The East Carolinian, October 4, 1988






Coming Thursday:
SGA committee heads lay down the platforms for the
fall 88 semester.
Features:
Sneak preview at Mendenhall of the new Tom Hanks
md Sally Field movie, "Punchline" see page 11.
���� '� � �
Sports:
A 36-48 victory for the Ragin' Cajuns drop the Pirates
averall record to 1-4, see page 16.
L
She lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 24
Tuesday October 4,1988
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
After 17 years and two colonies,Theta Chi
is rechartered and back on campus
By JOE HARRIS
Newt Editor
After 17 years of dormancy,
the Theta Chi Fraternity has re-
appeared on campus as the new-
est chartered Greek organization.
On Saturday, with the help of
14 other Theta Chi chapters, some
from as far away as Ohio State, the
Epsilon Iota chapter went
through the installation cere-
mony and received its' charter.
With its' new charter, the fra-
ternity has dropped the "colony"
status and is nationally recog-
nized. "Because we're chartered,
we'll be able to vote on things that
effect Theta Chi on the national
level, it really is important to us
said Chris Ffautz, president.
The fraternity, originally
founded in 1958, was one of the
first Greek organizations on the
ECU campus. In 1971, because of
disciplinary reasons, Theta Chi
had its charter revoked and did
not surface until 1984.
The 1984 attempt to re-
colonize failed because of low
membership. Ffautz said, "There
was only one brother, Bryan Las-
siter, he tried to keep it going, but
it was too much work for one
person
A third try to colonize in the
"Theta Chi is
back and here
to stay'
spring of 1986 was successful.
This time a sizable group was
taken to N.C. State and initiated.
With the newfound interest, the
workings of the fraternity began.
A regional counselor was
assigned to watch over the devel-
M
opments of the colony. "We had
to start keeping books, watching
over the grades of the members,
getting letters of recommenda-
tion from other fraternities and
prove that we were financially
stable. All these things were nec-
essary for us to even think about
signing a petition for our charter
said Ffautz.
Last spring, Steve Layman
filed the petition at the Theta Chi
national headquarters to obtain
the charter and was successful.
Now Theta Chi has 42 active
brothers.
"I feel like we're on our way
up. We're stronger as a fraternity
and getting more recognition on
campus. Also, we're looking into
buying a house on Pitt Street �
the same place we held this year's
rush and where some of the broth-
ers already live. I would have to
sav Theta Chi is back and here to
stav said Ffautz.
Brody Scholars Program names five scholarship recipients
FCU Vews Bureau
Five students in the first-year
class at the East Carolina Univer-
sity School of Medicine are recipi-
ents of annual scholarships and
fellowships awarded through the
Brody Scholars Frogram.
Established five years ago by
the Brody family of Kinston and
Greenville, the program annually
provides academic awards for
students demonstrating exem-
plary academic performance and
leadership skills.
The program's largest stipend,
a $7,500 � per-year-scholarship,
is awarded to the student chosen
as the Brody Scholar. The scholar-
ship recipient is selected based on
high academic performance,
demonstrated leadership poten-
tial, and personal interview
evaluations.
Charles David Finley of Char-
lotte has been named this year's
Brody Scholar. An honors gradu-
ate of the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, he is the
son of Robert and Jane Finley,
1601 E. Crest Drive, Charlotte.
Four fellowships, each carrying
a $2,000 annual award over the
next four years, are also presented
to students with exemplary aca-
demic records.
� uM�w&�
.� "5


'�.

A cup chain turned to a cup fig and then some fans resorted to bottle throwing. ECU Police re-
ported a few fans had to be esct I out of the stadium (Photo By Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab).
Legislators disappointed in fan behavoir at game
By MICHAEL BARTLETT
Staff Writer
Speaker of the House Marty
Helms appointed the committee
chairs for the 1988-89 school year
at the SGA's weekly meeting
Monday.
This year's chairpersons are.
Susan Cooperman, Appropria-
tions; Bob Landry, Rules and
Judiciary; Lee Toler, Student
Welfare; and Terry Hindle,
Screenings and Appointments.
During the opening discus-
sion, Legislator Bob Landry ex-
pressed his disapproval of fan
behavior at Saturday's ECU
game. Legislator Karen Smith, a
member of the Marching Pirates,
voiced her distaste for the inci-
dent.
"They work hard every week
for the halftime show and stu-
dents booing makes it seem any-
thing but worthwhile said
Smith.
Landry later presented a
constitution for the Overseas De-
velopment Network. He said the
Tailgating activities prior to Saturday's ECU Southwest Louisiana football game was enjoyed by
many (Photo By Gretchen Journigan, ECU Photolab).
Enrollment in N.C. colleges up for
men, women and minorities
the comparable amount charged and private colleges increased 30
by most other states. percent, from 240,936 to 312,503.
RALEIGH (AF) - An increase
of 5,000 students most of them
from the Tar Heel state in the
enrollment in the University of
North Carolina system reflects
UNC commitment to provide
more state residents with the
chance to go to college, a UNC
official said.
Last year, the UNC system
enrolled 131,913 students. While
Dawson told The News and
Observer of Raleigh that the per-
centage of North Carolina resi-
dents who attend colleges also
had increased dramatically in the
past decade.
N.C. State University en-
rolled 1,216 new students. With a
student body of 25,537, NCSU
final figures will not be available remains the largest university in
the state.
Enrollment at the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
the state's second largest univer-
sity, is up 804 students, to 23,579.
Of the 15,691 undergraduates
enrolled at UNC-CH this fall,
until late October, enrollment at
UNC campuses this fall is ex-
pected to surpass 137,000 - an
increase of about 4 percent.
Raymond H. Dawson, UNC
senior vice president for aca-
demic affairs, said enrollment
growth probably can be traced to 9,236 or 59 percent - are female,
the larger class of high school Each year since 1975, the flagship
students that graduated from campus has admitted more
North Carolina high schools last women than men, and has main-
spring, tained an average female-to-male
In 1987, the state's public ratio in recent years of about 60-
schools graduated 66,045 stu- 40.
dents. While the final count won't The most dramatic growth in
be available from state officials for terms of percentage was at UNC-
several weeks, the 1988 graduat- Charlotte, where enrollment in-
ing class is expected to show an creased 7.8 percent from 12,031
increase of more than 3,000 stu- to 12,970.
dents. East Carolina University in
Dawson attributed part of the Greenville remains the state's
university enrollment growth to third largest public university,
the state's policy of keeping tui- with a student body of 15,579 - a
tion as low as possible for North 4.7 percent increase over last year.
Carolina residents. State resi- From 1976 to 1986, enroll-
dents pay $504 a year in tuition to ment at North Carolina's commu-
attend UNC-CH far less than nity colleges, public univesities
pei
According to the Chronicle of
Higher Education that places
North Carolina sixth in the nation
in terms of college enrollment
growth.
Gary T. Barnes, UNC associ-
ate vice president for planning,
said that in the past, the number of
North Carolinians who have gone
to college has been less than in
most other states.
According to 1986 figures, 58
percent of the nation's high school
graduates enrolled in some form
of higher education, Dawson
said. That compares to a college-
going rate in North Carolina of
about 51 percent, he said.
Dawson said certain seg-
ments of the population, such as
women and blacks, are going to
college in much greater numbers
todav than they were a decade
ago
"The black going-rate is up
from 16 percent in 1980 to better
than 21 percent last year he said.
The number of women at-
tending North Carolina colleges
and universities increased by 54
percent in the past decade, from
111,465 in 1976 to 171,366 in 1986.
During the same period, the
number of men enrolled in North
Carolina colleges increased only 9
percent.
"They work hard every
week
for the halftime show
and students booing
makes it seem anything
but worthwhile"
network strives to make students
aware of the problems of global
poverty. The constitution passed
by consent.
Legislator Allen Manning
brought a yearly appropriation
bill for the ECU Accounting Soci-
ety of $510 to the floor.
The East Carolina Honors
Organization had its annual
budget of $650 approved. Legis-
lator Russel Lowe stated that the
majority of the money will be
spent for guest speakers.
The final piece of old business
was an annual appropriation of
$500 to the ECU Biology Club.
Notices and annoucements
began with Chairman of the
Screenings and Appointments
Committee Terry Hindle express-
ing some of his goals for the up-
coming year.
"Its' the goal of this year's
committee to keep a full legisla-
tive body said Hindle.
The meeting ended with the
legislators being sworn in by At-
torney General Alice Hardin.
The SGA meets every Mon-
day at 5 p.m. and it is open to all
students.
The SGA in full swing. Though the legislature looks full, there are some vacancies need to be filled
(Photo By Jeff Whigtmeyer, ECU Photolab).






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4, 1988
Marquette University adopts preaching ban
ICPS) � Angered by what they
call unethical Church of Christ re-
cruiting methods, Marquette
University officials have banned
all religious groups from prosely-
tizing on the Catholic campus.
The new policy is apparently
the first ban on preaching by any
Catholic college in the U.S. Uni-
versity officials say the Milwau-
kee Church of Christ uses "ma-
nipulation and "harassment" to
convert students to the faith, de-
scribed by one member as a self-
governing "bible-believing
church
"Their tactics are manipulative
by targeting vulnerable people
and pressuring them so it is diffi-
cult to make a free choice said
the Rev. David Haschka, director
of Marquette's Campus Ministry.
Although Marquette is a Catho-
lic school, it does not attempt to
convert its students to Catholi-
cism. Under the new policy,
Haschka said, no one � "not even
the Catholic church" � may
proselytize.
A handful of preachers regu-
larly travels across the country to
visit public campuses. While
many students find the preachers,
who seek attention by verbally
assaulting passersby, obnoxious
and disruptive, campus officials
sometimes are reluctant to ban
them for fear of lawsuits charging
them with violating the evangel-
ists' constitutional rights to free-
dom of speech and religion.
Still, some schools have taken
action.
Two University of Arizona stu-
dents, for example, organized a
drive to limit the preachers to a
"speakers comer" on campus last
fall. And in 1984, the University of
Virginia � after a volley of threat-
ened lawsuits � limited preach-
ers to certain days, hours and
areas of the campus.
Private Catholic schools like
Marquette aren't required to let
such preachers on campus. Bar-
bara Kcebler of the National
Catholic Education Association,
however, reports she's unaware
of other Catholic schools adopt-
ing similar policies.
"We don't have that problem
said Seton Hall University
spokeswoman Jane Dcganan of
campus preachers "I'm i �
aware of any groups that h i
come on campus to proselytize "
Seton r tall, she said, doesn I
to convert its non-Catholic stu-
dents, which make up 16 p
of the student body.
Milwaukee Church of Christ
officials told the Marquette Trib-
une, the campus newpaper, that
thev won't back down because
the ban
Discovery returns home safely
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
(AP) � Discovery's five astro-
nauts headed back to Earth today
alter a remarkably smooth four-
day flight that kept their pledge to
the Challenger crew and "re-
sumed the journey" of Americans
into space.
The shuttle travelers were on
course to ignite re-en try rockets
for a fiery hourlong dash through
the atmosphere. Touchdown was
scheduled for 12:37p.m. EDTona
drv lakebed at Edwards Air Force
Base in California's Mojave Des-
ert.
Thousands of people were
already gathered in the desert
Sunday to cheer their dramatic
arrival, and Vice President
George Bush was expected to
greet them. The weather looked
tine for a landing.
Commander Frederick H.
1 lauck and his crew were coming
home from the first shuttle flight
since the Challenger explosion of
Ian. 28,198o, and on Sunday they
poignantly remembered the five
men and two women who died in
that tragedy.
In an emotional message
which they took turns reading,
1 lauck pilot Richard 0. Covey,
n issi n -pe.ialist George D. Nel-
son, lohn M. Lounge and DavidC.
Hilmers eulogized their fallen
comrades as "fellow sojourners"
and friends and expressed "rever-
ence for those whose sacrifice
made our journey possible
"At this moment, our place in
the heavens makes us feel closer
to them than ever before Nelson
said as the television screen
showed the tail of Discovery sil-
houetted against a striking view
of Earth 184 miles below.
"Lest we ever forgetthat to
ascend to this seeming tranquil
sea will always be fraught with
danger, let us remember the Chal-
lenger crew whose voyage was so
tragically short said Covey.
'Today, up here where the
blje sky turns to black said
Hauck, "we can say at long last to
Dick, Mike, Judy, to Ron and El,
and to continue for you. Dear
friends, your loss has meant that
we could confidently begin anew.
Dear friends, your spirit and your
dreams are still alive in our
heart
The seven who died aboard
Challenger were Richard Scobee,
Michael Smith, Judith Resnik,
Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka,
Gregory Jarvis and schoolteacher
Christa McAuliffe.
Following the memorial,
Discovery's astronauts held a 20-
minute news conference from
space while gathered in the mid-
deck in front of a photograph of
the Challenger crew.
"It's good to be back to where
they wanted to go so badly
Lounge commented.
Replying to questions from
reporters at the Johnson Space
Center in Houston, the crew ex-
pressed pleasure over
Discovery's performance and the
results of the mission, during
which they released a $100 mil-
lion communications satellite
from the cargo bay and conducted
a dozen science and technology
experiments.
Hauck had said before the
Oight that because more than 200
modifications had been made,
flying Discovery would be like
testing a new spacecraft. He said
then heexpected some equipment
surprises, but reported Sunday
"the machine worked superbly
with only a few minor glitches.
He said, however, there
would be a discussion "with the
folks on the ground" about the
bulky, uncomfortable spacesuits
the astronauts have to wear on
liftoff and landing to take advan
tage of a new escape system.
The experiments were wide-
ranging, from growing crystals in
weightlessness to testing a laser
beam communications system.
Nelson said all "exceeded my
expectations in the way they have
run
Lounge was asked what he
would say to the two presidential
candidates to convince them to
support the space program. He
answered this way:
"This is a very important
flight simply because it's the first
step. I would hope that all of the
enthusiasm that we've seen
throughout the country for this
Hight is sustained for the dozens
and dozens of flights we have
ahead of us if we're going to make
this program grow to the point
that it needs to grow to to get us on
the path to the future
The shuttle redesign follow-
ing Challenger focused on the
solid-fue booster rockets that
caused theaccident. But extensive
modifications also were made to
the orbiting vehicle, the main
engines and the external fuel tank
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meyman
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankensh
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate S4 "
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50
200-299 col. inches$4.40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00
Two Color and black$155.00
di
5 Insertions -11 I 54
1225) 54
10 Insertions r-i $4
(12251 $4
15 Insertion- I S4
(12-25") $4
20 Insertions (4 -11 i $4
(12 -25 I $4
25 Inserttions 4ii") . $4
(12 25 $4
45
1
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
CROP walk coming to Greenville
The CROP walk, an event
aimed to raise money and interest
on the issue of world hunger, will
take place in Greenville on Nov. 6.
This is a 10 kilometer walk (6
milesi where paticipants are paid
for every kilometer they walk by
sponsors
Marianne Exum, chairperson
of this year's walk, said they want
to raise interest about the event,
not only in Greenville but on the
campus of ECU.
"We want to promote compe-
tition between campus organiza-
tions. By doing this we feel par-
ticipation in the walk itself, and
interest in the hunger problem
will be up said Exum.
She said prizes will be
awarded to the organization
which has the most participation
and also to those who raise the
most money.
Individuals are also encour-
aged to participate. "We are not
necessarily looking for only
group participation said Exum.
Anyone or group interested
in the CROP walk is encouraged
to attend a meeting Thursday
night, 7 p.m room 244 in the
Mendenhall Student Center.
ECU
in �
Kill '
PECIAI
�ei� G� �
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Big K
Soft Drinks
2$ 4 99
ns n lg
12-Oz
WEDNESDAY I
Sigma Sigma Sigma
All Campus Male
Strip-Off
1st $100.00
2nd $50.00
3rd $25.00
Drink Specials All Night!
Admission: $1.00 Members
$2.00 Guests
Ladies Only Til 10:30
Doors Open at 8:30
If interested - Sign-up on
Wednesday at the Elbo
8:30-9:00.You can also
sign-up in front of the
Student Store!
PAPER
Hi-Dri
Towels
Jumbo
Rolls
$1
LIGHT N LIVELY
Cottage
Cheese.
24
Oz.
Cup
$109
AVONDALE
French
Fries
Lb.
Bag
LMMIT 1 WITH S10 ADD L PURCHASE
miBiummmsiiimm
1,000 TITLES TO CHOOSE FROM
Movie QQO
Rentals55J Peroay
MULTIPLE COPIES OF NEW RELEASES
New 1 99
Releases . . � �
per Day
New Mail Boxes
Available at our in
Store Post Office.
U Itl'l
I Mil II SI II I s
POST
OFFICE�
MHV lit I
II III Oil
Sill ItlllV
It: :t�� 12:34
At Kroger
your
pharmacist
flits your
prescription
while you
fill your
shopping list
� jdflfet. Items and Pricei
f m m m Sun. October 2,
� I 1 � 'at. October 8, 1
KroaerXavon
Items and Prices Effective
1988 thru
1988
� H B H Copyright
�S K L BM Krog.r ta�
r SsHS WaWfa vv'S
O"
MaMs H.�.fv.d
d fa OII
' � 4 � �-�- ,
� - n � � .� , ,
; K i�w �- . r .
"� ' � �-�? �� � � � � - ,
f f 0 '�
� - - . ��
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Cree
nville I
Auth
si-
authorities more thai
unravel the mysti � �
pies it Uast 75 of I
crammed in
h( vi. pine woods hit'
st . "
tains
When � lid :l
behind it t
1 doj
search in N

in their Si
I n I

-
"
� : �
d �
and
Deparl

Moi

w hat it
Gre i
see that I
COU! '
� r
anin

s to ht
I
spective Y
the count -
ordeal, had pi -
this year.
Eastc
"A Colt
October
i
Gt
ECl si
CAI
; 5oc off
' Ex
I
, One discount
I OSa






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4.1988 3
ban
preachers "I'm not
any groups that have
campus to proselytize
all, she said doesn't try
rt its non Catholic stu-
make up 16 percent
tudent bod
I lurch ot Chnst
e Marquette Tnb-
,s rtewpaper, that
k dovk n because of
linian
andi
hip
MNG
i Rate4 75
r( acts)
S4 55
f4 50
r$4.50
54 4?
r - �54 43
54 4,1
r54 40
4 j 5
� .A
S4.20
URS:
lay
.m.
Cwp11
v i
L
�in.
3
$
Lb
Bo�
59

'e"L'
4$ "e
A I Kroger,
y J r
har maclst
If 111 s your
f escription
hile you
11.11 your
topping 1 ist
fURS EVERYDAY
Blvd - Gree
DAYJ
nville J
Authorities find 75 puppies
Clip-N-Save
SrARTA,N.C. (AP) �It took
authorities more than a month to
unravel the mystery of the pup-
pies at least 75 of them �
crammed in cages and left in the
heavy pine woods high in the
steep Alleghany County moun-
tains.
When they did, they found
behind it two teen-agers � one
whose family sold dogs for re-
search in New lersey, but moved
to North Carolina after surrender-
ing their license while being in-
vestigated. The other was a friend
who came from the same town in
New Jersey.
County, state and federal offi-
cials are investigating how the
teen-agers got the dogs and
whether they have been illegally
selling them. No charges have
been filed.
None of the dogs had records
of shots, and the owner surren-
dered them to the county last
week rather than pay to vaccinate
and house them according to legal
standards, said Al Eatmon, direc-
tor of animal welfare for the N.C.
Department of Agriculture and
the case's chief investigator.
Under county ordinances, the
dogs � most onlv months old �
are scheduled to be put to death
Monday if not adopted.
"I'd like to get it cleared up
and our dog problem back to
what it was Alleghany County
Manager Dan McMillan told the
Greensboro News & Record. "We
want to do everything we can to
see that they get good homes
McMillan said he will ask
county commissioners Monday
for an extension on holding the
animals, and officials also have
asked Watauga and other nearby
counties to help find homes for
the puppies. Five have been
adopted. Another five have pro-
spective homes.
It is an unusual problem for
the county, which has no animal
shelter and a part-time animal
control officer who, before the
ordeal, had picked up eight dogs
this year.
"We don't have a dog prob-
lem McMillan said.
But by the middle of August,
a problem had started. Residents
of the secluded neighborhood
nine miles from Sparta said they
heard constant barking from the
woods. Residents of summer cab-
ins complained they couldn't go
outside because of the noxious
smell.
When residents found the
dogs in a litter-strewn, boggy area
of the woods, they began watch-
ing the road that passes by their
homes, said Geraldine Bennett.
"First thing I knowed, they
were going in with dogs, going in
with dogs and going in with
dogs she said. As the number
grew, some dogs would break
free and roam yards, eating the
neighbors' pet food.
Authorities watched the
cages for a month before tracing
them to Ronald Wayne McDow-
ell, 18.
McMillan said McDowell had
come to his office weeks earlier,
asking about requirements for
raising hunting dogs. The
county's only requirement is that
an owner not raise more than six
litters a year.
"He said he was just going
into the dog business Eatmon
said. "He said he hadn't sold any,
but had intentions of selling some
dogs for hunting, as pets, and
might even sell some to research
When Eatmon and investiga-
tors from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture went to the area
two weeks ago, they found 75
dogs in 14 cages in a 50-yard area.
The dogs were cramped, but
"were in good flesh and all, fat
and sassy and probably could
not be considered abused, he said.
"They were getting some-
thing to eat and water, or it ap-
peared they had Eatmon said.
"A puppy can't miss many
meals But at least oneof thedogs
was sick and was killed.
Officials say a down payment
on the land where the dogs were
kept was made earlier this year in
the name of 15-year-old Ruddy
Vrana, whose parents - Rudolf
and Helena Vrana � own and
operate High Meadows Inn, a
motel, lodge and restaurant about
three miles away.
McDowell, who like the
Vranas is originally from
Millville, N.J works at the inn.
Efforts to reach both teen-agers
last week were unsuccessful. Nei-
ther has a telephone listing, and
motel staff said they were not
there.
McDowell told authorities
that the Vranas were not con-
nected to the dogs.
"He took the heat for the
whole thing said McMillan. "Of
course, you don't necessarily
have to believe him
For more than 10 years before
coming to North Carolina, the
Vrana family operated Vrana Re-
search Animals in Millville, N.J
licensed to sell animals to re-
search laboratories, exhibitors
and dealers, according to Marlene
Stinson, a U.S. Department of
Agriculture spokeswoman.
In 1985 Mr.Stinson said the
Vranas were convicted in New
Jersey of violating the Animal
Welfare Act by selling animals
during a required five-day hold-
ing period, failing to provide vet-
erinary care and not having clean
and adequate shipping contain-
ers.
The Vranas were fined $3,00C
and had their license suspended
30 days.
In February 1988, the Vranas
were found in violation of a
Millville ordinance allowing
them to keep no more than 26
dogs. Investigators found 272
dogs on their property. Rudoll
and Helena Vrana were fined
$5,000 each and sentenced to 1C
days in jail.
Cynthia Stahl, a USDA inves-
tigator in Trenton, N.J said the
Vranas also are under a federal in-
vestigation and surrendered their
license that month. She declined
to reveal the focus of the investi-
gation.
But she said a daughter, Bar-
bara Vrana, was issued an animal
dealer license about the same
time. Her business, Blue Star As-
sociation, has the same address as
Vrana Research Animals.
FIcwses
Order E.C.U.
Homecoming
Corsages
Early!
Call Day Or Night!
757-1892
3010 A. East 10th St.
Greenville
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Clip-N-Save
Chileans vote on Pinochet
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) Af-
ter a flurry of rallies, arrests and
speeches in the streets, campaign-
ing was put on hold today while
Chileans prepared for a vote on
extending right-wing Gen. Au-
gusto Pinochet's presidency to
1997.
Police and some army troops
were out in force.
By law political campaigning
ended on midnight Sunday, after
a massive pro-Pinochet caravan
of cars, trucks and buses jammed
the capital's main boulevards and
groups of opposition sympathiz-
ers skirmished with riot police.
Dozens were arrested in the
skirmishes, according to prelimi-
nary police reports. Helmeted riot
officers used tear gas, water can-
nons and nightsticks to disperse
groups of Pinochet opponents on
the downtown streets.
At least 10 people were hurt,
two seriously, in isolated inci-
dents throughout the day includ-
ing brawls between government
supporters and opponents.
Hundreds of policemen pa-
trolled the streets and were joined
Sunday by small army units, most
of them manning machine guns
mounted on pickup trucks and
other vehicles.
The government has insisted
that it will keep strict order before
and during Wednesday's referen-
dum, in which the government is
asking Chileans to ratify a pro-
posal by Pinochet and other mili-
tary commanders that he remain
in power until 1997. The armed
forces has traditionally been
charged with guarding elections
in Chile, where the last presiden-
tial ballot was in 1970.
SHEAR
HAIR
DESIGN
INC.
STYLISTS
Beth Long
Pam Freedman
Linda Jones
Tina Getsmger
Ricky Narron
Lisa BisseSI Whitehurst
Melody Furci
Linda Murrell
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP AND NEWLY REMODELED
Beth Perry Long and Keith Long. New Owners
SPECIALIZING IN:
Cuts for the entire family � Color � Perms
Highlighting � Eyebrow and facial waxing
Monday - Friday 9 00 UNTIL
Saturday by appointment
752-79109706
514 E 14th Street
Between Kmg Sandwicn and Tre Was.i House:
We carry 3 TaOf product hoes
East Carolina
Playhouse
presents
co
oo
"A Colorful, Family Show"
TIME Magazine
October 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10
in
McGinnis Theatre
at
8:15 pm
General Public: $10.00
ECU Students: 6.00
CALL: 757-6390
Y
O
U
TCBV" Shakes up
GREAT 1ASTL
Say goodbye to ice cream with a "WHT Shake.
This thick, creamy treat is a cup of our delicious
96 fat-free frozen yogurt, shaken and filled to
the brim. A "TCBV" Shake gives you the
great taste of premium ice cream
with only about half the calories.
ALL THE PLEASURE.
NONE OF THE GUILT
TOT
The Country. Best Itjyur
Store Address
iStore Town and State)
im K BY Svurmv In
r "t Off Anything In The Store J REE TCBY Stadium Cup With The J
J eriiMU rune ! Purchase Of Any Shake !
Except Kiddie Cups
1 One discount person per order per visit J One discount per person per order per visit
I Offer expires October 10, 1988 ! Good While Supply Last
, r Offer expires October 10,1988
I
I
J
A
N
M
K

