The East Carolinian, September 27, 1988






Coming Thursday:
The story concerning the format change in the 88
lomecoming contest.
Features:
A review of the two up coming Monty Python
movies to be shown at Hendrix Theatre, see page 7.
Sports:
Despite 538 total yards in offense, the Pirates drop to
1-3 against Southern Mississippi, see page 10.
m

Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 22
Tuesday September 27,1988
Greenville, NC
12 Tages
Circulation 12,000
Nursing graduates post low exam scores
By JOE HARRIS
News Editor
The ECU School of Nursing
class which graduated in Mav of
1988, posted the lowest test scores
in the UNC System on the N.C.
nursing exam.
According to figures released
by the North Carolina Board of
Nursing, 73 ECU graduates took
the exam and 43, or 59 percent
passed.
These figures do not include
the 17 graduates who took the
exam out-of-state. Fifteen oi the
17 who took the exam in states
other than N.C, had acceptable
scores.
Oi all 1,422 N.C nursing
graduates who took the exam in
1988, 85 percent oi first time ex-
aminees passed.
The examination, which is
given each Feb. and July, is re-
quired by the state to be a certified
nurse.
According to The Daily Reflec-
tor, the state Board oi Nursing re-
quires schools to post a 60 percent
passing rate for anv single exam
and a 70 percent passing rate over
any three-year period. Schools
that fail to meet that standard are
automatically reviewed by a team
of Board of Nursing officials.
Emilie Hcnning, dean of the
ECU School of Nursing, said, "We
are not at all happy about these
scores. Right now we are review-
ing our curriculum and looking
for some type of indicating fac-
tors
She said the exam taken by
the last class of graduates was a
new one and had an unofficial
failure rate oi 16.4 percent, as
compared to nine percent failure
rate of the old exam.
Henning also said the nurs-
ing school has established a task
force to look at all the aspects of
the program; from the ability of
the new student entering nursing
to possible outside influences.
"We offered a readiness diag-
nostic test which we felt gave the
students an indicator of what is to
be expected on the exam and gave
us a look at who might pass and
fail. Also we (the nursing faculty)
urged all students to attend re-
view courses, study for the exam
and not to take it lightly said
Henning.
The nursing department
keeps up with its graduates by
mailing surveys to check prog-
ress with jobs, etc. This year, the
surveys will be conducted by
phone and the questions will con-
centrate on the study habits of
those who took the exam.
"The survey will ask ques-
tions like, 'how much did you
study, what did you study and
what outside influences were
affecting during the exam or
studying?' " said Henning. She
also noted the exam is given in
July and Feb.
"Many students find it hard
to study after they have come
straight out of school. The period
after graduation is a big time in
life, there is so much going on, it's
tough to start studying again
Henning said.
Henning said in her 13 years
as the dean of nursing, she has
never seen scores like the ones
received on this year's exam. Ac-
cording to her, the scores go
against all trend data, which
stated there should have only
been a six percent rate of failure.
She said ECU nursing gradu-
ates have always been well re-
ceived at the professional level
and does not think this year's
scores will influence the hiring
process.
"We are going to offer assis-
tance to those who didn't pass, if
they want it. You are allowed to
take the exam as many times as
you want during a specified pe-
riod of time, after that, you have to
go back and repeat some of the re-
quired courses said Henning.
Henning said, "This problem
is alarming and we're doing eve-
rything to find solutions. Right
now we just don't understand the
reason why. We are very con-
cerned
Progress continues oh the Mendenhall Student Center. Beware of -the ditch running parallel with
the walk leading to the Student Bank (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab).
Numbers and percentages of
other nursing graduates in the
UNC system were as follows:
UNC Chapel Hill, 84 examinees,
88 percent pass rate; UNC Greens-
boro, 64 examinees, 89 percent
pass rate; UNC Wilmington, 20
examinees, 95 percent pass rate;
UNC Charlotte, 73 examinees, 84
percent pass rate; Winston Salem
State university, 11 examinees, 64
percent pass rate; Western Caro-
lina University, 42 examinees, 67
percent pass rate.
N.C. Central and N.C. A.&T.
posted the highest examination
grades in the state. Central had 14
people take the exam with a 93
percent pass rate while A.&T. had
eight students take the test and all
pass.
Co-op offers jobs, credit, experience and pay
By LYNN JOYNER
Staff Writer
The ECU Co-op program has
been in operation since 1975 and
last year placed about 1500 stu-
dents in career-related, paying
jobs.
Bill Barrett, co-op coordina-
tor, explained the advantages of
working in a co-op job, "There is
the opportunity to get experience
related to your major, and we do
provide paid employment unlike
internships that don't pay. There
is also the possibility of getting
academic credit for some majors.
The experience always looks
good on your resume, and there is
a possibility of having that job
when you graduate
The three ways a student can
co-op are through alternating
positions, parallel positions, and
summer positions.
In the alternating positions, a
student works full time for an
employer and does not go to
school. Typically, a student will
work more than one sei ester in
this situation. In the paro el posi-
tion, a student works part time
(10-20 hours per week) while at-
tending school. In the summer
position, a student works full
time only during the summer.
Some major corporations stu-
dents have worked for include
Northern Telecom, Burroughs
Wellcome, Duke Power, Purdue,
Inc and Wachovia Bank. Stu-
dents have also worked for the
state and federal government,
national institutes of health, and
Disney World. Students may be
placed in jobs in Greenville as
well as other parts of the state and
country. Barrett said students
have been placed from Maine, to
Horida, to Colorado.
Barrett said, "I think students
come back really enthused about
their curriculum. They find out
what they are learning really does
have a place in the real world
Usually juniors and seniors
are placed in jobs with large com-
panies, but there are many jobs
that do not require knowledge in
a particular major that are open
for freshmen and sophomores.
"We encourage students to get
involved as soon as possible. I
even encourage freshmen Bar-
rett said.
Barrett said after being as-
signed a coordinator, a student
should check by the co-op office
once or twice a month because of
varying application deadlines for
certain jobs. A resume, transcript,
and co-op application are also
required of the student, and the
co-op office will provide assis-
tance, if needed, to write a res-
ume.
Barrett said the bulletin board
outside the co-op office has job
positions posted on it that are
available at any given time, but
the coordinator has a list of those
that are not posted and are com-
ing up.
Barrett suggested to get in-
volved in the co-op program, a
student should pick up an appli-
cation at the co-op office, and then
attend one of the seminars held on
Mondays and Thursdays. The
office is located in room 2300-232
of the General Classroom Build-
ing and is open from 8 a.m. until 5
p.m. Monday through Fridav.
Dates and times for the co-op
seminars are listed on the Student
Events calendar or in The East
Carolinian.
Hargett, Thomas win elections
despite low voter participation
Students take advantage of the remaining warm afternoons. The shorts and short sleeves will soon
be replaced by jeans and sweaters (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab).
By REID PARKER
Stiff Writer
Melissa Hargett and Allan
Thomas were declared the win-
ners Wednesday night, Sept 21, in
theSG A run-off election for fresh-
man and sophomore class presi-
dent.
In the run-off for freshman
class president, Melissa Hargett
topped her opponent, Arielle
Sturz, with 55 percent of the vote.
A total of 73 freshmen voted in
Wednesdays election.
Allan Thomas received 67
percent of the sophomore vote,
enough to defeat Scott Jones for
the presidential seat. Eighty-six
sophomores voted in the contest.
Student turn-out for the SG A
election was poor.
Paul Puckett, chairman of the
elections committee, said, 'Turn-
out was again horrible. But, I re-
ally think, a lot of it had to do with
the students not knowing who
was on the ballot. I'm apalled that
only 73 freshmen and 86 sopho-
mores, out of all the thousands of
students, chose who their presi-
dent would be
Voters were not the only ones
who did not turn out for the elec-
tion. The vote count was sched-
uled for 7 p.m. Wednesday night,
though the voting began early, no
candidates, or anyone associated
with the four campaigns, came by
to learn the results of the initial
vote count which ended at 7:20.
A mandatory meeting was
scheduled at 5 p.m. Monday night
for all newly-elected representa-
tives at room 221 in Mendenhall.
The Elections Committee is
made up each term of represcnta- committee was headed by Paul
tives from various organizations Puckett who tallied the votes and
around campus. This term's declared the winners.
WZMB temporarily silenced
By SEAN HERRING
Staff Writer
When students turn their radio
dials to WZMB 91, they will be
tuning into static, for the next few
days.
WZMB, ECU's campus radio
station signed off of the air at 3:15
a.m. Saturday, after having fre-
quency trouble.
WZMB General Manager Keith
Powe said that, "It's a component
in our transmitter that went bad,
called an exciter. The exciter al-
lows us (WZMB) to stay on fre-
quency
Powe said that the exciter is
about the size of an f.m. receiver
that can be purchased for a stereo
system.
"It is going to take a couple of
days to get the exciter fixed. Our
engineer is out of town, and he
will be back on Sunday. So, we are
sending the exciter out to another
company
Powe held a meeting yesterday
for the staff, in which he informed
them that even though the station
is not on the airwaves, they will be
helping to reorganize it and make
improvements.
"We plan to clean everything in
the station, so that everything is
neat Powe said.
"Office hours will be kept be all
staff members, and we still take
phone calls from all businesses
and WZMB listeners. We are still
functioning as a radio station, we
are just not on the air right now, he
said
According to Powe, a image
change for WZMB should come
about by the end of this week.
"We do not plan to let this inci-
dent effect the way that we feel
about the station. It was some-
thing that could not be helped, so
we plan to do some productive
things with the time, such as some
minor repairs
"By sign on time at 5:45 a.m.
Saturday, we plan to come on
with a new liner, changing the old
one which is ' the unique differ-
ence with Z 91 So our audience
should listen for the new liner.
Also, we plan to return with better
sound qualitv
Powe stated that funding
which is donated to the station for
grant announcements and pro-
gram spots will not be lost, be-
cause the station is out of commis-
sion for a week.
"The station being down is not
something that WZMB has not ex-
perienced. Over the summer
there is a two week closing of the
station between second summer
session and the fall semester,
Powe said.
"The only way that it effects us
is that, it throws us a week behind
in our grant announcements and
See PROBLEMS, page 3





