The East Carolinian, September 22, 1988






Coming Tuesday:
Emilie Henning, dean of the nursing school, talks
ibout the low test scores of ECU nursing graduates
year.
Features:
"American Portrait" is reviewed by Jim Shamlin, see
:age 13
Sports:
A look into the ECU Sports Medicine Department,
rvho they are and what they do, see page 17.
She lEaat (Earolmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 21
Thursday September 22,1988
Greenville, NC
22 Pages
Circulation 12,000
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1988
ECU
1.
Cultural
Afro American
Center
2. Amphitheater
3. Austin Building
4. Ay cock Residence Hall
5. Bclk Building � School of
Allied Health and Social Work
6. Belk Residence Hall
7. Blount House � Public Safe-
ty, Traffic, and Informatioin
Center
8. Bloxton House
9. Brewster Building
10. Cafeteria Building
11. Central Supply � 2nd Floor
12. Chancellor's House
13. Christenbury Memorial Gym-
nasium
14. Clement Residence Hall
15. Cotten Residence Hall
16. Croatan Building
17. Erwin Hall
18. Faculty Offices
19. Ficklen Stadium
20. Flanagan Building � School
of Technology
21. Fleming Residence Hall
22. Fletcher Music Center �
School of Music
23. Fletcher Residence Hall
24. Garage
23. Garrett House � Computing
Center Annex
26. GaiTett Residence Hall
27. Graham Building
28. Greene Residence Hall
29. Harrington Field
30. Heating Plant
31. Home Economics Building �
(School of Home Economics
32. Howard House � News
Bureau
33. Infirmary
34. International House
33. Irons Building
36. Jarvis Residence Hall
37. Jenkins Fine Arts Cenici
School of ArtGray Gallery
38. Jones Residence Hall
39. Joyner Library
40. Leisure Systems Studies
41. Maintenance Building, Ceu
tral Warehouse
42. Mamie Jenkins Building
43. Mendenhall Student Cenu.
44. Messick Theatre Arts (ente,
45. McGinnis Auditorium
46 Minges Coliseum
47. Nursing Building ScL
of Nursing
48. Personnel Department
49. Pirate Club Building
50. Publications Building
51. Ragsdalc Hall
52. Rawl Annex
53. Rawl Building Schoi i
Business
54. Regional Development In
stitute
55. Scales Field Houm
56. Science Building
57. Scott Residence Hall
58 Slay Residence Hall
59. Speech and Hearing Buildi.ifc
60. Speight Building School of
Education Depaitmcnt ol
Psychology
61. Spilman Building
62. Sports Medicine Building
63. Taylor Slaughter fclu
Center
64. Tyler Residence Hall
65. Umstead Residence Hall
66. Whichard Building
67. White Residence I.all
68. Wright Annex
Parking 1988
Suggested Routes for General Public Parking � Ficklen Stadium
Parking � Greenville Boulevard 24 Bypass) to CharfcM Boulevard
Lou � Greenville Bfvd c Mm Street to Charles Bivd to Ficfcien Dnv
Either 14th Street or Greenlie Boulevard to Elm Street to Overlook Drive
� 10th Street c 14th Street to Charles Boulevard
IS'BAN! f
"BATE CLUB
FNTBANCE
Suggested
Parents'
Area
Parents'Day Schedule
Saturday, September 24,1988
4 � � .
8:00 a.m. -10:30 a.m.
Regis tr ation Check-In
Mendenhall Student Center
8:30 a.m. -10:30 a.m.
Chancellor's Reception
Mendenhall Student Center
11:15 a.m. -1:15 p.m.
Picnic Lunch
Menu: Fried Chicken, Barbeque, Cole Slaw
Cornsticks, Brunswick Stew, Canned Drink
Ficklen Stadium
1:30 p.m.
Football: ECU vs. Southern Mississippi
Ficklen Stadium
Tickets Required
East Carolina University
PRIVATE RV PARKING
l rmited number ol private RV parking
spaces atailable nnl�t the Pirate Club
at (SJlsi) 7S7178 tor further details
It is suggested that parents park in either of the gray areas m the map
to the left, especially if they plan to attend the pre-game picnic. Park
ing will not be allowed on the picnic grounds beside the stadium. 11
gray parking areas are the closest ones to the picnic grounds.
i�'
The Easi
would like to welcome all
parents to
ECU'S 1988 Parents
Day
Football seating:
Parents attending Saturdays
game h Southern Mississippi
have be seated in the areas
grayed on this map.
Job c
By JOE HARRIS
Nm Editor
One hundred twenty-
businesses and schools will
campus in October mtervu
seniors and graduates thi
the Job Planning and Place
Center.
Ihis number does not in
daily calls the placement
receives from banks, accoi
firms, sales firms, etc. who c
not to recruit on campus, bf
to have resumes mailed to
The placement centc
cated in Bloxton House, bef
Green Dormitory and MeJ
hall Student Center, lsdesigj
help students with the job
ing process. Even though he
students find )obs is the maij
of the Placement Center, it i
many job related services.
"We otter a number
related workshops. Ever
from resume and interview
shops to career counsel;i I
Jim Westmoreland, assistal
rector. All workshops are ol
several times throughoutj
month.
Illegal ah
via UTE
(CPS)� Like most larj
leges and universities, thl
versity of Texas at El Paso J
has an extensive system of
ground storm sewers anj
nels.
But unlike most sc
LTEP is not far from the N
border. The school's
ground tunnels have be
link in the flow of Mexicai
ers illegally entering the
States looking for pbs.
"Traffic is increasing
economy in Mexico gets
and these people are lookn
Student I
GET TO T
The Saturday Clii
Service will be he!
p.m. on Saturday
The Sunday Clini
2:00 p.m. to 4:00
Call the Student
more information I
L
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I! U.I ASTAROUNIAN
SEPTEMBER � 3
ill!

n � �
i b
Job center offers opportunity

By OI HARRIS
hundred twenty-eight
businesses and hools will be on
campus in October interviewing
seniors and graduates through
the ob Planning and Placement
. "enl
This number does not include
daih calls the placement center
receives trom banks accounting
firms sales firms etc who choo se
nol ' mi on campus, but ask
to ! i c � sumes mailed to them.
iicement center, lo-
cated in loxton House between
trmitor) and Menden-
hall Stud� nl enter, isdesigned to
itudents with the job hunt-
� . ,s. E en though helping
idents find jobs is the mam goal
ot the Placement Center, it otters
main job related services
We otter a number ot job
kshops Everything
arid inter iev vvork-
. said
oreland, assistant di-
11 workshops are offered
several times throughout each
moi
rhe center is a service. We're
here lor those who want to take
advantage ot the service said
Westmoreland.
I le said, "Our emphasis is on
jobs as careers, but we also help
with part time and summer em-
ployment. In this case, the person
we place gets work and interview
experience, which is invaluable;
but we want to put people into
long standing positions
Westmoreland added the tact
more people who register get jobs
with companies that do not even
recruit on campus. He said they
get jobs through companies
which call and ask the center to
mail qualified resumes, (qualified
meaning in a specific field of
study).
The placement center also
has three "resource rooms
rhese rooms are there to provide
the student with information
about the companies coming to
campus
Westmoreland urged every-
one graduating in December,
May or during the summer to
pick up the registration packet.
till it out and return it. The packet
consists ot instructions, basic data
cards listing job preference and
location and three reference
torms. Applicants should also
include a resume in the returned
materials.
Once a student is registered
with the Placement Center they
begin receiving a job guide, which
lists companies and addresses
that will be on campus conduct-
ing interviews.
He also added the deadline
tor sign ups to begin interviewing
in October is tomorrow (Friday)
at 2 p.m "People need to register
now, or as soon as possible be-
cause some companies only come
to campus once a semester Early
registration gives an applicant
more opportunity said
Westmoreland.
The Placement Center keeps
records on file or "active" tor 10
years. This me.ins 10 years from
the time ot graduation, a resume
is still being given to perspective
employers.
From 70 to 75 percent of stu-
dents registering through the
Placement Center have a job bv
the September that follows gradu-
ation. February and March are
primary recruitment months.
Westmoreland said, "The
people we see at the beginning of
the year are often the ones that
end up with jobs at the end ot the
year
"1 want students to have a
knowledgable and realistic ap-
proach to getting a job. We are
here to help the student with eve
r thing resumes, proper inter-
view techniques, helping them
get to know more about with who
they are going interview and most
important getting the interview
said Westmoreland.
Greenville' Finest Bakery for over 65 vtan
(buy your
B-Day
Phone: 752 5251
Happy Birthday
friends personalized
cakes at Dieners)
815 Dickinson Avenae
Greenville. N.C.
Illegal ailens enter U.S.
viaUTEP tunnels
.OhAParents vUv
This Party's For You! 4
Anything
has a
-
an exti
1
1 ike most large col-
universities, the I ni
rexasatElPasofUl
m of undi r
m rs and tun-
" it s hools
�t tar from the Mexican
school's und r-
Is have become a
flow I Mexican work-
nited
it is in� r( asing as the
in Mexico gets worse,
;eare looking tor a
better life 1 t Al Carpio of
I TEP's campus police said.
The tunnels are patrolled
regularly, Carpio said, and cam-
pus 'police often find undocu-
mented Mexican workers who
hide there. The workers are then
turned over to El Paso Police or
the I S Border Patrol.
UTEP police also less fre-
qu ntlv find local teenagers usii
drugs and criminals who sneak
through the tunnels and break
into campus buildings. Some-
tin - itolen property is later
� und in the tunnels, Carpio said.
y
Paper

?Salutes The Parents Of
ECU Students. ' K
Visit Us For All Your Party Supply Needs.
v-K Cups, Plates, Napkins, Trays, etc �
Parties For 8 to 8,000
W ' V vV : l , C U
v r
Jells Four Square f K
Iwy. 43 South S
a �������i���"
Student Health Services
GET TO THE GAME ON TIME
The Saturday Clinic at the Student Health
ServK e will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
p.m. on Saturday, September 24, 1088
The Sunday Clinic will be held as usual Irani
2:00 pan. to 4:00 p.m.
Call the Student Health Services at 757-6841 lor
more information or questions.
PARENTS DAY AT U.B.E.
SATURDRY, SEPTEMBER 24, OPEN 9-6
iSJS
vvi
Schick
Ultrex Plus
PIVOTING RAZOR
The ONLY pivoting razor with a
lubricating comfort strip and
one-push cleaning for the
ultimate shave!
$�
&&
SC
V�cK
Complete this FREE
Schick Razor Sweepstakes Entry
and nnng to youi I N �1 )re
STORE COUPON
iftS � UtiiOTm (adi � Viddxng Ttgvslry
� (fwui � Cyit&L
� S'uppiif IfOilahU � Spuiol (Jrders
fnu t Wrapping � Tlia aMtrCard and
In fitntst lT.nu t.vmLahU
Schick
Ultrex Plus
PIVOTING RAZOR
st PER STUCfs" s-
.fooiiange
i -
S16 S. Cotanche Street
. 3
entry to thi ��.��� - ���� � i
HURRY - QUANTITIES LIMITED






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1988 3
inkins Fin Arts C cniei
of ArtGray Gallery
nes Residence Hall
yner Library
isure Systems Studies
(aintenance Building, C en
'arehouse
lamie Jenkins Building
lendenhall Studentenu .
lessick Theatre Arts Cento
lcGinnis Auditorium
hnges Coliseum
lursing Building VI .
using
Icrsonncl Derailment
irate Club Building
ublications Building
jagsdale Hal!
awl Annex
awl Building School
If SS
plegtonal Development i;

rales r-ieki House
leence Building
c Ml Residence h.dl
llav Residence Hall
jpeech and Hearing Building
jpeight Building School of
Cation Depaitment of
lology
tpilman Building
ports Medicine Building
Taylor Slaughter Ala .�
le'
ler Residence Hall
bmstead Residence Hall
hichard Building
hite Residence I.all
right nnex
dule
988
law
�ink
ersity
ic gray areas on the map
pre-game picnic. Park-
beside the stadium. The
iicn i c grounds.
:
mo
Job center offers opportunity
By JOE HARRIS
Newt Editor
"The center is a service. We're
here for those who want to take
One hundred twenty-eight vantage � service �id
businesses and schools will oe on
Westmoreland.
campus in October interviewing . "e � �V e P ait �SS
seniors and graduates throughM 22? buj ?SP
the Job Planning and Placement w,lth Phme and summer em-
Center.
This number does not include
daily calls the placement center
receives from banks, accounting
firms, sales firms, etc. who choose
not to recruit on campus, but ask
to have resumes mailed to them.
The placement center, lo-
cated in Bloxton House, between
Green Dormitory and Menden-
hall Student Center, is designed to
help students with the job hunt-
ing process. Even though helping
students find jobs is the main goal
of the Placement Center, it offers
many job related services.
"We offer a number of job
related workshops. Everything
from resume and interview work-
shops to career counseling said
Jim Westmoreland, assistant di-
rector. All workshops are offered
several times throughout each
month
ployment. In this case, the person
we place gets work and interview
experience, which is invaluable;
but we want to put people into
long standing positions
Westmoreland added the fact
more people who register get jobs
with companies that do not even
recruit on campus. He said they
get jobs through companies
which call and ask the center to
mail qualified resumes, (qual'fied
meaning in a specific field of
study).
The placement center also
has three "resource rooms
These rooms are there to provide
the student with information
about the companies coming to
campus.
Westmoreland urged every-
one graduating in December,
May or during the summer to
pick-up the registration packet,
fill it out and return it. The packet
consists of instructions, basic data
cards listing job preference and
location and three reference
forms. Applicants should also
include a resume in the returned
materials.
Once a student is registered
with the Placement Center they
begin receiving a job guide, which
lists companies and addresses
that will be on campus conduct-
ing interviews.
He also added the deadline
for sign ups to begin interviewing
in October is tomorrow (Friday)
at 2 p.m "People need to register
now, or as soon as possible be-
cause some companies only come
to campus once a semester. Early
registration gives an applicant
more opportunity said
Westmoreland.
The Placement Center keeps
records on file or "active" for 10
years. This means 10 years from
the time of graduation, a resume
is still being given to perspective
employers.
From 70 to 75 percent of stu-
dents registering through the
Placement Center have a job by
the September that follows gradu-
ation. February and March are
primary recruitment months.
Westmoreland said, "The
people we see at the beginning of
the year are often the ones that
end up with jobs at the end of the
year
"I want students to have a
knowledgable and realistic ap-
proach to getting a job. We are
here to help the student with eve-
rything � resumes, proper inter-
view techniques, helping them
get to know more about with who
they are going interview and most
important getting the interview
said Westmoreland.
Illegal aliens enter U.S.
via UTEP tunnels
-jili Dorrir'cFnr Vrtlll
(CPS)� Like most large col-
leges and universities, the Uni-
versity of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)
has an extensive system of under-
ground storm sewers and tun-
nels.
But unlike most schools,
UTEP is not far from the Mexican
border. The school's under-
ground tunnels have become a
link in the flow of Mexican work-
of
better life Lt. Al Carpio
UTEPs campus police said.
The tunnels are patrolled
regularly, Carpio said, and cam-
pus police often find undocu-
mented Mexican workers who
hide there. The workers are then
turned over to El Paso Police or
the U.S. Border Patrol.
UTEP police also less fre-
quently find local teenagers using
ers illegally entering the United drugs and criminals who sneak
States looking for jobs. through the tunnels and break
'Traffic is increasing as the into campus buildings. Some-
economy in Mexico gets worse, times stolen property is later
and these people are looking for a found in the tunnels, Carpio said.
Student Health Services
GET TO THE GAME ON TIME
The Saturday Clinic at the Student Health
Service will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
p.m. on Saturday, September 24, 1988
The Sunday Clinic will be held as usual from
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Call the Student Health Services at 757-6841 for
more information or questions.
This Party' siFor You!
Anything
?Salutes The Parents Of A j �
ECU Students. V I
Visit Us For All Your Party Supply Needs, y
fci Cups, Plates, Napkins, Trays, etcv
A A Parties For 8 to 8.000
Bells Four Square
Hwy. 43 South
355-6212
DAY AT U.B.E
PTEMBER 24, OPEN 9-6
Schick
UttrexPlus
PIVOTING RAZOR
The ONLY pivoting razor with a
lubricating comfort strip and
one-push cleaning for the
ultimate shave!
A
cHVk A'
HceJi '
Complete this FREE
Schick Razor Sweepstakes Entry form
and bring to your bookstore
STORE COUPON
c$ Schick
yV UttrexPhis
To receive your free
school razor fcrst till in
the required information
Then bring this coupon !o
tne bookstore
Hurry: quantities are limited
ONE PEA STUDENT ONLY.
PIVOTING RAZOR
Name
Address.
City.
State.
Zip Code-
I
516 S. Cotanche Street ���� i
This coupon is your entry to the Schick Athletic Bag Sweepstakes i
HURRY - QUANTITIES LIMITED
J