T
H
E
D
I
F
F
E
R
E
N
C
E
REGISTER
TO
VOTE
IN FRONT OF THE STUDENT STORE
(BRING YOUR DRIVER'S LICENSE)
MON OCT. 3RD
9-11 A.M.
TUES OCT. 4TH
9-2 P.M.
WED OCT. 5TH
9-2 P.M.
THURS OCT. 6TH
9-12 P.M.
SPONSORED BY THE
INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
AND
ALPHA XI DELTA
I






1
oUfe �aat (Butalinxtm
v�n�j in !�.�Mm ,��,� lanmiiit inn !�
Pete Fernald, c
Chip Carter, m� m
James F.J. McKee, oir���rMmm
Joe Harris, w�.Erf,o,
Doug Johnson, sns �.��
Tim Hampton. rMm �i�r
Mici ielle England, &� �����
Debbie Stevens, se
JEFF PARKER,ST'u�mm
TOMFURR,CMti,
Susan Howell,
John W. Medlin, mm
Mac Clark, hmmmtvmmm,
October 4,1988
OPINION
Page 4
Olympics
Politics play too big a part
Many are familiar with the story
of Socrates' end. To oversimplify it,
he drank wine laced with the poison
hemlock rather than perform an
action that he felt was wrong. There
are two common reactions to this
story: one, from those who believe
that principle takes priority over
longevity, applauds Socrates; the
other, from those who prefer life at
any cost, denounces him.
Either way, it cannot be denied
that Socrates sacrificed his life to his
honor. And, as the dust settles on
Seoul's Olympic Stadium, it is clear
that America faces a similar di-
lemma.
It seems that politics has pro-
gressively tainted the Olympics
over the years. Admittedly, the
Olympic Games have been linked to
politics since their inception in an-
cient Greece. But (apologies to Si-
mon and Garfunkel) politics like a
cancer grows: it has wormed its in-
sidious way into the spirit of the
sport, and the 1988 Summer Games
dealt out three blatant examples.
JirtLe AmecarL,Women's
Gymnastic Team, a young and inex-
perienced group, lost the Bronze to
the East German team by less than
one-half of one point. The American
team had been leading the East
Germans, but they lost due to the
East Germans' invocation of a
rarely-enforced rule whose intent
was to prevent the competitors from
being "coached" through their exer-
cises.
If the East Germans had been
tenth and the Americans ninth,
would the East Germans have asked
that the rule be enforced? Of course
not. But then, the East Germans'
concern was not with principle but
with winning. The Americans vio-
lated the letter of the rule; but, much
worse, the East Germans violated
the spirit of the Games.
The second example was the
Korean boxing coaches' instigation
of a brawl in one of the boxing rings.
True, a boxing ring is as appropriate
a place as any for a brawl, but the
bout is not supposed to pit the refe-
ree against the coaching staff and a
security man. Following the
struggle, the Korean boxer who had
lost the fight sat in the ring for over
an hour, thereby setting "a new
Olympic record for petulance as
one NBC announcer put it.
The third example was the gold-
medal fight between Roy Jones, an
American, and Park Si-hun, a Ko-
rean. It was quite clear to onlookers
that Jones had won the match, but
the judges' decision was 3-2 in his
opponent's favor. This followed
many Korean disappointments in
Olympic boxing, and it was fol-
lowed by allegations that at least one
of the judges had been bribed.
Sports in general, and the Olym-
pics in particular, represent struggle
in a microcosm; it is only natural that
viewers should see the symbolism
in the Olympics. If we are to extrapo-
late from what happened at the
Games, it would appear that Amer-
ica is being badly used and abused.
It would appear that America is
blindly blundering along in the des-
perate hope that everyone else will
just play fair.
Looking again at the real world,
one can see immediately that Amer-
ica is in fact used and abused. But
then, we allow ourselves to be. Stu-
pid moves such as the Iran-Contra
affair, or merelv ur supporting the
contras in the fi A place, show other
countries a United States that is
badly disorganized and ill-
equipped to deal with the real
world. America can't seem to play
fair.
So it shouldn't be terribly sur-
prising that America can't cheat
well, cither. America's clumsy at-
tempts at covert operations - and
again, Iran-Contra leaps to mind -
perpetuate rather than alleviate its
problems. America's innocence has
been spoiled by two world wars and .
several smaller ones. On the positive
side, the world-war victories led to
America's retreat from isolationism,
thus making America an active par-
ticipant in the high-stakes game of
international politics. But to be a
truly effective player on the world
level, we must make a difficult deci-
sion.
On the one hand, we can make
some vaguely Orwellian moves in
the hope that they will make us a
harder target. We can tighten still
further the restrictions on citizens'
access to information about the ac-
tions of the government. We can
make the media a de facto propa-
ganda tool of the government. We
can even allow violations oi the Bill
of Rights in cases which the govern-
ment says are necessary to its own
welfare.
Without a doubt, these policies
would make sensitive information
about our country less accessible to
foreign powers. It would practically
end the intelligence leaks (now
there's a phrase that describes the
problem with Washington) and ille-
gal sales of advanced technology
that have become commonplace in
our society. But at what price?
Our alternative is to stick with
our present game plan This path
may very well result in America's
reduction to a third- or fourth-place
power. It could bring political disas-
ter on the heads of millions of
Americans. It would be drinking
hemlock.
Sad but true: our choice, as illus-
trated painfully in the Olympics, is
to risk an ignoble end on the one
hand and a noble end on the other.
We all strive to be first. Instead,
we should strive to be best. Such was
the lesson that Socrates taught. And
that's what the Games are all about.
Editorial Policy Change:
Due to the volume of letters received each week by the
Campus Forum, The East Carolinian is forced to request
that ALL letters contain no more than 300 words each. This
policy is effective immediately. Letters over the limit will
be returned to the author(s) for rewriting.
Yearbook criticized
To the editor:
Being a student at an accredited
four-year university such as ours, I
was hoping for a yearbook that I
could look at twenty years from now
and be proud of. I have been anx-
iously awaiting the 1987 Buccaneer
for well over a year and now that it
has arrived, and I have flipped disap-
pointedly through each page, my
reaction is sheer disgust.
Our yearbook should center
around the students, faculty and ac-
tivities surrounding life at ECU, yet
the first 24 pages are pictures from
around Greenville without even a
hint of a Pirate anywhere. There are
enough activities going on around
our campus all day long to provide
more student oriented snapshots to
fill the pages of our Buccaneer.
I couldn't helpbut remember my
junior high annual and the simple
m - �8n school quality of it when I exam-
ined the '87 Buccaneer. And to top off
the indignation I felt, my senior pic-
ture doesn't even have the right
name under it!
Tcrri R. Or
Graduate Student
Department of English
Voting rights
To the editor:
The members of the organiza-
tions listed below would like to en-
courage not only members of our
organizations, but students in gen-
eral lo exercise their right to cast a
vote in the upcoming campus Home-
coming elections as well as the na-
tional elections to be held in Novem-
ber.
One of the primary missions of
higher education is to promote and
develop good citizenship. One of the
best ways to show one's acceptance
of responsibility to hisher commu-
nity and country is to cast one's ballot
during times of election. Campus
wide elections offer us the opportu-
nity to practice becoming good citi-
zens. So, please, use the individual
power that you have and vote on
October 12 and November 4.
Remember, if you do not exercise
your right to vote then you cannot
exercise your right to complain.
Dr. Larry Smith
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
ECU Gospel Choir
Expressions Magazine
Christian Fellowship
Republican stand
To the editor:
For the past two years, I have had
the pri viledge of turning to the edito-
rial pages of this fine publication and
finding Justin Sturz immersed in a
duel with a campusalumni liberal. I
applauded his efforts on behalf of the
Republican conservatives, upon
which I place my beliefs as well as my
vote. Indeed, it is an honor to have the
eloquent (albeit verbose) Sturz de-
fend our cause against the "bleeding-
heart liberal Yet I am somewhat
perplexed.
Mr. Sturz, what exactly are your
intentions? As stated in your letter in
the Tuesday edition, your purpose in
writing such fiery, anti-liberal letters
was to, if I might paraphrase, antago-
nize liberals into unrequested de-
bate�at their disadvantage�debat-
ing on topics that you choose appar-
ently at random which vou attack
ferociously without realizing that
these arguments have no real pur-
pose except 1) to stroke your ego, 2) to
make others look bad and 3) to splash
your name abundantly across the
editorial page over letters that few
students read and even fewer care
about. Correct?
O.K Mr. Sturz. Here is your
chance to redeem yourself in the eyes
of your fellow Republicans. Instead
of shouting down the liberal plat-
form, why don't you list yours. A
fame-hungry personage such as
yourself should jump a t his chance to
shower us (your staunch followers
and admirers) with your infinite
wisdom concerning the Republican
views on such important matters as
foreign trade, deficit spending, sup-
ply-side economics, and other thorns
in the side of the Democratic party.
List your views in your finest
William F. Buckley style, type them
up, and send 'em all to the editor. The
world, not to mention Greenville and
surrounding areas (Wintcrville,
Bclvoir, Faukland, Ayden, Tickbite,
etc.) await breathlessly for your ex-
alted answer to Life, the Universe,
and Michael Dukakis. In other words
(written in one syllable, so that even
our professors can understand),
"Where do you stand, Jus??"
K. Blake Johnson
Junior
HistoryPizza Delivery
Sanskrit
Curriculum hard?
To the editor
Joe Harris's article which domi-
nated Tuesday's headlines should
pose a few questions to our student
body. Is the fact that our nursing
students scored so poorly on their
exam symbolic of all of our depart-
ments and of all students at our
school?
Where does the blame rest? Are
we not trying hard enough? It ap-
pears so. Is the curriculum too tough?
Or arc the requirements of an "A" too
demanding and strenuous? This is
unlikely.
It appears that society is mass-
producing high school graduates
that have never had any significant
level of responsibili ty. We are seeing
too many people at this school that
express little interest in academia
and more in social self-service. And
this is devastating to our standing as
a university. Is there any hope in
turning ECU from "party school" to
an outstanding academic entity?
It is only fair that my source of
outrage be known. The base of my
disappointment stems from several
of my classes. I have listened as stu-
dent after student has complained,
disrespectfully usually, to professors
that margins on a term paper are an
unknown. These same students had
no perception of proper term paper
format or a deadline.
This makes me wonder what our
admissions board requires of an
applicant. Several professors have
expressed their mutual astonishment
of our student's literacy, and lack
thereof, and disappointment in
student's basic language skills to
friends and myself.
With this happening at our fu-
ture alma mater, how should we feel?
Is ignorance Miss? I hope these prob-
lems have not become a plague in our
classrooms. It is a virus at the mo-
ment and we are in desperate need of
a vaccine.
I hope these problems will not
continue to spread. Because I never
want one of my fondest memories of
the great 'ol days at EC to be one of a
guy bickering with a professor over
the necessity of a paper being bound
by a staple.
lames E. Havcrtv II.
Junior
Communications
Paper praised
To the editor:
As long as I have been a student
at ECU,I never really paid much at-
tention to The East Carolinian. Sure,
I've read almost every edition that
has been published in the last few
years. To me the student newspaper
just magically appeared on campus
forme to leisurely read at my conven-
ience. Alas I have been enlightened.
This summer 1 began working at
the newspaper as an advertising
representative, I was simplv amazed
at the amount of effort and time put
into producing each and everv issue.
It is not unusual for some staff mem-
bers to average less than fifty cents an
hour.
On production nights (Mondavs
and Wednesdays) many students
work well past 1 a.m Gotfforbid if
the computers go down, we all know
that it'll be a very late evening. These
long hours do more than cut into
your study-time but they also inhibit
your social life. The students of ECU
are probably not aware that The East
Carolinian is completely run bv stu-
dents. As a matter of fact, few school
newspapers are solely run by stu-
dents.
If it appears to you that I am
patting the backs of the employees of
The East Carolinian well that's cxacti)
what I'm doing. I do not exactly agree
with all the editorials at times but I
still respect these individuals for
their professionalism and dedication
to doing the very best job tha t they arc
capable of doing.
In closing I would like for the
student body and faculty to trv to
look at The Big Picture before being
so critical about the product that we
so diligently provide for your read-
ing entertainment twice weekly.
Ruard Alan Cook
Industry and Technology
Senior
Forum
Rules
The East Carolinian xvelcomes
letters expressing all points of mew.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Pubications Building, across from
the entrance of Joync Library.
For purposes of verification, all
letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number, and signature of the
authoris). Letters are limited to 300
words or less, double spaced or neatly
printed. AU letters are subject to ed-
iting for Areyity. obscenity, and libel,
and no personal attacks will be per-
mitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are re-
minded that they are limited to one
every two weeks. The deadline for
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday's edition and 5 p.m. Tues-
day for Thursday's edition.
Publi
DURHAM I �-
ence has shown pu
on the superconductimi
collider art- mon thai
chance tor local i .
md off, a spoi
! s Department t I ner
I he real situation u
get testimony all i
of interests
uty executive dir � -
perconducting
fas said
r e h ar fr m I
;1 and � .
offi ials, utility con i
ronmental gi
tage is toh
of input that i!
and id as a :
beyor I
D IE t, .
comments from
- � �

arrived in ' rth ai
in pr
pi.
'
imj
comm � -
Quayle,
Qn
dential debal j
COr con ten -
rj
his candid i - ral
� - �
the format is
debati s and
� read for the c r
!h, tickets' I
Republican (
Democrat Mi;
a da oft from cai
day while tl - -
crammed I
itchupin(
Qu i
u w with 1
said that although the v
dentu! exourv.
ill JoiifiJliiijj )v
can voters is thecar
While House - .md
senator vwll direct his all
the Democratic nominee
The opponent tor md
chaeiDukakis He'sthc- J
running for : nt
said. "The senator from 1
the ice presidential ra
andim tandm
and k is that e
on th . J
a Its
� -
in Boston, was trs
mentary school in I
Conn todaj K-
rail) on the si -
Demo I
visiting Dearb rnH
to watch the inciner j
fis j
plant
Busfi was g
J
- five-man crev� 1
Force Base inO I
president was plan j
paign stop later in I
Red
K' inwhtU a
in hea
found the two can
tual dead heat with Bush le)
Dukakis 48 44 percent
vev ot B89 registered v
ducted tor The Raltir-
Monday through Thursday
margin ot erre:
33 percentage po
The vice pre I
dates, cleared their c
schedules to concenti
debate, while workers
Auditorium in Omaha
the hall after a perform J
Christian rock hand aiv.
bition by pro wrestlers
The biggest task taan
BRANDED!
Greenville Buyers
Memorial Drive






t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER A. 1988 5
.

d
Junior
Communications
iper praised
editor:
i; as 1 have been a student
r ver really paid much at-
The East Carolinian. Sure,
almost every edition that
published in the last few
Jme the student newspaper
Icallv appeared on campus
lei surely read at my conven-
es 1 have been enlightened.
Bummer I began working at
Bpaper as an advertising
itivc, 1 was simplv amazed
unt oi effort and time put
hieing each and every issue.
Inusual for some staff mem-
terage less than fifty cents an
production nights (Mondays
Incsdavs) many students
li past 1 a.m Gotiforbid if
tutors go down, we all know
a very late evening. These
irs do more than cut into
v-time but they also inhibit
il life. The students of ECU
not aware that The East
is completely run by stu-
a matter of fact, few school
ers are solely run by stu-
!appears to you that I am
ie backs of the employees of
'arolmian wcW that's exactly
doing. 1 do not exactly agree
Ithe editorials at times but I
xt these individuals for
Ifcssionahsm and dedication
� very best pb that they arc
hi doing.
losing 1 would like for the
bodv and faculty to try to
ic Big Ticture before being
il about the product that we
ntly provide for your rcad-
rtainment twice weekly.
Ruard Alan Cook
Industry and Technology
Senior
orum
Rules
e East Carolinian welcomes
expressing all points of view,
�drop them by our office in the
Itions Building, across from
trance of Joync Library.
r purposes of verification, all
tmust include the name, major
ssification, address, phone
and signature of the
(s). Letters are limited to 300
r less, double spaced or neatly
All letters are subject to ed-
)r brevity, obscenity, and libel,
personal attacks will be per-
Students, faculty and staff
letters for this page are re-
that they are limited to one
frvo weeks. The deadline for
il material is 5 p.m. Friday for
ly's edition and 5 p.m. Tues-
Thursday's edition.
Public concerned about collider
DURHAM (AD - Experi-
ence has shown public hearings
on the superconducting super
collider are more than just a
chance for local residents to
sound off, a spokesman for the
U.S. Department of Energy said.
"The real situation is that we
get testimony all across the range
of interests Richard Nolan, dep-
uty executive director of the Su-
perconducting Super Collider
Site Task Force, said Sunday.
"We hear from business groups,
local and regional government
officials, utility companies, envi-
ronmental groups. The advan-
tage is to benefit from a diversity
of input that includes interests
and ideas and comments that are
beyond just the local citizenry
Nolan wasa member of oncof
two DOE teams that will hear
comments from the seven states
competing for the supercon-
ducting super collider. The team
arrived in North Carolina Sunday
in preparation for this week's
public hearings.
Public hearings will be held
today and Tuesday in Butner to
address the draft environmental
impact statement prepared on the
$4.4 billion atom smasher, but all
comments will be welcome, No-
lan said.
"Many of the comments that
we have gotten and 1 suspect we
will get have to do with clear ex-
pressions of support or concerns
about the project he said at a
news conference. "We want to
take those into account
Nolan said 107 people have
signed up to speak, forcing offi-
cials to expand the length of the
hearings today and to add a sec-
ond day to the previously an-
nounced schedule. Today's hear-
ing will be from 2 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
and from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the
Butner Sports Arena. Further
comment will be heard from 9
a.m. to noon on Tuesday.
As of August, the department
had received 387 letters about the
collider from North Carolina. Of
them, only eight favored the proj-
ect, 364 were opposed, and 15 had
no clear opinion.
"It doesn't concern me in the
sense that 1 believe that is the ratio
of the people who favor the proj-
ect Bill Dunn, North Carolina's
project coordinator, told the
Greensboro News & Record.
"1 wish no one was unhappy
that the project would go here.
But we didn't try to match num-
bers we didn't recruit people to
send comments in to support the
project
Nolan said the amount of in-
terest shown in North Carolina
has been about on par with that in
other states. Hearings have been
held in Michigan, Tennessee,
Texas and Colorado so far. The
second team is currently in
Arizona and both teams will con-
verge on Illinois for the last series
Nolan said the process is on
schedule for an expected an-
nouncement of the preferred site
in late November and the formal
designation of a host state in Janu-
ary.
Comments made at the hear-
ing will become part of the final
environmental impact statement,
which will specify how the 53-
mile diameter project will affect
such things as wetlands, farm-
land, water supplies and the
economies of each site, Nolan
said.
Officials refused to ans ver
questions about how North Caro-
lina compares with the other
states vying for the project. Nolan
downplayed the competitive as-
pect, saying, "The enormity of
this project dictates that it cannot
be viewed as a winncr-take-all
proposal
He said the super collider is a
"commitment to the pursuit of
fundamental science" that will
ultimately benefit the entire na-
tion.
Nolan and Jay Hunze, direc-
tor of the Chicago office of DOE's
Technology Management Divi-
sion, also downplayed public
fears about the project.
"We've had years and years
operating experience at similar,
less-powerful facilities Nolan
said. "There has never been an
incident where a citizen has been
injured
Hunze said there is virtually
no risk of radiation from the ma-
chine, in which subatomic par-
ticles are magnetically whipped
around an underground race-
track, colliding and giving scien-
tists a glimpse at the nature of
matter.
Riverbluff
Apartments
We Welcome
Parents
And Students
?Fully Carpeted
?Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
'Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
Quayle, Bentsen ready debate
(AD-Republican Dan
Quavle believes the vice presi-
dential debate will enable the
GOP contender to dispel doubts
harbored by some voters about
his candidacv. Democrat Llovd
Rentson, still uncomfortable with
the format, is relying on mock
debates and intense preparation
to ready for the encounter.
Hie tickets' top candidates
Republican George Bush and
Democrat Michael Dukakis - took
a dav off from campaigning Sun-
day while their running mates
crammed for Wednesday night's
matchup in Omaha, Neb.
Quavle, in a pre-debate inter-
view with The Associated Press,
said that although the vice presi-
dential encounter is important,
tWoUivJnyinm& la�iS.i9r .rS�?er .
can voters is the candidate for the
White House - and the Indiana
senator will direct his attacks at
the Democratic nominee.
'The opponent for me is Mi-
chael Dukakis. He's the one that's
running for president Quavle
said. "The senator from Texas is
the vice presidential nominee,
and my target and my discussion
and my focus that evening will be
on the governor from Massachu-
setts
Dukakis, who spent Sunday
in Boston, was traveling to an ele-
mentary school in Hartford,
Conn, today before attending a
rally on the statehouse steps. The
Democratic nominee also was
visiting Dearborn Heights, Mich
to watch the incineration of con-
fiscated drugs at a local sanitation
plant.
Bush was greeting the return
of the space shuttle Discovery and
its five-man crew at Edwards Air
Force Base in California. The vice
president was planning a cam-
paign stop later in the day in
Redding, a growing Northern
California city.
Meanwhile, a statewide poll
in heavily-Democratic Maryland
found the two candidates in a vir-
tual dead heat with Bush leading
Dukakis 48-44 percent. The sur-
vey of 889 registered voters, con-
ducted for The Baltimore Sun
Monday through Thursday, had a
margin of error of plus or minus
3.3 percentage points.
The vice presidential candi-
dates cleared their campaign
schedules to concentrate on the
debate, while workers at the Civic
Auditorium in Omaha readied
the hall after a performance by a
Christian rock band and an exhi-
bition by pro wrestlers.
The biggest task facing the
crew, according to City Public
Events Manager Terry Forsberg,
is decorating the candidates'
dressing rooms with carpeting
and drapes.
"Thev'll look like vour living
room - or better yet, theirs
Forsberg said.
Quayle holed up with top
advisers at an undisclosed loca-
tion in the Washington, D.C
area, and conducted mock de-
bates with Bentsen's stand-in,
Sen. Bob Pack wood, R-Ore.
The Indiana senator said he
was not concerned about possible
gaffes during the debate, a prob-
lem for the candidate during his
campaign appearances.
"The reason I'm not is be-
cause ifs going to be questions
a.nd answers. There's alwdys mar
possibility, but I'm a "very confi
dent person he said.
Republican strategists be-
lieve expectations remain low for
Quayle's performance based on
his miscues and reputation as a
lightweight candidate. But the
Indiana senator says he is not
giving much consideration to
expectations.
Bentsen, meanwhile, held a
mock debate with Quayle stand-
in, Rep. Dennis Eckart, D-Ohio,
and then flew to Austin, Texas, to
devote his time to debate prepara-
tion.
In the mock session, Eckart's
attacks sent staffers scurrying for
research material, and left
Bentsen a bit uncomfortable with
the debate format - 90 minutes of
questions, two-minute responses
and one-minute rebuttals.
"He does not seem relaxed
said Bentsen's spokesman Mike
McCurry. "If it'wbre the Senate
floor he'd be very comfortable
and if it were the Senate rules he
would be very comfortable.
$SAVE MONEY! $
BUY YOUR WINTER CLOTHES NOW!
Over 80 Wool Overcoats In Stock $19.95-$49.95
(Tweed Herringbone, and Solid Colors)
Over 100 London Fog Trcnchcoats In Stock
$12.95-$39.95
(All Styles. Sizes, and Colors)
Huge Variety of Jackets $7.95 & up
(leather. Militant, Members Only, Denim, etc.)
Brand Name Rugby Shirts $5.95 each
or 2 for $10.00
(Alexander Julian, Cant, T.od, Merona, many others)
We Also Have Sweaters, Flannel Shirts,
Work Clothes, Overalls, and Coveralls
We Pay CASH FOR NICE LEVIS
and other Brand Name Jeans!
CLOTHES
f MAM
y.

