The East Carolinian, September 6, 1988






Coming Thursday:
Who killed Thomas Lee McGowan?
'ea hires:
he Marching Pirates celebrate their 50th anniversary.
SPORTS:
A look at the Pirate's 52-13 victory over Tennessee
Tech.
She
(tfarnlttuart
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. lb
Tuesday, September 6,1988
Greenville, NC
26 Pages
Circulation 12,000
ECU student assualted, sustains injuries
By SHAN HERRING
An ECL student was walking
home from work, when tour men
attacked him, beating him with an
iron bar and taking his money, ac-
cording to Greenville Police re-
ports.
Despite the attack injuries and I
$6,000 in medical bills. 1 awrence
Tolo. a native oi Kenya, has re-
sisted drawing unfavorable con
elusions about the United States.
It was something that could
have happened to anyone, he
said.Tolo, 22. hasbeen in America
tor three years studying pre-engi-
neering. at ECU, and is employed
at Fast fare.
1 do not have a bad perception
ot America, even though this has
happened. I do not believe that it
was racially motivated. " Tolo
said.
he attack occurred on
rhrusday September 1, about
10:50 p.m. near Elm and 10th
streets, acording to police reports.
Pitt County Memorial I lospital
reports show that Tolo was in-
jured around his right cheek and
eye and suffered a fractured left
arm. The total cost for his treat-
ment will be approximately
$6,000, according to hospital re-
ports.
"1 had a bad experience, that has
taught me to be more cautious, "
Tolo said.
"But 1 have met some good
people in America, like those that
1 know at the university, down-
town, and at work. "
He added, "The people 1 work
with are good people. Their sup-
port has been a comfort to me. 1
still have a long way to recovery,
not only physically and mentally,
but financially he said.
According to ECU officials,
because Tolo does not have 24-
hour insurance coverage at the
university, and he was not injured
on the campus, insurance benefits
from the school do not apply to his
situation.
"I do not know how I will be
able to cover all of my medical
bills. It is indefinite how long I will
be under doctors' care, " Tolo
Slid.
He further stated, "Hopefully,
the people that did this to me will
beapprehended,and some justice
will be served. "
Alumni contribute $150,000,
challenge others to do same
KT ch� H
Four alumni have committed
11 50
VI1
ast V arc
I i n a
Pro-
ther
University's Annual Civ in
gram and have challenged
ECU alumni to do the same.
John J. Beard III, of 1 i s Vngeles
William H. "Bill Bodenhame
oi Deerfield beach, Fla Robert S.
Bob" Rippy oi Wrightsville
Beach and j. Michael M.kc .
Hams of Burlington have agreed
to match all new and increased
gifts to the university ud
P
to
$150,000.
"There are few things in fui
raising that capture the imaj
tions of potential donors as d i sa
challenge gift said David B.
McDonald, institutional Ad-
vancement director. "There is
something very appealing about
the idea oi doubling the value ot
your contribution at no extra
expense to you. "
Thechallengegift will provide a
focus tor ECU's 1988-89 fund-
raising year as the Young Alumni
Challenge, McDonald said. "The
young' in the name refers to the
four who are issuing the chal-
lenge; all attended ECU during
the TO's, McDonald said.
"We're directing the challenge to
all alumni and friends oi the uni-
versity regardless oi age. "
The $150,000 contibuted by the
four "young" alumni will be used
to enhance ECU's scholarship
program. McDonald said. They
have agreed, however, to match
all new and increased gifts re-
gardlessol where that money will
be used.
Beard is the evening news an-
chor and commentator with
KNBC-TV in Los Angeles, a sta-
tion that is owned and operated
by NBC He has received two
Emmy a .�. ards: one for a program
he hosted on helpoing children
cope with emergencies and one
tor a series on the U.S. Marine
Corps in Beirut that he conceived,
wrote and produced.
A native of St. Pauls, N.C,
Beard enrolled at ECU after a tour
in Vietnam with the Navy hospi-
tal corps. He graduated in 1975
with a Bachelor ot Fine Arts de-
gree in drama and speech and a
minor in broadcasting.
While attending ECU, Beard
worked full time at IV I V in
Washington. N.C, as reporter
mo news anchor. I le was hon-
ored by the Alumni Association in
1984 with the
Alumni Award.
tions. "
Bodenhamer, a resident oi
Deerfield Beach, Fla is president
ot Grayline Transportation Serv-
ice and executive vice president of
B &: L Services Inc which to-
gether form the largest transpor-
tation company in the southeast-
ern United States.
"Now that I'm established pro-
fessionally, I want to give some-
thing back to the university and
encourage other alumni to do the
same, " Bodenhamer said. "With
this challenge, 1 hope we can
motivate other ECU graduates to
make their first commitments to
the university or to increase their
levels of giving. "
A native of Jacksonville, N.C,
Bodenhamer came to ECU in 1970
Crews work hard on Sunday morning cleaning Ficklin Stadium after the Pirate's S2-11 victory over
Tennessee Tech (ECU Photolab).
dent-senior manager of the Sher-
son Lehman Hutton Partnership
Group. "We develop and ma-ket
programs that are known as direct
investments, " Rippy said. "We
on a football scholarship. He left just finished up the financing oi
the team after two vcars to be
come more involved with other
campus activities.
He served as Student govern-
ment Association (SGA) presi-
dent in 1973-74, and is known for
implementing the student shuttle
Outstanding bus system and for insisting that
campus security cars switch from
" I had a great experience at East red to blue lights, thereby earning
Carolina and treasure the memo-
ries from those years, ' Beard
said. "As time has passed, my
appreciation for the university
has deepened. I'm proud to do
what I can to make an ECU expe-
rience available to future genera-
the nickname "Blue Light"
Bodenhamer.
Rippy, a resident of
Wrightsville Beach, is vice presi-
all of Walt Disney's movies. 'Who
Framed Roger Rabbit' was one oi
them. "
A native ot Burlington, Rippy
majored in biology at ECU and
was active in fraternity life, serv-
ing as president oi Phi Kappa Tau
fraternity and treasurer of the
Inter-Fraternity Council. I le com-
pleted all coursework tor a
master's degree in science educa-
tion and taught school for one
year before entering the business
world.
"I decided I didn't want to be a
biology teacher for the rest oi my
life, " he said. "The degree does
come in handy, though. I was the
liaison for a $30 million partner-
ship we just bought because I was
the only one is the group that
understood biochemistry. "
Williams is president oi Ala-
mance Machine Companv in
Burlington, a manufacturer oi
marine transmission couplings.
He also owns several small busi-
nesses, including car washes, a
miniature golf course and a rec-
reational water park.
As an ECU undergraduate,
Williams served as president ot
Phi Kappa Tau fraternitv, was a
member of the Inter-Fraternitv
Council, and a cheerleader. He
majored in biology education.
Williams is one oi ECU's major
contributers, having recently
committed $20,000 to establish a
University Scholars Award and
tour Alumni Honors Scholar-
ships.
"The state does a good job pro-
viding for education, " Williams
said. "But in order to truly enrich
the higher educational process,
individual commitments are
needed. Even if it isn't your kid
that will benefit from that gift.
somebody's will. "
See ALUMNI, page 9
12 perish on N.C. highways
Many people, including Patrick Davenport, enjoyed a few
pre-game beers (ECU Photolab).
(AP)- A wet Labor Day week-
end across much of North Caro-
lina has kept roads perilous as va-
cationers return from holiday
revelry, the state Highway Patrol
said today.
At least 12 people, including a
bicyclist, ha ve died so far in Labor
Day weekend traffic wrecks on
North Carolina roads, the patrol
said.
"Labor Day weekend traffic has
been heavy Trooper M.D.
Walker said. "I've been working
the interstates. It has been the
heaviest I've seen it all year. They
have kept us going
"Our advice is to slow down
and be patient he said.
The National Weather Service
said western North Carolina skies
should begin clearing today, but
those over eastern areas won't
clear until tonight as a cold front
moves out to sea.
The patrol's official Labor Day
fatality count began at 6 p.m. Fri-
day and ends at midnight tonight.
The Carolina Motor Club pre-
dicted 22 people would die in
North Carolina traffic accidents
over the 54-hour holiday week-
end.
Last Labor Day weekend in
North Carolina, 36 people died
and 1,675 were injured, taking it
the worst since 1971. Last year, the
highway patrol arrested
229people for driving while im-
paired and issued 932 speeding
tickets during the Labor Day
weekend.
Barry I loward Bell, 24, of Rose
Hill, was killed when his bicycle
was struck bv a car in his Duplin
County hometown at 4 a.m. Sat-
urday, troopxTS said.
Darrell Lynn Baber, 20, oi Fort
Bragg, was killed about 4:55 p.m.
Sunday when he apparently fell
asleep while driving on N.C. 410,
about three miles south oi Duplin.
His car struck a bridge railing.
Zula Barnes Perry, 70, of Merry
Hills, died about 12:30 p.m. Sun-
day when she walked into the
path of a car on a rural road in
Bertie Countv.
Donnell Catling, 29,of Ahoskie,
was killed about 7 p.m. Sunday
when the motorcycle he was rid-
ing struck a ditch off a rural road
about four miles north of
Ahoskie.
Donnell I loward Lewis, 31, and
Nancy Lee Lewis, 12, both of Blad-
enboro, were killed when the car
in which they were passengers
collided with another vehicle on
N.C. 211, about three miles cast of
Lumbcrton.
Phillip Edison Wcstbrook, 44,
of Eden, died when the car he was
driving collided head-on with
another vehicle on a rural road
about three miles west of Eden
about 6 p.m. Sunday.
During an earlv Sunday rain-
storm, two Catawba County
sheriff's deputies were injured
when their patrol car hit a pool oi
water, hydroplaned and collided
with another car at the Hickory-
city limits, according to authori-
ties. No one was killed.
In Burke Countv, 1 mile west oi
Glen Alpine, Ronald Cornelius
Fortune, 35, oi Ashevillc, died
about 9:30 p.m. Saturday when
his car ran off U.S. 70, overturned
and pinned him inside the ve-
hicle.
Johnnie Rudolph Monroe, 46, oi
Wade, was killed at 3:10 a.m.
Sunday when his car ran off a
rural Robeson County road six
miles southeast of St. Fauls, struck
a ditch bank and overturned sev-
eral times, throwing him from the
vehicle.
Karen E. Wargo. 21, oi Bethle-
hem, Pa and Anthony M. Bid-
well, 23, oi White Mills uere
passengers in a car that swerved
and struck a tree Friday night
when its driver tried to pass se
eral vehicles at once on N.C. 58 in
Nash Countv, troopers said.
On Saturday, William E. Tripp,
24, oi Shallotte, died when the car
he was driving was struck head-
on bv another on a rural road just
west of Ocean Isle Beach in Brun-
swick Dounty. Two other people
were injured in the accident at
1:15 a.m. Saturday, troopers said
The accidents bring a total of
981 people killed on North Caro
lina roads so far this year, com-
pared with 1,02" at this same time
last year.
Governor offers reward
for info on murder
RALEIGH� Governor James
G. Martin today announced that
the State is offering a reward of up
to $5,000 for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of the
person or persons responsible for
the murder of Thomas Lee
McGowan of Greenville, North
Carolina.
The body of Thomas Lee
McGowan, male, age 72, of 714
Atlantic Avenue, Greenville,
North Carolina, was found on
July 11, 1988, at approximately
10:30 a.m lying in a storage ware-
house in Greenville, North Caro-
lina. Mr. McGowan had received
multiple contact wounds to the
head that resulted in his death.
Anyone having information
concerning this murder should
contact the Greenville Police
Department or the State Bureau of
Investigation.





THF EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1988
ChJamydia may cause sterility and infertility
1 recently found out that 1 have
chlamydia. 1 low did 1 get it and is
it contagious
Chlamydia is a bacterial infec-
tion that is sexually transmitted.
Public Health authorities esti-
mate that four to five people get
chlamydia for every person who
has gonorrhea.
Genital infections caused by
chlamydia occur in men and
women and may cause different
types of medical problems includ-
ing:
i I N ' MdfllfifDlfi)
By
Mary Elesha-Adams
�sterility in males and infertil-
ity in women
Reiter's syndrome, an arthri-
tis-like condition
�increased chance of ectopic
pregnancy (the embryo grows in
the Fallopian tube instead of the
uterus)
�pelvic inflamatory disease in
women
�increased chance of sponta-
neous abortion and stillbirth in
women who have chlamydial in-
fections during pregnancy
�transmission of the bacteria
to a child during birth causing eye
infections and pneumonia.
How do you know you have
chlamydia?
The chlamydia victim may not
know that he or she has the dis-
ease because 60-80 of women
and 10 of men with the disease
have no symptoms. If people
don't know they have chlamydia
they may infect others. Symptoms
may include:
�painful urination and a wa-
tery discharge from the penis in
men
�women may have genital
itching and burning, dull pelvic
pain, vaginal discharge and
bleeding between menstrual peri-
ods.
If you think you have ch-
lamydia see your doctor, nurse
practicioner, or physician assis-
tant and ask for a test which in-
volves taking a genital sample.
The Student Health Center rou-
tinely tests for chlamydia in
women who have routine pelvic
pap exams because of the lack of
noticeable symptoms.
The treatment for chlamydia is
antibiotic therapy. You should tell
your sexual partner if you have
chlamydia so he or she can also seek
medical attention.

On a universitv or college cam-
pus a bicycle is the fastest, most
economical means of transporta-
tion Tins isespecially true at ECU
considering the present parking
situation, it also holds true that a
bicycle worth riding is worth
keeping' You can protect you bike
from theft and discourage theft bv
taking proper precautions.
During the 87-88 school year
there were fifty-seven (57) bicvcle
thefts reported to the ECU Cam-
pus Police, having a property
value of SIC 741.00. Thisincluded
one moped valued at $600.00.
Subtracting the value oi the
moped, the average cost ol each
ycle stolen was $181.09
Thus far this 88-89 school year
three (3) bicycles, having a value
t $483.00, have been reported
stolen. Two of these bikes were re-
covered, one sustaining $45.00 in
damages. Also, two mopeds w 're
reported stolen, having a value of
51 450.00. One was recovered
valued at $800.00) but sustained
�h era! hundred dollars worth ot
damage.
Most oi these thefts were made
easj b the bike or moped owner
who left the bike unlocked, used
inadeqyate locking devices, or
failed to take other precautions to
avoid or discourage theft. Most all
thefts are performed by amateurs.
Some of the thefts are bv fellow
students who may not have had
any criminal intent, but when pre-
sented the opportunity, just could
not resist Most bikes are usually
stol n t � il s or others pass
ingthrucampuslookingforanew
ride.
You can protect your bicycle or
moped from theft and discourage
most thieves by taking these
simple precaution
1. ALWAYS LOCK YOUR BI-
CYCLE OR MOLED
Remember, it only takes a
moment to steal an unlocked bi-
cvcle or moped. .Always secure
your bicvcle, even in areas you
think are protected, such as ga-
rages, porches and backyards.
Pirate Crime Column
By
Keith Knox
2. USE HIGH SECURITY
TYLE LOCK
The most common tools used
bv the bike thief are boltcutters
and cablewire cutters. These
tools are powerful enough to cut
through chains, cables or pad-
locks up to S" thick.
Fortunately, the new types of
high security bike locks are
shaped like huge padlocks de-
signed to stop the tools used bv
bike thieves. Many oi the new
locks come with a warranty that
guarantees the owner against
theft if defeated up to a specific
value. These are definitely the
best locks when properly used.
A hardened chain or cable at
least 716" thick when used with
the same size padlock provides a
degree oi security for most inex-
pensive bikes. However, an ex-
pensive bicycle or any moped
should bv protected bv a high se-
curity lock, regardless oi where ;t
is parked. Before purchasing a
lock, you should consider the
value of the bike as well as it's
value to you. Also keep in mind
the deductible in most insurance
policies are high enough to be of
little benefit in replacing most bi-
cycles.
3. LOCK YOUR BICYCLE OR
MOLED TROrERLY
A bike is light enough to be
carried away if it is not locked to
something immovable. Be sure to
use your lock to secure at least the
back wheel; and frame tube to a
bike rack or similar immobile ob-
ject. On campus they should only
be secured to a bike rack or desig-
nated bike shed. Never lock your
bike by the front or back wheel
alone. Lock your bike in a well-lit
area where pedestrian traffic will
discourage theft.
4. REGISTER YOUR BICYCLE
OR MOPED
On the ECU campusbicycleand
moped registration is mandatory,
just as registering your vehicle.
Each year the Department of
Fublic Safety impounds 100 bi-
cycles whicn go unclaimed.
All unregistered bicycles can be
impounded and held until proof
of ownership is determined. Be-
fore a bicycle is released, a $5.00
impounding fee must be paid.
This cost and inconvenience can
be eliminated by simply register-
ing vour bicycle for $1.00 which is
permanent. The moped registra-
tion is the same as a motorcycle
and the cost is $10.00 per year
By registering your bicycle or
moped through the Public Safety
Traffic Office, a permanent record
of its description is on file. To
further discourage theft, your
bike can be engraved or stamped
with a unique identification
number (Operation ID) on the
frame. If your bike is stolen, the
registration decal, along with the
engraved ID number and serial
number, if one, will help police in
identifying the bike as being sto-
len and in returning the bike to
you.
If you have not already taken
the above precautions, please do
so immediately. Remember a bike
or moped worth riding is worth
keeping.
)
The East Carolinian:
Long hours, low pay.
Great Experience.
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Building, Second Floor
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lames F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
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Officials finding
more than drugs
���
PHOENIX, (AD - Cociane and
marijuana arc still the major tar-
gets, but spiders and snakes are
showing up in some contraband
searches.
So are iguanas, desert tortises
and just about anything else that
creeps or crawls, officials saw
Federal and state officials who
patrol Arizona's borders don't
keep tabs on their living hauls the
way they keep count of kilos and
bads they siezc, but consider the
numbers in two recent cases.
On July 28,1987, the U.S. Border
Patrol siezed 3,000 iguanas and
several hundred tarantulas that
were being smuggled in the
United States through Nogales,
Mexico.
On March 23, the U.S. Customs
Service confiscated 1,600 tarantu-
las and 500 iguanas from a pick-
up truck tried to cross the border.
"We're not seeing a vast
amount cross the border says
Tom McDermott, agent in charge
oi the customs office in Tuscon.
"It's just not in the course of our
normal customs-type of exams
But Assistant U.S. Attomet
Reese Bostwick, who is prosecut-
ing Jorgr Manuel Martinez-Quin-
tero in the March 23 incident, says
there is a real market" out there
for almost anything that is rare,
even when it would make most
people's flesh crawl.
Bostwick, who handled wild-
life cases for the Pi ma County
attorney's office before switching
to the federal prosecutor's office,
recalls trailer home bedrooms
where walls were lined with rep-
tile cases and closets held "canvas
bags full of poisonous snakes
"To me it's not normal to sleep
in vour bedroom with all kinds of
reptiles he said.
"There's big bucks involved
Bostwick added, saying tarantu-
las go for $1.25 and Gila monsters
ran sell for $50 to $75 apiece and
the endangered spotted rattle-
snake fetches $100 to $150.
Although traffic in endangered
or protected species such as 18
types of iguanas is a specific focus
of such agencies as the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service, even a com-
mon species can draw attention of �
the customs agents.
That's because federal smug-
gling laws require importers to
declare theur goods and pay tax,
whether or not the goods are 1c-
gal.
"Anytime vou conceal some-
thing and bring it across the bor-
der and don't declare it, you are
violating a federal smuggling
statute McDermott says. That's
true even when the item is duty-
free, he added, citing laws on
declaring currency and jewels.
Smuggling of endangered spe-
cies and their pelts was a bigger
concern in the 1970s, but drugs
provide a bigger margin of profit
and "and it's going to take you
just as much room to smuggle in a
tarantula" as a more profitable
amount of cocaine, he added.
Over the years customs agents
"run across every type of com-
modity conceivable from pre-
Columbian artifacts to bull se-
men, McDermott says.
Still officers tend to jump back
a few feet when they open a box
that looks as though it could con-
tain drugs but find a boa constric-
tor, says Assistant Chief Ron
Moser of the U.S. Border Patrol's
Tuscon Sector.
Hunting a protected species not
only devastates the population
but often ruins the only habitat in
which the species can live, Bost-
wick added.
"What if they find out that the
venom from the two-spotted rat-
tler is the only known cure for
AIDS?" he said.
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rtility
taking a genital sample,
rudent Health Center rou-
tests for chlamydia in
;n who have routine pelvic
xams because of the lack of
ble svmptoms
treatment for chlamydia is
Ik therapy. You should tell
texual partner if you have
.iia so he or she can also seek
j. attention
rolinian
.t Advertising
mtatives
Spencer Meymandi
Adam Blankinship
t n TISING
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HOURS EVERYDAY
ie Blvd - Greenville
J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 3
Faces immortalized in plaster
EDINBURGH, Scotland (AP)-
Inside an old, disused church on
Edinburgh's Royal Mile, a
strange, even macabre spectacle
draws a steady line throughout
the day.
Upon a narrow wooden plat-
form around three of the walls,
the faces of 45 famous and infa-
mous men are displayed in a
dozen glass cases plaster casts
made in their lifetime of after
death, and not seen in public since
since 1886.
They start with a cheerful-look-
ing Sir Isaac dNewton, greatest of
scientists, who died in 1717, and
end with expressionless George
Rryce, who murdered a nurse-
maid in 1864 and was the last man
to be publicly hanged in Ed-
inburgh, the Scottish capital.
In between are such historic
figures as Prime Minister William
Pitt the Younger, composer Felix
Mendelssohn and the poets Fried-
rich Schiller and John Keats.
Novelist Sir Walter Scott's mask
has a line across the forehead
showing it was made after the top
oi the skull was removed at the
autopsy into the stroke that killed
him.
There is baby-faced John Any
Bird Bell, hanged in Kent in 1831
before a crowd of 10,000 for cut-
ting the throat of another youth.
"Lord have mercy upon us, all
people before me take warning
from me he cried before the gal-
lows trap was sprung beneath his
feet.
Visitors pay 50 pence (85 cents)
to enter, and lapse into a strange
silence as they gaze at the masks.
"I think visitors find it so fasci-
nating because we aren't exposed
to this sort of material any more
said Dr. Matthew Kaufman, pro-
fessor of anatomy at Edinburgh
University, who organized the ex-
hibition.
"To see the real features of the
famous in three dimensions when
they are long dead is fairly star-
tling. If you are looking at a
painted portrait you can never be
absolutely sure that the image is
lifelike, but about these there can
be no doubt, " Kaufman, 45, said
in an interview.
Of the 45 masks on display, nine
were made in life and 24 in death.
The others could be either.
Those of the poet Samuel Taylor
Coleridge and playwright Rich-
ard Brinsley Sheridan are far from
peaceful and clearly show the
final spasm of death.
Kaufman said life masks were
common before photography was
invented. They were made of
plaster with quills through which
to breathe, and moulds were then
made from the hollow plaster
casts.
"We found the masks covered
in grime in the cellars and an attic
of the university anatomy depart-
ment said Kaufman. "It seems
ludicrous that they were hidden
away for so long
The collection of 300 masks is
one of the world's largest and was
once double that number. Dam-
aged masks and duplicates were
disposed of years ago and many
were smashed in the late 1950s
when their shelves collapsed.
The masks include that of John
James Audubon, the American
artist and naturalist who died in
1851.
French artist Jacques-Louis
David is there, and so is Jean-Paul
Marat, the French revolutionary
agitator murdered in his bath by
Charlotte Corday in 1793. David's
painting of Marat dead in the bath
was a high point of European
painting of that time.
Corsican assassin Joseph
Fieschi's death mask shows the
mutilations he suffered trying to
kill king Louis Philippe of France
in 1835 with a contraption of 25
rifles bolted to a metal frame and
fired simultaneously.
The king escaped and Fieschi
and two accomplices were guillo-
tined.
The rogues' gallery includes
Edinburgh's notorious William
Burke and William Hare, who
murdered at least 16 adults and
children in the early 19th century
to sell the bodies to Dr. Robert
Knox, an anatomist.
"There are all sorts of strange
things like this lying about, ne-
glected or forgotten. Quite often
they get thrown out, sold, broken
or destroyed because the right
person with the curiosity or the
imagination is not there at the
right time to rescue them
Kaufman said.
"I'm interested in the masks
and I was sure others would be
because I'm interested in out-of-
the-way things the anatomist
.said.
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Jurors admit mistake
Philadelphia (AD - Halt the
jurors in the first tobacco liability
suit to result in a judgement
against a cigarette company for a
lung cancer death say they were
wrong in awarding money, ac-
cording to a report Saturday.
They hope an appeals court
overturns their verdict, according
to early Sunday editions of The
Philadelphia Inquirer.
Three of the six federal jurors
said in seperate interviews over
the last two weeks that they
shouldn't have ordered the Lig-
gett Group Inc. to award $400,000
Antonio Cipollone, whose wife
Rose, died oi lung cancer after
smoking for more than 40 years.
The trial judge, H. Lee Sarokin,
at firmed the werdict two weeks
irr- inrnTfrrffjgift
ThejuQjjiaid
"RsepTTOrTb was Tesponsrore
for her own actions, that the to-
bacco companies never forced her
to light up and that they never
should have been held liable.
But they said they compro-
mised after two oi the jurorswho
insisted on finding the tobacco
companise liable wore down the
others through five days of in-
tense deliberation and heated
arguments in a cramped jury
room in Newark, N.J.
"As I look back on it todav, I
don't think I did the right thing
said Marie Mickens, who was the
jury foreman. "I hope they (Lig-
gett) win on appeal. I really do
Mrs. Mickens and the others
who were interviewed by the
newspaper said they wish they
simply told the judge they could
not reach a conclusion. She also
said that they were a hung jury
and that the case should be re-
tried.
When the verdict was read in
court on June 13, juror Barbara
Reilly wept.
"1 was crying because I gave
in she said. She said shebelieved
the decision was wrong and that
she should have stood her ground
in the jury room.
Another juror, Ralph Eliseo
said he also thought he should not
have compromised and that the
iict should beqyertuxned.
erc'are nights f ray awake
11 lvl1rlrii1g,n!)id'Tobrnming
wrong that is going to affect
mankind for years? said Eliseo,
the lone smoker on the jury.
The other three jurors declined
to discuss the case, the Inquirer
Reported.
Cipollone's attorneys had ar-
gued that Liggett, which makes
Chesterfields, the brand Mrs.
Cipollone smoked most of her
life, made false health claims in its
1950s advertising. That advertis-
ing was essentially a false war-
ranty that smoking was safe, the
lawyers claimed.
But the heart of their case, the
lawyers said, was their claim that
Liggett conspired that Phillip
Morris Inc. and Lorillard Inc
which made other brands of ciga-
rettes Ms. Cipollone smoked, to
keep secret what the companies
knew about the health hazards of
smoking.
The plaintiffs' attorneys intro-
duced hundreds of secret indus-
try documents from the 1950s. It
was the first those documents had
been used in a tobacco liability
trial, and Cipollone's argued they
illustrated a decision by cigarette
makers to hide what they knew
about the dangers of smoking.
"It's just how you interpret it
she said. "We don't see how
theyrje so damaging
Attorneys for both Cipollone
awcH-iggett said-Fridaythey �rere
not surprised that the jurors had
compromised, but that their state-
ments would have little or no part
in the appeal that the cigarette
company plans to file later this
month.
"What the jurors, with their
comments, seem to indicate is that
they accept the proposition that a
person who smokes in the '40s,
'50s or '60s understands what
they're doing and voluntarily
chooses to smoke said James
Kearney, an attorney for Liggett.
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Four Klansmen
arrested at rally
(AD� Four members of the
Christian Knights of the Ku Klux
Klan were arrested during a
weekend march in Durham after
officers found a substance be-
lieved to be marijuana under the
front seat of one car, officials said.
Between 65 and 70 Klan mem-
bers drove through Druham after
a march in Raleigh on Saturday,
Durham Police Major H.K.
Fletcher said. The Klan members
were on their way to a march in
Hillsborough.
The Klan had asked permission
to march in Durham on Saturday,
but a permit was denied by Dur-
ham City Manager Orville Pow-
ell.
Fletcher said 23 vehicles con-
taining Klan members came
through Durham about 2 p.m.
Confederate nags flew from car
windows and Klan members ex-
changed shouts with passersby.
Officers stopped one car after
they received information that
there might be weapons in the
vehicle.
The owner of the car, Dwayne
Mark Karr, 29, of Petersburg, W.
Va consented to search of the
Officers arrested Karr, Gary
Ford Adkins, 23, of Reidsville,
Thomas Arthur Reed, 41, and
Timothy Ala Rexrode, 36, both of
Belpre, Ohio.
The four men were charged
with possession of marijuana and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia. Each was placed under a
$1,000 secured bond. Adkins
posted bond, but the other men
were held overnight in jail.
Later, about 50 Klan members
dressed in hooded robes marched
in Hillsborough to the Orange
County Courthouse, carrying
Confederate flages. More than
100 onlookers stood behind lines
of deputies from Orange County
and police from Chapel Hill and
Carrboro. Agents from the State
Bureau of Investigation were also
on hand. A handful of protesters
shouted back and waved anti-
klan placards.
The Christian Knights of the Ku
Klux Klan also held a march
around the Capitol building in
Raleigh.
The 73 marchers in Raleigh�
many dressed in hooded ropes of
white, red, green or black� gath-
Stop by UBE before
or after any home
pirate football
game. Choose
from the world's
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of pirate souvenirs from
t-shirts, sweaters and hats to
megaphones, pom poms and
even E.C.U. tote bags.
And while you're at
UBE see our full line
of Russell Athletic
and Champion
Sportswear.
It's all at University
Book Exchange, downtown
Greenville the one for
the fans. Stop by today.
vehicle, Fletcher said, and officers crcd for a brief rally and speeches
found marijuana and rolling pa- Less than a dozen protesters were
pcrs. present and there were no arrests.
Flaming Carrot � says Watch out for the V
Pirate Comix v�IV
1988 PIRATE HOME SCHEDULE
The cutting edg of humor'
Most every Thursday in the
East Carolinian. Solid
MjrMlMlJpMfMlMIHMM
Sept. 3 Tennessee Tech. 7:00 PM
Sept. 24 Southern Mississippi (Parent's Day) 1:30 PM
Oct. 1 Southwestern Louisiana 1:30 PM
Oct. 8 West Virginia (Homecoming)
Oct. 22 Syracuse
Oct. 29 Miami
2:00 PM
1:30 PM
130 PM
7ieOhe TofTheThnsI
Open Football Saturdays 9:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.Weekdays 9:00 A.M. - 5:30 P.M.
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville





(Ufa lEaat (ftarnlintan
SrvtHM th lt i.j�Wtw t�
iwyi.n umr 1925
Pete Fernald, cw�m��,�
Chip Carter, MMf.�,u�or
James F.J. McKee, ���� ofuwrtuwj
Joe Harris, N��FjitOT
DOUG JOl INSON, Sports UUor
Tim Hampton, re��i.r�i��
Mici ielle England, &�� m�
Derbie Stevens, s
Jeff Parker.s &
TOM FURR,Crrt�i�Kn.M�uj�r
Susan Howell, fvmMmpr
John W. Medlin, ek�,
Mac Clark, BusmesMMger
September 6, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Abortion
Funeral didn't help either side
Choices are always hard to While the priest who performed
make. From what to wear in the the service commented on the "in-
morning to what college to go to, trinsic dignity" of the fetuses, that
there's always the element of doubt dignity was compromised in every
"What would it have been like if I way from the scavenger-like
had chosen B instead of A?" method of collecting the fetuses, to
Maybe that's why organizations their storing and eventual burial,
and governments that focus on tak- While the pro-life contingent
ing away individual choice always may feel steps like this are necessary
pop up, despite the wars fought and to halt what they see as the murder
laws passed to prevent them. If one of uncounted innocents, this fiasco
has no choice, one cannot make the will only hurt their cause in the long
wrong choice. run. Not that it will help the pro-
Pro-life activists, such as the choice supporters more. While it
ones who staged the mass fetus may seem to justify their cause tem-
funeral, point out that unborn chil- porarily, the lasting memories of the
dren have no choice in the matter of funeral will be ones of disgust and
THE! MNDE:MHAU. G-FrAETRiCAUY &AU�D7 SUBSTITUTE" MEAL PLAN -
OK
C D c
Mow To EAT ON A Bock �6HTr FIVET
their own lives and deaths. Pro-
choice activists argue that the
woman must have the right to
choose what happens to their bod-
ies, especially after traumatic situ-
ations such as rape or sexual abuse.
While the anti-abortionists'
repulsiveness, and a desire to think
less about the situation of abortion.
something neither cause wants.
Choices are always hard to
make. Perhaps if the anti-abortion-
ists realized that the pro-choice
groups want to be responsible for
cause is a worthy one, and guided by their choices, they should let them
good intentions, their often extrem- be. They have to live with their deci-
ist nature prevents their reasons and sions for the rest of their lives,
rationale from being heard. The Just like the organizer of the
mass funeral was not a legitimate funeral, the priest, the people who
protest, it was a media spectacle. collected the fetuses
Mass funeral draws disgust
To the editor:
After reading several articles
concerning the recent mass funeral
for 157 aborted fetuses, we felt it
necessary to write and express our
disgust. Besides the fact that this is
conceivably the most morbid event
in the ongoing disputes between pro-
choice and anti-abortion factions,
this is a blatant and vulgar invasion
of the privacy of the women in-
volved.
We can understand the feelings
of those who for various reasons
wish to keep their unborn children;
however, we feel that there should be
more respect for those who do choose
abortion. It is pointless and trite to
speculate at what the world might
have lost by not having had these
children grow into maturity; what
we do not know about, we cannot
lose.
This funeral and the publicity
generated by it and its proponents
seem to be a grandiose guilt trip, a
most immature way to address an
issue. Everyone is entitled to his or
her beliefs � this is supposedly "the
land of the free" � but the attitude
these people are trying to generate is
one of absolute right and wrong, a
scenario which does not exist in the
real world.
Granted, for religious or per-
sonal reaasons, some will elect to
have their babies, but considering the
consequences faced by some mothers
and children, abortion could actually
be the more humane choice.
Many abortions are had by
women who are financially or emo-
tionally unable to deal with the
enormous responsibility of raising
and caring for a child. Furthermore,
should a woman be raped and not
report it, it is unrealistic to expect her
to bear her assailant's child.
While we are not advocating the
use of abortion as a form of delayed
in this country are sadly lacking.
Many girlswomen who find
themselves pregnant cannot
adequately provide for the child.
Medicaid, AFDC, food stamps and
housing assistance have been drasti-
cally reduced, not to mention student
financial aid, which is at an all-time
low.
Please explain how a young col-
lege woman, who is pregnant, is to
birth and care for a child without
money.
If she drops out of school and
works full-time, she is trapped in
low-paying, non-advancing jobs,
always struggling to make ends
meet. If she marries then one spouse
will have to work to support the
family, again in low-paying, non-
advancing jobs.
Also, over 75 of young mar-
riages fail. If she tries to stay in
school, she'll need her own apart-
ment plus tuition plus books plus
food plus childcare � difficult for
many parents with adequate in-
comes.
Finally, and probably most im-
portantly, many young people are
just not emotionally prepared to be
parents�it's no one's fault, they just
aren't ready.
Instead of anti-choice activists
burying fetuses, why don't they start
providing low-interest loans or
clothing or housing or childcare or
deposits on apartments.
There are very few of us who
choose to terminate a pregnancy for
convenience alone � many of us just
don't see any other viable alternative.
If you want to stop abortions, then
help us where it really counts � the
pocketbook. Hot air never pu t food in
anyone's mouth.
Lysa Hieber
Junior
Nursing
birth control, we still feel that the
choice should be made by the woman Mail SipOlOgiZ6S
herself not anyone else; it is, after all,
her own body.
Marshall Moore
Sophomore
Psychology
Robin Andrews
Junior
Anthropology
Pregnant reality
To the editor:
The article of activists holding a
funeral (for aborted fetuses) made
me again think of the whole abortion
issue. Aside from emotions, the eco-
nomic reality is that provisions for
parenting and providing for children
To the editor:
Well, it seems that the time has
come that every man in the universe
should stop pretending and own up
to the truth. All the things feminists
have said are, sadly enough, true,
and we have been lying to society
every day.
We really do think women are
the enemies, and feel comfortable
when they are bound and gagged.
And every time we open a door for a
woman, or even smile at her, what we
really want is to tie her up, beat her
into a bloody pulp, and rape her until
she can't walk straight.
We're so incredibly narrow-
minded that we hate everyc ne who
isn't exactly like ourselves. But
please forgive us, our brains are in
our penises.
We can't talk without using pro-
fanity and can't cope with society
when we're sober. We want to kill
everything we can't rape and burn
everything we can't kill. That's just
the way we are.
God is really a woman, and she
hates men, one and all. Satan put us
here to test women, the only "real"
human beings. We were put here to
insult, harass, humiliate and sexually
abuse them.
That's just our way of being po-
lite.
But honestly, I would like to say
that I am deeply sorry � I am deeply
sorry for the many people who have
read this letter thus far and agreed
with it, and haven't noticed that
those incredible truths are blatant
lies, a sarcastic trap for the narrow-
minded, self-righteous people who
are lost in a world of their own stere-
otypical truths.
I am sorry that many women
think of men as sexual vampires. I am
sorry that they sneer at me when I
hold a door. I am sorry they think of
me as a pervert whenever I speak to
them. I am sorry that they see me as a
sex-starved Neandrathal, whose
only interest in his fellow human
beings is in their use for pacification
of his violent and sexual urges.
I am sorry society has lost its
virginity. I am sorry that some people
are narrow-minded, prejudiced, self-
righteous zealots who stereotype
everyone they see. I am sorry for the
minority of individuals whose ac-
tions have caused the rest to be stere-
otyped. I am sorry to be living in a
society of people who love them-
selves so much, but love each other so
little.
Last of all, I am sorry for people
whom I have not touched, who will
go on thinking of everyone they see
as an enemy.
With deepest regrets,
Jim Shamlin
Senior
English
Paper "boo-boos"
To the editor:
When I was eight years old, I fell
off my bicycle while trying to pop a
wheelie to impress Molly Reeber and
skinned my elbow. It looked awful.
Blood everywhere. But when we
cleaned away the carnage, the
wound was very small.
Everything should have been
okay after that. Of course, It wasn't.
Children are lousy for picking scabs
and mine eventually became so in-
fected that I had to go to the doctor.
Two weeks ago, The East Carolin-
ian, in an attempt to impress us with
a "fancy" illustration, missed the
maneuver completely and got them-
selves very bloody. Now, because the
editorial staff cannot seem to quit
picking at the scab, this "boo-boo"
might become a far more mortal
wound.
While the illustration (8-23-88,
p.l) that has offended so many
people on this campus is undoubt-
edly a very gross and sexist thing, it is
not nearly so unsightful as the paper
published September 1st. that the
managing editor (editorial, p.4),
much less the illustrator (cartoon and
letter, p.4) and entertainment editor
("East Carolinian under siege
p.l7) can defend the illustration, and
attack those already injured, in the
patronizing, chauvanistic and
'light" way they did is unforgivable.
Instead of apologizing for the
insult they inflicted on a great num-
ber of people, they chose to drive
their illustrated sword to the hilt.
Every person on campus should take
their actions as a personal affront.
Although I am a very real sup-
porter of our paper's First Amend-
ment right to freedom of speech, I am
11 it
also a great believer in journalistic
ethics and maturity. The public bait-
ing and patronizing displayed in the
9-1-88 paper is obviously the work of
eight year olds.
I hope that the Media Board will
take this latest outrage by "our"
newspaper staff under serious con-
sideration. 1 encourageall students, if
you have not already, to evaluate the
illustration and to read the editorials
and satire mentioned above.
If you too take personal offense, I
hope you will exercise your First
Amendment right and scud letters to
the newspaper and Media Board of-
fices until either a formal apology or
resignation is offered by the manag-
ing editor oi The Eat Carolinian. We
do not deserve to be blatantly in-
sulted like this by our own paper.
Hale Svvanson
Graduate Student,
Technical and Professional
Writing
Former East Carolinian Staff
Writer
Cartoon still offends
To the editor:
When I picked up the first issue
of your paper I was .rushed and
didn't have time to read it, but 1 did
glance at the front page before tuck-
ing it into my backpack, and I
laughed with amazement at the ill-
fated pirate cartoon.
As a male, I wasn't particularly
offended by what I saw � Mr. Parker
has a fine sense of the female figure,
but I still can't believe it was allowed
to be represented in such a manner.
I have listened to my fellow
males making fun of the letters of
protest, and I have read with further
shock Parker's letter of explanation
and your editorial on the matter. You
are right � it wasn't an apologv, but
it should have been.
You should not have apologized
for being sexist or chauvanistic. You,
Parker, my friends and probably half
the people who complained seem to
have missed the point. It never
crossed my mind that you might be
sexist until you started so vehe-
mently protesting the issue.
What you should apologize for is
that you even considered printing
the cartoon in this day and age any-
where but in the Fun N Games sec-
tion (where it seems anything goes) if
at all.
You should apologize for your
insensitivity toward the feelings of
women in general and for negli-
gently chopping at the roots of credi-
bility of the newspaper you are so
proud of.
Printing such a cartoon in such a
way is simply not done � it is sub-
standard, just as the use of the word
"irregardless" in your editorial.
Charles W.Wilkerson, III
Graduate Student
Dukakis would fail
To the editor:
A Michael Dukakis presidency
would undoubtably be even a more
dismal failure than our last Demo-
cratic presidency � the infamous
Jimmy Carter era. This would be true
not only economically and socially,
but it would also be especially true in
the area of foreign policy.
"Mike Dukakis has not had a
single day's experience in foreign
policy� Senator Al Gore (D-
Tenn.), quoted in Los Angeles Times,
21888.
"Dukakis' approach to foreign
policy comes so close to renouncing
the unilateral use of American power
to protect national interests, while
relying on international covenants
and organizations that have looked
futile for 40 years, that it sometimes
sounds as if the ghost of Eleanor
Roosevelt controls his entire body
Washington Post columnist David
Broder, 21088.
"Dukakis's foreign policy is pure
McGovern on every issue from
arms control to the Persian Gulf, his
positions are foursquare with the
left end of the Democratic party
New Republic editor Morton Kon-
dracke, 81387.
"Dukakis shows how contemp
tuous the dominant liberal wing ol
his party is toward the traditions that
have kept this country strong and
how determined to neutralize the use
of American power in this hemi-
sphere � Former New Left leaders
Peter Collier and David Horowitz,
quoted in The New York Post, 315
88.
"Governor Dukakis" belief in
multilateral diplomacy and legal so-
lutions makes him little more than a
one-man United Nations, and a
somewhat simple-minded one at
that � The Economist, 423v
"Unfortunately, his good sense
as governor?) gives way to idiocy in
foreign policy. He seems unable to
grasp the expansionist dynamics of
tyrannies, and assume: a rational or
rather stable world where conflicts
can be reduced to negotiations He
always wants to deliver our vital
security to international agencies
said a Democratic strategist. It
shows breathtaking naivete �
Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Spec-
tator of London, 111487.
Our national security will be
severely and dangerously threat-
ened if Michael Dukakis is elected
president.
Nicolas Skottergaard
Treasurer
ECU College Republicans
Dukakis didn't help
To the editior:
During Michael Dukakis' second
term as governor of Massachusetts,
the state lost 13 of its manufactur-
ing jobs, thus accounting for 40 of
all manufacturing jobs lost nation-
wide. Employment growth has
been a sluggish 4.1 , far below the
national average of 7.6.
Yet despite this, Massachusetts
has maintained a healthy unem-
ployment figure of about 3.
Why?
1 � Massachusetts benefited
greatly from the Reagan defense
buildup. Ranking 12th in the na-
tion in population, Massachusetts
was fourth in total defense con-
tracts for fiscal year 1986, receiving
$9 billion in contracts.
According to Bank of Boston
Chief Economist James Howell, "If
it weren't for the Reagan defense
buildup, the Massachusetts indus-
trial economy could really be in the
worst shape in its history Ironi-
cally, the Reagan defense buildup
has been vociferously criticized
by Dukakis and most of his fellow
Democrats.
2 � Proposition 2 12, which
Dukakis opposed, spurred the
growth in non-manufacturing
jobs, such as real estate and con-
struction.
3 � Due to a low birth-rate and
out-state migration because of the
high cost of living, Massachusetts'
workforce has been stagnant since
1984, growing only 1.9 compared
to a national average of 5.6.
Thus, despite sluggish growth in
the employment rate, unemploy-
ment has remained low. "That low
unemployment is more a reflection
of a stagnant since labor force than
economic strength according to
Howell.
Now, as a Boston Herald edito-
rial pointed out, these three factors
have something in common:
"None of them bears Gov.
Dukakis' fingerprints
Russell Leon Dixon
Accounting
Snphnmnre
Tea
KEARNY, N.J. (AP) Ev
of the pugnacious polil
Teamsters Local 5f0 can
in thegraffiti on theconcrej
of the Pulaslu Skvw ay's hi
black girders.
"Remember Cask �
horts a scrawl, referring
thony Castelhto, a Local
cial slain in 19H
Reputed Genovest- enm
lly figure Anthonv 'Ton'
Provenzano and his bi
Salvatore and Nunzio n
Union City-based
1979, when Anthonv P
zano was convicted of rad
ing and ordering Cash
killing
In 1984, a fed :
moved 560 executive
placed the local under a trj
end a quarter-cei
Scho
WA
many sch
grade becau se
content, a coi - m
group has said rginj j
to serve "heal! I
mealss icha j
tatoes instead - I i
Ellen Ha
of Public for Fod
Health ?o
ted encourag ng ti
fresh fruit ar i
survey oi school n
But she s i
served in v
often are fied food
dishes high ir
"Our young Ir on ar-
rive audience We ha
tunity here. ' Ha:i-
got to establish' fest) I
healthy eat
The 37
program, sen ing
children, is rur I
Department. Surp ts
ties purchased b .
for 20 percent of tr ; -
the program.
Therein lies the roc' "j
lem, according v.
because the corr.r- j
often high in fat, sugar on
"Congress has comp
the problem by bowing
milk producers'lol li
ing that schools serve �
with low-fat milk opl
said.
Public Voice recommi
among other thiongs thatj
set limits on the air
sodium and sugar p I
school lunches and d j
healthier commodities I
But Suzanne S. Han
assistant secretary ei agriij
for food and oensumer
said in a statement that
be irresponsible to k
ties purchased by the
ment, as required h U
unused.
Furthermore, she said,
entific communin. 1 5 I
port setting absolute lej
sugar, fat or sodium at thij
because current n
tions regarding childre
troversial.
Trooper inju
when bitten
(AD - A state Highw
trooper who was bitten
tempting 10 arrest a suj
drunken driving was in
dition on Saturday aftei
undergoing surgery to refl
dozen wounds to his f
tiessav.
Trooper R.H. Fields
Moore County Memorial
Fridav for injuries he suft
ing a struggle with the su;
Al Warlick of the NC. CH
of Crime Control and Pul
Warlick said Fields was
in the face
The suspect had not beel
on Sarurdav night. Warhf
Fields stopped the
N.C 73 near Ellerbe
County at about midnij
on suspicion of dnving
paired. When fields wci
his automobile the man
soybean field, Warlick
pursued him and, the
fighting.
Fields, who has been a
about six months, event
trolled the suspect, retui
car and called for aj
Warlick said.