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27.1988
ECU Police have lost and found
Lost and found articles;
where do you go on campus to
find them?
Most do not know that there
is a place where lost and found
property can be recovered. The
place is ECU Public Safetv office
located at 609 E. 10th Street.
Lost and found property
usually finds its way to the cam-
pus police and the list of items is
usuallv long each semester.
A lot of students, staff, faculty
and visitors usually think that if
they lost or misplaced something,
it's gone forever. That may be the
case sometimes, but its worth the
time to check at lost and found.
Don't give up, check it out.
The following is a list of items
presently stored at the Public
Safety Police office: Glasses and
glasses cases of all kinds, contact
lens and cases, watches (mens &
womens), wallets, checkbooks,
purses, pocketbooks, knapsacks
with books, etc ladies rings, tote
bags and luggage, jackets and
vests, various text books, scarfs,
keys and key rings and other
miscellaneous articles of value.
These items are kept for a
period of 90 days and then are
disposed of according to law.
You never know if its your
lost and found property if you
don't check it out. If you've lost or
misplaced an article of value,
check by campus police. If it has
not been turned in, they will be
glad to log your missing item and
notify you if it turns up.
To claim your item, it will be
necessary for you to be able to de-
scribe it in some detail. However,
there are items turned in with
people's name etc. on them. But
for some reason they can no t be lo-
cated or contacted. So go on by,
maybe you'll get lucky with your
lost, misplaced, or possibly unre-
portcd or stolen item.
First female, Catholic bishop elected
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - The
Rev. Barbara C. Harris savs her
election as the first woman
bishop in the Anglican
Communion's 450-year history
offers new hope to those who've
felt alienated and ignored bv thi
Episcopal Church.
"A fresh wind is blowing
across this church of ours Ms.
Harris said Sunday in her ser-
mon at the Church of the Advo-
cate, where she serves as interim
rector.
Tne Episcooal Church is at-
tempting to include everyone in
the mainstream "oi God's jus-
tice, grace, brotherhood and sis-
terhood the black cleric told a
congregation of 50.
Pointing to the Rev. Jesse
Jackson's "Rainbow Coalition
reaching across color and sexual
lines, she said the church's ac-
tion gives "new hopeand new
vision to hundreds of thou-
sands" who have felt left out of
the denomination.
Ms. Harris, a 58-year-old for-
mer public relations executive,
was elected Saturday to the po-
sition oi suffragan, or assistant,
bishop for the eastern Massa-
chusetts diocese. The diocese,
which includes Boston, is the
nation's largest in both geogra-
phy and population.
However, the third-ranking
prelate in the Church of Enoland
said Sunday he will refuse to
recognize Ms. Harris or any
other woman bishop.
"I have already stated pub-
licly that I would not beable to
be in communion with a woman
so elected and consecrated
said the Rt. Rev. Graham Le-
onard, bishop of London.
Bishops at a world Anglican
conference this summer ap-
proved a resolution saying they
would respect and remain in fel-
lowship with churches that
have women priests and bish-
ops, even if they disagree with
their principles.
Several appointments earlier
this year show the church is
changing, said Ms. Harris. Two
black priests were elected coad-
jutor bishops, who are first in
line to succeed their presiding
bishops, without first serving as
assistants.
One, the Rev. Herbert Tho-
moson Jr was installed in Cin-
cinnati on Saturday as the first
black bishop of the Episcopal
Diocese of Southern Ohio.
Ms. Harris told the congrega-
tion her election "is of signifi-
cance to the Episcopal Church in
the United States and to the
worldwide Anglican Commun-
ion
The Rev. Paul Washington,
retired pastor of the Church of
the Advocate, said Sunday that
Ms. Harris' election will allow
other qualified women to move
into bishop positions.
The Episcopal Church is one
of 27 self-governing church comprise the Anglican Com-
bodies in 164 countries that munion.
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Bush
(( PS) � "I h
around the country savin
want to be known as the '
tion president Q
said during a campaign �
California this summer
son is simple: Opportui
hat America is all
education is the key 1 i
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An educated v rt
believes, is the ke to a pi
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workforce, he r n is
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forth ircl
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1 ducari n would
William Bennett.
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Continued fr
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27,1988 3
UT
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Bush says opportunity is key
r
(CPS) � "1 have been going
around the country saying that I
want to be known as the 'educa-
tion president George Bush
said during a campaign stop in
California this summer. "The rea-
son is simple: Opportunity is
what America is all about, and
education is the key to opportu-
nity
An educated workforce, Bush
believes, is the key to a prosper-
ous economy. To prepare that
workforce, he promises more stu-
dent aid, plans to help families
save for thci r children's education
and programs to bring more mi-
nority students to campuses.
He says his U.S. Dept. of
Education would avoid the con-
frontational style of President
Reagan's Education Dept. under
William Bennett.
And while all that might
sound very attractive toa national
college community buffeted by
eight years of budget cuts and
White House criticism, a lot of
people in higher education think
George Bush is full of bunk.
Bush "will do whatever his
advisors tell him to do to get
elected. Hell, it's politics said
Dr. Robert Clodius of the Na-
tional Association of State Uni-
versities and Land Grant Col-
leges.
While Dr. AimsMcGuincssof
the Education Commission of the
States thinks "you can take the
vice president at h word: he
wants to be the education presi-
dent he wonders whether Bush
would take the political heat of
funding college programs at the
expense of, say, defense.
"Whoever is elected presi-
dent has to face three major prob-
lems McGuiness said. "They
will have to deal with the budget
and trade deficits, the high prior-
ity placed on defense spending
and the commitment to entitle-
ments for older people, such as
Social Security
He can't do anything (about
education) if he doesn't address
those problems first
McGuiness, Cu Jius and
other education professionals
note Bush offered public support
for � and certainly no public re-
sistance to � the Reagan
administration's budgetary at-
tacks on federal college funding.
But now the vice president
calls for maintaining work-study,
the still-unproven income-contin-
gent loans program and Pell
Grants for low-income students.
For middle-class students,
the vice-president, like his Demo-
cratic opponent, Gov. Michael
Dukakis, proposes creating a Col-
lege Savings Bond. The bond
would be similar to U.S. Savings
Bonds, except that interest earned
would be tax-free if the bond is
applied to college expenses.
Helping students pay for col-
lege should be "one of our highest
priorities in the 1990s Bush says.
'The only thing he's wedded
to is the college savings bond
plan said Becky Timmons of the
American Council on Education
(ACE). "It's something we're in-
terested in. It could be an impor-
tant vehicle for the middle class.
But Bush has not laid out concrete
plans for the poor
"He's ignoring a whole sector
of the population Janet Licber-
man of the United States Student
Association (USSA) said.
The vice president, a Yale
grad, does have a long record of
supporting black colleges. Many
black college presidents credit
Bush with helping their institu-
tions secure federal grants.
Bush, too, has been a long-
time supporter of the United
Negro College Fund, donating
half the royalties he receives from
his autobiography "Looking For-
ward" to the fund.
While a Texas congressman
from 1967 to 1970, Bush did vote
for the major education funding
bills that arose.
Education, in fact, is one
arena where Bush appears eager
to distance himself from the Re-
agan administration, but many
campus denizens, unrepentedly
resentful of Reagan, wonder
where he was when they needed
him.
'The question is, where has
he been for the last eight years?"
asked Michael Edwards of the
National Education Association.
"For a lot of people, it is going to
take some convincing, and
they're going to doubt his credi-
bility
But Terrel Bell, President
Reagan's first Education secre-
tary, noting vice presidents are
supposed to play subservient
roles, didn't "think it's fair to say
the vice president should be re-
sponsible for the president's poli-
cies
Although Bush avoided criti-
cizing the Reagan
administration's education poli-
cies in public, Bell said, he did so
often during cabinet meetings.
"1 believe he will continue to
emphasize the value of education
for all people said Bush advisor
Shirley Gordon, president of
Washington's Highline Commu-
nity College.
"just the phrase 'education
president' indicates he wants to
give education a higher priority, a
different emphasis than we've
seen under President Reagan
said Dr. Richard Rosser of the Na-
tional Association of Independ-
ent Colleges and Universities.
And even Bush skeptics are
delighted the vice president is
paying attention to them, meeting
with them and including them in
his speeches.
"That he speaks to education
is a healthy sign said Lieberman
of the USSA, perhaps one of the
Reagan administration's most
outspoken education critics.
"I'm delighted he's put so
much attention on education
added Prof. Gloria Horn of
California's Mission College,
another Bush advisor. "1 think
Bush will work better with educa-
tion than Bennett has
Still, the ACE's Timmons
cautioned all the good intentions
in the world won't count without
cash.
The vice president's proposal
to freeze federal spending for one
year to reduce the budget deficit,
she maintained, "would con-
strain the prospects of doing any-
thing for education that's current
and vital
"The real gutsy stuff is what
his priorities will be when it
comes to budget requests Clo-
dius said. "It's well nigh impos-
sible to determine what Bush will
mean for higher education when
you think about it in those terms
'The next president must be
ready to make education at least
as important as national defense
said Rosscr. "If he doesn't, we'll
continue to have problems with
education.
"
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Problem plagues student radio station
Continued from page 1
program spots. We will still cover
our engagements this week, but
they won't be live when they are
aired said Powe.
"It is a disappointment, because
w c� rerc -jtis � getting some more
recognition by a lot of people who
did not know who WZMB is, or
what it stands for he said.
" i he appearances the station has
made in the last couple of weeks
and the remote reportings, is fi-
nally building up to were we, at
WZMB, wantit,asfarasacampus
medium and a Greenville
mediumhe added.
Even though
quency is down,
WZMB's fre-
the staff has
taken a good-natured look at the
incident.
Powe said that there is a joke
out that there is a little gremlin
going around,Jo everybody, jra?
dio, so no one can pick up WZMB.
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Governor of North Carolina
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First District
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I
otlft fEaat (Earnltman
PETE FERNALD, CmntMam
Chip Carter, M��rM �
James F.J. McKee, p� a
Joe Harris, N��Mtor
Doug Johnson, span, un
Tim Hampton, f u
Michelle England, era m�i�
Debbie Stevens, s�r�y
JEFF PARKER��-�
TOM FURR,Ci�HMMM.rr
Susan Howell, mm. m�
John W. Medlin, m m
Mac Clark, ��.�m�
September 27.1988
OPINION
Page 4
Concerts
Can we afford to keep up with UNC?
The pitiful turnout at theEU
concert, and the mishandling of the
promotional aspects of the show last
Sunday night, underscored the fact
that ECU isn't ready to start compe-
ting with Chapel Hill for cultural
superiority just yet. It also brings to
light some of the other problems
ECU'S Student Union has to deal
with when putting on a major con-
cert for students. While some of this
is due to factors such as space, band
availability, publicity and funding,
much of it can be attributed to stu-
dent apathy.
Many students are not even
aware of the Student Union, the
student organization that plans and
organizes entertainment through-
out the school year. Thus, they con-
tribute no input towards the band,
movie or other entertainment selec-
tion process, and have no reason to
complain if their favorite artist
passes Greenville by to play Duke or
UNC.
However, the Student Union
needs to take some more steps to-
ward involving students, and find-
ing out who they really want to see.
For example, look at the past few
semesters.
Fair T987 brought the Fixx and
Anita Baker to our campus. The Fixx
has been on a downward slide in
their career ever since their big hit of
several years ago, "One Thing Leads
to Another
Baker is a rising star with several
hit singles to her credit � but only
one album. Of the two artists, Baker
was by far the better choice eco-
nomically and aesthetically, but the
money used for the Fixx show
should have been saved for a later
date.
Spring brought a no-risk, cult
figure in Jimmy Buffett. Buffet has
such a large following on college
campuses that getting him here was
not a move anyone had to think hard
about. Next month will bring UB40,
a pop-reggae band whose old single
"Red Red Wine" is currently being
revived on the pop charts.
And of course, there was last
week's EU. While scheduling
groups like EU is a bold move to try
and bring new kinds of music to the
eastern part of the state, more pub-
licity was needed to make it the
success it could have been.
However, none of these artists
have a broad spectrum appeal.
While no one is suggesting that only
bands with the largest common
denominator be signed, perhaps the
idea of major concerts should be
changed to many minor concerts to
please punk, pop, metal, rap blues,
country and jazz fans.
Instead of spending big money
to sign big groups that only fractions
of the student population will see,
why not plan on many concerts at
lower prices that would enable stu-
dents to experience a variety of
genres.
Chapel Hill's Dean Dome can
afford the bigger names, and can
absorb the losses when only half the
arena is filled as was the case with
their Bob Dylan show. Minges isn't
the Dean Dome and there's no rea-
son to try and convert it now.
The ECU Parrots ?
To the editor,
I'm in agreement with Professor
E. Webber's letter suggesting a
change in the name of our school's
mascot to something "less aggres-
sive I have a suggestion that might
please her and even be a realistic al-
ternative. Let's change our name to
the ECU Parrots!
When we hear EOU students and
supporters yell "Go Pirates" it al-
ways sounds like "Go Parrots If we
listen closely, we can hear that most
eastern North Carolinians indeed
yell "Parrots" when they attempt to
yell "Pirates This change would
necessitate only a minor orthrogra-
phic ohange due to the similar man-
ner in which both words are spelled.
Finally, 1 feel the change to be a
realistic option. If one consults a
dictionary, one observes a meaning
of "Parrot" to be: "One who mind-
lessly imitates words or actions of
another Lots of ECU supporters
and students behave as if their cen-
tral nervoussystems belong to Par-
rots, not Pirates. Go Parrots!
Hal J. Daniel III, Professor
Speech, Language and Audi-
tory Pathology
Adjunct Professor, Anthropol-
ogy
Adjunct Professor, Biology
Liberal hypocrisy
To the editor:
Arnie Cullipher's letter in
Tuesday's paper was just the kind of
response I expected to my evaluation
of liberal hypocrisy which appeared
Letter labeled "uninformed diatribe
a week earlier.
Instead of logically and intelli-
gently rebutting my letter, Mr. Cul-
lipher engaged in puerile, hackneyed
name-calling. He sarcastically re-
ferred to me as "King He compared
me to Ed Meese.
He claimed that I "deserve to be
exiled to a land where opinions are
enforced He openly stated, "I am
condeming Justin Sturz He
branded me as a "pompus, self-pro-
claimed authority on Democracy"
that "makes my blood boil
He accused me of writing "more-
informed-than-thou drivel He ridi-
culed my beliefs as "bitching" and
only half-jokingly implied I want to
put all of those who ideologically
differ from me in "concentration
camps in Arizona
In short, Mr. Cullipher's letter
was unadulterated, preposterous,
McCarthyish paranoia. I can assure
my fellow students at ECU that not
only do more than a few of my friends
subscribe to the liberal viewpoint,
but that I have NO desire to censor
their opinions, "condemn" them, or
brand them as "pompus, bitching"
persons who "deserve to be exiled"
and who belong in "concentration
camps
The beliefs that I expressed in my
letter are the result of large amounts
of reading and listening to both sides
on each issue I raised. I can assure
everyone that my beliefs are based on
logical, documented facts and obser-
vationsof the world around me, NOT
some self-righteous belief that I
ucicvely possess some "divine inner
light" which elevates me to the status
of a "self-proclaimed authority on
Democracy
Recent polls indicate that a large
majority of the American people
subscribe to the conservative point-
of-view (40 as opposed to 18 who
are self-described liberals). Indeed,
the word "liberal" is such a dirty
word in politics today that Mike
Dukakis is doing everything he can
to avoid r�eing truthfully labeled one.
Liberalism has been such a tre-
mendous failure in so many areas of
American life that most Americans
have to be deceived into voting for a
liberal � a basic assumption of those
who wrote the bland, issueless,
spineless Democratic Party Platform
of 1988. In other words, those who
drafted the Democratic platform
tried to avoid doing just what I did:
stating in clear, unambiguous lan-
guage my sincerely-researched and
heart-felt beliefs.
One reason I wrote my "liberal
dictionary" was to stir up some de-
bate on this page. If Mr. Cullipher or
anyone else can logically rebut any-
thing I said in my letter, let them go
ahead and do it! I will be more that
happy to listen to their viewpoint,
and if they convince me that my be-
liefs are incorrect and unfounded,
well then by golly I'll change my
beliefs! This has always been my
policy in formulating my political
ideology.
And, contrary to what Mr. Cul-
lipher may believe, there are millions
of Americans, including many on
this campus, who agree with me on
the issues. Indeed, the statistical evi-
dence seems to indicate that a major-
ity of Americans agree with me.
I harbor no resentment against
Mr. Cullipher or anyone else with
whom I disagree, nor will I stoop to
his level and engage in personal at-
tacks.
My quarrel is with the entire lib-
eral ideology and its applications, not
any particular person. 1 trust Mr.
Cullipher will have the decency to
respect my willingness to stand up
for and unabashedly present my be-
liefs for the scrutiny of others.
Justin Sturz,
Senior
EnglishJournalism
To the editor:
To the ECU Chairman for Bush
88:
This letter is in response to Bobby
Hall's slanderous acusations to-
wards the Democratic party. It's
obvious Mr. Hall's letter is an
uninformed diatribe that is a laugh-
ing stock to literate voters.
Mr. Hall, when Jimmy Carter
became president, unemployment,
inflation, and interest rates did soar
to an all time high. There were 52
Americans being held hostage by
Iranian madmen. Do you know why?
During Carter's administration the
country was suffering through a seri-
ous oil crises. Neither the govern-
ment nor the public could do any-
thing about the crisis. This crisis and
not Carter's failed policies led to in-
flation, unemployment and high in-
terest rates. Mr. Hall, what would
you do with 52 American hostages?
Would you sell weapons to these
madmen like Reagan?
Yes, communism has spread to
Afghanistan and Nicaragua. Carter
imposed grain embargoes on Af-
ghanistan which Presidcn- Reagan
quickly lifted. Are the Nicaraguans
allowed to have a revolution if they
want? Does Mr. Hall support So-
moza and his National Guard?
Reagan's common sense poli-
cies? Supply side, which George
Bush once called "voodoo econom-
ics is just another word for deficit
spending which is more than any
Democrat ever!
New jobs? These jobs are in the
low-paid service sector. These
people and their families are barely
uving above the poverty level. The
manufacturing sector, due to Reagan
policy, is running from the necessity
of modernizing.
Sure, President Reagan "flexed
his muscle" by invading the pea pod
island of Grenada to stop commu-
nism. President Reagan does support
the right wing human rights viola-
tors in South Africa and Chile. Flip-
flop Reagan supports disarmament,
however, he opposed this early in his
administration.
George Bush will use the death
penalty, and he will release rapists
�and murderers (through the-furkmgh
program. Reagan was the first in the
U.S to introduce furlough while he
was governor of California. Most
states now have furloughs.
The ReaganBush administra-
tion is a sleazy one. There have been
indictments and convictions of high
advisors like Mike Deaver, who is
serving time, Nofziger, and Meese.
NSC staffers made foreign policy in
violation of U.S. law. Neither Bush
nor Reagan has given a satisfactory-
explanation.
Yes, George Bush made it,
though not very efficiently, in his
own business with the help and back-
ing of friends and family. Yes, Mi-
chael Dukakis worked hard through
night school and can call his accom-
plishments his own. It's a fact that
George Bush has never been elected
but appointed to every office he has
held. Bush did in fact run for office for
the only time in 1970. Lloyd Bentsen
soundly defeated George in this elec-
tion.
The DukakisBentsen ticket has
an outstanding plan which will allow
young people to access educational
opportunities allowing them a realis-
tic chance at achieving the American
Dream. With George Bush and his
huge deficit these opportunities will
not exist.
Wyatt M. Jones, IV.
Freshman
Political Science
Quayle's role in Army examined
By DAVID W. TREVINO
Special to Tha Eaat Carolinian
Immediately after the Honorable James
Danforth Quayle III received the Republican party's
nomination for the vice-presidency of the United
States, hours of television time and miles of column
inches were devoted to scrutinizing certain aspects
of his service with the Indiana Army National Guard
during the final years of the war in Vietnam. A great
many people, both in and out of the Fourth Estate,
feel Senator Quayle was treated unfairly by the
press.
There is no question that no one else's military
record from that period has been subjected to such
minute inspection and such wide exposure nineteen
years later. Memories of that time in our nation's
history have grown hazy for many of us who lived
through it, and many who will vote this year were
not yet born in 1969 when Senator Quayle enlisted.
Consideration of what others of his generation chose
to do, or not do, would help to give some perspective
to the Republican nominee for the vice-presidency's
decision to join the Indiana Army National Guard
six days before his student deferment expired.
Take, for example, the case of Jose Francisco
Jimenez. On the twenty-eighth of August in 1969,
101 days after the Honorable Mr. Quayle proudly
raised his right hand to take the oath of enlistment,
Jimenez was a lance corporal in the Marine Corps
serving as a fire team leader with Company "K
Third Battalion, Seventh Marines in Quang Nam
Province, Republic of Vietnam.
On that day, 95 days after Senator Quayle was
graduated from Depauw University where he had
been a vocal supporter of our involvement in Viet-
nam, Company "K" was engaged in fierce comt M
with elements of the North Vietnamese Army.
When the lead platoon became pinned down by
concentrated fire from small arms, automatic weap-
ons and an anti-aircraft gun, Lance Corporal
Jimenez acted without hesitation. He charged into
the elephant grass before him and killed an enemy
soldier obstructing his path to the anti-aircraft
weapon firing with deadly effectiveness into his
fellow Marines.
He rushed across twenty meters of open ground
swept by hostile fire to the anti-aircraft gun position.
Using his rifle and grenades, he destroyed the
weapon and killed its gunner.
Jimenez continued to advance through wither-
ing fire. He killed another North Vietnamese soldier
with a grenade. He killed two more with his rifle
from a distance of less than ten feet.
N.V.A. automatic weapons began concentrating
their fire on Jimenez. Shouting to his comrades, he
charged forward in pursuit of a sixth enemy soldier
he had spotted in a tree line. It was then a sniper's
bullet mortally wounded Lance Corporal Jimenez.
He was one of 9,856 members of our armed
forces to lose their lives that year in Vietnam. No
members of the Indiana Army National Guard were
killed defending the Hoosier State in 1969.
For his gallant action, Lance Corporal Jimenez
was posthumously awarded the highest decoration
conferred by the United States, the Congressional
Medal of Honor. It was presented to his mother by
then-President Richard Nixon at a White House
ceremony in 1970,the year the Honorable James
Danforth Quayle III began his studies at the Indiana
University School of Law.
Aside from the difference in the branches of the
armed forces in which Lance Corporal Jimenez and
Senator Quayle cnose to serve,there is another im-
portant difference between these two men who wore
uniforms during the war in Vietnam. The Republi-
can nominee for our nation's second highest elective
office was born in Indiana, a member of the family
which controls the richest and most powerful pub-
lishing empire in that state; the late Lance Corporal
Jimenez was the son of a farm worker and born in
Morelia, Mexico.
At the age of ten, Jimenez and his four-year-old
sister traveled with their mother from Morelia, a city
between Guadalajara and Mexico City, to Eloy,
Arizona in search of a better life.
After graduation from Santa Cruz Valley Union
High School where he was president of the Future
Farmers of America, Jimenez went to work on a
nearby ranch where he and his family lived.
The war in Vietnam dragged on and Jimenez
saw many of his classmates drafted, but he was not
called into service. Jimenez was a citizen of the
Republic of Mexico and could not be conscripted. He
had no need for a student deferment such as Senator
Quayle used between 1965 and 1969.
But on June 7,1968, Jimenez left the little farming
community in central Arizona where he lived and
drove sixty miles to Phoenix to join the United States
Marine Corps. He told his mother, "This country has
given us so much, and I must give something back
He gave his life.
The Honorable James Danforth Quayle III says
he is proud to have served his country as a public
information specialist in the Indiana Army National
Guard. It is unfortunate that the humble Jose Fran-
cisco Jimenez cannot thank Senator Quayle for those
weekends of sacrifice so many years ago.
Duka
(CPS) � Democratic
dential nominee Michael Di
unveiled a plan Sept. 7 to k
dents repay their college loaj
rate that depends on how
they earn after they gradual
The idea � which in tal
been tried at a number
puses � immediately
mixed reviews.
Bruce Carnes, deputy
secretary at the L' S t
Education, said it would
students who got we!
;obs after graduation
He predicted studenh
ing to take higher salaricj
would refuse to pin the pre
forcing the federal govern!
kick in dollars to cover t'rj
costs ot lower-paid
would never repay all U
owed.
Dukakis aide Thorn
man, of course, was more ej
astic.
"This is not only I I
.iesirable he said 'It wi
everyone who is qualm
wants to go to oolU j
college
"It is a substant. i
one that should be (
opened Bob A i the N
Association of State L'no
and Land-Grant College;
"We're extrem
that one of the president ii
dates has come forth wit
and imaginative prograi
lege loans for people
walks of life said Rich
ser, president of the
Association of Indcpencj
leges and Universities.
Janet Lieberman of
Student Association, w'
resents campus studentj
ments in Washington, "
"It's a very creative pre
help middle-class f ami til
doesn't really addres- t
of low-income people.
"What low-in,
need is grant money
Merkowitz oi the
Council on Education
the least likely to take
Both presidential c
nevd to develop plans
the needs of rhe needn
The Dukakis plan
low anv student, regi
family income, to gel a
guaranteed student toai
through mandatorv pi
auctions dunng the
working years for as loi
work, or "buy out" oi th(
at anv time by paying a lj
As a result, gradu
find jobs with high salal
pay back more than tl
and principal on their U
low-income students
pay back all thev born
' "The probler
(Dukakis s) plan, is
Carter dies
of cancer
PLAINS. C. (A
Carter, whose eso
President Carter's
zling good ol boy br
natch- amused and
Americans, "struggj
geously" with the
killed him, his familj
Carter died at hoi
creatic cancer, the saj
that killed his fat!
older sister, on Sunf
ing at age 51.
A few blocks av(
southwestern Georg
flag flew at half-stafl
street from the
where Carter oftej
beers while entertan;
ers with his irrevcrc
Billy Carter,
claimed beer-dnnkj
bov, was forced
himself when bJ
Jimmy rocketed int
House in 1977.
Within a few
Carter put his namj
of beer that floppej
water with remark
as racist or anti-
cepted money froi
was forced to sell -
ties to pay a debt t(
Revenue Service,
neath the mask o
was a perceptive
reader, a fighter wj
go down quietly ur
sures of alcoholifJ
He ran the U
business until Jii
officer 13 years rj
turned home to �
chafing under
reign, quickly
school sweetheaj
joined the Marine