QHfe iEaat fflaroltnian
Pete Fernald, oaKMM
Chip Carter, M�jmj u�
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of AJvertiang
Joe Harris, Nhuior
Doug Jot inson, sport, wuor
Tim Ham pton, mm em
Michelle England,crM�r
Debbie Stevens, scr�y
Jeff Parker,smt���
TOM FlIRR, QmMnMnq
Susan Hovvei l, p. .h it. ����!
JOI IN W. MEOL1N, Art Dtettr
Mac Clark, b�si�ssmuxct
September 22,1988
OPINION
Page 4
Parents
Welcome to The East Carolinian
Parents, welcome to ECU and
The East Carolinian.
We are the totally student-run
newspaper of East Carolina Univer-
sity, and we are dedicated to bring-
ing the students, faculty and staff of
this school the best campus-related
news, sports and features, along
with state and national news we feel
will be of interest to the campus
body.
The East Carolifiian is a pretty
liberal paper editorialwise, al-
though we try to maintain a balance
with our Campus Forum, which lets
all students, staff and other people,
liberal, conservative or non-commi-
tal, express their viewpoints.
We've had a shaky transition
from the editorial staff of last year,
but things seem to be running much
smoother now. We are continually
striving to produce the best paper
possible � with more student-ori-
ented news, a more sensitized edito-
rial viewpoint and overall high-
quality content.
This is a unique paper in that it is
entirely student run, it contains a
full page of student comics every
week, a satire page, football fore-
casts, and weekly health and crime
prevention columns.
So enjoy Parent's Day and enjoy
the paper. Please feel free to write us
with any criticism or suggestions.
Your opinion, as well as your
children's, is welcome.
Halloween
Celebration should be moved back
This year, Greenville's famous
downtown clebration will fall on a
Monday night. Unless the festival is
moved back to the Saturday night
before it, the city and the school will
face a lot of problems.
For ECU students, the problem
will manifest mainly as missed
classes. The percentage of profes-
sors who will take mercy on those
students wishing to take part in the
Halloween partying will be low.
And technically, there's no rea-
son teachers should cancel classes
just to accomodate students. After
all, no one is required to go out and
drink on Monday nights.
The city and its residents will
face several problems. One of those
problems is purely financial. Since
very few students from colleges in
other towns will make the effort to
travel to greenville on a Monday,
bars, convenience stores and other
retailers will sustain considerable
losses in their traditional Halloween
revenue.
The Attic has taken steps to
avoid this by offering to host the
School of Art's traditional Beaux
Arts Ball on that Monday. While this
may solve their problems, the over-
all tourist trade wr till be down.
Even so, there ill still be a large
crowd downtown Monday night.
That means a lot of lot of empty beer
cans and other refuse all over the
streets on Tuesday morning. No
matter how good the city's clean up
crew is, they won't be able to clear
Fifth Street up in time for the morn-
ing rush hours.
The alternative is to hold the
downtown celebration on Saturday
night. People from all over the state
have plenty of time to get in town.
No one misses valuable class time
due to hangovers on Tuesday. Re-
tailers and nightclub owners are
happy.
Teachers are happy. Students are
happy. The city has time to recover
before the week begins. The pro-
posal is a valid one and should be
thought about thoroughly during
the next month before it's too late
to do anything about it.
Once more, the cartoon
To the editor:
Can you stand one more letter on
the pirate and the lady?
Admittedly schools tend to
choose aggressive animals as their
totems. State chose wolves; Califor-
nia, bears. Professional teams like
names that reflect their areas � The
Minnesota Twins, the Milwakee
Brewers, the Houston Oilers, the San
Francisco 49crs. The Pirate is both
aggressive and related to the history
of coastal Carolina. Perfect symbol?
No! There is a good deal to ad-
mire in wolves and bears. Oil and
gold are important to the economic
history of Texas and California. The
joint sponsorshipof Minneapolisand
St. Paul is reflected in the Twins. But
the Pirate brandishing a sword in
front of a tied-up lady is only too
typical of the behavior associated
with pirates. Except for the superfi-
cially romantic freedom of pirates,
we might as well call ourselves the
Thieves or the Murderers. (I pass
over the Freudian symbolism.)
The East Carolinian, with essential
help from perceptive letter writers,
has done a service to the community
in high-lighting the vocious aspects
of the pirate. It's time to think about a
suitable successor for our school
symbol.
Edith Webber
Emeritus, English Department
Pen pal
To the editor:
I am writing this letter in hopes
that you will assist me in my unfortu-
nate situation. 1 am currently serving
a 12-year sentence for a burglary and
I haven't got any true friends left out
there in the free world. It seems as
though the friends I did have only
lasted as long as I could pay the tab
for their friendship.
If it matters at all, 1 am a 31 year
old Hungarian male with brown
hair, brown eyes, 5'7" tall and weigh
165 pounds. I have many interests
and I try to take advantage of every
opportunity to keep myself mentally
afloat and to better myself.
It is in the area of morale that 1 am
concerned with the most. Frankly,
this place is unbelievable and at night
when our mail is being passed out I
find myself standing around waiting
and wishing for a letter that never
seems to arrive. Believe me, it be-
comes very disturbing after awhile.
I would like very much for you to
print my letter. Perhaps I will get
lucky and someone might decide to
write. 1 will answer all letters as 1
truly want and need your friendship!
Bill S. Santa 23013
Westvill Correctional Center
P.O. Box 473
Westville, Indiana 46391
Dukakis vs Bush
To the editor:
In the race for the big one, it
seems that things have deteriorated
to a point both candidates wanted to
keep above, a contest of personali-
ties. With each candidate trying to
Parking bothers freshmen
malign the other's character or patri-
otism, the closest thing we get to
hearing a discussion of the issues is
who can recite the pledge of alle-
giance the best.
Bush claims that Dukakis is soft
on crime, soft on defense, and lacks
the foreign policy experience we
need in a leader. It's funny that we
never hear Bush talk about all the
foreign policy experience Reagan
had when we first elected him, which
amounted to the few movies he did
where his character was in the army
and overseas, or something.
In return, Dukakis impgns Bush
by blaming him for the Iran-Contra
affair, our kissing up to right-wing
dictatorships, the unprecedented
deficit (national and trade), and the
Noriega connection, not to mention
the Pentagon scandal. Bush attacks
Dukakis' patriotism and Dukakis in
turn questions Bush's competence.
Bush says that Dukakis lacks a
strong grasp of international issues
and their fundamental importance,
and Dukakis claims that Bush lacks
substance, and has never held a job
that he was not appointed to. It's a
decisionbetween record and resume.
On defense issues, Bush sup-
ports the MX missile system, SDI
(star wars, or Space Defense Initia-
tive) and just about any other ideas
the Pentagon can dream up. Gov.
Dukakis says that SDI is a trillion
dollar budget buster that could never
work in our lifetime for a thousand
different reasons, and wasn't the MX
system the same one we were having
difficulty basing as far back as Carter
and Ford?
In short, Dukakis thinks that we
have enough of a nuclear arsenal and
have long since reached a saturation
point, especially with redundant
weapons that cost tens and hundreds
of billions in this day and age of huge
budget deficits.
On the domestic front Bush is in
favor of a 'flexible freeze" to help
with the deficit, and rules out taxes of
iny kind and at any time. Dukakis
doesn't rule out taxes as a last resort,
but instead would like to focus on
other ways to deal with the deficit,
such as a tighter collection process on
the billions of unpaid taxes.
After the Mondale mistake, it's
easy to see why he will only use the
word 'taxes' in the same sentence
with the words'last resort He thinks
that all the 'economic prosperity7
we've been enjoying these last few
years have been due to the 'credit
card' policies of this administration,
where we merely charge all the bills
to future generations.
The difference between the can-
didates on foreign policy issues are
just as great. Bush is in favor of 'con-
structive engagement' with South
Africa, supports the Contras in Nica-
ragua, and he said that although
mistakes were made, it wasn't a mis-
take to try to gain favor with moder-
ate Iranians by offering them weap-
ons in exchange for a possible release
of some of the hostages in Lebanon.
Dukakis thinks more pressure
could and should be applied to South
Africa, that we have been funding an
illegal war in Nicaragua, and that we
have been 'in bed' with some of the
worst thugs and drug runners for too
long.
Earlier this year on "Nightline
Bush spent the entire half hour show
defending our relationship with the
Panamanian dictator who has been
indicted on drug charges, Manuel
Noriega. Ted Koppel held up a docu-
ment dated back in 1982, it was a
memo sent to Vice President Bush
informing him that Noriega was in-
volved with drug running to Amer-
ica.
Koppel said that critics have
charged that the reason we over-
looked that fact for so many years
was because Noriega was helping us
with our Contra funding efforts in
Nicaragua. When he repeatedly
asked Bush about that document and
reasons why we didn't do anything
sooner, and had he truly known
about it for so long, all Bush could say
was "Well, Ted, you have me some-
what at a disadvantage. As you
know, I was former Director of the
CIA, and I took an oath to protect
sources and methods of the CIA, so I
cannot answer that question
That may be a fine pat answer for
now, but I think when the time comes
for the general populace actually
ma king a choice of who they want for
our next president, they are going to
feel that they want someone that they
feel is telling them the truth. Dukakis
may be cheap and short but I get the
general feeling that he is an honest
man.
I'll bet that the majority of Ameri-
cans are not even sure about Bush's
knowledge or actual involvement in
that Iranian arms deal. One thing we
do know is that Oliver North is a hero
in his eyes, who has admitted to lying
to the Congress and shredding gov-
ernment documents.
Even the choice of their running
mates demonstrates the depth of
their character and their decision
making processes. Dukakis reached
out for someone who would appeal
to the more conservative elements of
the Democratic Party, who doesn't
necessarily agree on every point and
policy of his (and so could offer more
constructive input), and besides he
defeated Bush back in 1970 when
they ran against each other for Sena-
tor. In fact, to my knowledge Bush
has never been elected to any na-
tional office, other than on Reagan's
coattails.
In contrast, Bush wanted to pick
someone who would not over-
shadow him the way Reagan over-
shadowed him over the past 8 years.
Even vice presidential candidate
Quayle's strong foreign policy stance
is in direct contradiciton to his deci-
sion to join the National Guard to
keep from serving active duty in
Vietnam. That is kind of like not vot-
ingand thinking you have the right to
bellyache about who got selected.
I guess it all boils down to com-
petence and trust. When it comes
right down to voting time do we
want to elect the leader of this coun-
try who we are not sure what his
attitude was concerning the selling of
arms to Iran, what did he or didn't he
know about Noriega for the last few
years (and what did he do about it),
and what he would do as president
under the same circumstances; or do
we want to elect a Governor with no
national experience, just like Reagan
had and FDR, before we elected him?
Check the records, we have never
elected an incombent Republican
Vice-President after a two-term
President, and in this case, there is a
good reason.
One of the greatest things about
our democratic system is that every
election year we have the opportu-
nity to 'clean house' and put in a
whole new crowd if we want to. With
all its indictments, investigations and
resignations, this administration has
been called the sleaziest one in
memory. Reagan may have been
made of teflon, but Bush is made of
velcro.
Isn't it time we cleaned house?
Mike Highsmith
School of Business
To The Editor:
The article entitled "Parking
Freshmen Must Lose Out" (Sept v
1988 issue) was indeed one that ma
certainly cause much controversy
between the current freshmen and
other students here at ECU. As fresh
men, we do understand that the lack
of parking spaces does create man
inconveniences for those who arc
given the right to drive their cars on
campus. And yes, prohibiting fresh-
men from having cars while attend
ing school does seem like a gcxxi &
lution to the problem. However, tl
assigned freshmen parking areas a:
not exactly what could be call
conveniences for us. The one parkin ;
lot that isclosest to our dorm does r
provide sufficient spaces for those i
us who have access to it. That onh
leaves the sides of Ficklen Drive a
the small parking lot at the Allic d
Health Building for the College Hill
freshmen to park their cars. Weknev
that as freshmen our driving privi
leges would be very limited. None
theless, we are willing to use these1
parking areas, whereas many older
students would not fnd these park-
ing areas satisfactory and therefore
choose to park their automobiles on
campus anyhow.
Even though wcare the youngest
students on campus, we do have jobs
and certain responsibilities that must
be met. Many of us have jobs here in
Greenville. Often times, the bus
schedules and our personal sched-
ules come into conflict, and there
would not be any possible way to
catch a bus ride at the appropriate
times or places. Secondly, many of us
want or need to go home on the
weekends whether it be to visit our
families and friends, or just to take a
break from the pressure. Why should
freshmen be deprived of their rights"
Referring back to the article
"ECU'S Current Enrollment is Nov
at an Ail-Time High this should n. t
be a factor in determining any fresh
men priviliges, for the reason that w i
are not responsible for the overload
of students. Hopefully, as sopho-
mores next year, we will be able to
sympathize with the incoming fresh-
men and understand that the fresh-
man experience can be quite discour-
aging. Why should anyone try to
make it harder?
Concerned Freshmen,
jenny Deans & Shannon Sullivan
Campus
Spectrum
The East Carolinian welcomes
letters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Pubications Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the editorial
page, the East Carolinian features,
the "Campus Spectrum This is
an opinion column by guest writ-
ers from the student body and;
faculty. The columns printed in-
the "Campus Spectrum" will-
contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community oc
nation.
The columns are restricted iri
content only with regard to rules
of grammar and decency. Persons
submitting columns must be will-
ing to accept byline credit for their
efforts, as no entries from ghost
writers will be published.
"Dip
A student recently c
my office to see if I had am
mation about ways to ste
smokeless tobacco As we
we realized that most of tt
cational information abouj
ing and dipping smoke!
bacco focuses on "not stai
: - !
By
Mary Elesha-Adi
We came up vith a bej
list that may be helpful tl
thinking about quitting (
the process. Sni -
users absorb more r
cigarette smokers, sin,
absorbed into the r
Hurricane
MIAMI
Hclene formed earlv I
central Atlantic and fi
say the ocean's fourth
this year has already b
strengthen as it chum-
open water
Helene, packing
winds of 85mph, is tr I
cane to form since Gilbert f
a rampage last week thrc
Caribbean, Mexico and
Gulf Coast.


LED ZEPPUN
R.E.M. Litu
JETHRO T
GRATEFUL DEAD
U2 ' B �
SPRINGSTEEN
GEORGE M �(
PINK V �
DEF LEPI �
LYNYRD SKYV!
ALSO SI3.75: INXS �
PLANT � b(
Pers
Add SI �
ITS NOT TOO E;
OcVSToVfl
til
111
111


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TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1988 5
A
1
Reid
hmen
ft: Fditor:
rtide entitled "Parking -
It Must Lose Out" (Sept S,
V was indeed one that may
cause much controversy
the current freshmen and
Icents here at ECU. As fresh-
) understand that the lack
spaces does create many
aences for those who are
fc right to drive their cars on
-nd ves, prohibiting fresh-
having cars while attend-
does seem like a good so-
the problem. However, the
rreshmen parking areas are
:nv what could be called
(nces torus. The one parking
closest to our dorm docs not
sufficient spaces for those of
�have access to it. That only
q sides of Ficklen Drive and
II parking lot at the Allied
luilding for the College Hill
to park their cars. We knew
freshmen our driving privi-
uld be verv limited. None-
we are willing to use these
areas, whereas many older
Is would not find these pgrk-
is satisfactory and therefore
It park their automobiles on
anyhow.
n though we are the youngest
Is on campus, we do have jobs
ain responsibilities that must
Many of us have jobs here in
tie. Often times, the bus
les and our personal sched-
Irne into conflict, and there
not be any possible way to
bus ride at the appropriate
� places. Secondly, many of us
r need to go home on the
lids whether it be to visit our
and fnends, or just to take a
rm the pressure. Why should
?n be deprived of their rights?
erring back to the article,
Current Enrollment is Now
ll-Time High this should not
(tor in determining any fresh-
Iviliges, for the reason that we
responsible for the overload
ents. Hopefully, as sopho-
�ext year, we will be able to
uze with the incoming fresh-
Id understand that the fresh-
?rience can be quite discour-
Why should anyone try to
harder?
cerned Freshmen,
Inv Deans & Shannon Sullivan
mpus
ectrum
East Carolinian welcomes
pressing all points of view.
irop them by our office in the
ions Building, across from
mince of Joyner Library.
addition to the "Campus
section of the editorial
the East Carolinian features
tampus Spectrum This is
fnion column by guest writ-
m the student body and;
r. The columns printed in
Campus Spectrum" will-
current topics of concern
campus, community oc
I

e columns are restricted iri
it only with regard to rules
mmar and decency. Persons
itting columns must be will-
accept byline credit for thfcir
�, as no entries from ghost
rs will be published.
Rules
"Dipping tough habit to kick
LEADING EDGE
Model D
Complete System
with Printer
$1195
A student recently came by
my office to see if I had any infor-
mation about ways to stop using
smokeless tobacco. As we talked,
we realized that most of the edu-
cational information about chew-
ing and dipping smokeless to-
bacco focuses on "not starting
rUdxgillfilft C�DyRn)n)
By
Mary Elesha-Adams
We came up vith a beginning
list that may be helpful if you're
thinking about quitting or are in
the process. Smokeless tobacco
users absorb more nicotine than
cigarette smokers, since it is
absorbed into the bloodstream
through the gums.
Therefore, you can expect to
see some signs of nicotine with-
drawal, such as restless nights,
headaches, irritability, and upset
stomach. Techniques to try in-
clude:
Decide in advance vhen you
plan to stop and stick to that date.
Let your friends and families
know you're planning to quit so
they can support you.
Throw away all your smoke-
less tobacco on the day you quit.
Keep very busy - take a valk,
exercise or do an activity you
don't ordinarily do when you dip
or chew.
Chew gum and keep plenty of
munchy vegetables around, like
celery and carrots. Chewing on a
toothpick can also be helpful.
Co to the dentist and have
your teeth cleaned. They'll look
and feel great.
Drink lots of water and fruit
juices.
Get plenty of rest.
Avoid alcohol or other bever-
ages you associate vith smokeless
tobacco.
Avoid situations you associ-
ate vith dipping and cheving.
Save the money you vould
have spent on smokeless tobacco
and buy something for yourself.
Why should you think about
quitting?
Smokeless tobacco causes
dental problems, receding gums,
tooth decay, and bad breath. It
also decreases your ability to taste
or smell. Even more seriously,
smokeless tobacco use can cause
mouth and throat cancers.
You should watch for the fol-
lowing symptoms:
Sore and red gums
Sore throat
Sores in the mouth that bleed
easily or don't heal
Pain when chewing and swall-
owing food
If you have any of these signs,
you should see a health care pro-
vider.
The American Cancer Society
is working on a brochure about
how to stop using smokeless to-
bacco. I'l 1 let you know when it's
available.
Includes:
Leading Edge Model D
� IBM PCXT compatible
� 2 - 360k floppy drives
� 512k RAM
� Monochrome monitor
� 20 month warranty
Leading Edge Wordprocessor
� 80.000 word spelling corrector
Citixen 180D printer
� 180 characters per second
� Graphics & Near Letter Quality
System Starter Kit
� I box diskettes
� all software installed
���w
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0 sheets clean tear paper
S & R Computer Associates, Inc.
530 Cotanche Street
Downtown Greenville (Next to Bicycle Post)
757-3279
I UuitriQ Edge �Jd logo : Model XT an rogrtwod �ad�mart� of Laadra Edgs r���� f- HP � � �����' I
lot WomataRilWSl Midni Cxp CUbam � an ragMrad (ademartt 4 CSkzan WMcfi Co .lid
Hurricane Helene churns, picks-up power in Atlantic
MIAMI (AP) - Hurricane
Helene formed early today in the
central Atlantic and forecasters
say the ocean's fourth hurricane
this year has already begun to
strengthen as it chums across
open water.
Helene, packing sustained
winds of 85 mph, is the first hurri-
cane to form since Gilbert went on
a rampage last week through the
Caribbean, Mexico and the Texas
Gulf Coast.
At 6 a.m. EDT, the center of
Helene was located near latitude
12.1 north, Ion gitude 39.3 west, or
about 1,450 miles east of the
LesserAntilles, according to an
advisorv from the National Hur-
ricane Center.
The storm, which registered
75 mph when it became a hurri
cane early today, was moving
west at 15 mph and maintain that
course for the next day or two
with a good chance for further
strengthening, the advisory said.
"Conditions are quite favor-
able for it to pick up strength,
there's nothing to stop it way out
there in the middle of the ocean
said Stanley Wright, a meteorolo-
gist at the hurricane centerBui
it's still way too early to tell if it
will get as big as Gilbert
Meteorologist Randy Las-
cody said the path of Helene, the
eighth named storm of the Atlan-
tic hurricane season, cannot be
projected until it moves closer to
the Caribbean.
"It's going across the warm-
est water of the year now, which is
perfect to fuel its growth Las-
cody said. "But it really would be
very premature to give a guess on
what may happen. It still has
along way to go
Storms that form this month
near the Cape Verde Islands off
Africa's Hurricane-spawning
conditions, forecasters say.
6 i
&
3 �
SPECIALIZING
IN ROCK N
ROLL
MEMORABILIA
SINCE 1980
LICENSED CONCERT
T-SHIRTS NOW ON SALE
LED ZEPPL1N "Swan Song" Blue Tye Dye SI7.50
R.E.M. "Little America" Raspberry Tee $15.50
JETHRO TULL "Crest of the Knave White Tee SI0.25
GRATEFUL DEAD "Baseball-Spring Training" White Tee $13.75
U2 "BonoFlag Stripes"White Tee $13.75
SPRINGSTEEN 'Tunnel of Love" Black or White S13.75
GEORGE MICHAEL "Faith Tour" Blaek or White SI3.75
PINK FLOYD 87 Tour Blaek or White SI3.75
DEF LEPPARD "Hysteria" Black or White $13.75
' LYNYRD SKYNYRD Tribute Tour" White Tec $13.75
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ORDERING INFO:
M. L. OX Available
Personal Checks & Money Orders Accepted
Add 5 N.C. Sales Tax
SHIPPING CHARGES:
Add $1.65 for first tee and 75� for each additional tee
All Items sent Insured UPS
ITS NOT TOO EARLY TO SHOP FOR CHRISTMAS
P.O. Box 1803
Dept. E
Greenville. N.C. 27835-1803
(919) 355-2747
Call or Write about your Favorite Artist
You Can Take
Your Utility Bill
And
Mail It
Or
Pay It At A Local Bank
GUC is remodeling its main office, so the entire first
floor and the drive-thru window are closed. While
renovations continue, it will be more convenient for
you to just drop it in the mail, use our automatic Bank
Draft program, or pay it right on campus at the ECU
Student Bank. Other banks which accept GUC pay-
ments are as follows: Barclays of N.C Branch Banking
& Trust Co First Citizens Bank & Trust Co First
Federal Savings and Loan, Peoples Bank & Trust Co
Planters National Bank & Trust Co Wachovia Bank &
Trust.
When our remodeling is finished, we'll be able to
serve you better. If you have any questions, please call
us at 752-7166.
Greenville r$8riS& Utilities
COLD CUT
COMBO
IT'S NEW.
IT'S $169.
ir S THE
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SANDWICH AND GET A
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5th St. Downtown � The Plaza
aSUBUUfiV
I mi ' t )� aupm ;�� � ��-�:�
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GET A 6"
SUPER COLD CUT COMBO
FOR $2.29.
5th St. Downtown � The Plaza
aSUBUURV
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
MONDAY
NIGHT
FOOTBALL
On Greenville's Largest
Wide Screen TV
This Week
Los Angeles Raiders
vs
Denver Bronco's
8:00 until
Hot Dog Buffet 5-8
Buffalo Wings 8-until
$2.00 Pitchers
RAMADA INN
(Formerly Sheraton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd. � 355-2666
Thursday Pi Kappa Phi L'il Sisters
and phi Kappa Tau L'il Sisters
Presents Ladies Night
All Ladies Free All Night
Come Early Drink Specials All Night
Friday The Famous
"Late Dav Tea Bash"
5 p.m. - 2 a.m. $2.00 Ice Teas And
Free Admission For All Until 9:00






