The East Carolinian, September 8, 1988






Coming Tuesday:
The story behind parking permit "A'
eatures:
Ijack the Ripper is still alive.
SPORTS:
A profile of Jarrod Moody, the Pirate's flashy slot-
back
dihe �nst (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 17
Thursday, September 8,1988
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Pirate Crew replaces Buccaneer Babes
By i,in yco K
ThePirah; Crew v i11 replace
zcaneit Babes, iis the or-
- the 1 I ; th the re-
nd a
ikethe tiassadors
Pirate . r( wmembersserve ah
�tesses '�eir duties
.a 11 �t t S arid
r �"uentsng t�urs, pre
n j'rout ECU
'ith the visitors and
at thefootball
Ann�explained
that, e1vear the
TC AAI- il.
live 'tn-
letes ii d one
unol'al v isi- iution. The
unoffic-1 ���n the fall
when p�their
parentsattend ECU home football
games. Thcofficial visitsare taken
in the spring.
Previously, the Buccaneer
Babes were hostesses for visiting
athletes. They began under the
U adershipof Nancy Emery, wife
ol former ECU football coach Ed
Emery.
Once Nancy and Ed left, there
was not a staff person available to
give the amount of time to the
organization that was necessary.
rhey had some people in the foot-
ball office who oversaw it. But
they were so busy. It was a sccre-
tarv or something like that,
A man said.
In additon to the lack of leader-
ship, "They had a lot of com-
plaints about the name, too. "
Aman said.
Not only was the name, Bucca-
neer Babes, sexually suggestive,
but it limited the organization to
female membership. "A guv is not
going to try out for an organiza-
tion called Buccaneer Babes, '
Aman said.
The athletic department de-
cided to re-organize the Bucca-
neer Babes into Tirate Crew and
employed Aman part-time to di-
rect the new group.
The rirateCrew consists of four
male and 16 female students.
Aman emphasized the fact that
ECU is the only university who
has male participants in this type
of group.
In response to rumors that the
Buccaneer Babes sexually inter-
acted with the visiting athletes,
Aman said, "I think that's the type
of reputation this kind oi group
gets at all universities. They
(rumors) are totallv untrue
J
One of the rules of the Bucca-
neer Babes and a rule of this or-
gaization (Pirate Crew) is that
they are at no time alone with a
recruit. 'That's for a number of
reasons: so rumors can't be
started and also because the
NCAA is so strict about payoffs
and things of that nature, "said
Aman.
In regard to NCAA rules, the
Pirate Crew attended a two hour
training session. "They know
what they can or can't do. They
can't give money to the recruits.
You can't buy them (the athletes)
anything. If the student wants a
drink, he can't buy one for the
recruit. There are a lot of grav
areas too, " Aman said.
In addition to athletic recruit-
ment, the Pirate Crew helps the
cheerleaders paint banners on
Thursday nights proceeding the
football games. "In the future,
they hope to also work with the
non-revenue sports in getting
folks out to the swimming meets
and volleyball games and things
like that, they're a spirit group, "
Aman said.
!n order to participate in Pirate
Crew, students had to undergo
interviews by a selection commit-
tee1. They must also have a 2.2
grade point average.
"The reason we chose a 2.2 is
because that is the average G.P.A.
of the ECU student. If they are
having a problem with grades,
they don't have any business giv-
ing extra time. They need to be
studying, "Aman said.
"Pi Kapps" get first house at
ECU built for a fraternity
By Ot HARRIS
Consti iction i . ler � �) for
thefirstl us to be built sole) for
a fraternity in the histon fECU.
"All oi the other fraternity and
sorority houses, for that matter,
were purchased privately, ours is
the first to be built with fvinds
raised by the fraternity . nd
alumni said Dillon Kalkhurst, a
brother of Pi Kappa Phi.
The foundation for phase one
of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity
house was poured last Wednes-
day, August 31.
This newest structural edition
to the Greek housing system is
located on a 2.7 acre lot at 803
Hooker Road. The original house
that stood on this same ground
from 1970 to 1985 has since been
demolished to make room for the
new one.
A fire in 1973 ravaged the sec-
ond floor of the original house,
thus weakening the main struc-
ture. Then, in 1985, the house had
to be vacated because of the struc-
tural damage, "it was just going to
collapse on us one day, we had to
pet out said Kalkhurst
"We've beer, waiting five years
to see this. Many of us started to
doubt whether or not it was really
going to happen said Kalkhurst,
the only active member to live in
the old structure.
Phase one, when complete, will
be a fully furnished, two story,
5,500 square foot structure. "The
bedrooms arc going to have dorm
type furniture in them. Every-
thing, beds, desks, shelves, and
dressers arc going to be stationary
� we think it'll be more durable
said Kalkhurst.
An look at the progress on the 85,000 square foot Sports Medicine Complex from the top
of Ficklen Stadium. Evidence that ECU is definitely growing (Photo by Thomas Walters).
Other features of the house are The alumni and undergradu- oi whom are alumni, were very
central air conditioning, cable TV, ates raised over $75,000 for a
complete kitchen facilities, a full down payment. Fund raising for
size bar, a fireplace and party the new house has been going on
room. Each of the eight bedrooms since 1983, but according to
will have its own bathroom. Kalkhurst, over $11,000 was
The house is being built with raised on the 25 Annual
:b-
cxpansion in mind. Phase two
and three are already on paper.
Kalkhurst said "it's been de-
signed so we can add on to it with-
out much difficulty
In the second phase a 'Great
Hall' for meetings, etc. will be
added and more bed space is
planned for the third phase.
"Phases two and three are on
down the road, right -now, we
have to get phase one built and
paid for Kalkhurst said.
Founder's Day weekend last Fel
ruarv. The total cost for the house
is $225,000.
To help pay, the Pi Kapps (as
they are known on .ampus) sold
stock in the house for $10 a piece.
A plaque is to be placed on the
outside of the house honoring all
those who contributed $100 or
more.
"Ellis Banks, who has been
chapter advisor for 10 years, and
Carl Darden, a local realator, both
instrumental in getting the fund
raising campaign oii the ground
said Kalkhurst.
The house is being built by
Freddy Morton Construction
Company, out or New Bern, NC.
Morton too, is an alumni.
The proposed time of comple-
tion is in mid December. "It has to
be finished by the spring semester
so 16guys can move in and begin
making house payments with
their rent money said
Kalkhurst.
Kalkhurst said the last three
years have really been tough on us
as a fraternity. It's hard when
there is no house or central meet-
ing place.
Governor, GPD want murderer
lie on!) remaining indicator that there was once a fraternity house
at 803 Hooker Road, things are due to change (Photo by Thomas Walters)
Hatcher on the lam, sought to
stand trial in Roberson Co.
federal authorities continue to
search for accused hostage-taker
Eddie Hatcher while an attorney
for the fugitive savs he expects his
client to appear for trial on fire-
arms and hostage-taking charges.
U.S. marshals reported no new
developments Tuesday in the
search for Hatcner, one of two
Robeson County American Indi-
ans charged in tne Feb. 1 takeover
of a newspaper office in Lumber-
ton.
Authorities have been searching
for Hatcher since Aug. 31. when
he failed to surrender after a fed-
eral appeals court revoked the
bail that allowed his release from
jail on Julv 5.
Hatcher's co-defendant, Timo-
thy Jacobs, 20, who was released
with Hatcher surrendered to au-
thorities Aug. 31 in Asheville.
One of Hatcher's attorneys,
Barry Nakell of Chapel Hill, said
Tuesday he expects Hatcher to
appear for trial.
"I think that all I'll say is that I
expect him to appear for trial
Nakell told The Favettcville
Times. "He's been very eager for a
trial
Nakell has declined to comment
about whether he has spoken
By SEAN HERRING
A��i�Unt Newt I ditnr
Governor James G. Martin an-
nounced that the State is offering
a reward for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of the
person or persons responsible for
the murder of a local man.
The reward offered, in crimes of
this nature, is known as the
Governor's reward.
Detective J.E. Nichols, of the
Greenville Police Department
said, "the Governor's reward is
an additional tool to help us
gather information, in any serious
offense
"The Governor can grant or not
grant any amount that he feels is
necessary, but the amount usu-
ally awarded is $5,000 he said.
Nichols stated the murder of
Thomas Lee McGowan, 72, of 714
Atlantic Avenue, who was a local
'can man is still under investiga-
tion, and that they are looking for
more information.
The FBI and State Bureau of
Investigation (SBI) are working
jointly to gather information and
solve the crime.
According to police reports,
McGowan was found on July 11,
1988, at approximately 10:30 a.m
lying dead in a Greenville storage
warehouse, where he ran a make-
shift flea market. McGowan had
received multiple contact
wounds to the head.
"I do not want to give out any
privileged information, because it
might tip the case, or discourage
people from calling with informa-
tion Nichols said.
He stated, "the Governor's
reward is somewhat like Crime
Stoppers, but they only offer
$1,000 for information leading to
the arrest or conviction of the
perpetrator
No one is awarded any money
until after the court heanng, to
decide whether his information is
pertinent to the arrest or convic-
tion of the accused, as stated by
the NC. Governor's Statue.
Furthermore, if more than one
person comes forth with useful in-
formation, the reward is divided
among the number oi people,
who gave the tip.
Nichols said. "Law enforce-
ment personnel are not eligible to
receive the reward. because this is
our job to investigate crimes. No
crane is going to be solved bv one
person, but we must utilize other
agencies, tools, and equipment
he said.
with Hatcher since he was to sur-
render to authorities in Raleigh.
A trial has tentatively been set
for later this month, authorities
said.
Hatcher, 30, was last reported
seen at a Mexican restaurant in
Chapel Hill on Aug. 31, according
to William Berryhill Jr U.S. Mar-
shal for eastern North Carolina.
"Right now, there's just no major
break in the case, but we're
diligently pursuing Mr. Hatcher's
whereabouts Berryhill said
Tuesday. "It's almost has disap-
peared off the face of the earth
Berryhill said he did not think
any harm has come to Hatcher.
'To the very best of my knowl-
edge Eddie Hatcher is alive,
well and kicking somewhere
Hatcher and Jacobs, who are
accused of holding hostages for 10
hours at The Robesonian in Lum-
berton, have said thev took the
action to call attention to allega-
tions of corruoption in the
county's criminal justice system.
All of the hostages were freed
uniniured by the two Tuscarora
Indians, who surrendered with-
out incident after Gov. Jim Martin
agreed to appoint a task force to
investigate the allegations.
The two men face possible life
imprisonment if they are con-
victed of the charges, which in-
clude taking hostages, using fire-
arms to commit a hostage-taking
offense and firearms.





Coming Tuesday:
The story behind parking permit "A
Features:
Jack the Ripper is still alive.
SPORTS: "
A profile of Jarrod Moody, the Pirate's flashy slot-
back
Sthe �aBt Ularultnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 17
Thursday, September 8,1988
Greenville, NC
16 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Pirate Crew replaces Buccaneer Babes
By TAMMY AYCOCK
Stiff Wnlcr
The Pirate Crew will replace
The Buccaneer Babes, as the or-
ganization which helps the ECU
Athletic Department with the re-
cruitment of new athletes.
This year, the new group con-
sists of twenty students and a
J
non-student director, Page Aman
Like the ECU Ambassadors,
Pirate Crew members serve as
hosts and hostesses. Their duties
include: meeting athletes and
their parents, giving tours, pro-
viding information about ECU
and sitting with the visitors and
their parents at the football
games.
Aman, the director explained
that, each academic year the
NCAA allows prospective ath-
letes one official visit and one
unofficial visit per institution. The
unofficial visits occur in the fall
when potential recruits and their
parents attend ECU home football
games. The official visits are taken
in the spring.
Previously, the Buccaneer
Babes were hostesses for visiting
athletes. They began under the
leadership'of Nancy Emery, wife
of former ECU football coach Ed
Emery.
"Once Nancy and Ed left, there
was not a staff person available to
give the amount of time to the
organization that was necessary.
They had some people in the foot-
ball office who oversaw it. But
they were so busy. It was a secre-
tary or something like that, "
Aman said.
In additon to the lack of leader-
ship, "They had a lot of com-
plaints about the name, too. "
Aman said.
Not only was the name, Bucca-
neer Babes, sexually suggestive,
but it limited the organization to
female membership. "A guy is not
going to try out for an organiza-
tion called Buccaneer Babes, "
Aman said.
The athletic department de-
cided to re-organize the Bucca-
neer Babes into Pirate Crew and
employed Aman part-time to di-
rect the new group.
The Pirate Crew consists of four
male and 16 female students.
Aman emphasized the fact that
ECU is the only university who
has male participants in this type
of group.
In response to rumors that the
Buccaneer Babes sexually inter-
acted with the visiting athletes,
Aman said, "I think that's the type
of reputation this kind of group
gets at all universities. They
(rumors) are totally untrue
One of the rules of the Bucca-
neer Babes and a rule of this or-
gaization (Pirate Crew) is that
they are at no time alone with a
recruit. "That's for a number of
reasons: so rumors can't be
started and also because the
NCAA is so strict about payoffs
and things of that nature, " said
Aman.
In regard to NCAA rules, the
Pirate Crew attended a two hour
training session. "They know
what they can or can't do. They
can't give money to the recruits.
You can't buy them (the athletes)
anything. If the student wants a
drink, he can't buy one for the
recruit. There are a lot of gray
areas too Aman said.
In addition to athletic recruit-
ment, the Pirate Crew helps the
cheerleaders paint banners on
Thursday nights preceeding the
football games. "In the future,
they hope to also work with the
non-revenue sports in getting
folks out to the swimming meets
and volleyball games and things
like that. They're a spirit group
Aman said.
In order to participate in Pirate
Crew, students had to undergo
interviews by a selection commit-
tee. They must also have a 2.2
grade point average.
"The reason we chose a 2.2 is
because that is the average G.P. A.
of the ECU student. If they are
having a problem with grades,
they don't have any business giv-
ing extra time. They need to be
studying, "Aman said.
"Pi Kapps" get first house at
ECU built for a fraternity
By JOE HARRIS
News Fd iror
sorority houses, for that matter,
were purchased privately, ours is
the first to be built with funds
Construction is underway for raised b the fratemity and
the t.rst house to be built so ey for aiumni mon Kalkhurst, a
a fraternity in the history of ECU. brother of Pi K phi
ther fraternity and y foundatior; for phase one
of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity,
house was poured last Wednes-
day, August 31. j
This newest structural edition
to the Greek housing system is
located on a 2.7 acre lot at 803
Hooker Road. The original hou9e
that stood on this same ground
from 1970 to 1985 has since been
demolished to make room for the
new one.
A fire in 1973 ravaged the sec-
ond floor of the original house,
thus weakening the main struc-
ture. Then, in 1985, the house had
to be vacated because of the struc-
tural damage, "it was just going to
collapse on us one day, we had to
get out said Kalkhurst
"We've been waiting five years
to see this. Many of us started to
doubt whether or not it was really
going to happen said Kalkhurst,
the only active member to live in
the old structure.
Phase one, when complete, will
be a fully furnished, two story,
5,500 square foot structure. "The
bedrooms are going to have dorm
type furniture in them. Every-
thing, beds, desks, shelves, and
dressers are going to be stationary
�we think it'll be more durable
said Kalkhurst.
An look at the progress on the 85,000 square foot Sports Medicine Complex from the top
of Ficklen Stadium. Evidence that ECU is definitely growing (Photo by Thomas Walters).
Other features of the house are
central air conditioning, cable TV,
complete kitchen facilities, a full
size bar, a fireplace and party
room. Each of the eight bedrooms
will have its own bathroom.
The house is being built with
expansion in mind. Phase two
and three are already on paper.
Kalkhurst said "it's been de-
signed so we can add on to it with-
out much difficulty
In the second phase a 'Great
Hall' for meetings, etc. will be
added and more bed space is
planned for the third phase.
"Phases two and three are on
down the road, right -now, we
have to get phase one built and
paid for Kalkhurst said.
The alumni and undergradu-
ates raised over $75,000 for a
down payment. Fund raising for
the new house has been going on
since 1983, but according to
Kalkhurst, over $11,000 was
raised on the 25 Annual
Founder's Day weekend last Feb-
ruary. The total cost for the house
is $225,000.
To help pay, the Pi Kapps (as
they are known on campus) sold
stock in the house for $10 a piece.
A plaque is to be placed on the
outside of the house honoring all
those who contributed $100 or
more.
"Ellis
Banks, who has been
chapter advisor for 10 years, and
Carl Darden, a local realator, both
of whom are alumni, were very
instrumental in getting the fund
raising campaign off the ground
said Kalkhurst.
The house is being built by
Freddy Morton Construction
Company, out of New Bern, N.C.
Morton too, is an alumni.
The proposed time of comple-
tion is in mid December. "It has to
be finished by the spring semester
so 16 guys can move in and begin
making house payments with
their rent money said
Kalkhurst.
Kalkhurst said "the last three
years have really been tough on us
as a fratemity. It's hard when
there is no house or central meet-
ing place.
Governor, GPD want murderer
Theonly remaining indicator that there was once a fraternity house
at 803 Hooker Road, things are due to change (Photo by Thomas Walters)
Hatcher on the lam, sought to
stand trial in Roberson Co.
Federal authorities continue to
search for accused hostage-taker
Eddie Hatcher, while an attorney
for the fugitive sa vs he expects his
client to appear for trial on fire-
arms and hostage-taking charges.
U.S. marshals reported no new
developments Tuesday in the
search for Hatcner, one of two
Robeson County American Indi-
ans charged in tne Feb. 1 takeover
of a newspaper office in Lumber-
ton.
Authorities have been searching
for Hatcher since Aug. 31. when
he failed to surrender after a fed-
eral appeals court revoked the
bail that allowed his release from
jail on Julv 5.
Hatcher's co-defendant, Timo-
thy Jacobs, 20, who was released
with Hatcher surrendered to au-
thorities Aug. 31 in Asheville.
One of Hatcher's attorneys,
Barry Nakell of Chapel Hill, said
Tuesday he expects Hatcher to
appear for trial.
"I think that all I'll say is that I
expect him to appear for trial
Nakell told The Favetteville
Times. "He's been very eager for a
trial
Nakell has declined to comment
about whether he has spoken
By SEAN HERRING
Aaaktut New Editor
Governor James G. Martin an-
nounced that the State is offering
a reward for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of the
person or persons responsible for
the murder of a local man.
1 The reward offered, in crimes of
this nature, is known as the
Governor's reward.
Detective J.E. Nichols, of the
Greenville Police Department
said, "the Governor's reward is
an additional tool to help us
gather information, in any serious
offense
"The Governor can grant or not
grant any amount that he feels is
necessary, but the amount usu-
ally awarded is $5,000 he said.
Nichols stated the murder of
Thomas Lee McGowan, 72, of 714
Atlantic Avenue, who was a local
'can man is still under investiga-
tion, and that they are looking for
more information.
The FBI and State Bureau of
Investigation (SBI) are working
jointly to gather information and
solve the crime.
According to police reports,
McGowan was found on July 11,
1988, at approximately 10:30 a.m
lying dead in a Greenville storage
warehouse, where he ran a make-
shift flea market. McGowan had
received multiple contact
wounds to the head.
"I do not want to give out any
privileged information, because it
might tip the case, or discourage
people from calling with informa-
tion Nichols said.
He stated, "the Governor's
reward is somewhat like Crime
Stoppers, but they only offer
$1,000 for information leading to
the arrest or conviction of the
perpetrator
No one is awarded any money
until after the court hearing, to
decide whether his information is
pertinent to the arrest or convic-
tion of the accused, as stated by
the N.C. Governor's Statue.
Furthermore, if more than one
person comes forth with useful in-
formation, the reward is divided
among the number of people,
who gave the tip.
Nichols said, "Law enforce-
ment personnel are not eligible to
receive the reward, because this is
our job to investigate crimes. No
crime is going to be solved by one
person, but we must utilize other
agencies, tools, and equipment
he said.
with Hatcher since he was to sur-
render to authorities in Raleigh.
A trial has tentatively been set
for later this month, authorities
said.
Hatcher, 30, was last reported
seen at a Mexican restaurant in
Chapel Hill on Aug. 31, according
to William Berryhill Jr US. Mar-
shal for eastern North Carolina.
"Right now, there's just no major
break in the case, but we're
diligently pursuing Mr. Hatcher's
whereabouts Berryhill said
Tuesday. "If s almost has disap-
peared off the face of the earth.
Berryhill said he did not think
any harm has come to Hatcher.
"To the very best of my knowl-
edge Eddie Hatcher is ave,
well and kicking somewhere
Hatcher and Jacobs, who are
accused of holding hostages for 10
hours at The Robesonian in Lum-
berton, have said thev took the
action to call attention to allega-
tions of comioption in the
county's criminal justice system.
All of the hostages were freed
uniniured by the two Tuscarora
Indians, who surrendered with-
out incident after Gov. Jim Martin
agreed to appoint a task force to
investigate the allegations.
The two men face possible life
imprisonment if they are con-
victed of the charges, which in-
clude taking hostages, using fire-
arms to commit a hostage-taking
offense and firearms.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8, 1988
Pap smears can detect cancer in women
I'm 18 years old a;�d having
my first Pap smear.
What do I need to Know?
The Pap smear is a simple and
painless test used for the detec-
tion of cervical cancer or the pres-
ence of precancerous cells. The
test is done by collecting a sample
of cells from the cervix or mouth
of the womb.
The pap smear makes it pos-
sible to discover very early cancer
vhich is almost 100 percent cur-
able.
However, if the precancer-
ous cells are left untreated they
may advance to invasive cancer.
Some women are more likely than
others to develop abnormal cervi-
cal cells.
Although the exact cause is
lot knovn, sexual intercourse is
somehow involved, women at
risk include, 1) those who began
sexual intercourse before age 18,
2) those who have had sexual in-
tercourse vith multiple partners.
You should start having Pap
smears soon after you begin hav-
ing sexual intercourse.
If your first Pap test shovs no
evidence of abnormal cells, it
should be repeated in one year.
If your second test is also nor-
mal then the test should be re-
peated at regular intervals of 1-3
years.
Check vith your health care
provider since the need for this
test varies from person to person.
At the same time you receive your
Pap smear, the health care pro-
vider usually examines your
breasts for any lumps.
At this time heshe may teach
you hov to do a breast self-exam.
Don't be afraid to learn about
breast cancer and hov to detect it.
Ninety percent of breast cancers
are discovered by the woman or
her partner.
Breast cancer is also one of the
easiest types of cancer to identify.
Early detection and treatment is
what makes treatment of breast
cancer so successful.
Breast self-exams should be
performed once a month, ltisbest
to do the exam 3-5 days after your
period. This is because it is very
common for normal lumps in the
breasts to svell and harden before
your period. If you are just learn-
ing how to perform breast self-
exams, home helth care provid-
ers recommend that you
perform the breast self-exams ev-
ery day for one month.
This helps to familiarize you
vith the procedure and that is nor-
mal for you. If you do find a suspi-
cious lump, DO NOT PANIC.
Most lumps are not cancerous.
However, consult your health care
provider since only heshe can
distinguish between a benign or
malignant lump.
A mammogram is another
method used for detection of
breast cancer. The mammogram is
an x-ray that develops a very clear
picture of each breast.
Mammograms have been able to
identify tumors up to two years be-
fore they can be felt.
The American Cancer Soci-
ety recommends a "baseline"
mammogram for women between
the age of 35-39 years for 1 ater com-
parison; a mammogram every
year or two for "omen 40-49, a
mammogram every yeer for
women over 50.
Remember it is knowledge
about these two types of cancer
that leads to early detection and
successful treatment. Ifyouvould
like more information stop by the
Student Healt Center or see yo
health care provider.
This Health Column was it-
ten by Donna Bullock, a recent
graduate of the ECU School of
Nursing. Also, credit goes to
Vicky Langrehr, also a recent
graduate of the School of Nursing.
Old Faithful threatened
YELLOWSTONE NA-
TIONAL PARK, (AP) - Visitors
were ordered out of the Old Faith-
ful complex today as a wind-
blown wildfire roared less than a
mile away, and firefighters at
Yellowstone's northern border
battled to save two towns.
The 500 to 600 visitors and
non-essential emoloyees at the
hotel and campground complex
near the park's most popular at-
traction were told to leave for
safety reasons and to allow fire-
fighters the access they need to
protect structures, says spokes-
woman Joan AnzelmoThis is
not a panic at all she said.
Winds gusting to 30 mph
pushed the 147,000-acre North
Fork blaze to within three-quar-
ters of a mile of the complex early
today. Embers carried by the
wind started spot fires even
nearer to the famed geyser.
Although officials had earlier
said they did not believe an
evacuation would be needed.
Anzelmo said the fire did not calm
down during the night as it usu-
ally has.
"We just feel that for the
public's safety ,we will never take
anvjotuiatiftsfche said, I
Officials are confident they can
protect structures from the ad-
vancing flames. These include the
historic, wooden Old Faithful Inn,
two other lodges, hundreds of
cabins, a general store, a service
station and a clinic.
On Tuesday, soldiers laid a
4.000-foot irrigation line to wet
down the area to divert the
Hames.
The blaze is among 13 major
fires that have burned roughly 1
million acres this summer in Yel-
lowstone and the surrounding
national forests in Wyoming,
Montana and Idaho. Inside the
2.2 million-acre park, 634,000
acres are charred.
At Yellowstone's northern
border, firefighters wetted down
buildings in the tiny towns of Sil-
ver Gate and Cooke City as the
63,000 acre Storm Creek fire
surged out of the park. Both
towns with a combined year
round population of 150, were
ordered
evacuated earlier Tuesday as the
fire threatened from 1 and a half
miles away.
Flames from a spot fire skirted
Silver Gate from just 600 yards
away Tuesday night and moved
toward Cooke City, three miles to
the east.
Wind-blown embers landed
on buildings but were quickly
doused by firefighters, who
worked a night-long effort to save
the community.
"Cool night air reduced the
spot fire's intensity, said fire in-
formation officer Pat Kaunert, but
tne Storm Creek fire raged out of
control
Firefighters cut Silver Gate's
power Tuesday night to prevent
the downing of live power lines.
The town was lit only by spot-
lights, and the orange glow of the
spot fire 200 yards away was
bright enough to read by, The
Associated Press' David Foster
reported from the town.
David Liebersbach, fire com-
mander at Silver Gate, estimated
firefighters had a 25 percent
chance of saving the town.
Other Montana fires also
forced evacuations.
The 66,000-plus-acre Canyon
Creek fire in west-central Mon-
tana grew so quickly that officials
had no accurate idea of its size,
said jane Weber of the Lewis and
Clark National Forest. The
growth promoted an evacuation
of an undetermined number of
cabins.
More than 30 cabins southwest
of Augusta were ordered evacu-
ated, Weber said. To the south-
west across the Scapegoat Wilder-
ness, the Canyon Creek fire forced
evacuations as it burned north of
Ovando, about 75 northwest of
Helena. Officials evacuated
about 10 residences near a new
fire eight miles west of Glacier
National Park.
Gov. Ted Schwinden on Tues-
day banned all outdoor recreation
outside Montana's cities and
towns due to the fire danger.
Elsewhere, a fire in parched
grass and pine in central Wash-
ington exploded from 160 acres
Monday to more than 25,000 acres
Tuesday, sending firefighters
fleeing, destroying at least one
house and forcing the evacuation
of a dozen others. State officials
closed 40 miles of nearby U.S. 97
due to smoke.
In Idaho, wind whipped a fire
in the Nez Perce National forest
from 25,900 acres Monday to
36,780by Tuesday, night.
Campgrounds were evacu-
ated about 225 miles north of San
Francisco in the King Mountain
Range, wherea 1,150-acre fire was
burning. Forests and grassland
also burned in Oregon and Utah.
The Boise Interagency Fire
Center, the coordinating office for
firefighting in the West, said fires
this year have charred 3.65 mil-
lion acres, an area larger than
Connecticut. Slightly more than 2
million of the acres are in Alaska.
During the last big fire season,
1985, 2.8 million acres burned.
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U.S. lo
WASHINGTON (AP) - A studv
released today challenoes the
notion that America will be able to
replace millions of jobs lost inj
fading smokestack industries
with new jobs in emerging high-
technology fields.
The Council on Competitive
ness said the United States ha;
lost its once-commanding lead 111
many high-tech industries It said
that onlv a concerted effort b
government, industry and thq
nation's schools can reverse tht
trend.
"In field after field, from com
bustion engineering to consume:
electronics, from machine tools t
the integrated circuitg foreigi
competitors have moved int
markets pioneered and onc
dominated by American firms
the report said. "Often, their sue
cess wasbuilt onexoloiting invenj
tions made in American Laboratal
Patriotism
WASrflNGTON(AP)-M
Dukakis spoke of his immigrant
heritage before a backdrop I
American Rags and the Statue 01
Liberty. George Bush led the RJ
publican convention in a n
tion r( the Pledge o Allegiance.
Typical scenes from what I
ready the most star spai I
presidential campaign in n j
ory.
The red, white and blue hue i
the contest no doubt reflects
judgment that Americans are .1
the mood for another dose of pa
triotism, the sort oi stuff Rona'u
Reagan promoted in two lanv
slide election victories.
But flag-waving also is the ret
uge of candidates who woul
rather not spell out how they plaJ
to balance the budget :r creatj
millionsof new, well-paying
Hag-waving isn't Limited
creating a sea of color for the e
ning television news shows.
"Read my lips says Republ
can Bush, no new taxes.
"Good jobs at good wages
Embassy worki
ordered home
RANGOON, Burma (AP)
Army trucks loaded with trooj
rolled toward the center of tb
capital todav with orders to shoe
looters, who were sacking go
ernment buildings, factories anl
farms.
The U.S. Embassv in Ran goo)
ordered an evacuation oi
American dependents as a "prj
cautionary measure said Re
Petzino. the U.S. Embassy spoke
man in Bangkok. He said tl
evacuees would be sent to Banj
kok.
"The streets are deserto
people are pretty much in fear
their property.Things have pretj
much closed down said a Wei
ern diplomat in Rangoon. "The
is a widespread perception tl
things have deteriorated
Today was the first time
nearlv three weeks that the mi
tary presence had been obvious
Rangoon, where looting bro)
out Tuesday.
The diplomat said he saw abel
10 trucks with at least 20 soldiej
in each vehicle late Tuesdi
around Rangoon University ai
Shwedagon Tagoda, both gath
ing spots for anti-governmel
protesters. He said it was the lai
est military force he had seen,
Rangoon in two weeks.
"The defense forces and
people's police force shall o
fire to impose control should tl
find that these looters, bent
violence, continue th
actsstate-run Rangoon Rac
announced as the troops roll
in
"At present, unscrupulol
people are restoring to violent
breaking into, looting and
stroying factories, warehouj
and other sites where puP
property is being stored
brief broadcast said.
It was the first stem warnj
about intervention to stop If
ing, which began outside the
several weeks ago.
Radio Rangoon said its warnj
"does not concern those
who are demonstrating pe
fully referring to pro-der
demonstrations against the thrj
week-old government of Pre
dent Maung Maung.
Looters broke into the Custol
Department warehouse, a buil
ing of the Education DepartmJ
and soap and textile factonl