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27,1988 5
IBM
Red
tribe

which Presideni Reagan
�re the Nicaraguans
e a revolution if they
es Mr. Hall support So-
National Guard?
n - common sense poli-
?pl) side, which George
; called "voodoo econom-
t another word for deficit
which is more than any
ever!
jobs are in the
ic sector. These
d their families are barely
ve the poverty level. The
jring sector, due to Reagan
running from the necessity
�rni;
President Reagan "flexed
nvading the pea pod
Grenada to stop commu-
nt Reagan does support
wmg human rights viola-
uth Africa and Chile. Flip-
supports disarmament,
It r he opposed this early in his
listration.
porge Bush will use the death
and he will release rapists
11 rdevem through the-Airlough
im. Reagan was the first in the
introduce furlough while he
vernor of California. Most
have furloughs.
2 ReaganBush administra-
izy one. There have been
lents and convictions of high
rs like Mike Deaver, who is
: time, Nofziger, and Meese.
rs made foreign policy in
lion of U.S. law Neither Bush
leagan has given a satisfactory
lation.
es, George Bush made it,
;h not very efficiently, in his
usiness with the help and back-
f friends and family. Yes, Mi-
Dukakis worked hard through
school and can call his accom-
ments his own. It's a fact that
;e Bush has never been elected
Ippointed to every office he has
Bushdid in fact run for office for
ily time in 1970. Lloyd Bentsen
ly defeated George in this elec-
he DukakisBentsen ticket has
� mdingplan which will allow
Ig people to access educational
jrtunities allowing them a realis-
lance at achieving the American
i. With George Bush and his
deficit these opportunities will
Wyatt M.Jones, IV.
Freshman
Political Science
ned
Jimenez and his four-year-old
heir mother from Morc!ia,acity
Ira and Mexico Citv, to Elov,
a better life.
trom Santa Cruz Valley Union
was president of the Future
Jimenez went to work on a
he and his family lived,
tnam dragged on and Jimenez
smates drafted, but he was not
Jimenez was a citizen of the
ltd could not be conscripted. He
jdent deferment such as Senator
?n 1965 and 1969.
, Jimenez left the little farming
al Arizona where he lived and
'hoenix to join the United States
d his mother, "This country has
id I must give something back
fames Danforth Quayle III says
served his country as a public
st in the Indiana Army National
late that the humble Jose Fran-
thank Senator Quayle for those
te so many years ago.
Dukakis unveils loan plan
(CPS) � Democratic presi-
dential nominee Michael Dukakis
unveiled a plan Sept. 7 to let stu-
dents repay their college loans at a
rate that depends on how much
they earn after they graduate.
The idea � which in fact has
been tried at a number of cam-
puses � immediately drew
mixed reviews.
Bruce Carnes, deputy under-
secretary at the U.S. Dept. of
Education, said it would "soak"
students who got well-paying
jobs after graduation.
He predicted students train-
ing to take higher-salaried jobs
would refuse to join the program,
forcing the federal government to
kick in dollars to cover the loan
costs of lower-paid students who
would never repay all that they
owed.
Dukakis aide Thomas Her-
man,of course, was moreenthusi-
astic.
"This is not only feasible, it is
desirable he said. "It will allow
everyone who is qualified and
wants to go to college to go to
college
"It is a substantive proposal,
tme that should be discussed
opened Bob Aaron of the National
Association of State Universities
and Land-Grant Colleges.
"We're extremely pleased
that one of the presidential candi-
dates has come forth with a new
and imaginative program for col-
lege loans for people from all
walks of life said Richard Ros-
ser, president of the National
Association of Independent Col-
leges and Universities.
Janet Lieberman of the U.S.
Student Association, which rep-
resents campus student govern-
ments in Washington, D.C said,
"It's a very creative program to
help middle-class families, but it
doesn't really address the needs
of low-income people
"What low-income people
need is grant money said Dave
Merkowitz of the American
Council on Education. "They're
the least likely to take out loans.
Both presidential candidates
need to develop plans to address
the needs of the neediest
The Dukakis plan would al-
low any student, regardless of
family income, to get a federally
guaranteed student loan, repay it
through' mandatory payroll de-
ductions during the student's
working years for as long as they
work, oriiy out" of the program
at any time by paying a lump sum.
As a result, graduates who
find jobs with high salaries could
pay back more than the interest
and principal on their loans, while
low-income students may never
pay back all they borrowed.
"The problem with
(Dukakis's) plan . is it depends
Carter dies
of cancer
PLAINS. Ga. (AP) - Billy
Carter, whose escapades as
President Carter's beer-guz-
zling good ol' boy brother alter-
nately amused and dismayed
Americans, "struggled coura-
geously" with the cancer that
killed him, his family says.
Carter died at home of pan-
creatic cancer, the same disease
that killed his father and an
older sister, on Sunday morn-
ing at age 51.
A few blocks away in this
southwestern Georgia hamlet, a
flag flew at half-staff across the
street from the gas station
where Carter often downed
beers while entertaining report-
ers with his irreverent wit.
Billy Carter, a self-pro-
claimed beer-drinking good ol'
boy, was forced to redefine
himself when big brother
Jimmy rocketed into the White
House in 1977.
Within a few years, Billy
Carter put his name on a brand
of beer that flopped, got in hot
water with remarks denounced
as racist or anti-Semitic, ac-
cepted money from Libya and
was forced to sell some proper-
ties to pay a debt to the Internal
Revenue Service. But under-
neath the mask of court jester
was a perceptive man, an avid
reader, a fighter who refused to
go down quietly under the pres-
sures of alcoholism or cancer.
He ran the family peanut
business until Jimmy, a Navy
officer 13 years his senior, re-
turned home to take over. Billy,
chafing under his brother's
reign, quickly married his high
school sweetheart, Sybil, and
joined the Marines.
upon people who are likely to
make reasonable incomes being
willing to get soaked Carnes
contended.
Rosser believed the federal
government will have to subsi-
dize the program to keep it viable
� something Dukakis says won't
be necessary � but in the long run
would deal "with the student loan
default question in a very effec-
tive way thus saving taxpayers
millions of dollars.
Because the government
would take its payment directly
out of grads' paychecks, the de-
fault rate � at least theoretically
� would be minimal.
"It's nice that under this plan
you can graduate and go into a
low-paying job like teaching and
nursing and not worry about
paying off your loans said
Lieberman. "We appreciate the
creativity
Yale University had a similar
loan program for 3,600 students
from 1972 to 1978, in which stu-
dents could borrow a portion of
their tuition from the school and
begin repaying it after graduation
at a rate of four-tenths of one per-
cent � or $4 per year �- for each
$1,000 borrowed.
Dukakis's plan, by contrast,
would have students repay their
loans at a rate of $8 per year for
every $1,000 borrowed.
"We still think it's a plausible
idea said Yale's Donald Routh,
director of financial aid.
Routh said Yale dropped the
idea because it required massive
amounts of capital to maintain it.
Administrators figured it would
take 17 years before payments
would reduce the outstanding
balance owed the university.
Yet fears that students antici-
pating a high income would not
participate in such a program
proved not to be true, Routh
added.
Carncs's own U.S. Dept. of
Education also has promoted an
"income contingent loan" pro-
gram, now being tested at 10
campuses.
In his last two federal college
budget proposals, in fact, Presi-
dent Reagan asked Congress to
replace virtually all Guaranteed
Student Loans with income-con-
tingent loans, but Congress, heed-
ing educators' testimony that it
was too early to tell if the idea is
workable, opted for a pilot pro-
gram instead.
Under the Reagan plan, all
borrowers would have to repay
all the principal and interest they
owed in a prescribed time.
Under Dukakis's plan, loan
repayments would come directly
out of graduates' paychecks,
much like their Social Security
payments.
Graduates would not have
' $SAVE MONEY!N
BUY YOUR WINTER CLOTHES NOW!
Over 200 Overcoats In Stock $19.95-$49.95
(100 Wool and London Fog Trenchcoats)
Huge Assortment of Men and Women's Jackets
$7.95 & up
(Leatlicr, Ski, Military, Denim, Wool & Windbreakers)
Just Arrived! Dozens of Fashionable Men's and
Women's Sweaters (All Fabrics & Styles)
$3.95-$9.95
All Dress Suits $19.95 All Dress Jackets $5.95
We Pay CASH For Nice Clothes
We Especially Need Nice Men's Jeans!
CLOTHES
f vmam(
-v
-
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
400 S. Evans St.
On the corner below "Fizz"
752-3866
Enjoy One of Our
Delicious Dinner Specialties!
Samples From The Menu:
Camaron Ranchero
Shrimp delicately sauteed Ranchero Style with a blend of mild
peppers, onions, and tomatoes. Served with rice and beans.
Polly Yucateco
Only
695
A new treat! A delicious breast of tender chicken grilled and
covered with strips of Ortega peppers and tasty slices of bacon.
Topped with melted cheese and Pico de Calloand served with
rice and beans - a real meal
�695
Carne ala Tampiquena
Only
One thinly cut piece of beef marinated in adobo sauce and
grilled to perfection. Served with a tasty cheese enchilada, rice,
id beans. Civ it a in'
and beans. Give it a try!
Only
Enjoy A Delicious Margarita
�695
FREE Parking Across
The Street Beside
S ft R Computer Associates
A The Bicycle Pi st
Sun -Thurs 11 a m -10 p m
Fn I Sat 11 a m -11 p m
repayments deducted from earn-
ings over a certain cap, probably
to be set somewhere between
$50,000 and $100,000 a year.
Graduates who borrowed
$20,000 to get through college and
earned, say, $20,000 would repay
the government $500 in a year, or
2.5 percent of their income.
Students would take out the
loans, which would be guaran-
teed by the government, through
banks.
Aaron thought it intersting
that Dukakis, who has trailed Re-
publican presidential nominee
George Bush in the polls since
mid-August, unveiled the "sub-
stantive" proposal because he
thinks it's something the Ameri-
can people want.
But although he commended
the Massachusetts governor for
developing a program with meat,
Aaron feared it will be used
against him.
ECU
15
m
LOW COST ABORTIONS UP TO
12TH WEEK OF PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cost.
Pregnancy Test, Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy
Counseling. For further information, call 832-0535 (toU
free number. 1-800-532 5384) between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
weekdays Ceneral anesthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
STUDENTS
Got ready to join America's number
one name in temporary help. Kelly
Services can help you make the most
of your free time this semester by
offering the flexibility to tarn some
great cash while still being able to
earn good grades. We have a variety
of short and long term assignments,
Tiany of which do not require special
skills or experience.
�Secretaries
�Typists
� WP and DE Operators
�General Clerical
�Light Industrial
Call or stop in and let us tell you about our
comprehensive benefit package.
204 E. Arlington Blvd Suite E
Arlington Center
355-7850
Kid
s e r v i � � .
"The First And The Best
US. Law requires all applicants to show proof of
identity and right to work in the US.
All New!
$56
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A LIC. OF POWER IOUSE GYM LICENSING ENT INC.
DBA. POWERI IOUSE GYM, GREENVILLE, N.C
FEATURING:
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WORKOUT PROGRAMS
DIET & NUTRITION SUPPLEMENTS

4000 sq. ft Newly Remodeled Workout Area
Use This Ad For 1 Free Workout
$50
Membership
For Remainder Of Semester
Hrs: M-F 10-9: Sat10-6; Sunl-6
oOl�HOi,S
m m
1002 Evans St
758-9584
FOR EVfcfcYiWty
For. adV sftDCiffis
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flA&F� CourM

sponsored ey
potfT JUST WATCH
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STUDENT (JNION
-7jCtWr �HfiF- tf3ZTCTO�y