10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
400 S. Evans St.
(n the corner below "lizz "
Recycled Clothing (New & Used)
752-3866
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyers Market Fclll SflVlIlfiS
I
: prn
Unml.iv S.iinulv
-uini.i 1 '�
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Aiftner, Nike and Rrbokl
. , , . I
tcLotiustt Stadium Cleaners & Shirt Laundry
free Cleaning coupons
Located at Corner of 10th & Cotanche Streets
758-2701 (Next to Hardee's &McDonald's)
�ALTERATIONS �FLUFF & FOLDING
$FREE Dry Cleaning $
Bring in Any 3
Items & Pay For
2one is cleaned
FREE.
(Lamest priced garment is cleaned free!
Present this coupon when
you bring in your clothes
I
$FREE Dry Cleaning $
Bring In 3 and
Get 1 FREE.
(Lowest priced gasmen! is cleaned Jme)
m
$FREE Dry Cleaning $
Present this coupon when
you bring in your clothes
$FREE Dry Cleaning $
$FREE Dry Cleaning $
Bring In 4 and
Pay For 3
1 is FREE.
(Lowest priced gai ment is cleaned free
Present this coupon when
lyou bring in your clothes
SFREE Dry Cleaning $
I
ALL THIS WEEK
THE
GREAT PITT
COUNTY FAIR!
WRIST-BAND
NIGHTS ARE:
TONIGHT AND THURSDAY
$8.00
GETS YOU IN THE GATE-
UNLIMITED RIDES AND
ALL FREE ATTRACTIONS!
PITT COUNTY
FAIR
HWY 264 EAST
BIGGEST FAIR EAST OF RALEIGH!
Li J ��
� w






I
1
6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4, 1988
;i
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian male
roommate to share new mobile home. 10
minutes from campus. Non-smoker,
please. Weekends call Hugh 756-6851.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Duplex
House. 12 block from campus. 2 small
bedrooms. Large kitchen and living room.
250.00. 12 month lease. 402 Biltmore
Street. 752-7538.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
$167.50 per month, 1 2 utilities (bedroom
furnished or unfurnished). 355-7269
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Century Limited,
AC, Cruise, PS, PB. High mileage but
sharp; in good running condibon. $2800.
Call 758-7413 anytime.
FOR SALE: Beige & white love seat. Good
condition S50. Call today! 758-9264.
FOR SALE: Waterbcd, Queen size with
bookcase headboard, heater, free float.
$150. Call John 757-1597.
FOR SALE: 55 gallon fish aquarium with
cast iron stand. Also includes 55 pds. of
rock, under gravel filter, hood, light,
pump. Call 758-0678.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED Vehicles from
$100. Fords Mercedes Corvettes.
Chews. Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
687-6000 Ext. S-1166.
FOR SALE: 1 londa CX500 Custom mint
condition. 6000 mi must sell Desperate.
Call David 758-5510. Leave message if not
in.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE: Papers, SI 50 per
page. Resume's written and typed, S20.00
Close to campus. Call Joy at 758-7423 be-
tween 6 and 9 p.m.
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at S2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
Re'sumc' production, and other business
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. for more de-
tails!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 it. beach Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan
TYPING SERVICES: Resumes Term
Papers, Theses, etc. Great Rates Call
Becky 758-1161 before 5, 752-1321 after 5.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Shenanigans Nite Club
in Goldsboro is now hiring cocktail serv-
ers. Apply in person at Comfort Inn,
Spence Ave, Goldsboro, NC.
TRAVEL SALES: Sell package spring
break tours to Caribbean. Free travel and
S! Great sales experience and flexible
hours! Call 1 (800) 426-7710.
ON CAMPUS TRAVEL REP. OR OR-
GANIZATION NEEDED to promote
Spring Break Trip to FloridaTexas. Earn
money, free trips, and valuable work ex-
perience. Call lntercampus Programs. 1-
800-433-7747.
BE ON T.V Many needed for commer-
cials. Casting info (1) 805-687-6000 Ext.
TV-1166.
PART-TIME OFFICE POSITION avail
able at Carolina Imprints, 715 Albemarle
Ave Greenville. 1230-5:30 p.m , M-F.
Pleasant phone voice a must. Light typing
and filing. $3.50 per hour. Call 830-1929
for appointment.
PERSONALS
CHRISTINE ANDERSON: Hope you
had a Happy 21st Birthday! Love, Rae.
TO MY BIG SIS DANA: Thank you so
much for all the great gifts, especially the
time and thought vou put into them. 1 had
a blast that Thursday night! I laving you as
my big sis means alot to me Love, Col-
leen.
JULES: Happy B-day. I know we will
have as much fun celebrating this one as
we will the next 21. Love, Bud.
NEW DELI JAMS! Friday come welcome
back the best blues band in 3 states, the
BLUES DEFENDERS. Saturday boogie
down to the sounds of the LEMON SIS-
TERS and RUTABAGA BROTHERS. Be
there!
CONGRATULATIONS AND GOOD
LUCK to the following Sigma candidates
for the Homecoming Court: Kris Kelly,
Marta Joyner, Deborah Watkins, Susanna
1 ludson, Noelle I logan and Kathryn
Sepcnzis. Love the Sisters and Pledges of
Tri Sigma
LIZ WALMA: We love you and support
you 100! On Wed vote Liz Walma
HOMECOMING QUEEN!
BONNIE ARMENTROUT for HOME-
COMING QUEEN. Don't forget to vote
for Bonnie on Wed. We love you!
CASEY: Hello again Wish 1 could have
spent this weekend with vou but I'm sure
you didn't spend it alone. Listen to your
mother, you know mother knows best By
the way, you looked really good last
Thursday I don't know if you have ex-
plained yet but I hope it turns out good.
Don't worry, be happy. There is no such
thing as stress. I'll bet you know who feels
better by now. Your Not So Secret Ad-
mirer.
PI KAPPA PHI: The Brothers and Pledges
of Pi Kappa Phi would like to congratulate
their new Little Sister Pledges. President
Karen Costenbader, Secretary Lisa Kra-
mer, Kendran Hudgins, Robin Bently,
Brigette McKay, Cindy Jones, Carolyn
Mason, Tina Jones, Dawn Edwards,
Jeanne Sharpe, Andrea Cole and Angela
Woodward. Good luck, we are looking
forward to a killer semester.
PI KAPPA PHI: Get ready PiKapps and
Dates for the Daddy Weekend. Party Fri-
day, Party Saturday at the Moose Lodge
and Sunday. Who knows7
TOJODI C1FERNI ON HER 20th: Cock
tail is approaching soon. Should we go to
low-impact or Tony? Don't Phillip on too
many drinks that night. Kenny be theone?
If not, don't get apPauled or go psycho on
us. Just walk aRay and I'll referee vou to
someone else. Alpha love, Debbie.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
CHI OMEGA PLEDGE CLASS: Leigh
Atkiss, Molly Anderson, Cate Bohanon,
Robyn Cayton, I leather Cierpik, Angela
Clay, Ashley Dagenhart, Madge Duffy,
Anna Eubank, Tina Getgood, Beth
Hay wood, Michelle Gibson, Danielle
LaMonica, Megan Grecnwald, Ashley
Hendrix, Kathy Hewitt, Jenni Higgins,
Sommer I lunsucker, Jarilyn Jones, Paula
Joseph, Jennifer Kinlaw, Jen Levine, Tracy
Lewis, Stacie McCarver, Courtney
Maultin, Christie O'Brian, Amy O'Neal,
Marv Scott Parsley, Bridgette Pichot,
Angela Proctor, Tracy Siska, Georgie
Slaughter, Jennifer Sncll, Tracy Stallings,
Regina Thompson and Colleen Wunner.
We Love You Girls! The Sisters of Chi
Omego.
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES: Keep up the
good work and enthusiasm! You are
doing a great job and I'm proud of y'all
Your Pledge Trainer, Melissa Tucker.
KIRSTIN EAKES We all wanted to let
you know how proud we are to have you
representing us at Homecoming. Love,
the sisters and pledges of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA wishes the football team
best of luck at 1 lomecoming GO PI-
RATES
SWF seeking romantic, wealthy SWM
who desires a loving companion for the
Homecoming Weekend. No common
men or petit bourgeois relationships
wanted. 1 lope this helps you out Liz!
TO THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE
Congratulations Sorry I couldn't be
there for the vote but work is keeping me
away. Signed, A Camp Counselor.
TINA BURNS: Happy Birthday, Hon! I
hope it was the best because you deserved
it! I love ya! Your big sis, Evelyn Brown.
KA LITTLE SISTER PLEDGES: There
will be a meeting at 9:30 tonight, Oct 4th
Wednesday, Oct. 5th come to the house at
5:00 for the raising of the flag and to help
build the KA Homecoming float.
LOST: Green velcro wallet. If found
PLEASE call Mike at 752-7307. Show your
honesty.
DARYL: 1 couldn't have asked for a better
big sis. We arc going to have a blast 2-
gcther. Your the greatest! Sigma love and
Mine. Lil sis Kim
DEBBIE: thanx for being a great big sis. I
can't believe you fooled me. Thanx for
being there. Sigma love and mine, little sis
Lois.
SIGMA LITTLE SISTERS want to thank
our big sisters for a great week. Thanks for
all the fun and gifts but most of all thanks
for being GREAT big sisters. Love Al-
ways, Sigma little sisters
TO THE BEST GUYS in the world, Alpha
Sigma Phi! Thanks! Love Missy C.
NEED CASH? 1 lave baseball cards? Call
Earlvis, the mad baseball card buyer I pay
damn good money for cards of any year,
any shape, and any condition. If you need
party money, Big E is the one to call. 757-
6366, leave message if not there.
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCE-
MENT: Greenvilles 1st Annual Baseball
Card, Coin, and Comic Book Show Sun-
day October 23, 1988, 1000 am� 5.00
p.m Ramada Inn, Greenville, N C , Hwy
2M Bv Pass, Admission $1 00per person
door prizes For more information call
752-7736
LOST: 7 month male Dalmation, one blue
eye and one brown, needs mcdicaiton If
seen or found please call 830-3909, 758
3084 or 738-5580 ask for John Note he's a
deaf dog and will not respond to sound
Please call � I miss him a lot
Your Best Look
Specializing In: MANICURES.
French Manicures � Nail Tips �
Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
PEDICURES � SKIN CARE. Body
Wrapping � Tacc &c Body Waxing �
Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products For
Men & Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
STazaDrrcenvillc
EL-TORO
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 700
WALK-INS WELCOME
20 YEARS OF SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Eastgatc Shopping Center
IAitoss from Highway Patrol SlaUoil
Brhlnri Car Qurst Auto Parts
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Ixxntrd Stir ECU
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
S32S a month
Contact J T or Tommy Williams
756-781 5 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt 8. 12 - 530 p m
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quirt one hedroom fumuh�i
apart mrnts, energy efficient, fre water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV
Couples or singles onlv $2S a month. 6 month
lease MOHILF. 1 iOMK RENTALS - couples or
singles Apartment and mobile homes ir. Azalea
Gardrns near Brook Valley Country Club
Contact J T or Tommy Williams
7-v78l5 "
ABORTION
"Personal and Confideritial Cars"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appomtmer.t Mon thru Sat Low
Com Trrmin,arin o 20 wreka of rrrgriancy
1-800-433-2930
Announcements
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Season tickets arc now on sale for the Per-
forming Arts Series at ECU. This year
there are 14 outstanding performances
starting in Oct and running through
April. Some of the attractions include:
Wynton Marsahs, CABARET, The Acting
Company in Love's Labour's Lost, Nadja
Salerno-Sonnenbcrg, The Tokyo String
Quartet, Oregon, The Atlanta Symphony,
and the Ohio Ballet. For a free brochure,
and further details contact: The Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-6611, cxt.
266.
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
CCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase you "fun"
budget,
�opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to sec us today!
Mon Oct. 3, 4 p.m. rm. 2006; Thurs Oct.
6, 1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon Oct. 10, 1 p.m.
rm. 2010; Thurs Oct. 13, 4 p.m. rm. 2006;
Thurs Oct. 20, 1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon
Oct. 24,1 p.m rm. 2010; Thurs Oct. 27,4
p.m rm. 2006; Mon Oct. 31, 4 p.m rm.
2006.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us in lifting up the name
of Jesus in songs and Bible study.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you arc encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
LOST?
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium
KAYAKINGCANOE
Be sure to attend the Intramural Kavak-
ingCanoe registration held from Sept. 15
to Oct 7. Learn to canoe and kayak in a
fantastic trip All you need to do is regis-
ter.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Ohio Ballet will innate the 1988-89
Performing Art Series on Oct. 12 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. The program for
the evening includes: "Untitled" (first
performed by PHIL080LUS in 1975),
"Summer Night" (choreographed by
I leinz Poll), "Gravity" (a new work by
Laura Dean), "Triptych" (choreographed
bv Heinz Poll to Mendelssohn's "Piano
Concerto No. 2, D Minor), Tickets for this
outstanding event are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 757-6611, ext. 266. This event
is sponsored by the Performing Arts
Committee and the Department of Uni-
versity Unions.
WATER BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural COREC
water basketball registration meeting
held Oct. 4 at 6 p.m. in MG 102. Play begins
shortly afterward. Interested in officiat-
ing? Attend the first official clinic Oct. 4 at
6:30 p.m. in MG 102 For additional info
call Dave Hall at 757-6387
1-ON-l BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramurral 1-on-l
basketball registration meeting held Oct.
5 at 5 p.m. in MG 102. Play begins shortly
afterwards. Be sure to register as soon as
possible to see who is the next Michael
Jordan.
BANNER CONTEST
To participate in the banner contest, dur-
ing NATIONAL ALCOHOL AWARE-
NESS WEEK, register your organizations
entry, in 209 Whichard Building, by Oct.
14. Six divisional 1st place winners will be
displayed during the ECU vs Syracuse
game and be awarded S50. Call 757-6823
for entry forms and additional informa-
tion.
CRQPWALK 88
Any individuals or groups interested in
participating in the 7th annual Cropwalk
for hunger should attend the ECU Re-
cruitment Rally Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. in room
244 Mendenhall. The walk will be held on
Nov. 6th. For more information contact
Marianne Exum (ODN) 757-6271 or 830-
9450.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Business students interested in scholar-
ships should secure forms from one of the
following dept. offices: Accounting �
GCB 3208, Decision Sciences � 3418, Fi-
nance � 3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414. All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210),
Chairman of School of Business Scholar-
ship Committee, by Oct. 14. Students may
apply 'or one or more of the scholarships
listed below. Planters Bank Scholarship (3
at SlOOOeach), University Book Exchange
( 2 at S500 each), NCNB ($500), J. Fred
1 lamblen ($200) Credit Women Interna-
tional (S200), Cameron-BrownFirst
Union Scholarship (3 at S500 each), FOR
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY: Latney
W. Pittard Memorial, Raleigh-Durham
Chapter Institute of Internal Auditors
($350), National Association of Account-
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship ($500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
ONLY: Archie R. Burnette (S600), Ward
Real Estate Scholarship ($300).
BUCCANEER
The 1987 yearbooks have come in. Any-
one who would like a copy of it may come
by the office and pick one up. We are
located in front of Joyner Library in the
Publications Bldg.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
All students who intend to go to law
school after ECU are invited to join the
ECU Law Society The next meeting will
be at 6:00 in Mendenhall, rm. 221 on Oct.
6th.
NEW POETRY CONTEST
Cameron Publishing Company an-
nounces a new poetry contest open to all.
$1,500 First Prize plus other prizes. For
contest rules, send self-addressed
stamped envelope to: Cameron Publish-
ing Company, 1109 S. Plaza Way 422,
Flagstaff, AZ 86001. The contest deadline
is Nov. 10,1988.
PURPLE & GOLD
PIG PICKIN' AND SOCIAL
The ECU Black Alumni Chapter cordially
invites alumni, students and their friends
to our 2nd Annual Pig Pickin' and Social
on Oct. 7 at the Pirate Club from 6p.m. to
1 am The menu wili include BBQ and
fried chicken with all the fixins! Cost: $10
person for all that you can cat. Mail check
to ECU Black Alumni Chapter, P.O. Box
4021, Greenville, or contact Barbara Hines
(Psychology Dept.) at 756-6491. Come
enjoy an evening of good food, good com-
pany and live jazz! Proceeds will go to-
ward the Ledonia S. Wright Memorial
Scholarship Fund for Minority Students.
AMBASSADORS
Then will be a general meeting for all Am-
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p.m. in Menden-
hall rm. 221. Remember that missing over
2 meetings per semester may lead to pro-
bation.
KAPPA DELTA PI
Organizational meeting Oct. 11 at 7:30
p.m rm. 129 Speight. For member and
any interested potential members
HTM FL TAILGATE PARTY
Jewisn students, see your eld friends ?nd
meet new ones when we have a Tailgate
Party on Oct. 8th from 11:30-130 pin.
Meet by the playground in front of
Elmhurst Elementary School (across from
Ruse High and behind the Freshmen
parking lot on 14th St.). Bring your own
food and drink. For more info , please call
Mike at 756-4930.
WOMEN'S TENNIS
The Lady Pirates will host UNC-
Wilmington today at 3:00 next to Minges.
The match is one of only two to be played
here at the university. The other match
will be Thurs. at 2:30 against Campbell.
SPANISH CLUB
Attention students: come join our Spanish
Club. Meehr.gs are held every Wed. at
3.00 in conference room of Foreign Lan-
guage Dept. In the now GCB. Elections
will be held Oct. 4th. Make your vote
count!
PHI BETA LAMBDA
ELECTIONS! for officers will be held
lues, Oct. 4 at 4:00 p.m. in 1013 GCB.
'Those interested in nmning for office
please have dues paid and be present at
the meeting. Anyone interested in BUSI-
NESS or BUSINESS ED. is encouraged to
attend. PBL is the collegiate equivalent to
FBLA and ALL MAJORS ARE WEL-
COME!
STUDENTS FOR DEMOC-
RACY
Students for Economic Democracy will be
meeting on Sun. evening at 7.00 in Men-
denhall, room 248. Attendance is re-
quired
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
Attention all ECU students, faculty,
alumni and parents of ECU students!
Why spend another dull Thanksgiving
when you could be in the exciting city of
lights, New York City. Come join the Stu-
dent Union's Travel Committee excursion
to New York City, Nov. 23-27. For more
info call the Central Ticket Office at 757-
6611.
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
College Democrats will meet tonight -
Tues Oct. 4 at 7.30 p.m in Brewstcr B304.
We will have a speaker from the state
office of College Democrats and will dis-
cuss further businesscampaigning If
you have questions, call 830-1382.
PHI ALPHA THETA
There will be a meeting Oct. 10 at 2:30 in
the Todd Room. Graduate and under-
graduate history majors are encouraged
to attend Undergrads must have an over-
all 3.0 average and a 3 5 average in history.
MINORITY STUDENT ORG.
ELECTION of officers for the MINORITY
STUDENT ORGANIZATION will be
held on Oct 11 at 5:00 p.m in Speight 129.
S' jdonts interested in running for an of-
fice or nominating another student
should contact Dr. Smith (205 Whichard
or extension 6495) NO LATER THAN Oct.
7. Positions available are PRESIDENT,
VICE-PRES SEC. AND TREASURER.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
CCF would like to invite you to our Bible
Studies every Tues. night at 7:00 p.m. in
Rawl 130. Bring a friend. For more info
call Jim at 752-7199.
FINANCIAL MGMT. ASSOC.
CASH, VACATION, & PRIZES: HOW?
By playing the hottest business game in
town sponsored by Wall Street and
AT&T. There are over 400 chances to win.
The top 10 performers will receive a cash
prize, with first place performer receiving
S25,000 cash; and the top 100 performers
each month will receive athletic shoes
from Reebok and a wrist watch, courtesy
of Bcneton by Bulova. You can participate
for only $49.95. Interested participants
can register on the first floor of the GCB on
Wed. and Thurs. between 10-2 p.m. or by
contacting Student Financial Mgmt. As-
soc. members or call the FINA dept. 757-
6670.
OLD YEARBOOKS
The yearbook staf t has a few copies of the
1983-1986 Buccaneers left in the office. If
you would like to receive a copy of any of
these books, please come by the Bucca-
neer office and pick one up They arc in
front of the office door, and anyone is
welcome to receive a copy. We arc located
in front of Joyner Library on the second
floor of the Publications Bldg.
BIOLOGY CLUB
There will be a meeting Oct. 10 in BN-109
at 500. The Dean of Med. School will be
speaking about Med. school and what it
takes to get in. Please try to attend
SURF CLUB
There will be a Surf Club meeting Tues
Oct 4 at 700 p.m. in room 221 at Menden
hall Evervone is welcome.
S�MQRS
Applications are now being taken for
scats on the Senior Class Council Fill out
application in SGA office at Mendenhall
by 3 p.m Oct. 7.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
!STAR SEARCH STAR SEARCH' ECU
Gospel Choir will be holding ROUND I of
STAR SEARCH '88 on Tues . Oct 4 at 7 30
p.m in Jenkins Auditorium. Admission is
S2.00 at the door.
CHRISTMAS PARADE
The 1988 Farmvillc Christmas Parade,
sponsored by the Farmvillc Chamber of
Commerce, will be held Dec 1 at 4 30 pm
Any group, business or individual wish-
ing to enter a float or unit in the parade this
vcar should contact the Chamber of
Commerce office at 104 E. Wilson St or
call 753-4670. The Chamber is requesting
that reservations be made before Oct. 31.
SCHOLAR-IN-RESIDENCE
Opportunities for American colleges and
universities to host z. visiting scholar from
abroad for all or part of the 198-90 aca-
demic ; ear are available through the
Fulbnght Scholar-in-Rcsidence Program
A Fulbnght Scholar-in-Residence may Z
teach regular courses from a foreign area
perspcct: e, serve as a resource person in �
mterdisophrary courses, assist in devel-
oping new courses, or participate in spe- E
cial seminars The program prondos I
roundtrip travel for the grantee and, for �
full-year awards, one accompanying :
dependent; a monthly maintenance al- Z
lowancc, and incidental allowances fori
travel, books, and services essential to the I
assignment The host institution is ex ;
oocted to share some costs in the form of -
supplementary funding or in kind sup-
port such as housing The deadline for-
receipt of proposals is Nov 1, 1988 De- I
tailed program guidelines and proposal-
forms are available now and can be re- i
quested from the Office of International
Studies. 1002 GCB, 757-6769.
ECU FORENSIC SOCIETY j
Interested in competing in Intercollegiate'
Debate, Public Speaking, Oral Interpre
tivc Reading, or Dramatic Interpretation7"
Well, the ECU Forensics Society is for you.
We meet everv Tues night at 8:00 in 211:
I
Mcssick Theatre Arts Building
Read The East Carolinian Classified Page
Bush
WASHINGTON (AT)
George Bush commands j! j
autumn advantage over M
Dukakis in the Electoral Colle
but the campaign for the Wr
House will be divided in a set
of close, hard fought
from California to Connecti
according to an Associated Pr
survey oi the 50 statt -
Republicans sound o
following a strong, lat
surge by Bush Demo
concern but sa Ihei
time to overtake tht
dent.
"Dukakis wont nary
his Massachusetts n
but now people are renx
what government, th
was under immv Car-
Tony Feather ex
of the Republican !
soun, where the
are rated even
Said Democrat
Stenholm of I exa�
Dukakis is the un
over yet be an)
imagination But he - .
the offensive
charges of liberal
The nationwide :
Stress ai
avoided
What is sti
sion and what can be
avoid theml'
Stress is your b I
sponse to any demand
amount of stress may K
for example, by h
paper written on time or I
well in a competition.
Too much str ss an in.
you uncomfortable an i
shorten your life Signs
include aches. esp
aches, neckaches, and backacl
"nervous stomach
chest pams. grouchiness
and drinking too much
little, inability to sit sli
trate, insomnia, and ha
fears about known or unk-no
events.
Sleep at least 6-5
night; sleep helps the h d I
store itself. Exercise -
swimming, running
reduces tension and
mental alertness. Diet influ
your reaction to stress c i
increases feelings of anxiety.
down on sugar sail
food, and caffeine.
Spend time alone ea I
to give yourself a chance I
wind and focus on yours
your friends as s unding
sharing daily expei
them can be rela
at the same time Consider! -
courses in time arrangem
stress reduction All oi us
benefit from these pr grams;tl
can help us put our busv In
back into perspective
Depression is a mo
turbance; feelings of sadn
disappointment or loneliness
present and may cause' the
pressed person to withdraw fri
people and activities, and
velopphvsical discomfort - i
aches, pains, fatigue, poor -j
tion, weight less or gain an
DELIVERY
FAMOU
�GENEROUS T
�REALC1
�Fl
DELIVERY HOURS
SUNTHURS. 4 PI
FRI.&SAT. 4PMT
DELIVERY CHARG75





