The East Carolinian, September 20, 1988






Coming Thursday:
EClPs nursing program is under boardfaculty
scrutiny.
Features:
Experience Unlimited causes controversy at Minges
Sunday night, see page 9.
s:
Pirates drop to 1 -2 after a tough loss to Sduth
Carolina, see page 13.
She fEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 20
Tuesday September 20,1988
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Bentsen asks Democrats to "come home'
Lloyd Bentsen addresses listeners from the steps of the Pitt County
Court House (Photo by Thomas Walters, ECU Photolab).
By JOE HARRIS
Newt Editor
Lloyd Bentsen, the Democratic
vice presidential nominee, spoke
to Democratic supporters, Re-
publican opposition and inter-
ested listeners from the steps of
the Pitt Co. Court House Friday,
Sept. 16.
Bentsen, the running mate of
Mike Dukakis, is campaigning
through the South in order to stir
Democratic support for the up
coming presidential election. The
nominee said he was chosen by
Dukakis as a move to appeal to
southern supporters.
"I have been a Southern Demo-
crat all my life,and am proud of it,
"said Bentsen, a native of Texas.
Shadowed by the statue com-
merating the fallen Confederates
of the Civil War, he spoke to a
crowd estimated at more than 500
during the afternoon rally. The
ECU band entertained the crowd,
which was treated to a southern
style barbeque, complete with
iced tea, cole slaw and hush pup-
pies.
Bentsen appealed to the crowd
when he spoke of farming. "I
know what made North Carolina
great � agriculture He asked
the crowd to compare the Repub-
lican farming package to the
Democratic one.
"They don't understand the
tobacco and cotton programs the
way I do. Mike Dukakis and
myself will work for the farmers.
'Ve know what it takes said
Bentsen.
Bentsen asked the Democrats to
"come home He noted that
many conservative Democrats
gave their support to Reagan in
the last election. He told the
crowd the Democratic party is
stronger than it has been in many
years and asked Democrats to
support Mike Dukakis.
"Help us put Mike Dukakis in
the White House said Bentsen.
He touted defense as a strong
point of the Democratic platform. countlT
Bentsen said Dukakis supported
the Cruise Missle, the Stealth
Bomber and submarine launched
missies, but said, "A real, conven-
tional war is fought with tanks,
guns, fighter planes and Ameri-
can lives
"Because of the credit-card
mentality and borrow and spend
policy of the current administra-
tion, America has gone from the
number one lender nation to the
number one debtor nation said
Ben tsen of the economic situation.
He said it will cost every citizen an
average of $604 to pay the interest
on the national debt.
"Our policy is can-do and not
voodoo economics he said.
Senator Albert Gore, of Tennes-
see, was also at the rally support-
ing the Democratic ticket.
"We've had enough of the last
eight years with Reagan and
Bush, lets put a Democratic into
office said Gore.
Quayle
The Tennessee senator asked
the audience to note how Bush
called himself an environmental-
ist and how he (Bush) and James
Watt, the secretary of the interior,
were working to "clean up the
"I have to call these two men the
Bonnie and Clyde of the E.P.A. If
anything George Bush is running
from his environmental record
said Gore.
The N.C. Commissioner of
Agriculture, Jim Graham, former
governor Jim Hunt, gubernatorial
candidate Bob Jordan and Secer-
tary of N.C. Rufus Edminsten
were also on hand showing their
support for the DukakisBcntsen
team.
Election run-off is
slated for Wednesday
By TAMMY AYCOCK
Staff Writer
Tomorrow, the Student Gov-
ernment Association will hold
run-off elections for freshman
and sophomore class presidents.
According to SGA election
rules, run-off elections for class
officers result when there are
three or more candidates on the
ballot and no candidate receives
more than 50 percent of all votes
cast for that office. Arielle Sturz
and Melissa Hargett are running
for freshman class president. Al-
len Thomas and ScAtt Jones will
Gore called Bentsen a champion appear on the ballot for sopho-
of agriculture because he . more class president
(Bentsen) grew up on a farm and In the elections held last
owns farmland in Texas and Vir- week,Slurz led me freshman class
ginia. Gore said Bentsen is a man race by a one percent margin,
who would be a great president if Sturz had 37 percent of the votes
called upon. He noted Bentsen's while Hargett was in second place
with 36 percent.
The race for sophomore class
president had a larger division of
service record by saying, "He
honorab'y served his country in
war, unlike his opponent Dan
"I was disappointed in the
lack of sincerity of some of those
who filed for office. Approxi-
mately 23 candidates were dis-
qualified for failing to complete
filing procedures. These guide-
lines include: filling out a candi-
date certification form, submit-
ting an expense report, and at-
tending a mandatory meeting. All
candidates were supplied with a
copy of the election rules Pvick-
ett said.
"Many waited until the last
possible minute (5 p.m. Monday,
Sept. 12) to submit repotis Puck-
ett safef. Because of this, "The Fat
Carolinian" was unable to print a
candidate menu in Tuesday's pa-
per for the elections held on
Wednesday.
Due to candidate disqualiti-
caitons andor because no one
filed for them, many positions of
the SGA legislature still remain
open. "Only four dorms have
ECU gets endowed professor
An expert on financial institu-
tions and real estate has joined the
School of Business adds stature to
our programs Lanier said.
School of Business dean
Ernest B. Uhr described Stansell
as "a senior scholarly leader" who
will assist business faculty in
ecu sewi Bureau Polytechnic Institute.
The professorship held by
Stansell is the first in ECU'S his-
tory. It was established in 1986 in
honor of Robert Teer, a 1967
East Carolina University faculty graduate of ECU. Teer is the
as the university's first en-
dowedprofessorship in the of Teer Associates Inc a real es
School of Business. tate development, leasing and
Dr. Stanley R. Stansell, a for- management firm in the Durham,
mer professor of economics and Raleigh and Chapel Hill area.
finance at the University of Mis- The endowment to support
sissippi, is the holder of the Robert the Teer professorship totals
Dillard Teer, Jr. Distinguished more than $500,000. Of this,
Professorship of Business. The $333,000 was a gift from the Teer M.B.A. degrees from Florida State
professorship was endowed by a family. A state matching grant of University and the Ph.D. in Busi-
gift from the Dillard Teer family $167,000 is from the challenge ness Administration from the
of Durham and by a challenge grant program for endowed
grant program for endowed chairs set up by the 1985 General
chairs set up by the N.C. General Assembly.
Assembly.
A native of Jacksonville, Fla "It is probably the most sig-
Stansell was a professor of eco- nificant gift to ECU for academic Gulf Life Insurance Company.
nomics and finance and the purposes in recent years said
chairholder since 1982 of the Tom James L. Lanier, vice chancellor
B. Scott Chair of Savings Institu- for Institutional Development.
tionsat University of Mississippi. 'The Teer family is very re-
He has also taught at the Univer- spected in the business commu-
sity of South Carolina, the Univer- nity of North Carolina and their
sity of Houston and the Virginia commitment to ECU and to the
in a study of the stock markets in
the United States and India as
well as a study of the credit union
industry.
Related to his research,
Stansell has written more than 30
eight percent. Thomas received 37 complete representation and 10
percent of the votes and his oppo- are partially represented. There
nent, Jones, trailed with 29 per-
cent.
To vote tomorrow, students
must present an ECU identifica-
tion card with an activity sticker, class secretarytreasurer.
Polls will be open from 9 a.m. until "Out of the 37 positions avail-
6 p.m. at these locations: the bot- able for day representatives, 36
are 14 postions still available
Puckett said.
Other vacant offices are sen-
ior class vice president and senior
president and managing director achieving their potential.
He said the School of business
"will utilize the experience of the
chairholder to inspire, instruct
and assist in activities which will
enrich teaching, develop research
and furnish service
Stansell holds the B.S. and
University of Georgia. In addi-
tion to teaching, Stansell has
worked as a financial economist
with the Farm Credit Administra-
tion and as a security analyst with
At ECU, Stansell will teach
courses in commercial banking
and real estate and will also con-
duct research in the areas of finan-
cial institutions and real estate
markets. He is currently involved
torn of College Hill, the Croatan,
and the Student Store.
In addition to class officers,
the SGA also conducted elections
articles published by leading iast Wednesday for dorm and day
business magazines and journals representatives. Students elected
to these positions will form the
SGA legislature.
In regard to voter turnout last
week, the SGA Elections Chair-
person, Paul Puckett, said, "The
student participation and interest
and has delivered numerous
presentations to meetings and
conferences.
"My wife and I are very
pleased to be in Greenville and at
East Carolina University
Stansell said.
were filled. There were 29 candi
dates on the ballot and seven
write-ins. Only one position is
vacant Puckett said.
Like the candidates who filed
for election, write-ins had to sub-
mit an expense report.
After the SGA convenes this
fall, vacancies will be filled by the
SGA Screening and Appoint-
ments Committee. "Applicants
must undergo an interviewing
process before they are ap
was horrible Out of the 15,000
He said he is looking forward enrolled at ECU, only 380 voted pointed Puckett said
to learning more about eastern for class officers, 208 voted for day Both write-ins and appoint-
North Carolina and the business representatives and 49 voted for ees must meet candidate ehgtbil-
interests of the region. dorm representatives. See ELECTIONS page 2
Fraternities caught in crackdown
(CPS) � Two more fraterni- them to write essays, donate $50 cocaine charges,
ties were caught last week in the dollars to charity, pay $90 fines, At the same time, the Univer-
nationwide crackdown on Greek perform 100 hours of community sity of Texas at Austin put Tau
misbehaviors. service and write a formal letter of Kappa Epsilon on probation
In surprise raids on five frats appology to the whole University while officials probe a hazing alle-
during the first party weekend of of Wisconsin at Madison campus gation, and Rutgers University
the year, Indiana University offi- for disrupting classes and setting sent 14 Lambda Chi Alpha mem-
cials found six kegs of beer at one off stink bombs during a raucous bers off to a counseling program
house and "minor violations" at road trip last April. as punishment for allegedly co-
another. College officials have been ercing pledges to drink danger-
IU Associate Dean Richard imposing much tougher penalties ous volumes of alcohol.
McKaig said he would release the elsewhere since drinking ages
names of the houses when he filed and liability insurance rates be-
formal charges � which could gan to rise in 1986.
lead to the fraternities' suspen-
sion � in mid September. Just in August, for example,
Meanwhile, on Sept. 2, a Wis-
consin court put four University
of fllinois Acacia fraternity mem-
bers on probation, and sentenced
During the summer, adminis-
trators at the University of Ne-
braska at Omaha, the University
of California at Santa Barbara and
the University of Alabama shut the University of Colorado also
down its Sigma Alpha Epsilon disciplined errant Greek organi-
chapter for two years after four zations with suspensions and
SAE members were arrested on sanctions.
The Purple and Gold cookout took place Saturday on College Hill. All residents were
invited to attend the festivities (Photo by J.D. Whitmire ECU Photolab).





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20,188
Wilmington, Morehead receive $36 million
i
Wilmington (AH � "They
should pay their own wav, but
that's all they should do, " Ed-
wards said. The state should pay
for anv expansions or major im-
provements.
"The ports shouldn't be a bur-
den on the taxpayers, except for in the past year of $1 16,000. The
SPA's bottom line, Edwards said,
because it will mean larger deduc-
tions against the ports' revenues
tor higher depreciation costs.
It was the paper costs for de-
preciation and other non-cash
items that led to the reported loss
those major capital outlays
Edwards said. "As the ports ex-
pand, business expands and the
state benefits
It was during Edwards
three-vear tenure that the General
Assernblv approved a $36 million
development package for the
ports actually had a positive cash
flow of about $2.9 million.
Edwards joined the SPA in
1975 after retiring as a lieutenant
commander with 23 years in the
Navy. Ironically, most of his mili-
tary experience was in air traffic
control. It wasn't until after he got
Wilmington and Morehead state the job at the authority, he says,
that he found it didn't own any
airports.
Nevertheless, by 1978 Ed-
wards was promoted to Wilming-
ton portmanager. He was pro-
moted again in 1983 to deputy
ports. About $2b million is being
spent to build a 900-foot wharf
extension at Wilmington and to
bin two new container cranes.
While that's good news tor
the port, it could be bad for the
executive director,moving up to
the top slot two years later.
William M.A. Greene re-
signed after eight years as execu-
tive director under the Hunt ad-
ministration in 1985. Members of
the SPA board of directors, newly
appointed by the Republican
Martin administration, seemed to
think oi Greene as a political ap-
pointee, he says - a charge he
denies.
"They said they wanted me to
retire Greene said. "I said I
wasn't about to retire, but I had
my letter of resignation ready"
Greene joined the SPA soon
after retiring from the Navy as a
rear admiral. He has a bachelor's
degree in business administration
and a master's in international af-
fairs, with concentration in for-
eign diplomacy and commerce.
During his 30 years in the Navy, state. Any other port you talk to
Greene held a command at sea, would say, We're in here to make
had various administrative and money or we'll change the people,
management positions and was a The General Assembly should
publisher and editor for the U.S. only appropriate funds to those
Naval Institute. parts of a seaport that can't make
Greene maintains he was not
under pressure from the Hunt
administration to show a profit. I
didn't feel any pressure other
than what I put on myself he
said.
Greene said he believes a port
can serve the state and still make a
profit. Before he left in 1985, he
said, the SPA paid for a third con-
tainer crane and bought a former
Texaco oil terminal in Wilming-
ton out of revenues and still made
$1.9 million in profits.
"It should be a profit-making
entity Greene said. "It is a cor-
porate business owned by the
money but are a service to the
state
Major developments should
be handled in-house, Greene said.
Thecurrent $36 million expansion
being funded by the state involve
a number of projects including
the berth extension-that would
have been handled by a $32 mil-
lion bond issue proposed in 198?
But the proposal was delayed
"somewhere in the state govern-
ment" until bond interest rates
were too high, he said.
"What's happening now was
my vision of Wilmington
Greene said. But they're doing it
lateand with stateappropnahons
rather than bonds. We still could
have sold bonds six months ago
Pope preaches reconciliation in Mozambique
BE1RA, Mozambique (AP)� The rebels in a statement to-
Pope lohn Paul II today preached day from Portugal claimed their
peace and reconciliation in north- troops killed 46 soldiers from
em Mozambique, where a 13-year Mozambique and Zimbabwe in
civil conflict has forced 1 million the last 30 davs, including one
to flee and left 6 million at the edge near Vila de Mungan, southwest
oi famine. of Beira. Rebel leader Alfonso
The Roman Catholic leader Dhlakama also said he hoped the
traveled from Maputo, the capi- papal visit would contribute to
tal. to this Indian Ocean port city
in the devastated north, where he
celebrated Massbefore thousands
oi people, including many refu-
gees.
The pope lamented "the pre-
oeace in Mozambique.
Some Mozambican bishops
have been urging President
joaquim Chissano's Marxist gov-
ernment to start talks with the
rebels. John Paul told Chiss.no
vailing situation oi insecurity due Friday night that "the efforts of
to violence which generates vio- my brother bishops in Mozam-
lence, anxiety and distress, leav-
ing limited space for freedom
Beira, which has port and rail
facilities that reach into land-
locked African nations, has been a
frequent target of attacks by reb-
els oi the Mozambique National
Resistance, known by their Portu-
guese acronvn as Renamo.
bique have always received my
backing
The Marxist government,
however, has refused to negotiate
and has criticized the bishops for
advocating talk with "armed
bandits
The conflict that started in
1975 between the government
wmz
You Can Take
Your Utility Bill
And
Mail It
Or .�
Pay It At A Local Bank
GUC is remodeling its main office, so the entire first
floor and the drive-thru window are closed. While
renovations continue, it will be more convenient for
you to just drop it in the mail, use our automatic Bank
Draft program, or pay it right on campus at the ECU
Student Bank. Other banks which accept GUC pay-
ments are as follows: Barclays of N.C Branch Banking
& Trust Co First Citizens Bank & Trust Co First
Federal Savings and Loan, Peoples Bank & Trust Co
Tlanters National Bank & Trust Co Wachovia Bank &
Trust.
When our remodeling is finished, we'll be able to
serve you better. If you have any questions, please call
us at 752-7166.
Greenville Utilities
"HELP" WANTED
Excellent Opportunity to
Earn Extra Cash
Flexible Hours!
Dependable People (18 and over)
needed at the
and the guerrillas has forced
about 1 million Mozambicans to
flee into neighboring countries
and left an estimated 6 million of
Mozambique's 14.5 million
people in need of food aid, accord-
ing to relief organizations.
The anti-Marxist guerrillas,
believed to number between
12,000 22,OtXl are able to roam
the countryside almost at will.
No government acknowl-
edges assisting the rebels, who
have caused tremendous eco-
nomic damage and have beer
accused of widespread civilian
atrocities. Renamo denies the
charges.
The U.S. State Department, in
a report released in April, esti-
mated the rebels had killed
100,000 civilians in the past
two to three years.
SGA elections on Wednesday
Continued from page 1
.$4
itv requirements as stated in the
SGA election rules. These in-
clude: having a 2.0 grade point
average, being in good standing
at HCU, being a full-time student,
and they cannot already be serv-
ing on the Executive Council or a
judiciary body.
"Participation by the poll
tenders was excellent. I want to
commend the organizations who
worked the various polls for a job
well done. Because of them, we
(the SGA) were able to open eight
out of the 11 possible polling sta-
tions Puckett said.
"I would like to congratulate
the new legislature and class offi-
cers on their election and for run-
ning clean campaigns.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymand
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Hlankonshi;
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Irequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50
200-299 col. inches$4.40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 .12
Two Color and black$155.00
$4.55
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5 Insertions n i
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20 Insertions (4" n ; $4.40
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25 Insertions (4 11") $4.35
1 $4.20
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
tltstt wl�� attended.
O to
REGULAR OR DIET MT
DEW DIET PEPSI OR
llytS? Pepsi
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6
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449
KROGER FROZEN
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RentalSW pe'Day
MULTIPLE COPIES OF NEW RELEASES
New 1 99
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Available at our in
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lMI III'
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POST
011 in:
IO I 111
II Mi i mi
Mil Kit V
IIIII 12:30
At Kroger
vour r�-�
pharmacist IV
fills your i 13T
prescription 1
while you
'ill your
shopping list
1 u
� �g Items at
m m m m Sun. Sep
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KroqerXav-
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September 18, 1988 thru
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$50





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20,1988 3
illion
extension-that would
handled by a $32 mil-
issue proposed in 1982.
sal was delayed
the slate govern
i interest rates
said
g new was
e. ilmington
ey'rc doing it
ippropriahons
We still could
v months agp
olinian
mandi
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4 )5
$4.50
$4.50
4 4
$4.45
$4.40
4 40
$4 55
$4 2(1 :
OURS
iday
p.m.

latrx�i : ; �iiiiil. it
99c
HOURS EVERYDA
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day
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Ad campaign for atomic power
WASHINGTON (AP) -
America's troubled atomic power
industry has started spending
millions of dollars on advertising
aimed at rebuilding public sup-
port tor nuclear energy.
The advertisements make the
argument that nuclear power
helps reduce dangerous U.S. de-
pendence on foreign oil imports.
Anti-nuclear activists, however,
say the ads are misleading be-
cause only about 4 percent of U.S.
ofl consumption goes toward
generating electricity. They con-
tend that the industry is belittling
or ignoring safety risks involved
with nuclear power.
Spearheading the pro-nuclear
campaign is the U.S. Council for
Energy Awareness, a Washing-
ton-based trade association
largely supported by the nuclear
industry. L'SCEA's advertising
and public relations activities are
augmented by other groups, in-
( hiding the Edison Electric Insti-
tute, also based in Washington,
representing the nation's inves-
tor-owned utilities.
Carl Goldstein, a USCEA
spokesman, said that about $7
million of theorganization's $17
million annual budget goes to ad-
vertising.
The ad campaign includes a 15-
second spot that ran during the
CBS Evening News and Saturday
afternoon baseball games on NBC
this summer.
The cartoon-style ad depicts a
person perched atop oil drums as
they speed up and down a roller
coaster. Then the person is flung
into midair and floats back to
earth using a parachute embla-
zoned with the words "COAL"
and "NUCLEAR
An announcer intones: 'The
problem with foreign oil is that
price and supply go up and down.
To get off this roller coaster,
America can use its own coal and
nuclear energy. America can
count on coal and nuclear en-
ergy
USCEA is striving to convey a
similar message - spelled out in
greater detail - in advertisements
in The Wall Street Journal and
magazines including Time,
Newsweek, U.S. News & World
Report, Reader's Digest, National
Geographic, Forbes and Sports
Illustrated.
One ad says: "Even though most
Americans believe that nuclear
energy will continue to play an
important role in our nation's
energy future, no new nuclear
power plants are currently being
planned. At present, too many
financial, political, licensing and
regulatory uncertainties stand in
the way of America's further
developing its nuclear energy re-
sources
Criticism of USCEA's advertis-
ing campaign has come from the
Safe Energy Communication
Council, a Washington-based
coalition of 13 energy, environ-
mental and public interest
groups.
"Current national television and
magazine advertisements pro-
moting nuclear power as a solu-
Unions looking to N.C. for members
RALEIGH (AP) - Labor unions,
faced with declining membership
in North Carolina and across the
nation, hope to capitalize on dis-
gruntled workers at the House of
Raeford turkey processing plant
and Baxter Healthcare Inc.
At the House of Raeford near
Fayetteville, 1.000 workers
walked off their jobs in August to
protest working conditions and
low wages
One worker said she had
worked at the plant for 17 vears,
but earned only $3.90 an hour.
Another said workers had to ask
permission to go to the bath-
rooms
At Baxter Healthcare in Marion,
2 .0C Vk orkers have rallied against
their employer, complaining of
low wages and stiff production
las.
One assemble worker said he
was required to pack 10,000, 1-
pound intravenous bags in Hoxes
in eight hours. That's about one
bag every three seconds.
L nions have launched intense
rantzTng crTorts at both plants,
with elections scheduled for later
this fall. A union victory at either
plant would be an enormous coup
for labor groups hurt bv automa-
tion and increased competition
from overseas.
The trends in North Carolina
have been similar to national
trends as unions have not done
well in terms of the number of suc-
cessful organizing efforts said
. rrv Hirsch, an economics pro-
fessor at the University of North
irolina at Greensboro and an
expert on the labor movement.
Even when workers win elec-
ns, sometimes they can't get
contracts
About 200,000 workers in North
Carolina belong to unions, ac-
cording to the N.C. State AFL-
C lO. But that number has not
changed over the past 10 years
even as state's labor force grew at
a healthy pace.
in the second least unionized
ite in the nation, unions repre-
� nt just 6.1 percent of Tar Heel
workers, compared with 16 per-
nt nationwide.
�Mule nearly half the labor
ups' organizing efforts have
�eded in North Carolina over
past two years, the victories
kept unions only from losing
ground, labor leaders told The
News and Observer of Raleigh.
That's because while unions
gained members in some cam-
paigns, they have lost others
when plants closed.
In 1986, half the 42 organizing
efforts in North Carolina suc-
ceeded, compared with less than
one third succeeding in the early
1980s. Last year, unions won 42
percent of the union elections
held in North Carolina.
"I would guess we added 5,000
members (in 1986-87), but most of
the larger expansions in member-
ships come from existing plants
such as those in textiles and to-
bacco said Chris Scott,president
of the N.C. State AFL-CIO. "That
offsets losses at, say, the closing of
the (American Telephone & Tele-
graph Cos) plant in Winston-Sa-
lem which employed 3,000
workers.
One labor analyst attributed the
labor movement's improved rec-
ords to better tactics used bv
unions to organize plants. Unions
havrsharpened tactics 1070'�
ing plants and training workers to
convince their colleagues to sign
up for a union.
"Unions are getting their acts
together, and they are targeting
people better said Robert
Sheahan, a High Point lawyer and
big, like in getting Baxter, then
they can use that win as (momen-
tum) to go elsewhere
But labor analysts say problems
loom ahead for unions. Among
the largest hurdle is convincing
workers they will receive better
pay by joining a union.
Heated competition from com-
panies overseas that pay their
workers far less than their
counterparts in the United States
has hurt unions in promising bet-
ter pay for new members, analysts
said.
Even though some union work-
ers in North Carolina cam up to 35
percent more than those who do
not belong unions, the size for
union workers has declined
steadilv over the last five vears.
Meanwhile, the percentage of
wage gains for non-union work-
ers has actually exceeded those of
union workers, according to a
federal study. �-���
"Some of the anti-union forces
would show that our percentage
raises have been less Scott said.
Just In From New York City
'Classic" Wool
Overcoats
and London Fog Trench Coats
Black, Brown, Tweed, Blue,
Herring Bone, Etc.
Over 200 To Choose From
$19.95 to $49.95
-T?
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tion to foreign oil dependence are
misleading and irresponsible
the council said in a statement.
To counter the USCEA cam-
paign, the council is distributing
public service announcements to
radio stations.
In one, actor Robert Redford tells
listeners: 'This year the nuclear
industry is spending millions to
sell you on nuclear power and
also saying solar energy is not
practical today. Yet every year
more solar energy equipment is
being bought by consumers and
even utilities to power a variety of
our energy needs
"Nuclear energy creates wastes.
Conservation creates jobs
Redford savs.
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33 ext.) Greenville. North Carolina
Mon. thru Thurs. Night
Shrimp Plate $3.65
Fri. & Sat.
Flounder, Shrimp,
Oyster Plate
$5.75
10 Discount with PCCECU
Student I.D.
(Not applicable to specials)
DELIVERY
SMALL MEDIUM LARGE
Cheese Pizza $4.95 $6.85 $8.95
Cheese and 1 Topping$5.60 $7.65 $9.90
Each Additional Topping$ .65 .80 .95
SPECIALTY PIZZAS
Cheese Lovers$6.90 $9.25 $11.80
Meat Lovers$6.90 $9.25 $11.80
Supreme $6.90 $9 25 $11.80
Super Supreme$7.55 $10.05 $12 75
FAMOUS PIZZA HUT� QUALITY
�GENEROUS TOPPINGS
�REAL CHEESE
�FRESH VEGETABLES
�DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY - NEVER FROZEN
DELIVERY HQVR$ DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
9VO�' � EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
DELIVERY CHARGE 75' PHONE 7524445
COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 5 DAYS! ���
DELIVERY
ANY LARGE PIZZA OF YOUR CHOICE
FOR THE PRICE OF A MEDIUM!
Good for delivery, dine in or take out at your
Pizza Hut restaurant at 2601 E. 10th
(coupon expires Sept. 26. 19835
The EGU Special Events
Committee and
rpres
MUSIC TELEVISION8
RANDEE'S
iS CAMPAIGN
CARAVAN
Antw
FLEMLNG
M RANDEE of the REDWOODS
Tuesday, September 27,1988
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
ECU Students $4.00 Public $6.00
Tickets Available at Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
M-F 11 a.m.Sp.m.