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'�
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27, 1988
Classifieds
mi
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian male
roommate to share new mobile home. 10
minutes from campus. Non-smoker,
please. Weekends call Hugh 756-6851.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Room semi-private. $130 a month. 12
utilities. Call after 3:00 p.m. 830-9138.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1982 Buick Century Limited,
AC, Cruise, PS, PB. High mileage but
sharp; in good running condition. $2800.
Call 758-7423 anytime.
2 WATER BEDS: King & Queen size, with
heaters and side rails. $200.00 each. Call
355-2764 anvtime.
FOR SALE: 9 ft. cubic refrigerator � ice
box. New, used 1 month (90.00! Sleeper-
sofa, great condition (50.00). Call 758-
9437.
DODGE OMNI: 1979, 4 cylinder. FM
AM stereo. Very good condition. 86,000
miles. $1300 756-4329.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICE: Papers, $1 50 per
page. Resume's written and typed, $20.00
Close to campus. Call Joy at 758-7423 be-
tween 6 and 9 p.m.
STUDENT TYPING SERVICES: Pro-
gressive Solutions, Inc offers high-qual-
ity, inexpensive word processing and
other services for the student Our high
speed laser printing systems yield the
highest possible quality in the shortest
length of time. Rates start at $2.00 per
page, and include paper and computer-
ized spelling check. We also offer
Resume' production, and other business
TYTINC, TYPING, TYPING: Real cheap
ffordable Rates! Call 752-5084.
and professional services. Call 757-3111
M-F 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. for more de-
tails!
QUALIFIED TUTORING: in Latin &
French. Call 758-7592.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
DWI7 Don't Drink & Drive. Come Party
In Style. Call Class Act Limousine 757-
3240.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for trie best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
WORD PROCESSING AND DESKTOP
PUBLISHING: Reports, Resumes, etc.
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
galleria
FULL TIME
Positions
Now Open!
We are looking for responsible
individuals who enjoy RE-
TAIL SALES. You must be
willing to work hard! Desire a
career, not just a job? Galleria
offer the chance for advance-
ment!
Call for Appt.
756-0700
PERSONALS
PLEDGES OF TRI SIGMA: Now the sus-
pense is over, big sis week is through, we
all had so much fun and we hope that you
did too. Giving you gifts and surprises,
without giving our names away, it was
hard, but you all are great girls, and we're
glad that your Sigmas to stay! Love the
sisters.
KAPPA SIG'S: Can't wait to get started
on the Homecoming float. The Sigmas.
ALPHA OMICRON PI BETA
LAMBDA'S: I just wanted to tell all of you
that I think you're great. We're going to
have a fantastic semester! Keep up the
enthusiasm! Feelin' Kinda Mellow. Your.
"PT" � Heidi.
IF ANYONE HAS FOUND: A gold signet
ring with the initials TAM (in that order),
in Mcndenhall Student Center contact
Thorn Atkinson at 758-9155.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
WE THANK EVERYONE: For his and
her kindness and sympathy last week.
Your thoughtfulness is greatly appreci-
ated. Love Alpha Delta Pi.
ALPHA DELTA PI: Hope you all have a
good week. The Sigmas.
AZD: We had a great time with you all at
the picnic. Looking forward to doing
something again soon. The Sigmas.
YO BABIES: Here's a little encourage-
ment to keep up the good work out on the
field. Let's continue, to show them that the
Delta Zeta's can't be beat!
STEPHEN AND LEE: Hope you boys had
fun hitting the big 21. Downtown �
beware! Love ya, Judy and Kristi.
SUSAN AND LESLIE: Hey, you sexy
girls � I've been watching you! LHW.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
BUS DRIVER:
Needed to deliver
children to and from a
private school, Monday
thru Friday, from 7:00
a.m. to 9:00 a.m
and from 1:30 p.m.
to 3:30 p.m.
If you desire part-time
earnings of $6.00 to $6.50
per hour, then contact
Lynn Branch at 752-7444.
Experience Preferred.
EL-TOftO
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 700
WALK-INS WELCOME
20 YEARS OF SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Eastgate Shopping Center
;Across from Highway Patrol Station)
IJrhlnd Car Quest Auto Parts
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318
NEW DELI: Wants you to jam with the
best. Come welcome UNCLE GREEN on
Thursday, you will love the original tunes
from their albums. Don't miss THE
BOND Friday, and jam hard with BAD
BOB & THE ROCKING HORSES Satur-
day. Don't forget Open Mike Wednes-
days.
WOULD YOU LIKE TO HA VE A: Daddy
Earth Cruiser, you can, just buy a raffle
ticket from a Pika.
SISTERS OF ALPHA DELTA PI: We feel
great sorrow for your loss and express our
condolences. With Love, The Brothers of
Pi Kappa Alpha.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE OFFI-
CERS OF AOPI'S BETA LAMBDA'S:
Pres. � Chris Saleeby; V-Pres. � Caroline
Haire; Treas.� Heather Hatch; Sec �
Amy Pfrommer; Social Chrmn. � Shan-
non Fowler; Phil. � Kathy Bowen; PR.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
$325 a month
Contact J T or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 430-1937
Office open - Apt 8,12 - 530 p m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $205 a month. 6 month
lease MOBILE HOME RENTAIS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Ayalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T or Tommy Williams
756-7815 '
� Kelli MacWelch, Fundraising � Missy
Ellis; Historian � Torry Davidson; Chap-
lain � Meredith Grogan; Jr Panhellenic �
Jo Brooks, Sarah Metcalf, Kim Wood and
Amy Huber. Have a great semester! Love,
the sisters of AOPi.
DON'T MISS THE TREBLE MAN1AX:
Appeanng at Susie's Treehouse Wednes-
day, Sept, 28 Party Rock & Roll by REM,
U2, Hoodo Gurus, etc.
BARB BOND: I am so excited to have you
as my little sister We will have tons of fun
together. Good luck with pledging and
remember you're my special pledge
Love, Your Big Sister Lisa Reucher
ANYONE GOING TO PITTSBURGH? I
need a ride anytime � but especially for
Fall Break. Will pay 12 gas. Call after
noons 355-0711.
SUSAN: Happy B-day sweetheart � I
love you Tommy.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care'
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru SaL Low
Cost Termination to 20 wee.ka of preuirvcy
1-800-433-2930
Announcements
jINTVFRSITY UNIONS
Season tickets are now on sale for the Per-
forming Arts Series at ECU. This year
there are 14 outstanding performances
starting in Oct and running through
April. Some of the attractions include:
Wynton Marsalis, CABARET, The Acting
Company in Love's Labour's Lost, Nadja
Salerno-Sonnenberg, The Tokyo String
Quartet, Oregon, The Atlanta Symphony,
and the Ohio Ballet. For a free brochure,
and further details contact: The Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall 757-6611, ext.
266. .
NEW ARRIVALS
The MSC Music Listening Lounge has
received the following selections on com-
pact disc: Aerosmith�Permanent Vaca-
tion; Wynton Marsalis�Standard Time;
INXS� Kick; Ahmad Jamal�Crystal;
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg; Sinead
O'Connor�The Lion and the Cobra; REO
Speedwagon�Life as We Know It. The
Music Listening Lounge is open seven
days a week from 2-10:30 p.m. and is
located on the second floor gallery of
Mendenhall. Check out the new runes
before you buy
PRE-P.T. STUDENTS
All general college pre-physical therapy
sophomores, or higher, anticipating ap-
plying to the May 1989 Physical Therapy
Class should go to the Physical Therapy
Dept. Office, 1st floor, Belk Bldg before
the end of Sept. to determine eligibility.
Instructions for receiving the application
packet will be given then. If you have any
question, contact that office by phone
(757-6961, ext. 261) or in person.
WINDSURFING
Be sure to attend the Intramural
Windsurfing registration meeting held
from Sept. 6-27. Now you can surf the
waters and learn the technique in this fun
filled trip.
GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept. 15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2. Please note that a group
listing with the name of every person in
the photograph MUST be presented BE-
FORE the photographer films the group.
ORGANIZATIONS WITHOUT LIST-
INGS WILL NOT BE PHOTOGRAPHED,
and time does not permit the scheduling
of another session. Call 757-6501 and
leave date it time for the photo to be taken.
Please give two days notice for the pho-
tographer.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
NETWORK
Are you interested in dedicating 6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Overseas Development has
the perfect opportunity. Call Marianne
Exum (h) 830-9450 or (w) 757-6271 for
application and more details. Application
deadline Oct. 1.
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before vou graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB . The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase your
"fun" budget,
�opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us in lifting up the name
of Jesus in songs and Bible study. God
Bless You.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
ECU STUDENT BANK
Faculty, staff, and students may now pay
their Greenville Utility bills at the ECU
STUDENT BANK, presenting both parts
of the bill. Other services include cashing
checks, savings accounts, paying tele-
phone bills, and the purchase of money
orders.
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri. night
at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
FRISBEE CLUB
Practices are in full swing. Come to the
bottom of College Hill every Tues
Thurs and Sun. at 5:00. New players are
more than welcome. Join the team that
tied for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anyone who purchased New Student
Review this summer, should come by the
Buccaneer, yearbook, office and pick
them up. The office is located in front of
Joyner Library, on the second floor of the
Publications Bldg. You may pick the book
up between 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. this week and next week.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The new executive officers of the National
Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society are Sherry
Campbell, Kathy McHate, ludy Wilson,
Suzanne Black, Kevin Sullivan, Stacy
Truett and Stacie Scales The next meeting
will be the 27th of Sept in Jenkins Audito-
rium.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Amnesty International will meet Wed
Sept. 28 at 8 p.m at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 401 E. 4th St in the upper floor
Students welcome.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet Sept. 27 at 8 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium. Attendance is required.
Don't forget to bring your nickels.
AMA
The AMA will be holding its second
meeting Thurs Sept. 29 at 3:30. This
meeting will be held in room 1031 of the
GCB. Our guest speaker will be Craig
Quick from Pitt Memorial. He will be
speaking about marketing health care. All
interested are welcome and old members
are encouraged to attend.
KAYAKINGCANOE
Be sure to attend the Intramural Kayak-
ingCanoe registration held from Sept. 15
to Oct. 7. Learn to canoe and kayak in a
fantastic trip. All you need to do is regis-
ter.
BOWLING
Be sure to attend the Intramural Bowling
registration meeting held Oct. 4 at 5:00
p.m. in GCB 1026. Play begins shortly
afterwards! Be sure to register as soon as
possible for some in the alleys!
GAMMA BETA PHI
To all students with a 3.0 gpa or better:
Gamma Beta Phi is having an orientation
meetingOct.4&5at7p.m. in Mendenhall
room 244. If you're interested, please
come by.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Ohio Ballet will intiate the 1988-89
Performing Art Series on Oct. 12 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. The program for
the evening includes: "Un titled" (first
performed by PHILOBOLUS in 1975),
"Summer Night" (choreographed by
Heinz Poll), "Gravity" (a new work by
Laura Dean), "Triptych" (choreographed
by Heinz Poll to Mendelssohn's "Piano
Concerto No. 2, D Minor). Tickets for this
outstanding event are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 757-6611, ext. 266. This event
is sponsored by the Performing Arts
The Buswell Parnas-Luvisi Trio will open
the 1988-89 Chamber Music Series on Oct.
3, at 8 p.m. in I lendrix Theatre. Composed
of James Buswell (violinist), Leslie Parnas
(cellist), and Lee I uvisipianist). Their
program includes: 1 laydn's � "Trio in G
Major Zaninelli's � "Arioso Brahm's
� Trio in C Minor. Op. 101 and
Beethoven's � 'Trio in B-flat Major, Op.
97" (The Archduke). Tickets are now on
sale for this event in the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, 757-
6611, ext 266. This event is co-sponsored
bv the School of Music and the Depart-
ment of Univeristy Unions.
SPANISH CLUB
Will have a meeting on Sept. 28 in confer-
ence room of Foreign Language Dept. in
GCB at 3 p.m.
STAR SEARCH
Star Search '88. ECU Gospel Choir will be
holding auditions for interested students
on Sept. 28 in Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center at 5 p.m. There will be a $5 entry fee
due at time of audition. Everyone wel-
come.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice in the Bloxton House is offering these
one hour programs on beginning a res-
ume for your job search. Handouts and
samples will be given out to the first 20
people to come to each session. No sign up
required. These sessions are held in the
Career Planning Room on Sept. 28 at 3
p.m.
INTERVIEWING WORKSHOP
To help ECU people prepare for on and off
campus interviews, the Career Planning
and Placement Service in te Bloxton
House is offering these one hour pro-
grams to aid you in developing better
interviewing skills for use in your job
search. The program is open to the first 20
people to come for each session. No sign
up is required. These sessions are held in
the Career Planning Placement Room on
Sept. 29 at 3 p.m.
S.A.M.
S.A.M. meeting Sept. 28, 3:30 p.m GCB
1026 Speaker will be Lisa Daniel, Person-
nel Director for the Northeast Region,
Wachovia Bank. Her topic will be Man-
agement Development Programs. Mem-
bers are encouraged to attend and guests
are welcome.
Committee and the Department of Uni-
versity Unions.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
EXPRESSIONS
Expressions is now accepting poetry and
short stories for the December issue. The
magazine is published twice a semester
with the first issue coming out in October.
This special issue will be a small magazine
with mainly general information,
whereas the December issue will be a
larger size containing news stories, short
stories, editorials, poetry, etc Articles
may be left at the office or at the Media
Board Secretary's Office in the Publica-
tions Building.
FILMS COMMITTFF
The Student Union Films Committee
presents "Monty Pythons Flying Circus
on Sept 28. "Life of Brian will show at 8
p.m in Hendnx theater followed by "The
Meaning of Life" at 10 p.m These show-
ings are free to all ECU students with valid
ID and faculty with film passes.
FATAL ATTRACTION
Fatal Attraction will be playing Thur. thru
Sunday at 8 p.m. in I lendrix Theater. This
is free to all ECU students with valid ID
and faculty with film passes. Sponsored
by Student Union Films Committee.
WATER BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural CO-REC
water basketball registration meeting
held Oct 4 at 6pm in MG 102 Play begins
shortly afterward. Interested in officiat-
ing? Attend the first official clinic Oct. 4 at
6:30 p.m. in MG 102 For additional info
call Dave Hall at 757-6387.
1-ON-l BASKETBALL
Be sure to attend the Intramural 1-on-l
basketball registration meeting held Oct.
5 at 5 p.m. in MG 102. Play begins shortly
afterwards. Be sure to register as soon as
possible to see who is the next Michael
Jordan.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
The co-ed National Service Fraternity,
proudly announces and congratulates the
Fall 1988 Pledge Class: Yolanda Arroy,
Tammy Blake, Rodney Dancy, Mark
Dyer, Tracey Eason, Dennis Gardner,
Rana Harris, Sean Herring, David Konne-
gay, Bill Mitchell, Tom Mitchell, Lisa
Moffat, David Overton, Stephen Parker,
Beth Sedberry, Todd Stewart, Jennifer
Terrell, Marti Wilson, and Don Witham.
WES2FEL
Wes2fel is a Christian fellowship which
welcomes all students, and is sponsored
jointly by the Presbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries. Come to the Method-
ist Student Center (501 E 5th, across from
Garrett dorm) this Wed. at 5 p.m. and
every Wed. night for a home cooked meal.
This week we will worship before we eat
The meal is $2 at the door, $1.50 if you sign
up in advance. Call 758-2030 for reserva-
tions.
BANNER CONTEST
To participate in the banner contest, dur-
ing NATIONAL ALCOHOL AWARE-
NESS WEEK, register your organizations
entry, in 209 Whichard Building by Oct.
14. Six divisional 1st place winners will be
displayed during the ECU vs Syracuse
game and be awarded $50 Call 757-6823
for entry forms and additional informa-
tion.
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
Students for Dukakis and College Demo-
crats will hold an organizational meeting
on Sept. 29 at 8:lb p m in Mendenhall
Room 221.
CROPWALK 88
Any individuals or groups interested in
participating in the 7th annual Cropwalk
for hunger should attend the ECU Re-
cruitment Rally Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. in room
244 Mendenhall. The walk will be held on
Nov. 6th. For more information contact
Marianne Exum (ODN) 757-6271 or 830-
9430.
IRS
Intramural independent representative
meeting Sept. 29 at 5:30 p.m. in Memorial
Gym 105-C. Help the intramural inde-
pendent division grow! Your ideas are
needed For additional info call 757-6387
NURSING STUDENTS
In order to receive your nursing pin by De-
cember, 1988, orders must be placed in the
Student Stores, Wright Building, no later
than Oct. 3. Orders should be placed at the
Jewelry Counter Orders must be paid in
full when the order is placed
EARLY CHILDHOOD CLUB
All early childhood club members are
reminded of the fashion show on how to
dress professionally at the next meeting
on Sept. 28 at 4 p.m. in Speight 129.
SCEC
The Student Council for Exceptional Chil-
dren will hold ameeting on Oct. 3at 5pm
in Sp 103. Everyone is welcome to attend
PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Productions Commit-
tee is accepting applications for members
to serve on the Committee. If interested, or
for more info call 757-6611 ext. 210 Stu-
dent Union Office, Mendenhall Student
Center.
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Business students interested in scholar-
ships should secure forms from one of the
following dept offices: Accounting �
GCB 3208, Decision Sciences � 3418, Fi-
nance � 3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414. All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB 3210),
Chairman of School of Business Scholar-
ship Committee, by Oct. 14. Students may
apply for one or more of the scholarships
listed below. Ranters Bank Scholarship (3
' at $1000 each), University Book Exchange
( 2 at $500 each), NCNB ($500), J. Fred
Hamblen ($200) Credit Women Interna-
tional ($200), Cameron-BrownFirst
Union Scholarship (3 at $500 each), FOR
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY: Latney
W. Pittard Memorial, Raleigh-Durham
Chapter Institute of Internal Auditors
($350), National Association of Account-
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship ($500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
ONLY: Archie R. Bumette ($600), Ward
Real Estate Scholarship ($300).
Single vote keeps minimum wage from increasing to $3.55
a achimctom (AP) hr.aW thplnonAm Dpmorratir narine down bv about half the below the current $335 floor. 100th Congress is to end bv Oct. specified number of
S
WASHINGTON (AP) �
Only one vote - and possibly a
few federal judgeships - are
stopping Senate Democrats
from shutting off a Republican
filibuster and passing the first
increase in the $3.35 hourly
minimum wage since 1981.
But having lost two cloture
votes last week in trying to
break the logjam, Democratic
leaders were unwilling to
schedule a third attempt until
after Sunday night's debate be-
tween presidential candidates
George Bush and Michael
Dukakis.
Republican leaders following
a White House-directed legisla-
tive strategy are insisting on
paring down by about half the
$1.20 increase in the minimum
wage that Democrats would like
to implement over a three-year
period.
The Republicans also want to
couple the increase to a new 90-
day, 85 percent subminimum
wage for newly hired workers,
as long as no one would fall
below the current $335 floor.
The minimum wage bill is
one of several facing an impa-
tient Congressmen eager to ad-
journ to hit the fall campaign
trail.
Senate Majority Leader
Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va has
warned senators to be prepared
for Saturday sessions if the
100th Congress is to end by Oct.
16 � a date two weeks beyond
the original target date for fin-
ishing business.
Behind the scenes, GOP lead-
ers are holding the minimum
wage bill hostage while trying
to win a commitment from
Democratic leaders to act before
Congress adjourns on an un-
specified number of the 29 fed-
eral judicial nominations that
President Reagan has sent to
Capitol Hill.
GOP leaders, however, were
confident that no more mem-
bers in their party would break
ranks and suggested that a few
might even switch back.
Mend
By JIM SHAMLIN
�ull Writer
Tomorrow night, Mendi
hall Student Center
double-shot of Engli
Showing in Hendrix 'it it r wi
bo 'The Life of Brian" �
by "The Meaning ol Life
films are products
(Monty) Pictures, Inc
TheMontyP) tl
already attracted a
in the United StaU s
panded when MTV I
ing their halt-hour sh
Python FlvingOr
weekly. John Cici
Pal in, two of its fon
bers, recently
office hit "A Fish
Those unfamiliar
group should pr
Over-ex
prematu
NEW YORK ,P
who exercise enouj I
their menstrual pi i
fer an irreversibl
in their bones that could
serious fractures or a �
mature aging, ru
gest.
A 24-year h
periods are irregular car
bones of a 50-year- I
Charles H.Chesnu I
sity of Washington
loss has occurred
there's very little u
it
The bone loss
tentially serious spina
and to less serious fracrt
that will keep worn
cising.
Women can n gaii
periods bv rediK
exercise, but the I
to fullv recover, said Chestnut.
Recreational athk
women who are just tryii i
fit don't suffer disruj
ods.
The loss r
menstrual periods know n
callv as amenorrhea. o, 1
J �
in runners c i lists s
and ballet dancers, sa
Loucks, a research i I
istat the Univ. j
San Diego, and
the effect of exercise oi
Researchers don't kr .
intense exercise a I
periods. "Most people think I
probablv a combinal
tors said Barbara . -
an exercise a
physiologist at the Pa j
cal Center in Seattle v
Biden
NEW YORK (AP) J
seph Biden says he
strength and confidence from
knowledge that he survived a"
threatening brain aneun, sm
"Instead ot making me
that now there's a great urge
about what I must do wi th my
it had the opposite effect 1
serene the Delaware DertxW
said in the Oct. 3 issue of Peo
4
UB40, pictured here, will be
album. The eight Englishm
great hits are such songs as'





