The East Carolinian, September 13, 1988






Coming Thursday:
fudge Robert Orr campaigns in Greenville. ECU'S
nursing school is under fire for low test scores.
'eatures:
The Ayden Collard Festival has turned Earlvis into a
lover of the leaves.
Sports:
The Pirates take it on the chin from the Hokies 27-16.
Also, a regional college wrap up.
i&hz iEaat (ftaroltman
Sewing the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b3 No. 18
Tuesday, September 13,1988
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Student property owners should show respect
By TOM PAGE
MilT V nttr
Each year many ECU students
choose to live in various off-cam-
pus housing.
There are over 4(1 apartment
complexes in the arc. and also
various rooms and homes for
rent.
When students decide to mine
oii campus and abandon dorm
life, they must also be conscious of
the fact that they are citizens of
Greenville and are responsible for
their actions that may affect their
neighbors, according to detective
Doug Jackson, of the Greenville
police department.
Jackson stated that one of the
biggest problems off-hand is the
iack ol respect given to neighbors
bv many of the college students in
their neighborhoods.
"Not all, but many students
fail torealize they are residents of
Greenville and should act as such.
Many students think they are just
temporary residents and can do
whatever they want, but that is
not the case he said.
lackson said much of the time
parties are the disruptive factor in
many of the complaints.
Some other common com-
plaints received bv the police
department pertaining to the area
around the university are:
- More than 3 unrelated people
living in a single familv dwelling.
Violation of Greenville Zoning
Ordinance Section 32-3.
- "Dogs running at large Vio-
lation Citv Code Section 12-2-39
- Loud noises or music. Viola-
tion City Code Section 12-5-1
- Speeding on the streets � Vio-
lation City Code Section 10-2-141.
Parking tickets andor towing
will be issued for the following
violations:
1-on a sidewalk
2-in front of a public or
private driveway
3-within 15 feet of a fire
hydrant
4-on a crosswalk
5-within 10 feet of an in-
tersection
6-parked left to curb
7-no parking zones
marked with signs or yellow
curbs
8-a controlled residential
parking area designated as "A"
parking
9-double parking
10-bus stops
These are all violations of city
ordinance codes and carry penal-
ties which many students are not
aware of or may not take seri-
ously. Some students do not real-
ize that there is even a problem.
"I never really thought of
myself as a citizen of Greenville,
but I guess when it comes down to
it 1 am. 1 didn't know there was
that much of a problem. It seems
like it's all students in the area
anyway said one student resi-
dent of a nearby apartment com-
plex.
1 he neighbors in the sur-
rounding area see things a little
differently.
One man on lewis St. ex-
pressed, "It's not so much the
parties as it is the parking prob-
lem. On the weekdays they take
my spaces and if thev ha e parties
on the weekend they take my
spaces, not to mention leave a
mess sometimes. After communi-
cation tails, you have to call the
police. Which is something neigh-
bors shouldn't have to do
According to Detective
lackson, the "Good Neighbor
Policy" is the best way to get to
enjoy off-campus experience for
everyone involved. Jackson said
students should be aware ot the
ordinances listed above which
may affect them. Many of the
complaints could be cut down in
regards to the parties if students
would tell neighbors ahead of
time when they plan to have a
part v.
"It comes down to the fact that
student or non-student, v.
citizens of the same city and
should respect each other as
as respect the city ordinance, "he
s.iid.
lackson works jn conjunction
with many m . rhood im-
provement programs such as
Crime Stoppers and The Tar F
Neighborhood Association
SGA plans for improvement
IU MICHAEL LEWIS
The plan ot" action for this
vear's Student Government Asso-
ciation is to better the ECU cam-
pus, while it motivates and helps
the student body.
"No problem too big or person
too small, tell us what's happen-
ing, and we'll get involved said
SGA President Larry Murphy.
This is the attitude the SGA has
taken on for the Fall year of 1988.
The SGA has taken affirmative
action towards improving in-
volvement, school spirit, campus
interaction and student facilities.
According to Murphy a major
focus oi the SGA is to improve
minority involvement.
Murphv said, "one ot the mam
goals oi the SGA this year is to
promote more minoritv involve-
ment
The SGA plans to do this with
the help of MSO (Minority Stu-
dent Organization). MSO Presi-
dent Greg Thompson and Direc-
tor )oe Singleton will both play
crucial roles in this plan.
"We hope to improve race rela-
tions and encourage more partici-
pation among minority students,
said Thompson
"School spirit, is another con-
cern of the SGA said Treasurer,
Tripp Rouges.
"We hope to promote ECU's
name and be rccognzied for being
more than just a party school he
said.
To boost morale, th SGA plans
to stir up competing a between
fraternities, dorms, and other stu-
dent organizations. Prizes will be
awarded to the dorm, fraternity
or organization that has the larg-
est attendance at the home games.
"Leaders meetings tech-
niques similar to the one North
Carolina State University uses,
will be conducted by the SGA
with intent to promote more
campus involvement.
The bG A has started a newslet-
ter campaign which will be sent to
most campus organizations.
These letters will inform the or-
ganizations about what's going
on on campus and activities pro-
posed by the SGA. By doing this,
the SGA hopes to encourage or-
ganizations to work with them in
making better programs for stu-
dents.
Work petition polls were con-
ducted this summer for handicap
students. The questionaire was
concerned with problems of
handicap students such as regis-
tration. The main question was
whether or not students would
mind handicap students having
priority during class registration.
Other concerns of the SGA this
year are better student recrea-
tional facilities, parking and Pi-
rate Walk.
Most of the programs have al-
ready been put into effect, but
some are scheduled for later in
the semester.
vandals struck campus Saturday night. Another job that FCU Maintenance should not have to
waste time repairing (Photo by David Paris Ian, ECU Photolab).
Assault story is questionable
By JOE HARRIS
On Tuesday, September 6, The
East Carolinian ran a story stating
that a Lawrence 1 olo, a Kenyan
and a pre-enginecring student
was assaulted and sustained
$6,(XY) in injuries.
Foreign Student Advisor Dr.
Lucv Wright brought it to the at-
tention oi The East Carolinian that
there is no one enrolled at ECU by
that name. She, along with main
others requested more informa-
tion on Tolo, and the incident.
When police reports, school rec-
ords and work records concern-
ing Tolo were examined more
closely, it seems he does not exist.
The story reported that Tolo
was attacked on Thursday, Sep-
tember l,bv four men withan iron
bar after he finised his shift at the
Fast Fare. The Greenville Police
Department nor FCU Campus
Security has any record oi an as-
sault complaint being filed that
night. Also, after contacting all ot
the Fast Fare food stores, all of
which have no record of Tolo's
employment, his identity and
whereabouts still remain a mvs
Students opt for five years
College Hill residents partake in an oversized game of Twister.
Just one of the activities SKA has for the students (Photo by
Thomas Walters
By SEAN HERRING
Assistant N�v�i Editor
Statistics show that not all stu-
dents are finishing college in four
years, but are extending their
undergraduate studies to at least
five years.
This one year extension is more
popularly known as "the five year
plan
According to ECU Planning
and Institutional Research, ECU
had a total of 2,910 seniors, as of
the spring semester of this year.
Of this number, 1,952 received
undergraduate degrees, by the
end of the first summer session.
The research shows that, the
number of minorities that re-
ceived degrees out of that 1,952
total was 248.
There were 199 black students,
that graduated, which made up
10.2 percent of the total under-
graduate class.
Other undergraduate students
included nine American Indians;
12 Asian Pacific Islanders; six
Hispanic and 22 non-resident ali-
ens (non citizens).
William Helton, the director of
ECU Planning and Institutional
Research stated that the data for
this study is gathered over a fiscal
year, which is from July 1 to June
30.
"It is too early to know how
many seniors will graduate this
fall or how many oi the seniors
have tentatively applied tor
graduation Helton said.
But according to their research
there are 2,657 students that are
classified as seniors, this
semester.
He said, "41 percent of students
that enrolled at FCU in 1982
graduated within five years. Also
37.8 percent either transferred to
other schools or dropped out of
school
Helton also found through the
study that 12.5 percent of the stu-
dents from the same class were
academically suspended.
Some students find it difficult to
graduate in four years because
they have done everything from
partying too much their freshmen
year to changing their major.
Kim Day, a senior psychology
major stated, "1 came to college
my first year thinking that college
was all fun, and I'd just get by
with the work. Then, I started
taking fewer semester hours,
which has put me behind. But 1
am not in any hurry to get out of
school. Even after I get mv under-
graduate degree, I want to stay
and get a graduate degree
Lester Faison, a senior business
major said, "I decided to take a
different route with my educa-
tion. I graduated from high
school, and then entered a trans-
fer program at Wayne Commu-
nity College, in Goldsboro. Even
though I did not graduate last
May, this was the best approach
to college for me
Some students believe that tak-
ing too many hours might cause
them to become overloaded, and
result in their not being produc-
tive. So, in order to put more
emphasis on their studies, they
plan their curriculum around five
or more years.
David Kornegay, a senior crimi-
nal justice major stated, " When I
first came to college, I did not
know exactly what I wanted to
major in, so I have changed mv
major since being at ECU. Also, I
did not want to overload myself
with too much of a heavy course
load. I decided to spread out my
semester hours over a five year
period, because I believe that it is
the quality of the work, not the
quantity of hours
tery.
Hie reporter who covered the
story, Sean Herring, an employee
of The Fast Carolinian and K
n-Karry said Tolo is a period
customer of the store and came in
Friday night, September 2 :
daged and severly bruised lie:
ring said Tolo had hospital re-
ports, which cannot be obtained
because thev are priviledged in
formation, and spoke of the inci-
dent without problem.
Herring said "Idid not have am
reason to believe that he was mis-
representing himself. So 1 did rt
examine the documents lolo had
in his folder. 1 ve seen and chatted
with him oft and on tor the lasl
two years
"I don't doubt that this isn t a
real person, but we have no vav
of proving this, said Wrigl
According to Wright it lolo is
here illegally, he would be in vio
lation of immigration law s.
"We don't want to get him
trouble, but we do want to h�
him if indeed, he needs it I've
people asking me w ho this pers
is and to whom could thev con
tribute money for the medi
bills Wright said.
She said "sometimes there are
students who trv and take advan
tageof the system because ot their
status, but we (the university)
have no tolerance tor actions like
this She added that incidents
where a student takes advantage
oi the system are very rare
"Wedefinitely know he is not a
student nor has he ever been a stu
dent, at least as long as I ve been
here at the university. I would
know immediately whether he
was a student, faculty or even a
resident.
"When it comes to registering
foreign students the school is verv
thorough in checking student vi-
sas and things of that nature. If we
did register a student who does
not have all the correct paper-
See TOLO, pace 5





f
2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN



SEPTEMBER 8, 1988
Syphilis cases up 38 percent in N. C. cities
RALEIGH (AP) - An alarming
increase in syphilis is occurring in
North Carolina cities, hitting
mostly young blacks and possibly
leaving them vulnerable to expo-
sure to AIDS, health officials say.
The state wide increase began
last year, when the number of
syphilis cases soared 38 percent
over the previous year, increasing
to 770 from 558. During the first
six months of 1988, the increase
has been less steep, about 18 per-
cent over 1987.
"Most of it is heterosexual
)ames W. Prugh of the state's
Sexually Transmitted Disease
branch told the News and Ob-
server of Raleigh. "Certainly the
vast majority of cases are in urban
areas
About 58 percent of the cases
occur in males, with an average
age of 28, and 42 percent in fe-
males, with and average age of 25.
About 87 percent of those affected
are black, 10 percent white and
the rest Hispanic, Asian or Ameri-
can Indian.
Last year, 41 percent of the
state's reported cases occurred in
three urban areas: Mecklenburg,
Guilford and Wake counties.
Prugh said no one was sure
what was causing the increase,
but some county clinic workers
say they are seeing an increase in
patients who are drug users.
"We're running into more situ-
ations where patients are talking
about drugs he said. "Obvi-
ously, these same people are
going to be at risk for AIDS
Statistics show AIDS is infect-
inga disproportionate percentage
of blacks. In North Carolina, 44
percent of AIDS victims are black,
while the general population is
about 25 percent black.
Some public health experts say
there is evidence syphilis helps
the spread of the AIDS virus.
Syphilis sores, sometimes hidden
internally, could be an easy en-
trance for the AIDS virus.
"It could very well compound
the problem said Judy Owen-
O'Dowd, regional supervisor for
the state's AIDS control program
in Raleigh.
In many instances, syphilis
appears to be decreasing in the
homosexual population as many
change their sexual habits for fear
of AIDS, said Dr. Peter Morris,
deputy director of the Wake
health Department.
"We would agree the shift has
occurred from gay or bisexual
males to heterosexual males he
said.
The pattern in North Carolina
has been reported nationwide.
Last month, th Centers for Disease
control reported a 25 percent in-
crease in syphilis nationwide for
1987 compared with 1986.
North Carolina's experience
varies with each city.
In Charlotte, a public health
expert said clients in the sexually
transmitted disease clinic appear
to be using more cocaine.
"There's trading sex for drugs
said Sakeena Smith, a regional
supervisor for sexually transmit-
ted disease control in Charlotte.
"It appears to be associated
with drug use. We're seeing a lot
of cocaine; some crack, but not a
whole lot.
In Wake County, some of the
increase may be due to a decrease
in federal syphiliscontrol funds in
the past five years. Whereas the
county shared a field investigator
with four other counties.
Because field investigators
track down those to whom syphi-
lis is passed, investigators who
are too busy will take longer to
track down sex partners, giving
the disease more time to spread.
Statewide, the number of feder-
ally funded investigators has
dropped from 21 in 1985 to nine
this year.
"They are stretched thin Mor-
ris said.
In Durham County, mean-
while, syphilis cases dropped
from 55 to 37 over the two-year
period ending in 1987.
"Health care for sexually trans-
mitted disease is much more ac-
cessible in Durham than other
places said Irving Hoffman,
clinical coordinator of the Dur-
ham County Health Department.
"We see all comers. That's tradi-
tionally the way it's been for a
long time
The decrease in Durham could
also be due to a second factor. The
county is one of the few in the state
that still uses an injected form or
penicillin to treat gonorrhea
cases.
The injected penicillin ala
knocks out any syphilis infection
Most other counties switched ir
the last few years to using a less
expensive oral form of pemcillir
for gonorrhea that does not tre.i
syphilis.
Rameses the Great on display
CHARLOTTE (AP) - The four-
month "Rame ses the Great"
exhibit of ancient Egyptian arti-
facts has arrived in Charlotte,
expected to bring enough new
visitors to the city's Mint Museum
to compensate for a big price tag,
officials say.
Organizers anticipate that 85 to
90 percent of the visitors drawn to
the exhibit will be seeing the
museum for the first time.
"We hope to expose the mu-
seum to at least 400,000 people
who have never walked through
these doors before said Robert
Bush Jr project coordinator for
the show that will feature some 70
objects from the time of Ramesses
11, who ruled Egypt 3,000 years
ago. "This could help us become
one of the leading visual arts faci-
tities in the South
The cost to put on the exhibit
will be $4.2 million - more than the
museum's combined budgets
over the past half-century. The
museum also is spending
$800,000 to get the word out on
jfftflflolletftpn which began its tour
in June 1985 in Montreal. But out-
of-town visitors are expected to
pump millions of dollars into the
area's economy during the
exhibit's four-month run, officials
said.
At 7:14 p.m. Sunday, about 23
hours after he left Boston by truck,
Ramesses the Great arrived at the
museum - feet first.
Harvey Walden, 50, swung his
65-foot rig into the museum's
driveway as two other trucks fol-
lowed with the head and middle
portion of the 3,000-year-old
statue of the great pharaoh.
On Monday, the other 72 arti-
facts in the exhibition, including
items of gold and Ramesses' cof-
fin lid, were expected to arrive by
plane from Boston, where the
exhibition recently concluded a
four-month stay.
On Tuesday, workers for Acuff
Crane & Rigging Co. of Memphis
will begin reassembling the 47-
ton, three-story statue in the tem-
porary wing.
The two-day 1,000-mile trip
took weeks of planning and the
cooperation of seven states to al-
low the overweight load to pass.
Keeping the route secret to
maintain security the convoy.of
three trucks and three cars swung
west to avoid the New York met-
ropolitan area. It included two
Charlotte police officers, two
Mint officials and a restorer from
Ciaro's Egyptian Museum.
The buildup has been going on
for nearly a year for the show,
which is expected to draw as
many as 600,000 visitors when it
makes its next-to-last U.S. stop in
north Carolina beginning Oct. 1
before heading to Dallas.
"You usually get only one op-
portunity like this in a lifetime
said Mint Museum Director Mil-
ton Bloch. "We're telling every-
one to stop thinking about it and
go out and buy your tickets
Landing the show was a major
coup for the museum and quickly
became a logistical nightmare. In
May, the museum closed its doors
and gutted the entire inside of the
building. Another 15,000-square-
foot structure was built for the
exhibit and parking was added.
The new $600,000 wing will
come when the show closes.
So far, about 200,000 tickets
have been sold and organizers
hope to sell another 50,000 before
the start of the show. To"bfeaT
even, they have to sell about
500,000 tickets priced at $7.50 a
piece.
In Memphis, the show drew
about 760,000 people and about
825,000 people went to see it in
Denver.
"The old adage that art follows
commerce is true said museum
spokesman Phil Busher. "Four of
the seven cities that hosted the ex-
hibit are in the South
The contract calls for the Egyp-
tian government to collect any
profits from the show, Busher
said. In the event it loses money,
more than 40 area corporations
have agreed to make up the defi-
cit.
But Bloch and his associates are
cautiously optimistic.
"The proof will be in the pud-
ding when it actually happens
he said. "We need a good show so
in the future when exhibits are
being organized they will think of
us again as a Southern anchor
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) - While
R.I. Revnolds Tobacco Co. isn't
J J
touting its reduced-smoke ciga-
rette as a safer smoke, a panel of
scientists says the new product is
less toxic than conventional ciga-
rettes.
RJR's testing showed "clearly
less toxicity produced by smoke
from the new cigarette than by
smoke" from regular cigarettes,
said 12 scientists assembled by
Emory University's School of
Medicine in Atlanta at RJR's re-
quest. The research is assembled
in a 743-page book, "New Ciga-
rette Prototypes That Heat In-
stead of Burn Tobacco which
will be sent to members of Con-
gress, scientists and other inter-
ested people.
The panel agreed RJR's tests for
urine mutagenicity, or potential
formation of cancer, showed a
significant difference" between
people smoking the new cigarette
or a conventional cigarette.
The cigarette, which will sell at a
premium to other brands, works
by heating instead of burning
tobacco. Smokers light a carbon
heat source at the cigarette's tip.
Duringinhalation, air is heated by
the smoldering carbon and
passed over an aluminum-en-
cased flavor capsule.
The result is no ash and little
smoke.
Reynolds is hoping the product
will quell nonsmokers' com-
plaints about second-hand smoke
and help stem the 2 percent an-
nual decline in the number of
American smokers.
Health groups are urging the
Food and Drug Administration to
regulate Premier, saying it bears
little resemblance to a cigarette
and the public might perceive the
product as safer.
However, RJR officials don't ad-
vertise Premier as a safer ciga-
rette, just one that reduces "many
of the compounds often associ-
ated with the smoking and health
controversy
Tolo story
a mystery
Continued from page 1
work, we'd be in trouble with the
Department Immigration
Wright said.
She also said there have been
Kenyans here in the past, but none
with the name Tolo. "Some
people change their name for the
sake of convenience, but the Tolo
case is so sketchy, we have no way
of knowing
If you have any information on
the identity or address of Law-
rence Tolo, please call The East
Carolinian at 757-6366 or Lucy
Wright 757-6882.
Wednesday, September 14
9 a.m. until 6 p.m.
Voting On The Following Positions:
Dorm Representative
Day Representative
Class Officers
Must have valid ECU ID with current activity sticker to vote
POLLS LOCATED THROUGHOUT CAMPUS
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate$4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
100-199 col. inches$4.50 5 Insertions(4 -in . $4.3
200-299 col. inches$4.40
300-399 col. inches$4.30
400-499 col. inches$4.20
500-599 col. inches$4.10
600 and above$4.00
Classified Display
Open Rate$5.00
Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 (12-25") . . $4.20
Two Color and black$155.00
(1225") $4.50
10 Insertions(4 -n ')$4.50
(12251 $4.45
15 Insertions -11 ) $4.4?
(12-25") $4.40
20 Insertions (4 11 )$4.40
(12-25 $4.3;
25 Insertions (4-in$4.35
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
PHONE:
757-6366
RUSH
Smokeless cigs less toxic
The Co-Ed National Service Fraternity
September) 13, 14, and 15
formore information
call 752-8736
Everyone Welcome
'Stop by our information booth today in
front of the E.C.U. Student Store
A FUN TRIP
THE MOST UNIQUE SHOP IN PIRATE COUNTRY
A "DIFFERENT" SHOPPING EXPERIENCE
USED
Over Coats Trench Coats
Worn Out Levi's
Cold Turquoise
Silver, Costume
CLOTHES -
JEWELRY -
FURNITURE -
ELECTRONICS- C5u2L�
SMALL APPLIANCES- au
COLLECTIBLES- Coins. Etc.
POTS & PANS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
JUNQUE
A FANCY JUNK SHOP
WE BUY AND SELL EVERYTHING!
AT
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00 - 3:00 Sat.
On The Corner Below "Fizz
400 S. Evans St.
752-3866
Libya!
(CPS) � For at leas! the
year in a row, the College f
Hearts National Committt
sent out a wildly alarmi;
draising letter to potent J
nors.
For example, the letter
Libyan leader Moammar(j
has given U.S. campus
$300,000 to "turn innocent
students away tr m theii
ents" and to "turn Am I
into the seething cauldi
respect and violence ol ti
sixties
Concerned citizens
Libyan-sponsored campus
by donating rr.
Republicans
The letter, aim
word the same plea for do
the group mailed to p
donors lastyeai
tions about th
committee's fundra
and political e
campus critics j
agan.
"This said an
Sanbrano of CISPES �
in Solidarity with the P 1
Salvador), which the let! -1
has ties to ten
geous
The College Rep
charges were built on "r
ports by a small net
servative student mi
them College Repubh I
bers � who, drawing the
conclusions from newsj
nes and conservative maj:
write papers accusi:
disloyalty
They then send ti
the Federal Bureau
tion which, it was reve
January 1988. used them
reason tor investigating
that were critical of Rea
ministration policies.
Federal legislators and nl
pers around the country rj
criticized the FBI's inv
of Reagan critics as n
when the scheme cairn I
documents obtained b � 1
ter for Constitutional R
New York "public ii
group.
. - , .to hearings, FBI otticu
fied their four-year invesj
Murderers
GREENSBORO (Al
ston-Salem teen-age. and
friend surrendered to Ohi
and were chargsi with rmi
the stabbing death ol I
steomother last week
Greensboro apartment
The two also were ch
felonv larceny oi the worn;
which was recovered Surj
the Ohio State Patrol.
Arthur Martin Marty
Jr. of Winston Salem, an
Michelle Lewis, also o W
Salem, surrendered Sundi
noon to police in MaumeJ
just southwest of Toledo
- stolen car reportedly raij
gas, said Greensboro po
Joe Deich.
Maumee police disj
Wavne Pitzen said ai
Lewis called his depart
12:21 p.m. Sunday fr
tion just off the Ohio
Pitzen said the two te.
ELE
T
RE
9a
in your r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,1988 3
cities
comers. That's tradi-
way it's been for a
ase in Durham could
�second factor. The
the few in the state
injected form of
t gonorrhea
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6
OUNTRY
IIENCE
IMCES- '
AL
ING!
Man
752-3866
Libya accused of funding unrest
(CPS) � For at least the second of the groups never did uncover publican allegations were false
year in a row, the College Repub- any wrongdoing,
licans National Committee has But College Republicans
sent out a wildly alarmist fun- spokesman Greg Rothman disre-
draising letter to potential do- gards the FBI's inability to verify
nors. his group's allegations.
For example, the letter claims "The information is still true
Libyan leader MoammarQaddati he maintained. "It hasn't
This year the department refused
comment, as did the FBI.
The Central American report
was prepared by College Republi-
added.
College Republican spies, he
said infiltrated the University of
Massachusetts at Amherst Young
Communist League. Rothman
cans who, the letter says, recently charged the group receives fund-
has given U.S. campus groups
$300,000 to "turn innocent young
students away from their par-
ents" and to "turn America back
into the seething cauldron of dis-
respect and violence of the late
sixties
Concerned citizens, can count
Libyan-sponsored campus unrest
by donating money to the College
Republicans.
The letter, almost word-for-
word the same plea for donations
changed. In fact, the situation
there (in Central America) has
gotten worse
The only difference between
1987 and 1988 f undraising letters:
Friends of the Democratic Center
in Central America, better known
as FRODEMCA, is not listed as a
recipient of Libyan aid in the 1988
version. TRODEMCA, like the
College Republicans, supports
travelled to Central America to in-
vestigate the situation there.
Rothman says College Republi-
cans visited Central America last
year and this year.
When asked if it was ethical �
or wise � to distribute the same
report of a "recent" College
Republican fact-finding trip,
Rothman said "a free market
would dictate that some donors
would read the same letter
He added that fundraising let-
ing and direction from the KGB,
the Soviet intelligence agency.
"America is under siege Roth-
man concluded.
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U .S. aid to the Nicaraguan rebels ters had to have a passionate tone
attempting to overthrow that to be successful in attracting
the group mailed to potential nation's leftist Sandinista govern- money.
ment. Moreover, he said some of the
Both letters cite a "classified letter's charges are coming true,
report" of how the Nicaraguan noting the July arrests of eight
rebels, known as contras, are Libyans accused of illegally fund-
donors last year, raises new ques-
tions about the national
committee's fundraising ethics
and political espionage against
campus critics of President Re-
agan.
sickly, ill-equipped and demoral-
ized. If the contras are not sup-
"This said an angry Angela ported, the letters say, commu-
Sanbrano of CISPES (Committee
in Solidarity with the People of El
Salvador), which the letter asserts
has ties to terrorists, "is outra-
geous.
The
nism will spread to the United
States.
Both letters claim leftist groups
such as Witness for Peace and
CISPES wish to "turn innocent
ing pro-Libyan demonstrations
on U.S. campuses and paying for
leftist students' trips to Libya.
One of the Libyans allegedly also
plotted to assassinate former
Marine Col. Oliver North.
"We were aware of it Roth-
man said. "The recent arrests
College Republicans'
charges were built on "recent" re- parents and grandparents" and
ports by a small network of con- disrupt American campuses to
servative students � many of promote communism,
them College Republican mem- CISPES's Sanbrano called the
bers � who, drawing their own letter "a way of trying to dclegit-
conclusions from newspaper sto- imize the work that comes from
nes and conservative magazines, real concern about U.S. policy in
write papers accusing others of Central America. These are false
young students away from their have to lead you to question to
credibility of CISPES
Sharon Dibbley, a spokes-
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accusations. There's no proof. The
FBI used an incredible amount of
resources to prove these same
changes, but they found no evi-
dence
"Our financial records are
available upon request said
Witness for Peace spokesman Joe
disloyalty
They then send the papers to
the Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion which, it was revealed in
January 1988, used them as the
reason for investigating groups
that were critical of Reagan ad-
ministration policies.
Federal legislators and newspa-
pers around the country roundly
cnticized the FBI's investigations
of Reagan critics as improper
when the scheme came to light in
documents obtained bv the Cen-
ter for Constitutional Rights, a
New York "public interest"
group.
� In hearings. FBI officials testi-
fied their four-year investigation department said the College Re-
Murderers surrender in Ohio
woman for the U.S. Attorney in
Alexandria, Va a connection be-
tween Libya and CISPES. "We
still have an ongoing investiga-
tion. We can't release that infor-
mation
The College Republicans, Roth-
man said, are still investigating,
too.
"Any time you have an organi-
zation whose idea is to subvert the
U.S. government, it's worth
watching he said. It's campus
conservatives' duty to look into
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GREENSBORO (AP) - A Win-
ston-Salem teen-age. and his girl-
friend surrendered to Ohio police
and were chargsi with murder in
the stabbing death of the man's
steomother last week in her
Greensboro apartment.
The two also were charged with
felonv larceny of the woman's car,
which was recovered Sunday by
the Ohio State Patrol.
Arthur Martin "Marty" Vause
Jr. of Winston Salem, and Lorrie
Michelle Lewis, also of Winston-
Salem, surrendered Sunday after-
noon to police in Maumee, Ohio,
just southwest of Toledo, after the
stolen car reportedly ran out of
gas, said Greensboro police Sgt.
Joe Deich.
Maumee police dispatcher
Wayne Pitzen said Vause and
Lewis called his department at
12:21 p.m. Sunday from a gas sta-
tion just off the Ohio Turnpike.
Pitzen said the two told police
they were wanted in connection
with a murder in North Carolina
and asked to turn themselves in.
Vause was being held without
bond in the Lucas County Jail in
Toledo, Ohio, while Lewis, at 17 a
juvenile under Ohio law, was
being held at the Lucas County
Child Study Institute, also in
Toledo, pending extradition to
North Carolina.
They are charged in the death of
Nancy Fogleman Cook, 40, who
was found dead Thursday in her
locked apartment. She had been
stabbed repeatedly in the chest.
The arrest warrants allege she
was killed Sect. 5. Police believe
she was last seen alive about mid-
night Sept. 3, when a pizza was
delivered to the apartment, and a
witness has told police she saw
Vause and Lewis leave the apart-
ment in Cook's car Sept. 5, just
after a loud argument inside the
apartment.
Rcgotri, noting the internal Reve- such groups to assist the FBI, he I yym (coupon expires Sept. 19, 1988)
nue Service would have found � ���� -��i�- � � ����� �� � �-� - ��.�� �-���. �
improper foreign payments to it
years ago.
"The IRS is a lot more experi-
enced in these matters than the
College Republicans
Last year the State Department
said the College Repbulican alle-
gations were false. This vear the
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V
I
I
aJlje lEaat (Earnlinian
Sm� �� U� C�fc�mpiii�ii�iin ') � 1 �KS
Pete Fernald, i
Chip Carter
James F.J. McKee, m�i�r a-��,
Joe Harris, n�. &�
Doug Johnson, sp. ��
Tim Hampton, f�r�r� u�
Michelle England, obm
Debbie Stevens, .w�ry
Jeff Parker, hm.
Tom Ftjrr,c�j
Susan Howell,
John W. Medun,
Mac Clark, �.
September 13.1988
OPINION
Page 4
Drop add
Reduction of deadline suggested
decrease the drop time but increase
the add period. Student A, faced
with unwanted classes, might drop
them and have to become a part-
time student, while Student B may
be dropping the classes Student A
might want to take � and has no
way to add them to his schedule.
The question of whether or not to
reduce the free drop period was
raised last year during a meeting of
the faculty senate, debated on but
never acted upon. It was left for the
Credits Committee to gather infor-
mation on the subject.
Which they will do during open
meetings on September 19 and 22 in
Brewster - C -103 at 2:30 p.m. Stu-
dents are urged to attend either
meeting to present feelings and
ideas on the subject.
One question that will un-
doubtably surface during the meet-
ings will be whether graduate stu-
dents, who may drop courses up to
two weeks before the final exam,
should be allowed to take 5000 level
courses while seniors are enrolled.
It is no doubt unfair that the grad
student is able to quit the class with-
out penalty while the senior is re-
stricted to the first six or less weeks
of the semester. Because in the final
analysis, it is the students paying for
the classes and he or she should be
the one to determine how long he or
she wishes to stay in the class.
The Credits Committee is having
two meetings to consider reducing
the free drop period undergraduate
students now enjoy. This means, in
many cases the drop period would
end before students have taken the
first test in the class and decided
whether or not it is worth their while
to continue in the course at the pres-
ent time.
While most students will see this
as a bad move, the reasons behind
the faculty's wish to reduce the cur-
rent six week drop period are sound.
In the first place, it is a long time
for students to decide whether or
not they wish to stay in the class.
Although it's nice to see what the
first test grade will be, that really
isn't a good indicator of perform-
ance, especially in a literature or art
class, where tests are infrequent and
usually not standardized.
It is also a matter of the student
and teacher's time. It is a waste of
time for a student to stay in a class
that long and then leave, as well as
the teacher.
Plus, when the teaching sched-
ules are made out at the beginning of
the semester, extra sections are
opened and closed depending on
the students enrolled. This wouldn't
be necessary if the class size dra-
matically decreases after six weeks
of class, and sectic s close again,
leaving extra faculty.
A helpful alternative would be to
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Liberal dictionary sent in
To the editor:
Anyone baffled by liberal dou-
blethink and the inconsistent, hypo-
critical double-standards of liberals?
This dictionary should help if you
are:
Crisis: Any situation liberals want
changed.
Bilingual: Unable to speak English.
Equal Opportunity: Preferential
treatment
Compassion: Using tax money to
support those unwilling to work.
Insensitivity: Objection to the use of
tax money for that purpose.
Simplistic: Any argument with
which liberals disagree but can't
answer.
Demonstration: A liberal riot.
Mob Violence: A conservative riot.
A Matter of Principle: A liberal con-
viction.
An Emotional Issue: A conservative
conviction.
Funding: Taxpayer's money.
Commitment: More taxpayer's
money.
Federal Budget: A work of fiction
about government spending.
Stereotypes: Liberal behavior pat-
terns they don't wish to think about.
Constitutional Interpretation:
Judges reading liberal political views
into the Constitution.
Politicizing the Courts: Judges
reading conservative political views
into the Constitution.
Public Interest Group: Politically
organized liberals.
Special Interest Lobby: Politically
organized conservatives.
Racism: Any criticism of minorities,
no matter how slight or justified.
National liberation movements:
Organizations trying to create
people's rebublics.
People's Republics: Places where
you do what you are told or get shot
Consciousness Raising: Embracing
liberal tenets.
Abortion-on-Demand: Mass murder
for fun and profit.
Fascism: Nazism: Any movement,
ideology, political opinion, or con-
viction not meeting liberal approval.
McCarthyism: Joe McCarthy
making outrageous, slanderous ac-
cusations of liberals under the shield
of Congressional immunity.
Protecting the Social Gains of the
Past: Teddy Kennedy making outra-
geous, slanderous accusations of
Judge Bork under the shield of Con-
gressional immunity.
Pragmatist: A politician with no
fixed principles in mind. Idealogue:
A conservative with a set of fixed,
right-wing principles.
Progressive: A liberal with a set of
fixed, left-wing principles.
United Nations: An international
competition more popular than the
Olympics because all the players win
except Americans Israelis, and South
Africans.
Civil Liberties: A legal and social
program for creating a privilege caste
of robbers, rapists, subversives and
pornographers.
Gun Control: A method of strip-
ping law-abiding citizens of their
firearms while assuring that crimi-
nals retain theirs undisturbed.
Arms Control: Campaigns by the
last eight American presidents to
demonstrate that liars and killers can
be trusted with our lives.
Welfare: A method of subsidizing
promiscuity and bastardy.
Education: In the U.S a device for
persuading citizens to contribute
upwards of $100 billion a year to-
ward the corruption of their children.
Right To Privacy: The right to engage
in perversion, and the right to pass on
any diseases that devolve from it.
(Important: Not to be construed as
the right to join a club in which the
members set their own standards for
admission
Liberal hypocrisy is rank and unend-
ing!
Justin Sturz
Senior
EnglishJournalism
Graph wrong
To the Editor:
Irrespective of the reasons for
the differences in the percentages of
faculty with PhDs at the various insti-
tutions described in the article of 1
September 1988The Story Goes
Much Deeper than the Statistics it is
important to note that the accompa-
nying graphic distorts the numbers.
The graphic employs a scale which is
unequal across the ordinate (vertical
axis) of the figure and which exagger-
ates the differences between the
universities.
As examples, the height of
the bar representing ECU (with 71
of ECU faculty holding PhDs) is
71mm, but the bars representing Ap-
palachian (with 84.8 of faculty with
PhDs) and UNC-CH (87.8 of fac-
ulty with PhDs) are 102mm and
109mm respectively. The effect of
this scale is to make the difference be-
tween ECU and Appalachian appear
more than twice its actual size (as
43.7 instead of the true 19.4), and
the difference between ECU and
UNC-CH appears as 535 rather
than the true 23.7.
That is, 84.8 of the faculty at
Appalachian have PhDs compared
to 71 of ECU faculty, and the differ-
ence (13.8) is 19.4 of 71. But the
bar representing Appalachian is
31mm longer (43.7 of 71mm) than
the bar representing ECU. The dis-
tortion is repeated with the bar repre-
senting UNC-CH.
The use of such deceptive
graphics has long been recognized by
both the lay person (Huff, 1954, How
to Lie with Statistics), and the profes-
sional (Tufte, 1983, The Visual Dis-
play of Quantitative Information).
Tufte presents a Tie Factor" index
which is obtained from the ratio of
the size of the effect shown in the
graphic to the size of the effect shown
in the data. The "Lie Factor" for the
printed graphic is approximately
2.25. Unfortunately, the deliberate or
inadvertent use of misleading graph-
ics is a common occurrence in the
popular press, but the misrepresen-
tation of numerical data should be
avoided.
The correct rule is simple: in-
creases in the length, width, or area of
the representational figure should be
tional to changes m tho data As your
article demonstrated, the interpreta-
tion of numbers is difficult enough
without further confusing the reader
through visual embellishments
which misrepresent the data.
G. Michael Poteat, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology
Cartoon bad
To the editor:
The cartoon depecting your
staff illustrator being hanged, while
"girls" wearing ERA shirts cheer,
suggests that only women were
offended by the illustration of the
pirate with the bound and gagged
female. This is not so. As the father
of a 7-year-old girl, who I hope will
grow up in a world that respects
her, I also found your illustrations
objectionable, including this latest
infraction.
There is an assumption that
most female students, like most male
students, are at the University to
study, and most do. But too many of
your photos, cartoons and ads por-
tray females as less than serious, and
the cumulative effect of such edito-
rial choices erodes the status that
women have fought so hard to
achieve in recent years. In particular,
the reference to the women who criti-
cized you as "girls" is inappropriate;
most of the letters you published
were from female professors and
graduate students older than your-
selves.
Tomis Kapitan
Assistant Professor
Phiosophy department
Penis envy?
To the editor.
As a former student of ECU I
would like to comment on the car-
toon flap of recent weeks.
First of all, vour editorial defense
was adequate and accurate but you
should realize that it will never sat-
isfy your feminist critics; they lack a
sense of humor. Feminists are ideo-
logues whose basic interest is politi-
cal power. Humor, unless it is explic-
itly directed against men, is for them
intolerable.
Moreover, you need hardly be
defensive about an ordinary piece of
comic relief. Page through any femi-
nist newspaper or magazine and you
will see what I mean. The cartoons
and commentary are often so ob-
scene and so desperately hostile to
men that it is almost unbelievable.
There is no humor in them� only a
very twisted kind of anxious hate.
Some psychologists believe
that the typically feminist problems
with men can be traced back to early
childhood. Little Jane looks bet ween
her legs and discovers that she lacks
something that Little johnny has. For
most little girls this shock is quickly
over and they go on to other things.
For feminists, however, it leaves a
lasting sense of inferiority and the
result is an abiding resentment of
anything masculine.
That is why reasoning with
them about humor doesnt work; it is
an emotional problem, not a logical
one and Freud described it in two
words�"penis envy If they can't
blame biology they will blame you
instead. The fact is that feminists hate
being women.
You may need a word of ad-
vice. Now that you have ruffled the
feathers of that vindictive academic
bird, best known as the whining
femette, you can expect a number of
nasty political measures to be taken
against you.
At least two of the critical let-
ters printed against the inoffensive
cartoon came from women who rep-
resent organizations (as you do not)
and so they obviously know each
other. The first tactic of such cliques
is to start a whispering campaign
against you.
They will also raise the issue with
faculty friends so as to get statements
in support.
A suitably pliable administrator
will then be found to remonstrate
with you and perhaps to hint darkly
at a "possible need for discipline, i.e.
punishment for contrary thinking, as
a means of muzzling dissent. Should
this effort at "re-education" fail, you
may then hear a whisper that per-
haps there should be a co-editor
appointed to "help you" with your
copy or, perhaps, that more "sensi-
tive reporters should be hired to pres-
ent their viewpoint� i.e. to criticize
men and to proclaim that every
manhole is a personhole.
How do I know: all this? Well,
t! sorry truth is that I once dated a
feminist and even let her persuade
me to attend some meetings. What
an eye-opener! These women, a lot of
whom were lesbians, were only very
superficially interested in issues like
equal pay tor equal work.
Their real goal, as one over-
weight speaker boldly put it, is
"power, so that we can build a matri-
archy in which the aggressfve' in-
stincts of men will be subdued to the
service of women If you think I
exaggerate just read the articles in
any feminist newspaper. By the way,
there were five or six other men sit-
ting together at this same meeting.
All of them applauded the speaker
and I couldn't understand whv until
I saw that they were homosexuals.
When I asked the woman
sitting next to me about this, her reply
was that the only man a convinced
feminist could trust was a homosex-
ual because "they like to penetrate
each other instead of us
I left my date at that meeting
and never looked back. Who needs
the sleaze and the aggravation! That
may be your attitude too, but you will
still need to watch out and protect
your newspaper. You have aroused
the feeding frenzy of the shrews and,
unlike other people, they are not
quick to forgive and forget. Be pre-
pared for a flank attack. It may take
the form of a demand for more
"women's studies" courses (i.e. po-
litical action committees) in which
the topic discussed will be the news-
paper at ECU.
The tone may even sound ob-
jective, but the emotions will be raw
and you will be the target. They will
work to construct a situation in
which their interpretation of humor
and fact becomes the only allowable
one. If you let that happen then you
deserve the consequences. How do
you like the idea of being "sub-
dued"?
Sincerely,
William May
Alumnus
Anti-abortion
To the editor:
As a woman and as a mother
of three, I feel I must respond to the
two pro-abortion letters in the Sept.
6 East Carolinian. The letters
blasted pro-life activists for holding
a mass funeral for aborted unborn
children, saying that the funeral
"disgusted" them and was a
"blatant and vulgar invasion of the
privacy of the women involved
I ask: whaf s wrong with prop-
erly and respectfully burying our
dead? Have we become so barbaric
and callous in this country that we
don't care if our unborn children are
disposed of as so much garbage?
And as far as the phrase "inva-
sion of privacy" is concerned, yes,
there WAS an invasion of privacy:
the ultimate invasion, which led to
the deaths of 157 innocent unborn
children.
See LETTER, page 3
1
S
is
Letter to &
Continued from pa
Lei me be clear
choice. As far as I'm coi
woman has the right tl
whether or not to have sex
marriage; a woman has th
choose whether or not to
control; and a woman has tl
choose whether or not to p
up for adoption. But a wt
not have the "right tol
whether or not to murder hi
child Even though a womj
legal right to murder that
does not for any reason
moral nght to do'so.
We who are ag
do provide alternativ
Greenville, we have the
Crisis Pregnancv Center l
111 East 3rd Street Thep
ber is 757-0003. Let
young women who think
nowhere to turn that there
canng help available for tl
for their unborn child
Raj
ECL
Vote Thomal
Totheed -
Sophornc- -
to voice your opir 1
bestowed upon you. On VI
vou will have the chai
vour class leaders Tl
valuable to you, fi r the
voice in Student Gov� n
backbone of all studc j
on campus.
You need a stror j
leader to represent youi
campus. You need a 4
who is willing to work for;
and desires and who will
defeat as an alternative
views are in mind.
You need for your leai
President � one whu
in student government ai
other campus actr.
tions. You need a Pres
shows concern for your cl
the school. You need
for vour Sophomore (
Show your concern tor y
exercising your right I
II YOUR S
Profess

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II It EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,1988 5
Letter to editor protests pro-choice letter about funeral
tactic of such cliques
hispering campaign
o the issue with
get statements
le administrator
remonstrate
to hint darklv
vd tor discipline, i.e.
:rarv thinking, as
ssent. Should
rail, you
a whisper that per-
be a co-editor
on with vour
that more "sensi-
d hehiredtopres-
� - i c to criticize
:laim that everv
nhole.
. all this? Well,
at 1 once dated a
� her persuade
meetings. What
� women, a lot of
�bian were onlv very
sted in issues like
. irk.
al, as one over-
er boldly put it, is
I we can build a matn-
:h the aggressive m-
be -ubdued to the
If you think I
t read the articles in
iper. By the way,
e or six other men sit-
at this same meeting.
pplauded the speaker
understand whv until
re homosexuals.
! asked the woman
i me about this, her reply
. man a convinced
j trubt was a homosex-
ke to penetrate
istead oi us
date at that meeting
- i back. Who needs
i the aggravation! That
ide too, but you will
watch out and protect
per. You have aroused
Irenzy of the shrews and,
h people, they are not
and forget. Be pre-
lank attack. It may take
It a demand for more
tudies' courses (i.e. po-
committces) in which
: us sod will be the news-
IL
me mav even sound ob-
he emotions will be raw
be the target. They will
instruct a situation in
linterpretation of humor
mes the onlv allowable
t that happen then you
ronsequences. How do
B idea of being "sub-
Sincerely,
William May
Alumnus
ti-abortion
iitor
I woman and as a mother
lei'l I must respond to the
ortion letters in the Sept.
)iinian. The letters
iife activists for holding
cral for aborted unborn
iving that the funeral
I" them and was a
d vulgar invasion of the
he women involved
what S wrong with prop-
spectfully burying our
pc we become so barbaric
in this country that we
If ur unborn children are
v is so much garbage?
las far as the phrase "inva-
lacv" is concerned, yes,
an invasion of privacy:
invasion, which led to
of 157 innocent unborn
Continued from page 4
Let me be clear: I am pro-
choice. As far as I'm concerned, a
woman has the right to choose
whether or not to have sex outside of
marriage; a woman has the right to
choose whether or not to use birth
control; and a woman has the right to
choose whether or not to put her baby
up for adoption. But a woman does
not have the "right to choose"
whether or not to murder her unborn
child. Even though a woman has the
legal right to murder that child, she
does not for any reason have the
moral right to do so.
We who are against abortion
do provide alternatives. In
Greenville, we have the Carolina
Crisis Pregnancy Center located at
111 East 3rd Street. The phone num-
ber is 757-0003. Let me assure the
young women who think they have
nowhere to turn that there is loving,
canng help available for them AND
for their unborn children.
Rachel Sturz
ECU Alumnus
Vote Thomas
To the editor:
Sophomores: Your opportunity
to voice your opinion is about to be
bestowed upon you. On Wednesday
you will have the chance to vote for
vour class leaders. These leaders are
valuable to you, for they are your
voice in Student Government � the
backbone of all student involvement
on campus.
You need a strong and capable
leader to represent your class on
campus. You need a class President
who is willing to work for your wants
and desires and who will not accept
defeat as an alternative when your
views are in mind.
You need for your leader � your
President � one who is experienced
in student government as well as in
other campus activitiesorganiza-
tions. You need a President who
shows concern for your class and for
the school. You need Allen Thomas
for vour Sophomore Class President.
Show your concern for your class by
exercising your right to vote. Vote on
Wednesday. Allen Thomas, Sopho-
more Class President, "A Proven
Leader
Kelly Jones
Student Government Vice
President
Vote Thomas
To the editor:
I would like to take this opportu-
nity to strongly encourage the sopho-
mores of East Carolina to vote for the
most qualified candidate for Sopho-
more Class president � Allen Tho-
mas. Last year Allen served as a SG A
Day Representative and on the Ap-
propriations Committee. Later, he
was also appointed to the Student
Store Advisory Committee.
While working with Allen on the
Legislature last year, I learned that he
is very concerned with campus ac-
tivities and the interests of his peers.
Allen also stands up for what he be-
lieves and is not afraid to voice his
opinion. He has the experience and
maturity necessary to uphold this
position. I urge you to take an active
part in your Student Government on
Wednesday by voting for Allen Tho-
mas as your Sophomore Class Presi-
dent.
Colleen M. McDonald
Sophomore
Communications
S.G.A. Secretary
Vote Sturz
To the editor:
Dear Freshman:
Tom orrow you will be electing
the two people who will be repre-
senting you throughout the 1988-89
school year, your freshman class
President and Vice President. These
offices need to be filled by two people
who will stand up and speak out for
their fellow classmates.
We, Ariclle Sturz and Kim
Faulkner, believe that we can fill
these two positions to the upmost of
their capacities. We have both held
many leadership positions through-
out our high school year and wish to
continue doing so here at ECU. Make
your vote count.
Arielle Sturz � President
Kim Faulkner � Vice President
Kim Faulkner
Spanish
Freshman
Arielle Sturz
Psychology
Freshman
Vote Kalkhurst
To the editor:
Dear Seniors:
Tomorrow we will be electing
our class president. The senior calss
president plays an important role in
our plans to graduate. He plans both
graduations and any other activities
concerning Seniors. The position of
senior president entails a strong
devotion to the job.
Dillion Kalkhurst possesses this
devotion and committement. Dillion
has committed himself to serving the
students his entire college career. He
has served on Canvassing and Solic-
iting, Chancellors Bcautification,
Recreation, and Screening, and Ap-
pointments committees. Dillion also
served on the legislature for three
vears and Scott Thomas's cabinet.
Being a senior myself, 1 believe Dil-
lion is the best person for us.
Vote Dillion Kalkhurst.
Senior President
Larry Murphy
Student Body President
Senior
English
Vote Kalkhurst
To the editor:
Seniors,
Tommorow you will be choosing
the person to be the head of your
class, the Senior Class President.
There is one candidate that stands
out above the rest, Dillion Kalkurst.
Dillion has served East Carolina in
many different ways. He has been an
active member of the Student Gov-
ernment for 3 years.
Dillion has held the position of
legislator for 2 years and last year
served on the Presidents Cabinet.
Dillion has worked very closely with
school administraiton and would
continue to do this a very
proffesional manner.
Fellow seniors 1 urge you to get
out and vote Dillion Kalkurst for
Senior Class President on Wednes-
day.
Tripp Roakcs
SGA Treasurei
Senior
SRA ELECTIONS
TODAY
VOTE
James Gardner
for
Vice President
"The Right Choice"
Helping Fellow Students Towards A
Better Dormitory Life
ih
"HELP" WANTED
Ex ellentpp rtur it :
Earn Extra Cash
Flexible I lours!
IV lo IVi ple ' I S : I over
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TANGERINE DREAM
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This legendary European trio:
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C. Took their name from a tropical-
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THE PRIMITIVES
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r TAYLOR DAYME
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A. Tell it to my Great Dane
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C. Tell it to the Marines
A
THE PLAZA, CAROLINA EAST MAIL
12?
LETTER, p.ige 5





k
.
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Large, 1 bedroom duplex
near university. 213 S. Eastern Street,
$230, 758-5299.
FOR RENT: Large 3 bedroom house near
uniwewtty. 111 East 9th St. $360.758-5299.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
$lr7 0 per month (bedroom furnished or
unfurnished) 12 utilities Available Oct.
1 355-T&9.
ROOM & BOARD available near cam-
pus for female non-smoker work ex-
change. Call 757-1798.
HOUSEMATE: Quiet mf, wanted by
faculty member. 3B house, newly remod-
eled, walking distance from campus. Rent
and lease negotiable. 757-6265 or leave
message 757-6665. Cabrielle Yablonsky.
APT. FOR RENT: Located 3 blocks from
campus. Low rent, great location. Call
Luke or Steve for more details. 830-0339.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Canon T80 auto-focus cam-
era, 30 mm lens, 60-300 mm zoom lens and
electronic flash $450. Call Bryan 752-0270.
FOR SALE: Crate GS150 watt amp. Brand
new. 15" electra voice speaker. 20 ft. patch
chord included. $275. 758-74, Jay.
SOFA, CHAIR: Floral print. Great condi-
tion � no tears, need to sell. 756-8913 after
5:30 p.m.
FOR SALE: AKC Labrador Retreiver
puppies, yellow, black, chocolate. Super
litter! 9 vrs. breeding experience. Ready 9-
19 HS. 793-9206.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED Vehicles from
$100. Fords. Mercedes. Corvettes.
Chews. Surplus. Buyers Guide (1) 805-
687-bOOOExt. S-1166.
1980, 850 SUZUKI: Black, 4 cyd drive
shaft, 2 fiber glass luggage type saddle-
bags, windshield, space helmet, new
battery and break shoes. $750. Call 756-
8692
HELP WANTED
FLORAL DESIGNER NEEDED: Prefer
experienced full time help. Will consider
part-time and training. Apply in person.
1703 W 6th St. Greenville.
ATTENTION ALL GIRLS! Rush Alpha
Sigma Phi Lil'Sisters! Join the fun meet
the brothers and sisters, Sept. 13 and 14
from 9-11 at the Alpha Sig house�422
West Fifth Street. For a ride or any infor-
mation, call 757-3516.
HELP WANTED: The Student Govern-
ment Association announces an opening
in the Student Services Board. The posi-
tion is Assistant Refrigerator Rental Man-
ager Salary is $150 a month. No experi-
ence required. Applications are available
in room 222 Mendenhall. Deadline 5:00
Friday, Sept. 16 For more info, contact
Tripp Roakes at 757-6611, ext. 218.
HELP WANTED: National marketing
firm seeks ambitious Junior, Senior, or
Graduate Student to manage on-campus
promotions for top national companies
this semester. Flexible hours with earning
potential at $2,500. Call Judy C or Myra at
1-800-592-2121.
NEED WAITRESSES AND HOST-
ESSES: Will work around class schedule.
Apply in person. Tar Landing Seafood
Rest, 105 Air Port Rd.
BE ON T.V Many needed for commer-
cials. Casting info. (1) 800-687-6000 Ext.
TV-1166.
EXPEDITIONS TO AFRICA: Spring
semester openings to Kenya and
Cameroon. Join a team of international
young people to explore tropical rain-
forests and discover African wildlife.
APPLY NOW! Final chance for selection
is Sept. 30-Oct. 2,1988 in North Carolina.
Call OPERATION RALEIGH at 1-S00-
727-7787 for an application today.
BRODrS AND BRODVS FOR MEN
are now accepting applications for the Fall
Semester. Enthusiastic individuals who
enjoy fashion and can work flexible hours
should apply. Brady's Carolina East Mall.
Monday thru Wednesday, 2-4 p.m.
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
NC 752-3694.
DWI? Don't Drink & Drive. Come Party
In Style. Call Class Act Limousine 757-
3240.
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties. Dance, Top 40 & Beach. Call 355-2781
ask for Morgan.
SCHOOLS IN: Time to party! Call us for
your music needs. We'll beat all prices and
videotape your party. The Power Station
DJ's. 752-0946, 752-0940.
PERSONALS
ECU LADIES: Come out tonight to
Grog's and meet the brothers of Pi Kappa
Alpha and become involved in the hottest
frat. on campus. Become a little sister and
find out why PIKE IS IT
ALPHA XI DELTA: We had a blast at the
party. Can't wait till the next one. Good
luck to all the pledges. The Brothers it
Pledges of Pi Kappa Alpha.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: We would
like to welcome all of the members of our
Alpha pledge class. Good luck fellows!
KA�Thanks for a great time at your
house Friday evening. The rain sure
didn't stop us! Let's do it again. Love, The
Alpha Delta Pi's.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
New York Hair Designer to
provide FREE make-overs to
Dorm Students.
RA's contact Joanne Dunn at
Professional Image.
Set up an appointment for
your hall today!
Designer Haicuts abo available
for all students $10. For more
information 756-2945
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru Sat. Low
Coat Termtnii i 11 ! i 30 v � npregnancy
1-800-433-2930
RA'S AND HEAD RESIDENTS: Be sure
to vote for your fellow staff member from
Jarvis. Vote Mary Fordham - Senior Class
President.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS are proud to
support their vice-chairman in her cam-
paign for senior class president. Good
luck Mary Fordham!
ALPHA OMICRON PI: The brothers of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon would like to thank
you for your participation with our Rush.
Wecould not have done it without you all.
Thanks again! Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
THE BROTHERS OF PI KAPPA PHI
would like to thank the ladies of Chi
Omega and Alpha Omicron Pi for their
help with rush.
TKE'S: On Sunday night we crossed the
street to what became an incredible feat.
Your house rocked on with party and
song and before we knew it the night was
half gone. Rush was awesome, and now
we can say, the parried that followed is an
unforgettable day. Looking forward to
the next time we meet because parties
with you sure can't be beat. Love, the
sisters & pledges of Alpha Phi.
RHONDA KNIGHT: Rush was awe-
some! Thanks for all the hard work - It sure
has paid off. We love you! Sisters of Alpha
Phi.
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI are proud
to announce the new Beta Sigma pledges:
Star Almasie, Katerine Baker, Leigh
Boggs, Lori Caviness, Keshia Colon, Lisa
Crawford, Rhonda Dale, Jill Dervero,
Melanie Hamilton, Elizabeth Hane,
Gretchen Helms, Malinda Highsmith,
Gretche Ives, Kathv Jablonski, Ann
Johnson, Dlen Joyner, Sarah Kennedy,
Colleen Kirkparrick, Kelli Kuchelmeister,
Cheryl Culin, Heather Lyle, LaDonna
McKee, Anne Pankratz, Stephanie Pipkin,
Veronica Potter, Julianne Ridolphi, Amy
Spencer, Tracy Stawarz, Becky Suarez,
Carolyn Suggs, Elizabeth Temple, Mich-
elle Vassil, Jeannette Varhies, Andrea
Worthington, Jennifer Ziegler. We're
proud of you all! Love, The Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
BETA RHO PLEDGES OF DELTA
ZETA: Tammy Preisler, Mary Ellen Lan-
ham, Michele Tate, Kathy Hornby,
Shelley Sotir, Melinda Gay, Kelly Wells,
Darla Brown, Susan Weast, Heather
Laird, Kelly Gibson, Kelly Kane, Nicolle
Smith, 1 racy Ford, Susan Carroll, Melissa
Pruden, Wendy Neal, Claudia Chalmers,
Katherine Klutz, Nancy Pew, Stacey Wal-
drop, ReneeCundiff, Kelli Green, Tammy
Thigpen, Pam McKinney, Suzanne Keen,
Rondalyn Mount and Kelly Spiegland.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: The brothers of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon would like to thank
you for helping us with Rush on such
short notice. We hope in the future we can
return the favor! Thanks Again! Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
3RD SEMESTER FRESHMEN: Your
vote still counts for Freshmen Class Presi-
dent. Elect one of your own, Dean Wilk-
ins.
FRESHMEN: Don't let someone else
choose your class president! GO VOTE.
Paid for by the Dean Wilkins for class
president committee.
PHI KAPPA TAU: The buses picked us
up, and songs we did sing, To get us all
psyched up for the famous tailgating.
When we finally got to the game, we were
all very impressed, with the seats on the 50
yd. line, which turned out to be the very
best. The victory of the game, got us ex-
cited about continuing the fun. Back to
your house we went, for the night was not
done. Thanks for showing us a great pref
day, we would not have done it any other
way. Let's do it again soon! Love the
AZD's.
TO DONNA BONNESERA AND KIM-
BERLY FLEMING: Congratulations on
becoming sisters! We are very excited to
have you part of our sisterhood! Love the
AZD's.
TO ALL THE FRATERNITIES: We hope
you all had a great rush! We all look for-
ward to meeting your new pledges! Love
the AZDs.
CHI ALPHA OMEGA: Congrats to the
Beta pledge class of Chi Alpha Omega:
Reggie, Jon, Devin, Mike, Chris, Jeff,
David, John, Kennith, Jonathan, Jesse.
From the Brothers of Chi Alpha Omega.
DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY
INC. will be having their formal rush on
Wed Sept. 14th 1988. It will be held at the
Ledonia S. Wright Afro American Cul-
tural Center at 8:00. All interested ladies
are asked to attend.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA invites all inter
ested girls to become Crescent Girls. Rush
is Wednesday and Thursday night, start-
ing at 9:00. For info, call 757-1367 500
Elizabeth St.
SENIORS! Be sure to bring your student
i.d. on Wednesday, Sept. 15, and vote for
Mary Fordham as your class president!
Don't forget.
ELLEN, I LOVE YOU We have spent
some great times together and I hope for
many more. TIL
TO ROCK AND (DO)2: The hotel was
kickin the game was stiff. We sat in Do's
car and whew, caught a whiff! At Capt.
Bill's we did meal, only to find we had to
pick up the bill. Then for a stroll onto the
swaying pier, M.K. asked why! Dot said,
"Let's get the hell out of here Thanks for
a great weekend! Dot and MKB.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEW
JAMMIN' PLEDGE CLASS OF ALPHA
DELTA PI! Robbyn Adams, Carey As-
penburg, Kristine Baker, Gina Beard,
Elizabeth Black, Barbara Bond, Amy Brat-
ton, Tina Burns, Lisa Creech, Kim Cum-
mings, Lisa Cummings, Maria Denoia,
Sarah Fallon, Jocelyn Casque, Lisa
Gonzalez, Kelly Hawthorne, Donna Hill-
beck, Julia Hodge, Ashley Hutchinson,
Dlen Jeffreys, Jennifer Kirchoff, Kelly
Lassiter, Bo McDonald, Mary Meadows,
Player Miller, Leslie Millikan, Rebecca
Serling, Jcana Shallcross, Michelle Shuler,
Melanie Simpson, Shannon Sitlinger,
Laura Stephens, Mary Staton Stocks,
Cynthia Sykes, Manea Thornell, Ahsa
Turner and Kristen Walsh Love your si.v
ters.
TO KA PLEDGES Congratulations KA
Little Sisters look forward to a great year
NEED A RIDE TO ALABAMA on
Thanksgiving Break Please call now to
confirm! 758-8727 � Tom
READY TO ROCK on a Wednesday
night? Check out hard rock hooligans
Roulette, who are out to entertain you
with style. Susie's Trechouse, Wedne.
day, Sept 21 at 1000
COME SEE THE EMBERS live at the K A
House for the 1st Annual Boardwalk
Benefit for MDA. Thur Sept 15 5-9 p m
Get your tickets now Coolers are wvl
come.
KAPPA ALPHA presents the 1st Annual
Boardwalk Benefit for MDA Featuring
the Embers Thurs Sept 15 from 5-9 p m
Tickets will be on sale in front of the Stu
dent Store or call 757 0128 Coolers are
welcome!
CHRISTIE: I lope you have a happy 21st,
looking forward to spending part of it
with you! RAC
BASEBALL CARDS Sell old card fat
cash, call Thomas. 756-0685 afte- ipm
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
$1.00 OFF
HAIRCUTS
OR STYLING
Eastgate Shopping Center
lAcroaa from Highway Patrol Station!
Dchtnd Car Quest Auto Part
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
Johnny Weathington
752-3318
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near BCU
� Arrow From hghway Pit rot Stit ion
S32S a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy William
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8,12 - 5 JO p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quirt one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $205 a month, 6 month
lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couple or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
ConUrt T or Tommy William
756-7815
CRUSTY
PIZZA
WE
DELIVER
Now Hiring Drivers
Starting Wage $4.00 per hr.
Earn Up To $9.00 per hr.
Flexible hours, Bonuses. Must
have own car and insurance.
Apply in person at 1414 Charles St.
ATTENTION
JUDICIAL BOARD
MEMBERS
The following Judicial
Board Members need to
contact Alice Harden at
758-9923 or
757-6611 ext. 218
immediately:
Angie South
Keith Crawford
Brad Cates
Thank You!
Announcements
ECU STUPENT BANK
Faculty, staff, and students may now pay
Iheir Greenville Utility bills at the ECU
STUDENT BANK, presenting both parts
of the bill. Other services include cashing
checks, savings accounts, paying tele-
phone bills, and the purchase of money
orders.
ECU GOSPEL CHQIR
ECU Gospel Choir is open for member-
ship to all interested students. Last day to
join is Sept. 21. Rehearsals are held
Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
CO-REC ALMOST ANY-
THING GOES
Be sure to attend the Intramural Co-Rec
Almost Anything Goes registration meet-
ing held September 20 at 530 p.m. in GCB
1026. It's fun and exciting and you'U have
a blast so register September 20.
CHANGES IN OFFICE
The League of Women Voters of
Greenville-Pitt County will sponsor an
informational evening for Greenville citi-
zens regarding the proposed changes in
the terms of office for the Mayor and
members of the City Council and the
Mayor's vote. Speakers will include: Dr.
Dorothy Clayton, Professor of Political
Science at ECU; Mr. DeWitt McCarley,
Greenville City Attorney; and Mayor Ed
Carter. The League encourages the public
to attend and participate in asking ques-
tions concerning these issues. The event
will be held in the Council Chambers on
the third floor of the Qty Office F 'ding
on Fifth Street on Sept 13,1968, at 8 p.m.
HEARTSMART FOOD
On Sept. 13th and 14th, the American
Heart Association and Purdue are spon-
soring Food Fest, 1988. At Krogers and
Harris (Bells Fork location) there will be
two "Heartsmart Food Tours" daily - at 10
a.m. and 6 p.m. Each tour costs $5 (which
is donated to the American Heart Assoc.)
and are given by qualified nutritionists.
These tours are to help consumers make
healthy, smart choices at the grocery
store. Handouts and samples are avail-
able - bring your shopping list! Please
come and help us raise money for a wor-
thy cause. Call 752-7374 evenings after 6
p.m. for more information, or just come on
down on the 13th and 14th for an informa-
tive and fun tour.
STUDENTS FOR BUSH 88
Students for Bush 88 call Bobby Hall for
info. Buttons, stickers etc. 758-5775.
GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept. 15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2. Please note that the
group listing with the name of every per-
son in the photograph MUST be pre-
sented BEFORE the photographer films
the group. ORGANIZATIONS WITH-
OUT LISTINGS WILL NOT BE PHOTO-
GRAPHED, and time does not permit the
scheduling of another session. Call 757-
6501 and leave date it time for the photo to
be taken. Please give 2 days notice for the
photographer.
MCfl.
Do not forget the Monday night meeting
at 7 p.m. at MSC Everyone is invited to
attend. Our first I.C. is at UNC-CH. One
major issue to be presented is "Condoms
in the Residences Hall This should bring
a lot of debate. For membership info
contact Don at 355-3152 or Janet at 355-
6420. All majors are welcome.
ECU FORENSIC SOriFTY
Interested in competing in intercollegiate,
public speaking interpreted reading or
debate? Well the ECU Forensic Society is
for you. The next meeting will be Sept. 20,
at 8 p.m. in 211 Messick Theatre Arts Bldg.
COUNSELING CENTER
STRATEGIES FOR TAKING STAN-
DARDIZED TESTSHOW TO DO WELL
ON THE GRE. Are you planning on tak-
ing the GRE, LSAT, MAT, MEDCAT, or
other standardized tests? This workshop
will cover basic information about these
tests, test taking strategy and sample
items. 4-5 p.m. in 312 Wright Bldg Sept.
19. If you are planning on taking the
Graduate Record Examination for admis-
sion to graduate school, this workshop
will help you prepare - types of items, test
taking strategy, scores and sample items
will be discussed. Sept 20 from 4-5 p.m. in
312 Wright Bldg GRE Workshop.
EARLY CHILDHOOD CM IB
All early childhood education majors are
invited to the first meeting of the Early
Childhood Education Club. The meeting
will be on Sept. 14 at 4 p.m. in Speight 308.
Please join us!
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
ECU Gospel Choir is now accepting new
members for Fall and Spring. Last day to
pin is Monday, Sept. 19. Rehearsals are
Wednesdays at 5 p.m. at Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
CCF - Campus Christian Fellowship, a
non-denominational Christian group for
ECU students will meet every Tuesday
night n Ra wl 130 at 7 p.m. You are invited
to join us for rood-fun-fellowship and
praise! B.Y.O.B. (Bring Your Own Bible).
MIDDLE GRADES ED. CI.IJB
ECU Middle Grades Club will be having a
membership drive in Speight on Sept.
13th, 14th, 19th, and 20th. The Club will
have its first meeting Sept. 20th in Speight
203. All Middle Grades Majors are en-
couraged to become a part of this special
organization. For info call club president
Tad Williams 830-1761.
STUDENTS FOR MARTIN
Students for Martin invite everyone to
come see Governor Martin on , Sept. 14 at
2 p.m. here on campus at Mendenhall.
There will also be a rally Tuesday evening,
6 p.m at the Moose Lodge. Call Mary
Fordham, 752-8359 for more info.
COMMUNION
Worship God and celebrate Communion
this Wed. night at 5 p.m. at the Methodist
Student Center then enjoy a delicious, all-
you-can-eat home cooked meal and good
fellowship (wes2fel). The meal is $2 at the
door, $1.50 if you sign up in advance. Call
758-2030 for reservations. Sponsored by
Presbyterian and Methodist Campus
Ministries.
PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB
Blood Drive Challenge - The P.T. Club is
challenging all clubs, fraternities, sorori-
ties, etc. to donate. You may need the "gift
of life" some day. Blood drive - Menden-
hall rm. 244 Sept. 14, Sept. 15,12-6 p.m.
LQSI
Something missing in your life? We've
found it and we want to share it with you.
Jenkins Art Auditorium. EVERY Friday
night at 7 p.m.
AGC
Attention Industry and Technology En-
thusiasts: There will be an (ACG) Associ-
ated General Contractors Meeting Sept.
14 at 5:45 p.m in the Rawl Bldg. Beer it
nuts will be served. Check it out.
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
If you are challenged everyday with prob-
lems that you find hard to overcome, join
us for the uncompromised word of God.
Every Friday night at 7 p.m. in the Jenkins
Art Auditorium.
ECU WOMEN'S SOCCER
cum
There is a mandatory meeting Sept. 15th
at 530 p.m. in Memorial Gym room 102.
All new it interested members are wel-
come.
WINDSURFING
Be sure to attend the Intramural
Windsurfing registration meeting held
from Sept. 6 to Sept. 27.
GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Group photographs will be taken Sept.15
until Dec. 2. No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2. Please note that the a
group listing with the r. me of every per-
son in the photograph MUST be pre-
sented BEFORE the photographer films
the group. ORGANIZATIONS WITH
OUT LISTINGS WILL NOT BE PHOTO-
GRAPHED, and time does not porn I
scheduling of another session
NEW ARRIVALS
The Mendenhall Student Center Music
Listening Lounge has received the follow
ing selections on compact disc: Aeros-
mith�Permanent Vacation; Wynton
Marsalis�Standard Time; INXS�Kick.
Ahmad Jamal�Crystal; Jadja Salerruv
Sonnenberg; Sinead O'Connor�The Lion
and the Cobra; REO Specdwagon�Life
as We Know It. The Music Listening
Lounge is open seven days a week from 2
1030 p.m. and is located on the second
floor gallery of Mendenhall Check out
the new tunes before vou
The National Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet Sept. 13 at 8 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium.
VOTERS
The League of Women Voters of
Greenville-Pitt County wiU sponsor voter
registration on Sept 14 from 830 am to 1
p.m. in the ECU Bookstore lobby. New
registrations, permanent address changes
andor party affiliation changes can be
made at this time.
NATIONAI TEACHER EXAM
The National Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery Exams � (Communication
Skills, General Knowledge, and Profes-
sional Knowledge) will be offered at BCU
October 22. Applications are to be com-
pleted and mailed to Educational Testing
Service. Box 911 R. Princeton, NJ 08541
Applications must be postmarked no later
man Sept. 19. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105, Speight Building
CREDJXCQMMITttE
The Credits Committee is considering
question of whether the free drop pe
for undergraduate students shouic,
shortened In order to learn thefeeuni
the faculty, staff, and students regard
this question, the Credits Commute
scheduled two Open Meetings du
which individuals are invited to pr
their feelings and ideas ALL faculty
and students are invited to attend u,
meetings on either of the following d
Sept 1Q. 2.10- 4:30 pj� room C
Drewstei and Sept 22. 2 30 � 4 30
room G 101 Brewster It is requested)
any proposal or recommendation
seated during the meeting be accor
nied by a written summary, given to,
committee at the time of the meej
Failure to prepare a summary
prevent you from being allowed to i
ent your iews and .
limit the abilm of the commit!
thorn complete consideration
IEYVISH bTU) MS
You are wel on e to after
High 1: s at 1
Shalom (1420 E. 14(
Sept 11 8pm El
12, 10 am. Rosh Hashanaii
Ma am
Masahanah Sept.
Kippur Sept .
Morning 130 .
Yior & N'ilah r moi
ttons call Mil
are invited to the hon
Resmk for j
Sept 2
dinner Call Dl I
or 757-6521 m r Mil
ECU WOMEN'S SQCCI r
Anyone interested I
Club Soccer in the Fa
year, an orga
set up It you an sted and
more information please get �
with one or an) r the folk
Kris Slacum 758-4255 Bern Harvey
9450 or Ann Totaro B3 -
leave messa
Outpatien
A treatment program I
people with aching backs .
pain in their sholders, elbov, -
knees is underway at East Caf
lina University in the D
of Physical Therapy.
The department a j
ECU School of Allied Health
ences, has established an
tient clinic specializing in
pedic physical therapy a; j
tions.
"We considered calling ii j
clinic so that pcopU?jCOu!c (
understand what we do
George Hamilton, chairn
the Physical Therapv pr
But he said calling it a back
tended to limit the wide ra
services and treatment I
will provide
"The clinic can help poor j
back problems, and probk
sociated with pain in the mus
and in the pints of the h-
said.
"Anybody who has km :
pain, whiplash injuries, bursi
tennis elbow, post fracture
some typeof injury that causes
joint to be week, painful or
can be helped bv
therapy he said 'We wi I
work to establish fund
joint after injury or surgen
said.
The clinic will take referral
physicians or individuals w!
call the Department of Physw
Therapy at 757-4133 or 7S7-�(.
to set up an appointment
Hamilton said the clinic is Km)
opened to provide a place
physical therapy faculty to mail
tain their clinical skills w hue pt
viding a service to the citizens
Greenville and eastern Mori
Carolina He said the clinic w
also be a teaching resource tj
students and will assist in ti
collection of research informant
for studies on the effectiveness
various treatments.
The physical therapy depai
ment at ECU began in 19(9 as oi
of the programs ottered in tl
CO
(Self Serviced I
FAST
aHMaaHt"JBaaMBi





1

H
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 7
tings, Lisa Cummings, Maria Denoia,
rah Fallon, Jocelyn Casque, Lisa
nzalez, Kellv Hawthorne, Donna Hill-
;k, Julia Hodge. Ashley Hutchinson.
Hen Jeffreys, Jennifer Kirchoff, Kelly
ivsiter Bo McDonald, Mary Meadows,
ber Miller, Leslie Millikan, Rebecca
sriing, jeana Shallaoss, Michelle Shuler,
lielanie Simpson, Shannon Sitlinger,
iura Stephens. Marv Staton Stocks,
tvnthia Sykes, Mariea ThornelL Alisa
furrter and knsten Walsh Love your sis-
fO KA PLEDGES Congratulations. KA
tie Sisters look forward to a great year.
itED A RIDE TO ALABAMA on
mksgiving Break Please call now to
Uirm' 758 8727 � Tom
D TO ROCK on a Wednesday
ight? Ch.vk out hard rock hooligans
ulette. who are out to entertain you
Style. Susie's Trechouse, Wednes-
Sept 21 at IftOO
: iME SEE THE EMBERS live at the KA
ri use for the 1st Annual Boardwalk
tor MDA Thur , Sept 13 5 9pm.
: youf tickets now Coolers are wel-
PPA ALPHA presents the 1st Annual
�jrdwalk Benefit tor MDA Featuring
�e Embers Thurs Sept 15 from 3-9 p.m.
;kets will be on sale in front of the Stu
i. -tore or call 757 0128 Coolers are
ne!
HRIST1E: i lope you have a happy 21st,
k oking forward to spending part of it
h you! RAC
VSFBALL CARDS Sell old cards for
"homas 756-0685 aft" 5pm
ASSIF1ED
TION
BOARD
ERS
g Judicial
ers need to
Harden at
23 or
ext. 218
ately:
outh
wford
ates
You!
GRAPHED, and time does not permit tlv
scheduling of another session.
NEW ARRIVALS
The Mendenhall Student Center Music
Listening Lounge has received the follow-
ing selections on compact disc: Aeros-
mith�Permanent Vacation; Wynton
MarsaJis� Standard Time, FNXS�Kick;
Ahmad Jamal�Crystal; Jad)a Salerno-
Sonnenberg, Sinead O'Connor�The Lion
land the Cobra, REO Speedwagon�Life
las We Know It The Music Listening
ILounge is open seven days a week from 2-
110-30 pm and is located on the second
floor gallery of Mendenhall Check out
Ithe new tunes before vou
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet Sept 13 at 8 p m in Jenkins
Auditorium
VOTERS
The League of Women Voters of
Greenville-Pi ft County will sponsor voter
registration on Sept 14 from 830 a.m. to 1
pm in the ECU Bookstore lobby. New
registrations, permanent address changes
andor party affiliation changes can be
made at this time.
NATIONAL TEACHER EXAM
The National Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery Exams � (Communication
Skills, General Knowledge, and Profes-
sional Knowledge) will be offered at ECU
October 22 Applications are to be com-
pleted and mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 911 R, Princeton, NJ 08541.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept 19 Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Building
Announcements
CREDIT COMMITTEE
The Credits Committee is considering the
question of whether the free drop period
for undergraduate students should be
shortened. In order to learn the feelings of
the faculty, staff, and students regarding
this question, the Credits Committee has
scheduled two Open Meetings during
which individuals are invited to present
their feelings and ideas. ALL faculty, staff,
and students are invited to attend these
meetings on either of the following dates:
Tt 19, 2.30 � 4:30 p.m. room C-103
Hrewster and Sept. 22, 2:30 � 4:30 p.m.
room C-103 Brewster. It is requested that
any proposal or recommendation pre-
sented during the meeting be accompa-
nied bv a written summary, given to the
committee at the time of the meeting.
Failure to prepare a summary will not
prevent you from being allowed to pres-
ent your views and proposals, but may
limit the ability of the committee to give
them complete consideration.
IEWISH STUDENTS
ou are welcome to attend the following
I ligh 1 lolidav Services at Temple Bayt
sh.ilom (1420 E. 14th St. in Greenville):
Sept 11,8 p.m. Erev Rosh I lashanah, Sept.
12,10 am Rosh I lashanah Day - 6:30 p.m.
Ma-ariv, Sept. 13, 10 a.m. 2nd Day Rosh
liasahanah, Sept. 20, 7 p.m. Erev Yom
kippur, Sept. 21, 9:30 am. Yom Kippur
Morning - 4:30 p.m. Atternoon bcrvice,
Wor & Nilah. For more info, or direc-
tions call Mike at 756-4930. All students
are invited to the home of Dr. Brainy
Resnik for a I lome Hospitality Dinner on
Sept 20 at 5:15 p m. Please call to RSVP for
dinner. Call Dr. Resnik at 355-5321 (home)
or 757-6521 (work) or Mike at 756-4930.
FCU WOMEN'S SOCCER
Anvone interested in playing Women's
Club Soccer in the Fall and Spring of this
year, an organizational meeting is being
set up If vou are interested and want
more information, please get in touch
with one or any of the following people.
Kris Slacum 758-4255, Beth Harvey 756-
M50 or Ann Totaro 830-9315. Call and
leave message.
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY
All general college pre-physical therapy
sophomores, or higher, anticipating ap-
plying to the May 1989 Physical Therapy
Class should go to the Physical Therapy
Department Office, 1st floor, Belk Build-
ing, before the end of Sept. to determine
eligibility. Instructions for receiving the
application packet will be given then. If
you have any questions, contact that office
by phone (757-6961, ext. 261) or in person.
ALUMNT ASSOCIATION
On Nov. 19 the Pitt County ECU Alumni
Assoc. the ECU Office of Admissions are
co-sponsoring an all day academic bowl
competition. The format used by the bowl
will closely adhave to the format used by
the GE College Bowl. The ECU Bowl
needs moderators, judges, time-keepers,
and scorers. Sept. 15 at7p.m. in theconfer-
ence room of the TaylorSlaughter
Alumni Center on E 5th Street, there will
be an orientationmini-training session
for interested volunteers. Faculty, staff,
and students are invited to attend. Call
Susan C. Smith, Admissions, 757-6640 or
John Anema at 752-7151 for further infor-
mation.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
Are you interested in dedicating 6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Call Marianne Exum (h) 830-
9450 or (w) 751-6271 for application and
more details. Application deadline Octo-
ber 1.
FRISBEE CLJJB
Practices are in full swing. Come to the
bottom of College Hill every Tues.�
Thurs and Sunday at 5 p.m. New players
are more than welcome. Join the team that
tied for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca.
PHI ALPHA THETA
Phi Alpha Theta will hold its first meeting
Sept. 14 at 230 in the Todd Room. All
members and those people who are inter-
ested in joining ARE ENCOURAGED TO
ATTEND.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Alpha Phi Omega is a co-ed National
Service Fraternity. We want you to know
what we are all about. Please look for
announcements in upcoming meetings
and events. Everyone is welcome!
CO-OP EDUCATION
Co-op education, a free service offered by
the University, is designed to help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. All students are en-
couraged to attend a Co-op Information
Seminar in the General Classroom Build-
ing. The Seminar schedule is: Thursday,
Aug. 25 4 p.m. Room 2006, Monday, Aug.
29 1 p.m. Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 1 4
p.m. Room 2026, Thursday, Sept. 8 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Monday, Sept. 12 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 15 4 p.m.
Room 2006, Monday, Sept. 19 4 p.m.
Room 2006, Thursday Sept. 22 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Monday, Sept. 26 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 29 4 p.m.
Room 2006.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester and or Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the Gen-
eral Classroom Building, Room 2028.
SPECIAL OLYMPCIS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special Olym-
pics will be conducting a training school
Sept. 17 at Elm St. Gym for anyone inter-
ested in volunteering to coach soccer for
special athletes. No experience is needed.
We are also looking for coaches for basket-
ball, weight-lifting, ans swimming. All
interested persons should contact Greg
Epperson or Connie Sappenfield at the
Special Olympic office, 830-4551.
THE REBEL
THE REBEL will be accepting submis-
sions for the annual poetry and prose
contests continuously until Nov. 7. Sub-
mit tv Gentries to Media Board or Rebel
Otfi pen to currently enrolled ECU
stud its only.
UNIVERSITY UNION
A special added attraction of EVITA will
be presented in Wright Auditorium on
Sept. 22,1988, at 8 p.m. Composed by An-
drew Lloyd Webber (CATS. PHANTOM
OF THE QPERA and 1ESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR), EVITA won seven Tony
Awards, including Best Musical. EVITA
is based upon the life of Eva Peron, the
second wife of Argentine dictator Juan
Peron. Tickets for the New York Touring
Production of EVITA are now on sale. For
further details, contact: The Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, 757-
6611, Ext. 266.
SRA
Interested in your resident hall? Become
involved by joining Student Residence
Association. See your residence hall direc-
tor for information. Elections for officers
are today!
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Season tickets are now on sale for the
Performing Arts Series at ECU. This year
there are fourteen outstanding perform-
ances starting in October and running
through April. Some of the attractions
include: Wynton Marsalis, CABARET,
The Acting Company in Love's Labour's
Lost, Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, The
Tokyo String Quartet, Oregon, The At-
lanta Symphony, and the Ohio Ballet. For
a free brochure, and further details con-
tact: The Central Ticket Office, Menden-
hall Student Center, 757-6611, ext. 266.
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial aid
for overseas education may apply for a
Rivers Scholarship. The next application
deadline is Oct 1, 1988. For further info
contact the Office of International Studies
in the GCB, room 1002, 757-6769.
VOLLEYBALL
The Lady Pirates Volleyball Team will
play Campbell University Wed. night at 7
p.m. in Minges Coliseum. The team only
has a limited amount of home games so
get out there and show your support.
VOTE
JIM LAYTON
FOR
Sophomore Class President
"OUTSPOKEN LEADERSHIP"
Outpatient clinic set up by physical therapy dept
A treatment program to help
people with aching backs and
pain in their sholders, elbows and
knees is underway at East Caro-
lina University in the Department
of Physical Therapy.
The department, a part of the
ECU School of Allied Health Sci-
ences, has established an outpa-
tient clinic specializing in ortho-
pedic physical therapy applica-
tions.
We ct nsiaered calling it a back
cinc so vYvai people .coulcTbettqf
understand what we do said
George Hamilton, chairman of
the Physical Therapy program.
But he said calling it a back clinic
tended to limit the wide range of
services and treatment the clinic
will provide.
"The clinic can help people with
back problems, and problems as-
sociated with pain in the muscles
and in the joints of the body he
said.
"Anybody who has low back
pain, whiplash injuries, bursitis,
tennis elbow, post fracture or
some type of injury that causes the
joint to be week, painful or stiff
can be helped by physical
therapy he said. "We will also
work to establish function in a
joint after injury or surgery he
said.
The clinic will take referrals by
physicians or individuals who
call the Department of Physical
Therapy at 757-4135 or 757-6961
to set up an appointment.
Hamilton said the clinic is being
opened to provide a place for
physical therapy faculty to main-
tain their clinical skills while pro-
viding a service to the citizens of
Greenville and eastern North
Carolina. He said the clinic will
also be a teaching resource for
students and will assist in the
collection of research information
for studies on the effectiveness of
various treatments.
The physical therapy depart-
ment at ECU began in 1969 as one
of the programs offered in the
then new School of Allied health.
Although the program currently
graduates about 24 students a
year, the demand by students to
major in Physical Therapy is high.
Hamilton said the department
gets more than 300 applications
for the spaces available each year
in the curriculum. He said the
department gets a constant
stream of calls and letters from
potential employers outlining the
opportunities for graduates of the
4?�gfajBv: 7" �
In past years the physical ther-
apy program has provided a lim-
ited amount of clinical service,
primarily to ECU students and
faculty. This is the first time that it
has offered a full time, full service
clinic to the public.
The Physical Therapy Depart-
ment and its clinic is located in the
Belk Allied Health Building.
Therapy rooms on the first floor of
the building contain an array of
sophisticated equipment. There
are tables for therapeutic exercise
and massage and special exercise
machines designed for manipu-
lating certain muscles and joints.
One of the machines is actually
a type of robot, called a Biodex,
that can be programmed to en-
hance muscle and tendon devel-
opment in the knee and other ex-
tremity joints. The machine can
also help therapists analyze the
extent of functional loss following
injury or disease of a joint.
Hamilton said that when an
individual comes to the clinic a
physical therapist will evaluate
the problem and make an assess-
ment to determine what should
be done. If the problem is some-
thing that cannot be helped by
physical therapy then the thera-
pist will suggest seeing a physi-
cian.
"Our intent is to work closely
with the medical community in
helping people with musclo-
skeletal problems he said.
He said that one of the goals for
the program is to combine the
patient care services offered by
the faculty of the Department of
Physical Therapy with the patient
care services offered by medical
school and faculty.
"We see physical therapy as an
extension of the physician Ha-
milton said.
He said medical doctors can
treat patients by administering
drugs, performing surgery or by
physical intervention. But he said
physicians sometimes forget the
physical intervention and rely
solely on drugs and surgery.
An example might be a patient
who sees a physician for back
pain. After examining the patient
and taking x-rays, if the doctor
can find no disease or major struc-
tural deficiency causing the prob-
lem the patient is sometimes told
that the condition is fleeting and
that it will get better with pain
medication and rest.
"Sometimes they do get better
and sometimes they don't said
Hamilton. These minor problems
sometimes grow into greater
problems because the patient will
usually cut down on physical ac-
tivity.
"As you cut down on activities
you weaken your muscle and
joint structure and allow bi-
omechanical alteration to occur
Hamilton said. "You then may be
placed in a sudden demanding
situation and your body can't
respond. When you can't respond
you injure yourself he said.
The East Carolinian
99 OFF
12" Sub or
Regular
Size Salad
5th St.
Downtown
758-7979
'S� Efiafiftmztiut
�SUBUJfiV
The Plaza
756-2110
Elbos 20th Anniversary
King Kong" Bundy,
i learned lo use it in only
?3 minutes without an
instruction book1
Heavyweight Wrestler
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S30CaUndicS�reet IJowntown Greenville
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757-3279
Thur: Ladies Night
Ladies free all night
Fri: The Famous "Late Dav Tea
Bash"
5 p.m. - 2 a.m. $2.00 Ice Teas and
free admission for all until 9:00
Sat: Dance Party-
Featuring the best in dance music
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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMRER 13. 1988
Gubernatorial candidates looking for edge
RALEIGH (AD - With the gu-
bernatirial race in the home
stretch and Gov. Jim Martin and
Lt. Gox. Bob Jordan running neck
and neck, the campaigns are
maneuvering for every opportu-
nity to gain advantage - however
slight.
Take, for example, their ap-
proach to "free media" - an
insider's term for campaign cov-
erage by newspapers, television
and radio. Strategists view a fa-
vorable news story, especially on
television, as a sort of frecbie, in
contrast to advertising that must
be purchased at steep rates.
In pursuit of such freebics, they
work to make their candidate look
good in the news and get the
media to report on the issues they
want to discuss.
"You want all the media atten-
tion that you can get focused on
what you feel is important said
Sam Poole. a Southern Fines attor-
ney who engineered Democratic
Sen. Terr Sanford's come-from-
behind defeat oi Republican Jim
Brovhill in 1986.
It's a political axiom that an
incombent has a natural advan-
tage where free media is con-
cerned. A governor has the "bully
pulpit" - virtually unlimited ac-
cess to the media simply by call-
ing a news conference. He also, as
Jordan frequently notes, has a
communications staff and pre-
sides over an administration dot-
ted with press offices.
Martin and his strategists skill-
fully exploit the bully pulpit.
Throughout his term, he has used
his regular Raleigh news confer-
ence to go over the heads of
Democratic legislators, portray-
ing himself to their constituents as
the victim of pettv partisanship.
Since the campaign has begun,
Martin has opened nearly every
news conference with announce-
ments of new initiatives or policy
statements, often talking for 20
minutes or longer before the floor
is opened for questions.
The tactic usually ensures that
at least some stations and news-
papers will carry stories Martin
wants covered.
Tim Pittman, Martin's cam-
paign press secretary, denies the
news conference format was de-
signed solely for political benefit,
But he acknowledged the
campaign's goal is for the gover-
nor to emerge from every encoun-
ter with the media "looking like a
leader, an activist governor
whose policies have moved the
state forward
Another goal is for newsconfer-
ences to establish differences be-
tween martin and Jordan with a
favorable slant for the governor,
Pittman said.
The lieutenant governor has a
much lower profile. Although
Jordan meets with reporters daily
when the General Assembly is in
session, television coverage of the
Legislature has fallen off in recent
years. His visibility has picked up,
but equalling Martin's is nearly
impossible.
To partially offset Martin's
advantage, Jordan and the state
Democratic Party have begun
holding news conferences Thurs-
day mornings in Raleigh - usually
an hour or so before Martin's get
under way at 10 a.m.
The Democrats generally focus
on an issue such as education or
the environment, touting
Jordan's record and proposals
and criticizing Martin's perform-
ance. This assures that Martin will
be put on the defensive at some
point during his own news con-
ference as reporters seek a re-
sponse. And it enables Jordan to
exert some control over the ongo-
ing campaign debate.
Jordan's campaign press secre-
tary, Phil Wells, usually attends
Martin's news conferences and
often buttonholes reporters after-
ward to rebut some of the
governor's remarks.
Pittman calls the Jordan camp's
tactics "annoying" but acknowl-
edges a Martin staffer occasion-
ally attends Jordan news confer-
ences. In 1984, the Martin cam-
paign recorded news conferences
of Democratic nominee Rufus
Edmisten.
"The bothersome thing is that
reporters walk into our press con-
ferences with questions about
whatever Jordan said Pittman
said. "The governor is very good
at handling questions on his feet.
But there's no doubt they have
negated the one-man show on
Thursdays
Poole said neither side has
clearly outdone the other in the
free-media battle. The important
thing, he said, is to stay on the
offensive and control the agenda -
stratagems Sanford worked to
near perfection.
By mixing paid commercials
with news conferences focusing
on specific topics, Sanford effec-
tively conveyed his message in
the crucial final weeks of the 1986
campaign when support surged
his way.
Dukakis takes policy on the road
TWO
AMHERST, MASS (CPS) � If
he's elected president in Novem-
ber, Gov. Michael Dukakis will
take with him education policies
that have left students in Massa-
chusetts with more financial aid
and campuses with more build-
ings, but that have also gotten the
state's public colleges in deep
budget troubles.
This fall, for example, some
schools are turning away stu-
dents, replacing teachers with
computers and raising tuition S3
percent � a higher price hike than
the national average oi 4 percent
� to cope with deep budget cuts.
In general, the Dukakis ad-
ministration has been both a boon
and a bust for colleges and univer-
sities.
Hie boons have been consider-
able: since beginning his second
term in 1982, after a four-year
absence from the governor's of-
fice and a stint teaching at Har-
vard, Dukakis has raised student
aid, faculty salaries and the budg-
ets oi other programs on public
campuses to promote his high
tech agenda for the state's econ-
omy.
As the federal government re-
duced aid to students, the
Dukakis administration picked
up the slack: since 1983 the state's
scholarship fund, for example,
jumped from $19 million to $84
million.
Earlier in 1988, moreover,
Dukakis signed legislation to inti-
tate more than $400 million in
massive construction, mainte-
nance and repair projects on sev-
eral campuses, a bill that was a top
priority for education officials. "I
think we were treated reasonably
fairly said Franklyn Jenifer,
chanceilor of the Board of Regents
of Higher Education.
Yet Massachusetts students
and administrators maintain
they're frustrated by what they
see as a bias toward private insti-
tutions, by scandals that pushed
several campus presidents out of
jobs and by Dukakis's failure to
maintain adequate operations
budgets for state colleges.
Jenifer, for one, said operating
budget cuts have almost para-
lvzcd the state higher education
system.
Public campuses will receive
$638 million this year, $21.3 mil-
lion less than last year, current
operating budgets are "not con-
ducive to maintaining pro-
grams Jenifer said.
Fitchberg State President Yin-
cent Mara called the reductions
the most severe blow to public
institutions since the state's fiscal
crises during Dukakis's first term
in 1975.
Several schools say they'll ac-
cept fewer students this year be-
cause of financial woes. To save
money, they'll cut back on teach-
ing assistants, freeze faculty hir-
ing and tap maintenance funds to
try to provide the same level of
services as last year.
The University of Massachu-
setts at Amherst, the state's flag-
ship public university with more
than 20,000 undergraduates, is
charging students a special one-
time $230 fee to raise emergency
cash.
Students throughout the state
public system face an 8.5 percent
tuition hike in the coming year
and a substantial increase in dor-
mitory fees.
Many University of Lowell stu-
dents will receive instruction
from computers, instead of fac-
ulty members, in order to cut
costs. Those students will have to
pav a $100 fee to use computer
labs.
"Without the faculty we have to
do something said President
William T. Hogan.
It could get worse. State campus
budgets, Dukakis said during a
March hearing on college savings
bonds, "cannot be expected to
continue to grow at anything like
the rate they have over the past
few years
Some students, however, are
upset most by Dukakis's support
of a measure that would allow
schools to keep excess revenues
generated by tuition hikes. The
"tuition retention" plan, student
leaders say, encourages colleges
to raise their prices.
"We all think he's not sensitive
enough said Michael Ferrigno,
director oi the State Student Asso-
ciation of Massachusetts. "It pains
us. This policy, we believe, is re-
allv a Republican policy
And Vincent McGrath, presi-
dent of the State College Faculty
Association and a Salam State
College professor, sud tuition in-
creases are often determined by
what private colleges charge,
even though private schools
"can't keep their own costs
down
McGrath also thinks Dukakis
tends to bow to the traditional
dominance of private collages in
Massachusetts.
"We aren't California we're not
Texas and we're not Michigan
Dukakis said during a 1986 Bos-
ton Globe interview. "We do hap-
pen to have some of the finest
(private) institu tions in the world.
And I don't think it makes sense
for us to duplicate that (by build-
ing up public colleges)
The remark infuriated many
educators and students. Stanley
Rosenberg, a Democratic state
representative from Arnherst,
said the UMass community still
feels betrayed.
�1
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"The governor has clearly done
and said things over time which
have given rise to concern and
annoyance among people in west-
ern Massachusetts Rosenberg
said.
Yet, he quickly added, the
Dukakis terms have been "a good
time" for UMass, noting that $141
million of the recently signed
capital improvements bill will go
to the Amherst campus alone.
Rosenberg credits Dukakis
with saving the multi-million
dollar capital outlay proposal
from legislature that had doomed
it.
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September 16-18, 1988
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Welc
By EARLVIS HAMP
Feature Fdrtor
AYDEN.N.C(EP)-
annual Ayden Collard fr
wasa blast in more wavs thai
Saturday afternoon the
between East Avenue and
Third of downtown Avdt
came filled with excitemenl
Children screamed on the!
carnival rides ranging rroml
ris wheel to flying dragon;
ents stood paticntlv by .
the nde would end
Like a minature coun I
there were manv booths
dolls could be won In one
players received six ring I
what else - a bottle of P j
At another booth, a praj
vendor with a northern
would periodically sav "V
pick one out, yes sir just pid
out "Oh boy, do you meai
win a Spuds doll too Bon
asked the Yankee
The smell of food perm
the air as vendors sold hot
pizza, sausage and oi cJ
plates of collards EP ta J
collards at two seperate
to determine what good
are.
EP first stopped at Hoi
Home Cooked Collard Dirj
in a quest for quality coif
Hennie's collards were
with a large ham hoc u I
toes, boiled oora and a d
combread.
"Been cooking collards
years or theres 'bout. I
Hennie said as she
plate with the stean
vegetable.
This is a picture of last veal
general manager andValerif
issue in October. (PhoU
Expression
By TIN) HAMPTOl
Features Fd.tor
VVith unblinking eves
nald Dillahunt looks out c
office window, off into the
tances and over the blur oi
before pausing
"We are out to broadei
scope of ECU's minority mi
zine Dillahunt said of E
sions, a student pubhcatio
the new general manager otj
pressions, Dillahunt along
managing editor Valeria LasJ
feel thev can accomplish sot
the goals set for the 88 H
duction vear.
In the first pages
Expression's summer edition
editorial staff defines the puri
of the magazine as to provide
alternate voice�a voice to I
dress the special concerns
problems of minority groups!
Expressions defines mincj
as "any student or group of
Miss Am
By SCOTT MAXWEl
I4itm
In spnng, a young man's
fancy turns to thoughts of love
contrast, in fall, it rums to "
nel 9 and the Miss America
eant.
Every year around this til
this symbol of overbearing 05
tatiousness and stunning stud
ity graces the public airwaf
Doesn't it ever occur to anyj





dge
:ontrol the agenda
anford worked to
i commercials
�S Kvusing
Sanford effec
i the I
�rt surged
les
Carolina
S I)XH
Durham
&39.00!
r n nindtnp
iiimbia Npt K
turning to
irham Sepl 17
kits arc- non-
lable and must
ir hased within
lours of
nation Seats
limited
v;S8So
THE EAST CAROI INJAN
stxk
SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 Page 9
Welcome to the Ayden Collard Festival
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Fcatuna Fditor
AYDEN, N.C. (EP) � The 14th
annual Ayden Collard Festival
was a blast in more ways than one.
Saturday afternoon the area
between East Avenue and North
TTiird of downtown Ayden be-
came filled with excitement.
Children screamed on the manv
carnival rides ranging from a Fer-
ns wheel to flying dragons. Par-
ents stood pahentlv bv, wishing
the nde would end.
Like a minature county fair,
there were many booths where
dolls could be won. In one booth
players received six rings to win
what else - a bottle of Pepsi.
At another booth, a practiced
vendor with a northern accent
would periodically say "Yes sir,
pick one out, yes sir just pick one
out "Oh boy, do you mean 1 can
win a Spuds doll too Bonehead
asked the Yankee.
The smell of food permeated
the air as vendors sold hot dogs,
pizza, sausage and of course
plates of collards. EP taste tested
collards at two seperate locations
to determine what good collards
are.
EP first stopped at "Hennie's
Home Cooked Collard Dinners"
in a quest for quality collards.
Hennie's collards were served
with a large ham hoc, white pota-
toes, boiled ocra and a cut of
cornbread.
"Been cooking collards for 14
years or theres 'bout, I forget
Hennie said as she loaded the
plate with the steaming green
vegetable.
Under the blue canvas tent of
Hennie's make-shift kitchen, EP
tasted the loaded dinner. One of
your exclusive crew, a blatant
bad-mouthed Yankee tratitor,
had never tried the succulent leaf
and vowed after a fork-full never
to again.
Others in the crew found
Hennie's collards mighty tasty
stating that the ham hoc was the
key to the zesty tongue kick.
From Hennie's, EP ventured to
Bum's Restaurant where the crew
merged into a long line of hungry
people. Bum's is a down home
kind of place. Waiting in line on
wood planked floors with the
varnish worn off, the crew looked
around to get a feel for the place.
On the far wall of stimulated-
wood grain was a row of pictures
placed for bored line-waiters to
pass the time. There were pictures
of dogs, pigs, and horses.
There was also a cool portrait of
John "The Duke" Wayne in a
cowboy hat in front of a rustic
setting. Beside "The Duke" was a
picture of another modern day
hero of sorts, Ollie North. But
OUie didn't quite fit in with the
dogs, pigs, horses and the rustic
back-dropping John Wayne,
that's why they put it near the tea
line where no one looks up.
Finally we reached the famed
Bum's food line. From our van-
tage point, one could see Bill
Dennis chopping his reknown
barbecue pig in the back and his
wife Shirley asking customers if
they cared for one meat or two.
Besides serving quality col-
lards, Bum had some damn good
barbecue.
After picking up the iced tea
without paying homage to Ollie,
the EP crew neaded for a white
cloth-covered picnic table. It was
there after saying grace to the God
of Bum's that Pete, EP's exclusive
Interlude driver, ran into some
misfortune.
Pete reached for Bum's bar-
bacue sauce (not barbeque as us
city boys say) which was nothing
more than red colored vingear in
an old Heinz bottle with a 'Bum's
sauce' written on a masking tape
label.
Pete, like a city boy can be when
thrown into a new rural environ-
ment, thought that Bum's sauce
was like all other barbeque sauces
and gave the swift shake. Little
did he know that Bum puts some-
thing exact in his sauce to give it a
kick and to loosen the bottle's cap.
Other members of our exclusive
staff had to endure the strong
odor of Bum's sauce for the rest of
the day. Well there was one ad-
vantage to Pete's Bum deal (corny
but not scatological), people got
out of our way as we passed
through the crowd.
Back at the collard cooking
contest, Ayden mayor Marvin
"Bear" Baldree named Mamie
Anderson of 2nd street the first
place winner. She won a trophy
and a $25 prize. By the wav,
Anderson was the first Collard
Queen in 1974.
For the five days of the festival,
gambling was legal in North
Carolina. Bets were placed on the
money wheel and quarter bearers
tryed to win in a game called
Splashdown.
It's now Mondav afternoon and
the collard festival is still with the
HP crew. Collards are still with us
bodv and soul. More body than
soul.
This is a picture of last year's Expressions staff. Returning staff members include Reggie Dillahunt,
general manager andValeria Lassiter, managing editor. Expressions is soon to release a special edition
issue in October. (Photo�Photofile)
Expressions broadens ECU minority voice
By TIM HAMPTON
Features Fditor
With unblinking eyes, Regi-
nald Dillahunt looks out of his
office window, off into the dis-
tances and over the blur of brick,
before pausing.
"We are out to broaden the
scope of ECU's minority maga-
zine Dillahunt said of Expres-
sions, a student publication. As
the new general manager of Ex-
pressions, Dillahunt along with
managing editor Valeria Lassiter
feel they can accomplish some of
the goals set for the '8889 pro-
duction year.
In the first pages of a
Expression's summer edition, the
editorial staff defines the purpose
of the magazine as to provide "an
alternate voice�a voice to ad-
dress the special concerns and
problems of minority groups
Expressions defines minority
as "any student or group of stu-
dents that feels outside the 'main-
stream Purposive, Expressions
addresses the special concerns of
students belonging to specific
minority groups, the handi-
capped, International students,
according to the statement
But Dillahunt stresses that
Expressions is not only for mi-
norities. He said he welcomes all
students who wish to contribute
art work, opinion or stories to the
publication.
For this year, the general man-
ager is concerned with covering
campus events. Dillahunt said
Expressions now than ever will be
reporting activities related to
ECU students.
Expression's next edition
(which will be a special issue), to
be available sometime in October,
will feature Lee McNeil, an ECU
trackester now competing in the
Summer Olympics in Seoul, Ko-
rea.
Also in the October issue, the
magazine will have an article on
Dr. Larry Smith, ECU's first direc-
tor of minority affairs. For opin-
ion, Dillahunt said the publica-
tion will center its editorials on
the government, federal, state
and local, while taking a focus on
the minority angle of news events.
The October issue will be dedi-
cated to former Expressions gen-
eral manager, Gloria Chance. Dil-
lahunt credits Chance with the
transformation of the magazine
with "strong leadership and dedi-
cation which has set new stan-
dards for Expressions
The accomplishments Expres-
sions has made in the last two
years speak for themselves. It
won "Best of Show" honors from
American College Press in 1986.
Expression's spring edition of
1987 won the Scholastic Press
Association "First Place" overall
and "Best Cover" for an illustra-
tion by the great Shelton Bryant.
The 14th annual Ayden Collard Festival turned out to be a big success as approximately 15,000 celebrated
the leafy green vegetable. Besides an eating contest, a cooking contest and the crowning of a new Collard
Queen, the collard monsters came out of the wood works. (Illustration by Parker�Parkerlab)
Spunk and Bones search for
fuzzy green Collard Monster
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Cotlaid Rrprtcr
The search for the Seatbelt-
Wearing Collard Monster began
after we ate. The Spunskter and I
saw a girl with at least six of the
fuzzy green creatures attatched to
her banana clip.
Ever the questioning tvpe of
guv, Spunky asked her where she
got it from. Bored with us already,
she waved backwards and said,
"That green tent over there
Our quest had begun. It was
to be a quest frought with peril,
danger and the foul aroma of col-
lards. But we would persevere.
We had not spent the balance
of the day in Ayden, enjoying the
sights, sounds and nauseating
smells of the 14th Annual Ayden
Collard Festival, to have our day
ruined by simple lack of direction.
The ride to the festival had
not been without its own perils.
The four of us: the collard-loving
Earlvis, the collard-hating Bone-
head, the collard-ingesting
Spunky and Pete, the Original
Collard Animal�, piled into
something we call The Prelude
With a Bra and set out for Avden.
Our progress was impeded
by two huge, slavering Cujo
clones. These two dogs were ap-
proximately five feet tall at the
shoulder and had onlv one
thought burning in their feeble
minds � scratch through the
windows of the car and bite the
people inside on the ankle repeat-
edly.
Luckily, Preludes are quite a
bit faster than your average rabid
canine
Parking was not a problem.
The railroad tracks provided
plenty of space, but evcrv time we
heard a whistle, Pete began to
squirm nervously.
The Festival itself was quite
well, festive. Sort of a really, re-
ally, really, really scaled-down
version of the State fair, the main
difference being the pervasive
smell of collards.
Cooked collards. Boiled col-
lards. Stuffed collards. Collard
with seatbclts on. Collard juice.
Collards and ham. Barbeque col-
lards.
Collard cakes. Collard cook-
ies. Spam� and collards. Collards
and eggs. Collards in just about
any imaginable size, shape and
form.
We ate lunch at not one, but
two places. Then Spunkv and i
saw the aforementioned Collard
Monsters. We took oii in the gen-
eral direction the girl had pointed
in.
We saw not one but three
green tents. Upon entering the
last one, an exhibit of grenades,
guns, bumper stickers and other
deadly weapons, we found an
emptv box.
Just ahead of us, a little girl in
pigtails and collard uice running
from her mouth walked away
with the last two Seatbelt-Wear-
mg Collard monsters. I fell into
despair.
The girl watched my face
screw up with tears. She walked
back and handed a Collard Mon-
ster to Spunky and saidHere.
i "all can have this
So, with a vinegar-saturated
Pete, an interviewlcss Earlvis, a
happy Bonehead and full
Spunky, we headed back to the
car, where the radio would tell us
that ECU was getting beat bv Vir-
ginia Tech in a pretty bad way.
My monster sits on top of my
computer now. I named him "Bla-
tant
New Collard Eating champion
unbuttons shirt for victory
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Feature Editor
AYDEN, N.C. (EP) � Johnny
Barrow did not have time to bask
in the limelight.
Instead, the newlv crowned
1988 Collard Eating King, who
had just consumed four poundsof
the leafy-green vegetable, fleed
the 14th annual Ayden Col-
lard Festival for a more favorable
spot behind some bushes.
Midway through the 30 min-
ute eating contest on Saturday,
Barrow, a native of Grifton, found
the key to his success. He unbut-
toned his black shirt to allow for
more collard room.
But it took more than just an
unbuttoned shirt to guarantee his
victory. Fans cheered during the
last ten minutes of the contest as
Barrow moaned in between bites.
"Oh Lordy, I don't know if I
can take one more bite Barrow
said as he dug a plastic folk into
the last styofoam container.
After the contest, Ayden
mayor Marvin "Bear" Baldree
awarded Barrow with a trophy
and a $50 first prize as the new
king strutted around the wooden
stage with a protruding stomach
and a gaping smile.
But not long afterwards, Bar-
row jumped from the festival's
center stage and high tailed down
the railroad tracks in search of
relief.
Some of the more curious
members of the crowd of approxi-
mately 400 followed Barrow as he
detoured into a parking lot, while
others wondered if Barrow would
be disqualified for running off.
According to the official
Ayden Collard Festival Eating
Contest Rules, the winning con-
testant may leave after being
crowned.
More succintly put, rule num-
ber four states: "Must eat the most
in the 30-minute time limit, then
keep them down long enough to
receive the trophy and prize
money
Initially with ten contestants.
including two women and an
uniformed soldier, the eating race
started as one pound containers
of collards where placed on two
tables. Slabs of combread and
cups of teas were provided, but
according to rule number two
"the weight of neither will count
in the contest
One by one, seven stomach-
holding contestants dropped
from the race leaving three collard
fcasters. At one table, the soldier
and a man sporting a white hat
folked their way through three
and a half pounds a piece as Bar-
row slumped over the other table.
In attendance for the contest
was Mort Hurst who holds the
world's record for eating collards
at seven and a half pounds. Hurst,
from Robersonville, wore a green
tee-shirt on stage which pro-
claimed "Collard Eating King
EP wondered if Barrow
would attempt to break Hurst's
record next year, but the 1988
collard chawing champ was
unavailable for comment.
Miss America Pageant reinforces outdated sexual stereotypes
By SCOTT MAXWELL
A�i��fit Featura Editor
In spring, a young man's idle
fancy turns to thoughts of love. By
contrast, in fall, it turns to Chan-
nel 9 and the Miss America Pag-
eant.
Every year around this time,
this symbol of overbearing osten-
tahousness and stunning stupid-
ity graces the public airwaves.
Doesn't it ever occur to anyone
that all the money that was spent
on the glitz and glamor could
have been better spent on the
hungry and homeless?
Of course, the Miss America
pageant is not completely worth-
less. It does pay of f in scholarships
to the young ladies who win. On
the other hand, it can hardly be
said (though it sometimes is) that
the Miss America Pageant pro-
motes education.
The Miss America Pageant
does, however, provide an oppor-
tunity for millions of American
males to look at lots of lovely la-
dies, and to do it in a completely
unthreatening environment. It's
even more socially accepted than
Playboy and its like (albeit more
demure).
One sure-fire formula for
success is to tell people what they
want to hear, and the Miss Amer-
ica Pageant tells one of the best
lies of all time. It reinforces the
prevalent typical-American-male
beliefs that (a) there is little of
value about any woman, except
for her body, and (b) good looks
make a good person.
Admittedly, many of the at-
tacks levelled at men by women
are accurate. Many men are slav-
ering, sex-starved microenceph-
alic semi-simians. Not all, and
fewer every year - yet many still
remain among The Unenlight-
ened. But given the picture that
the Miss America Pageant pres-
ents of women, who could expect
otherwise?
A common defense of the
Miss America Pageant is that Miss
America Does Great Things And
Promotes The General Welfare.
But be honest: this is the Miss
America Pageant, not the Ambas-
sador to France Pageant.
Of course, not all the contest-
ants are bubbleheads, either - in
fact, most of them aren't. But the
side of them most strongly em-
phasized (and virtually the only
side shown to the home viewer) is
the physical. And so they seem
like bubbleheads.
Miss Minnesota (now also
Miss America) actually seems to
be a good person, but how many
people noticed? She may very
well be a worthy recipient of a
$30,000 scholarship, but why
should she get it primarily be-
See PAGEANT, page 11





7
T
dge
ive and control the agenda -
gems Sanford worked to
?rfection.
nixing paid commercials
ews conferences focusing
rific topics, Sanford effec-
i conveyed his message in
rial final weeks of the 1986
lign when support surged
�INNERS
Price
jroroiled
kttered Grecian
ootato or steak
le only on Sun-
ie'ss
�T & PUB
jreenville Blvd.
:30am-Midmght, Fn -Sat
1

16-18, 1988
lcigh Durham
r only $3900!
for roundtrip
lumbia Sept. 16
returning to
urham Sept 17
Ickets are non-
le and must
rchased within
lours of
rvation. Seats
re limited.
Pairs subject to charge
without notice.
. S95856
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 Page 9
Welcome to the Ay den Collar d Festival
By EARL VIS HAMPTON
Fcatura Editar
AYDEN, N.C (EP) � The 14th
annual Ayden Collard Festival
was a blast in more ways than one.
Saturday afternoon the area
between East Avenue and North
Third of downtown Ayden be-
came filled with excitement.
Children screamed on the many
carnival rides ranging from a Fer-
ris wheel to flying dragons. Par-
ents stood patiently by, wishing
the ride would end.
Like a minature county fair,
there were many booths where
dolls could be won. In one booth
players received six rings to win
what else - a bottle of Pepsi.
At another booth, a practiced
vendor with a northern accent
would periodically say "Yes sir,
pick one out, yes sir just pick one
out "Oh boy, do you mean I can
win a Spuds doll too Bonehead
asked the Yankee.
The smell of food permeated
the air as vendors sold hot dogs,
pizza, sausage and of course
plates of collards. EP taste tested
collards at two seperate locations
to determine what good collards
are.
EP first stopped at "Hennie's
Home Cooked Collard Dinners"
in a quest for quality collards.
Hennie's collards were served
with a large ham hoc, white pota-
toes, boiled ocra and a cut of
combread.
"Been cooking collards for 14
years or theres 1xut, I forget
Hennie said as she loaded the
plate with the steaming green
vegetable.
Under the blue canvas tent of
Hennie's make-shift kitchen, EP
tasted the loaded dinner. One of
your exclusive crew, a blatant
bad-mouthed Yankee tratitor,
had never tried the succulent leaf
and vowed after a fork-full never
to again.
Others in the crew found
Hennie's collards mighty tasty
stating that the ham hoc was the
key to the zesty tongue kick.
From Hennie's, EP ventured to
Bum's Restaurant where the crew
merged into a long line of hungry
people. Bum's is a down home
kind of place. Waiting in line on
wood planked floors with the
varnish worn off, the crew looked
around to get a feel for the place.
On the far wall of stimulated-
wood grain was a row of pictures
placed for bored line-waiters to
pass the time. There were pictures
of dogs, pigs, and horses.
There was also a cool portrait of
John "The Duke" Wayne in a
cowboy hat in front of a rustic
setting. Beside "The Duke" was a
picture of another modern day
hero of sorts, Ollie North. But
Ollie didn't quite fit in with the
dogs, pigs, horses and the rustic
back-dropping John Wayne,
that's why they put it near the tea
line where no one looks up.
Finally we reached the famed
Bum's food line. From our van-
tage point, one could see Bill
Dennis chopping his reknown
barbecue pig in the back and his
wife Shirley asking customers if
they cared for one meat or two.
Besides serving quality col-
lards, Bum had some damn good
barbecue.
After picking up the iced tea
without paying homage to Ollie,
the EP crew headed for a white
cloth-covered picnic table. It was
there after saying grace to the God
of Bum's that Pete, EPs exclusive
Interlude driver, ran into some
misfortune.
Pete reached for Bum's bar-
bacue sauce (not barbeque as us
city boys say) which was nothing
more than red colored vingear in
an old Heinz bottle with a 'Bum's
sauce' written on a masking tape
label.
Pete, like a city boy can be when
thrown into a new rural environ-
ment, thought that Bum's sauce
was like all other barbeque sauces
and gave the swift shake. Little
did he know that Bum puts some-
thing exact in his sauce to give it a
kick and to loosen the bottle's cap.
Other members of our exclusive
staff had to endure the strong
odor of Bum's sauce for the rest of
the day. Well there was one ad-
vantage to Pete's Bum deal (corny
but not scatological), people got
out of our way as we passed
through the crowd.
Back at the collard cooking
contest, Ayden mayor Marvin
"Bear" Baldree named Mamie
Anderson of 2nd street the first
place winner. She won a trophy
and a $25 prize. By the way,
Anderson was the first Collard
Queen in 1974.
For the five days of the festival,
gambling was legal in North
Carolina. Bets were placed on the
money wheel and quarter bearers
tryed to win in a game called
Splashdown.
It's now Monday afternoon and
the collard festival is still with the
EP crew. Collards are still with us
body and soul. More body than
soul.
The 14th annual Ayden Collard Festival turned out to be a big success as approximately 15,000 celebrated
the leafy green vegetable. Besides an eating contest, a cooking contest and the crowning of a new Collard
Queen, the collard monsters came out of the wood works. (Illustration by Parker�Parkerlab)
Spunk and Bones search for
fuzzy green Collard Monster
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Col laid Kcprtcr
The search for the Seatbelt-
Wearing Collard Monster began
after we ate. The Spunskter and I
saw a girl with at least six of the
fuzzy green creatures attatched to
her banana clip.
Ever the questioning type of
guy, Spunky asked her where she
Sit it from. Bored with us already,
e waved backwards and said,
That green tent over there
Our quest had begun. It was
to be a quest frought with peril,
danger and the foul aroma of col-
lards. But we would persevere.
We had not spent the balance
�of the day in Ayden, enjoying the
sights, sounds and nauseating
smells of the Nth Annual Ayden
iCollard Festival, to have our day
Iruined by simple lack of direction.
The ride to the festival had
not been without its own perils.
The four of us: the collard-loving
Earlvis, the collard-hating Bone-
head, the collard-ingesting
Spunky and Pete, the Original
.Collard Animal�, piled into
Jsomething we call The Prelude
Vith a Bra and set out for Ayden.
Our progress was impeded
by two huge, slavering Cujo
clones. These two dogs were ap-
proximately five feet tall at the
shoulder and had only one
thought burning in their feeble
minds � scratch through the
windows of the car and bite the
people inside on the ankle repeat-
edly.
Luckily, Preludes are quite a
bit faster than your average rabid
canine.
Parking was not a problem.
The railroad tracks provided
plenty of space, but every time we
heard a whistle, Pete began to
squirm nervously.
The Festival itself was quite
well, festive. Sort of a really, re-
ally, really, really scaled-down
version of the State fair, the main
difference being the pervasive
smell of collards.
Cooked collards. Boiled col-
lards. Stuffed collards. Collard
with seatbelts on. Collard juice.
Collards and ham. Barbeque col-
lards.
Collard cakes. Collard cook-
ies. Spam� and collards. Collards
and eggs. Collards in just about
any imaginable size, shape and
form.
We ate lunch at not one, but
two places. Then Spunky and i
saw the aforementioned Collard
Monsters. We took off in the gen-
eral direction the girl had pointed
in.
We saw not one but three
green tents. Upon entering the
last one, an exhibit of grenades,
guns, bumper stickers and other
deadly weapons, we found an
empty box.
Just ahead of us, a little girl in
pigtails and collard juice running
from her mouth walked away
with the last two Seatbelt-Wear-
ing Collard monsters. I fell into
despair.
The girl watched my face
screw up with tears. She walked
back and handed a Collard Mon-
ster to Spunky and saidHere.
Y'all can have this
So, with a vinegar-saturated
Pete, an interviewless Earlvis, a
happy Bonehead and full
Spunky, we headed back to the
car, where the radio would tell us
that ECU was getting beat by Vir-
ginia Tech in a pretty bad way.
My monster sits on top of my
computer now. I named him "Bla-
tant
This is a picture of last year's Expressions staff. Returning staff members include Reggie Dillahunt
general manager andValeria Lassiter, managing editor. Expressions is soon to release a special edition
issue in October. (Photo�Photofile)
Expressions broadens ECU minority voice
New Collard Eating champion
unbuttons shirt for victory
By TIM HAMPTON
i Editor
With unblinking eyes, Regi-
nald Dillahunt looks out of his
office window, off into the dis-
tances and over the blur of brick,
before pausing.
"We are out to broaden the
scope of ECU'S minority maga-
zine Dillahunt said of Expres-
sions, a student publication. As
the new general manager of Ex-
pressions, Dillahunt along with
managing editor Valeria Lassiter
feel they can accomplish some of
the goals set for the '8889 pro-
duction year.
In the first pages of a
Expression's summer edition, the
editorial staff defines the purpose
of the magazine as to provide "an
alternate voice�a voice to ad-
dress the special concerns and
problems of minority groups
Expressions defines minority
as "any student or group of stu-
dents that feels outside the 'main-
stream Purposive, Expressions
addresses the special concerns of
students belonging to specific
minority groups, the handi-
capped, International students,
according to the statement
But Dillahunt stresses that
Expressions is not only for mi-
norities. He said he welcomes all
students who wish to contribute
art work, opinion or stories to the
publication.
For this year, the general man-
ager is concerned with covering
campus events. Dillahunt said
Expressions now than ever will be
reporting activities related to
ECU students.
Expression's next edition
(which will be a special issue), to
be available sometime in October,
will feature Lee McNeil, an ECU
trackester now competing in the
Summer Olympics in Seoul, Ko-
rea.
Also in the October issue, the
magazine will have an article on
Dr. Larry Smith, ECU's first direc-
tor of minority affairs. For opin-
ion, Dillahunt said the publica-
tion will center its editorials on
the government, federal, state
and local, while taking a focus on
the minority angle of news events.
The October issue will be dedi-
cated to former Expressions gen-
eral manager, Gloria Chance. Dil-
lahunt credits Chance with the
transformation of the magazine
with "strong leadership and dedi-
cation which has set new stan-
dards for Expressions
The accomplishments Expres-
sions has made in the last two
years speak for themselves. It
won "Best of Show" honors from
American College Press in 1986.
Expression's spring edition of
1987 won the Scholastic Press
Association "First Place" overall
and "Best Cover" for an illustra-
tion by the great Shel ton Bryant.
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
AYDEN, N.C. (EP) � Johnny
Barrow did not have time to bask
in the limelight.
Instead, the newly crowned
1988 Collard Eating King, who
had just consumed four pounds of
the leafy-green vegetable, fleed
the 14th annual Ayden Col-
lard Festival for a more favorable
spot behind some bushes.
Midway through the 30 min-
ute eating contest on Saturday,
Barrow, a native of Grifton, found
the key to his success. He unbut-
toned his black shirt to allow for
more collard room.
But it took more than just an
unbuttoned shirt to guarantee his
victory. Fans cheered during the
last ten minutes of the contest as
Barrow moaned in between bites.
"Oh Lordy, I don't know if I
can take one more bite Barrow
said as he dug a plastic folk into
the last styofoam container.
After the contest, Ayden
mayor Marvin "Bear" Baldree
awarded Barrow with a trophy
and a $50 first prize as the new
king strutted around the wooden
stage with a protruding stomach
and a gaping smile.
But not long afterwards, Bar-
row jumped from the festival's
center stage and high tailed down
the railroad tracks in search of
relief.
Some of the more curious
members of the crowd of approxi-
mately 400 followed Barrow as he
detoured into a parking lot, while
others wondered if Barrow would
be disqualified for running off.
According to the official
Ayden Collard Festival Eating
Contest Rules, the winning con-
testant may leave after being
crowned.
More succintly put, rule num-
ber four states: "Must eat the most
in the 30-minute time limit, then
keep them down long enough to
receive the trophy and prize
money
Initially with ten contestants.
including two women and an
uniformed soldier, the eating race
started as one pound containers
of collards where placed on two
tables. Slabs of combread and
cups of teas were provided, but
according to rule number two
"the weight of neither will count
in the contest"
One by one, seven stomach-
holding contestants dropped
from the race leaving three collard
feasters. At one table, the soldier
and a man sporting a white hat
folked their way through three
and a half pounds a piece as Bar-
row slumped over the other table.
In attendance for the contest
was Mort Hurst who holds the
world's record for eating collards
at seven and a half pounds. Hurst,
from Roberson ville, wore a green
tee-shirt on stage which pro-
claimed "Collard Eating King
EP wondered if Barrow
would attempt to break Hurst's
record next year, but the 1968
collard chawing champ was
unavailable for comment
Miss America Pageant reinforces outdated sexual stereotypes
By SCOTT MAXWELL
In spring, a young man's idle
fancy turns to thoughts of love. By
contrast in fall, it turns to Chan-
nel 9 and the Miss America Pag-
eant
Every year around this time,
this symbol of overbearing osten-
tatiousness and stunning stupid-
ity graces the public airwaves.
Doesn't it ever occur to anyone
that all the money that was spent
on the glitz and glamor could
have been better spent on the
hungry and homeless?
Of course, the Miss America
pageant is not completely worth-
less. It does pay off in scholarship
to the young ladies who win. On
the other hand, it can hardly be
said (though it sometimes is) that
the Miss America Pageant pro-
motes education.
The Miss America Pageant
does, however, provide an oppor-
tunity for millions of American
males to look at lots of lovely la-
dies, and to do it in a completely
unthreatening environment. If s
even more socially accepted than
Playboy and its like (albeit more
demure).
One sure-fire formula for
success is to tell people what they
want to hear, and the Miss Amer-
ica Pageant tells one of the best
lies of all time. It reinforces the
prevalent typical-American-male
beliefs that (a) there is little of
value about any woman, except
for her body, and (b) good looks
make a good person.
Admittedly, many of the at-
tacks levelled at men by women
are accurate. Many men are slav-
ering, sex-starved microenceph-
alic semi-simians. Not all, and
fewer every year - yet many still
remain among The Unenlight-
ened. But given the picture that
the Miss America Pageant pres-
ents of women, who could expect
otherwise?
A common defense of the
Miss America Pageant is that Miss
America Does Great Things And
Promotes The General Welfare.
But be honest this is the Miss
America Pageant, not the Ambas-
sador to France Pageant
Of course, not all the contest-
ants are bubbleheads, either - in
fact, most of them aren't But the
side of mem most strongly em-
phasized (and virtually the only
side shown to the home viewer) is
the physical. And so they seem
like bubbleheads.
Miss Minnesota (now also
Miss America) actually seems to
be a good person, but how many
people noticed? She may very
well be a worthy recipient of a
$30,000 scholarship, but wiry
should she get it primarily be-
See PAGEANT, page 11
��t.







10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,1988
Excessive INXS, the top 40 inside,top 40 inside
By JEFF PARKER
Staff! lluatrat or
mixed in the studio twelve billowing clouds of artificial fog.
times But that couldn't be far- Among some of the most
ther from the truth. memorable performances of the
Michael Hutchence has night was the groups old hit,
one of the best singing voices in "Original Sin Early on they did a
Last Friday night the Dean
E. Smith Center held a capacity
crowd that flocked to Chapel Hill rock today, and it sounds even lively and soulful rendition of
for the INXS Calling All Nations better live. The bands' musical "Mystify In fact, there wasn't a
Tour. ability is nothing to be ignored substandard performance to bo
The show opened with either. One of the greater assets of found in any of their numbers. But
Ziggy Marley and the Melody the band is Kirk Tengilly and his there was a problem with these
Makers performing their unique saxophone playing. Unfortu- high-quality renditions, they
brand of reggae before INXS nately, he didn't play the sax very were just like the released ver-
"kick"ed off their performance. It much at all during the show, but sions. Very rarely did the group
was clear that the Australian band did a nice job on the "Mediate" do any of their songs differently
wanted to live up to the implica- solo and was at his best during the from the albums, which made
tions generated by the title of their solo in "Never Tear Us Apart
latest album, "Kick The bass The lighting of the con-
was cranked up to full force, caus- cert was very subtle and
ing teeth to chatter all throughout downplayed except for certain
the Deandome. moody numbers like "Devil In-
I have to admit I was side That seems to be the hip night occasionally playing to the
pleasantly surprised at the qual- thing now, not using a lot of light crowd by dropping to his knees
lty of the live sound. Two nights effects. The' didn't have any every so often. Eventually he
qualms arx using the smoke came out of his baggy white shirt
machine, ho er. I don't think to the delight of the girls near the
the people sittirgHehind the stage stage, in a way living up to his
got to see all of the show for the reputation as a psuedo-JimMorri-
sing-along easy, but hindered
some variety and expression on
the part of the group.
Hutchence swayed and
paraded around the stage all
earlier I had heard one of their
concerts broadcast on radio and
was in fear ofOh no, they're one
of those groups that have to be re-
son for the eighties, as he has been
likened to in the media. He did a
few kicks that would have made
David Lee Roth proud.
The group did a few tips
of the hat to their popular videos
throughout the concert. During
"Mediate they pulled out signs
with all the ate" words like they
drop in sync in the video, but for
this show INXS made souveniers
out of them and threw them to the
crowd. For the instrumental part
of "Devil Inside Tim Farriss
went offstage to reappear riding a
skateboard. It was pretty enter-
taining, since he almost crashed
into Hutchence, but it pleased two
young skatepunks in front of me
to no end, which irked me.
As I mentioned before,
the bass was putting out to capac-
ity for the whole show, which was
fairly effective. It did get over-
powering, though, during "Devil
Inside and obscured the lyrics
too much. Another problem was
the monotonous heavy drum
lead-injon Farris did to most of
the songs. That kind of thing is
only good for one or two times,
and they did it a little too much.
And they could have played
longer. My personal gripe was
that they never did one of their
first big (and in my opinion their
best) hits, "The One Thing I
think that was an expected encore
song that they should have done.
After the concert, WRDU played a
"concert flashback" of about six
INXS songs, one of which was
"The One Thing so evidently I
wasn't the only person expecting
it. As a matter of fact, they didn't
really plav much at all from SH-
ABOO-SHOOBAH.
Aside from those bits,
there was really little to complain
about "Listen Like Thieves" was
full of energy, and Hutchence and
Pengilly (on guitar this time)
came out to do the token ballad
like all bands donow, but they did
it well. INXS puts on a show on
par with almost any recording
artists thesodays, but they need to
watch out for straying away from
their underground roots to the
lures of the typical Top 40 pop
music scene. Their success is well-
deserved and I hope they never
compromise their music. They
didn't for "Calling All Nations a
concert worth the admission,
which is true praise considering
Ticketron prices.
Thought-provoking folk singer strums mall
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Suft Writer
Last week on the mall Rick
Hall, a Christian folk singer,
strummed the mellow sounds ot
Peter, Paul, and Mary mixed with
his own style of folk music during
the evening hours.
His thought-provoking music
was about everyday life, prob-
lems overlooked, greed eventu-
allv leading to nothing, the home-
less, and the Bible. One of his
songs, which caused a lot of reac-
tion was about "man and his shal-
low image of woman
Hall also reminded his listeners
of the image being projected by
the political campaigners. "Oh
we're doing great Hall sarcasti-
cally quotes the politicians. "But
two and a half million people are
homeless. Growth is great, but not
for the poor said Hall. His next
song reflected his thoughts, with
the reminder: "We better care
about each other if our town is
gonna grow.
As dusk set in. Hall's figure
was but a shadow amidst the illu-
mination of the stage. One man,
almost hippy-looking with his
pony-tail, old jeans and t-shirt,
and his guitar provided all the
sound necessary to create an at-
mosphere on the mall.
The guitar softly backed up his
strong voice as he sang of wars
and what they do to people per-
sonally; not just what people do
for their country. The verse, "Who
cares about the end of the world?"
was enough to create a chill and
keep playing over and over in
one's mind.
Hall said he was born and
raised in a rich suburb outside of
Philadelphia, and that that had a
great impact on what he now
does.
"My music reflects on relation-
ships with other people. I've
spent a lot of time talking about
the poor. I know, having seen the
other side of that (poverty), the
resources that are there. My music
just tries to play down the'let'sget
wealthy' attitude said Hall.
He noted a misinterpretation
about his Christian music. "When
people think of Christian music
he said, "they think of 'smile, God
loves ya My music reflects on
relationships with other people
He said he reaches out to
people in his ministry through
games and sing-a-longs. "I don't
want communities to be large
bodies of people who don't know
each other. My music tends to be
community oriented he said.
Hall attended the Union Theo-
logical Seminary in Richmond,
Va where he began to blend his
music with his ministry. He at-
tended the chapel services and
said to himself: "This is silly. I can
do one of these things and can do
it much better
He then began to write songs,
instead of sermons. He prepared
two singing chapel services every
year for five years. "Each time I
took the congregation a little bit
further. I had them dancing,
which was unheard of. It's been a
wild, wild trip
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By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Feature F.diror
Having until a quarter to two
a.m the music of In Decision
decisively pleased the near
packed crowd at the Attic Satur-
day night.
Mostly rye-died, the audience
grooved to the fluid, breeze-back
play of the four member band. A
set of Grateful Dead songs proved
to be the highlight of the evening.
Jamming with the Dead's "Eyes
of the World In Decision's lead
singer bled vocals between the
high pitched twangs of the two
battling six strings and a jumping
bass. The band more than
adequately matched the patented
high string play of the Dead's
quitars.
Other Dead Head songs in-
cluded'n Franklin's Tower"
which In Decision played to the
satisfaction of Greenville's Dead
faithful.
"I was so glad they played 'Eyes
of the World it's one of my favor-
ite songs said a sweat drenched
Ashley Dal ton.
One of the biggest crowd pleas-
ers of the night proved to be a
rendition of The Guess Who's
"No Sugar Tonight Swaying to
the words of the song, the audi-
ence helped out with
'aasiakJraJJafaNdMaJfaNa
Another jammer was the
band's greenlighting of Traffic's
"Dear Mister Fantasy They also
played "Givemethebigboys who
freed my souls, I wanna get losted
in your rock and roll and slipped
away
During an instrumental, both
battling quitar players simply got
off. The twin quitarists split the
lead during the beginning of the
piece before forging together in
timed sincopation as they fin-
gered mirrored riffs. Bravo.
In Decision also played Led
Zep's "Hey, hey what can I say" as
the drummer thumped the ram-
ming intro.
Besides one short break, the
band entertained for about two
hours. After fanatical fans beat
their fists on the stage floor. In
Decision returned for one encore.
"1 have seen In Decision six
timesand withouta doubt tonight
was their best show Dalton said
as the jubilant crowd filed out oi
the Attic.
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Student Union
Coming Attractions
r
�' ' " ' "
1 1Q I i (tt I 1 Q I � ft) I L? I LJQJ
c o
R T
H
T
in
Wednesday. September 148:00 p.m. Hendrix
FRANTIC
Thursday. September 15 -
Sunday. September 188:00 p.m. Hendrix
MOONSTRUCK
Friday. September 168:00 p.m. Underground
CAMPUS COMEDIANS
v.
To sign-up or for more information Contact the
Student Union at 757-6611, ext. 210 - Room 236
Upcoming Events:
Lecture - Slide Presentation - "American Pictures"
By Jacob Holdt - Tuesday. September 20
SEPT. 16
7:00 p.m.
Squirrel Man Hotline
757-6366
JENKINS ART AUDITORIUM
SPONSORED BY
CAMPUS CHALLENGE
Special Event - RANDEE OF THE REDWOODS
Tuesday. September 27
RCACHMG OUT TO SCRVf OU
Page
Continued from page
cause of her body? N
gave Mother Theresa a S
scholarship.
And on that sub
there no similar paj
rewards people u
good people7 Admittedly,
more difficult to n
harder to see) than is p
tractiveness - there is (belie
not) debate on whether bo
abortion clinics is really
thing to do-but even �
can be overcome
The biggest r
there's no such
nobody would �
90 of the average m
attention is focus
program, the imsu I
tion. (You don't thir -
Miss America
ered on radio?)
I have even -
America Pageant h
piece ot Good Cli
Without laur,
on that insipid
onecountere
I worked
stage stuff) for a loc i
Pageant 'the V
eant in Serr.ir, -la
years runnir
tion with it alon
Opry veter
NASHVILLE
Grand Ole
Reeves is a sing -
musician, impressn
ist, television star ai
recently thought about a:
priate epitaph
"I want to be re j
great showman and a nic
he said m a rare surj
ness. "That's all I
The angular
year-old performer e r
about 1 million p
one of the m st
the Grand Ole Oprv
live countrv mus
He's been appear ng
show for 22 yeai
childhood vision as
the youngest oi 11 s
Sparta, N.C.
jea � c Oj
� . - � jn-$aturdav nif
he
it was the ultimate
interview. "As a chi
daddy I was goin I -
Opry one da v. He -
sure you are. 1 k
mind and in '66 we
He's cum rtl inv
several projects in I
album entitled "Oprv Lej
He and fellow Oprv su
Little Jimmy Dickens
an album whose proceed:
toward an Oprv retiremei
"Id like to see this b
cess for mv fellow mar
said. "I'll do everything
make it a success. I'd like
that accomplished more
No. 1 record.
PEPSI PLA1
lOE BRIGHT THI
H( I
East Carolina vs Virg
tackles, one for a 3 and
PERSONAL INFORM A
undecided on his major
he c
CONGRATULATION:
MUCH





I
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,1988 11
nside
side trom those bits,
really little to complain
l isten I ike Thieves" was
iergy,and Hutchenceand
(on guitar this time)
v to do the token ballad
ands donow, but they did
s puts on a show on
h almost any recording
wse days, but they need to
kit tor straying away from
derground roots to the
It he typical Top 40 pop
L r�e Vheir success is well-
v. and I hope they never
se their music. They
Calling AH Nations a
rth the admission,
I - true praise considering
KOF
. nancy Tost Birth
rjon,
- twee m and 5
OMEN'S HEALTH
MMIZATIONS
Oyster Bax
a
Night
S3.65
rimp
late
�j7 TO;
ov
u.
w � � ' ' '
&Q LQJ
endrix
idrix
Underground
.NS
mtact the
Room 236
in Pictures"
ber 20
Pageant agent of inequality
Continued from page 9
cause of her body? Nobody ever
gave Mother Theresa a $30,000
scholarship.
And on that subject, why is
there no similar pageant that
rewards people who are simply
good people? Admittedly, this is
more difficult to measure (and
harder to see) than is physical at-
tractiveness - there is (believe it or
not) debate on whether bombing
abortion clinics is really a bad
thing to do - but even that obstacle
can be overcome.
The biggest reason why
there's no such pageant is that
nobody would watch. Let's face it,
90 of the average male viewer's
attention is focused on 10 of the
program: the swimsuit competi-
tion. (You don't think so? Is the
Miss America Pageant ever cov-
ered on radio?)
1 have even heard the Miss
America Pageant held up as a
piece of Good Clean Americana.
Without launching a major attack
on that insipid idea, here is just
one counterexample.
I worked (lighting and back-
stage stuff) for a local qualifying
Pageant (the Miss Seminole Pag-
eant in Seminole, Florida) for two
years running. (Heck, my associa-
tion with it alone would disqual
ify it as Good and Clean.) During inequality,
that time, I gathered much evi- (It is worth noting, parcn-
dence (circumstantial, but very thetically, that many women
very strong) that the contest was seem to think that sexual equality
disappearance would be a symbol
of the triumph of sexual equality
only if it disappeared due to disin-
terest in it and not due to censor-
rigged - or, more accurately, po- means women's being able to ogle ship. Otherwise, its disappear-
� i a itu i-� �, : tlr fickinn that mon anm wnnW Ivrnmp A Svmbol of
ance would become a symbol of
the triumph of repressive and
fascistic tactics.
Second, its focus might be
radically different. The personal-
ity and inner beauty of the con-
testants would be given more
actual consideration than would
litical. And I would be very sur- men in the same fashion that men
prised if this were true only at the ogle women. While that does in-
local level. deed indicate equality, it isn't the
For good or for ill (mostly for best type of equality. It reduces
ill) the media strongly influence women to the men's level rather
the way we think. Watching the than bringing the men up.
Miss America Pageant leaves men (But then, we're all human;
feeling safe from women and un- weallenjoyogling.It'snot wrong,
threatened by them. Women are exactly, but it does tend to reduce their looks, as opposed to the cur
shown just as most men want the ogled to the status of mere rent policy of tolerating, just for
them to be - pretty playthings, things in the eyes of the oglcrs. show, everything other than the
"dolls" in the Ibsenian sense. And I don't think that's quite swimsuit competition.
Of course, much the same what the women's lib movement In fact, this may be beginning,
might be said of all the spinoff was aiming for.) The Pageant officials have elimi-
competitions - Mr. America, Mrs. There are those (primarily, nated the "derierre turn" as being
America, and Mr. Gay America, though not exclusively, feminists) degrading to women. It's not
just to name a few. There are all who think that a part of the solu- much but then, the longest jour-
kinds of such divisions and tion to the problem of sexual ine- ney begins with a single step,
pageants - from infant to elderly, quality is to get rid of pageants. And, I have been informed, TV
of all sexes and denominations On the contrary: the Miss Amer- Guide reports that Pageant offi-
and all the other artificial pigeon- ica Pageant, a symbol of outdated cialsare "bringing the Miss Amer-
holes into which we stuff each sexual attitudes, wfll one day be ica Pageant into the 21st century
other. the agent of its own destruction. Third, and most intriguing, it
These others notwithstand- You see, the best function of might no longer be separate from
ing, the Miss America Pageant is the Miss America Pageant is as a the other pageants. There might
the biggest, the best-known and barometer (or perhaps a ther- be an integrated pageant mvolv-
mometer) of social attitudes to- ing contestants of both sexes and
wards women. When at long last of all ages and races. This would
sexual equality has been estab- be the true mark of sexual and
lished, the Miss America Pageant racial equality: it wouldbehuman
will reflect it in one of three ways: equality.
First, it might be gone. But its Someday
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WRIGHT ANNEX, RM 312
919-757-6598
Leadership Excellence Starts Here
the most widely watched of all.
And it deserves the most attention
here - it is, after all, at the center of
what debate there is about the
merits of pageants and it is most
often cited as a symbol of sexual
Opry veteran sings, writes, acts , does it all
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)
Grand Ole Opry veteran Del
Reeves is a singer, songwriter,
musician, impressionist, humor-
ist, television star and actor. He
recently thought about an appro-
priate epitaph.
"I want to be remembered as a
great showman and a nice guy,
He's formed a production and light material early in his
company within the past year to career when he found those more
help aspiring singers record their to his liking than ballads,
songs and get professional advice "I couldn't really sell a ballad,
without being ripped off. He It had to be material on the lighter
wears a ring commemorating the side. Under this clown's face,
Opry's 50th birthday and hopes there's a serious guy. But I never
someone he takes under his expe- got to show it because I got tagged
rienced wing will eventually get as that clown. I've been clowning
NOW SHOWING
AT HENDRIX
Wednesday September 14
fe�n�su o rS- �� Oprs ,&,h birthday ri as .ong as .can re�
iicaaiuiiioiu b ,��� fknm tn crPf that nno Onpof thebreeziersone:
ness. "That's all I could hope for.
The angular, amiable 54-
year-old performer entertains
about 1 million people a year as
one of the most popular acts on
the Grand Ole Opry, a 62-year-old
live country music show.
I want them to get that ring One of the breezier songs was
and say, T)el Reeves helped me his recent recording, 'Dear Dr.
. J . � 1-X .1 St 1 a
get this" he said
Reeves is especially known to
Opry fans for his impressions of
actors like jimmy Stewart and
Walter Brennan and fellow coun
He's been appearing on the try stars Johnny Cash, Roy Acuff,
show for 22 years, fulfilling a Hank Snow and Dickens,
childhood vision as he grew up "I'd try these out on the band
on the road he recalled. "If they
the
Ruth about sex counselor Ruth
Westheimer.
He appeared on her televi-
sion show to talk about country
music and recalled the effect his
humor had on her: "She fell
plumb off that little box she sits
on.
Reeves, named after Franklin
"A heart-stopping
thriller In the
Hitchcock style
- rat Collins WWOR-TV
HARRISON
FORD
FRANTIC
m

t
DILLON
KALKHURST
FOR
SENIORS CLASS PRESIDENT
Student Government Legislature (3 years)
Student Government Presidential Cabinet
Student Government Screens and Appointments Committee
- Intramural Recreational Center Committee
� Past President, Treasurer, Chaplain of Pi Kappa Phi
ECU. Canvassing and Solicitation Committee
� Chancellor Eakin's Campus Beautification Committee
� Intra-Fraternity Council Vice-President, Secretary
Broadcast - Communications Major
E.C.U. Facilities Committee
EXPERIENCE THAT COUNTS!
BRING VALID ECU. STUDENT ID. TO VOTE WED. SEPT 14
vrmmrest of 11 siblines in on the road, nerecanea. urney iwf.�uu����.
� NC laughed1 knew I had it. it's been Delano Roosevelt, began singing
Sparta, N.C
?IKtthed (to the Dory) on a lot of hard work. I spent a lot of . and playingcuitar as a small bo
iffituv niSS and doing (perfecting) them. By the time he was 12, he wa�
SSSS "I starteTputting these to- playing with a band on a regula.
was
putting these to- playing with a band on a regular
nr-urtoldmy gether in RenoF and Las Vegas. Saturday radio show
interview. As a en id, 1 toia my & preareDeoDie there who have He had four brothers in
daddy I was going to sing on the J! roulette World War II and they left their
wheel or whatever. They give guitars at home to serve their
them two free drinks, and you'd country. He began playing them
better entertain them and gradually became proficient.
He admires the impressions He's recorded nine No. 1 rec-
of Rich Little and envies the time ords and two dozen made the top
Little apparently has to concen- 10 of the country music charts. He
Opry one day. He said, 'Yeah,
sure you are I kept my goal in
mind and in '66 we achieved it
He's currently involved in
several projects, including an
album entitled "Opry Legends
He and fellow Opry stars like
Little Jimmy Dickens will record
an album whose proceeds will go
toward an Opry retirement fund.
"I'd like to see this be a suc-
cess for my fellow man Reeves
said. "I'll do everything I can to
make it a success. I'd like to see
that accomplished more than a
No. 1 record
trate on them. and Bobby Goldsboro were duet
"He's darned good. He's had partners at one time
more time to rehearse and prac-
tice them than me. I had to learn
2,000 songs plus do impersona-
tions. He doesn't do (Johnny)
Cash too good, but the rest are
fantastic
Reeves turned to impressions
In the late 1960s, Reeves had
his own syndicated TV show.
VOTE DEAN WILKINS
for Freshman Class
PRESIDENT
Wednesday, September 14
PEPSI PLAYER OF THE WEEK
JOE BRIGHT, THIS WEEKS PLAYER OF THE WEEK
HOMETOWN-Chesapeake, Va.
I East Carolina vs Virginia Tech- Against the Hokies, Joe was in on 51
tackles, one for a 3 yard loss, and had 2 fumble recoveries from his
end position.
PERSONAL INFORMATION- Joe is a Red Shirt Freshman who is
undecided on his major. He is the son of Joe and Etta Bright, and
he enjoys lifting weights.
CONGRATULATIONS TO JOE BRIGHT, FROM PEPSICOLA.
MUCH CONTINUED SUCCESS.
GO!
PEPSI
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Its all at University Book Exchange, downtown
Greenville the one for the tans Stop by tod.n
Open Football Saturdays 9:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.Ateekdays 9:00 A.M. - 5:30 P.M.
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville





12
THE EASTCAROI INl.W
SEPTEMBER 1 ll)s.s
Fans worship Elvis to death
IOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (AP) pictures ot the thousands wno history has gotten people to put excitement. And there c
Manv Elvis Preslev fans feel re- descend on the mansion every tattoos of them on their bodies?" middle-class women who gr
IOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (AP)
Main Eh is Preslev fans feel re
sponsible tor his death and con
tinue to worship him because
they relate to his painful lite, savs
a North Carolina photojournalist
bitten in his own way by the
Treslev bug.
Ralph Burns treks to Mem
phis most years from his home in
Asheville, C to photograph
and interview Presle admirersas
they mourn their hero at
Craceland each Aug. 16.
' To his fans, the common
theme is that Elvis Presley lived
tor a reason and indeed did give
his lite tor a purpose he said
Burns said he tirst headed to
Craceland in 1978 for the first
anniversary ot Presley's death.
He's been going back ever since to
of the thousands wno
on the mansion every
year.
"In some strange sense ot
emotion manv ot the fans believe
they are partially responsible tor
Elvis having lost his life, that is by
giving him the adulation and by
forcing him into a very narrow
world with no exits' Bums slid.
1 hev teel they took their love
and forced him back into him-
self
Burns said the fans he has
interviewed don't consider their
devotion to Preslev a religion. But
he believes the Preslev myth in-
cludes a "religious wrapping" of
the fans through their unyielding
love and such rituals as the can-
dlelight procession to his grave on
the death anniversary.
stand bv Presley's erave and snap "1 low manv other people in
history has gotten people to put
tattoos of them on their bodies?"
Burns said. "1 mean, I can't think
of anybody personally
Much of the media have not
been fair to Presley fans, said
Burns, 44, who owns a photogra-
phy store in Asheville.
"The emphasis is on the per-
verse aspects. Not many in the
press take the time to really talk to
them or try to understand this,
and think, 'What does this say
about all of us? Burns said.
One woman Burns inter-
viewed asked whv he was inter-
ested. "I'm not obese and I don't
have a tattoo the woman told
him.
Not all Preslev fans are the
same, he said. There are
"weirdos" who flock to
Craceland for the attention and
excitement. And there are
middle-class women who grew
up in the sanitized, conservative
1950s with an emotional attach-
ment that stems from an untamed
sensuality they had little opportu-
nity to express as young people,
Burns said.
'This guy expressed proba-
bly every emotion that one would
encounter in a romantic, sexual
relationship he said.
The true Preslev fans, mean-
ing the ones who would "crawl
over the coals for this man relate
to his meager bovhood in Tupelo,
Miss , and the "pressure of exis-
tence" that led to hisdnig-taking,
marital problems and eventual
death, Burns said.
"One of the things Elvis fans
really understand is human
frailty he said.
SPORTSWORLD
EVERY TUESDAY
NTTE IS COLLEGE NITE 8-11
ONLY $2.00
ADMISSION WITH COU.ECE ID
.75 SKATE RENTAL
04E REDBANKSRD � GREENVILLE N � ' 6001
it.iiii' "v i iinv i uni anu ?iuu � ,x � � v �. . . K�,V.� � v � � - � ,
Fats Domino still on Blueberry Hill
TAYLORVIl 1.1 111. (AP)
Music fans parked their cars near
a soybean field, then walked past
a 1958 Chevy and through the
front doors to hear rock n roll
legend Fats Domino.
lust another weekend at
Nashville North.
This down home theater is
400 miles from its namesake, but
Nashville North attracts some of
the nation's top musical enter-
tainers, from Loretta Lynn nd
Tennessee Ernie lord to Bon ovi
and Fabian.
And it packs in the people.
"1 love it because it's close bv
and they have great entertainers
said Sue Norman of Urbana, who
often makes the 75-mile drive. "1
was surprised. 1 thought it would
be old and dump)
Still, Nashville North - lo-
cated in south-central Illinois,
southeast ot Springfield - is a tar
cry from the Los Angeles Forum.
The brick-and-metal building
opened in 1976. From the outside,
it could pass as a carpet store or
union hall.
But inside, ov ners Leroy and
Terry Harris give customers what
they want, music.
"1 just love to play and I'm
glad the people love us said
urtino relaxing in a small room
between two Sunday night
shows
Nashville North has 1,168
seats on a sloping concrete floor
facing the small stage.
The walls are covered with
framed ads tor area businesses
like Skyway Motors and
Richard's Towing. A huge sign
with glittering letters hangs on
the back of the stage proclaiming:
"Nashville North
Ushers patrol the aisles
hawking cartons oi popcorn and
cupsofsoda pop. No alcohol is al-
lowed.
"My customers just want to
Ciime here and enjoy the music
without worrying about some-
body getting rowdy or dumping a
beer down their back said Har-
ris, who took over the theater in
1985
A blues band from nearby
Decatur warms up the crowd,
then Domino and his 12-piece
band arrive bv bus from Milwau-
kee
Fans crowd around the front
oi the stage taking pictures as
Domino performs his chart-pop-
ping hits from the 1 3(.s: "Blue-
berry Hill "I'm In Love Again"
and "Ain't That A Shame
The band marches through
the theater, and Domino gets a
standing ovation as he bumps the
Join Doug Johnson every Tuesday And Thursday for the
best in Pirate Sports coverage. Only in The Past Carolinian.
LUNCH SPECIAL
MONSAT.
11AM-3PM
pl7
- 4 oz. Sirloin
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Salad Bar
Hot Bar
Sundae Bar
$4.49
I
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10 Discount on
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I With Student I.D.
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TAKE-OUTS OKAY
piano across the stage with his
stomach while doing his closing
song.
"1 play mv music the same
way because people expect it to
sound exactly the way it does on
the radio said Domino, whose
road schedule would take him to
Indianapolis the following day.
"I'vebeen traveling40years. I )ust
feel better when I'm performing
1 larris said Domino is one ot
170 acts he has brought to Nash-
ville North. Manv stop in Taylor-
ville on the way from one big city
to another.
"We pay a very good price
said Harris. "Instead of a band
sitting in a motel, they get $25,000
and perform at Nashville North
1 larris, who bought the thea-
ter alter two previous operators
failed, kept his job as a truck
Iriver with United Parcel Service
until he was sure his venture
would succeed.
One key, he said, is wearing
many hats to save money. 1 larris,
J5, picks groups, handles the fi-
nances, unloads the equipment,
runs the sound system, intro-
duces performers, and thanks
customers as they leave.
His wife, Terry, handles
ticket sales and often cooks a
snack for the stars to eat between
shows.
Thev soon hope to develop a
20,000-seat outdoor theater to at-
tract even bigger entertainers, but
it will not replace Nashville
North.
This theater is like one of
our four children - we love it and
we'd do anything for it Harris
said.
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes
Students To Come By And See
Our 2 Bedroom and 1 Bedroom
Garden Apartments.
�Fully Carpeted
�Large Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyers Market ffl 1 RlviTltfCl
Memorial Drive " �Villg3
I
Open
Monday-Saturdpy 10-9
Sundav 1 -6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Aigner. Nike and Reebok)
i i i
APPLICATIONS
BEING
ACCEPTED FOR
Advertising Layout
Technicians
and
Darkroom Technicians
Experience A Plus!
Apply at The East Carolinian
Publications Building - 2nd floor
(In front ofJoyner Library)
L
J 2903 E. 10th St. - 758-2712
fJlT, Structural Engineering. University � Virginia, Fi- Uc Santa Cruz. Marine Biol- Universitv � Michigan. MBA
Analyzin j m I lesigning nance. Studies fluctuating ogy. Itudu candidate isted
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analyze structural stress and Exchange The HP-12C with I . � HI 22S h i i I fl ws in I :� � . . nt
geometry It's the only calcu- RPN lets him analyze prices equati n library with lv : in . idget u I fore :asts
lator that lets him do both sy V Xfp m m H V 1 Y TWft �y�
bohc algebra and calculi. AVvJW XjLVslllVs V tJA l3 111
Heavy Metal, Swing, Blues H
matrix math and graphics cap- �-� -r -J w n " !W A W
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programming. With more than internal rate of return He can : mm nly used - .
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both RPN and algebraic entry, programs. The HP- 12C j th tn u :� A I We never stop asking "What if
the HP 28S is the ultimate sci established I mdard in fi i VXI HEWLETT
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1M 1 tFld" 171





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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,1988
Fans worship Elvis to death
JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (AP)
- Many Elvis Presley fans feel re-
sponsible for his death and con-
tinue to worship him because
they relate to his painful life, says
a North Carolina photojournalist
bitten in his own way by the
Presley bug.
Ralph Burns treks to Mem-
phis most years from his home in
Asheville, N.C to photograph
and interview Presley admirers as
they mourn their hero at
Graceland each Aug. 16.
"To his fans, the common
theme is that Elvis Presley lived
for a reason and indeed did give
his life for a purpose he said.
Burns said he first headed to
Graceland in 1978 for the first
anniversary of Presley's death.
pictures of the thousands who history has gotten people to put
descend on
year.
the mansion every
'In some strange sense of
emotion many of the fans believe
they an? partially responsible for
tattoos of them on their bodies?'
Burns said. "I mean, I can't think
of anybody personally
Much of the media have not
been fair to Presley fans, said
Elvis having lost his life, that is by Bums, 44, who owns a photogra-
giving him the adulation and by phy store in Asheville.
forcing him into a very narrow "The emphasis is on the per-
world with no exits Burns said, verse aspects. Not many in the
"They feel they took their love press take the time to really talk to
and forced him back into him- them or try to understand this,
self and think, 'What does this say
Bums said the fans he has about all of us? Burns said,
interviewed don't consider their One woman Burns inter-
devotion to Presley a religion. But viewed asked why he was inter-
he believes the Presley myth in-
cludes a "religious wrapping" of
the fans through their unyielding
love and such rituals as the can-
dlelight procession to his grave on
He's been going back ever since to the death anniversary
stand bv Preslev's erave and snap "How manv other people in
ested. "I'm not obese and I don't
have a tattoo the woman told
him.
Not all Presley fans are the
same, he said. There are
"weirdos" who flock to
Graceland for the attention and
excitement. And there are
middle-class women who grew
up in the sanitized, conservative
1950s with an emotional attach-
ment that stems from an untamed
sensuality they had little opportu-
nity to express as young people,
Burns said.
'This guy expressed proba-
bly every emotion that one would
encounter in a romantic, sexual
relationship he said.
The true Presley fans, mean-
ing the ones who would "crawl
over the coals for this man relate
to his meager boyhood in Tupelo,
Miss and the "pressure of exis-
tence" that led to his drug-taking,
marital problems and eventual
death, Burns said.
"One of the things Elvis fans
really understand is human
frailty he said.
Fats Domino still on Blueberry Hill
TAYLORVILLE, 111. (AP) - shows.
Music fans parked their cars near Nashville North has 1,168
a soybean field, then walked past seats on a sloping concrete floor
a 1958 Chevy and through the facing the small stage.
front doors to hear rock 'n' roll
legend Fats Domino.
Just another weekend at
Nashville North.
This down-home theater is
400 miles from its namesake, but
Nashville North attracts some of
the nation's top musical enter-
tainers, from Loretta Lynn and
Tennessee Ernie Ford to Bon Jovi
and Fabian.
And it packs in the people.
"I love it because it's close by
and they have great entertainers
said Sue Norman of Urbana, who
often makes the 75-mile drive. "I
was surprised. I thought it would
be old and dumpy
Still, Nashville North - lo-
cated in south-central Illinois,
southeast of Springfield - is a far
The walls are covered with
framed ads for area businesses
like Skyway Motors and
Richard's Towing. A huge sign
piano across the stage with his
stomach while doing his closing
song.
"I play my music the same
way because people expect it to
sound exactly the way it does on
the radio said Domino, whose
road schedule would take him to
with glittering letters hangs on Indianapolis the following day.
the back of the stage proclaiming: "I've been traveling 40 years. I just
"Nashville North feel better when I'm performing
Ushers patrol the aisles Harris said Domino is one of
hawking cartons of popcorn and 170 acts he has brought to Nash-
cups of soda pop. No alcohol is al- ville North. Many stop in Taylor-
lowed, ville on the way from one big city
"My customers just want to to another,
come here and enjoy the music "We pay a very good price
without worrying about some- said Harris. "Instead of a band
body getting rowdy or dumping a si tting in a motel, they get $25,000
beer down their back said Har-
ris, who took over the theater in
1985.
A blues band from nearby
Decatur warms up the crowd,
then Domino and his 12-piece
cry from the Los Angeles Forum, band arrive by bus from Milwau-
The brick-and-metal building kee.
opened in 1976. From the outside,
it could pass as a carpet store or
union hall.
But inside, owners Leroy and
Terry Harris give customers what
they want: music.
"I just love to play, and I'm
glad the people love us said
Domino, relaxing in a small room
Fans crowd around the front
of the stage taking pictures as
Domino performs his chart-pop-
ping hits from the 1950s: "Blue-
berry Hill "I'm In Love Again"
and "Ain't That A Shame
The band marches through
the theater, and Domino gets a
and perform at Nashville North
Harris, who bought the thea-
ter after two previous operators
failed, kept his job as a truck
iriver with United Parcel Service
until he was sure his venture
would succeed.
One key, he said, is wearing
many hats to save money. Harris,
35, picks groups, handles the fi-
nances, unloads the equipment,
runs the sound system, intro-
duces performers, and thanks
customers as they leave.
between two Sunday night standing ovation as he bumps the
Join Doug Johnson every Tuesday and Thursday for the
best in Pirate Sports coverage. Only in The East Carolinian.
APPLICATIONS
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ADKIMION WITH COLLSOS IJ�.
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His wife, Terry, handles
ticket sales and often cooks a
snack for the stars to eat between
shows.
They soon hope to develop a
20,000-seat outdoor theater to at-
tract even bigger entertainers, but
it will not replace Nashville
North.
This theater is like one of
our four children - we love it and
we'd do anything for it Harris
said.
Riverbluff
Apartments
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WR3W





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 13, 1988 Page 13
Pirates meet defeat at hands of Hokies
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Saturday's game with the
Hokies of Virginia Tech was one
of missed opportunities for the
Pirates, on offense as well as de-
fense, as they dropped their first
game of the season 27-16.
The Pirates drove the ball
down inside the Tech 30 yard line
seven times, but they were able to
convert on three of these occa-
sions, twice for touchdowns and
once on a field goal.
Tech won the toss, and took
the ball at their own 20. In a varied
offensiveattack, the Hokies drove
the length of the field in a sus-
tained drive to draw first blood
when running back Jon Jeffries
crossed the goal line on a three
vard sprint. Tech added the extra
point, and the Hokies took an
early 7-0 lead.
ECU opened their first drive
with a 30 yard pass completion
from Travis hunter to Al Whiting,
who was voted as the offensive
player of the game. The Pirates
were unable to move the ball on
the ground, but Hunter kept the
drive alive on an 18 yard scramble
on a broken pass play. After more
failed running attempts, Hunter
dropped back to pass, and, under
pressure, threw an interception to
a Hokie player, turning the ball
over.
On their next series, both
squads stalled, unable to get the
necessary yardage. The Pirates
were forced to punt, but got the
ball back three plays later when
Robert Jones forced a fumble, and
Junior Robinson recovered on the
Tech 21 yard line. Three plays
later, Hunter connected on a
scrambling pass to Walter
Wilson, who made a finger tip
catch in the corner of the end zone.
Imperato added the extra point,
tying the score 7-7 with 8:55 re-
maining in the first half.
The Hokies responded in suit,
taking Imperato's kick-off and
returning it 28 yards to their own
33. Led by their young quarter-
back Will Furrer, the Hokies
drove the field in another long,
time consuming drive, ending
with Jeffries second score of the
half, a five yard sprint off the right
side. The extra point was good,
boosting the Hokies to a 14-7 lead
with 4:27 remaining in the half.
Furrer went 13 Of 18 on the day for
158 yards.
Again, the Pirates were
unable to move the ball on a
tough, scrappy Tech defense, and
they were forced to punt to the
Hokies. Engineering another long
drive, consisting of 11 plays,
down to the ECU 11 yard line
before stalling under the pressure
of the Pirate defense. Chris Kinzer
came on the field for the Hokies

�V � -
i - V , ,�
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: jte
and kicked a 28 yard field goal
with :09 remaining, giving Tech a
17-7 half time lead.
The halftime statistics told a
tale of their own. Virginia Tech
amassed 17 first downs, com-
pared to only seven for ECU. Tech
gained 159 yards on the ground,
while ECU managed only 42
yards. Passing yardage was about
equal, 76 yards for Tech and 66 for
ECU. Total yardage for Tech and
ECU was 235 and 108 yards, re-
pectively. Time of possession was
decidely in Tech's favor, with a
5:18 difference.
The Pirates had the ball to
begin the second half, and they
looked like they had come out of
the lockeroom ready to play foot-
ball. Tim James took the ball up
the gut for a 10 yard gain on the
first play from scrimmage, and
Reggie McKinney followed with a
16 yard burst. Helped along by a
15 yard personal foul penalty on
the Hokies, the Pirates drove the
ball to the Tech 22 before stalling.
Imperato came in to try a 44 yard
field goal, but it drifted wide, and
ECU came away empty.
The Hokies answered the
ECU drive with one of their own,
with one distinct difference. They
drove the ball from their own 22
down to the the ECU five in 12
plays before the defense tough-
ened and stopped them. Kinzer
came on and connected on his
second field goal of the afternoon,
22 yarder with 6:42 remaining in
the third quarter, giving the Hok-
ies a 20-7 edge.
ECU answered in turn on
their next possession, when McK-
inney took the Kinzer kick-off and
returned it 55 yards to the Tech 33.
The Pirates kept the ball on the
ground, grinding out 20 yards on
carries by James, Hunter, and
Denell Harper. The drive stalled
at the thirteen, and the Pirates
were forced to settle for a 29 yard
Imperato field goal with 4:01 left
in the third, cutting the Hokie lead
to 20-10.
On Tech's next series, they
gave the Pirates the opportunity
that they were looking for when
Joe Bright recovered a Hokie
fumble on the ECU 44 yard line
with approximately four minutes
remaining in the quarter. How-
ever, they were unable to capital-
ize when, two plays later, Hunter,
under pressure from a storming
Tech defense, threw an intercep-
tion at the Hokie 44, his second on
the day.
Neither team was able to
capitalize on the other's mistakes,
and the two traded the ball for the
remainder of the third period.
The Pirates had the ball to
begin the final period, but were
again unable to move it, with the
Hokies stopping many of the Pi-
rate option plays in the backfield.
The Pirates were forced to punt,
and John Jett, who had been doing
See PIRATES, page 14
Junior Robinson confers with Coach Bell after the defense came off the field in Saturday's
contest with the Hokies. The defense gave up 434 yards to the Hokies. (Photo SID).
IRS crowns kings
IRS- Over 400 participants
took part in the first annual King
of the Hill Competition held on
College Hill last week. The com-
petition pitted residence hall
against residence hall in 8 com-
petitive and crazy events de-
signed strictly for participation
purposes. Sponsored by Intramu-
ral-Recreational Services.
Participants enjoyed refresh-
ments from Pepsi-Cola and pop-
corn donated by Dining Services
as well as a mix of popular tunes
blending in with fun and excite-
ment of the day. The event offered
basketball, sand volleyball, tennis
doubles, mini basketball, quarter-
back pass, hoop the human, giant
twister and the finale tug-o-war.
Aycock residence hall lead
the men's residence hall division
in winning tickets up to the last
half hour of play when Bclk sud-
denly took the lead. Within min-
utes, the men of Aycock once
again pulled away in the ticket
court as well as total participation
numbers.
Tyler residence hall over-
powered the ladies from Jones
and Belk with a 645 ticket total
that kept them way above both
male and female residence halls.
Winning ticket resident halls
battled it out for the finale tug-o-
war event. Aycock pulled against
a strong Belk squad while Tyler
pulled against a mix of Jones and
Belk females. The Tyler ladies
took only a minute to dust off the
other combination as they walked
away with t-shirt honors. Aycock
struggled momentarily, but
gained a substantial lead with the
cheerful aid of spectators stand-
ing by. Aycock hall, a large per-
centage of whom are freshmen,
pulled Belk into the ground and
captured the finale event.
Winners of the overall King of
the Hill competition received a
crown for display in the winning
residence hall while Queen of the
Hill recipients took home a jew-
eled Septor. For the overall
crowning, Aycock narrowly de-
feated Belk residence hall by a 15
percent to 12 percent margin of
overall participants. Jones resi-
dence hall and Scott followed suit.
In the ladies race, Tyler
walked away with the Queen of
the Hill championship with a 24
percent residence hall participa-
tion mark. Belk followed with 13
percent. The event was a huge
success. Plans for the future in-
clude a "Best of the West" compe-
tition for West Campus residents
and a "Hall of Them All" for all
campus recreational fun.
DMA RECKS INTRAMU-
RAL TOP PICKS
FLAG FOOTBALL
MEN: 1. Funk Brothers, 2. Pi
Kappa Phi 'A 3. Scott Sob-C
Hurricanes, 4. The Heart Founda-
tion, 5. The Alcoholics, 6. Belk
Bums, 7. Kappa Sigma 'A and 8.
Fried City Gang.
WOMEN: 1. Silver Bullet, 2.
Zeta Tau Alpha, and 3. Enforcers.
CO-REC SOFTBALL
1. The Syndicate, 2. D&P
Stoners, 3. Our Prerogative, 4.
Mayberry All-Stars, and 5.
Mudhens.
Denell Harper turns the ball upfield as he tries to make a first
down against the stingy Hokies. Harper and the rest of the Pirate
offense accounted for only 297 yards in the game. (Photo SID).
Agents violate rules
Loss of quarterbacks dooms
many of the NFL squads
(AP)- Just how important is one- to have confidence that anybody The Montana-Rice score came
eleventh of a football team? The who goes in can do the job just 39 seconds after Phil Simms
Cincinnati Bengals, with Boomer In other games Sunday, it wasSan hit Lionel Manuel with a 15-yard
Esiason at the controls, demon- Francisco 20, the New York touchdown pass that gave New
strated that a healthy quarterback Giants 17; Chicago 17 Indianapo- York a 17-13 lead. What appeared
can make all the difference. Hsl3; Buffalo 9, Miami 6; New Or- to be a game-winning score for
The Cleveland Browns proved leans 29, Atlanta 21; Washington New York, 1-1, wasset upby a 32-
the point when their second 30, Pittsburgh 29Tampa Bay 13, yard punt return by Phil McCon-
(CPS)- Three sports agents and a
pro foottall player were indicted
Aug. 24 for allegedly using lucra-
tive but illegal payments and
threats to coerce college athletes
into signing representation con-
tracts.
New York agents Norby Wal ters
and Lloyd Bloom are accused of
offering student-athletes cash,
cars, trips and clothing if they
signed - in some cases post-dated
- agreements allowing Walters
and Bloom to represent them in
professional contract negotia-
tions.
If the offer of cash or cars didn't
work, U.S. Attorney Anton
Valukas said, Walters and Bloom
threatened to break their legs and
harm their families.
"This is my life on the
line Now it's your life on the
line your reputation, your busi-
ness, your family, your brother,
your school, everything is going
to be tainted and tainted bad. It's
gonna be terrible for you Wal-
ters allegedly told former Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh linebacker Tony
Woods, now with the Seattle
Seahawks.
Bloom and Walters are
charged with racketeering, mail
fraud, wire fraud and extortion.
The payments and contracts vio-
lated National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) rules.
Also indicted was Cali-
fornia agent Dave Lueddeke and
Cris Carter of the National Foot-
ball League's (NFL) Philadelphia
Eagles.
The indictment named
reputed mobster Michael
Franzese as an unindicted co-
conspirator. Franzese financed
the agents' efforts, and Walters
and Bloom used Franzese's repu-
tation to coerce athletes into sign-
ing oontracts, Valukas said.
Franzese is serving a 10-year
prison term in California for rack-
eteering and tax violations.
Walters also allegedly
used threats to sign acts in the
music business, including the
Jackson Five, according to the
indictment.
Prosecutors say Carter accepted
$5,000 from Lueddeke that both
ooncealed from a federal grand
jury investigating Walters and
Bloom. Carter, a former Ohio
State player, was charged with
obstruction of justice and mail
fraud. Lueddeke was charged
with perjury and obstruction of
justice.
"I am cooperating fully
and could only say that I regret
my past mistakes Carter said in
a statement released by the
Eagles.
Prosecutors say Walters
and Bloom induced athletes to
defraud their schools by accept-
ing cash and signing contracts in
violation of NCAA rules, and
then signing affidavits saying
they had not broken any rules.
Among the 35 schools
defrauded were Michigan State,
Notre Dame, Purdue and the uni-
versities of Michigan and Illinois.
Valukas said 43 college
athletes who signed with Walters
and Bloom avoided prosecution
with pretrial agreements to per-
form community service and to
reimburse portions of their schol-
arships to their universities.
That group includes NFL
players such as Ron Morris of
Chicago, Ronnie Harmon of Buf-
falo and Paul Palmer of Kansas
City and Brad Sellers of the Na-
tional Basketball Association Chi-
cago Bulls. All have agreed to
testify against Walters and
Bloom, authorities said.
Walters and Bloom each
face a maximum of 70 years in
prison and $2 million in fines if
convicted. Carter faces 10 years
and a $500,000 fine, and Lued-
deke faces 15 years in jail and
$750,000.
starter in as many weeks went to
the hospital.
The end result in the National
Football League is measured on
the scoreboard, and the relative
health of quarterbacks played a
major role. With Esiason throw-
ing four touchdown passes, the
Bengals remained unbeaten by
beating the Philadelphia Eagles
28-24.
The Browns, with Bernie Kosar
out with an elbow sprain, lost
backup Gary Danielson to a bro-
ken ankle on Sunday. That left the
Browns with former Indianapolis
Colt Mike Pagel running a strange
offense, and it showed. The
Browns lost 23-3 to the New York
Jets and after eight quarters of
football are still looking for their
first touchdown of the season.
Green Bay 10; Denver 34, San
Diego 3; Minnesota 36, New Eng-
land 6; Houston 38, the Los Ange-
les Raiders 35; the Los Angeles
Rams 17, Detroit 10, and Seattle
31, Kansas City 10.
Dallas visits Phoenix tonight.
Jets 23, Browns 3
The Jets, 28-3 losers in a miser-
key.
Bears 17, Colts 13
Indianapolis, 0-2, had two
chances to come back after Chi-
cago took a four-point lead on
Matt Suhey's 2-yard run. But Eric
Dickerson, whose 12-yard run
had given the Colts a 13-10 lead,
fumbled at the Chicago 37 and
able performance at New Eng- Steve McMichael recovered. One
land last week, preferred to think pjay after forcing a punt, Jack
they had earned Sunday's victory Trudeau's pass was intercepted
on performance and not because
of Cleveland injuries.
Roger Vick had two short scor-
ing runs in the fourth period and
Pat Leahy kicked three field goals.
by Vestee Jackson.
Bills 9, Dolphins 6
Bengals 28, Eagles 24
Esiason completed 20 of 32
passes for 363 yards, throwing
two scoring passes apiece to Tim
McGee and James Brooks. Cun-
"A lot of people didn't think we'd
come in here and play well Esi-
ason said after winning an offen- �Sha� h�25 oiior� Xa
sive duel with the Eagles'Randall and aJded another B on the
Cunningham. "That was motiva- 8J?�-
tion for us. We have a lot of weap- Es'ason the fmal �nJt 3'
� yard touchdown pass to McGee
As for the Browns, who also lost
two defensive starters to injury
during the game, "We didn't
handle adversity today tight fers 20 Giants 17
end Ozzie Newsome said. Joe Montana on the sidelines m
"Football's a team game, and you favor of Steve Young at the start of 8:52 remaining. NewOrleans, 1-1,
have to execute regardless of he 8ame- �� "J Wlth exTV completed the comeback from a
with 5:02 left to overcome a 24-21
Eagles lead.
Scott Norwood kicked three
field goals, two in the fourth quar-
ter, to give the mistake-prone Bills
a narrow margin over the Dol-
phins.
Norwood gave Buffalo its sec-
ond win of the year with a 28-yard
field goal with 3:12 left. Miami
drove 37 yards to the Buffalo 35
before Dan Marino's fourth-
down pass to Jim Jensen fell in-
complete with 37 seconds left.
Saints 29, Falcons 21
Dal ton Hilliard made up for two
lost fumbles by running for 97
yards and scoring the clinching
touchdown on a 4-yard run with
who's playing next to you or at �� on a 78-yard scoring pass
any particular position. You have PlaV "� 42 seconds to PlaX-
See NFL, page 15





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,1988
Wilander wins Open, moves into first spot
NEW YORK (AP) - Now when
they compare Mats Wilander to
Bjorn Borg they can talk about the
things Borg never did.
Up until now, the focus has been
on the failings of Wilander. But
his stirring five-set victory Sun-
day over Ivan Lendl in the men's
final of the U.S. Open changed all
that.
He won the tournament Borg
never won.
And today the computer rank-
ings released by the Association
of Tennis Professionals will have
No. 2 Wilander replacing Lendl as
the No. 1 plaver in the world.
That number combined with his
6-4, 4-6, 6-3, 5-7, 61 victory over
Lendl should put to rest some of
the talk about him not winning
the big one.
Ever since Wilander, 24, burst on
the scene as a 17-year-old cham-
pion at the 1982 French Open he
has been seen as the next Super
Swede. But mostly the perform-
ance has fallen short of the prom-
ise.
And no one is more aware of that
than Wilander. "It felt better than
the first Paris time he said after
he stopped Lendl from winning
his fourth consecutive U.S. Open
and took the No.l men's ranking
away from him.
"It meant so much. I never won
here. A Swede never won here.
And I'm going to be number one
now in the computer rankings.
"It was the biggest match I have
ever played
By winning at the Open, Wilan-
der did something Borg never
did. And by winning three Grand
Slam events in the same year, he
did something else his country-
man never accomplished.
In fact, no one among the men
have won three Grand Slam
events in the same year since
Jimmy Connors did that in 1974.
He now joins John Newcombe,
Hie Nastase, Connors, Borg, John
McEnroe and Lendl as the only
men to be ranked No. 1 since the
computer rankings started in
1973.
No one respected Wilander's ac-
complishments this year more
than Lendl, who was trying to
become the first man to win four
straight U.S. Opens since Bill
Tilden won six straight in the
early 1920s.
"Three grand Slams is unbeliev-
able said Lendl, who also saw
his 156-week skein atop the com-
puter rankings end just three
weeks shy of the record set by
Connors. "I hope i t happens to me
next year
Lendl, 28, did not go down with-
out a fight in his seventh straignt
trip to the Open finals.
Trailing 3-5 in the fifth set with
Wilander serving, he won the first
point of the game. But Wilander
won a big point when he survived
a 52-volley effort to even the game
at 15.
Twice Lendl fought to gain the
advantage in the game, but both
times Wilander evened it at deuce
and finally won match point
when Lendl netted a backhand
service return.
Wilander won the first set when
he broke Lendl in the 10th game
and took the third set with a break
in the second game. Lendl cap-
tured the second set when he won
the last five games after being
down 1 -4 and evened the match at
two sets each when he won the
fourth set 7-5 by breaking Wilan-
der in the final game.
But in the end Wilander had
enough left to finally be on the
right side of compasisons with
Borg.
West Craven high on running back Becton
NC
(AP)- Athletes and coaches like
Kay Yow, J.R. Reid, Sylvia Hatch-
ell, Al Buehler, Hank Johnson,
Sam Jones, Tab Ramos, Jim
Copcland and Anthony Hem-
brick are among those from North
Carolina who will be part of the
Olympics in Seoul, Korea.
About 20 people in all with North
Carolina ties wili be in the sea of
25,000 at the Summer Games. But
when it comes to the awarding of
the gold, they figure to be on vic-
tory stands in great disproportion
to their number.
In basketball, both men's and
women's, they expect to help the
United States put on a golden
show. And in boxing and swim-
ming, there are strong possibili-
ties the favorites may fall to ath-
letes who practice in North Caro-
lina rings or pools.
With UNC star Reid and Greens-
boro-raised Danny Manning op-
erating in the front court, the
United States again will be the
choice in men's basketball.
The U.S. women also figure to be
the strongest, and while none of
the team members has North
Carolina collegiate ties, Yow also
heads the women's program at
North Carolina State. And her as-
sistants are Hatchell, the head
women's coach at North Carolina
and sister Susan Yow, a former
Wolfpack All-America and assis-
tant coach who now coaches at
Drake.
Golden also are the dreams of the
U.S. boxing team, where Johnson,
a soldier at Fort Bragg, will serve
as an assistant coach. And while
the veteran coach will have a full
card of athletes to watch out for,
he'll no doubt keep a close eye on
Fort Bragg's Hembrick, the three-
time U.S. Armv middleweight
champion many say has the best
chance of stopping favored Henry
Maske of East Germany.
Another major medal contender
with Tar Heel connections actu-
ally calls Fort M ill, S.C, home. But
when Melvin Stewart is ready to
practice, he zips across the state
line to Charlotte's Mecklenburg
Aquatic Club where long hours of
work have made him the top U.S.
hope in the 200-meter butterfly
and a possible challenger to world
record-holder Michael Gross of
West Germany.
Baseball will be a demonstration
sport at the Olympics, but
officials will decide winners and
losers there, too, and
Wake Foresfs Billy Masse, an out-
fielder, should be a standout for
the U.S. team.
A gold also could come Lee Ver-
non McNeill's way if tne East
Carolina sprinter runs in one of
the rounds of the men's 400-meter
relay, since relay team partici-
pants share any medal won in the
final.
Former Pirate Leora "Sam" Jones
may also sparkle in the Seoul
Games, just as she did in Los An-
geles, but the United States needs
several more players as talented
as Jones before it becomes a medal
contender in women's team
handball.
NEW BERN, N.C. (AP) - West
Craven High School's Lee Becton
may be only a 15-year-old sopho-
more, but, the 5-foot-ll, 175-
pound athlete has experienced
overnight success on the Eagle
football squad.
He became the school's first-
ever basketball starter as a fresh-
man last year, and took a silver
medal with a 46-foot, one-inch
triple jump in the Junior Olym-
pics in Gainesville, Fla this past
July.
In West Craven's first two foot-
ball games this season, Becton has
amassed 475 yards rushing, while
his 231 yards rushing and four
touchdowns scored last Friday
against Greene Central resulted
in him being named the state 3-A
player-of-the-week.
"The best thing about Lee Becton
is that he's very gifted
academically said Eagle foot-
ball coach Clay Jordan. "You
couldn't ask for a better student-
athlete
Jordan says intelligence serves
Becton well on the playing field in
determining where the best spot
is to run through.
"He uses his agility and intelli-
gence rather than speed so
much Jordan said. "He reads
his blocks well and makes good
decisions on his cuts. Having
speed is great, but if you don't
know how to run the football that
speed's not going to carry you
very far
Becton's performance so far this
season is not a fluke, based on the
fact that he rambled for 21 touch
downs last year on the junior var-
sity, then added another touch
down and a two-point conversion
after being brought up to the var
sity in West Craven's final gam.
of 1987.
Pirates handed first loss of season
Continued from page 13
a good job all day for ECU,
dropped his punt on the 14 yard
line of Tech, hemming them in
deep in their own territory when
the Hokies could manage only an
eight yard return as a result of
good special teams play.
The Hokies stalled after only
three unsucessful plays, and a
shanked punt gave the Pirates the
ball and another oppurtunity on
their own 40 yard line. But they
were once again thwarted on the
first play from scrimmage when
Hunter, under a heavy Tech pass
rush, turned the ball over on an
interception on the 43 yard line.
With the advantage of excel-
lent field position, Furrer guided
the Hokies down to the Pirate two
yard line before, on a second and
goal situation, Rich Fox carried
the ball over the right side for a
Tech score. The extra point was
good, giving them a 27-10 leads
with 8:06 left to plav.
At this point, Pirate Coach
Art Baker decided to make an
adjustment at quarterback, put-
ting Charlie Libretto into the
game. Libretto opened with a 24
yard completion to Wilson down
to the Tech 42. However, the Pi-
rates faltered, and Libretto was
forced into an interception trying
to get a Pirate first down, after-
which he saved a certain Hokie
score when he tackled the re-
turner on the ECU 17. Two plays
later, the Hokies fumbled on the
ECU 33, with Bright recovering
for his second of the afternoon.
The Pirate offense took over,
and behind Libetto's arm, took
the ball down to the Tech 12 yard
line on receptions by Harper and
Bojack Davenport , before li-
bretto fired into the end zone
complete to Davenport on a 12
yard touchdown strike. They
went for two points after the
score, but were unable to convert
when a Libretto pass to Harper
fell incomplete. The Hokies ledby
a scoreof 27-16 with 3:11 left in the
game.
At this point, the Hokies were
content to keep the ball on the
ground and run time off the clock.
The Pirate offense got the ball
back with :18 remaining, but were
unable to move it, thus giving the
Hokies their final 27-16 victory.
"When we came out of our
dressing room and they came out
of their dressing room, I think it
was obvious that they were better
prepared to get out there and play
than we were Baker said after
the game. "We had the opportuni-
ties on offense. We know we can
move the football. But moving the
football doesn't score points.
"They did not run anything
that we didn't expect them to run.
We lost the fight in the trenches,
we just got knocked out of there.
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NFL
Continued from page
14-3 deficit when Hilhai
rnaxed a 70-vard dnve.
The Saints, 1-1, toke the lei
good before the end of thtf
period when Reuben
scored from the 17 on a sw
the right side
Redskins 30. Steelers 29
Washington had to rally
keep from starting defend
Super Bowl title with cons
losses. Chip Lohmiller ki
19-yard field goal with 12
left to overcome the Steelei
got two long touchd
from Bubbv Bnster on the
a 29-20 lead with 9 12 min
play.
Bucs 13, Packers 10
Tampa Bay, 1-1. br �
game losing streak when
Igwebuike kicked a 26 i
goal on the final play
Igwebuike kicked
field goal of the game afte
I esta � rdi dr
ards in the final four mil
Broncos 34,hai
Perm S
CHARLOTTESVILLE,M
- In the process of surpri;
ginia, No. 18 Penn State
pnsed itself.
"We wanted to start stroi
don't think we re "I
it Tenn State quarterbal
Bill said after the Nittanl
took a 21-0 lead just ovj
minutes into Saturday
came and beat the Cava
14.
Bill, a redshirt junior ma
first start, completed I!
passes for 179 yards aj
touchdowns in tl i
for Penn State
Bill was not the or
untested Nittanv Lion w
The





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,19W 15
spot
10k the third set with a break
second game. Lendl cap-
the second set when he won
ist five games after being
1 -4 and evened the match at
?ts each when he won the
set 7-5 by breaking Wilan-
the final game.
in the end Wilander had
Ich left to finally be on the
side of compasisons with
k Becton
Jordan said. "He reads
locks well and makes good
ions on his cuts. Having
is great, but if you don't
how to run the football that
S not going to carry you
Ifar
U's performance so far this
in is not a fluke, based on the
lat he rambled for 21 touch-
last vear on the junior var-
Ithen added another touch-
i and a two-point conversion
being brought up to the var-
lr West Craven's final game
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NFL game highlights
Continued from page 13
14-3 deficit when Hilliard cli-
maxed a 70-yard drive.
The Saints, 1-1, toke the lead for
good before the end of the third
period when Reuben Mayes
scored from the 17 on a sweep of
the right side.
Redskins 30, Steelers 29
Washington had to rally late to
keep from starting defense of its
Super Bowl title with consecutive
losses. Chip Lohmiller kicked a
19-yard field goal with 12 seconds
left to overcome the Steelers, who
got two long touchdown passes
from Bubby Brister on the way to
a 29-20 lead with 91 2 minutes to
play.
Bucs 13, Packers 10
Tampa Bay, 1-1, broke a nine-
game losing streak when Donald
Igwebuike kicked a 28-yard field
goal on the final play of the game.
Igwebuike kicked his second
field goal of the game after Vinny
Testaverde drove the Bucs 56
yards in the final four minutes.
Broncos 34, Chargers 3
Tony Dorset t ran for 113 yards
and a touchdown. Dorsett passed
Franco Harris for third place on
the NFL career rushing list with
12,181 yards, 61 more than the
former Steelers great. Jim Brown
of the Cleveland Browns is the
next Dorsett target, 131 yards
away.
John El way completed 17 of 28
passes for 259 yards and two
touchdowns - 44 yards to Mark
Jackson in the first period and 24
to Vance Johnson in the third.
Vikings 36, Patriots 6
Tommy Kramer, returned to the
starting lineup after Wade Wilson
presided over a season-opening
13-10 loss to Buffalo, completed
12 of 27 passes. His first two
passes, a 24-yarder to Anthony
Carter on the opening play and a
38-yarder to Hassan Jones, set up
Darrin Nelson's 8-yard touch-
down run for a 7-0 Minnesota
lead. Kramer left with six minutes
remaining in the third quarter
with a leg- cramp, and Wilson
went the rest of the way.
Oilers 38, Raiders 35
Allen Pinkett, starting for in-
jured Mike Rozier, scored three
touchdowns for Houston, 2-0.
The last of the three was a 6-yard
run with 31 seconds to play.
Rams 17, Lions 10
Greg Bell, elevated to the start-
ing lineup when Charles White
was suspended for substance-
abuse violations, ran for 139yards
and a touchdown to pace Los
Angeles, 2-0.
A 4-yard touchdown pass from
Jim Everett to Damone Johnson
midway through the third quar-
ter, following a Lions' turnover,
provided the winning margin for
the Rams.
Seahawks 31, Chiefs 10
Curt Warner had two short scor-
ing runs and Jacob Green recov-
ered a fumble in the end zone for
another score as Seattle put the
game away with a 28-point sec-
ond quarter.
Warner scored on runs of 1 and 3
yards for a 17-3 lead. After Dave
Krieg's 17-yard pass to rookie
Brian Blades pushed the lead to
24-3, Green sacked Kansas City
quarterback Bill Kenney on the
next play and caused a fumble.
Penn State learns about selves
CHARLOTTESVILLE,Va. (AP)
- In the process of surprising Vir-
ginia, No. 18 Penn State also sur-
prised itself.
"We wanted to start strong, but I
don't think we really planned on
it Penn State quarterback Tom
Bill said after the Nittany Lions
took a 21-0 lead just over nine
minutes into Saturday nighfs
game and beat the Cavaliers 42-
14.
Bill, a redshirt junior making his
first start, completed 15 of 22
passes for 179 yards and two
touchdowns in the season opener
for Penn State.
Bill was not the only relatively
untested Nittanv Lion who made
a big contribution. Gary Brown, a
sophomore starting at tailback in
place of the injured Blair Thomas,
ran for two scores and caught a 19-
yard pass for a third.
"We needed a win Coach Joe
Paterno said. "We got to play a lot
of young kids we will need down
the stretch. Our defense played
hard and with a lot of intensity.
We played ball like we wanted
to
Eleven different players carried
the ball for the Nittany Lions, who
finished with 444 yards in total
offense compared to 250 for Vir-
ginia. The Penn State defense
forced a pair of turnovers, both of
which led to touchdowns during
the 21-0 run.
"It all came together tonight
said Brown, who ran seven times
for 38 yards and caught three
passes for 45 yards.
Brown admitted he felt pressure
trying to fill in for Thomas, who
ran for 1,414 yards last year, the
third-highest total in Penn State
history. Thomas may miss the
entire season as he recovers from
knee surgery performed in Janu-
ary.
"I think this makes people real-
ize that I can still play
football Brown said.
Fullback Sam Gash scored the
first of his two touchdowns on a 1-
yard run that capped Penn State's
opening drive of 61 yards.
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CANTEEN





16 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13, 18
Clemson prepared to consider Seminoles
CIEMSON, S.C. (AP) - Now,
Clemson can now focus all of its
attention on Florida State.
Since preseason practice last
month, the third-ranked Tigers
have had to endure questions
daily about the Seminoles. While
acknowledging it was hard not to
think about playing Florida State,
which was ranked No. 1 going
into the season, the Tigers re-
minded everyone they had two
other games to play first.
Last week, Clemson took care of
the first game, beating Virginia
Tech 40-7. On Saturday, the Tigers
took care of second, downing I-
AA Furman 23-3 at Death Valley
"Who wants to talk about Florida
State now?" Clemson coach
Danny Ford said after the Tigers gers didn't look as sharp against said the Clemson defense was the
beat Furman for the 23rd straight Furman as they had in their sea- key. The Paladins managed 201
time. son opener when they did not yards in total offense, but most of
Much of the talk late Saturday af-
ternoon focused on Furman,
which gave the Tigers a tough
time, and whether Clemson had
been conservative on offense so as
to keep the No. 10 Seminoles
guessing about what to expect
Saturday at Death Valley
turn the ball over once and did not
have an offensive penalty.
Against the Paladins, a member
of the Southern Conference,
Clemson lost one fumble and was
called for eight penalties for 85
yards.
"We weren't crisp, we weren't
A Florida State scout sitting in sharp Ford said. "It was a hard
the press box to watch the Tigers win. But we made it hard on our-
offered a reason for the Tigers selves.
doing just that. But Ford said that "We were not as perfect as far as
just wasn't so. execution and penalties. We had a
"Yeah, well, we really tried to do couple of bad, bad penalties. We Baynes threw a bad pitch that was
that' Ford said with a smile. "1 weren't as sharp, but I'm sure recovered by bandit end Jesse
hope he thinks that Furman had a lot to do with that Hatcher. Two plays later, tailback
Whatever was the case, the Ti- Furman coach Jimmy Satterfield Terry Allen scored the first of two
it came early and late on an over-
cast afternoon. The Tigers al-
lowed Furman three first downs
in the second period - two on
penalties - and none in the third
quarter.
"They are big and quick, and that
caused us a lot of problems Sat-
terfield said.
"I don't believe that at halftime
they were too impressed with
Clemson's ranking Ford said.
Furman quarterback Patrick
TDs, leaping over from a yard out
with 9:27 left in the opening pe-
riod.
Furman cut the lead to 7-3 when
Glen Connally kicked a 48-yard
field goal with 13.21 left in the
second period.
But freshman Chris Gardocki
answered with two field goals to
give Clemson a 13-3 halftime lead.
Gardocki booted a 38-yarder with
11:05 left and then added a 46-
yarder with 2:47 remaining.
The first field goal came after a
52-yard drive, Clemson's longest
scoring march of the day.
Allen gave Clemson a 20-3 lead
when he scored on a 7-yard run
with 4:33 left in the third period.
Gardocki added a 31-yard field
goal with 9:19 to go in the game to
close out the scoring.
Clemson ended up with 316
yards on offense, led by tailback
Joe Henderson's 72 yards rush-
ing. Furman had 201 yards, 140on
the ground. Fullback Kennet
Goldsmith had 70 yards, while
tailback Bobby Daugherty had 66
yards.
"We're obviously disappointed
in not winning Satterfield said.
"We didn't execute well in the
third-and-three,third-and-two
situations. But a lot of that had to
do with Clemson. They're a very
experienced club.
Tigers poor in outing against Furman,
said holding back during contest
CLEMSON, S.C.(AP) -
Tailback Terry Allen scored two
touchdowns and freshman Chris
Gardocki lucked three field goals
as No. 3 Clemson defeated Fur-
man 23 3 Saturday
Clemson, 2-0, struggled on an
overcast afternoon to defeat the I-
AA Paladins, 1-1, who were 3-1-1
against Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence teams since 12 going into
the game
The Tigers, who have won the
past two ACC titles, scored their
first TD after recovering a fumble
at the Furman 3-yard line and
didn't have a single scoring drive
of more than 52 yards.
Furman didn't look like a team
playing against its highest-
ranked foe ever before its largest
crowd ever.
The Tigers were one notch
higher ranked than Florida State
was when Furman lost to the
Seminoles a year ago. And the
80,300 at Death Valley easily
eclipsed the 56,244 that saw the
Paladins beat South Carolina at
Williams-Brice Stadium in 1982.
The Paladins, whose offensive
line weighed an average of 35
pounds less per man than the
Tigers' defensive front, kept
Clemson off guard with a tough
running attack and scrappy de-
fense that refused to surrender a
big play.
Clemson, which may have been
looking ahead to No. 10 Florida
State next week, led 13-3 at the
half. The Tigers upped their lead
to 20-3 when Allen scored on a 7-
yard run to cap a five-play, 43-
yard drive set up by James Lott's
23-yard punt return.
The Tigers then recovered a
fumble at the Furman 38 and
looked to be headed for the clinch-
ing score. But Wesley McFadden
fumbled four plays later to give
the ball back to Furman.
Blue Devils upset Volunteers
( AP)- Duke expected to get a
strong test trom Tennessee's pass-
ing game, but it was the Blue
Devils who took charge of the air
to pull off a big upset.
Fifth-year senior Anthonv
Dilweg riddled the Tennessee
defense with 21 completions in 32
attempts for 311 yards and the
three touchdowns. All of those
touchdown passes went to Clark-
ston Hines, who caught eight
passes for 145 yards in the 31-26
victory.
"4t amaeehmp'earlynrHhe game
that Tennessee acted like thev
�fere afraid to throw the ball
Duke Coach Steve Spurrier said.
"I know thev want to run the ball
and we heard coach (Johnny)
Majors emphasized it in Practice
this week, but 1 thought they
would throw the ball a lot more
Tennessee actually outgained
the Blue Devils 488yards to 438
yards, but much of it came in the
Volunteers' desperate fourth-
quarter rush which cut a 31-7
deficit to within the final margin.
If Tennessee's players were sur-
prised by how well Duke's pass-
ing game worked, Majors wasn't.
Nor was he caught off guard by
the Blue Devil defense, which
kept Tennessee out of the game
long enough to keep the last-gasp
rally from ruining the upset.
"I wasn't surprised by how well
Duke did, especially on offense
Majors said. "And I want to pay
tribute to the fine work turned in
by the Duke defense. They kept us
off balance through much of the
game
The ACC's non-conference vic-
tories this weekend came against
Division I-AA teams. Wake For-
est stopped Illinois State 35-0,
Georgia Tech beat Tennessee-
Chattanooga 24-10 and No. 3
Clemson defeated Furman 23-3.
North Carolina lost a 28-0 deci-
sion to fourth-ranked Oklahoma
and No. 17 Penn State whipped
Virginia 42-14.
Tony Rogers rushed for 108
yards and two touchdowns while
reserve tailback Darrell France
ran 14 yards for another touch-
down for the Demon Deacons,
1�lWg-g Mnkc Ywvrwg �rtsr hgdsi
touchdown run and quarterbaek
Mike Flkins threw a 69-yard
ouchdown pass to Ricky Proehl.
Overall, the offense did a good
ob' Wake Forest Coach Bill
Ztooley said "A lot of good things
:ame from the offensive line
opening holes and providing ex-
ceptional protection for the quar-
terback
Tailback Terry Allen scored two
touchdowns and freshman Chris
Gardocki kicked three field goals
in Clemson's 23rd straight victorv
over Furman. But Coach Danny
Ford wasn't very excited about
climbing to 2-0.
As we look at the films Sunday,
we'll see Furman was responsible
for the way we looked at times
Ford said. 'They gave us a hard
contest
Georgia Tech was tied by divi-
sion 1-AA Furman when they
played the Paladins in 1983. A
repeat of those troubles loomed
when Tennessee-Chattanooga
took a 10-0 lead after three quar-
ters, but it was just where Coach
Bobby Ross wanted the Mocca-
sins.
"More than anything else, I
wanted to see us come back from
a little adversity Ross said. "In
all honesty, I really wanted that
kind of game for us as a football
team
Georgia Tech erased a field goal
on the way to its first touchdown,
and Cedric Stallworth's 16-yard
interception return to the Mocca-
sins' 6-yard-line set up Stefen
Scotton's 1-yard scoring run that
put Georgia Tech ahead to stay
with 9:59 left.
WinlegftJMojbe Carolina was
beaten by three long Oklahoma
drives, not long Sooner runs. A
fourth drive led to a field goal, but
when the Tar Heels were called
for offside, Oklahoma traded the
field goal for a touchdown 40 sec-
onds later.
"Our team took what they
thought were proper angles be-
cause they were just beating us
outside for the first two plays in
the option game Tar Heel Coach
Mack Brown said. "That's some-
thing you can't let them do
Eleven different Nittany Lions
carried the ball as Coach Joe
Paterno substituted freely, trying
to find a replacement for injured
Blair Thomas, a tailback who ran
for 1,414 yards last season. Gary
Brown started in Thomas' place,
and responded by running for
two touchdowns and catching a
19-yard pass for a third.
Penn State forced a pair of turn-
overs in the first quarter, and went
to a 21-0 lead in the period.
"Penn State is a team that you
don't want to make two crucial
early mistakes against Virginia
Coach George Welsh said. "I
don't know if it changes the out-
come of the ballgame, but it
makes it that much tougher to
play
Next week shows another abbre-
viated schedule. Wake Forest is at
North Carolina State and Georgia
Tech goes to Virginia to open the
ACC schedule. Clemson and Flor-
ida State meet in Death Valley,
The Citadel is at Duke and Mary-
land goes to West Virginia. North
Carolina has Saturday off.
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Allis
RICHMOND (AP) - M
before he drove to victoi
Miller 400, Davey Alhsoi
familiar voice talking to
"I don't think anyone
how much V ve missed hn
son said of his father, Bol
son, who was senouslv u
a June 19 crash at a race
Pond, Pa.
For nearly 1 12 vears,
Allisons drove together
Winston Cup circuit,
proud father saw his
rookie-of-the-vear honors
But now, Bobby Alhsonl
perating from his vanou;
at a rehabilitation cents
mingham, Ala, and Dave
on each week without
litely answering the
stream of questions about
father is progressing.
On Sunday, as the Miller
about to begin, the public
Tarh
CHAPEL HILL. C
homa quarterback
Holieway savs not playii
game saves wear and te,
knee, but sharing time wil
les Thompson did plenty
age to North Carolina.
Holieway, who missed
three games oi the 198"
with a knee injurv,
ompson, the player wru
him, each scored a touch
the fourth-ranked Soon
victorv- over the Tar
wasn't the high-sconnj
which many had expect
did achieve the desired rl
"The offense plavcd
Holieway said. "I'm prol
everybody on our team
Success came early as Oj
scored on its first two po
and led 21-0 at halftii
ompson wasn't expect!
aspect.
Dodgj
AP)- The Cincinnaj
mav have thrown away
chances of catching the L
les Dodgers in the
League West.
A pair oi throwinj
with two outs in the bottc
ninth inning enabled Los)
to score the tying run
Hamilton followed with
run as the Dodgers rallies
visiting Reds 5-3 Sundav
The Dodgers, in dl
seeing their two closest
ers each gain ground,
maintained a five-game 11
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13,1968 17
les
added a 31 -yard field
19 19 to go in the game to
�the scoring.
Ison ended up with 316
lot tense, led by tailback
person's 72 vards rush-
ianhad201vards,140on
jnd Fullback Kennet
b had 70 yards, while
bby Daugherty had 66
ibviousry disappointed
inning Sattertield said.
n t execute well in the
la-three,third-and-two
But a lot ot that had to
lemson. They're a very
:cd club.
BS
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��
ire tarrn is there
.a Company
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Allison wins, hears father's voice in head
RICHMOND (AP) - Moments
before he drove to victory in the
Miller 400, Davey Allison heard a
familiar voice talking to him.
"I don't think anyone realizes
how much I've missed him Alli-
son said of his father, Bobby Alli-
son, who was seriously injured in
a June 19 crash at a race in Long
Tond, Pa.
For nearly 112 years, the two
Allisons drove together on the
Winston Cup circuit, and the
proud father saw his son take
rookie-of-the-year honors in 1987.
But now, Bobby Allison is recu-
perating from his various injuries
at a rehabilitation center in Bir-
mingham, Ala and Davey drives
on each week without him, po-
litely answering the endless
stream of questions about how his
father is progressing.
On Sunday, as the Miller 400 was
about to begin, the public address
system at the new Richmond
International Raceway relayed
the message that a special guest
would be giving the ceremonial
command to the drivers to start
"I was kind of prepared for it the
younger Allisonsaid, "so it didn't
catch me off guard as bad as it
might have, but it still sent cold
chills up and down my spine. I
know it probably set a lot of
people on fire around this place,
too
Allison, who started on the pole,
responded to his father's com-
mand by leading 262 of the race's
400 laps and pulling away late for
a 3.25-second victory over Dale
Earnhardt.
"Man, I'm tickled to death Alli-
son said when asked what his
victory would do for his father's
outlook. "When I talked to him
yesterday, he was all pumped
up
Allison said his father told him
he plans to be in Richmond for the
February 1989 race.
Allison not only earned the dis-
tinction of winning the first Win-
ston Cup event at the new track -
the only three-quarter-mile lay-
out on the circuit - but he also
shattered the record for the fewest
races needed to surpass the $1
million mark in career winnings.
Allison won $57,800 for Sunday's
triumph, pushing his career win-
nings to $1,052,785 in 52 races. The
previous standard had been set by
Earnhardt, who in 1981 went over
the $1 million mark 76 races into
his career.
"I don't even think about that
stuff said Allison, 27, of
Hueytown, Ala. "I just want to go
racing. I'm having a blast
Allison trailed Ricky Rudd
when the race went back to green
on lap 332 following the fifth and
final caution. Rudd held his posi-
tion for 15 laps before a blown
engine finished his day and put
Allison's Ford Thunderbtrd
ahead to stay.
"I wasn't even driving it hard'
said Rudd, who wound up 26th.
Allison gradually pulled away
from Earnhardt over the last 52
laps, finishing with an average
speed of 95.770 mph.
Earnhardt, the two-time defend-
ing Winston Cup champion, said
his tires weren't handling prop-
erly, "and we couldn't run with
Davey. He just kept trucking on
Terry Labonte was third, fol-
lowed by Mark Martin and Alan
Kulwicki. The outcome
prompted a further slide by Rusty
Wallace in the Winston Cup sea-
son points standings. Wallace,
who dropped from first to second
two weeks ago at Bristol, Tenn
slipped to third Sunday after fin-
ishing 35th in the 36-car field.
"If we lose this championship, if s
because of Geoff Bodine an
angry Wallace said, referring to a
collision he and Bodine had on the
second lap under caution. The
wreck crippled Wallace's Pontiac,
and NASCAR officials penalized
Bodine for trying to pass cars
during a caution period.
Bodine, who wound up 22nd, said
Wallace "pulled in front of me.
They say his team is mad at me,
but I had a head of steam up and
ran over him. I can understand
why they would be upset, but if
they see the films, I think they will
owe me an apology
Bill Elliott, who finished sev-
enth, held onto his points lead
over Earnhardt, who went into
the race in third position. Elliott
has 3363 points, 117 ahead of
Earnhardt and 119 ahead of Wal-
lace.
The 60-foot-wide, D-shaped
track, which was built in less than
seven months to replace an aging
half-mile oval, has seating for
53,103 people, but the race drew
an estimated 60,000, making it the
largest crowd ever for a sports
event in Virginia.
NASCAR officials took what
they acknowledged was an
unusual move by black-flagging
Jimmy Means after 259 laps be-
cause of his apparent fatigue.
Tarheels lose second game
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)-Okla-
homa quarterback Jamelle
"1 was figuring it would take the
offense the second quarter,
years Switzer added. "But we touchdown run around left end
shut them out by making some with 7:54 left in the third period
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i
knee, but sharing time with Char-
les Thompson did plenty of dam-
age to North Carolina.
Holieway, who missed the last
three games of the 1987 season
with a knee injury, and Th-
ompson, the plaver who replaced to 8et its ponts
him, each scored a touchdown in
the fourth-ranked Sooners' 28-0
victory over the Tar Heels. It
wasn't the high-scoring affair
which many had expected, but it
did achieve the desired result.
That score ended a 12-play, 88-
yard drive.
North Carolina, which pene-
trated Oklahoma territory four
times in the first half, crossed the
50 three times in the second half
noma quant-mac janteiie �������. i - ' ; , ��r��i
Holieway saVs not playing a full maybe the third, to get going big plays defensively, ntercept
game saves wear and tear on his Thompson said. "I was surprised mg some� passes at key timesu
by our team's performance One of those interceptions led to
The Sooner offense did not break Oklahoma's first touchdown, one
off the long plays as expected with of the four long drives. Leon
their huge edge in speed over the Perry's 1-yard dive late in the first
Tar Heel defense. Instead, Okla- quarter capped a 71 -yard, 10-play but its only scoring opportunity
homa used three sustained drives drive for the Sooners. missed when Hamp Greene s 51-
and the fourth Thompson came in for yard field goal attempt was wide
touchdown resulted when a Oklahoma's third offensive series left near the end of the first half. A
North Carolina penalty on a and finished an eight-play, 80- Jonathan Hall pass was inter-
Sooner field goal attempt kept a yard drive with an 8-yard scoring cepted in the end zone with 40
drive alive. In all, Oklahoma run with 1:17 left in the first quar- seconds left to play,
rushed 71 times for 391 yards, tcr. Anthony Stafford closed out a First-year Coach Mack Brown, a
Holieway and Thompson com- 79-yard, 13-play march with a 1- Switzer assistant in m �C-
se Dlaved great" pleted 3 of 6 passes for 72 yards, yard dive on fourth down with k"�led8 it was speed
HoHewaviid "I'm proud of The Sooners fumbled seven times 8:30 left before halftime to give the that doomed the Tar Heels.
3�J2I? and lost two. "Offensively, I Sooners a 21-0 lead after R.D. "We were concerned coming into
SKt0W� thought we had a pretty good Lashar kickec1 the 30-yardfield the ball game that you cannot
scored on its first two possessions
and led 21-0 at halftime. Th-
ompson wasn't expecting that
aspect.
game Oklahoma Coach Barry goal with 8:32 left. But North
Switzer said. "Defensively, we Carolina was penalized for off-
don't have the speed and quick- side, and the Sooners traded the
ness we've had the past couple of field goal for a Holieway 4-yard
nearly put on the picture of their
speed during the week Brown
said.
Dodgers keep
ame
AD- The Cincinnati Reds
may have thrown away anyone's
chances of catching the Los Ange-
les Dodgers in the National
League West.
A pair of throwing errors
with two outs in the bottom of the
ninth inning enabled Los Angeles
to score the tying run and Jeff
Hamilton followed with a home
run as the Dodgers rallied past the
visiting Reds 5-3 Sunday.
The Dodgers, in danger of
seeing their two closest challeng- Pittsburgh 7-4 and
crs each gain ground, instead defeated Atlanta 8-2.
Hous.onanapu.eaan.nna "jR-MrJEA S
12 behind. eigm h hd ounder that third
-These are the type of games lead baseman Chris Sabo stopped for
vou'veeottowinifyouwanttogo John franco, leaumg u.c v n� c�hn threw
ntobworldchamV'saidKSk league in saves, took over to start an mfidd Wt But �oew
Gibson, who scored the tying run the ninth. He had n0.KMmrf �� 5ng when first
when he dashed home from first run average in his last 31 outings Jejnnmg,scong
base on the Reds'double error. over 35 2-3 innings. rrWtoVhePbte
The Astros kept their distance Gibson, who homered earlier, poorly to tl
by beating San Francisco 4-1.
Elsewhere, New York beat Mon-
treal 3-0, St. Louis got past Chi-
cago 3-2, Philadelphia downed
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Nothing could have prepared me
for the first few moments with my
roommate. "Anique"�nothing more,
just "Anique"�was her name. Change
theuA" to a"U"and youVe got a
description.
When they asked what type of
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reached into her leather
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can of Suisse Mocha and
offered me a cup Okay I
decided I'd keep an open mind.
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18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8, 1988
SC cruises past WC, prepares for future
COLUMBIA, S.C.(AP) - West-
ern Carolina coach Bob Waters,
whose Catamounts fell 38-0 to
No. 16 South Carolina, might be a
little down after losing by lop-
sided margins two weeks in a
row.
Not so.
There is, according to Waters,
still light at the end of the prover-
bial tunnel.
'The East Tennessee State game
Thursday night (Sept. 15) is a big
game for us and we have very
little time to get ready he said
following Saturday's loss.
"Our goal is still to win the
Southern Conference champion-
ship and we're still undefeated
East Tennessee State is Western
Carolina's first Southern Confer-
ence opponent.
South Carolina coach Joe Morri-
son, whose Gamecocks went to 2-
0 with the win against Western,
sees the going about to get
tougher for his team.
"Any time you win it's a good
feeling said Morrison. "But 1
told our ball club after the game
that we will need to be a lot
sharper physicially and mentally
from this part on
South Carolina, which beat
North Carolina 31-10 a week ear-
lier, next faces East Carolina, fol-
lowed by Georgia. Later come
Florida State and Clemson.
"We were able to play a lot of
folks, especially in the second
half Morrison said, sizing up
Saturday's win. "I thought our
running backs did a good job.
"Mike Dingle ran hard. He's
going to be a good back
Dingle, The Associated Press
high school Player of the Year in
1986, started his first game Satur-
day for South Carolina and got his
first two collegiate touchdowns.
However, he suffered a brusied
right shin and had to be carried off
the field in the third quarter with
85 yards rushing and another 57
receiving.
The status of the 6-3, 230-pound
sophomore, who was filling in at
fullback for the injured Keith
Bing, was expected to be known
earlv this week.
South Carolina scored enough
points to win on its first series
with a 47-yard field goal by Collin
Mackie, led 17-0 at half time and
used reserves the entire fourth pe-
riod.
The initial touchdown came late
in the first quarter on a 9-yard
sprint around left end by tailback
Gerald Williams, who was start-
ing in place of Harold Green. Wil-
liams had 108 yards rushing.
Both Green and Bing were hurt
the previous Saturday in the
Gamecocks' 31-10 win against
North Carolina.
Dingle completed the first half
scoring with a four-yard touch-
down run about seven minutes
before the half and got his other
TD at the start of the second half.
Gamecock quarterback Todd
Ellis threw for 187 yards, his low-
est passing output since he was
Yankees beat Tigers
(AP)- The better it gets for the
New Yorx Yankees, the worse it
becomes for the Detroit Tigers.
Claudell Washington's two-
run homer in the bottom of the
18th inning Sunday rallied the
Yankees over Detroit 5-4 as both
teams tried to stay close in the
American League East race.
Both clubs are 3 12 games
behind division-leading Boston.
Although they share the same
space, the Yankees and Tigers are
heading in opposite directions.
New York completed a four-
game sweep at Yankee Stadium.
Detroit, which led the AL East by
tour games on Aug. 21, lost for the
17th time in 20 games.
The Yankees begin a four-game
series in Boston on Thursday
night. "We had a sense of having
only a few games left to do some-
thing" Yankees manager Lou
Piniella said. "We knew it was
now or never. I think that's what
brought out the best in us
The game lasted 6 hours, 1 min-
utes. It was the longest game by
time and innings in the AL this
season. Atlanta and St. Louis
played 19 innings on May 14.
In other games in the American
League, it was Cleveland 4, Bos-
ton 2; Baltimore 4, Toronto 2; Chi-
cago 3, Minnesota 2; Oakland 8,
Kansas City 7, in 11 innings; Mil-
waukee 5, Seattle 3, and Texas 8.
California 3.
Detroit's Alan Trammell hit a
solo home run in the seventh in-
ning that made it 3-3 and the game
stayed tied until the 18th when the
Tigers took the lead.
An error by first baseman Don
Mattingly set up an RBI single by
rookie Tory Lovullo against Steve
Shields, 4-4, the eventual winner.
Mike Henneman had pitched
seven scoreless innings before
Guillermo Hernandez, 5-5, took
over the start the bottom of the
held to a 141-yard day in South
Carolina's 20-16 loss last season to
then-No. 2 Miami.
Last weekend against North
Carolina, he passed for 290 yards
- more typical for the record-set-
ting junior.
The closest Western Carolina
ever got to scoring was when the
Catamounts reached South
Carolina's 36-yard line before
time ran out in the second quarter.
After Dingle's second touch-
down, South Carolina fumbled
the ball away on two successive
possessions.
Then Ellis got South Carolina
going again, ending their next
drive by hitting tight end Carl
Platt on a 12-yard shot that made
the score 31-0.
Backup quarterback Dickie De-
Masi, who replaced Ellis for the
final quarter, moved the Game-
cocks to their fifth ai id final touch-
down - a seven-yard run by fresh-
man tailback Albert Haynes.
Western Carolina, a Division I-
AA school, posted all of its six first
downs in the first half, the fewest
first downs in school history. The
Catamounts were held to seven
first downs by Carson-Newman
in 1967.
The Catamounts had just 19
yards total offense in the second
half, finishing the game with 123
yards. Ten second-half running
plays netted just nine yards.
Williams was the game's leading
rusher, followed by Dingle and
Haynes. The biggest rushing
gainer for Western was tailback
Carlton Terry, who had 44 yards
on 12 attempts.
18th.
Rickey Henderson drew a lead-
off walk and Washington fol-
lowed with his ninth home run.
Indians 4, Red Sox 2
Willie Upshaw's RBI single
broke a tie in the eighth inning
and Tom Candiotti allowed five
hits in seven innings as Cleveland
salvaged the finale of a three-
game scries at Boston.
Upshaw's hit came off reliever
Bob Stanley, 6-4. The Indians
added an insurance run in the
ninth when Carter tripled and
Mel Hall singled.
Brewers 5, Mariners 3
Don August allowed seven hits
in eight-plus innings and Robin
Yount's two-run double keyed a
four-run fifth.
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$13
1414 Charles Blvd.
Greenville
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Price Buster 2
Large With
Everything
Plus Tax
& Deposit
Delivered
EXPIRES 10-15-88
Delivered
EXPIRES 10-15-88
Plus Tax
Pick Up Only
Items - Pepperoni, Ham, Beef, Italian
Sausage, Green Peppers, Onion, Hot
Peppers, Black Olives, Mushrooms and
Anchovcs. No substltlons
EXPIRES 10-15-88
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 13, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 13, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.624
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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