f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4.1988 7
SERVICE ANNOUNCE-
- 1st Annual Baseball
I Dink ivvk Show Sun
tor 23 1988 1000 am - 5:00
da Inn Greenville N C Hwy
. : pi :on
. mation call
or one blue
�on It
I 19 758
he'sa
id to ound
I TOftO
S HAIRSTYLING
1E CUT 700
IK-INS WELCOME
KS OF SI RVING ECU
H KS FKi 1 CAMPUS
��
Street
752-3318
JORTION
IEE Pregnancy
Testing
8:30-4 p.m.
lat. 10-1 p.m.
ngle Women's
alth Center
uirr or-
00-433-2930
d school and what it
it in Tloaso trv to attend.
RJ CLL'H
SJbNJQRS
taker t.r
. f ill out
Me-ndonhall
:U GOSPEL CHOIR
;
lies H t 4 at 7 3fJ
dn ission is
LBiiTMAS PARADE
. - stn i- Parade
by t! Tiher of
tec i at 4 30p.m
iness or individual wish
Iter a float or unit in the parade this
tact the Chamber of
A I Wilson St or
he Chamber is requesting
made before Oct. "U
L AR-IX RESIDENCE
Km Tican (.ollegt- and
� - visiting scholar from
1989 K) aca
h the
� ign area
ires erson in
l es, assist in devel
' courses, or participate in spo
The program provides
I j. tra � � � grantee and, r r
award jii on ; .
nt; a monthly mamt. i
allovvaii es f ;r
� s essential t -1
� institution is ex
i sts in the form ol i
I ling or in-kind sup- ;
deadline for
1, WHH De- �
)gram guidelines and proposal -
ie available now and can be re
I' fficeol Internationa:
iUFUXSJCSQCiET
d in competing in Intercollegiate
iPublic Speaking, Oral Interpre .
ping, or Dramatic Interpretation'
CU Forensics Society is for vou
everv Tucs night at 8 00 in 211
I Theatre Arts Building
age
t
i
i
e
I
r
e
e
3
3
e
k
y
Bush has slim lead over Dukakis
r
WASHINGTON (AP) -
George Bush commands an early
autumn advantage over Michael
Dukakis in the Electoral College,
but the campaign for the White
House will be decided in a series
of close, hard fought contests
trom California to Connecticut,
according to an Associated Press
survey of the 50 states.
Republicans sound confident
following a strong, late summer
surge by Bush. Democrats project
concern but say there's ample
time to overtake the vice presi-
dent.
"Dukakis won the primary on
his Massachusetts miracle claim,
but now people are remembering
what government, the economy,
was under Jimmy Carter said
Tony Feather, executive director
of the Republican Party in Mis-
souri, where the two candidates
are rated even.
Said Democratic Rep. Charles
stenholm of Texas, where
' Dukakis is the underdog: "It's not
over vet by anv stretch of the
imagination. But he's got to go on
the offensive" against Bush's
charges of liberalism.
The nationwide public opin-
ion surveys indicate a narrow
advantage for Bush, although the
same surveys show enough unde-
cided and loosely committed vot-
ers to alter the outcome of the race
at the last moment.
Adding to the uncertainty isa
campaign caelcndar that includes
a debate Wednesday betweren
vice presidential candidates Dan
Quayle and Lloyd Bentscn, fol-
lowed by a return engagement
between Dukakis and Bush in
mid-October. After that comes a
three-week sprint to the finish line
punctuated by a barrage of televi-
sion commercials.
Bush appears to be solidify-
ing much of the traditional Re-
publican base across the South
and Rocky Mountain We.4e sur-
vey showed. He is rated the solid
leader in Florida with its 21 elec-
toral votes and seems to be open-
ing a little daylight between him-
self and the Democrats in Texas,
although Dukakis is waging an
intensive campaign in running
mate Lloyd Bentsen's home state.
Dukakis is given the edge in
several traditional Democratic
party strongholds, including
New York with its 36 electoral
votes, but has not been as success-
ful as Bush in cementing his own
political base.
The A survey of Political
Leaders, Independent Analysts
and Public Opinion Polls in all 50
states turned up frequent expres-
sions of concern among demo-
crats over the shape of Dukakis'
campaign, tempered with hope
that the Massachusetts governor
may be on the rebound after suf-
fering a political free fall earlier in
the campaign.
Republicans who were wor-
ried when Bush was down in the
polls last summer are smiling at
their fortunes now that he is
showing surprising strength in
states like New York, Pennsylva-
nia and Iowa that figured to be
among his weakest.
The Electoral College lineup
looks like this:
- Bush's strongest region is
probably the South, where he
leads almost everywhere.
Bentsen's presence on the ticket
almost guarantees a close race in
Texas, however, and Dukakis has
strong support in North Carolina
and border states such as Arkan-
sas, Kentucky and Tennessee.
- California and Washington
on the West Coast are rated as
tossups, with Dukakis given the
edge in Oregon. Bush appears to
have firmed up support in tradi-
tional Republican states such as
Utah, Idaho and Wyoming, but
the Dukakis campaign says it has
strength in New Mexico and
Montana.
- Farm states such as Kansas
and Nebraska are leaning to Bush,
while Dukakis harbors hope for
the Dakotas. Dukakis is favored in
Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota
in the upper Midwest. Dukakis
has no hopes
for Quayle's home state of
Indiana. The Democrat seems to
have a slight edge in Illinois, but
Democrats concede he is proba-
bly slightly behind in Ohio and
Missouri. Republicans see a nar-
row advantage in Michigan.
- The Northeast is Dukakis'
strongest region, and despite
closer-than-expected public polls,
he is regarded as the likely winner
at home in Massachusetts as well
as New York, Rhode Island,
-jnra-y.mB-rfy
EVERY TUESDAY
NITE IS COLLEGE NITE 8-11
ONLY $2.00
ADMISSION WTTH COLLEGE ID
.75 SKATE RENTAL
104 E. RED BANKS RD. � GREENVILLE. NC � 756 6000
Stress and depression can be
avoided with a few measures
What is stress and depres-
sion and what can be done to
avoid them?
Stress is your body's re-
sponse to anv demand. A certain
amount of stress may be helpful,
for example, bv helping you get a
paper written on time or bv doing
well in a competition.
Too much stress can make
vou uncomfortable and can
shorten your life. Signs of stress
include aches, especially head-
aches, neckaches, and backaches
"nervous stomach diarrhea,
chest pains, grouchiness, eating
and drinking too much or too
little, inability to sit still or concen-
trate, insomnia, and having vague
fears about known or unk-nown
events.
Sleep at least 6-8 hours a
night; sleep helps the body to re-
store itself. Exercise such as
swimming, running, and aerobics
reduces tension and increases
mental alertness. Diet influences
your reaction to stress; caffeine
increases feelings of anxiety. Cut
down on sugar, salt, alcohol, junk
food, and caffeine.
Spend time alone each day
to give yourself a chance to un-
wind and focus on yourself. Use
your friends as sounding boards;
sharing daily experiences with
them can be relaxing and helpful
at the same time. Consider taking
courses in time arrangement or
stress reduction. All of us can
benefit from these programs; they
can help us put our busy lives
back into perspective.
Depression is a mood dis-
turbance; feelings of sadness,
disappointment or loneliness are
present and may cause the de-
pressed person to withdraw from
people and activities, and de-
velop physical discomfort such as
aches, pains, fatigue, poor diges-
tion, weight loss or gain, and sleep
disturbances. The person also
loses the ability to enjoy life.
Depression can occur as the
result of a loss - death of a loved
one, the loss oi a relationship, or
the loss oi an object or dream of a
major emotional meaning. De-
pression may also occur without a
recognizable cause.
Some feelings of depres-
sion are "normal" or common �
there is no need to feel weak or
ashamed. Most depressed people
do not attempt suicide, however;
all talk of suicide should be taken
seriously. Help should be ob-
tained immediately.
- see a physician tor a complete
checkup
- take a break for a favorite activ-
ity. Have some fun!
- get some exercise
- DO NOT ignore himher
- DO NOT try to "cheer up" the
person
Needed
M�0�T ARTIST
Immediately
Apply In Person At
The East Carolinian
(2nd Floor, Publications Building in front of Joyner Library)
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
�DIAMONDS
�STERLING SILVERY
�TELEVISIONS
�GUNS
�JEWELRY
�GUITARS
�COINS
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�VCR'S
752-0322
CORNER OF 10TH & DICKINSON
GREENVILLE
DELIVERY
SMALL
Cheese Pizza $4.95
Cheese and 1 Topping$5.60
Each Additional Topping$ .65
SPECIALTY PIZZAS
Cheese Lovers$6.90
Meat Lovers$6.90
Supreme $6.90
Super Supreme$7.55
MEDIUM LARGE
$6.85 $8.95
$7.65 $9.90
$ .80 .95
$9.25
$9.25
$9.25
$10.05
$11.80
$11.80
$11.80
$12.75
FAMOUS PIZZA HUTQUALITY
�GENEROUS TOPPINGS
�REAL CHEESE
�FRESH VEGETABLES
�DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY - NEVER FROZEN
DELIVERY HOURS
SUNTHURS. 4 PM TO MIDNIGHT
FRI.&SAT. 4 PM TO 1:00 AM
DELIVERY CHARG75
mmmmmmmmmmmmmimmm COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 7 DAYS!
DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PHONE 752-4445
PIZZA HUT PAIRS!
2 MEDIUM CHEESE PIZZAS
FOR ONLY $9.99
$1.29 PER TOPPING COVERS BOTH PIZZAS
? Icoupon expires OcL 10, 1988)
East Carolina's
Finest Tea
Jfz
a

s
DIAL 7581976

�off
in.4
4111
O
-
� East Carolina
Tea Party
� Every Thursday
at 4:00 p.m.
� Free Admission
All Night
� $3 First Iced Tea
$2 For 2nd, 3rd, & 4th
plus you keep the Mason Jar
� Free non-alcoholic drinks for
designated drivers.
� Must be 21 to enter and have valid I.D.
� High Energy Music provided by Connie
Rogers, Greenville's Hottest DJ.
RAMADA INN

5 c (Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
HOMECOMING
Gigantic Warehouse Sale
Just For You
NOTHING OVER $10
FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY
HIJACK

Tom Tog's
Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Ave
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Trocadero Tom Togs Fashions
Come Visit A New Image Featuring
1st Quality At Off Prices Originals From
Panama Jack & Other Exclusive Name Brands.
Located Next to Tons of Toys - S. Memorial Drive
Hours: 10-6 Mori. - Sat (Fri. & Sat til 9)
I
I
I
I
I
J
Visit Our Other Locations
Hwy. 64 East Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C.
Wed. -Sat. 9-5
Hwy. 70 West
Morehead City, N.C.
Wed. - Sat9-5





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4. 1988 7
VNNOl Ni. 1
. . a Sun
.) m 5 00
one blue
sound
L-TOftO
Ins hairstyling
1E CUT 700
K INS WTLCOME
i RVING ECU
M CAMP1 S
JJjLS
PORTION
EE Pregnancy
Testing
F 8:30-4 p.m.
at. 10-1 p.m.
ngle Women's
lealth Center
00-433 2930
.school and hat it
(tend
IB
QRS
GOSPEL CHOIR
HRISTMAS PARADE
R-IX-RESIDENCE
- i ,i
;h the
�ram.
� may �
n area
X FORENSIC SOCIETY
giate
peaking, Oral Interpre
:� . relation?
ECU Forensks Society is for vou
. a night al 8 00 in 211
I i atrc Arts Building
age
r
IS
t
t-
it
iV
;r
is
v
1.
at
�g
�d
at
e.
rv
in
j
ts
it
Vs
SO
to
it
L
it
i-
pi
u-
m
or
ly
pc
: I
Dr
n
re
ic
to
lg
ve
d
Dk
or
s

H
11
rr
te
ve
10
I
,
�8
ne
Bush has slim lead over Dukakis!
WASHINGTON (AP) -
(ieorge Bush commands an earlv
autumn advantage over Michael
Dukakis in the Electoral College,
but the campaign for the White
House will be decided in a series
o( close, hard fought contests
irom California to Connecticut,
according to an Associated Press
survey of the 50 states.
Republicans sound confident
following a strong, late summer
urge bv Bush. Democrats project
concern but sav there's ample
me to overtake the vice presi-
lent.
"Dukakis won the primary on
is Massachusetts miracle claim,
but now people are remembering
what government, the economy,
.as under Jimmy Carter said
bny Feather, executive director
. t the Republican Party in Mis-
ouri, where the two candidates
are rated even.
Said Democratic Rep. Charles
Menholm of Texas, where
hakakis is the underdog: "It's not
aver vet bv any stretch oi the
,magination. But he's got to goon
the offensive" against Bush's
charges oi liberalism.
The nationwide public opin-
ion surveys indicate a narrow
advantage for Bush, although the
same surveys show enough unde-
cided and loosely committed vot-
ers to alter the outcome of the race
at the last moment.
Adding to the uncertainty is a
campaign caelendar that includes
a debate Wednesday betweren
vice presidential candidates Dan
Qua vie and Lloyd Bentsen, fol-
lowed by a return engagement
between Dukakis and Bush in
mid-October. After that comes a
three-week sprint to the finish line
punctuated by a barrage of televi-
sion commercials.
Bush appears to be solidify-
ing much of the traditional Re-
publican base across the South
and Rocky Mountain We.4e sur-
vey showed 1 le is rated the solid
leader in Florida with its 21 elec-
toral votes and seems to be open-
ing a little daylight between him-
self and the Democrats in Texas,
although Dukakis is waging an
intensive campaign in running
mate Lloyd Bentsen's home state.
Dukakis is given the edge in
several traditional Democratic
rtv strongholds, including
York with its 36 electoral
votes, but has not been as success-
ful as Bush in cementing his own
political base.
The A survey of Political
Leaders, Independent Analysts
and Public Opinion Polls in all 50
states turned up frequent expres-
sions of concern among demo-
crats over the shape of Dukakis'
campaign, tempered with hope
that the Massachusetts governor
may be on the rebound after suf-
fering a political free fall earlier in
the campaign.
Republicans who were wor-
ried when Bush was down in the
polls last summer are smiling at
their fortunes now that he is
showing surprising strength in
states like New York, Pennsylva-
nia and Iowa that figured to be
among his weakest.
The Electoral College lineup
looks like this:
- Bush's strongest region is
probably the South, where he
leads almost everywhere.
Bentsen's presence on the ticket
almost guarantees a close race in
Texas, however, and Dukakis has
strong support in North Carolina
and border states such as Arkan-
sas, Kentucky and Tennessee.
- California and Washington
on the West Coast are rated as
tossups, with Dukakis given the
edge in Oregon. Bush appears to
have firmed up support in tradi-
tional Republican states such as
Utah, Idaho and Wyoming, but
the Dukakis campaign says it has
strength in New Mexico and
Montana.
- Farm states such as Kansas
and Nebraska are leaning to Bush,
while Dukakis harbors hope for
the Dakotas. Dukakis is favored in
Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota
in the upper Midwest. Dukakis
has no hopes
for Quayle's home state of
Indiana. The Democrat seems to
have a slight edge in Illinois, but
Democrats concede he is proba-
bly slightly behind in Ohio and
Missouri. Republicans see a nar-
row advantage in Michigan.
- The Northeast is Dukakis'
strongest region, and despite
closer-than-expected public polls,
he is regarded as the likely winner
at home in Massachusetts as well
as New York, Rhode Island,

EVERY TUESDAY
NTTE IS COLLEGE NTTE 8-11
ONLY $2.00
ADMISSION WITH COLLEGE I.O.
.75 SKATE RENTAL
104 E. RED BANKS RD � GREENVILLE. NC � 756 6000
Stress and depression can be
avoided with a few measures
What is stress and depres-
sion and what can be done to
avoid them?
Stress is your body's re-
sponse to any demand. A certain
amount of stress may be helpful,
for example, by helping vou get a
paper written on time or bv doing
well in a competition.
Too much stress can make
vou uncomfortable and can
shorten your life. Signs oi stress
include aches, especially head-
aches, neckaches, and backaches
nervous stomach diarrhea,
chest pains, grouchiness, eating
and drinking too much or too
little, inability to sit still or concen-
trate, insomnia, and having vague
fears about known or unk-nown
events.
Sleep at least 6-8 hours a
night; sleep helps the body to re-
store itself. Exercise such as
swimming, running, and aerobics
reduces tension and increases
mental alertness. Diet influences
your reaction to stress; caffeine
increases feelings of anxiety. Cut
down on sugar, salt, alcohol, junk
food, and caffeine.
Spend time alone each day
to give yourself a chance to un-
wind and focus on yourself. Use
v our friends as sounding boards;
sharing daily experiences with
them can be relaxing and helpful
at the same time. Consider taking
courses in time arrangement or
stress reduction. All of us can
benefit from these programs; they
an help us put our busy lives
back into perspective.
Depression is a mood dis-
turbance; feelings of sadness,
disappointment or loneliness are
present and may cause the de-
pressed person to withdraw from
;vople and activities, and de-
velop physical discomfort such as
aches, pains, fatigue, poor diges-
'ion, weight loss or gain, and sleep
disturbances. The person also
loses the ability to enjoy life.
Depression can occur as the
result oi a loss death of a loved
one. the loss oi a relationship, or
the loss of dn object or dream of a
major emotional meaning. De-
pression may alsooccur without a
recognizable cause.
Some feelings of depres-
sion are "normal" or common
there is no need to feel weak or
ashamed. Most depressed people
do not attempt suicide, however;
all talk of suicide should be taken
seriously. Help should be ob-
tained immediately.
- see a physician tor a complete
checkup
- take a break for a favorite activ-
ity. Have some fun!
- get some exercise
- DO NOT ignore himher
- DO NOT trv to "cheer up" the
person
Needed
LAYOUT ARTIST
Immediately
Apply In Person At
The East Carolinian
L
(2nd floor, Publications Building in front of Joyner Library)
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
INSTANT CASH LOANS
�DIAMONDS
�STERLING SILVERY
�TELEVISIONS
�GUNS
�JEWELRY
� GUITARS
�COINS
�CAMERAS
�STEREOS
�VCR'S
752-0322
CORNER OF 10TH & DICKINSON
GREENVILLE
SMALL
Cheese Pizza $4.95
Cheese and 1 Topping$5.60
Each Additional Topping $ .65
SPECIALTY PIZZAS
MEDIUM LARGE
$6.85 $8.95
$7.65 $9.90
$ .80 .95
DELIVERY
Cheese Lovers $6.90
Meat Lovers$6.90
Supreme $6.90
Super Supreme$7.55
$9.25
$9.25
$9.25
$10.05
$11.80
$11.80
$11.80
$12.75
FAMOUS PIZZA HUT QUALITY
�GENEROUS TOPPINGS
�REAL CHEESE
�FRESH VEGETABLES
�DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY NEVER FROZEN
DELIVERY HOURS
SUNTHURS. 4 PM TO MIDNIGHT
FRI.&SAT. 4 PM TO 1:00 AM
DELIVERY CHARG75
���t GOOD FOR JUST 7 DAYS!
PIZZA HUT PAIRS!
DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PHONE 752-4445
I
2 MEDIUM CHEESE PIZZAS
FOR ONLY $9.99
$1.29 PER TOPPING COVERS BOTH PIZZAS
coupon expires OcL 10. 1988)
)
c
X
I
i
(in
in. i
East Carolina's
Finest Tea
� East Carolina
Tea Party
� Every Thursday
at 4:00 p.m.
� Free Admission
All Night
� $3 First Iced Tea
$2 For 2nd, 3rd, & 4th
plus you keep the Mason Jar
Free non-alcoholic drinks for
designated drivers.
Must be 21 to enter and have valid I.D.
High Energy Music provided by Connie
Rogers, Greenville's Hottest D.J.
RAMADA INN
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
HOMECOMING
Gigantic Warehouse Sale
Just For You
NOTHING OVER $10
FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY
-mIACK

Tom Togs
Factory Outlet
1900 Dickinson Avc
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Trocadero Tom Togs Fashions
Come Visit A New Image Featuring
1st Quality At Off Prices Originals From
Panama Jack & Other Exclusive Name Brands.
Located Next to Tons of Toys - S. Memorial Drive
Hours: 10-6 Mon. - Sat. (Fri. & Sat. til 9)
I
I
I
I
J
Visit Our Other Locations
Hwy. 64 East Between
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C.
Wed. -Sat. 9-5
Hwy. 70 West
Morehead City, N.C.
WedSat 9-5





I
The ECU Homecoming committee
Sonja Love
Tyler Hall
Katherine Kirk
Cotton Hall
i tt
Teddy Burroughs
Pirate Crew
Tammy Tadlock
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Deborah Watkins
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Elizabeth Batson
Zeta Tau Alpha
Cheri Matthews
Delta Sigma Theta

Kristina Muth
Chi Omega

Tammie Daugherty
Alpha Kappa Alpha
Kirsten Eakes
Delta Zeta
Wendy Klich
Pi Kappa Alpha
Paige Barber
Greene Hall
Kathryn Sepenzis
Kappa Alpha
Emily Procter
Alpha Delta Pi
� ��: .
Shawn Bowden
ECU Gospel Choir
Melissa Smith
Clement Hall
Barbara Lamb
Alpha Zi Delta
Mae Woodard Yelverton
Early Childhood Education
T
prese
Susie Tolar
Medical Records Association
IWthanv Robinson
Slav Mall
Tracey Holderfield
Beta Theta Pi

r
Michelle I ud
International I i
1 i N alma
Upha Phi
AmyO' Dell
Scott Hall
ii' Val
Leisure Svstems Studies
Delynda Carter
Alpha Omicron Pi
1 twanna Richardson
Kappa Alpha Psi
Cam Ward
PanhclUnic Council
Christine Cioto
Umstead Hall
Kris Kelley
Sigma Sigma Sigma





T
I
1
e
presents the 1988 Court Candidates
Bethany Robinson
Slav Hall
ai tvCvr
ssiKUtlOn

,4
�"
Michelle Tudor
International Language Organization
field
ta Pi
y O Dell
tt Hall

'
Li. W alma
Alpha Pn.
m
i Carter
Alpha Omicron Pi
Angie Neal
Leisure Systems Studies
Levanna Rtchardson
Kappa Alpha Psi
ggg&yjh �f
(am Ward
Panhellenic Council


'
f W �" -arl
W
Christine Cioto
I mstead Hall
Kris Kelley
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Valeria Lassiter
Expressions Magazine
Jan Schuller
Sigma Alpha Iota
Vira Robinson
Omega Psi Phi
Susanna Hudson
Ambassadors
Kim Ives
White Hall
Sonia Pickens
Phi Beta Sigma
"
Missy Cleveland
Alpha Sigma Phi
Bonnie Armentrout
Theta Chi
Rana Harris
Student Union
I H
Laura Clark
Fletcher Hall
Cynthia McMurray
Jones Hall
Noelle Hogan
Lambda Chi Alpha
Pam Soucv
American Marketing Associ ition
Hannah Hooks
Carret Hall
Ramona Brady
Pi Kappa Phi
Lyn Harris
Pure (lold Dancers
Marta Joyner
Kappa Sigma
Kim Bowen
Cheerleaders
I