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 61988 5
At PtN
: and
hcmi-
isu
is didn't help
tur

th has i
- below tin
UIU'Ill
ut
lefense
� the na-
husctts
� Boston
"It
i t. nse
. its indus
be in the
torv Ironi
uildup
riticized
� - ins fellow
12, which
irred the
� mufa luring
� iti and con
birth rate and
n because i f the
� e Massachusetts
� jnant since
mpared
i erag, of 5.6
iggish growth in
nl rate, unemploy-
i ned low 'That lou
ntis mere a reflection
ince labor force than
gth " iccording to
is a Boston Herald edito-
it, these1 three factors
imething in common:
� them bears Gov
fingerprints
Russell Leon Dixon
Accounting
Teamsters Local 560 hold first elections
KEARN , N.J. (AD Evidence
t the pugnacious politics of
leamsters Local tO can be seen
in the graffiti on the concrete base
ol the Pulaski Skyway's hulking
Mack girders.
Remember Castellito ex-
horts a scrawl, referring to An-
thony Castellito, a Local 560 offi-
cial slain in 11.
Reputed Genovese crime fam-
ily figure Anthonv "Tony Tro"
Provenzano and his brothers
Salvatore and Nunzio ran the
Union City based local until
1979, when Anthonv Proven-
zano was convicted of racketeer-
ing and ordering Castellito's
killing
In 1984, a federal judge re-
moved 560 executive board and
placed the local under a trustee to
end a quarter-century of organ-
VVASHINGTON (AP)
Too
ized crime domination.
It was the first such action in
U.S. history.
This Labor Day finds Local 560
in its 26th month nder the trustee,
Edwin Stier. But the trusteeship
is scheduled to end Dec. 6, the
date Stier set for 560's first con-
tested election since 1965, the last
year anyone ran against the
Provenzanos.
"What's happening here is
exactly what we wanted said
Stier. '
The candidates are going to
each barn and campaigning in an
open election
But in the bams, as the sprawl-
ing truck depots are known, the
trusteeship has not pleased
many members.
Some at first welcomed the
efforts to exercise corruption but
gTew wary when U.S. Atorney
Rudolph Giuliani of New York
recently sued to place a trustee-
ship over the International
Brotherhood of Teamsters.
"We are keeping a sharp eye of
events over the river said a fed-
eral prosecutor in New York who
spoke on the condition of ano-
nymity.
"A smooth transition back to
union control of the local could
mean a lot to our case against the
international
Three men arc running for
president of the 8.000-member
loeak, the Teamsters' largest:
Michael Sciarra of the Teamsters
for Liberty, who served on the
ousted board; Russ Viggiani, a
Local 560 business agent and head
of Teamsters for Solidarity; and
Ray Carney, a trucker who ran
against Anthony Provenzano in
1965 and leader of The Committee
for the United Ticket.
The government had sought to
bar Sciarra for running, saying the
local would again be dominated
by organized crime under his
leadership.
U.S. District Judge Dickinson R.
Debevoise is expected to rule soon
on the government motion.
After U.S. District Judge Harold
A. Ackerman ordered the ouster
of the local's leadership, Sciarra
served as interim president for
two years until June 1986, when
appeals were exhausted.
The goverment's case against
Sciarra rests partly on secretly re-
corded tapes of conversations.
The tapes, made public during
the hearings, allegedly depict
Genovese captain Matthew
"Matty the Horse" laniello telling
a former Local 560 official that
Sciarra should "take over" the
union after the trusteeship.
Sciarra has denied any link
toorganized crime or any inten-
tion to take orders from anyone
J
once elected. Though he declined
to be interviewed, he authorized
union member and friend Al
Laurie to speak for him.
Laurie said the tape transcripts
are unclear about the subject
being discussed and who is
speaking.
Stier, who has taken no official
position on Sciarra's participa-
tion, agrees Sciarra is probably the
front-runner, but that Carney has
made inroads.
Sciarra's two opponents, con-
cerned about the possible back-
lash that barring Sciarra could
create, say they would like him to
run.
Viggiani, 48, said he believes
the intimidation of the Proven-
zano years still remains, though
more subtle.
"There are still members con-
cerned with reprisals who arc not
openly supportive of an opposing
ticket he said.
Stier said that intimidation has
been "only minor at this point
Carney, 58, admits that Sciarra
has experience because of his 14
years in union office.
"But that's why we're where we
arc today he said. "I'm a truck
driverand I wanttogivcthisunion
back to the members. Thcv should
have a voice and know w here their
money is going
much
many school lunches rate a C"
grade because of their high fat
ntent, a consumer nutrition
group has said, urging caferterias
to serve 'healthfully modified
meals such aschili atop baked po-
es instead of hot dogs.
Ellen Haas executive director
f Public 'Voice for Food and
I lealth Policy, aid her group spot-
ted encouraging trends toward
fresh fruit and vegetables in a
sun ey of school menus.
But she said the main courses
served in school cafeterias tar too
�'en are tied foods" and other
dishes high in saturated fat.
'Our oung children are a cap-
tive audience We have an oppor-
� it) here. ' Haas said. "We've
I to establish lifestyles that have
healthy eating habits
The 3.7 billion school lunch
I r igram, serving some 27 million
ildren, is run by the Agriculture
Department. Surplus commodi-
� 5 purchased by USDA account
for 20 percent of the foods used in
the program.
Therein lie s the root oftheprob-
a rd ng to Public Voice,
because the commodities are
ten high in fat, sugar or sodium.
"Congress has compounded
the problem bv bowing to the
milk producer' lobbvand requir-
ing that schools serve whole milk,
with low-fat milk optional, " it
said.
Public Voice recommended,
among other thiongs, that USDA
set limits on the amount oi fat,
sodium and sugar permitted in
school lunches and distribute
healthier commodities to schools.
But Suzanne S. Harris, depry
assistant secretary of agriculture
for food and oensumer services,
said in a statement that "it would
he irresponsible" to let commodi-
ties purchased by the govern-
ment, as required by law, go
unused.
Furthermore, she said, "the sci-
entific community does not sup-
port setting absolute levels for
sugar, fat or sodium at this time"
because current rccommenda-
ns regarding children are con-
troversial.
Trooper injured
when bitten
(AP) - A state Highway Patrol
trooper who was bitten while at-
tempting to arrest a suspect for
drunken driving was in good con-
dition on Saturday afternoon after
undergoing surgery to repair half a
dozen wounds to his car, authori-
ties say.
Trooper R.H. Fields was taken to
Moore County Memorial Hospital
Friday for injuries he suffered dur-
ing a struggle with the suspect, said
Al Warlick of the N.C Department
�f Crime Control and Public Safety
Warlick said Fields was also bitten
in the face.
The suspect had not been charged
on Saturdav night, Warlick said.
Fields stopped the man along
N C 73 near Ellerbe in Moore
County at about midnight Friday
n suspicion of driving while im-
paired. When fields went back to
his automobile the man ran into a
soybean field, Warlick said. Fields
pursued him and, the man began
fighting.
Fields, who has been a trooper for
about six months, eventually con-
trolled the suspect, returned to his
car and called for assistance,
Warlick said.
"Nutrition strategies warranted
tor the general adult population
may actually be harmful to chil-
dren, particaularly low-income
children, during periods or
growth and development Hams
said.
However, Haas said the Na-
tional Science Foundationk the
National Institutes of Health and
the Merican Heart Association
agree that fat should not constitute
more than 30 percent of a child's
daily caloric intake. And she said
the average school lunch contains
39 percent fat.
Public Voice listed several ex-
amples of traditional menus heavy
on tried chicken and fish, mashed
and fried potatoes and sweet, pre-
pared deserts. The group com-
pared those with "healthfully
modified menus adopted by some
school districts.
For example, in Kennesaw, Ga
students got baked chicken breasts
with lemon and garlic, steamed
broccoli and carrots, a homc-
makde whoe wheat roll and fresh
sruit. And in Denver, one meal
was a baked potato topped with
chili, accompanied by raw broccoli
and carots and sweet potato pie.
"We hear complaints that stu-
dents won't eat this stuff, " Haas
said. "We just don't buy that "
Some school districts won praise
for serving low-fat milk and home-
make iow-fat salad fressings, buv-
ing the ingredients themselves to
substitute for higher-fat com-
modities from USDA.
Haas urged the department to
help keep nutntious meals afford-
able
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� MEAL PLAN -
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6.1988 5
&hington Post columnist David
tier, 21088.
Du ka kiss foreign policy is pure
overn on every issue from
ih control to the Persian Gulf, his
itions are foursquare with the
nd of the Democratic party
Republic editor Morton Kon-
8 'S7.
Dukakis shows how contemp-
- the dominant liberal wing of
v irty is toward the traditions that
kept this country strong and
determined to neutralize the use
merican power in this hcmi-
Icre � Former New Left leaders
pr Collier and David Horowitz,
ed in The New York Post, 315
i
Governor Dukakis" belief in
(lateral diplomacy and legal so-
ns makes him little more than a
man United Nations, and a
lewhat simple linded one at
- The Economist, 42388.
fortunately, his good sense
overnoii ?) gives way to idiocy in
pi en policy. He seems unable to
jsp the expansionist dynamics of
innies, and assume: a rational or
t stable world where conflicts
be reduced to negotiationsHe
says wants to deliver our vital
Rrity to international agencies
a Democratic strategist. It
vs breathtaking naivete. �
wose Evans-Pritchard,TheSpec-
rof London, 111487.
Dur national security will be
and dangerously threat-
it Michael Dukakis is elected
dent.
Nicolas Skottergaard
Treasurer
ECU College Republicans
hikakis didn't help
To the editior:
During Michael Dukakis' second
?rm as governor of Massachusetts,
e state lost 13 of its manufactur-
tg jobs, thus accounting for 40 of
111 manufacturing jobs lost nation-
Vide. Employment growth has
eon a sluggish 4.1 , far below the
lational average of 7.6.
Yet despite this, Massachusetts
las maintained a healthy unem-
lovment figure of about 3.
IVhy?
Massachusetts benefited
treatly from the Reagan defense
jmildup. Ranking 12th in the na-
ion in population, Massachusetts
-as fourth in total defense con-
racts for fiscal year 1986, receiving
�9 billion in contracts.
According to Bank of Boston
Thief Economist James Howell, "If
It weren't for the Reagan defense
mildup, the Massachusetts indus-
rial economy could really be in the
.orst shape in its history Ironi-
cally, the Reagan defense buildup
las been vociferously criticized
y Dukakis and most of his fellow
emocrats.
2 Proposition 2 12, which
Hikakis opposed, spurred the
jrowth in non-manufacturing
bs, such as real estate and con-
struction.
3 � Due to a low birth-rate and
ut-state migration because of the
ugh cost of living, Massachusetts'
orkforce has been stagnant since
1984, growing only 1.9 compared
to a national average of 5.6.
Thus, despite sluggish growth in
the employment rate, unemploy-
rnent has remained low. "That low
i nemployment is more a reflection
4 a stagnant since labor force than
ronomic strength according to
4owell.
Now, as a Boston Herald edito-
lal pointed out, these three factors
lave something in common:
I'None of them bears Gov.
Dukakis' fingerprints
Russell Leon Dixon
Accounting
.rtpKfrryra1
Teamsters Local 560 hold first elections
KEARNY,N.J. (AP) Evidence
of the pugnacious politics of
Teamsters Local 560 can be seen
in the graffiti on the concrete base
of the Pulaski Skyway's hulking
black girders.
"Remember Castellito ex-
horts a scrawl, referring to An-
thony Castellito, a Local 560 offi-
cial slain in 1961.
Reputed Genovese crime fam-
ily figure Anthony 'Tony Pro"
Provenzano and his brothers
Salvatore and Nunzio ran the
Union City-based local until
1979, when Anthony Proven-
zano was convicted of racketeer-
ing and ordering Castellito's
killing.
In 1984, a federal judge re-
moved 560 executive board and
placed the local under a trustee to
end a quarter-century of organ-
ized crime domination.
It was the first such action in
U.S. history.
This Labor Day finds Local 560
in its 26th month nder the trustee,
Edwin Stier. But the trusteeship
is scheduled to end Dec. 6, the
date Stier set for Ss first con-
tested election since 1965, the last
year anyone ran against the
Provenzanos.
"What's happening here is
exactly what we wanted said
Stier.
"The candidates are going to
each barn and campaigning in an
open election
But in the barns, as the sprawl-
ing truck depots are known, the
trusteeship has not pleased
many members.
Some at first welcomed the
efforts to exercise corruption but
grew wary when U.S. Atorney
Rudolph Giuliani of New York
recently sued to place a trustee-
ship over the International
Brotherhood of Teamsters.
"We are keeping a sharp eye of
events over the river said a fed-
eral prosecutor in New York who
spoke on the condition of ano-
nymity.
"A smooth transition back to
union control of the local could
mean a lot to our case against the
international
Three men are running for
president of the 8.000-member
loeak, the Teamsters' largest:
Michael Sciarra of the Teamsters
for Liberty, who served on the
ousted board; Russ Viggiani, a
Local 560 business agent and head
of Teamsters for Solidarity; and
Ray Carney, a trucker who ran
against Anthony Provenzano in
1965 and leader of The Committee
for the United Ticket.
The government had sought to
bar Sciarra for running, saying the
local would again be dominated
by organized crime under his
leadership.
U.S. District Judge Dickinson R.
Debevoise is expected to rule soon
on the government motion.
After U.S. District Judge Harold
A. Ackerman ordered the ouster
of the local's leadership, Sciarra
served as interim president for
two years until June 1986, when
appeals were exhausted.
The government's case against
Sciarra rests partly on secretly re-
corded tapes of conversations.
The tapes, made public during
the hearings, allegedly depict
Genovese captain Matthew
"Matty the Horse" Ianiello telling
a former Local 560 official that
Sciarra should "take over" the
union after the trusteeship.
Sciarra has denied any link
toorganized crime or any inten-
tion to take orders from anyone
once elected. Though he declined
to be interviewed, he authorized
union member and friend Al
Laurie to speak for him.
Laurie said the tape transcripts
are unclear about the subject
being discussed and who is
speaking.
Stier, who has taken no official
position on Sciarra's participa-
tion, agrees Sciarra is probably the
front-runner, but that Carney has
made inroads.
Sciarra's two opponents, con-
cerned about the possible back-
lash that barring Sciarra could
create, say they would like him to
run.
Viggiani, 48, said he believes
the intimidation of the Proven-
zano years still remains, though
more subtle.
There are still members con-
cerned with reprisals who are not
openly supportive of an opposing
ticket he said.
Stier said that intimidation has
been "only minor at this point
Carney, 58, admits that Sciarra
has experience because of his 14
years in union office.
"But that's why we're where we
are today he said. "I'm a truck
driver and I want to give this union
back to the members. They should
have a voice and know where their
money is going
School lunches don ft hold much nutrition
WASHINGTON (AP)� Too
many school lunches rate a "C"
grade because of their high fat
content, a consumer nutrition
group has said, urging caferterias
to serve "healthfully modified"
meals such as chili atop baked po-
tatoes instead of hot dogs.
Ellen Haas, executive director
of Public "Voice for Food and
Health Policy, aid her group spot-
ted encouraging trends toward
fresh fruit and vegetables in a
survey of school menus.
But she said the main courses
served in school cafeterias "far too
often are fied foods" and other
dishes high in saturated fat.
"Our young children are a cap-
tive audience. We have an oppor-
tunity here, " Haas said. "We've
got to establish lifestyles that have
healthy eating habits
The 3.7 billion school lunch
program, serving some 27 million
children, is run by the Agriculture
Department. Surplus commodi-
ties purchased by USDA account
for 20 percent of the foods used in
the program.
Therein lies the root of the prob-
lem, according to Public Voice,
because the commodities "are
often highin fat, sugar or sodium.
"Congress has compounded
the problem by bowing to the
milk producers' lobby and requir-
ing that schools serve whole milk,
with low-fat milk optional, " it
said.
Public Voice recommended,
among other thiongs, that USDA
set limits on the amount of fat,
sodium and sugar permitted in
school lunches and distribute
healthier commodities to schools.
But Suzanne S. Harris, depty
assistant secretary of agriculture
for food and oensumer services,
said in a statement that "it would
be irresponsible" to let commodi-
ties purchased by the govern-
ment, as required by law, go
unused.
Furthermore, she said, "the sci-
entific community does not sup-
port setting absolute levels for
sugar, fat or sodium at this time"
because current recommenda-
tions regarding children are con-
troversial.
Trooper injured
when bitten
(AP) - A state Highway Patrol
trooper who was bitten while at-
tempting to airest a suspect for
drunken driving was in good con-
dition on Saturday afternoon after
undergoing surgery to repair half a
dozen wounds to his ear, authori-
ties say.
Trooper R.H. Fields was taken to
Moore County Memorial Hospital
Friday for injuries he suffered dur-
ing a struggle with the suspect, said
Al Warlick of the N.C. Department
of Crime Control and Public Safety.
Warlick said Fields was also bitten
in the face.
The suspect had not been charged
on Saturday night, Warlick said.
Fields stopped the man along
N.C. 73 near Ellerbe in Moore
County at about midnight Friday
on suspicion of driving while im-
paired. When fields went back to
his automobile the man ran into a
soybean field, Warlick said. Fields
pursued him and, the man began
fighting.
Fields, who has been a trooper for
about six months, eventually con-
trolled the suspect, returned to his
car and called for assistance,
Warlick said.
"Nutrition strategies warranted
for the general adult population
may actually be harmful to chil-
dren, particaularly low-income
children, during periods of
growth and development Harris
said.
However, Haas said the Na-
tional Science Foundationk the
National Institutes of Health and
the Merican Heart Association
agree that fat should not constitute
more than 30 percent of a child's
daily caloric intake. And she said
the average school lunch contains
39 percent fat.
Public Voice listed several ex-
amples of traditional menus heavy
on fried chicken and fish, mashed
and fried potatoes and sweet, pre-
pared deserts. The group com-
pared those with "healthfully
modified menus adopted by some
school districts.
For example, in Kennesaw, Ga
students got baked chicken breasts
with lemon and garlic, steamed
broccoli and carrots, a home-
makde whoe wheat roll and fresh
sruit. And in Denver, one meal
was a baked potato topped with
chili, accompanied by raw broccoli
and carots and sweet potato pie.
"We hear complaints that stu-
dents won't eat this stuff, " Haas
said. "We just don't buy that. "
Some school districts won praise
for serving low-fat milk and home-
make low-fat salad fressings, buy-
ing the ingredients themselves to
substitute for higher-fat com-
modities from USDA.
Haas urged the department to
help keep nutritious meals afford-
able-
anrnt
The Duke
MAGAZINES
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12 iss 19.97
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CYCLE WORLD
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HOME MECHANIX
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ATLANTIC
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USA TODAY
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Newsstand $35.40
AUDIO
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BASEBALL
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INCOME
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OUTSIDE
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988
Classifieds