I
J
6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1988
n
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
167.50 per month, 1 2 utilities (bedroom
furnished or unfurnished.) 355-7269.
HOUSEMATE: Quiet mf, wanted by
faculty member 3 bedroom house,
newly remodeled, walking distance
campus. Rent and lease negotiable.
Home: 752-3677. Art dept. office: 757-
6665, Gabrielle Yablonsky.
FOR RENT: Large, 1 bedroom duplex
near university. 213 S. Eastern Street,
S230, 758-5299.
FOR RENT: Large 3 bedroom house near
university. 111 East 9th St. $360.758-5399.
ROOMMATE WANTED for a 2 bed
room apartment in Twin Oaks. $157.50
per month plus 1 2 utilities. Call 757-0316
or 757-7991. Ask for Marni.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian male
roommate to share new mobile home. 10
minutes from campus Non-smoker,
please Weekends call Hugh 756-6851.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Room semi-private. $130 a month. 12
utilities. Call after 3:00 p.m. 830-9138.
FOR SALE
SOFA, CHAIR: Floral Print. Great condi-
tion - no tears, need to sell. 756-8913 after
5:30 p.m.
FOR SALE: Queen-size waterbed, frame,
headboard, pedistal, mattress, heater,
liner. $125. Call Tim Allen at 758-7406 or
839-5595 leave message.
FOR SALE: Matching loveseat and chair,
tan. Call 756-0382 after 6 p.m.
FOR SAL 25 inch color TV console.
"General Electric" $150. 756-8692.
"BARCOLOUNGER" RECLINER Nut-
meg Excellent condition $60.00. Call 756-
0356 between 8-9 a.m. & after 9 p.m.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Kitchen table &
chairs - $75; Twin bed $50, Couch $20;
Black & brass wall mirror $45; TV & Stereo
Stand $25; Desks, Dresser & Lamps - Best
Offer. Moving, Must Sell Call Julie at 758-
5783 or leave message.
FOR SALE: CIIEAP VACATION for two.
2 round trip tickets for $300 or best otter.
G'ville to Newark to G'ville. Call Mike
758-0734. Sept. 23-25.
FOR SALE: 30 inch oven, with four burn-
ers, electric. 10 years old, clean $75.00 or
best offer. 758-8010.
SERVICES OFFERED
QUALIFIED TUTORING: in Latin &
French. Call 758-7592.
CAR STEREO INSTALLATIONS: per-
formed in your driveway. 5 yrs experi-
ence, very reasonable, very professional.
Call for appointment! 756-9864 cars,
boats, home, VCRs, ect.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
DWI? Don't Drink & Drive. Come Party
In Style. Call Class Act Limousine 757-
3240.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
PAPERS TYPED: Tvped on new IBM
computer and WordPerfect software with
spelling checker. Fast, cheap service Call
Greg at 752-1202.
WORD PROCESSING AND DESKTOP
PUBLISHING: Reports, Resumes, etc.
Rush jobs accepted Call 752 1933.
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING Real cheap
Affordable Rates! Call 752-5084
HELP WANTED
HIRING! Federal government jobs in
your area and overseas Many immediate
openings without waiting list or test. $15-
68,000. Phone call refundable (602) 838-
8885. Ext. 5285.
HELP! MATH TUTORING: Need help in
all areas. Pref. math major On campus, 1
hr a day, 4 days week 3-4 p.m. 752-9174.
PART-TIME HELP: Needed at Benetton.
10-20 hours a week. Must be able to work
Saturdays.
NEEDED: Someone to work with Clean-
ing Service on Tuesdays and Wednes-
days. Please call 756-4099.
PERSONALS
ANGEL FLIGHT RUSH: Be an angel and
you will si?e, the fun in suj porting Air
Force ROIC! Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m lobby of
White Dom Sept. 27, &;30 p.m, social
room in F.otcher Dorm.
ALPHA XI DELTA PRESENTS Tig
pickin at ORockafellcr's after home foot-
ball game on Oct. 1st. All you can eat
buffet on'y $5 per person. Tickets avail-
able thru any Alpha Xi Delta membei or
call 758-5677.
ZETA PHI BETA: In all interested young
ladies We are proud to announce our
upcoming RUSH Sept 25 Coffee Hbuae
at Mendenhall at 7:00
ceeds 527.00
EVELYN BROWN, KAY HARRIS, AND
LISA CHAPELL: Congratulations! We
love you! Your sisters.
FOUND: Ring in Mendenhall Student
Center. Run your own ad to request re-
turn!
THE BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA PHI:
Would like to congradulate their fall
pledges: Mike Apple, Jai Couture, Chris
Fields, Jon Holt, Darren Parker, Tommy
Piner, Lee Potter, Brad Rainey, Charles
Russell, Chris Schiphof, Rodney Strick-
land, Jonathan Tart, Danny Taylor, Keith
Zitt 1 lang in there and look forward to a
great semester.
TO THE LADIES OF ALPHA
OM1CRON PI: The 1 lawiian Party was
really great, the Brothers and Pledges had
a blast. The games we played and beer we
drank made the night go by too fast.
Thanks alot for a real fun night, even
though the time flew away, this pary
ranks amonth the best because we all got
Leid. Lets party again soon. Aloha, I'i
Kappa Phi.
TO THE GUYS IN ROOM 212-D: We all
know that "some people will steal any-
thing" but next time take a vaccum
cleaner. The detectives.
COME JOIN US: The Delta Sigs are hold-
ing a second rush from 6:00 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. on Thursday, Sept 22 at the I louse
(510 E. 10th St; Across from Wendy's) If
you didn't make rush before, we are look-
ing forward to seeing you now. Call 757-
0313 for more info.
THE DELTA SIGMA PHI: Fraternity will
be holding a second rush fraternitv will be
holding a second rush from 6:00 p.m to
8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept 22 at the
House (510 E. 10th St; Across from
Wendy's.) If you missed the first one, you
have a second chance Come join us! Call
757-0313 for more info
PI KAPPA PHI: Aloha! Monday night we
got on the bus, it was cold some put up a
fuss. Once at Camp Contentnea we all got
our Iris, Bob still had his on the very next
day, but many were still screaming for
that one last dance. The votes are in - we all
had a ball - Let's do it again, maybe later
this fall! Love the Alpha Omicron Phi's.
ALPHA OMICRON PHI: would like to
congratulate two new sisters � Becky
Carter and Felicia Parker. You guys are
great and we love you! The sisters of
Alpha Omicron Phi.
ECU LACROSSE VS. ODU: On the field
beside Ficklcn Stadium, Friday night,
Sept. 23, 8:00 p.m. Come support the men
of pirate lacrosse!
KAPPA SIGMA: The girls of Delta Zeta
want to congratulate you on a fabulous
rush. We loved being a part of it. Let's get
together again soon. Love the Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: Wishes to welcome four
new editions to the Beta Rho pledge class:
Lori Gibbson, Dawn Woolen, Brigette
Clayton, and 1 leather Elden.
TRACY AND LIZ: Delta Zeta wants to let
you know what a great job you did during
rush You are a couple of really cool chicks
and we love you!
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Tonight you find out
why you picked the daddy frat. Put your
giggin shoe's on!
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo car
tridges with instructions for re-sale. East
Coast Music & Video 758-4251,1109 Char-
les Blvd.
TO KAPPA ALPHA: Little Sister Pledges,
Congratulations! We look foward to a
great year. Inductions are at 9:00 Sept. 26
be their with Due. See you then.
NEED CASH? 1 lave baseball cards? Call
757 6366, leave message if not there.

A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
� Located Near BCU
�Across From Highway Patrol Slat ion
S325 a month
Contact J. T or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 83(V 1937
Officropen- Apt 8,12 -530 pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furrmhed
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or single! only. $205 a month, 6 month
lease MOBII F. HOME RKNTAIS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Aalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7b 15
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Tall for appointment Mon thru SaL Low
Cost Termination to 20 weeks) of prcsjnsuTcy
1-800-433-2930
Wednesday Night Fiesta! (Taco's and
Nacho's at Off The Cuff Lounge,
Ramada Inn (formerly The Sheraton) $1.00
Chiuahua! Dig What I Say, hombre Hey!
Ramada Inn
(Formerly The Shearton of Greenville)
203 W. Greenville Blvd.
$NEED CASH? Loans On & Buying Guns$
TV's. Stereos, Gold Jewelry, coins,
most anything of value
$Southern Gun & Pawn, Inc.
752-2464A
Yo Sports Fans! Watch Monday
Night Football on the largest wide
screen in town. $2.00 pitchers, free
buffalo wings!
Only at Off The Cuff Lounge, Ramada Inn
(Formerly the Sheraton of Greenville)
Free Admission & Free Fun Woo-Boy
Ramada Inn
(Formerly Fhe Shearton of Greenville)
203 W Greenville Blvd.
(Hie lEast (Carolinian
SI Hs KIIM l M )l 1
! I ll
K I I � It htal 42� H
CRUSTY
PIZZA
WE
DE1JVER
Now Hiring Drivers
Starting Wage $4.00 per hi.
Earn Up To $9.00 per hr.
Flexible hours, Bonuses. Must
have own car and insurance. �
Apply in person at 1414 Charles St.
Announcements
PSI CHI
Psi Chi - The National Honor Society in
Psychology - announces that applications
for membership are now available in
Rawl-104 Applications need to be com
pleted and turned in to room 104 by Sept.
23, 1988.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Season tickets are now on sale for the Per-
forming Arts Series at ECU. This year
there are 14 outstanding performances
starting in Oct. and running through
April. Some of the attractions include:
Wynton Marsalis, CABARFI The Acting
Company in Love's Labours Lost, Nadja
Salerno-Sonnenberg, The Tokyo String
Quartet, Oregon, The Atlanta Symphony,
and the Ohio Ballet. For a free brochure,
and further details contact: The Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext.
266
NEW ARRIVALS
The MSC Music Listening Lounge has
received the following selections on com-
pact disc Aerosmith�Permanent Vaca-
tion; Wynton Marsalis�Standard Time;
INXS� Kick; Ahmad Jamal�Crystal;
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg; Sinead
OConnor�The Lion and the Cobra; REO
Speedwagon�Life as We Know It. The
Music Listening Lounge is open seven
days a week from 2-10:30 p.m. and is
located on the second floor gallery of
Mendenhall. Check out the new tunes
before you buy
PRE-P.T. STUDENTS
All general college pre-physical therapy
sophomores, or higher, anticipating ap-
plying to the May 1989 Physical Therapy
Qass should go to the Physical Therapy
Dept. Office, 1st floor, Belk Bldg before
the end of Sept. to determine eligibility.
Instructions for receiving the application
packet will be given then. If you have any
question, contact that office by phone
(757-6961, ext 261) or in person.
WINDSURFING
Be sure to attend the Intramural
Windsurfing registration jmeeting held
from Sept. 6-27. Now you can surf the
waters and learn the technique in this fun
tilled trip.
CROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept. 15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2. Please note that a group
listing with the name of every person in
the photograph MUST be presented BE-
FORE the photographer films the group.
ORGANIZATIONS WITHOUT LIST-
INGS WILL NOT BE PI lOTOGRAPI 1ED,
and time does not permit the scheduling
of another session. Call 757-6501 and
leave dte & time for the photo to be taken.
Please give two days notice for the pho-
tographer.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
NETWORK
Are you interested in dedicating 6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Overseas Development has
the perfect opportunity. Call Marianne
Exum (h) 830-9450 or (w) 757-6271 for
application and more details. Application
deadline Oct. 1.
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Sept. Semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase you "fun"
budget,
�opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
"a highly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us in lifting up the name
of Jesus in songs and Bible study. God
Bless You.
COT I FCF WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 1028.
SOCCER
The Pirate soccer team will take on Ameri-
can this Sat. at 11 a.m. next to Ficklcn
Stadium. Come out and see the exciting
action as a warm-up to the football game.
The Pirates will also play the Naval Acad-
emy on Sunday at 12 p.m.
C�F
Campus Christian Fellowship, a non-de-
nominational Christian group for ECU
students will meet every Tues. night in
Rawl 130 at 7 p.m. You are invited to join
us for food-fun-fellowship and praise!
B.Y.O.B. (Bring Your Own Bible).
LOST'
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night :it 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
A special added attraction of EVITA will
be presented in Wright Auditorium on
Sept. 22 at 8 00 p.m. Composed by An-
drew Lloyd Webber (CATS, PHANTOM
OF Tl IE OPERA, and IESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR), EVITA won seven Tony
Awards, including Best Musical. EVITA
is based upon the life of Eva Peron, the
second wife of Argentine dictator Juan
Peron. Tickets for the New York Touring
Production of EVITA are now on sale. For
further details contact: The Central Ticket
Office, MSC, 757 6611, ext. 266.
ECU FRISBEE CLUP
Practices are in full swing. Come to the
bottom of College Hill every Tues
Thurs and Sun. at 5:00. New players are
more than welcome. Join the team that
tied for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anyone who purchased New Student
Review this summer, should come by the
Buccaneer, yearbook, office and pick
them up. The office is located in front of
Joyner Library, on the second floor of the
Publications Bldg. You may pick the book
up between 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. this week and next week.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all Am-
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p.m. in Menden-
hall loom 221. Remember that missing
over 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The new executive officers of the National
Gamma Beta Phi I lonor Society are Sherry
Campbell, Kathy McHale, Judy Wilson,
Suzanne Black, Kevin Sullivan, Stacy
Truett and Stacie Scales. The next meeting
will be the 27th of Sept. in Jenkins Audito-
rium.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Amnesty International will meet Wed
Sept. 28 at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 401 E. 4th St in the upper floor.
Students welcome.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet Sept. 27 at 8 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium. Attendance is required.
Don't forget to bring your nickels. ,
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will be having its first
meeting on Thurs Sept. 22, at 7:00 p.m. in
room 1026 GCB. Certificates will be avail-
able. If vou have any questions, call Dana
at 752-0856.
AMA
The AMA will be holding its second
meeting Thurs Sept. 29 at 3:30. This
meeting will be held in room 1031 of the
GCB. Our guest speaker will be Craig
Quick from Pitt Memorial. 1 ic will be
speaking about marketing health care. All
interested are welcome and old members
are encouraged to attend.
BIOLOGY STUDENTS
There will be a BIOLOGY CLUB meeting
Sept. 26 at 5:0C in BN-109. Dr Lytis will be
speaking on "Career Opportunities in
Biology We will be going to dinner at
6:30. Please try to attend.
AKD SPEAKER SERIES
T i!ks in Sociology. Sponsored by The In-
ternational Sociological Honor Society.
"Divorce in the Southeastern States" by
Dr. Marty Schultz. Thur Sept. 22, 3:30-
4:30 p.m. Mendenhall, room 248. (Re-
freshments provideo cy AKD). In Octo-
ber�"Social Structure & Effectiveness in
Isolated Groups" by Dr. Jeff Johnson.
Wed Oct. 26th, 3:30-4.30 p.m Menden-
hall, room 248. In November�"CHAOS"
by Dr. Mike Dalecki. Thurs Nov. 17th,
3:30-4:30 p.m. Mendenhall, room 212.
KAYAKINGCANOE
Be sure to attend the Intramural Kayak-
ingCanoe registration held from Sept. 15
to Oct. 7. Learn to canoe and kayak in a
fantastic trip. All you need to do is regis-
ter.
BOWLING
Be sure to attend the Intramural Bowling
registration meeting held Oct. 4 at 5:00
p.m. in GCB 1026. Play begins shortly
afterwards! Be sure to register as soon as
possible for some in the alleys!
GAMMA BETA PHI
To all students with a 3.0 gpa or better:
Gamma Beta Phi is having an orientation
meeting Oct. 4 & 5 at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall
room 244. If you're interested, please
come bv.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Ohio Ballet will intiate the 1988-89
Performing Art Series on Oct. 12 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. The program for
the evening includes: "Untitled" (first
performed by PHILOBOLUS in 1975),
"Summer Night" (choreographed by
Heinz Poll), "Gravity" (a new work bv
Laura Dean), "Triptych (choreographed
by Heinz Poll to Mendelssohn's "Piano
Concerto No. 2, D Minor), Tickets for this
outstanding event are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, 737-6611, ext. 266 This event
is sponsored by the Performing Art�
Committee and the Department of Uni
vasty Unions
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
The Buswell-Parna-Luvisi Trio will open
the 1988-89 Chamber Music Series on Oct
3, .it 8 p m in 1 lendnx Theatre Composed
of James Buswell (violinist), Leslie Parnas
(cellist), and Lee Luvisipianist). Their
program includes: Haydn's � "Trio in C
Major Zaninelli's � "Arioso Brahm's
� 'Trio in C Minor. Op 101 and
Beethoven's � "Trio in B-flat Major, Op
97" (The Archduke). Tickers are now on
sale for this event in the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, 757
6611, ect. 266. This event is co-sponsored
by the School of Music and the Depart
ment of Univensty Unions.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
ODN will hold a meeting Sept 22 at 430
p.m. in room 247Mendenhall Someof the
items on the agenda are personal expen
ences from trips to Bolivia and Mexico AH
new members welcome!
ECU LACROSSE
ECU Lacrosse vs. ODU on the field beside
Ficklen Stadium Friday night, 8 p.m
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
Star search '88 ECU Gospel choir will be
holding auditions for interested students
on Sept 28 in Ledonia Wnght Cultural
Center at 5p m There will be a S3 entrv fee
due at time of audition Everyone wel
come
SPANISH CLUB
Pot-luck dinner will be held Sept 22 from
5 p.m. to 7:30 p m. Bienuenidos Todos.
PIRATE FOOTBALL
The Pirates return home after a two game
road tnp for Parents Day Weekend The
game will kickoff at 1 30 p.m. against
Southern Mississippi. Let's show the par
ents your pride in ECU. By coming out to
the game �nd showing your support.
VOLLEYBALL
The Ladv Pirates will host UNC Greens
boro Friday at 7 p.m in Minges Coliseum
There's only limited home action left so
let's get out there and cheer them on to a
victory.
Debat
GREENSBORO (AP) - Wh
the Bush and Dukakis campaij
each hope its candidate emerj
the victor in the presidential
bate Sunday, law enforcement
ficials hope both come a way frci
North Carolina without a scrat
Hundreds of officers - frt
the Wake Forest University
ritv force to the U.S. Secret Sen
�are gearing up this week to mc
sure they do. "If everything gc
smoothly, everyone wins
JCapt. E.L. Yokley, who heads
special operations division of
jYVinston-Salem Police Depc
jment.
Security planning actua
�began tour months ago, long
;fore debate plans were firm, k
before law enforcement kn
swhen the candidates would
nvcand leave.
More details had jelled
I uesday, as officials from 10 1
enforcement and medical a
:cies met with Secret Servi
!agents in Winston-Salem to
cuss security plans. They'll m
again Friday.
Many security details
well-kept secrets. The Secret Sc
ice does not say how many age:
will be involved, for examj
Other law enforcement agencl
say thev don't know vet h
j many officers will be involved.
I what the extra work will cost.
"From the time the candidl
! arrives to the time he leaves.
i route has been planned
' Bruce Garamella, national k
; advance for Massachusetts Gj
Michael Dukakis, the Democri
nomineeThe Secret Servi
knows when and where hel
: going to go, and whom he is go
: to be with
Dukakis probably will an
-at Smith Reynolds Airport
Winston-Salem earlv Sundj
afternoon.Vice President Ge�
ECU
fREE DELIVERY � FREE
r.
,

GU.
Using the
ents, we
behind w
are not c
with one d
ply return
either re
your mon
TAIlJ
Hoi
SunThurs. 11 :
Fri. ASat. 11:01
Read The East Carolinian Classified Page
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
2WHOL
& 1 LITE
(NO SUPE
n
EXPIRES
iRFh D LIVERY FREfcl





