The East Carolinian, September 15, 1988






Coming Ttiesd&y:
Lloyd Bentson campaigns in Greenville.
Features:
Micah Harris takes a satiric look at the new Fall TV
season, see page 9.
Sports:
Pirates meet Gamecocks this Saturday, see page 13.
She lEast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 19
Thursday, September 15,1986
Greenville, NC
16Pages
Circulation 12,000
Telefund hopes to exceed $160,000 in 1989
By TAMMY AYCOCK
Suit Writer
This fall, ECU's Telemarketing
Director, Cindy Callawav, hopes
to exceed the estimated $160,000
received in last year's National
Telefund.
The National Telefund, spon-
sored by the ECU Alumni Center,
is only one aspect of the Annual
Giving Program. This national
campaign is aimed at former ECU
students who do not live near an
ECU alumni chapter.
This annual fund drive will last
fromSept. 19 until November 10.
"What we're excited about this
year is the Young Alumni Chal-
lenge Callawav said. Four men
who graduated from ECU in the
197Cs : John J. Beard, 111 75; Wil-
liam H. (Bill) Bodenhamcr, Jr 74,
Robert S. (Bob) Rippv, '74; and J.
Michael (Mike) Williams, '79;
have pledged to match each new
and increased donation made this
fiscal year (July 1,1988 until June
30,1989) up to $150,000.
Callaway said, "new"means
friends of the university who have
never given before. And the in-
crease is the amount you give
above what you gave last year. If
you gave $20 last year and you
give $50 this year, they will match
the $30 difference. ECU would
receive $60 from that increase
instead of just $30.
"Our alumni are always recep-
tive to these telefund calls. They
enjoy having the chance to talk
with the students and they like to
catch upon what's happening at
ECU. The concept of giving two
for one will make it that much
easier for them to give
"Money received from these
fund raising campaigns is used
for things like scholarships, fac-
ulty research, and the expansion
of library collections
For the past few weeks, Call-
away has been distributing sign-
up sheets in order to recruit stu-
dent volunteers. Because many
organizations have service proj-
ects, Callaway is confident that
there will be enough volunteers.
"We've got a pretty spectacular
group of students. We can man
20-25 phones a night for eight
weeks using student volunteers.
They love ECU and they're just
real enthusiastic about helping
out Callaway said.
Unlike previous years, the
National Telefund will bedivided
into two phases, the purple phase
and the gold phase. "At the end of
each phase, we will have cash
prizes for the callers who make
the most money Callaway said.
The purple phase consists of
the first three weeks of the tele-
fund, from Sept. 19 until Oct. 7.
During this time, the majority of
the callers will be dorm residents,
Gamma Beta Phi members, and
the ECU Ambassadors.
The last five weeks (Oct. 10 until
Nov. 10), or the gold phase, will
involve fraternities, sororities,
and other university organiza-
tions.
In regard to the phases, Call-
away said, "Anyone can call
whenever they want, but it's eas-
ier to target specific groups for
certain times. For example, it's
better for sororities and fraterni-
ties to call during the second
phase due to rush
Because of the "learning
curve Callaway encourages stu-
dent volunteers to work the tele-
fund at least three times.
"The first time you call, you are
learning and just starting to get
comfortable at the end of the eve-
ning. The second time, you can
just pick up where you left off the
first night. You don't have to be
trained again. By the third time,
you can really blend your person-
ality into it and you gradually be-
come more effective Callaway
said.
She also said "For those who
call at least three times, we'll put
their name in a hat. If their name
is drawn, they win a prize
The ECU Ambassadors serve
as night captains. "Each night
captain is responsible for a rtairt
nights. The night before their
night, the Ambassadors will i
the people they want to, until tl
get a total of twenty to twenty fi e
callers for the night
"I've never known us not to
completely go through the whole
list. Everyone who wants to call
will get a chance said Calaway.
Orr plans to make history
By JOE HARRIS
Newt Editor
Judge Robert F. Orr, the Repub-
lican candidate who is running
for a seat on the N.C. Court of
Appeals, says he has a tough
battle ahead of him if he is to de-
feat Democrat John Friday.
If Orr is elected, he will be the
first Republican to hold the state-
wide judgeship since 1896. Orr
thinks things will be different this
year because, as he said, "I feel
this has been a very Republican
year. The presidential race looks
good for Republicans, Gov. Mar-
tin and Lt. Gov. Jim Gardener are
two popular candidates and I
hope these things will have an
influence on voters
"The key to getting elected is
simple; I have to appeal to the
Democrats. I ieel my �work record
will make some people do a lot of
thinking before they go to the
polls said Orr.
In his two years at the appellate
level Orr has voted on over 600
cases and written opinions up-
wards of 200 cases. He said the
case that sticks out in his mind is
the Rowan County School Board
versus U.S. Gypsum.
In this case, the Rowan School
Board was suing U.S. Gypsum for
damages caused by asbestos. U.S.
Gypsum said an 1860 statute of
limitations was applicable to the
case. Orr ruled no, on the grounds
that the statute did not fit the re-
quirements for this particular
case. 'The thing that makes this
case special to me Is that I had to
clarify 120 years of law. I had to sit
down and seriously scrutinize the
materials said Orr. He added
this is the only asbestos case that
has made an impact on the na-
tional level.
Orr said he would like to see
more appellate court cases tried
outside Raleigh.
"There are 12 judges on the
Court of Appeals. One day I
would like to see this body di-
vided up into four groups of
three. Then, the N.C. Bar could
locate these groups throughout
the state. This way, I feel like we
(the Court of Appeals) could hear
more cases said Orr.
He added the plan would save
money for litigants who have to
pay their attorney's travel ex-
penses.
Orr said, "this would be benefi-
cial to both the court and Bar As-
sociation to hold more sessions
outside Raleigh. The cost for
funding these smaller appellate
courts could be made up by rais-
ing court fees. These smaller
courts would also give more
people a look at what happens on
the Court of Appeals level.
If elected, Orr would serve on
the N.C. Court of Appeals until
1992
ECU to host 1989 convention
By JOE HARRIS
News Editor
The East Carolina Ambassa-
dors won the honor to host the
1989 Student Alumni Associa-
tion-Student Foundation national
convention.
The Ambassadors defeated
Iowa State in an annual competi-
tion to determine which univer-
sity will host the meeting for the
National Network of Ambassa-
dors. One hundred and fifty
schools and over 700 students
participated in the event at the
home of last year's winner, the
University of Maine.
The schools compete to see
which one is best fit to host the
yearly contest. Each team of am-
bassadors must create a bid pack-
age and present it in front of the
convention; it is then voted on.
The bid package must be very
thorough. It has to describe, in
detail, everything that is involved
with putting on a three-day con-
vention for 700 people. This in-
cludes: guest speakers, hotel ac-
commodations, food services,
meeting rooms and transporta-
tion to the scheduled events.
In ECU's winning bid, the final
cost came out to $115. The visitors
will stay at the Holiday Inn and
the Cricket Inn.
The Ambassadors are planning
on three guest speakers and have
already confirmed two. Kay Yow,
head coach of the women's Olym-
pic basketball team and Dudley
Flood, the associate superinten-
dent of education in North Caro-
lina, both of whom are ECU
alumni, have agreed to speak at
c
L
A
S
s
E
L
E
C
T
I
O
N
FRESHMAN PRESIDENT
�Harget (runoff)
Sturz (runoff)
Farnior I
(Bill)
FRESHMAN VICE PRESIDENT
Faulkner
Long
SOPHOMORE PRESIDENT
Hadley
Layton
?Thomas (runoff)
Jones (runoff)
SOPHOMORE VICE PRESIDENT
Bohamon
JUNIOR PRESIDENT
Steek
Good
flJNIOR VICE PRESIDENT
Rosell
SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENT
Kalkhurst
Fordham
Total Votes.
2336
2437
1320
47R
38 2263 37E
1014S
15 2720 37u
2129L
2100T
3054S
2646
28
65
32
100
67
33
the convention.
"We set the standard for the rest
of the conventions to come said
Ms. Scott Allen, assistant to the
Ambassadors.
ECU was the first to use a
video presentation. "Yes, we've
used slide presentations in the
past, but so have other schools.
This year was different because
we used video. None of the other
bid packages included a video
presentation, ours simply stood
out over the rest. It was very im-
pressive
She also said "eighteen dedi-
cated men and women have
worked on the project since last
February and it showed at the
convention. They did an out-
standing job marketing ECU to
the rest of the nation
Allen went on to say that due to
the victory, ECU is recognized as
having the premier ambassador
program in the nation.
The Ambassadors are a student
organization that help host all the
major campus events. They pro-
vide daily campus tours, work the
chancellor's events and host all
the alumni activities. Allen said
"we are the hosts and hostesses of
ECU
Accoring to Allen, ECU was so
impressive, they had students
from other universities knocking
on their (ECU Ambassador)
doors asking for shirts, shorts,
sweats � anything with the
school logo on it.
"We were definitely a hot
commodity said Allen. "Thisisa
real honor for ECU
The dates for next year's con-
vention are September 14-17,
when the schools will be compet-
ing for the 1990 location.
If elected, Bob Orr will be the first Republican to win statewide
judgeship in 92 years (Press Release Photo).
Tuition does not cover
all student expenses
By SEAN HERRING
Assistant News Editor
All college students know
that there are three things in life
that are inevitable: death, taxes,
and paying tuition. But, what
does the tuition bill mean? Does
the student know what he is pay-
ing for?
"First, I think that the differ-
ence between tuition and fees
should be established said John
S. Bell, assistant vice-chancellor
of business.
'Tuition is what pays for the
students instructional cost. The
amount of the tuition payment is
set by the N.C. Legislature, " Bell
said.
"But, the tuition in no way
covers the expenses that it costs
the University per student. "
Bell stated that, ECU receives
an allocation of $5318 per stu-
dent, per year. This money is
provided through the tax payers,
and the students' tuition helps to
supplement the additional ex-
pense.
Bell said, "Fees on the other
hand, are not state appropriated,
but are an addition to the tuition.
Fees include such things as stu-
dent health services, student ac-
tivities, athletics, and debts
"The health service fee is
listed separately on the students'
bill, and the rest of the university
fees are simply designated as
other university fees, " he said.
ECU students pay $446 a year
in fees. The break down of the fees
on a yearly basis is $104 in health
services; $102 in student activiv-
$145 in athletics; and $95 debt
fees.
"The student health center
does not receive state appropiate
funds, so the $104 each student
pays is his share for the cost n4
operating the student heal thserv-
�ice Bell stated.
According to Bell the other
university fees cover three bask
areas, which are student activi-
ties, athletics, and debt services.
"Student activities include
such organizations as the SGA
(Student Government Associa-
tion), the transit system, the me-
dia board, and intramurals bo
said.
"Athletic fees are exactly
what they indicates. They a the
fees that the student pays in sup-
port of the intercollegic athletic
program5 jdh as football, has
ketball, g , and baseball. Arv
sport th we participate in on i
collegic basis he said.
The debt service fee is what
the student pays to help the Uni-
versity liquidate the debt for cor
tain buildings on campus, accord -
ing to Bell.
"Right now, the univcrsitv
has three buildings in which we
have a debt service. MendenhTll
Student Center is one, including
the addition to it he said.
He added, "this means we
(the university) had to secure
funds through a bond, which is a
type of debt that we have to repay
over a period of time
See TUITION, page 2





f
Tt E EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8 1W8
Auto theft not just for cities
Do you own or drive an auto-
mobile to work or school? Have
you ever had your car stolen,
broken into or something stolen
from it?
Most of us can answer no.
However, a few of us have not
been so fortunate.
Let's Uok at these particular
crimes as they relate to your park-
ing on campus.
During a 10 month period
from Aug. 87 thru May 88, 93
cases of theft from automobiles
were reported to the ECU Public
Safety. There was $15,237.26
worth oi property taken and
$2,270 worth of damages sus-
tained to those vehicles. Only
$205 in property was recovered.
During that same period two
automobiles were stolen valued
at $11,(XX). Both were recovered,
but several hundred dollars in
damage was sustained by one.
These figures may seem trivial
considering the number of ve-
hicles on campus. However, you
must consider your chances of
becoming one of these statistics.
Most of these thefts were
made easy by an unsuspecting
owner. Owners, or those respon-
sible for these vehicles, made theft
tempting by leaving valuables
inside in plain view.
The majority of these thefts
were performed by amateurs.
Some thefts were by fellow stu-
dents who could not resist when
presented the opportunity. Most
could have been prevented fairly
easily if simple precautions had
been taken.
1 11 be the first to admit that no
crime prevention technique is
foolproof. But by taking the time
to practice a few precautions, you
can reduce your chances of be-
coming a statistic. The next time
you park your car, reduce your
risks by taking the following pre-
cautions.
At night, park in well lighted
areas with pedestrian travel if
possible. Thieves do not like
working in areas where theyrc
clearely visible.
Remove all valuables, includ-
ing C.Bs, tape decks, radar detec-
tors, etc. and lock them in the
trunk. If possible, take them with
Pirate Crime Column
By
Keith Knox
you. These items only tempt
thieves. Remove antennas and
lock them in the trunk if possible.
Locked glove compartments are
easily broken into and should not
be used to store valuables.
Always take your keys with
you. Never leave them in the car,
even while running an errand.
Always lock your car. It takes
only seconds for theft to occur.
The above should become a
part of your daily routine.
Here are some additional tips
to deter theft of your vehicle and
property. Remove key identifica-
tion numbers printed on your
key sor the metal tag attached to it.
Potential thieves can use these
numbers to obtain duplicate keys
through car dealers or locksmiths
by presenting the key number,
posing as the owner.
You can punch out these
numbers or remove the tag, thus,
eliminating the problem. How-
ever, before you do, record these
numbers in a safe place in case
you need a duplicate.
Never attach a tag with your
name andor address to a key
ring. If they are lost or stolen, the
tag will lead the thief directly to
your car and your home.
Always leave only the igni-
tion key with parking attendants
or auto service personnel. A dis- aid in its recovery, but prevent it
honest one may duplicate your from being used for other illegal
house keys and sell them along purposes.
with your name and address for a Last, but not least, help the
profit. campus police help you. By re-
Use operation identification, porting suspicious persons or
With an electric engraver, etch activities in and around campus,
your operator's license number parking lots or elsewhere, you
preceded by the state abbrevia- may have prevented yourself, a
tion on C.Bs, tape decks and friend, a fellow student, staff or
similar items. Consider doing the faculty member from becoming a
same under the hood, on car crime statistic.
doors,trunklidorotherconspicu- REMEMBER: Working to-
ous places. This will provide posi- gether we can prevent crime and
tive identification of your vehicle make our campus and commu-
if it is recovered after theft.
Record your vehicle identifi-
caiton number and store it in a
safe place. Never leave your
driver's license inside the car and
nity a safer place.
If you have any information
concerning any crime on campus,
call the PIRATE CRIME BUST-
ERS at 757-6266. A reward up to
keep the vehicle registration out $1,000 could be paid for your in-
Keep a balanced diet
1 have heard a lot recently
about what constitutes a proper,
lalanced diet, What should I
eat?
1 lardly a day goes by without
someone telling us what we
should and should not cat.
Newpapers, magazines, televi-
sion, books, and radio give us lots
of advice about the "ideal diet. "
Some of this confusion exists be-
cause we don't know enough
about nutrition to identify the
perfect diet for each individual.
People differ and their food needs
differ depending on age, sex,
bodv size, physical activity, and
other conditions, such as preg-
nancv and illness.
The Recommended Dietary
Allowances (RDA) are suggested
amounts of energy, protein, and
ome minerals and vitamins for
an adequate diet. For the U.S.
population as a whole, increasing
starch and fiber in our diets and
'educing calories (primarily from
fats, sugars, and alcohol) is sen-
sible No guidelines can guaran-
tee health and well-being. Health
depends on manv thincs. includ-
ing heredity, lifestyle, personality
traits, mental health and atti-
tudes, and environment, in addi-
ton to diet.
Dietarv guidelines for Ameri-
cans include.
eat a variety of foods daily in
adequate amounts, including
fruits, vegetables, whole-grain
and enriched breads, cereals and
other products made from grain,
milk, cheese, yogurt, and other
products made from milk, meats,
poultry, fish, eggs, and dry beans
and peas.
maintain your desirable
weight. Eat slowly, take smaller
portions, and avoid "seconds. '
Eat more fruits, vegetables, and
whole grains, less fat and fatty
foods, less sugar and sweets, and
drink less alcoholic beverages.
Increase your physical activity.
eat foods with adequate
starch and fiber, including whole-
grain breads and cereals, fruits,
vegetables, and dry beans and
peas. Eating foods high in fiber
has been found to reduce symp-
toms of chronic constipation,
diverticular disease, and some
types of "irritable bowel It has
also been suggested that diets low
in fiber may increase the risk of
developing colon cancer.
avoid sugar because it pro-
vides calories but few other nutri-
ents.
avoid too much sodium.
of sight. If you don't, thieves will
be able to produce legitimate
documents when stopped by the
police.
You may also want to con-
sider the purchase and installa-
tion of certain security devices
such as:
- interior hood lock and re-
lease devices.
- a fuel switch that prevents
fuel from reaching the carburetor
- a locking gas tank cap to
prevent theft of fuel.
- locking lug nuts to prevent
tire and wheel theft.
- a second ignition or kill
switch which prevents the car
from starting.
- an alarm device which will
activate a horn, siren or lights or
all three of these to frighten a thief
away and attract attention if tam-
pered with.
WHAT TO DO IF YOUR
VEHICLE IS BROKEN INTO OR
STOLEN? Report it to the police
IMMEDIATELY. Stolen vehicles
are sometimes used in the
commission of other crimes.
Quick action by you may not only
Tuition pays
for instruction
Continued from page 1
"Ficklcn Stadium and Minges
Coliseum still have a certain
amount of outsUndin&debt .on
them said Bell.
Bell stated that "Thre, is, a
very conscientiousmethod on
behalf of ECU and state legisla-
tures to keep tuition cost here as
low and affordable as possible
Bell believes that for in-state
and out-of-state students tuition
and fee costs are reasonable.
formation. REMEMBER, WE
WANT YOUR INFORMAITON,
BUT NOT YOUR NAME.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
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Join Joe Harris and The
East Carolinian News
Team every Tuesday and
fhursday for the latest in
campus news.
DUNKIN
DONUTS
Itfe worth the trip.
s
758-5607
South Memorial Drive
Near the Hospital
Open 24 hours, 7 days a week
ECU Graduate School
21 years old, growing
Thursday Pi Kappa Phi L'il Sisters
and phi Kappa Tau L'il Sisters
Presents Ladies Night
All Ladies Free All Night
Come Early Drink Specials All Night
By LYNN JOYNER
Suff Writer
The ECU Graduate School, as
it exists today, began in 1967 and
i made up of 24 schoolsdepart-
ments.
Over 2,300 students are cur-
n ntly enrol' J I ohool with
an average o? 'nates per
. ar.
Two groups : ip guide
Ihe graduate program are the
graduate council and the gradu-
e student advisory council.
The graduate coucil, made
u p of faculty representatives from
i ich schooldepartment, serves
as a policy-making body. The
graduate student advisory coun-
cil, made up of graduate student
representatives from each
-hooldepartment, serves as a
problem-solving body.
Dr. Charles Cullop, associate
dean of the graduate school, said
the graduate student advisory
council is "a form in which gradu �
ate schools can deal with collec-
tive concerns which cut across
academic unit lines. These con-
cerns are common to all graduate
students, not just individual
units
The graduate student advi-
sory council had its first monthly
meeting on Sept. 8. Plans were
discussed to enlarge the commit-
tee by including a representative
from the medical school, to con-
solidate a packet with deadlines
that arc important to graduate
students, and to consider alterna-
tives for graduate assistant park-
ing on campus. Officers were also
elected and are as follows: Gregg
F. Lowe, chair; Keith Stephenson,
vice-chair; Lisa Spencer, secre-
tary; Victoria Higgins, policies;
and Gregory Madison, curricu-
lum.
Friday The Famous
"Late Dav Tea Bash"
5 p.m. - 2 a.m. $2.00 Ice Teas And
Free Admission For All Until 9:00
Rado
About 10 percent o
homes may have exo i
of radon, a radioactive
can cause cancer, state
say.
The highest pei 1
curs in the mount
gTanite that r-
producing rad
face ot the ground.
Th
cial, Dayne Brow i
that about 2? pvri nt
sampled in the j
ceeded the t. :
dard ot 4 pico
Brown said tl
recalled wa n
picocuries I
mental Pn tection
ported Monday that
the 15 million horrv i
last winter in -
Indian land r
ceeded the :
standard
But the Ra
Section in the ' -
of Human
ducted a ur.
the state
radon problen
be as sou re as
countrv said Mel Frv
chief ot the
Section t th. N
Human Resources
He said
lower raden le
Rapt
RALE1 .C
prediction t the K
prelude to tin -
Christ, was half I
wrong, some P n1
fundamer
While a Bibl
dieted that belie
rethink their b
the believers proved
Thev conceded that tl
wrong, but sa .
would occur
at anfc-44aTf
.
feSflvs ncf rfttn
the dav nor the ho
said Tuesda i 1
ing to the g sp
Crusade on tin I
Asheville. The t
was not plan I
ture, Rab said.
More than 100r
tening to the preachj
singing about an he
sundown Menti
ture brought -
skepticism and seme o
The Rapture ua-
Edgar Whisenant
Little Rock. Ark
tired NASA rocket em
self-taught Bible
had said lesus
the church -tak I
heaven -by s
Tuesdav
He changed hi
Tuesdav. setting the r
for 9:55 a.m
Whisenant s or.
tions were made in 1
Reasons Why The Rajj
Be In 1968
About 1 million
copvnghted book hi
circulated throe.
tion, two-thirds -
rest given awa) -
Bob Doom vho run
tian bookstore m ' I
pastor ot Grace Fellow
tist Church a B
fundamentalist chur.
"Why copyright th
you won t he here to
royalties?' Doomasl
Doom who also v
Bentsen caiq
in Greenvill
OnFridav.Sept. In.
Vice-Presidential
Uovd Bentsen ot Texj
the Tut County Couj
address questions re!
campaign.
He will be joined b
Gore oi Tennesce
Commissioner of
James Graham.
The campaign rail vj
12:30 p.m. on the
steps. Sen. Bentsen
issues relating to s
fense, agriculture an(
Refreshments an
ment will be provide
is encouraged to attcj
information, or to vdj
355-0744