I
(Blfz iEaat (Earoltman
ynw iv 1 &u crtiia warn
Pete Fernald, c��iMiur
Q up Carter, Mmrnt u��
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, DtnctotofAdvcrlmng
Joe Harris, su
Doug Johnson, spn
Tim Hampton, rut.
Michelle England,cmum
Dehhie Stevens, $���
Jeff PARKER,sufHymor
TOM FURR, CifrrukiOT M��?�r
SusanHvni.r. hnM.i.j!
JOI IN W. MEDLIN, Ar W�
Mac Clark, rushes mbm.
September 20, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Voting
Students must fight apathy
College students are in both the
best and worst position when it
comes to voting in presidential elec-
tions.
The candidate they vote for now
may influence their lives until they
complete graduate school or are
working at their first jobs. Or the
candidate that wins may be a lame
duck before they buy their cap and
gown.
Student turnout since the activist
60s has been notoriously low. While
j
this can be attributed to any number
of factors, one of the biggest is
apathy. Students often feel defeated
before they start, since candidates
historically have little to hear from
the youth vote.
And, as in the scenario above,
when the presidential turnover is
one every four years as happened in
the 70s, students look to the elec-
tions that will occur after they
graduate. Why vote now, when four
years down the line, another presi-
dent or party will be in power?
And there is the complaint about
registration. Although North Caro-
lina has one of the easiest registra-
tion policies, students usually need
to return to their home counties or
home states to register, and during
the school year, this is nearly impos-
sible to remember, let alone do.
Even so, it is a task worthy of
remembering and doing. Voting is
one of the most fundamental of
citizen's rights and one of the most
ignored. Keep in mind that if you
don't vote, you have no right to
complain.
The American election process,
while not perfect and not the most
efficient method of government,
does guarantee every U.S. Citizen a
voice in how their country is man-
aged. If your voice is used only to
criticize and not to help decide, then
nothing gets fixed.
The registration deadline is Oc-
tober 10. You have less than a month
to decide whether you want to be
heard or ignored.
Dictionary draws fire
v�tttpH!7?jPUfAieu&�ww7npfsruar3yifu-
To the editor:
To address King Justin Sturz's
letter in Tuesday's East Carolinian,
how dare he consider himself the
authority on any subject other than
his own narrow point of view. Who
died and made him Mcese?
1 suppose that 1 could write a well
developed reply to his mud-slinging,
but why should I? Sturz's letter is
nothing more than opinion disguised
as fact. I consider myself a well read
and intelligent person.
1 find it stimulating to debate
with qualified people on just about
any subject. However, Mr.Sturzdoes
not deserve mv energies on the level
of a debate. What he does deserve is
to be exiled to a land where opinions
are enforced.
A land where the moral and
thoughts of a powerful minority are
jammed down the throats of people
who are too busy working for a living
to sit behind a typewriter twenty-
four hours a day deciding how the
rest of the country should think.
Don't get me wrong. Some of my
best friends are Republicans. I am not
condemning the Republican party or
even Conservatives for that matter. 1
am condemning Justin Sturz. Just the
thought of this pompous, self-pro-
claimed authoritv on Democracy is
enough to make my blood boil.
Yet, in an odd sort of way, I am
happy that Mr. Sturz continues to
bombard the editorial page with his
more-informed-than-thou drivel. It
means that Freedom of Speech is
working and that makes me rest eas-
ier at night. The irony of Sturz's
rhetoric is that if it was truly enforced
he would have no one to bitch about.
They would all be in concentration
camps in Arizona hand printing
bumper-stickers with Justin Sturz's
motto on them: LIVE LIKE I DO
NOW!
Arnic Culliphcr
junior
EnglishWriting
May criticized
To the editor:
To William May:
After reading your letter and
disagreeing with everything in it, I
am compelled to respond.
1 think you must be afraid of
women. That's okay, I suspect a lot of
men are afraid of women, and that a
lot of women are afraid of men. I
believe the militant femi nists you
describe are terrified of men and just
like you � the chauvinist extraordi-
naire� they are seeking to annihilate
the object of their fear.
1 am a feminist. 1 am not a bra-
burning, man-hating huntress It
may further violate your system of
beliefs to learn that 1 shave mv legs,
wear dresses, and have a boyfriend.
Feminists are not all "hostile
humorless penis cnviers Please do
not judge us by the lunatic fringe of
the movement. Most of us simplv
believe women are equal to men and
should be treated as such. That is all.
And, by the way, I didn't notice
that you yourself had a rollicking
sense of humor.
Leslie Martin
Senior
EnglishTheatre Arts
Vote Thomas
To the editor:
Tommorow the run-off for So-
phomore Class President will be
held. Allen Thomas is the logical
choice to hold this office. Allen has
served East Carolina well in the past
year
He served ECU last year as a
member oi the SGA legislature.
While serving Allen spoke up for the
students on many occasions. 1 feel
that again this year his voice will be
even stronger and more respected on
the legislature. Sophomores, 1 urge
you to get out and vote tommorow
tor Allen Thomas, experience that
counts!
Tripp Roakes
SGA Treasurer
Paranoid paper
To the editor:
It appears that the furor over
recent editorial cartoons and state-
ments has made The East Carolinian
staff a bit paranoid. I refer to the
photograph which appeared on the
front page of the September 13th is-
sue. The caption under a pictun
The Last Carolinian sign alleged I
the sign was vandalized.
I walked past this particular
on Monday, and I would like to pr i
pose another scenario. Just suppose i
great deal of ram fell the precedii
Friday night, and also suppose a
breeze came upSunday morning
not possible that the sign was simph
blown over? 1 saw no evidence i
vandalism, and your photograp;
well as my observation) indi
that the sign was simplv laying
on its side.
This university has enough
age problems without publish
unsupported allegations in the can-
pus newspaper. In this country, guill
must be proven If you had a I
tiortal information, it was vour n
sponsibility to convey it to vour read
ers. Without supporting evidence
your conclusion of vandalism is con
jecture that should be confined to th
editorial page.
Jeff Scott
Alumnus
Forum
The East Carolinian welcomes
letter? expressing all points ot vieu
Mail or drop their: by our office in the
Pubications Building, across from
the entran met library.
Tor purposes of verification, all
letters must include the name, majt p
and classification, address, phone
number, and signature of the
authoris). Letters are limited to two
typewritten pages, double spaeed oi
neatly printed. All letters are subject
to editing for brevity, obscenity, and
libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students facultyandsta
writing letters tor this page are re
minded that they are limited to one
every two weeks The deadline fat
editorial material is 5 p.m. Friday for
Tuesday's edition and 5 p.m. Tues
day for Thursday's edition
Rules
Bush doesn't recognize his own intolerence
By PHILIP ROTH
The New Kejdtfk
What is it about the Pledge of Allegiance that upsets
him so much? It is very hard for me to imagine that the
Pounding Tathers, Samuel Adams and John Hancock and
John Adams; would have objected to teachers leading
students in the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the
United States. � George Bush, Aug. 24.
Of course, Samuel Adams had been dead 89
years, John Hancock 99 years, and John Adams 66
years before the Pledge of Allegiance was even
dreamed up. According to one account, the Pledge
of Allegiance was the creation of the Kansas Popu-
lists and Republicans in 1892; according to another,
it was devised in that year for publication in the
magazine Youth's Companion to mark the 400th
anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America.
Its importance during the first decades of the
20th century was in the American educational sys-
tem, where it was used largely to helpde-European-
ize the children of immigrants and meld them into
"one nation indivisible Itssubtext might run some-
thing like this: I do not pledge allegiance to the flag
of Italy, or Ireland, or Germany, or the Ukraine, or
Poland, etc.
Far from being "upset" about the Pledge of
Allegiance, the bright son of self-made Greek immi-
grants would probably, as a schoolchild, have been
idealistically susceptible to its lofty formulations,
even more so perhaps than the young scion of an old
Yankee family for whom identification with this
country would have been effortless and without
ambiguity.
What upsets Dukakis about the Pledge of Alle-
giance is too childish a question even to think about.
But what Bush raises by asking it are more distress-
ing questionsabout himself. Why is he going around
the country leading audiences in the Pledge of Alle-
giance as though he were the leader of an American
priesthood empowered to renaturalize citizens who
happen already to be American? Why is he turning
the Pledge of Allegiance into a loyalty oath? Why,
exactly, at the outset of his campaign, has he seized
on the shallowest, most demagogic theme available?
Now it could be that he has seized on the shal-
lowest theme for the same reason that he has chosen
as his vice president the shallowest candidate�
because shallowness stirs him most deeply and fos-
ters his confidence, because only fortified by cliche is
he able to find access to a spontaneous public self.
Anything necessitating utterance more complicated
or original seems to reduce the public man to awk-
ward role-playing and emotional posturing.
However, by pointedly challenging Dukakis'
allegiance to the very idea of national allegiance,
Bush appears to me to be up to something more
unsavory than merely armoringhimselfwithbanali-
ties. As permissibly as he can, like a gentleman� yet
in a code whose meaning cannot but filter through to
those awaiting the message� he is drawing atten-
tion to the aura of forcignness emanating from
Dukakis' name and appearance, the forcignness that
the Democrats tried to paper over at their conven-
tion by writing their cliched melodrama of
America's immigrant heritage.
Bush's question, "What is it about the Pledge of
Allegiance that upsets him so much?" does not go so
far as to suggest, even subliminally, the ludicrous
charge that Dukakis secretly harbors an allegiance to
another country like Greece or Russia (or Harvard).
Rather, through admirably artful innuendo, the
question manages to insinuate that there is some-
thing that remains unnaturalized in a man called
Dukakis, an ineradicable alienncss that prevents
him from standing in the same easy, automatic,
unchallengeable, seemingly hereditary relationship
to America and the Founding Fathers as a George
Herbert Walker Bush or a J. Danforth Quayle.
I don't believe that when Bush described the
children of his Mexican-American daughter-in-law
as "the little brown ones" he intended to be anything
other than playfully affectionate about beloved
grandchildren whose appearance is a bit unexpect-
edly outside the family mold. What he was trying to
demonstrate was his emotional largess, the breadth
of his tolerance and not its limitations.
The clumsy remark confirms, however, what 1
might have surmised anyway from his politics and
his privileged background� that he is highly sens
tive to, and sometimes, perhaps, like many millions
of Americans, guiltily discomfited by, the physk
signs of ethnic or racial difference.
Surely neither Bush nor his canpaign advisers
have failed to observe that the marriage oi Greek-
American to an American Jew could seem a some
what too exotic� if not a downright outlandish
union to those voters whose most nostaligic desire
especially in a renewed period of massive immigra
tion, is for Andy Hardy's vanished America. Sou
will recall that in Andy Hardy country, the picket
fince was white, the people housed behind the fend
were white, and, what is more, the people in most
houses were white in a particular way that Governor
and Mrs. Dukakis arc not� in a way, 1 should Add
that even some of the vice president's grandchildren
are not, at least in his eves.
J
It might, at first, seem generous to suggest that
the vice president is himself unconscious of the
nature of the appeal that he is making and that the
last thing he would want to do is to stir up xenopho-
bic longings for pure, homogeneous, ptckct-tcncc
America. But if the man really does not recognize the
resentment and intolerance and suspiciousness that
underlie the notion of patriotism he is espousing,
then, to speak bluntly, he is blind and ignorant. And
if he is to be the president, I for one would feel safer
knowing that beneath all those gollies and wows
and dams, he was merely unprincipled and cynical


i
1
1
i
Bakkl
PORTMILL,S i
founder im Bald �
ministry's current
leader. Sam Johnson. J
aging their separate flo
the faith in difficult UmJ
Bakker gave his hi
sermon Sunday at his
nant Church, a leal I
five miles awa from P
tage USA complex, whi
� about �
tagehurch.
But tin �
the future ot PTL
Promi uri
again Jim and Tamm
ed to r� gain h
television ministr
theme part i
� ker sold �
1-a-half since I
PTL has I
caust" for him a: I
"It was just like a i
honcami 11(j
In a �
a i
wan
Heritage
ministei I j
on him.
"it v. ou
Aids infec
are on the
WASHIN
numb r of �
uith the AIDS j
the tederal estimates a
tion amoi . he
population ma) be thro
high, aa � :
leased todav h the r
stitue, a privately-fir
search org i
Ke in R t 1
Institute ma then
study using mon
techniques than arc u-
Centers tor 1
shows that as n
Americans maj be inl
human innumod i
which cau
The high estim it
which is the prime t j
monitoring the sprc
that about 1.4 mill
witJv the virus
"A best guess atl
infections oi year-f i
from 2.2 million I
sons, with the lik
tween 2.2 million and
people the Hu
ported.
Over half ol I
amoung h
Hopkins said, but
number of he! ill
bv the virus mav be thl
higher than the CDC -I
The institue estinu
850,1100 to 1.4 million hei
als are infected with the
and that 200,000 to -
number are heterosexi
don't use drugs
"There are vastl) n
sexuals infected
Hopkins.
A break out i
nogamous po
unavoidable
The CDC has
l
AIDS virus has inl
80,000 to 165,000 of th
using heterosexual popl
Hopkins said the 1 lucf
tute AIDS estimate d:
those of CDC becausej
computer models wen
because more soj i
statistical analysis
were applied to the i I
As of Aug. 8, 196
been diagnosed in 70,21
cans, of whom more thJ
39,620 have died sine
1981, according to the
one is know to have
from AIDS
The Hudson stud
rrated on the projectio
now infected with HIV
have not progressed
which is the end stage ofj
tion. AIDS is known t
from three to eight w
infection. Persons infel
HIV are capable of sprej
virusbefore the) actuall
AIDS. For this reason, ej
attempting to estimate
infection in order to
future size of the epidei
c
Join Joe Harris ai
East Carolinian
Team every Tuj
and Thursday fo
Jatest in cagpg





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20,1988 5
?
,Rttd
fire
inder a picture of
rolii jn alleged that
t this particular sign
and 1 would like to pro-
r scenario, lust suppose a
�f run fell the preceding
t a nd also suppose a light
; up Sunday morning. Is it
; that the sign was simply
r? 1 saw no evidence of
our photograph (as
servation) indicated
is simply laving over
rsit) has enough im
i ms without publishing
;od allegations in the cam-
aper. In this country, guilt
t n It you had addi-
mation, it was your re
to convey it to your read
ipporting evidence,
n of vandalism is con-
should be confined to the
�C.
Jeff Scott
Alumnus
rum
; n
d !
th
uan welcomes
. points of view.
. ur office in the
ling, across from
iter I ibrary.
� verification, all
ie the name, major
iddress, phone
nature of the
in limited to two
. uble spaced or
tiers are subject
obscenity, and
.ittacks will be
ultyandstajf
r this page are re-
are limited to one
The deadline for
p m I ndayfor
i and 5 p.m. Tues-
's edit
Rules
ence
U
Hid
perl

tl he is highly sensi-
aps, like many millions
discomfited by, the physical
difference
h nor his canpaign advisors
that the marriage of Greek-
can lew could seem a some-
t a downright outlandish�
hose most nostaligic desire,
period of massive lmmigra-
v s vanished America. You
Hardy country, the picket
pie housed behind the fence
is more, the people in those
particular way that Governor
not� in a way, 1 should add,
�V president's grandchildren
ves.
em generous to suggest that
himself unconscious of the
it he is making and that the
nt to do is to stir up xenopho-
homogencous, picket-tcncc
really does not recognize the
ance and suspiciousness that
patriotism he is espousing,
he is blind and ignorant. And
ent, I for one would feel safer
all those gollies and wows
ely unprincipled and cynical.
V
1
f
Bakker asks flocks to keep faith
FORT MILL, S.C(AP) �PTL
founder Jim Bakker and the
ministry's current spiritual
leader, Sam Johnson, are encour-
aging their separate flocks to keep
the faith in difficult times.
Bakker gave his first official
sermon Sunday at his New Cove-
nant Church, a leaky warehouse
five miles away from PTL's Heri-
tage USA complex, while Johnson
spoke to about 800 people at Heri-
tage Church.
But the topic was the same:
the future of PTL.
Promising "the sun will shine
again Jim and Tammy Bakker
vowed to regain control of the
television ministry and Christian
theme park as soon as possible.
Bakker said the past year-
and-a-half since he resigned from
PTL has been a spiritual holo-
caust" for him and his wife.
"It was just like a concentra-
tion camp he said.
In a two-and-half hour serv-
ice at a rented, concrete block
warehouse, Bakker criticized
Heritage USA leaders and other
ministers for turning their backs
on him.
"It would have been kinder of
Aids infections
are on the rise
WASHINGTON (AP) The
number of Americans infected
with the AIDS virus may be twice
the federal estimates, and infec-
tion among the heterosexual
population may be three times as
high, according to a report re-
leased today by the Hudson In-
stitue, a privately-financed re-
search organization.
Kevin R. Hopkins, a Hudson
Institute mathematician, said a
study using more sophisticated
techniques than are used by the
Centers for Disease Control
shows that as many as 3 million
Americans may be infected with
human innumodeficiency virus
which causes AIDS.
The high estimate by the CDC,
which is the prime federal agency
monitoring the spread of AIDS, is
that about 1.4 million are infected
with- the virus.
"A best guess at the rate of total
infections of year-end 1987 (was)
from 2.2 million to 3 million per-
sons, with the likeliest range be-
tween 2.2 million and 2.6 million
people the Hudson study re-
ported.
Over half of the cases are
amoung homosexual men,
Hopkins said, but estimates the
number of heterosexuals infected
by the virus may be three times
higher than the CDC estimate.
The institue estimates that
850,000 to 1.4 million heterosexu-
als are infected with the HIV virus
and that 200,000 to 500,000 of this
number are heterosexuals who
don't use drugs.
"There are vastly more hetero-
sexuals infected today said
Hopkins. "
A break out into the non-mo-
nogamous population is
unavoidable
The CDC has estimated that the
AIDS virus has infected only
80,000 to 165,000 of the non-drug-
using heterosexual population.
Hopkins said the Hudson Insti-
tute AIDS estimate differ from
those of CDC because different
computer models were used and
because "more sophisticated"
statistical analysis techniques
were applied to the model.
As of Aug. 8, 1988, AIDS had
been diagnosed in 70,208 Ameri-
cans, of whom more than half, or
39,620, have died since June 1,
1981, according to the CDC. No
one is know to have recovered
from AIDS.
The Hudson study concen-
trated on the projections of those
now infected with HIV, but who
have not progressed to AIDS,
which is the end stage of the infec-
tion. AIDS is known to develop
from three to eight years after
infection. Persons infected with
HIV are capable of spreading the
virus before they actually develop
AIDS. For this reason, experts are
attempting to estimate the rate of
infection in order to gauge the
future size of the epidemic.
them to stone us than what they "We keep looking for a bigger conscious, but you came where
did he cried during the ser- building. There are a few big, we were and you said: "Arise. I've
mon. They're chicken. Why not empty buildings we know of near come into your midst to be your
beat Jim and Tammy to death? here Bakker said, referring to
They'vealready done it with their financially troubled Heritage
words
Tammy Bakker, whom Jim
Bakker said was suffering from a
severe cold, stood up to lead the
congregation in the song, "The
Sun Will Shine Again
" I brought this just in case
she said, holding up a plastic bag
of medicine bottles, apparently to
treat cold symptoms.
"I prayed to the Lord a tear-
ful Tammy Bakker said. "Will this
never end? We have a lawsuit
here and a lawsuit there, every-
where a lawsuit � The Lord said
my troubles would disappear,
just like taking an Alka-Seltzer
About 250 people crowded
into the warehouse, located next
USA.
PTL officials have declined to
let Bakker hold services there.
savior he prayed Sunday.
Johnson said after the service
that his sermons are written to
provide comfort to church mem-
bers who may be bitter and dis-
Johnson's sermon Sunday couraged about the uncertain fu-
sounded like a locker room pep ture of PTL.
talk for team members after a los-
ing season.
"We are simply worrying
ourselves to death but worrying
is failure to apply our faith
Johnson told a congregation.
But the worries of the church
and the financially troubled min- Sunday to Sunday he said
istry worries are far more serious
than a lost championship.
Over the past year, PTL has
laid off about 1,500 people be-
cause of financial problems
caused by its bankruptcy. The
They're ultimately con-
cerned about the instability and
will it be maintained as a Chris-
tian retreat center. I have tried to
make each sermon applicable to
those who are going through all of
this. We just hold hands from
to the Jim and Tammy Ministries closing of three help centers Fri-
offices. The service was the sec-
ond in as many weeks at the build-
ing.
The roof leaked in at least two
spots. Loading doors were
opened for fresh air as oscillating
fans stirred the breeze.
day put 17 people out of work,
including Johnson's wife, Joyce,
who was director of the church's
home for unwed mothers.
We at Heritage Church have
been mobbed, broken, bruised
and it seems at times we were un-
Jim Bakker promised his con-
gregation that finances of his
church and a PTL under his au-
thority would be managed by
more fiscally responsible minds
than had managed PTL in the
past.
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes
Students To Come By And See
Our 2 Bedroom and 1 Bedroom
Garden Apartments.
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bu� Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
Join Joe Harris and The
East Carolinian News
Team every Tuesday
and Thursday for the
latest in cagpu8 news.
ON SALE NOW!
Short & Long Sleeved T-Shirts
($8.00) ($10.00)
� Sweatshirts
($13.00)
VIARG4RITA VllAH
. � � r
GREENflLLE,N.C.
AMENGAN PClWEb
Sponsored
By Student
Union Minority
Arts Committee
Tuesday, Sept. 20
Hendrix Theatre
8:00 p.m.
FREE ADMISSION
A Dane's Personal Journey Through The American Underclass
"Utterly stunning "American Pictures is a show that will
powerful and disturbing" haunt you for days. AH Americans should
-S.F. Chronicle see it, everyone who cares about the
conditions of America"
-The Chicago Reade:
"The USA has never been so intimately
described in all its explosive contradictions" "A powerful emotional experience
Der Spiegel. Cermany -L.A. Times