fr
n
IC ih Mac Welch, Fundraising � Missy
I listorian � Torrv Davidson, Chap-
Meredith Grogan; Ir Panhellenic �
oks arah Metcalf, kirn Wood and
n hiber la e a great semester! Love,
asters or AOPi.
.1 MISS THE TREBLE MANIAX:
� j at susu- S Treehouse Wednes-
28 Part) Rock A Roll bv REM,
eurus, etc.
RB BOND amso excited to have you
tittle asta Wo will have tons of fun
I etna Good luck with pledging and
nbex you're im special pledge.
iv our Big Sister Lisa Reucher.
ONl c.OINC TO PITTSBURGH? I
� anytime � but especially for
ik WU1 pa I 2 gas Call aftcr-
'11.
swivt heart
ISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
I i Mfuiential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
men) Mon thru Sat- Low
��rki of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
r Mendenhall
CROP WALK 88
r groups interested in
g the 7A annual Gropwalk
unger should attend the ECU Re-
rtt Ra � Ocl t at 7 p.m. in room
ill The walk will be held on
I 6th For more information contact
Exum (ODN) 757-6271 or 830-
IRS
imural independent representative
ingS pt 29 at 5 30 p m in Memorial
Help the intramural tnde-
� vision grow' Your ideas are
r additional info call 757-6387.
NLRSING STUDENTS
receive v our nursing pin by De-
ber 1988, orders must be placed in the
lent Stores, Wright Building, no later
� I 1 Orders should be placed at the
untei Orders must be paid in
: the order is placed.
RL CHILDHOOD CLUB
.v childhood club members are
femindod of the fashion show on how to
ss professionally at the next meeting
sept 2 at 4 p m in Speight 129.
SCEC
I Council for Exceptional Chil-
d will hold a meeting on Oct. 3 at 5 pm.
3 E ervone is welcome to attend.
I PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE
E Student Union Productions Commit-
is accepting applications for members
ten eon the Committee. If interested, or
more info call 757-6611 ext. 210 Stu-
nt Union Office, Mendenhall Student
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
ss students interested in scholar-
should M-cure forms from one of the
pi offices Accounting �
CiCB 32 - Decision Sciences � 3418, Fi-
3420, Management � 3106,
Marketing � 3414. All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (CCB 3210),
ran of School of Business Scholar-
ommirtee, bv Oct. 14. Students may
r r one a more of the scholarships
listed below Planters Bank Scholarship (3
� (Oeach), University Book Exchange
I 2 at S500 each), NCNB (S500), J. Fred
I famblen CS200) Credit Women Interna-
(S200), Cameron-BrownFirst
I mon Scholarship (3 at $500 each), FOR
T1NG MAJORS ONLY: Latney
W Pittard Memorial, Raleigh-Durham
ipter Institute of Internal Auditors
National Association of Account-
ants - Eastern Carolina Chapter Scholar-
ship (S500) DECISION SCIENCES MA-
JOR ONLY: Grant for Decision Sciences
Majors ($125), FINANCE MAJORS
NLY Archie R. Bumette (5600), Ward
cal Estate Scholarship (5300)
$3.55
specified number of the 29 fed-
ral judicial nominations that
resident Reagan has sent to
apitol Hi
GOP leaders, however, were
�confident that no more mem-
bers in their party would break
ranks and suggested that a few
�might even switch back.

� 4


THE EASTt AROI INJAN
SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 Page 7
Mendenhall to show two Python movies
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Suff Writer
Tomorrow night, Menden-
hall Student Center hosts a
double-shot of English satire:
Showing in Hcndrix Theater will
be 'The Life of Brian" followed
bv"The Meaning of Life Both plans to see
tion. MTV's introduction to their
scries includes a warning: to be random silliness, when there
"Monty Python's Flying Circus" is actually a deeper, more intcllec-
has been proven to be an effective tual meaning,
tool in the offending of the easily
offended. So, if you're one of The first film, "The Life of
them, do us both a favor, and Brian" precedes "The Last Temp-
don't watch tation of Christ" in poking fun of
Two things anyone who Christian mythology. It follows
the show should Brian, a poor young man who had
tools, much of the plot will seem allels with modern society.
After that, "The Meaning of
Life" will be screened. This film
takes the audience on a whimsical
stroll through history, laughing
all the way. Monty Python makes
fun of the stupidity of the stone-
age man, feudal lords, and the
modem consumer, covering the
entire history of the search for the
meaning of this awkward thing
called 'life' in less than two hours.
The double-feature begins at
8pm and should last between
three and four hours. Although it
is worth admission at any price,
the show is free to all students
with ID card and activity sticker.
films are products of Python
Alontv) Pictures, Inc.
The Monty Python troupe has is always sniping at some political
already attracted a cult following faction, and usually with amazing
bring: First, a brain, preferrably the misfortune of being born in
one which is sharp. Monty Python Jerusalem on Christmas day, 0
in the United States, which ex-
panded when MTV began show-
ing their half-hour show, Monty
Python Flying Circus, eight times
weekly. John Cleese and Michael
Palin, two o its foremost mem-
bers, recently starred in the box-
office hit "A Fish Called Wanda
Those unfamiliar with the
group should proceed with cau-
subtlety. No country is safe and
no religion sacred when the cam-
era is rolling.
Second, a general knowledge
of English humor and society.
Since they are an English group, a
great portion of their material
deals with British culture and in-
tellect. Without these two vital
AD. From the moment of hisbirth
to his unfortunate crucifixion, he
is mistaken for the messiah with
hilarious results. Most of the
Mother not bitter because of son's
accidental contraction of AIDS
DURHAM (AP) - Matthew's
mother says she is not bitter that
her 8-year-old son acquired AIDS
Over-exercising can cause
premature aging in women
NEW YORK (AP) - Women
who exercise enough to disrupt
their menstrual periods may suf-
fer an irreversible loss of strength
in their bones that could lead to
serious fractures or a kind of pre-
mature aging, new studies sug-
gest.
A 24-year-old woman whose
periods are irregular can have the
bones of a 50-year-old, said Dr.
Charles H. Chesnut of the Univer-
sity of Washington. "Once that
loss has occurred, it appears
there's very little we can do about
it
The bone loss can lead to po-
iaborated with Chesnut.
"I low much of the problem is
due to exercise, how much is due
to nutrition, how much is due to
psycholooical stress 1 don't think
anyone can say with certainty
Estimates of the frequency
vary widely, said Loucks, with
some researchers reporting the
problem in only a few percent of
athletes and others reporting
some disruption of periods in as
many as 40 percent of women
atnletes.
Chestnut said the women he
and Drinkwater studied did not
pothesis.
Women who have lost their
periods do not produce as much
of the female sex hormone estro-
gen, which leads to calcium loss.
So the researchers assume that
exercise-related bone loss is due
to the low estrogen levels in the
amenorrheic athletes Loucks
said.
The same thing haopens after
menopause, leading to the disor-
der called osteoporosis, charac-
terized by loss of calcium and
fragile bones.
Loucks said the underlying
per week or more. (That thrcsh-
hold varies from one individual to
the next, he said.)
"We want to be very sure that
people don't get the idea that
exercise causes low bone mass
Drinkwater said. "Exercise is
beneficial to bone. It's the amen-
tentially serious spinal fractures were running 30 miles to 35 miles
and to less serious stress fractures
that will keep women from exer-
cising.
Women can regain regular
periods by reducing their level of
exercise, but the bones don't seem
to fully recover, said Chestnut.
Recreational athletes, or
women who are just trying to stay
fit, don't suffer disruption of peri-
ods.
The loss or disruption of
menstrual periods, known techni-
cally as amenorrhea, occurs most
in runners, cyclists, swimmers
and ballet dancers, said Anne
Loucks, a research endocrinoloo-
ist at the University of California,
San Diego, and an authority on
the effect of exercise on women.
Researchers don't know why
intense exercise affects menstrual
begin to have problems until they disorder that triggers thcamenor-
the doctor isn't always easy,
however.
They view themselves as
very healthy she said. "It's very
periods. "Most people think it's hard to convince them they have a
probably a combination of fac- problem
tors said Barbara Drinkwater, The mechanism of bone loss
an exercise and eu�ironmenta! un.c. . woiCi�ii is not
physiologist at the Pacific Medi- completely clear, but researchers
cal Center in Seattle who has col- say they do have a plausible hy-
Biden survives aneurysm
NEW YORK (AP) - Sen. Jo-
seph Biden says he gained
strength and confidence from the
knowledge that he survived a life-
threatening brain aneurysm.
"Instead of making me feel
that now there's a great urgency
about what I must do with my life,
magazine.
Biden, 45, who was wel-
comed back to the Senate earlier
this month, said that before the
first of his two operations in Feb-
ruary, he spoke with his sons,
Beau, 19, and Hunter, 18.
film's satire is a wholly imaginary through an accidental blood
conception of the way in which transfusion. She is more upset
Monty Python would have made about the way society has treated
sport of the government of society her family,
of Biblical times had television "Isolation is a big issue with
been invented two thousand these folks. They're all alone
years earlier. Some of this satire, said Chris Weedy, a social worker
however, has unmistakable par- at Duke's Pediatric AIDS Clinic,
where Matthew Lane, not his real
name, is being treated.
Many families of children
with AIDS are rejected by society
and do not have any support sys-
tems to help them with common
feelings of fear, guilt, anger and
denial, Ms. Weedy said. Counsel-
ing, financial assistance and other
support services available to
families whose relatives are fight-
ing cancer, Alzheimer's disease
and other illnesses are scarce for
families whose members have
AIDS.
The Lane family is finding
that out first-hand. When Mat-
thew developed leukemia,
friends and family were there to
comfort him and his family. But
when a contaminated blood
transfusion gave him the AIDS
virus, they suddenly found them-
selves coping alone.
Nurses at their local hospital
quit hugging and holding him.
The tutor who taught Matthew at
home - and who had brought him
cookies and held him in her lap
refused to enter the house.
Some of the other mothers in
the leukemia support group that
helped Mrs. Lane cope with
Matthew's cancer expressed con-
cern that an unnamed child in-
fected with the AIDS virus might
be coming to the same clinic as
their children.
Mrs. Lane became more iso-
lated, afraid to tell them that the
child they feared was her son.
The Lanes fear harrassment.
Even family members shunned
them.
"Matthew used to play with
my sister's children, but not
now said Mrs. Lane.
Her sister will not visit and
ignores the Lanes when they
chance to meet in public.
"They're just real frightened,
I guess Mrs. Lane told The Dur-
ham Morning Herald.
But AIDS can not be acquired
through casual contact with an
infected person. The immune-
weakening disease can only be
transmitted perinatally, through
sexual contact, tainted blood
and contaminated
trials at Duke as part of a multi- upbringing and has taken on the
center study to test the drug's enormous responsibility of caring
toxicity and effectiveness in chil- for a child with AIDS,
dren. The drug is the only medi- "I had a home and I have love
cine approved by the U.S. Food and that's what he needed said
and Drug Administration for Carol, not her real name, during a
treating adults with AIDS. recent interview. The social serv-
Since entering the AZT study ices department in Carol's corn-
June 13, Matthew has been taking munity asked that the real names
the drug in liquid form every six of the child and foster parent not
hours, around the clock. Matthew be revealed,
is more active, has gained weight Social workers say it is diffi-
and feels better, Mrs. Lane said. cult to find foster parents for chil-
The highly-toxic drug is ap- dren with AIDS because of the
rhea in exercising women ap-
pears to be in the brain, perhaps in
the hypothalamus, which con-
trols the body's hormonal system.
The hypothalamus sends signals
to the pituitary gland, which in
turn regulates hormone produc-
tion.
Chesnut and Drinkwater
orrhea that's responsible for the found that women who stop exer-
decrease of bone density cising and regain menstrual peri-
Loucks also notes that many ods can recover some, but proba-
thmgs can cause a woman to lose bly not all, of the lost bone,
regular menstrual periods. "A Because bone loss is difficult
woman who stops menstruating or impossible to remedy, doctors
definitely should consult with her must focus on prevention, Ch-
gynecologist to rule out other csnut said. "We want to get to
possibilities these women athletes as soon as
Getting women athletes to possible after amenorrhea occurs,
within five to six months cer-
tainly, and presumably get them
on estrogen replacement, so we
can prevent that loss before it's
occurred.
Because once that loss has
occurred, it appears there's very
little we can do about it
Estrogen may not be suitable
for all women, however.
"Degarmo & Key a higu-energy Christian rock and roll band, will
be playing at Wright Auditorium Sunday at 7 p.m. This band features
three Grammy & Dove nominees for contemporary Christian music.
Tickets will be available at local Christian bookstores as well as Men-
denhall Student Center.
proved for adult AIDS patients
but still experimental in children
who have the fatal disease. The
Lanes know there are unknown
risks for Matthew in taking AZT,
but they believe the AIDS-fight-
ing medicine is his only chance at
a better and longer life.
"You really don't have a
fear of the disease. Carol said
Gregory deserves a full life no
matter how short it might be.
"I take one day at a time with
it said Carol, who has had cus-
tody of Gregory since December.
"I'm thankful for each day he is
here. He's a human being. He
needs to be held and touched. No
choice. That's the only treatment child or you and me has a guaran-
thry've got and who knows, he tee of tomorrow she said.
even
said.
get to experience Biden
He said many people men- products
tion the 1972 car accident that needles,
killed his first wife and their in-
fant daughter, telling him, "My
God, you've had it tough and
it had the opposite effect. I feel how lucky we were - even if it
serene the Delaware Democrat ended there. We've had a love
said in the Oct. 3 issue of People that 1 believe most people don't
"I tried to point out to them been unlucky
"But I think God balances it
out Biden said.
Matthew is one of about 50
children from North Carolina and
surrounding states who receive
treatment at Duke's Pediatric
AIDS Clinic.
He was 4 when a blood trans-
fusion necessary to fight the leu-
kemia out the AIDS virus into his
body. After years of
chemotherapy, the cancer is in
remission.
Now the young AIDS victim
is in another medical battle where
the weapons are experimental.
might outlive us. You never
know Mrs. Lane said. "It keeps
him with us longer. And he seems
to be doing good, so we just got to
keep it up she said.
Blood banks have developed
screening techniques to prevent
Gregory has been hospital-
ized several times for his illness
and is being treated with AZT at
Duke. Carol said she does not
mind the frequent trips to the
doctor's office, the worries and
contaminated blood from getting the vigilance,
into the pool, but Matthew re- She works part time at night,
ceived his transfusion before the but said Gregory is "her biggest
blood banks began testing for job
AIDS.
Gregory, 8, is one of a grow- "He's just been a real blessing
ing number of children exposed to me. I wouldn't trade what I
to AIDS who was abandoned at a have to do with the child for any-
hospital after birth. His mother, thing she said,
an intravenous drug abuser, was As of Sept. 1, there have been
infected with the virus. 13 reported cases of AIDS in chil-
A woman who heard about dren under the age of 13 in North
He is being treated with AZT, Gregory's plight in the media,
an AIDS-fighting drug, in clinical rescued him from an institutional
Carolina, according to the state's
AIDS Control Program.
AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) - Soul
singer James Brown is again in
trouble with the law.
Brown faces numerous
charges, including assault and
battery with intent to kill, after
leading police on a chase that
began near Augusta, ran into
South Carolina and back into
Georgia.
"The Godfather of Soul" was
free Sunday after posting a total of
$25,298 in bonds in both states.
The half-hour chase ended
after police shot out the tires on
JrUfi mcruredhere willbeperformingatMingesColiseumonMondaOctobertopromotetheirnew Brown's pickup truck. He drove
alburn The ei�ht Englishmen comprise one of the best-known reggae bands around; among their many six miles on wheel rims before
reat hiareten songs as"Red Red Wine" and "Rat in the Kitchen winding up m a ditch, police said.
Singer James Brown in trouble
again, runs from police
The incident began when tenced to two and a half years of
Brown, 55, walked into an insur- suspended jail time, fined $1,200
ance seminar Saturday armed and placed on probation until he
with a shotgun and a pistol, or- performs a benefit concert after
dcred everyone to leave the room pleading no contest to possession
and "escorted" some women out- of the drug PCP and guilty to a
side to lock the restrooms, police charge of resisting arrest and a
said. weapons charge.He was arrested
During the chase, Brown again on Sunday, less than 10
tried to ram police cars with his hourslater,thistimeonadrunken
pickup truck, said Sgt. Frank driving charge, police said
Tiller of the Richmond County
Sheriff's Department.
Brown's wife, Adrienne, said
the singer is on medication for jaw
Brown was released on$l,219
bond after being charged with
driving under the influence, driv-
ing while his license was sus-
surgery. "He's in pain He's not pended and improper movement
in his right mind she said. on the roadway, said Augusta
On July 21, Brown was sen- police Sot. C V. Huffman.





8
THE EAST CAROL INI AN
SEPTEMBER 27,1988
Belated prom for Townsend
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Come-
dian Robert Townsend, with a
little help from an orchestra,
singer and troupe of dancers, was
on stage re-creating the high
school prom he missed 13 years
ago in Chicago.
The orchestra played, the
singer sang, the dancers danced,
and Townsend, clad in his trade-
mark black overcoat and brown
hat, tried to generate the
adolescent magic he missed in
1975.
Townsend and his cast took
over the Wadsworth Theater, on
the Veterans Administration
complex in West Los Angeles, to
rehearse his comedy special for
Home Box Office.
"We're doing a prom skit but
we're using modern music he
said as he took a seat to see how
the show looked from out front.
"Howard Hewitt is going to sing
Once, Twice, Three Times 1
graduated from Austin High
School in Chicago, but 1 never got
to the prom. So I'll just pretend
this is it
The one-hour special, pre-
miering Saturday, is one of a se-
ries of shows Townsend is doing
for HBO. It's called "HBO Com-
edy Hour: Take No Prisoners-
Robert Townsend & 1 lis Partners
in Crime II
"We have a theme in the
shows of taking characters and
breaking the rules he said. "We
want to make people laugh as
hard as they can. I think with
comedy there's a way to be funny
that's totallv clean. There's a wax-
to be funny that's risque. Some oi
the stuff I do is very clean. But
some is borderline blue"
The special also features a
soap opera spoof called "The
Bold, the Black, the Beautiful" and
a very tough game show called
"Street Wise Townsend bor-
rows the cowboy drifter from a
few Clint Eastwood Westerns for
a skit called "How the West Was
Won - Maybe
After his prom-less gradu-
ation in Chicago, Townsend
joined the Second City comedy
troupe. He later worked in the
clubs in New York, where he met
another rising young comedian
named Eddie Murphy. Both audi-
tioned for NBC's "Saturday Night
Live Murphy got it.
"I kept working in the clubs
he said. "I did some movies, like
'A Soldier's Story 'American
Flyers 'Cooley High' and 'Streets
of Fire Eddie and I stayed friends
and supported each other. There
wasn't any rivalry. I directed his
concert (movie) 'Raw
"1 don't think I was ready at
the time. In retrospect, I think if I
had gotten it ('Saturday Night
Live') I wouldn't have become a
writer and director
Townsend is probably best
known for his movie "Hollywood
Shuffle Not so much for the fact
that he co-wrote, directed and
starred in it as for how he paid for
the production.
"I financed nearly half of it
with credit cards he said, nam-
ing the various cards he used.
"The picture cost $100,000, and 1
put $40,000 on credit cards. It
earned $8 million at the box of-
fice
"Hollywood Shuffle" is a sat-
ire on the way the movie industry
treats blacks and the compro-
mises they face if they want to be
a part of it.
"Hollywood Shuffle" got
Townsend some serious attention
from the studios - which suggests
the most important color in Holly-
wood is green.
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$500.00
fl�
The tradition continues
Mojo sportswear presents:
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14 color screenprint now available at:
U.B.E Belks, At Barre Ltd Marsh's Surf Shop,
The Attic & The Wash Pub.
Gordon's
Skyr Turtlenecks
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LUNCH SPECIAL
MONSAT.
11AM-3PM
17-4 oz. Sirloin
Potato Bar
Salad Bar
Hot Bar
Sundae Bar
$4.49
I I
Daily Specials
10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student ID.
FREE DESSERT BAR
with All Steak Dinners
TAKE OUTS OKAY
J 2903 E. 10th St. - 758 27 12
DELIVERY
Cheese Pizza
Cheese and 1 Topping
Each Additional Topping
SPECIALTY PIZZAS
SMALL MEDILM LARGE
si 95 $6.85 $8 95
$5.60 $7.65 SO.90
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Cheese Lovers$6.90
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NEVER FROZEN
SSyLoQ?lw � .�.� DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
� iTSS' JLT?��?Gm EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
FRI.&SAT. 4 PM TO 1:00 AM i-ittmvtt 7Co a a a e
DELIVERY CHARGE 75 rrlUISiS OZ-4445
��� COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 7 DAYS!
LARGE CHEESELOVER S PIZZA
two toppings of your choice plus triple cheese
For $9.99 (You Save $1.90)
DELIVERY
(coupon expires Oct. 1988
EasLCatplina
Playhouse
presents
7t .
� ' 1
MtMMHF.R l�. I.
A MOON FCffi THE MfSSEBOTTEN
IAS! CAROLINA
DANCE
THEATRE
V
The
Boys in the Bond
f kMM kv I � .
Mtll(H 15. It
r a it. i
AGNES OF GOD
U'KII U I- IT a I" l-wx
FILL Ol T ORDER FORM
AND MAIL TO:
East Carolina P1ahmiM
General Manager
Fast Carolina I'mxerviiv
Greensille NC :7HSK �
Oft.HARf.r R PifOM-
CALL (�!�� 757-4.W0
BOX OFFICE INFORMATION
The East Carolina Plavhouve Box Office in
totaled in Room 108 of ihe Mex.ick Theatre
Anc Center until September 2 and is Uitaied
in the lohbv ol McGinnis Theatre after the
above dale Ii � open Morxlax through rn
dav from KIIHf a m to 4 0U p m On per
formance ntghu the Box Office M open until
�10pm Box Officeph.�e (U TSJ M�)0
!nf(rmalton im group rale is available bx
calling the Box. Office
AH vales are final and nun refundable
rVave allow vn dax fin inlet shipment
Ticket orderv received vsithin �mc week ol ihc
performance dale will he- held at the Box
Office
ORDER FORM
N1.MI
Address
( il
PERFORMANCE SELECTION In tele it. � . .
CARMX l
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FU
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Ml IN
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IHr MlsHH.nl IVN
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Mr
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PAYMEN1 Please .heik om
Check payable i. I �' t i' A
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Signdli.itc
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Pee W
CHICAGO (AP) Aim
every morning at 6, Pee Wi
eyes blink open. He stavs in
while his legs limber up It takj
while - sometimes a coupU
hours because of a bullet
lodged in his left call
Around 10 am. he head
the liquor store, where he can
two 40-ounce bottles of 1 I
$1.75 and can begin a longandl
eventful day by "cooling out
It he can round up
change or if he's get n
from his aid che� .
and buy more
This way, Pee Wee
dreamily isolated from the
world around him - the
that comes hurtling out windc
the used diapers dropped indj
ways, the urine-soaked
and the muscled teen-a
who rule the pur
buildings where I �
Pee Wee tr
realization that 1
the housing ; i
Homer Horn,
still here.
"I'm doing
life said
name is B I
nobody's fault bul ni
do regret sorre I
out of thi-
dreaming : gi
doing what i I
am
"i et oru
for several minutes und i
enemy fire in Vk tr
wounded himself wl
ing back to safety
something kids dream a
was a hero.
Tee Wee p
kid whose body had 1
blown away, a kid �.
help, dying in the bush
a sergeant and
threw him over his s
carried him t
knew the white kid -
had never seen him N
would never see him
"I wasn't no h i
savs. "Over there w �.
each other. We all did
matter where you came J
Plus F
.mi
Bong a V(anm ,
willi B
.
I tine
� $100 a morth wtafc �
� (Tt-vhllHT ilk! S" I
vtiinin; t�i six �� � - j
sums fa h i'ijm! .





ECIAL
It.
PM
4 oz. Sirloin
ato Bar
id Bar
Bar
idae Bar
49
DESSERT BAR
Ih All Steak Dinners
UkE OITS OKAY
27 12
mJ.MEDIUMLARGE
- ' � v- i$8 95
$7 65$9 90
-$ 95
$11.80
25$1 1.80
- �$1 i 80
$12.7!)
UALITY
NEVER FROZEN
AREA LIMITED TO
OLINA UNIrERSITY
752-4445
YS! i

;r's pizza
lus triple cheese
S1.90)
I 9mrrp.
1r A - 1
fit-V . The
Beys in tie 14Bond
OFCOD
lMt .M v
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Si H
1
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27,1968 9
Pee Wee: an American hero
CHICAGO (AP)�Almost
every morning at 6, Pee Wee's
eyes blink open. He stays in bed
while his legs limber up. It takes a
while - sometimes a couple of
hours because of a bullet still
lodged in his left calf.
Around 10 a.m he heads to
the liquor store, where he can get
two 40-ounce bottles of beer for
$1.75 and can begin a long and un-
eventful day by "cooling out
If he can round up more
change or if he's got money left
from his aid check, he'll go back
and buy more.
This way, Pee Wee can stay
dreamily isolated from the grim
world around him - the garbage
that comes hurtling out windows,
the used diapers dropped in door-
ways, the urine-soaked stairways
and the muscled teen-age boys
who rule the public housing
buildings where he lives.
Pee Wee tries to ignore the
realization that he was raised in
the housing project called Henry
Horner Homes and, at age 38, is
still here.
"I'm doing nothing with my
life said Pee Wee, whose real
name is Bob JeffersonIsn't
nobody's fault but mine, but I
do regret somehow not getting
out of this place. Aren't no kids
dreaming of growing up and
doing what I do or being what I
am
Yet once, when he was 18,
for several minutes under heavy
enemy fire in Vietnam, already
wounded himself while stagger-
ing back to safety, Pee Wee did
something kids dream about. He
was a hero.
Pee Wee picked up a white
kid whose body had been half
blown away, a kid pleading for
help, dying in the bush. Pee Wee,
a sergeant and squad leader,
threw him over his shoulder and
carried him to safety. He never
knew the white kid's name. He
had never seen him before and
would never see him again.
"I wasn't no hero Pee Wee
says. "Over there we did that for
each other. We all did that. Didn't
matter where you came from or
who you were, rich or poor. You
did for a man what you hoped
they'd do for you
But Pee Wee Jefferson won
the Bronze Star for gallantry. He
also won a Purple Heart and spent
three months in the hospital. The
Army returned him to the front,
where he was shot in the same leg
again.
Two weeks in a hospital in
Da Nang and another Purple
Heart and hewas back in the line
of fire.
It took a third wound, this,
lime shrapnel under his ribs - and
a third Purple Heart - before he
was sent home with a chest cov-
ered with medals, a bad leg, a new
drug habit and little chance of
getting a job or having a future.
"I guess you'd call me a dope
fiend Pee Wee said. Thafs
what I would still be if I could
afford it. Now I drink beer
As Pee Wee grew older, he
was arrested many times and
served 18 months in prison for
burglary.
He's been married twice,
lived with several women, and
fathered five children. He's been
made old not by the war he fought
abroad but by wars he's fought at
home - in the housing projects.
"I don't quite know what I'm
going to do if I don't get myself
out of here Pee Wee said, refer-
ring to the Henry Horner homes,
where he has been shot, stabbed
and beaten. 'This place is con-
trolled by young boys, and for this
place, I am old. I am tired. I need
to set out
Being called a hero could
have changed it all for Pee Wee
Jefferson, but it didn't.
"I ain't ashamed to say it. I'm
so lost I'm waiting to be foundhe
said.
Pee Wee has spumed veter-
ans groups and activities, though
he recently began wearing a cap
that says, "Vietnam Remem-
bered
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
AWMAijofAMEAL "student Special"
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Mon S.it 0 -6
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Shoes in stock:
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Immediately upon graduation you could become a Marine
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Maybe you're the kind of
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Gigantic Warehouse Sale
FOR BACK TO SCHOOL
Parents invited to preview warehouse Sept. 24th
$10 or less
Merchandise valued up to $48
September 26 - October 1
Tom Togs
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Visit Capt Williams at the Student Supply Store
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Visit Our Other Locations
Hwy. 64 East Between Hwy. 70 West
Morehead City, N.C
Wed. - Sat 9-5
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C.
Wed. -Sat. 9-5