linian
i
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1988 3
ISATURDAY
mateurs
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trial Drive
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And
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Radon gas haunts homes
About 10 percent of N. C.
homes may have excessive levels
by opening
Brown, who
is chief of the
of radon, a radioactive gas that N.C. radiation protection section
can cause cancer, state officials in Raleigh, said surveys have
say. shown that high radon levels are
The highest percentage oc- associated with houses that have
curs in the mountains, where a basement, have baseboard
granite that contains uranium- heatingthat doesn't allow for air
producing radon lies near the sur- exchanges and are well-insulated,
lace of the ground.
The state's top radiation offi- He said homeowners can
rial, Dayne Brown, said Monday lower radon levels in their houses
that about 25 percent of the homes bv opening windows on mild
felt or smelled, occurs naturally Kits to test radon levels can be
by the breakdown of uranium, bought for anywhere from $10 to
which is radioactive. $50, Craig said. Each consists of a
The gas, which can't be seen, charcoal-filled canister which
felt or smelled, occurs naturally absorbs radon gas.
by the breakdown of uranium, The canister is set out for a
which is radioactive. few days and then can be mailed
While the federal govern- to the address included with the
ment determines the danger of test kit. At the laboratory, radon
radon gas mostly on studies of levels are estimated by measuring
uranium miners rather than the The canister is set out for
sampled in the mountains ex-
ceeded the federal health stan-
dard of 4 picocuries per liter.
Brown said the highest reading he
recalled was between 45 and 50
picocuries.The U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency re-
ported Monday that 29 percent of
the 15 million homes surveyed
last winter in seven states and on
Indian land in two more states ex-
ceeded the agency's acceptable phone
days and by sealing cracks in
concrete and holes around pipes
with a special caulk.
Meanwhile, officials at the
EPA in Research Triangle Park
said they were inundated Tues-
day with telephone calls from
North Carolina presidents con-
cerned about radon.
"We've been swamped. The
homeowners, officials are con-
vinced that the problem is serious.
"Evenifweareoffbyanorder
of magnituoe, it would still be the
most serious health effects prob-
lem that the EPA faces said
Alfred Craig, a physical scientist
a few days and then can be mailed
to the address included with the
test kit. At the laboratory, radon
levels are estimated by measuring
the radioactivity of the charcoal.
Another home test, called the
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Hank's Homemade Ice g
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312 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
758-0000
Open Friday. Saturday, Sunday til midnight
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HOMEMADE
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has not stopped said
with theEPAinResearchTriangle Alpha-Track test, uses photo-
Park- graphic film to record the passage
The EPA estimates that ra- of radioactive particles. These kits
don-related radiation exposure are set out for a period of months
causes from 5,000 to 20,000 cases and cost from $25 to $50.
of lung cancer a year. "The risks Craig said these are more
for lung cancer are the greatest of accurate test because they meas-
standard of 4 picocuries per liter. Deborah Janes, an EPA spokes- any to non smokers, and the sec- Ure radon over a longer period.
But the Radiation Protection
Section in the N.C. Department Park
of Human Resources con- Ms. Janes said the EPA is rec-
ducted a survey of 500 homes in ommending that homeowners
the state last year and found the test their homes for radon with an
radon problem does not appear to inexpensive testing device. If
be as severe as in other parts of the elevated levels are found, more
country, said Mel Fry, deputy comprehensive followup tests
chief of the Radiation Protection that measure the average annual
woman in the Research Triangle ond largest to all people Craig
said.
5,000 to 20,000 cases of lung
cancer a year. "The risks for lung
cancer are the greatest of any to
non smokers, and the second larg-
est to all people Craig said.
5,000 to 20,000 cases of lung
Section of the N.C. Department of radon exposure should be done cancer a year. "The risks for lung
Human Resources.
He said homeowners can
lower radon levels in their houses
before expensive remedial meas-
ures are taken, she said.
The gas, which can't be seen.
cancer are the greatest of any to
non smokers, and the second larg-
est to all people Craig said.
A third way to test is continu-
ous radon monitor testing, done
by an xpensive instrument that is
installed in a home and measures
levels over a period of time.
D. Bruce Henschel, an EPA
engineer who studies indoor ra-
don exposure, said the highest
radon readings usually are re-
corded in the winter, when colder
outdoor temperatures cause the
gas to seep inside the home from
the underlying soil and rock.
5th Street Subway
NOW
DELIVERS
Under New Management
Hrs: Sun. Wed. 11-2
Thur Fri Sat. 11-3
756-2110
The Plaza
758-7979
5th Street
Rapture was a fifty-fifty deal
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - The
prediction of the Rapture or
prelude to the second coming of
Christ, was half right and half
wrong, some Pcntacostalists and
fundamentalists sav.
While a Biblical scholar pre-
dicted that believers would not
rethink their trust in the theory,
the believers proved him right.
They conceded that the time was
wrong, but said the Rapture still
would occur - and could happen
at arjirfC- W . "
We Wtneoys ncTTTWPrfwwweth
the day nor the hour Bill Raby
said Tuesday night while sway-
ing to the gospel music at the
Crusade on the Green in
Asheville. The three-day event
was not planned for the Rap-
ture, Raby said.
More than 100 people were lis-
tening to the preaching and
singing about an hour after
sundown. Mention of the Rap-
ture brought smiles, some of
skepticism and some of joy.
The Rapture was predicted by
Edgar Whisenant, a 56-year-old
Little Rock, Ark. resident, re-
tired NASA rocket engineer and
self-taught Bible student who
had said Jesus would "rapture
the church" - take the faithful to
heaven - by sunset
Tuesday.
He changed his prediction
Tuesday, setting the final hour
for 9:55 a.m. CDT today.
Whisenant's original predic-
tions were made in his book "88
Reasons Why The Rapture Will
Be In 1988
About 1 million copies of the
copyrighted book have been
circulated throughout the na-
tion, two-thirds sold for $2, the
rest given away, said the Rev.
Bob Doom, who runs a Chris-
tian bookstore in Ashevile and is
pastor of Grace Fellowship Bap-
tist Church, a "Bible-believing
fundamentalist church
"Why copyright the book if
you won't be here to get the
royalties?" Doom asked.
Doom, who also does some
Bentsen campaigns
in Greenville
On Friday, Sept. 16, Democratic
Vice-Presidential candidate
Lloyd Bentsen of Texas will be at
the Pitt County Court House to
address questions relative to his
campaign.
He will be joined by U.S. Sen. Al
Gore of Tennesee and N.C.
Commissioner of Agriculture
James Graham.
The campaign rally will begin at
12:30 p.m. on the court house
steps. Sen. Bentsen will address
issues relating to students, de-
fense, agriculture and health care.
Refreshments and entertain-
ment will be provided. The public
is encouraged to attend. For more
information, or to volunteer call
355-0744.
publishing, said the book was
printed on poor quality paper
with a low-cost cover. Publish-
ing costs must have been low -
maybe a dime or 15 cents.
"Most folks who have some
sort of thorough knowledge of
the
Scripture just sort of laughed at
the thing he said. Whisenant's
premise is interesting he
said, "but he's got a mixture of
truth ar I error
A Dui 'niversity theologian
said evt the event doesn't
happen sooi beMev�r�. won't
give up.
"I don't expect it to go away.
Every time they predict and it
doesn't come to pass, " they
don't get embarrassed by that.
They just reload. And they say
.We miscalculated said James
Efird, professor of biblical inter-
pretation at Duke's Divinity
School.
"In other words, a true believer
doesn't give up ju t because
there's been a disap ointment,
and these people, I fearlessly
predict, will go on predicting
Efird said.
Efird said predictions pin-
pointing the time of The Rap-
ture cause a stir every couple of
years.
"They've all come to naught.
Most of these predictions are
based on a system of interpreta-
tion based on faulty presupposi-
tions Efird said.
He said the system used by
Whisenant and others dates
back to 1829, when Irish minis-
ter John Nelson Darby began
predicting the end of the world.
Efird believes such predic-
tions give religon a bad name.
"A.wt of people�w� mtmm$tk
from Christianity and bibiical
study and responsible religion
because of these kind of sensa-
tional predictions It keeps
people away from studying the
Bible he said.
Before word was out that the
day and hour of the Rapture had
been changed, Jerry McLamb,
37, of Coats, was "just waiting
on the Lord" while continuing
his work at his auto repair shop
Tuesday afternoon.
"I've been bom again a year and
a half. I'm read) to meet
Jesushe said.
McLamb said he believes the
Rapture could come within the
next few days.
In the Guilford County town of
Gibsonville, a 27-year-old man
holed up in a house after being
told by a religious sect that the
world was coming to an end.
Shots were fired Periodically
from the house in which Ricky
Odell Chavis remained barri-
caded early today. The standoff
began about 6 p.m. Monday .
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MONDAY
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Pete Fernald, dmiMtut
Chip Carter, mw �,�
James F.J. McKee, d 4�!
Joe Harris, n�� &
Doug Joi bmson, sp, m
Tim Hampton, f-�, &
Michelle England, cmm�j.
Debbie Stevens, s
JEFF PARKER,smiijrF��or
TOM FURR, CirtuUtKm M�tr
Susan Howell, ��� m
John W. Medlin, a am
Mac Clark, ��,�� m-
10:55
10:54 I 10:55"
September 15,1988
OPINION
Page 4
Drugs
Should they be legalized?
Much has been wTitten, debated chemicals might be dangerous,
and demonstrated concerning the addictive or even impair day-to-day
legalization of drugs since the 60s, functioning?"
when their use became most popu- Many prescription drugs are
lar. It is pretty much an endless ar- dangerous addictive and impair
gument. daily functioning, like Valium and
Whether or not illegal drugs Codeine. These drugs may not cause
become legalized in our lifetimes is those symptoms with the severity
not the main issue though. The illegal drugs might, but the fact
underlying factor in this argument, remains they are available, and no
the argument over abortion, reli- laws prevent them from being
gion, politics and just about every taken.
other debatable issue is choice. Questions are raised about the
Should people have the right to do behavior of people taking drugs,
drugs, abort unborn children, wor- and whether they would be more
ship the way they want etc. prone to break laws while under the
In most cases, the question is influence. This would definetly in-
moot. This country was founded on fringe on the rights of others, but this
the principles of choice and individ- has never been proven.
ual rights. It's when individual Legalizing drugs will not solve
rights begin infringing on other's the problems of substance abuse
rights that grey areas start popping and trafficking or help decrease
up. crime. But legalizing marijuana
So it is with drugs. The question andor cocaine, if only for medici-
becomes one of "Is it okay for some- nal purposes, would be another step
one to put whatever chemicals they towards a more Constitutional
want in their bodies even if those United States.
Rapture?
aJUo M�0
uo?s.es
No WAVff
See, 1lbu
Paper needs improvement
mtcmmotnAm
4�wr-M7MejnMeM�
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of mew Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
of joyner Library.
Tor purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages, double
spaced or neath printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial material
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Campus
Spectrum
Forum
rules
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
To the editor:
Who is The East Carolinian
printed for?
When I was a news editor for The
East Carolinian in 1987, this was an
important question in my mind.
But this is an easy question to
answer, isn't it? The East Carolinian is
a student newspaper. The students,
and the faculty and administration,
look to this newspaper to tell them
what's happening at ECU.
The newspaper can also enter-
tain with reviews and humor col-
umns. Sometimes it can offer valu-
able advice concerning health or
safety.
In the past few weeks, however,
there has been squabbling over alleg-
edly sexist pictures and complaints
about supposedly obscene feature
articles. Meanwhile, the newspaper
suffers from editorial and journalistic
errors that are hard to ignore.
Whether or not the material is
obscene is, in my mind, irrelevant.
The newspaper's image is failing for
reasons thatgt) beyond a woman tied
up on the front page. The newspaper
is losing its credibility. The reason is
simple: lack of purpose. You are
spending more time concerned with
your jokes than with giving your
readers a product that offers a cred-
ible news product.
There has been blatant editorial-
izing (expression of opinion) in news
stories and headlines. There have
been lead paragraphs without verbs
and news stories without attribution.
The so-called "Satire Page" ap-
pears deceptively similar to real
news, despite its title. The "bogus
press" (BP) stories bear a scary re-
semblance to the garbage found in
the National Enquirei.
Although I don't really care
about the "offensive" material, I
would suggest that if you feel you
must print columns about "wet
spots" after sex and fictional ac-
counts of a squirrel man, confine it to
one clearly labeled page.
Make the format of this page
consistent and make sure it is done in
a different type style or format than
regular news.
I realize that such mistakes are a
natural part of a student newspaper:
it is a learning experience. But I know
the staff can do better.
Try to edit the front page (and all
the pages) more closely. This is your
showcase�as unfair as it may seem,
lead paragraphs without verbs and
misspelling Ficklen Stadium will
make people take you less seriously.
Major errors in journalistic
judgement combined with errors in
grammar and style distract the
reader from enjoying the paper. And
such mistakes will destroy a
newspaper's credibility.
If these mistakes continue, your
news sources will not trust you to
write a competent story. They will
not want to talk to you (although
many of them must do so anyway).
Yes, you have a right to satirize
and poke fun (within the limits of the
law), but if you spend more time
devoted to such jesting and less time
to editing of stories and headlines,
people will think The East Carolinian
is a joke, not a newspaper.
This would be the least funny
joke of all.
Andy Lewis,
Senior
English
Vote Bush
To the editor;
I Do you know what November
the 8th is? It's a day that 77 percent of
ECU students will forget to vote. Out
of the 23 percent that voted last time,
67 percent voted Republican. In an
age where swing voters decide the
final outcome, college students could
make a tremendous difference. If
only 50 percent of college students
would have voted last time, the U.S.
Senate would still be in control of the
Republicans. We also would not
have Terry the Flip-Flop Man repre-
senting us in Washington.
The last eight years have been
when most of us have grown up. In
all of those years, I can't remember
any time that I have not been proud of
being an American. No other country
in the world can match the opportu-
nity and peace that we have here.
That is why I cannot understand why
anyone would risk going back to the
failed liberal policies of the past.
I was ten years old when Jimmy
Carter became President. Unemploy-
ment, inflation and interest rates
were low. In just four years they were
the highest this country has ever
seen. He let 52 Americans spend over
a year in the hands of Iranian mad-
men, and they weren't there on vaca-
tion.
The communist spread into
Afghanistan and in our own back
yard, Nicaragua. Our country's econ-
omy and military might had lost it's
edge. He said it was because of the
people, we were in a malaise.
In the eight years that followed,
Americans voted in Ronald Reagan
and George Bush. With their new
common sense policies America
turned around. Se- enteen million
new jobs, 67 straigh months of eco-
nomic growth, thelc v'est unemploy-
ment rate in 12 years, and a new
enthusiastic pride in America.
Not one country has fallen to
Communism in the last eight years
and for the first time we are destroy-
ing nuclear weapons instead of just
building them. This is why I feel so
lucky to have grown up in this time.
This year we have a clear choice
we can stay with a strong proven
leader, or choose a leader so liberal
that he makes Jimmy Carter look like
Jerry Fall well. This man's policies are
so hypocritical, that I believe his
coach is Jim Bakker and Tammy is his
make up artist. Tammy hid his liberal
face well, but its time we wash it.
I believe if we make a wrong
choice, we risk our economy, country
and our freedom. Can we risk all that
on a man who thinks fun is jogging in
grit socks and Sunday school shoes,
while holding hand weights?
We need a person with vision
and experience. A person who has
made it on his own in business. A
person who cares about family and
young people. A man that can say no
to new taxes and no to releasing rap-
ist and murderers.
A man who will instead cut taxes
and will only release murderers
through the death penalty program.
A man who didn't hesitate to recom-
mend sending troops to Granada to
save American students, like us. That
man in George Bush.
Bobby R. Hall, Jr.
ECU Chairman for Bush 88
Pen pal wanted
To the editor:
I'm a prisoner in desperate need
of letters from the free world.
My name is Kurt Douglas Ray-
mer. I've wrote there before and had
a few responses but lost my address
book while I was in court in Missis-
sippi. So any of you who wanna write
feel free, I'll answer any letters and all
questions.
I just got 15 years in May 1988 for
the federal prison system, and have 3
years for the State here in Kentucky I
got 15 years for writing some threat-
ening letters to my ex-parole officer
But am on appeal to 5th circuit court
in New Orleans and am pretty sure
I'll get a reversal and a new trial and
will only get 2 or 3 years instead of the
15 years.
I am 32 years old, brown hair and
blue eyes. Weigh 150, 5 ft. 8 in. tall.
I've been in prison about 712 years
and hoping to get out in 1991 if things
go right in courts. But my luck is not
the best. I just got a new 15 years, but
I'm in court on appeal on it.
If you're interested in writing me
my address is below. I'd like to get to
know you and let you know me. So
pick up your pen in your spare time
and drop a line or two. It will make
my day.
In Struggle
Kurt D. Ravmer
J
address is:
Kurt D. Raymer 89573
K. S. P. P.O. Box 128
Eddyville, Kentucky 42038-0128
Save parking
To the editor:
This letter is in response to ban-
ning freshmen from parking on
campus. If a rule such as this was
enforced, it would be a serious error.
Like the article stated, ECU is one
of the only major universities in the
UNC system to allow freshmen to
park on campus. This may very well
be the deciding factor for a student
who plans to work while in school.
Two of the freshmen lots (5th St.
Reade St. and 3rd St.Reade St.) hold
approximately 150 and 400 cars.
At first glance, this does appear
to be a considerable amount of
spaces. The main parking problem
revolves around commuters and
staff; their (esp. commuters) re-
peated complaints are that the lot$
are too far away. If most commuters
avoid parking as "far away" as Men
denhall, what commuter would park
on 3rd St. Reade St.?
Hopefully, the proposed 951
space surface lot additions will ease
the burden somewhat. I just don't see
how banning freshmen from parking
on campus would alleviate any of thi
current commuterstaff parking
problems. What are some feasible
solutions?
- Separating the lots into "far
commuter" (Mendenhall, Library,
9th St.) and "close commuter" UOSt
College Hill, Nursing). Those who
are willing to pay more will have the
privelege of parking closer.
- Evening out the number of staff
spaces to commuter spaces. Slowly
but surely commuters are being
pushed out of the main campus and
more and more staff lots are opening
up. Why?
- Increase the sticker price for
freshmen since it is a privelege not
found elsewhere.
Although others have suggested
some of these same solutions before,
I feel that they are much more practi-
cal than a ban for freshmen.
Rachel Romano,
Junior
Pre-Physical Therapy
:�"
T
; �
IRSfi
: COLUMBIA, S.C (AP)
JSRS agent says he could t
documentation to prove a I
imate business purpose for)
jsonal 300-foot water slid
(Rolls Royce automobile
hundreds of thousands oi
that Jim and Tammv Bakke
key aide got through
counts.
; Larry Howlett, an audito j
Jexempt organizations, w
becond witness Tuesday
trial of PTL's $52 milli I
iagainst the Bakkers and
PTLaide David Taggart. T
�began Monday in U.S
jruptcy Court.
PTL attorneys are seekii
;the Bakkers and Taggart
!the money they sav w
through through mismi
mern of funds that incl I
advances on PTL credit
unjustified compensati
ben fits.
Hijaq
FRANKFURT, West Gei
(AP) - Mohammed Ali Hi
today accused witnes
tnal of failing to tell I
day after they test
Hamadi gloated over
of an American pac-
ing the hijacking of a TWl
Hamadi, a Lebanese Shutef
lem, is accused oi murder aj
piracy in the June 1985hija
U.S. Navy diver Robert Sti
was killed and 39 Amei
were held captive for 1" d
'The testimony very
ates far from trie truth
told the court today.
On Tuesday, flight enj
Benjamin Zimmerman;
scribed how Hamadi po
with pnde to bloodstain-
murdered U.S. hostage anj
lier, pilot John Testrake m
fied Hamadi as the hiiackej
shot Stethem to death an(
he was the leader
operation. Hamadi .
"I was not the leader
commando
The"de?endant did fie
anything about testimony
he had gloated over the
of Stethem.
He also did not sa
about who killed Stetl
However, In testimony AJ
he vehemently denied th
had shot Stethem.
Hamadi told the court
that the hand grenades th
hijackers had brought on
had been deactivated an1
explosive material taken
"We didn't get on board to!
up the plane in mid-air
madi told the court. He sj
Possible ban
on trawling
(AP) � Non-ocean ti
eventually should bo r�l
because it kills young nsl
shellfish and damages hf
Washington, N.Cbased
ronmental group's rep.
A subcommittee ot the
lico-Tar River Foundation
the recommendation in a
released recently. Founj
officials said Tuesday the
is not final and the organi
which claims about 1300
bers, will divide in the nej
or three weeks it it will a
the recommendation
The report has touch!
strong criticism and opp
by commercial fisher mei
ing a meeting of the
County Board of Comrrj
ers last week, angry nsl
said a ban on trawling H
and sounds would be a trl
their livelihood. Clinton
chairman ot the Carteret I
Watermen's Association
ban trawling in nvei
sounds would hit about
cent of the state's fishet
would just about wipe
Willis told the News a
server of Raleigh m a tell
interview from Marshal.
Carteret County.
Willis, who said his L
resented about 400 peoi
mated that he fished aj
days of the year in oceai
and the rest inside. He sai
boats were not built to oj
rougher waters in the





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1988 5

A
foU

ent
tct 15 years in May 1988 for
rison system, and have 3
State here in Kentucky. I
r- tor writing some threat-
p s to mv c-parole officer,
appeal to 5th circuit court
Ir'cans and am pretty sure
Versal and a new trial and
k 12 or 3 years instead of the
2 v ears old, brown hair and
.Vcigh 150, 5 ft. 8 in. tall.
lr� prison about 712 years
g to get out in 1991 if things
courts. But my luck is not
Ijust got a new 15 years, but
irt on appeal on it.
're interested in writing me
is below. I'd like to get to
and let you know me. So
ur pen in your spare time
a line or two. It will make
In Struggle
Kurt D. Raymer
less is:
1D. Ravmer 89573
P. P.O. Box 128
rville, Kentucky 42038-0128
ve parking
ie editor:
letter is in response to ban-
?shmen from parking on
If a rule such as this was
it would be a serious error
i the article stated, ECU is one
major universities in the
astern to allow freshmen to
1 campus. This may very well
leading factor for a student
ins to work while in school,
the freshmen lots (5th St.
kt and 3rd St.Reade St.) hold
imately 150 and 400 cars.
first glance, this does appear
la considerable amount of
The main parking problem
� around commuters and
their (esp. commuters) re
I complaints are that the lots
far away. If most commuters
parking as "far away" as Men
1, what commuter would park
St. Rcade St.?
Ipefully, the proposed 951
lurface lot additions will ease
den somewhat. I just don't see
Inning freshmen from parking
jpus would alleviate any of the
(t commuterstaff parking
is. What are some feasible
Ins? .
?parating the lots into "far
jter" (Mendenhall, Library,
land "close commuter" UOSt
Hill, Nursing). Those who
ling to pay more will have the
e of parking closer.
ening out the number of staff
to commuter spaces. Slowly
(rely commuters are being
out of the main campus and
id more staff lots are opening
crease the sticker price for
?n since it is a privelege not
elsewhere.
hough others have suggested
these same solutions before,
at they are much more practi-
a ban for freshmen.
Rachel Romano,
Junior
Pre-Physical Therapy
IRS finds Bakker's tax returns questionable
i COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) � An
(IRS agent says he could find no
'documentation to prove a legiti-
mate business purpose for a per-
sonal 300-foot water slide, two
JRolls Royce automobiles and
�hundreds of thousands of dollars
that Jim and Tammy Bakker and a
key aide got through PTL ac-
counts.
Larry Howlett, an auditor of tax-
jexempt organizations, was the
�second witness Tuesday in the
Strial of PTL's $52 million claim
iagainst the Bakkers and former
IpTL aide David Taggart. The trial
Sbegan Monday in U.S. Bank-
jruptcy Court.
(PTL attorneys are seeking to force
the Bakkers and Taggart to repay
'the money they say was lost
'through through mismanage-
ment of funds that included cash
advances on PTL credit cards and
unjustified compensation and
ben fits.
Howlett listed among the expen-
ditures with no legitimate busi-
ness purpose a 300-foot water
slide at Bakker's Lake Wylie
home, which has since been sold,
and $32,000 worth of luggage.
Howlett also said the IRS could
find no documentation to support
the business purpose of some
$300,000 in cash advances made
to Bakker and Taggart between
1984 and 1986.
"There was no back-up docu-
mentation for any of the cash
ad vances,none of them Howlett
said.
"We tried to evaluate the busi-
ness nature of these items, but we
could not determine any business
purpose Howlett said. Howlett
also testified that records show
neither Bakker nor Taggart at-
tempted to reimburse the minis-
try for money taken from three ex-
ecutive accounts.
The PTL television ministry and
Heritage USA theme park at Fort
Mill filed for reorganization in
bankruptcy court in June 1987,
three months after Bakker left the
ministry amid a sex and money
scandal involving church secre-
tary Jessica Hahn.
Earlier Tuesday, a former PTL ac-
countant said he was frustrated
that Bakker and other top minis-
try executives continually ig-
nored his memos warning that the
ministry financially was facing
"real emergencies
Peter Bailey, who was an ac-
countant and financial director at
PTL from June 1979 through July
1987, also testified that top execu-
tives received bonuses in antici-
pation of money coming into the
ministry's coffers, but that there
was often no money in the bank to
cover those bonuses.
Bakker attorney Ryan Hovis said
Tuesday that U.S. Bankruptcy
Judge Rufus Reynolds is expected
to adjourn the trial after this
week's testimony. "We'll proba-
bly present our case in a month or
so Hovis said during a break in
the hearing.
Hovis was to cross-examine
Howlett during the trial today.
Bailey testified Tuesday he rou-
tinely warned Bakker of the finan-
cial troubles the ministry was
having, but was continually frus-
trated by a'iack of financial integ-
rity" on the part of top executives.
The former chief financial officer
added that efforts by his staff to
control cash advances were
stopped by top executives.
"Bakker would buy things on the
spur of the moment, for auctions
and things, and he'd pay cash for
them Bailey said.
Bailey said that memos regard-
ing cost reductions and a limit of
expenditures were either ignored
or inadequately responded to.
He admitted that Bakker and
other executives did at times
show concern nuses given to the
Bakkers and Taggart at the same
time the ministry was having seri-
ous financial problems. Ministry
attorney Tom White introduced a
financial statement showing that
at the end of January 1987, PTL
had only $426,000 in cash on
hand, had assets of about $12
million, and liabilitieees off about
$41 million. Bailey confirmed that
despite that negative balance of
some $29 million, Bakker in Feb-
ruary was given bonuses of as
much as $450,000.
"They kept spending money
Baily said. "There seemed no end
to it
Bailey admitted that in 1987 he
received some $55,000 in bonuses.
He testified thaat in 1986 his base
salary was $55,000.
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Hijacker says witnesses lying
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FRANKFURT, West Germany
(AP) - Mohammed Ali Hamadi
today accused witnesses at his
trial of failing to tell the truth a
day after they testified that
Hamadi gloated over the killing
of an American passenger dur-
ing the hijacking of a TWA jet.
Hamadi, a Lebanese Shiite Mos-
lem, is accused of murder and air
piracy in the June 1985 hijacking.
U.S. Navy diver Robert Stethem
was killed and 39 Americans
were held captive for 17 days.
"The testimony very often devi-
ates far from the truth Hamadi
told the court today.
On Tuesday, flight engineer
Benjamin Zimmermann de-
scribed how Hamadi pointed
with pride to bloodstains of the
murdered U.S. hostage and ear-
lier, pilot John Testrake identi-
fied Hamadi as the hijacker who
shot Stethem to death and said
he was the leader of the
operation. Hamadi said today:
"1 was not the leader of the
commando - - �
The" (defendant did not say"
anything about testimony that
he had gloated over the killing
of Stethem.
He also did not say anything
about who killed Stethem.
However, In testimony Aug. 9,
he vehemently denied that he
had shot Stethem.
Hamadi told the court today
that the hand grenades the two
hijackers had brought on board
had been deactivated and the
explosive material taken out.
"We didn't get on board to blow
up the plane in mid-air Ha-
madi told the court. He spoke in
Possible ban
on trawling
(AP) � Non-ocean trawling
eventually should be banned
because it kills young fish and
shellfish and damages habitat,
Washington, N.C-ba. i envi-
ronmental group's report says.
A subcommittee of the Pam-
lico-Tar River Foundation made
the recommendation in a report
released recently. Foundation
officials said Tuesday the report
is not final and the organization,
which claims about 1,500 mem-
bers, will decide in the next two
or three weeks if it will endorse
the recommendation.
The report has touched off
strong criticism and opposition
by commercial fishermen. Dur-
ing a meeting of the Beaufort
County Board of Commission-
ers last week, angry fishermen
said a ban on trawling in rivers
and sounds would be a threat to
their livelihood. Clinton Willis,
chairman of the Carteret County
Watermen's Association, said a
ban trawling in rivers and
sounds would hit about 80 per-
cent of the state's fishermen. "It
would just about wipe us out
Willis told the News and Ob-
server of Raleigh in a telephone
interview from Marshallberg in
Carteret County.
Willis, who said his group rep-
resented about 400 people, esti-
mated that he fished about 10
days of the year in ocean waters
and the rest inside. He said many
boats were not built to operate in
rougher waters in the ocean.
Arabic, and his testimony was
translated into German by an
interpreter.
On Tuesday, Zimmermann
described, how he and Hamadi,
who has acknowleged taking
part in the hijacking, made a
walk-around inspection of the
aircraft in Algiers, where it had
been flown after Stethem was
killed in Beirut.
"When we went around the
front, the nose of the airplane,
Mr.Hamadi joyfully pointed to
the (dried) blood running down
the door. And with the pistol he
pointed - he indicated - he was
very proud of this gun and of
him having caused this, Zim-
mermann told the court. After
Stethem was shot, his body was
thrown onto the runway in
Beirut before the flight to Algi-
ers. In previous testimony,
Flight 847 pilot John Testrake
identified Hamadi as Stethem's
killer.
Zimmermann also testified he
was kicked and pistol-whipped
during the hijacking.
Zimmermann said the hijack-
ers took turns in the beatings,
but Hamadi was the more me-
thodical, with the other hijacker
more impulsive and excitable.
He said the second air pirate
once "attempted to jump up and
kick the co-pilot with a grenade
in his hand
"But somehow he got tangled
up in the seat, and then the
jumping stopped Zimmer-
mann also described the events
that led up to Stethem's shoot-
ing.
He said that during ex-
cited negotiations between the
hijackers and the control tower
in Beirut, Hamadi suddenly
shouted "Get up! Get up to
Stethem, who lay bound and
beaten just outside the cockpit
door.
above the engine noises. The
shock of that noise was added to
by the co-pilot on the radio stat-
ing that we needed fuel because
they were killing passengers
Zimmermann tojd the court.
He said he did not know which
hijacker had the pitol just be-
fore the sailor was shot.
GET YOUR
FUTURE OFF
HE GROUND
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Contact
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
WRIGHT ANNEX, RM 312
919-757-6598
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September 17-
Saturday,
September 20,1988
Store Hours: Open Sundays 1 p.m. - 6 p.m
Mondays - Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m
W -V I