men
his
member it is knowledge
icse two types of cancer
is to early detection and
ul treatment. If you vould
o information stop by the
Heall Center or see yo
.ire provider.
t lealth Column was ,wit-
Donna Bullock, a recent
e of the ECU School of
Use credit goes to
angrehr, also a recent
2 of the School oi Nursing.
rolinian
Using
?ncer Meymandi
am Blankenship
Kate$4.75
tracts)
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$4.50
$4.50
$4.45
$4.45
$4.40
$4.40
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$4.20
OURS:
iday
p.m.

166
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yer Leg
uarters
9
lb

idweiser
ular Only
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3
19
cans
ola 2 Liter
r i
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89
of your choice with a
ore order not including
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lless White
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lb.
9
eptember 10
n. - 8 p.m.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8,1988 3
U.S. lost lead in high-tech
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
WASHINGTON (AP) - A study
released today challenoes the
notion that America will be able to
replace millions of jobs lost in
fading smokestack industries
with new jobs in emerging high-
technology fields.
The Council on Competitive-
ness said the United States has
lost its once-commanding lead in
many high-tech industries. It said
that onlv a concerted effort by
government, industry and the
nation's schools can reverse the
trend.
"In field after field, from com-
bustion engineering to consumer
electronics, from machine tools to
the integrated circuitg foreign
competitors have moved into
markets pioneered and once
dominated by American firms
the report said. "Often, their suc-
cess was built on exoloiting inven-
tions made in American laborato-
ries by American scientists
The report said other countries
such as Japan have done a much
better job of bringing new tech-
nology to the marketplace
quickly.
Unless this trend is reversed,
the study warned, the United
States will suffer further deterio-
ration in its trade deficits and a
declining standard of living.
"Technology is essential to
America's competitiveness, the
driving force behind increased
productivity, export growth and a
rising standard of living said
John Young, chairman of the
council and president of Hewlett-
Packard Co.
In releasing the report, Young
said he wanted to challenoe the
comforting illusion tnat "the sun-
rise industries of high technology
are the wave of the future - the
economic panacea we all need
"In 1987, our trade deficit with
Japan in electronics was almost as
large as it was for automobiles. So
Silicon Valley is not so far re-
moved from Detroit he said.
The report cited these develop-
ments:
-American companies' share of
the U.S. domestic market has
shrunk dramatically in many
high-technology fields. Between
1970 and 1987, U.S. manufactur-
ing companies' share of the
American market in phono-
graphs fell from 90 percent to 1
percent, in color televisions from
90 percent to 10 percent, in ma-
chine tools from 100 percent to 35
percent and in teleohones from 99
percent to 25 percent.
-America's trade surplus in high-
technology products has declined
precipitously during the 1980s
and was actually in deficit for the
first time in 1986.
-Foriegn inventors captured 47
percent of U.S. patents in 1987, up
from 35 percent in 1975 with Japa-
nese inventors holding key pat-
ents in an increasing number of
fields.
-By 1986, Japan had captured 65
percent of the world market in
computer chips. The United
States had less than 30 percent.
-America could face a shortfall of
500,000 scientists and engineers
by the year 2010, due to retire-
ments and a declining number of
students choosing careers in sci-
ence and engineering.
The council, founded in 1986, is
composed of 151 chief executives
from industry, organized labor
and higher education. It has is-
sued a series of reports aimed at
improving the ability of Ameri-
can companies to compete in
world markets.
i
Thg Center la Orwm
Wed.
9-2:30
Tues.
10-2
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
111 East Third Street � The Lee Building
Greenville. N. C.
Free Pregnancy Te�t-
. Confidential Counselin
Patriotism is Dukakis, Bush platform
WASHINGTON (AP) - Michael
Dukakis spoke of his immigrant
heritage before a backdrop of 22
American flags and the Statue of
Liberty. George Bush led the Re-
publican convention in a recita-
tion r( the Pledge of Allegiance.
Typical scenes from what is al-
ready the most star spangled
presidential campaign in mem-
ory.
The red, white and blue hue of
the contest no doubt reflects a
judgment that Americans are in
the mood for another dose of pa-
triotism, the sort of stuff Ronald
Reagan promoted in two land-
slide election victories.
But flag-waving also is the ref-
uge of candidates who would
rather not spell out how they plan
to balance the budget or create
millions of new, well-paying )obs.
Flag-waving isn't limited to
creating a sea of color for the eve-
ning television news shows.
"Read my lips says Republi-
can Bush, " no new taxes
"Good jobs at good wages
says Democrat Dukakis, waving
his favorite rhetorical flag.
Weighing in on Tuesday was
the president, an old master at this
kind of campaigning.
"After eight hard years of re-
building America's strength, do
we really want to return to a
Disneyland defense policy ?" the
president asked the American
Legion.
He ticked off the defense system
he claimed Dukakis opposes, in-
cluding the Trident missle system
and the Stealth bomber, both of
which the Massachusetts gover-
nor supports.
On the question of a federal
budget awash in record amounts
of red ink, both candidates talk
about the need to reduce the defi-
cits, but they aren't saying how
they'd do it.
The flexible freeze proposed by
Bush is derided by Dukakis as
"son of voodoo economics the
memorable phrase Bush once
used - and now wishes he hadn't
to describe Reagan's economic
policies.
But Dukakis' own plan for cut-
ting the deficit is based on un-
specified cuts and his determina-
tion to collect up to $100 billion in
unpaid income taxes.
Helping the homeless, the eld-
erly, providing better schools and
health care, rebuilding the
nation's roads and bridges, re-
storing the competitive edge to
American industry, cleaning up
the environment, all these are
widely accepted goals to be
reached through the vaquest of
proposals.
Everybody is for cooperation,
bringing together government,
business and labor.
With new taxes a forbidden
topic and budget deficits remain-
ing, at record levels, neither Bush
nor Dukakis wants to commit
himself to specific proposals with
price tags the nation can't afford.
So, instead they tout their lead-
ership abilities, a pitch that as-
sumes the main task is to convince
voters that the candidate will
make the right decisions, what-
ever they may turn out to be.
By now, the voters ought to be
convinced that both presidential
candidates are patriots who love
their country and revere its flag,
convinced and ready to hear now
the contenders plan to deal with
national problems.
Read The East Carolinian for the latest in campus
new, sports, and features, every Tuesday and Thurs-
day.
Until we drop dead from exhaustion.
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Embassy workers
ordered home
RANGOON, Burma (AP) -
Army trucks loaded with troops
rolled toward the center of the
capital today with orders to shoot
looters, who were sacking gov-
ernment buildings, factories and
farms.
The U.S. Embassv in Rangoon
ordered an evacuation of 95
American dependents as a "pre-
cautionary measure said Ross
Petzino. the U.S. Embassy spokes-
man in Bangkok. He said the
evacuees would be sent to Bang-
kok.
"The streets are deserted,
people are pretty much in fear of
their property. Things have prettv
much closed down said a West-
ern diplomat in Rangoon. "There
is a widespread perception that
things have deteriorated
Today was the first time in
nearly three weeks that the mili-
tary presence had been obvious in
Rangoon, where looting broke
out Tuesday.
The diplomat said he saw about
10 trucks with at least 20 soldiers
in each vehicle late Tuesday
around Rangoon University and
Shwedagon Pagoda, both gather-
ing spots for anti-government
protesters. He said it was the larg-
est military force he had seen in
Rangoon in two weeks.
"The defense forces and the
people's police force shall open
fire to impose control should they
find that these looters, bent on
violence, continue their
actsstate-run Rangoon Radio
announced as the troops rolled
in
"At present, unscrupulous
people are restoring to violence,
breaking into, looting and de-
stroying factories, warehouses
and other sites where public
property is being stored the
brief broadcast said.
It was the first stern warning
about intervention to stop loot-
ing, which began outside the city
several weeks ago.
Radio Rangoon said its warning
"does not concern those people
who are demonstrating peace-
fully referring to pro-democ-
demonstrations against the three-
week-old government of Presi-
dent Maung Maung.
Looters broke into the Customs
Department warehouse, a build-
ing of the Education Department
and soap and textile factories.
The Wash House
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Voting On The Following Positions:
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103 EASTBROOK DRIVE 758-7570





(Miz iEaat Carolinian
Pete Fernald, o�rM��
Chip Carter, m� gm�
James F.J. McKee, DtnctofAhtTi&nt
Joe Harris, m�m
Doug joi nson,m g�
TIM HAMPTON,f�h,r�F,fttor
Mia ielle England, o-� m
Debbie Stevens, smm
Jeff Parker,s��t ��
TOM FURR, Circyiaum Manager
Susan Howell, pro m�
John W. Medlin, msm
Mac Clark, Fusm�sM�ugCT
SEPTEMBER 8,1988
OPINION
Page 4
Parking
Freshmen must lose out
The parking situation on campus
is getting worse. The stopgap meas-
ures proposed last semester will not
alleviate nearly enough of the pres-
sure, pressure made worse by the
fact this year's enrollment was at an
J
all time high. While an admittedly
expensive parking deck would
seem the best long term solution,
there is another avenue that needs to
be explored.
It's an unpleasant alternative, but
one that seems to be inevitable. ECU
can no longer afford to let freshmen
register their cars. We are the only
one of the larger schools in the UNC
system that still lets freshmen park
on campus.
While it's a good thing ECU was
able to help ease the transistion to
college life for the freshman body
this long, there are three other
undergraduate classes, graduate
students, faculty, staff and admini-
stration to consider.
The added space of the current
freshmen lots, added to the 900
under construction would still not
solve the problem, but it would help
considerably.
Greenville, while not much else in
a lot of respects, is a convenient town
for students. Almost anything is
within walking or bus distance.
While a mandatory ban on freshmen
cars is an major inconvenience, in
most respects it is hardly a fatal one.
The ban would also change
Greenville weekends substantially.
Many think of ECU as a suitcase
college, but having the majority of
the freshmen here on the weekends
would encourage them to take ad-
vantage of the opportunities
Greenville does have to offer.
While freshmen would under-
standably rage at this restriction, it
really is fast becoming one of the few
Dptions ECU has left in this situ-
ation. And, with the prejudice of up-
perclassmenhood, they will no
doubt appreciate it in the coming
years.
Apology
As editor of The East Carolinian, I
have had to think and rethink my
position on the infamous "pirate
cartoon" we ran in our first issue,
and the editorial I wrote on Sept.l.
After listening to many differing
opinions on the subject, I feel I was
out of line in writing the editorial.
I wrote it as an explanation of why
the cartoon got published, but it
came out much more arrogant than
I intended, and much more defen-
sive. My personal feelings on the
matter obviously surfaced much
more than is warranted in an edito-
rial.
I would also like to apologize to
those people who found the cartoon
offensive � as stated before, it was
not our intent to offend with that
particular cartoon and I and my staff
are sorry for any grief it might have
caused.
va9 ottvotAvveivs� wmsp camm- s ytv.
Quayle overshadows during convention
BY FRED BARNES
The New Republic
Dan Quayle did to George Bush what Presi-
dent Reagan was expected to do. Quayle over-
shadowed the vice president, at least from day
two of the Republican National Convention
through the following week.
Quayle also did what Bush often does to
himself. Quayle made himself the butt of jokes,
both for being a lightweight und for having spent
the Vietnam War in the Indiana National Guard.
Comedian Jay Lcno said National Guard duty
served Quayle well: "You just kind of sit around
and you wait for something to happen. Hey, if
that isn't training for the vice presidency, I don't
know what is)
The Qualye vice-presedential controversy. It
may not be the turning point in the campaign,
but it's an awfully important episode. In the best-
case scenario, Bush will suffer only slightly on
Nov. 8 because of Quayle.
But Bush has to make the best case happen,
and that won't be easy. The guess is it's too late
to dump Quayle from the ticke . "After you get
Bush up defending him four or five times, you
can't yank him says John Sparthe Republican
consultant.
So Bush somehow has to take the focus off
Quayle. Qr he'll be peppered with questions
about Quayle from now until Eection Day. And
Democrats, without directly attrcking Quayle,
will make Bush's judgment in picking him an
issue.
Why did Bush pick Quayle? The answer is not
that Bush was looking for a "lapdog's lapdog
as Democratic operative Jerry Seigel puts it.
Bush took the course of least resistance. When
the other candidates were ruled out, he went
with the guy that two of his senior aides were
touting.
Edward Collins, who managed President
Reagan's canpaign in 1984, has twe good rules
for choosing a running mate. Bush violated both.
One is never let the decision get tied ap with the
convention, which invariably distorts reality.
The other is to pick som,eone who's been nation-
ally tested.
One tested candidate was Richaid Thorn-
burgh, the former Pennsylvania governor who'd
just been unanimously confirmed as attorney
general. But Thornburgh was persona non grata
with conservatives, so he was out. Alan Simpson
was unacceptable for the sane reason - a pro-
choice position on abortion. Dole and Kemp
were out because Bush can't abide either of
them, especially Dole. And Gov. George
Deukmiejian of California didn't want to be
picked.
By process of elimination, Quayle was left. Both
pollster Robert Teeter and media consultant Roger
Ailes had worked in Quayle's Senate campaigns,
and they spoke favorably. But neither Teeter nor
Ailes had enough clout to impose their man on
Bush. The only fellow with that sort of influence is
campaign chief James Baker, who favored Dole but
didn' t lobby aggressively. The Quayle decision was
Bush's.
Naming Quayle on day two upset everyone's
well-laid plans for the convention and the cam-
paign. The first day, aimed at touting the Reagan
record, went off as planned. Day Two was for
basinng Michael Dukakis, but Quayle got all the
attention. Day three was fo. building up Bush, but
Quayle and questions about his background held
sway. Bush's speech was the centerpiece on day
four, but the burgeoning Quayle story rivaled it.
After that, it was all Quayle.
Bush was supposed to come out of New Orleans
on a hot streak. He didn't. His speech was scintillat-
ing, but his comments on everything but Quayle
were ignored for the next week. He sought to make
the case that as president he'd build on Reagan's
foundation and that Dukakis was too great a risk for
the nation to take. None of this got through. The
media concentrated on Bush's vehement defense of
Quayle ("He damm sure didn't burn the American
flag").
Baker and Stuart Spencer, the premier GOP
strategist, had ambitious scheme for making the
vice presidential nominee a big help to Bush. That
went up in smoke. Spencer figured a well-run vice
presidential effort could add two or three percent-
age points to Bush's vote. Now he will be delirious
with joy if Quayle doesn't lose points for the ticket.
The pro-Quayle arguments trotted out by the
Bush campaign haven't help ed. They're negative-
Quayle isn't qualified to be president just because
he didn't flee to Canada during Vietnam. And at-
tacking the press may inflamie the public against
Sam Donaldson, but not in favor of Quayle.
The Bush campaign desperately needs, in Sears'
wordsa device to get people to lay off Quayle
The best device is Quayle himself. Should Quayle
turn out to be a spectacularly appealing cam-
paigner, the press might ease up.
Don't hold your breath. If Quayle were that good
on the stump, he wouldn't be regarded as such a
lightweigh t by his peers in Congress. Quayle's
strong suit supposed to be national defense, but
given the National Guard flap, this is the subject on
which he has the least credibility at the moment.
An obvious step is a Ferraro-sryle press confer-
ence that allows reporters to exhaust their ques-
tions. Bushies aren't willing to risk thus. They don't
trust all of Quayle's story and they aren't confident
he can sell himself. They also recoil at the analogy to
Geraldine Ferraro.
Another idea, credited to Eric Breindel of the
New York Post, Bush to name his Cabinet and and
give the press a flock of new personalities to cover
Breindel suggested Co'in Powell for defense secre-
tary and Max Kempelmen for national security
adviser. This might work in the short run.
It's up to Bush to create a compeleing story.
Otherwise, short of a windfall like a major Dukakis
blunder, the Quayle story will lingerBy mid-Sep-
tember, the press will be writing stories about
places Quayle won'tgo" because GOP candidates
don'twant him around, says Sears. Bush will be one
of those candidates.
Sun tans need not be cancer causing hobby
By FRED BARNES
The New Republic
Almost 6,000 Americans will die of skin cancer
this year. That's a lot. What makes it worse is that
skin cancer is the most easily preventable form of
cancerotherflvn lung cancer caused by smoking. As
we all now r jw, most skin cancer is caused by
overexposuie to the sun. Even when it doesn't kill,
excessive sun causes premature aging of the skin
and non-fatal cancers.
Now that the link between sunlight and skin can-
cer is well known, the official position of right-
thinking people is that the purposeful exposure of
pale flesh to raw sunlight for the purpose of acquir-
ing a tan is almost criminally foolhardy � like
smoking. Millions disregard this interdict, of
course, but their pleasure is.reduced (or enhanced,
as the case may be) by guilt.
"You cannot get a tan without damaging your
skin says the president of the American Academy
of Dermatology. The Skin Cancer Foundation says,
"The term 'healthy tan' is a contradiction in terms
An expert featured in the current issue of Conde
Nast Traveller recommends using a sunscreen that is
the equivalent of "standing in a dark basement at
midnight
Is it truly necessary for everyone who enjoys a tan
to give up that small pleasure? This is the kind of
decision our culture is ill-equipped to help us make
sensibly. Although sunning and smoking both cause
cancer, there are differences. One is that the risk of
getting fatal cancer from heavy sunning is far
smaller than the risk of getting fatal cancer from
heavy smoking. More people tan than smoke, but
hundreds of thousands die each year from smoking.
Another difference is that in the case of sunning,
moderation is a live option. If the vast majority of
smokers would cut back to two or three cigarettes a
day, smoking would no longer be a serious health
problem. But smoking is addictive, and few smokers
can hold themselves to two or three a day. There is no
such dilemma regarding suntans, yet the new helio-
phobia rarely allows for any middle ground.
The risk of skin cancer from suntanning has three
features that make it difficult to assess rationally.
First, it is a small risk of a large negative outcome.
We are shutting down our nuclear power industry
because of the tiny chance of a catastrophic melt-
down, while we complacently tolerate the certainty
of lesser but still serious harms (pollution, mining
accidents) from other power sources.
Second, the degree of risk varies with the degree of
exposure. No exposure to the sun, however small, is
completely harmless; extra caution is never com-
pletely wasted. You can always be a bit safer. Under
such circumstances, it's hard to abandon the quest
for perfect safety. Especially when � point three �
the benefit side of the calculus is "merely" pleasure.
A tan does nothing for the world except to make
people happy. And, despite our nation's founding
commitment to "the pursuit of happiness we often
act as if it deserves no weight. Oh, we all give it
weight in our personal decisions, but we abandon it
when we're in our civic mode of thought.
No one thinks a suntan is worth getting skin
cancer. It's not worth a one-in-a-hundred chance.
But at some point � one in 10,000,100,000,1 million
� trivial pleasure has its legitimate claims even
against cancer.
The two professions that guide us through that
tradeoff, journalism and medicine, both have pro-
fessional biases against this common-sense truth.
Having drawn attention to some peril � be it skin
cancer or nuclear war or the melting of the polar caps
�journalists are constitutionally indisposed to play
down its enormity or to emphasize how unlikely it is
to occur. Doctors are constitutionally disposed (and
thank God for it) to be extremely risk averse, and to
be absolutists about the tradeoff between health and
other concerns.
It's true that, at least for white people, any expo-
sure at all to the sun ages the skin and increases the
risk of getting cancer. If s also true, however, that the
overwhelming greatest danger is from sunburns,
not mere tanning. And it seems to be true that your
risk of getting skin cancer, and even of premature
aging skin, is based primarily on your experience of
sunburn as a child, not on your tanning behavior as
an adult. Although dermatologists are struggling to
prove otherwise, there's no proof yet that long ultra-
violet rays, the kind used in tanning parlors and the
kind that predominate in sunshine at times other
than around midday, are cancerous at all.
In short, the rates of skin cancer we're seeing today
are the fruits of ignorant misbehavior over the past
few decades. If everyone had escaped repeated
sunburn as a kid, avoided the sun around midday,
used moderately protective lotion the nest of the
time, and settled for a butterscotch custard look
rather than chocolate pudding, skin cancer would be
an insignificant problem.
Duke
RALEIGH (AP) A $1
judgment against Duke Li
sity that grew out of a dii
over an experimental cancer
ment has been overturned
panel of the N.C Court n
peals.
A three-judge panel on
day struck down a jurv's
that Duke pay former f
member Raymond U $1 m
But the judges upheld a $1(
judgment against a doctor
Duke faculty affirming the
finding that he had slander!
The ruling arose from a
over control of a machu
deep-heating cancerous tuj
LT, a Korean native who vJ
assistant professor of radiolj
Duke University Medical C
had done extensive resean
"hyperthermia anexpeni
treatment for cancer inv
heat radiation.
During a visit to lapan.
proached a manufacturer
developing the machine
manufacturer crafted the
motron RF-8 in 1981 and
to loan a unit to Duke for c
mental treatments.
U contended that the loa
contingent on his supervisii
controlling the machine
the experiments. But att
machine arrived in 1983,
physicians on the medical
staff argued that U could
the "principal inveshgatol
projects involving humai
cause he was not a med ical i
U contended he was ths
person qualified to lead tl
periments and was approi
Pope
RALEIGH (AP) - The
boro News & Record did n
a former Guilford Countv
when it said he "openly he
public" by denying that I
sex with the girlfriend of al
jail inmate or did favors,
inmate, a state appeal.
panel has ruled.
A three-judge panel
North Carolina Court of
upheld Thursday a judct
missal of a libel suit filed
mer sheriff James L. Proffi
Proffitt was elected count
iff in 1982. In 1985, the
Record said that the State
of Investigation was lookil
allegations that Proffitt aj
mer Assistant District Att
Robert Johnston had agre
certain favors for jail inma
nie Douglas in exchange
with Douglas' then-girj
Carmen Jobe. She later
Douglas.
Three of the new spa j
porters interviewed Pro ft
reported that he "denied
sex with the woman Th
was repeated in several
quent news stones.
In November 1985. Prq1
leased a lengthy stater
which he denied doing faj
Douglas in exchange for 4
his girlfriend but did notj
cally deny having had
her.
During his trial on
charges, Troffitt admitted
had sex with Mrs. Dougla
sisted the sex was not in ei
for favors. Profitt was acqi
bribery March 26,1986.
The next day, the New;
ord ran its editorial caj
Proffitt's removal from of
contending they had liej
having had sex witj
Douglas.
Proffitt later sued, arg
he had never denied ha
sex with the woman but
rued doing so in exch
favors.
"We find (Proffitt's) a
unpersuasive the appej
said in its opinion. j
The trial judge threwl
libel suit, ruling there wa
cient evidence that the nej
had libeled Proffitt.
In other cases, the ppeaj
awarded a new trial tc
Keith Benfield, who
victed in Rockingham Cj
first-degree sexual offej
taking indecent liberties
child. He was sentenced
prison plus five years.
The appeals court rule
trial court erred by alloi
alleged victim's hearsa
ment improperly tobeinl
asevidence. Benfield was
with forcing his mfe to
with his minor son, the