I
t
f
10
Till: EASTCAROI IN1AN
IKTOI1CR 4, 1W8
Gardner, Rand go after the issues in debate
GREENSBORO (AP) - Re-
publican fim Gardner accused his
Democratic opponent of being
part of the "arrogant" leadership
in the Legislature, while Tonv
Rand questioned Gardner's fit-
ness for office in the only sched-
uled televised debate between
thecandidates for lieutenant gov-
ernor.
Gardner said that under the
leadership of Rand, who isSenate
majority leader and chairman fo
the Senate Base Budget Commit-
tee, the state had moved back-
ward, not forward in addressing
education and road con struct ion
needs.
"1 would have assumed that
under this leadership he would
have moved ahead in great
stride tor North Carolina Gar-
dener said
"We've had a vacuum of it in
the General Assembly Rand
later noted Gardner's business
failures in the 1970s and said,
"His ability to manage his affairs
is somewhat suspect And he
touted the legislature's accom-
plishments in improving public
education in North Carolina.
"At a time when business
and government leaders across
our state have been working to-
gether hand in hand to make pub-
lic schools better. Mr. Gardner
has been absent with no excuse
Rand said. "Myopponent simply
isn't qualified to lead the fight to
make our public schools better
The debate was held at the
Bryan School of Business at the
University of North Carolina at
Greensboro. The UNC Center for
Public Televisions broadcast the
debate live, but 10 to 15 minutes
were lost because of technical dif-
ficulty caused by rain. The pro-
gram will be rcbroadcast at 8 p.m.
today.
Each candidate was allowed
a one-minute opening statement.
Tlien, each was required to an-
swer two questions from spon-
sorsol the event. Thecandidates
then fielded questions from a
panel of three state political re-
porters. Each then answered two
questions prepared by hisoppo-
nent Each was allowed a two-
minute closing statement.
Foreclosure on PTL?
( OLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) �
Another major creditor wants to
be allowed to foreclose on TTI.
property. This one Fairfax Sav-
ings and Loan of Baltimore �
helped finance construction oi
Heritage USA's hotel, retail mall
and water park.
Lawyers for Fairfax said in
papers filed last week in U.S.
Bankruptcy Court that since PTL
missed its Sept. 10 payment and
did not ask for an extension, they
should be allowed to "take imme-
diate possession oi all rents, prof-
its and revenues
During PTL's years of rapid
growth under founder Jim
Bakker, Fairfax loaned money to
help build its major attractions:
the Heritage Grand Hotel, water
park, conference center and retail
mall called "Main Street USA as
well as the unfinished Heritage
Towers Hotel.
The lending agency has a
$12.2 million claim against PTL in
bankruptcy court. PTL was or-
dered bv the court last year to
make monthlv payments of
$ 120,000 to Fairfax. When the tele-
vision ministry's revenues con-
tinued to dwindle, the court re-
duced the payments to $5 per
occupied room or $60,000 plus ten
percent of the gross retail and rent
from the mall shops.
Fairfax said PTLdid not make
the Sept. 10 payment for the
month of August and did not
produce the monthly operating
report that was to accompany the
payment.
No hearing date has been
scheduled yet to hear the motion,
but a hearing to hear several other
motions in the case has been set
for Oct. 17.
Also on that day, Bankruptcy
Judge Rufus Reynolds will con-
sider a motion to foreclose filed by-
First Mortgage Investment Co. of
Greensboro, N.C which holds
the note on about 10 acres of PTL
property, including the television
and radio editing facilities.
Reynolds also will consider
during that hearing motions by
Fairfax and another major credi-
tor � accountants Arthur An-
dersen and Co. of Charlotte, N.C.
� to convert the case to Chapter 7,
which would close the television
ministry and put its assets on the
auction block, one bv one.
Rand said that he would re-
form the budget process by in-
volving the governor in the for-
mation of the base and expansion
budgets enacted by the legislature
each vear. This way, the governor
would have to take some respon-
sibility for the final spending bill
before it is passed, Rand said.
"1 propose that he come to the
Legislature when they complete
the base budget process and that
he gives his ideas and give his
opinion on what the Legislature
has done Rand said. "I also pro-
pose that e do the same thing in
the expansion budget so the gov-
ernor can be a meaningful part of
the budget process
Gardner said he wants to
remove partisanship from the
Legislature. "Everyone in the
Legislature has a responsibility
once the election is over to work
for the best legislation for every
citizen of this state Gardner
said. "What we've had is a hostile
Legislature working against the
governor of North Carolina on al-
most each and every single is-
sue
Gardner sought to attach
himself to Gov. Jim Martin, the
incumbent Republican running
for re-election against Lt. Gov.
Bob Jordan, a Democrat. Gardner
invoked Martin's name during
several responses to questions,
touting proposals pushed by the
Martin administration.
Supporters of both candi-
dates moved quickly to declare
their man the winner.
"Rand clearly had more com-
mand of the facts and the issues
said Stephanie Bass the press
spokeswoman. Gardener was
quite vague and he showed he
knows little of the workings of
state government or the budget
State Republican Party Chair-
man Jack Hawke said Gardner
won. "He had the chance to talk
about his issues Hawke said.
The debate was sponsored by
the League of Women Voters; the
Junior League of Greensboro; the
Greater Greensboro Merchants
Association; the Greensboro Area
chamber of Commerce, the
Greensboro Pulpit Forum, the
Greensboro Jaycees; and the
Women's Professional Forum
USDA Choice Beef Top
Round Roast, London Broil
Roast & Full Cut Boneless
ROUND STEAK
USDA Choice
Family Pack
CUBE
STEAK
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, October 9, 1988.
USDA
Ml
WHITE POTATOES u-sno. 1
20 Lb. Bag
New Crop Sweet PotatoesRussett
BAKING POTATOES Lb
DIET PEPSI,
DIET PEPSI
FREE
California
HONEYDEWS
New Crop Rome Or
RED DELICIOUS
APPLES
jHotty Farms Grade A
LEG
QUARTERS
2 LITER
5 Lb. Bag
DIET
MTN DEW,
2 LITER
19
X
Each

PEPSI,
PEPSI FREE,
2 LITER
09
Thompson"
SEEDLESS
GRAPES
EXTRA LOW PRICES-EVERYDAY
I
.no
&32 Ounce
HUNT'S KETCHUP
99
15 Oz ABC-123 With Meatballs;
Beef O-GettiBeef-A-RomDinosaurs With
MeatballsBeef RavioliMini RavioliRoller
CoastersSpaghetti WMeatballsTic Tac
Toes WMeatballs
16 Oz. - FrenchThousand
IslandButtermilk-Herb
PFEIFFER DRESSING
99
10 8 Oz Sausage10 1 Oz Cheese
10 3 Oz Pepperoni10 8 Oz Hamburger
& Combination10.3 Oz Canadian
JENO'S FROZEN PIZZA
18.25 0z. - Assorted
Betty Crocker
CAKE MIXES
5 0z. - 5 Ct Buttermilk
Butter Tastin
HUNGRY JACK BISCUITS
20 Oz. - Frozen Shoestring
INTERSTATE POTATOES
27.5 0z. - Fish Sticks
24 0z - Fish Fillets
MRS. PAUL'S





I
f
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4,1988
Gardner, Rand go after the issues in debate
GREENSBORO (AP) - Re- Rand said that he would re- he gives his ideas and give his for the best legislation for every several responses to questions,
publican Jim Gardner accused his form the budget process by in- opinion on what the Legislature citizen of this state Gardner touting proposals pushed by the
Democratic opponent of being volving the governor in the for- has done Rand said. "I also pro- said. "What we've had is a hostile
part of the "arrogant" leadership rnation of the base and expansion pose that e do the same thing in Legislature working against the
in the Legislature, while Tony budgets enacted by the legislature the expansion budget so the gov- governor of North Carolina on al-
Rand questioned Gardner's fit- each year. This way, the governor emor can be a meaningful part of most each and every single is-
ness for office in the only sched- would have to take some respon- the budget process
uled televised debate between sibility for the final spending bill
thecandidates for lieutenant gov- before it is passed, Rand said. Gardner said he wants to
remove partisanship from the
"I propose that he come to the Legislature. "Everyone in the
Legislature when they complete Legislature has a responsibility
the base budget process and that once the election is over to work
sue.
Gardner sought to attach
himself to Gov. Jim Martin, the
Martin administration.
Supporters of both candi-
dates moved quickly to declare
their man the winner.
"Rand clearly had more com-
mand of the facts and the issues
said Stephanie Bass the press
ernor.
Gardner said that under the
leadership of Rand, who is Senate
majority leader and chairman fo
the Senate Base Budget Commit-
tee, the state had moved back-
ward, not forward in addressing
education and road construction
needs.
"1 would have assumed that
under this leadership he would
have moved ahead in great
strides for North Carolina Gar-
dener said.
"We've had a vacuum of it in
the General Assembly Rand
later noted Gardner's business
failures" in the 1970s and said,
"His ability to manage his affairs
is somewhat suspect And he
touted the Legislature's accom-
plishments in improving public
education in North Carolina.
"At a time when business
and government leaders across
our state have been working to-
gether hand in hand to make pub-
lic schools better, Mr. Gardner
has been absent with no excuse
Rand said. "My opponent simply
isn't qualified to lead the fight to
make our public schools better
The debate was held at the
Bryan School of Business at the
University of North Carolina at
Greensboro. The UNC Center for
Public Televisions broadcast the
debate live, but 10 to 15 minutes
were lost because of technical dif-
ficulty caused by rain. The pro-
gram will be rebroadcast at 8 p.m.
today.
Each candidate was allowed
a one-minute opening statement.
Then, each was required to an-
swer two questions from spon-
sors of the event. The candidates
then fielded questions from a
panel of three state political re-
porters. Each then answered two
questions prepared by hisoppo-
nent. Each was allowed a two-
minute closing statement.
incumbent Republican running spokeswoman. Gardener was
for re-election against Lt. Gov. quite vague and he showed he
Bob Jordan, a Democrat. Gardner knows little of the workings of
invoked Martin's name during state government or the budget
State Republican Party Chair-
man Jack Hawke said Gardner
won. "He had the chance to talk
about his issues Hawke said.
The debate was sponsored by
the League of Women Voters; thf
Junior League of Greensboro; trip
Greater Greensboro Merchants
Association; the Greensboro Area
chamber of Commerce; the
Greensboro Pulpit Forum; the
Greensboro Jaycees; and the
Women's Professional Forum.
i USDA Choice Beef Top
Round Roast. London Broil
Roast & Full Cut Boneless
ROUND STEAK
USDA Choice
Family Pack
CUBE
STEAK
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, October 9, 1988.
USD
TOES us-No-1
20 Lb.
New Crop Rome Or
DELICIOUS
APPLES
Foreclosure on PTL? KjHolW FmS
Grade A
FREE
2 LITER
nuNtYDEWS
5 Lb. Bag
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) �
Another major creditor wants to
be allowed to foreclose on PTL
property. This one � Fairfax Sav-
ings and Loan of Baltimore �
helped finance construction of
Heritage USA's hotel, retail mall
and water park.
Lawyers for Fairfax said in
papers filed last week in U.S.
Bankruptcy Court that since PTL
missed its Sept. 10 payment and
did not ask for an extension, they
should be allowed to "take imme-
diate possession of all rents, prof-
its and revenues
During PTL's years of rapid
growth under founder Jim
Bakker, Fairfax loaned money to
help build its major attractions:
the Heritage Grand Hotel, water
park, conference center and retail
mall called "Main Street USA as
well as the unfinished Heritage
Towers Hotel.
The lending agency has a
$12.2 million claim against PTL in
bankruptcy court. PTL was or-
dered by the court last year to
make monthly payments of
$120,000 to Fairfax. When the tele-
vision ministry's revenues con-
tinued to dwindle, the court re-
duced the payments to $5 per
occupied room or $60,000 plus ten
percent of the gross retail and rent
from the mall shops.
Fairfax said PTL did not make
the Sept. 10 payment for the
month of August and did not
produce the monthly operating
report that was to accompany the
payment.
No hearing date has been
scheduled yet to hear the motion,
but a hearing to hear several other
motions in the case has been set
for Oct. 17.
Also on that day, Bankruptcy
Judge Rufus Reynolds will con-
sider a motion to foreclose filed by
First Mortgage Investment Co. of
Greensboro, N.C which holds
the note on about 10 acres of PTL
property, including the television
and radio editing facilities.
Reynolds also will consider
during that hearing motions by
Fairfax and another major credi-
tor � accountants Arthur An-
dersen and Co. of Charlotte, N.C.
�to convert the case to Chapter 7,
which would close the television
ministry and put its assets on the
auction block, one by one.
QUARTERS
DIET
MTN DEW,
2 LITER
PEPSI,
IPEPSI FREE.
Thompson
SEEDLESS
GRAPES
2 LITER
EXTRA LOW PRICES-EVERYDAY
.VCtAZ.
32 Ounce
HUNT'S KETCHUP
15 Oz. - ABC-123 With Meatballs
Beef O-GettiBeef-A-RoniDinosaurs With
MeatballsBeef RavioliMini RavioliRoller
CoastersSpaghetti WMeatbattsTic Tac
Toes WMeatbate
CHEF B0Y-AR-0EE PAST APS
16 Oz. - FrenchThousand
IslandButtermilk-Herb
PFEIFFER DRESSING
10.8 Oz. Sausage10.1 Oz. Cheese
10.3 Oz. Pepperoni10.8 Oz. Hamburger
& Combination10.3 Oz. Canadian
JENO'S FROZEN PIZZA
5 0z. - 5 Ct. Buttermilk
Butter Tastin'
HUNGRY JACK BISCUITS
18.25 Oz. - Assorted
Betty Crocker
CAKE MIXES
20 Oz. - Frozen Shoestring
INTERSTATE POTATOES
27.5 Oz. - Fish Sticks
24 Oz. - Fish Fillets
MRS. PAUL'S
$uperMoist
J . �'�
'ftlu'fieiul
65
v
$299
30 Ct. - Food Lion Tall
KITCHEN BAGS
$-49
22 Oz. - 40 Off Dawn
DISH DETERGENT
$109
6 Oz. - Assorted Flavors
9-UVES CAT FOOD
389
There is a Food Lion conveniently located near yon
FOOD LION





i
i
THE EASTCAROl INI AN
Features
OCTOBER 4,1988 Page 11
'Punchline' preview tonigh
By ALICIA FORD
StaffWriter
The Student Union will be
presentinga free sneak preview of
the new movie "Punchline" star-
ring Tom Hanks and Sally Field
tonight at 8 p.m. in Hendrix The-
atre.
Written and directed by
David SeltzerTunchline" is a
comedy about two aspiring,
young stand-up comedians.
Academv award-winning
actress Sally Field is best known
for her role as the determined
union organizer in the film
"Norma RaeIn "Punchline she
stars as Lilah Krysick, a house-
wifc-turned-comic who is trying
to make a name for herself in a
New York club called The Gas
Sta tion. Krvsick is mother of three
children, and throughout the
movie she strives to overcome her
insecurities and inhibitions in
order to succeed as a stand-up
comedian.
Tom Hanks first achieved
stardom in the Ron Howard film
"Splash" and has more recently
been praised for his comedic abili-
ties in the summer box office
smash, "Big In "Punchline"
Hanks appears as Steven Gold, a
medical student who wants to be
a heart surgeon but can't stand the
sight of blood. He moonlights at
The Gas Station and everyone
agrees that he is going to be the
next one to become a famous
comic.
After Gold neglects his stud-
ies and flunks out of medical
school, he devotes all of his en-
ergy into being a comedian. Al-
though it is impossible to teach
anyone how to be funny, he tries
to show Krysick that the best rou-
tines are based on your own per-
sonal problems, and that every
situation has a potential humor-
ous content.
Hanks found that being a
stand-up comic is much more
difficult than it looks. "I wanted
my character to be authentic, so I
decided to try out my material in
real comedy clubs. At first I
bombed terribly. In fact, one of
the most important lessons I
learned was how much it hurt to
be really bad
With the help of his comedy
coach Randy Fechter, Hanks per-
fects his routine and succeeds in
portraying the character of Steven
Gold as truly humorous.
"Punchline" features over
twenty real comedians and is cer-
tain to be full of laughs. Passes are
available at The Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center information desk and
free movie posters will be given
away to students presenting a
completed screening pass at the
door.
Dance workshop set for weekend
News Release
On Saturday and Sunday, Oc-
tober 8 and 9, the Theatre Arts
Department of ECU will co-spon-
sor a weekend workshop for
dance teachers in the studios of
the Messick Theatre Arts Center
on the ECU campus in Greenville.
This years guest artists will be
Robert Atwood and Michelle Pi-
ette.
Robert Atwood's expertise as
a ballet instructor has placed him
as a teacher-in-demand on the
faculties of the NYC Joffrey Ballet
School, STEPS, Pineapple Studio,
the Zena Rommctt Dance Asso-
ciation and Connecticut College.
Atwood served as Guest Ballet
Master for the City Contempo-
Robert Atwood, pictured here, will be one of the special quest
instructors during the Fourth Annual Dance Workshop this
weekend.
rary Dance Company of Hong
Kong, was Associate Director of
the Bicentennial Dance Theatre,
and has guest taught for the
Rockford Ballet, the Academy of
the Hong Kong Ballet and the
North Carolina Dance Alliance.
The workshop will include
movement classes, lecturedem-
onstrations and questionanswer
sessions conducted by an accred-
ited faculty of dance movement
specialists.
Atwood performing credits
range from work in musical the-
atre summer stock and the Ameri-
can Dance Machine, to the
Bernhardt and Fokine Ballet
Companies, to the Mimi Garrard
Dance Theatre and the Rebecca
Kelly Dance Company.
He has also choreographed
and directed for musical theatre
and cabaret productions.
Michelle Pictte holds an M.S.
in Sports Medicine from the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin at LaCrosse.
She has a vast knowledge in dance
medicine and is Head Athletic
Trainer and a facultv member at
Ravenscroft School in Raleigh.
In addition to teaching at the
American College Dance Festival
in 1983 and 1986, she has been a
consultant to Daniel Nagrin in
writing of his current book, Sur-
viving As A Dancer
Registration for the two day
workshop will begin Saturday,
October 9, at 9 a.m. in Room 108 of
the Messick Theatre Arts Center.
The registrationfee of $45.00 will
include a buffet lunch on Satur-
day. Classes on Sunday will begin
at 9:30 a.m. and conclude at 5:00
p.m.
Sally Field and Tom Hanks star as two aspiring stand-up comic in "Punchline In a sneak preview,
Student Unions is presenting "Punchline" tonight at 8 p.m. in Hendrix theatre.
Review of home videos
By DAVID TREV1NO
Special to Cast Carolinian
SLEEPING BEAUTY
Directed by Clyde Gcronimi
Written bv Erdman Penner, et
al.
Released through Disney
Home Video
1959color75 minutes
This animated version of the
familiar storv, in which a beauti-
ful princess is bewitched and
sleeps alone waiting to be awak-
ened by the kiss of true love, was
first released to theatres in 1959,
but Walt Disney's Sleeping
Beauty endures as one of the most
charming presentations of the
fairy tale oi romantic love.
The film begins with a bejew-
eled volume opening to a world of
animated dream imagery. Sleep-
ing Beauty contains a cornucopia
of astonishingly vivid surreal
apparitions which range from the
terrifying transformation of the
wicked witch from human forms
into a towering reptilian vision of
enraged evil to the gentle meta-
morphosis of flying arrows and
hurtling boulders into harmless
flowers and fragile bubbles.
The animation is pared down
compared to the cluttered lush-
ness of Snow White and the Seven
Dwarfs or Bambi, but it is cer-
tainly not sparse or barren.
The frames contain less of the
realistic detail which fills the
other works. The drawing in
Sleeping Beauty is sharper, the
edges harder. There is less of the
idealized haze And with the lov-
ers united at last in marriage, the
storybook closes because the fairy-
tale has come to an end.
I'VE HEARD THE MER-
MAIDS SINGING
Written and Directed by Pa-
tricia Rozema
Released through Charter
Entertainment
1987color82 minutes
Sheila McCarthy makes her
feature film debut in this charm-
ing feminist fairy tale from Can-
ada as Polly, the sincere, straight-
forward dreamer who effortlessly
navigates her bicycle around
Toronto snapping photographs of
lovers, skyscrapers, mother
babies, street hockey players and
whatever else strikes her fancy
when she is not fantasizing that
she can fly.
I've Heard the Mermaids
Singing is staged as a stream-of-
consciousness confessional in
front of a video camera. Polly
admits that she is thirty-one years
old, has no family and no lover,
and works as a barely competent
"Girl Friday" with a temporaries
agency. She describes herself as a
"spinster" and an "unsuccessful
career woman
Wonderfully played by Ms.
McCarthy, Polly gets a job work-
ing in a trendy art gallery where
she becomes infatuated with her
confident, sophisticated boss,
Gabrielle (Paule Ballargeon), to
whom she refers as "the curator
Awkward Polly is the an-
tithesis OF the sleek, French-
See WITCHES, page 12
CORRECTION
In the article "Famous more
reknowned for their sub sand-
wiches" printed in Thursday's
The East Carolinian, it was incor-
rectly stated that Famous Pizza
delivers 99-cents pitchers of beer
on Wednesdays.
In fact, no such deliveries are
made. Pitchers of beer are avail-
able at the restaurant for 99 cents
on Wednesdays, but they will no
be delivered. It is, in fact, illegal tc
deliver alcoholic beverages ir
North Carolina.
In addition. Famous Pizza
first opened in 1978 at 300 E. 10th
St. It moved to its present location
100 E. 10th St in 1986.
Famous Pizza serves a varierv
of food in addition to pizzas anc
subs.
We apologize for any incon
venience Thursday's mistakes
might have caused.
Solid Rock'tour draws praise
By DAVID McCREARY
SUff Writer
An enthusiastic crowd of
approximately 600 gathered at
Wright Auditorium on Sunday
night to hear DeGarmo & Key,
The Altar Boys, and comedian
Steve Geyer. These contemporary
Christian performers rocked the
building at several decibels for
about three hours and seemed to
please all onlookers.
The Altar Boys, a three-man
band from Los Angeles, opened
the show with a head liner-level
performance. Sporting black
denim jeans and dangling ear-
rings, these guys filled the stage
with nonstop motion as they
ripped through a short set of
tunes from their latest album
"Against the Grain
Although their music re-
sembles punk-rock style, the Al-
tar Boys were quick to label their
music otherwise. Guitarist-singer
Mark Strand stated, "I classify our
music as rock-and-roll. I have
something to communicate and
this (style) is how I do that And
communicate he did, as Strand
strummed his gu iiar with furious
passion in the last song of the set,
"You Are Loved
As the crowd continued to
edge its way closer to the stage,
bearded comedian Steve Geyer
entertained the crowd with a half-
hour performance of good, clean
humor. Geyer, a Nashville, Ten-
nessee native and former night-
club performer, talked about dat-
ing relationships, struggles with
parents, and his personal relation-
ship with Jesus Christ. "I think
God has a great sense of humor.
Whenever we do something com-
pletely bonehcaded 1 know He
must get a kick out of watching
us said Geyer.
After a brief intermission, the
veteran five-man band DeGarmo
& Key took the stage, filled it with
a multi-colored lightshow, and
opened with several of their clas-
sic hits. The crowd, which had
been standing almost all evening,
began to increase a few notches in
volume and clapped along with
the band's melodic sounds.
Eddie DeGarmo, who carried
a hand-held keyboardsynthe-
sizer, was dressed in a long, black
trenchcoat and gray-and-white
striped pants. Dana Key, with his
brown hair in a pony-tail, was also
wearing a black outfit and
handled an electric guitar.
DeGarmo quickly excited the
crowd by saying, "The Bible says
praise the Lord with a loud noise;
we promise to do our best Dana
Key constantly proved he had the
vocal ability and mastery of his
guitar to handle front and center
stage.
Near the end of the tune
"666 Key showed command of
his instrument by blazing a few
chords under the spotlight.
Drummer Chuck Reynolds kept a
solid back-beat on his raised
Yamaha drum set and Eddie
DeGarmo frequently maneu-
vered to a stationary keyboard
where he flashed bits of synthe-
sized brilliance.
Following a fifteen-minute
break, bassist Tommy Cathey
took center stage wearing a white
hat, black jacket and pants, ivory-
snow tie, and tennis shoes.
Cathey began strumming the
tune to "The Pink Panther" and
some vintage James Bond themes
as the heart-thumping bass vi-
brated the floor of the auditorium.
This partial repertoire in-
spired the fans to gear up for the
second half of the show, which
was nearly perfect. The crowd
sang along with the song "Addy"
and danced in the aisles to "Des-
tined to Win" The tune "Rock
Solid" was the final song as the
band began building toward a
dynamic finish. The crowd then
chanted for an encore and was
treated to "Don't Stop the Music
Aside from the rock-and-roll
aspect of the show, there were
moments of straightforward con-
versation. Dana Key was the pre-
miere spokesman as he chal-
lenged the audience to forget
about the priorities of the world
and to focus on giving glory to
Jesus Christ.
"We love rock-and-roll, but
that's not the reason we came here
tonight. We came to challenge ev-
eryone to make Jesus Christ their
King and Savior said Key.
The concert ended with an
invitation for people to come for-
ward and profess Jesus Christ as
their Lord and Savior. As several
responded to this altar call, the
band closed with "Stand Up and
Be Counted Dana Key then chal-
lenged everyone to stand up for
their beliefs wherever they go.
DeGarmo and Key rocked Wright Auditorium Sunday with the contemporary Christian sounds of
"Solid Rock