V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
,
SEPTEMBER 15,196E
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Tar River
Apartments: OWN bedroom, $130 a
month plus 13 utilities. Call 830-6735.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom, new carpet, close
to campus. Tar River Estates. Call 830-
3915.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Duplex
House. 12 block from campus. 2 bed-
rooms. Large kitchen and living room.
$250.00. Phone 752-7538.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
bdrm. duplex 1 blk from campus. $125
mo. per person. $125 deposit. Call after
7:00 p.m 830-3909.
FOR RENT: Large, 1 bedroom duplex
near university. 213 S. Eastern Street,
$230, 758-5299.
FOR RENT: Large 3 bedroom house near
university. 111 East 9th St. $360.758-5399.
ROOM it BOARD available near cam-
pus for female non-smokerwork ex-
change. Call 757-1798.
APT. FOR RENT: Located 3 blocks from
campus. Low rent, great location. Call
Luke or Steve for more details. 830-0339.
ROOMMATE WANTED for a 2 bed-
room apartment in Twin Oaks. $157.50
per month plus 1 2 utilities. Call 757-0316
or 757-7991. Ask for Marni.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY: Crad Stu-
dent (Biology) looking for Grad. Student
roommate. $80 shared, $135 private, de-
posit & 1 3 phone & util. Close to campus,
AC, pool, laundry. Female, non-smoker,
studious, & quiet but pleasant company.
Call Carla at 758-6837.
FOR SALE
NEW BAREFOOT SUIT - Never used.
Full flotation. Blue and gray, $75. Tan and
brown couch - $30.1981 Camaro- DK Blue
- $2000. Call 752-2830 leave message. All
items must go!
MUST SELL: Two Air Conditioners - one
4000 B.T.U. for $110, one 5000 B.T.U. for
$135. Call 757-1319 - ask for Eric or leave
name and number. Thanx.
FOR SALE: 1984 Berlinetta CamaroSpe-
cial Edition Beautiful Car $6,500.00.
Call today! 758-4924.
FOR SALE: Schwinn Ten speed. Black
and silver, good cond. $80. Call after 6:00.
830-3909.
FOR SALE: 1974 Honda 450 good cond.
$300 (neg.) plus spare engine & wheels.
Call after 6.00 830-3909.
FOR SAJL�; Canon. T$Q Auto-Focus
camera, 50 mm 1 ens, 60-300 mm zoom lens
and electronic flash. $450. Call Bryan 752-
0270.
FOR SALE: Crate GS150 watt amp. Brand
new. 15" electra voice speaker. 20 ft. patch
chord included. $275. 758-74 - Jay.
SOFA, CHAIR: Floral Print. Great condi-
tion - no tears, need to sell. 756-8913 after
5:30 p.m.
1980, 850 SUZUKI, black, 4 cycl. drive
shaft, 2 fiber glass luggage type saddle-
bags, windshield, space helmet, new bat-
tery & brake shoes. $750. Call 756-8692.
SERVICES OFFERED
QUALIFIED TUTORING in Latin &
French. Call 758-7592.
CAR STEREO INSTALLATIONS per-
formed in your driveway. 5 yrs. experi-
ence. Very reasonable. Very professional.
Call for appointment! 756-9864. Cars,
boats, home, VCRs, etc.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
DWI? Don't Drink & Drive. Come Party
In Style. Call Class Act Limousine 757-
3240.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties dance, top 40 it beach. Call 355-2781,
ask for Morgan.
SCHOOLS IN: Time to party! Call us for
your music needs. We'll beat all prices and
videotape your party. The Power Station
D.Js. 752-0940.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Need experienced
painter, carpenter, handyman to work
part-time or weekends or both. Also pos-
sible help landscaping needed. 758-0897.
HELP WANTED: Marketers to work 10-
20 hrs. a week. Must be willing to talk to all
types of people. Great sales experience.
758-0897.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also cruiseships.
$10,000 - $105,000yr! Now Hiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext OJ-1166.
MKTG. FIRM seeks individual to work
ft or pt marketing credit cards to stu-
dents on campus. Flexible hours. Earn b
w $90.00-5150.00day. Call 1-800-932-
0528, Ext. 25.
NEEDED: Someone to work with Clean-
ing Service on Tuesday and Wednesdays.
Please call 756-4099.
HELP WANTED: The SGA announces an
opening in the Student Services Board.
The position is Assistant Refrigerator
Rental Manager. Salary is $150.00 a
month. No experience required. Applica-
tions are available in room 222 Menden-
hall. Deadline 5:00 Friday, Sept. 16. For
more info contact Tripp Roakes at 757-
6611, ext. 218.
BRODY'S AND BRODVS FOR MEN
are now accepting applications for the fall
semester. Enthusiastic individuals who
enjoy fashion and can work flexible hours
should apply. Brady's, Carolina East
Mall. Monday through Wednesday, 2-4
p.m.
PIRA" WALK IS ON THE RISE! Walk
ers . jpcrators needed. Applications
will b located at the Student Store Tues
Sept. 20,10-1 or call 758-7114 for informa-
tion.
PERSONALS
DELTA SIGS AND SAE'S: We had a fan-
tastic time at the pref party! Thanxs for
helping us celebrate our pledges. We hope
to do something with you guys again.
Congratulations to AOPi's, Beta Lamb-
das; Delta Sig's, Beta Epsilons; and SAE's,
Alphas! Good luck to all! love the AOPi's.
AMANDA BREWER: Congrats on rush!
You did fantastic but your earrings look
like. . . NAPKIN RINGS love the
AOPi's.
BETA'S: The pledge blowout was defi-
nitely a blast you really showed us how to
make a party last. You welcomed our
pledges in style which proves ya'll are
more than wild! We parried all through
the night with kegs of beer and P.J which
did us right. Thanks for a great time. Can't
wait to party with the betas again another
time. Love the ZETA's.
OX: Congratulations on a great rush.
Thanks for asking us to be a part of it. The
ZETA's all had a great time and can't wait
to party with the brothers and pledges
again real soon. Love the Zeta's.
ZTA: Congratulations to our new sisters
Sara Home and Kim Heinly. You've made
us proud. Love the Zeta's.
ZTA PLEDGES! Congratulations! and
get ready for lots of fun this semester!
Love the sisters.
AOPI'S: Pref night was incredible! The
suds were flowing, the music was pump-
ing, and we were all getting wild. It's too
bad that the cop wouldn't stay and party.
That just meant more Pi for us. Love - The
Delta Sigs.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY JODI: Scrub me
while we get rody runk tonight. We think
about you more than anyone and that's
great. (But we'd like to see more of your
bedroom) I lappy 20th you sorority bim!
We love you. Hellion, Skank and Breff.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
L.E.W "In to deep I'll miss you. My
Fellow Pikes, "the seal" is back!
THE DELTA SIGS would like to con-
gratulate our new pledges: Joe Bobrow-
ski, Patrick "Conan" Campbell, Brian
Egger, Gene Furr, Mack Hannon, J.D.
Jamison, Patrick Magdanz, Charles Mas-
scy. Bill Shueart, and Steve Spell. Good
luck guys! We're looking forward to a
great semester. The Delta Sigs.
PHI TAU: Congratulations to the 28 new
pledges! We wish you the best of luck
rushing! Love, you lil' sisters.
THE BROTHERS OF ALPHA SIGMA
PHI would like to congratulate their fall
pledges: David Baird, Robert Barto, Rich-
ard Basili, Scott Crawford, Mike Curtis,
David Freeman, Tony George, Greg Gen-
try, Ronald Giles, John Gist, James Gray,
Eric Halus, Kevin Harris, Don Harvey,
Chris Herman, Steve Huston, Scott
Mulwee, Chris McHenry, Chris
Naughton, Billy Schiff, Korey Shroutis,
Haywood Tyndall, Brady White, Randy
Wynn, Chip Lanier, Jason Yoder. Get
ready for a killer semester!
SIG EP. Pimp and Hooker was the name,
getting money what a game. We all
dressed up, some more than most. You
guys can sure throw a party that we must
boast. We all had fun, that is no lie, Con-
grats to your new pledges, they are all real
cool guys. Love the Sigmas.
KA LITTLE SISTER RUSH: From 8:00 to
11:00 Sept. 19,20,21. Sept. 19,20,come and
meet the brothers and sisters. Sept. 21, in-
vitation only. Hope to see you there.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Our last minute
gig, last Sunday night, turned out to be an
interesting sight. The night started out
early to begin the fun, as soon ss the funk
songs started, James got us shaking our
buns. The rain didn't stop us, from com-
ing in full force. Because we always have
a good time with all, but you know that
of course. So thanks for inviting us and
ending our weekend right. We are looking
forward to seeing you again one very soon
night. Love the AZDs.
9 KEGS, 36 BOTTLES of champagne,
tequila, Jim Beam. NUFsaid. We love you
Chi-Os. Thanks. The Pikes.
PI KAPPA ALPHA would like to apolo-
gize to all the other fraternities about rush.
We took the best and left you the rest.
Sorry. The Pikes.
THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA ALPHA
EPSILON would like to thank the ladies
of ALPHA OM1CRON PI for a great pref
night. We had a Mast!
BILL: It was great to see you this weekend.
Good Luck next weekend at US.C Miss
you lots! Love, Susie.
ERIK: Thanks for the past 8 months
You're someone special. Love, N.
THETA CHI: Welcome new pledges.
Brothers & Pledges call the prez at the hub
to make sure your on the pizza list for
tonight at the house! - The Rev.
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo Car-
tridges with instructions for re-sale. East
Coast Music it Video 758-4251,1109 Char-
les Blvd.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA invites all inter
ested girls to become Crescent Girls. Rush
is Wednesday and Thursday night, start
ing at 9:00. For info call 757-1367 500
Elizabeth St.
NEED A RIDE to Alabama on Thanksgjv
ing Break. Please call now to confirm! 758
8727 - Tom.
READY TO ROCK on a Wednesday
night? Check out hard rock hooligans
Roulette, who are out to entertain you
with style. Susie's Treehouse, Wednes
day, Sept. 21 at 10:00.
COME SEE THE EMBERS Ive at the K
House for the 1st Annual Board w;
Benefit for MDA. Thurs Sept 15,5-9 pm
Get your tickets now. Coolers are wei
come.
KAPPA ALPHA presents the 1st Annual
Boardwalk Benefit for MDA featuring the
Embers Thurs Sept. 15 from 5-9 p.m
Tickets will be on sale in front of the Stu
dent Store or call 757-0128 Coolers are
welcome!
BASEBALL CARDS: Sell old cards for
cash, call Thomas 756-0685 after 5 p.m
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
A
it.
$ NEED CASH?$
: Loan On ie Buying Guns
TV'S, Stereos, Gold Jewelry, coin.
most anything of value
. Southern Gun & Pawn, Inc. 792-2464

A

or
fi
-u
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mori thru SaL Low
Coat Termlnr CO av ttaa �f prefnancy
1-800-433-2930
I
A Beautiful Place to Live
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�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
� Looted Near BCU
� Aaraa From Highway Patrol Sutta
$325 � month
Contact J. T. or Tommy WOllama
7SA-7�1S or 830.1937
Office open - Apt �, 12 - 530 pjn.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bad room fumahec
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lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couple, or
alnglea. Apartment and mobile homes la Azalea
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Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
75-7815
I
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Savewhen you need it tire - go
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UCWARC of used tires without a
written warranty We warrantee
our tires in writing for 3060 days,
depending on price On the corner
of 1 Iwy 33 and N. Greene 55. Infor-
mation calls welcome - 830-3772
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Friday, Sept 16
Blues Defenders
Saturday, Sept 17
Liquid Sound
513 Cotance St.
(Across from U.B.E.)
CRUSTY'
I lsbaLrl DELIVER
Now Hiring Drivers
Starting Wage $4.00 per hr.
Earn Up To $9.00 per hr.
Flexible hours, Bonuses. Must
have own car and insurance.
Apply in person at 1414 Charles St.
DO YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR
LONG DISTANCE SERVICE?
INTERESTED IN LEARNING ABOUT CALLING
PLANS AND SPECIAL PRODUCTS THAT MAY
SAVE YOU MONEY!
Contact: Dana Dunlow,
Your AT&T Student Campus Manager
Here at ECU
CA11: 752-0856
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Monday - Friday
Announcements
CRAP. STUDENTS
The Graduate Student Advisory Council
has begun to meet for the 1988-89 aca-
demic year and your input is desired. The
council exists to give the graduate student
a voice in decision making processes of
the graduate school.
PSI CHI
Psi Chi - The National Honor Society in
Psychology - announces that applications
for membership are now available in
Rawl-104. Applications need to be com-
pleted and turned in to room 104 by Sept.
23, 1988.
PHI SIGMA FI
Our smoker is Tues. in Mcndenhall rm.
244. All brothers should be there by 6:15.
To all persons who received invitations,
please come out and find out what we are
all about. Refreshments will be served.
WOMEN'S SOCCER CLUB
There is a mandatory meeting Thurs. at
530 p.m. in Memorial Gym, rm. 102. All
new it interested members are welcome.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Electronic Data Systems will be speaking
on Sept. 20 at 4:00 p.m. in room 1028 GCB.
Anyone interested in Business or Business
Ed. is encouraged to attend and ALL
MAJORS are welcome. Phi Beta Lambda
is the collegiate equivilant to FBLA.
PIRPCLUP
The Sept. meeting of the Greenville-River
Park North Bird Club will feature John
Fussell of Morehead Qty. The bird dub
will meet Mon, Sept. 19 at 730 p.m. in the
Parks and Recreation Bldg at J.C. Park.
The dub is open to anyone with an interest
in birds.
SME
The Society of Manufacturing Engineers
is having a called meeting Sept. 20 in Ra wl
106 at 4:00 p m All members and inter-
ested persons are urged to attend. Come
join us and be a survivor!
COLLEGIATE DECA
Collegiate DECA will have its first meet-
ing on Mon Sept. 19 in the GCB room
2015. Anyone who is a Marketing Educa-
tion major is encouraged to attend, be-
come a member and learn all about DECA
at the secondary level. Hope to see you
there!
ESE
The Episcopal Student Fellowship meets
5:30 St. Paul's Church 4th St. Come join us
for fun, food and fellowship in a relaxed
atmosphere. Call Allen Manning at 758-
1440 for more info.
COMPIJTFRCLUB
The East Carolina Computer Club will
meet with Phi Beta Lambda on Sept. 20 at
4:00 p.m. in the GCB, room 1028. Repre-
sentatives from Electronic Data Services
Corp. will present a program.
STUDENT UNION
The All Campus Comedy Competition
presented by the Coffeehouse Committee
of the Student Union needs all comedians
to come and compete. Pick up applica-
tions at Mendenhall info, desk or the
Student Union office by Fri. at 5:00 p.m.
See you there!
SOTWn ADMISSIONS
Applicants for Fall admissions to the
SOCWCJ Program must have picked up
their application by Sept. 23. All first inter-
views with a faculty member must be
scheduled and completed by Oct. 14. The
second interview meeting with Mr. Cart-
man will be held on Oct 19 and 20, at 5.00
p.m. Applicants must have an overal GPA
of 2.5 and completed at least one SOCW
CJ course to apply.
PURE COLD DANCERS
BY PUBLIC DEMAND: The nationally
ranked PURE COLD DANCERS will hold
auditions for two alternate positions. The
tryouts are set for Sept. 21st at 730 p.m
and will be held at the Strength Complex
on 14th St. For more info contact Lynette
at 757-6178
EXAM FFF INCREASE
Due to an increase in cost from the testing
company. The Psychological Corp effec-
tive Jan. 1, 1989, candidates will pay
$30.00 to take the Miller Analogies Test.
fNTVFRSITY UNIONS
Season tickets are now on sale for the Per-
forming Arts Series at ECU. This year
there are 14 outstanding performances
starting in Oct. and running through
April. Some of the attractions indude:
Wynton Marsalis, CABARET, The Acting
Company in Love's Labour's Lost Nadja
Salerno-Sonnenberg, The Tokyo String
Quartet, Oregon, The Atlanta Symphony,
and the Ohio Ballet. For a free brochure,
and further details contact: The Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext.
266.
THE REPEL
The REBEL will be accepting submissions
for the annual poetry and prose contests
continuously until Nov. 7. Submit typed
entries to Media Board or Rebel office.
Open to currently enrolled ECU students
only.
NEW ARRIVALS
The MSC Musk Listening Lounge has
received the following selections on com-
pact disc Aerosmith�Permanent Vaca-
tion; Wynton Marsalis�Standard Time;
INXS�Kick; Ahmad Jamal�Crystal;
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg; Sinead
O'Connor�The Lion and the Cobra; REO
Speedwagon�Life as We Know It. The
Music Listening Lounge is open seven
days a week from 2-10:30 pm. and is
located on the second floor gallery of
Mendenhall. Check out the new tunes
before you buy
PRF-P.T. STUDENTS
All general college pre-physkal therapy
sophomores, or higher, antidpating ap-
plying to the May 1989 Physical Therapy
Class should go to the Physical Therapy
Dept. Office, 1st floor, Belk Bldg before
the end of Sept. to determine eligibility
Instructions for receiving the application
packet will be given then. If you have any
question, contact that office by phone
(757-6961, ext. 261) or in person.
JEWISH STUDENTS
You are welcome to attend the following
High Holiday Services at Temple Bayt
Shalom (1420 E. 14th St. in Greenville):
��Sept. 20th, 7:00 p.m. Erev Yom Kippur
Sept. 21 st, 9:30 a.m. Yom Kippur Morning,
430 p.m. Afternoon Service, Yizor it
N'ilah. For more info, or directions please
call Mike at 75r4930.
��All students are invited to the home of
Dr. Bramy Resnik for a Home Hospitality
Dinner on Sept. 20th at 5:15 p.m. Please
call to RSVP for dinner, for rides, and to
get directions: Dr. Resnik at 355-5321
Oiome) or 757-6521 (work) or Mike at 756-
4930. There is no charge and we will be
providing rides to services.
WINDSURFING
Be sure to attend the Intramural
Windsurfing registration meeting held
from Sept. 6-27. Now you can surf the
waters and learn the technique in this fun
filled trip.
CRpUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept 15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2. Please note that a group
listing with the name of every person in
the photograph MUST be presented BE-
FORE the photographer films the group.
ORGANIZATIONS WITHOUT LIST-
INGS WILL NOT BE PHOTOGRAPHED,
and time does not permit the scheduling
of another session. Call 757-6501 and
leave date it time for the photo to be taken.
Please give two days notice for the pho-
tographer.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
Are you interested in dedicating 6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Overseas Development has
the perfect opportunity. Call Marianne
Exum (h) 830-9450 or (w) 757-6271 for
application and more details. Application
deadline Oct. 1.
CO-OP EDUCATION
Cooperative Education, a free service of-
fered by the University, is designed to
help you find career-related work experi-
ence before you graduate. We would like
to extend an invitation to all students to
attend a Co-op Information Seminar in the
GCB (see schedule below for Sept. Semi-
nars). The only bonuses we can offer you
for taking time from your busy schedule
are
�extra cash to help cover the cost of college
expenses or perhaps to increase you "fun"
budget,
�opportunities to test a career choice if you
have made one or to explore career op-
tions if undecided about a future career,
and
�a highly "marketable" degree, which
indudes a valuable career-related experi-
ence, when you graduate.
Come by to see us today!
CO-OP SEMINARS
Thurs Sept. 15,4 p.m, room 2006; Mon
Sept. 19, 4 pjn room 2006; Thurs Sept.
22, 1 p.m room 2010; Mon Sept. 26, 1
p.m room 2010; Thurs Sept. 29,4 pm
room 2006.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Christian Fellowship will be held every
Thurs. at 6:00 in the Culture Center. You
arc invited to join us in lifting up the name
of Jesus in songs and Bible study. God
Bless You.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off-campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the GCB.
room 2028.
FCU STUDENT BANK
Faculty, staff, and students may now pay
their Greenville Utility bills at the ECU
STUDENT BANK, presenting both parts
of the bill Other services indude cashing
checks, savings accounts, paying tele-
phone bills, and the pur chaw of money
tend. Our first I.C. is at UNC-CH One
major issue to be presented is "Condom
in the Residences Hall This should bring
a lot of debate. For membership info con-
tact Don at 355-3152 or Janet at 355-6420
All majors are welcome.
CCE
Campus Christian Fellowship, a non-de-
nominational Christian group for ECU
students will meet every Tues. night in
Raw! 130 at 7 p.m. You are invited to join
us for food-fun-fellowship and praise'
B.Y.O B (Bring Your Own Bible).
NCSL
Do not forget the Mon. night meeting at 7
p.m. at MSC Everyone is invited to at-
LQST2
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Fri night
at 7:00.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God
Every Fri. night at 7:00 in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium.
I UNIVERSITY UNIONS
A special added attraction of EVITA will
be presented in Wright Auditorium on
Sept. 22 at 8:00 pjn. Composed bv An-
drew Lloyd Webber (CATS, PHANTOM
OF THE OPERA and 1ESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR). EVITA won seven Tonv
Awards, including Best Musical EVITA
a based upon the life of Eva Peron. the
second wife of Argentine dictator Juan
Peron. Tickets for the New York Touring
Production of EVITA are now on sale. For
further details contact The Central Ticket
Office. MSC 757-6611, ext. 266.
NTECORE BATTERY
The National Teacher Examinationa�
Core Battery Exams�(Communication
Skills, General Knowledge, and Profes-
sional Knowledge) will be offered at ECU
on Oct 2X19M. Application blanks are to
be compacted and mailed to the Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 911 -R Prince-
ton, NJ 08541 Applications must be post
marked no later than Sept It, 19ta
Appbcations may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, room 105 Speighi
Bldg ECU. '
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt Countv Special Ol vmJ
pics will be conducting a training school
on Sat at Elm St Gym for anvonc inu-i
ested in volunteering to coach soccer fr
special athletes No experience in Morkj
ing with handicapped populations J
needed We are also looking for
for Special Olympics basketball � '
lifting and swimming All interesti
person should contact Greg Cprvrson
Connie Sappenfield at the Special Olvi
pic office, K30-4551
ECU FK1SBEE CLUB
Practices are in full swing Coaw
bottom of College Hill ever) I
Thurs , and Sun at 5 00 New players al
more than welcome Join the team "i
tied for 3th place last year jt Collegia
Nationals m santa Barbara Cm
ECU FORENSIC SQCJI D
Interested in competing in mt i I
public speaking, interpreted read
debate1 Well the ECU Forens �
for you The next mei ring v�
at 8 00 in 211 Mfirt Theatre Art
VOLLEYBALL
The Lady Pirates take on I ��
130pm and Daid�n at 4 � .
in Minges Coliseum as pa
lar Come on out and see the j
action
COUNSELING CENT! R
STRATEGIES FOR ' � N
DARDIZED TESTS HI
ON THE GRE Are you planning n t
ingtheGRE. LSA1 MAT M
other standardized tests? This � "
will covet basic information about ft
Marti
RALEIGH (AD �Ropuj
lican Gov. Jim Martin says h
confident that his Democrat
support will be at least as stn
this year as it was tour years aj
when his strategists believe tl
half of his votes came trom
opposing party.
"We've got more coun!
organized and more peoi
working as volunteers than
On Tuesday, he unveiled a
county "Democrats for Marti
organization, saying consen
rive Democrats liked his recoj
were angry at the General Ass
bly and considered their part
ticket too liberal.
But campaign officials for
Gov. Bob Jordan, who is challet
ing Martin in the governor's n
said their candidate likewise l
some support from the other
of the political fence Ionian a
paign spokesman Phi! V
noted that the hosts of a Md
County rally for lordan were
publicans.
"There are probably more Re
licans for Bob Jordan than
before Wells said. There m
be a good number of Demod
for Martin, but we honestly d
feel there are enough of thei
beat Bob Jordan
Martin flew to five cities rel
ing lists of registered Denv
who have agreed to assume lj
ing roles m Martin's camtvf
Strong upport from the mat'
party is a must for any succe
Republican candidate in a
wide race, since the GOV is I
numbered in North Carotin
1.
I