FOR RENT
NON-SMOKING FEMALE ROOM-
MATE WANTED: Upper classman or
grad. 95mo 1 3 utilities, private room.
5 blocks from campus. Call 758-6830.
ROOM FOR RENT: In a cozy 2 bedroom
duplex. Furnished, completely. $200 per
month for everything. Deposit nego-
tiable, 3 blks from main campus. Leave
message for Renee at 758-1900.
HOUSEMATE: Quiet mf, wanted by
faculty member. 3B house, newly remod-
eled, walking distance campus. Rent and
lease negotiable. 757-6265 or leave mes-
sage 757 6665. Cabrielle Yablonsky.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
male roommate to share new mobile
home. 10 minutes from campus. Non-
smoker, please. Weekends call Hugh 756-
6851.
APT FOR RENT: Located 3 blocks from
campus, low rent, great location. Call
Luke or Steve for more details. 830-0339.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: $80 for
new house one block from campus, fully
furnished with AC. Call Mike or leave
message. 830-4728.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom house 5 blocks from campus.
Completely furnished except for bed-
room. $175 deposit with 6 months lease.
SI80month 13 utilitiesphone. Free
cable Jacuzzihot tub. Non-smoker pre-
ferred. Call Wiley 752-4614.
FOR SALE
1982 KAWASAKI: 440 LTD � 7,000
miles. White Letter Bridgestone Mags �
2 full face Fulmer helmets � Garage kept
� EC. $850. 830-5280.
LOFT FOR SALE: Very sturdy. Perfect
for dorm. Can be used as either loft or
bunk bed. $75. Please call 757-0131.
FOR SALE: 1988 Dodge Raider, red, four-
wheel drive, automatic, AC, AMFM
stereo cassette, loaded, 15,000 miles. Paid
SI 5,500 new � will sell for $13,000 or best
offer Great for beach, hunting, fishing,
camping, etc. Call Angela at 830-8802.
UNIVERSITY AREA: Walk to school
from your 2500 sq. ft. heated space 3
bedroom, 2 bath home. Freshly painted
interior. $95,000. Call Alice Moore Realty.
355-6712 or Bradley Gray 752-3699.
SERVICES OFFERED
AMERICAN HISTORY TUTOR
AVAILABLE: Call 830-3728 after 6 p.m.
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties Dance, Top 40, Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
IMPROVED GRADES
GUARANTEED! Proven method for
obtaining better grades sent $3.95 to. Rl 1
Publications 5639 Chapel Hill Rd. 416
Durham, NC 27707.
SCHOOLS IN: Time to party! Call us for
your music needs. We'll beat all prices
and videotape your party. The Power
Station DJ's. 752-0940.
DWI? Don't Drink & Drive. Come party
in style. Call Class Act Limousine. 757-
3240.
HELP WANTED
EXPEDITIONS TO AFRICA: Spring
semester openings to Kenya and
Cameroon. Join a team of international
young people to explore tropical rain-
forests and discover African wildlife. AP-
PLY NOW! Final chance for selection is
Sept. 30 - Oct. 2, 1988 in North Carolina.
Call OPERATION RALEIGH at 1-800-
727-7787 for an application today.
SHONEYS: On Memorial Drive, is hiring
waitresses, hostesscashiers, and bar at-
tendents. We have full and part-time
positions available. Come by for an appli-
cation.
TUTOR NEEDED: For 7th grader to help
with homework 1 hour a day, 4 days a
week. 3-4 p.m. Must have own transpor-
tation. 756-7966.
STUDENT NEEDED: To care for a group
of infants and toddlers on Thursday
mornings from 9:00 - 12:00. Must have
transportation. Call Mrs. Dunn at 355-
6852.
DELIVERY PERSONEL: Needed part
time 10-20 hrs. per week. Must have own
car. Apply in person at 114 E. 10th St.
Greenville.
NEEDED: Soccer coaches. Must be abail-
able Tuesdays and Thursdays after 2.00
p.m. Starting salary $5.00 per hour. For
more information contact Rita Roy, Pitt
County Community Schools at 830 4216.
SUNNY SIDE EGGS INC: Is now ac
cepting applications for responsible col-
lege students who wish to earn while they
learn. Apply in person at our main office
on State Road 1708 or call 756-4187.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Inter
ested in making money part-time photo-
graphing people? No experience neces-
sary; we train. If you are highly sociable,
have 35mm camera and transportation,
give us a call between 12 noon and 5 p.m.
M-F at 1-800-722-7033.
PART-TIME WORKERS: Needed at
Sunnyside Eggs to load and unload
trucks. Hours are from 5 p.m. to mid-
night. Call Tracy at 756-4235 or apply in
person.
WANTED FILE CLERK: For local law
firm. Filing, light typing, and some tele-
phone work. Experience helpful. 355
0300 ask for Carla.
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR MEN:
Are now accepting applications for the
Fall semester. Enthusiastic individuals
who enjoy fashion and can work flexible
hours should apply. Brodv's Carolina
East Mall. Monday thru Wednesday, 2-4
p.m.
PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS: To the new fall
pledges of Sigma Sigma Sigma: Christine
Allaback, Merry Aycock, Ginger Bcattv,
Robin Black, Stephanie Bovkin, I lolly
Bratton, Meadc Burke, Catherine Car-
penter, Misha Caison, Luanne Collins,
Suzanne Desrochers, Valerie Dixon,
Paige Dusenberry, Emily Euro, Carla
Fairbanks, Danielle Faulkner, Lois Gi-
lbert, Abbie Gore, Julie 1 lamrick, Amv
I larns, Chnsti 1 larris, Amber I lodge,
Cynthia Holhauser, HannaM Hooks,
Lisa Joyner, Martha Riser, Cassis Lane,
Katerie Laughlin, Jill Mau, Colleen
McDonald, Liz Moore, kati Mulligan,
Amy Neal, Kin Schecter and Michelle
Streib. We love you, the Sisters.
THE SIGMAS: Would like to wish all the
fraternities good luck on a successful
rush.
KELLY GREER: You did a great job with
rush, we love you. The Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS: To all the so-
rorities on a terrific rush The Sigmas.
TAKE PART IN GREEK LIFE: By rush-
ing one of the strongest fraternities on
campus � Sigma Phi Epsilon.
"PHI KAPPA ALPHA" Enough said
LAND HO Rush Pika on "Pikes Peak"
corner of 5th in Elizabeth tonight!
SORORITIES: Congratulations girls
Hope you all had a fabulous rush. The
Pikes.
TO THE LONDON TRAVELERS:
Well, it's not exactly South Kensington,
but the rain seems familiar. I lope your
return to Greenville has been pleasant,
and let's do that dinner thing sometime.
� Leona.
PHI KAPPA ALPHA The most fun you
can have with your clothes on
DEAR PETE: We quit Love the staff of
the East Carolinian.
DEAR JIMMY: Where were you? We all
quit! Signed: S.M S.M , A.B AD R.C
Later now.
DEAR TYPESETTERS: We missed you
Monday at work. Hope you enjoyed
your long weekend!
TO ALL OF OUR "ENGLISH"
SPEAKING FRIENDS: "Mark
"Anne "Emma and "Mike" We hope
you enjoyed your stay in Greenville. We
hope you take some of this jolly good
fun back to England From Trish, Susan,
and Tammy
DEAR CLAYBORN: It's me again Once
again we had too much space left in the
last column I thought I would take this
opportunity to say thank you for a great
weekend Love, Susan.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
a-TOfio
$1.00 OFF
HAIRCUTS
OR STYLING
Eastgate Shopping Center
(Across from Highway Patrol Station)
Behind Car Quest Auto Parts
2800 E. 10th Street
Greenville
Johnny Weathington
752-3318
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
� Acroas From Highway Patrol Station
$325 a month
Contact J. T or Tommy William
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt 8, 12 - 530 p m
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet ont bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient tree water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $205 a month, 6 month
lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Aulea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact JT. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
ABORTION
"Personal aiul Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon thru fiat l,ow
Cost Termination to 20 wrrlts of prrgnjnty
1 1-800-433-2930
CRUSTY'S
PIZZA
WE
DELIVER
NOW HIRING DRIVERS
25-30 Delivery Drivers. Earn $4 - $8 per hour.
Flexible hours. Bonus Plan Available.
Must have own car and insLirance.
Apply in person at 1414 Charles Streets.
Announcements
SENIORGRAP STUDENTS
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice, located in the Bloxton House between
Mendenhall and Greene Residence Hall,
is where graduating students may put
resumes and establish a credentials file.
Interview signups begin soon, and you
must be registered to sign up. General in-
formation meeting will be held Aug. 30,
31, Sept. 15at3p m and on Sept. 7at7p.m.
in the Bloxton 1 louse.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester and or Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the Gen-
eral Classroom Building, Room 2028.
SPECIAL OLYMFCIS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special Olym-
pics will be conducting a training school
Sept. 17 at Elm St. Gym for anyone inter-
ested in volunteering to coach soccer for
special athletes. No experience is needed.
VVe are also looking for coaches for basket-
ball, weightlifting, ans swimming. All
interested persons should contact Greg
Epperson or Connie Sappenfield at the
Special Olympic office, 830-4551.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anyone who purchased new student
reviews should come by the yearbook
office to pick them up. Hours are M-F, 6-8
p.m
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
ECU Gospel Choir is open for member-
ship to all interested students. Last day to
join in Sept. 21. Rehearsals are held
Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
HONORS PROGRAM
Student, faculty, staff, and the general
public are invited to attend a lecture spon-
sored by the Honors Program. The topic is
"Polish Public Opinion and the Crisis of
Socialism the lecturer is Dr. Renata
Siemienska-Zochowska a sociologist
from Warsaw University The lecture
takes place at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6 in Room
1026 General Classroom Building and is
free of charge.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
ECU Christian fellowship will be held
every Thursday at 6 p.m. in the Cultural
Center.
CAMPUS GIRL
College aged adults meet for the 1st meet-
ing of the semester, Thursday at 6 p.m.
Room available from information desk
in Mendenhall. New memberships avail-
able. For information call Nanci 7"W-6701
after 5 p.m.
NATIONAL TEACHER EXAM
The National Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery Exams � (Communication
Skills, General Knowledge, and Profes-
sional Knowledge) will be offered at ECU
October 22. Applications are to be com-
pleted and mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 911-R, Princeton, NJ 08341.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept. 19. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105, Speight Building.
GMAT
The Graduate Management Admission
Test will be offered at ECU on October 15.
Applications are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ 08540.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept. 12. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105 Speight Building.
SEA
Interested in your residence hall? Become
involved by joining Student Residence
Association. See your residence hall direc-
tor for information. Elections for officer's
are Sept. 13.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
Are you interested in dedicating 6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Call Marianne Exum (h) 830-
9450 or (w) 751-6271 for application and
more details. Application deadline Octo-
ber 1.
FRISBEE CLUB
Practices are in full swing. Come to the
bottom of College Hill every Tues
Thurs and Sunday at 5 p.m. New players
are more than welcome. Join the team that
bed for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca.
RUGBY
All athletes are encouraged to try this
hard nosed sport and join in the fellow-
ship of Rugby. Practice is Tuesday thru
Thursday 3:30 p.m. until. For more infor-
mation call the ECU Intramural Club
Sports Dept. or Bob Eason at 757-0209.
BATTLE OF THE BANDS
Battle of the Birds, presented by the cof-
fee house committee of the student union,
will be accepting appbeations for this
event until Sept 8 at 5 p.m. Pick up appli-
cations at the information desk at Men-
denhall. Amateur bands only please! So-
loists and Guitarists welcome.
HANG GLIDING
Be sure to attend the Intramural Hang
Gliding registration meeting. From Aug.
22 to Sept. 6 learn how to fly high in the
skv!
BACKPACKING
Be sure to attend the Intramural Back-
packing registration meeting held from
Aug. 22 to Sept. 6. Have an excellent time
exploring the woods and Uving in the
wild!
CO-OP EDUCATION
Co-op education, a free service offered by
the University, is designed to help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. All students are en-
couraged to attend a Co-op Information
Seminar in the General Classroom Build-
ing. The Seminar schedule is: Thursday,
Aug. 25 4 p.m. Room 2006, Monday, Aug.
29 1 p.m. Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 1 4
p.m. Room 2026, Thursday, Sept. 8 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Monday, Sept 12 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 15 4 p.m.
Room 2006, Monday, Sept. 19 4 p.m
Room 2006, Thursday Sept. 22 1 p.m
Room 2010, Monday, Sept. 26 1 p.m.
Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 29 4-p.m
Room 2006.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
The Women's Studies Committee will
hold it's 1988-89 organizational meeting
Thursday from 3-5 p.m. in GCB 1028 All
interested faculty, staff and students are
invited to attend.
FRIENDS
The final interest meeting for East Caro-
lina Friends will be held tonight at 7 p.m.
in Brewster B 205. Anyone interested in
joining ECF this year and who has not
already done so must attend tonights
meehng. For more info, call Dr. Mooney,
Sociology, at 757-6137.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet Sept. 13 at 8 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditorium.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
I lelp support a new tradition at ECU. Be a
part of the Women's Frisbee dub. For all
those interested there will be a meeting at
Mendenhall, room 247 Wednesday at 5
p.m. No experience necessary.
STUDENT UNION
On Friday there will be a meeting held in
the lobby in front of the Student Union
offices for the following students: Leigh
Boggs, Anna Cancy, Amy Eckroth,
Christy Mangum, Darlene Perdisatt,
Davandra Reed, Diana Richardson, Dawn
Schafer, Nancy Simons, Melissa Spain,
Mitzi Stumps, Todd Teague. If you are
unable to attend this 4 p.m. meeting
please contact me at 752-8165.
SCEC
The Student Council for Exceptional Chil-
dren will hold their first meeting on Sept.
12 at 5:15 p.m. in Sp 103. Speakers from
Assn. of Retarded Citizens and Special
Olympics: Everyone is welcome to attend.
ECHQ
There will be a meeting Thursday at 5 p.m.
in the Honors Lounge (Room 1004 - Gen-
eral Classroom Bldg.). All those interested
in the Honors Program at ECU should
plan to attend. Members are requested to
bring ideas regarding our community
outreach & ideas for guest lectures and
colloquia. New members always wel-
come. Call Dr. Sanders (757-6373) for
more info.
OMEGA PSI PHI
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Incorporated
will be host at the Unlimited Touch Thurs-
day at 100 p.m. until Ladies wear those
biker shorts to participate in our first
competition of the year
OMEGA PSI PHI
There will be a formal smoker Wednesday
at 8 p.m. in the Ledonia B. Wright Cultural
Center. All persons interested are wel-
come. Shirt and tie are required.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda is holding an OPEN
1 lOUSE for anyone interested in Business,
on Thursday at 4 p.m. in room 1013 Gen-
eral Classroom Building. Anyone en-
rolled in a Business or BV'IE course is
encouraged to attend and all majors are
welcome PPL is the collt t � equivilant
to FBLA.
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY
All general college pre-physical therapy
sophomores, or higher, anticipating ap-
plying to the May 1989 Physical Therapy
Class should go to the Physical Therapy
Department Office, 1st floor, Belk Build-
ing, before the end of Sept. to determine
eligibility. Instructions for receiving the
application packet will be given then. If
you have any questions, contact that office
by phone (757-6961, ext. 261) or in person.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
On Nov. 19 the Pit! County ECU Alumni
Assoc. the ECU Office of Admissions are
co-sponsoring an all day academic bowl
competition. The format used by the bowl
will closely adhave to the format used by
the GE College Bowl. The ECU Bowl
needs moderators, judges, time-keepers,
and scorers. Sept. 15 at 7 p.m. in the confer-
ence room of the TaylorSlaughter
Alumni Center on E. 5th Street, there will
be an orientationmini-training session
for interested volunteers. Faculty, staff,
and students are invited to attend. Call
Susan C. Smith, Admissions, 757-6640 or
John Anema at 752-7151 for further infor-
mation.
RE-ELECTION FOR GOV.
The ECU Students for the Re-election of
Gov. Jim Martin invite all students, fac-
ulty and staff to the opening of the Pitt
County I leadquarters on Thursday start-
ing at 5:30 p.m. The Governor's wife Dot-
tie Martin will be attending at 6 p.m. The
Pitt County Headquarters is located at 210
E. 4th St. and the telephone number is 758-
6339.
RE-ELECTION FOR GOV.
The ECU Students for the Re-election of
Gov. Jim Martin invite all students, fac-
ulty and staff to "An Evening with Gov.
Jim Martin" a barbecue supper and eve-
ning of entertainment on Sept. 13 starting
at 6 p.m. Tickets are $5 and are available at
210 E. 4th St. or by calling 758-6339 or 758-
1403.
IEWISH STUDENTS
You are welcome to attend the following
High Holiday Services at Temple Bayt
Shalom (1420 E. 14th St. in Greenville):
Sept. ll,8p.m.ErevRoshHashanah,Sept.
12,10a.m. Rosh Hashanah Day -6:30p.m.
Ma-ariv, Sept. 13, 10 a.m. 2nd Day Rosh
Hasahanah, Sept. 20, 7 p.m. Erev Yom
Kippur, Sept. 21, 9:30 a.m. Yom Kippur
Morning - 4:30 p.m. Afternoon Service,
Yizor it N'llah. For more info, or direc-
tions call Mike at 756-4930 All students
are invited to the home of Dr Bramv
Resnik for a Home Hospitality Dinner on
Sept. 20 at 5:15p.m. Please call to RSVP for
dinner. Call Dr. Resnik at 355-5321 (home)
or 757-6521 (work) or Mike at 756-4930.
CHI ALPHA OMEGA
Any young Christian men who are inter-
ested in pledging the new Christian Social
Fraternity, Chi Alpha Omega, rush will be
Sept. 6,7 from 7-9 p.m. in the Biology
Building N-102. If you have any questions
contact: Steve Llvod 752-1765 or Dean
Layes 752-8239.
WES2FEL
Wes2fel is a Christian fellowship which
welcomes all students, and is sponsored
jointly by the Presbyterian and Methodist
Campus Ministries. Come to the Method-
ist Student Center (501 E. 5th, across from
Garrett dorm) every Wednesday night at
5 p.m. for a home cooked meal with a short
program afterwards. This week the meal
wall be promptly at 5 p.m. and than a Rick
Hill eonert. The meal is S2 at the door,
$1.50 if you sign up in advance. Call 758-
2030 for reservations.
KERYGMA
A Bible study only for those serious about
studying the Bible. It is challenging and
requires commitment, involving discus-
sion and readings. Weekly meetings will
be scheduled to accomodate those who
are interested. Kcrygma is an interde-
nominational program, and sponsored by
Presbyterian Campus Ministry. For more
info, call Mike at 752-7240.
FREE CONCERT
Rick Hill, a Christian Folksinger, will give
a free concert on the mall Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m. He will play music from
James Taylor and Peter, Paul and Mary, as
well as his own music. Sponsored by Pres-
byterian Campus Ministry, 752-7240.
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meeting for all
Ambassadors Wednesday at 5:15 p m in
Mendenhall room 221. Remember that
missing over 2 meetings per semester may
lead to probation.
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
Accounting majors: If you are enrolled in
a 3000 or 4000 level accounting class, you
are invited to attend the Accounting Soci-
ety Wine and Cheese Social, Thursday.
Stop by the Accounting Office for an in-
vitation.
EDUCATION MAIORS
The Department of Speech-Language it
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be pro-
viding the speech and hearing screening
for all students eligible for admission to
the Upper Division of Teacher Education
on Sept. 12, 13, and 14. The Department
will be testing from 5 to 6:30 p.m on each
day listed above. NO APPOINTMENT IS
NEEDED (first come, first serve basis).
The SLAP Department is located in Belk
Annex on Charles St.
BIQLQGi STUDENTS
Get acquainted with biology facult) ar .
biologs club members at the oriental
gathering Sept 12 jt 7 pm in ii I
Refreshments will be served.
FORENSIC SOCIETY
Interested in competing in Intercollegiate
Public Speaking, Interpretation, or De-
bate?WeU the ECU ForensicsSociety is
vou. The next meeting will be Sept 6 at 8
p.m. in 211 Messtck Theatre Arts Building
WINDSURFING
Be sure to attend the Intramural
Windsurfing registration meeting held
from Sept 6 to Sept 27.
GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS
Croup photographs will be taken Sept 1 5
until Dec 2 No group pictures can be
taken after Dec. 2 Please note that the a
group listing with the name at every per
son in the photograph MUST be pre-
sented BEFORE the photographer films
the group ORGANIZATIONS V
OUT LISTINGS WILL NO! H PO
GRAPl 1ED, and time does not permit I
scheduling of another session
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
A special attraction of EVITA will be pre
sented in Wright Auditorium on Sept 22
at 8 pm Composed bv Andrew Lloyd
Webber (CATS, PHANTOM OF THE
OPERA, and 1ESUS CHRIST SUPER-
STAR), EVITA won seven Tony Awards,
including Best Musical. EVITA is based
upon the life of Eva Peron, the second wife
of Argentine dictator Juan Peron Tickets
for the New York Touring Production of
EVITA are now an sale For further details
contact: The General Ticket Office, Men-
denhall Students Center, 757-6611, ext
266.
FOOD FEST
The American 1 ieart Association and
Purdue will sponsor Food Fest, 1968 at
Krogers and Harris (Bells Fork location)
Sept. 13 and 14. "Heartsmart" tours will
be given by qualified nutritionist at 10
a.m. and 6 p.m daily for a S5 donation to
the Al IA The tours teach consumers to
shop for healthy foods found in local gro-
cery stores. For more information call 752-
7374.
VOTERS
The League of Women Voters of
Greenville-Pitt Countv will sponsor voter
registration on Sept 14 from 8.30 a m. to 1
p.m. in the ECU Bookstore lobbv New
registrations, permanent address changes
andor party affiliation changes can be
made at this time
COUNSELING CENTER
Coping with stress: A free mini dass of-
fered by the ECU Counseling Center for
students: You can � identify sources of
stress, make positive changes, manage
your response to stressful situations, learn
to relax, improve self confidence Sept
12,14,16,19 in 329 Wright Building from 3-
4 pm. No advance registration is re-
quired. Call or stop by the Counseling
Center for further information. (316
Wright Building 757 6661) Plan on at
tending all four sessions
Advertise in The East Carolinian
A spi
NEW YORK (AP)
sales jumped 41 pen � I
weeks earlier this vearf
cause of a rash of h j
A stud) of more th
male doctors hud she,
taking a single aspii
other das could I he j
risk in half
The study wason
recent reports
first time that doctor
ly to treat heart atta
to prevent them
In the most r-
�found that one aspi
and a
�n v
hours ran dramal
ride of a second fatal he�
Without the treatmt
tientshad a 13 per
within five w -
the figure dropped I -j
'The real - j
treatment for pa'
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Heart .
leading
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in 1987
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the recent . -J
heart attacks are the
dissoKers and that

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Phone
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scheduled for Deceml
next April in the i
added to resident
Their call is bei
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the state u
who at the very U
to take a second I
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month on Dec 1 a I
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chargt that tx .
increase in fuh,
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$7as a ua to
duos distano
courage large busii
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State I : imer
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future increase s
about $1 billion
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i
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6.1988 7
I (X K �ENGLISH"
I FRIENDS: -Mark
mma and Mike" We hope
id our M a in Greenville. We
tke some ol thi jolly good
England From Tnsh, Susan,
BOKV It s mo aain. Once
i to much space left in the
. thought S would take this
-xiv thank ou for a great
in
ORTION
It ntial Care"
E Pregnancy
Testing
8:30 4 p.m.
r. 10-1 p.m.
gle Women's
lalth Center
)0 433 2930
Y'S
WE
DELIVER
i-ERS
$8 per hour,
lilable. �
surance.
- Streets.
OG STl
DENTS
ig facult) and
R1 NSK MiClIT
� i i-i)t'
� i. 6 at 8
NDSLRF1NG
tramural
hold
UP PI C.RAPHS
. � n Sepl 15
J. N . tures can be
: ise note that the a
� every per-
MUST be pre-
� graphef films
� ; WITH-
N rBEPl IOTO
es not permit the
- session
r Rsm unions
' AwtU be pro
. � num on Sept 22
Andrew Lloyd
� NTOM OF THE
S CHRIST SL'PER-
�n so on Tony Awards,
, EVITA is based
ron, the second wife
Juan Peron Tickets
.ring Production of
: further details
ket Office, Men-
Center, 757-6611. ext
FQDDFISI
i ioart Association and
sor Food Fest, 1988 �
and Harris fBeOs Tork location)
13 and 14 "1 leartsmart" tours will
len b qualified nutritionist at 10
p m daily for a S5 donation to
f A The tours teach consumers to
jr healthy foods found in local gro-
r more information call 752-
VOTERS
� n n Voters of
� County will sponsor voter
- � 14from830am to 1
the ECU Bookstore lobby. New
Ia ns, permanent address changes
r irty affiliation changes can be
this time
QLNS�LIN��EXIEB
with stress A free mini class of-
the ECU Counseling Center for
s You can � identify sources of
make positive changes, manage
nsc to stressful situations, learn
(, improve self confidence Sept.
19 in J29 Wright Building from 3-
No advance registration is re-
Call or stop by the Counseling
for further information. (316
It Building, 757 6661) Plan on at-
lg all four sessions.
tan
Aspirin cuts the risk
NEW YORK (AP)-Aspirin
sales jumped 41 percent for a few
weeks earlier this year, not be-
cause of a rash of headaches.
A study of more than 22,000
male doctors had shown that
taking a single aspirin every
other day could cut heart attack
risk in half.
The study was one of a series of
recent reports showing for the
first time that doctorsare able not
only to treat heart attacksbut also
to prevent them.
In the most recent report, doc-
tors found that one aspirin tablet
and a single dose of a clot-dis-
solving drug given within 24
hours can dramatically cut the
risk of a second fatal heart attack.
Without the treatment, pa-
tients had a 13 percent chance of
dying from a second heart atack
within five weeks, the research-
ers found. With the treatment,
the figure dropped to 8 percent.
'The real discovery is that
treatment for patients is going to
reduce in-hospital mortality sub-
stantially says Richard Peto of
Oxford University, one of the
study's authors.
Heart disease is the nation's
leading causes of death, by far.
The National Center for Health
Statistics reports that 762,820
Americans died of heart disease
in 1987. (This does not include
those who died of blood-vessel
diseases, such as strokes.)
The drugs most responsible for
the recent success in preventing
heart attacks are the new clot-
dissolvers and that old standby,
aspirin.
The usual cause of heart at-
tacks is a blockage of the coro-
nary arteries, which supply the
heart muscle with oxygen-rich
blood. The blockage arises from
the buildup of fats, cholesterol
and clotted blood.
Clot-dissolvers break up clots,
thus restoring blood flow. Aspi-
rin interferes with aspects of the
clotting process, helping to pre-
vent clot formation in the first
place.
The limited sales of the clot-
dissolving drugs in the United
States show that many doctors
are still not using them, despite
their proven success. But that is
beginning to change.
Some doctors predict that in the
not -too-distant future these
drugs will be judged so safe that
they will be administered rou-
tinely by paramedics in ambu-
lances before suspected heart at-
tacck victims even reach the hos-
pital.
"We have to know how to re-
spond quickly, and we have to
have the courage to use these
drugs in the absevce of a defini-
tive diagnosis says Dr. Burton
Sobel of Washington University
in St. Lousis, a pioneering in the
testing of the clot-dissolvers.
"The most important thing we
can do is teach patients in advance
about the value of early treat-
ment he says.
While most public attention has
focused on this new ability to pre-
vent heart attacks, researchers
have also made important prog-
ress in speeding the recovery of
patients who survive heart at-
tac
Researchers at the University of
Michigan recently determined
that some heart attack victims can
be released from the hospital as
soon as three daysafter their heart
attacks. Most heart attacks vic-
tims are kept in the hospital for at
least seven to 10 days.
The patients given early dis-
charge were able to return to work
two weeks sooner than others in
the study group. After six
months, not one death was re-
corded in the early-discharge
group. The researchers concluded
that perhaps 15 percents of heart
attacks victims could be safely
discharged after three days.
In July, Stanford University
doctors found that workers who
went back to their jobs about
seven weeks after their heart at-
tacks did at least as well as work-
ers who went back after a more
typical convalescence of about 10
or 11 weeks.
All of these advances come at a
time when public health experts
are increasingly emphasizing the
role of good gealth and good nu-
trition in lowering heart disease
risk.
Early next year, the American
Heart Association seal of approval
will begin appearing on foods that
are low in fat and cholesterol and
therefore can help reduce heart
disease risk.
U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett
Koop in July issued his first report
on nutrition, calling on Americans
to lower their consuption of fats
and to eat more vegetables, fruits,
fish, poultry and whole grains.
Progress in research on heart
disease is making clear that the
heart attack is no longer a mysteri-
ous killer that strikes without
warning and cannot be defended
against.
MUch can be done to prevent
heart attacks, great improvements
are being made in treatments, and
recovery is faster than ever before.
Phone rates slated to increase
WASHINGTON (AP) - Local
residential phone rates across
America are due to go up twice
during the coming months, but
state utility consumer advocates
are trying to head off the increases
before they can take effect.
Consumer advocates want the
Federal Communications
Commission to cancel increases
scheduled for December and the
next April in the "line charge"
added to residential phone bills.
Their call is being heard by
some members of Congress and
the state utilities commissioners,
who at the very least want the FCC
to take a second vote on the added
charges before they take effect.
The increases - 60 cents per
month on Dec. 1 and 30 cents on
April 1,1989 - were part of a three
step) boost in the monthly line
charge that began with a 60-cent
increase in July 1, 1987. The
monthly charge is already $2. 60.
The FCC approved the increases
in April 1987asa way to further re-
duce long distance rates and en-
courage large business users to
stay on the public phone network
rather than building their own
networks.
But the National Association of
State Utility Consumer Advocates
is asking the FCC to cancel the
future increases - amounting to
about $1 billion dollars a year -
saying they are "unecessary, un-
supported and unwarranted
The association and three tele-
communication analysts commis-
sioned by the group to study a June
report compiled by the FCC on the
effects of the subscriber line charge
concluded that the threat of large
users bypassing the local phone
network has not materialized. In-
creasing the charge by 90 cents will
have no effect on the bypass that is
already occurring, they said.
"We've really attacked the very
basis for the subscriber line charge,
" said Ron Binz, Colorado con-
sumer counsel.
The line charge helps pay the
cost of wire that connects a
consumer's telephone with a
phone company's central office.
Part of the cost of that line is also
subsidized with long distance
rates, so raising the proportion
paid by suscribers reduces long
distance rates. Long-distance
rates have dropped more than 30
percent since the charge was
imposed in 1985.
Raising the line charge also
raises local connection fees paid
by large business users. Some
businesses find it ecomomical to
build their own telecommunica-
tions networks and bypass the
public phone network.
The FCC continues to support
the subscriber lone charge and the
underlying policy of shifting the
costs of the local phone network
to subscribers, said FCC spokes-
man John Kamp.
"The policy has worked very
well. Bypass has not grown and it
has caused rates overall to come
down considerably, and we have
not seen evidence to cause us to
change course, " he said.
The agency, however, will
"look very carefully" at the con-
sumer advocates' requests to can-
cel the scheduled increases, he
said.
But the consumer advocates'
group has already taken its case to
Congress, where it is talking to
Democratic members of the com-
munications committees, most of
whom opposed the original im-
position of the line charge at $1 in
June 1985 and the later increases.
The issue "has caught Con-
gress' eye, " said Gerard Sa-
lemme, an aide to Rep. Edward
Markey, D-Mass chairman of the
House of telecommunications
subcommittee, particularly be-
cause of concerns about an FCC
proposal to give AT&T and the
local Bell phone companies more
financial flexibility by capping
rates but lifting the lid on profits.
Salemme said that if price caps
were adopted, regulators would
have little or no assurance that the
line-charge increases were being
passed along in the form of re-
duced long-distance rates.
DELIVERY
SMALI, MEDIUM L-ARQE
Cheese Pizza $4.95 $6.85 $8.95
Cheese and 1 Topping$5.60 $7.65 $9.90
Each Additional Topping$ .65 .80 .95
SPECIALTY PKZA8
CheeseLovers$6.90 $9.25 $11.80
Meat Lovers$6.90 $9.25 $11.80
Supreme$6.90 $9.25 $11.80
Super Supreme$7.55 $10.05 $12.75
FAMOUS PIZZA HUTQUAUTY
�GENEROUS TOPPINGS
�REAL CHEESE
�FRESH VEGETABLES
�DOUGH MADE FRESH DAILY - NEVER FROZEN
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FRI.&SAT- 4 PM TO 1:00 AM
DELIVERY CHARGE 75
COUPON GOOD FOR JUST 7 DAYS!
DELIVERY AREA LIMITED TO
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
PHONE 752-4445
A FREE PIZZA HUT
DELIVERY
(YOU SAVE 75�)
(coupon ��rt�� Sept 12,1988)
FOR
RUSH PHI KAPPA TAU
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY
409 Elizabeth St.
r-
i
fi-i
Tuesday, geptemfrer Qh
Key West Night
wsinger Clee Wilder
and Seafood
Wednesday. September 7th
Little Sisters
of Phi Kappa Tau
and Pizza from
Dough Boy
Thursday. September 8th
Meet the Brothers
of Phi Kappa Tau
If
Come See What Makes Us Best
it
Call 757-1319
for a ride
ju�!tjL �i.





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988
Fires threatening two towns
SILVER GATE, Mont. (AP) -
Resident of two towns on the edge
of a giant wildfire near Yellow-
stone National Park fled their
homes and firefighters today
made a "last ditch" effort to stop
the encroachiong flames-
About a 150 residents of Silver
Creek and Cooke City near
Yellowstone's northeastern en-
trance, were told Sunday to
evacuate.
Only a few residents opted to
stay.
"There's no real reason to
leave Cooke City's Wayne
Johnson as firefighters moved
past him. "I don't think the town
is going to burn
But officials were not confi-
dent.
"If the fire jumps out of the line
and explodes, it could burn up
that canyon faster than they could
drive out of there said fire infor-
mation officer Dave McMorran.
"So we're spreading the word
around tonight, 'Don't sit around
and wait, folks
Crews lit a three mile line of
flames through the forest Sunday
night to burn up fuel in front of the
60,000-acre Storm Creek fire and
to buffer the towns.
The blaze was among fires that
have blackened 910,000 acres of
the greater Yellowstone area, in-
cluding 611,000 acres within the
park itself, or more than one-
fourth of Yellowstone's 2.2 mil-
lion total acreage. One blaze, the
North Fork fire, was within three
miles of the Old Faithful geyser in
Wyoming.
Elsewhere, fires in Southern
Calirornia blackened nearly 3,000
acres of brush, timber and dam-
aged at least 21 homes as searing
dry weather and Santa Ana winds
harried firefighters and ignited
new flames. The fire forced 150
people to evacuate from a mobile
home park 15 miles northeast of
San Diego.
Washington state's most seri-
ous forest fires balloned to more
than 12,500 acres, sending smoke
and ash over the town of Republic
but posing no immediate threat.
In Utah, calm winds helped
firefighters keep a raging 5,400
acre brush-fire from more than 70
canyon homes east of Salt Lake
City, authorities said.
In Idaho, a fire that spread from
Yellowstone into the Island Park
area of eastern Idaho during the
weekend burned more than
1400 acres, but light winds gave
firefighters a reprieve. The state's
largest fire, the Ludder Creek fire
in central Idaho, grew to more
than 21,000 acres.
More than 600 firefighters in
Montana tended the backfire set
near Yellowstone's northeast en-
trance. The blaze was expected to
burn more than 5,000 acres by la te
today in a west, southwest direc-
tion.
The Storm Creek fire, which
started nearly three months ago in
the Abroska-Beartooth Wilder-
ness of Montana, continued burn-
ing southerly down a pair of creek
drainages in the park, away from
the two towns.
The next two days are critical as
officials expect southwest winds
to kick up Tuesday and blow the
flames toward the towns, said Pat
Kuanert, fire information officer.
"We're creating a massive
buffer in a last ditch effort to save
this town Kuanert said. "We
need two miles of buffer to hold it.
Two miles of black
Crews also manned a 65-foot-
wide swath bulldozed through
the forest, waiting with shovels
and hoses to put out any burning
embers.
Tanker trucks sprayed flame
retardent foam on the historic
gatehouse at the park's northeast
entrance.
Smoke from the backfires filled
both towns, and curious residents
in Cooke City watched down the
highway.
The evacuation notice was
given Sunday morning and
sheriffs deputies drove a patrol
vehicle slowly through the streets
blaring out the evacuation signal.
The fire started June 14 when a
lightning strike sparked a small
blaze in the wilderness. Under
forest service policy, it was al-
lowed to burn as long as it re-
mained within the boundaries
perscribed in a fire management
plan.
But in mid August, 70 mph
gusts blew the fire across several
miles in a few hours and firefighters
moved in to stop the advance. At
the same time, a man-caused fire
burning to the west in the same area
- the Hellroaring Creek blaze - also
gained ground.
The Hellroaring fire stands at
nearly 54,000 acres, and officials
expect the fires to merge Tuesday.
To the southeast of Cooke City and
Silver Gate is the 236,900-acre Clo-
ver Mist fire, burning in Yellow-
stone.
"This group of fires is the largest
complex of fires to ever burn in the
written history of the continental
U.S excluding Alaska Kaunert
said. 'This is a one-in-400 year
event
Suspect killed by police fire
FAYETTEVILLE (AP) - A sus-
pect in an extortion attempt was
shot to death by Fayetteville po-
lice in a wooded area of Fort Bragg
after he picked up $15,000 left by
an extortion victim, authorities
said.
The suspect armed with a shot-
gun "slung around his chest
was shot after he pointed the
weapon at lawmen, said Fay-
etteville police Sgt. A.M.Marable.
Detective Melton brown was
injured when his left knee was
struck by an officer's bullet that
apparently richocheted. Ms.
Marable said.
Brown was treated and released
from Cape Fear Valley Medical
Center, a hospital spokeswoman
said.
An unidentified source told
Fayetteville Observer-Times that
the dead man had been identified
as Staff Sgt. Erick William
Johnson, 35, a Special Forces sol-
dier.
A backpack found by lawmen
in a search of the area around the
shooting Saturday afternoon con-
tained identification that led them
to Johnson's home, the newspa-
per reported.
Johnson had been reported
missing Friday night by his wife.
Fingerprints and other infor-
mation about the dead man had
been sent early Saturday to the
FBI's computer center in Wash-
ington by a team of federal inves-
tigators in an effort to establish his
identity, the newspaper said.
The shooting ocurred shortly
after 9 a.m. Saturday in an area
where the suspect had picked up
$15,000 that had been left by an
extortion victim, Ms. Marable
said.
Several officers were waiting in
the nearby woods "for whatever
might occur or whoever might
come out she said. The suspect
had a "bandoleer belt " of ammu-
nition strapped around his chest,
Ms. Marable said.
As the suspect came out of the
woods, the officers approached
and identified themselves, she
said. They also told the suspect to
drop his weapon, but he suspect
advanced on the officers "with his
weapon drawn she said.
"He pointed at one of our officers
and was shot by another"
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DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP)
Flying across the nation it is virt
ally impossible to discern tl
mighty rivers that normally n
bon thhe landscapes There
just vast seas of muddv brwi
water - and millions of strand
people
Roods have inundated thrd
quarters of Bangladesh and cl
transportation links from it n
jor port to the capital and otl
maor cities, officials sav thoul
today adding that flood waters
three ma)or rivers were recedii
In Dhaka, flood waters were
their highest levels i n 4 years af
covered three fourths of the cai
tal.
Dhaka newspapers reportedj
more flood deathhs today, brid
ing the toll to at (east " sir
June, when rivers began ov
flowing their banks in anni
monsoon flooding in this impd
erished nation or 110 milhi
people.
The government I
widely considered 1
Millions of the maroned
eating raw food and dr j
muddy, probabl) contaminat
water, 83.(X)0 people nationvMl
have contracted diarrheal d
cases, said Health Minister At
Loans
RALEIGH With
terms just tx ginning -
dents and parents may i
with meeting educati
penses f so, they ma
consider student or parent
available through t ollegt l
datum Inc. (Cl I reru Imei
any eligible . univei
technical or v nal sch
College Foundation - - j
the central lender in North (
lina for Staff i - form
Insured Stud( nt 1 ins
mental Loans I - Stud
FLL'S Loans to parents. Funds)
loans from CF1 are provided
North Carolina full-service bar.
and special investors The Nd
Carolina State Education As
tancc Authority (N.C SEA A
vides the guarantee for tK
CFI's educational ear arc
fered under the nationwide Ro
T. Stafford Student Loan I
(formerly called the Guarand
Student Loan Program). The SJ
ford Loans are need-based but I
Supplemental and PLUS loan-
not.
North Carolina resident- H
apply, even if they attend a
out of state. Out-of-state reside!
ma appl v it they a t tend c -J
North Carolina
Stafford Loans are for depe
ent or independent student!
undergraduate or graduate pj
fessional programs oi study
are based on financial need
gible undergraduate freshi
and sophomores may borrow
to $2,625 per year; undergradi
juniors and seniors, up to 54.
per year. The loan maximum
graduateprofessional studeni
$7,500 per year.
The interest rate on Staff
Loans is 8 per year for new
rowers. Repayment oi loan pnj
pal does not have to begin und
months after the student gral
ates or drops below half-time
rollment. Most borrowers hi
financial need and thereby qua
for the federal government's rf
ment oi interest prior to the ret.
ment period.
Supplemental Loans tor
dents (SLS), the second t p
Youth alumni
challenge
Continued from page 1
The Young Alumni Challenl
was formally announced dunj
todav's Alumni Leadership G
ference, a training and intomj
tion session sponsored annu.
by the Lumni Associaiton
alumni and fiends who hod vi
untary leadership positions w
the university.
"We're thrilled that these f
young entrepreneurs have
cided to invest in East Carolina
said Chancellor Richard R. Eal
"We're excited about their
sonal success and about wl
their challenge can mean for
university Their generosity
their enthusiasm are splenJ
examples for all of us "
For more information about
Young Alumni Challenge, cj
tact David B. McDonald at
ECU Office of Institutional
vancement, TaylorSlaughl
Alumni Center, Greenville, Nf
27858,(919)757-6685-






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Millions stranded by floods
DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) -
Hying across the nation it is virtu-
ally impossible to discern the
mighty rivers that normally rib-
bon thhe landscapes. There are
Hist vast seas of muddy brwon
water - and millions of stranded
people.
Hoods have inundated three-
quarters of Bangladesh and cut
transportation links from its ma-
jor port to the capital and other
major cities, officials say, though
today adding that flood waters on
three major rivers were receding.
In Dhaka, flood waters were at
their highest levels in 54 years and
covered three fourths of the capi-
tal.
Dhaka newspapers reported 60
more flood deathhs today, bring-
ing the toll to at least 1,007 since
lune, when rivers began over-
flowing their banks in annual
nonsoon flooding in this impov-
erished nation of 110 million
people.
The government of 333 dead id
widely considered low.
Millions of the marooned are
mating raw food and drinking
muddy, probably contaminated
water, 83,000 people nationwide
have contracted diarrheal dis-
eases, said Health Minister Abdul
Munim.
He said 65 people have died of
the diseases so far.
"It is a calamity Information
Minister Mahbubur Rahman told
reporters Sunday night. "It is a
havoc creating, menacing flood
Flying in an airplane across
Bangladesh Sunday from the In-
dian border to Dhaka, even the
civilian pilot couldn't differenti-
ate between rivers and flood wa-
ters.
"I've never seen anything like it
before said Ghias Ahmad, who
has been flying over his country
for 19 years.
The waters swallowed up en-
tire villages. Occasionally, tin
roofs glinted in the sunlight, the
houses beneath them completely
submerged.
On a few high spots of ground
or short stretches of paved road
still above water, people milled
idly, small boats beside them.
The Ganges and Brahmaputura
rivers and their dozens of tribu-
taries flow from India to and
through Bangladesh to the Bay of
Bengal.
The rivers flood almost each
year after the monsoon rains in
Bangladesh annd India. Last year
the flooding in Bangladesh killed
about 1,500 people.
This season, some refugees
found shelter in relief centers or
relatives' homes, said govern-
ment officials who spoke on the
condition of anonymity. But they
estimate that at least 20 million
people were either stranded in
their homes or marooned on small
outcroppings of high ground
with few supplies.
Wells and pumps are flooded,
officials said, and flood water
which is probably impure, is the
only source of drinking water.
The central government for
foregin aid, includin boats, heli-
copters and three million tons of
grain.
Officials today reported water
levels falling on the Brahmaptura,
Ganges and Megha rivers. But
relief officials cannot reach many
parts of the country because
transportation has widely broken
down.
"Shorrtages of medicine,
cooked food and drinking water
is causing untold miseries to mil-
lions of marooned people a re-
lief ministry official said on con-
ditin of anonymity.
The information minister said
flood waters destroyed crops and
Loans available
RALEIGH- With college fall
ns just beginning, some stu-
kts and parents may need help
with meeting educational ex-
penses. It so, they may want to
consider student or parent loans
lilable through College Foun-
dation Inc. (CFI) for enrollment at
any eligible college, university,
technical or vocational school.
College Foundation serves as
central lender in North Caro-
i for Stafford Loans (formerly
ured Student loans), Supple-
mental Loans for Students, and
s i oans to parents. Funds for
n - from CFI are provided by
North l arolina full-service banks
and special investors. The North
Carolina State Education Assis-
tance Authority (N.C. SEAA) pro-
les the guarantee for the loans.
CFI's educational loans are of-
ercd uTtdes .hc nationwide Robert
T. Stafford Student Loan Porgram
(formerly called the Guaranteed
Student Loan Program). The Staf-
ford Loans are need-based but the
Supplemental and PLUS loans are
not.
North Carolina residents may
apply, e'en if they attend college
out ol state. Out-of-state residents
may apply if they attend college in
North Carolina.
Stafford Loans are for depend-
ent or independent students in
dergraduate or graduatepro-
nal programs of study and
are based on financial need. Eli-
'e undergraduate freshmen
and sophomores may borrow up
$2,625 per year; undergraduate
ors and seniors, up to $4,000
year. The loan maximum for
iuateprofessional students is
17,500 per year.
The interest rate on Stafford
ins is 8 per year for new bor-
rowers. Repayment of loan princi-
pal does not have to begin until 6
months after the student gradu-
ates or drops below half-time en-
rollment. Most borrowers have
nancial need and thereby qualify
for the federal government's pay-
ment of interest prior to the repay-
ment period.
Supplemental Loans for Stu-
dents (SLS), the second type of
Youth alumni
challenge
Continued from page 1
The Young Alumni Challenge
was formally announced during
today's Alumni Leadership Con-
ference, a training and informa-
tion session sponsored annualy
by the Lumni Associaiton for
alumni and fiends who hod vol-
untary leadership positions with
the university.
"We're thrilled that these four
young entrepreneurs have de-
cided to invest in East Carolina
said Chancellor Richard R. Eakin.
"We're excited about their per-
sonal success and about what
their challenge can mean for the
university. Their generosity and
their enthusiasm are splendid
examples for all of us. "
For more information about the
Young Alumni Challenge, con-
tact David B. McDonald at the
ECU Office of Institutional Ad-
vancement, TaylorSlaughter
Alumni Center, Greenville, N.C,
27858, (919) 757-6685.
loan offered by the Foundation,
are available to undergraduate
independent students and in
some cases, undergraduate stu-
dents who are dependent, or
graduateprofessional students.
These loans are appropriate for
students who do not qualify for
the interest-subsidized student
loans (Stafford Loans) or need as-
sistance in addition to a Stafford
Loan.
Students do not have to demon-
strate "need" in order to qualify
for Suplemental Loans for Stu-
dents. Under this program they
may borrow up to $4,000 per year
with an aggregate limit of $20,000.
Interest is a variable rate set annu-
ally for the 12-month period July
1- June 30. The rate for the current
12-month period is 10.45.
Students with Supplemental
Loans may postpone the required
payments on loan principal as
long as they are enrolled full-time.
They are, however, responsible
for paying the interest while en-
rolled. The SLS borrower must
either pay the interest monthly or
sign an agreement authorizing
CFI to add the interest to the loan
principal.
PLUS Loans are for parents of
dependent students and are not
based on financial need. The in-
terst rate for the current 12-month
period (July 1- June 30) is 10.45.
Under the PLUS Loan Program,
parents may borrow up to $4,000
per year per dependent student,
with an aggregate limit of $20,000
per student. Although parents do
not have to demonstrate "need
they must be able to show the
ability to make the required
monthly payments.
CFI cite the advantages of PLUS
Loans as being low monthly pay-
ments over a long repayemnt
period, coverage with "cash
flow" while the student is en-
rolled in college, and the opportu-
nity to accelerate payments at any
time without penalty.
Repayment on a PLUS Loan
begins within 31-60 days of the
date the loan is issued; but the
WORK FOR YOURSELF
As a campus representative
you'll be responsible for placing
advertising materials on botlettn
boards and wording on
marketing programs for clients
such as American Express,
Boston University. Eurall, and
various movie companies,
among others. Part-time work,
choose your own hours. No
sales. Many of our reps stay
with us long after graduation If
you are self-rnotlvated. hard-
working, and a bit of an
entrepreneur, call or write for
more Information to:
AMERICAN PASSAGE
NETWORK
6211 W. HOWARD STREET
CHICAGO. IL. 60648
1(800) 221-5942 or
(312)647-6860
CHICAGO DALLAS LOS ANGELES
NEW YORK SEATTLE
could prevent the planting of the
winter rice crop. He said this
might lead to the shortfall of two
million tons of rice.
The minister said Bangladesh
needs 18 million tons of rice a year
to feed its people. He said 16.5
million tons are grown at home
and 1.5 million tons imported.
In Dhaka, a city of 6 million
people, gasoline has become
scarce for the few motor vehicles
that are still navigating the streets.
Many gas stations are closed.
Boats have replaced cars and
bicycle-powered rickshaws in
manny parts of the city. River
boats capable of carrying 100 to
200 people sail between partly
submerged houses in low lying
nieghborhoods flooded by the
Buriganga, Turag and Sitalakya
rivers that surround Dhaka on
three sides.
Many of the capital's street are
knee and waist deep in murky,
black water that carries a strong
stench of sewage, and adults and
children alike wade through it.
Over the last week, the price of
rice nearly doubled, from 15 cents
a pound to 28 cents, as those who
could afford started hoarding.
CFI
monthly payment may be as low
as $50 per month, depending on
the amount and number of loans.
The maximum repayment period
for each loan is 10 years.
CFI urges students and parents
to seek overall advice from the fi-
nancial aid office of the student's
college about which of CFI's loan
programs would be the appropri-
ate choice for them in meeting their
college's cost.
Students and parents can get
more information aobut CFI's loan
programs from college financial aid
officers or College Foundation Inc.
P.O.Box 12100,Raleigh,NC 27605,
919821-4771.
SCIENCE AND
ENGINEERING
MAJORS!
The Air Force has open-
ings for men and women in
selected science and engineering
fields. To prepare you for one, you can
apply for an Air Force ROTC scholarship
See what it can do for you. Contact the cam-
pus Air Force ROTC representative today
CAPT RANDY HOUSTON
WRIGHT ANNEX, RM 312
919-757-6598
.AlRrQR�EJ
Leadership Excellence Starts Here
MIIA1
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BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE
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little Caesars Pizza
Open for Lunch at 11:00a.m.
ANNOUNCING
Elections for Executive Officer's
for the
Student Residence Association
Area Residence Councils
Residence Hall House Councils
September 13,1988
Filing Dates Are September 6-8
For more information and applications
See Your Residence Hall Director
Student Union
Coming Attractions
Wednesday. September 78:00 p.m.
MATEWAN
Thursday. September 8
Sunday. September 118:00 p.m. Hendrix
GOOD MORNING VIETNAM
Friday. September 98:00 p.m. Underground
Coffeehouse Auditions
"BATTLE OF THE BANDS
To sign-up or for more information Contact the
Student Union at 757-6611, ext. 210 - Room 236
Upcoming Events;
Lecture - Slide Presentation - "American Pictures"
By Jacob Holdt - Tuesday. September 20
E. 10th St. at Greenville Blvd. 756-7256
(noit to Food Uon) ' m
757-1212
323 Arlington Blvd.
(across trom Form Froth)





10THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988
Drug campaign not successful OOITION
TINGO MARIA, Peru (AP) -
The increase has come despite a 5-
year-old American-financed
manual eradication program.
U.S. officials say manual eradica-
tion of plants is too slow and too
dangerous because workers are
exposed to attacks by the hired
gunmen of the drug barons and
by Maoist Shining Path rebels
who prowl the valley.
Thirty-four members of eradi-
cation teams have been killed in
recent years, and in 1987 the 460
workers in the program pulled up
only 876 acres of plants.
The 3-year-old Garcia admini-
stration has tried to disrupt the
marketing network of Peruvian
and Colombian drug organiza-
tions. But American drug offi-
cials, while praising Peru's
commitment, say the efforts have
been frustrated by the far greater
resources of the cocaine lords.
Since 1985, a special anti-nar-
cotics police force has confiscated
nearly 100 tons of semi-refined
cocaine paste, burned 770 crude
jungle labs for producing paste,
and dynamited more than 170
clandestine airstrips, according to
Gen. Juan Zarate, head of the nar-
cotics unit.
But the drug gangs have
quickly repaired the dirt run-
ways, often within 24 hours, us-
ing well-paid work crews of local
villagers and sometimes even
earth-moving tractors, Zarate
said in an interview.
The campaign against cocaine
ran into a new obstacle since the
fanatical Shining Path guerrillas
extended their presence in the
Upper Huallaga Valley in early
1987.
the guerrillas now control large
areas of the valley. They have
exploited resentment of the man-
ual eradication program to win
support among peasants growing
coca.
U.S. officials now want to try
aerial applicaiton of Spike in pel-
let form to see how accurately
planes can drop them on coca
fields, most of them smaller than
an acre and interspersed with
jungle. Spraying has been ruled
out because the liquid might be
blown to surrounding areas.
But the officials say the aerial
testing is "on hold" until the U.S.
government can resolve its dis-
pute with Lilly. The company
announced in late May that be-
cause of "a number of practical
and policy considerations" it
would not sell Spike for use in
Peru against coca.
State department officails say
that Lilly is worried about repri-
sals from international drug traf-
fickers and that the company also
fears lawsuits for any ecological
damage.
The company stands by Spike's
safety if used as directed against
brush in grasslands in the U.S.
West� the purpose for which it
was designed� but not as an
herbicide against coca in Peru's
jungle.
A pamphlet distributed with
the herbicide warns that it will kill
trees and shrubs if their roots
come in contact with it.
'The problem is that Spike is
not designed specifically for coca,
" says Edgar Machado, an agron-
omy professor at the National
Agrarian University in Lima and
Peru's leading expert on coca.
"Any broadleaf plant that
comes in contact with Spike is
going to die, and breadleaf plants
make up 98 percent of the jungle,
the exposed soil will be washed
away by the valley's torrential
rains. The erosion will be terrible,
" Machado says.
Although the debate on the use
of a potent herbicide has centered
on ecological damage, Peru's
government must also consider
the economic and social conse-
quences of destroying illegal coca
cultivation.
U.S. drug experts estimate that
cocaine trafficking generates at
least $700 million annually for
Peru, a sum equal to nearly 30 per-
cent of the country's legal export
earnings.
With Peru mired in its worst
economic troubles of the century,
many Peruvians wonder whether
the country can afford to wipe out
coca cultivation.
"If this bankrupt nation has
dollars circulating on the streets,
it is because of drug trafficking
Machado says. "It is not in
anyone's interest to kill the goose
that lays the golden eggs. "
Some 200,000 peasants have
migrated to the Upper Huallaga
Valley in the past two decades to
grow coca because they can earn
10 times as much from it as from
other crops.
Some government officials be-
lieve that if coca is eradicated in
the Upper Huallaga without a
program to help the peasants,
they will migrate elsewhere, cut
down more trees and plant more
coca. That would also create re-
sentment that the Shining Path
would be quick to exploit.
(Ka la shan, ka-) 1. the act, process, or
result of gathering (the sections of a book)
together in proper order for binding
IT'S OUR BUSINESS
We specialize in duplicating and binding
multiple page documents
&
rsn
z
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
We are open early & late (Next to Chico's in Georgetown Shops)
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Pinochet is the only candidate
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP)-Thou- Gen. Pinochet, the 72-year-old blocking trat; � Police broke up
sands of protestors battled police army commander who has ruled
following the largest anti-govern- Chile with a military junta since a
ment rally si nee the military coup in September 1973, was se-
nominated right -wing President lected last Tuesday by himself
Augusto Pinochet as the only can- and the commanders of the navy,
didate in a fall presidential refer- air force and national police as the
endum.
More than 100,000 people
the processir �� and there were
skirmishes throughout the area
between rock-throwing demon-
strators and police firing buckshot
Pinochet led the 1973 military!
coup that ousted the elected gov-
ernment of Marxist President of I
Salvadoe Allende.
Ricardo Lagos, a socialist opposi-
tion leader, called the rally "the first
and teargas.
Pinochet, in an "open letter to the step toward the final defeat of Pino-
sole candidate in the presidential men and women of my country" chct
referendum scheduled for Oct. 5. printed Sunday in most local news- Rallying participants including
packed blocks of a broad avenue Sunday's rally was the largest papers promised full democracy if Chileans who have returned from
in central Santiago on Sunday show of force by the opposition he is returned to office in the refer- exile, sang and danced to poitical
chanting "Pinochet's going to since Pinchet, seeking popular endum. songs,
fall support lifted on Aug. 27 the state "If Chileans call me to govern, Among former exiles was Isa-
Police arrested 262 demonstra- of emergency that restricted pub- each of them will govern too the belle Allende, 44, a daughter of the
tors, a police officer and eight ci- lie gatherings. letter said. late president, who died during the
vilians were wounded, said Gen. There had been scattered street In an interview printed Sunday, coup. She received a huge ovation
Sergio Badiola, the govenor of demonstrations after Pinochet's in the conservative newspaper El when her name was announced
Santiago. He said six of the in- nomination was announced Mercutio, Pinochet also promised annd joined in the dancing with
jured, including the police oficer Tuesday when three people were to resign "3(5 amity commander and Lagos,
were seriously hurt. shot to death and hundreds were govern as a civilian. Pinochet on Thursday decreed an
Police fired tear gas, buchshot arrested. Chile's 7.2 million voters are to enj j0 political exile,
and water cannons when tens of Hector Moya, the main speaker vote either for or against Pinochet
thousands of people began a at Sunday's rally, told the cheer- in the referendum,
march on the government palace ing crowd: "We can clearly now If approved Pinochet will begin a
after the generally peaceful rally see that the Pinochet regime al- new eight year term in March. If
had ended. ready has been defeated Moya is rejected on open presidential elec-
Organizers said 300,000 people the head of the truckers' union. tion is to be held in December 1989
attended the rally and journalists When the rally ended a column with Pinochet remaining until an
estimated the crowd at more than of tens of thousands of people elected president takes office in
100,000. marched to the city's center, March.
ECU
Fugitive apprehended in Franklin, Va.
ASHEVILLE (AP)�People who fraud in 1983, and the new charges been published in another North
aided the six month-flight of a fed- violated the terms of his release Carolina newspaper, Tucker said,
eral fugitive form Burke county from federal prison,
apprehended last week may also be Some individuals may have har-
charged as the result of an ongoing bored Roberts or otherwise assisted
investigation, a federal agent says, him in violation of federal law,
Ronnie Floyd Roberts, 45, who Tucker said,
allegedly faked his own obituary in Most residents cooperated, he
an effort to throw authorities off his said, and federal agents eventually
trail, was arrested Friday by federal traced Roberts to a mobile home in
marshalls in Franklin county, Va the Penhook Community, about 30
on charges of violating his parole, miles south of Roanoke, Va.
The bogus obituary "wasn't the Roberts is lodged in the Franklin
only elaborate attempt to deceive county Jail on a felony charge of
us, " Inspector J. Glenn Tucker, of possession with intent to distribute
the U.S. Marshall Service's cocaine as the result of evidence
Asheville office, said Saturday, agents in Virginia say they found at
"The other (scheme) is part of a the home,
continuing investigation. " Marshall Wayne Beaman, based
Federal authorities conducted an in Virgnia, said in a statement Fri-
"intensive investigation" in and day that Roberts had managed to
around Roberts' home community get his obituary printed in an
of Icard after he failed to appear in Asheville newpaper on or about
court to answer charges of posses- March 21 in an attempt to avoid ar-
sion of cocaine and driving while rest.
impaired earlier this year, Tucker But a check of the Asheville Citi-
said. zeneditionsof March 20,21, and 22
Roberts had been on parole since showed no published obituary for
1985 after being convicted of wire Roberts. The obituary may have
Join Joe Harris and The
East Carolinian News
Team every Tuesday
and Thursday for the
latest in campus news.
Wednesday September 7
Phi Tau Uil Sisters Presents
Ladies Best Tan Contest
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FOREST CITY, N.C Ai
Forest City does not hawanai
mobile auction and is not parti
larly close to the state's lar$
retail centers, but the south!
mountain town has more thai
share of people trying ti i mcrej
the value of a car by knockini
few miles off the odometer.
Last spring 10 Rutherfc
County wholesale car deaj
were arrested on federal fa
charges and pleaded guilty
summer, authorities said
One of the 10 dealers, r
die � not his real name gd
suspended jail term, a fine an
order to pay restitution
Dealers like Freddi
tered the business as a teen
high-mileage cars from ante
Recorl
LONGWOOD,
winner of the rec rd5 1IV1
plus Lotto game remain-
tcry, but the ma - his
where the winning ticket a asj
has already claimed some en
"It might put Longwood
map now Mayor David Gu
s3id Sunday "Whether thev
bought the ticket hen or wh'cl
they live here, it means a ltf
community like tl
"We're going to talu I
Engin
GRAPEVINE, Texas
vestigatiors concluded work
site of the Delta Air lines 1
crash that killed 13 of the' -
aboard, refusing to comment!
reports that two engines mJ
tailed.
Some pilots specul
cf the Boeing 72Ts threi
may have failed K ause thej
flaps apparentIv wen r
the time oi the crash, rathe
extended for tak
� Virrfi
. 'V

irk.
SV
x
t
1
-
�i
MI
All
ME
u
ji
S





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 11
ION
ORD .
ct. process, or
'onsof a book)
if btndmg
INESS
and binding
TIMES
rgetown Shops)
ember 7
Presents
Contest
i
($2.00 Guests)
.rCall
7-1319
everyone to
SI.00 guest)
ock-N-Roll
s Every
ight
ton
a
Car dealers arrested for odometer tamper
tOREST CITY, N.C. (AP) -
I rest City does not have an auto-
mobile auction and is not particu-
dose to the state's largest
retail centers, but the southern
mountain town has more than its
are of people trying to increase
the value of a car by knocking a
tew miles off the odometer.
Last spring 10 Rutherford
County wholesale car dealers
ere arrested on federal fraud
, barges and pleaded guiltv this
summer, authorities said.
One ot the 10 dealers, Fred-
die � not his real name � got a
suspended jail term, a fine and an
rder to pav restitution.
Valers like Freddie, who en-
d the business as a teen, buy
gh mileage cars from auto auc-
tions or large dealerships, make
cosmetic and minor internal re-
pairs to the vehicles and lower
their mileage � by changing the
odometer and accompanying
documents.
"There wouln't be any way
these cars would be sold other-
wise he told The Charlotte
Observer. "No one would buy a
car with 120,000 miles, no matter
what kind of condition it's in
"Rutherford County has been
dubbed Little Detroit' for all the
buying, selling and trading of
used cars that goes on there said
A.A. "Butch" Justice, a Marion
resident who heads the Odome-
ter Task Force at the N.C. Divi-
sion of Motor Vehicles.
Dozens of concrete-block ga-
rage line U.S. 74. Signs say things
like "wholesale used car dealer"
and "auto restoration special-
ists
Rutherford County has many
honest wholesalers, Justice said,
but others specialize in flipping
miles off odometers, falsifying
titles and forging mileage state-
ments.
Freddie, who talked about his
business only on condition of
anonymity, said rollbacks don't
really hurt consumers. Mileage
isn't a fair indicator of a car's
condition anyway, he said.
"A person who commutes
from Monroe to Charlotte and a
traveling salesman could put
75,000 miles a year on their cars,
but it's not the same kind of wear-
and-tear he said.
"Nobody's getting hurt
Justice disagreed.
"If nobody gets hurt, for what
reason are they rolling the cars
back?" he said. "They do it for one
reason � to increase the amount
of money they can make
The National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration estimates
that a mid-sized car two years or
older loses $50 in value for every
1,000 miles driven.
Freddie figures rollbacks
added an average of $200 per car
to his profits. At retail, the roll-
backs cost consumers much
more. Trimming a late-model
Cadillac to 40,000 from 75,000
miles could increase the retail
value more than $1,000.
When he rolled back an odome-
ter, he often didn't tell the retailer
he sold the car to. Dealers aren't
liable unless they know about the
alteration.
"Why should I get anyone else
in trouble?" Freddie said. "I'm
the one who changed the miles
Still, he said, many dealers
know about rollbacks even if they
don't talk about it.
'They'll call me and say they
want a blue '85 Ford with 25,000
miles on Monday, and I'll have
one with 55,000 miles, which they
won't take he said. "The next
day I'll call and offer the same
kind of car with under 25,000
miles. They know
If s the false mileage statement
that usually leads to wholesalers'
arrests. Eventually the paper trail
leads to a canceled title or odome-
ter statement with many thou-
sands more miles than the cur-
rent odometer reading.
Finding the title is easy for a car
traded in North Carolina. It's
more difficult for one that came
from another state.
"You have some North Caro-
lina dealers who will buy a car
from Florida, sell it in Virginia
and never touch North Caro-
lina Justice says. 'That's why
cooperation with other states is so
important
If s also why federal courts and
the FBI have gotten involved, the
says. "Our state laws are not
strong enough to keep these
people out of business
Record lottery winner is still a mystery
I ONGWOOD, Ha. (AD The
nner oi the record $54 Million-
- I otto game remains a mvs-
v but the mayor oi this town
ere the winning ticket was sold
- already claimed some credit.
It niight put Longwood on the
p now' Mayor David Guntcr
.1 Sundav. "Whether thev just
ight the ticket here or whether
v live here, it means a lot to a
nmunity like this
We're going to take the credit.
It feels good
The winning ticket for Saturday
night's game, whose jackpot was
a North American record, was
purchased in this bedroom com-
munity 18 miles northeast of
Orlando, said Lottery Secretary
Rebecca Paul at a news comfer-
ence in Miami Beach. She did not
identifv the vendor who sold the
J
ticket with the winning numbers
3-5-19-20-27-35.
The frenzy of lottery-ticket
buying here poured over to other
states, including New York,
where one winning ticket was
purchased for Saturday night's
$23 million jackpot, and Illinois,
where holders of four winning
tickets will split $21 million.
The previous North American
record jackpot, $54.4 million, was
shared by two California lottery
players in June. A Pennsylvania
couple had the largest single-
ticket lottery prize until now
when they won $46 million in
1987.
The new Florida millionaires, if
several persons shared the ticket -
get 180 days to claim the prize.
The earliest it can be claimed is
Tuesday, after Labor Day.
actual federal taxes owed could depending on final sales figures,
be higher. Florida has no state Saturday sales totaled 14.6 mil-
income tax. lion tickets, and total weekly pur-
Splitting a $54 million payout chases were 44.78 million,
into 20 installments, and deduct- Players had turned to psychics,
ing 20 percent, would bring the gimmicks and other formulas to
annual check to $2.16 million. beat the 14 million-to-1 odds of
Officials had estimated picking the six winning digits out
Saturday's jackpot at $52 million, of 49.
The prize will be doled out over but the last-minute frenzy of sales Until Saturday, there hadn't
20 years. The state lottery with- that sometimes topped 850 tickets been a winner since Aug. 6. That
holds 20 percent of large payouts a second raised the total to $54 boosted the jackpot with each
for federal income taxes, although million. It could be even larger, passing week.
Engine failure may have caused 727 crash
IRAPEVINE, Texas (AP)� In-
tigatiors concluded work at the
c of the Delta Air Lines jetliner
ish that killed 13 of the 108 people
ard, refusing to comment about
oorts that two engines mav have
led.
Some pilots speculated that two
I the Boeing 727's three engines
v have failed because the wing
ipS apparently were retracted at
time of the crash, rather than
tended for takeoff, The Dallas
Morning News reported Sunday.
"When someone says 'engine
failure' there are a whole host of
things that might mean, " Lee Dick-
inson of the Naitonal Transpor-
taion Safety Board said Sunday.
A recording of cockpit crew
members showed they mentioned
engine failure. Two loud pops were
then heard, which could have indi-
cated a "compressor stall. " But
Dickinson said a compressor stall,
which occurs when an engine is
starving for air, is not critical: "Keep
in mind, compressor stall is not
serious, it's a hiccup. "
Flight 1141 crashed and burned
on takeoff Wednesday at Dallas-
Fort Worth International Airport
on a flight for Salt Lake City.
On Sunday, workers at the crash
site sealed the cockpit in a plastic
blue tarpaulin. The wreckage was
to be hauled to Delta headquarters
in Atlanta, where it would be dis-
mantled and studied, Dickinson
said.
Two flight attendants were taken
to the wreckage and questioned,
but Dickinson said he had no infor-
mation on what they told investiga-
tors.
The role of the wing flaps, which
are extended during takeoff to pro-
vide added lift, continued to be dis-
cussed.
Flight Engineer Stephen Judd has
toid investigators the flaps were
extended in the proper postion
upon takeoff. But evidence from the
wreckage indicated the flaps wre
completely or almost completely
retracted.
"We have further verification
that the flaps were retracted Dick-
inson said Sunday.
Bill Melvin, a Delta pilot partici-
pating in the investigation on
behalf of the Air Line Pilots As-
sociation, said he believes Flight
1141's pilot could have been
facing engine failure and de-
cided to retract the flaps in a last-
ditch effort to save the plane.
"A 727 will still fly if it loses
one engine, but all 727 pilots
know if you lose two engines,
the onlv wav you can fly the
plane off is to get rid of the flaps,
" Melvin said, noting the man-
uever is not an approved emer-
gency procedure. "With two
engines out, there's onlv one
way that plane could flv� with
the flaps up. "







12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988
Eastern Airlines to lay off 4,000 workers
MIAMI (AP) � Eastern Air-
lines will lay off 4,000 workers
Saturday now that the financially
troubled carrier has posted a $4.7
million bond with a federal court
in case unions battling the cuts
win their case.
The bond was posted late Sat-
urday, airline spokeswoman Vir-
ginia Sanchez said Sunday.
'The layoffs will be effective
September 10 at the end of the
employees' normal shift Ms.
Sanchez said. "We really don't
know what the exact number of
employees will be. Some may
take early retirement, there are
different options
No union spokesman could be
reached for comment late Sun-
day.
But spokesmen earlier had said
they eventually would win their
case.
"We strongly believe that the
earlier ruling will be upheld
said Charles Bryan, president of
the Miami local of the machinists'
union.
The airline in July announced
plans for the layoffs and service
cutbacks in 14 cities.
The unions, however, contend
that Texas Air Corp Eastern's
parent company, is stripping the
Miami-based carrier's assets in
favor of sister carrier Continental
Airlines. Eastern has lost about $1
billion during the past decade.
The three main unions sued
when the layoff plans, the largest
in Eastern's 60-year history, were
announced. Those affected in-
clude management, about 1,000
flight attendants, 1,000 machin-
ists and 500 pilots.
On Friday, the U.S. Court of
Appeals dissolved an order by
U.S. District Judge Barrington
Parker in Washington, D.C, who
ruled that Eastern could proceed
with the service cuts but could
not lay off union members.
The appeals court said the car-
rier would have to post the bond
to cover a month of paychecks
should the unions win.
After the machinists' union
balked at pay and benefit cuts,
Eastern asked federal mediators
Greeks will close U.S. airbase
in Athens, renewal talks stall
ATHENS, Greece (AP) - Talks
on a new U.S. bases agreement
broke off today after Greek nego-
tiators announced the U.S. Air
Force base next to Athens Airport
will be closed, the government
said.
Government spokesman Sotiris
Kostopoulos said the American
sideasked that the talks be tempo-
rarily postponed following the
Greek announcement.
"The American delegation re-
quested a temporary postpone-
ment in order to return to Wash-
ington and fake relevant instruc-
tions from the American authori-
ties Kostopoulos said in a state-
ment.
The statement did not say when
the talks would resume.
No U.S. Embassy spokesman
could immediately be reached be-
cause of the Labor Day holiday.
The postponement came on the
opening day of a ninth round of
negotiations for a new Greek-
American defense cooperation
agreement to replace a 1983 ac-
cord expiring in December.
Premier Andreas Papandreou's
socialist government said last
month that Hellenikon Air Basp
would be shut do wn. At that time,
the United States said its future
was still under discussion.
Hellenikon is one of four
American bases that have
operated in Greece since the
1950s. It provides support for
planes monitoring Soviet naval
operations in the Mediterranean
and for another three U.S. bases
here.
About 1,400 American service-
men, 200 civilian employees and
700 Greeks work at the base, lo-
cated next to Athens International
Airport.
The Greek government has so
far made no threat to close any
other base, but says Hellenikon's
operations cannot be transferred
to another U. s. installation.
There had been speculation
here that a U.S. Navv communi-
catons base at Souda Bay on the
southern island of Crete could be
expanded to replace Hellenikon.
The other American bases in
Greece are a Navy communica-
tions at Nea Makri near Athene
which tracks Soviet naval and
submarine activity and an elec-
tronic surveillance base at
Gournes, also on Crete.
As a form of rent for the bases,
Greece receives $340 million an-
nuallv in U.S. militarv credits.
Talks for the new defense coop-
eration agreement started in
November but the regular
monthyl meetings have made
little progress.
The main obstacle appears to be
Greek insistence that in return for
a new bases agreement the United
States should help toward solving
Greek-Turkish disputes over
military control of the Aegean
and the divided island of Cyprus.
If the Greek and American ne-
gotiating teams fail to reach
agreement, the current accord
gives the United States 17 months
to dismantle the bases after the
date the accord expires.
to declare contract talks at an
impasse. If mediators, who have
been involved off and on since
January, make the declaration
and no agreement is reached after
a 30-day cooling off period, the
union could strike and Eastern
could impose its terms on work-
er-
Machinists union members arc
to vote Sept. 15 on a company
proposal under which some
workers would take leaves with
workers keeping seniority if
called back.
Young Americans suffering,
experiencing economic woes
WASHINGTON (AP) � High
poverty rates for young families
are getting America's youth off to
"the worst possible start warns
the head of a group promoting
the interests of children.
"Our children and our young
families are this nation's growing
edge. We neglect them at our
peril said Marian Wright Edel-
man, president of the Children's
Defense Fund.
The comments came with the
release of a study commissioned
by the group, which found that
the economic growth of the last
reported.
As a result the poverty rate for
such families nearly doubled
from 12 percent in 1973 to 22
percent in 1986, the fund said.
Census Bureau figures for 1987
were released last week and,
while not identical to the
children's fund figures, tend to
support the group's assertions.
The Census Bureau found that
the 1987 poverty rate for children
aged 18 and under was 20 per-
cent, up from 14.2 percent in 1973.
Younger families tended to have
higher poverty rates than older
few years hasn't benefited young ones, the census figures showed.
American families.
"America's young families are
afflicted by an economic depres-
sion in the middle of our society's
more general prosperity Edel-
man said in a statement.
In terms of constant dollars, the
income of families with children
headed by an adult under the age
30 fell by about one-fourth be-
tween 1973 and 1986, the fund
Poverty rates for children,
whether black, white, or His-
panic, rose between 1973 and
1987, the figures showed, and
were higher than for other fami-
lies or individuals.
'These are the children on
whom we must rely to be the
workers, leaders, parents, tax-
payers, soldiers and hope of the
21 st century Edelman said. "We
are getting them off to the worst
possible start
In the short term, the
Children's Defense Fund called
for a higher minimum wage and
passage of the Act for Better
Child Care, legislation pending
in Congress to improve services
for working parents.
Long-term recommendations
included extending Medicaid
coverage to pregnant women and
children in families with less than
twice the poverty income; ex-
panded tax credits for low-in-
come families; expanded Head
Start programs; setting up com-
munity learning centers for chil-
dren, and a series of educational
and home-buyer assistance pro-
grams.
The fund describes itself as a
non-profit group working to
draw attention to the needs of
children, particularly the poor,
minorities and handicapped.
w m There's more to an education than just the classroom. When you've
JOD finished with the books, you still have a ways to go. You need
experience � practical, skill-building experience. And you can get both at ECU.
Working for The East Carolinian can help students of all majors gain abilities
that can make the difference in the job market. Practical writing, editing,
interviewing and reporting experience will give most job seekers an extra edg-
over the competition. If you are looking for a part-time job that will do more for
your future than flipping hamburgers will, come by The East Carolinian offices
on the second floor of the Publications building,
across from the entrance or Joyner iibrar.
tVlil IllUilV. U.UI1 1 ilj.jll i�t, li
Experience
y
The brick benches outside tn
Photolab).
-air
���
I
The days of sun are becumir
Kappa Sigma
m
KAPPA
SIGMA
THE MOST
MMi
MAN IN THE
COUNTRY
4'ssroBi
Hyeta-ffi ffippter
Qtyartereb 1966
700 E. 10th St.
Phone 752-5543757-1005
September 6 - Chicken & Shrimp with the girls of Delta Zeta
September 7 - Meet the girls of Alpha Xi Delta
September 8 - Meet the Brothers and Alumni
The Brothers Of Kappa
Sigma Invite You To Stop
By During Fall Rush.
Tutu urges e
JOHANNESBURG, 5
rica (AP) - Archbis
Tutu, saying he .
God" in defying the g
urged Macks and ��
next month's nat
regated municipal
Elsewhere on Sunday
tivist Winnie Mandela
lated state of emerg
palling for increased i
economic sanctions 5tS
Africa.
Tutu, in a service at St. Gei
Cathedral in Cape 1 �� n
scribed the elections as i
crous" and "unjust" and -
government was attemp
"force participation
"I urge black people in this
cese both to vote in the Octi
elections and I hope that
Angilicans would join their bj
fellow Angilicans in that actiT
Said Tutu, winner oi the
Nobel Peace Prize.
"I am aware oi the penaltid
tached to this call. 1 am not dc
the government, 1 am obej
God the black churchman
Whites, blacks, Asians
people of mixed-race will
separate elections Oct. 2Moch
local officials. The black majq
has no vote in national affairs
though the nation's 2b miM
blacks make up about 75 percej
South Africa's population.
Under the36-month-old staj
bnergency if is illegal to call
flection boycott in South AtncJ
convicted, violators may bo ti
Or imprisoned
In the 1984 municipal electii
anti-apartheid groups promo
election boycotts and only at
Join the dedicate
East Carolinian!
troopers as the
bring you the
freshest news,
features and
sports every Tuel
day and Thursday!
Available free a
convenient loca
tions all over
campus.
The best paper for the
money