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1988 7
ABORTION
I Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
� (�� i Man thru Sal i�"w
H) �rk� of vxTgrvancy
ifA-
1 800-433-2930
sta! (Taco's and
Cuff Lounge,
ii he Sheraton) $1.00
hombre Hey!
Inn
; nliuian
5
STY'
VU-E
DFI
Drivers
4.00 per hr.
per hr.
lonuses. Must
ii insurance,
D4I4 Charles St.
- . isei
rmng Art
: of Uni-
JXIV1 RSI n UNIONS
will open
- � ���-on Oct.
posed
� Leslie Parnas
. ivisi pianist). Their
In's 'Trio in C
Brahm's
Mil � - v 101 and
B flat Major. Op
luk 1 kets are now on
the Central Ticket
tudenl Center, 757
� I t is co-sponsored
and the Depart
ERSJ EVELQPMENT
: Sept 22 at 4:30
� ' hall Some of the
I � rMnal expert
i and Mexico All
VCROSSE
� r the field beside
night, 8pm
ECl GOSPEL CHOIR
ispel choir vnll be
� r interested students
ta Wnght Cultural
her will be a $5 entry fee
tudit Everyi me wel-
SPANISH CLUB
ei will be held Sepl 22 from
m Bu-nuenidos Todos.
11K Ml FOOTBALL
.rn home after .i two game
V kend The
will . I �� ii I ! p m against
Mississippi Let's show the par
our pride in ECU Bv coming out to
irrv md showing vour support.
VOLLEYBALL
ad) Pirates will host UNC Croons
fruia a;7pm in MingesColiseum
1 only limited home action left so
It there and cheer them on to a
Page
Debate security tight
GREENSBORO (AP) - While
the Bush and Dukakis campaigns
each hope its candidate emerges
the victor in the presidential de-
hate Sunday, law enforcement of-
ficials hope both come away from
North Carolina without a scratch.
Hundreds of officers from
the Wake Forest University secu-
rity force to the U.S. Secret Service
are gearing up this week to make
sure they do. "If everything goes
smoothly, everyone wins said
Opt. E.L. Yokley, who heads the
special operations division of the
Winston-Salem Police Depart-
� ment.
Security planning actually
began four months ago, long be-
fore debate plans were firm, long
before law enforcement knew
when the candidates would ar-
rive and leave.
More details had jelled by
Tuesday, as officials from 10 law
enforcement and medical agen-
cies met with Secret Service
agents in Winston-Salem to dis-
cuss security plans. They'll meet
again Friday.
Many security details are
well-kept secrets. The Secret Serv-
ice does not say how many agents
will be involved, for example.
Other law enforcement agencies
say they don't know yet how
I many officers will be involved, or
j what the extra work will cost.
"From the time the candidate
arrives to the time he leaves, his
route has been planned said
Bruce Garamella, national lead
advance for Massachusetts Gov.
Michael Dukakis, the Democratic
nomineeThe Secret Service
knows when and where he is
going to go, and whom he is going
to be with
Dukakis probably will arrive
at Smith Reynolds Airport in
Winston-Salem early Sunday
aftemoon.Vicc President George
ECTT
Bush, the Republican nominee, is
expected to arrive late Sunday
morning at Piedmont Triad Inter-
national Airport.
He is expected to go from
there to Wake Forest to be briefed
by staffers before going to his
hotel to await the 8 p.m. debate in
Wait Chapel.
Bush and Dukakis each plan
public appearances in addition to
the debate, but times and sites
have not been announced.
With the help of the Winston-
Salem Police Department, For-
sy th County Sheriff's Department
and Wake Forest officers, the Se-
cret Service has prepared a secu-
rity plan for each site candidates
will visit or stay, said Bill William-
son, the head agent in North
CarolinaWe have to constantly
look at alternatives, too he said.
"The name of the game is being
flexible
Among other things, Secret
Service agents check buildings for
bombs, for entrances and exits.
State and local law enforcement
say they provide federal agents
with names of potential trouble-
makers. At its discretion, the Se-
cret Service may check on anyone
with access to a candidate.
Airport police in Greensboro,
the Guilford and Forsyth County
Sheriff's departments will help
provide airport security. The Se-
cret Service is reviewing motor-
cade routes and traffic control
with the Highway Patrol and the
Kemersville and Winston-Salem
Police departments.
Yokley said he is prepared for
any possibility.
"I have prepared 27 different
routes - from the Greensboro air-
port to Wake Forest, from the
Winston-Salem airport to Wake
Forest, from the hotel to Wake
Forest, from the hotel to the hospi-
tal, from WakeForest to the hospi-
tal Yokley said.
Meanwhile Tuesday, the
sound of hammers and saws ech-
oed throughout Wait Chapel as
workers built booths for the tele-
vision networks in the balcony
where 600 seats once rested.
Outside, a Cable News Net-
work reporter taped a story. A
newspaper reporter interviewed
students on the Wake Forest
campus. C-Span scouted camera
angles for the presidential debate
Sunday between George Bush
and Michael Dukakis.
And in a nearby parking lot,
two large NBC tractor trailers
pulled in to start unloading the
technical equipment necessary to
broadcast the debate to the world.
"Everything is on track said
university President Thomas
Hearn Jr. "Plans are coming to-
gether. The chapel is being turned
into a television studio
"What was it Andy Warhol
said, 'Everybody should be fa-
mous for five minutes?' Well,
we're going to be famous a good
bit longer than that
The story behind the story of
Wake Forest becoming the first
debate of the 1988 presidential
campaign lies in the determina-
tion of three students: Scott
DuBois, Beth Dawson and Mike
Smith.
"It's overwhelming said
Dawson, 21, a speech communi-
cations major from Richmond,
Va. "It's real weird to see a whole
town and the national press talk
about something that started
right here, that we've been work-
ing on for 18 months. It's mind-
boggling
Smith, 21, ofGlen Mills, Pa is
a politics major and student gov-
ernment president. His idea was
carefully conceived after he coor-
dinated New York Gov. Mario
Cuomo's visit to campus in April
1987.
We Have Something New
Ambassador
Introducing
Greeting Cards by AMBASSADOR
A4itr each purchase of an
Ambassador greeting card
you'll receive a FREE
postage stampso you can
send someone special a card on us!
(Limit three stamps per customer, please)
ONE WEEK ONLY - Sept. 20 thru Sept. 26
WE HAVE BALLOONS FOR A
HblONS
CENTRAL
&fcKlAffC Open'Til 9:30 P.M.
HK1ff9 Seven Days A Week
Greenville Square Shopping Center � 756-7177
J? snocSPiH;
Read The East Carolinian for the latest in campus
new, sports, and features, every Tuesday and Thurs-
day.
The Unique Shoes
Of 1989
ARLINGTON VILLAGE SHOPS
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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22. 1988
CIA accused of slowing
peace in Nicaragua
Read The East Carolinian for the latest in campus
new, sports, and features, every Tuesday and Thurs-
day.
Until we drop dead from exhaustion.
"The best paper for the price
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Reagan administration has used
the CIA to foment civil unrest in
Nicaragua and in the process has
damaged efforts at a long-term
peace accord between the leftist
government and the Contra reb-
els. House Speaker Jim Wright
says.
In a highly unusual disclo-
sure, Wright told reporters Tues-
day that the CIA has employed
agents covertly in Nicaragua to
organize and promote anti-gov-
ernment rallies and protests.
Wright, speaking at his regular
daily news conference, said Con-
gress has received "clear testi-
mony" that the CIA has sought
"to provoke an overreaction" by
the Managua government
Elaborating later in an inter
view, the speaker added: "Agents
of our government have assisted
in organizing the kinds of anti-
government demonstrations that
have been calculated to stimulate
and provoke arrests
Wright said the CIA had
nvade the admission under ques-
tioning from members of Con-
gress. Presumably, the disclosure
would have come in closed-door
oversight sessions of the congres-
sional intelligence committees,
most of whose work is classified.
A CIA spokeswoman, Sharon
Basso, said, "There isn't anything
the agency would say publicly
about that to confirm or deny it.
We do brief Congress, but
wouldn't discuss that publicly
Wright said he opposed the
CIA activity as detrimental to
regional peace efforts because it
has led to government crack-
downs on the opposition and
complicated already hostile rela-
tions.
"I do not believe it is the
proper role of our government to
try to provoke riots or deliber-
ately to try to antagonize govern-
ing officials into foolish overreac-
tions he said. "We should be
using the influence of the United
States to encourage the peace
process, not discourage it
But he also said the Sandin-
ista regime was "foolish" to re-
spond to the protests with crack-
downs such as the closing of
opposition media outlets like the
newspaper La Prensa and Radio
Catolica, a church-run station.
"I've made that unmistakably
clear to the people in Nicaragua.
They have to demonstrate their
commmitment to democratiza-
tion thev have announced" in
J
earlier peace agreements, he said.
Wright said he did not know
which specific anti-government
actions were due to CIA-spon-
sored agitation.
But a spokesman for the Sen-
ate Intelligence Committee,
David Holliday, said the panel
was confident that 40 people ar-
rested at a July 10 anti-govern-
ment demonstration at Nan-
daime, south of Managua, were
not linked to the CIA.
The committee held two davs
of hearings July 13-14 that in-
cluded testimony from U.S.
Ambassador Richard Melton,
who was expelled along with
seven other embassy personnel
following the Nandaime protest.
"We were satisfied there
was no U.S. government
involvcmenf'in that particular
demonstration, Holliday said.
Wright's disclosure raised
fears in the Reagan administra-
tion that the Sandinistas might
take the comment as evidence that
the jailed protesters were CIA-
sponsored subversives, accord-
ing to an administration official
who spoke on condition oi ano-
nymity.
Individual thoug
Like a circlen a rectangle, each of us has
to be unique. Individual thought. Freedom
of expression.
Express yourself in The East Carolinian.
Positions are now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't b
beat.
Team effort.
ly today
WEDNESDAY
ATiTIC
The
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Now Open
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FRIDAY
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Lduie's

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Sept. 28th
PARENTS
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1 1 I I LL I I
ECU CHAPTER
of
Society for Technical Communication
Presents
Dr. Richard Eakin
Chancellor
"Professionalism and Student Involvement"
Monday, September 26,1988 7:00 p.m.
New Classroom Building Room 1032
All Interested Persons Invited To Attend
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s k iH R rVNA 111
An 8 year old u j with All:
related sympton farr
fled one cit) aft r protest
admittano I J
(tthi-r strugglt .M- th j
people arc going ;
mother sa
'(x big prol
is that we )ut . i non
tmilj as :� R
tlu-r. rai
rights acth I
11 1 wai ' �
' 1
! my kid
! Jason's � 1
suburb '
null s - '
ng th :
their 1 ft
Ktr v l.i
la
Bush wi
Martin
dat
he w





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Sale End
�cp. 28th
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMB1 K.
TS
TAIL
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lor any
me
10' 12'
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Child harassed for having AIDS
SOUTH ROX AN A, 111. (AP)-
An 8-year-old boy with AIDS-
rolated symptoms, whose family
fled one city after protests over his
admittance to school, dreads an-
other struggle because "the ugly
people are going to be back his
mother says.
"Our big problem right now
is that we just want to be a normal
family jason Robertson's
mother, Tammie, said Tuesday.
"We don't want to be in the spot-
light 1 don't want to be a civil
rights activist.
"All 1 want to be is a house-
uiio Mrs. Robertson said. "All
my kids want is a mother
Jason's family left the St. Louis
suburb of Granite City, about 15
miles south of here, last month,
saying they'd been harassed for
their efforts to enroll him in regu-
lar classes there.
Last week, as many as two
dozen parents began picketing
South Roxana Elementary School
in this town of 2,000 to protest
Jason's application for admission,
which officials are considering.
At Tuesday's protest, parents
carried hand-lettered signs read-
ing "AIDS Kills" and "Help Keep
AIDS Out of Our Schools
"If that kid comes here, my
daughter will go to a private
school Roseann Hayes said in
an interview. Charles Conner, su-
perintendent of Roxana's schools
said the objections to Jason's at-
tendance come mainly from "a
minority group of parents in
need of further education" about
AIDS.
The boy became infected with
the AIDS virus after a transfusion
of tainted blood products to treat
his hemophilia.
Jason has AIDS-related com-
plex, a disease that often precedes
full-blown acquired immune de-
ficiency syndrome. AIDS cripples
the body's defenses against dis-
ease, leaving the victim prey to in-
fections and cancer.
The disease is spread through
sexual contact, needles or syr-
inges shared by drug abusers, in-
fected blood or blood products,
and from pregnant women to
their offspring. It cannot be
spread casually.
Because of his illness, Jason
was the lone first-grade student in
a trailer on the Granite City
schoolgrounds through most of
last school year.
His isolation ended in May,
when U.S. District Judge James L.
Foreman ordered Jason back in
the classroom with his peers. But
the ruling did not end the pro-
tests, and the family fled Granite
City.
Mrs. Robertson said the fam-
ily has been left alone in their new
home except for a recent harass-
ing phone call to her mother-in-
law telling her to keep Jason out of
school.
The boy hasn't attended
school since it began Aug. 29. His
mother said he's eager to be back
in class, but dreads further pro-
tests over his attendance.
"He said, "Oh brother, not
that again. We're going to have to
go back to court again - the ugly
people are going to be back
Mrs. Robertson said.
Despite the protests, Mrs.
Robertson said she's glad the
family relocated, and that they
have received support from
neighbors, churches and a county
AIDS-support group.
"My daughter plays wi th him
(Jason) said Fredia Shimchick.
School children "are not going to
be using his toothbrush. They're
not going to be having sex with
him. They're going to be sitting in
a classroom with him. So whaf s
the harm?"
Conner said a review group,
including himself, a school nurse
and a doctor, will decide Thurs-
day night on Jason's placement.
Bush will not support tax
RALEIGH (AP) - Gov. Jim
Martin has obtained a letter from
Republican presidential candi-
date George Bush pledging that
he would not support a tax hike
on cigarettes.
David Sandor, a spokesman
for Bush, said the pledge was
nothing new given Bush's well-
publicized opposition to tax in-
creases of any kind.
"I don't think it's a big mys-
tery to the people of North Caro-
lina what the vice president's
position on taxes is Sandor told
The Winston-Salem Journal.
The letter states that Bush's
position is in sharpcontrast to that
of his opponent, Gov. Michael
Dukakis of Massachusetts, "who
raised taxes, including cigarette
taxes, by over $100 million this
year alone But a spokesman for
Dukakis said that he wouldn't
support raising cigarette taxes if
he were elected.
Tim Pittman, the press secre-
tary for Martin's campaign, said
that Martin wants to "get the
word out to tobacco growers that
George Bush is opposed to raising
federal excise taxes, or any taxes
on tobacco
On Aug. 5, Pittman said,
Martin sent Bush a letter telling
him that many tobacco growers
were concerned about the fate of
the state's tobacco economy if the
next administration decided to
raise the excise tax on cigarettes.
"I would like to reassure
North Carolina's tobacco farmers
that you oppose any increase in
federal excise taxes on ciga-
rettes Martin wrote.
"I have always known you to
be a fearless man who is willing to
say where he stands on tough is-
sues. A commitment from you to
oppose an increase in federal ex-
cise taxes on cigarettes would
lend a message to North Carolina
tobacco farmers
In his reply, which is dated
Sept. 6, Bush restates his belief
that tax increases would "damage
our economic recovery" and put
millions of new jobs at risk.
"I am strongly opposed to
any increase in excise taxes, in-
cluding those on tobacco or ciga-
rettes he wrote.
The federal excise tax, which
increased from 8 cents to 16 cents
per pack in 1983, does not apply to
unprocessed tobacco. It is levied
only on the finished products,
such as cigarettes, cigars and
chewing tobacco.
Victoria Rideout, deputy is-
sues director for the Dukakis
campaign, said Dukakis would
support a tax increase only as a
last resort, after doing everything
possible to cut spending and col-
lect unpaid taxes.
oPPmans
MENS WEAR
and
rAUSTIN REEQ
Let's Deal With Basics

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Tarrytown Mall � Rocky Mount
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Sr
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I v Gigantic Warehouse Sale
FOR BACK TO SCHOOL
Parents invited to preview warehouse Sept. 24th
$10 or less
Merchandise valued up to $48
September 26 - October 1
4-JACK
4��
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Factdrv Outlet
1900 Dickinson Av
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Wed. -Sat. 9-5
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V
10
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1988
Lottery winner is
Raleigh resident
DANVILLE, Va. (AP) - You
can bet that Early Graham of
Raleigh is glad that he drove to
Virginia to pick up a few lottery
tickets on the first day of sales
there. He has $5,000 coming to
him for his efforts.
'The second one he scratched
was it said Steve A. Powell,
owner of the S&J Grocery in
Cluster Springs, Va where Gra-
ham bought 10 tickets Tuesday
morning. "It didn't seem to
bother him. I was jumping up
and down
"I just kind of looked at it
Graham said later Tuesday as he
sat in the kitchen of his South
Raleigh apartmentI wasn't
sure it was right
Graham's winning ticket was
one of 35 verified winners
of$5j000 Tuesday. Graham told
The News and Observer of
Raleigh he would buy a special
dinner and maybe pay somebills
with the money.
Like Graham, Fred Elliott
wasn't afraid to cross the state
line to take a chance on Virginia's
new tottery. But he planned to
take nothing but his winnings - if
any - home to North Carolina.
1 believe I'll be coming here
quite often. If 1 have good luck I'll
play even more the Reidsville,
N.C resident said as he began
scratching numbers on the first
of his 15 tickets.
"Still, I'll destroy my results
before 1 go home Elliott added,
a reference to warnings from
North Carolina officials that Tar
Heels might be taking a legal
chance as well as a financial one
by participating in the Virginia
lottery.
In North Carolina, possessing
a lottery ticket is a misdemeanor
and carries a maximum $2,000
fine and six months in prison.
State officials sav the law will be
enforced.
But that didn't stop Sonny
Locklear from driving his 1955
Chevy 40 miles from Greensboro
to Danville for a fill-up and $150
in lottery tickets.
"People are going to come
here to buy them (lottery tick-
ets) he saidI know hundreds
of people who will come up from
North Carolina to buy them
Still, a number of buyers from
south of the state line expressed
concerns about possibly break-
ing the law.
"I'm from North Carolina. I
heard if we're caught playing it
we could get in trouble said
Roger Meeks, of nearby Pelham,
N.C. "I don't want to find out the
hard way
The legal posturing by N.C.
officials irked some ticket
buyersWhat concerns me is
why can't I do what I want with
my own money?" said a school-
teacher from Greensboro who
also declined to give her name.T
could be somewhere shooting
up (drugs) or buying crack. That
would be much more detrimen-
tal
The woman said she bought
five tickets. "I may buy 100 be-
fore I leave today she said.
Initially, only scratch cards
will be sold. Each $1 card has six
boxes covered with latex paint.
To win $2 to $5,000, a player has
tomatch three numbers. After six
weeks, the maximum payoff
doubles.
Ed Gregory, owner of Ed's
Stop & Go convenience store in
Danville, said he sold more than
1,000 tickets in three hours Tues-
day morning.
To collect winnings over $50,
tickets must be mailed to the lot-
tery department in Richmond.
Even North Carolina officials
admit it can be done from a Vir-
ginia mail box.
CASH IN A FLASH FOR
TliE BIG GAME BASH V
Southern Gun
& Pawn, Inc.
INSTANT CASH LOANS
ON
TV'S. STEREOS, VCR'S, GUNS,
DIAMONDS, BICYCLES, CLASS RINGS.
ALL MOST ANYTHING OF VALUE
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
TTSCfTOE'S
Dear Customers,
f crmrity Bl�a�ir'�
As you know, Bissettes has been owned and operated by Pescatores, Inc, since
October 1, 1987. We greatly appreciate your continued patronage over this time
and to say "thanks" we will be running a drawing during the month of ���
for free meals in our restaurant. The drawing will be held on Saturday, October I,
1988, coinciding with the day we officially change our name to "Pescatores
Please ask the sales clerk for details of the contest.
TJuni You. Tim MMttmBt PtxMort. �
416 Evans St. Mall (across from Gold's Gym) 752-3131
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758-6001
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We Support The Pirates
i
Ward International of N.C.
608 B Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(919) 756-3819
Ron Ward, Manager
Across From Dawson's
FAT.L SPECIAL
Beautiful Selection of 100 Silk
Scarves made in China
Retail Price $30.00
Our Price $14.95
or 2 for $25.00
We Also Have a Beautiful Selection
of Italian Crafted 14 Karat Gold
and Sterling Silver Jewlery
High Quality Jewelry
At Up To
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BRACELETS , NECKLACES, RINGS, EAR-
INGS, CHARMS, ETC . . .
PTL employee says
Bakker made advances
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - A
former PTL official said Tuesday
he told a federal grand jury he had
se with Jim Bakker, the television
ministrv's founder.
Jay Babcock, PTL's former
director of creative television,
said he gave the information to
the grand jury meeting in Char-
lotte after Ix'ing askCv questions
apparently designed to deter-
mine whether ministry money,
much of which comes from tax-
deductible donations, was paid
for sexual favors.
Babcock is the first man to
publicly acknowledge telling the
grand jury of a sexual encounter
with Bakker.
Calls by The Associated Press
to Bakkcr's phone number in Fort
Mill,S.C, went unanswered Tues-
day night.
In August, Bakker denied
under oath that he had ever had a
homosexual relationship.
Told by a reporter Tuesday
outside the federal courthouse
that Bakker had denied ever hav-
ing a homosexual relationship
with anyone, Babcock
repliedTm saying he's a liar
Babcock had told reporters
Monday that he expected to be
questioned by prosecutors about
"whether 1 had sex with the boss
On Tuesday, after testifying
much of the afternoon, Babcock
was asked by a reporter, "What
did you say regarding sex with
Jim Bakker?"
His response: "I commented
that 'Yes, it happened - a long time
ago
Babcock said prosecutors also
wanted to know about the cir-
cumstances surrounding that sex.
"I'm not willing to talk about
those he told reporters.
Babe ck also told reporters
that prosecutors asked him
whetherBakker and his personal
aide, David Taggart, had had a
sexual relationship.
"Ihave no first-hand knowl-
edge of that Babcock said.
PTL records show that Tag-
gart drew more than $620,000
from PTL in a 15-month period
that ended in March 1987, the
month Bakker resigned as PTL's
president after acknowledging
that he had a 1980 sexual encoun-
ter with Jessica Hahn and that
money had been paid to silence
ner.
The grand jury probe, now in
its second year, is focusing on
whether Bakker and other minis-
try leaders violated federal laws
by raising money through the
mails or on television for one
purpose and then spending it for
another.
Bakker was dismissed from
the ministry by his Pentecostal
denomination, the Assemblies of
God, in May 1987 for unbecoming
conduct related to his sexual en-
counter with Ms. Hahn and be-
cause of "alleged misconduct
involving bisexual activity
In May 1987, the Rev. Jerry
Falwell, whom Bakker had in-
vited to take over PTL, said Gary
Smith, PTL's former general
manager, was the target of one of
Bakker's alleged homosexual
advances.
Smith testified before the
grand jury for about six hours
Monday but refused to discuss
what he said. He acknowledged,
however, that the subject of
homosexuality was discussed.
John Wesley Fletcher, the
evangelist who introduced Ms.
Hahn to Bakker, testified for
about three hours Tuesday. He
also refused to tell reporters what
happened inside the grand jury
room.
500 W Greenville Blvd
Banquet Facilities Available
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ECU Students Get 10 Off With I.D.
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Haiti
PI Ms I K PRIN ! Hail
V) Soldiers sat ked trx ir j
manders and workers strud
state run i ompanies rip A
apart a b me in on
stance, as Haitia i
up rage at U;rct
thoritarian rule
Violence and ,
fire continued I I Ih
capital today foui
soldiers topp
n 1 lenri Na
Radio
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den r! tral
"1 in al
, i u ither u
� i nmenl I
I t (-en :
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and �
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1 1mandt r. Tl
1� .i rad
1 � Ji said t! cs wil this
1nation
Solilicrs kill on
strike in Lcbam
troops Willed o
4od.iv -r ib SOuroM - ; �-
lents observed
mark a
I el

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ated i �
of th Mid �
thai it

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ristian militi �
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Electron
Resin
Electronic
Great S.
Ll