U
r.i
5 ASU announci
literacy progn
4
n
b
Hi
n

A
ss
ni
JT
M
?
u
o
�i
1
(AD - A yearlong prrJ
designed to transform litj
instructors at the state s corj
niry colleges into expert
teaching adults to read and
should benefit an estin
100,000 illiterate North C
a os.
"The outcome will be inc
ga.ns m reading and wntinj
adults enrolled in adult basij
cation said Dr. Mike Mar1
chau man of the Departmt
Language. Reading and K
tion abilities at Appalachian
University m Boone.
In July, the adult and col
ing education division of thj
Department of CommuniH
leges awarded a $130,000 c
Marlowe, who hopes to
others so he can continue tl
crram for three years.
The grant will be used to,
literacy instructors how �
better job of teaching t
Snodgrass, coordinatt
extension rxograms for ti
Department of Commurot
leges.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1988 7
.MBDA CHI ALPHA invites all inter
l ted girls to become Crescent Girls. Rush
L Wednesday and Thursday night, start-
m, at WM For info, call 757-1387. 500
ibcth St
�NEED A RIDE to Alabama on Thanksgiv
fcig Break Please call now to confirm! 758-
27 Tom
IkEADY TO ROCK on a Wednesday
r ght' Check out hard rock hooligans
IK alette who are out to entertain you
� style Susies Treehouse, Wednes-
. Sepl 21 at 10:00.
OME SEE THE EMBERS live at the KA
ousc for the 1st Annual Boardwalk
enefi! tor MDA Thurs Sept 15,5-9 p.m.
et vour tickets now Coolers are wel-
rPA LPHA presents the 1st Annual
oardwalk Benefit for MDA featuring the
mbers Thurs, Sept. 15 from 5-9 p.m
elects vmII be n sale in front of the Sru-
cnt Store or call "57-0128 Coolers are
.elcome!
USE BALL CARDS Sell old cards for
jsh call Thomas 756-0685 after 5 p.m.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
BUDGET TIRE
& SERVICE
Zrerne treet
S when vou need L tire - go
: .rv.id of new
has e GOOD used tires - all
- - - Low profile, high pcrform-
a regular street tread a few
raised Setters, and the popular
� . ar Cagle CT
VRE of used tires without a
- ten warranty We warrantee
res in eriting for 3060 days,
- g on price On the corner
. 53 and N Greene St Infor-
iUs welcome - 830-3772
istions about your
:e service?
fING ABOUT CALLING
RODUCfS THAT MAY
MONEY!
ia Dunlow,
Campus Manager
ECU
2-0856
6:00 p.m.
I- Friday
Announcements
A
ill
n
tend Our first IC is at UNC-C1L One
mapr issue to be presented is "Condoms
in the Residences Hall " This should bring
a lot of debate For membership info con-
tact Don at 355-3152 or Janet at 355-6420.
All maiors are welcome
I
Ic
he

t
I
rv
u
IP
pr�
If
let
IV
:u
ECU Testing Center, room 105, Speight
Bldg, ECU.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special Olym-
pics will be conducting a training school
on Sat at Elm St. Gym for anyone inter-
ested in volunteering to coach soccer for
special athletes. No experience in work-
ing with handicapped populations is
needed We are also looking for coaches
for Special Olympics basketball, weight-
lifting, and swimming. All interested
person should contact Greg Epperson or
Connie Sappenfield at the Special Olym-
pic office, 830-4551.
ECJiFRISEEECLUP
Practices are in full swing Come to the
bottom of College 1 lill every Tues
Thurs , and Sun. at 500. New players are
more than welcome. Join the team that
tied for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca
ECU FORENSIC SOCIETY
Interested in competing in intercollegiate,
public speaking, interpreted reading or
debate' Well the ECU Forensic Society is
for you The next meeting will the Sept. 20
at 8 00 in 211 Messick Theatre Arts Bldg.
VOLLEYBALL
The Lady Pirates take on Georgia Tech at
1:30 p.m. and Davidson at 4 00 p.m. on Sat.
in Minges Coliseum as part of a triangu-
lar Come on out and see the exciting
acbon.
COUNSELING CENTER
STRATEGIES FOR TAKING STAN-
DARDIZED TESTSHOW TO DO WELL
ON THE GRE. Are vou planning on tak-
ing the GRE, LSAT, MAT, MEDCAT, or
other standardized tests? This workshop
will covcj basic information about these
tests, test taking strategy and sample
items. 4-5 p.m. in 312 Wright Bldg Sept.
19. If you are planning on taking the
Graduate Record Examination for admis-
sion to graduate school, this workshop
will help you prepare - types of items, test
taking strategy, scores and sample items
will be discussed. Sept. 20 from 4-5 p.m. in
312 Wright Bldg GRE Workshop.
rO-RFC ALMOST ANY-
THING GOES
Be sure to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
Almost Anything Goes registration meet-
ing held September 20 at 5:30 p.m. in GCB
1026. It's fun and exciting and you'll have
a blast so register September 20.
CHANGES IN OFFICE
The League of Women Voters of
Greenville-Pitt County will sponsor an
informational evening for Greenville citi-
zens regarding the proposed changes in
the terms of office for the Mayor and
members of the City Council and the
Mayor's vote. Speakers will include: Dr.
Dorcthy Clayton, Professor of Political
Science at ECU; Mr DeWitt McCarley,
Greenville City Attorney; and Mayor Ed
Carter. The League encourages the public
to attend and participate in asking ques-
tions concerning these issues. The event
will be held in the Council Chambers on
the third floor of the Gty Office Building
on Fifth Street on Sept. 13,1988, at 8 p.m.
PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB
Blood Drive Challenge - The P.T. Club is
challenging all clubs, fraternities, sorori-
ties, etc. to donate. You may need the "gift
of life" seme dav. Blood drive - Menden-
hal! rm. 244 Sept. 14, Sept. 15,12 6 p.m.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
ECU Gocj Choir is now accepting new
members for Fall and Spring. Last day to
join is Monday, Sept. 19. Rehearsals are
Wednesdays it 5 p.m. at Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
MFW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anyone who purchased New Student
Review this summer, should come by the
Buccaneer, yearbook, office and pick
them up. The office is located in front of
Joyner Library, on the second floor of the
Publications Bldg. You may pick the book
up between 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. this week and next week.
RHO EPSILON
Rho Epsilon, National Real Estate Frater-
nity, will hold its first meeting on Sept.
21st at 3:30 p.m. in GCB 3009. Any Real
Estate major or interested student is wel-
come to attend. Any questions, please
contact Todd Kirkpatrick at 752-3642.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Meetings will be held Thurs. night at 700
p.m. in rm. 221 Mendenhall. All those who
are interested come on out and join us.
CnuNSFTTNC CENTER
ASSERT1VENESS TRAINING. A three
part workshop offered to students at no
cost by the University Counseling Center
Sept. 22, 29 and Oct. 6. All three sessions
will be conducted from 3-4 p.m. in 312
Wright Bldg. Assertiveness Training can
sharpen your interpersonal skills and
help you target personal goals. The work-
shop will focus on helping members dis-
tinguish between their assertive, aggres-
sive, and nonassertive behaviors. Par-
ticpants can learn how to express them-
selves directly and openly, and respond to
interpersonal situations in a manner
which neither compromises individual
beliefs nor offends others. Please call the
Counseling Center (757-6661) for registra-
tion.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all Am-
bassadors Wed. at 5:15 p.m. in Menden-
hall room 221. Remember that missing
over 2 meetings per semester may lead to
probation.
EXPEDITIONS TO AFRICA
Spring semester openings to Kenya and
Cameroon. Join a team of international
young people to explore tropical rain-
forests and discover African wildlife.
APPLY NOW! Final chance for selection
is Sept. 30-Oct. 2, 1988 in N.C. Call
OPERATION RALEIGH at 1-800-727-
7787 for an application today.
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial aid
for overseas education may apply for a
Rivers Scholarship. The next application
deadline is Oct. 1, 1988. For further info
contact the Office of International Studies
in the GCB, room 1002, 757-6769.
ALPHAPHIQMEGA
Alpha Phi Omega is a co-ed National
Service Fraternity. We want you to know
what we are all about. Please look for
announcements in upcoming meetings
and events. Everyone is welcome!
MIDDLE GRADES ED. CLUB
ECU Middle Grades Club will be having a
membership drive in Speight on Sept.
13th, 14th, 19th, and 20th. The Club will
have its first meeting Sept. 20th in Speight
203. All Middle Grades Majors are en-
couraged to become a part of this special
organization. For info call club president
Tad Williams 830-1761
The Wash House
Laundromats - Dry Cleaning
10th St.
752-6117
14th St
758-6001
Attendants -
Snacks - Cable TV
One type of Coupon Per Visit
r
COUPON
20 Off
Fluff
&
Fold
COUPON
20 Off
Dry Cleaning
or
Shirt Laundry
i Expires 9-23-88 Expires 9-23-88 Expires 9-23-88
11
COUPON
Buy 1 Wash,
Get 2nd
One Free
We Support The Pirates
ECU
Martin wants Democrat
Campus Christian Fellowship, a non-de-
nominahonal Christian group for ECU
students will meet every Tues. night in
Raw! 130 at 7 p.m You are invited to join
us for food-fun-fellowship and praise!
BYOB (Bring Your Own Bible).
IQST?
Something missing in your life7 We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium EVERY Fri night
at 7 00
CAMP! S CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God
Everv Fn night at 700 in the Jenkins Art
Audi ton urn
I ?NTVFR;rTY UNIONS
A special added attraction of EV1TA will
be presented in Wnght Auditorium on
Sept 22 at 8 00 p m Composed by An-
drew Lloyd Webber (CATS. PHANTOM
OF THE OPERA, and 1ESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR). EV1TA � seven Tony
Awards, including Best Musical EVITA
is based upon the life of Eva Peron, the
second wife of Argentine dictator Juan
Peron Tickets for the New York Touring
Production of EV1TA are now on sale For
further details contact The Central Ticket
Office, MSC, 757-611, ext 266
NTT; CORF. BATTERY
The National Teacher Examinations-
Core Battery Exams�(Communication
Skills, General Knowledge, and Profes-
sional Knowledge) will be offered at ECU
on Oct. 22,1988 Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to the Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 911-R. Prince-
ton. NJ 08541 Applications must be post
marked no later than Sept 19, 1�M
Applications may be obtained from the
RALEIGH (AD � Repub-
lican Gov. Jim Martin says he's
confident that his Democratic
support will be at least as strong
this year as it was four years ago,
when his strategists believe that
half of his votes came from the
opposing party.
"We've got more counties
organized and more people
workirtg as volunteers than we
half AfJ�W3 artJid�eiOHn
On Tuesday, he unveiled a 70-
county "Democrats for Martin"
organization, saying conserva-
tive Democrats liked his record,
were angry at the General Assem-
bly and considered their party's
ticket too liberal.
But campaign officials for Lt.
Gov. Bob Jordan, who is challeng-
ing Martin in the governor's race,
said their candidate likewise had
some support from the other side
of the political fence. Jordan cam-
paign spokesman Phil Wells
noted that the hosts of a Moore
County rally for Jordan were Re-
publicans.
"There are probably more Repub-
licans for Bob Jordan than ever
before Wells said. 'There might
be a good number of Democrats
for Martin, but we honestly don't
feel there are enough of them to
beat Bob Jordan
Martin flew to five cities releas-
ing lists of registered Democrats
who have agTeed to assume lead-
ing roles in Martin's campaign.
Strong upport from the majority
party is a must for any successful
Republican candidate in a state-
wide race, since the GOP is out-
numbered in North Carolina 2 to
I.
ASU announces
literacy program
(AP) - A yearlong program
designed to transform literacy
instructors at the state's commu-
nity colleges into experts on
teaching adults to read and write
should benefit an estimated
100,000 illiterate North Carolini-
ans.
"The outcome will be increased
ga.ns in reading and writing for
adults enrolled in adult basic edu-
cation said Dr. Mike Marlowe,
chaiiman of the Department of
Language, Reading and Excep-
tion abilities at Appalachian State
University in Boone.
In July, the adult and continu-
ing education division of the state
Department of Community Col-
leges awarded a $130,000 grant to
Marlowe, who hopes to obtain
others so he can continue the pro-
gram for three years.
The gTant will be used to teach
literacy instructors how to do a
better job of teaching Donald
Snodgrass, coordinator of
extension programs for the N.C
Department of Community Col-
leges.
"We've made some progress in
getting People to switch (to the
GOP) slow, sleady progress
Martin said. But we still need
Democratic support
State Democratic leaders have at-
tributed the widespread defec-
tions in 1984 to President
Reagan's coattails, the unpopu-
larity of Walter Mondale and dis-
harmony in Democratic ranks
!Aft�C�l��Mtott's�l te-
rnary.
This year, they say, the party
leadership is united behind Mi-
chael Dukakis and Jordan and
grassroots Democrats are return-
ing to the fold.
But Martin said conservative
Democrats were no happier with
Dukakis than they were with
MondaleI think what they can
claim is that they have unity
within the party leadership
Martin said. "But they could
never claim that they've got all the
registered Democrats or promi-
nent Democrats because there are
a lot of conservatives who just
aren't going to stick with them
Ken Eudy, the state Democratic
executive director, said Martin's
contention that the Democratic
rank-and-file don't support the
ticket is "phoney baloney
"I could get 70 people out of 6
million in North Carolina to stand
up and say something Eudy
said.
Albert McCauley of Fayetteville
and Joe Marshall of Madapr
both of whom are businessmen,
will be co-chairmen of Martin's
organization for Democrats.
The statewide leadership also
includes Hoke County Sheriff
D.M. Barrington and several may-
ors, including Fred Cates of
Hillsborough, Kenneth Baker of
Smithfield, W.K. Delbridge of
Norlina and Dan Meshaw of
Clarkton.
Others include former state Sen.
Hector McGeachy of Fayetteville,
former Rep. L.M. Brinkley Sr. Of
Hertford County, and former Sen.
Mary Fay Sherwood of Murphy.
McCauley said conservative
distrust of Dukakis and satisfac-
tion with Martin's term would
produce considerable support for
the Republican governor in east-
ern counties.
"A lot of people won't be honest
in public, but when they go to the
polls they vote for the best man
McCauley said.
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rHE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15. 11SH
Bush denounces Dukakis
(AP) � Republican George
Bush charged that rival Michael
Dukakis wants tocontrol farmers'
lives with an outdated agriculture
policy. The Democratic nominee
hammered away on the defense
issue as he promised to improve
America's conventional strength
and maintain a strong nuclear de-
terrent.
1 r�e vice president's criticisms
of Dukakis, including Tuesday's
attacks on his economic and agri-
culture policies, appear to have
Paid off � at least according to
two public opinion polls.
A Gallup survey found Bush
lead ing by an 8 point margin, and
Dukakis suffering his highest
negative rating oi the presidential
race. A CBS News-New York
Times poll also showed the
Democratic nominee trailing by 8
points, and Bush capitalizing on cerned with production controls,
into Missouri today to stump for
Bush with speeches on his
administration's economic suc-
cesses and the nation's military
strength.
Democratic vice presidential
candidate Lloyd Bent sen looked
to reinforce Dukakis' defense
stance as the former pilot in-
spected World War II aircraft
todav and toured a defense con-
J
tractor in Texas.
GOP candidate Dan Quayle
planned a visit to NORAD, the
North American Aerospace De-
fense Command, in Colorado.
Campaigning in Missouri on
Tuesday, Bush pledged his sup
port for expansion of American
markets abroad and suggested
that Democrats are only con-
defense issues.
Dukakis continued to respond
to CIOP complaints that he is weak
on defense with a foreign policy
speech todav at Georgetown Uni-
versity in Washington and a visit
to Annapolis, Md. Bush planned
to tour a farmer-owned coop-
erative in Fresno, Calif and visit
San Francisco's
Chinatown.
President Reagan planned a foray
similar to the grain embargo im-
posed by former President Carter.
They want to "control the lives
of the farmers " the GOP nominee
said.
Bush cited a published report
that quoted a Dukakis aide as
saying the Democratic nominee
might re-examine the U.S. policy
of selling government subsidized
v. heat to the Soviets.
"Can you imagine another presi-
dent who leaves open the door of
using agriculture products to
make the political points and us-
ing our producers in that way?"
he asked.
Earlier, in a speech to Chicago
businessmen. Bush said that
Dukakis' promise of a "helping
hand" from government would
translate into that hand reaching
"right for the wallet" of the tax-
payers.
He said the economic picture
has been bright during the Re-
agan administration and prom-
ised to "strengthen and broaden
our economic growth
Dukakis used his campaign
day to assess U.SSoviet relations
and take a nde in an M-l tank,
considered one of the fastest and
most advanced in the world.The
Democratic nominee, in a speech
outside the General Dynamics
plant in Sterling, Mich said the
nation "needs a new president
who
ill invest our defense dollars in the
fiber and muscle of our defense
Dukakis promised a "strong
and effective and credible" nu-
clear deterrent and continued re-
search on strategic dee systems
but said his main concern was
improving conventional might.
The CBS-Times poll, which
showed Bush ahead 47-39 per-
cent, found that 28 percent of the
probable voters surveyed believe
Bush would make the nation
stronger while only 4 percent said
he would weaken its defense.
In comparison, 39 percent said
Dukakis would make U.S. de-
fenses weaker and 13 percent said
stronger.
The poll surveyed 1,043 probable
voters from Thursday through
Sunday and had a margin of error
of plus or minus 3 percentage
points.
The Gallup poll, which found
Bush leading 441 percent,
showed that 40 percent have an
unfavorable view of Dukakis, up
from 32 percent ast month and the
Massachusetts governor's high-
est all year.
Fifty-three percent gave
Dukakis a favorable rating.
Bush had a 59 percent favorable
rating and a 35 percent unfavor-
able.
The Gallup survey of 1,003 reg-
istered voters was done Friday
through Sunday and had a 4-
point margin of error.
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Thirty-hour standoff ends without incident
CIBSONVILLE, N.C (AP)
An armed Guilford County man
who had barricaded himself in a
house for more than 30 hours
atter being told that the world
was coming to an end was ap-
prehended without incident
early today, officials said.
Ricky Odell Chavis, 27, was
apprehended after negotiators
from the State Bureau of Investi-
gation got him to step outside
the back door oi the house
shortlv after 2 a.m. Unlay, said
Cibsonville police dispatcher
Susan Garinger.
C officers from the Guilford
County sheriff's department
then threw concussion grenades
at Chavis, stunning him, Ms.
Gilbert heads for
Yucatan Peninsula
MFRIDA, Mexico (AP) � Hurri-
cane Gilbert,among the strongest
storms in history, thrashed a path
through the Caribbean today on a
deadly course toward the
Yucatan Peninsula as thousands
or pe pie fled resort centers in this
region.
Gilbert, with flooding rains and
sustained winds of 175 mph,
caused havoc in the Dominican
Repuhlic, Jamaica and the low-
lying Cavman Islands Sunday,
Mondav and Tuesday as it moved
steadily toward thispeninsula the
Gulf of Mexico. At least 11 people
were reported killed.
Rescue teams worked desper-
ately to restore utilities and com-
munications in the shattered ar-
eas.
Jamaican Prime Minister Ed-
ward Seaga, in a report late Tues-
day, said at least six people were
killed and an estimated 60,000
were left homeless in "the worst
natural disaster in the modern
historv of lamaica
The six known dead included
three children who drowned, offi-
cials said.
Civil defense officials in the Do-
minican Republic, sideswiped
Sunday by the storm, rcportec
five people were known dead. A
3 a.m. EDT, the U.S. Nationa
Weather Service said Gilbert was
centered near latitude 20.0 north,
longitude 85.6 west, or about 95
miles east-southeast of the Mexi-
can resort island of Cozumel.
It said Gilbert was moving
west northwest at about 15 mph
with maximum sustained winds
of 175 mph. The hurricane center
said tropical storm-force winds!
ex tend out ward up to 250 miles to
the north and 200 miles to th
south of the center.
"People in the warned area
should have completed all po
sible preparations for this ex
tremely dangerous hurricane i
said.
The center said Hurricane Gi-
lbert was the most intense storm
on record in terms of barometric
pressure. It said by 8 p.m. EDT
Tuesday it was measured at 26.13
inches, breaking the 26.35 inches
recorded for the 1935 hurricane
that devastated the Florida Keys
'That's the lowest pressure ever
measured in the Western Hemi
sphere said forecaster Mark
Zimmer.
Gamnger said.
"No one was hurt said Sgt.
David Powell of the Guilford
Countv sheriff's department.
"(Chavis) had fired one shot
(Tuesday night), in the house
but not at our officers
Chavis was charged with two
counts of assault on a policeoffi-
cer with a deadly weapon and
with one county oi going armed
to the terror oi the public, Pow-
ell said.
The standoff began about 6
p.m. Monday. On Tuesday, po-
lice snipers were posted on the
roof of a nearby building and
behind the wall of an adjacent
car wash, and surrounding
businesses were evacuated. Al-
most every street in downtown
Cibsonville was blocked, at
least partially, with dozens of
neighbors watching from their
porches.
"He was messed up real bad on
religion said Chavis' aunt, joy
Cassell, one of dozens of on
lookers following the marathon
standoff from a vantage point
about 200 vards from Chavis'
house.
Ms. Cassell said two door-to-
door missionaries for the
Two new ways to
keepthe scholastic
edge:
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Greeklassies
Clifls Notes on
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(jam a greater uriderstanding of the people,
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Date: Thursday, September 15th Time: 7:30-9:00
Place: Brewster C-103
Sponsored by Campus Crusade Jor Christ
Jehovah's Witness seet appar-
ently convinced her nephew he
needed to "get right because
Tuesday would be the day that
God called all the righteous to
heaven and left the secular
world to warring non-believers.
Morris McTherson,
Gibsonville's police chief, said
Chavis fled to a nearby wooded
firing more shots before making
it back to his house.
Comfort
Inn
We Welcome Students
and Parents
$33 Single with Free Full Breakfast Buffet ($5.00 Value)
Meeting Rooms and Banquet Facilities
Group Rates Available
Relax In Our Cocktail Lounge ($1.00 Draft)
756-2792
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"thirtysomething" will
a k with mon j
into the human condition
, � plot s
episod
VC5 'Elliot
and !
gue About Micha
iir in the Bathtub
- -
think it
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It's old horm - j
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"Celebrating Eastern f
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of four artists from the Eal
Carolina Area. The show feal





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1988
V
Bush denounces Dukakis
(AP) � Republican George
Bush charged that rival Michael
Dukakis wants tocontrol farmers'
lives with an outdated agriculture
policy. The Democratic nominee
hammered away on the defense
issue as he promised to improve
America's conventional strength
and maintain a strong nuclear de-
terrent.
The vice president's criticisms
of Dukakis, including Tuesday's
attacks on his economic and agri-
culture policies, appear to have
Taid off � at least according to
two public opinion polls.
A Gallup survey found Bush
leading by an 8-point margin, and
Dukakis suffering his highest
negative rating of the presidential
race. A CBS News-New York
Times poll also showed the
Democratic nominee trailing by 8
points, and Bush capitalizing on
defense issues.
Dukakis continued to respond
to GOP complaints that he is weak
on defense with a foreign policy
speech today at Georgetown Uni-
versity in Washington and a visit
to Annapolis, Md. Bush planned
to tour a farmer-owned coop-
erative in Fresno, Calif and visit
San Francisco's
Chinatown.
President Reagan planned a foray
into Missouri today to stump for
Bush with speeches on his
administration's economic suc-
cesses and the nation's military
strength.
Democratic vice presidential
candidate Lloyd Bentsen looked
to reinforce Dukakis' defense
stance as the former pilot in-
spected World War II aircraft
today and toured a defense con-
tractor in Texas.
GOP candidate Dan Quayle
planned a visit to NORAD, the
North American Aerospace De-
fense Command, in Colorado.
Campaigning in Missouri on
Tuesday, Bush pledged his sup-
port for expansion of American
markets abroad and suggested
that Democrats are only con-
cerned with production controls,
similar to the grain embargo im-
posed by former President Carter.
They want to "control the lives
of the farmers the GOP nominee
said.
Bush cited a published report
that quoted a Dukakis aide as
saying the Democratic nominee
might re-examine the U.S. policy
of selling government subsidized
wheat to the Soviets.
"Can you imagine another presi-
dent who leaves open the door of
using agriculture products to
make the political points and us-
ing our producers in that way?"
he asked.
Earlier, in a speech to Chicago
businessmen, Bush said that
Dukakis' promise of a "helping
hand" from government would
translate into that hand reaching
"right for the wallet" of the tax-
payers.
He said the economic picture
has been bright during the Re-
agan administration and prom-
ised to "strengthen and broaden
our economic growth
Dukakis used his campaign
day to assess U.SSoviet relations
and take a ride in an M-1 tank,
considered one of the fastest and
most advanced in the world.The
Democratic nominee, in a speech
outside the General Dynamics
plant in Sterling, Mich said the
nation "needs a new president
who
ill invest our defense dollars in the
fiber and muscle of our defense
Dukakis promised a "strong
and effective and credible" nu-
clear deterrent and continued re-
search on strategic dee systems
but said his main concern was
improving conventional might.
The CBS-Times poll, which
showed Bush ahead 47-39 per-
cent, found that 28 percent of the
probable voters surveyed believe
Bush would make the nation
stronger while only 4 percent said
he would weaken its defense.
In comparison, 39 percent said
Dukakis would make U.S. de-
fenses weaker and 13 percent said
stronger.
The poll surveyed 1,043 probable
voters from Thursday through
Sunday and had a margin of error
of plus or minus 3 percentage
points.
The Gallup poll, which found
Bush leading 49-41 percent,
showed that 40 percent have an
unfavorable view of Dukakis, up
from 32 percent ast month and the
Massachusetts governor's high-
est all year.
Fifty-three percent gave
Dukakis a favorable rating.
Bush had a 59 percent favorable
rating and a 35 percent unfavor-
able.
The Gallup survey of 1,003 reg-
istered voters was done Friday
through Sunday and had a 4-
point margin of error.
LTIED TO MUCH
STUDENTS? NEED CASH?
Southern Gun
& Pawn, Inc.
INSTANT CASH LOANS
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� GREENVILLE

$
r
Thirty-hour standoff ends without incident
Garringer said.
"No one was hurt said Sgt.
David Powell of the Guilford
County sheriff's department.
"(Chavis) had fired one shot
(Tuesday night), in the house,
but not at our officers
Chavis was charged with two
counts of assault on a police offi-
cer with a deadly weapon and
with one county of going armed
to the terror of the public, Pow-
ell said.
The standoff began about 6
p.m. Monday. On Tuesday, po-
lice snipers were posted on the
roof of a nearby building and
behind the wall of an adjacent
car wash, and surrounding
businesses were evacuated. Al-
most every street in downtown
Gibsonville was blocked, at
least partially, with dozens of
neighbors watching from their
porches.
"He was messed up real bad on
religion said Chavis' aunt, Joy
Cassell, one of dozens of on
lookers following the marathon
standoff from a vantage point
about 200 yards from Chavis'
house.
Ms. Cassell said two door-to-
door missionaries for the
Two new ways to
keep the scholastic
edge:
GIBSONVILLE, N.C (AP)
An armed Guilford County man
who had barricaded himself in a
house for more than 30 hours
after being told that the world
was coming to an end was ap-
prehended without incident
early today, officials said.
Ricky Odell Chavis, 27, was
apprehended after negotiators
from the State Bureau of Investi-
gation got him to step outside
the back door of the house
shortly after 2 a.m. today, said
Gibsonville police dispatcher
Susan Garinger.
Officers from the Guilford
County sheriff's department
then threw concussion grenades
at Chavis, stunning him, Ms.
Gilbert heads for
Yucatan Peninsula
MERIDA, Mexico (AP) � Hurri-
cane Gilbert, among the strongest
storms in history, thrashed a path
through the Caribbean today on a
deadly course toward the
Yucatan Peninsula as thousands
of people fled resort centers in this
region.
Gilbert, with flooding rains and
sustained winds of 175 mph,
caused havoc in the Dominican
Republic, Jamaica and the low-
lying Cayman Islands Sunday,
Monday and Tuesday as it moved
Steadily toward this peninsula the
Gulf of Mexico. At least 11 people
were reported killed.
Rescue teams worked desper-
ately to restore utilities and com-
munications in the shattered ar-
eas.
Jamaican Prime Minister Ed-
ward Seaga, in a report late Tues-
day, said at least six people were
killed and an estimated 60,000
were left homeless in "the worst
natural disaster in the moderns
history of Jamaica
The six known dead includec
three children who drowned, offi-
cials said
Civil defense officials in the Do-
minican Republic, sideswipec
Sunday by the storm, reportec
five people were known dead. A
3 a.m. EDT, the U.S. Nationa
Weather Service said Gilbert was
centered near latitude 20.0 north
longitude 85.6 west, or about 95
miles east-southeast of the Mexi-
can resort island of Cozumel.
It said Gilbert was moving
west-northwest at about 15 mph
with 'maximum sustained winds
of 175 mph. The hurricane centei
said tropical storm-force winds
extend outward up to 250 miles tc
the north and 200 miles to the
south of the center.
"People in the warned areas
should have completed all pos-
sible preparations for this ex-t
tremely dangerous hurricane,
said.
The center said Hurricane Gi
lbert was the most intense storm
on record in terms of barometric
pressure. It said by 8 p.m. EDI
Tuesday it was measured at 26.13
inches, breaking the 2635 inches
recorded for the 1935 hurricane
that devastated the Florida KeysjDatc: Thursday, September 15th Time: 7:30-9:00
"That'sjrtowest pressure evei pUcc. Brewster C. 103
measured in the Western Hemi-
sphere said forecaster Mark
Zimrner.
Jehovah's Witness sect appar-
ently convinced her nephew he
needed to "get right" because
Tuesday would be the day that
God called all the righteous to
heaven and left the secular
world to warring non-believers.
Morris McPherson,
Gibsonville's police chief, said
Chavis fled to a nearby wooded
firing more shots before making
it back to his house.
I
Comfort
Inn
We Welcome Students
and Parents
$33 Single with Free Full Breakfast Buffet ($5.00 Value)
Meeting Rooms and Banquet Facilities
Group Rates Available
Relax In Our Cocktail Lounge ($1.00 Draft)
756-2792
(1-800-228-5150)
301 S. E. Greenville Blvd. (264 Bypass)
Approximately 1.5 miles from campus
Cliffs Notes on
Greek Classics
Cliffs Notes on
Roman Classics
Gain a greater underetanding of the people,
events, literary movements and influence
of Greek and Roman civilizations.
Now available from:
Student
Supply
tore
TONIGHT!
How to Get
BETTER
GRADES
tiave More fm7
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An action plan and follow-through strategy to help you implement
what you learn.
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J25 Arlington itvd.
355-6td�
THEfc-
Critic
By MICAH HARRIS
Suif Writer
In the gTand tradition of thoi
better tabloids which grace chc
out lanes in supermarkets acrcj
this great country, the East Cat
linian is proud to present its thij
annual Fall-TV preview.
"thirtysomething" will
back with more poignant msigl
into the human condition. I thi
these detailed plot synopsises
upcoming episodes speak
themselves. "Elliot Mows
Grass "Hope and Michael
gue About Michael Leaving
Hair in the Bathtub and (on
personally looking forward
"Melissa Plucks Her Eyebrows
think it's really self-evident w
"thirtysomething" took an Emi
for writing, don't you?
It's old home week on "Ml
lock when Andy Griffith's fl
mer fellow Thespian, Clint Hoi
ECU Pla
producti
ThrMrr Alt M�
The Department of Theafj
Arts at ECU will present fit
extraordinary productions in t
McGinnis Theatre during
1988-89 Playhouse season.
The season will open on Oct
ber 5 with "Carnival the wini
of the New York Critics' Cird
Award for Best Musical. Adi
tional performances will be
October 6,7,8 and 10. The musi
is full of heart tugs, humor, low
songs, and endearing puppel
and is utterly suitable for ee
body, young and old.
Liii, a shy, lonely orpt
jom the carnival and becomes 1
pawn in fierce rivalry for her
fcction between Marco the Mi
nificant, the troupe's magicij
and Paul Berthalet, a quiet, U
puppWfWFTlBn�rruiaar rule
the description of "Carnival'
probablv due to the fact that lj
based on the charming moj
"Lib which starred Les
Caron.
The staging of "A Moon
the Misbegotten the seasoi
second offering, will be in celebj
n :
This is what Earl looks like
done too many things. Reall
October 6 as Gray Arts Gall
Gray Art Gat
artists' alon.
Two distinct exhibitioi
be on view at East Cai
University's Gray Art
from October 3-28,1988. The
bition, "Celebrating Ea�
Carolina Artists will shat
gallery with the work of
York sculptor, Peter Gourfaj
"Celebrating Eastern 1
Una Artists" will present the
of four artists from the "
Carolina Area. The show