invention
n w as
ones
I the cam-
R igan
vas tor
all the
ng up Bush, but
kgi �und hold
n day
aled it.
i it if New Orleans
vh was scinullat-
ervtl �' Quayle
- ;htt make
n Reagan's
great a risk tor
g � through. The
hement defense of
.m the American
premier GOP
� r making the
� Push. That
l well-run vice
r throe percent-
he will be delirious
points for the ticket,
trotted out bv the
i. They re negative-
�sident just because
g Vietnam. And at-
: the public against
r I Quayle.
tely needs, in Scars
ft Quayle "
ild Quayle
ppealing cam-
re that good
regarded as such a
toss Quavle's
il defense, but
- the subject on
the moment.
- confer-
4 'heir ques-
r - They don't
ireri t confident
coil at the analogy to

n IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8,1988 5
reindel of the
me hi- t and and
nalities to cover.
- defense secre-
n for national security
rt rvm.
i competeing story.
� a maior Dukakis
ger "By mid-Sep-
iries about
cause GOP candidates
� �rs Bush will beone
Slobby
mely risk averse, and to
tradeoff between health and
k r white people, any expo-
. s the -kin and increases the
t s also true, however, that the
SI danger is from sunburns,
d it seems to be true that your
ancer, and even of premature
nmarilv on your experience of
I on your tanning behavior as
matologists are struggling to
e's no proof yet that long ultra-
ised in tanning parlors and the
tie in sunshine at times other
are cancerous at all.
skin cancer we're seeing today
ant misbehavior over the past
eryone had escaped repeated
aided the sun around midday,
rotective lotion the rest of the
a butterscotch custard look
pudding, skin cancer would be
Duke loses $1 million SAVACENTER
i
RALEIGH (AP) A $1 million
judgment against Duke Univer-
sity that grew out of a dispute
over an experimental cancer treat-
ment has been overturned by a
panel of the N.C. Court of Ap-
peals.
A three-judge panel on Tues-
day struck down a jury's order
that Duke pay former faculty
member Raymond U $1 million.
But the judges upheld a $100,000
judgment against a doctor on the
Duke faculty affirming the jury's
finding that he had slandered U.
The ruling arose from a fight
over control of a machine for
deep-heating cancerous tumors.
L, a Korean native who was an
assistant professor of radioloev at
Duke Universitv Medical Center,
had done extensive research on
"hyperthermia an experimental
treatment for cancer involving
heat radiation.
During a visit to japan, U ap-
proached a manufacturer about
developing the machine. The
manufacturer crafted the Ther-
motron RF-8 in 1981 and offered
to loan a unit to Duke for experi-
mental treatments.
U contended that the loan was
contingent on his supervising and
controlling the machine during
the experiments. But after the
machine arrived in 1983, some
physicians on the medical center
staff argued that U could not be
the "principal investigator" on
projects involving humans be-
cause he was not a medical doctor.
U contended he was the only
person qualified to lead the ex-
periments and was approved as
sole principal investigator by the
university's Institutional Review
board and the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration.
But Dr. LeonaraProsnitz, direc-
tor of radiationonocology,insisted
that he should be the principal in-
vestigator. As the argument per-
sisted, Prosnitz allegedly began
making statements about U's
abilities, qualifications and char-
acter, the appeals court's opinion
said.
On April 2, 1984 U obtained
access to the Thci motron and re-
moved parts making it inoper-
able. The university obtained a
court order for the return of the
parts and a contempt motion
when U failed to comply. The
university later dismissed its ac-
tion when a consent order was
agreed to by all parties that said
the machine would not be used
unless both sides agreed.
U filed his suit in October 1984,
alledgingthat Duke,Prcsnitz and
other university officials were
guilty of malicious prosecution,
abuse of process, intentional in-
fliction of emotional distress, tak-
ing U's personal property, tres-
passing, civil conspiracy, slander
and libel.
The jury in the August 1986 trial
in Durham County Superior
Court ordered Duke to pay U $1
million in punitive damages and
$30,000 in compensatory dam-
ages for malicious prosecution
and $1 for coverting his personal
property for the university's use.
It also ordered Prosnitz to pay
U. now a biophysicist at Rex
Hospital in Raleigh, $50,000 in
compensatory damages and
$50,000 in punitive damages for
libel and slander.
The court upheld the $100,000
judgment against Prosnitz and
the $1 million judgment against
Duke.
In ruling that Duke did not
have to pay the $1 million, the ap-
peals court said the university did
not act unreasonably in filing a
civil action against U to recover
the parts of the Thermotron he
had taken.
"Although it is not clear
whether either partv had an ex-
clusive right to use and control the
property it is clear that it was
reasonable for defendant Duke to
employ a procedure for a quick,
definite resolution since patients
depended on the operation of the
machine "Chief Judge Robert A.
Hedrick wrote in the court's opin-
ion.
The court also ruled that there
was insufficient evidence for the
Jury's finding that Prosnitz li-
beled U. But, the court said.
Prosnitz's statements were slan-
derous.
According to the appeals court,
Prosnitz said that U was "a liar,
deceitful, absolutely, useless, and
does not have a Ph.D and was a
fraud
"We hold that such statements
concerning plaintiffs academic
credentials amount to allegations
that impeach plaintiff in his pro-
fession Hedrick wrote. "As a
member of Duke University's
faculty and as a research scientist,
plaintiff depended on his aca-
demic degree in his work
Paper wins libel suit
iem.
RALEIGH (AP) - The Greens-
boro News & Record did not libel
a former Guilford County sheriff
when it said he "openly lied to the
public" by denying that he had
sex with thegirlfriendofacounty
jail inmate or did favors for the
inmate, a state appeals court
panel has ruled.
A three-judge panel of the
North Carolina Court of Appeals
upheld Thursday a judge's dis-
missal of a libel suit filed bv for-
mer sheriff James L. Proffitt.
Proffitt was elected county sher-
iff in 1982. In 1985, the News &
Record said that the State Bureau
of Investigation was looking into
allegations that Proffitt and for-
mer Assistant District Attorney
Robert Johnston had agreed to do
certain favors for jail inmate Ron-
nie Douglas in exchange for sex
with Douglas' then-girlfriend.
Carmen Jobe. She later married
Douglas.
Three of the newspaper's re-
porters interviewed Proffitt and
reported that he "denied having
sex with the woman The denial
was repeated in several subse-
quent news stories.
In November 1985. Proffitt re-
leased a lengthy statement in
which he denied doing favors for
Douglas in exchange for sex with
his girlfriend but did not specifi-
cally deny having had sex with
her.
During his trial on bribery
charges, Proffitt admitted having
had sex with Mrs. Douglas but in-
sisted the sex was not in exchange
for favors. Profitt was acquitted of
bribery March 26, 1986.
The next day, the News & Rec-
ord ran its editorial calling for
Proffitt's removal from office and
contending they had lied about
having had sex with Mrs.
Douglas.
Proffitt later sued, arguing that
he had never denied having had
sex with the woman but had de-
nied doing so in exchange for
favors.
"We find (Proffitt's) argument
unpersuasive the appeals panel
said in its opinion.
The trial judge threw out the
libel suit, ruling there was insuffi-
cient evidence that the newspaper
had libeled Proffitt.
In other cases, the appeals court:
awarded a new trial to Darold
Keith Benfield, who was con-
victed in Rockingham County of
first-degree sexual offense and
taking indecent liberties with a
child. He was sentenced to life in
prison plus five years.
The appeals court ruled that the
trial court erred by allowing the
alleged victim's hearsay state-
ment improperly to be introduced
asevidence. Benfield wascharged
with forcing his wife to have sex
with his minor son, the woman's
stepson, in May 1985.
Ordered new trials for Ellen
Jones Robey and Richard Dale
Barnes. Mrs. Robey wascharged
with second-degree murder and
Barnes with accessory after the
fact, but the appeals panel ruled
both convictions were based on a
statement that was obtained in
violation of Mrs. Robey's right to
have counsel present during
questioning.
The Randolph County case
stemmed from the Cnristmas Eve
1984 slaving of Thomas Robey.
Upheld the July 1987 conviction
of James Howell Hensley on a
charge of assault with a deadly
weapon inflicting serious injury
and second-degree sexual of-
fense.
Hensley was charged in Burke
County with bearing his pregnant
live-in girlfriend.
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Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8, 1988
Classifieds
FOR RKNT
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOM-
MAT1 WANTED: Upper rlnTimwi or
grad 95mo 13 utilities, private room.
5 blocks from campus. Call 758-6830.
ROOM FOR RENT:htacozj� 2 bedroom
pie Furnished, compleiely. S2(X) per
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message tor Renee at 758-1900.
API FOR Rl NT: Located 3 Mocks from
w rent, great location. Call
Stcvi for more details. 830-0339.
HOUSEMATE: Quiet mf. wanted by
member. 3B house, newly remod-
walking distance campus. Rent and
negotiable 757 (tvS Cabrielle
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom house 5 blocks from campus.
furnished except for bed-
i deposit with b months lease.
nth � I 3 utilitiesphone. Free
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FOR SALE
1982 KAWASAKI: 440 LTD 7,000
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give us a call between 12 noon and 5 p.m.
M-F at 1-800-722-7033.
PART-TIME WORKERS: Needed at
Sunnyside Eggs to load and unload
trucks. Hours are from 5 p.m. to mid-
night Call Tracy at 756-4235 or apply in
person.
WANTED FILE CLERK: For local law
firm. Filing, light typing, and some tele-
phone work. Experience helpful. 355-
0.100 ask for Carla.
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR MEN:
Are now accepting applications for the
Fall semester. Enthusiastic individuals
who enjoy fashion and can work flexible
hours should apply. Brody's Carolina
East Mall Monday thru Wednesday, 2-4
p.m.
BARMAIDS WANTED: Part-time, no
experience needed, will train. Must be 21
years old. Excellent tips call 758-0058, ask
for Sue.
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED: Young
male for sales and stock. Some heavy
lifting required. Must be neat and outgo-
ing. Apply at the youth shop, Carolina
East Centre. No phone calls
BE ON T.V Many needed for commer-
cials Casting info. (1) 805-687-6000 Ect.
TV- 1166.
EXPRESSIONS MAGAZINE: The
American Scholastic Press Association
Award Winning Publication at ECU is
now accepting applications for staff writ-
ers and a PromotionDistribution Man-
ager. Apply at the Media Board
Secretary's office in the Publications
Bldg. (second floor) by Friday. Contribu-
tors welcome.
PERSONALS
SHANNA�OK, here it is, the personal
you've been anxiously awaiting. Have a
great semester � you're running out of
time � the countdown is 8 mos. You're
the best "Roomie" ever! Stephanie.
THE DAY THEY COULDN'T CALL
PREF Sigmas and Lambda Chi's had a
last. From before the game 'til after, the
fun sure did last. With the flowers and the
escorts, our pledges were surprised, let's
do it again soon, thank you to the Lambda
Chi's. And good fellowship was had by
all. The Sigmas.
GIRLS OF ECU: How would you like to
spend one night of the week with 54 of the
best looking guys on campus? Little Sis-
ter Rush Phi Kappa Tau, Sept. 13,14! Little
Sister President - Lori Moss.
KAPPA ALPHA presents The EMBERS
Thurs Sept. 15 from 5-9 p.m. Tickets will
be on sale in front of the Student Store or
call 757-0128. Coolers are welcome!
PHI TAU LIL SISTER Happy Hour at
?bo! Thursday nights! Come party with
ECU'S best Lil' Sisters!
CONGRATULATIONS to all the new
pledges. We are real excited. Love the
sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
MICHELLE BOYD: We just want to
thank you for such a great job and all the
hard work you did. We Love You Sisters
of Alpha Xi.
CONGRATULATIONS to everyone for
a great Rush and a special thanks to Cam
and Liz for all their hard work and a job
well done. Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
PHI KAPPA TAU: Thanks for such a
blast at the game and the pref party after-
wards. Let's do it again soon Love,
Alpha Xi Delta.
KATIE: Happy 21st birthday! We've all
been through alot together, way too
much to recount, but it's been fun. Have a
great time Friday night, don't do any-
thing stupid such as pass out at 10.30 with
your skirt up around your head, pull
slugs off the shed or "Let me see you
smooch" and for god's sake if you get
sick, ADMIT IT! None of this "from here
down I'm sick, but from here up I think I
have the flu Let's have a great party
Friday. "Keith-Keith-get off me Keith
Love Kris, Lynne, Leigh Anne, Banshee,
Freddie, Zack, B.B. (wherever he is) and
Elvis and his crew.
JEFF: Thanks for making the last 2
months wonderful! I'm glad you can fi-
nally use that "L" word. I Love You, Rae.
PETE: It was nice meeting you at the late
night - Sat. night at the Phi Tau house
Let's get together soon.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Beta
Lambda pledges of Alpha Omicron Pi
Michelle Allen, Kathryn Bowen, Jo
Brooks, Natalie Brown, Donna Davidson,
Barbara Dean, Holly Eckman, Missy Dhs,
Shannon Fowler, Jodi Gear, Meredith
Grogan, Caroline Haire, Bonnie Haswell,
Heather Hatch, Amy Huber, Robin Jen-
kins, Fay Jones, Gretchen Joumigan, Jen-
nifer Jounigan, Kellie MacWelsh, Sarah
Metcalf, Amy Pfrommer, Gina Pacifico,
Sara Rowe, Rebecca Saleeby, Lora Sadler,
Leanne Shaw, Lisa Selby, Sue Sullivan,
Christi Smith, Stephanie Slyvester, Robin
Wiggins and Kim Wood We had a great
time this weekend and we're looking
forward to some fun! Get psyched for
Friday - Ifs your night!
SIGMAS: Partying Saturday before and
after the game was Supreme. Congrats to
your new pledges (beautiful in the Sigma
tradition). Let's do it again soon as good
fellowship was had by all. Love, The
Lambda Chi's.
KAPPA ALPHA presents the 1st Annual
Boardwalk Benefit for MDA. Featuring
the Embers Thurs, Sept. 15 from 5-9 p m.
Tickets will be on sale in front of the
Student Store or call 757-0128. Coolers are
Welcome!
COME SEE THE EMBERS live at the tCA
House for the 1st Annual Boardwalk
Benefit for MDA. Thurs Sept. 15, 5-9
p.m. Get your tickets now. Coolers are
welcome.
DO YOU ENJOY WORKING WITH
PEOPLE? Undecided on a major? If so,
come find out what SCEC is all about
First meeting � Mon Sept 12 at 5:15 in
SP103.
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo Car
fridges with instructions for re sale i ast
Coast Music and Video 754251, 1109
Charles Blvd
180 PROOF, band of Pi Kappa Phi pet
forms with three other bands at the Bud
Band Wars, Sat. Sept 10, noon b
Opening with skvdivers and �
broadcasting live IT A pia ana
sold and c(�olers wel.ome Tickets
Coast Music and Video Fottowth
or catch the bus at the bottom ol
Hill"
1980, 850 SUZUKI: Blaik 4 cyd
shaft, 2 fiber glass luggage tvi' -���.
bags, windshield, space helmet, n.
tery and break shoos $750Call75
BASEBALL CARDS: SeH old
cash, call Thomas at 7V 068 - afti I
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED: Ar .
year, shape of car.K I 11 pav damn grx.i
money for anv ards of am yeai
shape or condition Net i; irtyn
Sell your cards to EarivisM! fall 757
1 eave niivjr it not there
r
ECU
V.
The East Carolinian:
Long hours, low pay.
Great Experience.
Apply in person, Publications
Building, Second Floor
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
FRIDAY SEPT. 9
Mike Lightnin' Wells
SAT. SEPT. 10
The Boomers
513 Cotanche St.
(Across from U.BI.)
BUDGET TIRE
& SERVICE
�:� Sireel
.ou need & tire � go
I . : :i ol new.
ha eCO( D used tires - all
� �� profile, high pcrform-
ur street tread, a few
I letters, and the popular
' � ir Eagle GT.
VAI of u ed tires without a
irrant) We warrantee
. tires in writing for 3060 days,
nding on price. On the corner
� t 1 h v 33 and NL ('reene St. In for
i calls velcomo H30-3772
ABORTION
"Personal and Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru Sat- Low
Cost Termination to 20 weeks of pregnancy
1-800-433-2930
Mandarin &
Ming Dynasty
HELP WANTED
for
New Restaurant to
Open in Middle Sept.
Need Hostess,
Waitress & Deliver
Call Mary
756-9687
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
� Located Near ECU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
$325 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Odwxopen- Apt 8, 12-530 p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quirt one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $205 a month. 6 month
lease MOBI1.E HOME RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
CRUSTY'S
1 lli�ri DELIVER
Now Hiring Drivers
Starting Wage $4.00 per hr.
Earn Up To $9.00 per hr.
Flexible hours, Bonuses. Must
have own car and insurance.
Apply in person at 1414 Charles St.
ATTENTION
JUDICIAL BOARD
MEMBERS
The following Judicial
Board Members need to
contact Alice Harden at
758-9923 or
757-6611 ext. 218
immediately:
Angie South
Keith Crawford
Brad Cates
Thank You!
Announcements
� QLLEGE WORK STIJDY
f you 1 i been awarded college work
. foi I ill Semester andor Spring
Semester you .ire encouraged to contact
� �. about off campus place-
ments Call 57-6979 or come by the Gen-
r.il v . �! room Building, Room 2028.
SPECIAL OLYMPqS
. i Pitt Count) Special Olym-
pics will lx conducting .1 training school
iept 17 at Elm Si Cym for anyone inter-
ested iii volunteering to coach soccer for
sped il athletes. No experience is needed.
We are also 1 tokingfor nudies for basket-
kill, iveightlifting, ans swimming. All
interested persons should contact Creg
j person rmime Sappen field at the
ial Xympk office, 830 4551
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anyone who purchased new student
reviews sin Mild come bv the yearbook
office to pick them up. Hours are M-F, 6-8
p m
WINDSURFING
Be sure to attend the Intramural
Windsurfing registration meeting held
front Sept f to Sept 27
GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
i iroup photographs will be taken Sept 15
until Dec 2. No group pictures can be
taken atter Dec 2 Please note that the a
group listing with the name of every per-
son in the photograph MUST be pre-
sented BtrOKE the photographer films
the group. ORGANIZATIONS WITH-
OUT LISTINGS WILL NOT BE PI lOTO-
GRAPHED, and time does not permit uV
scheduling of another session.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
ECU Christian fellowship will be held
every Thursday at 6 p.m. in the Cultural
Center.
CAMPUS GIRL SCOUTS
College aged adults meet for the 1st meet-
ing of the semester, Thursday at 6 p.m.
Room available from information desk
in Mendenhall. New memberships avail-
able. For information call Nanci 7SH-6701
after 5 p m
NATIONAL TEACHER EXAM
The National Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery Exams � (Communication
Skills, General Knowledge, and Profos-
sional Knowledge) will be offered at ECU
October 22. Applications are to be com-
pleted and mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 911-R, Princeton, NJ 08541.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept. 19. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105, Speight Building.
GMAT
The Graduate Management Admission
Test will be offered at ECU on October 15.
Applications are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT Educational Testing
Service, Box 96f-R, Princeton, NJ 08540.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept. 12. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105 Speight Building.
SEA
Interested in your residence hall? Become
involved by joining Student Residence
Association, bee your residence nan direc-
tor for information. Elections for officer's
are Sept. 13.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
Are you interested in dedicating 6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Call Marianne Exum (h) 830-
9450 or (w) 751-6271 for application and
more details. Application deadline Octo-
ber 1.
FRISBEE CLUB
Practices are in full swing. Come to the
bottom of College Hill every Tues
Thurs and Sunday at 5 p.m. New players
are more than welcome. Join the team that
bed for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca.
RUGBY
AH athletes are encouraged to try this
hard nosed sport and join in the fellow-
ship of Rugby. Practice is Tuesday thru
Thursday 3:30 p.m. until. For more infor-
mation call the ECU Intramural Club
Sports Dept. or Bob Eason at 757-0209.
BATTLE OF THE BANDS
Battle of the Bands, presented by the cof-
fee house committee of the student union,
will be accepting applications for this
event until Sept 8 at 5 p.tr. Pick up appli-
cations at the information desk at Men-
denhall. Amateur bands only please! So-
loists and Guitarists welcome.
BIOLOGY SIUPENTS
Get acquainted with biology faculty and
biology club members at the orientation
gathering Sept. 12 at 7 p.m. in BN 109.
Refreshments will be served.
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
Accounting majors: If you are enrolled in
a 3000 or 4000 level accounting class, you
are invited to attend the Accounting Sor -
ety Wine and Cheese Social, Thursday.
Stop by the Accounting Office for an in-
vitation.
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Department of Speech-Language &
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be pro-
viding the speech and hearing screening
for all students eligible for admission to
the Upper Division of Teacher Education
on Sept. 12, 13, and 14. The Department
will be testing from 5 to 6:30 p.m. on each
day listed above. NO APPOINTMENT IS
NEEDED (first come, first serve basis).
The SLAP Department is located in Belk
Annex on Charles St.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet Sept. 13 at 8 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium.
VOTERS
The League of Women Voters of
Greenville-Pitt County will sponsor voter
registration on Sept. 14 from 8:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. in the ECU Bookstore lobby. New
registrations, permanent address changes
andor party affiliation changes can be
made at this time.
roiiNSFTTNr: center
Coping with stress: A free mini dass of-
fered by the ECU Counseling Center for
students; You can � identify sources of
stress, make positive changes, manage
your response to stressful situations, learn
to relax, improve self confidence. Sept.
12,14,1619 in 329 Wright Building from 3-
4 p.m. No advance registration is re-
quired. Call or stop by the Counseling
Center for further information. (316
Wright Building; 757-6661). Plan on at-
tending all four sessions.
CO-OP EDUCATION
Co-op education, a free service offered bv
the University, is designed to help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. All students are en-
couraged to attend a Co-op Information
Seminar in the General Classroom Build-
ing. The Seminar schedule is: Thursday,
Aug. 25 4 p.m. Room 2006, Monday, Aug.
29 1 p.m. Room 2010, Thursday, Sept 1 4
p.m. Room 2026, Thursday, Sept. 8 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Monday, Sept. 12 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 15 4 p.m.
Room 2006, Monday, Sept. 19 4 p m
Room 2006, Thursday Sept. 22 1 pm.
Room 2010, Monday, Sept. 26 1 pm
Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 29 4 pm.
Room 2006.
STUDENT UNION
On Friday there will be a meeting held in
the lobby in front of the Student Union
offices for the following students: Leigh
Boggs, Anna Cancy, Amy Eckroth,
Christy Mangum, Darlene Perdisatt,
Da van dr a Reed, Diana Richardson, Dawn
Schafer, Nancy Simons, Melissa Spain,
Mitzi Stumps, Todd Teague. If you are
unable to attend this 4 p.m. meeting
please contact me at 752-8165.
SCEC
The Student Council for Exceptional Chil-
dren will hold their first meeting on Sept.
12 at 5:15 p.m. in Sp 103. Speakers from
Assn. of Retarded Citizens and Special
Olympics: Everyone is welcome to attend.
ECHO
There will hi a meeting Thursday .1! 5p
in the 1 ionots Lounge (Room 1 �
eral Classroom Bldg 1 Allt - stcd
in the Honors Program at ECU should
plan to attend Members are requesti d
bring ideas regarding our comn
outreach & ideas for guest lectures and
colloquia New members always m
come Call Dr Sanders (757-6373) for
more info
KERVGMA
A Bible study onh forthosi serious atx
studying the Bible it is challenging at d
requires commitment, involving discus
sion and readings Weekl) meetings will
be scheduled to accoi xtate those who
are interested Kervg.ua is an interde-
nominational program, and sponsored by
Presbyterian Campus Ministry i or more
info, call Mike at 752-7240
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
ACCOUNTING MAJORS It vou me en
rolled in a 3000 or 400Q level account c
class, you are invited to attend the Ac
counting Society Wine and Cheese Sodal
Thursday, September 8 Stop by the Ac-
counting Office for an invitation
ECU WOMEN'S SOCCER
Anyone interested in playing Women's
Club Soccer in the Fall and Spring of this
year, an organizational meeting is being
set up. If you are interested and want
more information, please get in touch
with one or any of the following people
Kris Slacum 758-4255, Beth Harvev 736-
9450 or Ann Totaro 830-9315 Cail and
leave message
I'Hl BET A LAMBDAI
Phi hV?a Lai ung an
i K USE for ai .iinBi
on Thursday at 4 p m in room 1(
eral Classroom :� ding Anvi
: in a Businc� � E
j
1
!
PRE-PHYSICALTHFR,
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turned to the lower c iri
'The fundamental -
titled to protection
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Univers Norl
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reinstatement and back
Superior Court ju - U
her, but the appc -
out the judgment.
Ms Truesdalc was ei
SIC I
Gordo
Golf & S
In Front of Greenville
7-10 a.m. S,
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Daily Lunche
& Sunday Bui
Shrimp Dinne)
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1 VSP'ffl