!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4.198�
Ohio Ballet coming to ECU
K I New Bureau
The Ohio Ballet, one of the
nation's leading ballet compa-
nies, will perform at ECU Wed-
nesday, Oct. 12, at 8 p.m. Their
program, consisting of four re-
cently-choreographed dance
pieces, is scheduled for Wright
Auditorium as the first event of
ECU's 1988-89 Performing Arts
Series.
The performance will consist
oi two romantic dance pieces cho-
reographed by the company's
founder-director, Heinz Poll �
"Summer Night based on the
"Romanze" from Chopin's Con-
certo No. 1 in E Minor and "Trip-
tych danced to Mendelssohn's
Piano Concerto No. 2 in D Minor
along with "experimentalist"
dance pieces by Laura Dean and
Robert Barnett based on contem-
porary music.
Founded in Akron, Ohio, in
1968, the 22-member company
became a professional touring
group 10 years ago and has since
performed in 162 cities and 36
states, as well as in Europe and
South America.
This year, the Ohio Ballet tour
schedule includes a week-long
return engagement at the Joyce
Theater in Manhattan, an
extensive California coastal tour
and a fall series of performances
in the southeastern states.
Dance critics have praised the
company's blend of modern
dance techniques with classical
ballet forms.
'Their appealingly open,
unaffected manner and the emo-
Thc Ohio Ballet, one of the nation
ECU Performing Arts Series,
"experimentalist" dance pieces.
tional honesty of Poll's dances are
rarer virtues than properly
pointed feet said Christine
Temin of the Boston Globe. "One
of the most pleasant surprises of
the dance season has turned out to
be the Ohio Ballet which turns out
to be uniquely itself said Anna
Kisselgof f of the New York Times.
In the Ohio Ballet, each
dancer is treated as an important
component in the whole, with no
favored few "stars In selecting
dancers, Poll says he looks for
strong classical technique and
such contemporary dance values
as vitality, athleticism and ncr-
's leading ballet companies, is comi
The Ohio Ballet will perform
sonality.
As a European whose career
asa solo dancer developed in Ger-
many and France, Poll has ob-
served a certain "energy and per-
sonality" in American dancers.
"When I came to America, I
noticed people walked differently
here he commented. "Here
there was a casualness and uncon-
cern. I try to capture that in the
company
The Ohio Ballet's ECU per-
formance is funded in part by a
grant from the North Carolina
Arts Council and the National
ng to ECU Oct. 12. Kicking off The
"Summer Night" along with
Endowment for the Arts.
Tickets are $14 each for the
general public and $7 for students
and youth and are available at the
Central Ticket Office, telephone
(919) 757-6611, ext. 266.
'Witches of Eastwick' on video
Continued from page 11
speaking, slightly older Gabrielle.
Polly aches to learn everything
her self-assured role model seems
to have so easily mastered.
Before working at the art gal-
lery Polly was content to cover the
walls of her tiny apartment with
the photographs she took, but it is
not too long before, like everyone
else in Gabrielle's circle, she be-
comes a real artist. And, not sur-
prisingly, it turns out that the rcd-
1 aired Polly has something im-
portant to teach the worldly Gab-
rielle.
Despite Ms. Rozema's rather
predictable script and less than
extraordinary direction, I've
Heard the MermaidsSingingisan
unusually entertaining experi-
ence. This is primarily a result of
the endeari ng performance of Ms.
McCarthy. Fellow Canadian Ron
Graham has described her as
looking and sounding "as if
C.oldie Hawn had a daughter by
Woody Woodpecker You have
to see her.
THE WITCHES OF EAST-
WICK
Directed by George Miller
Written by Michael Cristofer
Released through Warner
Home Video
1987color118 minutes
"Women. A mistake? Or did
He do this to us on purpose?"
The Witches of Eastwick is a
post-feminist fairy tale which
begins on a dark and stormy night
when three beautiful New Ent
land matrons (Susan Sarandon,
Michelle Pfeiffer and Cher) seem-
ingly conjure up the answer to
their boredom with the local crop
of tedious, uptight men. The ful-
fillment o( their longing is Darvl
Van Home, the devil incarnate,
brilliantly protrayed in a torrent
of smirks and raised eyebrows by
Jack Nicholson.
Paunchy and eccentrically
dressed. Van Home seduces all
three repressed women, most
memorably Cher, after lunch, and
they share a relationship which
both infuriates and titillates the
entire town. There is a falling-out,
though, and the women wind up
with Van Home's palatial estate,
his money and his children.
The film presents a sleek and
polished surface. With the bodies
of Susan Sarandon, Michelle
Pfeiffer and Cher frequently and
lovingly caressed by the camera,
it is an eminently watchablc film.
Mr. Nicholson is certainly enter-
taining if not so visually pleasing.
The problems with The
Witches oi Eastwick are, surpris-
ingly, with director George Miller
and writer Michael Cristofer.
The Australian Miller, well-
known for his Mad Max films,
never captured the look and feel
of Nathaniel Hawthorne country
essential to the film. Periodic in-
sertions of postcard vistas failed
to create a believable New Eng-
land coastal town.
Mr. Cristofer's screenplay is
full of unanswered questions and
unexplained motivations. It was
especially disappointing when
one considers that it came from
the author of The Shadow Box.
The Witches of Eastwick may
mark the return of "real" men to
the American cinema, but it
ended with women in control and
me relieved the film was over.
Videos courtesy of East Coast
Music and Video.
DOUBLE FEATURE
WEDNESDAY
October 5
At Hendrix
8:00 pm
"AIM APOCALYPTIC
COMEDY OF
SEXUAL MANNERS
� Hi'twrman. i'hiije oice
"A TRIUMPH OF A NEW SORT
FROM BRITAIN'S TOP TEAM
� Smjmnim M Sinnimmm, S Y. Past
Get Laid
A SCARING COWED FROM
-C MAKERS OF MY SCAUTirUL LAUNORETTE '
� �-�� ������ xUtBCOtft
Pitti Rocks
you explore
m entirety
new sexual
TT
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO
12TH WEEK OF PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost.
Pregnancy Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further information, call 832-0535 (toll
free number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays. General anesthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
�3. WML
You Can Take
Your Utility Bill
And
Mail It
Or
Pay It At A Local Bank
GUC is remodeling its main office, so the entire first
floor and the drive-thru window are closed. While
renovations continue, it will be more convenient for
you to just drop it in the mail, use our automatic Bank
Draft program, or pay it right on campus at the ECU
Student Bank. Other banks which accept GUC pay-
ments are as follows: Barclays of N.C Branch Banking
& Trust Co First Citizens Bank & Trust Co First
Federal Savings and Loan, Peoples Bank & Trust Co
Planters National Bank & Trust Co Wachovia Bank &
Trust.
When our remodeling is finished, we'll be able to
serve you better. If you have any questions, please call
us at 752-7166.
Greenville rTTQS� Utilities
FANTASTIC
FALL AIR FARES
FROM
GREENVILLE
NEW YORK. . .
BUFFALO
ATLANTA
ORLANDO . . .
CHICAGO
CHARLOTTE .
WASHINGTON
BALTIMORE . .
DALLAS
OMAHA
MIAMI
$158 DES MOINES.
$148 LOS ANGELES
$168 HOUSTON
$190 SEATTLE
$183 CLEVELAND. . .
$58 DETROIT
$148 PHOENIX
$148 PHILADELPHIA
$268 DENVER
$218 COLUMBUS OH
$200 ST.LOUIS
$278
$338
$228
$348
$148
$158
$328
$178
$264
$138
$198
Call Us For The Lowest Fare To Your Destination
Read the Fine Print A). drps are fOunrj "in 'om Grppnv'lP rra�a- wtrirtbuti ��� t�.�
" wi- � o w � �3' es. ons apply These ares a'e sur I - ,
nce -eserva os a-e qed P-tps based on o� Wa travel Monday noon tn,u rZr� - - - a!e
.�� � changeable and mus! be purchased �itt�n 24 hou-s ot esea' � s Fan
-ares .e- -a-
CALL ITG FOR HOLIDAY RESERVATIONS N0W!
frs
J
TRAVEL CENTER
TNI PLAZA-GMEMVILLE
MONFRI. 9 A.M. 'TIL 5 PJ.
355-5075
ECU SPIRIT-
GREAT IN '88!
Homecoming 1988 Events
Thursday, October 6 - Pep Rally
7 p.m. Ficklen Stadium
Featuring: Tlie Marching Pirates,
Tlie Pure Gold Dancers, and More
Court Candidates will be introduced
and the 8 finalists will be announced!
Free tee Shirts to the first 200 fans
Saturday, October 8 - Parade
10 a.m. - Starts at 10th & Elm
and travels down 5th Street
Bands, Floats, Homecoming Court, and Lots More
Amn
(( I,S)-TimCarr
sity of Massachusetts
a big tan of U2, made it a
catch the band on a
telecast.
It turned out thegroul
formance was part j
International's "Cor. 1
Hope" tour, designed k
duce the human r j
students ust like Carrier
And it worked In whai
be one of the most sue
political recruiting 1
cent campus hi arrj
ther peopli
ganization
UMass chapter
Nationwide, the
I high s
l( rs grew to "more th
ted Peter 1 ai
membership fl
"Idon'l
with music
whoistakii
m intern with
national (A
equate it w
coursel
the group, wh

to resp �
cizc s th
� cience i -
ers - and v
penalty
d
ot U.S. student i
involved with I .1
"nonpartisa I
been able to build
port in as si rl I
Intei
- udd terrible I
all those new men j
ing si
- time it's
"1 luman Rights!

Chapman, Sting
and issou Ml
"It's important to se�
certs - and our rtst
Environme
mad over ?.
WILMINGTON
door balloon launch
ten some folks � Stin
want them d
"Releas
traditional - j
burn, a W
lawyer who r
himsell as an emit
until he saw a p i I
turtle lool
n.
�ctv. I
balloons g
come down ar I J
in the ocean.
those and the) die. Evi
loves sea turl - � '� i
TheWilmii tonMorninj
Wa
examining litt i
begun talking to l J
and city Ol -
the practice ot outd r
launches.
"It's not a m
- e. but it
said - m the
coming a ma
A few weeks
launch marked theofl
rung ot re5 1 !
Thalian W in Wilm j
On Frida) Nal I
MIA Da) f
launched in New
County to honor � v -j
linians listed I
action The launch u as -a
by the local Veterans
Wars.
Washburn said I
commander ot the VF
whether the could d
else to honor the veteraf
60-gun salute.
'There s not
about it im Williams
manding officer tor tl
chapter, said hours Kj
ceremony Friday.
Ot Washburn scall.
son said, "1 think he's jus
on the telephone I ve ne
a fish with any rubber irj
Andv Wood, a natj
the NC Aquarium at Fcj
said he has been warnirj
about the danger of out!
loon launches for 10 yf
with little success.
-Virtually every to
the beach I find balloonl
READ
CA





iVTOBLFU. 1988
3
I
Presents
-Jn the Fiesta Room.
Join us for
Drinks & Appetizers.
Must be 21 or older.
C
E
ES. . .$278
-ESS338
.$228
. .$348
f . .$148
$158
$328
HIA .$178
$264
OH$138
$198
istination
ONSNOW!
55-5075
IIRIT-
Nf88!
988 Events
ep Rally
m
irates,
d Wore
duced
kneed!
tans
arade
Elm
reet
i Lots More
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4,1988 13
Amnesty
(CPS)- Tim Carrier, a Univcr- students-as one of the ways we're Kotkin's in the majority. already helped triple attendance-
sity of Massachusetts student and building a base of support for Unlike some other activist to 35 people-at the OU chapter's
a big fan of U2, made it a point to human rights said Ellen Cull of groups, Amnesty seems to believe fall meeting,
catch the band on a 1986 MTV Amnesty's Northeast office. that "the more the merrier ob- About 40 students were in-
telecast. Building it that fast, however, served Roger Williams, a reporter spired enough by news of the
It turned out the group's per- can cause pioblems for a group. for Foundation News, which cov- concerts to attend an Amnesty
jormanoe was part of Amnesty Integrating such vast num- crs charitable and volunteer or- organization meeting at Indiana
International's "Conspiracy of bers of new members "strain our ganizations. University in September.
Hope" tour, designed to intro- resources confessed jack "The more people involved Reporter Williams thinks
duce the human rights group to Rendler, who helps coordinate Williams explained, "the greater another key to AI's success is that,
students just like Carrier. AI's campus chapters, and, inev- t,ie pressure they can bring to once the students get to their local'
And it worked. In what had to itably, brought in a lot of people governments to respect human campus meeting, they get to
who were fans of music, not rights
human rights. Recruiting all those warm
"I know Sting sings about it or bodies, moreover, has been "good
something one Indiana Univer- for Amnesty he said.
be one of the most successful mass
political recruiting efforts in re-
cent campus history, Carrier, like
30,00 other people, joined the or-
ganization, eventually founding a sity student said when asked why
UMass chapter. she was attending a campus AI
Nationwide, the 250 campus meeting,
and high school Amnesty chap- That attitude, Amnesty offi-
ters grew to "more than 1,000 re- cials say, was the source of their
ported Peter Larson of the group's problems after the 1986 tour,
membership office. "The 'Conspiracy' tour re-
"1 don't even equate Amnesty called Allen Hailey, a University
with music anymore Carrier, of Oklahoma junior, "got more
who is taking this term off to work people involved, but some
as an intern with Amnesty Inter- weren't getting the message,
UMass student Carrier
thought it's been especially good
for the human rights issue.
"Most who follow the cause
he contended, "don't do it be-
cause it's a rock star thing. Those
people get washed out after the
concerts are over
Amnesty International USA
choose from a cafeteria assort-
ment of ways to end torture
around the world.
"Some people can fly to
Southeast Asia to inspect prisons
if they like he said. "Others only
need to commit themselves to
writing a letter once a month
Even if students don't stick
with Amnesty, Hironaka points
out, they become "more con-
scious of serious things
"Young people need to real-
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greenvilfe,NC
Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
and Sorbet
312 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
758-0000
Open Friday, Saturday. Sunday til midnight
BUY 1,
GET 1 FREE
YOGURT BLEND-IN!
Coupon expires 10-11-88
Executive Director Jack Hcaley ize the power they can have over
national (AI), said. "Now all I
equate it with is human rights
Of course the main purpose of
the group, whose efforts won the
1978 Nobel Trize, is to lobbv gov
noting some saw it as this week's
cause.
Added Loala Hironaka,
whose University of California at
Berkeley chapter grew from 200 to
ernments worldwide to get them 500 members after the "Conspir
to respect human rights. It pubii- acy" concerts: "What happened in
cizes the cases of "prisoners of
conscience" - or political prison-
ers - and works to end the death
penalty.
And while a healthy handful
of U.S. students always has been
involved with the issue, few
"nonpartisan" groups have ever
been able to build campus sup-
port in as short a time as Amnesty
International did in 1986.
1986 is that you have a lot of
people join up, but you don't have
time to form them
It was hard, Hironaka said, to
educate the new members about
Amnesty's strictly nonpartisan,
independent stance.
"Amnesty is supposed to be
nonpartisan, but students are
sometimes using it in partisan
ways she said. "You'd like to
have the students understand
And this month, despite hav
ing had a terrible time integrating Amnesty's mandate
all those new members two years Steve Kotkin, also of the
ago, the group is actively recruit- Berkeley chapter, called it "a
ing students again. question of philosophy
This time it's called the "Some are for a smaller, tight-
"Human Rights Now tour, and knit group where all the members
features Bruce Springsteen, Tracy are informed and involved. Oth-
Chapman, Sting, Peter Gabriel crs want a broader organization,
and Senegal's Youssou N'Dour. I'm partial to greater numbers
"It'simportant to see thecon- myself. We can always educate
certs - and our efforts to organize people after thev join up
Environmentalist lawyer hopping
mad over balloon launches
concedes AI has always had a
modest attrition rate among its
members, but that the huge vol-
ume of new members after the
1986 tour gave Amnesty a new
edge: "Now there's depth
So the group is out recruiting
again. This time (it also mounted
lower-key concerts in the late sev-
enties and early eighties) there are
only U.S. three stops - Philadel-
phia, Los Angeles and Oakland -
for the "Human Rights Now
tour that will touch down in India,
Europe, Japan, Africa, Latin
America and perhaps even the
Soviet Union before ending.
But at the same time, AI has
designated the second week in
October a U.S. campus activities
week, complete with lectures and
concerts to raise awareness of the
issue.
"We'll have an Oklahoma
Human Rights Now! concert with
local bands OU's Hailey prom-
ised.
While Rendler doesn't expect
the new tour to generate as many
new American members as the
1986 effort, Hailey reported it has
the future and over their own
destiny Peter Gabriel told the
Washington Post. "If you follow
the line of the cynics on compas-
sion fatigue, you end up with a
world that doesn't care, that feels
impotent, that is unable to voice
its feelings or to have any influ-
ence over its own life, and that's
very self-destructive
COPIES 5 $
(Self Service 8 12 x 11 white bond)
ACCU
758-2400
Fast Copies For Fast Times
(Next to Chico's in the Geogretown Shops)
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member oi the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you re part ot a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on tne right means you command respect as an Armv officer. It you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call toll free 1-800-USA-ARMY.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
th�
WILMINGTON (AP) - Out-
door balloon launches have got-
ten some folks so stirred up they
want them stopped.
"Releasing balloons is pretty
traditional said Jonathan Wash-
burn, a Wilmington real estate
lawyer who never thought of
himself as an environmentalist
until he saw a pictureof what a sea
turtle looked like after it ate a
ballon.
"Actually, it's littering. The
balloons go up. They've got to
come down and they come down
in the ocean. The sea turtles eat
those and they die. Everybody
loves sea turtles Washburn told
The Wilmington Morning Star.
Washburn said he has been
examining littering laws and has
begun talking to local lawmakers
and city officials about curbing
the practice of outdoor balloon
launches.
"It's not a major political is-
sue, but it could be Washburn
said. "Plastics in the ocean is be-
coming a major topic
A few weeks ago, a balloon
launch marked the official begin-
ning of restorations to City Hall-
Thalian Hall in Wilmington.
On Friday, National POW-
MIA Dav, 60 balloons were
J
launched in New Hanover
County to honor 60 North Caro-
linians listed as still missing in
action. The launch was sponsored
bv the local Veterans of Foreign
Wars.
Washburn said he called the
commander of the VFW to ask
whether they could do something
else to honor the veterans, say a
60-gun salute.
'There's nothing I can do
about it Jim Williamson, com-
manding officer for the VFW
chapter, said hours before the
ceremony Friday.
Of Washburn's call, William-
son said, "I think he's just a wacko
on the telephone. I' ve never found
a fish with any rubber in them
Andy Wood, a naturalist at
the N.C. Aquarium at Fort Fisher,
said he has been warning people
about the danger of outdoor bal-
loon launches for 10 years, but
with little success.
"Virtually every time I walk
the beach I find balloons Wood
said. He records and catalogues
the trash and debris he finds
washed ashore and balloons ac-
count for "no small percentage
he said.
And, like all plastics, they do
not go away.
During last year's Beach
Sweep, in which volunteers col-
lected and catalogued trash along
the beach, balloons had their own
category,Wood said.
"It's a problem. It's a real
problem. We do know that some
animals have died eating this
stuff he said.
Particularly vulnerable are
land and sea turtles and some
duck species. "There's something
about the texture of a balloon that
wood ducks like Wood said.
When released to the wind,
balloons can travel for days,
across hundreds of miles. Wood
said he once found three balloons
on North Carolina beaches that
had been launched three days
earlier from Terre Haute, Ind.
"Wherever they come down,
they are a problem he said.
Today, the Naval Fleet Re-
serve plans to launch 201 balloons
from the Battleship North Caro-
lina to celebrate the 201st anniver-
sary of the Constitution - one bal-
loon every minute at the sound of
the ship's bell.
Wood said he will try to have
today's 4 p.m. balloon launch
canceled.
Del Herrmann, secretary of
the Wilmington Fleet Reserve
Association, said he doesn't buy
the balloon scare. An animal may
die if it swallowed a balloon by
freak accident, he said, "but that
wouldn't stop me from launching
a balloon
The national bicentennial
committee recommended that
every town and city across Ameri-
ca launch balloons every year to
celebrate the nation's
Constitution.
"It flies in the face of common
sense Wood said, who acknowl-
edged that since the balloon in-
dustry has its own Washington
lobby, opponents of outdoor
launches are probably outspent in
getting lawmakers to see things
their way.
Specializing In:
"Custom Screen Printing
As Well As Tuxedos For All Formal Occasions
Retail Store Carries:
-Tve Dye and Indian Tapestries
5s
& Trolls Tuxedos
757-1007
A Full Line of imported Jewelry 3rd world clothing from Egvpt, Africa, South America etc
Arriving Soon, Halloween attire & accessories, Mask, Makeup, Soft Bizarre Pumpkin Heads
This Add Acts As A 10 Off Coupon To All
Retail Sales Over $20.00
Good Til December 1,1988
READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
A102
Intro, to The Short Story
When Carla told me that my date
was a little short, I thought she was
talking dollars and cents, not feet and
inches. So there I was at the door, in
my spiked heels, staring at the top of
my date's head.
All I could think was, how do I
get myself out of this? I could imagine
how my legs would ache if I had to walk
around with my knees bent all evening.
So to stall for time, while figuring
out how to take malaria, I made us
some Double Dutch Chocolate.
When I brought it into the living
X room, I discovered that Gary was
a chocolate lover too. Ahh, a man
after my own heart. Okay, I de-
cided Id give him a chance. So we
sat down and saw each other face
to-face for the first time. He had a
nice smile.
After some small talk�I mean
conversation�I discovered that we
both love Updike, hate the winter
weather, and both have minia-
ture schnauzers. So, we made
a date to introduce Shadow
and Schatzi next week.
General Foods International Coffees
Share the feeling.





i
14 THE EAST CARPI 1NIIAM
OCTOBER 4i Qua
Football fans create cup snake
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Featura Editor
Neil Chang couldn't believe
his eyes. Chang saw a 129-foot
white snake wind by his bleacher
seat Saturday at Ficklen stadium.
During the third quarter of a
football game between ECU and
South Western Louisiana, the
long ribbed serpent slowly made
its way down section 28 of the
stadium's student side towards
the field.
Created by an estimated 1,548
plastic cups, the snake of cups (or
cup chain) stretched over 43
bleacher aisle before it mysteri-
ously exploded.
Starting during the third
quarter, bored fans from section
28 (the middle area of the student
side) made a strange request to
the surrounding crowd. "Throw
us your cups was one of the
request.
And the cups flew from eve-
rywhere. From across the field it
looked as if a huge flock of doves
had descended on the Pirate faith-
ful.
Originating six aisles from
the stadium's top, the cup chain
slivered down ten rows of bleach-
ers in 15 minutes. Patient fans
from the middle section sup-
ported the cup chain with their
hands as it weaved downward.
Some of the self-amusing fans
said building the cup chain was
more exciting than watching the
game. By the beginning of the
fourth quarter, the chain was
growing in strength as ECU's
football team was losing at the
hands of South Western
Lousiana's Ragin' Cajun.
After 45 minutes of cups
being thrown, cups being col-
lected and cups being added to
the chain, the ribbed white snake
had reached a milestone; it
stretched to the first row.
struction of the snake. Lasting ten
minutes, the cup war pitted the
top of the section against the bot-
tom. As women and children
cleared aside, bleacher bums
showed their new sport of cup
chucking.
The cup snake is unofficially
the largest of its type to ever be
sighted in Ficklen Stadium. Esti-
mated to be made of 1548 plastic
cups, it reached 43 rows.
While there are many other
estimates of the number of cups,

Ficklen fans do the Snake Cup during the third quarter of Saturday's football game. Before erupting, the
snake sprawled from the top to the bottom of the stadium. (Photo by Thomas "Snakecatcher" Walters -
-Photolab).
And then it exploded. Er-
rupting in the middle, the cups
went flying up in the air. At one
point someone said it looked like
corn in a popper.
The ensuing cup war was as
entertaining as watching the con-
Untortunately, Campus Se-
curity had to break up the cup war
and carry away some of the most
ardent cup warriors. It seems that
some of the warriors took this
thing a little too far and started
throwing glass liquor bottles.
ranging trom 5,000 to 20,000, the
1548 estimate is derived from the
following theorem. Estimates are
based on three feet from bleacher
to bleacher and the length of a
second cup in a stack is estimated
to be one inch.
John's Flowers and Gifts
503 E. 3rd St.
752-3311
Order Early for
Homecoming Corsages
$5.00 plain
$10.00 fancy
$7.50 with Greek Letters
r1
I Discounts For Fraternities I
I and Other Groups
I
of 20 or more
I
'The Thin Blue Line a documentary on a Texas murder, to air on PBS
LOS ANGELES (AP) - "The
Thin Blue Line the documentary
movie about a Texas murder that
has audiences buzzing, owes its
origin to an unusual source -
public television.
The film, playing in selected
theaters across the country, is
among the latest fruits of an inno-
vative financing deal created by
the Public Broadcasting Service's
"American Playhouse" series.
The arrangement, by which
PBS helps pay production costs in
exchange for first television
rights, has yielded some of the
most critically acclaimed inde-
pendent films in recent vcars,
including 1983's "Testament
1984's "El Norte 1985's "Smooth
Talk last year's "Stand and De-
liver and now, "The Thin Blue
Line
"I don't think any of those
movies could have been made
without "American Playhouse
said Lindsay Law, the series' ex-
ecutive producer.
In an age of soaring produc-
tion costs and diminishing under-
writing, the "American Play-
house" formula stands as a cost-
efficient programming break-
through.
The documentary will not
appear on PBS for at least a year.
LUNCH SPECIAL
MONSAT.
11 AM -3PM
17-4oz. Sirloin
Potato Bar
Salad Bar
Hot Bar
Sundae Bar
$4.49
I1
Daily Specials
10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student I.D.
FREE DESSERT BAR
with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
Fair
The Titt County Ame I
Legion Agricultural Fair
open its 69th edition on Mont
October 3rd at 6 p m , and, fj
the powerful lineup of ex hi
and entertainment tl
can only be describ
gest and most colossal I -
County's history
Fair manager . .
stated that ever thii
into place and thai
officials have been �-
January to make tl is tb
and greatest fair I ail
"Last year we I i �
ords in attendance
wide margin, sa i ��
crvone seemed ;
1987 fair and we g I
fine complements
any negative comm.
taken the bas
1987 fair and
panded. so this .
be even tx U r
Forrest said tl t t
getting they
Christ
NEW YORK
ries of the la 11
are best undersl
unsaid
"She said I
terv, what can not I
that made a si -
nating She d
ways were
were always si
store for everyb
Fitzgerald, a lonj
the late writer
O'Connor's 'COlk ��
(library of Arm -
The ant
O'Connor - rt i
Blood" and
and "A CK'd M
Find Also includ
and a large si
Mary Fl u
was born inSavani
only child of K
Edward Francis 0
She began v. �
age and set up
(options, Pqr lifer lin Shades
i1
I I null-
rnstxne
(fercpriM
I iij H, 'f i.i.l
�( I 1 n t
ti 111 llIBJ H 'I
HTMi i�.lJHU�)Jt,Jrl.oertat3n�fr
Get AS and Bs for
ardaCDfor
Try a Maddosh today-you may wi
Unlitled i .
3 a pi " lootbOM SS
I A
frnapsftrtj
itrtsanr$JK
:i�rocrnerts.
i ivt ii�n-tv(�rtrT�'MiiltTK�jv�iirf Mr
iji��iiittmiiij4JvHu4rrfrriNt�ivit
� �rt �i i .i�iryrYfiti.�A"ihH,in4rii'
ill
liif
i T I j
MM
ftf H
j 11 i�
Now that a new school
year is under way, we have
an idea that'll make both
you and your parents feel a
bit more confident come
finals time:
Get a Macintosh
computer to help with your
homework.
Then you'll never have
to spend another all-nighter
retyping a paper just to
purge a few typos and
dangling modifiers. You 11 !
be able to crank out assign
ments that look as though
you bribed a friend in art n
school. And with an amaz
ing new7 program called
HyperCard�which just s
happens to come packaged, i
with every Macintosh�vou
can easily store, organize,
and cross-reference reseat
notes toyour heart!
And if that isnt
reason to look at a 1
today, here's anotf
Right now. voul
three chances to w
of Sony's Decmanl
players�including
citing Sony Rockel
which also plavs thj
3-inch CDs. .And evj
miss out on the CI
" m-mtmrnf