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THE EAST CAROL INI AN
Features
SEPTEMBER 15, 1988 Page 9
twists
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
ard ("Leon" on "The Andy Grif-
fith Show) guest stars.
Clint plays a swamp hermit
n the grand tradition of those who appeals to Matlock "for per
vtkT tabloids which grace check-
out lanes in supermarkets across
his great country, the East Caro-
inian is proud to present its third
innual Fall-TV preview.
thirtysomething" will be
with this AIDS thing these days,
no one really wanted to put their
mouth where someone else had
theirs. But it was a sweet gesture
Griffith may have thought.
Look for a major rehaul of the
cast of "Star Trek: The Next Gen-
eration" to bring the new series
more in line with Roddenberry's
current vision. Gavin MacLeod
sonal reasons" to stay a court
order to have his aged pet bear,
accused of fatally mailing a child,
from being destroyed.
The twist comes when we
learn that Clint's schizo character
�ack with more poignant insights is responsible for the child's dis- will assume the role of Captain
into the human condition. I think figurement. Angry of being Heard; Fred Grandy will take the
hese detailed plot synopsises of duped, Matlock pursues part of Mr. Data, Ted Lange the
upcoming episodes speak for Howard's character into the Flor- role of VVarf, with Lauren Tewes
solves: "Elliot Mows His ida everglades, where, in an in- as your empathic cruise director,
Hope and Michael Ar- stance of art imitating life, Cliff and Jill Whclan as Ensign Wesley!
K About Michael Leaving His steps into quicksand and disap- Look also for recurring appear-
� lair in the Bathtub and (on I'm pears without leaving any sign ances by the Landers sisters (Judy
personally looking forward to), that he was ever here. and Audrey) as two mischievous
Melissa Plucks Her Eyebrows I "It was great working with slavegirls.
k it's really self-evident why Clint again said Griffith. "He In the syndicate market,
thiru something" tookan Emmy hasn't changed a lot since he was "Jeopardy's" outgoing Alex
or writing, don't you? a boy still walking around the Trubec will be replaced by contro-
It's old home week on "Mat- set good naturedly offering a bite versial talk show host, Morton
lock when Andy Griffith's for- of his half-eaten jelly sandwich to Downey, Jr.
nor fellow Thespian, Clint How- anyone who'll take it. 'Course, 'This is mv show, now said
ECU Playhouse to present five
productions during new season
Theatrr Art trlrau
Theatre Art Rel
Hie Department of Theatre
at ECU will present five
xtraordinary productions in the
IcGinnis Theatre during its
- 89 Playhouse season.
Theseason will open on Octo-
vr 5 with "Carnival the winner
t the New York Critics' Circle
�.ard for Best Musical. Addi-
onal performances will be on
Vtober 6,7,8 and 10. The musical
- full of heart tugs, humor, lovely
H'ngs. and endearing puppets,
md is utterly suitable for every-
body, young and old.
Lili, a shy, lonely orphan,
ins the carnival and becomes the
pawn in fierce rivalry for her af-
ebon between Marco the Mag-
ificant, the troupe's magician,
md Paul Berthalet, a quiet, lame
puppeteer. The familiaf ring to
the description of "Carnival" is
probably due to the fact that it is
based on the charming movie
"Lili which starred Leslie
Caron.
The staging of "A Moon For
the Misbegotten the season's
second offering, will be in celebra-
tion of the 100th anniversary of
the birth of America's greatest
playright, Eugene O'Neill. The
story revolves around two people
who may hope that their revela-
tions of truth will bind them to-
gether forever, but who arrive
instead at the tragic realization
that their salvation is but a brief,
peaceful way-station on their
intersecting paths to separate
graves.
The talk of New York during
the 2 12 years of its run there,
'The Boys in the Band" will run
February 8-11. Mart Crovvley's
play has been described as funny
sad and honest play about a set of
mixed-up human beings who just
happen to be homosexuals. The
play presents a birthday party in a
Greenwich Village apartment,
attended by a group of gay men
whose manners and appearance
range from thoroughly "straight"
to those undisguisedly effemi-
nate.
Critics have emphasized that
its straightforward and very
moving revelation of a milieu not
previously presented on the stage
contains no elements overtly of-
fensive - except for an extreme
frankness of language. Hailed as
the best American play in some
seasons, this very funny play is
not for everybody, just for sophis-
ticated plavgoers.
Appearing fourth in the sea-
son is the "East Carolina Dance
Theatre" on March 15,16,17 and
18. This evening of dance has be-
come an annual event that audi-
ences look forward to all year. A
varied program of modern, ballet
and jazz performed by the tal-
ented students in the profes-
sional-oriented dance program
within the Department of Theatre
Arts at ECU will be choreo-
graphed by the ECU dance fac-
ulty. Performances of the "East
Carolina Dance Theatre" are gen-
erally sold out several days before
the event. A subscription to the
season would assure you a seat
for this "Standing-Room-Only"
production.
The final production of the
season is John Pielmicr's spell-
Downey, Jr. "The categories are
going to change from mamby-
pamby stuff like history, geogra-
phy, and literature. I want to see
questions on feminism, white
supremacy, gay brothals, and
legalizing illegal drugs. If a con-
testant gives an answer I don't
like, I'll tell 'em to zip it or just run
I'm off the stage
Look for the first syndica-
tionnetwork crossover on
Two distinct exhibitions will
I e on view at East Carolina
ni versify's Gray Art Gallery
from October 3-28,1988. The exhi-
bition, "Celebrating Eastern
Carolina Artists will share the
gallery with the work of New
York sculptor, Peter Gourfain.
"Celebrating Eastern Caro-
lina Artists" will present the work
of four artists from the Eastern
Carolina Area. The show features
Sarah Blakeslee of Greenville,
paintings and drawings; Fausto
Cardelli of Kinston, paintings;
Frank Diener also of Greenville,
miniature wooden circus; and
Allan Erdmann of Snow Hill, elec-
tronic sculptures. The opening
reception will be held in Gray Art
Gallery on October 6th at 7:30
p.m. Additionally, thegallery will
sponsor the ceramic sculptute of
noted artist, Peter Gourfain. He
will give a slide lecture at 7:30
NBC's "Baby Boom When Kate
Jackson's darling kid is kidnap-
ped, she contacts "Angels '88" to
come to the rescue.
Things'll be shaken up on the
"Golden Girls when it is learned
that Bea Arthur's Dorothy is actu-
ally a famous male tennis player
of yesteryear who disappeared
after a scandalous sex change.
On "L.A. Law Susan Dey's
Van Owen will forsake Harry
Hamlin to fall for a younger man.
Danny, played by Danny Bona-
duce. "She reminds me of my sis-
ter Bonaduce's character ex-
plains with Bonaduce's patent.
Puckish grin.
The romance ends unhap-
pily, however, when Van Owen
learns that these aren't freckles
over Danny's masculine frame,
but actually legion of latent weep-
ing sores.
f his is what Earl looks like when he takes a bath the morning after he has gone too many places and has
lone too many things. Really, it is titled "The Embarkation" by Fausto Cardelli and it will be on exhibit
)ctober 6 as Gray Arts Gallery celebrates the artists of Eastern North Carolina.
Gray Art Gallery to 'celebrate Eastern Carolina
artists' along with New York sculptor
These guys are Experience Unlimited or more popularly known as EU. EU at ECU, Sunday, September
18, Minges Coliseum at 8:00. So do" Da Butt" and "Shake Your Thang in the two hour self proclaimed
'Go-Go show7 of EU. There will be a $100 first prize for the best EU BUTT CONTEST. And remember
this is a Fun Boys Production in conjunction with Major Concert Committee,
binding, "Agnes of God April lines a few years ago. The big be purchased for each show one
14, 15, 17, and 18. The show fo-
cuses on a nun charged with
murdering her newborn infant, a
court-appointed psychiatrist
probing the young nun's sanity
and a Mother Superior who be-
lives that Agnes is an innocent
saint who experienced a virgin
birth.
The play is based on a true
story that made newspaper head-
questions in this suspense
drama are: Where did the baby
come from, Who was the father,
and Is the nun really a murderer?
Season tickets for all five pro-
ductions are only $25.00 and will
be available through October 10.
Your season ticket entitles you to
one reserved seat ticket for each
performance. Single tickets may
week prior to each opening at the
cost of $10.00 for "Carnival and
$5.00 for all other productions.
Group rates are available for par-
ties of ten or more: $20.00 Season
ticket;$8.00 "Carnival and $4 X)
for all other productions. ECU
students may purchase single
tickets for "Carnival" for $6.00,
and all other productions for
$3.00.
Pic kin9 the bones
Bones uses 'party' as a verb while
talking in psycho-babble tongues
p.m in Jenkins Auditorium on
October 24, 1988 and a reception
will follow at 8:30 p.m. in Gray Art
Gallery.
Lectures from "Celebrating
Eastern Carolina Artists" will be
held in Jenkins Auditorium and
will be as follows: Fausto Cardelli,
Monday, October 10th at 7:30
p.m and Frank Diener, Thurs-
day, October 13th at 7:30 p.m. a
gallery walk through.
See related schedule on page 10
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Pond Slime
I admit it. I am one of the
luckless pond slime that uses
"party" as a verb.
This habit is no doubt some
sort of karmic throwback to a past
life when I was somebody's
lackey, and until I stop doing it,
fate will continue to throw very
heavy, blunt objects at the back of
my osseous little head.
This also probably accounts
for the fact that every so often,
especially at frat parties, some
pseudo-human, attracted by my
fame, free toilet paper and general
boneyness, will come up and try
to talk to me.
And more often than not, said
sub-humanoid will want to: be
my best friend girlfriendcasual
sex partner or show me their po-
etry or sketchbooks in the hopes I
will mention them in my column
and make them famous too.
And they are inevitably, bla-
tantly boring.
Being the nice (or pleasantly
drunk) person that I usually am,
and supposing I've had a pretty
good day in which nobody gave
me a parking ticket or chlamydia
or something, I don't want to be
mean.
I don't want to tell them their
body odordrawingspoetry or
limbs are pretty damn offensive
and I wish they would go away
before I call the people from
Ripley's "Be. ve it or Nor and
have them removed for study and
eventual permanent embarass-
ment.
But some people cannot take
a hint. So, without further ado,
The Bonehead'9 Guide to Getting
Away from Boring People Who
Feel the Need to Relate Their Life
Histories to You.
1) Answer questions in a dis-
interested monotone with as few,
monosyllabic words as possible.
Unfortunately, most people just
take this as a sign of drunkeness,
and will continue to bother you.
Thus, the instant you see
someone you know, and can
stand even marginally better,
address them and become very
enthusiastic about it. Ask them
about their GPA, if they own a
umbrella, anything to show the
boring person still hanging
around vou that THIS person's
life is infinitely.nore intruiging to
you than anything THEY have to
say.
2) If they know where you
live or your phone number, you
could be in trouble. There is hope.
An answering machine (or a good
lackey) is incredibly helpful in
screening calls. If you can't afford
these, always answer the phone in
a voice that tells them you just
woke up from a restless sleep after
the eight keg party you got home
from three hours ago.
If they know where you live,
know where your keys are. If your
keys are at hand, you can almost
always let them know you really
were almost out the door and
leaving on an extended pilgram-
age to Graceland.
3) The supernatural is your
friend. Tarot cardsand the 1 Ching
are especially good at determin-
ing when boring people will be
crossing your path. In case you
forget to foretell, another option is
plain old witchcraft.
Weather spells are great. A
good hailstorm will usually let
people know that you really hate
to run, but it IS starting to hail. Of
course, some are so incredibly
rnJpHlP�s that thgy don't know
when to come in trom the hail.
Other handv magic to culti-
vate is voodoo. In case you wan!
to stay at the party, a few pins in
the doll's stomach can send even
the most persistent gabber to the
John for an hour.
4) Talk about things know
one knows shit about. Comic
book, late movie, literary, stamp,
religious and computer trivia are
sure bets. A few sentences about
the time Superman got trapped in
the bottle citv of Kandor and be-
came Nightwing, the Kryptonian
version of Batman, will send
people flying for the keg.
5) Talk in tongues. Not only
will this scare the average fresh-
man who is jabbering on about
babes and the Elbo, it might get
you invited to join a frat. Appar-
ently, people who can answer the
phone while loudly gobbling like
an epileptic turkey are a bic plus
for fraternity life.
6) Totally ignore them Again,
most people won't take the hint,
but those who can't are the ones
you are going to have to use op-
tion seven on anyway.
7) Blow them up. Though
dynamite is expensive and hard
to acquire in the Emerald Citv, it's
worth it after fifteen minutes of
mind-numbing boredom to push
the button and let the annoying
offender's covalently-bonded
atoms go flying apart in a very
rapid manner.
Warning: It is slightly illegal,
but in the confusion following the
blast you can usually slip away
unnoticed.
Well, I hope these tips help.
That's all for now, so always
remember Ask not if you can
pay for the beer, ask instead if the
beer can pay for vou.





t
The Clearly lahl
10
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1988
Crusty's Pizza deserves a "four star" rating R��m
By SCOTT MAXWELL
VuiiDnt Feaiurw Editor
So it has a funny name.
Crusty's Pizza, which opened
in this area on August 25, 1988,
has the national standard "Buy
one get one free offer with free
30-minute delivery. Crusty's also
offers a 10-minute pick-up serv-
ice, just like Little Caesar's and
Crusty's pizza is topped with
100 Mozzcrella cheese which
has to be about the best cheese I've
ever had on a pizza.
A Crusty's pizza bearing
some of this delicious cheese and
pcpperoni was delivered to the
East Carolinian offices at about
5:00 on a Wednesday night. Note
before I go on that this was a free
pizza, and Crusty's knew it was
coming here for review.
In my other reviews 1 have
ordered pizza in my roommate's
Pizra Hut.
r ART EXHIBITION ANTi LECTURE SCHEDULE
name, and the business delivering
the pizza did not know that the
pizza was going to be reviewed. I
offer this information in the inter-
est of strict accuracy and journal-
istic ethics, which we thought
would be fun to try for a change.
1 myself prefer thick crust,
but, given what I see as the inher-
ent limitations of thin crust, the
Crusty's was very good. The
Mozzerella was marvelous; the
pepperoni, perfect; the crust
well crusty. As I and the other
October 6:
October 6:
October 10:
October 13:
October 24:
November 7
December 2:
November 14:
November 17:
Program 1:
Program II:
November 21:
Lecture:
December 1:
L
Charles Miller, Visiting
Critic, Lecture 7:30 p.rrr
Jenkins Auditorium.
Celebrating Eastern Carolina
Artists: Sarah Blakcslee,
Fausto Cardelli,
Frank Diencr, and
Allan Erdmann.
RECEPTION: 8:30 p.m Gray Art
Gallery.
Sarah Blakcslee - Paintings
& Drawings.
Fausto Cardelli - Paintings,
Lecture 7:30 p.m Jenkins
Frank Diener - "Dicner's Circus
Gallery Walk-Through, 7:30 p.m.
Allan Erdmann - Sound & Light
Sculptures
Peter Gourfain - Ceramic
Sculpture and Carved Tools and
Banners
Lecture, 7:30 p.m Jenkins
RECEPTION: 8:30 p.m Gray
Jodv Pinto - Documentation for
Finger Span Bridge Project
and Model Lecture,
7:30 p.m Jenkins.
RECEPTION: 8:30 p.m Cray.
Manifest Destinv - Documentation
Photography on Farming and
Rural Life in America.
Ken Bloom, curator of
Manifest Destiny, Director
of the Light Factory,Charlottc.
Lecture, 7:30 p.m Jenkins.
Video Series: Early
Experimental Work and
Recent Explorations.
Acconci, Rosier, Wcgman,
Nauman, Benglis, Serra,
Jonas,
Freed, Sonnier, and
Vasulka.
Anderson, Bimbaum,Condit, Geller,
Dcmichicl, Reeves, Holzer Almy,
Miller, Fagan,
Rankin, Yonemoto,
and Kuchar.
Kate Horsfield, of the Video
Data Bank, Art Institute of
Chicago.
The History of Video Art,
7:30 p.m Jenkins.
Eleanor Heartney, Visiting Critic,
Lecture 7:30 p.m Jenkins.
RECEPTION: 8:30 p.m Gray.
Read The East Carolinian for the latest in campus
new, sports, and features, every Tuesday and Thurs-
day.
Until we drop dead from exhaustion.
"The best paper for the price
$ NEED CASH? $
WE ARE NOW BUYING
&& Summer Clothes
t Winter Clothes
We Especially Need:
Nice Levi Jeans!
and
Large and Extra Large
Men's and Women's Clothes

CLOTHES! MAH
The Coin & Ring Man
East Carolinian staffers dug in,
the reaction was unanimous:
thumbs up for Crusty's.
Crusty's offers three types of
subs: Italian, Ham and Cheese,
and Pizza. In addition, they serve
all types of Frito liy potato chips.
Soft drinks available are Coke,
Diet Coke and Mello Yello. Inci-
dentally, a matter of interest to me
and other environmentalists is
that Crusty's is the only pizza
place in Greenville that serves so ft
drinks in recyclable bottles (it is
not the only one that uses recy-
clable containers, however).
In its products, Crusty's uses
real pepperoni and sausage and
fresh produce bought locally.
Crusty's pizza is cooked in what
they describe as "top-of-the-line"
ovens. While 1 don't know
enough about ovens to verify this
claim, I can say that their Middle-
bury Marshall Pacesetters put out
some great pizza for us!
Crusty's has 210 stores in the
country; there are presently! 5 in
10:00-5:00 M-F
1CHXV3 00 Sat
400 S. Evans St.
'Evita' takes a trip to ECU
ECU n� Bureau
GREENVILLE - The national
touring production of "Evita the
Tony A ward-winning musical by
Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim
Rice, will be presented at East
Carolina University Thursday,
Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. in Wright Au-
ditorium.
The performance is a "special
added attraction" to ECU's 1988-
89 Performing Arts Series.
Based on the life of F.va Peron,
second wife of Argentine dictator
Juan Peron, "Evita" is a romanti-
cized biography of the young girl
from the Argentine backwater
who succeeds in her determina-
tion to get to Buenos Aires and
gain power and position.
As mistress- and later wife of
the military dictator Juan Peron,
Evita was noted as the most pow-
erful woman ever known in Latin
America.
GORDONS
Golf & Ski &
20 off Pre-
Season Ski Sale
(Ski's, Boots, and
all Ski Apparel)
Ends Sat. 9-17-88
North Carolina, and eight to ten
new stores are planned for 1989.
All this makes Crusty's the!2th
largest pizza chain in the U.S.
To give you an idea of their
prices, two small cheese pizzas
cost $5.62, two medium cheese
pizzas cost $7.46, and two large
cheese pizzas cost $9.98 Crusty's
Pizza is located at 1414 S. Charles
Street; their telephone order
number is 758-2233.
Plaza Cinema
Plaza Shopping Or. 75tt OOMH
Now Showing
PIPI LONGSTOCKINGS
(Sat Sun . Manner Only!
THE BLOB
(Evrn!nj9 Only)
A FISH CALLED WANTED
!Sumr, John Crr�r
NIGHTMARE ON ELM ST.
PART IV
TarkJIfieatre
Now Showing
DEADPOOL
Ctnt Kastwood
New forum for aspiring poets
The ECU Poetry Forum will
have its first meeting tonight at 8
p.m. in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. The Forum meets every
month to critique and discuss
poems that members bring.
Dr. Peter Makuck is the coor-
dinator of the Forum. All stu-
dents, faculty and local citizens
are urged to attend. All that is
required to attend is 8-10 copies of
the poem(s) that you wish to read
and have critiqued.
The Toetry Forum was set up
to encourage people to share their
poetry with others and to get feed-
back and constructive criticism on
the poems.
The exact room the Forum
will meet in is not known at press
time, but the Information desk at
Mendenhall will know the desig-
nated room number before the
meeting. For more information,
call 757-6611.
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $250,til
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
$2!
NOW SHOWING
ATHENDRIX
Wednesday
September 15-18,8 p.m.
Cher
Starring In
�irresistible:
BUCCANNER MOVIES
l 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
ratcd k YOUNG GUNS
1:00 3:05 5:10 7:15-9:20
I H t K
0L Ab Ulil
MaoNsreua
&�

