Norman Lamont Has-
san stopped during the song to
explain two key words in the lv r-
ics, "Amandla Awethu the Afri-
can words which mean the
"people are the power
The three-level stage was one
of the largest stages Minges has
ever set up for a band. C n the top
level, a fantastic three-member
hom section consisting of trum-
peter, saxaphone player and
trombone player, played in con-
stant choreographed motion
throughout the show.
Although the lighting equip-
ment was not elaborate, the tim-
ing oi lights added to the show's
effect. The light show especially
shined during "Red Red Wine
Everytime the chorus of "Red Red
Wine" came up, Minges was lit up
with bright red lights enabling
everyone to be seen.
A crowd of about 2,000
people attended the concert spon-
sored by Major Concerts Commit-
tee. 1 lowever, ECU student turn-
out could n't be compared to the
estatic high school fans. Although
the crowd was young in age. ev-
eryone seemed to enjoy the show
which was ev ident from the con-
stant dancing that occurred
throughout the show.
One possible reason for ECU
attendance being so lax could
have been because W ZMB wasoff
the air tor a week before the con-
cert and wasn't able to promote
the show as much a the station
wanted.
I B40 played for about 1 hour
and V minutes including a juic-
ing three song encore.
In opening tor UB40, Velvet
Elvis made their Greenville de-
bute. Velvet FK is. a four-member
band from Lexington Kentucky
has a definite progressive sound.
After experiencing problems
with the public announce system,
Velvet Elvis tore through some
meat) originals. Most of the songs
Velvet Elvis played can be found
on their album 100Proof, which is
produced by Mitch Faster.
Easter has produced bands
Let's Active. RFM, and Pon
Dixon. If you like Velvet Elvis or
would like to know more about
them, tune in to ECl 's radio sta-
tion WZMB. Velvet Elvis songs to
be request are Something Hap-
pened Todav "Privilege and
Ambition, all ot which can be
found on their new release-
Elvis is undisputedly dead
HENDERSONVILLE, N.C.
(AP) - Evangelist Rick Stanley,
Elvis Presley's step-brother, savs
Elvis is unequivocally and unde-
niably dead.
"I know Elvis isdead. There is
no belief about it the34-year-old
Southern Baptist evangelist said
Sunday in 1 lendersonville.
"I was there when they rolled
him over on the carpet and he had
been dead tor six hours; rigor
mortis (had) set in he said.
But Stanley said recent car-
toons and television shows de-
picting Elvis as alive don't bother
him.
'I'm used to it Stanley
told the Hendersonville Times-
News.
"People don't want to let go of
the memory oi Elvis Stanley
grew up at the Craceland Man-
sion in Memphis, Tenn after his
mother married Elvis' father,
Vernon Presley.
1 le said the recently released
book, Is Elvis Alive? by Gail
Brewer-Giorgio has embarrassed
and hurt him.
1 thought of getting in touch
with the host lawv ers in the coun-
trv and suing her tor mental an-
guish Stanley said, adding that
he decided it would just help her
sell more books. "1 don't think
much ot her 1 wish she'd stop and
think. It's a drag for me
Perry Coino is still alive
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP)-
Perrv Corrto savs the awful
novelty songs" that his concert
audiences still demand have been
haunting him since the 1930s,
w hen he sang with led Weem's
big band.
"Me and Sinatra and all the
rest oi the singers used to talk
about all the crap we had to sing
Como said.
Corrto, 76, said he still winces
when performing such million-
selling hits as "Papa 1 ove
Mambo" and "Don't I et the Stars
Get in t our Eyes
A Hubba-Hubba-Hubba'
was another sick one and another
gold record said Como, who
performs this week at Rally's
Grand 1 lotel md Casino.
'1 still do them onstage once
in a while because the audience
wants it. but I say Vech' after-
wards






i
i
PECIAL
SAT.
3 PM
5 11 oz. Sirloin
otato Bar
undae Bar
3.49
REE DESSERT BAR
1th AH Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
OCTOBER 6, 1988 Page 11
VDAE
EK.
Two thumbs up for 'Carnival
TCBV
� he taste I
� n hall
,nd; - fat-free. Add
nuts, sprinkles
rithi gai Ided, or
r nvtnine . I - ise.
All Off PLEASURE.
None of the am
TC8V,f
This is a scene from "Carnival ECU Playhouse's current production
now playing at McGinnis Theatre. Here, Lili, protrayed by Nina
Blanton is seeking Crobert, played by Chris Brown. (Photo by Mark
Love � Photolab)
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Asi-t.int features KJilur
Something about going to the
theater is magical. Of "Carnival"
this is doubly so.
Set in (what else?) a "Carni-
val the musical follows the ex-
periences and growth of a stun-
ningly beautiful small-town girl,
Lili (Nina Blanton), who comes to
the Cirque dc Paris looking for a
friend oi her recently-deceased
father.
Unfortunately for the naive
Lili, her father's friend turns out
to be less help than she had hoped.
To make matters worse, the poor
girl is spotted by the slick and
opportunistic magician Marco
the Magnificent (Jeffrey 1 largett),
who dazzles her with tricks and
invites her back to his trailer for a
spot oi lunch.
Fortunately for Lili (although
she doesn't see it as particularly
fortunate), she has also been spot-
ted by Paul Berthalet (Stuart
Maxwell), a bitter ex-dancer
turned puppeteer, who tries des-
perately to rescue her from
Marco's dutches without reveal-
ing too much of himself in the
process.
The greater portion of the
show focusses on Paul's inner
struggle as he tries to save Lili
from Marco. Marco is more expe-
rienced in wooing women, and he
finds it easy to attract Lili with his
magic.
Paul, on the other hand, finds
that he cannot be as direct as the
magician. He can use his own
magic - his delicate charm on
Lili only when he hides behind his
puppets. When he confronts her
face-to-face, he can show Lili
nothing but his rage and frustra-
tion at his own inability to open
up to her. She interprets his feel-
ings asanger towards her,and she
sees him as a monster. In fact,
without meaning to do so, Paul
almost drives Lili out of Marco's
arms and into those of Paul's as-
sistant jacquot (Billy Sharpe).
Marco's assistant and oft-be-
trayed lover, Rosalie (Janice
Schreibcr), unwittingly helps
Paul. She, too, has a stake in de-
flecting Marco's attention away
from the lovely Lili. (Incidentally,
the hilarious scene between
Rosalie and the quintessential
ringleader Mr. Schlegel (Vandy
Behr), in which the pair drink and
sing to Marco's many mistresses,
is worth the price of admission in
itself.)
The major problem with a
premise such as this is that it is too
easy to take the "sitcom" ap-
proach to it � to skim the surface;
not to probe too deeply. Happily,
"Carnival" avoids this trap. It
walks a treacherous tightrope
without ever falling into the abyss
of predictable shallowncss on on
side or overblown tearjerking on
the other. It retains the semi-mys-
tical atmosphere of a "Carnival"
and combines it with deeply
moving human drama.
Some of the best moments in
the play are those in which Mavis
Ray's skillful choreographv
See NOT, page 12
� �'
Iht i, unity Hii )
� . � v.
Micah does alien rental flicks review
in psyching - up for Halloween
By MICAH HARRIS
staff Writer
With 1 lalloween around the
er, video consumers may
want to look into the many space
creature flicks now available.
Let's look at a few.
IT. - the Extra-Terrestrial"
will be making close encounters
with ideo store patrons on Octo-
ber 27. The proximity to 1 lallow-
een seems appropriate when you "War of the Worlds" �
consider the tradition of alien George Pal's beautifully crafted
invasion via mass media begun film seems dated today, but that's
by Orson Welles' "War of the hardly a fair criticism. However,
Worlds broadcast. it's hardly excuse fo the hokey,
I lalloween became as much a single glimpse oi the aliens we're
night when aliens slither over the given. They are less effective than
earth as the ghouls. You can cele- their battleships that float
brate the event by checking out through the skies with the malign
the video versions for the misad- mein of aerial sharks,
ventures of aliens less benign The ship's design crackles
than sweet ol' E.T. See INVADERS, page 12
i STADIUM CLP
tase of any sundae
ersort per visit per order
ffer expires � � ber 14 191
H0�$
:et
D MONDAY
er the great 1
DOM W
� TIRE STOCK I I
WESTIES W
25
OFF
MFC SUGG.
RETAIL



x

IA ROUP
S PUMPS
IAPEZIO
7f OFF
M
3
More scenes from the ECU'S Playhouse latest production, "Carnival (Photo by Mark Love � Photolab)
UB40 reggaes Minges
By JEFF GIBSON
Staff Writer
Through a smokey Minges stage, UB40 shines. Feeding the crowd's appetite for Reggae, this 12-some
fromEngland played in Greenville Monday. (Photo By Mark Love � Photolab)
Fields, Hanks line up the punches
By ALICIA FORD
Suff Writer
"We are all God's own ani-
mated cartoons insists Lilah
Krvsick, who is portrayed by
Sally Field in the new movie
"Punchline
COMING
IN
ENTERTAINMENT
Thursday
Movo Campaign, Attic
Black jack, Susie's
Friday
Helix, Attic
HIues Defender, New Deli
Saturday
Ice Water Mansion
Lennon Sisters and
the Rutabeger Brothers,
New Deli
"Punchline" was presented
by The Student Union on Tuesday
night. Even after sitting on the
floor for two hours, watching this
movie from an extreme angle and
straining to hear it over the
packed house in Hendrix Theatre,
I was still able to thoroughly enjoy
it.