Enter: 0ct
ECU
v
Apptr. the Appk logo. HvprrCanl aid Manmoah art rqpsrmj iradrmarks. and "The povn to hr youi bm is I (radrmark of Appk Computer. Ik Sony CHv nun u i trademark nf
Sony Corporation No purchase neresury Odds depend on number of entrant Sec yaw campus Appte reseller fm complete comm details Prues ma vary frnm produci shown





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4,1988 15
and Gifts
St.
iv for
orsages
.ain
ncy
iek Letters
raternities I
I
l
f
l
Groups
nore
ECIAL
T.
PM
- 4 oz. Sirloin
:ato Bar
lad Bar
Bar
idae Bar
49
:E DESSERT BAR
th All Steak Dinners
fAKE-OUTS OKAY
'1th St. - 758-2712
Fair will be better than ever
N.w.Rek�. involved, was expanding the pre- Also, the Magical World of
The Pitt County American miums on livestock, and is host- Mike Basile will be featured each
Legion Agricultural Fair will ing a lamb show this year. In night on the giant outdoor stage at
open its 69th edition on Monday, addition, a new grandstand has 7:45 and 9:30 p.m. This is a great
October 3rd at 6 p.m and, from been erected and extensive paint- illusion show that many describe
the powerful lineup of exhibits ing and modiwcations on the as "beyond belief
and entertainment, this year's fair twenty-building W. Conner In between these two events
can only be described as the big- Eagles Farm Homestead Museum will be the hit of the 1987 fair, the
gest and most colossal fair in Fitt have been completed. Buck Swamp Kickin Cloggcrs, on
County's history. Amusements of America will the outdoor stage for 45 minutes
Fair manager Elvy Forrest again bring their giant midway to Monday through Friday
stated that everything is falling Greenville with new thrill rides Probably the most hilarious ���� num suum, ana eas
into place and that he and fair and provide the Pitt County Fair show will be the Banana Derby we intend to keep growing and
officials have been working since with the largest midway cast of with ponies racing around an 80- placing our emphasis on agricul-
Januarv to make this the biggest Raleigh, just as it was in 1984, foot oval track where the "jock- ture, education and a wholesome
and greatest fair of all. 1985,1986 and 1987. The midway eys" are monkeys. This show will family atmosphere. We invite all
Last year, we broke all rec- promises lots of motion, music, perform 4 times nightly. of Eastern Carolina to be here
mirth, and memories before head- On Wednesday and Thurs- with us on October 3-8,1988
ing south to theGeorgia State Fair, day nights at 7 Jack Kotchman's Children's days are Tuesday
As for free attractions, never great auto thrill show "Holly- through Friday, College night is
entrance. This all adds up to an
almost continuousstrcam of qual-
ity free entertainment from 6:15
p.m. on.
"All of this is in keeping with
our goal towards making the Pitt
County Fair a regional fair for all
of Eastern Carolina said Forrest.
"We have already accomplished
this to a large degree, as we now
have people from as far as 75-100
miles north, south, and east, and
ords in attendance by a rather
wide margin said Forrest. "Ev-
eryone seemed pleased with the
1987 fair and we got hundreds of
fine complements with hardly
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
AtMAgtfAMEXi "student Special"
ALL YOU CAN EAT MUTD �HUMP
Served with French Frtea or Baked Potato Cole Slaw. Hmh Puppies y5.99
SERVED THIS TUES WED. 4 THURS. 11 A.M. - 9 P.M.
758-0327105 Airport Rd.
I
has the Fair had more. Hcrriot's
European Trained Animal Circus
any negative comments. We have will be back this year, presented
taken the basic contents of the by Domino's Pizza and the Coca-
1987 fair and added and ex- Cola Bottling Company of
panded, so this year's fair should Greenville. Two free pcrform-
be even better "
Forrest said that the fair was
wood Stunt World" will be in the
new grandstand along with the
gigantic monster Car Crusher.
New thrills have been added to
Thursday night, and Senior Citi-
zens Day is Wednesday, October
5 with free admission and attrac-
tions 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Handicapped
children will be treated to rides
and refreshments all free of
getting the youth of the area more except Monday
this year's show.
In addition to all of this, the
ances will be given for children of old midway Band Organ (1910 charge on Thursday morning,
all ages at 6:15 and 8:30 each night vintage) will be belting out its with the same for pre-schoolers
midway each night at the midway on Friday morning.
� � r Jmiuway tjainugiiituuiunuuwdY un rnuay morning.
Christian author remembered
NEW YORK (AP) - The sto
riesof the late Flannery O'Connor
are best understood by what's left
unsaid.
"She said that it was the mys-
tery, what can not be explained,
that made a story endlessly fasci-
nating. She didn't feel that God's
ways were cut and dry. There
were always some surprises in
store for everybody said Sally
Fitzgerald, a longtime friend of
the late writer who has edited
O'Connor's "Collected Works"
(Library of America, $30).
The anthology contains
O'Connor's short novels, "Wise
Blood" and "Artificial Nigger"
and "A Good Man Is Hard to
Find Also included are essays
and a large selection of letters.
Marv Flannery O'Connor
was born in Savannah in 1925, the
only child of Rcgina Cline and
Edward Francis O'Connor, Jr.
She began writing at an early-
age and set up an attic studio in
her home as a work place. One of
her favorite books growing up
was "The Humorous Tales of
Edgar Allan Poe
She attended Georgia State
College for Women, where she
began signing her academic work
"Flannery O'Connor
In 1945. she received a schol-
arship in journalism from the
University of Iowa. She gained
admission to the Writers' Work-
shop, where she began reading
the works of James Joyce, Franz
Kafka and William Faulkner.
"She was influenced by the
Workshop Fitzgerald said. "She
learned to spend a certain number
of hours writing every day at the
same time. She let nothing inter-
fere with it
O'Connor received a master
of fine arts degree in 1947. That
same year she began working on
"Wise Blood her first novel. It
took five years and endless revi-
sions before the book was pub-
lished.
"She certainly suffered writ-
ing Fitzgerald said. "Writing
was very hard for her. She was a
real perfectionist. She discarded
more than 2,000 sheets from 'Wise
Blood
Fitzgerald met O'Connor in
1949. "She was quite silent. She
didn't talk a lot. She listened very
carefully. If you were aware, you
realized you were in the presence
of someone listening and watch-
ing very carefully
In 1950, O'Connor began to
suffer pains and heaviness in her
arms and shoulder joints. Al-
though at first she laughed off the
symptoms as psychosomatic, an
excuse not to write, O'Connor
was eventually diagnosed as
having lupus, an incurable dis-
ease that killed her in 1964.
"She bore it very well. We
heard no complaints. She was
quite funny about it Fitzgerald
said.
Despite her weakened condi-
tion, O'Connor continued to work
until her death. She completed a
second novel, published two col-
lections of short stories and was a
prolific letter writer.
Man and God, the struggle
against grace and redemption
were the major themes of
O'Connor's stories and her life. In
a 1957essay, "TheChurchand the
Fiction Writer O'Connor
summed up how religion shaped
her writing:
"When people have told me
that because I am a Catholic, I
cannot be an artist, I have to reply,
ruefully, that because I am a
Catholic, I cannot afford to be less
than an artist
Fitzgerald said O'Connor
was concerned with "durable
matters
"These are the great ques-
tions that have concerned serious
artists throughout history she
said.
2 Medium
Pizzas
wcheese
& 1 Topping
$Q45
plus tax
Expires October 27
BUY1,
GET 1 FREE,
BUY 2,
GET 2 FREE,
BUY 3.
GET 3 FREE
BUY 4,
GET 4 FREE
ETC ETC ETC
12
5B5
FREE PIZZA!
BUY ONE PIZZA, GET ONE FREE!
P1ZZAMENU M MO LG CAESARS SANDWKHES
One .tern H � nS ?�-r6
TVS 1M� 7 JO 940 12 ����C1aMSS2.36
Three Items 7� 1035 13� Vegetarian 2X
LrttleC�.r,Sp�.l �� � ,4W f1 SM MO LG
-��. � o�- T�wd 1.19 2.39 3 69
�"����' Greek 1.39 2 89 4 69
Extra Iterm ov�x 3 " W ijo Artipasio 1.39 2.89 4 69
"Extra Cheese 1.50 2.00 2.50
CHOOSE FROM THESE TOPPINGS CHOOSE FBOM THESE TOPPING3
PtWfBOW �fc��OOMB.OMONB.H�.B�C'�.OHC��)Bf��. Fwv mm. Nan MM � 4 ��!
�!�L1M SU6A0�. ORIf N PlPPtBS. AMCMOXi HOF P1W�K�A
sjaajvta.anHi.cxnc SPECIALTIES
BEVERAGES SM MJ2 LLTEB f'Mh � Cr� a"m 11�
spn�� Mat, Y��ow�� razy sauce 86
ChrryC�
am mm wejpi aa� �e aa� m.
GRAND OPENINO OF OUR REW STORE ARD WTRX WILL AT
UnWeraity Square Shopping Center 533 Alliagtea BML
(��t Tenth Street at Oreenrffle Bird.) (Acrew frost rare PSaatj
757-1212 756-7256
Hours: 11:00 a.m. - 12.00 midnight SUN. - THU.
11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. FR1. - SAT.
our parents,
;h today -you may win a Sony Discman.
purge a few typos and
jangling modifiers. You 11
)e able to crank out assign
nents that look as though
()u bribed a friend in art
chooLAnd with an amaz-
ing new program called
HyperCard � which just
happens to come packaged
zith every Macintosh�veu
ran easily store, organize,
id cross-reference reseauch
notes to vour hearts content.
And if that isn't enough
reason to look at a Macintosh
today, here's another:
Right now, you have
three chances to win one
of Sonvs Discman "CD
players�including the ex-
citing Sony Pocket Discman,
which also plays the new
3 inch CDs. And even if you
miss out on the CD player,
you may still win one of 15
Apple T-shirts. No strings
attached�just fill out a
registration form at the
location listed below.
So come in and get
your hands on a Macintosh.
If not for yourself, do it
for vour folks.
The power to be your best
Enter: October 3rd-0ctober 21st
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
Greenville, NC





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 4.1988 Page 16
Pirates drop to 1-4
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sport Editor
on
drove the ball down to the ECU
seven on a varied running attack
before, on a third-and-goal situ-
ation from the seven, Cajun quar-
terback Brian Mitchell fumbled
the ball on a draw. The Pirate's
moments of the fourth quarter, Brian McPhatter, who has turned
once again meeting defeat, this in solid play all year, recovered
time at the hands of the Ragin' the ball at the five.
A game that started very
quickly for the Pirates turned into
a nightmare as they watched the
game slip away in the waning
Felton Parquet of the Southwestern Louisiana Cajuns runs for a gain against a Pirate defense that
had trouble containing him and his running mates. (Photo by Angela Pridgen.)
Tennis team has good outing
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
S�aJi Writer
East Carolina's women's ten-
nis team recorded its first tourna-
ment win of the season this past
weekend as it earned the team
champion honors at the Meredith
Invitational Tennis Tournament
in Raleigh.
The Lady Pirates won three of
the final single's rounds and two
of the final double's rounds to win
the team championship over
seven other North Carolina
schools.
Wendy Simpson, Melyanee
Morgan and Kathi Messer, ECU's
fourth, fifth and sixth seeded
singles respectively, were all
winners in their final rounds.
Simpson defeated Salem
College's Jennifer King, 6-4,6-3 in
Saturday's final, while Morgan
was a winner over Theresa Burger
of Meredith College, 6-3, 6-1.
Messer, who is seeded in sixth
place for the Lady Pirates, de-
feated Mt. Olive's Kelly Quinn, 6-
1,6-3.
ECU's two doubles finals vic-
tories came in the second and
third doubles final round.
In number two doubles, Jill
Hobson and Wendy Simpson de-
feated a Mt. Olive duo in three
sets, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4.
Ellen Harrell and Melyanee
Morgan made up ECU's number
three team as they defeated Pfeif-
fer College's number three team
for ECU's fifth win of the day
ECU's Holly Murray made it Lady Seahawks of
to the final round in number one Willmington at 3 p.m
singles. Murray was defeated by
Atlantic Christian's Sheila Milne
in the final round, 1-6,1-6.
Susan Mattocks of East Caro-
lina also advanced to the final
rounds in number three singles.
Wingate College's Jill Deardoff
defeated Mattocks in the final, 6-3,
6-4.
ECU recorded two losses in
the first round. The first came in
number two singles as Meredith
College's Libby A very defeated
Jill Hobson in three sets, 6-4,5-7,6-
3. ECU's second loss in the first
round came when Atlantic
Christian's number one doubles
team defeated ECU's Mattocks
and Murrav in the first round of
J
play.
East Carolina will resume
play on Tucsdav as it hosts the
UNC-
on the
courts next to Minges Coliseum.
The men's team will be on the
road Tucsdav at Pfciffer.
Cajuns of Southwestern Louisi-
ana.
The Pirates were in the game
the entire going, and it was theirs
to win or lose right up to the last
two minutes of the fourth quarter.
It was the fourth loss in a row for
the Pirates, dropping their record
to 1-4.
ECU took possession to start
the game, beginning at their own
20 yard line. Charlie Libretto took
the snap, and pitched the ball back
on an apparent running play that
turned out to be anything but. Jeff
Blake, the recipient of the pitch,
who also happens to be a quarter-
back, pulled up and fired up-field
to Walter Wilson for a 38-yard
gain out to the USL 42. Libretto
took over the quarterback respon-
sibilities at this point, guiding the
Pirate offense down to the Cajun
17before taking the ball in himself
on a keeper around the right side.
Imperato came on and added the
extra point, and with only 2:35
clasped, the Pirates held an early
7-0 lead.
The Pirates dodged a bullet
on the ensuing kick-off when
Willie Culpepper took the kick at
the USL 12 yard line and returned
it 51 yards out to the Pirate 37
before being shoved out of
bounds by Imperato, the last man of Pirate backs. On a second and
back on defense. The Cajuns ten situation, Jarrod Moody took
the pitch and ran around the left
side down to the 10. ECU moved
the ball eight yards down to the
two, but were unable to pu ,h it
into the endzone. Facing a fourth
and goal situation. Pirate Coach
Art Baker decided to go for it The
call went to Libretto, who took the
ball in for his second touchdown
of the day- Imperato added the
extra point, giving the Pirates a
The Pirates moved the ball
out to the USL45 yard line, helped
along by 25 yards of penalties 14-10 edge
against the Cajuns, before stall-
ing. John Jett's punt rolled dead in
the end zone, and the Cajuns took
over on their own 20.
Mitchell then proceeded to
guide the Cajuns the length of the
field down to the Pirate 17 before
The Cajuns began their next
series at their own 15-yard line
Behind the running of USL's
Steve McKinney, the Cajuns
drove the ball out to midfield.
Mitchell took over here, on a run
of 15 yards and a pass accounting
finding Corey Williams in the end for 12 more to Culpepper. Then,
on a first and ten from the 17 yard
line, fullback Felton Parquet took
the ball up the middle and into the
end zone. The Lemoine kick was
good, and the Cajuns took a three
point 17-14 lead.
Reggie McKinney gave the
Pirates excellent field position on
their next series, returning the
USL kick-off 28 yards from his
own 12 out to the 40 yard line.
The Pirate offense took ad-
vantage of the good field position,
and behind the leadership of Li-
bretto, thev took the ball down to
the USL nine yard line before
Libretto punch.id it in on a keeper
around the right side for his third
rushing touchdown of the day.
"I thought he (Libretto) did
an excellent job Baker said of his
starting quarterback. "I think the
See HRATES, page 17
zone for a touchdown strike. The
extra point was good, and at the
1:55 mark in the first period, the
score was tied 7-7.
The Pirates dodged their sec-
ond bullet of the dav on the next
J
kick-off, when Junior Robinson
fumbled the ball at the 10. USL
recovered the ball, but after three
attempts were unable to punch it
into the endzone. The Cajuns
were forced to settle for a 26-vard
Mike Lemoine field goal, giving
the Cajuns their first lead of the
day at 10-7 with :54 remaining in
the quarter.
Not to be outdone, the Pirates
retaliated with a scoring drive of
their own to begin a 35 point sec-
ond quarter between the two
teams.
The Pirates took the ball on
their own 22, and ground it down
to the USL 37 on runs bv a number
Volleyball team 6-7
Olympics disturbing
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
East Carolina's women's vol-
leyball team dropped to a losing
record (6-7) for the first time this
season after taking two losses this
Liberty match, the Lady Pirates
were in every match, with the
ability to win.
"We had excellent play from
Debbie Tate and Michelle Macin-
tosh this weekend, but we had a
breakdown in our serve receive
and, of course, this hurts us offen-
past weekend at the Winthrop sively said Kirkpatrick, whose
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - A
Korean boxer who knew he didn't
deserve his gold raised the hand
of an American who felt cheated,
and with that noble gesture of
sportsmanship ended an Olym-
pics that will be remembered,
sadlv, for its scandals.
So many athletes came and
did so well - the Soviet gymnastic
whizzes and men's basketball
team, East German swimming
star Kristin Otto, Americans Greg
Louganis, Janet Evans, Jim Ab-
bott, Carl Lewis, Florence Griffith
Joyner and Jackie Joyner-Kersee.
These Games overcame the
fear of terrorism and civil unrest
and brought together nearly
10,000 athletes from 160 countries
in stadiums, arenas and pools as
fine as ever seen.
The Soviets reigned again
with 55 golds, followed by East
Germany's 37 and the United
States' 36. Host South Korea rose
to No. 1 in Asia, and fourth in the
world with 12 golds.
There were glorious mo-
ments, from an opening cere-
mony with exotic dancers and
parachutists to a closing with
hugs and tears, fireworks and
dances, and the mascots of Seoul
and Barcelona, the site of the 1992
Games, floating together into the
starry night.
Yet, the highest moment of
the Games - Ben Johnson rocket-
ing to victory over Lewis in a 100-
meter dash world record - led to have ended the fight in the ring,
the deepest pain when the Cana- Instead, the decision went to the
dian was caught cheating with judges and the result was aston-
muscle-building anabolic ster
oids.
"There have been high points
and some low points arcs the most
important low point was Ben
Johnson Juan Antonio
Samaranch, president of the Inter-
national Olympic Committee
said Monday. "That was indeed a
blow
Catching Johnson, however,
and expelling him along with nine
other athletes with positive drug
tests was an indication,
Samaranch said, that "we have
won the � ttle against doping
Lessons for the future also
could be learned from the strange
and appalling things that went on
at the boxing ring, from an Ameri-
can fighter missing hisbusand his
bout, to Korean coaches pummel-
ing a referee, and judges losing
sight of honesty.
Three golds, three silvers and
two bronzes were quite a haul for
the U.S. boxers, but they weren't
ishing - to the fighters, the coaches
and even to many Koreans.
The Soviet and Hungarian
judges scored it 60-56, a huge
spread, in favor of Jones. The
judges from Uruguay and Mo-
rocco scored it 59-58 for Park, and
the judge from Uganda had it 59-
r9. with a plus mark for the Ko-
jt
rean ihat gave him the gold.
On the victory platform, the
gold iround Park's neck and the
silver on Jones the Korean raised
the American's hand for the
crowd. Here, the gesture said, is
the real winner.
"I thought I lost the fight
Park said. "1 might have won the
gold medal thanks to the advan-
tage of a home ring
Jones, little soothed by his
award afterward from the Inter-
national Amateur Boxing Asso-
ciation as the outstanding fighter
of the tournament, charged the
judges with robbing him of his
gold and his dream and said he
enough to wipe out the bitterness was giving up plans for a profes
of a decision Sunday against 19- sional career.
year-old Roy Jones in the 156-
pound final against Korea's Park
Si-hun.
Jones peppered Park's face
with rights and left hooks for
three rounds, forced him to one
standing 8-count and could have
gotten three others that would
UNC drops to 0-4
AUBURN, Ala. (AP)-North said
Carolina Coach Mack Brown, fast
becoming an expert on Top 10
teams since he's already seen
three this season, says fourth-
ranked Auburn is the best one to
meet his eyes.
"At this point in our program,
we're not ready to play Auburn
Brown said after watching the
Tigers manhandle North Caro-
lina 47-21 Saturday.
Two of Carolina's earlier
losses were to Top 10 teams, 31-10
to eighth-ranked South Carolina
and 28-0 to No. 10 Oklahoma. But
Auburn, Brown said, "is the best
football team we've played
"They're so physical they
won't let you run the ball he
It'sone of the better football
Samaranch said Monday the
IOC will study whether boxing
should be continued in the Olym-
pics because of the hazards in the
sport and the problems of officiat-
ing.
"We are really not happy
with the way judges and officials
are acting he said. "We lake the
problem very seriously
In a whirl of races and scan-
dals and a blur of tears, happy and
Invitational Volleyball Tourna
ment in Rock Hill, SC.
The Lady Pirates went into
the tournament with an even 5-5
record, after a loss on Wednesday
to CAA opponent UNC-
Wilmington.
At the tournament, ECU was
victorious in its first match
against Baptist College. The Lady
Pirates went five games with
Baptist before coming up with the
win.
ECU won the first game, 15-9,
but BC's Lady Buc's rebounded
back with two straight wins, 15-6,
15-6.
East Carolina made the next
two games count as they went on
to defeat Baptist, 15-10,15-13.
"This was a dog-fight type of
match said ECU coach Judy
Kirkpatrick. "We fought hard and
saw some very good offense from
Jemma Holly, Debbie Tate and
Michelle Macintosh
ECU's second game of the
tournament did not go as well as
the first. Liberty University
handed the lady Pirates a loss in
three straight games, 15-10, 15-8,
15-1.
Liberty, who finished 22-8
last season, took complete control
of their game, taking ECU out of
their own game.
"This was a very tough Lib-
erty team. They took us out of our
game with good offense and good
serving said Kirkpatrick. She
also predicted that Liberty would
win the tournament, and that they
did on Saturday, defeating ECU's
CAA rival UNC-Wilmington
team looks to rebound next week-
end as it faces two CAA oppo-
nents.
The Lady Pirates will take the
week off and then travel to
Wilmington on Saturday to take
on George Mason and American.
"American is a very much
improved team over last year
said Kirkpatrick about the Ameri-
can team who finished 9-21 last
season. ECU and American met
once last season, with American
winning in three straight games.
Kirkpatrick says that she expects a
close match between the teams
this vear. In the American
matchup, Kirkpatrick says, the
Lady Pirates have the skills to beat
George Mason, but the match
could be a tough one for ECU.
Ticket pick-up times
In ECU's last match of the
teams I've ever coached against sad, the Olympics slipped from weekend, the team faced East
All in all, Auburn turned in summer to fall. They were the Tennessee State University. The
about an average effort. The Ti- m0st expensive and biggest ever. Lady Pirates were up against a
gcrs had 255 yards passing and The Seoul Olympic Organiz- squad who finished 22-5 last sea- ECU's Traci Smith goes for a slam while her teammates look
256 yards running for 511 total ingCommitteesaysitmadea$349 son and in first place of their con- on during weekend action. (Photo by Mar StartarU
yards. million profit on the Games. Four ference.
In four games, the Tigers have years ago, the Los Angeles Games ETSU won the first two
averaged 257, 251 and 508 yards, earned a $225 million profit. games, 15-8,15-6 and looked to be
respectively. It's that kind of of- Some athletes left Monday on its way to victory, but the Lady
fensivc balance that has opposing with medals, others with only Pirates delayed the win coming
coaches shaking their heads. souvenirs. back in the third game to win, 15- For all of you students who 1106:00 at Mendenhall.
"We tell our guys you've got Some will get rich off these 7. ECU could not hold on though didn't know, or may have ,ust And remember any tickets
tostoptherun,andthey'rethrow- Games, others will struggle. as ETSU won the fourth game, 15- forgotten, here, once again are notpfcted up on the abovemen-
9, eliminating ECU from the tour- the times that you can pick up tioncd days will be made ava.l-
nament your tickets or tne remaining able for purchase by the general
ECU coach Judy Kirkpatrick home football games. public on Friday and Saturday. In
Olympics received a gold crown said the level of play at the tourna- Y�&&Tady. other words, if you wait around
y S 1 nnt was a good level for her Wednesday or Thursday from too long, you may not get a ticket
team. With the exception of the
ing the ball as well as I've seen in
a long time said Brown, still
winless after four games in his
first season at North Carolina.
See TARHEFXS, page 1H
East German swimmer
Kristin Otto, the first woman ever
to win six gold medals in one
See OLYMPICS, page 17
You can get them on Tuesday, other words, if you wait around
rtesday or Thursday from too long, you may not get a t
8:0.) to 5:00 at Minges, or from for one of the bigger games.
Pirates at
1-4 now
( outinued from page 16
things he didn't do well, Sout
western Louisiana had a lot to
with that
"I'm always surprised whei
run the ball commented
bretto on his 59-yard rushii
performance. 1 always think
myself as slow When I run hi
that, somebody has to be blocj
ing. So the credit would have to j
to the offensive line and the slo
and the good downfield bkx
ing Libretto also accounted t
163 yards passing, going 11 for!
The Tirates got yet anotl
break on the ensuing series v h
ECU's Chris Hall intercepts
Mitchell pass on the L'SL 26 i
line It was the first interceptij
on the year that he had throvs
Travis Hunter came into
game for his tirst appearance
the day to begin the series Tj
plavs later, Tim James bui
the middle for an ECU sec j
22 vards out. on only his �-
carrvofthe da) Itwasjami I
rushing touchdown of the �
Imperato s kick was wide,andl
Pirates led by 1 27-17, with
left in the halt
The Ca)uns sti I :k K
quickly, however, dri i
81 yards in seven
Broussard capped the dr
an 11 yard run t i
extra point was
Cajuns went into th - �
trailing by only thr� rT- j
halt
Neither team was
capitalize on their n
sessions to start the second he
The Cajuns got the ha
second time in the half on
jett punt to the USL l,and
returned out to the 2s yard 11
From here the I
time consum ng ! .
covering 2 ai Is
5 24 off the clock M
the Cajuns dov n I
yard line before taking
himself. Lemoine ad I
point, giving lb
lead, a lead thai
relinquish for I
the contest
The Pirates MtSWI I
five minute, 13 play dr:
own. but with a slightK d
ending. The offen 9f s I
USL 20 yard line, and tl
were forced to settle for a 37
Imperato field goal tl l
the Pirates to within one 31
the beginning of the fo
ter
Lemoine returned I
on the next series with a : I
of hisow n this one a 4r
cap a 40 yard drive h US1
field goal was the to)
Lemoine's career. The s
lengthened the Cajun lead b
30.
The Cajuns scored againj
series later, on a six plav 55
effort when Mitchell took the
in from 35 yards out to givej
Cajuns an 11-point 41-30
with 3:5" left to go in the gai
But the Pirates were tar tj
reads to roll over and plav dj
On their next series, the Pn
drove down the held on the
ot Libretto and the receiving aj
ties of Al Whiting and jaj
Moody, moving down to the
nine yard line From here LibT
found Walter Wilson in the-
zone for an ECU touchdej
Baker decided to go tor two pej
to pull the Pirates within
Olympic
memories!
Continued from page lb
from local newspapers Mo
as most valuable player c
Seoul Games.
The Pack Sang crown,
of 20-karat gold and deal
at ter the headgear of ancienj
rean warriors cost Sll.OOf
donors said.
Although it was not at
cial IOC award, the winne
chosen by a panel of four!
members.
Greg Louganis' diving
ended with his second pair oj
medals in the springboard
platform events, and he savj
off to begin an acting careei
Perhaps his first film sf
be his own life story, begij
with a troubled youth anO
age bout with alcoholisr
ending with his dives in
after hitting his head ol
springboard.