RATED R


BLACK EAGLE
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:05-9:00
RATED R
PRESIDIO
1:15 3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
-
"All right, cassLef's test your New Music Knowledge
TONICHI1DS
Union
Toni Childs is:
One of 1988s critically-
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The host of a popular
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Elvis love child
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LPTape
2.
RAHBM
The Vigilante
This 16-year-old sensation
is known as:
A. The Vigilante of Rap
B. rhe Vigilante of Blueqrass
C. The Vigilanteot Polka
AM A99 A99
�r� W LPTape W CD
A FOLKWAYS
H. Various Artists
Springsteen, Dylan and U2
appear on this tribute to
A. Gumby & Pokey
B. Leadbelly &
Woody Guthrte
C. The Captain & Tennilte
T 12"
LPTape �
752-3866
C TOMMY COMMA
J. Rumble
This hot new rockers
band is called:
A. The Young Rumblers
B. The Young and the Restles
C. The Jung Psychiatrists
699 1
5ME8ll0a?
THE PLAZA, CAROLINA EAST MAIL
LPTape
10
CD
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mg problem that we h �
assist us with We live in a
bedroom apartment v
roommate who moved
beginning of the semes!
The problem is - she SME
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moved in she has only t
bath - we had to scrub the tub
clorox afterward
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worn the same tye-d -I
skirt - we haven't seen I
laundry! Her long hair bra
tens - but not from t
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black. Although srw
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smell of our apartment
health. She ha
Entrepr
squirrel
CREENYILi I
While each
Greenville's wsq n
most residents into a
people are ma �
alleged killer.
Tee-shirts al
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shirt, which sh ��� - I
the squirrel man I
course with a hum.
popular red circle a
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worth it lustcau-
got to be a little -
niry which I can I
kick me out
Grecnvil'
keep the tees:
T
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TICK
MON-T
CO
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FORM





i
i
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1988
By SCOTT MAXWELL
So it has a funny name.
Crusty's Pizza, which opened
in this area on August 25, 1988,
has the national standard "Buy 5:00 on a Wednesday night. Note
one get one free offer with free before I go on that this was a free
Crusty's pizza is topped with
100 Mozzerella cheese which
has to be about the best cheese I've
ever had on a pizza.
A Crusty's pizza bearing
some of this delicious cheese and
pepperoni was delivered to the
East Carolinian offices at about
30-minute delivery. Crusty's also
offers a 10-minute pick-up serv-
ice, just like Little Caesar's and
Pizza Hut.
pizza, and Crusty's knew it was
coming here for review.
In my other reviews I have
ordered pizza in my roommate's
name, and the business delivering
the pizza did not know that the
pizza was going to be reviewed. I
offer this information in the inter-
est of strict accuracy and journal-
istic ethics, which we thought
would be fun to try for a change.
I myself prefer thick crust,
but, given what I see as the inher-
ent limitations of thin crust, the
Crusty's was very good. The
Mozzerella was marvelous; the
pepperoni, perfect; the crust-
well crusty. As I and the other
East Carolinian staffers dug in,
the reaction was unanimous:
thumbs up for Crusty's.
Crusty's offers three types of
subs: Italian, Ham and Cheese,
and Pizza. In addition, they serve
all types of Frito Lay potato chips.
Soft drinks available are Coke,
Diet Coke and Mello Yello. Inci-
dentally, a matter of interest to me
and other environmentalists is
that Crusty's is the only pizza
place in Greenville that serves soft
drinks in recyclable bottles (it is
not the only one that uses recy-
clable containers, however).
In its products, Crusty's uses
real pepperoni and sausage and
fresh produce bought locally.
Crusty's pizza is cooked in what
they describe as "top-of-the-line"
ovens. While I don't know
enough about ovens to verify this
claim, I can say that their Middle-
bury Marshall Pacesetters put out
some great pizza for us!
Crusty's has 210 stores in the
country; there are presently 15 in
" :SKTfcXHlBlTIoN AND LECTURE SCHEDUL
October 6:Charles Miller, Visiting Critic, Lecture 7:30 p.m Jenkins Auditorium.
Celebrating Eastern Carolina Artists: Sarah Blakeslee, Fausto Cardelli, Frank Diener, and Allan Erdmann.
October 6:RECEPTION: 830 p.m Gray Art Gallery. Sarah Blakeslee - Paintings & Drawings.
October 10:Fausto Cardelli - Paintings, Lecture 7:30 p.m Jenkins
October 13:Frank Diener - "Diener's Circas Gallery Walk-Through, 730 p.m. Allan Erdmann - Sound & Light Sculptures Peter Gourfain - Ceramic Sculpture and Carved Tools and Banners
October 24: November 7 -December 2:Lecture, 730 p.m Jenkins RECEPTION: 830 p.m Gray
'Evita' takes a trip to ECU
ECU Newt Bureau
GREENVILLE - The national
touring production of "Evita the
Tony Award-winning musical by
Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim
Rice, will be presented at East
Carolina University Thursday,
Sept. 22, at 8 p.m. in Wright Au-
ditorium.
The performance is a "special
added attraction" to ECU's 1988-
89 Performing Arts Series.
Based on the life of Eva Peron,
second wife of Argentine dictator
Juan Peron, "Evita" is a romanti-
cized biography of the young girl
from the Argentine backwater
who succeeds in her determina-
tion to get to Buenos Aires and
gain power and position.
As mistress- and later wife of
the military dictator Juan Peron,
Evita was noted as the most pow-
erful woman ever known in Latin
America.
GORDON'S
Golf & Ski $L
20 off Pre-
Season Ski Sale
(Ski's, Boots, and
all Ski Apparel)
Ends Sat. 9-17-88
North Carolina, and eight to ten
new stores are planned for 1989.
All this makes Crusty's thel2th
largest pizza chain in the VS.
To give you an idea of their
prices, two small cheese pizzas
cost $5.62, two medium cheese
pizzas cost $7.46, and two large
cheese pizzas cost $9.98. Crusty's
Pizza is located at 1414 S. Charles
Street; their telephone order
number is 758-2233.
Plaza Cinema
l"ui.i SfiC-T 7'rfj �v.
frHii Showing
PIPI LONGSTOCKINGS
S�t. Sun Matmee OnJyl
THE BLOB
(Cvrmnfi Onlyt
A FISH CALLED WANTED
New forum for aspiring poets f
November 14:
November 17:
v
Program I:
Program II:
November 21:
Lecture:
December 1:
Jody Pinto - Documentation for
Finger Span Bridge Project
and Model Lecture,
730 p.m Jenkins.
RECEPTION: 830 pjn Gray.
Manifest Destiny - Documentation
Photography on Farming and
Rural Life in America.
Ken Bloom, curator of
Manifest Destiny, Director
of the Light Factory,Charlottc.
Lecture, 7:30 p.m Jenkins.
Video Series: Early
Experimental Work and
Recent Explorations.
Acconci, Rosier, Wegman,
Nauman, Benglis, Serra,
Jonas,
Freed, Sonnier, and
Vasulka.
Anderson, Birnbaum,Condit, Geller,
Demichiel, Reeves, Holzer Almy,
Miller, Fagan,
Rankin, Yonemoto,
and Kuchar.
Kate Horsfield, of the Video
Data Bank, Art Institute of
Chicago.
The History of Video Art,
730 p.m Jenkins.
Eleanor Heartney, Visiting Critic,
Lecture 730 p.m Jenkins.
RECEPTION: 830 p.m Gray.
The ECU Poetry Forum will
have its first meeting tonight at 8
p.m. in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. The Forum meets every
month to critique and discuss
poems that members bring.
Dr. Peter Makuck is the coor-
dinator of the Forum. All stu-
dents, faculty and local citizens
are urged to attend. All that is
required to attend is 8-10 copies of
the poem(s) that you wish to read
and have critiqued.
The Poetry Forum was set up
to encourage people to share their
poetry with others and to get feed-
back and constructive criticism on
the poems.
The exact room the Forum
will meet in is not known at press
time, but the Information desk at
Mendenhall will know the desig-
nated room number before the
meeting
For more information,
CONSOLIDATED
XHEATRES
Adults $2�'Xtt
5:30
CHILDREN "Y
ANYTIME $27
UCCANNER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
RATED R YOUNG GUNS
1: 00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
RATED R
BLACK EAGLE
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:05-9:00
RATED R
PRESIDIO
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
"All right, classLet's test your New Music Knowledger
Read The East Carolinian for the latest in campus
new, sports? and features, every Tuesday and Thurs-
day.
Until we drop dead from exhaustion.
"The best paper for the price
$ NEED CASH? $
WE ARE NOW BUYING
C& Summer Clothes
S1 Winter Clothes
We Especially Need:
Nice Levi Jeans!
and
Large and Extra Large
Men's and Women's Clothes
WfSfsf m
The Coin & Ring Man
I. Union
Toni Childs is:
A One of 1988s critically
acclaimed new artists
B. The host of a popular
French cooking show
C. Elvis' love child
2
ONLY LIFE
Critics have praised this
Hoboken, N.J. band's:
Distinctive brand of
jangly New Wave rock
B. Table manners
C. Killer cover version of
"Feelie-ings"jc09
1O4O-&00 M F
1000-3:00 S�t
400 8. Evans St.
752-3866
The Vigilante
This 16-y ear-old sensation
is known as:
A. "The Vigilante of Rap
B. "The Vigilante of Bluegrass
C. "The Vigilante of Polka"
AM A O
A FOLKWAYS
H. Various Artists
Springsteen, Dylan and U2
appear on this tribute to
A. Gumby & Pokey
B. Leadbelly&
Woody Guthrie
C. The Captain & Tenmlte
LPTap I mm co
HOWTOSCORf
0-2 Correct
3-4 Correct
AHSCorred
Looks like vou could use some remedial work m
Music Better come see us soon
You tp doing tine Dui some e�ua research m�y I
needed We suggest you oome see us soon
Nice woov You re obviously one ot o� regular
customers See you soon
3. Rumble
This not new rocker's
band is called:
A. The Young Ramblers
B. The Young and the Restless
C. The Jung Psychiatrists
THE PLAZA, CAROUNA EAST MAIL
i
The Clearly InhA
SB
Crusty's Pizza deserves a "four star" rating J R�om
We have a seriously threa
ing problem that we hope yoi
assist us with. We live in a
bedroom apartment with
roommate who moved in at
beginning of the semester.
The problem is - she SMEI
Her odor is so bad that our pl
are drooping and three of
gold if sh have died. Since sht
moved in she has only taker
bath - we had to scrub the tub
clorox afterward.
For the past weeks she
worn the same tye-dyed pea
skirt - we haven't seen her dc
laundry! Her long hair braid
tens - but not from being cle�
definitely does not squeak!
Her once white socks arl
longer white but a putrid sha
black. Although she is sweej
hired, we fear for our sanity!
smell of our apartment and!
health. She has signed a lease j
Entrepr
squirrel
GREENVILLE, N.C. (B
While each sighting!
Greenville's "squirrel man "j
most residents into a panic.
people are making money
alleged killer.
Tee-shirts abound oi
ECU campus, and the hJ
selling item this week i
"STOP MUTANT OFFSrR
shirt, which shows silhouc
the squirrel man having
course with a human, wit
popular red circle and sla
perimposed over the illustrJ
"I had to go to Raleigh
mine freshmen Presson
chirped happily. "But it I
worth it. Just cause 1 bought
got to be a little sister at a
nity which I can't name or
kick me out
Greenville store owners
keep the tee-shirt, and
T
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TIC
MON-Tl
CO
FORM





,
ating
Carolina, and eight to ten
Itores are planned for lg89.
lis makes Crusty's thel2th
It pizza chain in the US
give vou an idea of their
I two small cheese pizzas
5o2, two medium cheese
cost $7.46, and two large
b pizzas cost $9.98. Crusty's
is located at 1414 S. Ovules
; their telephone order
r is 758-2233.
iza Cinema
hopiittClr. 756 00Mrt
BfeU2 Showing
n LONGSTOCKEMGS
-va: Sun MaUwt Only)
THE BLOB
;Kvrnings Onlyl
SH CALLED WANTED
'SLirrtng John Clww)
f HTMARE ON ELM ST.
PART D7
rkJThtatrz
Now Shovvma
DEADPOOL
X-
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10
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5 30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME $250
MOVIES
; Shopping Center
UNS
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05-9:00
HO
15-9:15

ige!
91
II
'if
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1-
a
Vigilante
year-old sensation
as:
l'gilanteof Rap
1 ante of Bluegrass'
I qilante of Polka'
699 A"
LP Tape W CO
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labelet
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1988 11
5F!h M&&& (Sagv�)3L4jMgiiQ g&feikg ffgkgp
Roommate oblivious to hygiene deficiency
Dear Earlvis,
us and we cannot afford to have
her move out.
Wehavea seriously threaten- , Mr E J we askof JPf J?
ingproblemthat wehopeyoucan for � �hat wf ?n fnUy teU
;C o . ��u aj v l her to get her shit clean!
assist us with. We live in a two b
bedroom apartment with our
roommate who moved in at the
beginning of the semester.
The problem is - she SMELLS!
Her odor is so bad that our plants
are drooping and three of our
goldifsh have died. Since she has
moved in she has only taken one
bath - we had to scrub the tub with
clorox afterward.
For the past weeks she has
worn the same tye-dyed peasant
skirt - we haven't seen her do any
laundry! Her long hair braid glis-
tens - but not from being clean. It
definitely does not squeak!
Her once white socks are no
Signed,
Desperate Women Who Ran
Out Of Lysol
Just Ask
BigE
Dear Lysolless roomies,
It sounds like you have one
problem that really ranks up
there.
We here at the satire page
think people who disregard per-
longer white but a putrid shade of sonal hygiene should be forced
black. Although she is sweet na- to work at the city dump or the
tured, we fear for our sanity, the waste management park, locales
smell of our apartment and our where they will feel right at
health. She has signed a lease with home
But on the other hand, why
not have some compassion for
your caustically pungent room-
mate? Take our house guest (see
Satire Page, Sept. 8) for instance.
The East Carolinian took in a
homeless loser last week who
slept in the Bat Cave.
Since we don't have any
showers here at the EC, our
guest, like your roommate ac-
quired a rather acrid odor. Hey, I
just had a thought (abnormal in
this pretense), why don't we set
your roommate up with our
homeless dreg? They would
make a great pair. They could
slap the flies off each other's
body.
All this isn't helping is it?
Here are some suggestions.
We used to have a roommate
who had a girlfriend named
Angie. Angie was alright but at
times she would get on our
nerves. One night when she was
talking at her usual thirty decibel
level, we cranked upThe Rolling
Stone's "Angie
And we continued this, we
played "Angie" every time
Angie (who later became the A)
came over, time after time. We
may have been rude, but our
subliminal influence worked; the
couple broke up in less than 200
playings of "Angie
So Big E is advocating that
you go to the Record Pub or to
West Coast or to SlowGold and
purchase Lynard Skynard's
greatest hits. Go home and cue
up that Skynard tune named
"That Smell" and play it over
and over and over. And just
don't play it, CRANK IT.
You'll be surprised, music
played in a repetitive fashion can
have an effect on some. It may
take a few days or maybe a few
months of playing "Ooouuoo
that smell, can't you smell that
smell continuously but like the
Cajun Cook, "I quaruunntee"
that this remedy works.
Has your landlord evicted
you? Are you poor because you
gamble your life away? Do you
work with people who pick
they nose?
Well just ask Big E, who asks
have you looked at your sell
lately?
Earlvis
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Pile City, N.C.
Woman carries squirrel baby
Entrepreneurs profit off the
squirrel man, buyers go nuts
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
While each sighting oi
Greenville's "squirrel man" send
most residents into a panic, some
people are making money off the
alleged killer.
Tee-shirts abound on the
ECU campus, and the hottest
selling item this week is the
'STOP MUTANT OFFSPRING"
squirrel man merchandise in
stock. Various retailers are work-
ing late nights trying to locate
anything sellable that relates to
the creature.
Perhaps the most bizarre
scheme to jump on the squirrel
bandwagon is the ad a local den-
tist ran in The East Carolinian,
wanting to hire the squirrel man
tistry.
"This could be bigger than Jcx
Isuzu� and that party dog put
together he added.
Whether or not the squirrel
man will respond to the ad re- pregnancy is expected,
mains to be seen. As he is wanted ������ibbw
by the police, he may want to
hibernate a while until the storm
blows over.
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
Teen-age Lisa-Marie Hellpop, a
student at Rose High, is claiming
she is three months pregnant with
the child of Greenville's infamous
"squirrel man
Hellpop, 14, told authorities
she had been molested by the
creaturebackinjuly,butshe"was
scared nobody would believe me
until the paper started printing all
those articles
Doctors at Pitt Memorial
have examined the girl and con-
firmed the pregnancy, but Dr.
Ded Fetus said, "since it's too
early for an amniocentisis, we
can't determine whether or not
the child will be human or ro-
dent
Fetus added that Hellpop's
condition is stable and a normal
although
could
certainly the creature has been sighted has
been cordoned off he said.
When asked why the police
have not been able to handle the
squirrel monster, O" Hara wiped
his forehead and replied wea-
rily I just don't know. It's out of
our hands now
In a related story, the so-
called "giant tick people" who
killed a man in Ayden have been
discovered to be a group of rene-
gade midgets from the Free Broth-
ers Circus. The owner of the cir-
Scott Free, discovered the
complications
arise
Hellpop said in her state-
ment, "I had just called in my vote
to the Top Nine at 9, when I heard
something at the window. I
looked, and all of a sudden, this
huge guy with a tail busted in
Her voice is strained as she
recounts the events that followed.
"He was drooling when he
pinned me to the floor it was
horrible
Police Chief Gordon O'Hara
held a press conference Wednes-
day to inform the press of new dwarves were missing and was
measures being taken to halt the able to tip off police to some of the
threat of the squirrel creature. gg's old hideouts, in this case
"We've contacted the presi- an abandoned house on 13th
dent, and Greenville has been Street in Greenville,
declared a disaster area, and the All eight of the 'Tick People"
National Guard is being flown in are currently being held without
tonight. Every known area where bond.
cus,
shirt, which shows silhouette of for an adh"8 "JJff; �e
the squirrel man having inter-
course with a human, with the
popular red circle and slash su-
perimposed over the illustration.
"I had to go to Raleigh to get
mine freshmen Presson Nails
chirped happily. "But it was
ad reads, "SQUIRREL MAN
Earn some cash for your nuts! Let
me use you in a TV ad for aesthetic
dentistry
The dentist, Fred Nitrous,
D.D.S has planned a whole series
of ads to run on television if he
Rapture came
Tolerance says Menopause will come
RALEIGH, N.C. (BP) �
Reverand N. Tolerance an-
nounced today that by sunset
EARTH, Milky Way (BP) � lonjght, an ancient Biblical proph-
As expected, at sunset Tuesday fXy wffl Cf)me tfue and aU
form of life on the planet, will be tne ages for their belief in God"s
"raised upby the hand of God and most perfect creation
wafted to the Land of Little Mois-
worthit JustaiuseIboughtone,I canonly nnd the squirrel man to
got to be a little sister at a frater- starin them. Nitrous explained I
nity which I can't name or they'll wa�,use his obviously well-
kick me out" formed front teeth to launch a
Greenville store owners can't Public awareness campaign on
the tee-shirt, and other benefits of aesthetic den-
keep
night, Biblical predictions came
true. The rapture came and the
world ended. Only 17 survivors
have been found, with another
five billion missing and pre-
sumed transported to heaven, or
some other suitable afterlife.
who believe in St. Mary of the
Cacti will be "lifted up and flown
first class to Death Valley
The "Menopause a long-
discredited doctrine that says all
those who believe water-efficient,
desert vegetation are the highest
ture. Do not pass 'GO Do not
collect $200 has surfaced in a
new book by Tolerance called "I
Know Why The Cacti Don't Wear
Reeboks� � A Survival Guide to
the Menopause
Tolerance said he wrote the
book to help "those believers who
have been ridiculed throughout
In the book, he predicts that
by 7:56 tonight, "the sky will be-
gin to rain needles and cacti fruit,
blinding many and driving others
insane. Only the faithful will be
spared, and they shall not be
smited by the Death From
Above
m
2nd ANNUAL
TKE BACK
YARD BASH
FRIDAY SEPT-16
7-12 pm
with
THE USUALS
AND
THE BOND
AND
STARK NAKED
TICKETS-$3.00 IN ADVANCE
MON-THURS AT THE STUDENT STORE
$4.00 AT THE DOOR
BYOB
COOLERS WELCOME
NO GLASS PLEASE
FOR MORE INFO CALL 757-3042
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
D
I S
N E
I R
N V
G I
C
E
S
Don't forget
Celebrity Chef
Fall Grill-Out
Tonight on
College Hill
4:15-7:00 p.m.





Overkill
"That's me, that's me, ain't nobody else it could beAl
Orpheus
By Harris and Gurganus
5, up ft Tnor rn�
By Friedrich
Inside oke
By Rik he Avatar

f
A
ALTERATION.
NO
QJESTiONS
ASKED
. . . C03T YOU 3,0�0 CM.O1TJ ,
WR TATC . YOV OOWT LOOK TO
have that iwcm Chakgi oh rou.
I'm sut you
UAfC AM ACCESS
KKV HER�PRh�G-�R.
I HAVfc THt CNCKirj
IN MY BANK AtXOUNr
I'UTrn IN THt ACC
coot Af r� rue
ALTCHAT'O.
NOW)
Si' down
AGfc��D
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I A
Quo It z to Live By
I'm going mad
-Stephanie Folsom
The computer is our
friend
-Doug Johnson
YOU rou'HE CRAZV.
AIN'T PAYIN' TIL'
OU PUT Mf BACK
ATi a.u TMCl
Bv Harris and Haselrig
iOOt 5- -?�0 Hfc
.ion es. � �
w�tLO DHA
YOJR
our.
MOW uONO P0E3
IT TAKf TO
S
looorrtiT
FISTICUFFS.
CNOL! RUFRS
50, �BC-SPit�R�:
PRAfcGEB . wE
:CT AGAlrt.
Optical Illusion
Which line is longer?
B
;peai-iapuiids 'ja8uo si �v� aun
Find the Lloyd Imposter
One of the pictures below is NOT Democratic Vice-President candidate
Lloyd Bentsen. Can you figure out which?
Yo Readers
If you have anything you'd like to
say about the Comics Page or Tun and
Games, let us know. What do you
like or dislike? Any ideas? What are
your philosophies on life? Do you like
these half-tops women are wearing
now? We sure do. How do you feel about
all this Squirrel Man stuff? Drop us a
line or call us at 757-6366. Word.
2.
3.

a.ipj e si
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9 jaqumN iojeuosjdduit uasjuaa Pll 'll3 VniO IFM si oum '� si wmsite paxioD aqj.
Typical Partridge Family
plotline:
Soul Club
W: Harry Winklcr & Harry Dolan. I):
Paul Jungcr Witt. C.S: Richard 1'ryor
When Reuben makes a mistake, the
Partridges spend a weekend perform-
ing in an old firehouse in a Detroit
ghetto.
The Second Annual
Kill Danny Partridge Contest
Since our last contest was so well-recieved and successful, we're doing
it again! All civilized people hate and despise Danny Bonaduce, the
precocious red-haired teeny-bopper from "The Partridge Family" who
perpetuated everything bad about the seventies, (that's everything) Now you
new-comers have the chance to Destroy Danny. Write in a paragraph or less
how you visualize the violent disgusting death of Danny and send them to or
bring them by the East Carolinian in care of "Fun and Games" by Wednesday
the 28th. The best submissions will be printed here and the First Place killer
will win a cheap plaque, a tour of the newspaper, meet the Pirate Comics
crew, and see how we make Fun and Games! Include name and phone
number, please.
DECIDE THE DESTINY OF ROBIN
Guess what readers? DC comics is having a great contest that we at Fun and
Games wish we had thought of! In connection with their current storyline,
DC is giving we readers the chance to decide whether Batman's useless
sidekick Robin lives or dies in next month's comic. We thought this was too
important a decision to remain in the hands of foolhardy teenage youths
(who will probably want him to live) so we are making the call-in numbers
available to YOU COLLEGE STUDENTS! The call will cost fifty cents, but
that's a small price to pay to help out our old Bat-Pal. Exercise your right to
vote! The calls are only being taken Friday, so get on those phones tomorrow!
LET THE BOY WONDER LIVE
1-900-720-2660
KILL THE BOY WONDER
1-900-720-2666
I
y -VPut the Boy Wonder
'Vi Six Feet Under.
Fun and Games by Jelf" Parker, who gets paid for it now.
Pirate
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Pirate
7
An ECU runner escapes the
Volley
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Stiff Wnie
After a weekend on the re
ECU'S volleyball team will sp
this weekend at home as it hi
Davidson College, a team thai
Lady Pirates defeated last w
end, and the Lady Yellow Jacl
of Georgia Tech.
The Pirates, now 2-2 on
year, are looking to improv
their record after they opei
their season with two straf
wins, and then two loses to A
lachian State and UNC-ChJ
Hill at the All Carolina Classic
'ffisf.wfyJfenff,
ECU'S win over Davit
came as it traveled to Chapel
for the All Carolina Classtr
Friday, the Ladv Pirates defe�
Davidson 16-14,15-11,15-13.
"It was a good way to starj
weekend said Kirkpatrick
saw a lot of good offensive
from our girls
On Saturday, ECU f�
Appalachian State in a gamel
was much closer than the
indicated, according to Kir
trick. The Lady pirates lost
15-9,5-15,4-15, evening theirl
rooorror
TlSTICVFFS.
CMOUftUFFUS!
m �?"
Find the Lloyd Imposter
One of the pictures below is NOT Democratic Vice-President candidate
Lloyd Bentsen. Can you figure out which?
Yo Readers
If you have anything you'd like to
say about the Comics Page or Fun and
Games, let us know. What do you
like or dislike? Any ideas? What are
your philosophies on life? Do you like
these half-tops women are wearing
now? We sure do. How do you feel about
all this Squirrel Man stuff? Drop us a
line or call us at 757-6366. Word.
iiiA'DIl l� �"�! &W& uMMon�H 1 aiepipuea din. jo aanpid un e si
9 jaquinN lojeuosjaduii uas;uag pXon liaxreH 13nHD UM SI �MM '� si iaMsue paoaoa am
Typical Partridge Family
plotline:
Soul Club
W: Harry Winklcr & Harry Dolan. D:
Paul Jungcr Witt. GS: Richard Pryor.
When Reuben makes a mistake, th
Partridges spend a weekend perform-
ing in an old firehouse in a Detroit
ghetto.
The Second Annual
Kill Danny Partridge Contest
Since our last contest was so well-recieved and successful, we're doing
it again! All civilized people hate and despise Danny Bonaduce, the
precocious red-haired teeny-bopper from "The Partridge Family" who
perpetuated everything bad about the seventies, (that's everything) Now you
new-comers have the chance to Destroy Danny. Write in a paragraph or less
how you visualize the violent disgusting death of Danny and send them to or
bring them by the East Carolinian in care of "Fun and Games" by Wednesday
the 28th. The best submissions will be printed here and the First Place killer
will win a cheap plaque, a tour of the newspaper, meet the Pirate Comics
crew, and see how we make Fun and Games! Include name and phone
number, please.
DECIDE THE DESTINY OF ROBIN
Guess what readers? DC comics is having a great contest that we at Fun and
Games wish we had thought of! In connection with their current storyline,
DC is giving we readers the chance to decide whether Batman's useless
sidekick Robin lives or dies in next month's comic. We thought this was too
important a decision to remain in the hands of foolhardy teenage youths
(who will probably want him to live) so we are making the call-in numbers
available to YOU COLLEGE STUDENTS! The call will cost fifty cents, but
that's a small price to pay to help out our old Bat-Pal. Exercise your right to
vote! The calls are only being taken Friday, so get on those phones tomorrow!
LET THE BOY WONDER LIVE
1-900-720-2660
KILL THE BOY WONDER
1-900-720-2666 rSffJ f7 B�y Wonde
�LS JLiS Six Feet Under.
Fun and Games by Jett Parker, who gets paid for it nowT
A
An ECU volleyball playei
Cross C
defeat
ByMIKEMcGEHEF
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Saturday East Carolina
the Pembroke Invitational i
they met up with adversitj
success.
There was much to cel
as far as the women's teai
concerned. They took
place just behind VCU, and
man Ann Marie Welsh set
school record in a 5k race wj
time of 18-38. Filling out tf
five were Kim Griffiths





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Sports
SEITEMBLR IS. 1KH Page 13
Pirates prepare for contest with 'Cocks
An ECU runner escapes the grasp of a Gamecock defender in action last season. (File Photo).
Volleyballers at home
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sporti Fditor
Pirate Head Coach Art
Baker hopes that he can prevent a
repeat of last season's 34-12 loss to
South Carolina Saturday, and
he's placing his faith in provi-
dence, and maybe a little more.
"Everybody knows that
we're facing a ranked team next
week. I don't know where they'll
be, but I'm sure they will be in the
top 15. After South Carolina looks
at our Virginia Tech film, perhaps
they'll get the same feeling that
I'm sure we must have gotten af-
ter watching our film and
Clemson's film (against Virginia
Tech), and perhaps they will get
overconfident themselves, and
mavbe we'll pull the same thing
that Virginia Tech did Baker
commented Monday during a
press conference held at the Pirate
Club.
The Gamecocks opened the
season with a 31-10 victory over
North Carolina, and improved
their record to 2-0 last week with a
38-0 shutout of Western Carolina.
South Carolina's Heisman candi-
date, junior Todd Ellis, was 13 of
19 for 187 yards and one touch-
down last week, and is 3b for 57
for 477 yards and three touch-
downs on the season. He has yet
to throw an interception.
The Gamecocks changed
their offense this year from the
run and shoot to a more pro style
multiple offense. Baker feels that
this offense is more suited to a
quarterback of Ellis' style and tal-
ent, allowing him more opportu-
nities to throw the ball. "This of-
fense allows Ellis to throw off the
running game, and off the straight
drop-back passing game. But
whatever game you put him in, as
long as you give him the opportu-
nity to throw, he's going to be
good he said. "They also have
two freshman receivers that are
performing well for them. But the
biggest difference is that we will
have to contain an outstanding
running game. I think that Harold
Green will be a valid candidate for
the Heisman, just as Ellis is
Baker believes that a good
passing game, coupled with a
good running game, could spill
trouble for the Pirates. "Anytime
you can defend one or the other,
you're okay, but when you have
to defend both, you have prob-
lems he said.
The defense for South Caro-
lina could also pose problems for
the Pirates The Gamecock de-
fense has held opponents to one
touchdown rushing and none in
the air, and to only 388 yards in
total offense in two games. "They
(the defense) blitz about 80-85
percent of the time Baker said.
"They don't give you much time
to throw deep. Their defense is
agressive, and they are excellent
pass rushers. We'll have to do an
excellent job of preparing for their
defense
Another obstacle that the Pi-
rates will have to overcome is the
crowd in William-Brice Stadium,
one that numbered b9,131 in last
season's contest. "A huge crowd
may be a problem for us Baker
said. "We had trouble last year in
our checks, and we'll have to
work hard on our checks for this
game
Despite a tough opponent
and the Pirate's performance last
weekend, Baker still remains con-
fident. "Even with all the adverse
things that happened last week-
end, I still feel very confident
about this football team "
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
SUII Vnf�v
After a weekend on the road,
ECl 's volleyball team will spend
this weekend at home as it hosts
Davidson College, a team that the
Lady Pirates defeated last week-
end, and the Lady Yellow jackets
oi Georgia Tech.
The Pirates, now 2-2 on the
year, are looking to improve on
their record after they opened
their season with two straight
wins, and then two loses to Appa-
hian Mate and UNC-Chapel
HillattheAHCarolinaC lassi tl
pabt weekend.
ECC's win over Davidson
came as it traveled to Chapel 1 lill
for the All Carolina Classic. On
Friday, the Lady Pirates defeated
Davidson 16-14, 15-11, 15-13.
"It was a good way to start the
weekend said Kirkpatnck. "We
saw a lot of good offensive play
from our girls
On Saturday, ECL faced
Appalachian State in a game that
was much closer than the score
indicated, according to Kirkpa-
tnck. The Lady pirates losl 7-15,
15-9, 5-15, 4-15, e enine their rec-
at the( lassie at 1-1.
Next on the Pirates schedule
was Atlantic Coast Conference
�tpowerhouse I C Chapel
Hill. The Tarheels, led by Ail-
Americanandidate Sharon Ger-
man, took the match in straight
set 15-2, 15-2, 15-7.
ECU'S Traci Smith led the
Lad Pirates in the Tarheel match
with seven kills.
Host UNC-Chapel Hill fin-
ished the tournament 3-0. ECU'S
Colonial Athletic Conference ri-
val I C Wilmington, finished
with a 2 1 record while the Lady
Pirates dnd the Ldy Mountain-
eers both recorded 1-2 records.
Davidson finished the tourna-
ment at 0-3.
ECL junior Jcmma Holley,
who leads ECU with 41 kills and
54 dis tor the season, was se-
lected to the All Tournament
team.
"We had a good tournament
for the teams that we placed
said Kirkpatnck. "The Appala-
chian match was closer than the
score indicated and 1 wish that we
played later in the season. I feel
like we could have a much better
match Our girls were out of the
Carolina match psychologically
before they took us out of it physi-
cally
Kirkpatnck credited Traci
Smith and Michelle Mclntosh
with leading the Lady Pirates of-
fensively during the tournament.
On Wednesday night, the
I.adv Pirates will host Campbell
University. The Lady Pirates eas-
ily defeated the Lady Camels in
the!9S7 season, winning 15-0, 15-
1.
Kirkpatrick says the match
should be a good one with ECU
and Campbell's ongoing rivalary.
.But diraitajast year's easy wire
k the Gidv Pirates will take the
match with the much improved
Camel team very seriously.
In this weekend's action, ECU
will take the first match on Satur-
day off, as Davidson and Georgia
Tech square off at 11:00 a.m.
At 1:30, the Ladv Pirates will
face Georgia Tech, who finished
18-20 last season, and in last place
in the ACC.
ECU will then meet Davidson
at4:00, for what they hope will be
a repeat of last weekend's win.
� . � .�
The Pirates went through some hard practices in preparing for this week's game. (File Photo).
Rice gets grand slam
An ECU volleyball player prepares to set the hall for a teammate.File Photo).
Cross Country faces triumph,
defeat while on the road
By MIKI McGEHEE
( orresporuient
Saturdav East arolinaranal
the Pembroke Invitational where
thev met up with adversity and
success.
There was much to celebrate
as far as the women's team was
concerned. They took second
place just behind V l .and fresh
man Ann Mane Welsh set a new
school record in a 5k race with her
time of 18:38. Filling out the top
five were Kim Griffiths (8th,
20:04), Dawn Sweeney (11th,
20 19), DawnTillson (18th, 21:08)
and fennifer Hough (21st, 21:44).
Bad news for the men's team
i ame in the form oi rain, causing
injuries Both themenand women
had to run in poor conditions, but
it took its greatest toll on the mens
squad 1 hev placed fifthoutof ten
teams, possibly because they had
to compete without two of their
top runners Peter Sengenberger
and Gene Womzy were both
unable to finish, one due to sick-
ness, the other an injury. This put
the Pirates at a disadvantage, but
they made the best of the unfortu-
nate situation.
The top finisher for ECU was
Matt Schweitzer (17th, 27:51). The
rest of the top five were Vince
Wilson (23rd, 28:31), James Lay-
ton (30th, 29:23), Russel Williams
(41st, 30:22) and Rusty Meador
41st, 30:22).
This weekend the Pirates will
be traveling south to compete in
the Wilmington Invitational.
(AP)- Even in a season of dis-
content, Jim Rice still finds mo-
ments oi solace. Enough oi them
might make him and the Boston
Red Sox very happy.
Rice, relegated to a role as
part-time designated hitter, con-
nected for his eighth career grand
slam Tuesday night as the Red
Sox beat Baltimore 6-4 and in-
creased their lead in the American
League East.
"I'm ready to play any day,
but if I'm not in the lineup I can't
do anything about it Rice said
after starting for just the fourth
time in fourteen games. "My atti-
tude has been the same for four-
teen years. I'm not going to
change
"When I'm called upon, 1
want to go up there and do my job.
If I'm not called upon, I don t have
anything to worry about
Ricc suspended earlier this
season after a run-in with Man-
ager Joe Morgan, is batting .270
with 12 home runs and 61 runs
batted in.
The Red Sox moved 4 12
games ahead of Detroit, which
lost to Toronto 9-1. New York also
is 4 12 behind after beating
Cleveland 5-4. Milwaukee stayed
5 12 back by defeating Chicago
4-0.
In other AL games, Oakland
held off Texas 2-1, Minnesota ral-
lied past Seattle 2-1 and Kansas
City downed California 4-3.
Rice spoiled the major league
debut of Pete Hamisch, who was
drafted by the Orioles in June
1987.
Harnisch struck out Rice on
three pitches in the second inning,
but Rice got his revenge when he
came to the plate with the bases
loaded in the fourth.
Rice sent a 2-2 pitch high oii
the light tower above the wall in
left-center field for his 376th ca-
reer home nin.
Yankees 5. Indians 4
Pinch hitter Luis Aguayo's
two-run homer in the eighth in-
ning rallied New York over host
Cleveland for its fifth victory in
six games.
Dave Winfield opened the
eighth with a single for his third
hit. One cut later. Aguayo greeted
Scott Bailes, 8-13, with his home
nin. Neil Allen, 5-2, pitched 3 1-3
shutout innings for the victory.
Blue Jays 9, Tigers 1
Jesse Barfield hit a grand
slam and Ernie Whitt added a
two-run shot as host Toronto
trounced slumping Detroit.
Dave Srieb, 13-8, allowed six
hits in seven innings. Ted Power,
5-7, gave up five runs in 2 1-3
innings.
Barfield's second slam of the
season and third of his career
came in the seventh It was hi-
17th home run this year and came
against Paul Gibson.
Brewers 4, White Sox 0
Juan Nieves pitched a three-
hitter and Paul Molitor and Robin
Yount homered in the first inning
to send Milwaukee oer Chicago.
Nieves, 6-5, won in his first start
since July 14. He stnick out four
and walked two in his only com-
plete game this season. Molitor
led off the first inning w i th a home
run for the 23rd time in his career.
Athletics 2, Rangers 1
lose Canseco hit his 39th
home nin and Dennis Eckersley
got his 40th save as host Oakland
cut its magic number for winning
the AL West to seven. Canesco.
leading the majors in home runs
and with 115 RBls, hit a two-run
shot in the sixth inning. He also
stole his 37th base, moving closer
to becoming the first player to hit
40 homers and steal 40 bases in the
same year.
Curt Young, 10-8, held Texas
to four hits in 7 2-3 innings.
Twins 2, Manners i
hm Dwyer singled home the
tying run and Tom Herr had an
RBI grounder as Minnesota ral-
lied tor two nins in the ninth in-
ning and wen at Seattle.
The Twins, shut out bv five
pitchers for eight innings came
back as singles bv Randy Bush,
Garv Gaetti and Dwyer tied it at 1 -
1 Herr s bases-loaded groundout
scored pinch runner Al Newman.
Keith Atherten. 7-5, got the
victory and left Reardon earned
his 38th save
Rovals 4. Angels 3
Bret Sabcrhagen evened his
record at 14-14 as Kansas Citv
won at California.
Sabcrhagen gave up two
runs on six hits in seven innings
He struck out nine, matching his
season high Steve Fair got his
19th save Chuck Finley, 9-14.
took the loss.






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laanpid djej e si
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lat we at Fun and
current storyline,
latman's useless
ught this was too
teenage youths
call-in numbers
1st fifty cents, but
Rise your right to
hones tomorrow!
"HA HA! you
UOULONT PA-
Put the Boy Wonder
Six Feet Under.
vaid for it now.
r.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
H.
SEPTEMBER 15, 1988 Page 13
Pirates prepare for contest with 'Cocks
An ECU runner escapes the grasp of a Gamecock defender in action last season. (File Photo).
Volleyballers at home
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Pirate Head Coach Art
Baker hopes that he can prevent a
repeat of last season's 34-12 loss to
South Carolina Saturday, and
he's placing his faith in provi-
dence, and maybe a little more.
"Everybody knows that
we're facing a ranked team next
week. I don't know where they'll
be, but I'm sure they will be in the
top 15. After South Carolina looks
at our Virginia Tech film, perhaps
they'll get the same feeling that
I'm sure we must have gotten af-
ter watching our film and
Clemson's film (against Virginia
Tech), and perhaps they will get
overconfident themselves, and
maybe we'll pull the same thing
that Virginia Tech did Baker
commented Monday during a
press conference held at the Pirate
Club.
The Gamecocks opened the
season with a 31-10 victory over
North Carolina, and improved
their record to 2-0 last week with a
38-0 shutout of Western Carolina.
South Carolina's Heisman candi-
date, junior Todd Ellis, was 13 of
19 for 187 yards and one touch-
down last week, and is 36 for 57
for 477 yards and three touch-
downs on the season. He has yet
to throw an interception.
The Gamecocks changed
their offense this year from the
run and shoot to a more pro style
multiple offense. Baker feels that
this offense is more suited to a
quarterback of Ellis' style and tal-
ent, allowing him more opportu-
nities to throw the ball. "This of-
fense allows Ellis to throw off the
running game, and off the straight
drop-back passing game. But
whatever game you put him in, as
long as you give him the opportu-
nity to throw, he's going to be
good he said. "They also have
two freshman receivers that are
performing well for them. But the
biggest difference is that we will
have to contain an outstanding
running game. I think that Harold
Green will be a valid candidate for
the Heisman, just as Ellis is
Baker believes that a good
passing game, coupled with a
good running game, could spell
trouble for the Pirates. "Anytime
you can defend one or the other,
you're okay, but when you have
to defend both, you have prob-
lems he said.
The defense for South Caro-
lina could also pose problems for
the Pirates. The Gamecock de-
fense has held opponents to one
touchdown rushing and none in
the air, and to only 388 yards in
total offense in two games. "They
(the defense) blitz about 80-85
percent of the time Baker said.
"They don't give you much time
to throw deep. Their defense is
agressive, and they are excellent
pass rushers. We'll have to do an
excellent job of preparing for their
defense
Another obstacle that the Pi-
rates will have to overcome is the
crowd in William-Brice Stadium,
one that numbered 69,131 in last
season's contest. "A huge crowd
may be a problem for us Baker
said. "We had trouble last year in
our checks, and we'll have to
work hard on our checks for this
game
Despite a tough opponent
and the Pirate's performance last
weekend, Baker still remains con-
fident. "Even with all the adverse
things that happened last week-
end, I still feel very confident
about this football team
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff Writer
After a weekend on the road,
ECU's volleyball team will spend
this weekend at home as it hosts
Davidson College, a team that the
Lady Pirates defeated last week-
end, and the Lady Yellow Jackets
of Georgia Tech.
The Pirates, now 2-2 on the
year, are looking to improve on
their record after they opened
their season with two straight
wins, and then two loses to Appa-
lachian State and UNC-Chapel
Hill at the All Carolina Classic this
ECU's win over Davidson
came as it traveled to Chapel Hill
for the All Carolina Classic. On
Friday, the Lady Pirates defeated
Davidson 16-14,15-11,15-13.
"It was a good way to start the
weekend said Kirkpatrick. "We
saw a lot of good offensive play
from our girls
On Saturday, ECU faced
Appalachian State in a game that
was much closer than the score
indicated, according to Kirkpa-
trick. The Lady pirates lost 7-15,
15-9,5-15,4-15, evening their rec-
ord at the Classic at 1-1.
Next on the Pirates schedule
was Atlantic Coast Conference
(ACC) power house UNC-Chapel
Hill. The Tarheels, led by Ail-
American Candidate Sharon Ger-
Carolina match psychologically
before they took us out of it physi-
cally
Kirkpatrick credited Traci
Smith and Michelle Mclntosh
with leading the Lady Pirates of-
man, took the match in straight fensively during the tournament,
sets, 15-2,15-2,15-7. On Wednesday night, the
ECU's Traci Smith led the udy Pirates will host Campbell
Lady Pirates in the Tarheel match University. The Lady Pirates eas-
with seven kills. ily defeated the Lady Camels in
Host UNC-Chapel Hill fin- thel987 season, winning 15-0,15-
ished the tournament 3-0. ECU's
Colonial Athletic Conference ri-
val, UNC-Wilmington, finished
1.
Kirkpatrick says the match
should be a good one with ECU
with a 2-1 record while the Lady and Campbell's ongoing rivalary.
Pirates and the Lady Moyntain .jul-dispitajast-year's easy viv
Davidson finished the tourna-
ment at 0-3.
ECU junior Jemma Holley,
who leads ECU with 41 kills and
54 digs for the season, was se-
lected to the All Tournament
team.
"We had a good tournament
for the teams that we played
said Kirkpatrick. "The Appala-
chian match was closer than the
score indicated and I wish that we
match with the much improved
Camel team very seriously.
In this weekend's action, ECU
will take the first match on Satur-
day off, as Davidson and Georgia
Tech square off at 11:00 a.m.
At 1:30, the Lady Pirates will
face Georgia Tech, who finished
18-20 last season, and in last place
in the ACC.
ECU will then meet Davidson
played later in the season. I feel at 4:00'for what tneY h�pe wiU
like we could have a much better a repeat of last weekend's win.
match. Our girls were out of the
The Pirates went through some hard practices in preparing for this week's game. (File Photo).
Rice gets grand slam
An ECU volleyball player prepares to set the ball for a teammate. (File Photo).
Cross Country faces triumph,
defeat while on the road
By MIKE McGEHEE
Compondent
Saturday East Carolina ran at
the Pembroke Invitational where
they met up with adversity and
success.
There was much to celebrate
as far as the women's team was
concerned. They took second
place just behind VCU, and fresh-
man Ann Marie Welsh set a new
school record in a 5k race with her
time of 18:38. Filling out the top
five were Kim Griffiths (8th,
20:04), Dawn Sweeney (11th,
20:19), Dawn Tillson (18th, 21:08)
and Jennifer Hough (21st, 21:44).
Bad news for the men's team
came in the form of rain, causing
injuries. Both the men and women
had to run in poor conditions, but
it took its greatest toll on the mens
squad. They placed fifth out of ten
teams, possibly because they had
to compete without two of their
top runners. Peter Sengenberger
and Gene Womzy were both
unable to finish, one due to sick-
ness, the other an injury. This put
the Pirates at a disadvantage, but
they made the best of the unfortu-
nate situation.
The top finisher for ECU was
Matt Schweitzer (17th, 27:51). The
rest of the top five were Vince
Wilson (23rd, 28:31), James Lay-
ton (30th, 29:23), Russel Williams
(41st, 30:22) and Rusty Meador
41st, 30:22).
This weekend the Pirates will
be traveling south to compete in
the Wilmington Invitational.
(AP)- Even in a season of dis-
content, Jim Rice still finds mo-
ments of solace. Enough of them
might make him and the Boston
Red Sox very happy.
Rice, relegated to a role as
part-time designated hitter, con-
nected for his eighth career grand
slam Tuesday night as the Red
Sox beat Baltimore 6-4 and in-
creased their lead in the American
League East.
"I'm ready to play any day,
but if I'm not in the lineup I can't
do anything about it Rice said
after starting for just the fourth
time in fourteen games. "My atti-
tude has been the same for four-
teen years. I'm not going to
change
"When I'm called upon, I
want to go up there and do my job.
If I'm not called upon, I don't have
anything to worry about
Rice, suspended earlier this
season after a run-in with Man-
ager Joe Morgan, is batting .270
with 12 home runs and 61 runs
batted in.
The Red Sox moved 4 12
games ahead of Detroit, which
lost to Toronto 9-1. New York also
is 4 12 behind after beating
Cleveland 5-4. Milwaukee stayed
512 back by defeating Chicago
4-0.
In other AL games, Oakland
held off Texas 2-1, Minnesota ral-
lied past Seattle 2-1 and Kansas
City downed California 4-3.
Rice spoiled the major league
debut of Pete Hamisch, who was
drafted by the Orioles in June
1987.
Hamisch struck out Rice on
three pitches in the second inning,
but Rice got his revenge when he
came to the plate with the bases
loaded in the fourth.
Rice sent a 2-2 pitch high off
the light tower above the wall in
left-center field for his 376th ca-
reer home run.
Yankees 5, Indians 4
Pinch hitter Luis Aguayo's
two-run homer in the eighth in-
ning rallied New York over host
Cleveland for its fifth victory in
six games.
Dave Winfield opened the
eighth with a single for his third
hit. One out later, Aguayo greeted
Scott Bailes, 8-13, with his home
run. Neil Allen, 5-2, pitched 31-3
shutout innings for the victory.
Blue Jays 9, Tigers 1
Jesse Barfield hit a grand
slam and Ernie Whitt added a
two-run shot as host Toronto
trounced slumping Detroit.
Dave Stieb, 13-8, allowed six
hits in seven innings. Ted Power,
5-7, gave up five runs in 2 1-3
innings.
Barfield's second slam of the
season and third of his career
came in the seventh. It was his
17th home run this year and came
against Paul Gibson.
Brewers 4, White Sox 0
Juan Nieves pitched a three-
hitter and Paul Molitor and Robin
Yount homered in the first inning
to send Milwaukee over Chicago-
Nieves, 6-5, won in his first start
since July 14. He struck out four
and walked two in his only com-
plete game this season. Molitor
led off the first inning with a home
run for the 23rd time in his career.
Athletics 2, Rangers 1
Jose Canseco hit his 39th
home run and Dennis Eckersley
got his 40th save as host Oakland
cut its magic number for winning
the AL West to seven. Canesco,
leading the majors in home runs
and with 115 RBIs, hit a two-run
shot in the sixth inning. He also
stole his 37th base, moving closer
to becoming the first player to hit
40 homers and steal 40 bases in the
same year.
Curt Young, 10-8, held Texas
to four hits in 7 2-3 innings.
Twins 2, Mariners 1
Jim Dwyer singled home the
tying run and Tom Herr had an
RBI grounder as Minnesota ral-
lied for two runs in the ninth in-
ning and won at Seattle.
The Twins, shut out by five
pitchers for eight innings, came
back as singles by Randy Bush,
Gary Gaetti and Dwyer tied it at 1-
1. Heir's bases-loaded groundout
scored pinch runner Al Newman.
Keith Atherton, 7-5, got the
victory and Jeff Reardon earned
his 38th save.
Royals 4, Angels 3
Bret Saberhagen evened his
record at 14-14 as Kansas City
won at California.
Saberhagen gave up two
runs on six hits in seven innings.
He struck out nine, matching his
season high. Steve Farr got his
19th save. Chuck Finley, 9-14,
took the loss.





14
THE EASTCAROLINMAN
SEPTEMRER 15, 1988
SAVA-CENTER
Redshirting problem
"Redshirting like "Miami
is a dirty word at Notre Dame.
The Notre Dame roster for 1988
includesonly three redshirts fifth-
year seniors Flash Gordon, VVes
rritchett and Frank Stams, all
linebackers.
You have to understand why new offensive line, three new re-
Notre Dame doesn't redshirt. ceivers and two new kickers.
"Notre Dame says you come "People have five classes, and
in here as a freshman and your they mature and grow and de-
schedule's set for you. You're velop Holtz said. "We have
going to take'X'amount of hours, four classes. You need three
You have your choice what Ian- classes to win, and when people
Gordon was granted an extra guage you want to take or what redshirt they have five classes to
year of eligibility after a series of science you want to take. draw three Over the years, even
injuries prevented him from play- "At the end of your freshman the Gerry Faust years, Notre
ing in 1984. Pritchett was not in year, if you're not even with your Dame generally was ranked near
school during the spring of 1986 class for graduation - athletes, the top in recruiting by the so-
and needs this semester to com- non-athletes - you go to summer
plete his degree requirements. A school and you start out your
nagging thigh problem limited sophomore year even with your
Stams to 16 seconds of action in class. Same thing at the end of
your sophomore and junior years.
So you start your senior year,
you're on line for graduation.
"Now the NCAA says to be
eligible you basically have to be
pursuing a worthwhile degree.
all
1986 - ergo, an extra year.
Coach Lou Holtz may not be
thrilled with the Notre Dame ath-
letic board's policy of granting a
fifth year only for medical or per-
sonal reasons - many coaches
automatically redshirt as many
true freshmen as possible to build
depth for the future - but says he
agrees with it.
"Eleven times a year - 12
rimes, hopefully - 1 wish we re-
dshirted Hoftz says. "But it
doesn't blend in with Notre
Dame's philosophy or with its
purpose.
"We're the only school in
America that doesn't redshirt
and I don't think there's anv
doubt that that has hurt us drasti-
cally on a Saturday afternoon.
"But I concur with Notre
Dame's philosophy and belief.
But you've already graduated. Do
we give somebody a position in
graduate school and deny a wor-
thy candidate a position just so he
can play one semester of football?
Or do we start playing games and
stretching out their career and
change everything about Notre
Dame?"
How important is redshirt-
ing? Holtz says it has "changed
the game more than any other
thing in the last 25 years Like
most schools, Notre Dame is hurt-
ing depth-wise. In Saturday
night's 19-17 victory over Michi-
gan, the Irish unveiled a brand-
called experts. Where have
those great players gone?
"Number one, I don't believe
who had the best recruiting year
in the country Holtz says. "That
goes according to who had great
high school years. It's never based
on who's going to get better,
who's going to mature and the
reasons why.
"But I do think if you will go
check the recruiting list three and
four years ago, you will not find
Notre Dame in the top 10. And
consequently, our junior-senior
class from top to bottom is not real
strong.
"When I first came here
(1986), we were predominantly a
freshman-junior-senior foot-
ball team. Last year, we were pre-
dominantly a freshman-sopho-
more-senior football team. This
year, we're predominantly a
fresh man-sophomore-juni or
football team without very many
seniors on the first two teams
Greenspan creates film about
Olympics in Nazi Germany
(AP- The television studio set
was right out of network central's
morning stable. A couch. An easy
chair. Two news anchors chatting
amicably. A remote screen posi-
tioned behind them for on-site
interviews.
This could be Good Morning
America or Todav or CBS This
Morning. Hijane. Hello, Bryant.
Here's VVillard Scott with the
weather.
And then came the words,
words from another time and
another place. Words about war
clouds and troop movements.
And suddenly, it was no longer
1988 America. Instead, it was
1936 Germany and we were in
Berlin for the Summer Olym-
pics.
Television was in its infancy 52
years ago, a faint idea with no
dream of its enormous potential.
It certainly was in no position to
cover the 1936 Games with the
blanket coverage that N BC plans
for Seoul over the next few
weeks.
But if it could, reasoned Bud
Greenspan, this might have been
how it would have looked.
Greenspan is America's most
prolific writer-producer-direc-
tor of sports films and the
nation's most prominent chroni-
cler of the Olympic Games. His
award winning account of the
19S4 Games, "16 Daysof Glory
was PBS' warmup for the Seoul
Games. It probes the emotions of
winning and losing and is per-
haps the best example of
Greenspan's approach to his
craft.
"We try to give some historical
perspective, not only to those
who win, but to those who lose,
as well he said. "We make
films about people who happen
to be in sports
And he makes films about his-
tory, which brings us to 1936.
Because of the circumstances of
world history - the economic
depression in the United States,
a civil war in Spain, a new Italian
dictator named Mussolini - these
might have been the most tu-
multous Games. Greenspan, his
glasses pushed up on his fore-
head in what has become a trade-
mark position, considered that
suggestion but chose instead a
different adjective.
"They were the most political he
said. "It was a great
propaganda opportunity for
Adolph Hitler, who had been in
power a little over three years
Hitler lucked into this world
stage and he took full advantage
of it. The 1936 Games had been
awarded to Berlin in 1932, when
Germany was still a democracy.
"It wasn't Nazi Germany who got
the Games Greenspan said. But
it was Nazi Germany when the
Games got there and that caused a
near-boycott by the United State
"Until January, 1935, there was a
boycott planned Greenspan
said. "Finally, we decided to
compete The results included
Jesse Owens' record four gold
medals, an eloquent statement
against Hitler's Aryan theories.
Ten blacks, including Owens,
were members of America's 66-
person track and field team. They
won eight gold, three silver and
two bronze medals, took every
flat race from 100 to 800 meters
and outscored every national
team, including their 56 white
teammates.
Two other members of the
U.S. track team, Marty Glickman
and Sam Stoller, were Jewish.
Dodgers extend wins
(AP)- Shutout for shutout, the
Los Angeles Dodgers almost
match up with the New York
Mets.
While the Mets have grabbed
all the attention with their 22 shut-
outs, the Dodgers quietly have
compiled, their own impressive
total. They beat the Atlanta
Braves 2-0Tuesday night for shut-
out No. 19.
"We're not really concerned
with the pennant race Mike Sci-
oscia said after hitting a two-run
homer that proved decisive. The
victory, coupled with Houston's
5-2 loss to Cincinnati, increased
the Dodgers' lead in the National
League West to 6 1 2 games over
the Houston Astros.
John Tudor, Ramon Martinez
and Jay Howell combined on a
two-hitter for the Dodgers.
"We're just going out there
every game and playing good
baseball Scioscia said. "We're
confident we're going to win, but
we haven't painted ourselves into
a corner and put pressure on our-
selves
In other games, Pittsburgh
beat New York 1-0, Montreal beat
St. Louis 7-1, Chicago beat Phila-
delphia 9-2 and San Francisco
beat San Diego 4-1.
Tudor, 9-8, held the Braves to
a first-inning leadoff single by
Ron Gant and a two-out single in
the fourth by Andres Thomas.
Both Martinez and Howell
fetched two innings of hitless re-
ief, with Howell gaining his 19th
save.
John Smoltz, 2-5, gav up five
hits, struck out five and walked
three in 5 1-3 innings. He has lost
five of his six starts since winning
his major league debut on July 23.
Pirates 1, Mets 0
Bob Walk won for the first
time since beating San Diego July
20 and Bobby Bonilla hit a run-
scoring double, snapping the
Mets' five-game winning streak.
New York leads Pittsburgh by 10
games in the National League
East.
Walk, 12-10, had lost six con-
secutive decisions. He allowed
five hits, walked two and struck
out two in eight innings before
Jim Gott finished for his 29th save.
Dwight Gooden, 17-7, lost to
Pittsburgh for the third time this
season. He allowed five hits and
struck out seven in seven innings.
Expos 7, Cardinals 1
Hubie Brooks hit a grand
slam and drove in five runs and
Pascual Perez pitched a seven-
hitter.
Brooks hit his fifth career
grand slam and 17th home run of
the season in the fifth inning off
Larry McWilliams, 5-7, giving
Montreal a 6-0 lead.
Perez, 11-6, walked four and
struck out one in his third com-
plete game as he won his third
consecutive decision.
McWilliams, 5-7, gave up
eight hits and six runs in six in-
nings.
Cubs 9, Phillies 2
Greg Maddux won his first
game since Aug. 10 and Damon
Berryhill hit his first career grand
slam as Chicago snapped a five-
game losing streak.
Maddux, 7-7 after going 15-3
in the first half, allowed six hits in
seven innings, struck out six and
walked none.
Kevin Gross, 11-14, lost his
sixth consecutive decision since
Aug. 12, giving up four runs and
six hits 3 2-3 innings. Steve Jeltz
was 0-for-2 and now has one hit in
his last 52 at-bats.
Reds 5, Astros 2
Jose Rijo allowed three hits in
seven innings and Dave Collins'
pinch-hit single ignited a three-
run seventh inning. Cincinnati
built a 2-0 lead as Eric Davis
singled home a first-inning run
and Jeff Reed hit a solo homer in
the second off Mike Scott 13-7,
who hasn't since Aug. 13. A
throwing error by reliever Larry
Andersen set up run-scoring
singles in the seventh by Collins,
Barry Larkin and Kal Daniels.
Rijo, 13-8, allowed just three
singles in his second start since
coming off the disabled list Sept.
8. John Franco got four outs for his
33rd save.
Giants 4, Padres 1
Robby Thompson and Candy
Maldonado hit solo home runs
and Rick Rcuschel gained his 18th
victory as San Francisco passed
San Diego and went back into
fourth place in the NL West.
Reuschel, 18-9, gave up seven
hits, struck out one and walked
none in seven innings. Craig Lef-
ferts finished with one-hit relief
for his eighth save.
Ed Whitson, 12-10, gave up
seven hits and four runs in five
innings.
i
USD A. CHOICE GRAIN FED
Boneless Beef
Chuck Roast
J
lb.
SLICE�MTN. DEW�PEPSI FREE
Regular orJDiet
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Cola
LIMIT THREE WITH MINIMUM 10 PURCHASE
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Towels For
LITE�GENUINE DRAFT
Regular
Miller
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(12) 12 oz.
cans
LIMIT ONE WITH MINIMUM 10 PURCHASE
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Reg. or Butter
Crisco
Shortening
NOW AVAILABLE! AMERICAN EXPRESS
Money
Orders
AT US POST OFFICE PRICES
AMERICAN
EXPRESS
Postage
Stamps
Prices Effective Thru Sat Sept. 17, 1988. Quantity Rights Reserved Not Responsible For Typographical Errors
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. � Monday thru Saturday 7:00 a.m. -12 Midnight
ECU at South Carolina
Ga. Tech at Virginia
Maryland at West Virginia
LSU at Tennessee
Wake Forest at N C State
Miami at Michigan
Florida State at Clemson
Notre Dame at Michigan
Alabama at Texas A
Arizona at Oklahoma
Bears
(AP)- Isn't it nice t know th
Chicago Bears are back? Isn't
nice to know that the 34-7openii
day victory over Miami .
aberration; that Sunday's 17
win at Indianapolis v �- �
all those 16-14 and 20-17 game
Chicago has been winning the la
few years?
Isn't it nice to see im
completing touchdown p
and key third down plays, tl j
ing off his back foot with ru
draped all over hirre
And isn't it nice to s� tl at
Walter Tayton, Gar. anv
Wilber Marshall gone, that it
all young guys despite a
high 11 rookies on thu -
How about gray-haired
templed1) 30-year-ol
Suhey earning the ball in thre
times from the eight for tl
ahead touchdown1
"Nothing I haven't seer
fore says Mike Singletarj
other of the gray-Bears at
In fact, the team that was writtc I
off before the season as no b I
than a second-place finisher in thJ
NFC Central can put itself intc
position for its fifth straight divii
sion title as earlv as Sundav it
can beat Minnesota at Soldiel
Field. A victory would give thJ
Bears a two-game lead over thJ
team that went to the NFC tit
game last season and was fa i
to beat the Bears in the I
this year.
That would make it tough tol
Minnesota to come back in a
sion in which both the Bears an
Vikings are almost guaranteed
victories against Detroit, Gret
Bay and Tampa Bay.
1 In Chicago's case, they mav b
by scores such as 13-10, 10-7
and the like, but they'll be vicu
ries nonetheless. Since 1984, Chi
cago is 22-1 against those threat
albeit often by narrow margins
That's how it was Sundav again?
Indianapolis, a better team thai
any Of the Central's downtroddei
three.
There were mistakes, including
10 penalties for 73 vards. One waj
an uncharacteristic spearing cat
on the always-sportsmanhkj
Singlctary that prolonged a i j
Quarter drive that might have
to a winning touchdown for th�
Colts.
"Hev, I'm not that kind oi u
the Bears' captain told the Indian
apolis assistant coach who be-
rated him on the sidelines. Bu t tht
other Bears couldn't care los-
about their image.
Sacks replace
Baker at helm
CHARLOTTE, N.C (AP)-Grq
Sacks will replace Buddv Baker
next season as driver for tht
Baker-Schiff stock car racinj
team, according to a publisher
report.
Baker, 47, has 19 victories during
a NASCAR Winston Cup careej
that began in 1959. He underwent
surgery in August to remove
blood clot from his brain, discov
ered after a crash at the Charlott
Motor Speedway in the Coca
I Cola 600 m May.
the Charlotte Observer reporter
in Wednesday's editions that
Baker would retire because of tl
injury.
"We're going with Greg saic
Baker, who owns the team alonj
with industrialist Danny Schiff.
Baker also had talked with KyH
Petty about the possibility of joii
ing the team.
"We were talking Baker said cj
"Tetty. "But time ran out, and w(
had to put our deal together,
think the world of Kyle.





t
r
I HI LAST AKOLINIAN
SLIT1WHIK l 1988 IS
Fearless Football Forecast
BRIAN BA1I E
V N"I rV Sports I irector
1 ast Week (5 5)
Overall (H 7)
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week (7-3)
Overall (14 - b)
DOU(. OI INS( N
Sports Editor
I.ast Week (6 4
Overall (13 7)
1 r Rl i IAI
1(1(1:
rail '11 f
( Hiri'Y B JNEHEAD
Managing Editor
1 ast Week (55)
()verall - (14 h)
I ARI VIS HAMl'K '
Features Editor
Last Week 7 )
i Overall 114 6)
it south t. arolinaSouth v arolina
h at irginiaVirginia
md at West irginia est Virginia
i nessei1 SU
: esl at StateN State
.Mul liganMiami
t it v lemsonc lemson
amc at Michigan StateMichigan M,iu
u at rexas &i 1Alabama
l lahoma(Oklahoma
ECU
Virginia
West Virginia
1 SI
N C State
Mu higan
Clcmson
Michigan State
&M
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Virginia
West Virgmsa
LSU
Wake Forest
Miami
(lemson
Muhigan state
Alabama
Oklahoma
t !
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' inn
t )kl a
South arolina
Virginia
West Virginia
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N state
Miami
( lemson
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' .a Tei h
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Tennes . .
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Hdahoma
Bears to be a force in football this season
know the l I1 tn P1V after Singletary's
l, � Isn't it penalty, fumble prone Eric Dick
day- "1 think m knee came up gainsl tl
and got the ball. You know how it a 5-yard t
tev
I
the -l
� ami w asn t an
lay's 17-13
�re like
17 games
nning the last
ion
lown pa-ses
1 la s, throw
s b.i. b 1 w ith rushers
that, with
: encik i
that it snot
'�ie
: � � ter
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im n three
m �

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vas written
.
'iJ-pla � Tin the
if it

ton : Rve tr�e
i rson headed up the middle Pan
! lampton dived into the pile, the
ball popped loose and Steve
v 1 Michael fell on it.
1 le kicked me complained
I ickerson, who has had crucial
tumbles in earl of thi I two
u sses.
1 don'l know what happened
said the ingenuous I lampton
w ho was in the Colts' backfield all
is in the middle of the line
i he kev plav was pulled ofl by
McMahon, who still has the knack
tor doing what has to be done
he's 27-1 in his last 28 starts.
1 le did it again Sunday though
lie threw tor just 186yards In fact,
the only M30-yard game of his
seven year career came in that
one loss, against John Elway and
I Vnver last year
Dennis1
� i pei fectly

ITen after the
ahead 13 I
M Ma
his i
With thi i I
making n
crow I
back from cent rand
. stepped up, took
I somehow managed
ill up toward the
with two olts on him
. is, perhaps the best
r okies, leaped,
ill away from Eu-
ime down, 11
1 a first d ��� n awa)
- Suhey went in
. hdown.
: the ha llotf before the
erowd started roam .
Wendell made the pi �. - M '
hon said ' It w as �, �
don't know somebod
arm or s trnething "
Itwasthekindof play ii M M
hon always seems to make
guessing sn �
nents or tl �
10 in the four- rter
Nl �thing i haven t
fore Sine ry said
iDad was right
�)u get what
you pay for
� �y:

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'
Hpp
I si
reen
�. be
2

i:n than
i r t s m a i
mged a tour-
it might have led
ichdow n tor the
� :� � � I of guy
Id the Indian
issistanl ach who be-
i � . But the
in't ire less
Sacks replace
Baker at helm
m .)TTE,N i D Greg
ill repla e Buddy Baker
i � n as dri er f �r the
hiff sto ar racing
j rding I � published
ker,47, has 19 during
up career
l � : rwent
� . ii, August to remove a
I clot from his brain, discov-
� ,ft( r a i i.i h .it the harlotte
pee Iwa) m the a
i MX) in Ma .
bserver reported
Wednesday's editions that
� � ,uld retio- be ause of the
, ry
.� re going with (Ireg said
. � vvho owns the team along
with industrialist 1 anny St hiff.
iker also had talked with Kyle
� about the possibility of join-
the team
were talking baker said t
Petty "But time ran out, and we
i to put our deal together. I
think the world of Kyle
:
��"
r�


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t
THEEAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15,1M8 15
LL'f
7
V
64 oz
ctn
OFFICE PRICES
sponsible For Typographical Errors
ville Blvd.
7:00 a.m. -12 Midnight
Fearless Football Forecast
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week-(5-5)
Overall - (13 -7)
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week -(7-3)
Overall - (14 - 6)
DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Last Week-(6-4)
Overall -(13 - 7)
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week - (7 - 3)
Overall -(14 - 6)
CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
Last Week-(5-5)
Overall-(14-6)
EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Last Week-07-3)
Overall -(14 -6)
ECU at South Carolina
I Ga. Tech at Virginia
Maryland at West Virginia
LSU at Tennessee
Wake Forest at N.C. State
Miami at Michigan
Florida State at Clemson
Notre Dame at Michigan State
Alabama at Texas A&M
Arizona at Oklahoma
South CarolinaECUSouth Carolina
Virginia West Virginia LSUVirginia West Virginia LSUVirginia West Virginia LSU
N.C. StateN.C. StateWake Forest
Miami ClemsonMichigan ClemsonMiami Clemson
Michigan State AlabamaMichigan State A&MMichigan State Alabama
OklahomaOklahomaOklahoma
ECU
Ga. Tech
West Virginia
LSU
N.C. State
Miami
Fla. State
Notre Dame
Alabama
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Virginia
West Virginia
LSU
N.C State
Miami
Clemson
Michigan State
Alabama
Oklahoma
South Carolina
Ga.Tech
West Virginia
Tennessee
N.C. State
Miami
Clemson
Michigan State
A&M
Oklahoma
Bears to be a force in football this season
(AD- Isn't it nice to know the
Chicago Bears are back? Isn't it
nice to know that the 34-7 opening
day victory over Miami wasn't an
aberration; that Sunday's 17-13
win at Indianapolis was more like
all those 16-14 and 20-17 games
Chicago has been winning the last
tew years?
Isn't it nice to see Jim McMahon
completing touchdown passes
and key third-down plays, throw-
ing off his back foot with rushers
draped all over him?
And isn't it nice to see that, with
Walter Payton, Gary Fencik and
Wilber Marshall gone, that it's not
all young guys despite a league-
high 11 rookies on the roster?
How about gray-haired (gray-
templed?) 30-year-old Matt
Suhey carrying the ball in three
times from the eight for the go-
ahead touchdown?
"Nothing I haven't seen be-
fore says Mike Singletary, an-
other of the gray-Bears at 30.
In fact, the team that was written
off before the season as no better
than a second-place finisher in the
NFC Central can put itself into
position for its fifth straight divi-
sion title as early as Sunday if it
can beat Minnesota at Soldier
Field. A victory would give the
Bears a two-game lead over the
team that went to the NFC title
game last season and was favored
to beat the Bears in the division
this year.
That would make it tough for
Minnesota to come back in a divi-
sion in which both the Bears and
Vikings are almost guaranteed six
victories against Detroit, Green
Bay and Tampa Bay.
n In Chicago's case, they may be
by scores such as 13-10,10-7, 7-6
and the like, but they'll be victo-
ries nonetheless. Since 1984, Chi-
cago is 22-1 against those three,
albeit often by narrow margins.
Thaf s how it was Sunday against
Indianapolis, a better team than
any of the Central's downtrodden
three.
There were mistakes, including
10 penalties for 75 yards. One was
an uncharacteristic spearing call
on the always-sportsmanlike
Singletary that prolonged a four-
tniarter drive that might have led
to a winning touchdown for the
Colts.
"Hey, I'm not that kind of guy
the Bears' captain told the Indian-
apolis assistant coach who be-
rated him on the sidelines. But the
other Bears couldn't care less
about their image.
Sacks replace
Baker at helm

CHARLOTTE, N.C (AP)-Greg
Sacks will replace Buddy Baker
next season as driver for the
Baker-Schiff stock car racing
team, according to a published
report.
Baker, 47, has 19 victories during
a NASCAR Winston Cup career
that began in 1959. He underwent
surgery in August to remove a
blood clot from his brain, discov-
ered after a crash at the Charlotte
Motor Speedway in the Coca-
Cola 600 in May.
fhe Charlotte Observer reported
in Wednesday's editions that
Baker would retire because of the
injury.
"We're going with Greg said
jiaker, who owns the team along
j with industrialist Danny Schiff.
i Baker also had talked with Kyle
: Petty about the possibility of join-
i ing the team.
I "We were talking Baker said of
Petty. "But time ran out, and we
had to put our deal together. I
think the world of Kyle.
On the play after Singletary's
penalty, fumble prone Eric Dick-
erson headed up the middle. Dan
Hampton dived into the pile, the
ball popped loose, and Steve
McMichael fell on it.
"He kicked me complained
Dickerson, who has had crucial
fumbles in each of the Colts' two
losses.
"I don't know what happened
said the ingenuous Hampton,
who was in the Colts' backf ield all
day. "I think my knee came up
and got the ball. You know how it
is in the middle of the line
The key play was pulled off by
McMahon, who still has the knack
for doing what has to be done -
he's 27-1 in his last 28 starts.
He did it again Sunday though
he threw for just 186 yards. In fact,
the only 300-yard game of his
seven-year career came in that
one loss, against John Elway and
Denver last year.
Against the Colts, McMahon had
a 35-yard touchdown pass to
Dennis Gentry in the first quarter,
a perfectly thrown ball with a bl-
itzer in his face.
Then, after the Colts had gone
ahead 13-10 early in the fourth,
McMahon faced a third an 10 at
his own 36.
With the Hoosier Dome crowd
making noise as only indoor
crowds can, he calmly stepped
back from center and waited, and
waited and waited.
Then he quickly stepped up, took
the snap and somehow managed
to heave the ball up toward the
sidelines with two Colts on him.
Wendell Davis, perhaps the best
of the Chicago rookies, leaped,
wrested the ball away from Eu-
gene Daniel and came down, 11
yards and a first down away.
Nine plays later, Suhey went in
for the winning touchdown.
T tried to get the ball off before the
crowd started roaring again but
Wendell made the play McMa-
hon said. "It was a terrible pass. 1
don't know, somebody hit my
arm or something
It was the kind of play Jim McMa-
hon always seems to make out-
guessing someone - the oppo-
nents or the crowd - on third and
10 in the fourth quarter.
"Nothing I haven't seen be-
fore Singletary said.
WDad was right.
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you pay for
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That's the genius of the AT&T
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If you'd like to know more
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ART
The right choice.





V
� f ��� �m

16
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1988
Cyclers pedal into Eastern Blocs, USSR
Wll MINGTON (AP) - After
pedaling his way through the
Everywhere the group stopped, are the colors of the earth. A small
Jamieson said, people would rush American flag - given to Jamieson
Soviet Union and eastern Europe to meet them. by a Swansboro man who asked said. " We were with the bikes 14
this summer, Bob Jamieson says "When we would come into a him to fly it in Red Square - hours on the first day, and that
he has higher hopes for Soviet square, kids would come from all flapped from the back of was our longest day. But the ex-
leader Mikhail Gorbachev's pol- around, and a lot of our guys Jamieson's 15-speed road bicycle citement sort of enabled people to
lev of glasnost. "A lot remains to could fix their bikes for them for most of the trip.
be seen he said. "But an ob-
served enthusiasm has infected
the people. 1 did feel there was a
curiosity, an open spirit. There
seemed to be an optimism about
Gorbachev among people on the
street.
"It seems to me like it is for real
said lamicson, the regional direc-
Jamiesonsaid. "And people were
filled with questions about why
they were there and where they
were going.
"I was surprised at the way we
were warmly received every-
where we went Jamieson said.
"Going to a communist country,
you didn't know whether
ter of the state Department of people would throw rocks or
Natural Resources and Commu- bottles at us or what. Even the
nity Development in Wilmington, military troops were friendly.
Jamieson and 35 other Ameri- "I guess part of that's because we
cans bicycled into the tourism were on a bicycle. People don't
trivia books in June when they feel threatened by that
became the first U.S. tour group to The American group, in their
The cyclists were a diverse
group, ranging in age from 16 to
74. The group included a 68-year-
old man who'd had triple bypass
surgery and a 23-year-old blind
girl who rode tandem with a
young man.
"Her perspective was the noises
and odors Jamieson said. "As
we rode, he would describe what
we were seeing. It was a real trib-
ute to what people can do
Jamieson, 46, was the only North
Carolinian.
Because of the group's wide
range of cycling skills, the early
because you were always on the rigidly planned. But the cyclists expecting people to be as friendly
move taking things in Jamieson found ways around the problem, and open as they were
"We figured out ways to get free "You found out they knew there
for the afternoon he said. "We were better opportunities in.
would say we were going to clean places outside their's. But:
our bikes, and then we could go people love their countries and
anywhere we wanted and talk to are adapted to whatever their
whoever we wanted situations are
That freedom to move around "We are so fortunate
was a pleasant surprise, he said.
"There were some occasions
where you could sit down and
talk to people he said. "1 wasn't
pedal through the Iron Curtain. bright biking gear, stood out like days of the trip were long. They
The 34-day, 1,750-mile tour be- the streaks of a rainbow against never rode farther than 90 miles,
gan in Trafalgar Square in Lon- the Polish, Czech and Russian stopping every 10 miles for a
don and ended in Red Square in countryside, where most things, break.
Moscow. including houses and clothing, "It was more a trek than a tour,
make it.
The group crossed the Polish bor-
der into the Soviet Union two
weeks into their trip. They were
met there by Intourist, the Soviet
equivalent of a U.S. tourism bu-
reau or chamber of commerce.
From the border, they rode two
abreast, with police cars - their
blue lights flashing - at the front
and rear. All traffic stopped to let
them pass.
Most of the way to Moscow, the
group traveled on the Soviet
Union's main highway, where
traffic was sparse- "like 1-95 at
three in the morning Jamieson
said. They stopped at small towns
to eat, and Intourist arranged
things for them to do and see. The
arrangement began to grow old,
Jamieson said, because it was so
and have
so much opportunity. We think
they must just want to pack up
and leave. Their roots are much
stronger than that
Mets continue their winning
( D- The New York Mets' count-
down to that magic moment is
starting. Gary Carter hit a home
run with one out in the ninth in-
ning to give New York a 3-2 vic-
this into the playoffs and World Dodgers 5, Braves 4
Series Mickey Hatcher drove in two
Elsewhere, it was Los Angeles 5, runs and Tim Leary won his 17th
Atlanta 4; Montreal 14, St. Louis 2; game as Los Angeles beat Atlanta
Philadelphia 5, Chicago 1, and at Dodger Stadium. The victory
tory over visiting Pittsburgh on San Francisco 4, San Diego 2. reduced the Dodgers' magic
Monday night, reducing the Rookie Gregg Jetferies went 4- number for clinching the NL West
Mets' magic number for clinching for-4 for New York and is 24-for- title to 15.
the National League East title to 52, .462, since being called up Leary improved his lifetime rec-
10. from Class AAA Tidewater. ordagainst Atlanta to 5-0 with the
!t was the Mets' fifth straight "I just go out and try to hit the ball help of relievers Ricky Horton
victory and their 15th in 19 games hard, and do something to help us and Alejandro Pena. Pena pitched
a- thev moved 11 games ahead of win Jefferies said. "If 1 went one-hit ball over the final 2 1-3
the second-place Pirates. one-for-four and we won, I'd be
"They are the best team in the happy. Gary got the big hit and
league. Ask all the other manag- (Ron) Darling pitched well,
innings for his 10th save.
thev will tell you the same they're the real heroes
Carter and first baseman Keith
Hernandez arc co-captains on the
Mets and have been helping Jef-
feries adjust to life as a big-league
star.
"He's such a good kid Carter
said "He had adversity (a slump
in Class AAA Tidewater) and that
i rv
thing Pittsburgh manager Jim
l.e land said.
"I'm not frustrated because I'm
doing what I love. However, I am
frustrated about the losses
I evland added. "Still, we are far
from behind the class of New
York right now
Carter used to be in a class by was probably good for him
himself among major-league Darling pitched 8 2-3 innings for
catchers, too. But he had a long New York and allowed two runs
homer drought in the middle of and seven hits and Randy Myers,
the season when he was looking 6-3, got the last out in the top of the
for his 300th homerun and has ninth for the victory.
only 46 runs batted in.
eff Robinson, 9-5, relieved
D Kig Drabek to start the ninth,
and after Howard Johnson fouled
on t to third base, Carter hit his ilth
homer and 302nd of his career.
"It's nice to start off the (10-game)
home stand in dramatic style like
this Carter said. "These are not
Gary Carter numbers that I have
this season.
"Hopefully, I can finish off strong
in the regular season, and carry
Phillies 5, Cubs 1
Bob Dernier's run-scoring single
snapped a seventh-inning tie and
rookie Ron Jones drove in three
runs as Philadelphia sent visiting
Chicago to its fifth straight loss.
Don Carman, 10-11, allowed
four hits in seven innings to break
a personal six-game losing streak
and Kent Tekulve finished for his
fourth save.
Expos 14, Cardinals 2
Nelson Santovenia drove in fiye
runs and Rex Hudler three more
as Montreal snapped St. Louis'
seven-game winning streak.
START
EXECUTIVE
TRAINING NOW
ACC Player
of the Week
GREENSBORO (AP) - Clemson
freshman Chris Gardocki, who
kicked three field goals in a 23-3
victory over Furman, has been
chosen as the Atlantic Coast
Conference rookie of the week.
Gardocki, of Stone Mountain,
Ga made field goals of 31, 38
and 46 yards.
ITic selection was made by a
eommittee of the Atlantic Coast
Sports Writers Association,
which earlier picked Duke's
Anthony Dilweg and Clarkston
t h nes as the ACC offensive play-
ers of the week.
Dilweg, a 6-foot-4, 215-pount
senior quarterback, completed
21 of 32 passes for 311 yards and
three touchdowns in the Blue
Devils' 31-26 victory over Ten-
nessee.
Dilweg, of Bethesda, Md also
punted four times for a 39.5
ivi rage as Duke won for the
second time in as many outings.
lines, an all-ACC performer a
year ago, won the offensive line-
man award for the fourth time in
his last seven regular season
games over the past two years,
the 5-11, 170-pound Jackson-
ville, Fla junior wide receiver
caught eight passes against the
Volunteers for a game-high 145
vards.
Hines also teamed with
Dilweg on touchdown recep-
tions of 15, 18 and 26 yards and
extended his streak of having a
touchdown reception to six
straight games.
Earlier, Georgia-Tech defensive
back Cedric Stallworth and
Wake Forest defensive end
David Braxton were named de-
fensive players of the week.
Don't wait until you
finish college to start a man-
agement training program. If you
have at least two years remaining, consider
Air Force ROTC We can give you a head
start on a fast-paced career.
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STOP SHOP
The Expos set a season-high for
runs and broke out of a weekend
scoring drought that saw them go
22 2-3 innings without a run while
being shut out twice in three
games by New York at Olympic
Stadium.
Byrn Smith, 11 -9, went six innings
for the victory while Joe Magrane,
4-9 took the loss.
Giants 4, Padres 2
Dennis Cook allowed no runs
and two hits over 5 1-3 innings in
his major-league debut as visiting
San Francisco beat San Diego.
Cook, just recalled from Class
AAA Phoenix, combined with
Craig Lefferts, Roger Samuels,
Scott Garrelts and Joe Price for the
victory.
Carmelo Martinez led off the
Padres' ninth with his 14th home
run to break up the shutout bid,
and Keith Moreland followed
with another homer off Samuels.
1st Annual
Student Residence
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September 22nd
in SRA Gameroom
Registration Fees: $1 with SRA Card
$5 without SRA Card
Tournament Begins September 26th, 1988
AMfiMWK PICTURE
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 15, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 15, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.625
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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