I
Till-LAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22. 19RH 11
YE s ;
Haiti under siege
w
hal of N.C
1AI
jewelry
b
GS!
! MR1N 1 Haiti
sIdii rs:it ked their com
, lersand mworkers struck panics, ripping
i .)home in one in
Mam.ins released pout
three decades of
a.in.in ruU
aid sporadu gun
tinuedthroughout the
t.iltodajfour davs after
i the reg 11 t
�its said troops ore n .il kill-street the l ise re n tl ie v e . go . 1 itel .i . nking soldiers : � m nd the i p mting a
i.i.l an
I rement ol eight
R-
. tiers
. lion
iTIl
lani
ami
aio ii
i '
Several repeated on the air:
The army is the people, and
people are the army
The coup leaders have de-
manded that Avnl reorganize
the military and institute demo-
cratic reforms including free
elections, which Haiti has not
had for 31 years. On Nov. 29,
armed thugs killed more than 30
people at polling stations in
thwarting independently run
elections.
lust after midnight, the gov-
ernment appealed on nation-
wide television for the cancella-
tion of a demonstration called tor
later today in support oi the mu-
tm ing officers.
On Tuesday, workers at the
state owned electricity com-
pan port authority and flour
mill went on strike to force the
removal o( their managers, radio
stations said.
Workers looted and tore
apart by hand the house of lean-
Claude Souriac, head of the elec-
tricity company, while two
armed soldiers stood by, wit-
nesses said The flour mill man-
ager also was removed, radio
stations said.
I he managers' fates were not
known. Radio stations said gun-
men killed four people in appar-
ent reprisal tor atrocities linked
to Namphy's government in-
cluding the Sept. 11 massacre of
!people during a Mass cele-
ated by a politically active Ro-
man C atholic priest.
len other people have been
cirtcd killed since the coup,
which sent Namphy into exile to
the neighboring Dominican
Republic.
Port-au-Prince Mayor Franck
Romain, accused of ordering
opposition leaders killed, took
refuge in the Dominican Em-
bassy.
On state television Tuesday
night, the government an-
nounced in a communique that it
had retired eight generals, in-
cluding Maj. Gen. Williams
Regala, who was ousted as into
rior and defense minister after
the coup and has not been seen
since, and Brig. Gen. Carl Michel
Nichols, former army chief of
staff.
Tne communique said tour
officers were promoted. Earlier,
radio stations said mutinying
soldiers had ousted the com-
manders of the navy, port and
airport security, the crack 300-
nian Leopards Batallion, and the
Artibonite Department, a region
north of Port-au-Pnnce.
Avnl said Tuesday he was
aware of "numerous problems
within the armed forces, but
urged his troops "to stay calm
At a ceremony outside the Na-
tional Palace, he appointed a
new armed forces commander-
in-chief, Maj. Gen. 1 lerard Abra-
ham, who was foreign minister
under Namphy.
Namphy led a junta that ran
Haiti for most of the two-and-a
half years since street demon
5trations forced Duvalier into
exile in February 1986.
Duvalier and his father, Fran-
cois, had ruled Haiti since 1957
,
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n ol
. an
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SEPTEMBER 22,1968 11
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Haiti under siege
PORT AU-PRINCE, Haiti
(AP) - Soldiers sacked their com-
manders and workers struck
state-run companies, ripping
apart a boss's home in one in-
stance, as Haitians released pent-
up rage at three decades of au-
thoritarian rule.
Violence and sporadic gun-
fire continued throughout the
capital today, four days after
soldiers toppled the regime of Lt.
Gen. Henri Namphy.
Radio reports said troops
were removing more and more
commanders and reprisal kill-
ings and spontaneous street
demonstrations were on the rise.
"I'm afraid we're on the eve
of another insurrection a gov-
ernment official said privately.
It Gen. Prosper Avril, who
declared himself president Sun-
dav after lower ranking soldiers
staged the coup, tried to end the
unrest Tuesday by appointing a
new armed forces chief and an-
nouncing tne retirement of eight
generals.
Radio stations said the revolt
in the 7,000 member army
spread because Avril had not
fired commanders the soldiers
identified with the corruption
and repression of the govern-
ments of Namphy, Leslie Mani-
gat and Jean-Claude Duvalier.
We will chase out of the
army all supporters of Namphy,
Manigat and Duvalier said a
policeman at a station in down-
town Port-au-Prince where sol-
diers removed their com-
mander. The army runs the po-
lice in Haiti.
Soldiers broadcasting from
radio stations Tuesday some-
thing unheard of before the coup
- said they identified them-
selves with the downtrodden of
this impoverished Caribbean
nation
Several repeated on the air:
"The army is the people, and
people are the army
The coup leaders have de-
manded that Avril reorganize
the military and institute demo-
cratic reforms including free
elections, which Haiti has not
had for 31 years. On Nov. 29,
armed thugs killed more than 30
people at polling stations in
thwarting independently run
elections.
Just after midnight, the gov-
ernment appealed on nation-
wide television for the cancella-
tion of a demonstration called for
later today in support of the mu-
tinying officers.
On Tuesday, workers at the
state-owned electricity com-
pany, port authority and flour
mill went on strike to force the
removal of their managers, radio
stations said.
Workers looted and tore
apart by hand the house of Jean-
Claude Souriac, head of the elec-
tricity company, while two
armed soldiers stood by, wit-
nesses said. The flour mill man-
ager also was removed, radio
stations said.
The managers' fates were not
known. Radio stations said gun-
men killed four people in appar-
ent reprisal for atrocities linked
to Namphy's government in-
cluding the Sept. 11 massacre of
13 people during a Mass cele-
brated by a politically active Ro-
man Catholic priest.
Ten other people have been
reported killed since the coup,
which sent Namphy into exile to
the neighboring Dominican
Republic.
Port-au-Prince Mayor Franck
Romain, accused of ordering
opposition leaders killed, took
refuge in the Dominican Em-
bassy.
On state television Tuesday
night, the government an-
nounced in a communique that it
had retired eight generals, in-
cluding Maj. Gen. Williams
Regala, who was ousted as inte-
rior and defense minister after
the coup and has not been seen
since, and Brig. Gen. Carl Michel
Nichols, former army chief of
staff.
Tne communique said four
officers were promoted. Earlier,
radio stations said mutinying
soldiers had ousted the com-
manders of the navy, port and
airport security, the crack 300-
man Leopards Batallion, and the
Artibonite Department, a region
north of Port-au-Prince.
Avril said Tuesday he was
aware of "numerous problems"
within the armed forces, but
urged his troops "to stay calm
At a ceremony outside the Na-
tional Palace, he appointed a
new armed forces commander-
in-chief, Maj. Gen. Herard Abra-
ham, who was foreign minister
under Namphy.
Namphy led a junta that ran
Haiti for most of the two-and-a
half years since street demon-
strations forced Duvalier into
exile in February 1986.
Duvalier and his father, Fran-
cois, had ruled Haiti since 1957.
C A I IV BEAUTY
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i STUDENT DISCOUNTS HONORED YEAR AROUND
Soldiers kill one,
strike in Lebanon
JERUSALEM (AP) � Israeli
troops killed one Palestinian and
wounded 24 in the occupied lands
oday, Arab sourowaid,a� resi-
dents observed a general strike to
mark a massacre ot Palestinians in
Lebanon six years ago.
Today also was the 10th anniver-
sary of the signing of the Camp
David accords which called for
Palestinian self-rule in the occu-
pied lands and paved the way for
the Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty
of March 1979.
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir
issued a statement on the accords
saying: "These agreements cre-
ated a turning point in the history
of the Middle East. They proved
that it's possible to achieve peace
between Israel and its neighbors,
that the hatred which prevailed is
not eternal
Underground leaders of the Pal-
estinian uprising called for the
general strike to mark the mas-
sacre of hundreds of Palestinians
Beirut's Sabra and Chatilla
in
refugee camps by Israeli-backed
Christian militiamen in Septem-
ber 1982. The strike turned violent
in several towns and villages.
In Jenin. dozens of Palestinians
blocked the road with stones and
burning tires and threw rocks at
passing military vehicles, an Arab
reporter said.
Troops opened fire with rubber
bullets and tear gas.
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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1988
Prosecutors reaping benefits of
articles seized in drug cases
WOODBURY, N.J. (AP) -
Some New Jersey law enforce-
ment authorities drive flashy,
pricey vehicles seized in drug
cases, but the state attorney gen-
eral doesn't think prosecutors
should be behind the wheels of
Porsches or Mercedes.
Attorney General Cary Ed-
wards is reviewing regulations
on the use of confiscated vehicles
and may revise them, spokes-
man John Hagerty said Tuesday.
"The attorney general's posi-
tion is that these vehicles should
be sold as quickly as possible
said Hagerty. "In the interim, if
they need to utilize them for
investigative purposes fine
For the past two months,
Gloucester County Prosecutor
Richard E. Hickey III has been
driving a gray 1984 Porsche 928
seized in a drug case.
"With seized vehicles, the
actual cost to the taxpayer is
greatly reduced from going out
and buying one said Hickey.
Burlington County Prosecu-
tor Stephen G.G. Raymond said
seizing vehicles sends a strong
message to drug dealers.
"It's a real deterrent to the
criminals themselves when they
get their cars taken away from
them Raymond said. "It's nice
when you have the criminals
financing a portion of what we
do
Raymond this year traded in
a confiscated Datsun 280Z he'd
been driving for a county ve-
hicle, but about 10 seized ve-
hicles remain in use, mainly in
undercover work by the
county's narcotics unit, he said.
"You can't buy drugs out of a
cop car Raymond said.
Hickey and Raymond said
most of the flashy confiscated
cars are sold at county auctions.
"In most cases, when we deal
with the more expensive ve-
hicles we'll sell those because
with the dollars brought from
the sales, we can end up buying
two cars Hickey said. "The
maintenance on some of these
vehicles is so darn expensive that
we don't want to keep them
Hickey's county has not yet
been granted title to the Porsche,
and the car may not be sold until
next year, he said. "We couldn't
sell it right now if we wanted to
It can take up to a year for a
court to grant a prosecutor's
motion to forfeit a seized car.
"To let a car like that sit for a
year or better is going to lessen
the value of that car said
Hickey. This vehicle costs the
county $75 the filing fee for the
forfeiture
In Atlantic County - which
includes Atlantic City - a handful
of vans, Jeeps and several Old-
smobiles seized in drug cases are
being used by undercover detec-
tives, said Prosecutor Jeffrey S.
Blitz.
Blitz, who drives a 1988
county-purchased Chevy Ca-
price, said he does not oppose
the use of seized vehicles by
other prosecutors.
Budget solution offered
WASHINGTON (AP)-Out of
the glare of the presidential cam-
paign, a bipartisan commission is
quietly crafting a proposed solu-
tion to the federal budget deficit
that would include cuts in Social
Security and defense spending as
well as possible increases in con-
sumption taxes.
That is the word from Demo-
crat Robert Strauss, who is co-
chairman of the 12-member
commission along with Republi-
can Drew Lewis.
Straus? provided a tantaliz-
ing glimpse Tuesday oi what op-
tions the panel is considering rec-
ommending to the new president.
The panel, concerned about be-
coming embroiled in the presi-
dential campaign, has purposely
kept out of the public eye since
July.
Strauss indicated that work
has been going on behind the
scenes and he said the commis-
sion will resume holding public
hearings immediately after the
Nov. 8 election.The commission
would like to finish its work bv
Dec. 21.
The commission, which is
split evenly between Democrats
and Republicans, was created by
Congress last year in an attempt to
break the the impasse created by
President Reagan's refusal to in-
crease taxes and the refusal of the
democrta-controlled Congress to
cut government spending
enough to bring the deficit under
control.
Strauss said the group proba-
bly will recommend a four- or
five-year plan to eliminate the
deficit, which this year is expected
to total about $152 billion. Social
Security benefits, Medicare and
other entitlement programs and
defense spending will have to be
cut, Strauss said, since they ac-
count for 68 percent of total
spending.
Strauss said the commission
was aware of the political
firestorm likely to be triggered by
such suggestions. "That means
you are withholding money from
the sick, the elderly and the de-
fense of the nation he said.
Strauss said top priority will
be given to spending cuts and
only after they are exhausted
would the commission look at
possible tax increases as a way of
balancing the budget.
His comments marked the
most detailed discussion yet of
where the commission is headed.
The panel has been criticized for
not holding public meetings in the
past several months, opting in-
stead to hold informal discus-
sions with less than a quorum
present in order to avoid require-
ments of the Government in the
Sunshine Law.
But Strauss defended this
approach, saying the
commission's chances of success
would be doomed if the presiden-
tial candidates were forced to take
a stand now on every proposal the
panel was considering.
Democrat Michael Dukakis
has indicated a willingness to lis-
ten to the group's recommenda-
tions, but Republican George
Bush has vowed to ignore any
calls for a tax increase.
On the revenue side, Strauss
said the commission was examin-
ing boosting so-called sin taxes
such as federal levies on cigarettes
and alcohol. Strauss said that
other types ot consumption taxes ing a two-day conference on the
also would be considered. economic problems which will
Strauss' comments came dur- faCe the next president.
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rrors





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
SEPTEMBER 22, 1988 Page 13
Dane captures America with photographs
By JIM SHAMLIN
Staff Writer
Jacobi Holdt, a Dane, came to
the United States in the mid-
1970's with fourty dollars and a
small camera. Beginning in Can-
ada, he went through North
America on his way to Latin
America, but never quite made it.
"I got to this country and immedi-
ately fell in love with it he said.
He saw many things, about
which he wrote home, and about
which his parents did not believe.
So they sent him a camera, and
asked him to send pictures home.
In the five years that followed, he
roamed the continental United
Stated taking over 15,000 photo-
graphs.
"I had the luck he said "of
living with a black family in
southside Chicago. The first
people I was afraid of he later
stated, "were whites
So he roamed the country,
living as he could. He worked in
cotton fields and tomato farms, he
hitchhiked over 118,000 miles,
lived in over 400 homes, and sold
his blood plasma to buy film for
his camera. He lived in places in
which the level of poverty is as-
tounding, places which most
Americans have never seen.
When asked if he was afraid
to go some of the places he's gone,
he simply stated, "You can walk
around safely in a ghetto After
five years of wandering he com-
bined his best work into a presen-
tation called American Pictures.
He personally presented the
first part of this presentation,
which focuses on the south, at
Hendrix Theater Tuesday. The
event, sponsored by the Student
Union Minority Arts Committee,
was free to students.
Though Holdt himself is not a
member of a mmority (as a Dane,
he's about as Anglo-Saxon as one
could possibly be), the presenta-
tion focused on the people with
whom he lived: the impoverished
American blacks. It began with
the slave trade and followed the
progress of blacks until the pres-
ent.
The presentation also dealt
with poor whites, and the upper
class, scenes of which were
mainly used in contrast to the
desperate situation of the impov-
erished blacks. It included scenes
from the Vietnam protests, from a
Klu Klux Klan rally, and modern-
day slave camps in the southern
United States. It touched briefly
upon every segment of American
Culture and its relation to his
subject.
"I hope the show he said in
his introduction, "will bring us all
together in a creative debate
about the problems (of racism)
The program was objective,
showing the problems of racism
and the way it is destroying the
nation. "If you, as a society, can-
not use the full potential of the
people he said, "you will fall
behind other societies
The program did not give an
answer. In fact, when asked for
the answer to the problem of ra-
cism after the program, he said, "I
would not tell you to do any-
thing The answer, he said, was
not a simple one. He proposed
only we, as a society, begin by
ceasing our archaic oppressive
habits; "Once a system of oppres-
sion has been set up he stated,
"It will be continued among the
members of the oppressed
Why, then, does he choose to
present his "show" to upper-
middle class college students, a
predominately white audience,
rather than poor and oppressed,
who are the only ones with the
power to change their ritualistic
patterns of counterproductive
behavior, or to the active racists?
"The Klan has no power Holdt
said, "But we, who get an educa-
tion can keep them out of jobs
The problem was not attrib-
uted solely to racism. He gave
examples of "white trash people
also caught in the rut of their caste,
and of Costa Rica, where the
upper class is predominated by
blacks who oppress the impover-
ished whites. And though he de-
fined the cause of poverty upon
our adherence to a "Master-
slave� relationship his main
focus was on the senseless op-
pression of the lower class and the
ways through which they are
manipulated, and forced to re-
main poor, by the upper castes of
society.
Nor was the program simply
a knout with which he could beat
guilt into the minds of whites. The
program clearly states, "for
blacks, the show has been a posi-
tive experience in terms of better
understanding the impact if inter-
nalized racism
Lastly, the show was as-
sembled with a conscious effort to
offend some viewers. The pro-
gram refers to it as a "biased
show and states in bold letters
'THE 'SHOW' IS OPPRESSION,
NOT ENTERTAINMENT
Holdt further said that, 'The idea
of the show is to put you through
a reverse opression
About the Greenville area,
Holdt said, "I know this place
very well He spent some time
here on last trek. Some of his pic-
tures were taken in Greenville,
Washington, Bethel, and other
sites in eastern North Carolina.
Since time limited him to
showing only the first half of his
presentation (The second part
deals specifically with the north,
and he likes to follow it up with a
three-hour seminar), he repeat-
edly stated a desire to return to
ECU, so that he may show the
entire presentation and conduct
the seminar.
If, in the future, the Minority
Arts Committee can find the re-
sources to finance Holdt's return,
students would benefit from see-
ing his show and attending the
seminar. It has been shown at
many major universities, some of
which, Holdt said, require all
freshmen to attend. It is an impor-
tant presentation for anyone who
considers himself educated, espe-
cially if he does not consider him-
self a racist.
While roaming around the U.S Danish photographer Jacobi Holdt
caught a piece of Americana, the rich, the poor, the desolate, the KKK,
in 15,000 pictures. Holdt held his side show exhibit, which included
this photo, Tuesday at MendenhalL
New Superman comic needs super writer
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Legion of Super Critiq
Faster than a movie can bomb
out in a box office! More powerful
than 35 years of mishandling!
Able to come back more times
than Cher!
It's a bird! It's a plane! It's
the new Superman cartoon!
It wasn't as bad as I expected,
but it wasn't as good as I'd hoped.
The new "Superman" on Satur-
day mornings at 8:30 a.m. had its
problems, and it won't get any-
where near as popular as that
disgusting Muscle Mouse or
whatever his name is, but the Man
of Steel is back one more time.
And if he's going to make it
this time, the first thing that needs
to be done is get him out of that
Kryptonite time slot. Only the
most devoted super fans will
wake up, down some Advil� and
sit through 30 minutes of bad
dialogue.
One of the reasons Pee-Wee
and his Playhouse got so hip is
because it comes on at a time
when most college students begin
recouperating from Friday night,
and that's the time of day you
most need a laugh.
Also, "Superman" is directly
opposite the first 30 minutes of
Disney's new "Winnie the Pooh"
scries. The short I saw on the
"Pooh" show where Tigger lost
his stripes and no one knew who
he was, was lots funnier than Lois
Lane telling a robot to "Scat! Go
bother somebody else
You'd think after four mov-
ies, three cartoon series (if you
count "Super Friends"), a live
action TV show, a Time magazine
cover and the longest running
comic book in history that some-
one would understand how to
bring the Kyrptonian Crime-
fighter to life on the small screen.
A major problem with the
new show is who's writing it.
Marv Wolfman, who writes one
of Superman's comics and also
"The New Teen Titans is not the
best choice to scribe these car-
toons. Wolfman belongs to the
Chris Claremont school of writing
comic books � make the charac-
ters as one-dimensional and pa-
thos-filled as possible.
Nobody needs pathos on Sat-
urday morning. Even Wolfman
understands that. So instead, he
writes cheesy dialogue, worthless
plots and Jimmy Olsen on a skate-
board.
In the first episode, "Destroy
the Defendroids Lex Luthor
builds robots to defend Metropo-
lis, making Superman feel use-
less. Supes leaves town, robots
attempt to steal a gold shipment.
Superman pops, pack up and
saves the day. Bleagh.
While visually the show is
pretty good (great facial expres-
sions, Japanese-style explosions
and lasers and a lot of attention
paid to shadows and shading)
this kind of writing drags it down
to the level of almost unwatch-
able.
Also, why did every crook,
policeman and innocent by-
stander have a laser instead of a
plain old handgun? I felt like I was
watching "G.I. Joe
Surprisingly, Wolfman kept
some of the renovations the comic
made in the last two years. Clark
Kent isn't a total wimp, Luthor
wears a kryptonite ring to prevent
being arrested, Jimmy Olsen
doesn't wear a bowtie. (Where
did the skateboard come from?)
See SUPERMAN, page 14
Cartoonist Barks shines in Uncle Scrooge
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
Walt Disney's Uncle
Scrooge: His Life and Times, by
Carl Barks (Celestial Arts,
$34.95).
Coming Up
in
Entertainment
"Evita musical, Wright
Theater
Panic, the Attic
Friday
Clearlight, Pink Floyd Tribute,
the Attic
Knocked Out Loaded, blues,
the New Deli
Saturday
Jacket, the Attic
Slurpee, the New Deli
Iuej&day
Randee of the Redwoods,
Hendrix Theatre 8:00
UB
Mnnflaynctober-3
40 Minges Coliseum
Carl Barks has long been un-
recognized by the public at large
for his comic book stories featur-
ing Walt Disney's Donald Duck,
his nephew's Huey, Dewey, and
Louie and Barks' own creation,
Uncle Scrooge McDuck.
This is partly because of the
inane, particular American bias of
comics as ghetto reading for sub-
literates and also because of the
Disney Studio's policy of ano-
nymity which insists the Walt
Disney's name be signed to com-
ics featuring characters and not
the name of the actual artist.
Unmindful of his obscurity,
Bark poured integrity into not
only his artwork but story con-
tent. What could have been for-
gettable hackwork became in-
stead pieces of Americana.
Barks' integrity shone
through so that his unsigned
work bore a signature clearly dis-
tinct from the other Disney duck
artists.
Barks has been recognized by
a circle of fans for some time now,
but the finest monument to be
erected to him is the massive
"Scrooge McDuck: His Life and
Times Originally released in the
early '80' s as a limited edition by
publisher Gary Kurtz (producer
of "Star Wars"), the book is now
available in a trade soft back.
Fittingly, Barks' own crea-
tion, Uncle Scrooge, is the focal
point of this book. In a twist,
Disney's animated version of the
character was based on the comic
book version. Before the current
"Duck Tales" series (now airing
on Channel 9 in Greenville),
Scrooge's animated appear-
ances were sparse: "Scrooge
McDuck and Money" (1967) and
"Mickey's Christmas Carol"
(1983).
The selection of the Uncle
Scrooge stories, contained herein
was gleaned from several decades
worth of stories. The chosen mate-
rial was reshot and the original
flat comic book colors replaced by
extensive hand and air brush
work by fantasy illustrator, Peter
Ledger. The result is that each
page is a fully rendered painting.
Ledger's brush has enhance
Barks' detailed art to the nth de-
gree which his work has always
deserved: underground lakes
shimmer, candles radiate auras,
ponds reflect, and Scrooge's
giant moneybin glints in the sun-
shine.
An incredible variety of color
effects are allowed by the scope of
the stories. Barks took Scrooge,
Donald, and their nephews
around the world and into outer
spaces. Barks was a meticulous
researcher, modeling exotic set-
tings on those actually existing.
The power of his rendering
comes through as never before
not only by the better coloring but
also the size of the larger pages
which allow for a better sense of
scale: scenes of a plane gyring
toward a Shangri-La nestled at
the bottom of towering moun-
tains, a horde of Lemming's car-
See UNCLE, page 14
Pickin' the Bones
To move or not to move Halloween
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Activist
"Those who pry in God's busi-
ness eventually go madmy Eng-
lish teacher.
I'll take my chances.
This year, Halloween falls on
a Monday. Not the best of times to
go out, 'ss up, beg for candy
and wade downtown to get drunk
and see how long your costume
lasts. Especially with classes on
Tuesday.
That's why we at The East
Carolinian are spearheading the
effort to get our traditional down-
town Halloween celebration
pushed back to Saturday the 29.
Sure, it's not a very scary day, but
there are a lot of arguments for
this.
1) More of our collegiate
brethren would be able to attend.
Sure, the folks from Pitt Commu-
nity and Atlantic Christian can
make it on Monday, but only the
hardcore partiers from Duke,
Carolina, Campbell, Appalachian
etc. will make a Monday road trip.
This IS the party ECU is most
famous for, and while we don't
want that to be our only claim to
fame, it has become a North Caro-
lina tradition. Plus, think of all the
alcohol that will sit unopened on
the shelves since there won't be
the massive crowds of yore.
2) 8 a.m. Tuesday classes will
be empty. Professors might as
well cancel classes now, but you
know they won't, and everyone
will get an unexcused absence.
3) Think of all the older
Greenville residents. They're
used to noisy Saturday nights. A
massive Monday party could
throw their metabolism off per-
manently.
And think of all the adults
who'll be late for work Tuesday,
simply because Fifth Street was a
veritable riverbed of beer cans.
They might all lose their jobs.
4) God wants it to be on Satur-
day.
5) I want it to be on Saturday.
What's the use of being a famous
columnist if you can't use your
clout for a worthy cause? Satur-
day is much more convenient for
me personally, and this aggravat-
ing little village owes me this little
favor.
This plot of land that dares
call itself a town has almost
given me an ulcer with its cultural
deficiencies. No decent nightlife,
rednecks everywhere, rain almost
hourly, nothing you can honestly
call a shopping mall � I'm sick of
it. Changing the date of the Hal-
loween party is the very least it
could do to begin appeasing me.
A statue in the middle of
campus would be nice, but that's
another column.
6) Monday is a tacky day to
party anyway. For reasons of
sheer aesthetics, the celebration
should be moved to Saturday.
Close downtown on a Monday
the very concept is appalling.
7) Only inexperienced frat
boys party on Mondays.
8) No one ever wrote a song
about "Rainy Days and Satur
days" did they? No, of course not
and I'll tell you why. Saturdays
are non-stress days. You have a
whole other day before you have
to go back to school and you're
well rested from the week.
Saturday is the best day of the
week. Mondays suck, that's all
there is to it and it's hard enough
to psych yourself up for school on
Mondays, let alone the party of
the year.
9) If we protest this thing, we
get to make a bunch of cardboard
signs saying, "HELL, NO WE
WON'T PARTY ON MONDAY!
and other revolutionary jargon.
We can march around and picker!
Campus Security. Imagine Mayor!
Carter's face when we have a sit-
in on his front yard.
10) No one will have to go to
church Sunday. Nobody expects
you to show up in a house of
worship if you're hung over.
You'll have a great excuse not to
say all those "Hail Mary's.
11) Statistically, the squirrel
man kills more people on Mon-
day nights than any other time.
Surely the good authorities of the
Emerald City don't want theii
See WHY?, page 14