Ci
lb
1-4
backs On a second and
situation arrod Moody took
?itch and ran around the left
i to the 10. ECU moved
eight yards down to the
b but were unable to push it
the endone Facing a fourth
goal situation. Pirate Coach
Wer decided to go tor it. The
ll �?nt to Libretto, who took the
" in tor his second touchdown
t e da Imperato added the
rtt ging the Pirates a
in their next
r own 15-yard line.
) id the running of USL's
e McKinne) the Cajuns
.e the ball out to midfield.
hell � I on a run
yar iss accounting
ppcr Then,
d ten from the 1" yard
n Parquet took
! id into the
kick was
, k a three

McKinn gave the
. � it held position on
i r next series, returning the
�� 8 i irds from his
i r I
took ad
' � ; sition
id rship of Li-
i wn to
: fore
tin on a keeper
� is third
�. n of the day.
br tto) did
- � I of his
rtei - I think the
PIRA IKS. page 11
h
6-7
�sea so
m George Mason and American.
"American is a very much
m over last year
- � k about the Amori-
nished 9-21 last
ECU and American met
n, with American
straight games.
ksays that she expects a
match between the teams
is year. In the American
li tatchup, Kirkpatrick says, the
Lady Pirates have the skills to beat
George Mason, but the match
could be a tough one for ECU.
t
k
I
while her teammates look
by Mar Startari.)
-up times
11:00-6:00 at Mcndenhall.
And remember, any tickets
not picked up on the abovemen-
tioned days will be made avail-
able for purchase by the general
public on Friday and Saturday. In
other words, if you wait around
too long, you may not get a ticket
for one oi the bigger games.
T! IE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 4, 1988 17
Pirates at
1-4 now
Continued from page 16
things he didn't do well, South-
western Louisiana had a lot to do
with that
"I'm always surprised when I
run the ball commented Li-
bretto on his 59-yard rushing
performance. "1 always think of
myself as slow. When 1 run like
that, somebody has to be block-
ing. So the credit would have to go
to the offensive line and the slots,
and the good downfield block-
ing Libretto also accounted for
163 yards passing, going 11 for 20.
The Tirates got yet another
break on the ensuing series when
ECU'S Chris Hall intercepted a
Mitchell pass on the USL 26 yard
line. It was the first interception
on the year that he had thrown.
Travis Hunter came into the
game for his first appearance of
the day to begin the series. Two
plays later, Tim James bulled up
the middle for an ECU score from
22 yards out, on only his second
carrv of the day. It was James'first
rushing touchdown of the year,
lmperato's kick was wide, and the
Pirates led by 10, 27-17, with 4:22
left in the half.
The Cajuns struck back
quickly, howcver, driving the ball
81 yards in seven plays. P.D.
Broussard capped the drive with
an 11 yard run for the score. The
extra point was good, and the
Cajuns went into the locker room
trailing by only three, 27-24, at the
half.
Neither team was able to
capitalize on their respective pos-
sessions to start the second half.
The Cajuns got the ball for the
second time in the half on a John
jett punt to the USL 11, and it was
returned out to the 28 yard line.
From here the Cajuns began a
time consuming 13 play drive,
covering 72 yards and burning
3 24 off the clock. Mitchell guided
the Cajuns down to the ECU one
yard line before taking it over
himself. Lemoine added the extra
point, giving the Cajuns a 31-27
lead, a lead that they were not to
relinquish for the remainder of
the contest.
The Pirates answered with a
five minute, 13 play drive of their
own, but with a slightly different
ending. The offense stalled on the
I SI. 20 yard line, and the Pirates
were forced to settle for a 37-yard
Imperato field goal that moved
the Pirates to within one, 31-30, at
the beginning of the fourth quar-
ter.
Lemoine returned the favor
on the next series with a field goal
of his own, this one a 46 yarder to
cap a 40 yard drive by USL. The
field goal was the longest of
Lemoine's career. The score
lengthened the Cajun lead to 34-
30.
The Cajuns scored again two
series later, on a six play, 59 yard
effort when Mitchell took the ball
in from 35 yards out to give the
Cajuns an 11-point 41-30 lead
with 3:57 left to go in the game.
But the Pirates were far from
ready to roll over and play dead.
On their next series, the Pirates
drove down the field on the arm
of Libretto and the receiving abili-
ties of Al Whiting and Jarrod
Moody, moving down to the USL
nine vard line. From here Libretto
found Walter Wilson in the end
zone for an ECU touchdown.
Baker decided to go for two points
to pull the Pirates within field
Olympic
memories
Continued from page 16
from local newspapers Monday
as most valuable player of the
Seoul Games.
The Pack Sang crown, made
of 20-karat gold and designed
after the headgear of ancient Ko-
rean warriors, cost $11,000, its
donors said.
Although it was not an offi-
cial IOC award, the winner was
chosen by a panel of four IOC
members.
Greg Louganis' diving career
ended with his second pair of gold
medals in the springboard and
platform events, and he says he's
off to begin an acting career.
Perhaps his first film should
be his own life story, beginning
with a troubled youth and teen-
age bout with alcoholism and
ending with his dives in Seoul
after hitting his head on the
springboard.
The Smith Corona Correcting Cassette.
We've reformed thel
correction system.
tl
Charlie Libretto, who rushed for three touchdowns Saturday,
looks for the end zone here. (Photo by Mark Love.)
goal range of the lead, but the
conversion failed, and the Pirates
were down 41-36 with 2:55 re-
maining in the game.
On the ensuing kick-off,
Baker opted to try an onsides kick.
Instead of lmperato's kick bounc-
ing the required ten yards, it took
a bad hop back towards the
swarm of Pirate defenders. Willie
Culpepper picked up the ball for
USL at the 43 yard line, and ran
through the pack as they rushed
right by htm. He was finally
dragged down at the ECU three
yard line. Three plays later,
Broussard punched it in from one
yard out to give the Cajuns their
final 48-36 edge.
'The ball just took a crazy
bounce and bounced backwards
instead oi towards. It doesn't
work that way in practice, it usu-
ally bounces 10 yards up the
field Baker said of the muffed
onsides attempt.
Libretto was intercepted on
the next series, but it was really
incidental as there was only 1:10
left to play. The Cajuns simply ran
the clock out, and went back to
Louisiana touting a perfect 4-0
record.
T am very disappointed with
the way we played in the second
half Baker said after the game.
'They (USL) did a good job stop-
ping our option in the second half
and we didn't.
"We are not playing good
defensively. We have to play bet-
ter pass defense, tackle better, and
do better on the line of scrimmage.
"USL did a good job doing
what they had to do to win
Baker concluded.
r
GORDONS
V
DON'T WAIT FOR
THE SNOW
264 Bypass 756-1003
STUDENTS
(let rcadv to join America's number
one name in temporary help. Kelly
Services can help vou make the most
of your free time this semester by
offering the flexibility to earn some
great cash while still being able to
earn good grades. We have a variety
of short and long term assignments,
manv of which do not require special
skills or experience.
� Secretaries
�Typists
�VP and DE Operators
�General Clerical
�Light Industrial
Call or stop in and let us tell you about our
comprehensive benefit package.
204 E. Arlington Blvd Suite E
Arlington Center
355-7850
KLU
l R V I C E c-
"The First And The Best
U.S. law requires all applicants to show proof of
identity and right to work in the US.
SOMETHW
FROM SUBWAY
�;�. W3WS�S
�r$gPV r��C)prg
BUYOIS
ONE
I
I
I
I
Subway always has "Somethin' Hot Enjoy the fresh
alternative at Subwayl Delicious steak and cheese,
meatball, hot ham & cheese or roast beef and
cheese. All with the fresh flxin's of your choice.
Buy One Sub Get
Another For 99
(With purchase of Medium Drink)
Offer Expires Oct. 31, 1988
Prisoners of old-fashioned
correction systems, freedom is
here.
Smith Corona's Correcting
Cassette means an end to
twists, tangles and fumbles.
It's an easy-to-load, drop-in
correction tape you can insert in
mere seconds.
There are no spools to
unwind. No complicated thread-
ing. No more muttering under
your breath. It's that simple.
What's just as simple is
our Right Ribbon System" It
simply prevents you from
using the wrong combination
of ribbon and correcting
cassette.
You'll find our Correcting
Cassette and Right Ribbon
System on the Smith Corona
XL 2500 typewriter.
You'll also find lots of other
great features on the XL 2500-
like the Spell-Right" 50,000
word electronic dictionary, full
line correction,WordEraser
and more.
You might expect a type-
writer this sophisticated to cost
a bundle, but the XL 2500 is
surprisingly affordable.
All of which makes it
one of the best values
you can find today.
Case closed.

SMITH
CORONIV
TOMORROWS TECHNOLOGY
AT YOUR TOUCH
(� writ) loSmith Corona Corporation. 65 Locust Avenue New Canaar CT 06840
or Smith rona (Canada Ltd 440 Tap-cott Road Scarborough Ontario Canada MlB M
V��
fltxVv
u
t, u
"� a.
-�- 'II III" �w
Student Union
Coming Attractions

W I o 11 (� t i u I La 11 p I I n j
PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW
Faces, Structures, Architecture of North
and Central America as seen by
ERNST HABRICH
Reception Wednesday, October 26 at 7:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Gallery
DOUBLE FEATURE
Life & Love in the 80s
Sammy & Rosie Get Laid - R
Patti Rocks - R
October 5
Pink Floyd The Wall - R
October 7-8
REPULSION- R
October 12
films are FREE to ECU Students with valid ECU I.D.
All Films are Shown in Hendrix Theatre at 8:00 p.m.
iOUT TOSCHVf VOU





V

18
TI IE EAST C A ROLINIA N
OCTOBER 4, 1988
Tarheels can't find a win
Continued from page 16
But it must be noted that
Auburn, 4-0, has yet to play a
winning team (the last three
twice, Stacy Danley and Alex
haven t even won a game) and its St each X0Tcd Qnce and
tour games were at Jordan- wide rcccivers Freddy Weygand
he left the scoring to the Tigers'
running game, which produced
six touchdowns.
Freshman Henry Love scored yards on a reverse for another
Hare Stadium
The Tigers finally get a taste
of the road this Saturday when
they meet Southeastern Confer-
ence rival Louisiana State in Baton
Rouge, where they haven't won
since 1939.
"I think this football team is
mature enough Auburn Coach
Pat Dye said. "They're smart
enough to know that they haven't
played an LSU or a Florida
Auburn quarterback Reggie
both
and Alexander Wright
scored on reverses.
Love, filling in for starter
James Joseph, who pulled a ham-
string in pre-game warmups, had Jonathan Hall hit Reggie Clark at
64 yards on 14 carries. Danley the goal line for a 24-yard touch-
added 88 yards on eight carries. down pass to put the Tarheels on
Dye, however, predicted the board in the third quarter.
Auburn's running attack would Auburn starting tailback
face a stiffer test against LSU. Stacy Danley made it 40-7 with a
"I'm not sure we're physical 33-yard scoring run in the third
enough to run the ball consis- quarter. Carolina's Kennard Mar-
tently well Dye said. "We'll tin capped an 87-yard drive with a
Slack completed 22 of 30 passes probably use the pass t0 xt the two-yard run for a touchdown in
the fourth quarter and closed the
Wideout Alexander Wright Carolina scoring with a two-yard
ran 13 yards on a reverse for run in the final minute.
Auburn's first touchdown and But Auburn's Alex Strong
split end Freddy Weygand ran 34 had an 11-yard touchdown run set
up by Shayne Wasden's 59-yard
kickoff return in the fourth quar-
ter and the Tigers were never
threatened.
Auburn's Win Lyle kicked
field goals of 21 and 23 yards but
he missed an extra point, the first
in his Auburn career after 44
straight.
An interception by the Tigers'
Greg Staples and his 16-yard re-
turn to the Carolina 13 sparked
Auburn to its first touchdown,
and the Auburn defense kept the
Tar Heels from getting any closer
than the Auburn 48 until halfway
through the third quarter.
touchdown as Auburn built a 23-
0 halftime lead.
Love ran 11 yards for
Auburn's second touchdown and
three yards for the Tigers' fourth
score that put the lead at 33-0.
North Carolina quarterback
Professor
Lating&DTiH
Come Home To Professor O'Cools
For The Idea Homecoming!
All Weekend Long
Drink Specials
Double Shot Line Margaritas $2.50
All Imported Mexican Beer $1.50
Prime Rib Dinner $9.95 After 5 p.m.
LOCATED IN THE FARM FRESH
SHOPPING CENTER
11 am-1 am Monday- Saturday 11 am-10 pm Sunday 355 2946
intercep-
tions against North Carolina, but
run.
Bengals back on winning track
(AD � Cincinnati coach Sam
Wyche understood the ultima-
tum he received from the team's
owners before starting the 1988
NFL campaign.
Wyche is in the fifth-and-last
year of his contract and the Ben-
gals haven't made the playoffs
since he arrived in 1984. The
message was either show im-
provement in 198S or start pack-
ing.
Owners Paul and Mike
Brown never told Wyche how
much improvement the team
needed to show. But, the team is
doing its share to keep Wyche
around.
The Bengals, who finished 4-
11 last year, are 5-0 and the only
NFL'sonlv undefeated team after
overpowering the Los Angeles
Raiders 45-21 Sunday. Cincinnati
holds a two-game advantage over
defending AFC Central cham-
pion Cleveland and Houston.
The Buffalo Bills and Los
Angeles Rams, who also went
into Sunday's action undefeated,
were losers. The Chicago Bears
beat Buffalo 24-3, while the Phoe-
nix Cardinals defeated the Rams
41-27.
Boomer Esiason picked apart
the Raiders' secondary for 332
yards and three touchdowns.
"Our defense played beauti-
fully, and our offense came up one
yard short of 500 yards said
Wyche, who isn't overplaying the
importance of the club's best start
since it opened 6-0 in 1975 en
route to an 11-3 record.
"Being the only undefeated
team means about three days of
bragging. It doesn't mean a
thing said Wyche, who evened
his NFL coaching mark at 34-34
with Sunday's victory.
In other games Sunday, it was
Cleveland 23, Pittsburgh 9;
Tampa Bay 27, Green Bay 24;
Philadelphia 32, Houston 23;
New England 21, Indianapolis 17;
the New York Giants 24, Wash-
ington 23; Seattle 31, Atlanta 20;
Denver 12, San Diego 0; San Fran-
cisco 20, Detroit 13, and Miami 24,
Minnesota 7. Kansas City and the
New York Jets played a 17-17 tie.
Esiason completed 10
straight passes at one stage, fin-
ishing with 21 completions in 28
attempts without being inter-
cepted or sacked.
Bears 24, Bills 3
Chicago's Jim McMahon also
had a strong performance, com-
pleting 20 of 27 passes for 260
vards and two touchdowns.
Buffalo quarterback Jim Kelly
completed 20 of 37 passes for 274
yards but was sacked six times for
losses of 56 yards. The Bills, who
lost 24 yards on an attempted
sweep, were held to a net of zero
yards rushing.
Giants 24, Redskins 23
Odessa Turner caught eight
passes for 103 yards and a touch-
down and the New York Giants
held off a late rally by Washing-
ton. The Redskins, 2-3, missed a
chance to take the lead when
rookie kicker Chip Lohmiller
missed a 36-yard field goal at-
tempt with 2:54 left.
The Giants, 3-2 and tied with
Phoenix for the NFC East lead,
saw a 24-9 lead in the third quarter
shrink on two touchdown passes
from Mark Rypien to Ricky Sand-
ers.
Buccaneers 27, Packers 24
Donald Igwebuike's 44-yard
field goal with 12 seconds left
gave Tampa Bay a victory over
Green Bay for the second time this
season.
Vinny Testaverde overcame
four interceptions to complete his
last five aerials, capping an eight-
play, 72-ycar drive with a 19-yard
scoring toss to Bruce Hill with 1:52
left that tied the game at 24.
Eagles 32, Oilers 23
Randall Cunningham passed
for two touchdowns and ran 33
yards for another score to rally
Philadelphia from a 16-point defi-
cit.
Cunningham completed 24 of
38 passes for 289 yards, while the
Eagles' defense held Houston to
206 yards - 55 running and 156
passing.
The Oilers led 16-0 in the first
period after blocking two punts,
one for a touchdown and another
resulting in a safety, and scoring
on a one-yard rollout by Cody
Carlson.
Cleveland turned three of
Pittsburgh's five second-half
turnover into two Matt Bahr field
goals, while rookie Brian Wash-
ington intercepted a Pittsburgh
pass and returned it 75 yards for a
touchdown.
Cleveland quarterback Mike
Pa gel, subbing for the injured
Bernie Kosar, threw for only 131
yards while completing 15 of 26
passes.
Patriots 21, Colts 17
Doug Flutie came off the
bench to spark a 14-point fourth
quarter, scoring the winning
touchdown on a 13-vard run with
23 seconds to play as New Eng-
land beat Indianapolis.
Flutie capped a nine-play, 80-
yard drive for the winning score
when he faked a handoff, rolled
left and outraced the Colt defend-
ers into the end zone. Rookie
Chris Chandler had given the
Colts a 17-14 lead with 2:23 re-
maining when he hit Bill Brooks
with a 48-yard pass.
Seahawks 31, Falcons 20
Rookie Kelly Stouffer engi-
neered four touchdown drives in
his first NFL start and John L.
Williams scored three touch-
downs on short runs as Seattle
downed Atlanta.
Stouffer completed a 53-yard
pass to Brian Blades to set up Curt
Warner's 12-yard scoring run that
gave Seattle a 7-3 first-quarter
lead it never relinquished.
Stouffer completed 11 of 21
parses for 164 yards and Warner
gained 110 yards on 22 carries.
Broncos 12, Chargers 0
Rich Karlis kicked four field
goals in Denver's victory over San
Diego.
The game turned on the play
of the Broncos' special teams,
which snuffed a first-half field
goal try, blocked a Ralf
Mojsicjenko punt late in the third
quarter and forced a fumble by
San Diego punt returner Lionel
James with 10:23 remaining.
Karlishad field goalsof 30,43,
30 and 28 yards.
49ers20, Lions 13
Jerry Rice scored the 48th
touchdown of his 49-game NFL
career with an 11-yard touch-
down on a reverse and John Tay-
lor got San Francisco's other
touchdown on a 77-yard punt re-
turn.
Detroit's Eric Hippie joined
the overcrowded list of injured
NFL quarterbacks when he suf-
fered a broken left ankle in the
third quarter.
San Francisco quarterback
Joe Montana passed for 182 yards.
Cardinals 41, Rams 27
Neil Lomax threw for 342
yards and two touchdowns as
Phoenix defeated the Rams for the
first time since 1976.
PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Charlie Libretto, THIS WEEK'S PLAYER OF THE WEEK
HOMETOWN-Middleburg, Ha.
East Carolina vs USC- Charlie rushed for 59 yards and 3 touch-
downs on 17 attempts, and went 11 for 20 for 163 yards in the air.
PERSONAL INFORMATION- Libretto is a junior majoring in
Business Administration. He enjoys hunting and fishing.
He is the son of Charlie and Paula Libretto.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Charlie Libretto, FROM PEPSI-COLA
MUCH CONTINUED SUCCESS.
The tradition continues
Mojo Sportswear presents:
The original Greenville Halloween party shirt!
14 color screenprint now available at:
U.B.E Belks, At Barre Ltd Marsh's Surf Shop,
Sweet Willie's, The Attic, The Wash Pub & Grogs.
Suffering
From Total
Mental Melt
Down? Need
A Mid-Week
Break
GREENVILLE'S HOTTEST
HUMP-DAY CELEBRATION
WEDNESDAYS
Fiesta
Grande
SS
p
�Fiesta All Night
Tacos-n-nachos 5-7
�Off The Cuff Lounge
at the Ramada Inn
Greenville
presents The
Return of
Mexican Fiesta
Siesta All Day;
Fiesta All Night
Mexican Beer $1.50
Marguritas $1.75
Free Non-Alcoholic
Beverages For
Designated Drivers
�NO COVER CHARGE
m
Must Have Valid Drivers
License And Be 21 To Enter
Ramada Inn
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666





Title
The East Carolinian, October 4, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 04, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.630
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy