The East Carolinian, September 29, 1988






I
Coming Tuesday:
SGA committee heads lay down the platforms for the
fall 88 semester
Features:
Earlvls takes a look at Randee of the Redwoods, wht
perfonned Tuesday night at Hendrix Theatre, see
?age 12.
Sports:
The Raght Cajuns pi Southwest Louisiana bring
their undefeated act to Field en Stadium to face the
Pirates, see page 17,
She Sast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b3 No. 23
Thursday September 29,1988
Greenville, NC
20 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Pirate Walk will resume Sunday
By TAMMY AYCOCK
SUlf Writer
After being cancelled this
summer for reorganization, the
SGA Pirate Walk will be back in
action begining this Sunday.
Co-sponsored by the SGA
and SRA, Pirate Walk is an escort
service which provides walking
companions for female students
on campus after dark. Escorts will
be available 6 p.m. until 12 a.m.
each Sunday through Thursday,
beginning October 2.
Because of its collapse last
spring, Kelly Jones, the SGA vice
president, spent the summer re-
vising the organizational format
of the program. "I relied a lot on
the recommendations written by
the 1985 administration about
things that were wrong with Pi-
rate Walk Jones said.
Instead of having a director
and an assistant director as in the
past, Jones appointed two co-di-
rectors. Ami Bannerman will be in
charge of the operators and Bar-
bara Froio will oversee the es-
corts.
Jones emphasized that this is
the first year that Pirate Walk has
had female directors. "Females
are the ones who are going to use
it, so I feel that a girl would know
what kind of walkers she would
like to have or what we could do
to make the program better so that
it would be attractive to other
females Jones said.
Jones selected Mandy Mar-
lowe to serve as the secretary
treasurer in addition to the co-
directors. She will be responsible
for recording information such as:
how many walks were taken each
night, points of departuredesti-
nation -and "problems that we
encounter. These statistics are
important for future planning
and improvement Jones said.
"Also, if I need to ask the
Appropriations Committee for
additional funding, they are
going to want to know how many
people are using the service and
how efficiently it is being run. I
will have the facts to back me up
Jones said.
The basement of White Hall
will serve as the main headquar-
ters for the escort service. "We're
going to set up a second station in
the lobby of Joyner Library. This is
something new we're trying. A lot
of time, people just forget that it
exists unless they see it sitting
right there. This will make it more
accessible Jones said.
"Maybe later, if we get com-
plaints about it taking walkers too
long to get up the Hill, we might
move one (Pirate Walk station) up
to the Hill Froio said.
In regard to those who have
night classes, Bannerman said,
'They can call in advance and
have someone scheduled to meet
them there at a certain time each
week. That way, they won't have
to deal with payphones
Froio expressed her confi-
dence in the program saying, "So
far we've had approximately 30
individuals and 6 groups to ap-
ply. We've already got the first
three weeks covered. This means
we're two weeks ahead of sched-
ule. It (Pirate Walk) is not going to
flop this time Froio said.
Anyone needing an escort
can contact Pirate Walk at 757-
6616. Usually, the waiting period
does not exceed 10-15 minutes.
Despite the format change,
Homecoming weekend is on ij I
By JOE HARRIS
New. Editor
Greene Dormitory and others in the vicinity that loom overhead
are some of the tallest buildings in Greenville (Photo by Thomas
Walters, ECU Photolab).
Assault
ECU Police looking for
assailants, ask for help
ECU Campus Police are
seeking information concerning
an armed robbery- which occurred
on Sept. 18, 1988 (Sunday) at ap-
proximatelyl2:45 a.m.
The robbery occurred near
the Maintenance Garage (green
barn) on Campus Drive.
The male victim was walking
alone, headed eastward toward
College Hill Drive, when he was
approached by a small black car
occupied by four black males
which stopped near him. Two of
the males exited the car, struck the
victim with their fists and with a
beer bottle on his head until it
broke. The victim was knocked
unconscious and robbed of his
money.
The two robbers were de-
scribed as large built black males,
possibly college age or younger.
The car in which they were driv-
ing is similar to a Ford Mustang,
black in color, bearing a personal-1
ized license plate beginning with
the letter "R" and ending with the
numeral "6
Anyone having any informa-
tion regarding this incident is
asked to please call the campus
Pirate Crime Busters at 757-6266
or the Pitt-Greenville Crime Stop-
pers at 758-7777.
A reward up to $1,000 could
be paid for your information. RE-
MEMBER: We want your infor-
mation and not your name.
The format for this year's
Homecoming contest has been
changed from a double vote �
semifinalist then finalist, to a
single vote, which will choose the
winner from all other contestants.
The 1988 contest has43 candi-
dates. Voters will be asked to pick
eight o the 43. The eight who
receive the highest number of
votes will make up the semifinal-
ists. From this group of eight, the
candidate receiving the highest
overall total from the original
vote will be declared winner.
In this year's contest the
semifinalist vote will be elimi-
nated.
Forty-two contestants en-
tered last year's competition and
were voted on. From that vote,
eight semifinalists were chosen
and a seperate vote was held to
determine the winner from that
group.
According to the Student
Homecoming Committee Co-
chairpersons Leslie Council and
April Weatherington, the main
reason for the format change is
time.
"The main reason is time.
Half-time is planned down to a
tenth of a second. So this forces us
(the Homecoming Committee) to
present a plan to the Athletic
Parking on streets that run perpendicular to Fifth St is only permitted on the right-hand-side and by
parking permit "A" (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab).
Department that allows enough
time for the band to perform and
all other half-time festivities to
take nlace. By eliminating the
presentation of the Homecoming
Court, and just presenting the
queen, we'll save a lot of time
said Council.
Weatherington said, "Last
year we were so hard pressed for
time it was ridiculous
"If we were to use the same
format as last year, we would
have had to begin the voting last
week. Then tally up the ballots
and have another vote this week.
This really makes it complicated.
It's easier and less time consum-
ing with this year's format said
Weatherington.
The SGA has appropriated an
additional $900 bringing the total
homecoming budget to $8,000.
'This year's parade is going to be
the biggest one yet. The addi-
tional funding is going toward
floats for the parade said Coun-
cil.
There are 16 float entries from
sororities, fraternities and for the
first time, dormitories are partici-
pating. Council said, "We've had
more entries in every category
this year than in the past
This year, twice as many or-
ganizations have decided to spon-
sor candidates in the court. The
Pirate Crew, Pure Gold Dancers,
ECU Cheerleaders and Leisure
Systems Studies are some of the
organizations sponsoring candi-
dates that have never done so in
the past.
"Some 700 high school stu-
dents, civic organizations, public
works vehicles and, as al way s, the
eight convertibles carrying the
finalists will participate in the
parade. This makes up about 65 or
70 units. Everything starts Satur-
day morning at 10 a.m. on the
corner of Tenth and Elm said
Weatherington.
A pep rally is scheduled to
begin at 7 p.m. on Oct. 6 at Ficklen
Stadium. At the rally, the partici-
pants in the Homecoming Court
are to be presented. The eight
from the court receiving the most
votes will then be revealed.
'This year's pep rally is going
to be different. We're going to
have more fun things happening.
Last year's rally had guest speak-
ers and that sort of thing. This
time we're going to have the Pure
Gold Dancers, the band, the
Golden Girls and hopefully we
can get the football team to do a
skit for us. More fun and less
talk said Council.
A student takes time out for some leisurely reading and to break
pace from her class schedule (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU
Photolab).
SGA looks to a busy semester
By MICHAEL BARTLETT
SUf f Writer
See HOMECOMING, page 2
On Monday, Speaker of the
House, Marty Helms called the
second meeting of the 1988-89
Student Government Assocation
to order, and from there began to
run down the agenda for a busy
year.
The first call of business be-
gan with Dr. Robert
Shellenburger, professor of deci-
sion science, bringing forth the
new ECU Mission Statement.
The Mission Statement is a
plan set by the university depict-
ing the goals for which this insti-
tution stands. The statement
defines the general, educational,
research, service and nature of
the university community.
SGA treasurer Tripp Roakes
gave an up-to-date account of the
legislature's financial statement.
Roakes stated that there is ap-
proximately $58,000 remining
from the $100,000 balance of last
spring.
During the "new business"
portion of the meeting, Terry
Hindle introduced a bill request-
ing additional funding for the
Homecoming Steering Commit-
tee. A suspension of the rules was
requested and accepted.
Affirmative debate began as
Roakes said, "The Committee
needs an additional $9001 iuse
of the increase in tis year's par-
ticipation. Legislator Steve Som-
mers questioned the need for
additional appropriation and
Mr. Roakes alluded to the in-
creases in the number of floats
and the number of houses being
decorated.
After the meeting Roakes
stated that each floa� participat-
ing in the homecoming parade
receives $150 and each fraternity,
sorority, residence hall, or stu-
dent organization receives $40.
The bill passed by consent.
In other business, there was a
suspension c' Ihe rules requested
for the ad. -� money to the
new Pirat. A program. In the
first round of debate Susan Coop-
erman said, This year's Pirate
Walk is bigger, better, and it
needs more money
SGA vice-president Kelly
Jones stated that the additional
appropriation of $340 would be
utilized for the hiring of a new
secretarytreasurer and for extra
advertising. Jones said she
wanted to promote teamwork
within the program and obtain
both positive and negative re-
sponses from the student body.
She said "We would like to
hotter cover the student opinion
The bill passed by voice vote.





2 niEEASTCAROriNIAM
SEPTEMBER 29,1988
Alumni Association names winners
ECU New B
The East Carolina University
Alumni Association has named
its 1988 recipients of the Out-
standing Alumni Awards, to be
honored Saturday Oct. 8, in con-
junction with the universities
Homecoming activities.
Receiving the awards will
be William Scott Sawyer of More-
head City, Robert Allen Ward of
Burlington and Henry Gaston
Williamson, Jr. of Wilson. The
honorees were selected by the
Alumni Association's board of
directors based on nominations
by alumni, faculty and staff.
The recipients will be recog-
nized at the chancellor's annual
awards luncheon in Minges Coli-
seum and during halftime of the
Homecoming football game
against West Virginia University.
Sawyer, a 1984 graduate,
majored in political science and
minored in psychology. He en-
rolled at ECU in 1976, despite
having been confined to a wheel-
chair since the onset of muscular
dystrophy in his early teens.
"Scott overcame the daily physi-
cal and mental challenges of col-
lege life through determinatin
and ingenuity said Alumni As-
sociation executive secretary
Donald Leggett. "Several of his
professors endorsed his nomina-
tion in admiration of his positive
and courageous attitude
Now 32-years-old, Sawyer is
occupied by a number of interests,
primarily the writing of his auto-
biography. He has assembled a
collection of rare books and has
taken correspondence courses
toward a law degree through
LaSalle University in California.
Sawyer also designed and blue-
printed his parents' home to
eliminate physical barriers recog-
nized only by the wheelchair-
bound.
Robert Allen Ward is execu-
tive vice president of finance and
administration of Unifi Inc a
texturizer of synthetic yarns with
processing facilities in North
Carolina and Ireland. Ward re-
ceieved a bachelor of science in
business administration in 1962.
As an undergraduate he was
treasurer of the Student Govern-
ment Association, a member of
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity and
treasurer of the Inter-Fraternity
Council.
A past president of the N.C.
chapter of the Financial Execu-
tives Institute and a member of
the N.C. Association of Certified
Public Aocountants, Ward serves
on the Board of Visitors of Elon
College and is a past member of
the board of directors for the Burl-
ington YMCA.
Ward's volunteer work for
ECU includes service on the Busi-
Homecoming weekend ready to go
Continued from page 1
Another new activity for
campus organizations to compete
for during the weekend is the
spirit trophy. The award will go to
the sority, fraternity or other or-
ganization that enters a float,
decorataes their house or sup-
ports a candidate. There will be a
table at the stadium for all partici-
pants to sign in. The winning or-
ganization will be announced at
the game and take home the tro-
phy.
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ness Advisory Council for the
School of Business, the board of
directors of the ECU Foundation,
and the executive committee of
the Pirate Club. He served on the
steering committee for the 1986
School of Business Golden Anni-
versary Campaign and is a leader
in the Triad chapter of the Alumni
Association.
Ward assisted in the estab-
lishment of ECU's academic
counseling program for student
athletes. He and his wife Marga-
ret sponsor a University Scholars
Award.
The Wards have two sons,
David, a 1987 Wofford College
graduate now pursuing a busi-
ness degree at ECU and Robert, an
ECU, junior majoring in leisure
system studies.
Henry G. Williamson, Jr. is
president of BB&T Financial Cor-
poration. He completed his
bachelors and masters degrees in
business at ECU in 1969 and 1972,
after which he went to work with
BB&T's management develop-
ment program. During his stu-
dent years, Williamson was in-
ducted into Beta Gamma Sigma
and Omicron Delta Epsilon nai-
tonal honor societies.
Williamson is an active vol-
unteer in his home community
and in the university communitv.
He is vice chair of the Wilson
Chamber of Commerce executive
committee and is a member of the
Wilson Ki wards Club, where he is
president of the Wilson Kiwanis
Club All-American.
No underwear,
no worries
I am currently 22 years old. I
haven't worn underwear or ath-
letic supporters since I was six.
Lately, I've been running with
"no support" on a regular basis. Is
this hazardous to the testicles?
EHIdsilllNhi Ogfammi
My community health intern,
Lisa Walser, and I checked this
question out with John Siegel
M.D. from the Student Health
Service and with Ed Janosko M.D.
from Greenville Urology Clinic.
The consensus is that if you are
comfortable running with no
support, go ahead. There is no
scientific data that reports injuries
occuring as the result of not using
athletic supports. Nor is there any
indication that a lowered sperm
count or infertility can result. It'sa
matter of choice.
If you have any questions you
would like answered in the
"Health Column call Mary
Elesha-Adams at 757-6794 or
send them to the East Carolinian.
The East Carolinian
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WASHINGTON (APJ
the 100th Congress rusr
ward adjournment, it find
increasingly tangled in eh
year politics and the presic
campaigns of George Bus
Michael Dukakis
Even the tamest bill ca
itself held hostage to
fortune and partisian cam
ing.
Proposals that hav
guished for years sudl
have new life breathe
them by lawmakers with.
on politics, home district
and opponents' press rele
No single issue morel
up the election-year mc
Laun
CAPE CANAVERAL
(AP) - Anticipation and
rose today as final prepai
accelerated for launching
ery and five astronauts ind
at 9:59 a.m. EDT Thursday
first U.S. manned flight sii
Challenger tragedy.
"The weather looks
the morning so we're fev.
fident said Robert Crip
veteran astronaut who hj
one-man authority to appi
veto the long-awaited laui
fort.
Engineers worked tl
the night, confident they
resolve a nagging techmcal
lem, and Air Force weath
cers were on alert for
showers and tricky wind
Third
BERLIN (AP) - U.S. Trd
Secretary Nicholas F. Bradi
world financial leaders a fc
for relieving Third Work
and talks.
More than 100 peopld
arrested during Tuesday
tefhdxlemonstrations, polii
Brady said creditors
act to slash crippling Third j
debt, but onlv in wavs that i
� � ,
markets accept. He also rul
turning over risky loans frc
vate banks to government
their taxpayers.
"If we embark on a
that involves the transfer
from the private to the publ
tor, a true and lasting solui
the restoration of sust
growth among debtor
will have escaped he
Tuesday's speech.
Several hundred demc
tors on Tuesday marchc
the offices of the West Gj
drug company Schering toj
way station, police said,
masked marchers hurled
of pavement at the windo
bank, said a police spok�
who spoke on condition
nymity.
ECU Police
apprehend thu
During the first two w
this semester, a student, pre
a freshman, had hisher Cc
ken into and did not report
student drives a compa(
auto and was parked in tl
and Reade Street (FresJ
parking lot.
The ECU Campus Poli
arrested three individual
breaking and entering ai
ceny from autos. Stolen prJ
has been recovered that "
been reported to the poli
stolen property is said t(
come from a car broken ml
ing the first two weeks of
from a vehicle parked in tl
and Reade Street (FresI
parking lot. Perpetrators!
using a car unlocking devil
there may not have been anj
of forced entry.
Campus police requ(
any student who has had
car broken into or items
from hisher car during
and parked in this lot to
contact Detective E.L. Sul
757-6294 to identify and
theirproperty.
The Campus Police
also like to remind you thai
you park your car in a pul
you should check on it "
has been tampered with,
report it immediately to th
Campus Police at 757-6J
your car is parked off
please report the tarr
Greenville Police at





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29,1988 3
Campaigns slow 100th Congress
WASHINGTON (AP) - As
the 100th Congress rushes to-
ward adjournment, it finds itself
increasingly tangled in election-
year politics and the presidential
campaigns of George Bush and
Michael Dukakis
Even the tamest bill can find
itself held hostage to political
fortune and partisian campaign-
ing.
Proposals that have lan-
guished for years suddenly
have new life breathed into
them by lawmakers with an eye
on politics, home district polls
and opponents' press releases.
No single issue more sums
up the election-year mood of
Congress than the drug bill
passed last week by the House
and now pending in the Senate.
As Bush and Dukakis accused
each other of being soft on drug
dealers and crime, Republicans
and Democrats in the House
scrambled madly, clamoring to
lead the charge in a War on
Drugs.
The vote was a whopping
375-30 for a package of anti-
drug provisions that even spon-
sors say may be unconstitu-
tional. "If this bill becomes law,
Americans will be less free
said Rep. Don Edwards, D-
Calif chairman of the House
civil rights subcommittee.
But another Democrat,
Charles Rangel of New York, ex-
pressed the feelings of the ma-
jority. While the bill is flawed, he
said, "at least all of us can go
home" and say "we responded
to our constituents and the na-
tion
With all 435 House seats
and 33 Senate seats up on Elec-
tion Day, going home is just
what Congress wants to do, and
as soon as possible.
Senate Republican Leader
Bob Dole of Kansas says Con-
gress could adjourn this week if
it would simply pass the pend-
ing appropriation bills and a
few other relatively noncon-
troversial issues.
Dole said many of the late-
blooming issues should be left to
the presidential election cam-
paign and its winner. "We should
determine precisely what Gover-
nor Dukakis and the vice presi-
dent have in mind on these is-
sues Dole said. "We will have
plenty of time next year to address
each of them
But Republicans and Demo-
crats alike each have a political
agenda that could keep them in
Washington well into October.
Senate Majority Leader Robert
Byrd, D-W.Va is telling col-
leagues to plan on weekend work
and a mid-October escape.
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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
(AP) - Anticipation and tension
rose today as final preparations
accelerated for launching Discov-
ery and five astronauts into orbit
at 9:59 a.m. EDT Thursday on the
first U.S. manned flight since the
Challenger tragedy.
The weather looks fine for in
the morning so we're feeling con-
fident, " said Robert Crippen, the
veteran astronaut who has the
one-man authority to approve or
veto the long-awaited launch ef-
fort.
Engineers worked through
the night, confident they would
resolve a nagging technical prob-
lem, and Air Force weather offi-
cers were on alert for possible
showers and trickv winds cov-
ered by NASA's new, more con-
servative launch guidelines.
"We have to be successful
said Kennedy Space Center's di-
rector, Forrest McCartney. "The
nation could not withstand an-
other accident like Challenger
The technical question arose
not with Discovery itself, but with
a small satellite booster rocket
being readied for a shuttle flight
next February. Scientists want to
be certain a tiny cut found on one
of its O-ring seals does not exist on
a twin rocket whose launch is
Discovery's main item of busi-
ness.
"The folks have worked over-
night and I still don't know the
results of that said Crippen.
None the less, he told ABC's Good
Morning America show, "1 be-
lieve I'll hear as of today that all
those are go
Officials believe the cut was
inflicted during installation and
does not represent a design or
manufacturing defect. To be cer-
tain, they worked overnight
checking documentation and
pressure-testing deliberately
flawed rings.
A new launch oversight team
needs the information before it
can give the signal to start the final
countdown tonight.
Launch for the four-day flight
is set for 9:59 a.m. Thursday, with
a 2-and-a-half-hour window to al-
low for weather or technical de-
lays.
NASA officials said they'd
done everything possible to make
the mission safe.
"You can't totally take the
risk out of something like this
McCartney said in an interview.
"But in those last hours of the
count I'll know that we have done
everything we know how to make
this a safe flight, that we have
reduced the risks as much as we
possibly can
Asked what would be going
through his mind as the count
ticks down, the center's deputy
director, Tom Utsman, said, "I'll
be saying that hopefully we have
done all the right things, that we
haven't taken any shortcuts, that
we haven't overlooked anything.
I'd be a liar if I said I wasn't nerv-
ous. But I also am confident
North China
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Third World debt solution offered
BERLIN (AP) - U.S. Treasury
Secretary Nicholas F. Brady gave
world financial leaders a formula
for relieving Third World debt,
and talks.
More than 100 people were
arrested during Tuesday's scat-
tefted�demonstrations, police said.
Brady said creditors should
act to slash crippling Third World
debt, but only in ways that private
markets accept. He also ruled out
turning over risky loans from pri-
vate banks to governments and
their taxpayers.
"If we embark on a course
that involves the transfer of risk
from the private to the public sec-
tor, a true and lasting solution to
the restoration of sustained
growth among debtor nations
will have escaped he said in
Tuesday's speech.
Several hundred demonstra-
tors on Tuesday marched from
the offices of the West German
drug company Schering to a sub-
way station, police said. Some
masked marchers hurled pieces
of pavement at the windows of a
bank, said a police spokesman,
who spoke on condition of ano-
nymity.
ECU Police
apprehend thieves
During the first two weeks of
this semester, a student, probably
a freshman, had hisher car bro-
ken into and did not report it. This
student drives a compact type
auto and was parked in the 5th
and Reade Street (Freshman)
parking lot.
The ECU Campus Police have
arrested three individuals for
breaking and entering and lar-
ceny from autos. Stolen property
has been recovered that has not
been reported to the police. This
stolen property is said to have
come from a car broken into dur-
ing the first two weeks of school
from a vehicle parked in the 5th
and Reade Street (Freshman)
parking lot. Perpetrators were
using a car unlocking device and
there may not have been any signs
of forced entry.
Campus police request that
any student who has had hisher
car broken into or items missing
from hisher car during this time
and parked in this lot to please
contact Detective E.L. Suggs at
757-6294 to identify and claim
their property.
The Campus Police would
also like to remind you that when
you park your car in a public lot,
you should check on it daily. If it
has been tampered with, please
report it immediately to the ECU
Campus Police at 757-6150. If
your car is parked off campus,
please report the tampering to the
Greenville Police at 830-4300.
Riot police hauled away
about 100 of the demonstrators,
said a police spokesman who
asked not to be identified.
Earlier Tuesday, about 160
leftist radicals threw stink bombs
and tried to block traffic to West
Berlin's Tegel international air-
port, police said. Four people
were arrested.
The violence followed about
four hours of rioting in down-
town West Berlin Monday night,
when leftist militants smashed
many store windows, dragged a
car across a major boulevard, and
battled with police. About 10
people were arrested, and several
protesters as well as police offi-
cers were injured, according to
witnesses and police.
The protests coincide with the
annual meeting of the World
Bank and the International Mone-
tary Fund with most of the finance
ministers from 151 member gov-
ernments attending. The sessions
of the sister organizations, which
make international loans for de-
velopment projects, will continue
through Thursday.
The left-wing protesters ac-
cuse the bank and fund of impov-
erishing the Third World by forc-
ing nations to adopt austerity
measures to meet the $1.2 trillion
in debt to international and pri-
vate banks as well as other gov-
ernments.
Brady, who was making his
first appearance on the interna-
tional stage at the formal opening
of the talks Tuesday, recom-
mended several devices to reduce
debt.
Mon. -Thurs. 11.30 a.m. -10:00pm
Fri 1130 am. -11:00p.m.
Sat. 5 00 p.m11:00 p m.
Sun. 12:00 noon - 10:00 p.m.
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�lie i�uBt (Earnliman
Pete Fernald, r,� .�,
Chip Carter, M�ur ���
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, DirtctorofAdvtrtimnt
Joe Harris, nw,
Doug Johnson, spon, m
Tim Hampton, f�t� �
Michelle England, &� m�
Debbie Stevens, s�
JEEF PARKER.suffu-Mr-fof
TOM FURR, Circutatum Mauser
Susan Hovvell, product� m
John W. Medlin, &��
Mac Clark, Businessman
September 29, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Shuttle
Funds needed to further human unity
The horse. The train. The air-
plane. The Space Shuttle.
Every advance in transportation
(largely, though not exclusively,
because it yields an advance in the
dissemination of information) has
had enormous impact on the direc-
tion of human history. When men
travelled solely by foot, they tended
to band together in a tribal organiza-
tion. People thought of themselves
as members of a tribe.
With the rise of agriculture came
the domestication of animals, nota-
bly the horse, and the fall of strict
tribal organization. People thought
oi themselves as members of a town.
Thus began the first communi-
ties. The horse made it possible to
spread information at a hitherto
unprecedented rate. There could be
exchange of materials, exchange oi
ideas - and exchange of hostilities -
between towns.
The next major advance in trans-
portation was the railroad. Faster
even than the horse, the trains
played a major role in unifying the
United States of America - in
connnecting the States with the ter-
ritories. They also unified the Italian
city-states, thus largely ending a
number of bloody wars that had
been going on in that region for
centuries. And people began to
think of themselves as part of their
country.
Soon after the invention of the
airplane, it became possible to
quickly fly from one country to
another even across the seas! The
airplane, along with the telephone,
has helped bring about the rise of
multi-national communities. The
economy is no longer local in nature
but global. The Eastern Bloc and the
European Economic Community
are two major examples of the trend
towards a level of societal organiza-
tion that transcends mere national-
ity.
Soon, we Americans, along with
our Canadian and Mexican neigh-
bors, may well begin thinking of
ourselves as North Americans. The
British, French, Italians, Spanish
and Germans may come to think of
themselves as Europeans. The many
divisions within India may come to
think of themselves as Indians.
And, one day, perhaps even
within our lifetimes, we may all
come to think of ourselves as Earth-
lings. But only if one more new in-
crease in transportation comes to
full fruition: the Space Shuttle.
This is what the loss of the Chal-
lenger really meant: a setback in the
awareness we humans are at last
beginning to have of ourselves as
humans. We're all in the same boat,
trapped here on Spaceship Earth.
And this is what the Discovery
means: a chance to regain what we
lost with the Challenger. A chance to
progress into space, to rid ourselves
of the petty, meaningless divisions
wre humans make, which are all too
often based largely on where we
were born or what color is our skin.
It is a chance - perhaps the only
chance for peace on Earth. It is
perhaps the only chance any of us
have of surviving through the next
decade, of having a future.
More rides on the Discovery
than a few astronauts. It is more than
the future of NASA. What rides on
the Discovery is the future: our fu-
ture.
Bush chairman responds
The East Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
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The columns are restricted in
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submitting columns must be will-
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efforts, as no entries from ghost
writers will be published.
To the editor:
To Wyatt M. Jones IV:
Wyatt, it was indeed a pleasure
to read your letter. I haven't been so
amused since Mike Dukakis said
Sunday night, "Everyone knows I'm
against the death penalty and I'm
tough on violent crime Wyatt, you
must feel pretty sad and lonely being
the only guy at ECU to think Jimmy
Carter was a great president. (Why
didn't you go to Chapel Hill?)
Thanks for agreeing with me
about the state of interest, unemploy-
ment and inflation rates when Carter
took office. You said that it was the oil
crisis that caused them to soar. Why
are the rates low now when gas and
oil prices are higher than they were
then? (Because of ReaganBush voo-
doo economics).
You know there are a lot of
people who believe in voodoo these
days, that is why they re-elected
ReaganBush by the greatest major-
ity in history. Bush may have called it
voodoo, but if he had called it com-
mon sense economics, the liberal
democrats would have never let it get
through Congress.
I agree with you that the Iran deal
went bad, bu 11 wouldn't like to argue
that one with the released hostages'
wives and children. You know, at
least he tried something instead of
nothing, like Jimmy Carter. The 52
Americans in Iran didn't come home
till Jimmy went back to picking pea-
nuts.
On Afghanistan, Carter's grain
embargoes against the Russians' cost
our farmers money and one of our
largest markets, that is why Reagan
lifted it when elected. The Russians
aren't leaving because they couldn't
eat our grain. Thev are leaving be-
cause of the arms KeaganBush sent
the Afghanistan's rebels which they
are using to kick the Communist out
of there.
No, I didn't like Somoza and his
National Guard, but at least they
weren't Communist. Israel knew
what the rebels were, that's why they
were sending Somoza arms and sup-
plies. Carter's blockade stopped that
and now look what we have there,
the largest communist military air
base in our hemisphere.
The deficit is high, but think how
much higher it would have been if
ReaganBush weren't there. You say
that your're a freshman political sci-
ence major, well you should know
that the (democratic controlled) Con-
gress spends the money, not the
president, by now!
Reagan was the first to use fur-
lough. Maybe so. I know he didn't
release murderers though, because
California still had the death penalty
back then. As you know, Mike lets
out murderers who haven't even
been in long enough to be paroled,
just ask that Maryland woman who
got raped and her boyfriend mur-
dered by one.
Yes there have been some people
convicted of crimes since the Re-
aganBush team have been in office.
Just ask Dukakis where his friend he
appointed to head up education in
his state is. When Mike writes him
letters, he mails them to Mass. State
Prison, unless it's the weekend, then
he might be out on furlough. When
you have a million people working
for you, you are going to have some
people that will do wrong. Maybe
Carter didn't have that many steal
because during his administration
nobody had anything to steal.
Wyatt, the new jobs that have
been created by ReaganBush have
an average income of $30,000. Even if
they were the low paying jobs you
say, aren't they better than the jobs
those people had under Carter? You
can't remember those jobs can you?
It's because they didn't have jobs.
George did have help from his
family with financing his business,
but the work was all his and he paid
the money back with interest. Is it bad
for a family tc elp each other, does it
make you les a man? If this is true
how did you ever make it to college?
You also said that with the Re-
aganBush deficit, (read paragraph
about whose deficit it is again), that
college opportunities will not exist.
How did we all make it to ECU if the
opportunity didn't exist? Why is it
that enrollments are up in collegesin
this country?
When you said that George Bush
had never been elected to office and
that it was a fact, was when I realized
that all your information had come
from some bad dream, (do you like
mushrooms?) Bush has been elected
twice to the U.S. Congress from
Texas. Wyatt, wake up, the country is
doing great.
You must be very happy with
Dukakis, because he is everything
that Jimmy Carter was and worse. I
thought Carter supporters were
extinct. Is there any chance that you
have a pet dinosaur?
Bobby R. Hall
Senior,
Mgmt.
ECU Chairman for Bush
Drug bill
To the editor:
There are provisions of the drug
bill about to be passed by the US
House of Representatives which I
find alarming.
The expansion of the loophole in
the exclusionary rule of law which
would allow illegally seized evi-
dence to be used in federal trials
based on the "good faith" judgement
of the law enforcement officers in-
volved is an invitation for abuse
clearly at odds with the Fourth
Amendment to the Constitution. The
outrageous idea oi levying a $10,000
civil fine against anyone charged
with possession of illegal drug-
whether or not they are ever con-
victed of any criminal offense, is
simply intolerable.
The problem of drug abuse
within our country is certainly a seri-
ous one. One of my collateral duties
as a company grade officer at Camp
Lejeune was to serve as my unit's
drug and alcohol abuse officer and I
have a good deal of firsthand expo-
sure to what we are facing.
I assure you, the answer does not
lie with the mass testing of individu-
als in which inaccurate results are
unfortunate inevitability; nor does it
lie with the hysterical suspension of
the Constitution now being consid-
ered by our elected representatives in
Washington, D.C
I urge everyone concerned about
this threatened erosion of rights
guaranteed by the Constitution to
write the senators from your home
state and advise them against voting
for this piece of election year rubbish
Sincerely,
David W. Trevino,
alumnus
Talk show guide shows desire for fame
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
The New Republic
"If you want to touch something basic in your
audience says the full-page ad in the 1988 edition
of the Directory of Experts, Authorities and Spokes-
persons (also known as the "Talk Show Guest Direc-
tory"), " move them to action: phone, write,
praise, damn, cheer, etc then vou need to present
�REAL, LIVE COMMUNISTS ON YOUR SHOW
Yes, it's the "public relationsmedia" office of the
Communist Party of the United States, offering to
provide "honest-to-goodness, dues-paying mem-
bers of the CPUS A" to the nation's masses of TV and
radio talk show producers.
The talk show industry is enjoying a small crisis
of conscience these days over the revelation that two
actors managed to get on the Oprah Winfrey, Ger-
aldo Rivera and Sally Jesse Raphael shows by pre-
tending to be a "sex surrogate" and her "patient
The "Talk Show Guest Directory"�a fat paper-
back that looks like the yellow pages of a middle-
sized town � is a delirious illustration of how the
hunger for publicity levels us all. Harvard Univer-
sity and the Communist Party, the National Turkey
Federation and the Simon Wei sen thai Center, the
American Sunbathing Association (nudists), the
Prisoner Appreciation Society
(eel.
ii.
iring an old
TV show, not the Massachusetts furlough program), their talk-show-ability by conning three talk shows.
UNICEF, the South Central Connecticut Regional Now those very shows want them back to say how
Water Authority, and one Elliot Essman (self-de- they did it. But in the no-such-thing-as-bad-public-
scribed as "the Cyrano de Bergerac of the Computer ity stakes, these people are no match for the Rcvolu-
Agc") all buy space to beg for a chance to go on TV. tionary Communist Party (a Maoist sect not to be
confused with the Communist Party), which actu-
Harvard's Kennedy School of Government fran- ally trumpets its affiliation with Peru's "Shining
tically offers experts "on virtually any topic concern- Path" guerrillas, possibly the bloodiest group of
ing government and public policy By contrast Dr. lunatics currently loose in the world.
William Campbell Douglass maintains a bit more
dignity, offering to discuss only six specific matters, Carl Dix, the party's spokesperson, has all the
such as, "Was the AIDS virus invented at Fort necessary talk show qualifications: He's "an experi-
Detrich, Maryland?" enced revolutionary leader he's "an accomplished
Many would-be talk show guests offer tesrimo- public speaker" who has debated Patrick Buchanan;
nials. A woman calling herself "Laura X" � a profes- and he's the author of a pamphlet with the intriguing
sional rape victim who apparently seeks publicity title, "Jesse Jackson: The Right Stuff for U.S. Imperi-
and anonymity at the same time � claims to have alism
been "commended by the Surgeon General, The index of the 'Talk Show Directory which
Mademoiselle and the World Congress of Victimol- lists thousands of available topics in alphabetical
ogy Nancy Friedman, "the Telephone Doctor" order, nicely captures both the diversity of Ameri-
("What Doctor Ruth does for the bedroom' she can life and the moral and intellectual agnosticism of
asserts ambiguously, "the Telephone Doctor does the talk show culture. "Bulimia; Bulk Business Mail;
for the phone"), notes that a local TV station called BuUwinkle; Bunionsand Burning Feet Cholesteral
her "bubbly and sharp on the air Washington's Testing; Christ's Return Show Biz Legends;
own Heritage Foundation brags that it has been Shroud of Turin; Sibling Relationships
"called the 'brain center7 of U.S. conservatism by the Then there are the variations on a theme, captur-
Soviet news agency Tass ing not so much the diversity but the fragmentation
The two sex-therapy fakers have only enhanced of our society: "Suicide Epidemic, Teen; Suicide
Prevention; Suicide in Elderly; Suicide in Rural
America; Suicide, Assisted; Suicide Grief of; Suicide,
Survivors; Summer Day Camp
Neoconservatives who worry that an obsession
with "rights" is unravelling the national fabric will
not enjoy perusing the "R" section, where groups
pushing various rights ("Right to Die "Right to
Life") nestle together between "Retreaded Tires"
and "Rings of Saturn
Although the breadth of American obsessions is
impressive, there's a marked depth of preferred
expertise in two areas: sex and money Both is best.
The first time I saw the infamous "Morton Downev
Jr. Show" I was innocently flipping through the
channels and came across this man looming over a
woman in a chair, pointing a cigarette in her face,
and screaming, "You're a whore! You're a prosti-
tute Wondering what this poor woman had done
to unleash such metaphorical fury, 1 kept watching
and it turned out she really was a prostitute.
That was the whole story. They'd found a pros-
titute to put on TV in order to denounce her as a
prostitute. And she wasdelighted to be there. Some-
thing to tell the grandchildren.
"Never turn down a chance to have sex or go on
television Gore Vidal is supposed to have said. At
the rate things are going, people will soon be adver-
tising their availability to do both at the same time.
Med
(CPS�Oral Robert
sity medical stud.
about what the) -
Oral Roberts' betraj
pa rent ly has bo
enough to
reprimand them at th
perung chap
Some students
ferred, but others ren
� gelist Roberts, who
57 said God woul
he raised $�
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dents.
Though he rai
amount, Roberts
Tulsa campus i
iry that, as I I
wa � : � � �
rking tor hirr
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extraordiri .
interest rate
At the s
Gover
ERIE, Pa
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the Soviet
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home and
what the .
trom the
turn.
"By M
broke
into the I .S
to live,
1 Tuesd
here.
Branch a:
4 said :
gave them a fui
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o n ds
v very happy with
is everything
tor was and worse. I
r supporters were
chance that you
Bobby R. Hall, Jr.
Senior,
Mgmt.
Chairman for Bush 88
Drii� bill
ns of the drug
passed by the U.S.
resentatives which I
n of the loophole in
nary rule of law which
low illegally seized evi-
to be used in federal trials
n the "eood faith" judgement
iorcemenl officers m-
m invitation for abuse
3t odds with the Fourth
ment to the Constitution. The
?ous idea of levying i 000
ne against anyone charged
ossession of illegal drugs,
r or not they are ever con-
of any criminal offense, is
intolerable.
I problem oi drug abuse
our country is certainly a seri-
e. One oi mv collateral duties
.mpany gra le officer at Camp
te was to serve as my unit's
nd alcohol abuse officer and I
good deal of firsthand expo-
what we are facing,
ssure you, the answer does not
-i the mass testing of mdividu-
which inaccurate results are
unate inevitability; nor does it
h the hysterical suspension of
(institution now being consid-
v our elected representatives in
ngton, D.C
.rge every one concerned about
hreatened erosion of rights
d by the Constitution to
senators from your home
nd advise them against voting
: ce of elect ion year rubbish.
Sincerely,
David W. Trevino,
alumnus
e
tc
in Elderly; Suicide in Rural
ssisted; Suicide Grief of; Suicide,
Day Camp
es who worry that an obsession
avelling the national fabric will
the "R" section, where groups
ghts ("Right to Die "Right to
her between "Rctreaded Tires"
m
adth of American obsessions is
a marked depth of proferred
as: sex and monev. Both is best.
the infamous "Morton Downey
nnocently flipping through the
across this man looming over a
pointing a cigarette in her face,
ou re a whore! You're a prosti-
�hat this poor woman had done
taphoncal fury, I kept watching
e really was a prostitute,
hole story. They'd found a pros-
' in order to denounce her as a
was delighted to be there. Some-
ndchildren.
iwn a chance to have sex or go on
idal is supposed to have said. At
;oing, people will soon be adver-
tnlitv to do both at the same time.
e
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29,1988 5
Med students at ORU angered
(CPS)�Oral Roberts Univer-
sity medical students' anger
about what they see as evangelist
Oral Roberts' betrayal of them
apparently has become visible
enough to provoke Roberts to
reprimand them at the semester's
opening chapel service.
Some students have trans-
ferred, but others remain angry at
evangelist Roberts, who in March,
1987, said God would end his life
unless he raised $8 million for full
scholarships for ORU med stu-
dents.
Though he raised the full
amount, Roberts sent students at
the Tulsa campus a memo last
February that, as of this fall, he
was considering the scholarships
as loans � to be repaid either by
working for him for free for four
years after graduation or at an
extraordinarily high 18 percent
interest rate � instead.
At the semester's opening
chapel service, Roberts report-
edly warned students not to
grumble, adding "Keep your cot-
ton-picking mouth shut
"A small group of med stu-
dents feels there's been some
breach of trust said Jack Hay-
ford, pastor of the Church of the
Way in Los Angeles and a mem-
ber of the school's Board of Re-
gents. "In a technical sense, per-
haps
But those students, Hayford
insisted, should be grateful for
any attempt to continue the pro-
gram instead of knocking Roberts
and ORU.
During last year's $8 million
fundraising drive, Roberts re-
peatedly said donations would
fund full scholarships for medical
students.
This year Roberts says he
never promised the donations
would fund scholarships. In-
stead, students are required to
work as medical missionaries for
four years to repay the $93,500
cost to attend the school for four
years.
In a Feb. 1 memo, medical
school students were informed by
Assistant Dean Milton C. Olsen
that the Healing Team Scholar-
ship Loan program would be
cancelled at the end of the 1987-88
academic year.
Students who stayed at the
medical school for the next three
years would have to pay as much
as $71,000. Those who transferred
were told they would have to
repay the money they had already
received with 18 percent interest.
The restated loan agreement
also prohibited ORU students
from borrowing from "any source
other than ORU. . . except with
written approval of President
Oral Roberts and the Board of
Regents
At least 25 students have
sought legal advice regarding the
new "scholarship program
Twelve have transferred and
about half of the 85 who received
scholarships have refused to sign
new contracts.
The more than $8 million
raised in last year's drive was not
just for students, but for the cost of
operating the medical school,
Roberts and his son Richard said
on the "Richard Roberts Live"
program last March.
Jerry Collins, the Orlando,
Fla race-track owner whose $1.3
million donation pushed Roberts
beyond his $8 million goal just
before the March 31, 1987, dead-
line Roberts said God gave him to
raise the money, isn't surprised.
"They needed the cash flow,
and I never thought the money
would be used exclusively for the
med students
Professor
Back The Pirates
Professor O'Cools Style
All Weekend Long
Drink Specials
Quarterback Drafts - 75t
All House Highballs - $1.75
Prime Rib Dinner - $9.95 after 5 p.m.
LOCATED IN THE FARM FRESH
SHOPPING CENTER
11 am-l am Monday - Saturday
11 am-10 pm Sunday 355-2946
Government persuades return
ERIE, Pa. (AP) - An unem-
ployed couple who defected to
the Soviet Union a year ago in
search oi a better life are back
home and determined to claim
what they say were incentives
from the U.S. government to re-
turn.
"By Monday, we will be
broke, so we are going to move
into the U.S. Courthouse (in Eric)
to live Theodore Branch, 42,
said Tuesday from a small motel
here.
Branch and his wife, Cheryle,
40, Mid that after Soviet officials
gave them a furnished apartment
and jobs at Radio Moscow's
North American Service, officials
at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow
offered them the same benefits
plus help resolving their troubled
finances if they returned to the
United States. '
But State Department offi-
cials in Washington said the
Branches were offered only the there, why would they be worried
same loan available to any about us here?"
stranded U.S. citizen to finance The Soviets asked them in
passage to the United States. February to assure the U.S. Em-
"They made promises there, bassy that they were not being
and now they are backing out held against their will. Branch
Branch said. claims that jobs for you. Branch
The Branches want to be re-
imbursed for their $3,000 airfare
to return home and for their motel
room.
"We wouldn't be here look-
ing for a job if they hadn't prom-
ised us Branch said. Branch said
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
The couple will look for work
but do not plan to stay with any oi
their relatives in the area because
it's not up to our relatives to take
care oi us he said.
The Branches moved to the
Soviet Union last October because
"we were so mad at the U.S. gov- embassy officials said they could
claims that during a subsequent they might return to the Soviet
meeting, Jill Farrelly-Byrnes, the Union, but are "tired of moving
embassy's second secretary and back and forth across the ocean at
vice counsyl said, "We have a somebody's whim
place for you to live and medical
care
At an August meeting, the
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Shrimp Plate $3.65
Fri. & Sat.
Flounder, Shrimp,
Oyster Plate
$5.75
10 Discount with PCCECU
Student I.D.
(Not applicable to specials)
ernment, but not at the people
"We're really mad now he
said. Branch said that after arriv-
ing in Moscow, the Soviets asked
them to visit the Embassy because
American officials were worried
about them.
He said they refused because
"we vowed we would never step
inside another federal building.
Thev weren't worried about us
not help solve their problems
unless the Branches returned to
the United States, he said.
No one greeted them in
Washington as promised, Branch
said. "I think we have been de-
ceived. We have been stripped of
everything said Mrs. Branch. It
is hard to believe that in a demo-
cratic society, two peoplecould be
in such a predicament
WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
'A
The I The
CoMedYI CoMedY
ZONE A 2DNE
WED (J WED
THURSDAY
Peter Adonis,
752-7303
Ladies Night Out
FRIDAY
You've Seen These
Twins In Playboy,
Now See Then In Person
SATURDAY
The Point
The Point
The Point
The Point
Sl.OOwECU I.D.
PIRATEWALK
fOK MAT. STJI�tffS
M0lt3IO6t
FOR EVfcfcYBOW
Kulfo� c�i5iM
DK �� CZ.olw-rTEE-
SlODkNTuViOl
poTviSTVATcH
l-THAPPGTfa
MrVce -rt
-jjffWtfr 23- T6VUWG&y&
Escort Service
Starting Sunday, October 2, 1988
Every Sunday - Thursday 6 p.m. - 12 a.m.
MAKE ECU A SAFE PLACE
i
Join The Pirate Walk!
Pirate Walk is designed to
make walking across campus
safer for females by providing
male escorts.
IT WORKS!
Call 758-7114 for more information






)
THE EAST CA ROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29,1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian male
roommate to share new mobile home. 10
minutes from campus. Non-smoker,
please. Weekends call Hugh 756-6851.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Duplex
House. 1 2 block from campus. 2 small
bedrooms. Large kitchen and living room.
250.00. 12 month lease. 402 Biltmore
Street. 752-7538.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: For
a large, nice 2 bedroom apt. at Tar River
Estates Free rent until Oct. 15,1988. Call
Linda 830-6794.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Century Limited,
AC, Cruise, PS, PB. High mileage but
sharp; in good running condition. $2800.
Call 758-7423 anytime.
FOR SALE: Beige & white love seat. Good
condition $50. Call today! 758-9264.
FOR SALE: Waterbed, Queen size with
bookcase headboard, heater, free float.
$150. Call John 757-1597.
FOR SALE: Whirlpool automatic refridg-
erator, good condition. $100. Call 758-
8853.
FOR SALE: 55 gallon fish aquarium with
cast iron stand. Also includes 55 pds. of
rock, under gravel filter, hood, light,
pump. Call 758-0678.
2 WATER BEDS: King & Queen size, with
heaters and side rails. $200.00 each. Call
355-2764 anytime.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE: Papers, $1.50 per
page. Resume's written and typed, $20.00
Close to campus. Call Joy at 758-7423 be-
tween 6 and 9 p.m.
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student. Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
Re'sume' production, and other business
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F 11:00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. for more de-
tails!
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
DW1? 2on't Drink & Drive. Come Party
In Style. Cad Class Act Limousine 757-
3240.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND DESKTOP
PUBLISHING: Reports, Resumes, etc.
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933.
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING: Real cheap
Affordable Rates! Call 752 5084.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Shenanigans Nite
Club in Goldsboro is now hiring cocktail
servers. Apply in person at Comfort Inn,
Spence Ave, Goldsboro, NC
TRAVEL SALES: Sell package spring
break tours to Caribbean. Free travel
and $! Great sales experience and
flexible hours! Call 1 (800) 4267710.
PERSONALS
NEED CASH? Have baseball cards? Call
Earlvis, the mad baseball card buyer. I pay
damn good money for cards of any year,
any shape, and any condition. If you need
party money, Big E is the one to call. 757-
6366, leave message if not there.
DRAGONFEST '88: October 1 at the
BETA house. Free admission, live band!
CHI ALPHA OMEGA: Pledge brothers:
nice banner, guys. We did the banner
right. Let's keep growing tight. Brother
John, Right.
ATTENTION ALL SORORITIES: Rent a
Chi Alpha Omega pledge. For more infor-
mation call 752-8239 or 752-8933.
RESPONSIBLE, CAPABLE PERSON:
Able to drive, needed to help our two boys
(8 & 14) while we're away Oct. 8-11. 830-
0493.
PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY,
INC Invites all young men to their fall
formal smoker Sunday, Oct. 2, 1988 at
8:00 p.m. at the Cultural Center.
PARTY AT THE FIZZ: With the Kappa
Sigmas FREE nacho bar Special on all
drinks 9:30 Happy Hour SI .00 at the
door Thursday night
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Wants to thank
all the brothers, little sisters, and
pledges, and all their parents for a great
parents' weekend! We had a great time
at the game and party afterwards!
ATTENTION ECU: Dragonfest '88
October 1 at the BETA house. 1110
Cotanche St. Across from East Coast
Music. Its Free! Live Band!
KATE BOHANNON: Happy 19th
Birthday! I hope you have a good one!
Your Secret Admirer.
ALPHA PHI'S: Isn't that my tie?
Wednesday night was an experience.
Everybody's favorite beverages wore
flowing and the singing contest on the
front porch was a classic. As alwavs, a
great time was had by all Can wo have
our ties back now? Love � Tho Delta
Sigs.
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCE-
MENT: Greenvilles 1st Annual Baseball
Card, Coin, and Comic Book Show Sun-
day October 23, 1988, 10:00 a.m. � 5:00
p.m Ramada Inn, Greenville, NC I Iwy
264 By-Pass, Admission $1.00 per person
door prizes. For more information call
752-7736.
LEANNE B At last! Happy 21st Birth-
day! Get ready for a wild weekend! Patti.
VOTER REGISTRATION: Begins Oct. 2
6. Please vote. Sponsored by AZD.
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo car
tridges with instructions for re-sale. East
Coast Music & Video. 758-4251, 1109
Charles Blvd.
OH MY GOD ITS HANOI HANNAH
Ken � You big stud. Kevin � tried posi-
tion 15 lately? Marj � Do you? Cosmic
Muffin � On a galloping horse? Camille
� Gotta gun? Craig � Dollar forty five.
Kathy � Call me. This is because I love,
love, love you. Wierdo, Mar, Mar, 11 ussy,
Fruitcake, 36DD and Ditto.
FREE PARTY: Live music � coolers wel-
come. Come to the BETA house across
from East Coast Music this Saturday from
7 to 12 for DRAGONFEST.
YARD SALE: Saturday, 8.00 am until
good stuff, cheap. Especially for college
students. Enter College View Dr. from
10th St. and take a left into the parking
circle.
CONGRATULATIONS: To Cam Ward
for Panhellenic Homecoming Rep. Love
the sisters & pledges of Chi Omega.
THE SISTERS OF ZETA TAU ALPHA:
Would like to congratulate the new execu-
tive officers. President � Mandy Mar
lowe, First Vice-President � Caroline
McClelland, Second Vice President �
Tessa Thomas, Secretary � Sara I lome.
Treasurer � Sarah Lanier, Membership
Chairman � Alicia Thomas, Ritual Chair-
man � Susan Barnard, Panhellenic Rep-
resentative � Kelly Jones, and 1 listonan
Reporter � Deena Niewiadomski Best of
luck to you Love the sisters and pledges
of Zota Tau Alpha.
OFF TO A GREAT START: ETA pledge
class of Theta Chi. Keep up the good work
guys and get ready for the weekend.
THETA CHI: Get ready to cheer because
installation is almost here! This weekend
is the time � Uh Oh I can't think of a
rhyme. Friday night Holiday Inn is the
sight for a cocktail party that will leave us
feeling right. Then Saturday to the cere-
mony we will go and that night � Oh how
the beer will flow.
SATURDAY AFTERNOON: We will
cheer on the pirates at the game and after
tiie banquet that night, we won't ever be
the same. Alpha Phi, Alpha Omega Pi and
ZTA are helping us celebrate so the party
will definitely be great. Theta Chi get
ready to cheer because installation is
almost here.
KA: Thanks for a great parents weekend
Everything went well. We appreciate it.
I lope we can get together soon! Love
AZD's.
DELTA SIGMA PHI: Thanks for the help
this weekend, sorry for the wake-up call!
Love AZD.
OCT. 1 BETA THETA PI: Presents
Dragonfest '88. At the Beta house. Across
from East Coast Music. FREE ADMIS-
SION and Classic Rock Live Band!
TO AZD STANGER P A.TES: This Friday
night is the night to discover, who our
strangers in the night will be, so we can get
to know one another. It will start with a
pre-planned grouping of dates, and then
off to the campground, on buses that
hopefuly won't be late. Camp Contentnia
is the place to be, can't wait to see who our
strangers will be. So all of you strangers
get ready and psyched, for this will be one
evening that you will really have liked!
Love the AZD.
NORAHS: I told you I would. Hope
Casey is all right and tell your mom I said
hi. I hope you answered me by now. Now
was all of this embarrassing? You not so
secret admirer.
PI KAPPA PHI: Congratulations Alex P.
"Lendl" for winning your tennis match,
and congratulations to George "The
Swat" Lupton for his outstanding table
tennis victory.
LOST: 7 month male Dalmation, one blue
eye and one brown, needs medicaiton. If
seen or found please call: 830-3909, 758-
3084 or 758-5580 ask for John. Note: he's a
deaf dog and will not respond to sound
Please call � I miss him a lot.
DRAGONFEST '88: Oct 1 Featuring
from Chapel Hill "Something in the
Chicken Free admission at the BETA
house. 1110 Cotanche St Aaron from Lat
Coast Music.
TO THE SCUMMY, DIRT BAG, SLIME
BUCKET, GAMMBLING FOOLS OF
LANGSTON PARK: Have the keg cold
and chilly and the tap wide open for yours
truely Earlvis T. Radio Star, Columnist
and best buddy
TO JILL: The best of luck on your projin I
We'll have to celebrate when we get fin
ished with that damn project1 Susan.
&
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
$325 a month
Contact J T or Tommy William
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt 8,12 - 5 JO p.m
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and qu let one bed room fu mished
apartments, energy eificient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable IV.
Couples or singles only $205 a month, 6 month
lea� MOBI1.F. ! K.1ME RENTALS - couples or
singles Apartrrrnt and mobile iiomes in Azalea
C�rdcM near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact j T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 '
Loans On 4r Buying Guns
TV's, Stereos, Gold Jewelry, coins,
most anything of value
. Southern Gun & Pawn, Inc.
$ 752-2464 $
Your Best Look
Specializing In. MANICURES
French Manicures � Nail Tips �
Overlays � Wrapping � Acrylics �
PEDICURES � SKIN CARE Bod)
Wrapping � Face &. Body Waxing �
Facials � Deep Pore Cleansing �
Acne Treatments � Muscle Tone
Treatments � Complete Line Of
Therapeutic Skin Care Products F i
Men ot Women
355-2969 - For Appointment
314 Plaa Dr, Greenville
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Subscription Form
Name:
Address:
Date to Begin:
Co m pi i men ta ry
Amount Paid:
Individual:
Date to End:
Business:
Date Paid:
Rates: Individual $25 per yearBusiness $35 per year
Return to: The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg - ECU. Greenville, NC 2785A-43S3
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru Sat. l.ow
Coat Termination to 20 wrrka of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
ALPHA XI DELTA
Pig-Pickin at
O'Rockefeller
Restaurant
All You Can Eat Buffet
After The Football
Game til 8 p.rrh
October 1st
Barbeque � Potatoes � Slaw
� Breadstieks � Tea
Tickets Available Thru Any
Alpha Xi Delta member
Is it a Rumor or a Fact
East Carolina Ice Tea Party is Back
The Return of the Mason Jars
$3.00 For First Tea
$2.00 For The Rest
Keep The Mason Jar
Ramada Inn
(formerly the Sheraton - Greenville)
Announcements
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Season tickets are now on sale for the Per-
forming Arts Series at ECU. This year
there are 14 outstanding performances
starting in Oct. and running through
April. Some of the attractions include:
Wynton Marsalis, CABARET, The Acting
Company in Love's Labour's Lost, Nadja
Salerno-Sonnenberg, The Tokyo String
Quartet, Oregon, The Atlanta Symphony,
and the Ohio Ballet. For a free brochure,
and further details contact: The Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall 757-6611, ext.
266.
NEW ARRIVALS
The MSC Music Listening Lounge has
received the following selections on com-
pact disc: Aerosmith�Permanent Vaca-
tion; Wynton Marsalis�Standard Time;
INXS�Kick; Ahmad Jamal�Crystal;
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg; Sinead
OConnor�The Lion and the Cobra; REO
Speedwagon�Life as We Know It. The
Music Listening Lounge is open seven
days a week from 2-1030 pjn. and is
located on the second floor gallery of
MendenhalL Check out the new tunes
before you buy
FRE-r.T. STUDENTS
All general college pre-physical therapy
sophomores, or higher, anticipating ap-
plying to the May 1989 Physical Therapy
Class should go to the Physical Therapy
Dept. Office, 1st floor, Belk Bldg before
the end of Sept to determine eligibility.
Instructions for receiving the application
packet will be given then. If you have any
question, contact that office by phone
(757-6961, ext. 261) or in person.
CROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept 15
until Dec 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2. Please note that a group
listing with the name of every person in
the photograph MUST be presented BE-
FORE the photographer films the group.
ORGANIZATIONS WITHOUT LIST-
INGS WILL NOT BE PHOTOGRAPHED,
and time does ret permit the scheduling
of another session. Call 757-6501 and
leave ck "k. rime for the photo to be taken
Please give two days notice for the pho-
tographer.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
NETWORK
Are you interested in dedicating 6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Overseas Development has
the perfect opportunity. Call Marianne
Exum 00 830-9450 or (w) 757-6271 for
application and more details. Application
deadline Oct. 1
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Oct. Semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase you "fun"
budget,
�opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
�a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
Mon Oct 3,4 p.m. rm. 2006; Thurs Oct.
6, 1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon Oct. 10, 1 p.m.
tm. 2010; Thurs Oct. 13,4 p.m. rm. 2006;
Thurs Oct. 20, 1 p.m rm. 2010; Mon
Oct 24,1 p.m rm. 2010; Thurs Oct. 27,4
p.m rm. 2006; Mon Oct. 31,4 p.m rm.
2006.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join as in lifting up the name
of Jesus in songs ?.r.d Bible study. God
Bless You.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
ECU STUDENT BANK
Faculty, staff, and students may now pay
their Greenville Utility trills at the ECU
STUDENT BANK, presenting both parts
of the bill. Other services include cashing
checks, savings accounts, paying tele-
phone bills, and the purchase of money
orders.
LOSE
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fri night
at 7:00.
C AM PUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncontpromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
Practices are in full swing. Come to the
bottom of College Hill every Tues
Thurs and Sun. at 500. New players are
more than welcome. Join the team that
tied for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anyone who purchased New Student
Review this summer, should come by tiie
Buccaneer, yearbook, office and pick
them up. The office is located in front of
Joyner Library, or. the second floor of the
Publications Bldg. You may pick the hook
up between 9 a.m. to 12 p.m and from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. this week and next week.
AMA
The AMA will be holding its second
meeting Thurs Sept. 29 at 3:30. This
meeting will be held in room 1031 of the
GCB. Our guest speaker will be Craig
Quick from Pitt Memorial. He will be
speaking about marketing health care. All
interested are welcome and old members
are encouraged to attend.
KAYAKINGCANQE
Be sure to attend the Intramural Kayak-
ingCanoe registration held from Sept. 15
to Oct. 7. Learn to canoe and kayak in a
fantastic trip. All you need to do is regis-
ter.
BQWUNG
Be sure to attend the Intramural Bowling
registration meeting held Oct. 4 at 5:00
p.m. in GCB 1026. Play begins shortly
afterwards! Be sure to register as soon as
possible for some in the alleys!
GAMMA BETA PHI
To all students with a 3.0 gpa or better:
Gamma Beta Phi is having an orientation
meeting Oct. 4 & 5 at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 244. If you're interested, please
come by.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Ohio Ballet will intiate the 1988-89
Performing Art Series on Oct. 12 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. The program for
the evening includes: "Untitled" (first
performed by PHILOBOLUS in 1975),
"Summer Night" (choreographed by
Heinz Poll), "Gravity" (a new work by
Laura Dean), 'Triptych" (choreographed
by Heinz Poll to Mendelssohn's "Piano
Concerto No. 2, D Minor), Tickets for this
outstanding event are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 757-6611, ext. 266. This event
is sponsored by the Performing Arts
Committee and the Department of Uni-
versity Unions.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Buswell-Parnas-Luvisi Trio will open
the 1988-89 Chamber Music Series on Oct
3, at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. Composed
of James Buswell (violinist), Leslie Parnas
(cellist), and Lee Luvisipianist). Their
program includes: Haydn's � 'Trio in G
Major Zaninelli's � "Arioso Brahm's
� 'Trio in C Minor. Op. 101 and
Beethoven's � 'Trio in B-flat Major, Op.
97" (The Archduke). Tickets are now on
sale for this event in the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, 757-
6611, ect. 266. This event is co-sponsored
by the School of Music and the Depart-
ment of Univeristy Unions.
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
To help ECU people prepare for on and off
campus interviews, the Career Planning
and Placement Service in te Bloxton
House is offering these one hour pro-
grams to aid you in developing better
interviewing skills for use in your job
search. The program is open to the first 20
people to come for each session. No sign
up is required. These sessions are held in
the Career Planning Placement Room on
S ?pt. 29 at 3 p.m.
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the December issue. The
magazine is published twice a semester
with the first issue coming out in October.
This special issue will be a small magazine
with mainly general information,
whereas the December issue will be a
larger size containing news stories, short
stories, editorials, poetry, etc. Articles
may be left at the office or at the Media
Board Secretary's Office in the Publica-
tions Building.
FATAL ATTRACTION
Fatal Attraction will be playing Thur. thru
Sunday at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theater. This
is free to all ECU students with valid ID
and faculty with film passes. Sponsored
by Student Union Films Committee.
WATER BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural CO-REC
water basketball registration meeting
held Oct. 4 at 6p.m. in MG102. Play begins
shortly afterward. Interested in officiat-
ing? Attend the first official clinic Oct. 4 at
6:30 p.m. in MG 102 For additional info
call Dave Hall at 757-6387.
1-ON-1 BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramurral 1-on-l
basketball registration meeting held Oct.
5 at 5 p.m. in MG 102. Play begins shortly
afterwards. Be sure to register as soon as
possible to see who is the next Michael
Jordan.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
The co-ed National Service Fraternity,
proudly announces and congratulates the
Fall 1988 Pledge a ass: Yolanda Arroy,
Tammy Blake, Rodney Dancy, Mark
Dyer, Tracey Eason, Dennis Gardner,
Rana HaiTis, Sean Herring, David Konne-
gay. Bill Mitchell, Tom Mitchell, Lisa
Moffat, David Overton, Stephen Parker,
Beth Sedberry, Todd Stewart, Jennifer
Terrell, Marti Wilson, and Don Witham.
BANNER CONTEST
To participate in the banner contest, dur-
ing NATIONAL ALCOhOL AWARE-
NESS WEEK, register your organizations
entry, in 209 Whichard Building, by Oct.
14. Six divisional 1st place winners will be
displayed during the ECU vs Syracuse
game and be awarded $50. Call 757-6823
for entry forms and additional informa-
tion.
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
Students for Dukakis and College Demo-
crats will hold an organizational meeting
on Sept. 29 at 8:15 p.m. in Mendenhall
Room 221.
CROPWALK 88
Any individuals or groups interested in
participating in the 7th annual Cropwalk
tor hunger should attend die ECU Re
cruitnent Rally Oct 6 at 7 p.m. in room
244 Mendenhall. The walk will be hold on
Nov. 6th. For more information contact
Marianne Exum (ODN) 757-6271 or 830
9450.
IRS
Intramural independent representative
meeting Sept. 29 at 530 p m in Memorial
Gym 105-C. Help the intramural inde-
pendent division grow! Your ideas ate
needed. For additional info call 757-6387.
NURSING STUDENTS
In order to receive your nursing pin b v De
cember, 1988, orders must be places in the
Student Stores, Wnght Building, no later
than Oct. 3. Orders should be placed at the
Jewelry Counter Orders must be paid in
full when the order is placed
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Business students interested in scholar-
ships should secure forms from one of the
following dept. offices: Accounting �
GCB 3208, Decision Sciences - 5418.
Finance � 3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414. All applications roust
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210),
Chairman of School ot Business Scholar
ship Committee, by Oct 14 Students may
apply for one or more ot the scholarships
listed below. Planters Bank Scholarship (3
at $1000 each), University Book Exchange
( 2 at $500 each), NCNB ($500), J Fred
Hamblen ($200) Credit Women Intcma
tional ($200), Cameron-Brown First
Union Scholarship (3 at $500 each) FOR
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY I.atnev
W. Pittard Memorial, Raleigh Durham
Chapter Institute of Internal Auditors
($350), National Association of Account
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship ($500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR. ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
ONLY: Archie R. Eurnette ($600), Ward
Real Estate Scholarship ($300).
CONSTRUCTION MGMT.
Dept. of Construction Mgmt. presents a
series of seminars: Wed Oct. 26: "Brick
Masonry - Design, Detail. & Construc-
tion" by A Dwayne Bryant (Brick Assoc
of NC); Wed Nov. 16: "Critical Path
Method of Scheduling Construction" by
Donald Whitaker (Davidson & Jones
Const. Co.). AU seminars will be held at
630 in rm. 1031 of the GCB.
BUCCANEER
The 1987 yearbooks have come in. Any-
FOOTBALL
The Pirates will take on the Ragin
of Southwestern Louisiana this
Ficklen Stadium. Kickoff for the gl
set for 1.30 p.m. Before the gar
Arthritis Foundation will release
balloons � the most in Ficklen Stl
history Make plans now to be par!
fun ii excitement of Pirate football
IRS
Anyone interested m partiapatinj
woman's field-hockey club is invj
attend an organizational meetiij
Thurs, Sept. 29 at 5:00 p.m in
Memorial Gym If interested but i
attend, or have question, call I i
75H-8279.
WERE YOU A BOY SC
East Carolina Council's Oder of
row Lodge, Croatan Lodge
bra ting its 5Cth. Anniversr I
Bonner Scout Reservation J
members of roatan Lodge are
"Green Bar Bill William Hill
thor of the Boy Scout Handb- � j
mr honored guest In order: i
must preregister by Oct 14 The
PTLm
COLUMBIA, S.C
is neanng "the end of the
and must find a buyer b 1
or face the prospect of a Ik
tion of assets, the banki
judge handling the case saw
Trustee M.C "Red"
missed a deadline to pre
buyer to Judge Rufus Reync
Tuesday, saying he ncededl
time to work out compll
legal details of the pure ha:
"When you get two groj
lawyers analyzing 40-somel
of contracts, you can't
agree on what every
means Benton said dui
court hearing. "That's w
taking so long
Reynolds said he
stands the process is comp.
but he has to have a buyer I
"It's got to end somel
said Reynolds. "If you cq
here with no offer (on Octj
may go down the dram am
have to be a conversion
Chapter 7 case, which mel
sets would be liquidated.
FRFF DFLIVFRY � FR
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Using thi
en is. we
behind w
are not ci
with one
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either re
vour mor
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Fri. & Sat. 11:1
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J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29,1988 7
ind wiLl not respond to sound
i miss him a lot
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ipei Hill "Something in the
.H the Bl
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;ammbling fools of
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�RS
m in Memorial .rai tnde a teas are -
Rb!SILDENTS
)88, orders must be places ir. th
Building, no
il
Irders rrt
aced
LARSHIPS A.VAI1 BLI

? di .
U4. All
i Ruth jon. ��
� � : may
one or mure of tr
ow Planters Bank Sdiolarship O
each). University I-
Fred
K ��') Oedit Women Interna
Camei Firt
I �
NT1N' M "� ' r I atney
rd Memorial, Rak :ham
Institute of Internal litors
National Aasodati i
stern Carolina Chapter Sv holar-
�sK)N SC1EN ES MA
LY Grant for Detia
($125), FINANCT " �
jkrdue R Puniett W Yard
to Schdanfeip ($300)
S rRLXHOX MQML
Constructian Mgmt presents a
ieminars Wed (.Vt 26 "Brick
- Design, Detail. & Construe-
A Dvavne Bryant (Brick Assoc
Wed . Nov. 16: Critical Path
of Scheduling Construction" bv
Whitaker (Davidson & Jones
o.) All seminars will be held at
m 1031 of theGCB
7 yearbooks have come m Any
Announcements
FQQTPALL
The Pirates will take on the Ragin' Cajuns
of Southwestern Louisiana this Sat. at
Ficklen Stadium Kickoff for the game is
set for 130 p.m. Before the game. The
Arthritis Foundation will release 10,000
balloons � the most in Ficklen Stadium
history. Make plans now to be part of the
fun & excitement of Pirate football.
IRS
Anyone interested in participating in a
woman's field-hockey club is invited to
attend an organizational meeting on
Thurs Sept. 29 at 5:00 p.m. in rm. 105
Memorial Gym. If interested but unable to
attend, or have question, call Leigh Ann at
758-8279.
WERE YOU A BOY SCOUT?
East Carolina Council's Order of the Ar-
row Lodge, Croatan Lodge 117, is cele-
brating its 5Cth Anniversary on Nov. 4-6at
Bonner Scout Reservation. All past
members of Croatan Lodge are invited.
"Green Bar Bill William Hillcourt (Au-
thor of the Boy Scout Handbook), will be
our honored guest. In order to attend, you
must preregister by Oct. 14. The cost will
be $12 for Sat. and $15 for FriSun. Regis-
tration includes all meals, activities, and a
beautiful special edition patch. Send
check with name and address to: East
Carolina Council, O A 50th Anniversary,
P.O. Box 1698, Kinston, N.C, 28503 or call
(919)522-1521.
NEW POETRY CONTEST
Cameron Publishing Company an-
nounces a new poetry contest open to all.
$1,500 First Prize plus other prizes. For
contest rules, send self-addressed
stamped envelope to: Cameron Pubhsh-
ing Company, 1109 S. Plaza Way 422,
Flagstaff, AZ 86001. The contest deadline
is Nov. 10,1988.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Due to the rally for Jim Gardner tonight,
this weeks meeting will be cancelled,
however, we will meet next Thurs. night
at 7 p.m. in rm. 221 in Mendenhall. Any-
one interested in attending the rally, hav-
ing some BBQ, and getting to meet the
next Lt. Gov. please call 830-3605.
PURPLE & GOLD
PIG PICKIN' AND SOCIAL
The ECU Black Alumni Chapter cordially
invites alumni, students and their friends
to our 2nd Annual Pig Pickin' and Social
on Oct. 7 at the Pirate Club from 6p.m. to
1 a.m. The menu will include BBQ and
fried chicken with all the fixins! Cost: $10
person for all that you can eat. Mail check
to ECU Black Alumni Chapter, P.O. Box
4021, Greenville, or contact Barbara Hines
(Psychology Dept.) at 756-6491. Come
enjoy an evening of good food, good com-
pany and live jazz! Proceeds will go to-
ward the Ledonia S. Wright Memorial
Scholarship Fund for Minority Students.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all Am-
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p.m. in Menden-
hall rm. 221. Remember that missing over
2 meetings per semester may lead to pro-
bation.
HEALTH SERVICES
Don't miss the game on Sat The Sat.
Clinic will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
noon. The Sun. Clinic will be held as usual
from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Call the Stu-
dent Health Service at 757-6841 for more
info, or questions.
one who wo1 'Id like a copy ontmaycome
by the office and pick one up. We are
located in front of Joyner Library in the
Publications Bldg.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
All students who intend to go to law
school after ECU are invited to join the
ECU Law Society. The next meeting will
be at 6:00 in Mendenhall, rm. 221 on Oct.
6th.
EYE HEALTH PROFESSIONS
A representative from the Pennsylvania
College of Optometry will present a pro-
gram on eye health professions at ECU on
Thurs Sept. 29 at 2 p.m. The program will
be presented in Mendenhall, rm. 244, and
is open to all interested college and high
school students and their parents.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
College Republicans welcome all stu-
dents to join us every Thurs. evening at
7:00 p.m. in 221 Mendenhall. Although
there will be no meeting on Sept. 29 due to
the Jim Gardner rally at the American
Legion Bldg. Call 752-8359 for info, on the
meeting or the rally.
John's Flowers and Gifts
503 E. 3rd St.
752-3311
PTL may have to liquidate assets
Order Early for
Homecoming Corsages
$5.00 plain
$10.00 fancy
$7.50 with Greek Letters
i1
i Discounts For Fraternities i
I and Other Groups
� of 20 or more J
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - PTL
is nearing "the end of the road"
and must find a buyer by Oct. 14
or face the prospect of a liquida-
tion of assets, the bankruptcy
judge handling the case says.
Trustee M.C. "Red" Benton
missed a deadline to present a
buyer to Judge Rufus Reynolds on
Tuesday, saying he needed more
time to work out complicated
legal details of the purchase.
"When you get two groups of
lawyers analyzing 40-some pages
of contracts, you can't always
agree on what everything
means Benton said during a
court hearing. "That's why it's
taking so long
Reynolds said he under-
stands the process is complicated,
but he has to have a buyer soon.
"It's got to end sometime
said Reynolds. "If you come in
here with no offer (on Oct. 14), it
may go down the drain and it may
have to be a conversion" to a
Chapter 7 case, which means as-
sets would be liquidated.
Six weeks ago, Reynolds had
said he would order PTL shut by
Saturday if there was no buyer.
PTL filed for protection from
its creditors under Chapter 11 of
bankruptcy law in June 1987,
three months after founder Jim
Bakker admitted a sexual encoun-
ter with church secretary Jessica
Hahn and resigned.
Reynolds pushed the dead-
line for Benton to present a buyer
to Oct. 14, a Friday, and on Mon-
day Oct. 17, he will consider re-
quests from two major creditors -
Fairfax Savings and Loan and
Arthur Anderson & Co. - to liqui-
date the assets.
At that time, he also will con-
sider a motion to foreclose filed by
First Mortgage Investment Co. of
Greensboro, N.C, which holds
the note on about 10 acres of PTL
property, including the television
and radio editing facilities.
He'll also consider on Oct. 17
a request from the Internal Reve-
nue Service to terminate PTL's
lease with Heritage Ministries,
the non-profit religious arm that
was separated from PTL recently.
The IRS argues that Heritage
Ministries hasn't been able to
meet its rent payments.
"We're at the end of the road
now Reynolds said. "If we don't
get a sale soon, there's not going to
be anything for anybody
Benton said he's still negotiat-
ing with Canadian real estate
executive Peter Thomas, who has
offered $113 million for the
ministry's assets. He's also still
talking with Steven Mernick of
Toronto and a group of investors
from Washington and New York
called "Capital Management As-
sociates
"We're after the highest ini-
tial cash payment we can get
Benton said, declining to elabo-
rate on the offers being consid-
ered.
The judge also decided Tues-
day that after Oct. 1, professionals
such as lawyers and accountants
who are working on the case will
have a priority in getting paid. He
said he was concerned that if he
did not grant that special status,
the professionals handling the
case would stop work.
In other action, the judge
urged lawyers for PTL and for
contractor Roe Messner to try to
settle without a trial his claim for
$14 million. Reynolds said a trial
would take two to seven weeks
and would be very expensive.
He also said the claims by life-
time partners, or major contribu-
tors to PTL, should be considered
a class action, so that if any money
ever becomes available for them,
each partner would get an equal
amount.
Also Tuesday, Heritage Min-
istries President Don Edwards
said he was resigning that post,
citing dissension in the organiza-
tion.
"My management style has
been team building I can't con-
tinue in the hostile environment
that has built up said Edwards,
a retired Ford Motor Co. execu-
tive.
Riverbluff
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29,1988
Pilot of flight 1713 had history
�f flight training problems
VV ASHINGTON (AP) � Fed-
eral investigators said today the
pilot of the Continental Airlines
jet that crashed last November in
a snowstorm in Denver had a his-
tory of training problems and
little experience flying jet aircraft.
The experience of the cockpit
crew of Continental Flight 1713
was a key focus of the National
Transportation Safety Board's
nearly year-long investigation of
the crash last Nov. 15 in which 28
of the 82 people aboard were
killed.
As the safety board prepared
its final report of the accident, its
staff of investigators made clear at
a hearing that pilot experience
and questions about whether the
aircraft took off with ice on the
wings were central factors in the
accident.
Investigators said co-pilot
Lee Bruecher, 26, who was at the
controls of the McDonnell
Douglas DC-9 as it took off, had
numerous training problems dat-
ing back to 1983.
He had failed initial tests for
his multi-engine license and was
tired by a small air taxi operator in
1985 because of "handling prob-
lems" in flight tests.
After being hired by Conti-
nental in the summer of 1987, the
young pilot went through a series
of simulator training tests in
which instructors found him to
have problems controlling his
flights. At one such test an instruc-
tor said Bruecher "completely lost
control of (his) aircraft with en-
gine out at 2,000 feet accord-
ing to Continental documents
reviewed by the safety board.
Continental spokesman
Bruce Hicks said the airline was
not aware of the pilot's previous
training problems. He said when
inquiries were made about his
previous employment, "every-
thing we got was terrific
Hicks acknowledged that
Bruecher had problems in one of
his training sessions in a simula-
tor, but said he had performed
well at other times.
The NTSB was expected to
issue a final report, including the
probable cause for the Nov. 15
crash, later.
The board also has been look-
ing into a possible failure in proce-
dures that may have allowed the
aircraft to depart with snow or ice
on its wings, thereby inhibiting its
ability to gain lift.
Investigators said in opening
today's hearing that as long as 27
minutes was believed to have
passed between when the DC-9
was de-iced and when it took off.
They said Continental's
operations manual requires a pi-
lot to check for possible icing on
the wings if there is a delay of 20
minutes, but that there was no
evidence such precautions were
taken by the pilots of Flight 1713.
The jet crashed seconds after
lifting off from Denver's Staple-
ton International Airport.
The DC-9 is particularly sus-
ceptible to ice contamination be-
cause it has no slats on the leading
edge of the wings.
Bruecher had been hired by
Continental only four months
prior to the crash and was making
his first takeoff in a DC-9 during
snowy conditions. He had a total
of 3,186 hours of flying, but most
of that was in propeller aircraft
while working for a commuter
airline. He had only 36 hours on a
DC-9 and some of that was in
training, according to investiga-
tors.
Capt. Frank Zvonek, 43, had
12,135 total hours of flying time-
with 33 hours as a DC-9 captain.
Since the accident, the FAA
has advised airlines to require
that the captain of a jetliner
handle a takeoff in poor weather.
Continental has put into place
such a requirement since the acci-
dent and also has begun to ar-
range work flight assignments so
that two relatively inexperienced
pilots are not likely to be assigned
to the same cockpit, said Richard
Hillman, vice president for flight
operations.
But Hillman and other senior
Continental officials maintained
in interviews Monday that the
two pilots on Right 1713 were
qualified and properly trained.
Reagan administration wants to ban student
loans at schools with high default rates
(CPS) � The Reagan admini-
stration has again proposed not to
make college loans to students
who attend colleges where a high
number of people have defaulted
on loans.
It also wants to make banks
that have made a lot of "bad"
student loans assume some of the
nsk of default.
The proposals � published
in the Sept. 14 Federal Register �
will become an official rule if
they're not challenged within 90
days.
BruceCarnesof the U.S. Dept.
oi Education, in announcing the
proposals, released figures show-
ing that 10 percent of the banks
making student loans had at least
one of every five loans it made in
default.
Those banks, said Carnes,
generally made loans to students
attending private, for-profit trade
schools
Secretary of Education Wil-
liam . Bennett, who has in the
past termed the student loan de-
FBI agents
suspended
(CPS) � The Federal Bureau
of Investigation will suspend
three agents and censure three
others for mishandling an investi-
gation of political opponents �
many of them collegians � of the
Reagan administration's Central
American policy.
The FBI probed the Commit-
tee in Solidarity with the People of
El Salvador (CISPES) and other
Reagan administration critics, in-
cluding dozens of college stu-
dents and faculty members, after
private groups � many affiliated
with conservative campus or-
ganizations� told the bureau the
critics covertly were sending
funds and military supplies to
leftists in El Salvador.
During the four-year investi-
gation that included students and
faculty at the universities of Kan-
sas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Minne-
sota and Pennsylvania, as well as
Florida State, Wichita State and
Tennessee State, the FBI found no
evidence of wrongdoing.
"I am disciplining these indi-
viduals because of the manage-
rial or supervisory inadequacies
displayed by them" during the
investigation, FBI Director Wil-
liam Sessions said Sept. 14.
"The mistakes in judgement
that took place during the CISPES
investigation are serious ones,
and I cannot emphasize too
strongly my firm conviction that
there is no place for such mistakes
in the work of the FBI Sessions
told the Senate Intelligence
Committee.
Three employees, who Ses-
sions did not name, have been
placed on probation and sus-
pended without pay for 14 days.
The other three, he added, were
formally censured, with repri-
mands.
fault rate "intolerable said ter-
mination was the most severe
sanction an institution could face.
"Other, lesser sanctions would
also be available
The proposed rules would
require the trade schools to dis-
close state licensing and certifica-
tion requirements, and the pass
rates and job placement rates of
their graduates.
The schools will also have to
provide pro-rated refunds to stu-
dents who do not complete their
programs if the new rules are en-
acted.
Bennett has charged the train-
ing schools with ripping off stu-
dents. "Too often the only thing
they get out of these schools is
debt
The administration drew a
vehement reaction from trade
schools when it first floated the
idea last spring. School lobbyists
protested most defaulters were
relatively poor students who
couldn't afford to go to more tra-
ditional colleges and universities.
The General Accounting Of-
fice, Congress's investigative
arm, also has found students de-
fault on their loans most typically
because they don't have the
money to repay, not because
they're dcadbeats who simply
choose not to repay them.
n
START
EXECUTTVE
TRAINING NOW
Don't wait until yrju
finish college to start a man-
agement training program. If you
have at least two years remaining, consider
Air Force ROTC We can give you a head
start on a fast-paced career.
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
WRIGHT ANNEX, RM 312
757-6597
51 SffS i" jg-
Leadership Eacdknce Starts Here
Take a Break From
School and Work
i1
J Buy One Specialty Sandwich !
I andGet 2nd Sandwich I
I of Equal or Lesser Value
I
I
I
I
I
L
12 Price
Expiration 10-22-88
Not Good With Any Other Special Offers
Entertainment For The Weekend
I
I
I
I
I
J
Thursday, Sept. 29 Featuring Uncle Green
Friday, Sept. 30 The Bond with Stark Naked and The Car Thieves
Saturday, Oct. 1 Bad Bob & The Rockin' Horses
Call Ahead For Takeouts 758-0080
Hours of Operations
Mon-Tua
Uun-10pm
Wtd-Thur
llvn-lam
Friday
llm-2im
Saturday
12-noon-2am
SAV-A-CENTER
Journal
Share the feeling with money saving coupons and
special offers in October s Ladies Home Journal
October is Fall Fest of Savings' at A&P This
week save with special coupons from October s
Ladies Home Journal
LONGACRE-WAMPLER�10-14 LB. AVG
Fresh Grade 'A'
Young Hen Turkeys
TAB�SPRITE�CAFFEINE FREE
Regular or Diet
Coca
Cola
LIMIT ONE WITH �10 MIN. PURCHASE
Plain or SelfRisng
Red Band
Flour
LIMIT ONE WITH 10 MIN. PURCHASE
Grade 'A
Large
Eggs
j
LliVi 2 WITH 10 MIN. PURCHASE
Scott
Paper
Towels
ALL VARIETIES
Doritos
Tortilla
Chips
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Old
Milwaukee
Beer
(12)12 oz.
cans
DOUBLE COUPONS
On Manufacturer's Cents-Off Coupons See Store For Details
Prices Effective Thru Sat Oct. 1, 1988 Quantity Rights Reserved Not Responsible For Typographical Errors
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p jn. � Monday thru Saturday 7:00 a.m. - 12 Midnight
Offici
RALEIGH, N.C.
attorney representing
hostage-taker Tim
- i today the govern!
idence that Rotx .
Sheriff Hubert St
law enforcement offici;
volvedindrugtrafl
withholding it from tht
But U.S. District
T rrence Boyle said the
intention to s
defendant Eddie Hate
take I
Robeson Counrv n
"fatally flawed" b
no evidence the I
inv lived in drug
' The i
available to pri.
' � ilante acti
"The perpetrat i
� �
n.
"Un leryoui
the law
:
garten � .
. :
:
Lewis Pitt - i

s, asked
Assistant L 1
i3re wh th 1 �
hiei i
Robeson
that pyrai
Hul ne
Boyle d

dence
volvement.
the chasm
cent and
at a nc �-
Boyle -l
ction � �.�hoi

contin le ai
Boyle ordered U
clan
attorne) snot
Stone in the
the recess, shook I Is ; j
asked about the dr j
"1 heard they wen
my name around �
thought Yd better com
to what thev were
said
In his opening
Brue told jurors the
The Robesonian
Convicted d
may not get
(CPS Sl identd
or users should
federal financial aid
after they're convi
House of Reprc
last week
In a 3 55 67
approved H.R. 51
Senate also appr � s tj
purging of drug d
from student aid
come law.
Labeled as ba
Charles Saunders
can Council on
would deny student ai
federal benefits for up
for drug dealers a
prison terms or a vear 1
The bill denies sj
and other tederal bei
to five years from ar
victedoi two drug off
ears. Students who
drug rehabilitation
could regain their
however.
"This amendmeij
age- people to p I
ment said co-sponsol
Ham Hughes (D-N
much is a young manl
going to accomplish ij
they're on serious drul
" "Why should Anf
payers support studej
turn support a drug hj
fie in drugs" asko
lawmaker Thomas Cd
another supporter of tj
"Do the proponei
5210) mean to imply t
even a relatively min
la ted offense more h�
murder, rape and otj
felonies?" replied Red
Hawkins (D-CaU, nS
kinds of criminals can
student aid after se
debt to society.
Not many student)
actually would lose
the bill becomes law.
few students are �
drug offenses each yd
"doesn't affect a whof
dents Saunders add!





Till-CAST CAROLINIAN
SFPTTIMBER 29, 1988 9
i. ,fi
I nsi
i�i(;s
:ons and
I rhii
-
,

I
I,
9-
fONS
al Errors
Blvd.
a.m. - 12 Midnight
Officials in hostage case accused of trafficking
RALEIGH. N.C. (AP) - An
attorney representing accused
hostage-taker Timothy Jacobs
sud today the government has
evidence that Kobeson County
Sheriff Hubert Stone and other
law enforcement officials are in-
volved in drug trafficking, but are
withholding it from the defense.
But U.S. District Court Judge
Terrence Roy le said the defense's
intention to say Jacobs and co-
defendant Eddie Hatcher had no
choice but to take hostages at a
Kobeson County newspaper is
; itall) flawed" because there is
no evidence the hostages were
m olved in drug dealing.
' The necessity defense is not
available to private citizens who
take vigilante action Boyle said.
"The perpetrator of the harm
has to be the object of the ac-
tion.
Under your construction (of
the law), they would have been
justified in taking over a kinder-
garten class or a TV station
sa i. "But you cannot ran-
i ose innocent persons to
take .i tion against
Lewis Titts of Christie Insti-
r South, one of Jacobs' attor-
ney - asked Boyle to inquire oi
Assistant U.S. Attorney John
ice whether his office pos-
- ssed a pyramid showing the
hierarchy oi drug trafficking in
Robcson Countv. and at the top of
that pyramid is the name Sheriff
I lubert Stone
Bovle did not ask the ques-
tion, saying even if there was evi-
dence of law enforcement in-
volvement, vou still can't leap
the chasm of harm done to inno-
I and tree people - in this case,
at a newspaper
Boyle called a recess over the
ction oi Pitts, who insisted the
n e should be allowed to
ntii ue arguing the matter. But
B �yle ordered the bailiff to de-
. � I recess and cautioned the
itl sn ttobe disruptive
St( ne in the courtroom after
: . � shook his head when
isked about the drug charges.
eard they wore throwing
my name ground in here, so 1
thought I'd better come in a listen
to what they were saying he
said
In his opening statement,
Bruce told jurors the takeover oi
The Rolusonian "was roughly
Convicted dealers
may not get loans
(CPS) � Student drug dealers
?r users shouldn't be able to get
federal financial aid for 10 year
after they're convicted, the U.S.
House of Representatives said
last week.
In a 335-67 vote, the House
approved H.R. 5210. If the U.S.
Senate also approves the bill, the
purging of drug dealers and users
from student aid roles will be-
come law.
1 abeled as "bad policy" by
Charles Saunders of the Ameri-
can Council on Education, the bill
would denv student aid and other
federal benefits for up to ten years
for drug dealers sentenced to
prison terms of a year or longer.
The bill denies student aid
and other federal benefits for up
to five vears from anyone con-
victed of two drug offenses in ten
vears. Students who complete a
drug rehabilitation program
could regain their eligibility,
however.
"This amendment encour-
ages people to get drug treat-
ment said co-sponsor Rep. Wil-
liam Hughes (D-N.R). "How
much is a young man or woman
going to accomplish in college if
they're on serious drugs?"
"Why should American tax-
pavers support students who in
turn support a drug habit or traf-
fic in drugs?" asked Missouri
lawmaker Thomas Coleman (R),
another supporter of the bill.
"Do the proponents of (H.R.
5210) mean to imply that we find
oven a relatively minor drug-re-
lated offense more heinous than
murder, rape and other violent
felonies?" replied Rep. Augustus
Hawkins (D-Cal.), noting other
kinds of criminals can qualify for
student aid after serving their
debt to society.
Not many students, however,
actually would lose anything if
the bill becomes law. Since only a
few students are convicted of
drug offenses each year, the idea
"doesn't affect a whole lot of stu-
dents Saunders added.
analagous to an armed bank rob-
bery, but rather than money, the
object was publicity
Bruce said the government
would present many of the vic-
tims of the hostage-taking nd
"significantlv,niostot all, we'll re-
presenting the defendants' own
words into this trial
"Don't let anyone distract
you from the issue here Bruce
said. "No one else is on trial here
but Eddie Hatcher ud fimothy
Jacobs.
We urge vou to keep j our eye
on the ball and not let anyone
distract vou
Bob Warren, an attorney for
Jacobs, told the jurors the defense
expected "to shou you how co-
caine had corrupted law enforce-
ment in (Robeson) Countv, how
poor people without jobs were
offered quick money to sell co-
caine under the protection of law
enforcement "
"Some evidence includes
killing by law enforcement ofti
cers, usually wh n the person was
in jail and unarmed Warren
said
"We expect the evidence to
make it difficult to believe that
Robeson Count was a part of the
United States on Feb l bc auseol
the lawlessness and corruption
there
Warren said the defense
not deny Hatcher and Jacobs took
the newspaper staff hostage, but
he said the two men's lives were
in danger and. that taking the
newspaper "was the lesser
harm
Warren said Hatcher had re-
ceived maps of dnig drops in the
countv involving Stone and other
law officers.
Hatcher, when offered a
chance to make an opening state-
ment, repeated that he believed
his constitutional right to the at-
torney of his choice was being
denied and that he is not repre-
senting himself.
On Monday 1 latchersaid that
his counsel of choice, William
Kunstler oi New York, is not
available and has rejected efforts
by Bovle to have other attorneys
represent him. Boyle has ruled
that Hatcher, bvhisactions. isrep-
resenting himself. But Hatcher
also rejects that.
On Tuesday a jury of nine
blacks and three whites was cho-
sen despite protests from both
sides that the selection process
was tinged by racial discrimina-
tion.
Although they had said ear-
r that prosecutors had shown
"a pattern ol discrimination" in
cutting four blacksandone Indian
trom the pool of potential jurors,
defense attorneys said later Tues-
day they were pleased with the
composition of the jury.
"They seem to be fair-minded
people who expressed a desire to
hear both sides and willingness to -
hear the necessity defense, which
we look forward to presenting
said Pitts.
Bruce, meanwhile, accused
defense attorneys of practicing
discrimination by cutting 10
whites from the pool as it was
narrowed to 12.
Defense attorneys have said
the key to Jacobs' defense is the
argument that he and Hatcher
took hostages at The Robesonian
newspaper in Lumberton on Feb.
1 because their knowledge ot
drug dealing and public corrup-
tion put their lives in danger and
they had no legal recourse.
Defense lawyers have listed
dozens of Robeson County offi-
cials as potential witnesses, in-
cluding Stone, Distn. t Attorney
Joe Freeman Britt, Coroner
Chalmers Biggs, Pembroke
Mayor Milton Hunt and Pem-
broke Town Manager McDuffie
Cummings.
Subpoenas issued for more
than -10 of those witnesses ask
them to bring their telephone re c-
ords, tax returns and other docu-
ments covering the last three
years.
Bovle told the jury pool
members he expected the case1 to
last two weeks.
Hatcher, 31, and Jacobs, 20,
each face seven charges in connec-
tion with the siege. Each is
charged with conspiracy to take
hostages, hostage taking, using
firearms in a crime of violence,
two counts of making an illegal
firearm, possessing an illegal fire-
arm and conveying false informa-
tion on explosives.
The defendants never denied
occupying the newspaper, chain-
ing the door shut and holding up
to 20 people for 10 hours. The 10-
hour siege at the newspaper
ended after Gov. Jim Martin
agreed to form a state task force to
investigate their corruption
charges.
Student Health Services
GET TO THE GAME ON TIME
The Saturday Clinic at the Student Health
Service will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
n.m on Saturday, October 1. 1988
The Sunday Clinic will be held as usual from
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
i ill the Student Health Services at 757-6841 for
I more informa on or questions.
iDad was right,
bu get what
you pay for
Mi re pet pie ch n �se AT&T
ver anv ther K ne distance
service Be ausewith AT&T it
ists less' think I get
� h rvi ey u expect, like
clearer o nine ti as. 11 h air
V! &T perat �rassistance.
instant credit n vn nenum
bers. And the assurance that we
can put virtualh even one of
vi air calls thr nigh the first time.
! I tits the genius of the AT&T
t ! Idwide Intelligent Network
S ?when it s time to make
a ch k e. remember, it pays to
cho �se AT&T
It you'd like to know more
ah nit our products or services,
like the T&T Card, call us at
M M I
(HlHI.
AT&T
The right choice.






r
1
T
i
d
THT�OyNTAN

rial
g with money saving coupons and
Jctober s Ladies Home Journal.
Fest ot Savings" at A&P This
special coupons trom October's
rnal.
eys
-A,
VSAVE
ONS
)etails.
sibte For TypcgfapNcal Errors.
le Blvd.
00 a.m. -12 Midnight
Officials in hostage case accused of trafficking
RALEIGH, N.C (AP) - An
attorney representing accused
hostage-taker Timothy Jacobs
said today the government has
evidence that Robeson County
Sheriff Hubert Stone and other
law enforcement officials are in-
volved in drug trafficking, but are
withholding it from the defense.
But VS. District Court Judge
Terrence Boyle said the defense's
intention to say Jacobs and co-
defendant Eddie Hatcher had no
choice but to take hostages at a
Robeson County newspaper is
"fatally flawed" because there is
no evidence the hostages were
involved in drug dealing.
"The necessity defense is not
available to private citizens who
take vigilante action Boyle said.
"The perpetrator of the harm
has to be the object of the ac-
tion.
"Under your construction (of
the law), they would have been
justified in taking over a kinder-
garten class or a TV station
Boyle said. "But you cannot ran-
domly choose innocent persons to
take action against
Lewis Pitts of Christie Insti-
tute South, one of Jacobs' attor-
neys, asked Boyle to inquire of
Assistant U.S. Attorney John
Bruce whether his office pos-
sessed "a pyramid showing the
hierarchy of drug trafficking in
Robeson County, and at the top of
that pyramid is the name Sheriff
Hubert Stone
Boyle did not ask the ques-
tion, saying even if there was evi-
dence of law enforcement in-
volvement, you still can't leap
the chasm of harm done to inno-
cent and free people - in this case,
at a newspaper
Boyle called a recess over the
objection of Pitts, who insisted the
defense should be allowed to
continue arguing the matter. But
Boyle ordered the bailiff to de-
clare the recess and cautioned the
attorney's not to be "disruptive
Stone in the courtroom after
the recess, shook his head when
asked about the drug charges.
"I heard they were throwing
my naineArwmcUn htjap I
thought? a PHlwTOme inausten
to what they were saying he
said.
In his opening statement,
Bruce told jurors the takeover of
The Robesonian "was roughly
Convicted dealers
may not get loans
(CPS)�Student drug dealers
or users shouldn't be able to get
federal financial aid for 10 years
after they're convicted, the U.S.
House of Representatives said
last week.
In a 335-67 vote, the House
approved H.R 5210. If the U.S.
Senate also approves the bill, the
purging of drug dealers and users
from student aid roles will be-
come law.
Labeled as "bad policy" by
Charles Saunders of the Ameri-
can Council on Education, the bill
would deny student aid and other
federal benefits for up to ten years
for drug dealers sentenced to
prison terms of a year or longer.
The bill denies student aid
and other federal benefits for up
to five years from anyone con-
victed of two drug of fenses in ten
years. Students who complete a !
drug rehabilitation program
could regain their eligibility,
however.
"This amendment encour-
ages people to get drug treat-
ment said co-sponsor Rep. Wil-
liam Hughes (D-N.H.). "How
much is a young man or woman
going to accomplish in college if
they're on serious drugs?"
"Why should American tax-
payers support students who in
turn support a drug habit or traf-
fic in drugs?" asked Missouri
lawmaker Thomas Coleman (R),
another supporter of the bill.
"Do the proponents of (H.R.
5210) mean to imply that we find
even a relatively minor drug-re-
lated offense more heinous than
murder, rape and other violent
felonies?" replied Rep. Augustus
Hawkins (D-Cal.), noting other
kinds of criminals can qualify for
student aid after serving their
debt to society.
Not many students, however,
actually would lose anything if
the bffl becomes law. Since onfy a
few students are convicted of
dnw offenses each year, ttte idea
-doesn't affect a whole lot of stu-
dents Saunders added.
analagous to an armed bank rob-
bery, wit rather than money, the
object was publicity
Bruce said the government
would present many of the vic-
tims of the hostage-taking and
"significantly, most of all, we'll be
presenting the defendants' own
words into this trial
"Don't let anyone distract
you from the issue here Bruce
said. "No one else is on trial here
but Eddie Hatcher and Timothy
Jacobs.
We urge you to keep your eye
on the ball and not let anyone
distract you
Bob Warren, an attorney for
Jacobs, told the jurors the defense
expected "to show you how co-
caine had corrupted law enforce-
ment in (Robeson) County, how
poor people without jobs were
offered quick money to sell co-
caine under the protection of law
enforcement"
"Some evidence includes
killing by law enforcement offi-
cers, usually when the person was
in jail and unarmed Warren
said.
"We expect the evidence to
make it difficult to believe that
Robeson County was a part of the
United States on Feb. 1 because of
the lawlessness and corruption
there
Warren said the defense did
not deny Hatcher and Jacobs took
the newspaper staff hostage, but
he said the two men's lives were
m danger and that taking the
newspaper "was the lesser
harm
Warren said Hatcher had re-
ceived maps of drug drops in the
county involving Stone and other
law officers.
FJatcher, when offered a
chance to make an opening state-
ment, repeated that he believed
his constitutional right to the at-
torney of his choice was being
denied and that he is not repre-
senting himself.
On Monday Hatcher said that
his counsel of choice, William
Kunstler of New York, is not
available and has rejected efforts
by Boyle to have other attorneys
represent him. Boyle has ruled
that Hatcher, by his actions, is rep-
resenting himself. But Hatcher
also rejects that.
On Tuesday a jury of nine
blacks and three whites was cho-
sen despite protests from both
sides that the selection process
was tinged by racial discrimina-
tion.
Although they had said ear-
lier that prosecutors had shown
"a pattern of discrimination" in
cutting four blacks and one Indian
from the pool of potential jurors,
defense attorneys said later Tues-
day they were pleased with the
composition of the jury.
;They seem to be fair-minded
people who expressed a desire to
near both sides and willingness to
hear the necessity defense, which
we look forward to presenting
said Pitts.
Bruce, meanwhile, accused
defense attorneys of practicing
discrimination by cutting 10
whites from the pool as it was
narrowed to 12.
Defense attorneys have said
the key to Jacobs' defense is the
argument that he and Hatcher
took hostages at The Robesonian
newspaper in Lumberton on Feb.
1 because their knowledge of
drug dealing and public corrup-
tion put their lives in danger and
they had no legal recourse.
Defense lawyers have listed
dozens of Robeson County offi-
cials as potential witnesses, in-
cluding Stone, District Attorney
Joe Freeman Britt, Coroner
Chalmers Biggs, Pembroke
Mayor Milton Hunt and Pem-
broke Town Manager McDuffie
Cummings.
Subpoenas issued for more
than 40 of those witnesses ask
them to bring their telephone rec-
ords, tax returns and other docu-
ments covering the last three mamv possessing an ffltffie-
years. arm and conveying feiae informa-
Boyle told the jury pool tion on explosives.
members he expected the case to
last two weeks. The defendants never denied
occupying the newspaper, chain-
Hatcher, 31, and Jacobs, 20, ing the door shut and holding u
each face seven charges in connec- to 20 people for 10 hours. The
tion with the siege. Each is hour siege at the newspaper
charged with conspiracy to take ended after Gov. Jim Martin
hostages, hostage taking, using agreed to form a state task force to
firearms in a crime of violence, investigate their corruption
two counts of making an illegal charges.
;up
10-
5fcv
Student Health Services
GET TO THE GAME ON TIME
The Saturday Clinic at the Student Health
Service will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
p.m. on Saturday, October 1. 1988
The Sunday Clinic will be held as usual from
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Call the Student Health Services at 757-6841 for
more information or questions.
44rviH
mm
More people choose AT&T
over any other long distance
service. Because with AT&T, it
costs less than you think to get
the sendee you expect, like
clearer connections, 24-hour
AT&T operator assistance,
instant credit on wrong num-
bers. And the assurance that we
can put virtually every one of
your calls through the first time.
That's the genius of the AT&T
Worldwide Intelligent Network.
So when it's time to make
a choice, rernember, it pays to
choose AT&T.
If you'd like to know more
about our products or services,
1 ike the AT&T Caid, call us at
1800 2224300.
Greg Riky University of North Carolina-Class o� 1989
AWT
The right choice.
t&tpstfsm ir





f
AlcoholDrug
IMPLICATIONS
Drugs, Alcohol and Their Risks
North C
TYPES OF DRUGS:
Schedule I: Heroin, LSD, Peyote, Mescaline,
Psilocybin (Shrooms), Other Hallucinogens,
Methaqualone (Quaaludes), Phencyclidine (PCP), and
MDA
HEALTH RISKS:
Schedule II: Morphine, Demerol, Codeine, Percodan,
Percocet, Fentanyl, Dilaudid, Secondal, Nembutal,
Cocaine, Amphetamines, and other opium and opium
extracts and narcotics
Schedule III: Certain barbiturates such as amobarbitol
and codeine containing medicine such as Fiorinal 3,
Doriden, Tylenol 3, Empirin 3, and codeine-based
cough suppressants such as Tussionex and Hycomine
Psychologically and physically addictive; depression,
withdrawal symptoms, convulsions, death,
unpredictable behavior with hallucinogens; possible
damage to unborn fetus
TO POSSESS:
Maximum Penalty:
Five (5) years in prison andor fine (Felon)
Psychologically and physically addictive; withdrawal
symptoms, convulsions, respiratory failure, frequent
accidents; possible damage to unborn fetus; death;
cocaine and amphetamines increase blood pressure
which can lead to irregular heartbeat and death;
amphetamines can cause agitation, increase in body
temperature, hallucinations, convulsions, possible death
Psychologically and physically addictive; potential liver
damage, i ausea and vomiting, dizziness, disorientation,
shallow breathing, cold and clammy skin, coma
possible death; withdrawal symptoms include anxiety,
tremors, insomnia, convulsions; possible damage to
unborn fetus
Maximum Penalty:
Two (2) years in prison and 7or $2,000 fineMisdei i
� UNLESS �
1. Exceeds (4) tablets, capsules, other dosage units
equivalent quantity of Hydromorphone
2. Exceeds (100) tablets, capsules, other dosage units
equivalent quantity
3. One gram or more ot Cocaine. Maximum Pena
Five (5) years in prison andor fine (Felony)
Schedule IV: Barbiturates, narcotics and stimulants
including Valium, Talwin, Librium, Equanii, Darvon,
Darvocet, Placidyl, Tranzene, Serax, Ionamin (yellow
jackets)
Schedule V: Compounds that contain very limited
amounts of codeine, dihydrocodeine, ethylmorphine,
opium, and atropine, such as Terpine Hydrate with
codeine, Robitussin AC
Psychologically and physically addictive; drowsiness,
withdrawal symptoms, tre nors, abdominal and muscle
cramps, insomnia, anxiety, convulsions, possible death;
possible damage to unborn fetus
Maximum Penalty:
To possess less than (100) tablets, capsules, other
dosage units or equivalent quantity: Two2years
prison andor fine (Misdemeanor)
To possess more than (100) tablets, capsules, other
dosage units or equivalent quantitv: Five (5) vears in
prison andor fine (Felony
Schedule VI: Marijuana, THC, Hashish, Hash Oil,
Tetrahydrocannabinol
Psychologically and physically addictive; nausea,
gastrointestinal symptoms, drowsiness, withdrawal
symptoms including runny nose, watery eyes, panic,
chills, cramps, irritability, nausea; possible damage to
unborn fetus
Psychologically addictive; increased risk of lung cancer,
bronchitis, and emphysema; contributes to heart
disease, fatigue, paranoia, possible psychosis;
withdrawal symptoms including insomnia, hyperactivity
and decreased appetite; depression of the immune
system; decreased sperm count in men and irregular
ovulation in women
Maximum Penalty:
Same as Schedule 111.
Maximum Penalty:
Six (6) months in prison andor fine (Misdemearu
TYPES OF ALCOHOL:
Malt Beverage is beer, 12 of 1 to 6 alcohol
Unfortified Wine is wine not more than 17 alcohol
Fortified Wine is wine of not more than 24 alcohol
Spirituous Liquor is distilled spirits or ethyl alcohol,
including spirits of wine, whiskey, rum, brandy, gin,
etc.
Mixed Beverage is a drink composed in whole or part
of spirituous liquor and served at restaurants, hotels
and private clubs licensed by the State
HEALTH RISKS:
Psychologically and physically addictive; respiratory
depression; depression of the immune system; increased
risk of heart disease, cancer, accidents, hypertension;
brain damage; damage to unborn fetus; impotence at
high dosage levels
Maximum Penalty:
To possess less than 12 ounce ot Marijuana or I 20
ounce Hashish: Thirty (30) days in prison and or
fine (Misdemeanor)
To possess more than 12 ounce of Marijuana or 3
ounce of Hashish or consists of any quantitv ot
synthetic Tetrahydrocannabinols or synthetic
Tetrahydro-cannabinols or Tetrahydrocannabinols
isolated from the resin o( Marijuana; Five (5) years m
prison andor fine (Felony)
TO POSSESS, ATTEMPT TO PURCHASE OR
PURCHASE; TO SELL OR GIVE
Malt Beverage, Unfortified Wine, Fortified
Wine, Spirituous Liquor or Mixed Beverages to
Anyone Under Twenty-one (21) Years Old:
Maximum Penalty:
Imprisonment for a term not exceeding two (2) years
a fine, or both, in the discretion of the court
(Misdemeanor), however, to possess, attempt to
purchase, or purchase by 19 or 20 Year Old is an
infraction punishable by a fine not to exceed twenty-
five dollars ($25)
For Additional Information Contact Your Local Health Care Provider or Pbatmadtt.
w
WP �
Information Contact Your





s
I
f
)lDrug Abuse:
CATIONS ARE CLEAR
North Carolina LawsEast Carolina University Policy
! TO POSSESS:TO POSSESS With Intent to Sell or Deliver: TO MANUFACTURE; OR TO SELL ANDOR DELIVER:Minimum Penalties: To Possess With Intent to Sell or Deliver; To Manufacture; r or To Sell andor Deliver: Schedule 1 or II: That student shall be expelled and any faculty member, administrator or other employee shall be discharged. Minimum Penalities: To Possess Illegally Any Controlled Substance: Schedule I or II: Suspension from enrollment or from employment for a period of at least one semester or its equivalent.
Maximum Penalty: Five (5) years in prison and' or fine (Felony)Maximum Penalty: Ten (10) years in prison andor fine (Felony)
Maximum Penalty: Two (2) years in prison and or $2,000 fine (Misdemeanor) � UNLESS � 1. Exceeds (4) tablets, capsules, other dosage units or equivalent quantity of Hydromorphone 2. Exceeds (100) tablets, capsules, other dosage units or equivalent quantity 3. One gram or more of Cocaine. Maximum Penalty: Five (5) years in prison and or fine (Felony)Maximum Penalty: Ten (10) years in prison andor fine (Felony)
Maximum Penalty: To possess less than (100) tablets, capsules, other dosage units or equivalent quantity: Two (2) years in prison andor fine (Misdemeanor) To possess more than (100 tablets, capsules, other dosage units or equivalent quantity: Five (5) years in l prison andor fine (Felony)Maximum Penalty: Five (5) years in prison andor fine (Felony)Minimum Penalties: To Possess With 1 Intent to Sell or Deliver; To Manufacture; 1 or To Sell andor Deliver: 1 Schedule III, IV, V or VI: (1st Offense) Suspension 1 from enrollment or from employment for a period of at 1 least one semester or its equivalent. (2nd Offense) 1 Any student shall be expelled and any faculty member, I administrator or other employee shall be discharged. I Minimum Penalities: To Possess Illegally Any Controlled Substance: Schedule III, IV, V or VI: (1st Offense) Probation to be determined on a case by case basis. Must agree to participate in a drug education and counseling program, consent to regular drug testing, and other conditions and restrictions, including community service. Refusal or failure to do so shall result in suspension from enrollment or from employment for the remaining period of probation. Second or subsequent offenses involving illegal possession of controlled substances, progressively more severe penalties shall be imposed, including expulsion of students and discharge of faculty members, administrators or other employees.
Maximum Penalty: Same as Schedule III.Maximum Penalty: Five (5) years in prison andor fine (Felony)
Maximum Penalty: Six (6) months in prison andor fine (Misdemeanor)Maximum Penalty: Five (5) years in prison andor fine (Felony)
Maximum Penalty: To possess less than 12 ounce of Marijuana or 120 ounce Hashish: Thirty (30) days in prison andor $100 fine (Misdemeanor) To possess more than 12 ounce of Marijuana or 320 ounce of Hashish or consists of any quantity of synthetic Tetrahydrocannabinols or synthetic Tetrahydro-cannabinols or Tetrahydrocannabinols isolated from the resin of Marijuana; Five (5) years in prison andor fine (Felony)Maximum Penalty: Five (5) years in prison andor fine (Felony)
TO POSSESS, ATTEMPT TO PURCHASE OR
PURCHASE; TO SELL OR GIVE
Malt Beverages, Unfortified Wine, Fortified
Wine, Spirituous Liquor or Mixed Beverages to
Anyone Under Twenty-one (21) Years Old:
Maximum Penalty:
Imprisonment for a term not exceeding two (2) years or
a fine, or both, in the discretion of the court
(Misdemeanor), however, to possess, attempt to
purchase, or purchase by 19 or 20 Year Old is an
infraction punishable by a fine not to exceed twenty-
five dollars ($25)
AIDER AND ABETTOR:
1. By any person who is under (21) years of age to
purchase and who aids or abets another to attempt to
purchase, purchase or to possess; sell or give shall be
guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment
for not more than six (6) months andor a fine up to
five hundred dollars ($500).
2. By any person over (21) years of age to purchase and
who aids or abets another to attempt to purchase,
purchase or to possess; sell or give shall be guilty of a
misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not
more than two (2) years andor a fine up to two
thousand dollars ($2,000).
tor AdditionalInformation Contact Your local Law Enforcement Agency or District
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY PENALTIES
Progressive penalty system based on the type of
infraction and the circumstances involved. Penalties
may be a warning, probation, fine ($25 minimum)
voluntary community service, andor removal from the
residence system.
For additional information contact
The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student life,
209 Wbicbard Building






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
SEPTEMBER 29. 1988 Page L
Randee 'rivets attention'
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Feature Editor
While Dukakis and Bush
jocky for the populous vote, an-
other candidate for president,
Randee of the Redwoods, cam-
paigned ECU Tuesday night.
With funky oval glasses,
shaggy blonde hair, a hippie
puncho, and star-flecked pants,
candidate Randee (under the
MTV ticket) instantly appealed to
the audience of roughly 200 at
Hendrix theater.
Accompanied by his cam-
paign manager, A. Tyler Chip
Wellncr (but just call me Hal), Gus
Hermaner, the singing tonage in-
spector, Clorox, an asexual snif-
fer, Grudge Hanson, the bus driv-
ing poet and his first lady, Randee
and the Redwoods entertained
the crowd with a combination of
skits, stand-up comedy and mu-
sic.
Looking like an ex-surfer,
burned-out dead head and per-
pertual user of the drug acid,
Randee begun his show antics by
finding a minute sliver of tape on
the stage floor.
"Oh man it just riveted my
attention Randee said of the
white masking tape.
This may seem a little out of
the ordinary for a campaign
speech, but Randee is just a little
out of the ordinary. Maybe his
upbringing had to do something
with his uniqueness.
According to Randee his
parents sent him to a B.F. Skinner
preschool. In his third grade read-
ing group, Randee was placed in
the 'tornado' group.
"Yeah ,we were in the tor-
nado group because we read the
slowest Randee explains.
In performing his first music
of the evening, Randee sang while
manipulating an instrument
called the snoff. Randee stole the
snoff from an Indian (from the
country India) musician after
overpowering his guitar playing
bodyguards.
The Indian bodyguards, who
really weren't bodyguards be-
cause they were just heado inside
industrial sized mayonnaise jars,
told Randee not to steal the snoff.
"But they were just heads in
mayonnaise jars Randee said.
However, the snoff performance
was cut short because of worms
surrounding Randee's head.
While Sunday's debate be-
tween Dukakis and Bush is still
being churned in the giant stom-
ach of the press in efforts to decide
a winner, Tuesday's debate be-
tween Randee and Mr. Agger had
a victor: no one. Mr. Agger, the
1966 class C midget sprint racecar
champion, debated an envirom-
cntal issue with vigor.
"Save the dirt. Because with-
out dirt how can you have a dirt
race track Mr. Agger said.
No one won the debate be-
cause the candidates agreed on
every issue.
Randee on increasing the de-
fense: "We ought to buy a lot
guns, a whole lot guns, and have
all of our dads assemble them on
Christmas Eve so the guns would
have missing pieces
And the audience had the
chance to ask question. "How
about the legalization of drugs?
one over-zealous audience mem-
ber asked.
Mr. Agger on the legalization
of drugs: "You mean them drugs
are illegal. Well,I never knew
Randee on Star Wars: "I
thought there was going to be
nine of them
After the debate, Randee and
the Redwoods elicited the crowd
to "Bite off more than you can
chew in a song by that name.
In finishing the hour and a
half show, Randee said he didn't
expect to win the presidency, but
he was going to sleep in the White
House on January 20.
"You can sleep there too, why
it "m
Randee of the Redwoods entertains the audience at Hendrix
Theater . During his campaign stop Tuesday, Randee debated,
sang tunes with a snoff and cracked on life in general. (Photo by
Thomas Walters�Photolab)
doesn't every sleep in the White credited with ttw ofRan-
House, it's our house isn't it?" dee The sh �v pn vid( d for a par
The Student Unions must be evening oi entertainment.
Degarmo & Key , Altar Boys , comedian
bring Rock Solid '88 to ECU Sunday
By STEPHAINE FOLSOM
SUM Writer
Another persona
Thomas Walters-
of Randee.
-Photolab)
Here he is Clorox, (Photo by
Famous more reknowned
for their sub sandwiches
By SCOTT MAXWELL
�VvMNlini Features I'ditur
The time: early evening. The
place: my house. The reviewer is
alone. There's a knock at the front
door. I tense for a moment; then,
with great stealth, weapon in
hand, I approach the door. At
what mv perfectly-honed reflexes
tell me is precisely the right
moment, I fling it open!
But there's no cause for alarm,
it's just the guy from Famous
Pizza.
Famous Pizza offers free de-
livery; orders usually arrive
within 30 minutes (as did mine),
but they give no guarantee. Fa-
mous requires no minimum order
on deliveries. However, for deliv-
eries near the store (to the dorms,
for example), Famous asks for at
least a $5 order, and for deliveries
to places farther away from the
store, Famous requests at least a
$10 order.
Famous opened in Greenville
late in 1986; it is a single store
rather than part of a chain. Like
most pizza places, Famous makes
Coming Up
in
Entertainment
Thursday
Peter Adonis Fantasy Show, the
Attic
Uncle Green, New Deli
Free Beer, Susie's Treehouse
Friday
The Bond, New Deli
Saturday
The Point, The Attic
Bad Bob and the Rocking
Horses, New Deli
Sunday
Solid Rock, Christian Rock and
Roll, Wright Auditorium, 7p.m.
Monday
UB40 Minges Coliseum, 8 p.m.
Thursday. Oct. 6
Call in and talk with Earlvis on
Z-103 from Midnight to 3 a.m.
1-800-682-1033 (Toll Free)
its own dough from scratch daily.
Perhaps its biggest plus (espe-
cially since it's in a college town) is
that it deli vers 99c pitchers of beer
(with a pizza or sub) on Wednes-
days.
I ordered a pizza from Fa-
mous on a Tuesday night at ap-
proximately 7:30 p.m. My order
(two small pizzas; $8.75) arrived
hot and within 30 minutes, and
the delivery man took my check
without any hassle. Not knowing
any better, I ate the pizza.
Famous' pizza is your basic,
average, run-of-the-mill greasy
pizza. Everything about it was
basically average: price, cheese,
sauce, crust.
Actuallv, the crust wasn't
average. In fact, there were times
when I had to check to see
whether I was eating the crust or
the cardboard box. Well, okay, it
wasn't that bad, but it wasn't
good.
I'm sure that there must be
some people who like average,
greasy pizza. (Just as I'm sure that
there must be some people � ho
like having bowling balls
dropped on their heads.) If you're
a greasy-pizza lover, this pizza's
for you. (Also, if you're a greasy-
pizza lover, call the East Carolin-
ian. You'll make a stranger story
than the Squirrel Man.)
In gathering information for
this story, I talked not to the
store's owner, as is my custom,
but to the manager, Patricia
Winge. Winge prefers subs to
pizza, and she stressed the quality
of Famous' subs (I haven't tried
them, so I can't vouch for them).
She told me that she has ordered
subs from other local pizza places
and found them dry by compari-
son to Famous' own.
However, she also said that
Famous Pizza sells a lot of pizza,
so she assumes that the students
like it. In addition, Famous will
concoct all kinds of special orders,
and Winge said that Famous re-
ceives a lot of special-order re-
quests.
Famous Pizza is located at 100
East 10th Street; its telephone
order number is 757-0731. It is
open Sundays through Wednes-
days from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m and
Thursdays through Saturdays
from 11 a.m. through 12 a.m.
The Rock Solid '88 Tour will
make its stop at Wright Audito-
rium this Sunday at 7 p.m. The
tour includes Christian rock
bands DeGarmo & Key, the Altar
Boys, and comedian Steve Geyer.
Degarmo & Key is a five-mem-
ber band described as echoing the
sounds of classic rock.
Mark Barber, one of the coordi-
nators for the concert, said their
style is comparable to the Doobie
Brothers. Their video "Six Six Six"
is considered the "ground-
breaker" for other Christian rock
bands on MTV.
The difference between D&K
and other bands is that they're
described as "sub-culture mis-
sionaries Their concert evangel-
ism consists of rock 'n' roll music,
preaching, and an altar call.
Their 1986Grammv nominated
UB40 in
four days
By ALICIA FORD
album, "Street Light features
the single "Every Moment One-
hundred thousand copies of the
album contained a free duplicate,
intended for Christians to give
their non-Christian friends.
The Altar Boys, a three-member
Southern California band, has a
self-described "stripped down
rock 'n' roll" sound. Their latest
release is "Against the Grain
Guitarist-singer Mike Stand,
drummer Jeff Crandell and bas-
sist Rick Alba of the Altar Bovs
perform in clubs, colleges,
churches and have opened for
such major secular acts as Lone
justice and Foghat. "We don't
preach, we communicate states
Stand. "We do present a message,
but not in a preachy way. We're a
band that plays for people, wher-
ever they're at
Comedian Steve Geyer is a for-
mer night club entertainer who
has toured with DeGarmo & Key
SUff Writer
Among the upcoming musi-
cal events to be presented by the
East Carolina Student Union is
UB40 in concert October 8 at
Minges Coliseum.
The eight member, two-tone
English band performs a mixture
of popreggae and has recently
gained popularity from their re-
vived tune "Red Red Wine The
song was originally released on
the "Labour of Love" album five
years ago and has surpassed its
first billboard ranking tremen-
dously.
All of the material on "Labour
of Love" was previously recorded
by other reggae bands including
"Keep On Moving" by Bob Mar-
ley and the Wailcrs, and the popu-
lar "Sweet Sensations previ-
ously done by The Melodians.
The band is promoting their new
album, simply titled "UB40 and
are sure to perform a large
amount of new material.
UB40 likes to describe them-
selves as "true reggae so if thaf s
not your flavor, stay at home and
listen to "Bad Music" by Bon Jovi.
The show starts at 8:00 and tickets
are available at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall, nine dol-
lars in advance for students, $12 at
the door.
If you're more into Christian
rock, check out Degarmo and Key
with the Altar Boys. They are a
contemporary Christian band
See SAMMY, page 14
for the past year. He appears on
the D&K full-length concert video
'Rock Solid: Rock-U-Mentary
He has performed with such co-
medians as Sinbad and Paul
Kelly, and Billy Crystal and erry
Steinfeld in "Spring Break '84
Bob Swan, the youth pa-tor at
larvis Methodist Memorial
Church, was first contacted about
the Rock Solid Tour in early Sep-
tember. He contacted Barber, a
member of Navigators and Chi
Alpha Omega Christian frater-
nity, to see if those groups would
be willing to sponsor a concert of
this magnitude.
Navigators and Chi Alpha
Omega are the co-sponsors of this
concert, but Barber said mey have
had great support from other
campus ministries cumA area
churches.
"I think the fact that there are so
many people contributing and
putting a lot of effort into making
this Tl work says two
things ' . i irtx r "Firstofall
there' if w ' .
worked . ut t and sec-
ond r ppeals
to a lot of � they
sorrj
icontrib-
ittheE
ntral fk in Menden-
Juicksilver Rec-
ords ii ristian Bookstore &
Church Supply. Cost will be $9 50
inadvance atthedoor
ked me if i
thouj 5950 to see
t1- se groups said Barber, 1
think it would be v orth$12or$15
to see either one oi these groups.
It's a good deal to sei both bands
Geyer. ! truly don't
thin! .t a!l will be disap-
pointed whether they like con-
temporary Christian rock 'n' roi!
BLB81
Pickin' the Bones
In memorium Pickin- the
Bones gets the censor's axe
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Nat Ev�n A ttesin SUff Writer Anymore
get it legalized. garbage tnat h3S accumulated
But it's understandable that I under the sink, and is currently
didn't remember. Evervbodv else striving to evolve into a new kind
on campus may have had the dav of sentient life you can reply
off, but up here at The East Cam- with any of the following?
linian, I was working hard to 1) Give himher a non-verbal
produce a newspaper to come out si gnal with the middle hnger of
the next day. I apologize to any- cither hand.
one who really thought I meant 2) Try a non-verbal signal of
any disrespect to one of the great dumping the trash on their bed.
Or number 3) Tell them ver-
bally, "I'll take out everything
Welcome to the last "Pickin'
the Bones" and "Clearly Labeled
East Carolinian Satire Page" for a
while.
Due to increased outrage
from students, faculty, admini-
stration and floating jelly crea-
tures from the planet Venus, we heroes of the Gvil Rights move
are temporarily suspending pub- ment.
ucationof these two boss features. Kinda shows you the impor- except the remains of thes Budget
Believe me 1 hate it too. tance of dear communicaHon Gourmet� microwavable hn-
But it can't be helped. If s ei- don't it? So next time your teacher guine vou let t m the oven since the
ther this or get a faculty advisor tells you all you have to do is read game Sunday which.has come to
who will continually censor eve- the book for a test, and then all but resemble a plate of half-baked
rything we write. Said faculty four of the questions are on things kjtten after several painful
advisor would probably shut us he lectured on in class those days chemotherapy treatments.
down anyway, so we're doing it after two-keg parties, talk to him A compromise can be worked
cmrselves to preserve the tattered (or her, let's not be sexist in our out, but only through clear corn-
shreds of integrity we have left. waning moments). mumcahon. Yw could even help
It's not fairbut then, God Say, "Look, you. You lied and stop the madness and save my
never sent a telegram down here if you don't change my grade, I'm column and the satire page
sayinglifewasgSrtgtobeaHFun going to tell the faculty senate You can dothis by w
N Games (which may get shut
down next week). So, before we
take off on a forced leave of
absence, I'd like to say a few last
words �,
First off, last week's column
ended with the tines Today Hal-
wntingj
about those funds you misappro- letters to the editor, the media
priated for your 13 volume set of board and administrators saying
Time-Life� books on 'Edible De- clearly that if they don't leave
tergents and its Effects on Ano- Chippy Bonehead alone, that you
rexia Among Primitive Aborigi- will find out where they live and
rial Cultures put all their animalschildren
nuKuminuKui .uu .� The teacher may turn to you loved onesfloating jelly crea-
loween, tomorrow Martin Luther and smite you soundly upon the hires from the planet Venus in a
Day " Some people mteurt- nose with an eraser but thaf s blender and set it on puree.
okay. They have just communi- As for me, I'd like to sign off
cated in the most basic form pos- now by clearly saying to The East
sible � non-verbal signals. Carolinian Revenge Squad to
Or the next time your room- Off.
u,U. ra�c�u:t ��ia��� matesays,1'mgoingtosmiteyou Hope to write again soon.
ther King Efcy IS a holiday now. I soundly upside your head if you Until then, may your hangovers
thought we were still fighting to don't take out the three weeks of be gentle but the buzzes intense.
Clear Lig
Imakes yo
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
teatum Idilur
If you w eren't one of th
tunate fans to see Pink Floyd in
Chapel Hill or Raleigh, you mav
Kant to check out Clear Light the
next time they come to the Attic.
Although it's hard to d
cate the unique, psycho-s i
Pink Floyd, Clear Light ;
a damn g id I i le. This trib-
ute band proved Friday at the
Attic thai they can even ;
new Gilmore-less
Starting out the sh
�Learning to Flv U I
latest, "A M. m
Reason Clear Light : d up
the amj 5 and let I
iFatal A
By IIM SHAM LIN
The psycho-thri
Attraction" will be
Mendenhall Thui
Sunday.
Critics hailed the film
realistic her- i ry ina rrw
setting- It is -i gr
and itsseti
istic?!
Michael D - porti
mature (thirtyisl
sexual encounter with a -
mgly-sane woman (Glen
A fate orthi
It, she later lean
nant. At first, she tr
with him; then, sh
tactics turn from den
tical jokes to attempt
Most ��� men who h i
the film (
hope that it is. Television p.
alities from Oprah
PART !
Your
Look Ou!
"ANYTHI
You Ca
�Party Turn:
�Purple ec Gold
;
�Ask For Our Fir.
Purple &G I
Pii
Bells! rkS re �
that to mean f wanted to
abolish mat holiday.
Not what 1 meant at all. Being
the boneheaded guy that I am, I
didn't remember that Martin Lu-
MO
NI
FOO
On Greenvl
Wide sj
Thl
Dallas
New Oriel
8:0i
Hot Dog I
Buffalo
$2.00
Ram
(Formerly Shei
203 W. Greem





I
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29, 1988 1 3
dian
da v

kin' the
s axe
i
kind
rbal
: iier of
of
' ir bed.
� �r-
-vthing
� db!e ltn-
theovi - � t ethe
me to
baked
'111
rked
if 3om-
� � nelp
he madrv my
r
'� ed
� aying
- i leave
ne, that you
where they live and
inimalschiidFen
g jelly crea-
fhe planet Venus in a
t it on puree.
Yd like to sign off
i ig to The Em
an Revenge Siuad to
'P ' -d-n soon,
hen, may your hangovers
'iSe but he buzzes intense.
Clear Light, Pink Floyd tribute band
makes you 'Wish You Where There'
By FARLV1S HAMPTON
tuiui� Iditor
!t you weren't one of the for-
mate tans ti see Tink Floyd in
hapel Hill or Raleigh, you may
ant to check out Clear Light the
xt time they come to the Attic.
Although it's hard to dupli-
ite the unique, psycho-sound of
ink Floyd, Clear Light performs
lamn good facsimile. This trib-
o band proved Friday at the
trie that they can even play the
w Gilmore-lcss Flow!
Starting out the show with
earning to Fly" off of Floyd's
st A Momentary Lapse of
ason Clear Light pumped up
e amps and let the music blow
the house away. Second came
"One of These Days" off of
Floyd's "Medal" as the guitarists
cut into familiar Floyd licks.
In between songs, the light
man flicked all switches off to
create total darkness on the stage.
An artificial smoke machine then
bellowed clouds of dense gray
onto the riser. With sounds of pigs
snorting the band played the intro
to "Pigs on the Wing, Part II" off
PF's album "Animals
A spotlight shot shone on the
lead singer-lead guitarist as he
paraded around with a Dick
Nixon pig face. Notice of the pig
face, which incidentally really has
Nixon's features, elicited screams
from the pro-Floyd crowd.
This reviewer can still hear
them singing "Hey you, White
House in the song Floyd freaks
sometimes refer to as "Piggies
The White House phrase in the
opening line of the song was
meant to be a direct statement to
then president Dick Nixon. "Ani-
mals one of Pink Floyd's classic
releases, was produced in 1974
during the Nixon days.
No Clear Light exhibition
would be complete without the
immortal PF tune "Wish You
Were Here This song came off
the album with the same name.
Clear Light then dove into a
mess of cuts off of Floyd's most
noted "The Wall" release. "The
Wall a chronicle of David
Gilmore's World War II torn live,
is probably the most acclaimed of
the Floyd albums, but can't com-
pete (Billboard-chart wise) with
the English band's first vinyl cut
"The Dark Side of the Moon
"The Dark Side of the Moon
released in 1970, stayed on the
rock and roll charts longer than
any other album until Michele
Jackson's "Thriller" broke the
long-standing achievement.
Hying through Dante's "In-
ferno Clear Light played Wall's
"Run Like Hell Returning to
days of post innocence, the band
ripped through "Young Lust
The final replication off of
"The Wall" was "Mother Clear
Light finished the show with
something they started with, a cut
off Hovel's latest called "One
Slip
��
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"Fatal Attraction' plays Hendrix
BvJIM SHAML1N
suit Writer
The psycho-thriller "Fatal
hon" will Ix playing at
ndenhall Thursday through
inday.
Critics hailed the film as a
istic horror story in a modern
ng. It is a great horror story,
d it setting is modern; but real-
Michael Douglass portrays a
re I thirtyish) man who has a
lal encounter with a seem-
. sane woman (Glen Close).
r the writer) would have
later learns that she is preg-
int -t rst, she tries to reason
him; then, she goes nuts. Her
S turn from demented prac-
jokes to attempted murder.
Most women who have seen
i consider it realistic, or
that it is. Television person-
- from Oprah Winfrey to
Johnny Carson have nervously
laughed at this possibility. Most
men who have seen it consider it
unrealistic, and pray that it is.
Fatal Attraction portrays every
married man's worst nightmare:
the one-nighter who came to din-
ner. It far outweighs anything the
Surgeon General's Office will
ever say about the importance of
safe sex.
The film's conceivability can
be attributed to two things: The
plot itself represents a fear com-
mon to many men, especially
those who are involved with a
good woman, but want a taste of
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r
i
I
i
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29,1988
"Dead Ringers" a dead loss
By MICAH HARRIS
Sufi Writer
and the two inseparable
twins, so close throughout life,
end up together again in death,
their bodies drug-ridden and
piled on their apartment floor. So
ends David Cronenberg's "Dead
Ringers
And yes, I've deliberately
ruined the movie for you by giv-
ing away the ending because I
don't want a single risk of you
wasting your time and money.
"Dead Ringers" is supposed to be
horror director Cronenberg's
transition to mainstream film. I've
seen smoother transitions in
Freshman composition papers.
Supposedly this is a "psycho-
sexual thriller From the adver-
tisements, though, you'd think
this was another of Cronenberg's
typical horror fare. In truth,
"Dead Ringers" can only be de-
scribed as boring.
The film begins at a slow gait
(and manages to maintain it) as it
traces the youth of the twins, El-
liot and Bev Mantle, played by
Jeremy Irons. The precocious kids
bemoan the fact that humans,
unlike fish, reproduce in a way
that keeps the egg hidden. They
prefer the fish method because
they are fascinated by the hidden
mechanics of the female repro-
ductive system.
When they grow up, they
become acclaimed gynecologists.
They also become fascinated with
female anatomy in a way that is
decidedly non-clinical. The way
their joint relationship with a
particular woman (played by
Gencvieve Bujold) turns out,
they'd been better off raising
guppics.
Bujold's character, Claire,
disrupts the close relationship of
the Mantle twins and puts them
on the road to tragedy. An unorig-
inal premise? Sure, but that
would be forgivable if there was a
solid plot here instead of the
meandering, slow moving excuse
for one we're given. Watching
"Dead Ringers" unfold is like
watching a flower open without
the aid of time- lapse photogra-
phy.
The only moment of excite-
ment was during a dream se-
quence which Cronenberg puts
his gross-out stamp on: Claire
gnaws at the mass of skin sym-
bolically joining Bev and Elliot.
Subtle? No. Sick? To be surebut
that's about as good as it gets,
kids.
There was one other time my
lagging interest picked up: when
Bev collapsed from his overuse of
drugs and it appeared the movie
was over. Alas, it drug on for at
least another thirty minutes.
There's also a severe lack of
A"Carnival" at ECU
New� Relea
The East Carolina Plavhouse
J
will open its 19S8-89 season with
the hit Broadwav musical, "Car-
nival
Opening October 5, "Carni-
val" has additional performances
on October 6,7,8 and 10 at 8:13
p.m. in the McGinnis Theatre on
the ECU Campus.
"Carnival a heart-warming,
unashamedly romantic musical
fable of life in a traveling French
circus, was the outcome of the
Merrick, Champion, Stewart,
Merrill collaboration. It tells the
story of Lili, a homeless naive girl
who, recently orphaned, comes in
search of a friend of her father's to
a small-time little carnival that
travels to the villages in southern
France.
Lili, portrayed by Nina Blan-
ton, Jane from last season's
"Leave It To Jane turns starry-
eyed at the cheap glamour of the
little tent-show and is particularly
impressed with the suavity of the
show's slick magician, Marco.
Jeffrey Hargett, Senator Hicks
from "Leave It To Jane will be in
charge of bringing Marco to life
on stage.
So wonder-stuck is she by the
behind-the-scenes glamour of the
sleazy show that the disillusioned
proprietor gives her a job holding
placards while jugglers, dancers
and magicians perform.
But the magic of it all over-
whelms her, she botches her job
and is about to be dismissed until
a good-hearted, aging member of
a team of puppeteers offers to take
her on and train her. His younger
partner is the limping Taul Ber-
thalet, who loses his heart to the
homeless girl. He can, however,
only growl ill-temperedly at her
because he wants so desperately
to say loving things.
But, when hidden under the
tiny stage of his Punch-and-Judy
booth, he charms the girl with the
spry humor he imparts to his
puppets. One of these is Horrible
Henry, a green-eyed walrus who
has none of Paul's modesty, but
instead of gift for stupendous
boasting. The other puppets are
equally lively and appealing� a
sly, seductive fox, who over-
whelms a lady fox with a sudden
rain of kisses, and a Carrot-Top as
extroverted as Paul is shv. Stuart
J
Maxwell, who make his portrayal
of Pancho Villa in "Diamond
Studs" a memorable event, will
bring his talents to the role of Paul.
Tickets may be purchased at
the McGinnis Theatre box office
10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday, and 10 a.m. until
8 p.m. on performance days.
For further information, call
(919)575-6829.
story logic here. Claire sleeps wi th
Bev again after learning he's re-
peatedly duped her into sleeping
with his twin. Okay, her character
is established masochistic, but
then she develops tender feelings
for the guy. No way! And Elliot
allows his brother to examine
women despite his knowledge of
Bev's instability. Even after he
knows Be,r has mutilated some
poor woman's genitalia during a
mere office exam, he does nothing
to prevent him from getting in the
operating room. Crazy.
Cronenberg has evidently
confused sophistication with
drudgery in his attempt to go
"mainstream" (an appellation
that's overrated anyhow). Your
two hours would be better spent
watching his genre work like
"The Fly or for that matter, just
lying around contemplating your
navel. "Dead Ringers" rates only
one cat head. �g
Sammy
Continued from page 12
and wi U be performing with guest
comedian Steve Geyer on October
2 at 7:00 in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets are available at the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall, $9.50
in advance, $11.50 at the door.
In addition, the Student
Unions will present a number of
great entertainment events in
October. "Fatal Attraction" star-
ring Michael Douglas and Glenn
Close will be shown tonight, Sep-
tember 29, through October 2 at
Hendrix Theatre. The movie
starts at 8:00 and admission is free
with student ID and activity card.
"Sammy and Rosie Get Laid"
will be shown Wednesday, Octo-
ber 5 at 8:00. If you're into watch-
ing a guy dropping 40 hits of pure
yellow microdot and shaving off
his nipples and eyebrows, check
out Pink Hoyd's "The Wall
being shown on October 7 and 8 at
11:00 in Hendrix Theatre. As with
all movies sponsored by The Stu-
dent Union, admission is free
with student ID and valid activity
sticker. One free guest is allowed
for each student.
The Wash House
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10th St.
752-6117
14th St.
758-6001
Attendants -
Snacks - Cable TV
One type of Coupon Per Visit
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Expires 10-7-88 Expires 10-7-88 Expires 10-7-88
We Support The Pirates
A RESUME
IS A TERRIBLE
THING TO WASTE
At AccuCopy we realize the importance of clean,
professional-looking resumes. Our resume packages let
you choose between phototypesettmg. laser printing, or
basic typewriter originals.
In addition, we offer the widest range of paper and
envelope choices in the area.
FAST COPIES
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THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
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ALL
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WEEK
American Legion Agricultural
Truly Eastern Carolina's Greatest Regional Exposition!
OCT. 3rd
thru
OCT. 8th
1988

THE FASTEST GROWING FAIR IN NORTH
THE 1988 EXHIBITS�two man
exhibit buildings showing the regional pride in
Agriculture, Industry, Science, Livestock
and Education.
Twenty buildings in the famed W. Conner
Eagles Homestead Museum showing our re-
gional pride in our past. Many exhibits in each
building, showing the nostalgia of our area's
Family Living in Agriculture Education & In-
dustry.
THE 1988 MIDWAY�Amuse-
ments of America's giant Carnival of mo-
tion, mirth, music & memories will again give
Greenville the largest Midway east of Raleigh
as it was in 1985,1986 & 1987 - Bigger than ever
with new thrill rides and much, much more!
1988 FREE
ATTRACTION
DEPARTMENTS!
1. CHILDREN OF ALL AGES DEPT!
On Tues Wed Thrus Fri. & Sat
and he(vela Bottling Co. of Greenville
will present Herriotts European Trained Anim-
al Circus Free To Everyone. 2 shows nightly.
Much Circus quality!
2. BEYOND BELIEF DEPT!
"The Magical World of Mike Basile Is he the
next Houdini? First time at any fair in N.C. after
touring London & Atlantic City. A Great Illusion
Show on our huge outdoor stage. Absolutely
FREE-2 shows nightly 7:45 & 9:30 All Week-Mike
will escape from a straight jacket every
night at 10:15 hanging upside down
3. OLD STANDBY THRILL DEPT!
Wed. & Thurs. 7:00 P.M. - Jack Kotchman's new
auto thrill show sensation - Hollywood Stunt
World along with the great Monster Crusher -
(yes, it will be back) - free to all at the grand-
stand!
4. BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND DEPT!
Monday, thru Friday 7:00 P.M. - Folk Festival
on outdoor stage featuring the hit of the 19S7
Fair� Buck Swamp Klckln Cloggers - pre-
sented by area businesses Free - Midway entr-
ance.
5. FOR THOSE WHO THINK THEY'VE
SEEN EVERYTHING DEPT!
The Banana Derby! Horse Racing? Not Quite�
The "horses" are ponles-the "Jockeys" are
monkeys�Audience participation�Great fun-
4 shows nightly�ALL WEEK. FREE.
CAROLINA!
6. HAPPIEST MUSIC ON EARTH DEPT!
The 1910 Antique Carnival Band Organ playing
every night - all night - Midway entrance.
GENERAL ADMISSIONS�
Adults $3.00 - Kids free until 6:00 p.m. - Kids $1.50
at night & Sat.
Mon. Oct 3 and Thurs. Oct 6. These are wrist
band nights - a $8.00 wristband gets you in the
gate & unlimited rides on the Midway and all free
attractions.
Tues. Oct. 4 Only�This @��$S&t KlU
day and night. Get a coupon from any store
where (&ffl'6mu � is sold or from a g
delivery and get a $8.00 wristband for $7.00 after
presenting the coupon at the gate - Covers
admission 8c unlimited rides!
Sat. Oct. 8�Wristbands on sale until 4:00 p.m.
honored until 6:00 p.m.
College Night - Thursday Oct. 6�ECU & Pitt
Community College Students Admitted tor
$1.50 With Student ID!
Senior Citizens Day - Wed. Oct. 5�All senior
citizens free 1-3 p.m!
6 Big Days
8c Nights
Oct. 3rd - Oct. 8th
1988
Pin COUNTY FAIR
Eastern Carolinas Greatest REGIONAL Exposition!
Sponsored by tho American Legion Posts of Greenville, Farmvillo ft Aydtn
'V.
Clearly l!
Li
,e fc"
Were you a p
Dear Big E,
Where is the sanity? Why i
iumane thinking suddenl'
ibsent once people set foot on th
CU campus? Why does ever)
ne want to run over everybody
:lse? Where in the hell are thd
rights of the pedestrians on thij
rampus?
What am 1 talking about
IVill I ask questions forever
I am talking about the hi
lion bike riders that feast on inn
ent pedestrians daily. I an-
,ng about the cars who alma
walkers as they cross 10th Street!
im talking about the blood thirsj
manics who roam the can j
s Jewalks and roadways. I
talking about the people thj
rtake me scared to walk to
(ne day when I was wa -
tome I was almosl - 1 m ai
'Squirrel Mi
GREENVILLE, N.C (BP)
.ver today. It was fir;
Discovered at 10 am thismomii
v hen it was found that neithe
Campus Security or th
Greenville Police had give out
Single parking ticket.
Other strange even!
Curring ail over the planet
Michael ackson was discovered
in bed with a woman, Ronali
Reagan talked in gramma; I
Correct sentences and U2 I
r ling an album with Til
But the strar.
DP
Booger Pick Boy
eet Chilli d
E ��� �- -
michelle brj
Debbie Stevens,
Rod 10
Smtrwr've been cartceite
the lackej s who work here. Hi
Page what it was are not liste
Freckles Marvel, Copycat Edi
Lackey Bev Maxwell,First M
uy, the Touchy Cartoonist, M. j
vlaymundi The Eunky Inchi
Also, thanks to 77ic East C
I in for all the great scoops, tl
Xerox - machine, and Greenvij
And to steal an idea from
L"Dawn tal
e shall return. Til then,
Strange
N IF N.C (BP)
ille - dreaded "squii
: itely nothing tl
��. eek.
Squirrel watchers, knovj
lliqually as squirrel head
I ire hoping that the absence
squirrel-related killings isn
to thedemiseof the cream-
"We re afraid that J
. inian Revenge Squad
him, " squirrel head Mmd'N
irends said. Trendy is pi j
ol the newly organized Squi
TK
Tonil
Com
i
BRANDED Si
Greenville Buyer's ?
Memorial Drive
(Von
.1 I 1:1.
nni.i'
V&





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:cu

RESUME PEOPLE
oo
rgetown Shops
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1EPT!
rgan playing
trance
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m -Kids $1.50
iese are wrist-
lets you in the
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)m any store
roma HUj
for $7.00 after
late - Covers
until 4:00 p.m.
-ECU & Pitt
admitted for
5�All senior
Clearly laheled to tht� m�j
I HE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29, 1988 15
Death of the Satire Pag
r
Were you a possum in your former life? Are you on acid? Why do you fearaboss cruiser?
know those b�cs always run out ot
Dear Big E,
Where is the sanity? Why is
miane thinking suddenly
bsent once people set foot on the
ECU campus? Why does every-
ne want to run over everybody
else? Where in the hell are the
rights of the pedestrians on this
ampus?
What am I talking about?
v ill 1 ask questions forever?
1 am talking about the hel-
ion bike riders that feast on inno-
cent pedestrians daily. I am talk-
ng about the cars who almost nip
alkers as they cross 10th Street. I
am talking about the blood thirsty
rtanics who roam the campus
idewalks and roadways. I am
ilking about the people that
nake me scared to walk to class.
One day when I was walking
.erne, I was almost killed my an
orange cruiser as I rounded the
Art building. The girl rifling the
bike laughed as I fell into a big
mud puddle. She even had the
nerve to say, "I'm sorry She
must have been traveling about 45
miles when she almost collided
with me.
I went to the infirmary
where they treated me for severe
shock. The doctor said I could
have had a heart attack. I com-
plained to the Campus Security,
but they only laughed.
On another day, I was late to
class and I started running down
College Hill. When I reached 10th
Street, the light was yellow so I
decided to sprint across the walk
lane. Halfway across, I looked to
my left only to see a beer truck
coming at me. In desperation, I
lunged for the concrete island in
the middle of the road.
If it isn't a bike or a car, it's
one of damn skateboard riders
who sneak up on you. You can't
really hear those tiny wheels
coming towards you until they
are right beside you.
On one occasion I was walk-
ing in between Rawl and the
NoName building when one of
those rat-tailed, little surf punks
wheeled beside me on his skate-
board. He surprised me so much
that I jumped. The unfortunate
part for me was I jumped right
into a nearby holly bush.
Big E, please help me. I heard
you helped some poor guy to
eradicate his pestulant neighbors,
so can help me rid this campus ol
all the hell on wheels.
Just Ask
BigE
Dear Eddie and The Cruis-
ers,
So, you like hot wheels? i
prefer match box myself, you
So since I have no pity for your
r rr. . paranoid, self-centered, psycho-
hnnr?,V�V y stoned ,24: pathic point of view, let me ask a
utrn � nC y�U iJSSF few more questions.
N2K�rC f Do you look both ways be-
��r cw ?y fore crossing a street? Are you a
your shadow scare you? mental patient? Were you aVs-
Well you asked a bunch of sum fa f t Ufc? JJd
questions so ,ust thought ,t was prcferimprintcd on the back
my turn. By the way am one of ofyour? A. A size 26 by land three
fliose fiendish, bikc-nd.ng hel- qiarters bike tircf or B A
lions. And you even named the
make of my bike, and yes it is boss. Goodyear snow tire?
Signed, Sick of Boss Cruis-
ers.
Squirrel Man' does absolutely nothing
GREENVILLE, N.C (BP) �
lell froze over today. It was first
-v overed at 10 am this morning
hen it was found that neither
ampus Security or the
� reenville Police had give out a
iingle parking ticket.
Other strange events are oc-
urring all over the planet �
Michael Jackson was discovered
in bed with a woman, Ronald
Reagan talked in grammatically
correct sentences and U2 began
wording an album with Tiffany.
But the strange case of the
Greenville parking tickets is per-
haps the most bizarre of all. Police
Chief Gordon O'Hara said today,
"I don't know how I'll feed the
kids now. The parking fees were
our main source of income
"Parking tickets paid for my
VCR whined Sargeant Old
MacDonald. "And my CD player,
all my other appliances that have
intials for names. They'll reposess
my Subaru�
Students all over campus had
absolutely no sympathy for the
beleagured officers. "In fact
freshman Y. Bother said, "I kind
of wish Satan would just pop out
of the ground and swallow the
Krispee Kremc� up, causing a
slow, painful death for all its po-
lice customers
Around 1 p.m Satan did
indeed rise out of the ground and
swallow the headquarters of ECU
Campus Security and Greenville
Police. All the police inside re-
portedly died under hellish con-
ditions.
PETE FRAT BOY, Dana Major
Chippy Bonehead, a vmfbu go a joumahsm
Dr. James F. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. McKee, AurndmnaownM,nd
Booger Pick Boy, m ��
Sweet Chilly D, � &�
EARL VIS, Offtnavt Editor
Michelle Britain,g�m�f
Debbie Stevens, secmary wuh�tv��smt
Beer Spill Lad,s&j�y stem,
Tom Hairy, q�� &� p
Sweet Baby, a m pnn��
John W. Meddling, Miwh
Mac Donald, Farming Manager
Rocktober69,2010
OPINIONATED
Page 87
Srrvc�-vire've been cancelled anyway, we thxroght wewoutd tet you see the REAL names of some of
the lackeys who work here. However, some of the people who really made the Clearly Labeled Satire
Page what it was are not listed on this, the parody masthead. So without further ado, a big thanks to
Heckles Marvel, Copycat Editor, Ashley "I'm going home to ponder my big bills" Dalton, Scott
Lackey Boy" Maxwell, First Amendment Lad, the Android, the mean photo guy, the incompetent photo
uy, the Touchy Cartoonist, M. (You're always in our hearts) Burbella, Al, FSB Typesetter, Mr. "Spunky7'
Maymundi The Funky Inchmeister and the word "blatant for all your weirdness.
Also, thanks to The East Carolinian Revenge Squad for being sooooo understanding, the squirrel
man for all the great scoops, the Media Board for making me lug yearbooks around, Yvonne for her
Xerox� machine, and Greenville in general for being the easiest city in the world to make fun of.
And to steal an idea from Fun N Games, our closing quote of the week is
"Dawn take you all � and be stone to you � Gandalf the Wizard.
We shall return. Til then, practice safe stereo techniques and stay away from words like "glitch
Strange occurences on planet earth
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
eenville's dreaded "squirrel
an did absolutely nothing this
eek.
Squirrel watchers, known
lliqually as "squirrel heads
;re hoping that the absence of
,tiirrel-related killings is not due
j the demise of the creature itself.
"We're afraid hat The East
aroUnian Revenge Squad got
am, " squirrel head Mindless
i rendy said. Trendy is president
I the newly organized Squirrel
Man Appreciation Club,
Greenville Chapter.
The East Carolinian Revenge
Squad, a group of journalistically-
correct fanatics from the tiny
bottle city of Kandor, appeared on
the Greenville scene last week,
demanding that The East Carolin-
ian, ECU's student newspaper be
shut down "to prevent the slan-
derous libels perpetrated by
Chippy Bonehead and The
Earl vis
The Revenge Squad claimed
no credit for the slaying of the
squirrel man in a press release
Tuesday. Ima Nerd, a sentient
bag of gas from the planet Nep-
tune and leader of the group,
stated "We've got their blasphe-
mous satire page removed, but
that's not enough
The group's members are
composed primarily of "people
who don't have anything better to
do with their lives except criticize
things they know nothing about
explained Nerd.
Little Sister
Rush
Tonight 8-11 p.m.
Come One - Come All
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market FclH SclVlllfJS
Memorial Drive &
Jm
O'R EVE KYI) AY LOW PRICE
!Fju rr A V.kt
k-cbok)
Commodes explosions cause panic
GREENVILLE (EP) � An-
other commode exploded in one
of ECU's residence halls Wed
nesday night, bringing the toil to
four in the last two days.
The latest of the commode
explosions occurred on Aycock
Dormitory's fourth floor. While
no one was injured in the explo-
sion, one Aycock resident was
treated at Pitt Memorial
Hospital's Trauma Center for
water shock syndrome
According to Resident Advi-
sor, Herb Smelt, the blast hap-
pened at 8:13 p.m Wednesda
Smelt said the bathroom explo
sion was incredible.
"I was citing three freshmen
for drinking underage, when ail
of a sudden thetopofthe 'cock(a
phrase residents call the fourth
floor of Aycock) started to shake
because of the immense pres-
sure Smelt said
Authorities i ta reica the
name of the watei shock syn-
drome victim as one Arnold a
all of 479B -ycock. Eatall s
roommate Dave Butz, couldn't
believe the weird occurence.
Me and Eatall went to
Jonestown at about six o'cl l
like we always do and I wit-
nessed Arnold consume over 12
polish sausages and eight plates
of collard greens Butz said.
"It wasn't until we returned
to our room when Eatall said he
wasn't feeling too good. I re-
member telling him not to (de-
leted because of bad taste) in the
room and then he waddled
down to the bathroom and that's
the la t I saw him before the
Trauma unit carried him away
Butz said before his eyes filled
u ith tears.
Trauma unit personnel com-
mented Eatall is recovering well
atter what they say is possibly
the worst case of water shock
syndrome in Pitt County.
"1 have never seen a person
v ithstand the force of toilet wa-
tt r traveling at that particular
speed to that particular part of
the human anatomy Dr. B.M.
Enima said.
The latest incident brings to
light the severity of the toilet
explosion problem which has
destroyed four commodes in the
1. si two days. Two commodes in
Slay dorm mysteriously ex-
li led Tuesday after a pizza
eating contest and another toilet
blew to bits on the t welveth floor
of White dorm Wednesday
morning.
While the head of mainte-
nance, Dor Slam, could not be
reached for comment, an area
commodologist has a theory to
explain the recent crisis in the
campus's waste system.
"Gasseous deposits which
somehow get trapped under
water have been known to
cause such phenomenom Dr.
Rotor Rooder said. Rooder noted
that the U.S. Maine, a Navy ves-
sel which sunk before the turn of
the century and started the Span-
ish-Amcncan War, was the re-
sult of an exploding commode.
Rooder purposes that all
dorm residents be given a man-
datory GIL (Gasseous Intake
Level) test to determine which
persons would be high-risk us-
ers of the dorm restrooms. Those
persons with a dangerously high
GIL would then be forced to use
make-shift out houses.
"We have to institute some
form of early detection before we
are knee-deep in exploding
commodes Rooder said.
Hobucken signs are a missing
HOBUCKEN, N.C. (EP)
The mayor of this small coastal
town has proclaimed a war on
vandals who have stolen 20 of the
town's signs in recent m . hs
"Thisisjustadisgr . p v.pie
drive into town and they don'l
know where thr is i ecau e i e
ain't got no i.irn town signs
Mayor led 1 .lekl.v said Wednes-
day in a meeting before the t
counsel.
According to Back he and
ther members of the tew n
-el, vistors to Hobucken, popula
tion 300 Salute are often per
plexed alter entering ti city lim
its. The town signs which n ni
"Town of Hobucken, Govi nor's
Excellence 197 . 1984,Cro Sara -
turary started disappearing
from their po: ts in July.
"I just can't figure it o il This
case defies all criminal p i
ogy, Sheriff Barney Fife said Fife
said he has staked out the sign
posts, but the vandals still t le
the signs.
"Well, one night I drove ,
squad car (Hobucken's only po-
lice vehicile) to the Krispy Kreme
to get a dozen of glazed and when
I came back for the all-night stake-
out, the signs were all gone, Fife
said.
George Chaw, the propertior
ol George Chaw's Chewing To-
bacco and Soda, baid confused
motorists Mop at his btore daily to
enquire where they are. Chaw
offers to information about the
town's name only it vistors pur-
chase an item from his store.
"I don't mind the problem at
all, my business has gone way up
since this stuff started happen-
ing Chaw said.
Top Ten Reasons For Enrolling at ECU,
According to Freshmen
1. Utilization of convenient freshman
parking lots.
2. I ow priced parking stickers.
3. Spacious, rodent-free residence halls.
4 Gourmet campus dining.
5. Fine student recreation facilities.
6. a. Fat-girl ratio is lower than N.C. State,
b.Swell-head guy ratio is lower than
ijnch.
7 Closer to mega-urban centers of
Fountain and Bath.
8. Blue Labeled sandwiches at the Croatan.
9. The tree toilet paper
10. The East Carolinian's clearly labeled
Satire Page.
CoVfroov College SJI -v Student IN Special IHr COUPONS GOOD THRU SEPTEMBER 88" ONLY
2 Free Tanning visits with HaircutBlowdry$60.00 Membership to tanning Booth per semester
I Yearly Membership to tanning Booth $100.00 unlimited visits1 Free j Tanning Visit with a 29.95 perm
Special good with coupon only Appointment helpful but not necessary! 103 EASTBROOK DRIVE 758-7570





Overkill
the. DeAhA
"I'm a little rascal ii iy Little Rascalfeeble lady from the "Little Rascal" cart commercial
By Friedrich Orpheus
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By Parker
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Inside Joke
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The Avatar
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He's Dead!
He's Dead!
HA-HA!
QmrnHes to Live By
"There'll be no rock and roll in Hell
-Duffy Strode, child preacher
And now . . . here they are- the submissions to Hie great "Kill
Danny Partridge" contest! We appreciate your cooperation (and
sick minds) which made this the most successful Comics Page contest
ever! Hopefully this will lead to more involvement from the students
with this page, and eventually World Peace. We're still trying to
decide the best one, but in the meantime vou will all recieve mementos
of your day of greatness (As soon as 1 get around to it). 1 hanks again,
and remember, Danny is Dead.
AAGCH
i Harris and Haselrig
SMUT riAH PRCCOMOl
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Rurrus �s
GOiNG-TD SHOOT
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Danny at the Club
The Partridge Family was in the middle of a groovy gig at a bar called "Nipple's" when
suddenly Danny, in a drug-crazed frenzy, proceeded to do his Hendrix impersonation.
While the rest of the Family tore through their rendition of "Radar Love Danny jumps on
top of his amps and proceeds to urinate profusely on top of them. The ensuing explosion brought
squeals of delight from onlookers throughout the club.
This violent Death of Danny makes him a permanent part of rock history and Nipple's
grafitti-covered interior.
Paul Brian Hardy
The Danny Trap
Danny Bonaduce should at first be lured to the E.C.U. campus via a written request to appear
here to address a forum on the dangers of over-the-counter acne preparations.
Feeling a need for public awareness as well as a month's rent, he'll eagerly accept. Once lured
into Hendrix Theatre, he'll be stripped and hog-tied, and have trail mix stuffed into every
available orifice by several College Republicans.
He shall then be placed in the wooded area beside Jones Dorm, smeared with a mixture of
apple butter and refried beans, and left overnight as peace offering to the Squirrel Man. I know
this would work because, you see, I have a psychic link with the Squirrel Man and it is his
wish. . T
Anthony Lamm
Danny Goes to Mexico and Dies
After a lecture on '60's pop culture at Mendenhall, Danny is attacked by the squirrel man.
Danny suffers much gnawing in the clutches of the untoward creature, but survives the ordeal.
Soon thereafter, Danny sprouts a big, bushy red tail.
Shamed by his deformity, he flees south of the border to have the tail amputated by a
doctor infamous for performing abortions on '50's Hollywood starlets. The tail is removed, but
Danny bleeds to death due to poor supervision.
Months later, his sister Susan Partidge (who is visiting the doctor in question) discovers his
corpse and peels it from the clotted sheets. Tragic. Micah Harris
(With apologies to Gabriel Garcia-Marquez)
An angry crowd of 10,000 stormed the Partridge house, while a weeping and pleading
Partridge Family tried to stop the mob. The head of Danny was placed on a pike and paraded
around; the bright red hah and eyes seemed to glow, and the crowd roared.
The bizarre throng then set fire to the headless body, using the picket fence around the once
peaceful yard as fuel. The family sobbed pathetically at the spectacle.
NUke McCaffrey
Red Danny
During a friendship tour of the Soviet Union, Danny is pushed under a Soyuz spacecraft at
lift-off by his arch-nemesis Mason Reese. The horribly scarred Partridge was patched together
by Moscow's best surgeon and kept in a Soviet hospital in semi-stable condition.
Danny's old friends came to him in his hour of need. Susan Dey left the set of "L.A. Law " to
come, and Shirley came from visiting a doctor in Mexico. Eventually Rueben hitch-hiked from
France, and Danny glowed with delight at the reunion.
Amidst the festivities, the large oafish nurse Helga came in to give Danny his daily sponge
bath. Helga then ripped off her wig to reveal that she was in fact Mason Reese in disguise!
Mason proceeded to stuff his wet sponge down the youth's throat Tire former cast at first stared
in disbelief while Danns gurgling got quieter, and then they all began to laugh uncontrollably
at the slow death of their old chum. join Gurganus
3Danny took up playing the lyre and walking about the Greek countryside, spreading his
musical message of love, peace and the joy of gay sex with Reuban Kincaid. Eventually, the
wild Furies of the island Lesbos, maddened by his songs, attacked him. They ripped him to
shreds before the eyes of his helpless mother, Shirley, the Muse of Animated Eggs.
The Furies ripped his head off and tossed it into the river. Undismayed by its plight,
Danny's head floated onward, out to sea, still singing songs of hope and the joy of being a
disembodied head that could float in an aesthetically pleasing manner.
Eventually, he drifted into the Viking shipping lanes, where Skorf the Very Large and
Manly, annoyed by the singing, smited Danny's head upon the nose with a very large halbred,
thus silencing the Song of Danny forever. -From The Chronicles of W'irlief the Very Confused.
Fun and Games by Jeff Parker, a really happenin' guy.
Pirate
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Iditor
With seven garni
on the Pirate's schedi.
posted a 1-3 record '
one thing for cert
It devsn't jet an)
This Saturday th
face an undel
form of the Rag
Southwestern Lou
defeated Cal. St
Sam Hou I
crushing Rice I
the Cajuns will n I
Stadium on to
"Th ' :
for us this we �
Art Baker said in a .
ence held earlii
"Southwestern 1
very good t n rtba
undefeated team
thev are one
will pi
Baker
fense which b asts I
ranked with theh-
Charlie Libretto, picture J
starting nod this wei -
Women w
By CAROLYN II STIC 1
The Lady PiraU -
their fifth win of the
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 29, 1988 Page 17
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Pirate's road not easy
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sport Fdttor
With seven games remaining
on the Pirate's schedule, ECU has
posted a 1-3 record. And there is
one thing for certain.
It doesn't jet any easier.
This Saturday the Pirates will
face an undefeated team in the
form of the Ragin' Cajuns of
Southwestern Louisiana. Having
defeated Cal. State Fullerton 24-9,
Sam Houston State 33-8, and
crushing Rice last weekend 41-16,
the Cajuns will roll into Ficklen
stadium on top of a 3-0 record.
'Things don't get any easier
tor us this week Pirate Coach
Art Baker said in a press confer-
ence held earlier this week.
Southwestern Louisiana is a
very good football team, and an
undefeated team. Defensively,
they are one oi the best teams we
will play
Baker was referring to a de-
tense which boasts two players
ranked with the best in the nation
at their respective positions by
The Sporting News Chris Gannon,
a 6-5, 250-pound senior defensive
end, was called "the second best
defensive end in the nation
Mark Hall, a 6-5, 285-pound de-
fensive tackle, was named as the
seventh best tackle in the country.
Also in The Sporting News, Cajun
Coach Nelson Stokley was
named to the "Best Coaches" list-
ing for the the 24 Division 1-A
Independent teams, and the the
entire defensive line was ranked
third among the 24 teams.
"On defense, Chris Gannon
and Mark Hall are legitimate all-
america candidates Baker said
of the duo. Another player to look
tor to perform well is Thomas
King, a 6-1, 190-pound senior
safety.
the offense is led by quarter-
back Brian Mitchell, who Baker
referred to as "the best running
quarterback that we will face this
year In proving Baker's point,
Mitchell rushed for four touch-
downs last weekend against Rice.
On the Pirate's side of the ball,
there will be a change at quarter-
back, according to Coach Baker.
Charlie Libretto, the back-up at
that position until this week, will
get the starting nod coming of an
impressive eight for fifteen pass-
ing for 197 yards and three touch-
downs last week against the Uni-
versity of Southern Mississippi.
Tim James, ECU'S senior fullback,
went out of the game in the first
quarter against USM with a badly
bruised foot. According to Baker,
he has been on crutches all week,
and his playing status is still un-
known at this point.
On a lighter note for the Pi-
rates, tailback Reggie McKinney
will be looking to gain the one
yard he needs to boost him to
1,000 yards rushing for his career.
In his career at ECU, McKinney
has 999 yards on 179 carries, a 5.58
yard per carry average.
The two teams last met in
Ficklin Stadium on October 4,
1986. Southwestern Louisiana
won that contest 21-10, boosting
their record against the Pirates to
5-3.
Charlie Libretto, pictured here against the Ragin' Cajuns of Southwestern Louisiana, will get the
starting nod this week as the Pirates face the Cajuns for the first time since 1986.
Women win in volleyball action
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Stiff Writer
The Lady Pirates recorded
their fifth win of the season this
past weekend, as ECU won an
exciting match against the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Greensboro.
The Lady Pirates took the first
game from the Lady Spartans, 15-
6 as it looked to be an easy match
for ECU, but UNC-G had differ-
ent ideas in the second game,
coming back to defeat ECU 15-7.
In the third game, ECU did
See VOLLEYBALL, page 18
Informal Recreation
Memorial Gymnasium
Mon.Wed.f ri12:00 p.ml:30 p.m.
Mon. & Tues 4:00 p.m9:00 p.m.
Wed. & Thurs 3:00 p.m9:00 p.m.
Fri 3:00 p.m7:00p.m.
SatZZ ZZ11:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Sun. 12:�0 noon-5:00 p.m.
Weight Rooms
Memorial
MonThurs10:00 a.m9:00 p.m.
Fri 10:00 a.m7:00 p.m.
Sat. ZZZZZZZZZZ 11:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
gun 2:00 noon-5:00 p.m.
Minges
MonThurs3:00 p.m8:45 p.m.
Fri 3:00 p.m6:45 p.m.
Sun' ' ZZZ12:00 noon-5:00 p.m.
Garrett
MonThurs3:00 p.m9:00 p.m.
Fri. & Sun1-00 p.m5:00 p.m.
Swimming Pools
Memorial
Mon -Fri7:00 a.m8.00 a.m.
MonFri7Z12:00 p.ml:30 p.m.
Mon. & Wed3:00 p.m9:00 p.m.
Tues. & Thurs4:00 p.m5:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m9:00 p.m.
Fri 3:00 p.m7:00 p.m.
Sat11:00 a.m5:00p.m.
Sun. . ZZZZ12:00 noon-5:00 p.m.
Minges
Mon.Wcd.FriZPfmf
t �- s TVrC 6:00 p.m8:00 p.m.
S;& zzzzzzzz12.00 no0n-5:ooP.m.
Hours may vary in accordance with departmental programs. Valid ECU
identification is required for admittance to facilities.
Jarrod Moody looks for the ball in action from the Pirate's 1986 encounter with the Cajuns, who
won the game by a 21-10 margin.
Pirate Rugby team defeats a
tough Demom Deacon team
By"ELVIS"
Special to the Fast Carolinian
The ECU Rugby Club opened
its 1988 fall season Saturday, Sep-
tember 17, with an impressive
win against the Wake Forest Dea-
cons.
Lafleur back I
NEW YORK (AP) - Guy
Lafleur's place in the Hockey Hall
of Fame is secure. So is his spot on
the New York Rangers' roster.
Four years after retiring and
three weeks after being inducted
into the Hall of Fame, the former
Montreal Canadians great offi-
cially returned to the NHL as a
player bv signing a contract with
the New York Rangers.
Coach Michel Bergeron said
Tuesday that Lafleur, who signed
a one-year contract wi th an option
for a second year, wasn't signed
because of his past achivements.
"The reason we signed him is
that he made the team, not be-
cause he's in the Hall oi Fame.
He's one of our four best right
wings. He made the team
Bergeron said.
Lafleur, who turned 37 on
Sept. 20, agreed that he had
earned his chance to play again.
"When I started, 1 didn't
know what to expect. But I think I
really deserved it. This is the most
satisfying thing I've done since I
began professional hockey said
Lafleur, who retired after scoring
518 goals and 728 assists for 1,246
points to stand 11th on the all-time
NHL scoring list.
Lafleur played 14 seasons
with the Canadians and remains
Montreal's all-time leading
scorer.
The Pirates started with an
offensive attitude right from the
opening, and moved the ball with
a strong scram attack and fast
wing runs. Due to a steady rain-
tall, neither team was able to
make an early score. Late in the
first half, Blaire "Shred" Bryd
scored with a 25m run. Frank
Cutler made the conversion kick
for 2. In the 2nd half, Mike "Top
Gun" Burrell punched one in to
raise the score to 10-4. Bob "Luma
Keg" Eason added to the
Deacon's problems with a driving
score. The Deacons never were
able to put it together after their
earlier score, and ECU went on to
win 14-4.
The ECU Rugby Team, shown here in past action, took on a tough
Wake Forest squad and beat them 14-4. The Ruggers hope to
continue to put marks in the win column, and they need the
help and support of the ECU student body to do this. So go out
and support the Rugby team.
ACC player-of-the-week
GREENSBORO, N.C (AP) -
North Carolina State placekickcr
Damon Hartman, who kicked
four field goals in his collegiate
debut against Maryland Satur-
day, has been selected Atlantic
Coast Conference rookie of the
week.
Hartman, of Roswell, Ga
kicked field goals of 22,25,28 and
45 yards and made two extra
points as the Wolfpack dropped a
30-26 decision to Maryland.
Earlier, the selection commit-
tee of the Atlantic Coast Sports
Writers Association recognized
Neil O'Donnell of Maryland and
Chris Port of Duke as the
conference's offensive players of
the week while Clemson's Done
Brewster and Maryland's Matt
D'Amico were named defensive
players oi the week.
IRS has hang gliding
(IRS) - Several East Carolina
University students participated
in hang gliding adventures at
Nags Head, N.C. on the historic
Dare beaches Saturday, Septem-
ber 17.
Richard Raynor, Matt Jones,
Charles Conover, Emmy Blair,
Tiffany Kuntzman, Deborah
Teague, Billy Shugart, and
Christine Walker were led by the
fearless outdoorsman Mark Bor-
deaux to the heavenly skies and
relatively soft sand dunes for hard
landings on Jockey's Ridge.
The group participated in
ground school instruction that
lasted approximately an hour,
providing them with the funda-
mentals of the sport and actual
flight experience immediately
following the ground school.
Each individual received 5 flights
lasting only a few seconds each
but covering some excellent dis-
tance, which imparted the feeling
of a controlled fall.
The activity evaluations,
completed by each individual on
the van ride home ran highly in
favor of the trip and by all indica-
tions the group was interested in a
return engagement and addi-
tional opportunities at flight.
Kitty Hawk Kites also pro-
vides opportunities for a different
adventure in flying Tandem
Towing! You and an instructor
are hooked into a hang glider,
launched from a cruiising boat
and soar up to 1500 feet over
Roanoke Sound. A breathtaking
view and an exhilarating thrill is
provided if you're very adven-
turesome.
You can lean about wind-
awareness, rigging, sail trim and
boat control in two hour classes
taught on the water with respect
to catamarans and daysailors. In
addition you could participate in
the world's fastest growing water
sport and become a pro with a
three hour class in windsurfing.
The wind is normally steady
and the water is shallow in a well
protected area perfect for an intro-
duction into this fascinating
sport.
The group listed above had a
great time in the activity of their
choice and the folks at the Out-
door Recreation program are very
interested in providing you with
the activity of your choice. We
will arrange trips for small groups
of 8 or more at your convienence.
Feel free to contact the OR center
for more information. The Center
is located in room 113 Memorial
Gym.