THE! ASTCAROLir '
Announcements
EHJ BETA LAMBDA
' '�"� a i- holding .ui OI'LN
� �ne interested in Business
at 4 p m in room 1013 Gen
� i Building Anyone en
i isiness �! H IE course is
' nd and all majors are
i ollegiate equi ilanl
PR! PHYS1CAI THERAP
ego pre physical thorapv
highei anticipating ap-
Ma J89 Physical Thorapv
I e Physical Therapy
� ho 1st floor Belk Build
I ol Sept to determine
tions for receiving Iho
ill be given then It
- � ontacl that office
exl 2rl) or in person
l I'MNl ASSOCIATION
' v , unt) ECU Alumni
of Admissions are
�- . dav academic bowl
� .i! used by the bowl
the formal used by
�� Bowl ITie ECU Bowl
ges time keepers,
� i: p in m theconfer-
once room of the TaylorSlaughter
Alumni Center on E Sth Street, there will
lv an orientation mini- training session
tor interested volunteers Faculty, staff,
and students are invited to attend Call
Susan C Smith, Admissions. 737 SMfl or
lohn Anema at 7:2 71 Si for further mior
mation
RE-ELECTION FOR GOV.
The ECU Students tor the Re election of
Gov Jim Martin invite all students, fac
ulty and staff to the opening of the Pitt
County 1 leadquarters on Thursday start-
ing at 5 30 p m The Governor's wife Dot-
tie Martin will be attending at 6 p.m. The
Pitt Countv 1 leadquarters is located at 210
E. 4th St and the telephone number is 758
6339.
RE-ELECTION FOR GQV,
The ECU Student tor the Re election of
Gov Iim Martin invite all students, fac
ulty and staff �o "An Evening with Gov
hm Martin' a barbecue supper and eve
ning of entertainment on Sept 13 starting
at b p m Tickets are S and are available at
210E 4thS� orhycalhng758-6339or758
1403
JEWISH STUDENTS
You are welcome to attend the following
High Holiday Services at Temple Bay!
Shalom (1420 E 14th St in Greenville)
Spt 11,8pm ErevRoshHashanah,Sept
12,10am Rosh Hashanah Day 6:30p.m
Ma anv. Sept 13, 10 a m 2nd Day Rosh
Hasahanah, Sept 20, 7 pm Erev Yom
Kippur, Sept. 21, 9.30 a.m. om Kippur
Morning 4 30 p m Alternenin Service,
"iior & N'ilah. Tor more info, or direc
tions call Mike at 756 4430 All students
are invited to the home of Dr Bramy
Resnik for a 1 lome Hospitality Dinner on
Sept. 20 at SIS p.m. Please call to RSVP tor
dinner Call Dr. Resnik at 355-5321 (home)
or 757 6521 (work) or Mike at 756 4930
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Season tickets are now on sale for the
Performing Arts Series at ECU This year
there are fourteen outstanding perform
ances starting in October and running
through April Some of the attractions
include VVvnton Marsahs, CABARET.
Die Acting Company in Love's labour's
lost, Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, The
Tokyo String Quartet, Oregon, The At
lanta Symphony, and the Ohio Ballet Eor
a free brochure, and further details con
tact: The Central Ticket Office, Menden
hall Student Center, 757 fvill, exl 2m-
uirt rules on lie detector
THIi REBEL
Till RIBI'l will be accepting submis
sions for the annual poetry and prose
contests continuously until Nov 7 Sub
mil typed entries to Media Board or Rebel
i fti e (pen to � urrently enrolled 1 ' I
students only
PHI ALPHA THETA
Phi Alpha Theta will hold it- first meeting
Sept 14 at 2.30 in the Todd Room All
members and those people who are inter
ested in joining ART 1 N OURA ED R )
ATTEND
A MA
The American Marketing .V� iation will
hold its first meeting this M ursda Sep
tember 8th at 3 30 VVe will be meeting in
room 1031 of the Newlassroom Build
mg lom Atkins, a representative of th
Miller Brewing Company is our guest
speaker All interested are welcome and
old members are encouraged to attend
NEW ARRIVALS
I In- Mendenhall "student Center Music
1 is t en in g 1 ounge has received the follow
ing selections on oompad disc Aeros
mith Permanent Vacation Wynton
Marsahs standard I une, INXS Kirk
Ahmad amal rystal; adja Salerno
Sonnenberg;Sinead Cy onnor fheLion
All
New! I

GYM
USA
m �
i ��
i (' a r n
1 Tt '��
P) A state ap-
tel has ruled that a
t� st ask ing questions
s including
is not unconstitu-
: h acts are not
constitution.
;e panel of the
art of Appeals
irsday reversed a Forsyth
rc ourt order that
i a Winston-Salem State
. oe who was
� to take a lie-
he case was re-
1 the lower court.
mental rights en-
n under the right
iding family rela-
� acr or procrea-
. i resemblance to the
in the activities in
irt said in an
idg. Donald
irt (.Trod in
the polygraph
violated (the
n -t ��nal right to
I
n Truesdale hao
m State, the
� � t arolina sys-
officiais tor
1 back pay. A
: Ige sided with
; . als court threw
nt.
idale w as employed
as a security officer at the univer-
sity on a probationary basis in
November 1984. She was told that
before becoming a permanent
emplovee, she would have to un-
dergo a polygraph exam, but she
refused to do so after learning that
some of the questions would in-
volve her sexual activity.
She was dismissed in August
1985 for insubordination. In the
order giving Ms. Truesdale her
lob and back pay, the Superior
Court Judge found that the
university's action violated her
constitutional rights, including
the right to privacy and tne right
against self-incrimination.
The appeals court ruled that
the questions on the polvgraph
examination were designed to
determine whetner an applicant
was truthful on his or her employ-
ment application.
The questions dealing with
sexual activity involved homo-
sexuals, sexual arousal bv view-
ing children, sexual contact witn
minors and unusual or unnatural
sex acts - none of which is pro-
tected by the Constitution as a
fundamental right, the appeals
court said.
The appeals panel was unable
to determine whether the lie-de-
tector test violated Ms.
Truesdale's right against self-in-
crimination because it was un-
clear whether she would have
SIDEWALK SALE!
Gordon's
Golf & Ski
J7
:
� In vnville TV & Appliance & Gordon's Golf & Ski
756-1003
10 a.m. Saturday, September 10th
iwi rters ' Irei - lotho Idn & Mrns Ski Jackrts, Housrwarrs, Izod
its. Socks n & I sed Apparel, Bab) I krthes, Men s Pin's 5ue 32 & 34. etc .), Jr. 4
� j. s i loll a- f n and Indies Coif Shoes, etc.
M W- i I EMS FROM 25 TO $5.00
Will be postponed it it r.nns
I R
Mandarin
Restaurant
Spttta&zutg in Teina
unan Srethuan ('uisinr
Luncheon Special
$
1.99
Daily Luncheon Buffet
& Sunday Buffet
All You
Can Eft Only
$
� ��� ,� 6 to 10 S? TS)
3.89
11 30-3 00 pm
Shrimp Dinner Buffet$5.99
� � i ' ��� BBO CiMckan sr,arer,5 Snnmii � CNcMn Dei.gM
Men . e Beet � K a � � ik ami rwekax .fn
6 00-9 00 pm Thursday, Friday & Saturday
on
FREE DELIVERY
Lunch 1130-200 pm � Dinner 5:00-9:00 pm
756-9687
All ABC Permits Take Outs Welcome
Open 7 Days A Week 11 30 am-10 00 pm
been fired if she had refused to
answer some questions, Smith
wrote.
For that reason, the appeals
panel rule, the case must he re-
turned to the Superior Court so it
can be determined what would
happen if Ms. Truesdale took the
Fifth Amendment on some ques-
tions.
and the Gobra; K! () Sp edwagon
as Wi Know It 11 e Music 1 isti
I ounge is p n - en davs a weel �
; nd is S.k � � n the m
�r gallery f M I - -
tlu- new I ir es ' � i ro vu"
ECU

� '
n :
� I
USED FURNITURE
LIQUIDATION
Several Hundred Pieces
LIVING ROOM:
Couches $50.00 Up
Sleeper Solas $75.00 Up
Chairs $10.00 Up
End Tables $7.00 Up
Coffee Tables $8.00 Up
BEDROOMS:
INDIVIDUAL PIECES
OR COMPLETE SETS
Chests $20.00 Up
Dressers $20 00 Up
Nite Tables $10 00 Up
Beds $10 00 Up
DESKS. ROCKERS
TABLES
DINETTE SETS:
Table. 4 Chairs
$65 00 Up
COMPARE OUR
PRICES ANYWHERE
LOWEST PRICES FOR
CASH & CARRY
THF "URNITURE
MAN
iCOIN & RING MAN
Corner of Evan & Fourth Streets
752-3866
� �
FEATURING:
FLEX
POLARIS
NAUTILI �
WORKOl II'Io
DIE1 & NUTRITION Ul
LBS
'
LFM
-1000 sq. it. Newly Remodeled IVorkoul A
L'se This d lur 1 Free Work
� s,)
SPECIAL RAT I S IOK 1 Cl STUDENTS
!lrs: M-F 10-9; Sat 10-6; Sunl-6
10(32 Evans St
756-9584
LiV Sister Rush
'Come Party With The
Best"
Tuesday. Sept. 13
Wednesday. Sept. 14
Parties Start 9:00 P.M.
For A Ride or More Info Call:
757-1319
Thursday Ladies Night
Ladies Free All Night
Come Early
Drink Specials All Night
Friday The Famous
"Late Dav Tea Bash"
5 p.m. - 2 a.m. $2.00 Ice Teas And
Free Admission For All Until 9:00





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS, 1988 7
ED TO BU Used Nintendo Car
with instructions for re -jle East
Music and Video 758 4251, 1109
Blvd
OOF, band of li Kappa Phi per
with three other bands at the Bud
ars Sat Sept 10 runni til six.
g with skvdivers and WRDU
i-ting live PTA pizza and pepsj
i colliers u ekxxne Tickets at East
rusk and Video Follow the signs
:h the bus at the bottom ot "the

60 SUZUKI: Black 4 cyd drive
nber glass luggage type saddle
ndshield, space helmet, new bat
d bre.ik shot's $750 Call 756 8692
VI 1 c AKPS Sell old cards tor
��- at v ii arter 5 p.m.
I L i A.RPS U AMU): Anv
ards ! li pa) damn good
any cards I an) u of anv
nditn F I i:t mone) ?
irdst Eai is all 757 tvc�6

CUJ
e .ist Carolinian:
turs, low pay.
ireat 1 xperience.
n person, Publications
ding Second Floor
-
ED
ON
BOARD
RS
Judicial
3 need to
irden at
or
. 218
bly:
ith
ford
but
E�HQ
ting Thursday at 5 pjm.
ounge (Room 1004 - Gen
oom BldgAll those interested
tors Program at ECU should
nd Members are requested to
I r gardii g ur community
ldfjs t r guest lectures and
m members always tad
11 Dr Sanders (757-6373) tor
idv only for those serious about
the Bible It is challenging and
commitment, involving discus
leadings Weekly meetings will
lied to a. idase those wno
�sled Kerg,ua is an mterde-
mal program, and sponsored by
an Campus Ministry For more
like at 752-7240
DINTING SOCIETY
INC MAJORS: If you are o�-
MXX) or 4000 level accounting
: are invited to attend the Ac-
xriety Wine and Cheese Social,
, September 8. Stop by the Ac-
Dthce for an invitation.
;N'S SOCCER
He-rested in playing Women's
2r in the Fall and Spring of this
rganizartonal meeting is being
you are interested and want
rotation, please get in touch
w anv of the following people.
an 758-4255, Beth I larvey 756-
nn Totaro 830-9315 Call and
�sage
Announcements
EHLEETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda is holding an OPEN
1IOUSE for anyone interested in Business,
on Thursday at 4 p.m. in room 1013 Gen-
eral Classroom Building. Anyone en-
rolled in a Business or BVIE course is
encouraged to attend and all majors are
welcome. PBL is the collegiate equivilant
to FBLA.
PRE-PHYSICAI.THAFY
All general college pre-physical therapy
sophomores, or higher, anticipating ap-
plying to the May 1989 Physical Therapy
Class should go to the Physical Therapy
Department Office, 1st floor, Belk Build-
ing, before the end of Sept. to determine
eligibility. Instructions for receiving the
application packet will be given then. If
you have any questions, contact that office
by phone (757-6961, ext. 261) or in person.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
On Nov. 19 the Pitt County ECU Alumni
Assoc. the ECU Office of Admissions are
co-sponsoring an all day academic bowl
aim petition. The format used by the bowl
will closely adhave to the format used by
the GE College Bowl. The ECU Bowl
needs moderators, judges, time-keepers,
and scorers. Sept. 15 at 7 p.m. in the confer-
ence room of the TaylorSlaughter
Alumni Center on E. 5th Street, there will
be an orientahonmini-training session
for interested volunteers. Faculty, staff,
and students are invited to attend. Call
Susan C. Smith, Admissions, 757-6640 or
John Anema at 752-7151 for further infor-
mation.
RE-ELECTION FOR GOV.
The ECU Students for the Re-election of
Gov. Jim Martin invite all students, fac-
ulty and staff to the opening of the Pitt
County Headquarters on Thursday start-
ing at 530 p.m. The Governor's wife Dot-
tie Martin will be attending at 6 p.m. The
Pitt County Headquarters is located at 210
E. 4th St. and the telephone number is 758-
6339.
Re-election for gov.
The ECU Students for the Re-elecbcn of
Gov. Jim Martin invite all students, fac-
ulty and staff to "An Evening with Gov.
Jim Martin" a barbecue supper and eve-
ning of entertainment on Sept. 13 starting
at 6 p.m. Tickets are $5 and are available at
210 E. 4th St. or by calling 758-6339 or 758-
1403.
JEWISH STUDENTS
You are welcome to attend the following
High Holiday Services at Temple Bayt
Shalom (1420 E. 14th St. in GreenviUe):
Sept. 11,8 p.m. Erev Rosh Hashanah, Sept.
12,10 a.m. Rosh Hashanah Day - 6:30 p.m.
Ma-ariv, Sept. 13, 10 am 2nd Day Rosh
Hasahanah, Sept. 20, 7 p.m. Erev Yom
Kippur, Sept. 21, 9:30 a.m. Yom Kippur
Morning - 430 p.m. Afternoon Service,
Yizor & N'ilah. For more info, or direc-
tions call Mike at 756-4930. All students
are invited to the home of Dr. Bramy
Resnik for a Home Hospitality Dinner on
Sept. 20 at 5:15 p.m. Please call to RSVP for
dinner. Call Dr. Resnik at 355-5321 (home)
or 757-6521 (work) or Mike at 756-4930.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
Season tickets are now on sale for the
Performing Arts Series at ECU. This year
there are fourteen outstanding perform-
ances starting in October and running
through April. Some of the attractions
include: Wynton Marsalis, CABARET,
The Acting Company in Love's Labour's
Lost, Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, The
Tokyo String Quartet, Oregon, The At-
lanta Symphony, and the Ohio Ballet. For
a free brochure, and further details con-
tact: The Central Ticket Office, Menden
hall Student Center, 757-6611, ext. 266.
Court rules on lie detector
RALEIGH (AP) - A state ap-
peals court panel has ruled that a
lie-detector test asking questions
about sexual activities including
homosexuality is not unconstitu-
tional because such acts are not
protected by the Constitution.
A three-judge panel of the
North Carolina Court of Appeals
on Thursday reversed a Forsyth
County Superior Court order that
reinstated a Winston-Salem State
University employee who was
fired for refusing to take a lie-
detector test. The case was re-
turned to the lower court.
'The fundamental rights en-
ti tied to protection under the right
of privacy, including family rela-
tionships, marriage or procrea-
tion, bear no resemblance to the
right to enlarge in the activities in
questionthe court said in an
opinion written bv Judge Donald
L. Smith.
'Thus, the trial court erred in
concluding that the polygraph
examaination violated (the
woman's) constitutional right to
privacy Smith wrote.
Tommle Jean Truesdale hao
sued Winston-Salem State, the
University of North Carolina sys-
tem and two WSSU officiais for
reinstatement and back pay. A
Superior Court judge sided with
her, but the appeals court threw
out the judgment.
Ms. Truesdale was employed
as a security officer at the univer-
sity on a probationary basis in
November 1984. She was told that
before becoming a permanent
employee, she would have to un-
dergo a polygraph exam, but she
refused to do so after learning that
some of the questions would in-
volve her sexual activity.
She was dismissed in August
1985 for insubordination. In the
order giving Ms. Truesdale her
job and back pay, the Superior
Court Judge found that the
universitv's action violated her
constitutional rights, including
the right to privacy and tne right
against self-incrimination.
The appeals court ruled that
the questions on the polygraph
examination were designed to
determine whetner an applicant
was truthful on his or her employ-
ment application.
The questions dealing with
sexual activity involved homo-
sexualit, sexual arousal bv view-
ing children, sexual contact witn
minors and unusual or unnatural
sex acts - none of which is pro-
tected by the' Constitution as a
fundamental right, the appeals
court said.
The appeals panel was unable
to determine whether the lie-de-
tector test violated Ms.
Truesdale's right against self-in-
crimination because it was un-
clear whether she would have
been fired if she had refused to
answer some questions, Smith
wrote.
For that reason, the appeals
panel rule, the case must be re-
turned to the Superior Court so it
can be determined what would
happen if Ms. Truesdale took the
Fifth Amendment on some ques-
tions.
THE REBEL
THE REBEL will be accepting submis-
sions for the annual poetry and prose
contests continuously until Nov. 7. Sub-
mit typed entries to Media Board or Rebel
Office. Open to currently enrolled ECU
students only.
PHI ALPHA THETA
Phi Alpha Theta will hold its first meeting
Sept. 14 at 230 in the Todd Room. All
members and those people who are inter-
ested in joining ARE ENCOURAGED TO
ATTEND.
AMA
The American Marketing Association will
hold its first meeting this Thursday, Sep-
tember 8th at 330. We will be meeting in
room 1031 of the New Classroom Build-
ing. Tom Atkins, a representative of the
Miller Brewing Company is our guest
speaker. All interested are welcome and
old members are encouraged to attend.
NEW ARRIVALS
The Mendenhall Student Center Music
Listening Lounge has received the follow-
ing selections on compact disc: Aeros-
mith�Permanent Vacation; Wynton
Marsalis�Standard Time; INXS� Kick;
Ahmad Jamal�Crystal; Jadja Salerno-
Sonnenberg; Sinead O'Connor�The Lion
and the Cobra; REO Speedwagon�Life
as We Know It. The Music Listening
Lounge is open seven days a week from 2-
10:30 p.m. and is located on the second
floor gallery of Mendenhall. Check out
the new tunes before you
All New!
4flc�&
i
GYM
USA
A LIC. OF POWERHOUSE GYM.LICENSING ENT INC.
DBA. POWERHOUSE GYM, GREENVILLE, N.C
FEATURING:
FLEX 7000 LBS. FREE WTS.
POLARIS CO-ED
NAUTILUS OLYMPIC PLATFORM
WORKOUT PROGRAMS
DIET & NUTRITION SUPPLEMENTS
4000 sq. ft. Newly Remodeled Workout Area
Use This Ad For 1 Free Workout
?SPECIAL RATES FOR ECU STUDENTS
Hrs: M-F 10-9; Sat10-6; Sunl-6
SIDEWALK SALE!
Gordon's
Golf & Ski
M
In Front of Greenville TV & Appliance & Gordon's Golf & Ski
756-1003
7-10 a.m. Saturday, September 10th
Skis. Boots, Baby Items, Wool Sweaters, Children's Clothes, Ladies & Mens Ski Jackets, Housrwaies, Izod
hirts. Boys Shorts, Ski Hats, Socks, New & Used Apparel, Baby Clothes, Men's Pants (Size 32 it 34. etc), Jr. h
Child ren s Sneakers, Coif Clubs, Coif Balls, Golf Bags, Mens and Ladies Golf Shoes, etc
MANY ITEMS FROM 25 TO $5.00
Will be postponed if it rains
Mandarin
Restaurant
Specializing in Ttkjng
"Hunan Szxchuan Cuisine
Luncheon Special.
$1.99
Daily Luncheon Buffet
& Sunday Buffet
(Children under 5 eat FREE. Ages 6 to 10 $2 75)
Luncheon Special Menu Available
All Vow
Can Eai Only
$3.89
11:30-3:00 pm
Shrimp Dinner Buffet$5.99
Stumwl Snnmp Fn�l Shrimp. Sesame Seed Otcfcan. 8BO Chicken. Spareries. Shnmp 4 Chicken Oeiioht
Snnmp Fned Rice Shnmp Lo Mem Orange Beef Egg Roll. Sweet t Sour Pork and ClMCkan. Soup, lea Cream
Pmeapole Fortune Cookies
6:00-9:00 pm Thursday, Friday Saturday
FREE DELIVERY
Lunch 11:30-2:00 pm � Dinner 5:00-9:00 pm
756-568?
All ABC Permits � Take Out Welcome
Opan 7 Days A Weak 11:30 am-10:00 pm
.2217 yipggUgfj Gaftr"S .S&W&FWNtrlWVt
1002 Evans St.
758 9584
USED FURNITURE
LIQUIDATION
Savarai Hundred Placet
LIVING ROOM:
Couches$50.00 Up
Sleeper Sofas$75.00 Up
Chairs$10.00 Up
End Tables$7.00 Up
Coffee Tables$8.00 Up
BEDROOMS:
INDIVIDUAL PIECES
OR COMPLETE SETS
Chests$20.00 Up
Dressers$20.00 Up
Nfte Tables$10.00 Up
Bade$10.00 Up
DESKS. ROCKERS
TABLES
DINETTE SETS:
Table, 4 Chairs$65.00 Up
COMPARE OUR
PRICES ANYWHERE
LOWEST PRICES FOR
CASH & CARRY
THE FURNITURE
MAN
(COIN & RING MAN)
Corner of Evans A Fourth Streets
752-3866
Thursday Ladies Night
Ladies Free All Night
Come Early
Drink Specials All Night
Friday The Famous
"Late Dav Tea Bash"
5 p.m. - 2 a.m. $2.00 Ice Teas And
Free Admission For All Until 9:00





8
0
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8,1988
Elizabeth City attracting students
ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. (AP)- lie university with about 1,500
An ambitious plan launched a students enrolled, Elizabeth City
year ago to upgrade Elizabeth State was founded in 1891 to
City State University, viewed by educate young black men and
some as the weakest link in the women in rural northeastern
UNC system, is attracting better North Carolina,
students to the small, remote cam- Over the years, almost every
pus. student who has applied has been
But the university may have admitted, and as a result, ECSU man class' average SAT score by
trouble keeping that crop of has developed a reputation as the 70 points from 597 in fall 1986 to
campus of last resort for college- 667.
The top SAT score is 1,600, and
In less than two years, there are
indications more capable stu-
dents are being admitted.
In 1987-88, ECSU enrolled 249
incentive scholars who posted
an avcraoe Scholastic Aptitude
Test score of 678. That, in turn,
helped boost the entering fresh-
brighter students unless its cur-
riculum - which has been de-
scribed as lacking- sufficient
breadth and riogr" in places - is
strengthened,according to re-
ports prepared as part of the plan.
Studies of the school's curricu-
lum, conducted orimarily by offi-
cials from the four other predomi-
nantly black schools in the Uni-
versity of North Carolina system,
show some strengths, but reveal
overworked professors, diluted
academic programs and haphaz-
ard academic counseling, The
City McCants said. But a lot of
people are finding out that you
can't go to Elizabeth City any
more. As a matter of fact, if you
don't aoPly early, you may not get
into Elizabeth City at all
Jenkins, the university's chan-
cellor, agrees that the presence of
the scholarship students has
made a difference.
"Image is so important Jen-
kins said. Because we were able
to offer the scholarships, we have
attracted a much laroer number of
going blacks.
But in January 1987, CD. Span- everybody is given 400 points
gler Jr president of the Univer- when they take the test. By com-
sity of North Carolina system, parision the average SAT score for academically talented students
unveiled an "academic de- freshman at the University of than we have been able to attract
veloomcnt plan" to bolster North Carolina at Chapel Hill was in the past
ECSU's curriculum and lure as 1.099; at Western Carolina Uni- Spangler is similarly pleased,
many as 250 better-preoared stu- vcrsity, 828; and at North Caro- "Every measure we've had - not
dents each year through annual lina Central University, 716. just class rank, but all the other
scholarships of up to $3,000. Gerald McCants, who as UNC ranks such as the SAT - has gone
Spangler's plan to upgrade system director of special pro-
ECSU, developed in conjunction grams oversees implementation
Huyal � drey
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up by an increase that no other
university in the (UNC) system
with Chancellor Jimmy Jenkins, of the plan at ECSU, likens the has ever had Spangler said.
also called for a review of all aca-
News and Observer of Raleigh demic degree programs and the
general education program for
treshmen and sophomores.
In addition, the plan called for a
review of all teacher-education
prooramsand a review of admin-
istrative systems and student
services.
reoorted.
Some classes were criticized for
being too easy, including one sci-
ence course that was described as
more like an 8th or 9th orade
course.
North Carolina's smallest pub-
scholarshiop program to a ouiet Raymond Dawson, UNC's sen-
educational revolution ior vice president for academic
"The image that peoole have affairs, said ECSU officials al-
had of Elizabeth City - that image, ready have begun responding to
believe it or not, doesn't exist any the recommendations in the
more McCants said recently.
"It has always been known if
you didn't have any other school
to go to, you could ko to Elizabeth
reoorts comoleted so far.
But Dawson said that it still is
early to gauge the progress.
Chief DEA administrator pushes legalization
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Drug Enforcement
Administration's chief adminis-
trative law judge says marijuana
should be legalized as a perscrip-
tion drug because smoking it
helps cancer patients control nau-
sea after chemotherapy.
Francis L. Youno recom-
mended reclassifying marijuana
the legitimate need, amplv dem-
onstrated in this record, of count-
less sufferers for the relief mari-
juana can provide when pre-
scribed bv a physician in a legiti-
mate case
Young cited testimony by doc-
tors and patients during 11 davs
Laws(NQRML).
The group's attorney, Kevin B.
Zeese. vowed to take the case back
to the court if Lawn or his succes-
sor rejects Young's recommenda-
tion.
DEA has historically opposed
moving marijuana from the list of
of hearings that marijuana wasan Schedule I drugs, which includes
accepted and effective treatment
as a Schedule II drug so that it for nausea among cancer patients
could be prescribed by phvsicians and for multiple sclerosis, a de-
to treat the often severe nausea ac- bilitating and crippling neuro-
companying chemotherapy as logical disease,
well as muscle spasms caused bv The hearings were ordered in
multiole sclerosis. 1980 bv the U.S. Circuit Court of
Young, whose findings are not Appeals here, which chastised
binding on DEA's head, John DEA for ignoring its statutory
heroin, TCP and LSD, to Schedule
11.
DEA spokesman Cornelius
Dougherty said lawn "won't
have any comment until he has
had a chance to look at" Young's
68-page opinion.
Dougherty said Lawn could opt
process Zeese said.
Even if DEA upholds Young's
findings, the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration and state regulatory
agencies would have to pass
judgement before marijuana were
made available as a drug.
Young determined that smoking
marijuana was more effective at
controlling nausea from
chemotherapy than capsules that
contain the synthetic THC, the
chemically active ingredient of
cannabis.
When smoked, "natural mari-
juana is inhaled and generally
takes effect more quickly than the
i&l.
For Voting
Us 'The Best
All-Around Bar" &
'The Best Bartending
Staff In
Greenville
Pl
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APPRECIATION
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to hold further hearings before synthetic capsule which is in
Lawn, acknowledoed that obligation to consider evidence making a final decision.
"strong emotions are aroused on that marijuana might have some
both sides of any discussion con- medical benefit.
cerning the use of marijuana.
"Nonetheless it is essential for
this agency, and its
administrator, calml v and dispas-
sionately to review tne evidence
of record, correctly to apply the
law, and act accordingly he
wrote in an opinion released
Tuesday.
Young rejected as "specious"
the argument that prescribing
marijuana cigarettes as a medi-
cine "will send a signal' that mari-
juana is OK generally for recrea-
tional use
"The fear of sending such a sig-
nal cannot be permitted to over-
ride
Governor
offers
reward
RALEIGH� Governor James
G. Martin today announced that
the State is offering a reward of up
to $5,000 for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of the
person or persons responsible for
the murder of Thomas Lee
McGowan of Greenville, North
Carolina.
The body of Thomas Lee
McGowan, male, age 72, of 714
Atlantic Avenue, Greenville,
North Carolina, was found on
July 11, 1988, at approximately
10:30 a.m lying in a storage ware-
house in Greenville, North Caro-
lina. Mr. McGowan had received
multiple contact wounds to the
head that resulted in his death.
Anyone having information
concerning this murder should
contact the Greenville Police
Department or the State Bureau of
Investigation.
The appellate court had twice
previously overruled DEA's re-
jection of getitions, first filed in
1972, by the National Organiza-
tion for the Reform of Marjuana
Zeese hailed Young's decision,
saying it marks the first time
there has ever been an unbiased
hcarinc on whether or not marj-
juana is safe for use under medical
supervision
"It's a verv important step in the
gested and must be processed
through the digestive system be-
fore it takes effect Young said.
In the case of multiple sclerosis,
there are few drugs to treat
muscle spasms, and they often
cause serious side effects

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Wine $.50
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START
EXECUTIVE
TRAINING NOW
Don't wait until you
finish college to start a man-
agement training program. If you
have at least two years remaining, consider
Air Force ROTC Wk can give you a head
start on a fast-paced career.
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
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STOP SHOP
I1r American Express" Caul can pla a starring role
virtuaih am-where yt�u shop from Tuisa to Thailand
whether you re buying a A or a T shirt So during college
and after u s the perfecl wa to pay tor iut about
everything you II want
How to get the Card now
College is the fes sign of success vid because e believe
tential. we u- made it easier to get the Imencan
Express Card right no whether you re a freshman senior
- jrad ident ook into our new automatic appmva,
iffers Fordetails pick up an application on campus Oi
call 1 800 THE CARD and ak tor a student application
The American Express Card
Don't Leave School Without If
SRMTS
no tl
Tickli
ByJIMSHAMLIN
SuM Wntrt
A notice to intellectual mint
hungry for sociopolitical satire
just a cheap laugh from whate'
source: Berke Breathed,en
the much revered
County" comic str
nubtished his latest ba -
Mental
now in h
By SCOTT MAXWl LI
Amkum It
Cliff Notes hav
to by none other thai
ous Stephen King
babyfoodof
rywhere While 1 agi �
assessment, I'd rail � -
cliff than read I'
But now tht n
Jack th
ByMuVAHHARRT-
su" H rtaa
One hundred y
the Ripper stepped into tl
ing fog outside Whit
through the ethereal vei
ory.
There can be little d
is as much lack's continual
nvmitv and his m si n, j
pearance as his brief and hij
selective killing spree
killed prostitute- that
him such an appealir .
the various media.
Movies have found th.
ripe for treatment aim. � -
their beginning.A silent Hi
cock film. The I I
the ordeal ot a landlady v
afraid she has taken in the Ri
as a tenant.
Sherlock Holmes I r o.
met lack fn a Ws film A Stuj
Terror. And Nicl is ' U
(who combined 1 lolmes witl
likes oi Sigmund Freud and B
Stoker in hi run
Per Cent Sol
End Horror) created a v
mix from the Ripper H.G.
The Time Machine and
himself in 1971 -
Time.
Television, too, has
London murderer ass
ter sometimes putting hu
the strangest oi places A:
sode of the western "Omi
Jack the Ripper, who recent
White Chapel in London, il
his prostitute�killing leg;
Brown Re
ROCHESTER, NY. (API
foot infection possibly cl
by a spider bite has put evf
ist Billy Grahan in the hosj
ministry spokesman says.
Graham, 69, in western
York for a week long ci
was told he would have to
least two days after being





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TUAR
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BrVCES
THE EAST CARCH INI AN
Features
SEPTEMBER 8, 1988 l�ge 9
Tickling tale encompasses Bloom County'
ByJIMSHAMLIN
staff Writer
A notice to intellectual minds
hungry for sociopolitical satire, or
just a cheap laugh from whatever
source: Berke Breathed, creator of
the much revered "Bloom
County" comic strip, has just
nubhshed his latest book. Tales
too Ticklish to Tell. Both Opus and Binkley's poor process. left untouched in Bloom County, by Kalevji Levonof). Gorbachev
Bill and the meadow gang are father go through mid-life crises; Beneath the silliness is, as usual, Perhaps Tales too Ticklish to comments briefly on the paralel-
back, with the exception of yaz Steve files suit against Santa Claus a satire upon modern society. TeJl is not quite as funny as his lism between Tales too Ticklish
Pistacto, and are up to their old for selling war toys; and Hodge- Breathed slides adeptly into and past books (Loose Tales, Toons for to Tell and Mark Twain's Huck-
tricks in hillarious new ways: Bill podge discovers that Portnoy has out of social and political issues Qur Times, Penguin Dreams and elberry Finn, especially in the
becomes a born again televangcl- been a groundhog all these years, with the skill of a master humor- Stranger Things, Bloom County distinct similarities of Bill the Cat
ist "Oral Bill with a promise to As if that weren't enough, Steve is ist. He pokes fun at the elections, Babylon,and Billy and the Boin- and Jim. He even attempts a char-
send all the rest of the televangcl- kidnapped by aliens who subject the Wall Street crises, AIDS, pit gers Bootleg), but it is just as so- aciture of Ronald Reagan, but
ists to eternal rest if everyone him to "Gephardtization a bulls, anti-smoking propaganda, cially relevant, which makes it states "I will not be leaving my
sends in fiftv clams. mind-boggling, mind-reversing and much, much more. Nothing is just as worthwhile to the crowd of governmental duties for a new
' Mental Baby food for college students'
now in hilarious parody version
By SCOTT MAXWELL
AuisUnt Feature Editor
of us facing this quandary: Jump reads, in toto, "They're dead").
Off the Cliff Notes by Gina and In addition, most of the synop-
Annette Cascone, from Bart ses are accompanied by informa-
Cliff Notes have been referred Books. tion "About the Author a see-
to by none other than the illustri- Jump Off the Cliff Notes is a hi- tion telling you "Who's Who
ous Stephen King as "the mental larious parody of the actual Cliff sing-along songs, review ques-
babyfood o college students eve- Notes. In it are informally-told tions, and pop quizzes. Now how
r where While I agree with his synopses of no fewer than sixteen much would you pay? But wait,
assessment, I'd rather jump off a oft-assigned classics, ranging there's more!
cliff than read Moby Dick again. from Moby Dick to Romeo and After all of the synopses have
But now there's hope for those Juliet (the synopsis of which been concluded, there is "A Word
Jack the Ripper is still alive
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
One hundred years ago. Jack
the Ripper stepped into the morn-
Strip scripted by Harlan Ellison, future city. The citizens' corrupt
explainedJack'sdisappearanceas moral nature was a direct
a relocation of hunting grounds counterpoint to the antiseptic set-
ting.
link. Ellison's extrapolation is a
chilling comment on our society's
insatiable, vicarious enjoyment of
from 1880 London to the Ameri
can West of the ime. Fed up with
ing fog outside White Chapel and taking the blame for his murders,
through the ethereal veil of mem- the local Indians sent Jack to yet
orv. another hunting ground of the
There can be little doubt that it "happy" variety.
is as much Jack's continual ano- Jack found himself out west
nvmitv and his mysterious disap- again in the recent"Bridce Across violence through sports and van
pearance as his brief and highly Time" TV movie with Hunter's s
selective killing spree (he only Stephanie Kramer. William
killed prostitutes) that has made Nolan's script had Jack's spirit
him such an appealing enigma to part and parcel of the relocated
the various media. London Bridge. Star Trek's Wolf
Movies have found the Ripper in the Fold episode by Robert
ripe for treatment almost since Bloch (like Ellison, a writer fasci-
their beginning.A silent Hitch- nated by Jack) proposed that the
cock film, The Lodger, concerns Ripper was an evil entity which
the ordeal of a landlady who is manifested itself on different
afraid she has taken in the Ripper worlds by possessing unwitting
as a tenant. individuals.
Sherlock Holmes, for example, Fiction writers have found Jack
"met lack n a '60s film A Study in to be a mother lode of material.
Terror. And Nicholas Meyer Robert Bloch in Yours Truly, Jack
(who combined Holmes with the the Ripper proposed that Jack was
of Advice which includes a seri-
ous, well-researched, thought-
provoking, insightful essay on Dr.
Seuss's One Fish, Two Fish, Red
Fish, Blue Fish. Following this is,
appropriately, a tribute to Dr.
Seuss.
Rounding out the parody are
several humorous illustrations. In
one, Stallone-as-Rambo appears
deeply engrossed in a copy of
English Made Simple - but he's
holding it upside-down.
The text is slim, but its laughter
density is high. (Laughter density
is a quantity determined here at
the East Carolinian offices by a
rigorously scientific process in-
volving state-of-the-art Amiga
technology which measures
Peanuts" readers who have out-
grown Charlie Brown.
Sadly enough, there is no free
record inside, but there is a copy
of The bloom Picayune. Further-
more, the introduction in written
by Mikhail Gorbachev (translated
Gina Cascone
& Annette Cascone
career in the are profession any-
time soon
Tales too Ticklish to Tell is
published by Little, Brown, and
Company; it is available at local
bookstores for $7.95, plus tax.
JUMP OFF
THE CLIFF NOTES
A Parody
Jack becomes their toy as they laughs per unit page.) Occasion-
send him on a murder spree and ally, the authors ran a joke into the
enjoy his orgies through a psychic ground - after all, you can only
likes of Sigmund Freud and Bram an immortal who kept his youth
Stoker in his novels, The Seven by making ritual sacrifices.
Per Cent Solution and The West
End Horror) created a wonderful
mix from the Ripper, H.G. Wells
The Time Machine, and Wells
himself in 1970's Time After
Time.
Television, too, has used the
London murderer as subject mat-
ter sometimes putting him in
the strangest of places. An epi-
sode of the western "Cimmaron
Bloch and Ellison extrapolated
from the idea for two stories in the
Dangerous Visions anthology.
Bloch's "A Toy for Juliette" was a
routine time travel one-liner.
However, Ellison's sequel, "The
Prowler in the City at the Edge of
the World was an incredibly
provocative piece.
In this story, Jack has been lifted
from the past by a dysutopian
In "Is There A Demon Lover in
the House? Roger Zelazny cre-
ates an effective mood sketch that
allows Jack to enter the peep-
shows of the 20th century. The
story, like Ellison's, points out
how easily the line blurs between
voyeur and participant sex and
violence.
In his novel A Feast Unknown,
Philip Jose Farmer uses Jack as a
peripheral but important charac-
ter. According to Farmer, Jack
was a member of a society of
immortals, the son of a cromag-
non man, whose substitution of
cruelty for the sex act was a side
effect of the life serum.
Farmer's book, more than any
other, points out how Jack the
Ripper has become as much a fic-
tional as a historical being A Feast
Unknown opens with the state-
ment:
"I was conceived and born in
1888. Jack the Ripper was my fa-
ther
The speaker is Tarzan!
make so many phallic references
to Moby Dick - but mostly it's
good, relatively clean fun. And, if
you're clever enough to come up
with a great pop quiz of your own
(see the book for details), you can
win a lifetime subscription to
National Lampoon.
Jump Off the Cliff Notes
adroitly manages to simultane-
ously poke fun at "the classics"
and at the actual Cliff Notes. It
will be published September 30th
for $4.95. Though that may seem a
bit steep for something that re-
sembles a pamphlet more than it
does a book, the five bucks is
worth it: Jump Off the Cliff Notes The new outrageous Jump Off the Cliff Notes parody of the often
is a good thing in a small package, exam used booklets that even Albert Einstein used. This book
provides hours of cramped-filledentertainment.
Hot sucrose band, Sugarcubes, hits Raleigh
Cracking the Classics
Including Favorite Books of
the Rich and Famous
By STEVE SOMMERS
Staff Writer
Those of us who remember
buying REM records before the
Rolling Stone ever heard of them,
truly remember a different time.
This was a time when bands
which were abstract and a little
weird didn't get all the attention.
Then one day, people started
getting bored or sophisticated or
something. It's hard to put a fin-
ger on it, but the next thing you
by anatomically correct stick fig-
ures, this band has generated
more upward mobility in a single
week on the Billboard charts than
any other noncommercial band
today. It may be pop music but
you can't call it perky or cut or
shallow, and they do not fit into
my definition of commercial.
In fact, their album "Life's Too
Good" has the same abstract style
founded by the underground
know David Byrne is on the cover band Siouxie Sioux combined
of Time magazine and The Sug- with the down to earth yet still
arcubes, a band from Iceland of all flighty poetry of REM. The Sug-
places, takes America by storm. arcubes are just one big paradox,
With a single album decorated but so is today's music scene.
Even closer to home, a compari
son to these Icelandic hopsters
can be drawn with Fetehin' Bones
from Charlotte. Like the Tarheel
band, The Cubes are fronted by a
charismatic female lead who has
energetic, sultry, and reverbic
voice. In fact, the Cubes have
much in common with bands
with big cult followings.
When XTC first started receiv-
ing critical acclaim, they were
considered to be innovative with
See'CUBES, P. GE10
Pickin' the Bones
Evictee can't decide on new national anthem
Tack the Ripper, who recently celebrated his hundredth anniversary of his fog stepping death outside the
White Chapel in London, is the reoccuring subject of literature, cinema and television. While he is dead,
his prostitute�killing legacy follows him through the 1980's. (Illustration by Jeff Parker-Parkerlab)
Brown Recluse spider bites Billy Graham
ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP� A ted to Highland Hospital here on
foot infection possibly caused Labor Day, spokesman A. Larry
by a spider bite has put evangel- Ross said Tuesday,
ist Billy Grahan in the hospital, a A doctor who examined Gra-
ministry spokesman says. ham in North Carolina theorized
Graham, 69, in western New the evangeist had been bitten by
York for a weeklong crusade, Brown Recluse spider, Ross
was told he would have to stay at said. Graham lives in a wooden
least two days after being admit- area of the southern Appalachi-
ans mountains near Boone,
North Carolina where he has
been known to walk in the wil-
derness.
Brown Recluse, a rare breed of
spider, is one of the most poi-
sonious insects on North Ameri-
can.
BY CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Anthem Writer
In a moment, we will present
our column on "National An-
thems � Should We Change
Ours, and Why Do Russian Tag
Teams Consistently Feel the Need
to Sing Theirs Before Every Wres-
tling Match?" But first, a humor
update.
Those of you who read this
space during the waning summer
months were privileged to see the
article In Which the Bonehead
and his trusty sidekick Complain
A Lot Lass were bogusly pulled
for a DWI after a drivin' n' cryin'
show.
Well, yesterday we had the le-
gal adventure, In Which Bone-
head and Complain A Lot go to
Court Drunk, See Space Aliens
Who Look Like Agnes Morehead
Abduct the Judge and Mate Him
With Clones Formed From Ann
Jillian's Massected Breasts and
Eventually Lose their Parking
Space to the Teenage Mutant
Vampire Lawyer Who Gets Their
Sentence Reduced To Weaving
Without A Loom.
I guess that about says it all.
On to this National Anthem
business. Seems Ray Charles is
spearheading efforts to change
the anthem from "The Star-
Spangled Banner" to "America
the Beautiful His reasons are
that it's more reflective of the
country at peace and easier for
people to sing.
Even respected (at least by my
dad) Raleigh columnist Dennis
Rogers is getting invoved in this
hot issue. His column Tuesday
contained an interview with a guy
who has been trying to get the
song changed for years.
Well, boss for him. I'm pretty
sick of the "Star Spangled Ban-
ner" too. I could hardly sing it
when I was a wee bonehead and
my vocal chords were pitched
slightly higher. When I hit pu-
berty, I quit going to ball games
until the first half was over.
But the problem remains of
what to change the anthem to. I
dislike the "Banner but "Amer-
ica the Beautiful" ??? Advanced
sources say thaf s one of the songs
Tiffany is considering recording
on her next Lp.
As rockin' and a rollin' as I am,
I can't think of a very hip tune to
replace the current anthem. I ref-
use to be required to stand up for
anything Bruce Springsteen has
done.
As much as I used to like Prince,
his song "America" off that gut-
less "Around the World in a Da'
album is too damn aggravating,
and it's 26 minutes long on the
disco version. That could push the
length of televised sports games
up a good 45 minutes, allowing
for commercials.
Punkongsmenerarent
very complimentary towards the
country. I may be wrong on this
but nothing comes to mind
Maybe X's "Los Angeles but
guess that is a little too regional.
My choices lean toward the
more obscure and novel. Perhaps
thebest one would be "Movin'Ori
Up the theme song from The
Jeffersons It's a great little ditty
about success and being up-
wardly mobile, a very appropri-
ate mood in the country today.
Just run those lyrics through
your mind and tap out the beat!
across the dashboard of your car.
"Now we're up in the big
leagucsGettin' our turn at bat
Long as we live It's you and me
baby Ain't nothing wrong with
that It's enough to make you
believe in God.
"I'm Just a Bill "Elbow
Room or almost any of the other
songs from the "History Rock"
segments of ABC's old "School-
house Rock" series would be
great . They're bright, fun and
definitely patriotism at its best.
Imagine Whitney Houston
singing, "Oh, I'm just a bill Yes
I'm only a billAnd I'm sitting
here on Capitol HillWell, it's a
long, long wait while I'm sitting in
committee before the start of
the 89 Super Bowl, the year the
'Skins beat the Raiders by a g
21 point margin.
See 'CHAINS page 10
r the
;ood





mi i v
ROI INIAN
si I'll MB!
t)8S
Yo, to new western
Guns

Bv MM SHAMLIN
Start Wtiler
"Young Guns' Ihe latest re
K ist' hv Morgan Creek pictures
stands in tlii' shadows ol some
rather A.n k predi n
lust est� ml ised in
1980 � w as Sil ei ido w hu h
dosed before it reached most the
at res.
Next can ic i 'ale K idei vhich
survived onh because ol i
l irtN 1 lai i' I jsI � i m d k- repu
tarion tor massive devastation
untortunateh it didn t take long
tv r the film I ich discount the
atres Hut don't count on seeine,
r ' � ��
The plol : .
id of 1 � Kid and
gang of ed 1 he
Regul but 1 rrows much
' . .is v 11
Billy is res a � a an I eiffoi
named ohn runstel, v ho is
played b rerence Stn 'orin
from A Vi lo a Kill
Funstel owns a cattU ranch in
New M � � hiv h isguarded b)
a pad st boys orphans and
tla � eat h ol w huh is spe-
cialized in some form ol combat
such as pugilism, sharpshooting,
or knife throwing. These "Regu-
lators' guard the ranch from a
corrupt politician named Murphy
I Jack Palance ol Ripleys Believe
it or Not ). When Murphy sends
his men to kill Tunstel, the Regu-
lators become assasins bent on
revenge.
But th�: plol ls much thicker
than thatIt i:ides such con
ceptsasRe and man's
'Cubes intriangle
Conlnued t:om page 9
tl eir songs' actuastructure
I he Cubes are certainly innova
rvith their song structure. But,
CTC and5i uxieand the Ban-
she sfrom England, where
thissi i.sound was
mad lar
1 itts I I
on the small ind'pt ndenl label.
One LittleIndianRi. ords when
they cameto the statt s the) w ere
immevii.itted-up b I
r lali. 1 his sumn
i serendip I v.i
1 �
� kjc 1t ba�
i 11i to do
well in thi .
as I he Sir�ver, .it this
; in time all 1lis ex pet tations
navevi rshot �. thi
and s suc ess
Life's Ud ' has
higher on the Billboard i I
chart- than pi pected
ITiese � tt- fr m Iceland are
making a big big initial impai t
Toi .
Raleigh .it the ill eatre It
(.hi have tii kets i m �. en en i
I i i ausi � en sold-ont
for sc�' t ral da and me nA
most of nv friends don't have
any. However, copies ol Life's
loo Good" arc available every-
where. It' you have not ye( ob
tained a copy, go ahead and A so.
Lite's too good not to.
inhumanity to man It deals with
corruption, society, honor, and
humanity. It muses over empiri-
cal truths and the struggle be-
tween legality And justice. The
itor) is much deeper than venge-
ince and big guns in the old west.
Mute are topics which relate to
�ociet) in the twentieth century.
In short, there is something in it
for anyone who wants to see more
than blood and nudity.
Furthermore instead ol the
;� pica) two dimensional cowboy,
the characters of "Young Guns"
are real life people, with whom
the viewer can identify. Much ol
this can be attributed to the qual
it ol the actors
Emiiio Estevez ("Stakeout")
plays the lead role Although he
, rtravs Bill) the kid as a ho
tcidal psychopath with a sick
-v use ol humor, he is a likable
charactei I nderneath all the vio-
lence and anger is a little boy, who
loves pLo ing cowboys and Indi-
ans w ith the other neighborhood
children. Death is a completely
surreal concept to him, like King
down and counting to ten.
Charlie Sheen I Wall Street") is
Dick a father figure who keeps
the boys in check. I le was the only
one who can tell truth from illu-
sion, and who remains cooly in
control even when his life is in
danger.
1 ou Diamond Phillips 11 a
Bamba) plays Chaves, the last
Na vajo. Cha ves is, bv far, the most
disappointing character. He is
melodramatic and insecure, a
sign that both writer and actor
have many things to learn before
they can be considered masters of
their craft.
Dermont Melroney, a new
comer to the screen, plays the part
of Steven. Although he is billed as
a main character, he does little
more than shoot and spit tobacco,
a dark reminder o the cowboy of
classical western films
Casey Semaszko, another debu-
tant, is Charlie. He is the epitome
of the boy inside of every man,
who moans, whines, and screams
in tear, he is scared and alone,
following his peers before him-
self, even when it comes to leav-
ing his wife for a battle against
overwhelming odds.
By far, the most well developed
character is Poc, played by Keifer
Sutherland ('The Lost Boys").
Doe is a distinctly nontraditional
twist to the old characters. I le is a
romantic cowboy, who philoso-
phises and writes poetry. I le puts
his honor before his life and wins.
Doc not only shows a new side
ot the western man, it shows a
side of Sutherland which audi-
ences have never seen before: a
good actor who can portray a
multifaceted character, and who
portraysit well. Wecanonly hope
to see more work of this quality
from him in the future.
Aside from the depth ol the plot
and the quality ot the acting, there
are many things in "Young Cams"
tor the illiterate cinemaphile.
There is copious amounts of ac-
tion and bloodshed, some ol
which is completely unbe
lieveable. There is suk humor,
even though it's not in the form of
Schwarzeneggerian one liners.
There's even nudity, only one
breast, but it is thereon n t �
those who demand it
All in all, "Younglun is -t
terrific film.It may even sparl the
revival of the western genn in a
form representative ol today
new talent in screenwriting and
a ting It rates two thumbs up,
five stars, a massive ere ti in, oi a
ten on anybody's vale In an)
case, it well worth the five dol
lar admission, pl rhaps i ' ei
twice.
Nom thawing
STEALING HOME
NIGHTMARE ON
ELM ST. PART IV
COCKTAIL
TarkJIhtatrt
Have
' � �Jk
ARTHUR Ii
J
Squirrel Man Hotline
757-6366
NOW SHOWING
ATHENDRIX
SEPTEMBER 8 THRI II
ROBIN WlLl A.Ms
STARING IN
JST1&
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $2 i M5i
5:30 I u
UCCANNER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
r

RATED R YOUNG GUNS
1:00 3:05 5:10-7:1! I

COMING TO AMERICA
! :00 3:05 5:10 7:1

THE GREAT OUTDOOR
RATED pg 1:00 3:00 5 MI .
-
J
'Chains' to become new anthem
Continued from page 9
1 rue, Ihe song does reveal a lot
i our bureaucratic methodology
and we might not want the Rus-
sians earning how we managed
to cot to the efficiency level we're
currently at, but this is the era of
i Ilasnost 1 guess
What worries me the most is
that 1 couldn't find a suitable
Stevie Nicks soi to suggest
(i ran ted, there sno reason to proj-
ect my unhealthy obsessions on
the rest of ihe nation but hell,
Reagan did it foi years.
1 did find a Fleetwood Mac
song, and the more 1 thought
about it, it seriously is a pretty a it
dt scription ol thi1- land ol ours.
ii i i: multi -vo als
glorious 70s.
"I can still hoar you singing ' Ye-
w-ill never break the chainNever
break the chain( hams kecpus
together Songs like this you an
interpret anyway you want. And
that is what a national anthem
should be something different
tor all the citizens.
1 Intil next week, don't drink
and drive, be sure and catch the
Collard Festival Beauty Pageant
in Ayden tonight (in fact, don't
miss any of The c ollard 1 estival)
and most of all, keep our feet on
the ground and don't take any
bad poetry.
RACK ROOM SHOES
'Squirrel
of flying
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Open
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sunday 1-6
Fall Savings
RE
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Aigner. Ntke and Reebok)
1 1 I
TEEN f
Ulflb 7581976
vforicate
TO
SUMMER
SALE
starts Saturday,
September 3rd
50 Off
Starting Mon. Sept 12th
All Summer
Merchandise,
Sele ted ev elry and
Accessories. Some tall
and
winter merchandise.
419 Kcd Hanks Rd
Arlington Village
756-1058
"All right classLets test your New Music Knowledge
PRE
.
Bla
1.
STEVE W1NWOOO
Roll With It
As a teenager. Steve
Winwood sang in:
A. T � � wei
B. The Spen ei Dav is Group
C. His brother's weddn
0 BRIAN WILSON
Love and Mercy
Brian was the songwriting
genius behind:
A. The Beastie Boys
B. The Beach Boys
C. The California Raisins
�a TS. ITS,
o urn
L. Lot it
LITTLE FEAT
Roll
s
This is the group s
first all nt album
A :
B
C. 1979
BAD COMPANY
Dangerous Age
This British supergroup s
legendary vocalist is:
A. Paul Rod ;� "
B. Hoy R
C. Mi R
otfiv;
Xte
T 12"
0-2 Correct
3 4 Correct
All S Correct
s 7:00 S
Menc
A Co)
5.
ESCAPE CLUB
Wild Wild West
The Escape Club s smash
new single is:
A. Wild. Wild W�M
B. Escape Clause"
C. E s ape Hatch
Q33ffi(30a?
THE PLAZA, CAROLINA EAST MALL
O
'K
m
699 99
CD





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8, 188
Yoto new western'Young Guns'
By JIM SH AMLIN
S(i Writer
"Young Guns the latest re-
lease by Morgan Creek pictures,
stands in the shadows of some
rather dark predecessors: The
first western film released in
1980's was "Silverado which
closed before it reached most the-
atres.
Next came "Pale Rider which
survived only because of Clint
"Dirty Harry" Eastwood's repu-
tation for massive devastation;
unfortunately, it didn't take long
for the film to reach discount the-
atres. But don't count on seeing
"Young Guns" on cable this
spring.
The plot itself is based upon the
legend of Billy the Kid and his
gang of outlaws called "The
Regulators but borrows much
from Oliver Twist. It begins when
Billv is rescued bv a Gran Feiffor
named John Tunstel, who is
played by Terence Stump (Zorin
from "A View to a Kill").
Tunstel owns a cattle ranch in
New Mexico which is guarded by
a pack of lost boys�orphans and
outlaws -each of which is spe-
cialized in some form of combat
such as pugilism, sharpshooting,
or knife-throwing. These "Regu-
lators" guard the ranch from a
corrupt politician named Murphy
(Jack Palance of "Ripleys Believe
it or Not"). When Murphy sends
his men to kill Tunstel, the Regu-
lators become assasins bent on
revenge.
But the plot is much thicker
than that. It includes such con-
cepts as Romantic love and man's
'Cubes in triangle
Continued from page 9
their songs' actual structure, and
The Cubes are certainly innova-
tive with their song structure. But,
XTC and Siouxie and the Ban-
shees are from England, where
this "progressive" sound was
made popular.
In Europe, "Life's Too Good' is
on the small independent label.
One Little Indian Records, when
they came to the states they were
immediatelv picked-up bv the
major label Electra. This summer,
I serendipitouslv met the owner
of One Little Indian Records who
said that he hasn't seen such en-
ergy by the American mess for
this type of band, let alone one of
his bands.
He expected the Cubes to do
well in the U.S "maybe as good
as The Smiths However, at this
point in time all his expectations
have been way overshot bv the
realitv of the band's success.
life's Too Good" has
higher on the Billboard album
charts than most people expected.
These poets from Iceland are
making a big big initial impact.
Tonight, they will be playing in
Raleigh at the Rialto Theatre. If
you have tickets, I'm very envious
because they have been sold-out
for several days now, and me and
most of my friends don't have
any. However, copies of "Life's
Too Good" are available every-
where. If you have not yet ob-
tained a copy, go ahead and do so.
Life's too good not to.
inhumanity to man. It deals with Bamba) plays Chaves, the last
corruption, society, honor, and Navajo. Chaves is, by far, the most
humanity. It muses over empiri- disappointing character. He is
cal truths and the struggle be- melodramatic and insecure,
tween legality and justice. The sign that both writer and actor are many things in "Young Guns
story is much deeper than venge- have many things to learn before ftr the illiterate cinemaphile.
ance and big guns in the old west, they can be considered masters of There is copious amounts of ac-
There are topics which relate to their craft. tion and bloodshed, some of
society in the twentieth century. Dermont Melroney, a new- which is completely unbe-
In short, there is something in it comer to the screen, plays the part Heveable. There is sick humor,
for anyone who wants to see more of Steven. Although he is billed as even though if s not ��. the form of
than blood and nudity. a main character, he does little Schwarzeneggerian one-liners
Furthermore, instead of the more than shoot and spit tobacco,
typical two-di mensional cowboy, a dark reminder of the cowboy of
the characters of "Young Guns" classical western films,
are real-life people, with whom CaseySemaszko,anotherdebu-
the viewer can identify. Much of tant, is Charlie. He is the epitome
of the boy inside of every man,
who moans, whines, and screams
in fear, he is scared and alone,
to see more work of this quality breast, but it is there on screen for
from him in the future. those who demand it.
Aside from the depth of the plot All in all, "Young Guns" is a
and the quality of the acting, there terrific film. It may even spark the
There's even nudity, only one
revival of the western genre, in a
form representative of today's
new talent in screenwriting and
acting. It rates two thumbs up,
five stars, a massive erection, or a
ten on anybody's scale. In any
case, it's well worth the five-dol-
lar admission, perhaps even
twice.
Plaza Cinema
I'l.ia Shopping Clr. 756 OOH8
Now Showing
STEALING HOME
NIGHTMARE ON
ELM ST. PART IV
COCKTAIL
TartCIheatre
3 ife

San Showing
ARTHUR II
this can be attributed to the qual
ity of the actors:
Emilio Estevez ("Stakeout")
Squirrel Man Hotline
757-6366
plays the lead role. Although he following his peers before him-
portrays Billy the kid as a ho-
mocidal psychopath with a sick
sense of humor, he is a likable
character. Underneath all the vio-
lence and anger is a little boy, who
loves playing cowboys and indi-
self, even when it comes to leav-
ing his wife for a battle against
overwhelming odds.
By far, the most well developed
character is Doc, played by Keifer
Sutherland ("The Lost Boys").
ans with the other neighborhood Doc is a distinctly nontraditional
children. Death is a completely twist to the old characters. He is a
surreal concept to him, like lying romantic cowboy, who philoso-
down and counting to ten.
Charlie Sheen ("Wall Street") is
Dick, a father figure who keeps
the boys in check. He was the only
one who can tell truth from illu-
sion, and who remains cooly in
control even when his life is in
danger.
Lou Diamond Phillips (La
phises and writes poetry. He puts
his honor before his life and wins.
Doc not only shows a new side
of the western man, it shows a
side of Sutherland which audi-
ences have never seen before: a
good actor who can portray a
multifaceted character, and who
portrays it well. We can only hope
NOW SHOWING
AT HENDRIX
SEPTEMBER 8 THRU 11
ROBIN WILLIAMS
STARING IN
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
Adults $25�,tn
5:30
CHILDREN
ANYTIME
BUCCANNER MOVIES
. 756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center


RATED R YOUNG GUNS
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15 9:20
RATED R
COMING TO AMERICA
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
THE GREAT OUTDOORS
RATED PG 1 00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00



'Chains' to become new anthem
Continued from page 9
True, the song does reveal a lot
of our bureaucratic methodology
and we might not want the Rus-
sians learning how we managed
to get to the efficiency level we're
currently at, but this is the era of
Glasnost I guess
What worries me the most is
that I couldn't find a suitable
Stevie Nicks song to suggest.
Granted, there's no reason to proj-
ect my unhealthy obsessions on
the rest of the nation but hell,
Reagan did it for years.
I did find a Fleet wood Mac
song, and the more I thought
about it, it seriously is a pretty apt
description of this land of ours.
And it's one of those multi-vocals
glorious 70s.
"I can still hear you singing We
will never break the chainNever
break the chainChainskeep us
together Songs like this you can
interpret anyway you want. And
that is what a national anthem
should be something different
for all the citizens.
Until next week, don't drink
and drive, be sure and catch the
Collard Festival Beauty Pageant
in Ayden tonight (in fact, don't
miss any of The Collard Festival)
and most of all, keep your feet on
the ground and don't take any
bad poetry.
vings
O OFF
iY LOW PRICE
ike and Reebok)
vforicate
SUMMER
SALE
starts Saturday,
September 3rd
50 Off
Starting Mon. Sept 12th
All Summer
Merchandise,
Selected Jewelry and
Accessories. Some fall
and
winter merchandise.
919 Red Banks Rd
Arlington Village
756-1058
1.
SIEVE WMWOOD
Roll With It
As a teenager, Steve
Win wood sang in:
A. The shower
B. The Spencer Davis Group
C. His brother's wedding
M LPTape 'I CO

3 BRIAN WILSON
Love and Mercy
Brian was the songwriting
genius behind:
A. The Beastie Boys
B. The Beach Boys
C. The California Raisins
2.
UTTIEFEAT
Let It Roll
This is the group's
first all-new album since:
A 416 BC
B. Their last one
C. 1979
fff LPTape lib CO
BAD COMPANY
Dangerous Age
This British supergroup's
legendary vocalist is:
A. Paul Rodgers
B. Roy Rogers
C. Mr. Rogers
m LP-
Tape

0-2 Correct LoofcsNkeyou
Music Betler ��- see us
3-4 Correct � Joingtme :
needed We suggest cx. I
All 5 Correct Mo a m Youicotomouat) � ��
customers Se .
5.
Wild Wild West
The Escape Club's smash
new single is:
A. "Wild. Wild West"
B. "Escape Clause"
C. "Escape Hatch"
O LPTape 11
THE PLAZA, CAROUNA EAST MAU
Have
Dear Big E,
I have just lived the worst wee'
nd of my life, it started out out tl
k? a blast when
Meandering in a maze
streets, 1 could onlv think of a
ing my turgid head on Silky (ml
pillow) and sleep. Leaninf
against a sturdy tree, I set ml
bearings and wondered wh
Beam-ed me.
Coming upon the house when
rent a room, I stopped to pa
homcage to the homestead
was glad to be there. Gazinl
towards the shipped paint an
the crooked shutters, "Gee, wh�
a beautiful house slurred froi
my mouth.
Crossing the waist high wccl
oi the front yard, I sudden!
stopped. Maybe it was mv intu
tion, but more like
twirling blue lights
Greenville FD patrol cars whi
deterred my forward
and caused me to hit the d -
LikeG.l. foe, 1 crawled tl j
the jungle of rag u thj
heard a hysterical woma.
screaming at the two policemen
'Squirrel
of flying
GREENVILLE, N.C. BD
Greenville's infamous "squirm
man" has struck again, demo
strating a strange new swoopii
ability before blatantly killing �
ECU professor Monday night
Dr. Ripped Wallpaper, an EC
alumnus w ho majored in Stkkii
IV Needles in Peoples' Arms vs
killed as the squirrel creatui
swooped down from the top
Ringgold Towers aparmc
building and bit his shoulder.
Wallpaper was taken to V
Memorial following the atta
but was pronounced dead on at
val from loss oi shoulder.
Experts are unsure it the
den appearance of glider pane
on the previously land boui
creature means that there is a sei
PRE
S
YU
Gat
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Bla
Si
Delta SVSwa
The
At 7:00 Si
Men
A Cor





I
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TEALING HOME
JGHTMARE ON
:LM ST. PART IV
COCKTAIL
?arfcrheatre
AT�U' Shoeing
ARTHUR II
30
CHILDREN N
ANYTIME $2
MOVIES
ire Shopping Center
�UNS
MERICA
OUTDOORS

i OFF
OW PRICE
nd Reebok)
I I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8,1988 11
Have mercy for the homeless
Low tar, true Hast temptation9
Deai Big E,
have just lived the worst week-
d of my life, it started out out to
.1 blast when
Meandering in a maze of
streets, I could only think of lay-
ing my turgid head on Silky (my
How) and sleep. Leaning
igainst a sturdy tree, 1 set my
mrings and wondered who
am-ed me.
( oming upon the house where I
. nt a room, 1 stopped to pay
lomeage to the homestead as I
is glad to be there. Gazing,
wards the chipped paint and
crooked shutters, "Gee, what
tutiful house slurred from
v mouth.
( rossing the waist high weeds
the front yard, 1 suddenly
d Maybe it was mv intui-
�n but more likely it was the
tirling blue lights of the two
reenville PD patrol cars which
terred my forward progress
id caused me to hit the deck.
keG.I. oe, I crawled through
e jungle of rag weeds. 1 then
eard a hysterical woman
1 aming at the two policemen. I
lay still to listen. "Drug dealers,
can't you control these pushers of
death, these peddlers of Satin. Get
him, put out an UPI or whatever
it's called, get him she said. 1
finally recognized her voice, she
was my landlord.
Just Ask
BigE
Signed, Homeless Rufugee
Dear Fugitive Rufugee,
And if you need a job, hey
man we can set you up. Positions
will soon be open for General
Manager and Managing Editor.
The pay is pretty good for those
Ifeelforyouguy.It'sunfortu- two jobs, about $100 a month after
nate that some land-owning-Re- taxes, state and local, psychology
publican paranoids suddenly care, drug addictions and every-
throw good, emest-livingcitizens day injury from being an eight-
out of their rented dwellings for year-old.
unsignificant things. Jobs are also open for News,
Let me, along with the entire Features and Sports Editors. Yeah
staff of the East Carolinian, wel- it's sad but you see they are kind
come you to stay with us. We have of like Three-Mile-lsland, they are
several couches from which you experience a major melt down. If
can choose from to crash on. Re- y�u nave a big ego and hate for
Stiffling her with "Mam, Mam
now just settle down one of the
cops continued in a practiced,
professional tone, "We have just any man, come on up to the Pub- people to spit in your face, I don'�
borough search of lications Building, across from advise you to take on one of these
Joyner Library, and we will put jobs.
you up until you can get back on Really man, if life is getting
your feet again. you down then come up and live
People say that maybe the the life on the edge. And the best
opinion of this column isblatantly part about it, you can eat, sleep,
sexist (our opponents like the study and work inside the same
word blatant) and full of scato- four walls, just don't hit the ceil-
logical language but in your case, ing because it is made out of as-
I can't kick you when you down, bestos and you might die if you
Seriously, Pete has a big green breathe it.
What am I going do? I have no couch, Chip has a brown one and East Carolinian
place to turn. I am broke and am of course there is the famous Bat Publications Building
currently living out of the trunk of Cave which houses the Bat East Carolina Universitv
Greenville, N.C.
conducted a
these premises and have seizeebne
half of a marijuana cigarette
weighing approximately one
quarter of one gram
On Sunday, I found out that
the landlady had evicted me and
my roommate without notice. All
of my stuff was thrown out in the
stocks of rag weed in the front
vard.
mv car.
NEW YORK (BP) � Biblical
scholars today stunned the reli-
gious and entertainment worlds
with their startling revelation that
the real last temptation of Christ
was a Marlboro Light cigarette.
Rev. N. Tolerence, a Methodist
preacher who was made a life's
work of studying an ancient set of
forbidden religious papers
known popularly as the "Cacti
Scrolls revealed during a press
conference that Jesus was a pack
a day smoker by the time he was
16.
"He had been trying to quit for
years. Finally, Paul sent got him
enrolled in a sort of early version
of the Smoker's Anonymous
group, and he was able to quit be-
fore he was crucified Tolerence
explained.
The Cacti Scrolls, found in 1912
inthefamousShrineofSt. Mary of
the Cacti in Greenville, N.C, are
in poor condition and hard to
translate, Tolerence said. "That's
why it took me so long to be sure
of this find. I was pretty sure be-
fore Scorsese started filming
"I went to him with my discov-
ery. He said he wanted more
proof before he included it in his
movie, so I went back to translat-
ing, and he finished his film a
somewhat haughty Tolerence
said.
"But I was right he exclaimed
during the conference. "The
scrolls clearly say And the Dark
Angel came unto The Lord Jesus
of Nazarath and saycth unto
himHey want a drag?
"And the Lord jesus sayeth
unto the Wicked One, 'No, I quit a
couple of years ago. Thanks any-
way
"And the Prince of Darkness
said unto the lord one more
timeHey, man they're low tar
Here the fragment breaks off
said Tolerence.
Tolerence did not speculate on
whether Chnst took Satan up on
his offer. "Seems to me that's
another movie right there he
said.
Religious leaders are denounc-
ing the scrolls, saying that the fol-
lowersofSt. Maryarecultistsand
that the scrolls have nothing to do
with history, religious or secular.
Ticksuckers threaten Collard Festival
Couch.
Squirrel man' kills again after reports
�f flying offRinggold Towers high rise
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP)
reenville's infamous "squirrel
in has struck again, demon-
rating a strange new swooping
bility before blatantly killing an
professor Monday night.
Dr. Kipped Wallpaper, an ECU
mnus who majored in Sticking
ond creature or the first is matur-
ing rapidly.
Dr. Fetchin Bones, a noted zo-
ologist, speculates on the situ-
ation saying, "It could be two
seperate animals. Imagine if you
will, a whole hidden race of dor-
known creature has caused two
reported deaths. Sightings have
occurred all over the Greenville
area, but most are concentrated
around the ECU campus.
One documented sighting hap-
room, they found two long rows
of scratches down the screen of
the student's window. The rows,
according to police scientist Barry
Allen, looked "just like the
scratches found on tree bark in
Needles in Peoples' Arms, was reappearing for some reason,
lied as the squirrel creature "This could well be the scien-
vooped down from the top of tific find of the century he
o 1 ci Towers aparment added.
lilding and bit his shoulder. Police Chief Gordon O' Hara is
Wallpaper was taken to Pitt more skepticalI don't know
emorial following the attack, what's goin' on really, but it
mant squirrel people, suddenly the middle of campus. A female
student, who asked not to be iden-
tified, called police when she
heard a scraping sound on her
dorm window.
She turned around to see the
pened Sunday at the fountain in trees inhabited by squirrels, only
caused by something weighing
roughly 250 pounds
Greenville Police and The East
Carolinian have set up "The
Squirrel Man Hotline" at 757-
6366, in order to collect informa-
grey, bushy tail of the creature tion about the creature and try
sliding downward. She says she and target dangerous areas.
s pronounced dead on arri- seems to me like somebody done watched the squirrel man glide to Already sections of the campus
il from loss of shoulder. been into the bad chemicals up to the ground and scamper past the such as the ROTC building and
unsure if the sud- the Everready� plant. I don't fountain, disappearing behind the Mcndenhall reflecting pool
n appearance of glider panels
n the previously land bound
feature moans that there is a sec-
know what's next giant tick
people, I suppose
Whatever the cause, the un-
the Geology Building.
When police arrived at her
have been cordoned off due to the
number of sightings reported.
AYDEN, N.C. (BP) � While its
sister city Greenville struggles
with the rampages of the killer
"squirrel men Ayden, best
known forits yearly Collard Festi-
val, now has to contend with big
problems of its own � the "giant,
bloodsucking tick people
Three inhabitants of the
"Morttown Acres" trailer park
have reported the death of their
neighbor, Verdant Dungarees, 82,
Tuesday. Owner of the park,
Griselda Flatts, told reporters
Dungarees was a "good quiet
tenant, and a good Christian, even
if he did pick his nose a lot
"I know that's why they got him
instead of anyone else Flatts
addedAnyone'll tell you that
them bugs were after all them
dried boogers he flicked onto his
stoop. There's something in snot
they can smell she whispered
confidentially.
Dungarees had apparently
been sitting on thosesteps, talking
to passing neighbors when, Flatts
recounts, they heard "sounds
like hundreds of tiny little forks
scraping across the top of the
trailer
Dungarees had little time to
investigate. By the time he had
raised his head up, "13, maybe 15
of them little bug men were all
over him next door neighbor
Jethro Tweed, 36, an unemployed
florist said.
"They looked like those cartoon
critters the Care Bears on TV,
only they were dull grey with six
spidery legs and blue, veiny eyes
that kinda seemed to swim back
and forth he added.
Hatts interjects, "I swanee, 1
could almost hear the blood
they'd sucked gurgling around in
their stomachs as they moved.
And as Verdant died, you could
almost see them getting bigger
Dungarees was rushed to Pitt
Memorial, but the multiple tiny
wounds were fatal. His corpse
was almost completely drained of
blood.
PRESENTING
S$
Tva
G Sisters
4

kr
'Pp.
of the
4
We're getting a
FACE
LIFT!
Black Greek Order
Sisterhood
Friendship
e.


6
�&
DcUa SiSma
Theta
Togetherness
At 7:00 Sunday, September 11,1988
Mendenhall Student Center
A Convocation For The Black
College Woman!
d

Q
T)eS stress 9
Freshmen are welcome
Come by The Spa and see for yourself
the changes we're making!
� New owner
� New management
� September addition of 50 more space
� September nursery
� Expanded free-weight area
� 1500 square foot aerobic floor
� New aerobic program coordinated by
Mark Brunetz, which features high
and low impact classes, toning classes,
seniors and resistance classes.
� 50 aerobic classes per week
And find out
what we ALREADY offer:
� Co-ed aerobics program
� Complete dynacam weight machines
� Stationary bikes
� York free weights
� Organized activities
� Certified experienced aerobics
instructors
� Certified dynacam instructors
� CPR certified instructors
Take advantage of our many facilities:
� Two exercise rooms
� Aerobics classroom
� Wet steam room
� Desert dry sauna
� Hot mineral whirlpool
� Wolff system sunbed
� Private dressing rooms
� Private tile showers
PLUS, note our extra
benefits and services:
� IPFA and AHA Memberships
honored at locations worldwide
� Special Interest Seminars
� Monthly calendar events
� Social activities
Beat the Price Increase!
After our renovations are complete,
membership prices will go up, so be sure
to JOIN NOW! or, bring in the coupon
below for a free month pass and see for
yourself why The Spa is Greenville's best
health club value!
Student Memberships Available!
This coupon entitles you to a
FREE MONTH PASS
at The Spa in Southpark Shopping Center
OlUr tipirOt Spt�mt�f IS. 1�M
Limit on coupon pot customer
I
i7m�p






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8, 1968
Where it seems anything goes
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have: no
Its here at last!
THE
CLINT
HOWARD
TRIBUTE
The critics rave about the Fun and Games tribute to Clint Howard!
"A veritable Clint-festThe New York Times
"Two thumbs up for Ron's more talented brotherSiskel and Ebert
"Clint, Clint, CLINTRex Reed
BUT PRESIDENT
CRUISE'S OPPOSITION
TO CATMUlOATE
RAVANA'S ORTHO-
DOX FOLLOWING-
OF SHIEVEA
Micah Harris (unofficial biographer of Clint Howard) shares a poignant reminescience:
I first encountered Clint Howard in his role as "Leon the little boy in the cowboy suit
who always offered Barney a bite of his jelly sandwich on the "Andy Griffith Show" . Even in
.i walk-on part with no lines, it was evident to me that Clint had, well, "presence It wasn't
h.ird to imagine the jelly sandwich as the skull of Yorick and Clint as a young man assuming
the role of Hamlet in a Joseph Fapp festival. But mostly I just thought about how sick I was
looking at that jelly smeared all over that kid's face.
Overpowered by his brother Ron as Opie, Clint's "Leon" soon disappeared. However,
C inemax's release of "Andy Griffith: the Lost Episodes" gives us a chance to see what Clint
could've really done. In the filmed but previously unreleased "Opie's Snipe Hunt written by
a young Stephen King, we learn that Leon disappeared in the woods during the traditional
Boy Scout initiationpractical joke of sending new recruits into the night in search of the
mythical snipe creature.
Driven by guilt, fellow scouts Opie and Johnny Paul go looking for the young recruit. They
find Leon dead from exposure, a Jane Parker Jelly Roll wrapper clinging to his lips from a vain
attempt to derive sustenance.
But the episode never aired, and King used some of the story's elements in his novella 'The
Body" (now a film by Rob Reiner). Look for "Opie's Snipe Hunt" along with "Howard Sprague
Comes Out of the Closet" as part of Cinemax's "Andy Griffith: the Lost Episdoes" this month.
MMt
V
CLINT HOWARD IN HIS GREATEST ROLE
Facts about Clint:
Favorite food: Jelly sandwiches
Favorite drink: Tranya
Turn-ons: finding work
Turn-offs: pollution, bear-dung
Roles through the years:
Leon, on the Andy Griffith Show
Mark, on Gentle Ben
Balok, on Star Trek
Possesed Man-Boy, in EvilSpeak
Favorite appearance of his
brother Ron:
in Grand Theft Auto
A scene from STAR TREK'sThe Corbomite Manuever where young Clint was picked to play
the alien Balok because of his unique looks. The young Howard's voice was dubbed as he spoke
with Kirk, but thanks to his professionalism, no one ever even noticed!
Help Clint ride his brother Ronny's coattails to success!
Years later, Clint decided to expand his horizons
and took this challenging role as the demon-
possesed Man-Boy in "EvilSpeak
1
You probably noticed now that the maze can't be finished.
Thafs because Clint never became successful!
s
r
I Ml
Mood
Bv GRI K IV
S.j.) ,A
Jarrod Moody begai
football s. as � -
Sarurda. f'
for 5 yards and
touchdowns
Mood) is a -
Industrial i
played hih s
Northern Nash I
Nashville
"Iwasredshirti
year hesai i.M
isglad now that h
freshman
"Beinv: red
chana I
life and it .
better at
"The lean
Sarurda)
could impi
her of pi �
Mood) sa
have a winnii
"Tr� '
this year � i
ing pla) i �
Lame
By NEEDH v
RAU
all thereat
Sarurda)
when � �
purple and
where I w a -
o Boiang es fi
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i
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m
'4.v
E No more crowds like th;
i
85
Ganit
COLUMBIA -
South Care
son saysheisn tcert
two k.o players injured o
weekend back in shar
Sarurda) sgameag
Carolina
TheGamei
running backs tailba i
(Green and fullback K
suffered injuries in S
llO South Carolina
hhe North Carolina
Morrison suffered w j
,n described as a
fklebone and Bing susU
straimvi knee ligaments
Morns-n sui Greer
il�t was questionable
Western Carolina while Pin
Corn
I

: coimumv.�umm I ee
i36, former assistant men sba
?ball rx�ch at ECU has
mamed to the same posihi
Cornell University.
Talbot, along with d
Dorfman. fills the assistant
tions vacated bv Al Wall
rentlv head coach at CoK
College, and Sieve Robu
currently serving as an
at the Universirv of Kansas
"I'm extremely delighkj
have Lee join us said Cc
head coach Mike Dement





to i iiirgtiniis
t i
3


f EADf
( iu
out Clint:
?d: Jelly sandwiches
ink: Tranya
inding work
ollution, bear-dung
gh the years:
Andy Griffith Show
lentle Ben
tar Trek
Ian-Boy, in EvilSpeak
Jpearance of his
left Auto
it was picked to play
dubbed as he spoke
to success!
.hed.
;
IMF FASTI AROI INIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBERS, 18H Page 11
Moody a key figure in Pirate's success
By GREKR BOWEN
Staff Writer
larrod Moody began his senior
football season right this past
Saturday. Moody had two carries
tor 55 yards, and scored two
touchdowns.
Moody is a senior majoring in
Industrial Technology, lie
played high school football tor
orthern Nash High School in
Nashville, N.C.
"1 was red shifted my freshman
year he said. Moody said that he
is glad now that he didn't play his
freshman year for many reasons.
Being red shirtcd gave me a
chance to get adjusted to college
life and it gave me a chance to get
better at football he said.
"The team had a good game
Saturday, but there are things we
could improve on, like the num-
ber of penalties' said Moody.
Moodvsaid the Pirates are sure to
have a winning season.
'The team is more experienced
this year. We have a lot oi return-
ing players on both sides of the
ball, he said different cities, and the friend-
Moody thinks he had con- snjpS i've developed, " he said,
stantlv improved each season. " "The guys on the team are very
try to improve each Saturday and tight and we have a good rapport
do better than the week before. I with the assistant coaches, "
never want to go backwards Moody said. He said that it is
Moody said. 1 le said he likes to easier to relax with the assistant
Jarrod Moody turns up field towards the goal line. (File Photo),
play hard anil do what he has to coaches.
in order to help the Pirates be
successful.
Moody has played football
since the th grade and will miss
the sport next year. "1 like Satur-
day afternoons most of all. Rut I
enjoy the travel and uetting to see
1 lis favorite game of the season
used to be the ECU-NCSU game.
"It was the Rocky Mount Senior
High, Northern Nash High
School game all over again, but
better he said He is not pleased
that the NCSU and ECU won't
play each other again. "It wasn't
our fault. We can't control the
crowd and the situation was
handled poorly, but the decision
has been made and we've got to
live with it, " he said.
The ECU-NCSU game in 1987
was Moody's favorite game ever.
He said that the excitement that
surrounded that game was in-
credible knew a lot of the play-
ers on the NCSU team, and my
high school coach is the NCSU's
secondary coach, and I was able
to score twice. It was too much
fun" he said.
Although Moody was injured
in last Saturday's contest, he
hopes to be able to practice and to
play on Saturday.
The next home game is on Sep-
tember 24th against Southern
Mississippi "We play them well
each year, he said. Moody
wants to do well in that game. "1
want to do everything I can to
help the team. I don't want it to be
a last second game. "
Although Moody will miss the
Lamenting over lost rivalry
By NEEDHAM PARK
Staff Writrr
RALEIGH -The dements were
there at Carter-Finlev stadium
Saturday night. It was 6 p.m.
when three cheerleaders in
purple and gold strolled past
where I was biting into mv piece
of Bojangles fried chicken. Sud-
denly to my left I hear "Would
you like program?" I spent mv
last $2.50 on a program onl be
cause the girl selling them was
awfully cute 1 must tell you.
Anyway, I looked down at the
program and was in utter shock
to see that there v as a mistake on
the cover, it read "NC STATE VS
WESTERN CAROl IN A I re-
membered thinking "boy some
bumblehead must have printed
this baby, it's the first game of the
season and State always plays
Fast Carolina "
"Wait a second, there's no ten-
sion there's no 'hev EC you
look like shit to meor'straight to
hell with State no fights before
the game. This isn't the classic
No more crowds like this one on opening day for the ECU- NCSU football game. (File Photo).
Gamecocks hurting
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)
Ninth Carolina Coach oe Morri-
son says he isn't certain he'll have
two key players injured over the
veekend back in shape in time for
Saturday's game against Western
Carolina.
The Gamecocks' two starting
running backs, tailback Harold
.reen and fullback Keith Bing,
suffered injuriesinSaturday's31-
10 South Carolina victory over
the North Carolina Tarheels.
Morrison suffered what Morri-
son described as "a bruised an
klebone" and Bing sustained
strained knee ligaments.
Morrison said Green's av aila-
bility was "questionable" for
Western Carolina while Bino was
doubtful. Green rushed an even
100 yards, scored two touch-
dow ns and aught five pases for
68 yards against North Carolina.
Bing rushed three times for 31
yards, including a 25-yard run,
and caught one pass for nine
yards.
Morrison said Gerald Wil-
liamsand Mike Dingle, backup to
Green and Bing, respectively.
"kx)k like they'll get all the work
they want" this weekend.
Morrison said the pass block-
ing was good against North
( arolma and the relatively inex-
perienced receiver corps per-
formed well Quarterback Todd
Ellis completed passes to 10 dif-
ferent receivers in connecting on
23 of 38 for 290 yards.
Still, Morrison said Monday
he still sees "a lot of correcting to
do
"I was pleased with the win
he said. "Usually the most im-
provement comes between the
State-ECU game
No, I'm not that stupid, all that
was made up, of course. But I was
silly enough to go all the wav to
Raleigh to witness a 39 point
blow-out when I could have
stayed here in Greenville and
seen the same thing.
The game itself was an outright
joke and hardly worth reporting
anything else about. It was well
over before the third quarter was
even finished. State had run up
the score to 38-3 by that point and
most people began exiting to
avoid the oncoming rain.
Out of all this some questions
from the past arose once more.
Do we really want them to go to
hell? And if we really look like
shit to them should we even at-
tempt to not try and pick on a
State student next time the op-
portunity arises? Should the se-
ries have been cancelled?
The biggest question is whv
was there so much hate from both
sides? I have attended every
game since 1978 and can only
recall the 1983 game as one to get
uptight about. All theothcrs were
over for the most part before the
end of the third quarter, regard-
less of which team won.
In fact, the games themselves
are a big blur; what stands out are
the scenes that surround the
games. In the early years it was
mostly just people partying and
getting sick from having too
much of a good time. Gradually
over the years more and more
fights were breaking out, and the
rivalry was getting deeper in in-
tensity.
The only exception to all this
was the game in 1980 which was
plaved in the afternoon in No-
vember. It came down to what
football was intended to be. Fun
competition with very little un-
necessary occurrences, and the
game being in control of the play-
ers and coaches didn't care what
the fans did.
So both sides point the fingers
at each other while teams like
Tennessee Tech and Western
first and second games. We've
got a lot of correcting to do, but Carolina have the grand oppor-
not serious corrections.
He said the Gamecocks still
need to improve their running
game. South Carolina netted 166
yards on the ground against
North Carolina, but Morrison
said Green made much of his 100
yards on his own.
"We need to improve our run
blocking the coach said.
tunity to play first class 1 -A oppo-
nents. Why doesn't one side quit
whining because that is all any-
one has done since last year and
admit to being at least partially at
fault. Only then will something
be done about the game being
reinstated. Incidently, since both
teams won by a margin of 39 Sat-
urday, this year could be de-
clared a tie.
Cornell selects new coach
� COKNFILNFWSRHF.ASE- LoeTalbot,
, V,formerassistantmen'sbasket-
ball coach at ECU, has been
� named to the same position at
Cornell University.
Talbot, along with George
Dorfman, fills the assistant posi-
y tions vacated by Al Walker, cur-
it rently head coach at Colorado
1 College, and Steve Robinson,
currently serving as an assistant
e at the University of Kansas.
k "I'm extremely delighted to
� have Lee join us said Cornell
head coach Mike Dement. "I've
worked with him before, which
will ease the transition, and his
record as a head coach speaks for
itself. His teaching ability will
also be beneficial to our young
squad
Talbot is a 1973 graduate of St.
Lawrence University, with a
bachelor's degree in physical
education. He served asagradu
ate assistant at SLU from 1973-76
and earned his masters of educa-
tion degree in 1974.
He went overseas in 1976 to
work with the Saudi Arabian
national basketball team tor two
years, before returning to his
alma mater in 1978 as head base-
ball and assistant basketball
coach, where he worked with for-
mer Navy and current Pitt coach
Paul Evans.
Talbot was elevated to the
head post in basketball at St.
Iwrence in 1980, and his teams
posted an overall record of 82-49,
including three league champi-
onships and two invitations to
the NCAA Division III tourna-
ment. His clubs consistently
ranked in the top 10 nationally in
field goal percentage offense and
defense.
He joined the staff at East
Carolina University in 1985 as an
assistant, coordinating all re-
cruiting, scouting, scheduling,
travel and many of the day-to-
day operations of the Pirate
squad.
Talbot left ECU in 1987 to take
a position as an investment ex-
ecutive with Paine Webber in
Baltimore before returning to
coaching.
actual games, he won't miss all
the time football consume. He
goes to class from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. He has lunch from 1:00 p.m.
to 1:30 p.m gets dressed from
130 to 2:30 and has meetings
from 2:30 to 3.00. From 3:15 to
6:15 they practice and then watch
films from 6:30 to 7:00. Moody
said he will not miss the bumps,
the bruises, or the summer prac-
tices, but he will miss those Satur-
day afternoon games with all the
fans.
Women's Volleyball
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Staff H'nVr
Season openers can bring many
surprises. For first-year ECU
Volleyball coach, Judy Kirkpa-
tnck, Tuesday night's opening
match was a pleasant surprise as
ECU defeated Atlantic Christian
3-2.
"We did things so well tonight.
Our offense was in full swing
from the start and we were able to
trv out a lot of things we've
learned during'pre-season said
Kirkpatrick, who took her first
win at ECU in the victory at
Minges.
Things didn't look so good for
t' e Lady Pirates at the beginning
as Atlantic Christian defeated
them 11-15 in the first game.
Atlantic Christian was a much
stronger team than we expected,
so the first game took us by sur-
prise. But I think the loss took
some pressure off the team so
they could settle down and play
said Kirkpatnck.
ECU rebounded from its first
lose bv taking the second game
15-13. The match tested both
teams as control ot the game
bounced from team to team.
The 1 ady Pirates gained mo-
mentum of the second game from
plays like a spike from junior
outside hitter lemma Hollev.
Hollev's sp'ke "division-one
vollevball at its finest" according
to her coach, was just one of many
offensive boosts for ECU.
Kirkpatrick credits the team for
its tremendous offensive effort
One such effort came from jun-
ior setter Kerry Weisbrod, whose
experience showed as she took
control in running the offense
The third game did not o as
well for the Idv Pirates as ACC
won 8-15.
Determined not to let the effort
go to waste, ECU went on to a 15-
12 win in the fourth game and a
15-3 wm in the fifth game to cap-
ture the match
"Our team was m complete
control by the final game Every-
one was the offense said
kirkpatrick
ECl plivinc without sen r
i Vbbie Late be ius -t an in
also saw exceptional pi iv in b -
up setter Kc lle M il i
I i Iped pace the Pirates in
and passing
Kirkpatrick was
with th � play of Mid
'�� ir I : ra Si I
U continue � -� i
this weekend as u travels to the
Ml Carolina Classic in Chapel
Hill. The Lady Pirates will face
Davidson on Friday, and the
Tarheels and Appalachian
or Saturday
ECU returns to action at home,
Wednesday, September 14 as
they host Campbell Univi
7:00 at Minges Coliseum
The ECU women's volleyball team captured a win this weekend
to start the season on the right foot. (File Photo).
Cross Country runs
By MIKE McGEHEE
Com pondent
Methodist College held the first
Cross-Country relay invitational
over Labor Day weekend and
East Carolina came back from it
smiling. The women took second
place, finishing just behind
Winthrop. The women's race had
each relay team consisting of two
runners who ran three miles each.
The relay team of Kim Griffiths
and Ann Marie Welch won the
overall meet at 37.56. Freshman
Ann Marie Welch's cumulative
time made her ECU's top finisher
and overall invitational winner.
Other fine performances came
from Wilson and Sweeney (7th,
41.13), Tillson and Hough (10,
42.11). The last two relay teams
TalmadgeDaniels and McCall
West looked good and gave the
team depth. Both the women nd
men lacked depth last ve ir that is
not a problem this year Both
Griffiths and Welch said " V e . re
happy the first meet is over and
we're looking forward to a chal-
lenging and rewarding season
The Pirate men placed fifth and
leading the way for the Pirates
was the relay team o( Matt
Schweitzer and Vince Wilson(25,
107), and MeadorGarriss (28,
1 10). The men ran in pairs, each
running six miles. Mike Curtus
and Alan Burne didn't officially
run, but will bring much needed
depth to the program.
Coaches Welburn and Craib
were pleased with the times and
excited about a season that is
looking brighter every mile. The
next meet will take ECU to the
Pembroke Invitational.





14 THE FAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8,1988
Sports Briefs
Chapman expected to sign soon
DARLINGTON, S.C. (AP)-
Winston Cup points leader Bill
Elliot held off Rusty Wallace over
the final 32 laps on Sunday to win
the Southern 500 NASCAR race
at Darlington International Race-
way.
Elliott passed Mike Alexander
on lap 331 after the event's final
caution period and then stayed
just ahead of Wallace to win his
fifth race of the year - the most of
any driver on the circuit.
LEXINGTON, Ohio (AP) -
Emerson Fittipaldi moved past
Mario Andretti 24 laps from the
end Sunday to win the Escort 200
Indy-car race at Mid-Ohio Sports
Car Course.
Fittipaldi lost the lead to An-
dretti when the latter took advan-
tage of the only full-course cau-
tion flag in the 84-lap, 200.5-mile
race, but easily won the battle of
former Formula One champions.
The 41-year-old Brazilian
picked up the fifth victory of his
five-year Indy-car career and his
first of the season, beating An-
dretti to the finish line by 7.7 sec-
onds.
DARLINGTON, S.C. (AP) -
Harry Gant won his second
straight Grand National Gator-
ade 200 race Saturday at Darling-
ton International Raceway and
became the 17th different winner
on the circuit in 24 races this sea-
son.
Gant, of Taylorsville, N.C
dominated the race from start to
finish. He started second on the
starting grid and passed pole-sit-
ter Geoff Bodine on the sixth lap
entering turn three.
Bodine finished second. Mi-
chael Waltrip, subbing for
brother Darrell, finished third,
followed by Davey Allison and
Moroan Shepherd.
MOSCOW (AP) - Soviets who
win medals at the Seoul Olym-
pics not only will come home
with their awards, but also will be
paid the equivalent of up to
$19,000 for their winning per-
formance, the head of the Soviet
Olympic Committee said Mon-
day. Marat Gramov, speaking at
a news conference, denied such
payments conflict with the
purely amateur status that Soviet
athletes purportedly possess.
CHARLOTTE (AP) Former
Kentucky star Rex Chapman
probably will sign a contract with
the Charlotte Hornets in the next
month or so, General Manager
Carl Scheer says.
The new NBA team chose
Chapman in the eighth pick in the
NBA's college draft on June 28.
Last Wednesday, Scheer held his
first serious contract discussions
with Chapman's Washington,
D.C. attorney, David Falk.
In the interim, Chapman
could have been getting valuable
tutoring from his future coaches.
Instead he has remained in Ken-
tucky.
Scheer concedes that the final
haggling over Chapman's salary
will likely take no more than an
hour, and that the parameters for
his pay - between $600,000 and
$800,000 a year - were set almost
from the day he signed.
"It's just a style, a sense of
timing, a way of doing business
Scheer said. "After so many
years, you learn it. It may not
always be the best way, but that's
the way it is
On the surface, the system and
its generally protracted nature
don't seem so odd.
But the reality of the situation
is that the compensatorv worth of
the players is fixed by unofficial
salary scales. Most players are
paid roughly the same amount as
any other comparable player.
And the months of debate that
sometimes precede a signing
consist largely of rhetoric.
Scheer said it's a matter of
knowing who you're dealing
with more than dealing with a
friend or an enemy.
"It's almost like scouting a
team he said. "You need to
know their strengths and weak-
nesses and how they like to do
things. The situations are all dif-
ferent. Sometimes you need to sit
back. Other times it pays to be
aggressive
Scheer carefully plots his ne-
gotiating strategies, choosing his
ammunition and the manner in
which it will be fired.
"I never go into any negotia-
tions without at least half a day
spent planning what I'm going to
say, how I'm going to say it he
said. "There's no one way, so you
have to prepare
I
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Astros break Red's win streak
(AP)- Nerves proved more of
an obstacle for Bob Forsch in his
first appearance as a Houston
Astro than the Cincinnati Reds.
Forsch allowed five hits in
eight innings and hit a three-run
double as the Astros defeated
Cincinnati 3-0 Monday night,
snapping the Reds' five-game
winning streak.
Forsch, 38, broke into the ma-
jor leagues with St. Louis in 1974
and remained a Cardinal until
last Wednesday when he was
traded to the Astros for utili-
tyman Denny Walling.
"I remember my first start
(ever), it was against Cincinnati
when they were the Big Red Ma-
chine. 1 was just as nervous start-
ing this game. It was deja vu
Forsch said.
Reds rookie starter Norm
Charlton, 1-3, hit Glenn Davis
with a pitch leading off the fifth
and Buddy Bell singled. After a
sacrifice by Billy Hatcher ad-
vanced the runners, Rafael
Ramirez was intentionally
walked to load the bases.
Alex Trevino flied to shallow
center for the second out, but
Forsch followed with a double to
center field that cleared the bases.
Forsch is 8-for-27 (.296) this
season with five runs batted in.
Green wins
in golf final
OAKVILLE, Ontario (AP) -
Ken Green was standing in the
18th fairway, his hand resting on
a 1-iron in his bag, watching and
waiting.
He was watching Scott Ver-
plank, on the green ahead, lining
up a 20-foot birdie putt that could
tie the Canadian Open.
Green was waiting to make a
decision on whether to go for the
water-guarded green on the par-
5 finishing hole at the Glen Abbey
Golf Club.
When Verplank's putt mis-
sed, Green dropped the 1-iron like
a wriggling reptile and grabbed
the 8-iron.
"If he'd made the putt, I'd
have gone for the green. I'm glad
he missed it Green said. "If s a
lot easier to hit a lay-up8-iron and
a wedge than a pure i-iron
Green's par at the 72nd hole
on Monday gave him a final
round of par 72 and a 275 total, 13
under par. The one-stroke victory
in the rain-delayed tournament
was worm $135,000 from the total
purse of $750,000 and pushed his
year's earnings to a career-high
$413,097.
Verplank, who tied for second
at 276 with Bill Glasson. had a
closing 70 and was two under for
the seven holes he played Mon-
day. Glasson finished off a 67
with birdies on the three holes he
played.
"There are guys that say they
want to have to birdie the 18th to
win. I'm not one of them. I
wanted to have to make par
Green said.
He did. He laid it up safely,
pitched on and two-putted for
the title, the third of his career
and, he said, the best.
He's !86-for-864 (.215) in his ca-
reer with 80 RBI.
Pitching-wise and hitting-
wise, his first game as an Astro
was a great game. He pitched an
outstanding ball game Houston
manager Hal Lanier said. "He's
always been a good hitter. If I
hadn't had him I would have
played the whole inning differ-
ently. He started out as a third
baseman, and he's a good athlete
all the way around
Elsewhere in the National
League it was Los Angeles 3, At-
lanta 0: San Diego 7, San Fran-
cisco 4; New York 7, Pittsburgh 5;
St. Louis 6, Montreal 2; and in a
doubleheader, Chicago beat
Philadelphia 14-3 in the first
game and the Phillies came back
to win the nightcap, 4-3.
Dodgers 3, Braves 0
Orel Hershiser pitched a four-
hitter and won his 19th game as
visiting Los Angeles beat Atlanta
to snap a three-game losing
streak.
Hershiser, 19-8, struck out
eight and walked one en route to
his fourth shutout and fourth
straight complete game.
Alfredo Griffin singled with
one out in the first inning and
Rick Mahler, 9-13, hit Kirk Gi-
bson with a pitch. Mickey
Hatcher then singled to score
Griffin and send Gibson to third.
When the ball got by James in left
field, Gibson scored.
Mets 7, Pirates 5
New York moved 10 games
ahead of second-place Pittsburgh
in the East as Mookie Wilson hit a
three-run homer in the eighth
inning following Lee Mazzilli's
tie-breaking sacrifice fly.
David Cone, 15-3, pitched
seven inninos for his sixth victorv
in seven decisions and Darryl
Strawberry hit a solo homer run
as Mets won for the ninth time in
11 games.
Padres 7, Giants 4
San Diego beat San Francisco
at Candlestick Park to improve to
67-68 and move above the .500
mark for the first time since July
19,1986.
Eric Show pitched a six-hitter
and sparked a five-run fifth in-
ning with a single.
Cardinals 6, Expos 2
Pedro Guerrero hit his first
homer as a Cardinal at Busch
Stadium and Scott Terry won his
fifth straight game as St. Louis de-
feated Montreal, snapping the
Expos' four-game winning
streak. Terry, 7-3, benefited from
a four-run fifth inning keyed by
three consecutive infield errors.
includino two by shortstop Rex
Hudler.
Guerrero hit a two-run single
for the only hit of the Cardinals'
four-run fifth and hit his seventh
homer in the seventh.
Cubs 14, Phillies 3
Ricky Jordan's sixth hit of the
day, a two-run homer in the sev-
enth inning, gave Philadelphia a
4-3 victory over Chicago at
Wrigley Field and a double-
header split.
In the first game, rookie center
fielder Doug Dascenzo hit a
double and RBI single during an
eight-run, third inning as the
Cubs beat the Phillies 14-3.
The Labor Day doubleheader
was the result of the rainout of the
Cub's first home night game ever
on Aug. 8.
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GAME
ECU at Virginia Tech
Southern Miss at Fla si
Oklahoma at UNC
Air Force at San Diegt
Duke at Tennessee
Nebraska at UCLA
Kentucky at Auburn
Alabama at Temple
Penn State at Virginia
TCU at Georgia
Mia
(AD-The Mum; Hi
aren't nearly as excite
being No. 1 in this week -J
a ted Tress college J
they were when they
1987 national champ? nsl
"We set our .
team success and worki
ting better each week.
back Steve Walsh said
after the Hurricanes leaj
sixth place to the top of
following Saturdav nigl
pasting o( Florida State
had been No. 1.
"We got off to a good s
we didn't play anywhere
good as we can offensive!
ida State "held Miamil
yards). We want to conl
improve each week and
ter Walsh said. 'If tl
pens, then all the ranking
that other recognition w
care of itself
Nebraska remained
while Florida State ski
10th and Texas A&M ai
nessee dropped out oi
Twenty.
Club
By KRISTEN HAD
Stiff Wn�r
If you are a scuba divei
love to skin dive and bd
there is a club on camp
caters to your needs. Tl
Coral Reef Dive Club, ui
direction of president
Angel, is a campus orgai
that centers around one i
SCUBA diveng.
"Our main purpose her�
Carolina is to promote
enjoyable diving Angell
Founded in 1986 bv
ECU students Wade ' Bl
Butch Varker, and Clint
the club stresses safetj
makes sure the newer, le;
rienced divers are "buddj
with the more advanced
"We have a wide range d
rience in the club Ana
"There are dive instructor
tant dive instructors an
masters as well as bei
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preferred, but not
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Fearless Football Forecast
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS, 1988 1!
GAME
BRIAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Last Week- (8-2)
Overall- (8-2)
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
Last Week- (7-3)
Overall-(7-3)
DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
Last Week-(7-3)
Overall- (7-3)
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
Last Week- (7-3)
Overall- (7-3)
CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
Last Week-(9-1)
Overall-(9-1)
EARLVISHAMpftSN
Features Editor
Last Week- (7-3)
Overall- (7-3)
ECU at Virginia Tech
Southern Miss at Fla. St.
Oklahoma at UNC
Air Force at San Diego St.
Duke at Tennessee
Nebraska at UCLA
Kentucky at Auburn
Alabama at Temple
Penn State at Virginia
T'CU at Georgia
ECU
FSU
Oklahoma
Air Force
Tennessee
Nebraska
Auburn
Alabama
Virginia
Georgia
ECU
FSU
Oklahoma
Air Force
Tennessee
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
Penn State
Georgia
ECU
FSU
Oklahoma
Air Force
Tennessee
Nebraska
Auburn
Alabama
Penn State
Georgia
ECU
FSU
Oklahoma
San Diego St.
Tennessee
Nebraska
Auburn
Alabama
Penn State
Georgia
ECU
FSU
UNC
Air Force
Duke
UCLA
Auburn
Temple
Virginia
Georgia
ECU
FSU
Oklahoma
Air Force
Tennessee
UCLA
Auburn
Alabama
Penn State
Georgia
Miami taking it one at time
Join Doug Johnson every Tuesday and Thursday for the
best in Pirate Sports coverage. Only in The East Carolinian.
(AP)- The Miami Hurricanes
iren't nearly as excited about
being No. 1 in this week's Associ-
ated Press college football poll as
they were when thev won the
987 national championship.
We set our goals toward
team success and working at get-
�inj; better each week quarter-
pack Steve Walsh said Monday
after the Hurricanes leaped from
Mth place to the top of the Poll
following Saturday night's 31-0
pasting oi Florida State, which
tad been No. 1.
"We got off to a good start, but
we didn't play anywhere near as
ood as we can offensively (Flor-
ida State "held" Miami to 450
ards). We want to continue to
improve each week and get bet-
ter' Walsh said. "If that hap-
pens, then all the rankings and all
that other recognition will take
care of itself
Nebraska remained No. 2
while Florida State skidded to
10th and Texas A&M and Ten-
nessee dropped out of the Top
Twenty.
Miami received 38 of 60 first-
place votes and 1,149 of a possible
1,200 points from a nationwide
panel of sports writers and
sportscasters. Nebraska, No. 2 in
each of this season's three polls,
received 14 first-place votes and
1,113 points following a 63-13
rout of Utah State.
Miami's players apparently
have taken their low-key cue
from coach jimmy Johnson.
"It's really too early in the
season for a coach to be con-
cerned about the rankings
Johnson said. "I wouldn't even
address it one way or another. We
have a very young team and a lot
of difficult games to play- Our
only concern right now is going
up and playing Michigan (on
Sept. 17) in a place that's very
difficult to play in. All we've
done is win one game
Defensive end Bill Hawkins
said the Hurricanes "really don't
get all that excited about the polls
that take place during the season.
The only poll that counts is the
one on Januarv 2nd and that's a
long way off. We're 1-0 and we
have a tough road ahead. The
game at Michigan is the number
one concern for the team right
now.
Clemson, a 40-7 winner over
Virginia Tech, climbed from
fourth to third with three first-
place votes and 1,003 points.
Oklahoma, which opened its sea-
son this week at North Carolina,
slipped from third to fourth with
two first-place votes and 969
points.
UCLA held onto fifth place by
crushing San Diego State 59-6.
The Bruins received two first-
place votes and 941 points. The
other first-place vote went to
Southern Cal, which defeated
Boston College 34-7 and rose
from eighth to sixth with 878
points.
Auburn, which gets under
way this week against Kentucky,
remained seventh with 768
points while Georgia jumped
from 12th to eighth with 703
points after beating Tennessee
Club for Scuba divers
By KRISTEN HALBERG
Staff Writer
If you are a scuba diver or just
love to skin dive and be social,
here is a club on campus that
caters to your needs. The ECU
Coral Reef Dive Club, under the
direction of president David
Angel, is a campus organization
that centers around one interest,
CUBA diveng.
"Our main purpose here at East
Carolina is to promote safe and
enjoyable diving Angel said.
Founded in i986 by former
HCU students Wade Bunting,
Butch Varker, and Clint Charles,
the club stresses safety and
makes sure the newer, less expe-
nenced divers are "buddied up"
with the more advanced divers.
"We have a wide range of expe-
rience in the club Angel said.
There are dive instructors, assis-
tant dive instructors and dive
masters as well as beginning
Open Water I divers.
While diving may be the key
interest, Angel stressed that the
dive club is as much a social club
as a dive club.
"For every dive we do, we have
a party afterwards
The membership of the dive
club extends to twenty active
members but Angel hopes to get
more people involved.
"The more people we gave, the
more we can do. So many stu-
dents go through the SCUBA
class at ECU and never keep up
with the sport. But if there are
enough people to participate in
fundraisers, enough money can
be raised to pay for things like
charters and transportation
Fundraisers include having car
washes, selling t-shirts and
selling hot dogs on Barefoot on
the Mall.
Assisting Angel in club respon-
sibilities are vice president Rob
Moore, treasurer Sue Cochran
and secretary Heather Barfield.
The club dives in many areas
including many parts of Florida,
and at sites off the North Carolina
coast.
"We've chartered many boats
off the coast of North Carolina
and we've been diving in many
parts of Florida such as Blue
Springs, Fort Lauderdale, Key
Largo and Key West Angel
said.
"North Carolina is a great state
to dive in because there are many
tropicals, wrecks and history
here. And besides Florida, the
Gulf Stream comes closest here so
the water is basically clear and
warm
The club would also like to
stress that one does not need to be
a diver to join the club. Skin di-
vers and basically anyone that
enjoys water and the fun that
goes along with it is welcome to
join.
Help wanted
Typesetters needed to
work Sunday nights,
Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday mornings and
afternoons.
Experience with Apple
Macintosh computers
preferred, but not neces-
sary.
Must be able to type
upwards of 60 words a
minute.
Apply in person at The
East Carolinian office,
Publications Building,
second floor.
Serious, dedicated appli-
cats only
ANNOUNCING
Elections for Executive Officer's
for the
Student Residence Association
Area Residence Councils
Residence Hall House Councils
September 13,1988
Filing Dates Are September 6-8
For more information and applications
See Your Residence Hall Director
28-17.
Michigan moved up from 10th
place to ninth with 639 points.
The Wolverines open this week at
Notre Dame. Florida State
rounds out the Top Ten with 600
points.
The Second Ten consists of
LSU, West Virginia, Notre Dame,
Alabama, Michigan State, South
Carolina, Iowa, Penn State, Texas
and Washington. Texas and
Washington made the Top
Twenty for the first time this sea-
son although neither has played a
game yet.
Last week's Second Ten was
Texas A&M, Georgia, Notre
Dame, Alabama, Michigan State,
West Virginia, LSU, Tennessee,
South Carolina and Penn State.
Texas A&M fell to 0-2 by los-
ing to LSU 27-0 while Tennessee
dropped out as a result of its loss
to Georgia.
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i
16
THE EA'ST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 8,1988
Red Sox take two in a row on the road
(AD- It was a night of firsts for
the Boston Red Sox first time in a
long time they had won two
straight on the road and, more
importantly, first time they had
undisputed possession of first
place in two years.
The Red Sox finally got over
the hump Monday night with a 4-
1 victory at Baltimore while De-
troit was losing 5-4 in 10 innings
to Toronto. That gave Boston a
one-game lead over the Tigers in
the sizzling American League
East race which also saw the Mil-
waukee Brewers and New York
Yankees keep pace with victories
on Monday.
"Now we don't have to score-
board watch as much Marty
Barrett said after the Red Sox took
over first place alone for the first
time since 1986, when they won
the AL pennant.
Hanging tough just behind
the 1-2 teams in the AL East were
the Yankees and Brewers, who
remained virtually tied for third,
four games out. The Yankees
were one percentage point ahead
of the Brewers after their 7-2 vic-
tory over Cleveland on Monday.
The surprising Brewers, mean-
while, beat Chicago 5-2 for their
seventh straight victory.
Elsewhere, it was Oakland 11,
Texas 4: California 4, Kansas City
2, and Minnesota 2, Seattle 0.
Dwight Evans knocked in
three runs, two with a homer, and
Larry Parrish homered for the
fourth time in five games to lead
the Red Sox. The slugging of the
pair helped Mike Smithson win
his first game since July 23.
The victory marked the first
time since June 21 that the Red
Sox won back-to-back games on
the road. Boston, now 31 -38 away
from Fenwav Park this year, de-
feated California 6-5 Sunday in
Anaheim. Blue Jays 5, Tigers 4
Ernie Whitt homered leading
off the 10th inning to power
Toronto over Detroit at Tiger
Stadium.
Yankees 7, Indians 2
Don Mattingly singled home
theo-ahead run and Ken Phelps
King wins by
two strokes
SPRINGFIELD, 111. (AP) - A
two-stroke lead didn't look like
much to Betsy King, who had it,
or to Margaret Ward, who was
trying to overcome it.
But that turned out to be
enough Monday to give King her
third career victory and a $37,500
winner's check in the $250,000
LPGA Rail Classic at the Rail Golf
Club.
She endured a late surge by
Ward to win the tournament with
a final round of 1-under-par 71,
giving her a 9-under-par total of
207 for 54 holes on the wind-
blown 6,403-yard course.
King started Monday's final
round with that two-stroke edge
and led by as many as five shots in
the early going. But her own
miscues and birdies by Ward on
the 14th and 16th made it close
before Ward bogeyed the 17th
and sealed King's victory.
"I felt like I had a lot of chances
to put it away, but I never really
did King said.
King's round wasn't up to the
standard of the final-round 63
that helped her win the 1986 Rail
title. Her front nine was erratic,
with three birdies and two bo-
geys, but she said that this year as
the leader she was playing a de-
fensive game.
Monday's victory was King's
second of the season along with
the Kemper Open in March, and
it lifted her into the No. 9 spot on
the LPGA earnings list, with
$201,994.
Ward said she had been play-
ing for second place much of the
day because of King's command-
ing leads.
"I really didn't start playing
for first until I made thatbirdieon
16 Ward said. "I thought I had a
shot at it. I knew Betsy didn't like
17 where she took a bogey 6 on
Sunday.
This time, though, it was
Ward who took the bogey after
missing a 4-foot putt. She
matched King's 71 for the final
round but was two shots behind
for the tournament earnings sec-
ond-place money of $23,125.
Both leaders said they spent
much o the day trying to out-
guess a shifting wind that gusted
to as much as 25 mph over the
relatively flat, wide-open Rail
course. Only one player in
Monday's field of 83 broke 70.
hit a three-run homer as New
York scored six times in the
eighth inning to beat Cleveland.
Tom Candiotti held the Yan-
kees to one run on five hits for
seven innings before Don Gor-
don, 2-3, relieved to start the
eighth. Mattingly and Dave
Winfield hit RBI singles off Scott
Bailes and Phelps hit his 21st
homer against Jeff Dedmon.
Brewers 5, White Sox 2
Paul Molitor hit a leadoff
home run in the bottom of the
first inning, sending Milwaukee
over Chicago.
Rookie Don August, 9-6, al-
lowed six hits and left the game
after Carl ton Fisk's leadoff homer
in the ninth. Juan Nieves relieved
for his first career save.
A's 11, Rangers 4
Storm Davis won his 10th
straight game and Mark
McGwire, Jose Canseco and Dave
Henderson homered to lead a 15-
hit attack for Oakland.
Oakland won for the eighth
time in its last 10 games and low-
ered its magic number to 16. Any
combination of A's victories and
Minnesota Twins' defeats
equalling 16 will give the A's the
AL West title.
With their sixth consecutive
defeat, the Rangers were mathe-
matically eliminated from the AL
West race.
Angels 4, Royals 2
Wally Joyner doubled home
the tying run in the eighth inning,
then scored the game-winner on
an error by right fielder Bo
Jackson as California beat Kansas
City.
Charlie Leibrandt, 10-12,
walked Brian Downing with two
outs in the eighth before Joyner
doubled home pinch-runner
Mark McLemore to tie the game
at 2-2.
The winner was Willie Fraser,
11-10.
Twins 2, Mariners 0
Frank Viola won his major
league-leading 21st game and
John Moses' run-scoring single
broke a scoreless tie in the eighth
inning as Minnesota defeated
visiting Seattle.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 8, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 08, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.623
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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