I
t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS 1988 13
rs
5 on a compam
which some
ke loaves with
� seniority it
ring,
woes
aid. "We
: ff to the worst
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um wage and
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I
pa
top
The brick benches outside the General Classroom Building are the newest spots to hang-out (ECU
Fhotolab). b
The days of sun are becoming limited and the cold weather will soon be here (ECU Photolab).
Tutu urges elections boycott
HANNESBURG, South At- 10 percent of elgible black voters
" a P) - Archbishop Desmond went to the polls.
saying he was "obeying
m
re-
in defying the government.
d blacks and whites to boycott
th s nationwide but seg-
I municipal elections,
ere on Sunday, black ac-
� �'� lie Mandela also vio-
lat d oi emergency rules by
calling for increased international
ecor i sanctions against South
Africa
Tutu, in a service at St. George's
Cathedral in Cape Town, de-
- -bed the elections as ludi-
crous" and "unjust" and said the
� ernment was attempting to
"force participation
"1 urge black people in this dio-
cese both to vote in the October
elections and 1 hope that white
Angilicans would join their black
fellow Angilicans in that action
aid Tutu, winner of the 1984
Nobel Peace Trize.
"I am aware of the penalties at-
tached to this call. I am not defying
the government, I am obeying
God the black churchman said.
Whites, blacks, Asians and
people of mixed-race will hold
separate elections Oct. 26 to choose
local officials. The black majority
has no vote in national affairs, al-
though the nation's 26 million
blacks make up about 75 percent of
South Africa's population.
Under the 36-month-old state of
-nergency if is illegal to call for an
election boycott in South Africa. If
convicted, violators may be fined
or imprisoned.
In the 1984 municipal elections,
anti-apartheid groups promoted
election boycotts and only about
Many black activists view black
elected officials as collaborators
with the white-dominated gov-
ernment and its apartheid policies
oi racial separation.
Tutu said calling for an election
boycott was a legitimate "non-vio-
lent way of expressing our opposi-
tion to the evil and injustice of
apartheid
"You cannot get security
through the barrel of a gun, nor
through the draconian and op-
pressive state of emergencyhe
Now Showing
At Hendrix
Wed. September 7
8:00 p.m.
"����
ONE OF THE BEST
FILMS OF 1987"
Jack Sam GANNfcTT NEWS SESviCE
MATEWAN
W'iimHkiiuwDimi ran JmrSqies
Join the dedicated
East Carolinian
troopers as they
bring you the
freshest news,
features and
sports every Tues-
day and Thursday.
Available free at
convenient loca-
tions all over
campus.
"The best paper for the
money
Boat collides with another,
operator intoxicated
SWANSBORO, N.C. (AP) - A
Hubert man was charged with
operating a motorboat while im-
paired after his 20-foot outboard
struck an anchored " hing boat in
the Intracoastal Waterway, send-
ing four people to the hospital, of-
ficials said.
Robert Sutton Ramsey Jr 32,
was held in the Onslow County
Jail briefly Saturday before post-
ing $500 bond, said Church Boahn
with the N.C. Wildlife
Commission's Richlands ofice.
Ramsey's boat, which had a 200-
horsepower engime, was carrying
eight people at about 3:30 p.m.
Saturday when it struck an an-
chored 16-foot Regal open motor-
boat with two people fishing in
Brown's Inlet off Camp Lejune,
Boahn said.
The Glastron sank and is sitting
of the bottom of the waterway in
shallow water, but is not a hazard
to navigation, Boahn said. The
smaller boat did not sink, and
there was no fire or explosion.
A passenger on the Glastron,
Jeremy Trott, 7, of Hubert, was
taken to Onslow Memorial Hospi-
tal. He suffered multiple broken
bones of both legs, cuts and bruises
and fluid in his lungs and chest
cavity, said law enforcement per-
sonnel.
Jeremy Trott was flown to Pitt
Memorial Hospital in Greenville,
where he was listed in critical but
stable condition on Sunday night.
His father, Kenny Trott, 34, was
in stable condition Sunday night in
Onslow Memorial.
Mercy Trott, 12, was treated for
infuries to her right knee Onslow
Memorial on Saturday and re-
leased.
Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt.
Ronnie Joe Lowe, 36, was treated
at Lejeune Naval Hospital and
released. Lowe was fishing aboard
the Regal.
Victims were taken by a private
boat to Willis Landing on Bear
Creek and rushed to Onslow
Memorial by the Swansboro Res-
cue Squad.
Ramsey also is charged with
reckless and negligent operation,
driving with an expired registra-
tion and failing to transfer ower-
ship of a motorboat, Boahn said
Sunday.
He said an investigation was
continuing into a controlled sub-
stance found aboard the Glastron.
Help wanted
Typesetters needed to
work Sunday nights,
Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday mornings and
afternoons.
Experience with Apple
Macintosh computers
preferred, but not neces-
sary.
Must be able to type
upwards of 60 words a
minute.
Apply in person at The
East Carolinian office,
Publications Building,
second floor.
Serious, dedicated appli-
cats only
Hank's Homemade Ice I
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Gneenville.NC
and Sorbet
312 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
758-0000
Buy 1 Mini
Sundae
Get 1 Free
value $2.19
Expires 9-13-88
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Hank's Homemade Ice I
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
1
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greenville.NC
and Sorbet
312 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
758-0000
$1.00 Off
"Start the
Wave
Bandanna"
Expires 9-13-88
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Get up to 40 off
an IBM PS2
just by showing
PC FAIR - SEPTEMBER 7TH 9:00-3:00
ECU BOOKSTORE
Congratulations! Just by having your name on one of
these, you may be eligible to get a great discount on a new
IBM Personal System2 computer. And that's the hard
part.
The easy part's the IBM PS2. It's easy to learn and
easy to use. It can help you organize notes, write and revise
papers, produce high-quality graphics, and more.
So bring your school I.D. to us, and use your good
looks to make your schoolwork look better.
Register to win a "GIANT" BICYCLE at the Fair
(All-terrain, aluminum, $300 value)
FACULTY, STAFF, AND STUDENTS
DISCOUNT AVAILABLE SEPTEMBER 6-9,1988.





1
14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEITEMBFR 6.1988
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Wednesday
Sorority
Thursday Sept. 8
Meet the Brothers & Little Sisters of
PI KAPPA PHI at the Rotary Club.
For Ride or More
Information Call
752 - 6927
. V
LOCATION:
803 Hooker Rd.
MBy the Lake"
Arlington Blvd.
Evans St.
Pi Kappa
Phi
looker Rd.
College
Hill
Brewster
14th St.
10th St.
NEW HOUSE
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
Ready by January
(only house built for a Fraternity)