I
1

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 27, 1988 Page 10
Pirates fall to 1-3 at hands of USM 45-42
By TIM HAMPTON
HMuna I ditor
The Golden Eagles of the
University of Southern Missis-
sippi must have affixed a jinx on
the ECU Pirates.
In the latest contest between
the two teams Saturday at Ficklen
Stadium, ECU lead by four points
with 1:38 left in the game only to
become victims of a demoralizing
45-42 loss.
With twelve seconds remain-
ing in the fourth period, Southern
Miss quarterback Ailrick Young
connected with right end Preston
Hansford for the game winning
touchdown, capping a 64-yard
drive.
"I hate to use an old cliche, but
I don't know what to say Pirate
Head Coach Art Baker said after
the game. "They came back from a
difficult situation. I thought it
would be di f f icul t. We made some
mistakes on defense and they
(USM) made some great plays on
offense
With the Pirates down 38-27
in the fourth quarter, Charlie Li-
bretto, ECU's back up quarter-
back, came off the pine to deliver
a clutch performance. Libretto
threw for two last period touch-
downs as the Pirates pulled to a
42-38 lead with a little more than
a minute and a half left in the
contest.
"I'm prepared for the script
Libretto said in a post game inter-
view about coming off the bench .
"I'm just glad the coaching staff
has confidence in me to do the
role he added.
Libretto's 84 yard touchdown
pass to tailback Reggie McKinney
in the second quarter stands as the
longest pass play in ECU history.
Drifting back on the ECU 16, Li-
bretto delivered a strike to strid-
ing McKinney at mid-field. In the
play, McKinney turned com-
pletely around in full stride to
catch the ball before outrunning
one defender for the score.
"I picked up the blitz on the
play and saw a excellent pocket
downfield and Reggie used his
athletic ability to catch the ball
Libretto said.
The play surpasses the exist-
ing record of 83 yards set in a 1972
contest against Virginia Military
Institute.
Libretto completed eight of 15
passes for 197 yards while rush-
ing for 40 yards on seven carries.
Coach Baker said there is a possi-
bility that Libretto will start next
week against Southwestern Lou-
isiana, a game that will be played
at Ficklen.
In the first half, ECU drew
first blood after taking the open-
ing kickoff within the USM 20,
where place kicker Robb Imper-
ato nailed a 27-yard field goal.
Although the initial drive of 66
yards was marked by a methodic
running game of fullbacks Tim
James and David Daniels, junior
quarterback Travis Hunter's third
down completion to wideout
Bojack Davenport of 13 yards at
midfield was the key to the se-
quence. ECU took the early lead,
3-0.
James left the game after a
draw play during the first ECU
possession as he hobbled to the
sidelines while favoring his right
leg. His leg was later diagnosed
as being bruised.
Southern Miss also imple-
mented the ground game in their
first possession as tailback Shcl-
ton Gandy ran for six of the first
seven USM plays. Starting at their
own 16, Gandy picked up 23
yards in USM's first four plays.
On a third down and four
situation, Ailrick Young called his
own number as he scampered 42
yards to the ECU 19. After barrel-
ing seven yards on the next play,
Gandy waltzed 12 yards, un-
scathed by the ECU defense, for
the touchdown. USM went up 7-3.
Following an ECU punt,
Linebacker Anthony Thompson
had two consecutive tackles as the
Pirate defense shut down the
Golden Eagles on four plays.
Deep in their own territory, USM
punted to midfield, where return
man Junior Robinson carried the
ball to the USM 46.
A reverse call to running back
Darren Bynum ruffled the Eagles
for a 21 yard pick up. The reverse,
the first of three similar plays used
by the Pirates during the game, set
by a 10-7 margin.
In the Golden Eagles' next
possession, wide receiver Darryl
Tillman caught an eleven yard
pass, only to be popped by defen-
sive back Ricky Torain. Torain's
hit forced a fumble, which de-
fense back Flint McCallum recov-
ered.
Two plays later, quarterback
Libretto, calling his first plays of
the game, threw the midfield pass
to McKinney which netted 84
yards in the longest pass play in
ECU history. Following
McKinney's score ECU lead 17-7.
Following more good run-
ning by Gandy and a 12 yard Brett
Favre completion to Alfred Wil-
liams, the Golden Eagles kicked a
38 yard field goal off the foot of
Chris Seroka. ECU, 17-10.
After an ECU punt, USM
geared in the two minute offense
as Favre scrambled for a good
gain and completed a 30 yard pass
to wide out Robbie Weeks for a
touchdown in the closing seconds
of the half. At the half, the two
teams were deadlocked at 17-17.
On USM's second posses-
sion of the second half, tailback
Eddie Ray Jackson finished off a
90-yard drive by scoring on an
option left play. ECU blocked the
kick for the point after and South-
ern Miss led 23-17.
But the Pirates battled back
with a 72-yard drive behind the
leadership of junior quarterback
Travis Hunter. Hunter's short
touchdown pass to tailback Willie
Lewis before a Robb Imperato
point after kick put ECU ahead
24-23.
On USM's next possession,
Tillman returned the Imperato
kick off to the 37 yard line from the
end zone. Tillman also sparked
the ensuing drive with a 34 recep-
tion from Favre to the ECU one
yard line. Tailback Ricky Bradley
finished off the 63 yard, 8 play
series with a bulldog run over
center Jim Fcrrell's lead block.
USM, 31-24.
With two minutes elapsed in
the fourth quarter, a Hunter pass
was intercepted by free safety
�� �� �
tn9

Reggie McKinney turns upfield in search of the end zone. Although the Pirates amassed 538
yards in total offense, they were unable to top a tough USM squad. (Photo by Thomas Walters.)
up a 16-yard option left touch- Kerry Valerie. Hunter, who corn-
down run by running back Jarrod .cd five of 15 passes for 66
Moody. ECU took the lead back urds, departed the game with
12:57 left in the game.
Coach Baker called on Li-
bretto to fill the script. Big ground
gains by tailbacks Denell Harper
and Bynum of 12 and 16 yards set
up a 33 yard gain on a Libretto
keeper to the opponent's 10.
Harper rambled another 8 yards
to the USM 2 before Imperato
kicked his second field goal
through the uprights to make it
31-27.
And then it was Gandv's turn
to have a running exhibition. On a
first down play from his own
35, Gandy sliced up the middle,
shaking off the linebackers en-
route to a 52 yard gain before
Junior Robinson dragged him
down. Two plays later it was
Gandy up the middle for the
Eagle touchdown, giving USM a
38-27 edge.
With 5:50 left, ECU got the
ball back at their own 20. After
two incompletions, Libretto
found Harper for a first down.
Two plays later, Libretto
scrambled from the pocket, pick-
ing up another first down.
Libretto then looked for
Bynum coming out of the back
field. Finding a split in the zone
defense of the Eagles, Bynum
caught a Libretto pass for a 19
yard advancement.
A fifteen yard roughing the
passer penalty put the Pirates into
scoring position at the 16 yard
line. Following the penalty, Li-
bretto stepped back in the pocket
and drilled a touchdown pass to
wide receiver Walter Wilson. A
successful two point conversion
by Lewis pulled the Pirates within
a field goal as Southern Miss led
38-35.
In playing their best scries of
the game, the Pirate defense
stopped the Golden Eagles on
their next possession as junior
linebacker Compton McCurry
tackled Gandy twice in the play
sequence.
A 36 yard punt by USM's
Bradley gave ECU the ball at their
own 32. The ECU offensive unit
exploded across midfield follow-
ing a pass reception and a option
run by Moody. On the next plav.
Libretto found McKinney in the
flats once more, this time good for
30 yards. The Pirates had a tirt
and ten at the USM 17.
After two unsuccessful run-
ning plays, Libretto whipped a
pass to wide receiver Al Whiting
in the left cornei o( the endone
for the go ahead touchdown. With
1:38 left, the Ficklen "Parent's
day" crowd became jubilant as
the Pirates lead 42-38.
Coming off their best series of
defensive play, it looked as if the
Pirate defenders were flashing
back to a superb performance
against 12th ranked South Caro-
lina last week.
After an illegal proceedure
flag on USM, Favre was sacked
for a nine yard loss. Favre then
threw incomplete on second
down. And then the jinx came
back to haunt the Pirates.
Favre threw over the middle
to Tillman tor a 22 yard gain, then
to Jackson for a gain of nine. And
then came the defensive play of
the game as ECU linebacker
See PIRATES, page 11
Condrey "a good man to have at back

By DAVID MONROE
Staff Writer
On the football field, Kyle
Condrey is a man with a mission:
To be the hardest working player
on one of the hardest working
football teams in the country.
On the football field, Kyle
models himself after his role
models Dwight Stevenson, center
for the Miami Dolphins, and Mike
Webster, center for the Pittsburgh
Stcelers. When asked why, Kyle
responded, "They best portray
what being a professional is on a
year-inyear-outbasis. The deter-
mination and dedication that they
put into their careers to be the best
they can be both on and off the
field
Off the football field, Kyle is
respected by his teammates as a
loyal friend and a true gentleman.
He exemplifies the qualities and
character that he so admires
within his father. "My father has
always told me that everyone is a
friend and that as long as you treat
them as such they in return will
treat and respect you as a friend
Matt McLaughlin, a team-
mate of Kyle's, describes him as
the type of individual who will
keep an eye out for you and pro-
tect your backside. Kyle projects
an image that one would not ex-
pect from an individual who is 6
feet 2 inches tall and weighs in at
an impressive 265 pounds. His
soft spoken manner and pleasant
personality come across in such a
way as to portray an individual
who is confident and sure of his
future and his friends. With this in
mind, it is easy to understand
why he is respected and well-
liked among his teammates and
fellow students.
Early in Kyle's collegiate ca-
reer he was offered a scholarship
to attend Appalachain State Uni-
versity in Boonc, N.C but the lure
of possibly playing against some
��" '
Kyle Condrey
of the best teams in the country
drew him to East Carolina. At East
Carolina, Kyle was faced with
being a walk-on and having to
compete against scholarship ath-
letes for a position on the team.
Through hard work, determi-
nation, and love for the challenge
of competition, Condrey rose to
the occassion and within 2 years
had not only secured a position on
the football team but had also won
a scholarship. By his Junior year,
Kyle had achieved the starting
role at center and was playing
against the powerhouse football
teams of college football that not
more than four years earlier he
had only fantasized playing
against.
The senior year for Kyle Con-
drey will present the greatest
challenge to him as he continues
to lead EastCarolina University at
center, tries to cope with the pres-
sure of being an All-South Inde-
pendent candidate, and prepares
for graduation.
The most memorable mo-
ment in Kyle's career came in
1987's victory over North Caro-
lina State University in Raleigh
before one of the largest crowds in
North Carolina history. This
game marked perhaps his finest
hour as an athelete as he played
the game of his life, but maybe
more than that, this game marked
the first time in which he was
given the nod to start at center.
Although he has lived his
childhood fantasy of playing
against teams such as Florida
State, Auburn, Miami, and South
Carolina, the game against N.C.
State on that rainy September
night will always carry special
pride with Condrey.
An Industrial Tech major,
Kyle hopes to pursue a career in
the construction field after gradu-
ation, but he is quick to point out
that should an offer to play in the
National Football League come
his way he would gladly accept.
Although Kyle has a prefer-
ence for the Miami Dolphins, he
said just having the opportunity
to play with any team, irre-
gardless of their record, would be
a dream come true. As long as ball field he is spending time with food. Kyle is not the exception as
Kyle has the courage to dream, his his girlfriend Kim Quick or listen- he particularly enjoys eatting crab
ing to Van Halen or ACDC
albums. One thing noticeable
about football players in general
is their appetite and choice of
hopes of someday playing profes-
sional football will always be
within his grasps.
When Kyle is not on the foot-
legs; not exactly what one might
expect. Oh well, to each their own.
Boston Red Sox team of hour
IRS has fun weekend
(IRS) - The 1988 Almost Any-
thing Goes competition was held
Thursday September 22 on Col-
lege Hill Field with close to 200
ECU students enjoying free t-
shirts provided by Budweiser and
hilarity provided by the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services.
Six crazy events including a
keg rolling contest, dressing re-
lay, caterpillar walk and three
undescribable events allowed the
co-rec squads to compete for 1st
through 4th place individual tro-
phies.
Clueless found the answer to
four event championships, giving
them a 20 point lead over second
place finishers Adapted 6.
Clueless team members included
Kristen Halberg, Jen Slothower,
Heather Barfield, Clayton Wil-
liams, Mark Barber and B.D.
Wodd. Third place finisher and a
returnee from the 1987 competi-
tion, Gumby's, captured first
place event wins in Fill-er-up.
The fourth spot was up for
grabs and had to be determined
by a tug-o-war competition.
Mackies Perogative and the Un-
touchables pulled out the fourth
place position receiving individ-
ual trophies.
Almost Anything Goes is
held each year by the Department
See IRS, page 11
(AP)� Once again, Boston
was the winner in baseball's great
debate.
For the second weekend in a
row, the Red Sox outplayed their
archrivals, the New York Yan-
kees, and moved closer to a sec-
ond American League East title in
three years.
Roger Clemens gave the Red
Sox seven strong innings Sunday
and Mike Grcenwell and Dwight
Evans backed him with homers as
Boston won 6-0 to take the rubber
match of a three-game series at
New York.
"We just did what we had to
do to win. So did I Clemens said.
The Red Sox lead the second-
place Detroit Tigers by 4 12
games entering the final week of
the season. Any combination of
three Boston victories and Detroit
losses will clinch the division for
the Red Sox.
"We're in the driver's seat
said Grcenwell, who hit a three-
run homer in the first inning. "We
wanted to jump out today. We
knew Roger was going to be out
there
Elsewhere, it was Detroit 7-4
and 2-1 over Baltimore in a
doubleheader; Cleveland 4,
Toronto 3; Chicago 6, Kansas City
5; Milwaukee 4, Oakland 2; Se-
attle 8, Texas 5, and Minnesota 6,
California 2.
Clemens, 18-11, has struggled
over the past two months since
injuring his back while doing
housework. He won for just the
the third time in nine decisions,
striking out seven to increase his
major-league leading total to 287.
The Yankees, 5 12 games
back, have only themselves to
blame for falling out of conten-
tion. They dropped five out of
seven in their weekend series
against the Red Sox and contin-
ued to be hurt by poor pitching
and inconsistent hitting.
Tigers 7, Orioles 4
Detroit, on the brink of elimi-
nation, got a one-hitter from Jack
Morris in the opener of a double-
header and a grand slam from
Fred Lynn in the ninth of the sec-
ond game.
Morris, 14-13, struck out
eight, walked two and allowed
just a seventh-inning single to
Mickey Tettleton. Luis Salazar's
RBI single against Mark William-
son, 5-7, broke a tie in the top of
the ninth inning.
In the second, Lynn's 24th
homer of the season and seventh
career grand slam rallied the Ti-
gers from a 4-3 deficit. Baltimore
relievers Mark Thurmond and
Tom Niedenfuer, 3-4, had held
Detroit hitless over 3 1-3 innings
until Lynn's hit.
Doyle Alexander, 14-11, won
his third straight decision, allow-
ing six hits in eight innings, walk-
ing one and striking out one.
Guillermo Hernandez closed,
earning his 10th save.
Indians 4, Blue Jays 3
Dave Clark's RBI single with
two outs in the bottom of the ninth
gave Cleveland reliever Scott
Bailes his first victory since Aug.
16 and snapped the Indians' four-
game losing streak.
Toronto's Duane Ward, 9-3,
walked Andy Allanson with one
out in the bottom of the ninth.
After Jay Bell struck out, Julio
Franco singled to put runners on
first and third. Clark then lined a
hit between shortstop and third,
his third single of the game, scor-
ing Allanson.
Bailes, 9-14, struck out three
of the six batters he faced and
ended a personal three-game los-
ing streak, covering his last eight
appearances.
Brewers 4, Athletics 2
Robin Yount homered,
doubled and singled and Ted
Higuera combined with two re-
lievers on a seven-hitter as Mil-
waukee salvaged the finale of a
three-game series with Oakland
Higuera, 15-9, scattered five
hits over 6 2-3 innings, striking
out nine and walking four. Chuck
Bosio retired the last two batters
in the bottom of the ninth to cam
his fourth save.
Storm Davis, 16-6, lost for just
the second time in his last 13 deci-
sions.
Mariners 8, Rangers 5
Jay Buhner drove in four
runs, Darnell Coles had four hits
and reliever Gene Walter pitched
four hitless innings as Seattle beat
Texas despite trailing 5-0 after the
first inning.
Walter came on to start the
fifth and retired 12 of the 13 bat-
ters he faced, allowing just a walk
to Oddibe McDowell with two
outs in the sixth. Walter struck out
seven in winning his first career
decision in the American League.
Reliever Craig McMurtry, 2-
3, gave up Cole's two-run double
and an RBI single to Steve Balbont
in the Mariners' three-run sixth
Twins 6, Angels 2
Frank Viola won his 23rd
game, tying him for the major-
league high, and Dan Gladden
stole home in the top of the sev-
enth to put Minnesota ahead to
stay.
Viola, who has lost seven,
scattered nine hits in seven in-
nings.
Danny Jackson of the Cincin-
nati Reds and Orel Hershiser of
the Los Angeles Dodgers also
have 23 victories.
White Sox 6, Royals 5
Chicago rallied in the bottom
of the ninth, shelling four Kansas
City relievers for four runs to
come back from a 5-2 deficit.
SrsT
Continued from page 10
of Intramural-Recreational
ices and Bud weiser. Over
teams took part in this years si
rial event. The next big spef
event will be held spnl
semester. Co-Rec Super Spf
Day, also sponsored
Budweiser provided participc
with more competitive activij
to enjoy.
Duke win
not pretty
(AP) � Steve Spurrier J
reporters some ideas on I
write their stones on Di
that the Blue Devilsare 4 A
first time in 17 seasons
"I don't want you gi
writing that we're a g
team Spurrier said
a lot of stupid thii
here
A 31-7 half time lead
Blue Devils disintegrated in
last 30 minutes and left the
Devils clinging to a 38-34 .
in their first Atlantic Coast
ference outing. It was the t j
time in four games that I
run up a big lead, then j
on to win.
At Northwestern, a 28 I
melted into a 2S-13 edge DJ
had led Tennessee 24" be:
settling for a 31-2b triumph
Citadel had closed to within 2(
before Duke moved ahead f
41-17 victory.
Two Shawn Moore to
downs in the fourth quartei
lowed two Moore to Tim
kleston scoring passes in the tl
period and that made
come closer than Spur
thought it should have been
"Obviously, we're happ
win the football game, but wj
not very happv (with) the w,
happened he said. "We
sitting around here jumping
celebrating and acting like w i
a great football team. We are
Virginia Coach George vj
also was not pleased wit-
team's performance and blarf
defensive lapses for the
which dropped the Caviliers
2 and 1-1.
"They beat us mar i
and I think that their quarter!
had a little too much tirn
said.
Duke quarterback f
Dilweg completed 24 oi 4" pa
for 391 yards.
Clemson and Mary 11
joined the Blue Devils at 1-0ii
ACC this weekend. Clemson
feated Georgia Tech 30-13
Maryland scored with 1:12 to
to defeat orth Carolina Slat
26. Outside the conference V.i
gan held off Wake Forest HMj
Louisville knocked oii N
Carolina 38-34.
Georgia Tech still hasn't
an ACC football game but
have been close in their two p
Pirates lo
Continued from page 10
Glenn Willis leveled Tillmai
midfield, causing the wide
ceivcr to have the breath knoc
out of him.
With USM at midfield, �d
connected with Williams for
key play of the game, a 42 j
completion.
"We've been hurting with
man coverage. They hurt us n
man coverage. Certainly USM
to be given credit Coach "
said.
"Richard Wright (Freshi
defensive back) fell on the
that set up the last score
said.
Tight end Hansford cai
the final touchdown with tw
seconds on clock to seal the
tory for the Golden Eagles.
The team has to be emotl
ally drained Libretto c
mented.
Saturday's loss to Soutl
Miss extends the ECU's stre
misfortune with the Goll
Eagles to five years. Last yearl
Pirates lost in another he
breaker 38-34. Two years aj
yet another string of bad fate
fell short by a field goal as
won 23-21.
The game in 1985 wai
contest as USM rolled 27-
1984, USM pulled out all the i
in a 31-27 win. Regardless of I
games, ECU did win in 1983,
"I should of got a hor
or a rabbit foot for this one
said, still in disbelief
Saturday's game.