"Punchline" is a film about
two wanta - be comedians who
perform nightly at a New York
club called The Gas Station.
Tom Hanks, Sally Field and
the other twenty or so comics in
the movie had everyone in the
'dience laughing out loud.
Lilah Krysick is the mother
ot thr e children who, against her
family's wishes, performs nightly
at comedy house. She wants so
desperately to be funny that she
secretly spends $500 of the house-
hold cookie jar money on some
really bad jokes. After she realizes
she has wasted the money and the
jokes bomb on stage, she tries to
enlist Tom Hanks' character into
giving her a few pointers on how
to be a better comedian.
Everyone agrees that
Hanks' character, Steven Gold, is
the best comic at the club. After
flunking out of medical school
without the knowledge of his fa-
ther (a heart surgeon), he spends
all of his time performing and
perfecting his routine. The reason
that Gold is such a successful
comedian is that he is able to
apply his jokes to the audience
and the situation.
After he teaches Krysick
that everyone has the potential to
be funny, she is able to overcome
her insecurities and use her own
life as a housewife and a mother.
She starts making up her own
material and becomes a success at
The Gas Station.
In fact, she gets a little too
good, maybe even better than
Gold himself.
Tom Hanks deserves the
real credit for the best portrayal of
the life of a lonely comedian. He
makes Gold more realistic by
showing how he uses humor to
hide his real feelings. He falls in
love with Lilah and after she fi-
nally convinces him that she re-
ally loves her husband, he makes
up jokes to try and hide the pain.
In one scene Gold's father
and brother show up at the club
unexpectedly, just before Gold is
getting ready to perform. He is
overcome with fear and the audi-
ence senses this. He tries too hard
See PUNCHLINE, page 12
If there ever was a night to
forget about the drudgerv of
homework and studying and just
enjoy life, it was Monday night.
Why? Answer: UB40 was in town.
Playing their unique sound of
reggae in Minges Coliseum,
UB40, in their first Greenville gig,
more than satisfied the swaying-
to-the-beat crowd.
By 9:30 p.m the white lights
shone on the smoke-filled stage.
And the stage came alive with the
sounds of UB40.
Along with a good show of
reggae, UB40 brought with them a
great production which consisted
of a three level stage, an adequate
light show and of course a reeling-
s-member band.
As expected, UB40 played all
of their popular hits such as "Red
Red Wine" and "Rat in the
Kitchen" and "Maybe Tomor-
row" which is a single they re-
corded in the United Kingdom.
In "Sing Our Own Song off
their 1986 album "Rat in the
Kitchen UB40 demonstrated
they seek to end apartheid in
South Africa. "Sing Our Own
Song" is dedicated to the black
South Africanr population who
have seen their leaders jailed and
their human rights disregarded.
Singer Norman Lamont Has-
san stopped during the song to
explain two key words in the lyr-
ics, "Amandla Awethu the Afri-
can words which mean the
"people are the power
The three-level stage was one
of the largest stages Minges has
ever set up for a band. On the top
level, a fantastic three-member
horn section consisting of trum-
peter, saxaphone player and
trombone player, played in con-
stant choreographed motion
throughout the show.
Although the lighting equip-
ment was not elaborate, the tim-
ing of lights added to the show's
effect. The light show especiallv
shined during "Red Red Wine
Every time the chorus of "Red Red
Wine" came up, Minges was lit up
with bright red lights enabling
everyone to be seen.
A crowd of about 2,000
people attended the concert spon-
sored by Major Concerts Commi t-
tee. However, ECU student turn-
out could n't be compared to the
estatic high school fans. Although
the crowd was young in age, ev-
eryone seemed to enjoy the show
which was evident from the con-
stant dancing that occurred
throughout the show.
One possible reason for ECU
attendance being so lax could
have been because WZM B was off
the air for a week before the con-
cert and wasn't able to promote
the show as much as the station
wanted.
UB40 played for about 1 hour
and 30 minutes including a juic-
ing three song encore.
In opening for UB40, Velvet
Elvis made their Greenville de-
bute. Velvet Elvis, a four-member
band from Lexington, Kentucky
has a definite progressive sound.
After experiencing problems
with the public announce system,
Velvet Elvis tore through some
meaty originals. Most of the songs
Velvet Elvis played can be found
on their album 100 Proof, which is
produced by Mitch Easter.
Easter has produced bands
Let's Active, REM, and Don
Dixon. If you like Velvet Elvis or
would like to know more about
them, tune in to ECU's radio sta-
tion WZMB. Velvet Elvis songs to
be request are "Something Hap-
pened Today "Privilege and
AmbitionaIl of which can be
found on their new release.
Elvis is undisputedly dead
HENDERSONVILLE, N.C.
(AP) - Evangelist Rick Stanley,
Elvis Presley's step-brother, says
Elvis is unequivocally and unde-
niably dead.
"I know Elvis isdead. There is
no belief about it the34-year-old
Southern Baptist evangelist said
Sunday in Hendersonville.
"I was there when they rolled
him over on the carpet and he had
been dead for six hours; rigor
mortis (had) set in he said.
But Stanley said recent car-
toons and television shows de-
picting Elvis as alive don't bother
him.
"I'm used to it Stanley
told the Hendersonville Times-
News.
"People don't want to let go of
the memory of Elvis Stanley
grew up at the Graceland Man-
sion in Memphis, Tenn after his
mother married Elvis' father,
Vernon Presley.
He said the recently released
book, Is Elvis Alive? by Gail
Brewer-Giorgio has embarrassed
and hurt him.
"I thought of getting in touch
with the best lawyers in the coun-
try and suing her for mental an-
guish Stanley said, adding that
he decided it would just help her
sell more books. "1 don't think
much of her. I wish she'd stop and
think It's a drag for me
Perry Como is still alive
ATLANTIC CITY, N (AP)-
Perry Como says the "awful
novelty songs" that his concert
audiences still demand have been
haunting him since the 1930s,
when he sang with Ted Weem's
big band.
"Me and Sinatra and all the
rest of the singers used to talk
about all the crap we had to sing
Como said.
Como, 76, said he still winces
when performing such million-
selling hits as "Papa Love
Mambo" and "Don't Let the Stars
Get in Your Eyes
"A Hubba-Hubba-Hubba'
was another sick one and another
gold record said Como, who
performs this week at Bally's
Grand Hotel rnd Casino.
"I still do thetn onstage once
in a while because the audience
wants it, but I say Vech' after-
wards






1 T
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6, 1988
'Invaders From Mars' remade
Continued from page 11
with an eerie grace and holds up
against anything Industrial Light
and Magic has produced. Deserv-
edly, the movie took an Oscar for
special effects. Watch it on tape or
TV if you get a chance, because the
"War of the Worlds" TV scries
premiering this month is a direct
sequel to this 1953 movie.
"Invaders From Mars"�
This remake of Menzies film suf-
fers in comparison to the original.
The producers have seemingly
tried to make a bad movie and
they've succeeded. It works nei-
ther as a piece of camp or affec-
tionate tribute. They also seem to
unfairly assume familiarity with
the original so you're in on the
joke (nudge, nudge; wink, wink)
that it'sall a dream. Well, now you
know. I'd prefer "Santa Claus
Conquers the Martians
"Santa Claus Conquers the
Martians"� I think the plot sums
this one all up: armed with dan-
gerous pop guns, the martians
arrive on earth at the height of the
holiday season to kidnap Santa to
placate their young who've
learned of the jolly old elf via TV
signals from earth. The earth
stands still when the govern-
ments learn of the outrage.
Not to worry: we knowbv the
title who comes out on top of this
one. Considered one of the worst
movies ever made, it is perhaps
ont up to Ed Wood, jrs high stan-
dards, but it has to be preferrable
to, say, Tobe Hooper's "Invaders
From Mars
"Superman" and "Superman
II" -Bet you don't normally go
around thinking of Superman as
an alien, hah? Well, he is and
there's plenty of invasion stuff
going on when the Phantom Zano
Williams arrive in part two. The
Saly kinds successfully translated
the scale and good natured naiv-
ety of the American comic book to
the screen in these efforts. A tricky-
task even they haven't gotten it
right since. 1 fere's wishing them
better luck on their "Superboy"
series premiering this month.
"Buckaroo Banzai"� stands
as a definition of cult film.
Buckaroo" doesn't quite succeed
in making the pulpserial hero
hip but it offers an 'official'
explanation to the story behind
Orson Welles' infamous broad-
cast. Art students should like it.
"Plan 9 From Outer Space
you couldn't make a funnier
movie if you tried, and, indeed,
Ed Wood, Jr was in dead earnest
over his tale of aliens, who having
Mayberiys "Aunt Bea" in a bit
part.
"Invasion of the Body Snatch-
ers"� Both versions of jack
Finney's novel are pretty good
although you'd refer the remake
if you lean toward the gross-out.
However, the 1956 original is
unrivaled in sheer claustrophobia
inducement. The greenhouse
scene alone is particularly unset-
tling.
"The Thing"� No contest be-
tween remake and original here.
failedtoconquereartheighttimes A though Tohn r .
befonv unlJ.h ih.ir �JL n( n Allnou&h J�h" Carpenter's ver
before, unleash their army of the
undead.
Actually, the army consists of
three zombies (a fat guy, a
woman, and an old man) and one
saucer that resembles a utility
building in close-up. Hmmmm
maybe they should just skip
ahead to Flan 10.