t
4V
r
THE EAST CAROLIN1 N
Sports
SEPTEMBER 29,1988 Page 17
ris .nui ClurgJiius,
m 'I
ip i jn
� rV
l Reid
A TRp I?
Harris and Haselrig
Rurrus ws
CONOTD SMOOT
you QuEtaiMO
BuT THAT CUX wtiC
WI5 HArVOAMO
TJr.OKS 5TAftfEO
U� TJiTOUS ON
A SJMMER lAUN.
;eping and pleading
on a pike and paraded
�d.
t fence around the once
Mike McCaffrey
ler a Soyuz spacecraft at
;e was patched together
Indition.
the set of "L.A. Law" to
jueben hitch-hiked from
Danny his daily sponge
lason Reese in disguise!
former cast at first stared
to laugh uncontrollably
Tom Gurganus
ntryside, spreading his
incaid. Eventually, the
m. They ripped him to
lated Eggs.
lismayed by its plight,
and the joy of being a
lorf the Very Large and
lith a very large halbred,
irlief the Very Confused.
irker, a really happenin' guy.
Pirate's road not easy
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
With seven games remaining
on the Pirate's schedule, ECU has
posted a 1-3 record. And there is
one thing for certain.
It doesn't get any easier.
This Saturday the Pirates will
face an undefeated team in the
form of the Ragin' Cajuns of
Southwestern Louisiana. Having
defeated Cal. State Fullerton 24-9,
Sam Houston State 33-8, and
crushing Rice last weekend 41-16,
the Cajuns will roll into Ficklen
Stadium on top of a 3-0 record.
'Things don't get any easier
for us this week Pirate Coach
Art Baker said in a press confer-
ence held earlier this week.
"Southwestern Louisiana is a
very good football team, and an
undefeated team. Defensively,
they are one of the best teams we
will play
Baker was referring to a de-
fense which boasts two players
ranked with the best in the nation
at their respective positions by
The Sporting News Chris Gannon,
a 6-5,250-pound senior defensive
end, was called "the second best
defensive end in the nation
Mark Hall, a 6-5, 285-pound de-
fensive tackle, was named as the
seventh best tackle in the country.
Also in The Sporting News, Cajun
Coach Nelson Stokley was
named to the "Best Coaches" list-
ing for the the 24 Division 1-A
Independent teams, and the the
entire defensive line was ranked
third among the 24 teams.
"On defense, Chris Gannon
and Mark Hall are legitimate all-
america candidates Baker said
of the duo. Another player to look
for to perform well is Thomas
King, a 6-1, 190-pound senior
safety.
The offense is led by quarter-
back Brian Mitchell, who Baker
referred to as "the best running
quarterback that we will face this
year In proving Baker's point,
Mitchell rushed for four touch-
downs last weekend against Rice.
On the Pirate's side of the ball,
there will be a change at quarter-
back, according to Coach Baker.
Charlie Libretto, the back-up at
that position until this week, will
get the starting nod coming of an
impressive eight for fifteen pass-
ing for 197 yards and three touch-
downs last week against the Uni-
versity of Southern Mississippi.
Tim James, ECU'S senior fullback,
went out of the game in the first
quarter against USM with a badly
bruised foot. According to Baker,
he has been on crutches all week,
and his playing status is still un-
known at this point.
On a lighter note for the Pi-
rates, tailback Reggie McKinney
will be looking to gain the one
yard he needs to boost him to
1,000 yards rushing for his career.
In his career at ECU, McKinney
has 999 yards on 179 carries, a 5.58
yard per carry average.
The two teams last met in
Ficklin Stadium on October 4,
1986. Southwestern Louisiana
won that contest 21-10, boosting
their record against the Pirates to
5-3.
Jarrod Moody looks for the ball in action from the Pirate's 1986 encounter with the Cajuns, who
won the game by a 21-10 margin.
Pirate Rugby team defeats a
tough Demom Deacon team
By "ELVIS"
Special to the East Carolinian
�d, win get tne
Charlie Libretto, pictured hen �.
starting nod this week as the Pirates race the Cajuns for the first time since 1986.
Women win in volleyball action
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
past weekend, as ECU won an 6 as it looked to be an easy match
exciting match against the Uni- for ECU, but UNC-G had differ-
The Lady Pirates recorded
their fifth win of the season this
versity of North Carolina at
Greensboro.
The Lady Pirates took the first
game from the Lady Spartans, 15-
ent ideas in the second game,
coming back to defeat ECU 15-7.
In the third game, ECU did
See VOLLEYBALL, page 18
Informal Recreation
Memorial Gymnasium
Mon.Wed.Fri12:00 p.ml:30 p.m.
Mon. &Tues 4:00 p.m9:00 p.m.
Wed. &Thurs 3:0�pm9:00p.m.
Fri 3:00 p.m7:00p.m.
Sat ���11:00a.m5:00p.m.
Sun. .1ZL12:00 noon-5:00 p.m.
Weight Rooms
Memorial
MonThurs1&00 a.m9:00 p.m.
pri10:00 a.m7:00 p.m.
Sat. VUKl a.m5:00 p.m.
Sun 2:00 noon-5:00 p.m.
Minges
MonThurs3:00 p.m8:45 p.m.
Pri 3:00 p.m6:45 p.m.
cfan 12:00 noon-5:00 p.m.
Garrett
MonThurs3:00 p.m9:00 p.m.
Fri. & Sun1:00 p.m5:00 p.m.
Swimming Pools
Memorial
Mon -Fri 7:0� a.m8KX) a.m.
MonFriZZ12:00 p.m130 p.m.
Mon. & Wed3:00 p.m9KX) p.m.
Tues. & Thurs4:00 p.m5:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m9:00 p.m.
Fri 3:00 p.m7:00 p.m.
5 11:00 a.m5:00p.m.
gpp y s 12:00 noon-5KX) p.m.
Minges
Mon.Wed.FriI'�'wl�
Tues. & ThursJJSrP m IXJ?
A" 12:00 noon-5:00 p.m.
Hours may vary in accordance with departmental programs. Valid ECU
identification is required for admittance to facilities.
The ECU Rugby Club opened
its 1988 fall season Saturday, Sep-
tember 17, with an impressive
win against the Wake Forest Dea-
cons.
Lafleur back
NEW YORK (AP) - Guy
Lafleur's place in the Hockey Hall
of Fame is secure. So is his spot on
the New York Rangers' roster.
Four years after retiring and
three weeks after being inducted
into the Hall of Fame, the former
Montreal Canadians great offi-
cially returned to the NHL as a
player by signing a contract with
the New York Rangers.
Coach Michel Bergeron said
Tuesday that Lafleur, who signed
a one-year contract with an option
for a second year, wasn't signed
because of his past achivements.
"The reason we signed him is
that he made the team, not be-
cause he's in the Hall of Fame.
He's one of our four best right
wings. He made the team
Bergeron said.
Lafleur, who turned 37 on
Sept. 20, agreed that he had
earned his chance to play again.
"When I started, � I didn't
know what to expect. But I think I
really deserved it. This is the most
satisfying thing I've done since I
began professional hockey said
Lafleur, who retired after scoring
518 goals and 728 assists for 1,246
points to stand 11th on the all-time
NHL scoring list.
Lafleur played 14 seasons
with the Canadians and remains
Montreal's all-time leading
scorer.
The Pirates started with an
offensive attitude right from the
opening, and moved the ball with
a strong scram attack and fast
wing runs. Due to a steady rain-
fall, neither team was able to
make an earlv score. Late in the
first half, Blaire "Shred" Bryd
scored with a 25m run. Frank
Cutler made the conversion kick
for 2. In the 2nd half, Mike 'Top
Gun" Burrell punched one in to
raise the score to 104. Bob "Luma
Keg" Eason added to the
Deacon's problems with a driving
score. The Deacons never were
able to put it together after their
earlier score, and ECU went on to
win 14-4.
The ECU Rugby Team, shown here in past action, took on a tough
Wake Forest squad and beat them 14-4. The Ruggers hope to
continue to put marks in the win column, and they need the
help and support of the ECU student body to do mis. So go out
and support the Rugby team.
ACC player-of-the-week
GREENSBORO, N.C (AP) -
North Carolina State placekicker
Damon Hartman, who kicked
four field goals in his collegiate
debut against Maryland Satur-
day, has been selected Atlantic
Coast Conference rookie of the
week.
Hartman, of Roswell, Ga
kicked field goals of 22,25,28 and
45 yards and made two extra
points as the Wolfpack dropped a
30-26 decision to Maryland.
Earlier, the selection commit-
tee of the Atlantic Coast Sports
Writers Association recognized
Neil O'Donnell of Maryland and
Chris Port of Duke as the
conference's offensive players of
the week while Clemson's Doug
Brewster and Maryland's Matt
D'Amico were named defensive
players of the week.
IRS has hang gliding
1
(IRS) - Several East Carolina
University students participated
in hang gliding adventures at
Nags Head, N.C. on the historic
Dare beaches Saturday, Septem-
ber 17.
Richard Raynor, Matt Jones,
Charles Conover, Emmy Blair,
Tiffany Kuntzman, Deborah
Teague, Billy Shugart, and
Christine Walker were led by the
fearless outdoorsman Mark Bor-
deaux to the heavenly skies and
relatively soft sand dunes for hard
landings on Jockey's Ridge.
The group participated in
ground school instruction that
lasted approximately an hour,
providing them with the funda-
mentals of the sport and actual
flight experience immediately
following the ground school.
Each individual received 5 flights
lasting only a few seconds each
but covering some excellent dis-
tance, which imparted the feeling
of a controlled fall.
The activity evaluations,
completed by each individual on
the van ride home ran highly in
favor of the trip and by all indica-
tions the group was interested in a
return engagement and addi-
tional opportunities at flight.
Kitty Hawk Kites also pro-
vides opportunities for a different
adventure in flying Tandem
Towing! You and an instructor
are hooked into a hang glider,
launched from a cruiising boat
and soar up to 1500 feet over
Roanoke Sound. A breathtaking
view and an exhilarating thrill is
provided if you're very adven-
turesome.
You can lean about wind-
awareness, rigging, sail trim and
boat control in two hour classes
taught on the water with respect
to catamarans and daysailors. In
addition you could participate in
the world's fastest growing water
sport and become a pro with a
three hour class in windsurfing.
The wind is normally steady
and the water is shallow in a well
protected area perfect for an intro-
duction into this fascinating
sport.
The group listed above had a
great time in the activity of their
choice and the folks at the Out-
door Recreation program are very
interested in providing you with
the activity of your choice. We
will arrange trips for small groups
of 8 or more at your convienence.
Feel free to contact the OR center
for more information. The Center
is located in room 113 Memorial
Gym.





�f
18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29, 1988
Fearless Football Forecast
Southwestern Louisiana at ECU
N.C. State at Ga. Tech
Duke at Vanderbilt
UCLA at Washington
UNC at Auburn
Alabama at Kentucky
LSU at Florida
Maryland at Syracuse
Michigan at Wisconsin
Iowa St. at Oklahoma
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week - (2-8)
Overall - (22-16)
ECU
N.C. State
Vanderbilt
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
Florida
Syracuse
Michigan
Oklahoma
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week - (5-5)
Overall - (24-15)
ECU
N.C. State
Vanderbilt
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
Florida
Syracuse
Michigan
Oklahoma
DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Last Week - (6-4)
Overall (25-14)
ECU
Ga. Tech
Duke
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
LSU
Syracuse
Michigan
Oklahoma
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week - (4-6)
Overall - (25-14)
ECU
Ga. Tech
Duke
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
LSU
Maryland
Michigan
Oklahoma
CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
Last Week - (4-6)
Overall - (25-14)
Southwestern
N.C. State
Duke
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
LSU
Syracuse
Michigan
Oklahoma
EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week - (5-5)
Overall - (24-15)
ECU
N.C. State
Duke
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
Florida
Syracuse
Michigan
Oklahoma
Athletes arrested in Seoul
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - Gray and three unidentified com- meter run. He won the U.S. Olym-
U.S. Olympic runner Johnny L. panions complained that the cab pic trials in the event and was
Gray was arrested for kicking a was driving dangerously and national champion in 1985. 1986
taxi and is the third American
is
athlete to be detained for unruly
behavior in the past week, police
said today.
Authorities said Gray was
and 1987.
Police were to forward to the
prosecutor today their report on
the arrest Saturday of U.S. Olym
ing U.S. Olympic team members
has triggered a wave of criticism
in the South Korean media and
among some Koreans.
Newspapers have charged
Americans are rude and arrogant
almost hit them. Gray was acting
in self-defense, Rowan said.
The taxi driver chased the
Americans with an object that
appeared to be a tire iron, but did
seized by police after he became not hit anyone before police inter- Dalbey and Doug Gjertsen after a
involved in an argument with a vened and detained Gray, Rowan marble carving was removed
taxi driver Tuesday night. said. from a Seoul hotel.
The driver said he blew his Rowan said the driver had Dalbey and Gjertsen apolo-
hom at Gray because the runner been compensated for the dam- gized for the incident Tuesday,
was blocking the road. Gray age.
The case was fowarded to the Police officials said no special
Public Prosecutor for possible consideration was being given iu awarded a decision to a Bulgarian
action on charges of violent as- me American athletes, but they boxer over a local favorite.
sault, police said. But the case was indicated they did not expect
kicked the taxi and then tried to
flee, but was caught by police,
authorities said.
Gray was questioned at a
police station, then released in the
pic gold medalist swimmers Troy and have failed to behave prop-
erly during their stay in Seoul.
Much of the criticism appears
to be part of attempts to deflect at-
tention from an incident last week
in which South Korean boxing
officials attacked a referee after he

considered minor and it was un-
custody of U.S. Embassy officials, likely that any major action would
police said. be taken against Gray, a police
Ron Rowan, an attorney for officer said,
the U.S. Olympic Committee, said Gray finished fifth in the 800-
charges to be pressed.
There have been no reports of
athletes from other countries
being arrested.
A series of incidents involv-
That case is also under inves-
tigation by police, but there has
been no statement on how the
probe is proceeding and the case
is rarely mentioned by the local
press.
Nets make changes in team
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP) - Al Menendez has ended a
nine-year association with the
New Jersey Nets and resigned as
director of player personnel, the
team announced.
Menendez said Monday in a
long enough. I wish them well
and they wish me well
The Nets announced the res-
ignation in a one-sentence release
without comment from club offi-
cials.
tence
Menendez served as an assis-
tant coach with the Detroit Pis-
tons before joining the Nets in
1979. Prior to that he had worked
as an assistant at Nevada-Las
Vegas, the University of Hawaii,
Hofstra and C.W. Post.
The Nets also announced
Menendez refused to corn-
telephone interview that he re- ment on the reasons for his depar-
signed last week and he will pur- ture.
sue other job opportunities in the 'It's" better to keep it sweet Monday that forward Mike
NBA. and short he said. "When I want CfKoren has retired, and will
"I'm staying in basketball to write a book, I'll write a book, work for the club on special as-
hesaid. "Nine-and-a-half years is Now's the time for just one sen- signmentsand as a member of its
speakers bureau. The former
North Carolina star, who spent
seven seasons with New Jersey,
also will work with Howard
David and Jim Spanarkel on the
team's radio broadcasts on
WNEW-AM.
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Volleyball win
Continued from page 17
not take a lead until 10-9. The
Lady Pirates then held off the
Lady Spartans to win 15-12.
ECU was up 7-0 in the fourth
game, when UNC-G broke loose
and battled back to a 16-14 win,
putting the pressure on for both
teams in the fifth game.
Determined not to let the win
slip away, ECU took a 6-0 lead and
went on to win the final game 15-
11.
"I thought that we were about
to be upset said Coach Judy
Kirkpatrick. "The match was one
of ups and downs for us but that's
the nature of volleyball and I feel
that in that situation, the better
skilled team will eventually come
to the top. Tonight, we were that
team
Jemma Holley finished the
match with a 54 percent hitting
percentage. Holley had 23 kills for
the match, plus one block solo.
Debbie Ta te, also displaying a
fine performance for the Lady Pi-
rates, finished the match with 20
kills, two service aces, and one
block assists.
pi(KScms nvnHSri
BLAZE Of
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An NBA-tutored
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handed pitchc
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Scanda i
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They are ii �
despite the li
Ben Johnson dr
rivalries rev up a
shine
America i
in for what th� .
Gold ti
landed six r
round, hen
acquai:
brawlers.
Ron i
of the swifl
poised tog
in the
after i
ord Wedi
round heat in
world s � �
has ap I
l.vv, -
mel .
ach beat
dredths I
19.75 s
a silver
jump and
Johnson's .
is ha �
"Th
that
"Anur
twoAmeri ti
now tv,
200. Ti
the ' 5
For L
his fru
mentor
u
for nu
made the d
trained
for this ra
Steve
Carl aisi
in the 4
ord-holding
Reynolds and
year-ol I
on the US brad
43.87
sec nd
Cross (
has goo
By MIK1
A new c
rtingwe a
performa:
teams. The n
behind Cita I
tist and V
Matt S
was ECU'sl -
(10th, 28
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forman - .
Schweitzei I
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Finishi: .
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3&07) and
(24th
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The EC! �
make heads
performances
in second bt
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Top Twentj
I. Miami, Ha
: i a a
3. Southern
4. Auburn
3 Notre Dame
o. Florida
7. West Virginia i
8. South Carolina
9. Nebraska
10. Oklahoma
II. Clemson
12. Alabama
i3. Oklahoma State
14. LSU
15. Georgia
16. Washington
17. Florida
18. Wyoming
19. Michigan
20. Oregon





r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29, 1988 19
EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week - (5-5)
Overall - (24-15)
ECU
N.C. State
Duke
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
Florida
Syracuse
Michigan
Oklahoma
ur" Hiack Tec $13.75
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'
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AY, OCTOBER 4
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IENDENHALL
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RMATION DESK
Lewis defeated by his pupil
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -
An NBA-tutored Soviet basket-
ball team teaches the United
states a lesson, Carl Lewis' dis-
ciple beats the master, and one-
handed pitcher Jim Abbott gives
the world a study in courage and
achievement.
the high altitude of Mexico City in since 1974, when the United States
1968. Reynolds won the silver and captured the World Champion-
Lewis' UCLA teammate, Danny ships.
Everett, took the bronze. Tino Martinez homered twice
In a renewal of an old and and drove in four runs, and Ab-
bitter rivalry, the Soviet and bott � already an American suc-
American basketball teams took cess story � showed the world tajal and Romallis Ellis assured
the court against each other for that a disability doesn't have to be themselves of at least bronze
draft last June, had pitched three
strong innings in a brief Olympic
outing last week.
Americans Kennedy McKin-
ney, Kenneth Gould, Ray Mercer,
Andrew Maynard, Michael Car-
Scandal aside, sports are alive the first time since the disputed disabling.
and well at the Olympic Games.
They are, in fact, thriving,
despite the lingering gloom of the
Bon Johnson drug affair, as old
rivalries rev up and young stars
shine.
American boxers are digging
in for what they call "Operation
Cold an assault that has so far
gold medal game won in the final Abbott, the 1987 Sullivan
seconds by the Soviets at the 1972 Award winner and a high selec-
Munich Games. tion in the major league draft de-
All the players this time were spite having been born without a
children when that last game was right hand, struck out four and
held, but so much was made of it walked three while also playing
going into the Olympics it seemed superbly in the field,
there was some kind of grudge to He ran into trouble in the
settle for the only American loss sixth, when Japan parlayed two
medals by winning their quarter-
final fights.
British two-time decathlon
champion Daley Thompson is
also going after gold. He led after
three events � the 100, shot put
and long jump � but dropped to
third by the end of the first day of
the two-day competition.
Christian Schenk of East Ger-
many set an Olympic record for
landed six fighters in the medal in Olympic history. hits and two walks into a pair of
round, where they will renew an The only thing settled was runs to pull to within 4-3. But he the decathlon high jump by clear-
acquaintance with several Soviet that now there are two blotches on settled down and shut out the ,ng 7 feet, 5 14 inches and took
brawlers. the otherwise perfect U.S. Olym- Japanese the rest of the way. the lead with 4,470 points. Th-
Florence Griffith Joyner, she pic hoops record after an 82-76 Abbott, a two-time All- ompson, with4,332 points, trailed
of the swift legs and long nails, is semifinal victory by the Soviets. American at Michigan who was
poised to go after her second gold
in the women's 200-meter dash
alter smashing the Olympic rec-
ord Wednesday in her second-
round heat in 21.76 seconds. The
world's fastest woman already
has a gold in the 100.
Lewis' solid gold Games
melted when teammate Joe DeLo-
ach beat him by four one-hun-
dred ths of a second with a lime of
19.75 seconds in the 200. But with
a silver and two golds in the long
The Soviets thoroughly taken by the California Angels as
the eighth player selected in the
outhustled and outmuscled the
Americans, beating them fair and
square and leaving no room for
controversy.
Soviet coach Alexander
Gomelski thanked U.S. pro and
college basketball teams for help-
ing his players beat the United
States.
"This is very good prepara-
tion Gomelski. "United States
basketball and NBA basketball
Schenk and Christian Plaziat of
France, who had 4,375 points.
jump and 100, the latter thanks to helps my country. I am very
happy, and thank you United
States basketball
U.S. coach John Thompson,
who had criticized the Portland
Trail Blazers of the NBA for help-
ing Soviet center Arvydas
Sabonis recover from an Achilles'
tendon injury, steered away from
that issue afterward.
"Several NBA teams and
franchises helped us, too he
said.
On the baseball diamond,
though, the Americans avenged
another defeat that had bruised
the national ego in the 1984 Los
Angeles Games. Japan beat the
United States 6-3 in the 1984 title
game,but this time the Americans
returned the favor, 5-3.
It was the final time for base-
ball as an Olympic demonstration
sport; America's Pasttime be-
comes a fully recognized Olympic
trfn
Johnson's disqualification, Lewis
is happy.
'This is a tremendous thing
that's happened he said.
"Americans sweep the long jump,
two Americans win in the 100 and
now two Americans win in the
21X1 The best thing about it is that
the U.S. can do well
For DeLoach, there was no
greater satisfaction than beating
his friend, training partner and
mentor.
"Carl has been the inspiration
for me DeLoach said. "He's
made the difference for me. We
trained harder than we ever have
for this race
Steve Lewis, no relation to
Carl, also led an American sweep
in the 400, upsetting world rec-
ord-holding teammate Butch
Reynolds and barely missing a 20-
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Leadership EaceUenee Starts Here
ear-old Olympic mark.
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on the U.S. track team, won in 1992.
43.87 seconds, one-hundredth of a It also marked the first time a
second off Lee Evans' record in U.S. team has won a global title
Cross Country team
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A new course and great run-
ning weather produced some fine
performances from both ECU
teams. The men finished second
behind C.tadel and ahead of Bap- 2H�f kn�W that she
tist and Pembroke. real by letting her running do
Matt Schweitzer (5th, 27:53)
was ECU'S top gun. Vines Wilson
(10th, 28:22) and Jim Layton (13th,
28:47) turned in two gutsy per-
formances and could challenge
Schweitzer for the "Top Gun"
position in the near future.
Finishing out the top five
were Russell Williams (23rd,
30:07) and Peter Sengenberger
(24th, 30:26). If injuries can be
avoided the ECU men should
continue to surprise its competi-
tion.
Ihe ECU women continue to
make heads turn with their fine
performances. The women came
in second behind N.C. State and
ahead of Coastal, UNC-W and
Baptist.
Even though the course was
changed during the race, causing
confusion and a shortened course,
that didn't phase the ECU
women. The women had come to
run and that's exactly what they
did. Ann Marie Welch (3rd, 16:36)
was ECU'S top finisher and is let-
for
by letting her running do the
talking. Kim Griffiths (12th, 18:25)
and Dawn Sweeney (14th, 18:34)
turned in solid performances. Jen
Hough (19th, 19:24) and Dawn
Tillson (21st, 19:34) rapped up the
top five.
The men and women had last
weekend off and have been pre-
paring for the Lynchburg Invita-
tional.
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10. Oklahoma2-1-0
11. Clemson3-1-0
12. Alabama2-0-0
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14. LSU2-1-0
15. Georgia3-1-0
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19. Michigan1-2-0
20. Oregon� 0-0
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1
T
Si
20
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 29,1988
NBC in hot water withT-shirt proposal
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -
NBC, which had already angered
Koreans with its Olympic cover-
age, is in more hot water over a
boxing T-shirt design that many
Koreans find offensive.
At least two Korean newspa-
pers, including the country's larg-
est, printed pictures of the design
Wednesday, prompting a flood of
protest calls to the Korean Broad-
casting System, host network for
the Games.
NBC held a news conference
for the Korean media to apologize
and explain that the network
workers who ordered theT- shirts
did not mean to offend anyone.
But a network spokesman said
that because of translation prob-
lems and cultural differences,
"they didn't understand what we
were talking about
The design for the front of the
T-shirts � which were never
made � featured the words
"We're Boxing" on the top of the
NBC logo and the slang expres-
sion "We're Bad below the logo.
The design for the back of the
shirts had the phrase "Chaos Tour
'88" above a sketch of two fighters
superimposed on the Korean flag.
"XXTVth Olympiad" was written
below the flag.
Writing on the Korean flag is
considered defamation, and the
use of the phrase "We're Bad"
Kansas first of
final four teams
to play on NBC
NEW YORK (AP) � Defend-
ing national champion Kansas
takes on last year's Atlantic 10
champion Temple on Dec. 10 to
kick off NBC's college basketball
coverage for 1988-89, the network
announced Wednesday.
Kansas will be the first of the
1988 NCAA Final Four teams to
appear on the network, with
Oklahoma, Duke and Arizona
appearing in subsequent weeks.
independent Notre Dame leads
all teams with fivenetworkgames
and NBC also will cover nine At-
lantic Coast Conference games in
its 19-game slate.
Kansas defends its national
championship without Coach
Larry Brown and NBA draftee
Danny Manning, while Temple�
which lost its first game last year
during the NCAA tournament �
returns high-scoring sophomore
guard Mark Macon. The game
will be played in Atlantic City,
N.J.
Oklahoma, loser to Kansas in
the NCAA final, hosts the Univer-
sity of North Carolina-Charlotte
on Jan. 14; Duke facesNotre Dame
in South Bend, Ind on Feb. 5; and
the Blue Devils meet Arizona in
the Meadowlands on Feb. 26.
ACC coverage begins on Jan.
21 with North Carolina State and
North Carolina and it ends with
the ACC championship game at
the Omni on March 12.
was interpreted as a slander
against the Korean people even
though it was meant to be a boast-
ful reference to the U.S. boxing
team.
"We tried to explain to the
Korean media that 'bad' is an
American, urban, black expres-
sion meaning good, but they just
laughed. They didn't understand
us said NBC's Ed Markey, one
of two network spokesmen who
attended the news conference.
"Chaos Tour W appeared to
refer to the wild events that have
taken place at the Olympic boxing
venue, including the attack on a
referee by Koreans angry over the
loss of one of their countrymen.
NBC's coverage of the attack
on referee Keith Walker infuri-
ated many Koreans, who felt the
network was portraying the
country in a negative light.
At the news conference, at-
tended by about 40 Korean jour-
nalists, NBC issued a statement
apologizing to the Korean people.
"No one working for NBC
intended to offend Korea or Kore-
ans the statement said. "NBC
realizes that the proposed slogans
could be misinterpreted, and
NBC understands that any people
would be upset when their flag is
defaced.
"The offensive T-shirts, de-
signed by a group of people work-
ing inoneof our production areas,
were not approved by NBC
Sports. NBC executives were
upset by the T-shirts and ordered
that they not be made
The newspapers that ran pic-
tures of the T-shirt design, Dong-
A Ilbo and Chung-Ang llbo, also
carried stories on the subject.
They said a group of NBC work-
ers went to a Korean clothing
shop and ordered 48 of the shirts,
but the shop owner refused to
make them because he found
them offensive.
The newspapers said the
shop owner, identified as Mr.
Jong, then called and told them
about the design.
"The design that these people
ordered implies that the entire
Korean people are responsible for
all the confusion which has hap-
pened during the boxing, and
therefore I refused to make
them Mr. Jong told Dong-A
Ilbo.
heesy Hous
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MEASURE UP TO THE





Title
The East Carolinian, September 29, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 29, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.629
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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