11 .? t
WALK

vJ
ALL SIZES ON SALE NOW!
COLD CUT
COMBO,
IT'S NEW.
$169.
C

IT'S THE
mum mass
Come try the new tV Cold Cut Combo.
With three kinds of meat, cheese and lots
of free fixin's, it gets the job done
$1 n't i-sutj(ti�l mail pmr !� tbttTi .Mlul lumtxi hji(k�K. Ui. m Cento SUB
BUY ANY FOOTLONG
SANDWICH AND GET A
6" COLD CUT COMBO FREE
5th St. Downtown � The Plaza
GET A 6"
SUPER COLD CUT COMBO
FOR $2.29.
5th St. Downtown � The Plaza
�SUB
.SUB
Escort Service
Starting Sunday, October 2, 1988
Every Sunday - Thursday 6 p.m. - 12 a.m.
MAKE ECU A SAFE PLACE
Join The Pirate Walk!
Pirate Walk is designed to make walking
across campus safer for females
by providing male escorts.
IT WORKS!
We Need: Operators - Calling All Females:
Sororities, Dorm Councils, etc.
Escorts - Calling All Males:
Fraternities, Dorm Councils,
Big Men on Campus, etc.
Work As Little Or As Much As You Desire!
Whatever You Can AJford Will Be Appreciated
Apply in front of Student Store on Tuesday, September 20
or call 758-7114 for more information.
1 jmii i ne cuupun prt i ustumrr prr iwi Vh g�Ki m oomtwu
mm with anv mher uff-r Offer rKpwr.
Limn (tor "Hipun per �utinrr prr visit Vn gind in �nbru
(hit tth am irfhrr t4rr Xfff ripire-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20, 1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
French. Call 758-7592.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Duplex
House. 12 block from campus. 2 bed-
rooms. Large kitchen and living room.
$250.00. Phone 752-7538.
FOR RENT: Large, 1 bedroom duplex
near university. 213 S. Eastern Street,
$230, 758-5299.
FOR RENT Large 3 bedroom house near
university. 111 East 9th St $360.758-5399
ROOMMATE WANTED for a 2 bed-
room apartment in Twin Oaks. $157.50
per month plus 12 utilities. Call 757-0316
or 757 7991. Ask for Mami.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian male
roommate to share new mobile home. 10
minutes from campus. Non-smoker,
please. Weekends call Hugh 756-6851.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Room semi-private. $130 a month. 12
utilities. Call after 3:00 p.m. 830-9138.
FOR SALE
SOFA, CHAIR: Floral Print. Great condi-
tion - no tears, need to sell. 756-8913 after
5:30 p.m.
"BARCOLOUNGER" RECL1NER Nut-
meg Excellent condition $60.00. Call 756-
0356 between 8-9 a.m. & after 9 p.m.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Kitchen table 4
chairs - $75; Twin bed $50; Couch $20;
Black & brass wall mirror $45; TV & Stereo
Stand S25, Desks, Dresser Ac Lamps - Best
Offer. Moving, Must Sell. Call ulie at 758-
5783 or leave message.
FOR SALE: CHEAP VACATION for two.
2 round tiip tickets for $300 or best offer.
G'ville to Newark to G'ville. Call Mike
758-0734. Sept. 23-25.
FOR SALE: 30 inch oven, with four burn-
ers, electric. 10 years old, clean $75.00 or
best offer. 758-8010.
CARPET FOR SALE: Pink carpet, fitted
for Clement Dorm room. Good condition.
S30. Call 753-7233, ask for Carla.
REFRIGERATOR FOR SALE: Dorm re-
frigerator. Almost brand new (used one
semester). $65 Call Carla at 753-7233.
SERVICES OFFERED
QUALIFIED TUTORING in Latin &
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street ftwside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
DWI? Don't Drink & Drive. Come Party
In Style. Call Class Act Limousine 757-
3240.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 & beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
SCHOOLS IN: Time to party! Call us for
your music needs. We'll beat all prices and
videotape vour party. The Power Station
D.Js. 752 0940.
PAPERS TYPED: Typed on new IBM
computer and WordPerfect software with
spelling checker. Fast, cheap service. Call
Greg at 752-1202.
WORD PROCESSING AND DESKTOP
PUBLISHING: Reports, Resumes, etc.
Rush jobs accepted. Call 752-1933.
TYPING, TYPING, TYPING: Real cheap.
Affordable Rates! Call 752-5084.
HELP WANTED
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also cruiseships.
$10,000 - $105,000yr! Now Hiring! 320
Ustings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
MKTG. FIRM seeks individual to work
ft or pt marketing credit cards to stu-
dents on campus. Flexible hours. Earn b
w $90.00-$l50.00day. Call 1-800-932-
0528, Ext. 25.
PIRATE WALK IS ON THE RISE! Walk-
ers and operators needed. Applications
will be located at the Student Store Tues
Sept. 20,10-1 or call 758-7114 for informa-
tion.
HIRING! Federal government jobs in
your area and overseas. Many immediate
openings without waiting list or test. $15-
68,000. Phone call refundable. (602) 838-
8885. Ext. 5285.
PERSONALS
ANGEL FLIGHT RUSH: Be an angel and
you will see, the fun in supporting Air
Force ROTC! Sept. 26, 730 p.m lobby of
White Dorm. Sept. 27, �c;30 p.m social
room in Fletcher Dorm.
NEW DELI JAMS! Come hear the best
blues rock Friday with Knocked Out
Loaded, and don't dare miss Slurpee on
Saturday, formerly Soul Train. Also come
to Open Mike nights Wednesdays, it's
free! Don't Forget our daily lunch spe-
cials.
THE LADIES OF DELTA ZETA, Thanx a
million for the help during Rush. You girls
are wonderful. And how about that "Out
of Hand" tailgate party. We had a blast.
Kappa Sigs.
ALPHA XI DELTA PRESENTS: Pig
pickin at O Rockefeller's after home foot-
ball game on Oct. 1st. All you can eat
buffet only $5 per person. Tickets avail-
able thru any Alpha Xi Delta member or
call 758-5677.
BETH THOMPSON: Happy 21st Birth-
day - you wild woman Let's celebrate the
big day at the place of your choice. Thanks
for being such a great friend. Love in Chi
O - Laura.
CAM: You're the best Panhellenic presi-
dent and the greatest sister I could ever
want Keep up the good work. I love ya -
Laura.
HEY BETA CHI PLEDGE CLASS OF PI
KAPPA PHI: Get ready for the time of
your life. We know you can do it and we'll
be there if you need us. Love, Pi Kappa Phi
Little Sisters.
ATTENTION LADIES: Pi Kappa Phi
rush is coming
CONGRATULATIONS to our new Sis-
ters, Sara Home and Kim Heinly! We
knew you could do it Love, Pledges and
Sisters of ZETA.
WAY TO GO ZETA TAU ALPHA for
having the highest GPA on campus!
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Pref night, at theChi-
O house is where it all began w pizza,
cake and fun. On to the buses is where we
had to run. To make it to the cabin where
the night had just begun. The glasses were
full and the music was cranked, the cabin
began to shake. When the cabin is a rockin
don't come a knocking 'cause you're too
late. Everything was great! Love the sis-
ters and pledges of Chi Omega.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new sis-
ters of Chi Omega: Teri lickman, Christy
Wilson and Celia Rosemond. We love
r'ou, the sisters and pledges of Chi Omega.
ZETA PHI BETA: In all interested young
ladies. We are proud to announce our
upcoming RUSH Sept. 25. Coffee House
at Mendenhall at 7:00. We thank every-
one who gave to March-of-Dimes. Pro-
ceeds $27.00.
DAWN LEE AND BETH THOMPSON:
Keep up the good work. We are so proud
of you! Much Love, The Sisters & Pledges
of Chi Omega.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
PLEDGES Bohannon, Brigitte Pichot,
Danielle Lamonca, Moky Anderson,
Leigh Ackiss, Mary Scott Parsley, Anna
Eubank, Colleen Wunner, Jenn Levine,
Tracy Stallings, Summer Hunsucker,
Ashley Dagcnhard, Jennifer Snell, Jenny
Higgins, Amy CNeil, Anglea Clay, Angie
Proctor, Tina Getgood, Courtney Maul
drin, Megan Grenewald, Michelle Gi-
bson, Christy O'Brien, Tracy Lewis, Paula
Joseph. Love the sisters and pledges of Chi
Omega.
PI KAPPA ALPHA would like to clarify
that the personal in Thursdays paper was
not meant as a derogatory comment to
any fraternity, only as a congratulations to
our pledges.
PI KAPPA ALPHA HAPPY HOUR:
Wednesday Sept. 21st. Come party with
the PIKA's at the Fizz.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new Pi
Kappa Alpha Little Sisters. Get psyched
for a great semester.
LADIES: Don't forget Pi Kappa Phi Little
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Sister Rush Wed. night at the FJbo and
Thursday at Mendenhall. Come on out
and party with the BEST.
THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA ALPHA
EPSILON would like to welcome all of the
men of our Alpha Pledge Class. We hope
you're ready to have a great time.
PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY, INC.
invites all interested young men to their
fall informal smoker on Sept. 21,8:30 p.m.
at the Cultural Center.
PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY, INC.
invites all interested young women to
their fall little sister interest meeting on
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Sept. 21, 730 p.m. at the Cultural
KATHY SUE GILGO: You mean bitch'
Happy 21st birthday, you Amber - baby
Marybeth Whitehead - looking harlot'
"Want some fried crabs? F Nooooo
Love, Badbitch Les, nice bitch Roberta,
and Hester.
BILL: It was great to see you this weekend
Good luck next weekend at USC Miss you
lots! Love, Susie.
KA LITTLE SISTER RUSH: From 8:00 to
11:00 Sept. 19,20, 21. Sept. 19,20 come and
meet the brothers and sisters Sept 21 in
vitation only Hope to see you there
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
r

ABORTION
'Personal and Confidential Care'
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appotntiriCTit Mon thru SaL Low
CostTemrtro I i.j 20 u �� �f pregnancy
a-TOfto
1-800-433 2930
MENS HAIRSTYLING
STYLE CUT 7��
WALK-INS WELCOME
20 YEARS OF SERVING ECU
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Eastgate Shopping Center
(Acroa from Highway Patrol Station)
behind Car Quest Auto Parta
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
752-3318

A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Looted Near BCU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
S32S a month
Contact J. T or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt 8,12 - 5 JO p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bed room furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only $205 a month, fe month
lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS- couples or
singles Apartment and mobile homes tn Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
CRUSTY'S
1 liLaf DELIVER
Now Hiring Drivers
Starting Wage $4.00 per hr.
Earn Up To $9.00 per hr.
Flexible hours, Bonuses. Must
have own car and insurance.
Apply in person at 1414 Charles St.
Announcements
rsi chi
Psi Chi - The National Honor Society in
Psychology - announces that applications
for membership are now available in
Rawl-104. Applications need to be com-
pleted and turned in to room 104 by Sept.
23, 1988.
PHI SIGMA PI
Our smoker is Tues. in Mendenhall rm.
244. All brothers should be there by 6:15.
To all persons who received invitations,
please come out and find out what we are
all about. Refreshments will be served.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Electronic Data Systems will be speaking
on Sept. 20 at 4:00 p.m, in room 1028 GCB.
Anyone interested in Business or Business
Ed. is encouraged to attend and ALL
MAJORS a'e welcome. Phi Beta Lambda
is the collegiate equivilant to FBLA
SME
The Society of Manufacturing Engineers
is having a called meeting Sept. 20 in Rawl
106 at 4:00 p.m. All members and inter-
ested persons are urged to attend. Come
join us and be a survivor!
ES�
The Episcopal Student Fellowship meets
530 St. Paul's Churc i 4th St. Come join us
for fun, food and fellowship in a relaxed
atmosphere. Call Allen Manning at 758-
1440 for more info.
there are 14 outstanding performances
starting in Oct. and running through
April. Some of the attractions include:
Wynton Marsalis, CABARET, The Acting
Company in Love's Labour's Lost, Nadja
Salerno-Sonnenberg, The Tokyo String
Quartet, Oregon, The Atlanta Symphony,
and the Ohio Ballet. For a free brochure,
and further details contact: The Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext.
266.
The East Carolina Computer Club will
meet with Phi Beta Lambda on Sept. 20 at
4:00 p.m. in the GCB, room 1028. Repre-
sentatives from Electronic Data Services
Corp. will present a program.
SOCWCI ADMISSIONS
Applicants for Fall admissions to the
SOCWCJ Program must have picked up
their application by Sept. 23. All first inter-
views with a faculty member must be
scheduled and completed by Oct. 14. The
second interview meeting with Mr. Gart-
man will be held on Oct. 19 and 20, at 5:00
p m Applicants must have an overal GPA
of 2.5 and completed at least one SOCW
CJ course to apply.
PURE GOLD DANCERS
BY PUBLIC DEMAND: The nationally
ranked PURE GOLD DANCERS wiil hold
auditions for two alternate positions. The
tryouts are set for Sept. 21st at 730 p.m.
and will be held at the Strength Complex
on 14th St. For more info contact Lynette
at 757-6178
FYAMFFF INCREASE
Due to an increase in cost from the testing
company. The Psychological Corp effec-
tive Jan. 1, 1989, candidates will pay
$30.00 to take the Miller Analogies Test.
TfNfYTffiSrrv UNIONS
Season tickets are now on sate for the Per-
forming Arts Series at ECU. This year
THE REBEL
The REBEL will be accepting submissions
for the annual poetry and prose contests
continuously until Nov. 7. Submit typed
entries to Media Board or Rebel office.
Open to currently enrolled ECU students
only.
NEW ARRIVALS
The MSC Music Listening Lounge has
received the following elections on com-
pact disc: Aerosmith�Permanent Vaca-
tion; Wynton Mars?.is�Standard Time;
INXS� Kick; Ahmad Jamal�Crystal;
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg; Sinead
OConnor�The Lion and the Ccbra; REO
Speed wagon�Life as We Know It. The
Music Listening Lounge is open seven
days a week from 2-1030 p.m. and is
located on the second floor gallery of
Mendenhall. Check out the new tunes
before you buy
PRF-P.T. STUDENTS
All general college pre-physical therapy
sophomores, or higher, anticipating ap-
plying to the May 1989 Physical Therapy
Class should go to the Physical Therapy
Dept. Office, 1st floor, Belk Bldg before
the end of Sept. to determine eligibility.
Instructions for receiving the application
packet will be given then. If you have any
question, contact that office by phone
(757-6961, ext. 261) or in person.
JEWISH STUDENTS
You are welcome to attend the following
High Holiday Services at Temple Bayt
Shalom (1420 E. 14th St. in Greenville):
"Sept. 20th, 7:00 p.m. Erev Yom Kippur
Sept. 21st, 930a.m. Yom Kippur Morning,
4:30 p.m. Afternoon Service, Yizor &
N'ilah. For more info, or directions please
call Mike at 756-4930.
"All students are invitd to the home of
Dr. Bramy Resr.ik for a Home Hospitality
Dinner on Sept. 20th at 5:15 p.m. Please
call to RSVP for dinner, for rides, and to
get directions: Dr. Resnik at 355-5321
(home) or 757-6521 (work) or Mike at 756-
4930. There is no charge and we will be
providing rides to services
WINDSURFING
Be sure to attend the Intramural
Windsurfing registration meeting held
from Sept. 6-27. Now you can surf the
waters and learn the technique in this fun
filled trip.
aflME PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept. 15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2 Please note that a group
listing with the name of �very person in
the photograph MUST be presented BE-
FORE the photographer films the group.
ORGANIZATIONS WITHOUT LIST-
INGS WILL NOT BE PI lOTOCRAPHED,
and time does not permit the scheduling
of another session. Call 757-6501 and
leave date & time for the photo to be taken.
Please give two days notice for the pho-
tographer.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
NETWORK
Are you interested in dedicating 6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Overseas Development has
the perfect opportunity. Call Marianne
Exum (h) 830-9450 or (w) 757-6271 for
application and more details. Application
deadline Oct. 1.
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Sept. Semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are:
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase you "fun"
budget,
�opportunities to test a career choice if you
ha e made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
�a hhly "marketable" degree, which
includes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
are invited to join us in lifting up the name
of lesus in songs and Bible study. God
Bless You.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office abr ut off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB,
room 2028.
ECU STUDENT BANK
Faculty, staff, and students may now pay
their Greenville Utility bills at the ECU
STUDENT BANK, presenting both parts
of the bill. Other services include cashing
checks, savings accounts, paying tele-
phone bills, and the purchase of -money
orders.
Campus Christian Fellowship, a non-de-
nominational Christian group for ECU
students will meet every Tues. night in
Rawl 130 at 7 p.m. You are invited to join
us for food-fun-fellowship and praise!
B.Y.O.B. (Bring Your Own Bible).
LQSI2
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri.
night at 7.00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
A special added attraction of EVITA will
be presented in Wright Auditorium on
Sept. 22 at 8:00 p.m. Composed by An-
drew Lloyd Webber (CATS, PHANTOM
OF THE OPERA, and 1ESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR), EVITA won seven Tony
Awards, including Best Musical. EVITA
is based upon the life of Eva Peron, the
second wife of Argentine dictator Juan
Peron. Tickets for the New York Touring
Production of EVITA are now on sale. For
further details contact: The Central Ticket
Office, MSC, 757-6611, ext. 266.
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
Practices are in full swing. Come to the
bottom of College Hill every Tues
Thurs and Sun. at 5:00. New players are
more than welcome. Join the team that
bed for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca.
ECU FORENSIC SOCIETY
interested in competing in intercollegiate,
public speaking, interpreted reading or
debate? Well the ECU Forensic Society is
for you. The next meeting will the Sept. 20
at 8:00 in 211 Messick Theatre Arts Bldg.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anvone who purchased New Student
Rr iew this summer, should come by the
Buccaneer, yearbook, office and pick
them up. The office is located in front of
Joyner Library, on the second floor of the
Publications Bldg. You may pick the book
up between 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 2
pm. to 5 p.m. this week and next week.
RHQ EPSILQN
Rho Epsilon, National Real Estate Frater-
nity, will hold its first meeting on Sept.
21st at 330 p.m. in GCB 3009. Any Real
Estate major or interested student is wel-
come to attend. Any questions, please
contact Todd Kirkpatrick at 752-3642.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Meetings will be held Thurs. night at 7:00
p.m. in rm. 221 Mendenhall. All those who
are interested come on out and join us.
CpITTMSFIING CENTER
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING. A three
part workshop offered to students at no
cost by the University Counseling Center
Sept. 22, 29 and Oct. 6. All three sessions
will be conducted from 3-4 p.m. in 312
Wright Bldg. Assertiveness Training can
sharpen your interpersonal skills and
help you target personal goals. The work-
shop will focus on helping members dis-
tinguish between their assertive, aggres-
sive, and nonassertive behaviors. Par-
hepants can learn how to express them-
selves directly and openly, and respond to
interpersonal situations in a manner
which neither compromises individual
beliefs nor offends others Please call the
Counseling Center (757-6661) for registra-
tion.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all Am-
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p.m. in Menden-
hall room 221. Remember that missing
over 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The new executive officers of the National
Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society areShen-y
Campbell, Kathy McHale, Judy Wilson,
Suzanne Black, Kevin Sullivan, Stacy
Truett and Stacie Scales. The next meeting
will be the 27th of Sept. in Jenkins Audito-
rium.
WES2FEL
"The Rapture: What it is and What it
Isn't A program about the Book of Reve-
lation will follow a delicious home-
cooked meal at the Methodist Student
Center (501 E. 5th St. across from Garrett
Dorm), this Wed. at 5 p.m. Sponsored by
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministries, 758-2030.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Amnesty International will meet Wed
Sept. 28 at 8 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 401 E. 4th St in the upper floor.
Students welcome
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet Sept. 27 at 8 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium. Attendance is required.
Don't forget to bring your nickels.
FORUM COMMITTEE
We will be meeting Wed. the 21 at Men-
denhall at 4:00. Please call if you can't
attend. � Allen Manning.
SPANISH CLUB
The Spanish Club will meet at 3:00 p.m. in
conference room of Foreign Language
Dept. in GCB. Plans for pot-luck dinner
will be discussed. Bienvenidos todos.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will be having its first
meeting on Thurs Sept. 22, at 7:00 p.m. in
room 1026 GCB. Certificates will be avail-
able. If you have any questions, call Dana
at 752-0656.
AMA
The AMA will be holding its seond
meeting Thurs Sept. 29 at 3.30. This
meeting will be held in room 1031 of the
GCB. Our guest speaker will be Craig
Quick from Pitt Memorial. He will be
speaking about marketing health care. All
interested are welcome and old members
are encouraged to attend
BIOLOGY STUDENTS
There will be a BIOLOGY CLUB moot
Sept. 26at 5:00 in BN-lOQ.Dr Lyttei
speaking on "Career Opportunities in
Biology" We will be going to dinner at
6:30. PJease try to attend
AKD SPEAKER SERIES
Talks in Sociology. Sponsored bv The In-
ternational Sociological Honor Society.
"Divorce in the Southeastern States" bv
Dr. Marty Schultz. Thur Sept 22, 3
4:30 p.m Mendenhall, room 248 (Re-
freshments provided by AKD) In Octo
ber�"Social Structure it. Effectiveness in
Isolated Groups" bv Dr. Jeff Johnson
Wed Oct. 26th, 330-430 p.m Menden
hall, room 248. In November� "CHAOS
by Dr. Mike Dalecki. Thurs Nov. 17th,
330-430 p.m. Mendenhall, room 212.
INTERMEDIATE CLUB
Intermediate Education Maors: The In
termediate Club will meet Wed Sept 21
in Speight 312 from 5:00-6:00. We w
have guest speaker. Dr Parmalee Hawrl
speak on classroom discipline We invite
you to attend and SUPPORT YOUR
CLUB.
PUT TSFYF DART CLUB
The Bullseye Dart Club will be having its
first general meeting to elect officers on
Tues Sept. 20 at 7:00 p.m. in room 10
Memorial Gym. Anyone interested in
playing or learning to play darts is invited
to at.end
KAYAKINGCANOE
Be sure to attend the Intramural Kayak
ingCanoe registration held from Sept. 15
to Oct 7. Learn to canoe and kayak in a
fantastic trip. Ml you need to do is regis
ter.
BOWLING
Be sure to attend the Intramural Bowling
registration meeting held Oct. 4 at 5:00
p.m. in GCB 1026. Play begins shortK
afterwards! Be sure to register as soon as
possible for some in the alleys!
ECU GOSPEL CHQIR
ECU Gospel Choir is open tor member
ship to all interested students. Last day to
join is Sept. 21 Rehearsals are held Wed
nesdays at 5:00 in Ledonia Wright Cul
rural Center.
AfiC
Attention Industry and Technology En
thusiasts: There will be an (AGO Assoa
ated General Contractors meeting Wed
Sept. 14th at 5:45 in the Rav�. Bldg Beer &
nuts will be served Check it out.
CO-REC ALMOST ANY-
mrjsJGJIQES
Demo
RALEIGH (AP) � Go
Martin has attacked the G
Assembly's Democrats for
ing many of his proposals.
Republican allies in the RJ
administration have dealt s
his biggest setbacks.
If North Carolina is p
over as host state for sup
ducting super collider, as
lished reports have said is hi
will be the latest in a se;
disappointments for Martin
hands of the administrate
Democrats are gloahn
Martin's failure to exhibit
clout in Washington, .
served 12 years in the HoJ
Representatives before
tion as governor in 1 �
"I understand that h
around saying the leg
always telling him not nov.
state'Rep. Edd Nye, D
But he doesn't even get that
the Republican administral
Washington. They
him no
Kert Eudy, executi
j of the state Democratic Part
l Martin's problems in Washi
show he is not taken sei
' there.
"jim Martin has r.
� factor m Washington Eud
"He's a lightweight N;
hear about him being n I
for a cabinet post or the vice
r dency
Martin shrug
Mart

WRIGHTSVILLE Bl
NC (AP) � Campaign
has begun to heat up in th
natonal race, with Rcpj
Gov. Jim Martin vowl
"crush" Lt. Gov. Bob JordJ
the Democrat described
administration as unethicJ
Martin, speaking to thj
Carolina Associated Pre
Council on Sunday, did n
tion Jordan's remarks the
ous day. But he told rcpoi
terward that Jordan's
"doesn't have the ring of j
"He does have a n
that road if wants to
claims about ethical pre
Martin said. "That offend
I know I'm going to get evj
him because on Nov 8 hef
to be whipped.
"He'll probably savj
unethical. But that's the
get even with him crusl
Nov. 8
Martin likened Jordan
ments to state GOP Q
Jack Hawke's descriptio
dan as "a wimp" during
news conference. The Re;
governor said new spa
nal writers should take
task for his attack on Mai
"That's very unfair
supportable, it arises out
peration and I'm conhdf
the fair-minded editorie
this state will condemn
FA
NEW YOR1
BUFFALO
ATLANTA
ORLANDO
CHICAGO
CHARLOT
WASHING
BALTIMOl
DALLAS .
OMAHA .
MIAMI . .
Coll
Read �� Fl� Prt� '���
vnc .�s��i.os are �
nor. T�tu-aar�e cangeae
High!
CALL lit
Be sure to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
Almost Anything Goes registration meet-
ing held Sept. 20 at 530 p.m. in GCB 1026
It's fun and exciting and you'll have a blast
so register Sept. 20!





V p m at ihe Cultural
si E GILGO ou mean bitch!
ttdaj u Amber � baby -
Si Whitehead looking harlot!
Mnc tried crabs1 F Nooooo
Lea nice bitch Roberta,
as c:j: to ee ou this weekend.
weekend at USC. Miss you
11 K RUSH: From &00 to
1.19 20 come and
- tors Sept 21 in
h -v you "there.
LA CLASSIFIED
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 7
L-TORO
VS HAIRSTYLING
YLE CUT 700
.KINS WELCOME
EARS OF SERVING ECU
X RS FROM CAMPUS
ng Center
g . S aaon)
Street
732 3318
IED
rvsN
mr J
DFIiVFH
ivcrs
) per hi.
per hr.
uses. Must
nsurance.
4 Charles St.
� wicf old n
LQQ1 STUDENTS
� CLUB mo�
. Dr. I ytlswiHbe
� e to dinner at
KDSP1 AKER SERIES
ponsored by The In-
Honor Societv
i-tern States" bv
.r . Sept 22, 330-
- om 248. (Re-
: � . AKD) In Octo-
v Effectiveness in
�r (eft Johnson
: m Menden-
l� N ember�"CHAOS"
Mil ki Th-irs . Nov. 17th,
' ndenhall, room 212.
sTt RMI 1MATE CLUB
Majors The In-
MiU meet Wed , Sept 21
m 5 00-6 00 We will
alter Dr Parmalcc Hawk,
e We invite
: ll : T YOUR
!
ir learn ii
be having ps
t officers on
-i m in room 105
ne interested in
av darts is invited
K AYAKlNGCANQf
e Intramural Kayak-
m held from Sept. 15
rn to canoe and kayak in a
� , i need to do is regjs-
d the Intramural Bowling
g held Oct. 4 at 5:00
26 Play begm shortly
- sure to register as soon as
me m the alleys!
pel Choir is opon to: member-
i interested students Last day to
' 21 Rehearsals are held Wed-
0 in Ledonia Wright Cul-
AjG�
Industry and Technology En-
�Sts There will be an (AGO Associ-
�eneral Contractors meeting Wed ,
Uth at 5 45 in the Ra Bldg Beer &
will be served Check it out
0-REC ALMQSTAN

ps
to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
AnvthingGoes registration meet-
i Sept 20 at 5:30 p.m. in GCB 1026
and excitingand you'll have a blast
ter Sept. 20!
Democrats not the only foes
RALEIGH (AP) � Gov. Jim
Martin has attacked the General
Assembly's Democrats for reject-
ing many of his proposals, but his
Republican allies in the Reagan
administration have dealt some of
his biggest setbacks.
If North Carolina is passed
over as host state for supercon-
ducting super collider, as pub-
lished reports have said is likely, it
will be the latest in a series of
disappointments for Martin at the
hands of the administration.
Democrats are gloating over
Martin's failure to exhibit more
clout in Washington, where he
served 12 years in the House of
Representatives before his elec-
tion as governor in 1984.
"I understand that he goes
around saying the legislature's
always telling him not now, said
state Rep. Edd Nye, D-Bladen
But he doesn't even get that out of
the Republican administration in
Washington. They just tell
him no
Ken Eudy, executive director
of the state Democratic Party, said
Martin's problems in Washington
show he is not taken seriously
there.
"Jim Martin has never been a
factor in Washington Eudy said.
"He's a lightweight. You never
hear about him being mentioned
for a cabinet post or the vice presi-
dency
Martin shrugs off such criti-
cism as election-year politics. "I'd
say consider the source he said.
"I'm not going to get worried
about the Democrats' attacks.
We're going to give as good as we
et. It's all part of the game
He said he had obtained extra
federal highway money for North
Carolina after Congress overrode
President Reagan's veto of a
transportation funding bill that
shortchanged the state, returning
only two-thirds as much money
as North Carolina contributes.
The veto would have been
upheld if Sen. Terry Sanford, D-
N.C had not dropped his opposi-
tion at the last minute at the urg-
ing of Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan,
Martin's re-election opponent, he
said. "If he (Jordan) would make
half an effort to help me we'd get
a lot of things done Martin said.
If North Carolina surprises
the doubters and wins the super
collider, Martin's critics probably
will be silenced. The $4.4 billion
program is the ultimate public-
works project, offering thousands
oi jobs and an economic bonanza
to the host state.
Martin can take some credit
for the fact that North Carolina is
oneof seven states chosen as final-
ists for the super collider. His ad-
ministration spearheaded the ef-
fort to get the state on the U.S.
Department of Energy's "short
list
But the administration's lob-
bying effort since then has drawn
criticism, and some state officials
have grown lukewarm or hostile
to the project.
Paul Frampton, a physics
professor with the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
who was the state's super collider
project director through the sum-
mer of 1987, last week said North
Carolina's chances of getting the
collider were "about 2 percent
He blamedMartin's science ad-
viser, saying Earl Mac Cormac
had alienated the scientific com-
munity instead of rallying it to
North Carolina's side.
Other issues on which Mar-
tin has sought help in Washington
include:
- Oregon Inlet. Martin ap-
pealed personally to Reagan to
give North Carolina permission
to build stone jetties designed to
keep the treacherous inlet open to
sea traffic.
Earlier this month Reagan
said no, siding with the Depart-
ment of Interior, which said the
jetties would cause environ-
mental damage.
-Textiles. Martin lobbied Re-
agan in 1986 not to veto a bill to
restrict textile imports, arguing
that doing so would deal a severe
blow to one of North Carolina's
biggest industries. Reagan said
no, rejecting the bill.
- Bus drivers. The U.S. De-
partment of Labor this year or-
dered North Carolina to replace
its 17-year-old school bus drivers
with adults.
UNC-Chapel Hill political
science professor Thad Beyle says
such failures are fair game for
Martin's opponents in a cam-
paign, even though factors other
than his lobbying undoubtedly
figured in the administration's
rulings.
"I do know that some gover-
nors are much more aggressive
than others in winning people
over to their point of view Beyle
said. "But a president, whether
he's a Republican or a Democrat,
is sometimes constrained by the
courts or budgetary concerns or
other factors so that he can't do
what he'd like for a Jim Martin
Larry Cobb, the state Senate
Republican leader, said Jordan
could not be expected to do much
better than Martin even if Michael
Dukakis is elected president.
"Certainly Martin's relation-
ship with Reagan has been better
and more beneficial for North
Carolina than Jordan's relation-
ship with (state House Speaker)
Liston Ramsey Cobb said. "I
can't think of a thing Jordan's
been able to get out of Ramsey
when they were on opposite
sides
YOUR SPORTS STATION
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I
Martin vows to "crush " Jordan
WRIGHTSV1LLE BEACH,
N.C (AP) � Campaign rhetoric
has begun to heat up in the guber-
natorial race, with Republican
Gov. Jim Martin vowing to
"crush" Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan after
the Democrat described Martin's
administration as unethical.
Martin, speaking to the North
Carolina Associated Press News
Council on Sunday, did not men-
tion Jordan's remarks the previ-
ous day. But he told reporters af-
terward that Jordan's criticism
"doesn't have the ring of truth
"He does have a right to go
that road if wants to making
claims about ethical problems, "
Martin said. "That offends me but
I know I'm going to get even with
him because on Nov. 8 he's going
to be whipped.
"He'll probably say that's
unethical. But that's the way I'll
get even with him crush him on
Nov. 8
Martin likened Jordan's state-
ments to state GOP Chairman
Jack Hawke's description of Jor-
dan as "a wimp" during a 1987
news conference. The Republican
governor said newspaper edito-
rial writers should take Jordan to
task for his attack on Martin.
"That's very unfair, it's un-
supportable, it arises out of des-
peration and I'm confident that
the fair-minded editorialists of
this state will condemn him for
it Martin told reporters. Jordan,
the Democratic gubernatorial
nominee, stood by his comments
in a telephone interview from
Raleigh.
"I think I must have touched a
nerve because everything I said
was true and all the incidents I re-
ferred to have been reported in
the media Jordan said.
Jordan raised the ethics issue
Saturday in a hard-hitting speech
to the the same group of newspa-
per editors. He charged that
Martin's administration had been
riddled with nepotism, "Political'
payoff hit lists and blatant
conflicts of interest" and had
manipulated state government
for political gains at taxpayer
expense.
The exchange, perhaps the
most bitter of the campaign, oc-
curred against the backdrop of a
new Charlotte Observer poll
showing Martin leading Jordan
51 percent to 43 percent. The
newspaper's previous poll in May
said the race was neck-and-neck.
Jordan denied that his new
offensive was inspired by the poll
or a perception that he is trailing.
His speech was written before he
learned of the poll and was in
keeping with a strategy mapped
weeks ago, he said.
"Frankly, what we sense in
the polls is that they've jumped
around a lot like the national
polls Jordan said. "What we're
seeing is that people have not
fully made up their minds and
that it's anybody's race to win
He said he was in better shape
than Martin was at the same point
in 1984 or that Sen. Terry Sanford
was in his 1986 campaign, when a
September poll showed him trail-
ing Republican Jim Broyhill.
Martin's spokesman, Tim
Pittman, contended Saturday poll
had led Jordan to launch the ethics
attack. Martin declined Sunday to
speculate on Jordan's motive.
"It just amazes me that he
would use that kind of allega-
tion Martin said. "It's name-
calling. There's no case he can
make to smear me like that and it
won't work
" I expect the editorial writers
of the state to rise up in righteous
indignation against Bob Jordan's
false and mischievous characteri-
zation of this administration as
being unethical Martin added.
Jordan would not say
whether he planned to continue
questioning the Martin
administration's ethics. But he
said it was a legitimate issue.
"He's the one that promised
to strengthen the ethics of state
government in 1984 and he came
back and weakened it Jordan
said.
Martin said his administra-
tion had been less political than its
predecessors, particularly in the
hiring and firing of state employ-
ees. He said he had retained many
Democrats and had fired only
those who would not cooperate
with his appointees.
He acknowledged that some
relatives of his supporters had
been hired but said his admini-
stration had toughened nepotism
rules.
"This administration is a re-
form administration Martin
said. "State employees will tell
you it's much better than it's ever
been before
1st Annual
Student Residence
Association
POOL
TOURNAMENT
(Double Elimination)
in the SRA Gameroom
(Basement of AYCOCK HALL)
OVER $200 IN MONEY & PRIZES
(Cash, Trophies & Pool Sticks)
Last Day To Register
Is September 22nd
Registration
in SRA Gameroom
Registration Fees: $1 with SRA Card
�$5 without SRA Card
Tournament Begins September 26th, 1988

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V
If
8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20,1988
Campus papers face tough competition
(CPS) � Two new national
competitors to campus newspa-
pers have appeared in recent
weeks, and could jeopardize the
papers' financial health.
Student Life, published by
Time, Inc, hit campuses on Sep-
tember 11.
A new version of Campus
Voice, produced by Whittle Com-
munications of Knoxville, Tenn
bowed on more than 300 cam-
puses in August.
The publications threaten to
attract national advertising dol-
lars that ordinarily might go to the
papers themselves.
While the publications typi-
cally publish rehashed or old
new� Campus Voice's Aug. 29
issue, for example, had a lead
story about a year-old crackdown
on fraternities at Gettysburg Col-
lege in Pennsylvania; "U an-
other of the publications, reruns
month-old local stories from
campus papers� they take vital
national advertising dollars away
from student papers.
Mars Candy, AT&T and
Lever Brothers, among other, ad-
vertised in the Aug. 29 Campus
Voice "newspaper on the wall
spending $555,000 each for an
annual advertising contract that
in years past might have gone to
student publications instead.
University of Washington
Daily advisor Barbara Krohn
noted even CASS� an Evanston,
111 ad broker that is supposed to
route national ads to campus
papers� is publishing a catalog
that takes ads away from the stu-
dent publications it purports to
represent.
No one, in fact, knows how
much money Campus Voice, Stu-
dent Life, CASS, U Ampersand
and two just-folded predeces-
sors� Newsweek On Campus
and Business Week Careers-
have drawn from the campus
Skateboards out
at Applachian
(CPS) � Skateboarders be-
ware: You're not welcome at
Appalachian State University.
ASU has become the latest
campus to ban campus skateboar-
ding. Arizona State University
and the universities of Arizona
and California at Berkeley have
curtailed campus skating in re-
cent years, too.
ASU administrators decided
during the summer to banish
skateboards from campus, knock-
ing returning students this fall on
their feet.
"We had no reports of people
actually being knocked down, but
many people complained they
were nearly knocked down said
ASU Vice Chancellor Ned Triv-
ette. Skateboarders also slightly
damaged campus sidewalks, he
added.
"I'm glad the decision was
made because they were getting
in everyone's way Christi
Young, a student at the Boone,
N.C campus adds, "The skate-
boarders were so loud outside the
library it was hard to study even if
you wre on the second floor.
papers in recent years.
A group called College
Newpapers Business and Adver-
tising Managers (CNBAM),
which tracks campus paper
money issues, has no current na-
tional advertising data, reported
Judy Klein, CNBAM's president.
Klein, advisor to the North
Texas State University Daily, said
that, while the problem of com-
peting with the national publica-
tions has come up at CNBAM
meetings, "we have no survey or
documentation" of how much it's
hurt.
But campus papers them-
selves say they're not getting as
much lucrative national advertis-
ing as in the past.
'The amount of money com-
ing to the college market (from
national advertisers) has in-
creased said Eric Jacobs, general
manager of the Daily Pennsylva-
nian at the University of Pennsyl-
vania, "but we're not getting our
share
"The money he said, "is
going to other media
Jacobs added The Penn-
sylavanian hasn't enjoyed an in-
crease in national advertising "for
5-to-7 years. The national adver-
tising trend is flat
"Flat" would be an improve-
ment at Kansas State University,
where national ad revenues have
dropped from $36,000 in fall,
1984, to only $11,000 in fall, 1988.
Beer ads, lost when Kansas's legal
drinking age rose to 21, made a
significant part of the difference,
said Gloria Freeland, KSU's act-
ing director of publications.
"We hope the trend won't
continue said Freeland.
National advertising in the
University of Washington Daily
also was down from the year be-
fore, but Krohn had not yet re-
ceived a budget report giving
exact figures.
The University of Florida Al-
ligator is "getting its share" of na-
tional advertising� about
$225,000 last year� General
Manager Ed Barber said, though
he attributes it to aggressive mar-
keting to national ad agencies and
representation by three major
companies.
Utah Daily Chronicle General
Manager Robert McComber said
his national revenues were down,
but blamed the national econ-
omy� which in fact has been
expanding for five consecutive
years� and his paper's prohibi-
tion against ads for cigarettes and
alcoholic beverages.
"College newpapers are suf-
fering from a softness in the mar-
ket opened newpaper industry
analyst John Morton of Washing-
ton, D.C.
The national publications
themselves swear they don't want
to harm the college press.
"We're determined to aug-
ment the work of the college
press. It would be against all our
goals to do anything to weaken
the college press asserted
Sheena Paterson-Berwick, Us
publisher.
Campus Voice Senior Editor
Sheila De La Rosa maintained that
"CU complements what the cam-
pus publications do
Both De La Rosa and Pater-
son-Berwick, however, noted that
national advertisers find it much
more efficient to appear in the
bigger publications.
One reason is that campus
papers may have "haphazard dis-
tribution" and they may be frec-
bies. Advertisers prefer paid
readership, readers who are pay-
ing attention, suggests Pat Rcilly,
print media reporter for Advertis-
ing Age.
The national publications,
moreover, can offer glossy stock
and color reproduction that most
campus papers offer only in "in-
serts" hand collated into their
papers.
Most compelling, however, is
cost.
A magazine-sized ad in each
of the biggest 150 college papers
would reach 3.8 million students
and would cost $62,480 per inser-
tion, explained Mark Rose of
CASS, the ad broker for campus
papers nationwide, That's
$624,800 for 10 ads.
By contrast, Campus Voice
brings an advertiser's message to
3.7 million students on 365 corn-
puses during 34 weeks for
$555,000, said CV's John
Glasscott.
"The advertiser reaches half
the students in America each day
where they live, work and play"
For Tim Talbert, who places

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U.S. Air Force ads, a Campus
Voice ad "maintains the Air Force
presence on campus and rein-
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Local ads placed by Air Force
squadrons do still appear in cam-
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Talbert denied the money for
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to campus papers. "Without
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media aimed at students he
said.
Anheuser-Busch, the beer
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"We place ads in all the major
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757-1212
756-7256
Hours:
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11:00 a.m.
12:00 midnight SUN.
1:00 a.m. FRI. - SAT.
THU.
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BOX OFFICE INFORMATION
The Fast Carolina Plaxh.Hise Box Office is
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Fp Da
A4.NE.N
O �m
FRI Apr 14
SAT Apr 14
MON Apr 17
TIF Apt II
II I
I HI I
EUpl
By JEFF PARK. R
stall IMmiiiiui
Sunday niht in Mir
scum, at 8 p m Greem
cert-goers were to be treated
musical show-styling
ence Unlimited, EL
10:15, they were.
Problems like tins
with concert events, but u
not of this magnitud
guarantee vt reck mj I
tickets mentioned no su I
so fortunately tor the I
shelled out eigl
show up.
According to M
Committee, wht j
group for Sundsiv i
hour was sup pi
for dance times �:
'm. actuality, the ban I
hour and fifteen mil
Unfortunately, this w
dear and hardly an
vantage of this, time I
socialize, except tor thre
more talented tans w
creative dancing,en-
crowd for a short v I
Bv 10 p.m some
fans had already left, 1
many. The audience
have stood too man
departures, because there v. j
much of a turnout. The prx
seems to be due to noi
advance promotion tor
During EU. Experience Unl :
.and many other tunes. Unforti
Walters�Photolab)
Bob D
ByEARLVlSHAMFIO
Feattirr drloi
No laser light show No
orful stage back-drop No bac
singers. Just a black almost
ren stage, a drummer .i
player, a guitarist and Bs
Out of the darkness
and his new band enl
lights of the Dean E. Smith Cei
Thursdav night with a rea
flash back to the La!
flashback they did.
Opening with Sub
nean Homesick Blues
demonstrated he can -
fast song fast. Often cri I J
running his verse together Pj
sang with clarity throughoutr
concert � a clarity which was!
dent in the opener a he ; I
"Thefaucet don t work
vandals stole the handle
Dvlan whose tunes
earned "notoriety in the mid
showed no sign oi wear and I
from his latest tour. If anytrj
the performer displayed a
nite up-tempo in his songs.
minutes of music , Dylan am
band played 16 songs.
didn't mess around.
Tom Sellec
BALTIMORE (AD
Tom Sellcck savs he fulfill)
childhood dream by going tJ
with the Baltimore Orioles
hitting two home runs.
The former "Magnum,
star spent most of the sumr
the Baltimore area on locatu
"Her Alibi a romantic cor





tj
m
I Ml 1 S1 i k() INIAN
Style
sll'll MBER 20, 1988
Busch, the beer
ces advertising di
papers
Is n all the major
d on network tv, but
co papers we
to the college mar-
nbo account
or the company's
D A rev.
At tiev 11�
��
BUY 1,
ET I FREE.
BUY 2,
BUY 3,
:rET 3 FREE
BUY 4,
f 4 FREE
ETC
88
IZZA!
ONE FREE!
� '6
236
? 56
2 36
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N1
m; 89466
h2 K�se
' "9
06
mL� �-
AB VTU mu. AT
S3SArilnftM MWl
��r�ti tr��B Tmrm rraaJO
756-7256
1
rr
Th
Boys in the Band
( )r r )D
� MM
EU plays Minges late amid controversy
Hv l 11 PARK I R
Sunda night in Minges c oh
� .it s p m . (Ireem ille con
;oers w ere to be treated to the
cal show stvlings of Expcri
Unlimited, EU Finalh at
the were
roblems like this oc in often
. ncei t e ents, but usually
� I tis magnitude ithvM.it a
ol redemption I he
s mentioned no such v lau e
match tor the tans w ho
d out eight dollai � the did
up
According to Major c oncerts
ttec who contra ted the
p f r Sundax night, the first
is supposed to be de -
i time tor th e. So
she band v as onU an
and fifteen minutes late
; � inatelv this vvas not made
and li.ii dl am one took ad
time to dance and
.v except tor three of the
talented fans v ho did some
.v iai cing entc rtaining the
d tor a short while.
B 10 pan some disgruntled
had already left, though not
Vhe audience couldn t
have stood too many "early"
departures, because there v as not
h of a turnout The ;
- to be due t i not en
ce promotion for the i
cert
It was an applaudable effort
bs Major Concerts to bring in a
musical alternative that doesn't
often get showcased in this area,
but bad handling defeated the
cause ZMBdidall thcycouldin
promoting the show, but more
advertising should have been
done with nearby popular radio
stations
What purportedly happened
that I the long delay was a
conflict between the band and
di f(r this show. Be-
cause of the poor turnout .nd
m 'in : U ist all around fhe
board, the romoter apparently
told the members of EU they
would have to settle tor less
n , for the night I he band
remained i le in negotiation
(arguing) . ith the promoter until
they reached some settlement.
tu r sc eral stalling at-
tt mptsbv Fun Boys production to
pacify the crowd (playing more
tapes.a valiant effort b the Djon
' m ibles, and gi ing away
: theband appeared, to the
ht of the crowd. I hey per
icd a lei md lively num-
1 r intermixing several songs and
showed off some of the talent of
the band. In particular, the horns
and kettledrums were great.
I 'nfortunately alter the terri-
fic opening display, they went
a lot of crowd-goosin
expected of show bands, who are
supposed to get the crowd in
volved, but it went on a little ttx
long. When some of the "Da Butt"
music started playing, girls in the
audience were invited to come up
on stage and show off what they
knew.
What followed wasa parent's
nightmare. While the girls danced
on the edge of the stage, overzeal-
ous male tans take advantage ot
the opportunity to sample their
wares. While the ladies had their
buttocks poked out, a massive
audience caressing took place.
More than a few times the dancers
'faced the public' and the same
thing went on, but on the respec-
tive parts
Now, I'm by no means some
puritan as far as music perform-
ances go,and 1 probably wouldn't
complain except tor the fact that
these w ere all clearly Rose 1 hgh
School girls. Theband could have
discouraged this stuff.
But EU had to do something
to get the crowd jumpstarted. The
lead smger seemed a little taken
aback when he asked, "Whereare
all the party people?" and the
Rose 1 hgh kids were louder and
more numerous on the floor than
ECU students.
Admittedly, to most of
middle America, EU is a one hit
band. "Da Butt and their col-
boration with Salt N Pepa on
ing 11. F icperience Unlimited pleases the waiting crowd with "Da Butt" and "Shake Your Thang
many other tunes. Unfortunately, some disguntled fans didn't wait for the band. (Photo by Thomas
a alters�Photolab)
Bob Dylan still jammin'
By EARL VIS HAMPTON
lejturc 1 tiitur
No laser light show. No col-
rage back-drop. No backup
rs )ust a black, almost bar-
it ige, a drummer, a bass
1. rr. a guitarist and Bob Dylan.
Out of the darkness. Dylan
I his new band entered the
-ot the Dean E. Smith Center
sday night with a resolve to
back to the late '60s. And
. back they did
( fpening with 'Subterra-
l Iomesi( k Blues I Ian
� strated he (an still sing a
- : g fast (ften ritit ized f i
his vers together, Dylan
iout the
a ase i
ith claritv tl
rl
ai larif
the i'u'l � i
� . , , t d n t rl rise the
I lc the han .
an, whilst' tunes first
i notoriety in the mid '60s,
1 no sign 14 wear and tear
from his latest tour. It anything,
former displayed a defi
ii tempo in his songs In vd
minutes of music , I tylan and his
I laved 16 songs They
5 around
A legendary rock and roll
rebel, 1 Man walked on stage in a
funky leather jacket, black jeans,
and black boots with chrome spur
hooks. Dylan's 'just woke up
look long bushy hair and perma-
n nt five o'clock shadow, are his
trademark
Wasting no time, Dylan
uncanned classics like "It Ain't
Me" and lust Like A Woman"
and "Don't I hank Twice, It's All
ht
The audience of approxi-
mately 8,0( h) a diverse group of
young and old, rye-dyes and
sports eoats s�oig along with
Dylan as he uncorked "Like A
Rolling Stone" an hour into the
concert Ibis is probably one of
his most noteable songs, and
Dylan played the classic with in-
tensity
1 Ian s now band is com-
prised of throe talented musi-
cians, who have recently toured
with the likes of Tom Petty and
the 1 leartbn akersand Ric Grate-
ful Head
Bassist Kenny Aaronson, a
'50s throwback with hair grease
and black shades, provided a
steady back beat while Drummer
hristopher Parker upheld the
Tom Selleck lives dream, hits two homers
Before EU. The stage of Minges is empty as fans wait for the Go-Go band. It remained barren, except tor
a DJ scratching turntables, until 10 p.m. when the band finally showed up. (Photo By Thomas Walter
til i�i u
Photolab)
their new single "Shake that
Thing" is all most radio listeners
have ever heard.
Experience Unlimited did
delve into their go-go past during
the show. Space-age synthesizer
riffs, horns and synchronized
"1 )a Butt goes without sa
ing. It's the song that they just
can't do anything less than their
best on, and brings back all i t the
fun o "School Daze But v-
l.ee would have probably been
upset with the crowd rea( tii m for
dance routines, all the things that mosl ot lhc concert, in which too
them so hot on the manv People were either sf
band si a � i up.
What killed t iasm
the fact that v r h d) was
by the time the band
start
build anxiet tarl
� ins to an other
A
nave mack
D.C. go go scene were present.
But then they turned around
and did a weak, incomplete cover
of Kool Moe Dee's "Wild, Wild
West Why bother playing some
ing still or laid back in the
ers.
1 he lead singer, w hose
( ameo-style voice is becon
mi rereo gnizedontheairwav
be
EUdidafu ind
I I for their versatile
body else's songs? EUhadagrcat told the audience at one p intthat
opportunity to show Greenville nc iK" li because we "were
what else thev can do besides two reallyi ' He vvas just being
top 40 hitsand they just play nice, though, because I rl i
more. ; :rt the crow d w asabout a -
as the music pla cd tv I i
Album release
musical abi ty,
n ti en il : -
a while sf c awav I
c back-up tract
handlii I tl .ent com
I with - . tart to
put a lar. lamperonf
. fully f y car
� vear w ith ; tter results
New Cole release boss
pace with good thunder play.
At lead guitar, G.E. Smith
fevered his instrument in the clas-
sic "Highway 61 Midway
through the show, Smith teamed
with Dylan in a display of dual
acoustical guitars as the bassist
and drummer left the stage.
Dvlan and Smith continued
to jam the acoustics in a folk song
"Barbara Allen" and "The Lone-
some Death of Hattie Carroll"
"Girl from the North Countrv
Unlike some established
musicians, Dylan was not out to
sell his new release by playing
mostly new songs. "Silvio a new
Dvlan song which has received
some radio air-play, proved to be
the only tune the performer sang
from his new l.P "Down in the
Groove
During the encore, the band
finished the show with the classic
"Maggie's Farm
The concert's sudden end-
ing upset members of the audi-
ence. As some said, "He didn't
play 'Blowing in the Wind " but
Dylan and company more than
satisfied most. Although he jam-
med for 90 minutes, he did just
that: he jammed for 90 minutes.
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
M.i'iji; ng I i "or
Lloyd Cole and the Commo-
tions' third album, "Main-
stream may be trying to navi-
gate the pop river, but it also
proves thev still have too much
integrity to drown there. From the
opening synthesizer notes of "My
Bag it does look like the techno-
logical flood is about to deluge
Lloyd.
But then the drums start kick-
ing, Cole's no-nonsense voice and
lyrics cut in and the song starts
making some waves. Throughout
the song, the keyboard strains
occasionally trv to surface, but the
guitars and vocals submerge it
forcibly.
Cole's lyrics, arguable his
Strongest point since his debut
album, "Rattlesnakes came out
in 1984 suffer none for the band's
two vear hiatus since the 1986
album, "Brand New Friend In
fact, the wait may have helped.
"My Bag's" lines, "1 don't
need love 1 need a fire escape,
open window illustrate the tone
of "Mainstream Cole comes
across as a romantic, but one who
understands that "Love's not
everything as he sings in the
birthday lament "29
This attitude has come across
before in Cole's work. "Brand
New Friend and "Perfect Skin"
both raved about true love, but
also realized thingslike love often
cause more trouble than thev are
worth.
The Commotions used to get
criticized about being too heav
handed in their subject matter
Admittedly, their debut LP vvas
full of angst-ridden love songs
Intelligent, angst-ridden love
songs, but still saturated with
pathos.
So tm their next album, to
help balance things out, thev re-
corded "Lost Weekend and
filmed one of the most hilarious
videos ever for it. On "Mam-
stream the humor is more intrin-
sic to the subject matter the
darkly funny things about human
beings in love.
But the group still lets loose
with a satirical tune called Sean
Penn Blues Poor "Mr. Ma-
donna" does have his problems
' My wife says 1 go looking tor
trouble 1 surely find it It I trash
this TV camera, I know 1 will feel
better
Most of the tunes on the
album either stick to the crisp
guitar melodies or slow strum
mil g at characterized the
Comn � r�'s firsl two records
fhe new LP branches out with
lor - I new instrumen-
tation.
Hie most surprising experi-
ments on "Mainstream are Big
ik with ts -mating horn
5 and e Days w ith its
l.aur;e -r i - - esizer
intro.
� I ile the music the C mmo-
tions prod - a me of the best
around, what makes this band
wade through the pop chanr� -
higher th. n else is Cole s
Lyricsandl sincredil . - ice.On
"Rattlesnake s - voiceoften got
ovc rpo ered in the mix.
Both of his � s-up Lps
have taken care of this giving
equal stength to the music and the
vocals Cole has one of the most
soulful voices in music, light
years beyond Michael Boltonand
lus pitiful Otis Redding remakes
or Morrisey and his perpetual
whining.
For such a scary album title.
"Mainstream" is actually a reas-
suring record one that could set
new standards tor the diluted
rock pool of talent. To quote Cole.
"Feels Lke Prohibition Cave mo
the hard. -
World War I letter found in Wilmington
BAl riMORE (AP) Actor
Tom Selleck says he fulfilled a
child! od dream bv ' � bat
with th, Baltimore Jrioles
hitting two home runs.
The former "Magnum, P.I
star spent most of the summer in
the Baltimore area on location tor
"Her Ahbi a romantic comedy
film in which he plays a mystery Orioles at Memorial Stadiurr
writer who becomes involved where he hit two home runs, he
with a murder suspect. said.
I ilming for the movie, which
also stars model Paulina "It was about 7Q degrees on
Porizkova, wrapped up Friday. the field. I had a great time said
Lhe highlight of the summer Selleck, who played baseball in
was the day Selleck went to bat- college. "They helped me fulfill a
ting practice with the Baltimore childhood fantasy "
WILMINGTON (AP) It was
Aug. 5, 191S, somewhere in the
trenches of World War 1 Europe.
A young second lieutenant
named Edward Hardin sat in his
tent writing his mother in
Wilmington about his brush with
death )iist hours earlier.
"Dearest Mamma, I have had
an experience tonight which 1
don't care to repeat any time soon,
for it was the narrowest escape
from death I have ever had lie
wrote.
The soldier had come to take
for granted the sound of shells
bursting around the "hole-in-the-
ground" that was his company's
base. But that night, the explo-
sions came so close that Hardin
and his commanding officer.
whom he referred to as "Capt.
Cause were literally knocked
off their feet.
"Gosh! 1 thought my last
minutes had come Hardin
wrote, still partially deaf from the
concussion he received in the at-
tack.
Somehow, that first-hand
account of a soldier's experiences
in World War 1 wound up in a
desk at the Cape hear chapter of
the American Red Cross Beki
Summers, who recently took over
as director of services to military
families, was cleaning out a
drawer when she came across the
fragile, yellowed pages.
Ms Summers hopes to return
the 70-year-old letter to 1 iardin, it
he is still alive, or his tamilv
"Nobody knows how we got
ahold of it she told the Wilming-
ton Morning Star.
Written in pencil, the eight-
page letter chronicles the differ-
ent aspects of Army lite, from en-
counters with the enemy to the
second lieutenant s more mun-
dane duties, which included com-
piling reports for his captain, fre-
quent casualties suffered hv his
unit, and hew he looked forward
to the much-needed rest his com-
pany vvas expected to receive
soon.
In addition to the horrors ot
battle, there were other unpleas
antries associated w ith w ar
Mamma - w hisper it - 1 have
had cooties" Hardin wrote ex-
plaining that the dugouts and
shelters used hv the troops
abounded with the pests
He also told his mother how
much her letters meant to him. It
you on.lv knew, mv dear, how
those letters are appreciated he
wrote.
"The) are the particular
bright spots in the otherw ise rot-
ten days
Nowhere in the letter wa .
there a mention of where Hardin
was. though he had enclosed a
sampling of French currency.





m
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20,1988 Page 9
Anheuser-Busch, the beer
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vertising agency, D Arcy,
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EU plays Minges late amid controversy
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By JEFF PARKER
SUIT Illustrator
Sunday night in Minges Coli-
seum, at 8 p.m Greenville con-
cert-goers were to be treated to the
musical show-stylings of Experi-
ence Unlimited, EU. Finally, at
10:15, they were.
Problems like this occur often
with concert events, but usually
not of this magnitude without a
guarantee of redemption. The
tickets mentioned no such clause,
so fortunately for the fans who
shelled out eight dollars, they did
show up.
According to Major Concerts
Committee, who contracted the
group for Sunday night, the first
hour was supposed to be devoted
for dance time for the audience. So
in actuality, the band was only an
hour and fifteen minutes late.
Unfortunately, this was not made
clear and hardly anyone took ad-
vantage of this time to dance and
socialize, except for three of the
more talented fans who did some
creative dancing, entertaining the
crowd for a short while.
By 10 p.m some disgruntled
fans had already left, though not
many. The audience couldn't
have stood too many "early"
departures, because there was not
much of a turnout. The problem
seems to be due to not enough
advance promotion for the con-
cert.
It was an applaudable effort
by Major Concerts to bring in a
musical alternative that doesn't
often get showcased in this area,
but bad handling defeated the
cause. WZMB did all they could in
promoting the show, but more
advertising should have been
done with nearby popular radio
stations.
What purportedly happened
that caused the long delay was a
conflict between the band and
their promoter for this show. Be-
cause of the poor turnout and
money being lost all around the
board, the promoter apparently
told the members of EU they
would have to settle for less
money for the night. The band
remained outside in negotiation
(arguing) with the promoter until
they reached some settlement.
After several stalling at-
tempts by Fun Boys production to
pacify the crowd (playing more
tapes, a valiant effort by the DJ on
the turntables, and giving away
records) the band appeared, to the
delight of the crowd. They per-
formed a lengthy and lively num-
ber intermixing several songs and
showed off some of the talent of
the band. In particular, the horns
and kettledrums were great.
Unfortunately, after the terri-
fic opening display, they went
into a lot of crowd-eoosing. This is
expected of show bands, who are
supposed to get the crowd in-
volved, but it went on a little too
long. When some of the "Da Butt"
music started playing, girls in the
audience were invited to come up
on stage and show off what they
knew.
What followed was a parent's
nightmare. While the girls danced
on the edge of the stage, overzeal-
ous male fans take advantage of
the opportunity to sample their
wares. While the ladies had their
buttocks poked out, a massive
audience caressing took place.
More than a few times the dancers
'faced the public' and the same
thing went on, but on the respec-
tive parts.
Now, I'm by no means some
puritan as far as music perform-
ances go, and I probably wouldn't
complain except for the fact that
these were all clearly Rose High
School girls. The band could have
discouraged this stuff.
But EU had to do something
to get the crowd jumpstarted. The
lead singer seemed a little taken
aback when he asked, "Where are
all the party people?" and the
Rose High kids were louder and
more numerous on the floor than
ECU students.
Admittedly, to most of
middle America, EU is a one hit
band. "Da Butt and their col-
laboration with Salt N Pet
Before EU. The stage of Minges is empty as fans wait for the Go-Go band. It remained barren, except for
a DJ scratching turntables, until 10 p jn. when the band finally showed up. (Photo By Thomas Walter�
Photolab)
their new single "Shake that
Thing" is all most radio listeners
have ever heard.
Experience Unlimited did
delve into their go-go past during
the show. Space-age synthesizer
riffs, horns and synchronized
dance routines, all the things that
have made them so hot on the
D.C. go-go scene were present.
But then they turned around
and did a weak, incomplete cover
of Kool Moe Dee's "Wild, Wild
West Why bother playing some-
body else's songs? EU had a great told the audience at one point that
opportunity to show Greenville he liked us because we "were
what else they can do besides two really live- " He was Just being
top 40 hits, and they just play nice, though, because for the most
more. part, the crowd was about as live'
as the music played before the
Album release
"Da Butt goes without say- band showed up.
ing. Ifs the song that they just What killed the enthusiasm
can't do anything less than their was the fact that everybody was
best on, and brings back all of the ready to go by the time the band
fun of "School Daze But Spike started. Starting a little late can
Lee would have probably been build anxiety; starting too late just
upset with the crowd reaction for hardens the fans to an otherwise
most of the concert, in which too
many people were either stand-
ing still or laid back in the bleach-
ers.
The lead singer, whose
Cameo-style voice is becoming
more recognized on the airwaves,
entertaining show.
-
I Ml I f� t
Hi
EU did a fine job, and should
be commended for their versatile
musical ability, which enables
them to create a good-sounding
show while staying away from
using back-up music tracks. But
bad handling of the event com-
bined with the very late start to
pu t a large damper on the concert.
Hopefully they can come back
next year with better results.
rr
release boss
During EU. Experience Unlimited pleases the waiting crowd with "Da Butt" and Shake Your Thang'
and many other runes. Unfortunately, some disguntled fans didn't wait for the band. (Photo by Thomas
Walters�Photolab)
Bob Dylan still jammin'
By EARL VIS HAMPTON
feature Editor
No laser light show. No col-
orful stage back-drop. No backup
singers. Just a black, almost bar-
ren stage, a drummer, a bass
player, a guitarist and Bob Dylan.
Out of the darkness, Dylan
and his new band entered the
lights of the Dean E. Smith Center
Thursday night with a resolve to
flash back to the late '60s. And
flash back they did.
Opening with "Subterra-
nean Homesick Blues Dylan
demonstrated he can still sing a
fast song fast. Often criticized for
running his verse together, Dylan
sang with clarity throughout the
concert �a clarity which was evi-
dent in the opener as he poured
The faucet don't work, 'cause the
vandals stole the handle
Dylan, whose tunes first
earned notoriety in the mid '60s,
showed no sign of wear and tear
from his latest tour. If anything,
the performer displayed a defi-
nite up-tempo in his songs. In 90
minutes of music, Dylan and his
band played 16 songs. They
didn't mess around.
A legendary rock and roll
rebel, Dylan walked on stage in a
funky leather jacket, black jeans,
and black boots with chrome spur
hooks. Dylan's 'just woke up
look long bushy hair and perma-
nent five o'clock shadow, are his
trademark.
Wasting no time, Dylan
uncanned classics like "It Ain't
Me" and "Just Like A Woman"
and "Don't Think Twice, Ifs All
Right
The audience of approxi-
mately8,000 �a diverse group of
young and old, tye-dyes and
sports coats � sang along with
Dylan as he uncorked "Like A
Rolling Stone" an hour into the
concert. This is probably one of
his most noteable songs, and
Dylan played the classic with in-
tensity.
Dylan's new band is com-
prised of three talented musi-
cians, who have recently toured
with the likes of Tom Petty and
the Heartbreakers and The Grate-
ful Dead.
Bassist Kenny Aaronson, a
'50s throwback with hair grease
and black shades, provided a
steady back-beat while Drummer
Christopher Parker upheld the
pace with good thunder play.
t lead guitar, G.E. Smith
fev i his instrument in the clas-
sic "Highway 61 Midway
through the show, Smith teamed
with Dylan in a display of dual
acoustical guitars as the bassist
and drummer left the stage.
Dylan and Smith continued
to jam the acoustics in a folk song
"Barbara Allen" and "The Lone-
some Death of Hattie Carroll"
"Girl from the North Country
Unlike some established
musicians, Dylan was not out to
sell his new release by playing
mostly new songs. "Silvio a new
Dylan song which has received
some radio air-play, proved to be
the only tune the performer sang
from his new LP "Down in the
Groove
During the encore, the band
finished the show with the classic
"Maggie's Farm
The concert's sudden end-
ing upset members of the audi-
ence. As some said, "He didn't
play 'Blowing in the Wind " but
Dylan and company more than
satisfied most Although he jam-
med for 90 minutes, he did just
that: he jammed for 90 minutes.
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
m���n���l �'�������aiainaaaaiiiii ai ill
Lloyd Cole and the Commo-
kns' third album, "Main-
am may be trying to navi-
the pop river, but it also
they still have too much
rity to drown there. From the
opening synthesizer notes of "My
Bag it does look like the techno-
logical flood is about to deluge
Lloyd.
But then the drums start kick-
ing, Cole's no-nonsense voice and
lyrics cut in and the song starts
making some waves. Throughout
the song, the keyboard strains
occasionally try to surface, but the
guitars and vocals submerge it
forcibly.
Cole's lyrics, arguable his
strongest point since his debut
album, "Rattlesnakes came out
in 1984 suffer none for the band's
two year hiatus since the 1986
album, "Brand New Friend In
fact, the wait may have helped.
"My Bag's" lines, "I don't
need love I need a fire escape,
open window illustrate the tone
of "Mainstream Cole comes
across as a romantic, but one who
understands that "Love's not
everything as he sings in the
birthday lament "29
This attitude has come across
before in Cole's work. "Brand
New Friend and "Perfect Skin"
both raved about true love, but
also realized things like love often
cause more trouble than they are
worth.
The Commotions used to get
criticized about being too heavy
handed in their subject matter.
Admittedly, their debut LP was
full of angst-ridden love songs.
Intelligent, angst-ridden love
songs, but still saturated with
pathos.
So on their next album, to
help balance things out, they re-
corded "Lost Weekend and
filmed one of the most hilarious
videos ever for it. On "Main-
stream the humor is more intrin-
sic to the subject matter � the
darkly funny things about human
beings in love.
But the group still lets loose
with a satirical tune called "Sean
Penn Blues Poor "Mr. Ma-
donna" does have his problems.
"My wife says I go looking for
trouble1 surely find it If I trash
this TV camera, I know 1 will feel
better
Most of the tunes on the
album either stick to the crisp
guitar melodies or slow strum-
ming that characterized the
Commotion's first two records.
The new LP branches out with
longer songs and new instrumen-
tation.
The most surprising experi-
ments on "Mainstream" are "Big
Snake" with its dominating horn
solos and "These Days with its
Laurie Anderson-like synthesizer
intro.
While the music the Commo-
tions produce is some of the best
around, what makes this band
wade through the pop channels
higher than anyone else is Cole's
lyrics and his incredible voice. On
"Rattlesnakes" his voice often got
overpowered in the mix.
Both of his follow-up Lps
have taken care of this, giving
equal stength to the music and the
vocals. Cole has one of the most
soulful voices in music, light
years beyond Michael Bol ton and
his pitiful Otis Redding remakes,
or Morrisey and his perpetual
whining.
For such a scary album title,
"Mainstream" is actually a reas-
suring record, one that could set
new standards for the diluted
rock pool of talent To quote Cole,
"Feels like ProhibitionGive me
the hard sell
World War I letter found inWilmington
Tom Selleck lives dream, hits two homers
BALTIMORE (AP) - Actor
Tom Selleck says he fulfilled a
childhood dream by going to bat
with the Baltimore Orioles and
hitting two home runs.
The former "Magnum, P.l
star spent most of the summer in
the Baltimore area on location for
"Her Alibi, a romantic comedy
film in which he plays a mystery
writer who becomes involved
with a murder suspect.
Filming for the movie, which
also stars model Paulina
Porizkova, wrapped up Friday.
The highlight of the summer
was the day Selleck went to bat-
ting practice with the Baltimore
Orioles at Memorial Stadium,
where he hit two home runs, he
said.
"It was about 120 degrees on
the field. I had a great time said
Selleck, who played baseball in
college. "They helped me fulfill a
childhood fantasy
WILMINGTON (AP) - It was
Aug. 5, 1918, somewhere in the
trenches of World War I Europe.
A young second lieutenant
named Edward Hardin sat in his
tent writing his mother in
Wilmington about his brush with
death just hours earlier.
"Dearest Mamma, 1 have had
an experience tonight which I
don't care to repeat any time soon,
for it was the narrowest escape
from death I have ever had he
wrote.
The soldier had come to take
for granted the sound of shells
bursting around the "hole-in-the-
ground" that was his company's
base. But that night, the explo-
sions came so close that Hardin
and his commanding officer,
whom he referred to as "Capt
Cause were literally knocked
off their feet
"Gosh! I thought my last
minutes had come Hardin
wrote, still partially deaf from the
concussion he received in the at-
tack.
Somehow, that first-hand
account of a soldier's experiences
in World War I wound up in a
desk at the Cape Fear Chapter of
the American Red Cross. Beki
Summers, who recently took over
as director of services to military
families, was cleaning out a
drawer when she came across the
fragile, yellowed pages.
Ms. Summers hopes to return
the 70-year-old letter to Hardin, if
he is still alive, or his family.
"Nobody knows how we got
ahold of it" she told the Wilming-
ton Morning Star.
Written in pencil, the eight-
page letter chronicles the differ-
ent aspects of Army hit, from en-
counters with the enemy to the
second lieutenant's more mun-
dane duties, which included com-
piling reports for his captain, fre-
quent casualties suffered by his
unit, and how he looked forward
to the much-needed rest his com-
pany was expected to receive
soon.
In addition to the horrors of
battle, there were other unplcas-
antries associated With war.
"Mamma - whisper it -1 have
had 'cooties Hardin wrote, ex-
plaining that the dugouts and
shelters used by the troops
abounded with the pests.
He also told his mother how
much her letters meant to him. If
you only knew, my dear, how
those letters are appreciated he
wrote.
"They are the particular
bright spots in the otherwise rot-
ten days
Nowhere in the letter was
there a mention o( where Hardin
was, though he had enclosed a
sampling of French currency.





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20,1988
Former topless dancer becomes comic with
raunchy act, appears on network T V
LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP) -
Tamayo Otsuki, a former topless
dancer who became a stand-up
comic with a raunchy routine, is
being seen more and more on net-
work television since she cleaned
up her act.
Otsuki, perhaps the only
female Japanese comedian deliv-
ering punchlines in English, will
appear on NBC's "The Comedy
Store 15th Year "Class Reunion"
on Oct. 13 and she was cast in
"Elysian Fields a CBS drama
pilot that has yet to air.
The 29-year-old Osaka native
takes to the stage at the Dunes
Hotel here clad in a purple-
striped kimono, blue and gold obi
sash and gold sandals. In soft,
Japanese-accented English, she
introduces herself and tells the
audience that her name translates
as "Pearl Harbor
Like much of her humor, the
facts are partially true. Her first
namedoes mean "Pearl
She then moves to the end of
World War II and startles the au-
dience by saying, "Thank you
very much for dropping bomb
Clark eager for to return to USSR otherwise, she says, there
would have been no more Nissan
Soviet Union, which is also get- and Sony and she probably never
would have been born.
"We really appreciate it she
says, smiling at the audience.
"But please don't do it again
Later, backstage, Otsuki ex-
Madeliene Homan is Evita and Steven Snow is Peron in acclaimed
musical "Evita "Evita" will be at ECU Thursday. For more info
call Mendenhall Student Center.
return to
second
the Soviet
good-will
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)
Country singer Roy Clark says he nng funds from U.S. and Soviet
government agencies. He is due
to leave in mid-November for a
tour that will include 12 concerts
in Moscow and Leningrad.
"I guess I was the first person plains that she believes that the
Lindsey, one of Clark's co-starson to introduce country music to the atomic bombs detonated on Hiro-
the television show "Hee-Haw Russians, and they loved it shima and Nagasaki saved many
joined Qark at a fund-raising Clark said. "I, in turn, loved them. Japanese and American lives by
dinner in his honor Friday night. There just people, not so differ- averting a bloody land invasion.
is eager to
Union for
tour.
Tennessee Sens. Albert Gore
Jr. and Jim Sasser, and George
The host was comedian Bob ent rom us
Hope.
Proceeds from the dinner will
help pay for Clark's return to the
"1 send him to Russia with
love Hope quipped. "It's either
send him or deport him.
Matchcover king
CINCINNATI (AP) - Joe money, DeGennaro said.
DeGennaro figures he has at least �we meet just for the joy of
50,000 matchcovers in his collec- discussing matchcovers. The
tion - wedged snugly into a New people in the hobby are very
York City apartment. good he said. "It's not a money
The size of his collection isn't
particularly striking, he says. H?
knows collectors who have more
than a million matchcovers in
their possession.
And then, there are the untold
numbers of informal collectors.
'There are a lot of people who
we call 'closet collectors who
keep matchcovers and throw
them into a bowl and just keep
them he said.
DeGennaro and several
hundred other matchcover collec-
tors from across the United States,
Canada and as far away as Aus-
tralia and England gathered in a
suburban hotel recently for the
48th annual meeting of the
Rathkamp Matchcover Society.
Founded informally by col-
lector Henry Rathkamp of New-
port, R.I in 1939, the society has
picked up steam - and interest -
ever since as a focal point for
people who see matchcovers as a
fascinating way of chronicling
history. Rathkamp died in 1940, a
year after convening an informal
gathering of collectors at his
home.
There was another meeting
the following year at the
Ardmore, Pa home of another
collector, when those in atten-
dance decided to formally organ-
ize a group in Rathkamp's honor.
There are now 35 local affiliates
nationwide which operate year-
round, DeGennaro said.
The collections reflect his-
tory. DeGennaro recalls match-
covers printed to commemorate
the 1932 Olympics, the 1939
World's Fair and Charles A.
Lindbergh's first non-stop solo
flight from New York to Paris in
1927.
The Lindbergh matchcover
may be one of the most valuable,
since there are only six known to
exist, DeGennaro said. But match-
cover collecting isn't a way to get
rich quick, because collectors are
generally not motivated by
Condoms cover road
CORTE MADERA, Calif.
(AP) - Thousands of items fre-
quently touted for "safe sex"
made for some unsafe driving
conditions.
As many as 5,000 condoms
still in their packages spilled onto
a highway Friday afternoon, but
went unclaimed by the owner, ac-
cording to the California High-
way Patrol.
The two fast lanes of the
southbound side of Highway 101
were closed for about 30 minutes
as three officers and several mo-
torists picked up the condoms,
said CHP Officer Mark Peischke.
hobby,
thing
It's not a dog-eat-dog
While her routine is mostly
rid of the profanity that spiced her
act at comedy clubs around Los
Angeles, and later on the Playboy
Channel, she has drawn occa-
sional criticism that her material
is racist, which she denies.
"I'm against this prejudice
thing she says, adding that she
wants to teach Americans to
laugh with Japanese people in-
stead of at them.
Onstage, she recounts the
tale of her "legendary" grandfa-
ther, the only surviving defuses
n
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the situation by saying, "Some
people are looking at me and
thinking, 'We should have killed
them all
Otsuki, who now resides in
Hollywood, says that she picked
up her sense of humor from her
roller coaster life that initially
took her from star high school
pupil to college dropout to bar
singer to tour guide.
She then moved to England
and ended up as an admittedly in-
competent nanny for a wealthy
family. The household eventually
fired Otsuki, but took such pity on
her they gave her free room and
board.
After that, it was on to Amer-
ica, where within three months
she was in a Kentucky Fried
Chicken commercial. Soon, how-
ever, she found herself wonder-
ing where her next meal would
come from.
So the attractive 22-year-old
woman took a job as a topless
dancer in the Los Angeles suburb
of Monterey Park.
A visit to the Comedy Store
several years later persuaded her
to change stages.
"After three years of dancing
naked, I wanted to move on to a
better thing she says.
She became obsessed with
becoming a comedian but she was
ill-prepared to make a living by
delivering laughs.
appearing
at
Susie's
Treehouse
5th Street � Greenville
WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 21
10:00 P.M.
'�ri�W
Student Union
Coming Attractions
�� i 11
i io i j c� i t o i i t) ii p i r p�
UMJU
Tuesday. September 208:00 p.m. Hendri
FREE ADMISSION
"AMERICAN PICTURES"
LECTURE - SLIDE PRESENTATION
Wednesday. September 218:00 p.m. Hendrix
DOUBLE FEATURECINEMA FRANCAISE
"JEAN DE FLORETTE
ti
v.
tt
"MANON OF THE SPRING1
Thursday. September 22 - Sunday. September 2ft
8:00 p.m. Underground
"BROADCAST NEWS
Upcoming Events:
Special Event - RANDEE OF THE REDWOODS
Tuesday, September 27
UB40 - In Concert, Monday, October 3
8:00 p.m. Minges Coliseum
Special Brent - RANDEE OF THE REDWOODS
Tuesday, September 27
OUT TOJCTVt VOU
Nativ
STONY MOUNTAIN
toba (AP) - The Indians ta
two davs before crowding i
dome-shaped lodge to chanl
pray to the Great Spirit Vaj
poured over 16 red hot stonel
steamy purge of body and
But this sweat lodg
lowed tradition among natiJ
the North American prairie!
an unusual setting
It's erected every monj
the recreation varj ol
Mountain federal penitentu
western Canada, where a d
or more Indians strip d a
their bathing suits and �
sauna-like chamber!
halt hours of native comrnui
"I've -
angry individuals melt
or two sweats said Clark
rissette, a n ma
ployed at the pri
The experiment
rehabilitation is an attemi
break the Indian cycl
and alcoh tlism bv n
tural pride
The prison's "� .
Johnny A
pop-hip he
(A3 hnnvk
ten paid and in a b
single Just Got Paid
on the black c
singles chart this su
later on. got up to N
pop chart.
The follow -up
"Dancin' with V -
31 and climbing on tl -I
temporarv chart of &
Kemp's second albun
bia Records, "Se rets
was No. 19 on the K k
porarv chart and No. 1 "
pop chart
"I'm very proud of lb I
but I am surprised at th - ij
of the (first) single Kemp
He has been performing livej
such groups as Full I -
The LP, described
genng pop-hip h
soul-man vocals and touch
beat mixes the various
influences that Kemp ha -
into-ins own personal tviej
� alburn contains a spl

make of two 1971 '
songs, recorded as a
"Inner Citv Blues
Wanna Holler
Mercy Me (the Ea g)
"I wanted to pa) j
some o( the great sir
as great songs '� nd t
two and felt they were conte
rary and timel) so we d
doit. Marvin was an ins
to me when I was j
Kemp explained
Kemp a native of Na
began singing at a y�
became known in the
"LittleJohnny He and his bi
ers performed in churches
famrly gospel group.
Asa teen-ager. Kv
in local club covering man!
his favorite artists and s j
current Top 40. This expert
helped him to develop and 1
to use his voice
Kemp says, "Irea
get into singing when I
music as a serious
Fascinatir
horse fact
NEW YORK (AP) -
oughbred race horses are
ured from their hooves to
withers, not all the wav to
heads.
The average height oi a tl
oughbred is 15 hands fromf
ground to the withers.rough?
equivalent of human should
Horse people consider
one hand isabout the same as
inches, which means the avej
horse is about 5 feet tall
average weight of a race hi
varies between about 1
pounds and 1,200.
Purse definei
NEW YORK (AP) - The tj
purse at the race track evoij
from the early days of racin
England.
A bag of coins was hunj
the finish line and the first jc
to reach it took it down. Later
the idea of presenting the wii
with a trophy was started'
Queen Anne of England,
donated a cup to the first hor
leach the wire. That was the
gin of today's "Cup Races.





V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20. 1988 11
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September 25
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Dber 3
Native Americans practice rituals in prison
STONY MOUNTAIN, Mani-
toba (AP) - The Indians fast for
two days before crowding into a
dome-shaped lodge to chant and
pray to the Great Spirit. Water is
poured over 16 red hot stones in a
stoamy purge of body and soul.
But this sweat lodge, a hal-
lowed tradition among natives of
the North American prairies, has
an unusual setting.
It's erected every month in
the recreation yard of Stony
Mountain federal penitentiary in
western Canada, where a dozen
or more Indians strip down to
their bathing suits and enter the
sauna-like chamber for two and a
half hours of native communion.
"I've seen some awfully big,
angry individuals melt after one
or two sweats said Clark Mor-
nssctte, a Cree counselor em-
ployed at the prison.
The experimental form of
rehabilitation is an attempt to
break the Indian cycle of violence
and alcoholism by restoring cul-
tural pride.
Toe prison's Native Brother-
tS3 permitted they comprise less than 7 percent Ray Gawryluk, is fewe
Hrrlln gCS; of the population in either prairie disturbances. Sweet Grass Road. But there's a
me Sace niWhVOWS' f Pr�vinCe- ,nsid� the 20-foot-high walls gap and a bridge across it, and it's
anHTJuE: ownsweet grass Qn many reserves, bored of the maximum security prison, got a lot to do with self-esteem
and earn special passes to attend youngsters deliberately break the inmate Ed Sparvier, 26, said he Sparvier said,
sun dance rituals on nearby reser- ia w as a means of getting off the adopted a "do unto others before
1V' , reservation, according to the they do unto you" lifestyle on the
We re trying to get nd of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, streets of Winnipeg before his
myth there s two stnkes against the cuiturai program conviction in 1985 for aggravated
you ,ust because you're native. at Stony Mountain, seven out of assault.
But we can t do it without some i0 Indians would end up behind
T, �J Ic6lous awakening bars again following their release,
said John Stonechild, a Cree elder Curtis FontainC a Salteaux
hired to counsel Indian inmates Indian who heads the Native Clan
Si�� Pri�'s popu- Organization in Winnipeg.
That rate is now down to 30 to
lation of 430.
'These men are in search of
something, and part of that search
ends when they take up their
rightful heritage said
Stonechild.
For many of Canada's 465,000
Indians, joblessness on the reser-
vation and discrimination in the
cities lead to drinking and vio-
lence, and natives go to jail far
more often than other Canadians.
Half the prison inmates in
Manitoba and 64 percent in Sas-
katchewan are Indians, although
Raised on the Waywaysee-
cappo reserve in western Mani-
toba, Sparvier wants to return to
life on the land when he is paroled
next year.
"I remember history books in
40 percent, and those who do re- school telling me I was a savage
turn are surviving on the outside and my culture and religion were
for longer periods, said Fontaine, heathen said Sparvier, who has
whose agency has a contract with "get high" tattooed on his arm
the government to supervise pa- and attends Alcoholics Anony-
rolecs and run a halfway house. mous meetings as well as two-
"Native people are still going hour sacred circles every Tuesday
through culture shock. For many, night.
He keeps a bundle in his cell
containing sweet grass, sage, ce-
dar and a cloth depicting the
medicine wheel on which the
eagle symbolizes strength, the
buffalo wisdom, the bear health
and the mouse courage.
pens when you leave depends on
how much you want to succeed.
Alcohol and drugs are always
available
Prison authorities began en
couraging Indian culture 15 years
ago, but native religion was not
formally recognized until 1985
and it's been difficult to find
qualified elders willing to work
inside prisons.
Other problems remain
their f rustratioh is out of control
Fontaine said This program
shows them they do have a place
in society
Another result, according to
Corrections Department official
'There's times in my life I've
Brotherhood president Cecil Cooke said some unsympathetic
Cooke, 28, has been in and out of guards have seized sage, radar
prison since he was 15 for robbery and sweet grass from cells on
and other crimes. He's now pre- suspicion they were marijuana
paring a proposal for Cree and
Salteaux language lessons for in- When an Indian made ritual
mates and plans to attend college cuts on his chest after learning
when he is paroled. that his family had died, guards
He's learned that he alone is thought he was trying to commit
responsible for his actions, not suicide and threw him into soli-
society or the system, he said. tary confinement.
"Every time I got out before I "To a white person, he was
would either re-offend or be sent hurting himself. To a native, it
Johnny Kemp 'Just Got Paid' with hot
pop-hip hop fusion singles on charts
I AP) � Johnny Kemp has got-
ten paid and in a big way. His
single, "Just Got Paid hit No. 1
on the black contemporary
singles chart this summer and,
later on, got up to No. 13 on the
pop chart.
The follow-up single,
"Dancin' with Myself was No.
31 and climbing on the black con-
temporary chart of Sept. 10.
Kemp's second album for Colum-
bia Records, "Secrets of Flying
was No. 19 on the black contem-
porary chart and No. 100 on the
pop chart.
"I'm very proud of the album
but I am surprised at the success
of the (first) single Kemp said.
He has been performing live with
such groups as Full Force.
The LP, described as "swag-
gering pop-hip hop fusion, with
soul-man vocals and tough street
beat mixes the various musical
influences that Kemp has molded
" into his own personal style. The
album contains a splendid re-
make of two 1971 Marvin Gave
songs, recorded as a medley,
"Inner City Blues (Make Me
Wanna Holler)" and Mercy
Mercy Me (the Ecology)
"I wanted to pay tribute to
some of the great singers as well
as great songs. We found these
two and felt they were contempo-
rary and timely so we decided to
do it. Marvin was an inspiration
to me when I was younger
Kemp explained.
Kemp, a native of Nassau,
began singing at a young age, and
became known in the Bahamas as
"Little Johnny He and his broth-
ers performed in churches as a
family gospel group.
As a teen-ager, Kemp played
in local clubs, covering many of
his favorite artists and singing the
current Top 40. This experience
helped him to develop and learn
to use his voice.
Kemp saysI really started to
get into singing when I got into
music as a serious thing. I was
Fascinating
horse facts
NEW YORK (AP) - Thor-
oughbred race horses are meas-
ured from their hooves to their
withers, not all the way to their
heads.
The average height of a thor-
oughbred is 15 hands from the
gTound to the withers,roughly the
equivalent of human shoulders.
Horse people consider that
one hand isabout the sameas four
inches, which means the average
horse is about 5 feet tall. The
average weight of a race horse
varies between about 1,000
pounds and 1,200.
Purse defined
NEW YORK (AP) - The term
purse at the race track evolved
from the early days of racing in
England.
A bag of coins was hung on
the finish line and the first jockey
to reach it took it down. Later on,
the idea of presenting the winner
with a trophy was started by
Queen Anne of England, who
donated a cup to the first horse to
reach the wire. That was the ori-
gin of today's "Cup Races
about 12 or 13 at the time. I bought
everything I could get my hands
on - James Taylor, the Doobie
Brothers, Michael Jackson,
Marvin, Bill Withers, who had
such a great voice.
"I even bought records by
people I'd never heard of because
it looked interesting He adds,
"You should always be open to
different types of music. 1 would
sing along and copy every single
lick they did
Kemp's curiosity about dif-
ferent sounds has not lessened as
he has grown older. "I try to listen
and be open to everyone. I listen
to Jackson and Tracey Chapman
Openness is a theme that
runs through his music and
thoughts. He feels that the listen-
ing audience is not exposed to the
many different sounds available.
"It's difficult for a black artist
to get started on the pop charts
unless you have a hit in the black
market and crossover. However,
black radio does the same thing;
they play very few white
artists.unless you have a hit in the
black market and cross over.
However, black radio does the
same thing; they play very few
white artists.
"You can't dictate to a station
and say, 'You have to play
thisjust because of the artist's
color. I think radio has a respon-
sibility to expose the audience to
different artists and rhythms.
They don't have to do it all the
time but the audience should
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screwed up severely. A lot of dis- back for drinking. But what hap- was a ritual "said Gawryluk.
know what'savailable so they can
pick and choose
Kemp wants the black audi-
ence to appreciate his music. But
he hopes that he can interest that
audience in sampling different
rhythms and melodies.
"Music is so diverse. Unfortu-
nately, both black and white art-
ists get pigeonholed He adds,
"Black artists do everything, man,
rock 'n' roll, heavy metal, not just
rhythm and blues. Look at Prince.
He uses idioms that other artists
use but the public listens because
they are familiar with him.
"If everyone was open and
experimented, we wouldn't have
the same old stuff on the radio
His debut album on Colum-
bia, released in 1986, was simply
called"Johnny Kemp It con-
tained the rhythm and blues hit,
"Just Another Lover
Q$ the C4tfierai4fejlg1ajp
wrote most of the songs m addi-
tion to co-producing with Teddy
Riley.
"Writing comes naturally to
me he says. "I don't think about
it. Sometimes a song will come
completely finished into my
head
"Another time you just have
a phrase or lyric to work on
Kemp says he is most creative
by himself.
"I don't like to write with
other people in the room. I feel
self-conscious
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12
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20, 1988
i
Pandas stir up controversy
WOLONG, China (AP) - Sci-
entists and conservationists who
rallied to save the rare giant
panda when its favorite food ran
"Except for the pandas,
there's not a lot that's black and
white about it Ken Cook, a
spokesman for the World Wildlife
Fund, said in a telephone inter-
since then due to poaching and a ancestors lived 20 million years
shortage of the panda's favorite ago, contemporaries of the masto-
food, bamboo. don and other extinct species.
Ken Johnson, a University of A few hundred years ago,
out are sharply divided over what Tennessee zoologist who led the pandas still roamed the lowlands,
to do next. survey, says the earlier count was But humans gradually pushed view from Washington.
The World Wildlife Fund, a sloppy and too conservative. them into the mountains of west- China is dealing sternly with
conservation group and China's But Zhou Shoude, the deputy ern China's Sichuan, Gansu and one obvious problem - poaching,
main foreign partner in panda director of China's largest panda Shaanxi provinces, the only Its highest court last year ordered
research, recently turned to the reserve, the 800-square-mile places they now live in the wild. panda killers be given long prison
Wolong Nature Reserve near Ch- World attention was drawn terms or even the death sentence.
engdu in Southwestern China, to their plight in 1983 when their China has been less decisive,
discounted Johnson's figures, dietary staple, arrow bamboo, however, in dealing with another
which were based largely on a flowered and died as it does every human problem - ordinary peas-
U.S. Courts to determine if Chi-
nese panda loans to American
zoos are exploitative, as it says, or
educational, as China says.
Some Chinese and Western
count of panda nesting areas and
40 or more years. The World ans. Their encroachment on the
experts say China should do more droppings. Wildlife Fund collected more rare animal's turf, including in-
to breed captive pandas, while The experts agree, however, than $4.1 million toward saving side China's 12 panda reserves,
others say the only solution is to that the panda is steadily decreas- the animal, and the Chinese gov- advances steadily,
move humans from panda re- ing in number and that five years ernment and citizens contributed More than 4,000 peasants live
serves. after an international alert went millions more. in Wolong, which became a show-
Even the size of the panda out to save it, the outlook is grim. More than 62 animals starved case for panda conservation in
population is under debate. The "There are more pandas than before the bamboo began grow- 1980 when the World Wildlife
World Wildlife Fund is preparing we expected Johnson says but ing again a few years later. Fund helped build a breeding
to release survey results that put they are more critically endan- That crisis over, experts are center there. The peasants' ter-
the number of pandas in the wild gered than we expected looking more critically at China's raced corn and potato cropsclimb
at 1,100to 1,500,startlinglyhigher Pandas, black-and-white conservation program. They ac- high up the slopes of mountains
than previous estimates. bear-like animals that some say knowledge China's limited re- roamed bv Dandas.
A 1977 Chinese survey put are related to the bear and some sources, praise its good intentions
the figure at 1,000, and the popu- say to the raccoon, are native only and press for more action - with-
lation is known to have dropped to China. Experts believe their out agreeing on the best course.
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irate
So-called "Wolf Woman" claims wolves get
bad rap; publishes magazine to right wrongs
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Her
friends call her "the wolf
woman' an animal rights activist
with a taste for adventure and a
yen to be a centerfold.
Deborah Warrick, who now
publishes her own magazine
devoted to her favorite canines,
cringes every time she hears nurs-
erv rhymes like "The Three Little
Tigs' "Little Red Riding Hood"
and "Peter and the Wolf
Such tales, she says, wrongly
portray wolves as ravenous
beasts that prey on little children,
is in a passage from the famous
l irimms Brothers fairy tale:
"When she got to the wood,
she met a wolf; but Red Riding
1 lood did not know what a
wicked animal he was
"The wolf thought: This ten-
der little creature will be a plump
morsel
"Kids are raised fearing
wolves and they grow up not
- caring if thev are killed says Ms.
Warrick, who owns three wolves
and this year began publishing a
magazine called "Wolves and
Related Canids
Wolves were virtually wiped
out in the early part of this century
in the United States and only now
are they being reintroduced into
the wild.
Ms. Warrick, 33, became
interested in wild animals at an
early age.
"I've always been into exot-
ics she says. "My parents always
encouraged that sort of thing and
we had pet rattlesnakes and rac-
coons - even an 8-foot python
She is no stranger to adven-
ture. Besides nursing exotic rep-
tiles and other wildlife back to
heal th, she started her own adver-
tising agency, was an investment
counselor, performed in profes-
sional roller-skating shows and
was a sky diver until a near-fatal
accident.
She also was chosen recently
as one of 100 contestants in Play-
boy magazine's 35th anniversary
Playmate search.
Ms. Warrick hopes to win the
(35,000 in prize money, which she
ays will go toward her efforts in
behalf of wolves.
Seven years ago, Ms. Warrick,
who lives in the San Fernando
Valley and now sells 3-D com-
puter graphic systems to the aero-
space industry, was given her first
wolf cub.
"That's when I realized just
how intelligent they are she
says, noting that a wolf's brain is
30 percent larger than that of a
similar-sized dog.
She go Ground a California
law that prohibits people from
keeping purebred wolves as pets
by registering them as dogs. But
wolves, she says, are not for ev-
eryone.
In fact, Ms. Warrick uses the
magazine to discourage people
from attempting to raise wolves at
home. Too often, they get into the
wrong hands and either end up
put to sleep or in a wolf sanctuary.
"They don't make good pets.
They are a pack animal and will
not become your house pet she
says.
Ms. Warrick's three Alaskan
tundra wolves, Awesome, Nova
and Tundra, are kept in Northern
California and Colorado because
her Woodland Hills home has too
little space for them.
The wolves must be kept out-
doors. In the wild, they dig dens,
clearing away twigs, rocks and
other obstacles to protect their
cubs.
The magazine, which
averages 65 pages, is published
every other month from Ms.
Warrick's home. It evolved from
hundreds of documents sent to
her from wolf biologists in such
places as Minnesota and Canada.
"Wolves and Related
Canids" has 500 subscribers and
continues to grow. Ms. Warrick
estimates there are at least 500
wolf or hybrid wolf-dog owners
in California alone.
Ms. Warrick, who briefly
studied veterinary medicine at
the University of California-
Davis and took an animal keeper
course at the Los Angeles Zoo,
bottle-fed her charges goat's milk
every three hours when they were
infants. They now cat about five
pounds of raw meat daily.
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Of all the satiric funnies as Chip
and Earl take you to the land of
offensive slander.
NICHOLS
WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS PRESCRIPTION PRICES
COMPARE and
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERISTY STUDENTS
10 DISCOUNT ON PRESCRIPTION DRUGS WITH I.D
SGA RUNOFF ELECTIONS
FRESHMAN CLASS PRESIDENT
Melissa Harget
Arielle Sturz
SOPHOMORE CLASS PRESIDENT
Allen Thomas
Scott Jones
Wednesday, September 21,9a.m6p.m.
Polls located at
The Croatan, Student Supply Store, and the Bottom of College Hill
Bring valid ECU I.D. with current activity sticker to vote.
offmaris
MENS WEAR
and
gfAUSTIN REED,
Let's Deal With Basics
"Hb
The elegant NAVY SUIT and the
CHARCOAL SUIT are basic to the
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These suits are luxurious in feel and
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We highly recommend these BASICS
especially for the about-to-graduate
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MENSWEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mai!
Tarrytown Mall � Rocky Mount
'�
Charlie Libretto looks tor an opj
Wome
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
S�ff Writer
ECU'S voile vba II ream w
both a winner and a loser I
weekend as it played host
Davidson College and C
Tech.
The Lady Tiratcs came au
from the weekend improvu
their record to 4-3 on the season j
thev took a win over the Lav
Wildcats oi Davidson It w
ECU s second win over David;
this season as the two tear-
met two weekends ago at the
Carolina Classic.
ECU's loss ot the weekc
came as it taced its second A
team oi the season. The Lady Ja
ets ot Georgia Tech won th
games straight over the I
rates in Saturday's match
It looked as it ECU v�nj
have control of the first came wj
Georgia Tech. as it lumped I
Clems
CLEMSON, S.C (Al
plav's called Punt R an
will live in infamy at Clems !
Honda State used the pla)
take punt- to set up Kurj
Andrew's 19-yard held goal w
32 seconds left to lift the lOf
ranked Seminoles past No
Clemson 24-21 on Saturdav
With 131 left and Florj
State facing a fourth-and-toui
its 21-vard line. Coach Rol
Bowden called for the gutsy pij
The snap came to Dayne V
liams, who was one oi the rw o
men on the punt. Williams pla
the ball between LeRoy Butlc
legs and then took off to the nc
After waiting 1-5 seconds - he i
supposed to wait 3 seconds - Bj
ler went left, racing 78 yards
fore being tackled at the 1
Donnell Woolford.
"This was the most pressj
that I've had in my life Bus
said. "Nervous ain't the wort
didn't have butterflies, I had
ards. I had everything in my stcj
ach. I knew the game depcn
on me
Bowden said he put the
in this week and had plannt
use it against Clemson.
"We were liable to use it
time in the second half Bow
said. "We were just waiting
the right opportunity.
"All our offensive coacl
we decided that we were gor





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THE EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 20, 1988 Page 13
Pirates play tough, but lose to Gamecocks
Charlie Libretto looks lor an open receiver in football action.
By DOUG JOHNSON
Spoil! Editor
"It was the best of times, it
was the worst of times
This line from Dickens' "A
Tale of Two Cities" best describes
the effort of the ECU Pirates in
their game against theGamecocks
of South Carolina Saturday after-
noon in front of a crowd of 66,000.
The best of times: The Pirates
beat the Gamecocks in almost
every statistical category, save the
one that counted most. ECU out-
distanced USC in rushing yard-
age 232 yards to 49 yards, in total
offensive plays, 73 to 49, in total
offense, 336 yards to 284 yards, in
first downs, 24 to 14, and in time of
possession, 37:02 minutes to 22:58
minutes. A tough ECU defense
held a highly sucessful offense to
only 17 points.
The worst of times: ECU
failed to score, missing on three
field goal attempts and fumbling
the ball away on the USC 3 yard
line.
Many people gave ECU no
chance against the nationally
ranked Gamecocks, but the Pi-
rates silenced many of these crit-
ics with their first half play.
It was obvious from the start
that the Pirates were more pre-
pared to play than they had been
a week before in Blacksburg, Va.
They held the Gamecocks on their
first possession to three plays and
a punt.
Tim James then took over on
the Pirates' first possession, lead-
ing them down to the USC 25
before the offense stumbled.
"Their big fullback was a load
coming up the middle USC
Coach Joe Morrison commented
of James after the game. ECU was
forced to try a 42 yard Rob Imper-
ato field goal. However, before
Imperato could get the kick off,
the Pirates were hit with a delay of
game penalty, backing up Imper-
ato and lengthening the try to 47
yards, and his attempt was no
good.
The Pirate defense, led by
Brian McPhatter, who had 10
tackles on the day, again held the
much heralded Todd Ellis and
Harold Green and the USC of-
fense on their next possession,
and the Pirates got the ball on
their own 11.
Again, James took on the
brunt of the offensive responsi-
bilities, helped along by a 26 yard
keeper around the left side by
Hunter. After a time consuming
10 play drive, the Pirates again
stalled, and Imperato came on to
attempt a 47 yarder. The ball fell
short, and once again the Pirates
were denied a score.
The first quarter ended in a
scoreless 0-0 deadlock.
In the second quarter, the
Gamecocks engineered their only
scoring drive of the half, moving
the ball only 35 yards down to the
ECU 34 before the Pirate defense
dug in and stopped them. Collin
Mackie came on for USC to at-
tempt a 52 yard field goal, the fii st
attempt over 50 yards of his ca-
reer. The ball flew low and true,
giving the Gamecocks a 3-0 lead
with 11:42 remaining in the half.
The remainder of the half was
relatively unexciting, until, with
time running out, Mike Apple-
white recovered a fumble caused
by Ed Brogdenon the ECU 30. The
Pirate offense took the field with
1:50 remaining in the half, but the
Pirates once again let a scoring
opportunity slip away when they
were unable to move the ball into
the USC end zone. The half ended
with USC on top 3-0.
The Pirates took the kickof f to
begin the second half and the of-
fense took fi-e, driving from their
own 13 yard bn on a varied run-
ning attack by McKinney and
James and on good plays by
Hunter. The Pirates drove down
to the USC 6, before, on a fourth
and two situation, Reggie Mciin-
ncy dove over the top, a la Walter
Payton, and gained three yards
and the first down, only to fumble
the ball away. USC recovered on
the three, and on the first play
from scrimmage, Ellis dropped
back and connected on a 96 yard
touchdown pass to receiver
Robert Brooks. Brooks scampered
down the sideline, shaking three
Pirate defenders before cruising
into the end zone.
"We were playing two cover
age and it was a misunderstand-
ing between the two players on
that side. He just got behind both
of them. I could have stopped him
at the end, but I overplayed the
run, and he cut back in said
Junior Robinson.
The sudden shift of momen-
tum seemed to weaken the Pi-
rates, and although they contin-
ued to play hard-nosed football,
they were never able to mount a
serious scoring threat until, with
3:20 left in the third, Charlie Li-
bretto came in at quarterback and
drove the Pirates down to the U'jC
18 before the offense stalled. Im-
perato came on to attempt an-
other field goal, this time a 35
yards, but as on his previous at-
tempts, he couldn't seem to get
the ball through the uprights.
"Imperato has his confidence
shattered after today Art Baker
said. We'll have to take a look at
our kicking situation next week
"Travis had been down with a
cold this week and was trying to
catch his breath a lot during the
game Baker said of his decision
to put Libretto in. "So we came in
with Charlie to give him a break.
Also, when we needed to pass on
every play, we put Charlie in the
game
After this near score, the Pi-
rates were unable to move the ball
with any success and USC fol-
lowed suit, the two teams trading
the ball for most of the fourth
quarter until, with 1:54 remain-
ing, Ellis found Brooks for their
second touchdown hookup of the
day, this time from six yards out.
Libretto was intercepted on
the next series, and the Game-
cocks were content to run out the
clock and run away with the 17-0
victory.
"I'm pleased with the effort of
our players Baker said after the
game. "It surely was a different
picture than what I saw last week
(at Virginia Tech). The decision to
go for the field goals felt good at
the time. But, it's hindsight now,
and it doesn't look so good. It
would have been a big plus to go
up 6-3 at the half rather than down
See PIRATES, pafje 14
Women split games in home tournament
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sl�f Writer
ECU'S volleyball team was
both a winner and a loser last
kend as it played host to
Davidson College and Georgia
Tech.
The Lady Pirates came away
from the weekend improving
their record to 4-3 on the season as
they took a win over the Lady
Wildcats of Davidson. It was
ECU'S second win over Davidson
this season, as the two teams also
met two weekends ago at the All
Carolina Classic.
ECU's loss of the weekend
came as it faced its second ACC
team of the season. The Lady Jack-
ets of Georgia Tech won three
games straight over the Lady Pi-
rates in Saturday's match.
It looked as if ECU would
have control of the first game with
Georgia Tech, as it jumped out to
a 5-0 lead But the l.ady Jackets
battled back, winning eight
straight points to break the ECU
momentum
ECU was able to get control of
the serve, but was never able to
hold on long enough to make
Kerry Weisbrod
those serves into points.
Georgia Tech went on to win
the first game 15-8.
'The Georgia Tech match
was a much better match than the
score showed said ECU coach
Judy Kirkpatrick. 'The first game
was very strong for us but we beat
ourselves in the second and third
game
ECU came out in the second
game ready to take a win from the
Lady Jackets but it was not meant
to be. Although the Lady Pirates
were the first to score, they did not
score again until Georgia Tech
had piled up 12 points. ECU
managed only five points in the
game as the Lady Jackets went on
to win the second game 15-5.
ECU also struck early in the
third match, scoring the first
points and taking a 2-0 lead, but
after a scries of exchanges with
Georgia Tech, they were never
able to regain control of the scor-
ing. The Lady Jackets won their
third game, 15-3, as they swept
ECU in three games.
Things were looking up for
the Lady Pirates as they went into
their match with Davidson. ECU
had been victorious over the Lady
Wildcats in their firs meeting of
the season and had set their goal
for this match to have more con-
Traci Smith
trol as well as win.
Davidson had different ideas
as they scored the first three
points of the game. ECU battled
from behind most of the game as
Davidson continued to pursue a
win.
Down 6-11, ECU began to
gradually take control of the
game. Davidson began to break
down as the Lady Pirates scored
three straight points.
ECU took the lead 13-12 and
then went on to win the game 15-
13.
"We knew that we could beat
Davidson, but we wanted to play
them better than we played
against them last week said Kir-
pa trick. "We were down 6-11 and
were able to come back. I think
this says something for our team,
that we have the power and abil-
ity to keep playing and not give
in
ECU was in complete control
of the second game, jumping out
to a 3-0 lead. Davidson gave up 11
points to the Lady Pirates as it
looked as ECU was in for an easy
win, but the Lady Wildcats did
notletECU win without a fight, as
they came back, scoring nine
points in the 15-9 ECU vin.
ECU went on tj sweep
Davidson in three game, with a
15-9 victory in the third game as
the Lady Wildcats' concentration
broke down.
Junior Kcrri Wcisbrod con-
tinues to lead the Lady Pirates
offense. For her efforts, Wcisbrod
was selected as the ECU Volley-
ball Offensive Player-of the Week
by the ECU coaching staff. Wcis-
brod, after seven matches, has 34
kills, 66 digs and 167 assists.
Senior Traci Smith was se-
lected as the Defensive-Playcr-
Of-The-Wcck. Smith, who was a
spark for the Lady Pirates last
weekend on defense, has 46 kills,
10 service aces, and 71 digs for the
season.
See VOLLEYBALL, page 15
Clemson falls on Fla. State 'Punt Ruskie'
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) - The
play's called "Punt Ruskie" and it
will live in infamy at Clemson.
Florida State used the play - a
fake punt- to set up Richie
Andrew's 19-yard field goal with
32 seconds left to lift the 10th-
rartked Seminoles past No. 3
Clemson 24-21 on Saturday.
With 1:31 left and Florida
State facing a fourth-and-four at
its 21-yard line, Coach Bobby
Bowden called for the gutsy play.
The snap came to Dayne Wil-
liams, who was one of the two up
men on the punt. Williams placed
the ball between LeRoy Butler's
legs and then took off to the right.
After waiting 1.5 seconds - he was
supposed to wait 3 seconds - But-
ler went left, racing 78 yards be-
fore being tackled at the 1 by
Donnell Wool ford.
"This was the most pressure
that I've had in my life Butler
said. "Nervous ain't the word. I
didn't have butterflies, I had liz-
ards. I had everything in my stom-
ach. I knew the game depended
on me
Bowden said he put the play
in this week and had planned to
use it against Clemson.
"We were liable to use it any
time in the second half Bowden
said. "We were just waiting for
the right opportunity.
"All our offensive coaches,
we decided that we were gonna
use it now he said. "If we miss it,
they're gonna hit a field goal and
win. I just wanted somebody to
win the game
The gamble worked, al-
though Coach Danny Ford said
the Tigers were aware the play
was in the Seminoles' arsenal.
"The fake punt was a nice call
- a good gamble and very success-
ful Ford said. "We knew they
had it, but I'm not sure our people
were warned about it this particu-
lar time. They were told about it
earlier
The field goal came less than
two minutes after fullback Tracy
Johnson carried a Seminole defen-
der into the end zone for a 19-yard
TD run with 2:32 left. Rusty Seyle
added the extra point to pull
Clemson even.
But moments later the record
crowd of 82,500 stood silent and
stunned as the Seminoles pulled
off a bit of razzle dazzle to win the
first meeting between two top 10
teams in the 46-year history of
Death Valley.
The previous attendance high
was 82,492 in 1986 when the Ti-
gers took on arch-rival South
Carolina.
Florida State is now 2-1, while
Clemson suffered its first loss in
three games.
The Seminoles were out-
played in the first half and trailed
14-7 after being held to 71 yards
total offense to 232 for Clemson.
But Deion Sanders, a three-
sport athlete, brought the Semino-
les back. Using the speed that
brought him MVP honors at last
year's Metro Conference track
meet, Sanders returned a punt 76
yards to tie it at 14-14 with 11:30 to
go in the third period.
After forcing Clemson to
punt again, the Seminoles drove
77 yards in five plays to take their
first lead on fullback Dayne Wil-
liams' 1-yard run with 8:27 left.
Quarterback Chip Ferguson
hit three of three passes for 80
yards in the drive, including a 36-
yarder to Bruce LaSane. The 6-
foot-4 LaSane ourjumped 5-10
cornerback Donnell Woolford for
the ball at the 1 to set up the go-
ahead score on a rainy afternoon.
Florida State finished with
368 yards total offense, led by
Ferguson, who hit 18 of 28 passes
for 241 yards and one TD.
Clemson ended up with 364
yards, but managed just 132 yards
in the second half.
Tailback Terry Allen had a
game-high 77 yards rushing, but
the Tigers were hurt by quarter-
back Rodney Williams inaccurate
arm. Williams hit on just seven of
24 passes for 96 yards, including
only two completions in 14 at-
tempts in the second half.
The Tigers used their running
game to control the ball in the first
half, putting together an impres-
sive 99-yard, 17-play drive to take
a seven-point halftime lead on
Williams' 7-yard run with 2:45
left.
In the drive, which took 7:45,
Clemson converted four straight
third downs and one fourth-and-
one after Butler downed the ball at
thel for the Seminoles following
Tim Corlew's 40-yard punt.
In all, Clemson converted
eight of 12 third downs in the first
half, but it took a hook-up be-
tween two receivers to get the
Tigers on the scoreboard.
Wide receiver Chip Davis
took what looked like an end
around and turned it into a 61-
yard TD pass to flanker Gary
Cooper
Duke's Dilwig passes well in
rain to top the Citadel 'Dogs
in there and we had a chance to
he said.
win,
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) - Quar-
terback Anthony Dilweg didn't
let a little rain dampen Duke's
pacsing attack.
Playing in a steady down-
pour on Saturday night, Dilweg
engineered three touchdowns "We really got tested to-
and a career-high 410 yards as the night Spurrier said. "1 think
Blue Devils defeated the Citadel tonight proved that no matter
41-17. who you play, if the other team is
The fifth-year senior has ready they're going to give you a
passed for more than 1,000 yards tough time
and seven touchdowns in Duke's
added a 17-yard touchdown pass
to tight end Dave Colonna.
Duke coach Steve Spurrier The Citadel pulled to within
said the victory may have looked 20-17 after the Bulldogs blocked a
easy, but the numbers were de- Dilweg punt on Duke's first pos-
ceiving.
"We
three victories. He completed 19
of 31 passes on Saturday night
and threw one interception.
"Dilweg is just an excellent
quarterback said Citadel coach
Charlie Taaffee. 'To do what he
did on a wet field, a wet night, is
remarkable. He put it right where
he needed to. We had guys there
but his throws were perfect
"We executed our game plan
as well as we could expect. We did
what he had to do in order to hang
Duke led 20-10 at halftime
and broke the game open with
two third quarter touchdowns
session of the second half. David
Brodsky recovered at the Duke
41-yard line and Vemon Jones
completed the drive with a 2-yard
touchdown run.
The Citadel took a 7-0 lead
after David Matherly intercepted
a Dilweg pass in the end zone.
Adrian Johnson scored on a 1-
yard run to complete an 80-yard,
after the Citadel pulled to within 14-play drive.
20-17. Duke tied the score after driv-
Dilweg completed a 5-yard ing 74 yards on four plays, includ-
scoring pass to running back ing a 47-yard pass from Dilweg to
Walter Jones to give the Blue Clarkston Hines that kept the
Devils a 27-17 lead. On Duke's drive going. John Rymiszewski
next possession, Dilweg threw a scored on a 2-yard run.
65-yard touchdown pass to Keith The Blue Devils took a 10-7
Ewell with 139 left in the period lead early in the second quarter on
for a 34-17 lead. a 24-yard field goal by Doug Pe-
In the fourth quarter, Dilweg tcrson.





V
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20, 1988
Irish top Michigan teams
(AP)- The Fighting Irish, 2-0,
have the top football teams in
Michigan green with envy. Notre
Dame beat Michigan 19-17 in its
opener, then throttled Michigan
State as Tony Rich directed the
option attack to perfection and
tailback Mark Green ran for 125
yards.
" think that was the best
option we've seen in six years
said Michigan State coach George
Pcrles, whose Spartans dropped
to 0-2.
LSU 34, Tennessee 9.
Tommy Hodson had the hot
passing hand and that spelled
trouble for the Volunteers.
"They're going to be hard to
beat Vols linebacker Keith De-
Long said. Hodson, who tied a
school record with 12 consecutive
completions at the start of the
game, passed for 246 yards and
three touchdowns as the Tigers, 2-
0 won at Knoxville, Tenn for the
first time in history.
LSU, 0-9-1 in previous games
at Tennessee, won its 14th con-
secutive regular-season road
game while dropping Tennessee
to 0-3 for the first time since 1962.
VV. Virginia 55Maryland 24.
Maryland stunned the Moun-
taineers with two quick scores in
the first four minutes on touch-
down runs by Mike beasley.
"In the beginning, I looked
out there and said, 'Man, they
must have our number West
Virginia coach Don Nehlen said.
But the Mountaineers, 3-0,
rallied for 17 straight points to
climb back into the game against
Maryland, 1-1.
Quarterback Major Harris' 3-
yard run put West Virginia up for
good at 24-21 with eight seconds
left in the second quarter.
S. Carolina 17, E. Carolina 0.
The longest pass in Game-
cocks history broke open a close
game when Todd Ellis connected
on a 97-yard scoring strike with
Robert Brooks on South
Carolina's first play from scrim-
mage in the second half.
After South Carolina, 3-0,
recovered a Pirates fumble at the
3-yard line, Ellis fired down the
left sideline to Brooks, who
eluded three East Carolina tack-
lers at the 13 and sprinted into the
end zone.
East Carolina fell to 1-2.
20.
Penn St. 23, Boston College
Senior Ray Tarasi, who beat
out two other kickers in preseason
practice to earn the starting job,
wanted a chance to redeem him-
self after missing a 43-yard at-
tempt early in the fourth quarter.
Tarasi got his shot with 48
seconds left and the game tied 20-
20 following Eddie Johnson's
punt block that gave the Nittany
Lions the ball at the Boston Col-
lege 27.
Tarasi connected on his third
field goal of the game as Penn
State improved to 2-0 and
dropped BC to 1-2.
Washington 31, Army 17.
Army rolled up 273 yards on
the ground but Washington fi-
nally broke the Wishbone offense
when the Cadets were forced to
pass late in the game.
Chico Fraley returned an in-
terception 72 yards for the clinch-
ing score with 1:10 left as the
Huskies, 2-0 held of the Cadets,
21-point underdogs.
Army, 1-1, had moved to the
Huskies' 33 before Fraley picked
off Otto Leone.
"I was in the right place at the
right time Fraley said.
Pittsburgh 42, Ohio State 10.
Coach John Cooper guided
the Buckeyes to a victory over
Syracuse in his debut at Ohio State
and was proclaimed a hero. That
wasn't the case after Pittsburgh, 2-
0, pounded the Buckeyes behind
Adam Walker's 179 yards rush-
ing and three touchdowns.
Cooper was hooted and
booed by hundreds of Ohio State
fans, some of whom stood ou tside
the locker room door chanting,
"Bring Back Earle Bruce
Pitt sophomore quarterback
Darnell Dickerson scored two
touchdowns and rushed for 88
yardson 11 carries as the Panthers
beat Ohio State for the first time
since 1952.
Colorado 24, Iowa 21.
Iowa lost its home opener for
the first time in six years as Colo-
rado relied on u leadership of
quarterback Sal Aunese.
Auncsc scored twice, includ-
ing a 1-yard sneak with 5 12
minutes to play, and Eric Bieni-
emy rushed for 153 yards for
Colorado, 2-0.
Iowa, 1-2, led 21-17 and was
threatening to score with about
six minutes to play when
Hawkeyes quarterback Chuck
Hartlieb fumbled after being
blindsided on the Colorado 10.
Aunscs then directed the
Buffaloes on a 85-yard, 11-plav
scoring drive with about 5:30 left
to play.
U.S. wins first round pzTdrop
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -
David Robinson, not at all rusty
despite a long layoff from real
competition, scored 16 points
Sundav to lead the United States
to a 97-53 victory over Spain in a
rematch of the 1984 Olympic gold
medal basketball game.
Robinson, who has been serv-
ing his military obligation after
graduation from the Naval Acad-
emy in June 1987, led five U.S.
players in double figures as the
victory margin in Seoul was even
greater than the 31-point differ-
ence in Los Angeles four years
ago. The final score was the big-
gest lead for the United States.
The victory in their opening
game of competition here was the
79th in 80 Olympic games for the
United States team.
Joining Robinson in double
figures were Hersey Hawkins
and Danny Manning with 13 each
and Dan Majerle and Charles
Smith IV of Georgetown with 12
each.
Coach John Thompson had
said the starters wouldn't be in the
game long and he stayed true to
his word as 10 players saw action
in the opening 5:09.
The starters - Robinson, Man-
ning, Majerle, Mitch Richmond
and Smith - ran off a quick 8-2 lead
before there were any substitu-
tions. The lead reached 19-7 on a
tip-in by J.R. Reid of North Caro-
lina with 13:41 left in the half, but
Spain scored eight straight points,
six on 3 - pointers by Jose Antonio
Montero and Ignacio Solozabal -
before Thompson reinserted the
starting unit with 11:05 in the half.
USC game
Continued from paye 13
0-3. We made that tremendous
drive on the first drive of the sec-
ond half but fumbled at the four.
"It'll be great to get back
home with our fans. Today, they
were great, especially after our
performance last week. Their en-
thusiasm and noise were very
good for us today
The Pirates host Southern
Mississippi this Saturday, which
is Parent's Day. Kick-off is slated
for 1:30.
free
Membership
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Wolf
RALEIGH, N.C.
Preston Poag ran for one
down and threw for a key f
quarter score as North Q
State stopped Wake Forest
their Atlantic Coast Conf
opener Saturday night
Poag completed 10
passes for 254 yards, and h
ond-quarter scoring run oj
yards came at the 5:17 mari
helped the Wolfpack shakJ
Poag interception sevi r
utes earlier and overcoi
deficit after Wilson Hoyle
field goals of 41 and 51 yarj
latter tying a Wake Fon
record in the first quarter
Defense ruled on the
night, but N.C. State's defe
Giant
(AP)- After thr
practice to the San I
Giants, the Hous
stayed late and threw
practice to themselves.
Following a I
Giants on Sunday, Hou
ager Hal Lamer wa i
ordered his team back i I ii
for a 1 12-hour wort
angry after Houston .
consecutive game and di
into a second-place tie J
Francisco, nine games r- f
division-leading -
Dodgers.
The Astros, one-h
out on Aug. 9, have I j
since.
"I don't know if it wi
Kevin Bass said. "The
throw the ball ri j
middle in games
While Bass was n �
Lanier was painting a da
ture.
"You have to have p
you can't finish tirt
want to be second .
"We've worked too ha
whole season go d wr. I
the last three days. We'n
have to have the int
every ball game. 1 want tc
this to every ball
In the barren
Virginia
CHARLOTTESVILL
(AP) - Mark Inderlied,
missed on four oi five prei
field-goal attempts this I
said the odds finally caug
with him Saturday against
gia Tech.
"You can only miss a J
Inderlied said after his H
field goal with nine second
rallied the Cavaliers to a
victory over mistake-prone
gia Tech in the Atlantic
Conference opener for
teams.
Thomas Talmer had
Georgia Tech its only lead
game at le-14 on his seconi
yard field goal ot the game
one with 47 seconds to plays
But the Cavaliers' T
Lewis returned the i
off 41 yards to the Y
49, and Virginia needed o
seconds to go 32 vards in
plays to set up the winnii
Wide receiver Derek Dcx i
of Georgia coach Vince Dei
had receptions ot 18 and
yards in the brief drive
Inderlied, whose pre
misses included one fro
yards late in the third quartet
to wait to attempt the win
kick after Georgia Tech cal
timeout, during which the i
Jackets taunted him from a
the line oi scrimmage.
"I didn't pay attention td
of that stuff Inderlied sal
knew it was good as soon as if
But it was probably closer tj
right cross bar than it was tj
center
Virginia coach George V
said it didn't matter
"I'm not greedy hesau
like us to be a little betterl
Volleybal
Continued from page 13
The Lady Pirates take tj
�d Tuesday, traveling to
ginia Commonwealth, whii
suffering with a 1-12 record. L
will be at home on Fridai
Minges Coliseum for a 7:00 m
�gainst UNC-Greensboro.





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20. 1988 15
IONS
D FOR
Aiyout
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inicians
i Plus!
?arolinian
I - 2nd floor
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Rush
en of Kappa
to come and
Little Sisters
er 19th
?er 20th
on onlv)
inber 21st
Meeting You!
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Wolfpack wins over Wake Deacons
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - tougher in the second half, never Two plays into the fourth Jackson had to be escorted from
Preston I oag ran for one touch- allowing Wake Forest into quarter, Poag hit Danny Peebles the field after suffering a mild
down and threw for a key fourth- Wolfpack territory until the last on a 70-yard scoring play. Carter concussion Barbour nursing .
quarter score as North Carolina 90 seconds of the fourth quarter, kicked the extra point with 13:49 ��25�nSJTrashS o?A7
state stopped Wake Forest 14-6 in On second-and-10 from the left to helo the Wolfoack win its CS!ZSL� f�T ?
their Atlantic Coast Conference Wolfpack 29, Jesse Campbell
opener Saturday night. made a leaping interception of a
Toag completed 10 of 21 Mike Elkins pass intended for
est and forced a punt, with the
change of possession leading to
N.C. State's only score in the half.
Poag connected with Nasral-
lah Worthen on a 39-yard pass
passes for 254 yards, and his sec- Ricky Proehl in the end zone with
ond-quarter scoring run of four one minute left.
left to help the Wolfpack win its yarcis on 19 carries
second straight game. Wake Forest got Hoyle's first P,ay to the Wake Forcst 22- Five
Another N.C. State drive field goal on the game's opening plays later, Poag raced to the right
reached the Wake Forest 16. Poag drive, and his second came after cornerof theend zoneand Fowble
fumbled a snap on third-and-4 the first of three Wolfpack turn- kicked tr�e extra point with 5:17
yards came at the 5:17 mark. That
helped the Wolfpack shake off a
Poag interception several min-
utes earlier and overcome 6-0
deficit after Wilson Hoyle kicked
and Carter had his 33-yard field overs.
k "C fua!u d"u Kje M goal attempt blocked by A J. Poag lost the on a k
much with the Wake Forest de- Greene, his second of the night piay and Warren Belin recovered
fense, however, running up a
nearly two-to-one edge in total
yardage. Poag directed the
and ninth of his career
Carter came on to kick for
Mark Fowble, who reportedly
held goals of 41 and 51 yards, the Wolfpack inside the Wake Forest suffered torn ligaments in his
latter tying a Wake Forest school 10 twice in the third quarter, but right knee on a field goal attempt
ccord in the first quarter. lost both scoring opportunities on near halftime. Freshman tailback
Defense ruled on the rainy
the game after starter Tyrone
for Wake Forest at the N.C. State
25. The ensuing Demon Deacon
drive stalled and Hoyle kicked his
record-tying field goal with 1:54
left in the first quarter.
left before halftime.
The Wolfpack tried to extend
its lead, but the drive failed. Shane
Montgomery directed the
Wolfpack from its own 25 to the
Wake Forest 15, aided by a 31-
yard-pass to Todd Vam. With
rime running out, Fowble at-
missed field goal attempts by Anthony Barbour played much of a Poag pass in the second quarter which was blocked by Greene and
ght, but N.C. States defense got Bryan Carter. u � -r �� iii�cjjvl.
Bradford Benson intercepted temPtcd a 32-yard field goal
ag pass in the second quarter, which was blocked by C
but the Wolfpack held Wake For- !�? J� Ffwbles mjury.
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Giants take batting practice
(AP)- After throwing batting
practice to the San Francisco
Giants, the Houston Astros
stayed late and threw batting
practice to themselves.
Following a 10-3 loss to the
ants on Sunday, Houston man-
ager Hal Lanier was so angry he
trdered his team back on the field
Mr a 1 1 2-hour workout. He was
angry after Houston lost its fourth
eonsecutive game and dropped
into a second-place tie with San
Francisco, nine games behind the
division-leading Los Angeles
Dodgers.
The Astros, one-half game
out on Aug. 9, have lost 21 of 37
since.
"I don't know if it will help
Kevin Bass said. "They don't
throw the ball right down the
middle in games
While Bass was making light,
Lanier was painting a dark pic-
ture.
"You have to have pride. If
you can't finish first you certainly
want to be second Lanier said.
"We've worked too hard to let the
whole season go down the drain
the last three days. We're going to
have to have the intensity to win
every ballgame. I want to stress
this to every ballplayer
In the barren Astrodome,
cleared of fans after the game,
Houston players took batting
practice and did situation drills.
The players weren't happy but
understood Larder's anger.
"We do what tRe manager
says Buddy Bell said. "It's his
decision. Fifteen or 20 guys can't
manage this club. Things are not
going the way we want them to
go. He knows we are trying.
Sometimes you have to do things
you don't want to do. It was unex-
pected, not on the agenda. But Hal
thought it was necessary. An-
other hour and a half can't hurt
San Francisco players were
bewildered.
"Are they really having a
workout?" Chris Speier asked out
loud.
In other games, New York
beat Montreal 5-3, Los Angeles
beat Cincinnati 2-0, St. Louis beat
Chicago 5-4, Atlanta beat San
Diego 6-5 in 10 innings and Phila-
delphia beat Pittsburgh 6-5 in 10
innings.
Don Robinson, 8-4, won for
the fourth time in five decisions
and hit a two-run homer. He al-
lowed four hits and one run in
seven innings.
Will Clark hit a two-run
homer, scored three runs and
walked four times.
Mike Scott, 13-8, lost his
fourth straight start for the first
time in his career.
Mets 5, Expos 3
Dwight Gooden won his 18th
game and Darryl Strawberry hit
his league-leading 34th home run
as New York lowered its magic
number to three and increased its
lead to 12 games over Pittsburgh.
Gooden, 18-7, gave up eight
hits, struck out nine and walked
two in eight innings. Randy
Myers finished with perfect relief
for his 23rd save.
New York sent nine batters to
the plate in the first and scored
four runs on three hits against
Pascual Perez, 11-7.
Dodgers 2, Reds 0
John Tudor and Alejandro
Pena combined on a five-hitter
and Jeff Hamilton broke a score-
less tie with a seventh-inning
double off Frank Williams, 3-2.
Los Angeles lowered its
magic number to six as it nears its
first National League West title in
three seasons.
Cardinals 5, Cubs 4
Larry McWilliams, 6-7, gave
up five hits in 5 2-3 innings and hit
a two-run single and Greg Mad-
Virginia gets conference win
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
(AP) - Mark Inderlicd, who had
missed on four of five previous
tield-goal attempts this season,
aid the odds finally caught up
with him Saturday against Geor-
gia Tech.
"You can only miss so many
Inderlicd said after his 35-yard
field goal with nine seconds left
rallied the Cavaliers to a 17-16
victory over mistake-prone Geor-
gia Tech in the Atlantic Coast
Conference opener for both
teams.
Thomas Palmer had given
Georgia Tech its only lead of the
game at 16-14 on his second 47-
yard field goal of the game, this
one with 47 seconds to play.
But the Cavaliers' Tyrone
Lewis returned the ensuing kick-
off 41 yards to the Yellow Jacket
49, and Virginia needed only 38
seconds to go 32 yards in four
plays to set up the winning score.
Wide receiver Derek Dooley, son
of Georgia coach Vince Dooley,
had receptions of 18 and nine
yards in the brief drive.
Inderlicd, whose previous
misses included one from 40
yards late in the third quarter, had
to wait to attempt the winning
kick after Georgia Tech called a
timeout, during which the Yellow
jackets taunted him from across
the line of scrimmage.
"I didn't pay attention to any
of that stuff Inderlied said. "I
knew it was good as soon as I hit it.
But it was probably closer to the
right cross bar than it was to the
center
Virginia coach George Welsh
said it didn't matter.
"I'm not greedy he said. "I'd
like us to be a little better, but
Volleyball
Continued from page 13
The Lady Pirates take to the
road Tuesday, traveling to Vir-
ginia Commonwealth, which is
suffering with a 1-12 record. ECU
will be at home on Friday at
Minges Coliseum for a 7:00 match
against UNC-Greensboro.
we're not
Quarterback Shawn Moore
ran for one touchdown and threw
for another and John Ford,
Virginia's all-time receiving
leader, went over the 2,000-yard
mark in career yardage as the
Cavaliers improved to 2-1 overall.
"We're struggling to get bet-
ter Welsh said. "This could help
us if we use it right
Georgia Tech, which has not
beaten a Division I-A opponent
since November 1986, fell to 1-1
with its ninth straight loss on the
road. The Yellow Jackets lost two
fumbles, had one pass inter-
cepted, missed one field goal and
were penalized nine times for 80
yards.
Coach Bobby Ross said his
Yellow Jackets "didn't do every-
thing perfectly, and I thought we
stopped ourselves some of the
time when we should have gotten
things going
PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Tim James, THIS WEEK'S PLAYER OF THE WEEK
HOMETOWN-Hartsville, S.C.
East Carolina vs USC- Against the Gamecocks, Tim carried
18 times for 82 yards, most of these up the middle. He also
caught a pass for seven yards.
PERSONAL INFORMATION- Tim is one of ECUs top pro
prospects. He is a Communication Major. He is the son of
Marzell James.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Tim James, FROM PEPSI-COLA.
MUCH CONTINUED SUCCESS.
dux failed to win for the 11 th time
in 13 starts since the All-Star
break.
Todd Worrell got the final six
outs for his 32nd save, giving up
RBI singles to Shawon Dunston
and Mitch Webster in the ninth.
With runners on first and second,
Ryne Sandberg flied out and
Andre Dawson struck out to end
the game.
Braves 6, Padres 5
Pinch-hitter Ozzie Virgil
singled in the winning run in the
10th inning after the Braves
wasted a 5-1 lead.
Andres Thomas singled th
one out off Mark Davis, 5-9. Mark
Lemke walked, pinch-hitter Ted
Simmons popped out and Virgil
lined his hit up the alley in left-
center.
Paul Assenmacher, 8-6, blew
a 5-4 lead in the ninth when pinch-
hitter Dickie Thon homered to tie
the score 5-5.
Phillies 6, Pirates 5
Phil Bradley hit a lOth-inning
sacrifice fly after Lance Parrish
tripled off Randall Kramer, 0-1.
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16 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20, 1988
Red Sox inch closer to lead
(AP)- The Boston Red Sox
took a giant step toward taking
the small step the Oakland Ath-
letics hope to take tonight.
1Tie Red Sox, plagued by a
bad Yankees manager Lou Pin- fore Farr unintentionally walked
iella said
In 1978, Piniella was a mem-
ber of the New York team that
swept four games at Fenway in
Henderson on foiir pitches.
came known as the "Boston Mas-
sacre The Yankees, behind then-
long history of failure, took con- late September - a series that be
trol of the American League East
race Sunday with a 9-4 victory
over the New York Yankees. After
losing the opener of a four-game
series to the Yankees Thursday,
the Red Sox won the next three.
"And I guarantee we won't
lose three in a row in Toronto,
why should we?" Boston man-
Dan Pasqua hit two homers,
went 4-for-4 and drove in four
runs as Chicago won at the Met-
Orioles 2, Tigers 0. rodome.
Bob Milacki, making his ma- Pasqua's three-run homer
jor league debut, held Detriot to highlighted a five-run rally in the
one hit for eight innings as visit- seventh inning. Pasqua, batting
ing Baltimore ended a five-game .107 since Aug. 17, led of the ninth
ace Ron Guidry, went on to beat losing streak. with his 19th home run this sea-
the Red Sox in a playoff for the Milacki left the game after a son, all against right-handed
division title, climaxing an im- raindclayofl hour, 17 minutes in pitchers.
probable comeback. the top of the ninth inning. Tom Reliever Tom McCarthy, 1-0,
Guidry, far removed from the Niedenfuer pitched one hitless won in his second appearance
form that won him the Cy Young inning for his 18th save
Tar Landing Seafood
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758-0327105 Airport Rd.
ager Joe Morgan said as his team, day.
a decade ago, started again Sun-
holding a six-game lead, pre-
pared to visit the Blue Jays to-
night.
The Athletics, meanwhile,
can clinch the AL West this eve-
ning at home by defeating Minne-
sota. Oakland's magic number is
two and can be cut to zero with a
victory over the World Series
champions.
Oakland beat Kansas City 3-2
while the Twinslost toChicago,8-
5. Elsewhere, Baltimore blanked
Detriot 2-0, Milwaukee trounced
Seattle 10-2, Toronto downed
Cleveland 4-0 and California
stopped Texas 6-5.
"We just didn't get the job
done. In this game, you have to
learn to accept the good and the
a three-run
inning and
Ellis Burks hit
homer in the first
Marty Barrett's two-run double
chased Guidry in the second.
Dwight Evans met reliever Neil
Allen with a two-run homer that
made it 7-1.
Athletics 3, Royals 2.
Jose Canseco hit his 40th
home run and Dave Henderson
walked with the bases loaded in
the bottom of the 11 th inning to
force home the winning run.
Luis Polonia led off the 11th
inning with a double against
Steve Farr, 5-4, and Stan Javier
walked. The runners advanced on
Canseco's fly ball and an interna-
tional walk loaded the bases be-
T i Brookens got Detriot's
only a line-drive double in the
third inning.
Pete Stanicek homered in the
sixth off Frank Tanana, 14-10, to
break a scoreless tie.
Brewers 10, Mariners 2.
Jeffrey Leonard's fourth ca-
reer grand slam led Milwaukee
over host Seattle and kept the
Brewers' hopes alive in the AL
East
since being called up from the
minors.
Angels 6, Rangers 5.
Wally Joyner blooped a two-
run single with two outs in the
bottom of the ninth inning that
rallied California over Texas.
The Rangers had taken the
lead in the top of the ninth on a
grand slam by pinch hitter Pete
O'Brien.
But singles by Darrell Miller,
V
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Johnny Ray and Bob Boone
Leonard hit his eighth home loadcd thc bascs for Jovncr- who
the third inning against looped a single to left field against
Dwayne Henry.
run in
Mike Campbell, 6-10. Leonard
came to bat with the bases loaded
in the fourth but struck out.
Juan Nieves, 7-5, won his
third consecutive decision.
White Sox 8, Twins 5.
Blue Jays 4, Indians 0.
Dave Stieb pitched a four-hit-
ter and Toronto beat visiting
Cleveland and remained on the
fringe of the AL East chase.
West Virginia takes care of Maryland
in handy fashion, despite early lead
MORGANTOWN, W. Va.
(AP) Major Harris passed for a
touchdown and ran for another
score as No. 12 West Virginia,
down 14 points only foijr minutes
into the game, rallied to beat
Maryland 55-24 in college football
on Saturday.
Maryland, 1-1, stunned the
Mountaineers with twO' Mike
Boasley touchdown runs, the first
for 11 yards after Anthony
Brown's fumble on the opening
play of the game and the other a
74-yard sprint after a West Vir-
ginia punt.
Soccer gets
first win
Sports Information New� Rrltui
East Carolina's soccer team
picked up its first win of the sea-
son over the weekend, taking
third place in the Francis Marion
College Tournament in Florence,
SC.
The Pirates defeated host
Francis Marion in the consolation
game on Saturday. Andy Britton
scored with 18 minutes gone in
the second half to give ECU a 1-0
victory. Clark Payne was credited
with an assist on the goal,
Britton's first of the year.
"Our play in the first half put
us in a position to score in the
second half said head coach Bob
Lust. "We were playing with
poise and confidence. I'm happy
for my players because now they
can concentrate on playing their
best, and not worrying when that
first win will come
The Pirates played the tour-
nament without first-string goal-
keeper Mac Kendall. Kendall was
diagnosed Thursday with
cracked ribs, and second-stringer
Chris Wall started against
Campbell in the opening game
Friday. Wall allowed tout goals to
one of the best teams in the south,
and late in the game was replaced
by forward Austin Batse. Batse
recorded five saves, butCampbell
wound up with a 4-0 win-
On Saturday, Batse played
the entire game at goalkeeper. He
was credited with nine saves, re-
corded the Pirates first shutout of
the year and was named to the
All-Tournament team with Brit-
ton, who was moved from
midfielder to forward for
Saturday's contest.
"Batse and Britton played
outstanding over the weekend.
They deserved the recognition
they got. Andy(Britton) and
Austin(Batse) made great transi-
tions. I can't say enough about
how they played said coach
Lust
The Mountaineers, 3-0, ral-
lied for 17 straight points while
holding Maryland to just five
first-half first downs to climb back
into the game.
After taking over at the Mary-
land 41 after a punt late in the first
quarter, West Virginia scored in
four plays, the last Undra
Johnson's 4-yard run. The Moun-
taineers tied the game 14-14 with
a 66-yard drive in nine plays,
capped by Harris' 20-yard pass
that Keith Winn wrestled from
Maryland's Irvin Smith in the end
zone.
Charlie Baumann's 39-yard
field goal gave West Virginia a 17-
14 lead in the second quarter, but
Maryland quarterback Neil
ODonnell capped a 72-yard drive
with an 8-yard draw for a 21-17
lead with 49 seconds left in the
half.
Harris directed an 80-yard
drive in five plays and scored
untouched from the three to put
West Virginia up for good with
eight seconds left in the second
quarter.
West Virginia took advan-
tage of good field position the rest
of the game to beat Maryland for
the first time in five vear; whilp
scoring its most points ever in the
scries, which dates back to 1918.
Half of thc scoring drives covered
41 yards or less.
After Baumann and
Maryland's Dan Plocki traded
field goals in the third quarter, it
was all West Virginia.
Brown scored from the one to
make it 34-24 with 2:37 left in the
third quarter and the Mountain-
eers added 21 points in the last
quarter - on Craig Taylor's 1-yard
run, Bo Orlando's 56-yard inter-
ception return and Reggie
Rembert's 5-yard run.
vforicate-
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 20, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 20, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.626
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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