"The Day the Earth Stood
Still"� An incredibly mature film
at the dawn (1951 )of the bug-eyed
monster-kiddie matinee era. Still
a genre triumph. Look for
Not too bitter, not too sweet:
"Carnival" is just right
Continued from page 11
transforms the stage into a surreal
min-or of the play's action. Bodies,
at first frozen, slowly start to
whirl; then the pace increases, the
music builds, and suddenly the
stage is alive with activity.
The production as a whole is
an ambitious one (referring tp the
work it took to put the show to-
gether, director Edgar Loessin
called it "a monster"), and it
seemed to suffer from what
jitters At times, the actors
seemed to be fighting to be heard
over the orchestra, and there were
a couple of minor technical diffi-
culties. Rest assured, however;
neither of these was a problem in
dress rehearsal and neither
should be a problem again, so the
remaining productions should be
flawless.
Opening night jitters aside,
the theater department has done a
marvelous job. Everyone in-
volved in "Carnival from the set
Maxwell termed "opening night designers to the lead characters,
deserves a standing ovation.
Though the show is not psy-
chological drama in the nature of,
say, Equus, "Carnivar's charac-
ters are realistic, and, better yet,
they are compellinglv and be-
lievably portrayed by the stu-
dents. "Carnival" is tender and
unashamed!v romantic.
See it. And, if possible see it
with someone you love.
Dime for thought
(AP) - When Kennv Walters
used 3,000 $1 bills to pay the
county taxes on his tool-rental
business, he thought his feelings
were clear and the matter was
closed.
But Clear Creek County
Treasurer Geraldine Thompson
may have upstaged Walters. She
returned his change of $110
mostly in nickels, dimes and
pennies.
"I guess he was just trying to
make a statement said
Thompson "I just gave him all
the change I could dish out. I
mean, turnabout is fair play
Walters said he enjoyed
Thompson's response to his
"silent protest He said he was
trying to make a point when he
paid his $2,890 in taxes in person
withan old gunpowder crate full
of$l bills.
LastAlcatraz
inmate dies
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) -
Clarence Carnes, the only inmate
survivor of a 1946 escape attempt
from Alcatraz that left seven
dead, died Monday in prison a
month before he was to be re-
leased. He was 61.
On July 6, 1945, Carnes was
sent to Alcatraz, the federal prison
island in San Francisco Bay. He
was 18, the youngest inmate ever
incarcerated there.
Early the next year, Carnes
was drawn into a daring escape
plot that quickly went awry. Two
guards were killed and several
were wounded.
The six inmates who partici-
pated got control of little more
than one cell house.
Poetry Forum
The ECU Poetry Forum will
meet Thursday night at 8 p.m. in
Menedenhall 248. Those wishing
to have their work read and cri-
tiqued should bring 8-10 copies of
their poem(s) to the meeting.
All students, faculty and local
citizens are invited to attend.
Punchline
Continued from page 11
to be funny and bombs terribly.
He starts crying on the stage and
you can feel his frustration and
pain in trying so hard just to make
these people laugh.
"Punchline" is a very funny
and realistic movie about stand-
up comedy. So if you're in the
mood for a few tears and a lot of
laughs, go see it when it hits the
theatres nationwide this week-
end.
sion is no great movie, it's more,
uh, engrossing than the 1951 ver-
sion.
"Howard the Duck"� Al-
though slammed by critics in their
ongoing fits of George Lucas'
bashing (induced, no doubt, as a
reaction to thier overrating of
"Return of the jedi"), "Howard"
was a well-crafted in-joketribute
to the genre. The Dark OverLord
special effect is great. The Lea
Thompson special effect is even
better.
Student Health Services
GET TO THE GAME ON TIME
The Saturday Clinic at the Student Health
Service will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
p.m. on Saturday, October 8,1988.
The Sunday Clinic will be held as usual from
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Call the Student Health Services at 757-6841 for
more information or questions.
East Carolina
University
Department of
Intramural-Recreational
Services
2nd Session Fitness Classes
Registration Dates Session Dates
October 11-14
Cost Per Session (12 classes)
$10.00.Students
$20.00Faculry-Staff
October 19-December 2
Cost Per Drop-in Class
$1.00Students
$200 Faculty-Staff
All classes available on a drop-in basis with purchase of a ticket
Tickets are available in 204 Memorial Gymnasium, Monday-
Thursday, 8 a.m 6pm and Friday, 8 a.m5 p.m.
Days
Mon & Wed
Mon & Wod
Man. & Wed
Tues. & Th.
Tues. & Tlv
Tues. & Th
Tues & Th
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Mon & Wed.
Tues. & Th.
Tues ii Th.
Fn
Sat
Ti in e$
.100 4 (X) p m
405 5 05 p ni
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300 4 00 pm.
4 05 5:05 pm.
5:15-6.15 p m
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5:15 6:15 p m
1:00-2.00 p.m.
3.00-4:00 pm
(1 -��. mpa t
ow lmpa ti
(1 ow Impact)
(Drop in Only)
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TONING
4 05 5 05 p m
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5:30-6:30 p m
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(Drop in ChiK I
Location
MC 108
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MG 108
MC 108
Greene
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Tues. & Th
MC, 108
AOLAKOBICS
5 30 6 30 pm
SUPRCLASS
An innovative 90 minute workout incorporating weights js light �
muscular strength and endurance, in addition to a 30 minute aerobic compo-
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classes. Cost per session (12 classes) is SI 5 00students and S25 OOfaculh ar :
staff.
Mon & Wed. 6:30 8 00 p.m
Sat. 10.30-12:00 p.m.
'Drop in SI 25Student & $2 50Staff
MC 108
MC 108
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TarkjThiatre
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MIDNIGHT RUN
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LICENSE TO DRIVE
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CHEROKEE, N C. 1
The leaves on the Qualla Bou(
ary reservation have chanjf
color 150 times since me
Cherokee nation was forced
leave here in a wintrv march
became known as "the "rail
Tears" because 4,000 Indil
died during it
This week, represent
of Cherokee1 Nation �
homa came here to pin thr E
ern Band ot Cherokee Indu
those who staved behind
marking the 150th ann
ot the forced march At ti
enng, it was evident ti
leaves are not the onh
that have changed
Instead of skins and fei
ers, the Indians wore dark b
ness suits Rather than
ing the threat of the whir
they talked about e
development And the �
Cherokees have a woman
'The Cherokee pe pk
grown since the removal
Jonathan Taylor, chiet
Eastern Band, which inh
the 56,000-acre Qua
ary.
Throughout history
Cherokees have always tru
do something better he
The News & Record oi Gr
boro reported "And r
people have the abilit)
themselves and gel
done"
Eastwo
(CPS) Clint Hast
made their day at Wesl
versify in Connecticut
Eastwood last week
nounced he will donate all
ments and film relatir
career as an actor, prod
director to Wesleyan an.
Museum of Modem Art
York.
Persuading E
make the donation appart
wasn't too difficult althou
took three years to clinch the
"We saw him, told him
the archiy�and who was irt ij
kept inHoflch with him "j
plained leanine Basil
Wesleyan s Corwin-Fuller
fessor of Film Studies and cui
of the school's cinema archivl
Eastwood, currently
the countrv could not K
for comment about why he c
Wesleyan Basinger specular
might have been attracted h
other film folks in the camj
collection: Ingrid Bergman
directorsRaoul Walsh, Eha kJ
and Frank Capra. Eastwoo
known as a Capra fan.
Basinger was more empll
about why, on the other
Wesleyan chose Eastwood.
"No one would ask wl
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I
I-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6,1988 13
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'Trail of Tears' for 150 years
CHEROKEE, N.C. (AP) -
The leaves on the Qualla Bound-
ary reservation have changed
color 150 times since most of the
Cherokee nation was forced to
leave here in a wintry march that
became known as "the Trail of
Tears" because 4,000 Indians
died during it.
This week, representatives
of Cherokee Nation of Okla-
homa came here to join the East-
ern Band of Cherokee Indians,
those who stayed behind, in
marking the 150th anniversary
of the forced march. At the gath-
ering, it was evident that the
leaves are not the only things
that have changed.
Instead of skins and feath-
ers, the Indians wore dark busi-
ness suits. Rather than discuss-
ing the threat of the white settler,
they talked, about economic
development. And the western
Cherokees have a woman chief.
The Cherokee people have
grown since the removal said
Jonathan Taylor, chief of the
Eastern Band, which inhabits
the 56,000-acre Qualla Bound-
ary.
'Throughout history, the
Cherokees have always tried to
do something better he said,
The News k Record of Greens-
boro reported. "And now our
people have the ability to go
themselves and get things
done
The 9,000-member Eastern
Band evolved from about 1,400
Cherokees who refused the
government's order to relocate
in 1838. Instead, they hid in
North Carolina's mountains.
The Western band of Cher-
okees has 92,000 members, sec-
ond only to the Na vahos. It is led
by Wilma Mankiller, the tribe's
first woman chief.
Gov. Jim Martin told about
750 Indians at Cherokee High
School that the gathering should
be a reminder "so that none of us
should ever forget what hap-
pened here
rhe tribes used the gathering
Monday and Tuesday to "inspire
both remembrance and reflec-
tion on determination and
achievements said Ross Swim-
mer, once the Western Band's
chief and now assistant secretary
for Indian affairs in the U.S. De-
partment of the Interior.
"It shows we can overcome
difficulties to come back together
Swimmer said.
In two days of joint councils of
the Eastern and Western bands,
the Cherokees passed resolutions
to support an alternate to the wil-
derness bill introduced by Sen.