f
1
t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27,1988 11
'aeo
I
,1 538
Vs.)
t play,
I a tirt
tui run-
.1 a
nt s
11 ii
i aro-
� .
sacked

nd
came
rvt the Prates
or themiddle
-tin, then rul -
RATES�, P3ge ll
kption as rah
hat oiu n
jachtlMnrown.
i of hour
: I red
i re-
� -as Mil-
ib of a
. � � id
five
striking
�nick
I itters
.
: r ust

� r-
in tour
ad four hits
r Gene Walter pitched
r n ir gs a - s. attle beat
te trailing 5-0 after the
me on to start the
and retired 12 of the P bat
. lowing just a walk
' ' Do we!l with two
. Kth Walter struck out
winning his tirst career
n in the American League
. er Craig McMurtry, 2-
ip Cole's two run double
in RBI single to Steve Balboni
in the Manners' three-run sixth.
Twins 6, Angels 2
Frank Viola won his 23rd
, tying him for the major-
ie high, and Dan Gladden
home in the top ol the sev-
nth to put Minnesota ahead to
lay.
Viola, who has lost seven,
scattered nine hits in seven m-
ungs
Danny Jackson ot the Cincin-
nati Reds and Orel Hershiser of
the Los Angeles Dodgers also
have 23 victories.
White Sox 6, Royals 5
Chicago rallied in the bottom
t the ninth, shelling tour Kansas
itv relievers for four runs to
ome back from a 5-2 deficit.
IRS loaded with fun
Continued from page 10
of Intramural-Recreational Serv-
ices and Budweiser. Over 30
teams took part in this years spe-
cial event. The next big special
event will be held spring
semester. Co-Rec Super Sport
Dav, also sponsored by
Budweiser provided participants
with more competitive activities
to enjoy.
IMA RECKS TOP
FLAG FOOTBALL
MEN
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2. Silver Bullet
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4. High Steppers
5. Sigma Phi Epsilon 'D'
6. Belk D P I
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OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Alfiner. Nike and Reebok)
I I
Duke win
not pretty
(AP) � Steve Spurrier gave
reporters some ideas on how to
write their stories on Duke, now
that the Blue Devils are 4 -0 for the
first time in 17 seasons.
"I don't want you guys to go
writing that we're a great football
team Spurrier said. "We still do
a lot of stupid things around
here
A 31-7 halftime lead for the
Blue Devils disintegrated in the
last 30 minutes and left the Blue
Devils clinging to a 38-34 victory
in their first Atlantic Coast Con-
ference outing. It was the third
time in four games that Duke had
run up a big lead, then had to hang
on to win.
At Northwestern, a 28-0 lead
melted into a 28-13 edge. Duke
had led Tennessee 24-7 before
settling for a 31-26 triumph. The
Citadel had closed to within 20-17
before Duke moved ahead for a
41-17 victory.
Two Shawn Moore touch-
downs in the fourth quarter fol-
lowed two Moore to Tim Fin-
kleston scoring passes in the third
period and that made the out-
come closer than Spurrier
thought it should have been.
"Obviously, we're happy to
win the football game, but we're
not very happy (with) the way it
happened he said. "We are not
sitting around here jumping and
celebrating and acting like we are
a great football team. We are not
Virginia Coach George Welsh
also was not pleased with his
team's performance and blamed
defensive lapses for the loss,
which dropped the Cavillers to 2-
2 and 1-1.
"They beat us man-to-man,
and I think that their quarterback
had a little too much time he
said.
Duke quarterback Anthony
Dilweg completed 24 of 47 passes
for 391 yards.
Clemson and Maryland
joined the Blue Devils at 1-0 in the
ACC this weekend. Clemson de-
feated Georgia Tech 30-13 and
Maryland scored with 1:12 to play
to defeat North Carolina State 30-
26. Outside the conference, Michi-
gan held off Wake Forest 19-9 and
Louisville knocked off North
Carolina 38-34.
Georgia Tech still hasn't won
an ACC football game, but they
have been close in their two losses.
Pirates lose
Continued from page 10
Glenn Willis leveled Tillman at
midfield, causing the wide re-
ceiver to have the breath knocked
out of him.
With USM at midfield, Favre
connected with Williams for the
key play of the game, a 42 yard
completion.
"We've been hurting with the
man coverage. They hurt us in the
man coverage. Certainly USM has
to be given credit Coach Baker
said.
"Richard Wright (Freshmen
defensive back) fell on the play
that set up the last score Baker
said.
Tight end Hansford caught
the final touchdown with twelve
seconds on clock to seal the vic-
tory for the Golden Eagles.
'The team has to be emotion-
ally drained Libretto com-
mented.
Saturday's loss to Southern
Miss extends the ECU's streak of
misfortune with the Golden
Eagles to five years. Last year, the
Pirates lost in another heart-
breaker 38-34. Two years ago, in
yet another string of bad fate ECU
fell short by a field goal as USM
won 23-21.
The game in 1985 was no
contest as USM rolled 27-0. In
1984, USM pulled out all the stops
in a 31-27 win. Regardless of these
games, ECU did win in 1983,10-6.
"I should of got a horseshoe
or a rabbit foot for this one Baker
said, still in disbelief after
Saturday's game.
�1
United Way
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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27, 188
Lewis prevails in long jump
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -
Leaping lizards! Carl Lewis was
furious, bickering with officials
between jumps, but it didn't stop
him from soaring into Olympic
history with American teammate
Roger Kingdom, a hooded blur in
the high hurdles.
Lewis dropped his John
McEnroe imitation just long
enough to fly 28-feet, 7 12-
inches, lead a U.S. sweep with sil-
ver medalist Mike Powell and
bronze medalist Larry Myricks
and become the first long jumper
to win back-to-back golds.
Kingdom, too, won his sec-
ond straight gold in the 110-meter
hurdles with an Olympic record
time oi 12.98 seconds - five one-
hundredths of a second off the
world record bv Rcnaldo Ne-
hemiah and third-fastest ever af-
ter Kingdom's own 12.97 last
month.
Kingdom resembled the
comic book character Flash in his
red and white hooded racing suit,
skimming over the hurdles to
become the first two-time Olym-
pic winner in the event since Lee
Calhoun in 1956 and 1960.
The prospect of an American
gold rush in the final week of the
Games seemed more real a day
after Matt Biondi donned his fifth
gold and record-tying seventh
medal and Florence Griffith
lovner lit up the stadium with her
blazing speed and brilliant smile.
Seven U.S. fighters reached
the quarterfinals, the men's bas-
ketball team made the semifinals
with a ridiculously easy 94-57
romp over a good Puerto Rican
team and diver Greg Louganis
was poised to defend his platform
title in the finals Tuesday.
Lewis, who hopes to grab two
more golds in the 200 sprint and
400 relav after gaining a silver in
the 100 against Canada's Ben
Johnson, got into an unusual
quarrel against the officials.
"It's not fair Lewis claimed
repeatedly, complaining he
wasn't being given enough time
between jumps.
He had first argued the sched-
uling was too tight between his
200-meter qualifying heats and
the long jumps, lie ran in the last
first-round heat and the first sec-
ond-round heat of the 200 and
was scheduled to go first in the
long jump.
"They couldn't have found a
worse way to set me up he said.
Was it a challenge?
"More than that he said. "I
think it was a planned challenge
After three qualifying jumps,
though, he was moved back to
first in the order, and he com-
plained he should have 10 min-
utes between jumps.
Instead, he said, an official
told him to get on the runway
right away.
"I said the rules state inbe-
tween jumps you have to get at
least 10 minutes' rest Lewis
said. "It wasn't really a confronta-
tion. It was more of a discussion.
And then it became a stall tactic.
And then the funny thing is the
clock went dead, so there is a
Lord.
"1 seized the moment, took
the adrenalin and came up with a
great
In other track events, unher-
alded Paul Ereng of Kenya foiled
Said Aouita's bid for a distance
triple, kicking to victory in the
800; Ibrahim Boutaib of Morocco
won the gold in the 10,000; and
East Germans Sigrun Wodars and
Christine VVachtel finished 1-2 in
the women's 800 with American
Kim Gallagher taking third.
Olga Bryzgina of the Soviet
Union won the womcn's400gold,
with defending Olympic cham-
pion Valerie Brisco of the United
States fading to fourth.
Florence Griffith Joyner
couldn't stop smiling Sunday,
beaming broadly from start to
finish as she proved herself the
fastest woman in the world.
She ran in the red U.S. track
suit instead of the sexy one-
legged outfit that brought so
much attention at the Olympic
trials. No one, though, ever came
across the finish line in the Olym-
pics the way Griffith Joyner did:
bright red lips unsmudged, mas-
cara on her eyes and long finger-
nails painted red, white, blue and
A favorable wind slightly
over the limit during her 10.54-
second run ruined her bid to
break the Olympic record of 10.62
she set in the second qualifying
heat on Saturday, but the gold
was much more important to her.
It may, in fact, be worth millions
in endorsements.
Swimming ended Sunday
with Biondi draping a fifth gold
and a record-tying seventh medal
around his neck after anchoring
the 400 medley relay, and East
German Kristin Otto winning the
50 freestyle for a sixth gold to cap
the most glittering Olympics evei
by a woman.
"As a child said the 22-year-
old Biondi, "you awaysdreamol
the Olympic Games and you sort
of see athletes on television as
superherocs - like Superman and
Mighty Mouse and all those tre-
mendously strong and undefeat-
able people.
"And now, I put that in per-
spective with what I've done. Not
only did I make it to the Olympic
Games, not only have I won an
Olympic medal, not only an
Olympic gold medal, but I won
seven Olympic metals in one
Olympics It's a hard thing to
grasp
YOUR SPORTS STATION
Professor
Eating & Drinking
DON'T MISS (1 EVERY
OUR REGGAE WEDNESDAY
CELEBRATION NIGHT
Casual Dining at its Finest!
Featuring our soon-to-bc-famous Double-Shot Margaritas!
LOCATED IN THE FARM FRESH
SHOPPING CENTER
11 am-l am Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pmSunday 355-2946
Everything to
Get You Back On
the Slopes.
Come in and see the largest
selection in the area of
alpine ski equipment,
along with a superb
selection of the
latest in designer
fashion wear.

GORDON'S
StOLOtUUtL
GOLF AND SKI SHOP
264 By-Pass 756-1003
N�! to Gra�nvllla TV and Appliance)
SHIRT COUPON
SHIRTS
CLEANED
FOR
This coupon must be presented
ith shirt order
1
I
SHIRT COUPON
mmm
SPECIALIZING
IN ROCK N
ROLL
MEMORABILIA
SINCE 1980
LICENSED CONCERT
T-SHIRTS NOW ON SALE
YNGW1E MALMSTEEM Burning GuitarOdyssey Tour Black Tee $13.75
JOE SATR1AM Cosmic Photo Black Tee S13 75
LED ZEPPLIN "Swan Song' Blue Tye Dye S17.50
INXS "INXS" Denim Tye Dye Tee S17.50
J1MI HENDR1X "Smear Face PurplePink Tye Dye $17.50
R.E.M. "Allied" Purple Tee S13.75
GRATEFUL DEAD "Dead Set White Tee $13.75
U2 "Joshua Tree Black Tee S 13.75
PINK FLOYD "Bomer" Black Tee $13.75
LYNYRD SKYNYRD Tribute Tour White Tee SI3.75
"JUST IN "CrewSweat Shirts S 18.75 & Sweat Pants $19.75"
AEROSMITH. BON JOVI. IRON MAIDEN. MOTLEY CRUE. & POISON
INXS Denim Tve Dye Sweatshirt $26.50
ORDERING INFO:
M. L, XL Available
Personal Checks & Money Orders Accepted
Add 5 N.C. Sales Tax
SHIPPING CHARGES:
Add $1.65 for first tee and 45� for each additional tee
All Items sent Insured UPS
ITS NOT TOO EARLY TO SHOP FOR CHRISTMAS
P.O. Box 1803
Dept. E
Greenville. N.C. 27835 1803
(919) 355-2747
Call or Write about your Favorite Artist
' CUSTOMIH M�VCI
The ECU Special Events
Committee and
k i
rtvts
X
MUSIC TELEVISION
RANDEE'S
CAMPAIGN
CARAVAN
Suffering
From Total
Mental Melt
Down? Need
A Mid-Week
Break
GREENVILLE'S HOTTEST
HUMP-DAY CELEBRATION
WEDNESDAYS
Fiesta
Grande
FLEMI.NG
RANDEE of the REDWOODS
Tuesday, September 27,1988
akw HuMwaw � (31 V 99 am
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
ECU Students $4.00 Public $6.00
Tickets Available at Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
M-F 11 a.m.Sp.m.
�Fiesta All Night
Tacos-n-nachos 5-7
�Off The Cuff Lounge
at the Sheraton
Greenville
presents The
Return of
Mexican Fiesta
Siesta All Day;
Fiesta All Night
Chihuahua's $1.00
� Marguritas $1.75
� Free Non- Alcoholic
Beverages For
Designated Drivers
NO COVER CHARGE
�. ���
Must Have Valid Drivers
License And Be 21 To Enter
RAMADA INN
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666





Title
The East Carolinian, September 27, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 27, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.628
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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