14
T IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22.1188
Uncle Scrooge embodies capitalism ethic
Continued from page 13
petinga beautifully lit Norwegian
valley stretching toward the sea,
and the vast caverns honey comb-
ing the earth are breath-taking
examples.
The stories themselves, no
matter how colorful they are,
have a sober undertone. Uncle
Scrooge embodies capitalism and
the protestant work ethic. But he
is not a mere carricature. He is
greedy and selfish, but as Mike
Barrier points out in his introduc-
tory essay, "Scrooge' worked like
a Trojan for every dime he owned.
Thus he could be forgiven his fe-
rocious determination to keep
every dime he owned
Scrooge's lack of charity,
while understandable, is not pre-
sented by Barks as right. Al-
though Scrooge believes the
American ethic that hard work
should be rewarded, what he re-
allv believes is that his hard work
should be rewarded. He is con-
stantly refusing to pay Donald
and his nephews the actual worth
of their services to him.
(Although, in Scrooge's de-
fense, 1 must point out that he
never treats them dishonestly. He
promises Huey, Dewey and
Louie a "chunck of gold three feet
around and six inches thick" in
return for a lost locket. They de-
liver, and so does he: a hunk of
cheese, gold - in color - all the way
through).
Perspective on Scrooge's fet-
ish on money (he observes a vir-
tual pagan orgy of "diving in it
like a porpoise, burrowing
through it like a gopher, and toss-
ing it up and letting it hit him on
the head") is provided by Huey,
Dewey, and Louie. Their selfless-
ness combines with a sense of fru-
galness and adventure already
the rival of their uncle's marks
Why not have Halloween on Saturday?
Continued from page 13
town to become synonymous
with The Great Squirrel Man
Halloween Massacre.
What if we can't change the
date, and, come Tuesday morn-
ing, half the school is King on the
sidewalks of Fifth Street with big
fang marks all over them, and the
few survivors turn rabid? I guar-
antee that won't help the school's
image much.
Join us in The Committee to
Tush Halloween Back to a Day we
Can Really Throw Down On. But
we have to do it soon, so the word
gets out and no one ends up
downtown Monday night in a
Spuds McKcnzie� outfit, looking
like an inexperienced frat boy.
If you agree with any of these
reasons, or have some valid ones
of your own, bitch. Bitch to the
police, the administration, to
Campus Security, to the town
council, to the SGA bitch to
somebody. Write letters to the
editor � to me and to The Daily
Rejector. Anybody.
Admittedly, this isn't the
noblest cause to get behind. It's
actually a very selfish and arro-
gant cause. But who cares? It'd be
wild to see if we actually could
change things. Today Halloween
� tomorrow Martin Luther King
Jrs birthday.
them as much more mature than
the older Scrooge who by contrast
is often childlike in his impatience
and stinginess. He is also a very
lonely, pitiful being.
Like Frank Capra's films,
Barks comics' work celebrates
community and responsibility.
He exonerates the American
sense of "good neighbors" and
the ethics of fair play: concepts
considered naive by the "enlight-
ened" cynics of our day.
These attitudes are sparse in
today's cinema and especially so
in the comics of today which are
marked by increasingly being
downbeat or else mean hack-
work. In the context of today's
market, "Uncle Scrooge: his life
and times" is as much a light-
house to current comics creators
as it is an obelisk to Barks' past.
s
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Superman cartoon lacks
Continued from page 13
The cartoon also boasts the
John Williams music from the
movies, a total ignorance oi phys-
ics and Lois Lane as the most
unlikable bitch in years. This se-
ries has none of the grace of the
Max Heisher "Superman" series
of the 40s, despite the technologi-
cal advances that made "Who
Framed Roger Rabbit?" possible.
The second feature of the
show is a trip through
Superman's family album, a se-
ries oi vignettes showing him as
Superbabv. "The Adoption"
showed baby Clark in the
orpahanage, using his super
powers to avoid being picked by
any other couple but Jonathan
and Martha Kent.
Cute, but following episodes
could be a lot funnier. Superbaby
was always my favorite aspect of
the Superman legend. How do
you try to punish a three-year-old
who can stare at you and burn
holes through your head?
A future episode of the show
is scheduled to guest star Wonder
Woman, so it's possible a lot of
other heros could be showing up
too. There's hope, if Wolfman gets
fired and thev move the show to a
later time.
So I'll just hang on til the
syndicated, live-action "Super-
bov" show debuts on October 1.
The guv who plavs ClarkSuper-
boy is a Wilmington native and
both he and the girl playing Lana
Lang told the press they were
comic book fans, so maybe we'll
get something good.
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Fri. & Sat.
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10 Discount with PCCECU
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(Not applicable to specials)
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DRIVE AT THE BYPASS (U.S. 264)
The Clearlu Labeled
Apartme
Dear Mr Elvis
When I mo
townhouse apartment ht
(Irecnvi lie this summer, 1
cool, no more dorms, no m
occupancy hou
in� for toilet paper, fi
peaceandquiel Totrw
in an old lady and
side were two nur
And then the hell i
in They moved in th aj ai
which the nurses
� ire five of them, y ' ' -
of them. I can't -
them as students I
them g �
I don't th
i ause they an
thedooropen
ing. Thev
as human in i
rd. I thii � '
that got ki -
(rat at ECl
cause of I it
tions).
Take th
1
heard of I
but this ib ridi
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m in a tv
half bath re
the whole i
r hell hoi
their secur
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� � .
the ini i I
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T E EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1988 15
Saloon
FOOTBALL
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UNDER
Apartment dweller threatens to assassinate five obnoxious neighbors
Dear Mr. Elvis,
When I moved into my
townhouse apartment here in
Greenville this summer thought
cool, no more dorms, no more six
occupancy houses, no ore fight-
ing for toilet paper, finally a little
peace and quiet. To the right of me
was an old lady and on the left
side were two nurses.
And then the hellions moved
in. They moved in the apartment
which the nurses vacated. There
are five of them, yes Mr. Elvis five
of them. 1 can't really describe
them as students because I have
never seen them go to class.
I don't think they work be-
cause they are always home with
the door open and the stereo blar-
ing. They can't even be classified
as human in my definition of the
word. 1 think they are frat boys
that got kicked out of the worst
frat at ECU which is (deleted be-
cause of hate mail considera-
tions).
Take the first night thev
moved in for example. 1 have
heard of house warming parties
but this is ridiculious.
So the five of them, yes five of
them in a two bedroom one and a
half bathroom apartment, invited
the whole of the Emerald Citv to
their hell hole. If they didn't lose
their security deposit on the first
night, then my name isn't Joe
Blowe (name changed to protect
the innocent).
But talk about a house warm-
ing, these dweebs sprayed Bara-
cadi 151 on a heap of garbage
and proceeded to burn the refuge
on the patio at 4:30 in the morning.
Billowing from this burning trash
came black smoke blowing into
my window. I woke up thinking
my apartment was on fire, but 1
looked out of the window to see
these redneck frat boys parading
around the flames like apes who
had just invented fire.
The very next day, they
erected a basketball goal on the
patio area. They played ball until
all hours of the night until some-
body mvsteriously stole the back-
board. Having no basketball goal,
these mindless idoits with noth-
ing better to do pulled out the b-b
gun.
So, now they stay up to all
hours of the night shooting b-bsat
beer cans. This just demonstrates
the level of these guys pathetic
mentality, they shoot beer cans
when they could be doing con-
structive things at that time of
night.
Mr. Elvis, these guysarehide-
ous. I mean, I like my music loud
but these heavy metal freaks al-
ways have the Guns and Roses
cranked. The old lady two doors
down has already called the cops
twice and she wears a hearing
aid. I won't call the pigs on them,
but I really thought about it the
other day when the music vi-
brated my favorite picture of Jimi
Hendrix off the wall.
Just Ask
BigE
Since there are five of them,
they always have the best parking
spaces. If they don't hold a space,
one of their loser friends does. 1
work late at night and drive up
only to find the lot full of jacked-
up Novas and Chevclles.
Mr. Elvis, you have helped so
many others, please help me kill
my neighbors.
Signed, The Hating Neighbor
Dear Mister Roger's Neigh-
bor,
First oi all, can you read? My
name is Earlvis not Elvis and
while 1 do admire the late King
(God bless his amphetamined
heart), 1 don't appreciate you re-
ferring to me as such.
If you kill your neighbors,
you will serve five consecutive
life sentences and become Prepa-
ration H's poster boy. So don't do
that.
This is what I propose, you
said thev were hellions, so why
not MAKE THEIR LIFE A LIV-
ING HELL.
1. Since you can't sleep at
night because of their rude behav-
ior, copy all those late night TV
specials and send them to their
address, C.O.D.
2. Flood their apartment with
rat urine.
3. Crank call them 24 hours a
day until they disconnect the
phone and have no social life.
4. Print up flyers saying they
are the Squirrel Men.
5. Sit on your front porch
picking your nose and flinging
the mucous remnants onto their
steps. This will discourage visi-
tors.
Greenville hero,
GREENVILLE, N.C (BP) �
During the most sensational and
nauseating battle of the decade,
Greenville's only resident super
hero, Arm-Fall-Off Boy, died
from injuries inflicted by the city's
dreaded "squirrel man" creature.
Arm, posthumously identi-
fied as Lemuel Lesslad, a student
in the ECU graduate industrial
hygiene program, died Wednes-
day night, mere hours after a five-
minute brawl with the squirrel
creature. The squirrel man had
just killed an ECU student behind
the Col. E.G. Flanagan Sylvan
Theater, the third death in as
mtmy weeks.
Lesslad saw the attack and
changed into his Arm-Fall-Off
Boy costume, according to his
trusty manservant, James St.
Gangrene. "Lem simply leapt
into action after he saw the (stu-
dent) drop to the ground. But it
was too late
The student, Thurston
Eames, a dance major, was de-
capitated by the squirrel man's
24-inch long inscisors.
St. Gangrene said, "It was
over quicklv. Lem's only power
was the ability to make his arms
fall off. He thought it would con-
fuse the squirrel creature long
enough to stun him with some
Arm-Anti-Squirrel-Man-Repel-
lent
"But the beast wasn't fooled
St. Gangrene added in a choked
voice.
According to police reports
and video footage from WNCT
which arrived on the scene just
before the death blow, Arm-Fall-
Off Boy taunted the creature with
his left hand, trying to draw an
attack. The squirrel man locked
onto Lesslad's wrist and pulled
the arm off.
If they turn away the Mission-
aries, stand at the door and say
"just knock harder, I'm sure
they'll hear you sooner or later "
Gotta problem, Write the Big
E
Earlvis
Publications Building
ECU
Green-vile, N.C, 27834
Arm-Fall-Off Boy, killed by the Squirrel Man
Anyone who has information
on the late Greenville hero's arm,
its whereabouts, or has noticed a
6. Wait until the day after rent
is due, when you know they are
broke and hungry and send every
pizzafood delivery man to their
apartment.
7. And now the most devi-
ously conceived master plan to
eradicate all unwanted neigh-
bors:
Call the Jehova'ssWitnesses,
call the Morman Missionaries,
call PTL,call Jimmy Swaggart and
tell them to send troops, send
droves of religious - pamphlet
carrying fanatics to their place.
When you call on the phone say,
convincingly, that you are one of
these idiots and that you're des-
perate to know God. Say that you
are living in immortal sin, which
from your descriptions wouldn't
be a complete lie.
'There was always a kind of
sickening 'pop' when Lem used
his power St. Gangrene ex-
plained. "But for some reason I
knew I had heard that 'pop' for
the second to last time
The squirrel man then flung
the useless limb aside and tried to
latch onto the remaining hand.
Arm-Fall-Off Boy ran behind the
dumpster next to the Sylvan
Theater in a desperate attempt to
regroup. "Suddenly, the squirrel
man emitted this incredibly loud
whistle St. Gangrene said, "And
hundreds of squirrels began
dropping out of the trees as if he
had summoned them
The entire camera crew from
WNCT, St. Gangrene and five
other eyewitnesses were all bitten
during the "squirrel rain and
were taken to Pitt Memorial for
observation and painful rabies
shots.
"The last 1 saw of Arm, the
squirrel man had dragged his
body to the center of the Sylvan
Theater and pulled his right arm
off Lester Dribble, van driver
for the WNCT news team said.
"You could tell he had hundreds
of little squirrel bites all over
him
"The squirrel guy popped his
arm off and then ran awav. It was
creepy Dribble added.
A memorial service is being
planned for the fallen hero, who
requested that his body be do-
nated to science. Unfortunately,
this brave hero's request cannot
be fully honored.
"His right arm that thing
still has it, or he's stored it away
somewhere. Wretched creature
St. Gangrene said. "The medical
school says they can only accept
whole cadavers. Bloody doctors
rank smell in their homes latelv, is
asked to call the Squirrel Man
Hotline at 757-6366.
SIP Only on
TWO
Sirloin Steak Dinners
For One Low Price
Two special cut sirloins, charbroiled
to order and served with buttered Grecian
bread and your choice of baked potato or steak
fries This special offer is available only on Sun-
days!
Annabdle's8
1 RESTAURANT & PUB
The Plaza, Greenville Blvd.
756-0315
Hours 1 1 30am 11 00pm, Mon -Thurs , 11 30am-Midnight, Fri
12 Noon-11 00pm Sun
- � �. t- -
JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT
RUSH WAS OVER
RETURN OF THE
SIGMA NU LUAUH!
Late night RUSH PARTY tomorrow from 10 p.m. until.
So put your parents to bed then come on over
and eat some pi, while you play in the sand and limbo!
AM til 10 PM
iday 1-6 PM
IE
Y
UR
0
my
All ECU Men Welcome
THAT MEANS YOU TOO FRESHMEN.
Call the Luau Line for the location 752-7284







"We'll probably just have some wine and then make out before we go downtownOne of Karen Mann's Mystery Dates
Owrki
rit'iiru h
)rpheus
Ivis i dead and I don'
fccl so good myself
-Lewis Crizzard
By Harris and Gurgarjus
THE IJNDeRCOV&C7
The story as it stands:
Back in the thirties
spaceship built by Doctor
Hands Zark-off flew to the
planet Mondo with polo
player Flatulence Gordon
and nymphomaniac Tale
iarden. After many advent-
ures, they were imprisoned
?v Mink the Merciless, ruler
t Mondo. Now, in 1988, The
Undercover Cats (who just
found out about it) are on a
escue mission from Earth to
recover the long-missing
heroes. Episode Two:
A Shaky Landing
Inside Joke
' c-1: n. lJ � y
i�
A va ta r
By Harris and I laselrie
SI
Quoits to live By
VS. Hi, Stephanie! I think
you're really onto
Kill 'em,
Kill 'em,
Kill 'em!
Still Killin' Danny
S � 0@S) If'� Q�
aiao a � (w � � ji
That's right! We're still taking your written scenarios for the horrible death of Danny
Partridge, the most hated kid ever to grace the television screen. Some of you have already
turned in your emissions-er, submissions; but for those of you who haven't, you still have until
next Tuesday! In case you need to get steered in the right direction, here is a sample Heath of
Danny:
En route to a gig in Louisiana, the multi-colored Partridge Family bus has engine
trouble, forcing Shirley to pull over and spend the night in a small southern town not on any
map. Since Rueben lost most of the band's money the week before gambling in Nevada, the
Partridges can't afford to stay in a hotel and spend the night in the bus. Later that night, the
wayward family is woken by the blasting out of the bus windows by shotguns. Danny catches
some glass in the face and runs screaming out of the back of the bus into the bayou.
After an hour of scrambling through mud, roots and weeds, the freckled youth collapses of
exhaustion. Three obese, sweaty rednecks bearing guns and rope arrive on the scene, and laugh
heartily as they bind Danny's wrists and ankles to roots growing Out of the marsh. One of the
men loudly suggests that they reenact a particular scene from "Deliverance By this time
Rueben shows up to rescue his young friend, but upon seeing the helpless youth, shows his true
colors. Led by the ail-too familiar sounds of Danny's screaming and wailing, Shirley and the
rest of the family discover the perverse scene and can't help but notice Rueben joining in the
festivities!
Horrified, Shirley leads her troupe away and abandons her son. The ensuing commotion
draws a pack of ravenous alligators, who attack Rueben and the Rednecks. While the others
finish their meals, a latecoming gator is attracted by Danny's bright red hair and heads for the
worn and violated young bass player. Following the beaten path, the huge lizard begins to
consume Danny, reaching it's fill by the time it reaches his neck. Months later, Shirley returns
to the small town to find out what became of her son and is led to the home of a local voodoo
doctor, where hangs the mummified freckle-ridden Partridge head.
Disgusting, yes. Too long, yes. But this is just to get your minds cranking so that you can
create your own horrible death. Extra consideration is shown to scenarios that are appropriate
for Danny, and involve any of the others in the cast, who all went on to better things while
Danny didn't. Just make it a paragraph, and get inspired!
is&tlit)iri!�iy MRqiBiQo (D g Q d E) @ or 2$)i
Optical Illusion
Which line is longer?
A
B
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How many black balls are there
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Identify;
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Can you identify this statuette from the classic 70's TV show it
appeared OI1? meMH "� saoS ipung ppjg ain ipiiiM
ui aposida vied-OMj snouiej ain uiojj lainury yx� Apni Apejg Xqqog am s,ii 'juSu s,ieu i
Fun and Games by Jeff Parker, but not for long.
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UN
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Harris and Cmgaiius
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70's TV show it
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irker, but not for long.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 22, 1988 Page 17
Sports Medicine an important part of ECU
division. It is designed to provide hoped to help prevent sudden
optimal care for each individual death among athletes. Trainers
athlete in East Carolina's colle- and physicians are also involved
giate sports program. Equal care in creating individual diets to
isprovidedtoeachathleteregard- provide weight control for ath-
less of which sport they play. "A letes.
By SANDY ROGERS
SUM Writer
In 1970, Sports Medicine, di-
rected by Rod Compton, was
designed to create a more scien-
tific approach to athletic training, person's health is a person's
It was the first program of its kind health whether they participate in
in the country. football, basketball, soccer, etc
Compton said. Individual care
includes developing a program
for the specific need of an athlete
pertaining to his or her injury.
Three services that bports
Mcdicineprovidesare prevention
of injuries, immediate treatment
of injuries, and rehabilitation of
injuries. In order to determine if
an athlete is physically capable of
participating in a certain sport,
the physicians perform EKG's
(electro-cardiogram) tests, as well
as a complete physical examina-
tion. The thorough examination is
Sports Medicine is divided
into two programs. Under the
Sports Medicine curriculum, a
student is elibible to become an
athletic trainer if he passes an
examination given by the Na-
tional Athletic Trainers Associa-
tion. Student trainers receive an
average of 2300-2500 hours of
field experience in a four year
program at ECU. This experience
includes assisting certified train-
ers and working with athletes.
The second program under
Sports Medicine is the athletic
To provide adequate training
and treatment, the staff consists of
three certified athletic trainers
and eighteen professional con-
sultants. Trainers Rod Compton,
Greg Beres, and Karen Baker
travel with various athletic teams,
such as football, volleyball,
women's softball, and men's and
women's basketball in order to
provide immediate treatment of
sustained injuries.
In describing the sports Medi-
cine program at East Carolina,
Rod Compton says it is "One of
the little pockets of excellence on
campus
Sports Medicine personnel are present at all of ECU's football games, and most other sporting
events, to take care of injuries. They are also able to rehibilitate previous injuries.
U.S. Men's basketball team
advances to medal round
Holley multi-faceted
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) �
It was no shock when the big
confrontation turned out to be ho
contest.
The U.S. men's Olympic bas-
ketball team beat Brazil 102-87
Wednesday, eaminga berth in the
medal round. They did the job
with tenacious defense and a
strong transition game.
That, too, came as no shock
from a team coached by John
Thompson.
Brazilian shooting guard
Marcel Souza described the U.S.
play tKis way After"20 minutes it
was very dangerous for our team.
They played so intensely you just
give up
The shock came last year
when Brazil dominated the
That team blew a 20 point
second half lead. This team al-
lowed the Brazilians no closer
than the 15-point final margin
over the last 15 minutes.
"We were trying to deny
Oscar and Marcel the ball. We
didn't want them to get a lot of
free shots. We tried to contain
them said Dan Majerle, the first
player assigned to cover Oscar.
"I'm glad coach had confidence in
me to be a good defensive player
Thompson was more than
pleaded with Majerle.
"1 think Majerle set the tone
for the defensive game Th-
ompson said. "He got out and
played really well. He's a hell of a
player
The man known simply as
United States from long range in Oscar said of the five players who
the Pan Am Games in Indianapo- covered him during the game,
lis, winning the gold medal with a Majerle impressed him the most.
120-115 victory
This time it was different.
"if you're not going to shoot
the 3-point shots as well as your
opponent, you've got to make
certain that he doesn't use the 3-
point shot to dominate you
Thompson observed.
Brazil made just five of 21 3-
point attempts and the United
outreboundcd the South
"The defense was very in-
tense, very hard but very legal
said Oscar.
Oscar finished with 31 points,
16 from the free throw line, as
Brazil, which Thompson praised
as the best shooting team in ama-
teur basketball, never got going.
The United States led 63-55 at
halftime and opened up a 22-
point lead with a 21 -7 run over the
pressure at full throttle.
Bimbo Coles had a three-
point play after he stole the ball
from Marcel Souza. Eleven sec-
onds later he knocked the ball
away again, Stacey Augmon
saved it from going out of bounds,
and Jeff Grayer was fouled on a
layup.
After an exchange of 3-point-
ers, Augmon followed an impres-
sive dunk with a steal that was
converted by JR. Reid, who led
the U.S. team with 16 points, and
the United States had its first 10-
point lead, 55-45, with 3:37 left in
the half.
The score was 59-49 with 2:08
left on a jumper by Reid, but Brazil
ran off six straight before an
Augmon midcourt steal and
dunk gave the U.S. team the eight-
point halftime lead.
"We knew we could pressure
(Maury) Souza and by denying
him the ball we caused turn-
overs Coles said. "Stacey's
known for his defense and 1 guess
that run got us going
Augmon left the arena on
crutches after suffering a slight
ankel sprain.
Willie Anderson, Manning
and David Robinson also played
on the Pan Am team, but Ander-
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
Developing relationships is
an important part of everyone's
life, but for ECU's Jcmma Holley,
her relationships have become
significant to all aspects of her life,
especially athletics.
First Holley, a junior on the
ECU volleyball team, has devel-
oped a relationship with herself
as a student and as an athlete.
"I've become a more serious
person says Holley. "When I
came to college, I realized that I
was here to do something with
my life and I realize that as an
athlete, I was looked upon highly
and that my actions would reflect
on the program
Holley's roles have changed
in ECU volleyball during the past
three years. Now, as a junior, she
has developed into one of the
team's leaders both on and off the
court.
"I think I'm looked upon as
one of the leaders and because of
this, I want to set good examples.
I want people to know that I am a
hard worker, I'm dedicated and
that I will always give 125 percent
of myself in everything that I do
Holley's family plays an im-
portant part in her life, also. Fa-
ther Jack and mother Judith are
both teachers and Holley says
they raised her in a Christian fam-
someone who can understand
having responsibilities and not
having a lot of time to spend to-
gether said Holley.
But Lowe does understand
and Holley says their common
bond � athletics - makes them
working and best athletes I've
ever worked with says Kirkpa-
trick, who has coached for eight
years.
"She is the kind of athlete that
any coach would want and she is
good enough to play anywhere.
understand each other and appre- jemma is disciplined and dedi-
ciate the
more.
other one that much
Jemma Holley
As with any team, a good
coachplayer relationship is es-
sential to the team's performance.
Holley and ECU first year coach
Judy Kirkpatrick have developed
cated and my only regret is that I
was not here sooner to work with
her
Holley, like most athletes, has
set goals for herself and for her
team.
For her team, Holley's goal is
to move up in the conference after
finishing last in 1987.
For herself, Holley would like
to receive an honor that shows she
performed the best that she could:
All-Conference.
Holley says that she hasn't
reached her goals yet, but with her
team and her coa�h,he feels that
they are within reach.
Using athletics as one of her
teachers, Holley will continue to
teach dedication and determina-
tion after she finishes school. As a
Speech Language � Auditory
Pathology major, Holley hopes to
one day receive her masters and
go on to work with children.
ily and helped her to find what that important relationship. Each
States
Americans 40-28 in a game no opening 5:36 of the second half as son said this game wasn't played
member of the U.S. delegation Majerle had seven points and for revenge,
would say was sweet revenge for Danny Manning six.
an embarrassing defeat. "The defense was very diffi-
"You get embarrassed when cuit and it was that way for 40
you rob a bank or become a drug minutes. They are taller and
faster. They just play hard all the
time, " point guard Maury Souza
said.
Oscar made twi free throws
with 6:09 left in the first half to
bring Brazil within 42-40. The
United States then went on a 19-9
that featured the defensive
addict. I don't believe a person
can ever be embarrassed repre-
senting his country Thompson
said. "That team in Indianapolis
helped us
That team allowed sublime
shooter Oscar Schmidt and Souza
to combine for 77 points. This
team held them to 42.
run
You can't erase what hap-
pened last year and this game
wasn't for the gold medal An-
derson said. "It was just another
early game on the way to the
medal round
Oscar knows there's a chance
Brazil will face the United States
again, this time after both teams
advance to the medal round.
"I hope to try again against
the United States he said.
would make her a good person
Holley's older sister, also an
athlete, helped her in becoming
who she is today.
"It was hard following Ju-
lieanne (sister) at first. I felt intimi-
dated in high school that I would
not do as well as she had. But she
helped me to realize that I can
only be me and if I'm not as good
in something then that's okay
In the midst of athletics and
academics, Holley has developed
another important relationship:
one with boyfriend Grant Lowe,
an ECU offensive lineman.
respects the other and strives to
work for the benefit of the team.
"Before Coach Kirkpatrick
came, this team didn't have a fo-
cus, but she has completely
changed our attitudes and expec-
tations said Holley, whose '87
squad finished with a 9-19 mark
and in last place in the conference.
"We now have a nucleus.
Everyone works hard because we
have someone to please � Coach
K. She docs a lot for us and we
want to do a lot for her
Kirkpatrick shares the same
Top Twenty
(AP)� The top Twenty teams
in the Associated Press college
football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, season rec-
ord through games of Sept. 17:
1. Miami, Fl. (52)
respect for Holley in seeing her
It's hard having a personal strengths and doing as much for
relationship when you're an and her teammates as pos-
athlete. School and the team must siole-
come first and it's hard to find "Jemma is one of the hardest
UNC player is out for the season
CHAPEL HILL (AP)� Cap-
tain Courageous used to wear No.
49 and make bone-crushing tack-
les for the University of North
Carolina football team.
Now, Mitch Wike sports an 8-
inch scar on his stomach, stuggles
to move around his dorm room
and sometimes feels like a shut-in.
Doctors say that barring a miracle
recovery, Wike's college football
career is over.
"I've played this game since I
was 6 years old Wike told the
Durham Morning Herald. 'Then
something like this happens
Wike, a fifth-year senior in-
side linebacker from Brevard, had
a good start to his final season at
UNC. He was named a captain
and starter at linebacker for the
third straight season. By late in the
fi rst quarter of the opener a t Sou th
Carolina two weeks ago, the 6-
foot-2,225-pounder had make six
tackles.
Then the Gamecocks ran a
sweep toward Wike's side of the
field. He pursued and was ap-
proached by a South Carolina
offensive guard. The guard went
low, trying to cut Wike off his feet.
Wike countered by jumping over
the oncoming lineman. When
Wike was in mid-air, the lineman
kicked back his leg� a move
called a leg whip� and struck
Wike in the stomach.
"I went over and made the
tackle on the sidelines Wike
recalled. "But 1 couldn't get back
up. I've never been in so much
pain in my whole life. At first, I
just thought I was hit in the groin
area. But I knew it was a lot more
serious than that
Wike was treated on the side-
lines for a few minutes. Then he
became nauseous. Finally, he was
carted off on a stretcher, bound
for Richland Memorial Hospital
and numerous tests.
"I was out of it the rest of the
night Wike said. "They did an X-
ray two or three times and could
find nothing wrong. Somebody
mentioned that it might be
bruised muscles. But I've had that
before and I knew it was a lot
different. Dr. DeWalt said I
wouldn't have come out of the
game with just a bruise
Wike had a big bruise on his
abdomen and a couple of football
cleat marks from there to his belly
button. He was still in constant
pain. Wike even said the doctors
were considering releasing him
early Sunday morning after a bat-
tery of tests.
But Dr. Joseph DeWalt,
UNC's dirctor of sports medicine,
felt Wike's injury was something
notable. But he wasn't positive
until a few more tests were com-
plete. On Sunday morning, the
prognosis of a tear in the small
intestines was finalized and Wike
underwent emergency surgery.
"None of the team doctors
around the country that I've
talked to have seen this type of
injury happen to a football
player DeWalt said.
DeWalt said the injury is
more common in auto accidents
when the seat belt compresses the
stomach area and injures the
small intestines.
"I'd never had surgery before
in my life Wike said. "To think
that most football players get
messed-up knees and legs and
here I am with an intestine injury.
"The doctors down there told
me that somebody could take a
sledghammer and hit me in the
stomach and it would probably
break my spinal column before it
hurt my intestines.
Wike was hospitalized in
Columbia, S.C until Friday, Sept.
9, when he was transferred �via
Richlands' hospital plane� to
Chapel Hill's Memorial Hospital.
He stayed overnight at Memorial
and got up late Saturday, in time
to make the coin toss for the home
opener against Oklahoma.
"I really wanted to go to the
game said Wike, who walked
slowly on and off the field. "I
thought it would mean a lot to the
players. I wanted to try and sup-
port the team anyway I could
Wike returned to classes for
the first time Friday.
Wike's life has changed dras-
tically. He has lost 25 pounds,
down to 200 pounds. "It took me
five years to put 25 pounds on
(lifting weights) and one week to
take it off Wike said. He eats
normally, except that he tries to
avoid red meat. Pain killers are
also still in his diet.
"Right now I'm not thinking
about coming back to the team
Wike said. "My main concerns are
getting to the bathroom and get-
ting movies to put on the VCR. My
needs are pretty simple. It's weird
how you can go from doing so
many things in a day to the bare
essentials
UNC coach Mack Brown said
Wike first talked with him early
last week about returning to the
team, but by the end of the week
Wike was tending solely to his
injury.
"He'll come out to practice as
soon as he's able Brown said.
"He's in tune with what we need
to do. And we've got a lot of
young guys at his positon
2. UCLA (3)
3. Oklahoma (2)
4. Auburn
5. Southern Cal (2)
6. Georgia
7.LSU
8. Notre Dame
9. Florida State
10. Nebraska
11.West Virginia
12.Clemson
13. Alabama
14. South Carolina
15. Penn State
16. Pitt
17. Washington
18. Oklahoma State
19. Michigan
20. Florida
Other receiving votes: Wyo-
ming 74, Indiana 44, Arkansas 38,
Oregon 37, Brigham Young 32,
Colorado 30, Duke 11, Arizona
state 8, North Carolina State 8,
Houston 6, Hawaii 5, Texas 4,
Vanderbilt 4, Washington State 3,
Air Force 2, Baylor 1, Ohio Statel,
Western Michigan 1.






I
18
Tt IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1988
Fearless Football Forecast
Southern Miss at ECU
Virginia at Duke
West Virginia at Pitt
Georgia at South Carolina
N.C. State at Maryland
Wyoming at Air Force
Oklahoma at USC
Michigan State at Florida State
Louisville at UNC
Boston College at TCU
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week (7 2)
Overall (20 - 9)
ECU
Virginia
Pitt
Georgia
N.C. State
Air Force
Oklahoma
Florida State
UNC
TCU
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week (5 4)
Overall (19 - 10)
ECU
Duke
Pitt
South Carolina
Maryland
Air Force
USC
Florida State
UNC
Boston College
DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Last Week (6 3)
Overall (19 - 10)
ECU
Duke
West Virginia
Georgia
Maryland
Wyoming
Oklahoma
Florida State
UNC
TCU
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week - (7 2)
Overall (21 8)
ECU
Duke
West Virginia
Georgia
N.C. State
Air Force
Oklahoma
Florida State
UNC
TCU
CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
Last Week- (7 2)�
Overall(21 8)
ECU
Duke
Pitt
South Carolina
Maryland
Air Force
Oklahoma
Florida State
UNC
Boston College
FARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week - (5 4)
Overall(19-10)
ECU
Duke
West Virginia
Georgia
N.C. State
Air Force
Oklahoma
Florida State
Louisville
TCU
Last week's game between Alabama and Texas A&M was cancelled because of Hurricane Gilbert
U.S. confidence back
SEOUL, South Korea (AP)
It was the moment U.S. boxing
Coach Kenny Adams had feared
all along.
Little Michael Carbajal was
lighting a favored South Korean
and it was close. Neither fighter
seemed to have a clear edge, but
the partisan crowd was cheering
wildly with every punch landed
by the Korean
All alone, Adams had
warned his fighters oi judges who
didn't like Americans, urging
them to win decisively if they
expected to capture the decision.
Carbajal wasn't doing that,
and Adams was expecting the
worst.
it didn't happen.
Wednesday's decision went
to Carbajal after he surged against
Oh Kwang-So in the third round
of their 106-pound Knit, giving a
suddenly rejuvenated American
team new hope.
"It's kind oi given me a little
faith in a sense said Adams. "We
prevailed in this one"
Carbajal's victory was the
second in a row for the U.S. fight-
ers, who had become a demoral-
ized bunch after seeing world
champion Kelcie Banks knocked
cold in his first fight and Anthonv
Hembrick disqualified for show-
ing up late.
"This is a definite strong
morale booster for us said
Adams. "If we can beat the Ko-
rean and shut the crowd up, that's
just what we needed to do
Carbajal, who had lost to Oh
last vear in Seoul in their onlv
other meeting, picked up the pace
in the third round to overcome
Oh's mauling tactics and capture
a narrow 3-2 decision.
"He's the hometown hero
and 1 know 1 had to fight hard
because of the crowd said Car-
bajal. "I knew it would be close
because he's from here
The fight was close, so close
that Carbajal needed to pull out
the third round on four of the five
scorecards to win.
At the end of the fight three
judges had the Phoenix fighter
ahead 59-58, while one judge fa-
vored Oh by a 60-58 margin and
another had the Korean ahead by
bO-59.
A half-dozen of Carbajal's
teammates cheered loudly from
their seats near the ring as Car
bajal used some good inside work
to the bodv to score points in the
final round.
"1 heard the whole team
throughout the fight said Car-
bajal, who turned 22 the day the
Olympics opened. "It's some-
thing that really motivates you
Adams was also a motivator,
trying between rounds to get
Carbajal to go all out in the final
round.
"I said, 'Mike, this is close.
You've got to do it for America,
you've got to drive for the gold
said Adams.
Carbajal advanced to a Sun-
day fight against Hiem Dang
Hieu oi Vietnam despite .
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830-9262
Store Hours: M,T,Th, F -10-6 p.m.Sat. 8-6 p.m.
New 5-piece wooden Dinette Sets - $149.95
4 Drawer Chests - $46.00 each or 2 for $79.00
5 Drawer Chests - $69.95
AndVarious Other Unique Items!
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Personal property from local prominent estate plus the
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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24,1988,10:00 A.M.
Preview Thursday, September 22, 2-6 P.M.
Friday, September 23, 2-6 P.M.
and 2 hours prior to sale
Auction To Be Held At
WOODSIDE
( ANTIQUES )
Micahael G. Cable, N.C.A.L. 3303
Route 8, Box 428. Allen Road
GREENVILLE, NC 27834 919-756-9929
Appraisal Services, Tag Sales, Auctions
Media Board
is now accepting
applications
for Head Photographer
of Photo Lab.
Please apply at the Media Board
Office, 2nd Floor. Applications
accepted through September 30,
1988 at 5:00 p.m.
Squirrel Man Hotline
757-6366
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The Plaza
(next to Annabelle's)
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Stop by UBE before
or after any home
pirate football
game. Choose
from the world's
largest selection
of pirate souvenirs from
t-shirts, sweaters and hats to
megaphones, pom poms and
even E.C.U. tote bags.
And while you're at
UBE see our full line
of Russell Athletic
and Champion
Sportswear.
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Book Exchange, downtown
Greenville . . . the one for
the fans. Stop by today.
1988 PIRATE HOME SCHEDULE
Sept. 3 Tennessee Tech 7:00 PM
Sept 24 Southern Mississippi (Parent's Day) 1:30PM
Oct 1 Southwestern Louisiana 1:30 PM
Oct. 8 West Virginia (Homecoming) 2:00 PM
Oct. 22 Syracuse 1:30 PM
Oct. 29 Miami 1:30 PM
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Open Football Saturdays 9:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.Weekdays 9:00 A.M. - 5:0 P.M.
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville
SECri
with m
(AP)- While the
continues to have probh
Southeastern Conference
ing high.
The SEC has thro
among the first seven an
the Top Twenty in the
Associated Press college
poll. They are Auburn,
Georgia, No 6; LSL No
bama. No. 13, and Florid
By contrast, the BigT.
representative in the Top
is No. 19 Michigan And
vennes are 0-2, one oi
teams ever to make the
with that record. Ohio S
Iowa dropped out of the rl
after losses, while Pitt
moved in for the first t
season.
The Big Ten is
outside competition, ai
teams, including Michii
defending champion
State, have yet I vin
Meanwhile, the -EC
against teams from
conference 17-1
six teams have yet ti
"Without question, tj
far the K'st the league
since I've been I
burn Coach Pat Dye, in h
season as a head coach in I
Miami is No 1 for 1
week in a row
Saturday's amazii j
over Michigan Hie Hu
who trailed 30-14,
touchdowns and at,
final 5 1II mm
They received
place votesand 1,171
1,180 points from a natj
panel oi sports
sportscasti
Michigan, w I ;ch
opener 19-37 to N
slipped from 15th to
team u ith an 0-2 n
the Top Twent)
1984
UCLA, a 56
bong Beach State, receh
first-plac.e otes and r
No. 2 with 1 104 points
Last week, with 5!
participating, Miami lc
46-3 in first-place votes at
1,019 in points.
Oklahoma moved
fourth to third with
place votesand 1J16 : J
Sooners, who defeated
2S-10, replaced Clems,
dropped from third to 1
losing to Florida State
Auburn leaped fronl
fourth with 900 points b
ing Kansas 56-7, The n
two first-place votes
Southern Cal. which w,
U.S. an
with ruh
SEOUL, South Korea!
Soviet sprite's kj compol
three perfect 10s Wednel
throned reigning Oh;
world champion Rom
women's team gymnastii
U.S. team missed a bror
rare and controversial
The American worm
shots when the Games b
superb under pressure
fourth behind East Gerrn
a dav oi mixed fortune
U.S. team.
Cold, silver and brorj
from Matt Biondi'sneck
more Olympic medals arl
his giant reach, but the cj
got away by a hundret
second belongs, sti
enough to a swimmer fnj
name
Paritv has arrived
Games, scattering medalj
lctes barely known and
most unexpected.
Suriname? Yes, thai
American jewel with onj
pic-sized pool on the eo
of Brazil has its first
matching the feat of tinj
Rico.
The longtime superp
sport - the Soviets, East
and Americans - still
medal list, but they're
they can't win as easily
used to.
The Soviets lead
medals, including sever
East Germany is second
medals, and the United StJ
Bulgaria are tied with nij
als each.
China is making a b
in diving and swimmij
Bulgaria's bulging weij
are leading a brigade of i
in several sports.