Terry Sanford; to support legisla-
tion that would encourage eco-
nomic development by Indians; to
ask for a new formula for road-
funding apportionment; to sup-
port amendments to the federal
defense appropriations bill; and to Boundary's 2,400 homes are gov-
ask for funding of more teachers
aides positions.
"But I know when I look at
these hills, we all originated here
The gathering gave 70-year-
old Walker Calhoun of Cherokee a
chance to revive the Green Corn
Dance on the reservation for the
ernment subsidized, and about 50
percent of its students drop out of
school after the sixth grade.
Even the annual fall festival
that opened during the celebration
is a telling sign - a last grasp at
summer's tourists, who fuel 90
first time in 50 years. Calhoun said percent of the reservation's econ-
he learned the celebration of har- omy. During winter months,
vest from an uncle. He has taught it unemployment climbs to nearly
to his four grandsons, who per- 50 percent,
formed it to his chant Tuesday. Mankiller said she is optimis-
"I enjoyed seeing them do this tic about the tribes' future,
when I was young Calhoun said. "No matter what's happened
"I just feel like it's something we to us in history, no matter how
adverse the situation, we've been
able to rise again she said. "I
think every generation has more -
better education, industry, more
people living in adequate hous-
ing. Generation by generation,
there is overall improvement.
should keep.
One of the grandsons, 15-year-
old Bob Raines, said he believes a
sense of heritage is returning
among young Indians on the reser-
vation.
"It makes you proud to be able
to share in something so old
Raines said.
While the focus of the gather-
ing was hope, there remains a dark
side. In addition to the historical
"We can dedicate monu-
ments and build plaques she
said. "But the best monument that
we could give to the ancestors
who died on the Trail of Tears and
tragedy, the groups - though sepa- who fought that battle is to retain
rated by 1,200 miles and several our identities as Indians
states - also share modern prob-
lems.
As on most reservations, un-
employment, education and in-
adequate housing continue to be
problems for both the Western
Cherokees and the Eastern Band.
About 75 percent of the Qualla
:ma&
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11
Eastwood donates documents
(CPS) � Clint Eastwood
made their day at Wesleyan Uni-
versity in Connecticut.
Eastwood last week an-
nounced he will donate all docu-
ments and film relating to his
career as an actor, producer and
director to Wesleyan and the
Museum of Modern Art in New
York.
Persuading Eastwood to
wanted the working papers of
James Joyce or Beethoven, but
everyone's asked about this she
said.
The Eastwood collection and
others in the archive have their
greatest value in "connecting
alumni in the filmmaking world
to scholars and critics" as well as
to current students, Basinger said.
Moreover, "because
make the donation apparently filmmaking is viewed as a com-
wasn't too difficult although it mercial enterprise, availability to
took three years to clinch the deal, film doesn't always exist. Many
"We saw him, told him about
the archjygand who was in it and
kept inwach with him ex-
plained Jeanine Basinger,
Weslevan's Corwin-Fuller Pro-
J
fessor of Film Studies and curator
of the school's cinema archive.
Eastwood, currently out of
the country could not be reached
documents are not kept. The ar-
chives is a place o rectify that
problem and mate available the
documents that surround creat-
ing major motion pictures
Eastwood is a proper subject
for scholarly study, Basinger
added, because "he's unique
American artist. He has made
leader Martin Luther King's
widow, can sue Boston Univer-
sity to retrieve papers her late
husband apparently had donated
to the school.
She wants to transfer the
documents to the Martin Luther
King Center for Non-Violent So-
cial Change in Atlanta.
King went to graduate school
at BU, which has held the collec-
tion of his papers for 23 years.
Mrs. King asserted BU hasn't
cared for them or displayed them
well.
BU, in reply, producedktters
from King seeming to bequeafli
the papers to the school, and chal-
lenged Mrs. King's standing to
claim the papers.
Murphy's ruling said she did
have a claim.
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for comment about why he chose films that are distinctively origi-
Wesleyan. Basinger speculated he nal
might have been attracted by the
other film folks in the campus's
collection: Ingrid Bergman, and
directors Raoul Walsh, Elia Kazan
and Frank Capra. Eastwood is
known as a Capra fan.
Basinger was more emphatic
about why, on the other hand,
Wesleyan chose Eastwood.
"No one would ask why we
The donation has attracted a
lot of attention and publicity, but
East wood himself has been "just
terrific about this Basinger said.
Other institutions have less
happy experiences with dona-
tions.
Massachusetts Judge John L.
Murphy Jr. last week ruled the
Coretta Scott King, civil rights
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14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER M 988
i
ortimer Adler doesn t care
CHAPEL HILL, NC. (AD -
In 1492, Columbus set sail for the
new world. In 1789, French citi-
zens stormed the Bastille, setting
off the revolution. In 1863, Gen.
Robert E. Lee's Confederate army
was defeated at Gettysburg.
Who cares? Many students
don't. And neither does veteran
educator Mortimer Adler.
Facts are not important,
Adler said Tuesday.
"If I'm interested in the battle
of Shiloh, 1 can go to the encyclo-
pedia and look it up' he said.
But Adler is not about to let
students off the hook.
Thinking and understanding
are what get you along in the
world, he said.
And that is what Adler, chair-
man of the board of editors of
Encyclopedia Britannica, hopes to
accomplish with his Taideia con-
cept. Adler was on the UNC cam-
pus for several educational semi-
nars this week.
Earlier this summer, UNC
was selected as the headquarters
tcMbbtoteateMMi Center for the
Faideia Program. The center will
provide training for teachers and
coordinate efforts to spread the
Paideia concept to the nation's
schools. Previously, the center
was based in Chicago, Adler's
home.
The Paideia Program has
been in use for about four years,
he said.Paideia is Greek for the
upbringing of a child.
Adler's program focuses on
what children will learn. Instead
of the traditional lecture format,
Socratic questioning in seminar
discussions is emphasized. Stu-
dents also are coached in the skills
of learning.
All children are educable,
Adler said, and thev all deserve
the same quality of education.
Patricia Weiss, director o( the
UNC center, said the type of infor-
mation a student receives in the
traditional classroom format are
facts that are forgotten as soon as
the next test is over.
Over the course of a lifetime,
most people remember only one-
tenth of the facts that they once
knew well enough to pass an
exam, Adler said.
The quality of education in
America has declined since edu-
cators decided early in this cen-
tury to educate all Americans,
Alder said. But he doesn't suggest
that the decision was wrong.
No country has tried to do
what the U.S. has attempted to do,
he said. The educators just don't
know how to do it"
Adler's views have not en-
deared him to the educational
establishment, he said. The
Paideia concept is a slap in the
face to the schools of education, he
said.
Teachers from these schools
often resist these new methods,
Ms. Weiss said. The teachers,
however, often eventually be-
come the program's biggest sup-
porters, she said. This is especially
true when the teachers realize that
they no longer must have all the
right answers.
Sheria Reid, an English
teacher at Chapel Hill High
School, agrees. Ms. Reid has in-
corportated as much of Paideia
method into her class room as
possible, she said.
"It's very relaxing to say 'I
don't know, let's find out to-
gether Ms. Reid said.
Fifty-minute class periods
make it impossible to impose the
concept in full, she said. Adler
says seminars must be two hours
or longer to be completely effec-
tive.
Initial resistance often comes
from teachers and students, Ms.
Reid said. Teachers have been
taught to group students by abil-
ity, she said. But the Paideia pro-
gram stresses the need for all stu-
dents to be given the same chance
with the same material.
Leading a seminare discus-
sion is also difficult because a
teacher has to develop open-
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Students often oppose the
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they enjoy it she said. "It's a
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Welcome to Fun and Games take-off to Science Fiction!
Enjoy our tribute and please welcome our new cartoon,
"Hey Big Head' which we will spotlight later. In the
meantime, feel free to write us care of the newspaper
and tell us what you would like to see in Fun and Gamp
Narrated
By Pat
Prescott
of "Night Flight"
Warning! Warning!
Which "Lost in Space"
character
is this?
. Mr. Robinson
2. Mrs. Robinson
3. Will
4. Penny
5. Judy
6. Don
7. Dr. Smith
8. Robot
8 SJI
Where Are They Now
Formerly Doug on the cool 'btYs shuvu
"The Time Tunnel Robert Colbert is
now Eric Forrester on "The Bold and
the Beautiful Note the psychedelic
time tunnel.
What is Kirk Saying?
1. "Hey really, there's nothing going on
2. "No way. Not without my Starfleet-issue condoms
3. "Now, you've been a bad little girl, so the Captain's
going to have to spank
What's the name of this Outer Limits episode?
(Hint-it's the name of the hippest, most-read
feature in The Fast Carolinian.)
Is this the original Ming,
or the one from "Flesh
Gordon?'
Ifs Geoffrey Hunter, the original captain of
"the Enterprise! Luckily, Capt. Pike was booted out
the docking bay, and Shatner was brought in to be Kirk!
It doesn't matter. They
both look the same and
are kinky villains.
;uii Xzpj3 iniM
3uild) ou s,diain 'pH
What is Kirk shooting at?
A. Some damn no-good enemy of the
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B. A former crewman turned-god.
C. One of his many illegitimate offspring
around the galaxy hunting him down
for monev.
Doctor Who, for
all you weenies.
That's right-it's "Funjmdjames!
Fun and Games by Cap'n Parker





T
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 6 19M PaKe 16
Pirates face a tough foe
Reggie McKinney turns the corner under hot pursuit from
the Mountaineer defense during last season's match-up.
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Kditor
The West Virginia Mountain-
eers will bring a 5-0 record and a
number eight ranking with them
when they come into Ficklen Sta-
dium Saturday to play the Firatcs.
The Mountaineers have
rolled up impressive point totals
in beating Bowling Green 62-14,
Cal State Fullerton 45-10, Mary-
land 55-24, Pitt 31-10, and Vir-
ginia Tech, who defeated ECU
earlier this season, 22-10. They
average 43 points per game, while
allowing an average of only 13
points.
"This is not a good team for us
to have to bounce back against
said Pirate Coach Art Baker at a
press conference earlier this
week. 'They are a very talented
football team. If you look at West
Virginia physically, 1 don't know
if there's another team in the
United States that would com-
pare
On the offensive side of the
ball for the Mountaineers, the
Pirates will have to be very con-
cerned about the abilities of quar-
terback Major Harris. "Major
Harris is only one of the people on
that team who is outstanding
Baker said of the Mountaineer. "1
think his performance against us
last year helped him on his way to
being a great quarterback. Since
then, his career has really taken
off
Five games into the
Mountaineer's season, Harris has
completed 36 of 64 passes for 672
yards and three touchdowns,
being intercepted five times. He is
also the teams second-leading
rusher with 259 yards on 45 car-
ries for two touchdowns.
"They are intimidating on
defense, and on offense they are
power-oriented, throwing and
running the option, keeping you
off-balance Baker said.
Another player to watch out
for on offense will be Anthonv
Brown, the Mountaineers lead-
ing rusher. Brown has carried the
ball 91 times on the season for 524
yards and six touchdowns. The
Mountaineers average 302.8
yards per game rushing, and have
a total offensive average of 487
yards per game, while only allow-
ing a 287 yard per game average.
On defense, the Mountain-
eers can strike from a number of
positions. Linebacker Renaldo
Turnbull is the leading tackier for
West Virginia. After five games
Turnbull has forty tackles, includ-
ing 32 solos. He also has five sacks
for -44 yards and three pass de-
flections. Alvoid Mavs, a defen-
sive back, has amassed three in-
terceptions so far, and strong
safety Bo Orlando has picked off
two balls, returning one for a 56-
yard touchdown.
Another important part of the
Mountaineer squad is kicker
Charlie Bauman, who kicked
three fiel goals last week against
Virginia Tech. Bauman is nine for
10 on field goals on the year, with
a perfect three-for-three from 40-
49 yards.
Commenting on the Pirates
Baker said, "Our offense has per-
formed well. We had ust a couple
of breakdowns against South-
western Louisiana, but other than
that, I'm pleased with their per-
formance.
"On defense, we arc trying to
make whatever changes are nec-
essary. Part of it is physical We
are just being outmanncd. An-
other part is mental We don't
have great senior leadership on
the defensive side of the ball
Kobe honored
Swim team looks to win
By KRISTEN HA LB ERG
�Vssistant Sports tditor
The East Carolina Swim and
Dive team gets its first taste oi
action today at 4 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum as they compete in in-
tra squad action in the Pentath-
lon.
In the Pentathlon, each swim-
mer has the opportunity to swim
five events; the 200-yard individ-
ual medley, 100-yard butterfly,
100-yard breaststroke, 100-yard
freestyle and 100-yard back-
stroke, even though they might
not specialize in that particular
event.
"It'sanopportunitv to see the
kids swim everything Coach
Rick Kobe said.
Coach Kobe uses the Pentath-
lon to watch the swimmers com-
pete in something other than the
event they usually compete in.
"This enables us to observe
talent in the swimmer that we
might not have known about be-
fore Kobe said. "It is also a step-
ping stone for picking the travel-
ing team. The Pentathlon will give
us a good indication oi where we
are in our training
Awards will be given out to
anyone who sets Pentathlon rec-
ords. Last year George Walters
broke the record in the 100-vard
backstroke with a time of 55.97.
Ravmond Kennedv set a record at
101.37 in the 100-yard
breaststroke and Meredith Bridg-
ers also pulled through with a
record in the 100-yard
breaststroke with a time of 101.16.
Kennedy will be the one to
beat this year, as he captured last
year's Pentathlon crown with a
total of 2795 points.
For the ladies, Ryan Philyaw
should be watched, as she won
the Pentathlon last year with 3188
points.
When asked about the season
ahead. Kobe remained optimistic.
"We've been spoiled Kobe
said. "We really haven't had a bad
season. Tins should be an excel-
lent year for us
The men have 12 returning
swimmers to the ECU program
and, of those 12, all were confer-
ence finalists last year. The ladies
are just as strong with all seven of
their returning swimmers confer-
ence finalists as well.
"I'm anticipating our finest
year yet, but it is a long season
said Kobe.
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Assistant Sports Kditor
Rick Kobe, coach of the ECU
Swim Team, has been awarded
the title of Master Coach by the
College Swimming Coach Asso-
ciation of America.
This award, presented at the
1988 World Swim Clinic in San
Francisco, is one of the highest
honors in coaching collegiate
level swimming as a mere 10-1?
percent of college coaches actu-
ally receive an award of Master
Coach.
"I was verv honored Kobe
said proudly.
In order to be eligible for the
award of Master Coach, certain
criteria had to be met. First, any-
one considered had to have
coached at least 10 years in col-
lege.
Next, a coach must be a
member of the College Swim-
ming Coach Association oi Amer-
ica and be in good standing.
Third, a coach must win at
least 50 percent of all dual meets
(Kobe has an impressive 97-46
record since coming to ECU).
Fourth, a coach had to win a
conference championship (the
men's team won the conference in
1986).
Then, a coach had to produce
an Olympic team member (Kobe
had a former ECU swimmer swim
Rick Kobe
for the Peruvian team in the I 84
Olympics at Los Angeles).
And finally, a coach must
have conducted and attended
various swim clinics
When all this criteria is met,
the prospective coach then is
aamininmimi
"Now T can renre Tangncd
Kobe.
ECU welcomes "old timers
yy
ECU Sports Information
East Carolina, a baseball pro-
gram that has suffered just one
losing season since 1950, will
welcome former players from
years past on ,Oct. 22 for
the first annual Old Timer's Base-
ball Classic.
The Classic will highlight a
weekend of activities scheduled
for the former Pirate players,
coaches and managers. The game,
scheduled for 10 a.m. at ECU'S
Harrington Field, will coincide
with the ECU-Syracusc football
game scheduled for later in the
day.
"There have been a great deal
of players to come through the
Pictured here is the 1963 ECU baseball team, which finished the year third in the nation. ECU
will host a game for older players to return and have a good time. (Photo courtesy SID.)
ECU looks for winning years
By DAVID MONROE
Staff Writer
Througout the past five years
since the incredible 8-3 team that
brought pride, enthusiasm, and
respect to East Carolina Univer-
sity, ECU has been tortured by the
"almosts" and "What-ifs Many
blame the hell-bent scheduling by
the Athletic Office, while others
contend that the coaching staff,
through mindless decisions, have
brought this unbearable doom.
Some individuals even place
blame on the departure of Pat
Dye, the legendary ECU football
coach of the 70's and early 80's.
To be honest, I guess they all
are responsible in one way or
another. Sure, had Pat Dye not
decided to go to Auburn to build
his powerhouse of the South, East
Carolina University might have
continued their winning ways (by
1983, East Carolina had recorded
their tenth winning season in
twelve years; a feat that at that
time was unsurpassed by any
other school in the state of North
Carolina). Also, I guess if ECU
had decided to stay a Division I-
AA school and play ball with the
little guys they would have con-
tinued to prove to be a power-
house themselves.
The realism though, is that
See RETURN, page 17
ECU baseball program that
helped put it where it is today
said Charlie Carr, ECU's Associ-
ate Athletic Director and secre-
tary of the Pirate Club. "And now
we'd like to do something for
them to show our appreciation.
"We think this will be a great
opportunity for players from dif-
ferent ECU teams from years past
to get together and reminisce
Among those that have
committed early to play in the
game are Butch Davis (1978-80),
who played the final portion of
the 1988 season with the Balti-
more Orioles. Richard "Rooster"
Narron (1966-67) is a former ma-
jor league standout who has also
indicated that he will play.
Several members of the 1986
team that finished with a school
record 40 victories have commit-
ted, including Winfrcd Johnson,
who set an NCAA record by hit-
ting 70 career home runs and
pitching 35 career victories.
Since 1961, ECU has ap-
peared in the NCAA playoffs 10
times, won six Southern Confer-
ence championships, three
ECAC-South championships and
one Colonial Athletic Association
title. Prior to joining the NCAA
ranks, the Pirates won an NAIA
national title in 1961 and finished
third in the national NAIA tour-
nament in 1963.
More than 50 former ECU
players have gone on to sign pro-
fessional baseball contracts.
"We are very excited about
hosting the Classic and want to
make it an annual event ECU
head baseball coach Gary Over-
ton said. "I think you'll see a lot of
talent out there, but you'll also see
a great deal of laughs. And that's
what it's all about
The Ramada Inn of
Greenville announced last week
that it is a proud sponsor of the
Old Timers Classic and will also
be the official headquarters of all
"Old Timers" in town for the
game.
The Classic is the brainchild
of Pirate Club field representative
Phil Hatch.