I

1
lRI VIS HAMIMi)N
cs i ditoi
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Puke
West irginia
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2:00 I'M
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5:30 P.M.
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1988 19
SEC riding high
with most in top 20
(AP- While the Big Ten
continues to have problems, the
Southeastern Conference is rid-
ing high.
The SEC has three team
among the first seven and five in
the Top Twenty in this week's
Associated Press college football
poll. They are Auburn, No. 4;
Georgia, No. 6; LSU, No. 7; Ala-
bama, No. 13, and Florida, No. 20.
By contrast, the Big Ten's lone
representative in the Top Twenty
is No. 19 Michigan. And the Wol-
verines are 0-2, one of the few
teams ever to make the rankings
with that record. Ohio State and
Iowa dropped out of the rankings
alter losses, while Pitt and Florida
moved in for the first time this
season.
The Big Ten is 7-15, all against
outside competition, and four
teams, including Michigan and
defending champion Michigan
State, have yet to win a game.
Meanwhile the SEC is 11-3
against teams from outside the
conference� 17-19 overall� and
six teams have yet to lose a game.
"Without question, this is by
far the best the league has been
since I've been here said Au-
burn Coach Pat Dye, in his eighth
season as a head coach in the SEC.
Miami is No. 1 for the third
week in a row, thanks to
Saturday's amazing 31-30 victory
over Michigan. The Hurricanes,
who trailed 30-14, scored two
touchdowns and a field goal in the
final 5 12 minutes.
Thev received 52 of 59 first-
place votes and 1,171 of a possible
1,180 points from a nationwide
panel of sports writers and
sportscasters,
Michigan, which lost its
opener 19-17 to Notre Dame,
slipped from 15th to 19th. The last
team with an 0-2 record to make
the Top Twenty was Auburn in
1984.
UCLA, a 56-3 winner over
Long Beach State, received three
first-place votes and remained
No. 2 with 1,104 points.
Last week, with 55 voters
participating, Miami led UCLA
46-3 in first-place votes and 1,082-
1,019 in points.
Oklahoma moved up from
fourth to third with two first-
place votes and 1,016 points. The
Sooners, who defeated Arizona
28-10, replaced Clemson, which
dropped trom third to 12th after
losing to Florida State 24-21.
Auburn leaped from sixth to
fourth with 900 points by wallop-
ing Kansas 56-7. The remaining
two first-place votes went to
Southern Cal, which was idle but
U.S. angry
with rule
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - A
Soviet sprite's icy composure and
three perfect 10s Wednesday de-
throned reigning Olympic and
world champion Romania in
women's team gymnastics as the
U.S. team missed a bronze on a
rare and controversial penalty.
The American women, long-
shots when the Games began but
superb under pressure, finished
fourth behind East Germany after
a day of mixed fortunes for the
U.S. team.
Gold, silver and bronze hang
from Matt Biondi'sneck and four
more Olympic medals are within
his giant reach, but the gold that
got away by a hundredth of a
second belongs, strangely
enough, to a swimmer from Suri-
name.
Parity has arrived at the
Games, scattering medals to ath-
letes barely known and nations
most unexpected.
Suriname? Yes, that South
American jewel with one Olym-
pic-sized pool on the coast north
of Brazil has its first medal,
matching the feat of tiny Costa
Rico.
The longtime superpowers 6f
sport - the Soviets, East Germans
and Americans - still top the
medal list, but they're finding
they can't win as easily as they
used to.
The Soviets lead with 18
medals, including seven golds,
East Germany is second with 11
medals, and the United States and
Bulgaria are tied with nine med-
als each.
China is making a big splash
in diving and swimming, and
Bulgaria's bulging weightlifters
are leading a brigade of medalists
in several sports.
held onto fifth place with 859
points.
Georgia rose from seventh to
sixth with 802 points by defeating
Mississippi State 42-35, and LSU,
a 34-9 winner over Tennessee,
jumped from ninth to seventh
with 794 points.
Notre Dame remained in
eighth place with 753 points by
defeating Michigan State 20-3.
Florida State's victory over
Clemson enabled the Seminolcs
to climb from 10th place to ninth
with 739 points, and Nebraska,
No. 11 last week, rounded out the
Top Ten with 639 points. The
Cornhukers also were idle over
the weekend.
The Second Ten consists of
West Virginia, Clemson, Ala-
bama, South Carolina, Pern State,
Pitt, Washington, Oklahoma
State, Michigan and Florida.
Last week, it was Nebraska,
West Virginia, Alabama, South
Carolina, Michigan, Penn State,
Washington, Ohio State, Iowa
and Oklahoma State.
Pitt made the Top Twenty
and knocked Ohio State out by
trouncing the Buckeyes 42-10,
while Florida cracked the Top
Twenty by routing Indiana State
58-0. Iowa fell out by losing for the
second time this season, 24-21 to
Colorado.
Plaza Cinema
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p.m. Sat, Sept. 24 & we'll be here late after the
game. ECU & the Beef Barn .a winning
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Fri. & Sat. 6-10-30 p.m.
Sun. 5-30-9 p.m.
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THE DEAD POOL
Starts Friday
THE GREAT OUTDOORS
TONIGHT ONLY!
ATHENDRIX
THURSDAY,
SEPT. 22
S Oi1
ItltOVIM AS I lYS
lt'�thr�ttrv ot their lie
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes
Students To Come By And See
Our 2 Bedroom and 1 Bedroom
Garden Apartments.
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
Just In From New York City
"Classic" Wool
Overcoats
and London Fog Trench Coats
Black, Brown, Tweed, Blue,
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Pool Prices: $1.50 per hour per person
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Look For Upcoming Tournaments and Specials
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Welcome Parents of E.C.U. Students
Special Prices For Parents Weekend
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Also - No Charge For Tinting
Offer Good Until Oct. 15th
(Same Office Complex With Greenville Eye Clinic)
Putting You First Makes Us 2
752-4018





f
20
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1988
Sports Briefs
Moore named AL Player-of-the Week
w Y�KAH - Seattle Bergstroem 4-6, 4-6 in a first- 7 to win the Olympic gold medal 395.475 points Romania took the
ngh -bander Mike Moore, who round upset at the $190,000 Cc- Wednesday night in the men's foil silver wi?h 39I?2S wh�East
yielded only seven hits in two neva Open tennis tournament. competition of fencing. Germany won the bronze with
complete games, was named Fernando Luna of Spain, Alexandre Romankov of the 39075
American League Player of the seeded seventh, had little trouble Soviet Union won the bronze by The United States finished
in eliminating Arne Thorns of beating Ulrich Schreck of West fourth, with 390.575 points and
Moore allowed only one walk West Germany, 6-3,6-1
and struck out 14 in defeating
Minnesota and Milwaukee last
week, pitching a five-hitter
against the Twins on Monday and
a two-hit shutout Saturday.
Clarins Open
Browning NL
NEW YORK (AD� Tom
Browning of the Cincinnati Reds,
who pitched the major league's
first perfect game in nearly four
years last week, was named Na-
tional League Player of the Week.
Browning struck out seven of
PARIS (AD� Veronica
Martinek of West Germany de-
feated Hana Fukarkova of
Czechoslovakia in a tough three
Germany 10-8.
Gymnastics
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) �
The Soviet Union won the gold
medal in women's team gymnas-
tics Wednesday, with the United
the 27 batters he faced in posting a Raton, Ra 6-4, 6-0; Regina Mar
set match 6-2,5-7,6-2 on the open- States losing the bronze medal
ing day of the $50,000 Clarins because of a protest earlier in the
Open, part of the Virginia Slims competition.
tour- The Soviets finished with
In other first-round matches,
Laura Lapi downed fellow Italian
Linda Ferrando 6-3, 2-6, 6-1;
Nathalie Guerree of France de-
feated Susan Mascarin of Boca
would have won the bronze if not
for a half-point deducted because
in alternate was illegally on the
floor during one of the prelimi-
nary routines Monday night.
Suspension
Sports Information Pntsi Release
Charlie Tyson, a 5-11, 175
pound sophomore slotback from
Miami, Ra, has been suspended
indefinitely from the ECU foot-
ball team, announced head coach
Art Baker Tuesday.
Tyson was handed the sus-
pension after an alleged assault
incident on the ECU campus.
"Charlie's suspension re-
mains consistent with the policy
established at East Carolina, con-
cerning incidents of this nature.
1 le will be suspended indefinitely
as a representative of this team
Once the issue has been clarified,
we will take action as deemed
appropriate Baker said.

1-0 victory over the Los Angeles
Dodgers on Friday, itwas the last
perfect game in a nine-inning
game since Mike Witt of the Cali-
fornia Angels hurled one agianst
the Texas Rangers on Sept. 30,
1984. The last perfect game
pitched in the National League
was by Sandy Koufax of the
Dodgers on Sept. 9, 1965, against
the Chicago Cubs.
U.S. Seniors
MILWAUKEE (AP) � Dick
Riley and Richard Goerlich Jr.
shot 1-over-par 73s to share the
lead after the first round of the
34th U.S. Senior Amateur Cham-
pionship at Milwaukee Country
Club.
Riley, of Phoenix, Ariz and
Goerlich, of Tampa, Fla were one petition when he did 160 kilos,
shot ahead of eight players at 74. bettering Militossian's mark of
In that group was 1986 champion 158.5 set earlier this year.
BoWiIliamsandthree-timeCana- Guenchev'scleanand jerkof 202.5
dian Senior Amateur winner kilos topped the 200.5- kilo mark
tobert Wylie. of Mihail Petrov of Bulgaria, last
Seven players were at 75, in- year. The total surpassed Petrov's
silkova of Czechoslovakia beat
Alexia Dechaume of France, 6-4,
7-5; and Cathy Caverzacio of Italy
trounced Emmanuelle Derly of
France 6-0, 6-1.
Weightlifting
SEOUL, South Korea (AP)�
Angel Guenchev of Bulgaria
broke three world records Wed-
nesday night to win the gold
medal in the Olympic weightlift-
ing 67.5-kilogram division with a
total of 362.5 kilos in two lifts.
Joachim Kunz of East Ger-
many took the silver medal with
340 kilos while Israel Militossian
of the Soviet Union captured the
bronze medal with 337.5 kilos.
Guenchev set a world record
in the snatch portion of the com-
cluding last year's runner-up
James Kite jr. of Wolf town, Va.
Geneva Open
GENEVA (AP)- Fourth-
seeded MagnusGustafssonlost to
fellow Swede Christian
355.0, also last year.
Fencing
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) �
Stefano Cerioni of Italv defeated
Udo Wagner of East Germany 10-
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Tuesday, September 27,1988
�! AaercMntatwM � i3!Jt 99S90W
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
ECU Students $4.00 Public $6.00
Tickets Available at Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
M-F 11 a.m6 p.m.
Oscar
SEOUL, South Korea (AL
(all him Oh-scar, with emphl
on the Oh! He is Oscar Schrrud
Brazil, so widely acclaimed!
international basketball arc
that he needs just one name,
Kareem or Magic or Isiah.
The first thing you no
about him are his eyes, alwl
darting from here to there, al w
probing, looking for the soft s
in the defense He is alwj
moving without the ball, alw
looking for an opening and a pi
Both develop frequently and
said that he never met a sho
didn't like.
"He is so smart sighed V
lie Anderson of the USA has
ball team. "He's never oul
position
It was Anderson, rememl
who was victimized by Oh-sc
unconscious bombing at the
Am Games in Indianapolis, w'J
Brazil snatched the gold me
out from under the Amenc.
noses, 120-115.
Since that day 13 months,
Anderson had been wa
the inevitable Olympic remat
"I'd wake up and
Oscar pounding the flc I
Devils a
DURHAM (AP) - With
team at 3-0, Duke football co
Steve Spurrier says some dc,
ers are starting to become belij
ers, but he says the Blue De
have accomplished nothii
cial. And he avs their ba - .
be against the wall Satur,
ugainst Virginia
"We're trying to set the ml
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i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1988 21
hspended indefinitely
entative of this team.
Ii e has been clarified,
action as deemed
Baker said.
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Oscar known by first name
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -
Call him Oh-scar, with emphasis
on the Oh! He is Oscar Schmidt of
Brazil, so widely acclaimed in
international basketball circles
that he needs just one name, like
Karecm or Magic or Isiah.
The first thing you notice
about him are his eyes, always
darting from here to there, always
probing, looking for the soft spot
in the defense. He is always
moving without the ball, always
looking for an opening and a pass.
Both develop frequently and it is
said that he never met a shot he
didn't like.
"He is so smart sighed Wil-
lie Anderson of the USA basket-
ball team. "He's never out of
position
It was Anderson, remember,
who was victimized by Ob-scar's
unconscious bombing at the Pan
Am Games in Indianapolis, when
Brazil snatched the gold medal
out from under the Americans'
noses, 120-115.
Since that day 13 months ago,
Anderson had been waiting for
the inevitable Olympic rematch.
"I'd wake up nights and see
Oscar pounding the floor he
said.
So did his teammates. Coach
John Thompson made sure of
that. Every now and then, he'd
remind Team USA of the Pan Am
experience and that Olympians
Anderson, David Robinson and
Danny Manning took home silver
medals, not gold ones, from that
competition because of their last
encounter with Oh-scar.
America's basketball psyche
was scarred by Brazil's version of
the Big 0, perhaps more deeply
than the controversial Olympic
medal game loss to the Soviet
Union in 1972. The Americans
believe they won that they won
that game but were cheated out of
the gold. They know they lost the
Pan Am final against Oh-scar.
On Wednesday, Uncle Sam
got even, defeating Brazil 102-87
in the Olympic tournament. The
defensive assignment on Oh-scar
was shared largely by Dan
Majerle, Anderson, occasionally
Jeff Grayer, and whoever else
happened to come along. They
limited him - if that's what you
want to call it - to 31 points.
Defending Oh-scar is no
simple matter. He is a threat all
over the court and the American
strategy was to keep a hand in his
face whenever possible. "All the
time Anderson corrected, re-
membering Thompson's direc-
tions. "We wanted a hand in his
face all the time
Majerle picked up two fouls
in the first five minutes that way
and had to pass the defensive
torch to the others. In the first half,
Anderson et al permitted the Bra-
zilian star to touch the ball just 10
times. He still had 16 points,
though.
In the second half, Brazil
managed to find Oh-scar more
frequently but to their credit, the
Americans made him work for his
shots. He finished with 7-for-16
from the field, two of them long-
range three-pointers, and a per-
fect 15-for-15 from the foul line.
It was not exactly a defensive
shroud, but it got the job done for
the Americans. "He is such a
great outside shooter Majerle
said.
"Everybody had to help out. I
think we got him a little
frustrated
And he still scored 31.
Sometimes the frustration
spilled over, though. One time
down the floor on defense, he
challenged Grayer, gesturing at
the three-point line and shouting
at the American, "C'mon! Shoot!
Shoot
Grayer grinned, remembered
his roots in the disciplined game
taught by Thompson, ignored
Oh-scar's dare and casually
passed off to a teammate. Oh-scar,
perhaps impressed, later did the
same thing - once. It resulted in a
rare assist for the man who plays
run-and-gun basketball.
Marcei Souza, the resident
philosopher on the Brazil team
and the man who takes what few
shots Oh-scar leaves over, was
asked for his analysis of the USA's
victory.
Souza, wearing sunglasses to
protect his eyes from the glare of
Chamsil Gymnasium, thought for
a moment and then offered this:
"The most wonderful and impor-
tant thing about the human race
he began, "is we learn from our
mistakes. The USA learned very
much
Indeed.
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Devils are converting doubters
DURHAM (AP) - With his
team at 3-0, Duke football coach
Steve Spurrier says some doubt-
ers are starting to become believ-
ers, but he says the Blue Devils
have accomplished nothing spe-
cial. And he says their backs will
be against the wall Saturday
against Virginia.
"We're trying to get the mes-
sage across to our players that we just like before
haven't done anything yet Quarterback Anthony
Spurrier said. "Shoot, three wins Dilweg agreed that the Blue Dev-
over non-conference opponents Us have yet to really prove them-
has happened a lot of times here at selves.
. .
VUARNET.
U C C I
fcg 2f
Duke.
"We were 3-0 in 1982 and last
year, too, but we went downhill
after that both times. If we don't
beat Virginia, we'll be 3-1 again,
"We realize we're 3-0, but the
combined record of those three
teams we beat (Northwestern,
Tennessee, The Citadel) is 1-8
Dilweg said.
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22THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22,1988
Terps think State is taking them lightly
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP)- don't know if they're the caliber of probably licking his chops after "two of the best wideouts, not Maryland's running game,
Maryland coach Joe Krivak says West Virginia, but they're a good seeing the West Virginia film only in the conference, but maybe which has seen major improve-
the Terrapins have a fight ahead solid football club and we're Krivak said. "I'm sure there in the country ments over last season, could also
of them Saturday against North going to have to play very well to going to think they can run inside Krivak said he wasn't con- be a question mark if Beasley is
Carolina State in their Atlantic beat them against us. That's what happened cerned over the Terps' passing unable to play.
Coast Conference opener. The Wolf pack accomplished last year. It's something we've got game, even though quarterbacks Beasley scored touchdowns
Maryland is coming off a 55- last year'seasy victory by running to stop Neil O'Donnell and Scott Zolak on runs of 19 and 74 yards against
24 shellacking by No. 11 West roughshod through the middle of Although the running game combined to hit on just eight of 19 West Virginia and set up a third
Virginia last week, and the the Terps' defensive line. West isabigpartofN.C.State'soffense, passes for 99 yards with three score with a 42-yard pass recep-
week.
'Coach
called senior wide receivers scintillating performance Kri-
(Dick) Sheridan is Danny Peebles and Naz Worthen vaksaid.
Wolfpack, which has beaten Virginia used a similar strategy to Krivak warned that the Wolfpack interceptions last week.
Maryland two years in a row, gain 347 yards on the ground last is dangerous through the air. He "O'Donnell didn't have
possesses the kind of attack the
Terps traditionally have had diffi-
culty stopping.
Nevertheless, Krivak has
high hopes for his team.
"I still feel good about this
football team he said Tuesday
during his weekly press lunch-
eon. "I didn't see anyone sulking
or anyone down. We gave up 55
points, but I didn't see anyone
quit. To me, that's a positive sign.
"Obviously, we've got to get
better. But I've just got the feeling
somewhere down the line, we're
going to beat some good football
teams
Krivak's optimism is tem-
pered by an injury that may keep
his top running back out of action
for this week's game against N.C.
State, 2-1.
Mike Beasley, who rushed for
95 yards in seven carries against
West Virginia, is listed as ques-
tionable because of a bruised right
shoulder.
Last year, the Wolfpack
routed Maryland 42-14 at
Raleigh, N.C.
"We've had a lot of trouble
with this team Krivak said. "I
hon.
Junior college transfer Ricky
Johnson would start if Beasley
can't go.
"We're keeping our fingers
crossed with Beasley Krivak
said.
"He's doing some things for
us we haven't seen a running back
do in some time.
"We're also satisfied with
(Bren) Lowery, for an undersized
fullback, and with Ricky
Johnson
The Terps will probably also
be without starting guard Richard
Nelson, who strained his left knee
Tournament
"no-names"
ENDICOTT, N.Y. (AP) -
Without benefit of golf's biggest
names, the B.C. Open used to bill
itself as a tournament of
"tomorrow's champions
Tournament chairman Alex
Alexander now has a new slogan.
"Tommorrow's now here
he says.
The legendary names � Jack
Nickalus, Greg Norman, Lee
Trevino and Arnold Palmer - still
don't enter. But Alexander
quickly points out that the tour's
hottest young golfers will com-
pete in the 72-hole tournament.
"You look and see that we're
now getting the top money win-
ners Alexander said. "A lot of
these fellows are people we
watched develop.
"We may not have the pres-
tige of a U.S. Open or the PGA
Championship, but we have
the golfers that are the top com-
petitors at those tournaments
They're the same ones who
have been playing at En-Joie for
years.
When the tournament begins
Thursday, the tour's top two
money winners will be .there:
Chip Beck and defending cham-
pion Joey Sindelar, who lives in
nearby Horseheads, N.Y. In all,
nearly half of the tour's top 20
earners will be competing in the
four-day tournament.
It's only been in recent years
that the B.C. Open - which derives
its name from the "B.C comic
strip written by Endicott native
Johnny Hart - has made a move
upward from its secondary tour-
nament status.
The B.C. Open began as a one-
day tournament in 1971, when
winner Claude Harmon Jr.
emerged from a four-way sud-
den-death overtime to claim the
$2,000 top prize.
Sindelar received $72,000 last
year for his win here, and the
tournament this year boosted the
total purse from $400,000 to
$500,000 so the 1988 champion
will make $90,000.
From the beginning, the B.C.
Open drew the younger golfers
trying to etch a permanent spot
for themself on the tour, said Al-
exander.
Offering a challenging 6,088-
yard, par-72 course and solid
spectator support, the tourna-
ment became a favorite stop for
the new wave of professionals, he
said.
"People get excited because
we get five of the top 10 golfers'
Alexander said. "But they're not
new to the field. They've been
supporting us for a long time, and
now they're the stars
Among the regulars return-
ing to En-Joie are Ken Green, the
tour's sixth-leading money win-
ner, World Series champion Mike
Reid and Mark Calca vecchia, who
last week won the $600,000 Bank
of Boston Classic.
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Prices effective Thursday, September 22,
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 22, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 22, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.627
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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