Pirate's Booty Pirate's Booty
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sportt Kditor
If I may, I would like to tell '
vou all a storv. I was at the ECU-
J J
USL football game, covering it for
the ever popular East Carolinian
Things were going pretty good,
and the Pirates were holding their
own, when Art Baker decided to
give Charlie Libretto, who had
done quite a bit of running, a
break. In came Travis Hunter.
And up started the boos. To say I
was mad would be an understate-
ment. To say I was disappointed
could be placed in the same con-
text.
I couldn't understand how a
group of die-hard Pirate fans
could be booing a decision to rest
a quarterback who had been run-
ning a lot in 85 degree weather, by
putting in a quarterback who had
been a two-year starter up until
that game. Travis Hunter, in only
his junior season, is highly ranked
in all of the Pirate passing statis-
tics, and is expected to move into
the number one slot in most of
these before he graduates. He
helped lead the Pirates to a re-
spectable 5-6 finish last year, and
was intrumental in the Pirate's
season opening win over Tennes-
see Tech. Sure Travis has made
some mistakes, but who hasn't?
And to those who added their
voices to the mindless display of
idiodicy, did you think that your
actions would help improve
Travis' level of play?
Another thing that bothered
me was the fact that, when Travis
has needed a break in past games
and Libretto came in to spell him,
was his entrance met by boos? Not
that 1 can remember. So why
should it be the other way
around?
In a post-game press confer-
ence, Coach Baker was asked his
reaction to the booing. "I'm just
terribly disappointed he said. "I
don't mind anybody disagreeing
with me and my decisions, but
Travis Hunter has given as much
as anybody on this team, and it
really hurts me deep down to hear
all the comments that are being
made about him.
"We feel as if we have a class
program here, with class people
in it, and I know every one of these
young men, and they're great
young men
"I think it was pathetic said
Charlie Libretto of the incident,
"coming from East Carolina fans.
I was really hurt, 1 felt bad. be-
cause I think that brought me
down, and 1 want everyone to
know that it hurt me as much as it
had to have hurt Travis. 1 think
that if you're going to be East
Carolina fans,then you have to go
with the whole team, and not just
one person
"Travis has done nothing but
great things for this team farrod
Moody added, 'and the reaction
was a surprise to me. The coach-
ing staff and the players were
shocked. We expect a lot more

trom our fans, and you have to
stick behind a guv. We stick be-
hind our players 100 no matter
who it is, and it really hurt us all
I was listening to the Art
Baker show Sunday night, and I
heard a so-called 'fan call in and
tell Baker that the fans were boo-
ing his decision to put Travis in,
not booing Travis himself. This is
a lame excuse. What's the differ-
ence? Either way. Hunter still had
to feel the sting of the boos from
the people who were supposed to
be supporting him.
Don't get me wrong. I don't
agree with all of the calls that
Baker makes. And I'm just as tired
of seeing the Pirates lose as any-
one here. 1 came to ECU in 1984,
right after the 8-3 season. I saw
two 2-9 seasons drag by, in addi-
tion to last year's losing season,
and this year's poor start. So I've
seen as many losses as anybodv
But I don't think that I could use
that as an excuse for hurting a
player's pride and confidence.
You may not agree with my
reasoning, and that's your right
But 1 hope that the next time you
feel a need to express vour high-
handed indifference and insensi-
tivity, you will first consider the
feelings of the one you are about
to hurt. Remember, "Walk a mile
in my hightops or whatever that
saying is.
Retu
Continued from pagt
this is 1988 and not I9tfl
Carolina had a decision tcj
long before Pat Dye ever It
develop a football pr
the caliber of players that
be able to compete on a nl
level against established D
I-A schools. When you cj
that East Carolina ha- �
"established" Univi �
1967 and an NCAA I
athletic program sir
hardly think vou
Carolina Universit)
lished football program.
In order tor J
gram to develop into a natj
recognized or.
be treated delicately du
growing years I i j
East Carolina Univen
endure the a .
play with the 1
still only a child S j
likes of LSU, Auburn I
Florida, Miami, Fli ri I j
South Carolina
havoc with anyone - - J
fact, since I -
17 against thu 9 -
Some mav ask
long does it take : i
develop" Twelve w
answer that qw I
that ECU will have j
hard times and th I
must be ma
grams do not pop I
Thev take time hard
determination . ad
to improve.
As evident by tl
ECU Lcicn
Special to Ihr t j-
The East Cai
Club traveled to V 'mir.j
weekend for the i
Oceanfest Lacrosse
Four teams � Fort Bra
State, Piedmont and EC
scheduled to competi
nament. which took pi i
ber 1 and 2.
Saturday, the Pil
NCSU club in the pla
Fresh
Spare
ib. 9
Jesse Jo'
Fran
$
Pkg-
l1!
Smithfi
Baco
lb. pk:
$101
1
MAU





oe
the Pirates,
is per-
i couple
South-
than
their pcr-
tryingto
I - are nec-
. il We
�. An-
lon t
� hip on
ill
wred
luce
- Kobe
r swi m
i . h must
. � nded
i criteria is met,
cctive coa h then is
K � fra rtf?i �ebod
Pirate's Booty
said


J be-
k that 1 " me
rte to
itithurti
rt Tra - 1 think
it il g to be East


� � .
arr i
md the r action
e coach-
r were
re
ive to
k be-
no matter
rtusall"
the Art
' and I
I in and
� boo-
� put Travis in,
himself. This is
the differ-
� -till had
x the sting �s from
; p sd to
me rung. ! don't
i of the calls that
nd I'm just as tired
g : I irat( - �.� as any-
e here. I came to E in 1984,
ght after the season 1 saw
5 by, in addi-
' last � ng si iison,
id thi r start. So I've
n as mai . ises as anybody.
it i don't think that I could use
at as an excuse for hurting a
:nde and confidence.
You may not agree with my
pasoning, and that's your right.
lit 1 hope that the next time you
1 a need to express your high-
d indifference and insensi-
ity, you will first consider the
?lings of the one you are about
hurt Remember, "Walk a mile
my hightops or whatever that
vine is.
Return to greatness
Continued from page 16
this is 1988 and not 1983. East
Carolina had a decision to make
long before Pat Dye ever left� to
develop a football program with
the caliber of players that would
be able to compete on a national
level against established Division
l-A schools. When you consider
that East Carolina has been an
"established" University since
1967 and an NCAA Division I-A
athletic program since 1976, I
hardly think you can call East
Carolina University an estab-
lished football program.
In order for a football pro-
gram to develop into a nationally
recognized organization it must
be treated delicately during its
growing years. Unfortunately for
East Carolina University, it must
endure the agony of having to
play with the "big-boys" while
still only a child. Sure, playing the
likes of LSU, Auburn, Penn State,
Florida, Miami, Florida State, and
South Carolina would wreck
havoc with anyone's schedule. In
fact, since 1983 East Carolina is 0-
17 against these seven schools.
Some may ask, Just how
long does it take for a program to
develop? Twelve years?" I cannot
answer that question, but I can say
that ECU will have its share of
hard times, and that sacrifices
must be made. Winning pro-
grams do not pop up over night.
They take time, hard-work, and
determination a determination
to improve.
As evident by the past two
seasons, ECU has continued to
improve. Although posting a 2-9
record in 1986, a 5-6 record in
1987, and currently riding a 1-4
record in 1988, ECU has im-
proved. In 1986, ECU's chances
against the top schools were slim;
to survive was enough to hope
for. By 1987, ECU started to show
glimpses of good things to come,
but still a few mistakes here and
there prevented a true showing.
In 1988, ECU has met the opposi-
tion head on.
Although the East Carolina
football team is 1-4, they have
been in a position to win in each of
the four games in which they lost;
more than can be said for the pre-
vious three years. In any of those
games, had a series of plays went
in ECU's favor, East Carolina
University would be 5-0 (that in-
eludes an impressive, hard-
fought battle against then 14th
ranked South Carolina; a team
ECU has never beaten).
Against South Carolina
(USC), the defense was fine tuned
as they held USC to 49 yards rush-
J -
ing and Todd Ellis, a Heisman
candidate, to a less than 50 per-
cent pass completion rate, but the
offense was unable to get on
track�scoring wise that is. Actu-
ally, ECU had its way with USC as
they pushed them up and down
the field throughout the game.
In ECU's last two games they
have averaged over 500 yards
total offense while putting an as-
tonishing 74 points on the score-
board against two teams consid-
ered by many to be Top-20 caliber.
Unfortunately, a defense that al-
lows the opposition to average
over 500 yards total offense and 46
points a game tarnishes the
achievements of being garnered
by the offense. In order for ECU to
win, it must click on both cylin-
ders.
With West Virginia, Florida
State, Syracuse, and Miami still to
be played, ECU must continue to
show improvement. During any
of these games if both the offense
and defense play to their poten-
tial, ECU will land the biggest
victory in this schools history.
What is needed now more than
ever before is the support of the
Pirate faithful the diehard who
battles to the end of every game,
cheering on the Pirates, regard-
less of the score and not the way-
side weekend fan who looks for
the gates as soon as the Pirates fall
behind and who seeks to criticize
the efforts of the Athletic Office,
the coaching staff, and the team
itself. A new attitude needs to
grow at East Carolina . . . one of
pride, determination, and enthu-
siasm. Given a chance, ECU will
prevail. But short-term losses
must be endured in order to en-
sure long-term success.
Let us start the tradition now,
not next year. Turn out in force for
the pep-rally tonight (Thursday)
at Ficklen Stadium and for the
game on Saturday against West
Virginia. Show your pride, deter-
mination, and enthusiasm for
East Carolina Universitv. Let it be
known that this school will not
roll over and die.
East Carolina
Playhouse
0
presents
cro
Os!
t
A Colorful, Family Show"
TIME Magainc
October 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10
in
McGinnis Theatre
at
8:15 pm
General Public: $10.00
ECU Students: 6.00
CALL: 757-6390
ECU Lacrosse team competes in Oceanfest
Special to the Fast Carolinian
The East Carolina Lacrosse
Club traveled to Wilmington last
weekend for the First Annual
Oceanfest Lacrosse Tournament.
Four teams � Fort Bragg, N.C.
State, Piedmont and ECU � were
scheduled to compete in the tour-
nament, which took place Octo-
ber 1 and 2.
Saturday, the Pirates beat the
NCSU club in the playoffs 11-6.
First half scorers were Jeff
Cartlcdge with two goals, as-
sisted bv Ken McKenna and lay
Black, Kelly Hoyt, Pete Gibbs,
Drew Bourque, assisted by Jeff
Cartlcdge, and Ken McKenna,
and Jay Black with an assist by
Pete Gibbs. In the second half
N.C. State's defense improved,
and the Tirates only had four
goals. Pete Gibbs scored twice,
Jeff Cartledge was assisted by Jay
Black, and Jay Black was assisted
by Derrick McWilliams.
Sunday morning the club was
defeated in the championship by
the Piedmont Club, 12-1. The
single goal was scored in the first
quarter by Ken McKenna, who
was assisted by Drew Bourque.
Although defeated, the team
as a whole played extremely well
in the tournament. Pirate defense
was strong, and ECU goalie Jamie
Young received the Most Valu-
able Defensive Player Award-
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Prices effective Wednesday, October 5 -






18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6, 1988
Fearless Football Forecast
West Virginia at ECU
Michigan State at Michigan
Clemson at Virginia
Texas at Oklahoma
Oregon at USC
Notre Dame at Pitt
UNC at Wake Forest
Auburn at LSU
Ga. Tech at Maryland
Navy at Air Force
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week - (8-2)
Overall - (30-18)
West Virginia
Michigan
Clemson
Oklahoma
USC
Notre Dame
UNC
Auburn
Maryland
Air Force
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week - (8-2)
Overall (32-17)
ECU
Michigan
Clemson
Oklahoma
USC
Notre Dame
Wake Forest
LSU
Maryland
Air Force
DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Last Week - (7-3)
Overall - (32-17)
West Virginia
Michigan
Clemson
Oklahoma
USC
Notre Dame
Wake Forest
LSU
Maryland
Air Force
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week - (6-4)
Overall - (31-20)
ECU
Michigan
Clemson
Oklahoma
USC
Notre Dame
Wake Forest
Auburn
Ga. Tech
Air Force
CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
Last Week - (9-1)
Overall - (34-15)
West Virginia
Michigan
Clemson
Oklahoma
USC
Notre Dame
Wake Forest
Auburn
Maryland
Air Force
EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week - (9-1)
Overall - (33-16)
West Virginia
Michigan State
Clemson
Oklahoma
USC
Notre Dame
Wake Forest
LSU
Maryland
Air Force
ECU Irates win in Wilmington tourney
By GARY HURLEY
Staff Writer
East Carolina's Irates re-
turned from Wilmington, N.C.
champions of the Ultimate Fall
Fling held on October 1 and 2.
Hard running and a strong show-
ing from East Carolina's rookies
enabled them to come from be-
hind and defeat Wilmington's
crunch, 15-12, in front of their
home team crowd.
Eight men's teams and two
women's teams from around the
mid-atlantic region entered the
tournament. The women's teams,
East Carolina's Helios and
Wilmington's No Conflicks,
played three games over the
weekend. No Conflicks won the
contest. Helios was at a disadvan-
tage lacking a coach, but have
since found one in Randy Allen.
On the opening day, the Irates
handilv defeated Duke and the
both teams advanced through
their quarterfinal and semifinal
matches on Sunday. The two rival
teams would meet in the finals.
Wilmington scored first and
led through most of the game. The
Irates only managed to even the
score at times. Wilmington was
leading 11-9 until a late game rally
Univcrsitv of Virginia. Pit Bulls by EastCarolina finished them 15-
on Crack, a Washington D.C. 12.
based team, also lost to the Irates
bv a score of 15-9.
After the first day, the only
two undefeated teams were
Wilmington's Crunch and East
C olina's Irates. As expected,
The win was an important
one. The Irates had lost in the fi-
nals of their first tournament in
the fall season. Chain Lightning, a
veteran team out of Atlanta, de-
feated the Irates 17-9 at the Char-
lotte Ultimatum. Chain Lightning
led the Irates at the half 9-7. They
dominated the second half, scor-
ing 8 points to East Carolina's 2.
East Carolina now looks
ahead to Open Sectionals in
Richmond and Open Regionals in
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The
team's goal is to improve upon
their 1988 showing in Collegiate
Nationals, Ultimate's equivalent
to the NCAA tournament in bas-
ketball. The team tied for fifth
place in a field of 12 teams from
around the country.
The East Carolinian
West Coast dominates field
(AP) � No, that's not a mis-
print in the Pac-10 standings.
Yes, UCLA is 4-0 overall and
ranked No. 2 in the nation.
Yes, Southern Cal is 4 0 and
ranked No. 3 in the nation.
Yes, the West Coast is drool-
ing over the prospect of their Nov.
19 showdown.
But wait. Oregon is 4-it. too,
and ranked No. 18.
This is not uncharted terri-
tory for the Ducks. They are in the
Top Twenty for the second week
in a row and they also made it
once last year (No. 16) when a 34-
27 victory over eventual Pac-10
champion Southern Cal gave
them a 4-1 record before a four-
game losing streak did them in en
route to a 6-5 finish.
But before that, you have to
go back all the way to 1970 to find
Oregon in The Associated Press
rankings. And the last time the
Ducks appeared in a final AP poll
was 1965.
"Our followers and fans and
students have kind of accepted
that last year was not a fluke
thing says Coach Rick Brooks,
who inherited a string of six
straight losing seasons when he
took over in 1977. "We estab-
lished that we were a good foot-
ball team a year ago. This team is
for real and won't fade away
Oregon's six-game winning
streak is the longest in the Pac-10
and the school's longest since the
1964 team won its first six games
after the 1963 club finished with
four straight victories.
Not many people think the
Ducks can make it 5-0. Saturdav
finds them a 15-point underdog at
Southern Cal. Oregon isn't a
household word when it comes to
the Top Twenty and the Ducks
probably will be without quarter-
back Bill Musgrave.
Brooks pretty much summed
it up last winter at the NCAA's
annual College Football Preview
in Kansas City when he spoke
right after Coach of the Year Dick
MacPherson of Syracuse got
through entertaining the troops
and quipped, "This is kind of like
Twiggy following Dolly Parton
Oregon hasn't exactly played
creampuffs to get to 4-0. The
Ducks handed Washington State
� a team that has trounced Illi-
nois, Minnesota and Tennessee
on the road - - its only setback, 43-
28, and beat Stanford by four
points, just like Southern Cal did.
Brooks says Oregon's pro-
gram has come "light years" from
when he arrived.
"There quality in our pro-
gram as far as taleni, depth and
credibility he says. "We're a
very good football team. What
we're trying to do now is take the
step from a good team, which
we've been the last four-five-six
years. We've been a respectable
team, and if we're able to win on
the road against USC, it would
put us in the upper echelon.
"It's pretty hard not to be
happy being4-0 at this stageof the
season. USC has the psychologi-
cal advantage with their 100-year be ready to play, and I believe
centennial celebration. We beat we'll be ready to play them
thorn last vcar, so they're going to
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STYLISTS
Beth Long
Pam Freedman
Linda Jones
Tina Getsmger
Ricky Narron
Lisa Bisseli Whitehurst
Melody Furci
Linda Murrell
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP AND NEWLY REMODELED
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Every Thursday
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Free Admission
All Night
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$2 For 2nd, 3rd, & 4th
plus you keep the Mason Jar
Free non-alcoholic drinks for
designated drivers.
Must be 21 to enter and have valid I.D.
High Energy Music provided by Connie
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203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
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IRSu
(IRS) - The Department of In
tramural-Recroational Sports
introduced another unusual -
activity to the1
gram. The sport, under
hockey wa� original!) h
tfucedasafun wa
pit year round. Hov
has caught on qui �
oped into an inten it
tional and competiti
The game is pla
the width ofapo Normal! I
game 1- play i ii
match Mui deep u
fins, snorkt I and i I
shaped stick as th i
pushing a plastic
puck along th I ��
A team consist i f si
for recreationa
theplayersan .
female mixed i I
mal positions
worked out a.
ponents method i
players remain und -
long as the)
passing the j
an eft ort I
ing the pu k I
team -
From the surl .
hockey is not much i
sport � unles
seen a spi rf
feeding fi
view this sport is 1
and viev the a
it is tali
involved in it
Game - u
Friday i n
through v
of the club ar
and your
Be sure to hi
and snorkel
lungs even th
be better
For .
free to c
Tuesdays n
6905 or Pati
Knowles al
The rail inti
bash was held recent
Got'Iscum u ith I
suits BadminU n
huge success featui
star lung 5 mi-final
very competiti e fir
Volleyball pick
most valuable
By CAROLYN Ii
S
East Car
coach ud Kirk
named Debl
Maclntosl as
week for I k
througl
Tate a
from Arcadia I
the offensive .
Tate earned
performance
along with ha ing s
aces. 56 digs, 1 � -
and tour ble. -
"Debbie has beer
our games V i k
.count on her it
to her. She is all
cred from hei pre-s
and it we can keep her h
she will definite!) K a -
succeeding this yeai
Kirk pa trick
Macintosh, als a
side hitter fi
Was selected as the d
blayer-of-the veek. Ma
finished the -
kills one service
one Mock ass
Michelle was sup i oi
sides ol the ball this vend
said Kirkpahrick On defens
she seemed to be t er where th
ball was She was coming out
nowhere and making things haj
pen for us





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6, 1988 19
. . I HAMPTON
Features Editor
last Week(-l)
Overall(33-16)
West Virginia
Michigan State
Clemson
Oklahoma
Notre Pame
ake Forot
Maryland
Air 1 orce
rolinian
STYLISTS
da Jones
.
tehurst
NEWLY REMODELED
� Perms
I .axmg
en;
1706
a hit
3112
lesnii iorfj
0978
a hit virtually
�- �� sAi gelesto
. �ks baseball
lum � g at :u after.
pa : r just about
ill want
Mow to get
the (.ard now
efl u the firs
. cess nii
k t e believe in your
ntia ���� ideii easier for
� get the
� .mi riftht
' i nib or a
ther you're n
:�r i �� senior or
� � look into
approval
ifc ids up an
imp is or call
��� and ask for a
n plication
� Express (lard
�l Without It
" hmrn ftJtl Ke irei yv,cf i'omp�m t�
IRS unmasks new activities
A
(IRS) -The Department of In-
tramural-Recreational Sports has
introduced another unusual sport
activity to the Club Sports Pro
gram. The sport, underwater
hockey, was originally intro-
duced as a tun way to keep divers
fit year round. However, the sport
has caught on quickly and devel-
oped into an international recrea-
tional and competitive activity.
The game is played utilizing
the width of a pool Normally, the
game is played in water approxi-
mately 8 feet deep using a mask,
fins snorkel and a foot long "Y"
shaped stick as the medium for
pushing a plastic coated lead
puck along the bottom ot the pool.
� team consist ot six players.
For recreational purposes,
the players are generally male and
female mixed. Fhere are no for-
mal positions, and strategy is
rked out according to the op-
ponents method of play. The
ilayers remain under water as
ong as they can pushing and
issing the puck to each other in
in effort to sc re a goal bv advanc-
ing the puck to the opposite
team's goal h1 wall).
From the surface, underw ater
hockey is not much of a spectator
-port unless you have never
seen a sport similar to sharks in a
feeding frenzy! The best way to
view this sport is to put on a mask
and view the activity from where
it is taking place, or better yet, get
involved in it.
Games are generally held on
Friday evenings trom 7p.m.
through 8:30 p.m. New members
of the club are always welcome
and your stick will be provided.
Be sure to brine your mask, fins
and snorkel and a pair oi good
lungs � even though gills would
be better.
For more information feel
tree to contact Lynn Hams on
Tuesdays and ITiursday at 77-
905 or Patrick HarrisDave
knowles at 757-6515.
The tall intramural birdy
basn was held recently in Mingcs
Coiseum with the following re-
sults. Badminton singles was a
huge success, featuring six out-
star ling semi-final matches and
very ompetitive final games.
In the men's open division,
Gary Tilgham from Garrett Hall
smashed his way into the record
books by defeating Tote Clemens
oi LX'lta Sigma in a three game
match. Tho match featured nu-
merous long rallies, and power
slams finishing up with a five
point tie breaker.
In the men's intermediate
competition, Leslie White of Pi
Kappa Alpha triumphed over
Tripp Roakes from fraternity
fame Sig Fp in another 'dovvn-to-
the-wire' affair.
On the women's side of the
net, prognosticate: lma Reek's
favorite, lma Reek fell to the slams
and passing shots of ECU shot
putter Sarah Hickingbotham.
Sarah captured the gold rather
handily however, insiders claim
that Reeks Ribs weren't well.
EXCUSES EXCUSES
Intramural flag football
heads into its final week of com-
petition as playoffs begin this
week. Regular season top pricks
include:
Men's Independent A
1. Funk Brothers
2. Highste'bpers
3. Fried City Gang
4. Scott Sides wipers
5. Scott SOB-C 1 furricanes
Fraternity Division
1. Lambda Chi Alpha
2. Pi Kappa Alpha
3. Sig Fp B
4. Tau Kappa Epsilon
5. The la Chi
Co-Rec Softball Standings
1. Oakmont
2. Silent Attack
3. The Litewaits
4. The Educators
5. Damn Yankees
Men's Independent B
LBelkDPI
2. Aycock 4th
3. Longshots
Women's Division
1. The Scrags
2. The Enforcers
3. Zeta Tau Alpha
4. Silent Attack
5. Silver Bullet
ECU
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Volleyball picks
most valuable
By CAROLYN J l SLICE
Mjff Writer
last Carolina volleyball
coach udy Kirkpatrick has
n uned Debbie Tate and Michelle
Macintosh as the players-of-the-
week for the week oi October 3
through October 8.
late, a junior outside hitter
from Arcadia. IF, was selected as
the offensive player-of the-week.
Tate earned a 22 percent hitting
performance in last week's play,
along with having seven service
aces, 56 digs, three block solos,
and four block assists.
"Debbie has been a big key in
our games. We know that we can
(ount on her it we can got the ball
to her. She is almost fully recov-
ered from her preseason injury
and if we can keep her healthy,
she will definitely be a key to us
succeeding this year said
Kirkpatrick.
Macintosh, also a junior out-
side hitter from Morehead City,
was selected as the defensive
plaver-of-the week. Macintosh
finished the week's play with 19
kills, one service ace, 52 digs, and
one block assists.
"Michelle was super on both
sides of the ball this weekend
said Kirkpatrick. "On defense,
she seemed to be everywhere the
ball was. She was coming out oi
nowhere and making things hap-
pen for us
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� Blueprinting (the only service in town)
� Oversized Copies (up to 36" wide)
� Lamination (great for posters & important documents)
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
Located next to Chtcos
in the Georgetown Shops
758-2400
Flowers
Order
E.C.U.
Homecoming
Corsages
Early!
Call Day
or Night
757-1892
3010 A. East 10th St.
Greenville
CAUTION!
Skiing can be habit forming
It's ski fever, and it's very
contagious. We're ready to help
you combat it with the latest
ski fashions and equipment
20 OFF SELECTED APPAREL.
GORDONS
GOLF & SKI
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
Hours: M-F 10-6Sat. 9-6
Homecoming
&
Subway
A
Winning
Combination
ONLY 3 DAYS
LEFT!
Come By After Homecoming
Biggest Fair East of Raleigh
College Student Admitted
Tonite For $1.50 with I.D.
Pitt County Fair
Hwy 264 East
Greenville
SOMETWt
f
FROM SUBWAY
Buy One Sub Get
Another For 99 $
(With purchase of Medium Drinks)
Offer Expires Oct 31 1988






V
20 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6,1988
" ' nquna
�0$W
�-
IXZCL
GUARANTEE
Using the freshest ingredi-
ents, we are proud to stand
behind what we sell. If you
are not completely satisfied
with one our products, sim-
ply return it. We will gladly
either replace it or refund
your money.
"America's Best
We guarantee it
30 MINUTE
Delivery
$3.00 OFF
Limited Area
TAILGATE WITH A PURPLE PIRATE SPECIAL!
LARGE 2 ITEM PIZZA AND A TRIPLE
ORDER OF BUFFALO WINGS
ONLY
$12.55
M
u
EXPIRES 10-9-88
$1 Slices Of
Pepperoni Pizza From 12 Midnight
Until 3 a.m. every
Friday and Saturday Night!
Call Ahead
For Early
Pickup For
Tailgatin?'
DOUGHBOY
VALUE PAK
6 lbs. Buffalo Wings
$11.05
Expires 10-16-88
2 LARGE 14 INCH DELUXE
PIZZAS & 2 LITERS OF
PEPSI
INCLUDES PEPPERONI. SUASAOE. MUSHROOMS
GREEN PEPPERS AND ONIONS
$13.65
Expires 10-16-88
PIZZA PARTY
SPECIAL 3 LARGE
3 ITEM PIZZAS
$16.95
Expires 10-16-88
1 LARGE 14 INCH PIZZAS
WITH ONE ITEM OF YOUR
CHOICE
$4.95
One Pizza - Pick-up Only
Order Over $7.00 Delivery
Expires 10-16-88
2 WHOLE SUBS &
1 LITER PEPSI
$8.95
Expires 10-16-88
2 14 INCH 1 ITEM
PIZZAS & 1 LITER
PEPSI
$9.99
Expires 10-16-88
$1 OFF
ANY PICKUP ORDER!
Expires 10-16-88
LUNCH SPEICAL
11 AM-3 PM
9 INCH 2 ITEM PIZZA & 1 LITER
PEPSI
$5.30
Expires 10-16-88
Hours:
SunThurs. 11:00 a.m1:00 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 11:00 a.m3:00 a.m.
830-9400
1011 S. Charles St.
Greenville, NC
he Driivi
FRFF Hr IIVPRY � 1-KI I
Kl Pt I 1 I in � FRfcF DFLIVHRY � FRFF DFLIVFRY � FRkF





Title
The East Carolinian, October 6, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 06, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.631
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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