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 6,1988 Page 15
Marching in 50th year, the Pirates jam on
The beat in the stands. The beat on the field. The beat in your living room? The Marching Pirates are turning
50 and yes they are cutting an LP. Twirling, rifle-bearing horn-pumping, this large group of instrument waving,
drum pounders belabors long hours to entertain the Ficklen Crowd. (Photolab).
Clean your face after Four
Star, sauce a little heavy
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Auistant Feature Fditor
And now, the second install-
ment in the ECU Student Survival
Guide - a review of pizza places in
the Greenville area. This week the
spotlight is on Four Star Pizza.
Four Star's delivery is - what
else - free and within 30 minutes.
On those occasions when Four
Star fails to deliver within 30
minutes, they compensate with a
doNar-off coupon. Deliveries are
alwavs free - no iminimurrr order
is necessary.
Hobie Kern, owner and
operator of Four Star, admitted
that some deliveries to dorms
were "a little late" in his store's
early days (way back in Febru-
ary). On the other hand, Kern
maintained that he and his team
have improved, and that deliver-
ies are now almost alwavs on
time.
Four Star Fizza offers a
number of specialty items, includ-
ing diet pizza. The diet pizza,
available in a 10-inch size only,
has about half the calories of regu-
lar pizza (78 calories per slice) and
757c less fat. The pizza sports
mushrooms, onions, green pep-
pers, black olives, Parmesan
cheese, and sliced tomatoes. Stan-
dard add-ons are hot peppers and
pineapple. One diet pizza costs
$6.10, two cost $9.20.
Another specialty item from
Four Star is the aptly-named
Four-Star Flamer. This pizza is
HOT! The Flamer includes pep-
peroni, onions, hot peppers, jal-
apeno peppers, and a dash of
Texas Pete. This delectable deli-
cacy isavailable in large and small
sizesand costs the same as a three-
item pizza for that size ($6.60 for
one 10-inch, $10.20 for two 10-
inch, $10.25 for one 14-inch, or
$14.75 for two 14-inch). Order at
your own risk.
Four Star offers four types of
subs (all 12-inch): meatball, ham
and cheese, roast beef and cheese,
and Italian. All subs cost $4.50.
Four Star isn't limited to these
four subs, however; pizza subs
and other types of subs will be
made upon request (and my con-
versation with Kern seemed to
indicate that he enjoys a chal-
lenge).
Four Star recognizes that
some people, for whatever rea-
son, sometimes want to order
only one pizza. Therefore, in
addition to their "doublezz" piz-
zas (much the same two-for-onc
deal as Little Caesars, and at
competitive prices), Four Star
sells single pizzas.
Four Star make: its own
dough and sauce daih 'rom fresh
ingredients purchas i locally.
They use 100 real cheese (actu-
ally a blend of three cheeses) and,
according to Kern, they have the
best ovens in the business.
I ordered two 14-inch pepper-
oni pizzas and eight 12-ounce
Cokes from Four Star on a Satur-
day afternoon. The total was
$13.78 plus tip (I used a coupon,
however; standard prices would
be slightly higher). My order was
delivered hot and fresh within 3C
minutes.
The pizza would have been
worth a much longer wait. The
cheese was tasty and still melted;
the crust was good though not
great; and the tomato sauce was
well abundant.
There was, to be honest,
rather more tomato sauce than I
like. Kern informed me that this is
a common complaint from cus-
tomers. However, he stated that
he'd rather have customers com-
plain about getting too much
sauce than too little.
On the same note, Kern men-
tioned that Four Star is always
perfectly happy to fulfill a request
- whether for less sauce or for
none at all. Four Star will also
make other types of "custom-
ized" pizzas. Kern seems to live
by the well-worn phrase, 'The
customer is always right
Kern is a veteran of the pizza
business (you might call him a
Four Star general). Before open-
ing a Four Star in Greenville, Kern
operated two Four Star restau-
rants in other college towns. Four
Star is a 120-store chain, but the
Greenville Four Star is the chain's
first store in North Carolina. If all
goes well, Kern hopes to open
another Four Star elsewhere in
North Carolina in the spring.
Four Star is a worthy oppo-
nent of the "big boys" - Little
Caesar's, Dominoes, and Pizza
Hut. I strongly recommend giv-
ing Four Star a try next time you
want a pizza (although you may
want to ask for light sauce). And
when you want a custom sub or
pizza, Four Star really shines.
Four Star Pizza is located at
114 East 10th street. They can be
reached at 758-3300 from 11 a.m.
until 1 a.m. Sunday through
Thursday and from 11 am-until 2
a.m. Friday and Saturday.
Bob Bad and Horses plays Deli
By GREER BOVVEN
Staff Writer
Bad Bob and the Rocking
Horses, a three member band
who will rock the whale room
from the get-go.
Bad Bob, Bob Tunncll, who is
originally from Greenville, plays
the Emerald City scene is often as
he can.
"I started playing when I was
really young, I think I got started
because mv sister had a ukelele, "
said Tunncll (alias Bad Bob).
"J.W Raburn, also of
Greenville plays base, and Bob
"shakin" Aiken of Snow Hill
(Pugsleyland) plays the drums.
Raburn works the New Deli dur-
ing the day, and Bob "Shakin"
Aiken teaches at a prison.
These three musicians have
played in many other bands be-
fore forming Bad Bob and the
Rocking Horses one year ago. But
these three men plan to stick to-
gether at least for a while. "We
like each other" said Raburn. Both
Raburn and Bad Bob think Aikens
style is perfect for the band, "he's
got a solid drive, " said Raburn.
The band's main influences are
Albert King, Chicago blues, Lou-
isiana blues and oven country
music. "I like a lot of music but
blues is what I play best, " said
Bad Bob.
Bad Bob, who now lives in
Wilmington, say the band rarely
practices, "Blues lands don't ref-
use! " said Raburn. That's proba-
bly why they never do the same
show twice. "These guys have
enough experience that they can
follow me said Bad Bob.
Bad Bob said his favorite song is
Elvis's "Hound Dog" a solid hard
core blues version of an old rock
song, because the style feels more
comfortable to him. On the other
hand, Raburn said his favorite is
Chuck Berry's "Mabeline" only
ByTOBIFERRELL
Stiff Writer
The East Carolina Marching
Pirates entered their 50th per-
forming season with a spectacular
pre-game and half-time show at
the football game home opener
this Saturday in Ficklen Stadium.
With those dazzling Golden
Girls, flags, refiles twirlcrs, and
East Carolina's most talented
instrumentalists, the Marching
Pirates made an evening of enter-
tainment to remember.
Under the direction of Drum
Major Todd Brewer and the Asso-
ciate Drum Major Scott Lane, the
band performed a pre-game
show of the ECU fight song, "The
Star Spangled Banner the alma
mater, and a special piece, "Har-
lem Nocturne Pirate fans will
recognize Harlem Nocturne,
composed by Earl Hagen, as the
old theme song from The Un-
touchables.
The Overture to Ruslan
Ludmilla piece by Glinka opened
the half-time musical program.
The percussion section will dis-
play their express in a solo en-
titled "The Magician" by Chick
Corea. The third selection was
Benny Goodman's Sing, Sing,
Sing. The half-time program
lasted eight minutes.
As the season progresses, other
musical arrangements will be
added to the program.
Approximately 225 students
are participating in the marching
band this season. Aside from the
instrumentalists, there arc about
17 Golden Girls, 15 color guard
members, 10 rifles, and 2 feature
twirlcrs. Dr. Tom Goolsby, direc-
tor of the program, said, "Fresh-
men make up a little over one-
third of the band
Although instrumental majors
must march in the band at least
two years, many other music
majors and non-music majors re-
turn with the instrumental majors
year after year to be a part of this
enthusiastic group. Students in-
cluding Susan Cooperman, Tim
Tiegs, Steve Turner, Kelly Jones,
and Steve Purifoy are just a few of
the many students who have
faithfully entertained Pirate fans
for three years or more.
For Marching Pirates, school
started a week early with daily 9
am to 9 pm field and sectional
practices. While other students
were still lounging by the pool,
the Marching Pirates were sweat-
ing it out to the "perfection" fans
will hear and see Saturday eve-
ning.
Senior, Susan Cooperman, in-
strumental major, spoke on the
success of this year's band camp.
She said that by Tuesday the band
had memorized the music and
field drill for the half-time opener.
This was an unusual occurence.
Many bands perform their first
show with flipchart music or by
remaining basically motionless
while playing memorized music.
The pre-game show has also
been learned. Often it is learned
the day before the game. With
these achievements under their
belts, there's no stopping the
Marching Pirates.
Low esteem over Connells, Raleigh
band could have played longer
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Feature Rditor
Call me a rock and roll conser-
vative, call me a Led Zeppelin
freak, call me a user of scatological
language, call me a recent evictee
of the house from hell, call me a
yellow journalist, but the Con-
nells did not satisfv mv music
J J
bone.
The Connells, supposed to be
one of America's premier college
bands, came to Greenville's Attic
Friday night with their noses
pointed towards the purple sky.
But wait a minute, they have a
reason for being so arrogant, you
see they are from the shopping-
center capital of Raleigh.
First of all, the Connells didn't
play long enough. The opening
band, Mary on the Dash, played
until 11:30 p.m leaving a void of
a half of hour to be filled with bad
videos on Attic's magna bad
video screen.
By mid-night, the Connells
had left the back stage mirrors
and came on stage. Not a second
after 1:30 a.m they returned to
the self-indulence glory of the
back stage mirrors, leaving the
packed crowd in grimaced "Oh,
man" looks.
But when I fork over six bucks,
which I didn't have to do (thanks
Attic), I expect to hear at least two
hours of music. Are these guys so
big that they can't play for more
than a hour and a half?
Maybe this reviewer is over
reacting, some of the show was
actually pretty good. Although
the Connells can be called a REM-
sound-like-to-band, some of their
originals ripped the crowd with
quality guitar and bam-bam style
drums. The Connells' strength
lies in the guitar and drums.
Despite the frat-boy looks of
lead singer Doug MacMilan, he
managed to ramble through origi-
nals "Choosing Side" off their
critical acclaimed second LP �
Boylan Heights with tolerable
utterances. MacMilan, a Bryan
Adams clone, also sang lead on
the title cut from the five member
band's first release "Darker
Days
Long haired George Huntley
is the jammer of the band. Playing
lead guitar, Huntley also contrib-
utes with good key board play
and split vocals. Huntlev's vocals
in "1934" shook the audience to
the point where the wooden
floors where springing from the
slamming packed crowd.
Huntley also shined with a
six-string exhibition in "Scottv's
Lament" which surprisingly
sounded faintlv like bagpipes.
Although the ConnelJ s origi-
nals were good, their cover songs
sucked, except for one. Bon Jovi's
"I'm Cowboy" or whatever the
name of that song only received
cat calls from the true Pamilco
county fans in the audience. Rod
Stewart's "Maggie" was yawn
inducing.
Their ended the show with a
worthwhile rendition of Alice
Cooper's "I'm Eighteen
Whaling in the 50's, Bob Tunnell, J.W. Raburn and Bob Aiken, Bob and the Rockers, played and will play
the New Deli. So if you haven't seen them yet this month, don't worry, you can see them later. Kind of
like Now or Laters.
because "I get to sing it Bob took off into the dance floor, one upstages Bad Bob. Even quest
The band has a loyal following, sweat pouring from his brow as performances like Charles Ca-
Many of thes "groupies" are he made that electric guitar wail hoon, who played the harmonica
middle age and older but there are out the rocking, electric blues that with them at the Deli can't draw
many younger people who love has made the band so popular. eyes away from Bad Bob.
the band as well. They travel all Off stage, Bad Bob is quiet, and Bad Bob and the Rocking
across the state and rock all finds shy as he lets the more talkative Horses are a great blues band
of fans, no matter how young or band member, Raburn, steal the with a powerful sound. All three
old.
In a recent show at Greenville's
New Deli, Bad Bob laid down
guitar solos that Eddie Van Halen
would admire. At one point, Bad
Old woman joins Odd Shoe Exchange at
(AP)� fane Baldwin ot Sun one away. Now I have a place to someone who wears uiu&c&iz
(AP)� jane Baldwin of Sun
City joined the Odd Shoe Ex-
change this summer. The 62-ycar-
old woman, who had her left leg
amputated two years ago, wears a
10-B on her right foot.
She's still paying off the money
one away. Now I have a place to
take the extra shoe she says.
After trying on about a dozen
shoes, Ms. Baldwin decided on a
white leather tennis shoe and
white sandal.
On a nearby rack stood a dozen
she owes on her operation, she or so pairs of boots. Ms. Sallman
says. "I haven't had any extra pulled out a mismatched pair:
money to buy shoes. When you size 10 left and size 8 right.
have to buy good shoes, they run Through her system of handwrit-
about $50 a pair. It's awful to pay ten 3-by-5 index cards, she was
that much and throw the other able to match the boots with
izes.
Her extensive files include out-
lines of members' feet and shoe
ads that illustrate their prefer-
ences.
Many of the mismates that Ms.
Sallman helps pair never meet.
They correspond and send each
other shoes. Others live close
enough to shop together and
trade mismated pairs.
Ms. Sallman shared shoes with
one mismate for 11 years before
show. But when the lights came
on, Bad Bob transforms.
His energy and raw talent
shine. Raburn and Bob Aiken are
extremely talented as well, but no
62 in the longest headline ever read
members are talented and love
their music. Anyone who enjoys
driving drums, solid base, and a
blues lead guitar that makes your
feet move, should see Bad Bob.
meeting the woman, a Los Ane- up in California, and unbe-
les bookkeeper. They were mis- knownst to me, they lived an
mates from 1972 through about hour's drive apart Ms. Sallman
1984, when Ms. Sallman devel- recalls. "They would meet each
oped a bunion that made her foot other and go shoe shopping
part-time private-duty nurse be
cause she is working to make
some of her dreams come true for
the shoe exchange.
Those dreams include a store-
wider.
Ms. Sallman recalls one mis-
mate, a New York career woman
who bought expensive shoes. Ms.
Sallman could not keep up.
But many mismates share
happy endings.
"I matched these two women
Another member, 1 gave her a front shop where she can ware-
mate in another state who, unbe-
knownst to me, lived down the
street from a relative. The best
part about this service is the
friends you make
Ms. Sallman, a volunteer, has
little time to make a living as a tional funding.
house donated shoes, as well as
offer a place for members to try on
shoes, and an office for the
organization's headquarters.
Her wish list also includes vol-
unteers, a computer and addi-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 Page 15
Marching in 50th year, the Pirates jam on
The beat in the stands. The beat on the field. The beat in your living room? The Marching Pirates are turnin
50 and yes they are cutting an LP. Twirling, rifle-bearing horn-pumping, this large group of instrument waving,
drum pounders belabors long hours to entertain the Ficklen Crowd. (Photolab).
Clean your face after Four
Star, sauce a little heavy
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Assistant Feature Fditor
And now, the second install-
ment in the ECU Student Survival
Guide - a review of pizza places in
the Greenville area. This week the
spotlight is on Four Star Pizza.
Four Star's delivery is - what
else - free and within 30 minutes.
On those occasions when Four
Star fails to deliver within 30
minutes, they compensate with a
dollar-off coupon. Deliveries are
always free - no iminimurrr order
is necessary.
Hobie Kern, owner and
operator of Four Star, admitted
that some deliveries to dorms
were "a little late" in his store's
early days (way back in Febru-
ary). On the other hand, Kern
maintained that he and his team
have improved, and that deliver-
ies are now almost always on
time.
Four Star Pizza offers a
number of special ty items, includ-
ing diet pizza. The diet pizza,
available in a 10-inch size only,
has about half the calories of regu-
lar pizza (78 calories per slice) and
75 less fat. The pizza sports
mushrooms, onions, green pep-
pers, black olives, Parmesan
cheese, and sliced tomatoes. Stan-
dard add-ons are hot peppers and
pineapple. One diet pizza costs
$6.10, two cost $9.20.
Another specialty item from
Four Star is the aptly-named
Four-Star Flamer. This pizza is
HOT! The Flamer includes pep-
peroni, onions, hot peppers, jal-
apeno peppers, and a dash of
Texas Pete. This delectable deli-
cacy is available in large and small
sizes and costs the same as a three-
item pizza for that size ($6.60 for
one 10-inch, $10.20 for two 10-
inch, $10.25 for one 14-inch, or
$14.75 for two 14-inch). Order at
your own risk.
Four Star offers four types of
subs (all 12-inch): meatball, ham
and cheese, roast beef and cheese,
and Italian. All subs cost $4.50.
Four Star isn't limited to these
four subs, however; pizza subs
and other tvpes of subs will be
made upon request (and my con-
versation with Kern seemed to
indicate that he enjoys a chal-
lenge).
Four Star recognizes that
some people, for whatever rea-
son, sometimes want to order
only one pizza. Therefore, in
addition to their "doublezz" piz-
zas (much the same two-for-one
deal as Little Caesars, and at
competitive prices), Four Star
sells single pizzas.
Four Star make: its own
dough and sauce daih Torn fresh
ingredients purchas 1 locally.
They use 100 real cheese (actu-
ally a blend of three cheeses) and,
according to Kern, they have the
best ovens in the business.
I ordered two 14-inch pepper-
oni pizzas and eight 12-ounce
Cokes from Four Star on a Satur-
day afternoon. The total was
$13.78 plus tip (I used a coupon,
however; standard prices would
be slightly higher). My order was
delivered hot and fresh within 3C
minutes.
The pizza would have been
worth a much longer wait. The
cheese was tasty and still melted;
the crust was good though not
great; and the tomato sauce was
well abundant.
There was, to be honest,
rather more tomato sauce than I
like. Kern informed me that this is
a common complaint from cus-
tomers. However, he stated that
he'd rather have customers com-
plain about getting too much
sauce than too little.
On the same note, Kern men-
tioned that Four Star is always
perfectly happy to fulfill a request
- whether for less sauce or for
none at all. Four Star will also
make other types of "custom-
ized" pizzas. Kern seems to live
by the well-worn phrase, 'The
customer is always right
Kern is a veteran of the pizza
business (you might call him a
Four Star general). Before open-
ing a Four Star in Greenville, Kern
operated two Four Star restau-
rants in other college towns. Four
Star is a 120-store chain, but the
Greenville Four Star is the chain's
first store in North Carolina. If all
goes well, Kern hopes to open
another Four Star elsewhere in
North Carolina in the spring.
Four Star is a worthy oppo-
nent of the "big boys - Little
Caesar's, Dominoes, and Pizza
Hut. I strongly recommend giv-
ing Four Star a try next time you
want a pizza (although you may
want to ask for light sauce). And
when you want a custom sub or
pizza, Four Star really shines.
Four Star Pizza is located at
114 East 10th street. They can be
reached at 758-3300 from 11 a.m.
until 1 a.m. Sunday through
Thursday and from 11 a.m. until 2
a.m. Friday and Saturday.
Bob Bad and Horses plays Deli
By GREER BOWEN
Staff Writer
Bad Bob and the Rocking
Horses, a three member band
who will rock the whale room
from the get-go.
Bad Bob, Bob Tunnell, who is
originally from Greenville, plays
the Emerald City scene is often as
he can.
"I started playing when I was
really young, I think I got started
because my sister had a ukclele, "
said Tunnell (alias Bad Bob).
"J.W Raburn, also of
Greenville plays base, and Bob
"shakin" Aikcn of Snow Hill
(Pugsleyland) plays the drums.
Raburn works the New Deli dur-
ing the day, and Bob "Shakin"
Aiken teaches at a prison.
These three musicians have
played in many other bands be-
fore forming Bad Bob and the
Rocking Horses one year ago. But
these three men plan to stick to-
gether at least for a while. "We
likeeachother" said Raburn. Both
Raburn and Bad Bob think Aikens
style is perfect for the band, "he's
got a solid drive, " said Raburn.
The band's main influences are
Albert King, Chicago blues, Lou-
isiana blues and even country
Old woman joins Odd Shoe
(AP)� Jane Baldwin of Sun one away. Now 1 have a place to
music. "I like a lot of music but
blues is what I play best, " said
Bad Bob.
Bad Bob, who now lives in
Wilmington, say the band rarely
practices, "Blues lands don't ref-
use! " said Raburn. That's proba-
bly why they never do the same
show twice. "These guys have
enough experience that they can
follow me said Bad Bob.
Bad Bob said his favorite song is
Elvis's "Hound Dog" a solid hard
core blues version of an old rock
song, because the style feels more
comfortable to him. On the other
hand, Raburn said his favorite is
Chuck Berry's "Mabeline" only
ByTOBIFERRELL
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Marching
Pirates entered their 50th per-
forming season with a spectacular
pre-game and half-time show at
the football game home opener
this Saturday in Ficklen Stadium.
With those dazzling Golden
Girls, flags, refiles twirlers, and
East Carolina's most talented
instrumentalists, the Marching
Pirates made an evening of enter-
tainment to remember.
Under the direction of Drum
Major Todd Brewer and the Asso-
ciate Drum Major Scott Lane, the
band performed a pre-game
show of the ECU fight song, "The
Star Spangled Banner the alma
mater, and a special piece, "Har-
lem Nocturne Pirate fans will
recognize Harlem Nocturne,
composed by Earl Hagen, as the
old theme song from The Un-
touchables.
The Overture to Ruslan
Ludmilla piece by Glinka opened
the half-time musical program.
The percussion section will dis-
play their express in a solo en-
titled 'The Magician" by Chick
Corea. The third selection was
Benny Goodman's Sing, Sing,
Sing. The half-time program
lasted eight minutes.
As the season progresses, other
musical arrangements will be
added to the program.
Approximately 225 students
are participating in the marching
band this season. Aside from the
instrumentalists, there are about
17 Golden Girls, 15 color guard
members, 10 rifles, and 2 teature
twirlers. Dr. Tom Goolsby, direc-
tor of the program, said, "Fresh-
men make up a little over one-
third of the band
Although instrumental majors
must march in the band at least
two years, many other music
majors and non-music majors re-
turn with the instrumental majors
year after year to be a part of this
enthusiastic group. Students in-
cluding Susan Cooperman, Tim
Tiegs, Steve Turner, Kelly Jones,
and Steve Purifoy are just a few of
the many students who have
faithfully entertained Pirate fans
for three years or more.
For Marching Pirates, school
started a week early with daily 9
am to 9 pm field and sectional
practices. While other students
were still lounging by the pool,
the Marching Pirates were sweat-
ing it out to the "perfection" fans
will hear and see Saturday eve-
ning.
Senior, Susan Cooperman, in-
strumental major, spoke on the
success of this year's band camp.
She said that by Tuesday the band
had memorized the music and
field drill for the half-timeopener.
This was an unusual occurence.
Many bands perform their first
show with flipchart music or by
remaining basically motionless
while playing memorized music.
The pre-game show has also
been learned. Often it is learned
the day before the game. With
these achievements under their
belts, there's no stopping the
Marching Pirates.
Low esteem over Connells, Raleigh
band could have played longer
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Features Editor
Call me a rock and roll conser-
vative, call me a Led Zeppelin
freak, call me a user of scatological
language, call me a recent evictee
of the house from hell, call me a
yellow journalist, but the Cou-
ncils did not satisfy my music
bone.
The Connells, supposed to be
one of America's premier college
bands, came to Greenville's Attic
Friday night with their noses
pointed towards the purple sky.
But wait a minute, they have a
reason for being so arrogant, you
see they are from the shopping-
center capital oi Raleigh.
First of all, the Connells didn't
play long enough. The opening
band, Mary on the Dash, played
until 11:30 p.m leaving a void of
a half of hour to be filled with bad
videos on Attic's magna bad
video screen.
By mid-night, the Connells
had left the back stage mirrors
and came on stage. Not a second
after 1:30 a.m they returned to
the self-indulcnce glory oi the
back stage mirrors, leaving the
packed crowd in grimaced "Oh,
man" looks.
But when I fork over six bucks,
which I didn't have lo do (thanks
Attic), I expect to hear at least two
hours of music. Are these guys so
big that they can't play for more
than a hour and a half?
Maybe this reviewer is over
reacting, some of the show was
actually pretty good. Although
the Connells can be called a REM-
sound-like-to-band, some of their
originals ripped the crowd with
the title cut from the five member
band's first release "Darker
Days
Long haired George Huntley
is the jammer of the band. Playing
lead guitar, Huntley also contrib-
utes with good key board play
and split vocals. Huntley7s vocals
in "1934" shook the audience to
the point where the wooden
floors where springing from the
slamming packed crowd.
Huntley also shined with a
six-string exhibition in "Scottv's
Lament" which surprisingly
sounded faintlv like bagpipes.
Although the Conneli s origi-
quality guitar and bam-bam style nals were good, their cover songs
drums. The Connells' strength sucked, except for one. Bon Jo vis
lies in the guitar and drums. "I'm Cowboy" or whatever the
Despite the frat-boy looks of name of that song only received
lead singer Doug MacMilan, he cat calls from the true Pamilco
managed to ramble through origi-
nals "Choosing Side" off their
critical acclaimed second LP �
Boylan Heights with tolerable
utterances. MacMilan, a Bryan
county fans in the audience. Rod
Stewart's "Maggie" was yawn
inducing.
Their ended the show with a
worthwhile rendition of Alice
Adams clone, also sang lead on Cooper's "I'm Eighteen
Whaling in the 50's, Bob Tunnell, J.W. Raburn and Bob Aiken, Bob and the Rockers, played and will play
the New Deli. So if you haven't seen them yet this month, don't worry, you can see them later. Kind of
like Now or Laters.
because "I get to sing it. " Bob took off into the dance floor,
The band has a loyal following, sweat pouring from his brow as
Many of thes "groupies" are he made that electric guitar wail
middle age and older but there are out the rocking, electric blues that
many younger people who love has made the band so popular,
the band as well. They travel all Off stage, Bad Bob is quiet, and
across the state and rock all finds shy as he lets the more talkative
of fans, no matter how young or
old.
In a recent show at Greenville's
New Deli, Bad Bob laid down
guitar solos that Eddie Van Halen
would admire. At one point, Bad
band member, Raburn, steal the
show. But when the lights came
on. Bad Bob transforms.
His energy and raw talent
shine. Raburn and Bob Aiken are
extremely talented as well, but no
would admire. At one point, bad extremely taientea as wen, out no reet move, sne
Exchange at 62 in the longest headline ever read
someone who wears ulose sizes.
one upstages Bad Bob. Even quest
performances like Charles Ca-
hoon, who played the harmonica
with them at the Deli can't draw
eves awav from Bad Bob.
Bad Bob and the Rocking
Horses are a great blues band
with a powerful sound. All three
members are talented and love
their music. Anyone who enjoys
driving drums, solid base, and a
blues lead guitar that makes your
feet move, should see Bad Bob.
City joined the Odd Shoe Ex-
change this summer. The 62-year-
old woman, who had her left leg
amputated two years ago, wears a
10-B on her right foot.
She's still paying off the money
take the extra shoe she says.
After trying on about a dozen
shoes, Ms. Baldwin decided on a
white leather tennis shoe and
white sandal.
On a nearby rack stood a dozen
she owes on her operation, she or so pairs of boots. Ms. Sallman
says. "I haven't had any extra pulled out a mismatched pair:
money to buy shoes. When you size 10 left and size 8 right,
have to buy good shoes, they run Through her system of handwrit-
about $50 a pair. It's awful to pay ten 3-by-5 index cards, she was
that much and throw the other able to match the boots with
Her extensive files include out-
lines of members' feet and shoe
ads that illustrate their prefer-
ences.
Many of the mismates that Ms.
Sallman helps pair never meet.
They correspond and send each
other shoes. Others live close
enough to shop together and
trade mismated pairs.
Ms. Sallman snared shoes with
one mismate for 11 years before
meeting the woman, a Los Au6e- up in California, and unbe-
les bookkeeper. They were mis- knownst to me, they lived an
mates from 1972 through about hour's drive apart Ms. Sallman
1984, when Ms. Sallman devel- recalls. "They would meet each
oped a bunion that made her foot other and go shoe shopping,
wider. "Another member, I gave her a
Ms. Sallman recalls one mis- mate in another state who, unbe-
mate, a New York career woman knownst to me, lived down the
who bought expensive shoes. Ms.
Sallman could not keep up.
But many mismates share
happy endings.
"I matched these two women
street from a relative. The best
part about this service is the
friends you make
Ms. Sallman, a volunteer, has
little time to make a living as a tional funding.
part-time private-duty nurse be
cause she is working to make
some of her dreams come true for
the shoe exchange.
Those dreams include a store-
front shop where she can ware-
house donated shoes, as well as
offer a place for members to try on
shoes, and an office for the
organization's headquarters.
Her wish list also includes vol-
unteers, a computer and addi-





16
THEEAS1 CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6. 1988
Kinks still sing 'Lola, Lola'
(AT) - Earlier this vear, the
kinks brought out "The Road a
collection of songs, mostly from
the 1980s, recorded live during a
1987 IS. tour.
Now, kinks songwriter Ra
Davies is in California, where a
musical comedy he composed,
'80 Days is playing at the la
olla Playhouse.
The album, the British group's
second for MCA records, was
taped in Columbia. Md and
Philadelphia. The title" song was
recorded in a studio "he song "It"
is new, composed by Davies as a
dance for his wife Pat Crosbie,
formerly with the Irish National
ballet 1 le'd like to expand it so it
becomes one side of Mi album.
Recentl) . the kinks did some
recording for the next album, but
� it has paused while Davies
w i irks on 80 Daj s.
"I had seen the movie Around
the World in SO Days when 1 was
a kid Daviessays. '1 wasn't that
interested in it. But the show is
really more about ules Verne
himself. He was the Steven
Spielberg of the Victorian era.
"he Director, Des McAnuff,
who did Big River' (based on
Huckleberry Finn') sent me a
teli gramsaj ��. a) need
you, which It ht �� asa rather
nice introduction to the project
lie sent me a draft script
somebodv had done. We got talk-
ing about it. 1 wrote what 1
sought a few good tunes would
be. He liked them. 1 le got a book
writer. ! wasn't interested in
doing David Niven (star of the
movie) with music. This project
has been going on for tour years.
N. ou can't rush these things
Review
Davies wrote one previous
musical, which was rushed, for a
small English company in 1982. "I
had to write it in two weeks. It was
a bizarre plot oi out-of-work
women in Fast London kidnap-
ping Prince Charles. It was
commisioned by the National
Fheatre, by Sir Peter Hall. He
wanted a modern version of "The
Poet and the Women where the
women kidnap Aristophanes.
"It was good writing the song
for Prince Charles, a patriotic
song about England. It was of-
Broadway style, fun and campy.
It w asa daunting task to write it in
two weeks
I le wrote musk for the films
"The Virgin Soldier" and "Percy
1 le says, "We tired our manager
just after that. We had a top-10 hit
in America, l.ola at the same to
me Instead of putting us on tour
here, he said we should do the
"Percy" soundtrack. 1 wrote a
fantastic piece oi music. The pro-
ducer got a knife and cut every-
thing. My work was completely
butchered.
"The best way 1 did it was a TV
film I wrote, directed and did the
music, "Return to Waterloo A
few art-type cinemas showed it.
"1 was approached to write an
v. ri nental play with music. So
i wrote a play where the lead
character didn't speak. 1 ended up
directing Keith Colley, a Shake-
spearean actor, using sign lan-
guage, exploiting every facet oi
his face. 1 felt it was like doing a
silent movie.
"They wanted me to direct
something else after 'Return to
Waterloo'but I had other things to
do, like finding a record com-
pany. I always admired the
Beatles because they stayed with
the same company. The Kinks
have been with four labels. With
no disrespect to the companies
I've been with or am with, I'd
rather my career had been cata-
loged with one record company
In the 1960s, when the Kinks
had strings of hit singles, they'd
put all their equipment into a
truck and tour in Britain on week-
ends.
Now, Davies says, "Bands like
Def Leppard tour 18 months and
never make a record for four
years. They're completely ex-
hausted.
"And I can't decide to go play in
Truro and get equipment to-
gether. 1 have to hire about 30
people and it's all a big deal.
"We still play requests, which
sends the light and sound crew-
mad. They like to have the show
rehearsed
The Kinks were formed in 1964
with Davies as lead vocalist and
guitarist, Dave Davies on lead
guitar and vocals, Peter Quaife on
bass and Mick Avory on drums.
The current lineup is the Davies
brothers, Ian Gibbons, keyboards,
Jim Rodford, bass, and Rob
1 lenrit, drums.
Davies says, "It would be nice
for the Kinks to be on Broadway
for a week and do a week in Bos-
ton rather than doing one-
nighters. Next year will be our
25th year.
"The concert we did in London
Dec. 22 was one of the best ever.
We played about three hours
solid, with no intermission and no
popcorn. We used some of that
footage in the 'Road' video. The
video also has stuff from the 1960s
and 70s.
"I've got enough footage to
make an 8-hour film about the
Kinks. I'll settle for an hour and a
half
Davies believes that the best
ballad he ever wrote was "Water-
loo Sunset" and the two best rock-
ers were "You Really Got Me
which Van 1 lalen covered, and
"All Day and All of the Night
which the Stranglers covered.
"Now when we play You Really
Got Me new audiences think
we're covering the Van Halen
song
Asked whether he has mel-
lowed with age, Davies recountsa
letter from a nephew stating he
wasangry, discontent, ambitious,
jealous, wants to achieve every-
thing and feels there's no time. It
ended. "Uncle Raymond, what
are you like?"
He says, "I wrote a note back
sayingDitto I'm still as hungry
for success. I take failure hard.
That's the one aspect of my per-
sonality 1 try to fight against.
"I've tried to mellowout severa 1
times in my life. I finish one proj-
ect. The phone rings and I start
another. If the phone didn't nng
I'd start one myself.
"1 get passionate about what I
do. I think the older you get the
less mellow you get, really. You
get angrier
Pupp
PH

99VFF
5th St.
Downtown
758-7979
C77
gnjHSP
12" Sub or
Regular
Size Salad
The Pla
75
-I
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Summer Savings
Trust Baxt
� BAXTl R
Johnny D. conies back with Fatal Flowers
By MATT JAMES
M.l" K H
1 he rode over on a tidal
wa c ol gritty rock -n- roll quitars
in overdrive with last years
A ounger Days to stun many a
first time listener and critics alike.
For a band inspired by the
late 7 V ova. it's refreshing
to realize the) stuck to a basic
- �� I with a modern edge. For all
ol the unbridled energy found on
their last album, the new one
tsquietmonru nts thathigh-
light thoughtful - : gsandblues)
intramentation.
ohnny D. is the imaginary
character who realizes nothing
last forever (especially stardom)
and in rune carefully crafted
songs, I he (lowers perform
Lady runs body
business for sear
LITTLE HAMPTON, Eng-
land (AP) - Anita Roddick was the
quintessential flower child oi the
s. She cared seriously about
pollution, whales acid rain, all oi
it. Now she runs a $68 milion
cosmetics business - -n is still a
flower child at heart, and in fact.
To her competitors in this
highly competetive business,
"We may seem to be slightly
flaky she says. "But in 20 years
time what we are going to be
doing is the norm
And what is this 45-year-old
entrepreneur doing at her corn-
pans Body Shop International
PL( ?
Among other innovations,
she uses natural ingredients in her
products, vegetable - not animal -
materials. She refuses to test her
cosmetics on animals or buy from
suppliers that do. She provides
refills to cut down on waste. She
uses receded paper and recedes
her waste. She also plows a por-
tion of the profits into environ-
mental causes and education
"The Body Shop approach
Mrs. Roddick says, "is non-ex-
ploitative
And, apparently, successful.
What started out in 1976 as a little
shop in the seaside town of
Brighton in southeast England
today numbers 14 stores and 317
franchises all over the world. Its
first shop in the United States
opened this summer in New York
in - where else - Greenwich Vil-
lage.
"It s that constant looking for
a better way that gives our com-
pany its morals and sense of pur-
pose Mrs. Roddick says.
Mrs. Roddick is passionate,
with a hard edge. When she talks,
her face is alternately wide open
and closed. She is a short woman,
highly energetic, with a shock of
shoulder-length hair. She usually
wears jeans and sneakers to work.
songs related to his life and times, preme production, this Fatal
There is still a healthy portion Rowers LP could be played all
of crunch rock that actually help day long. There may be a lot oi
highlight the more evolved songs Johnny D's and a lot of Flowers,
on the album. Songs like "The but the Fatal Flowers arc an one of
DM
Open
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sunday 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Nike and Reebok)
Dance the title track and the
souped-up mid tempo sound of
"Rock and Roll Star challenge
to stared still or stay in your
seat.
From "Moving Target" to
"Dear friends" and the violin,
piano, harmonica and trombone
work inbetween, The Fatal Flow-
ers can give any band this union a
run for its money.
oupled with record sculp-
tor Mick Ronson's , who has also
produced Lou Reed, David
Bowie, and Mott the Hople, su-
shop, $68 million
ch for new face
She is breaking the rules not
just in business but in the cosmet-
ics industry in particular.
Body Shop seeks to buy its
ingredients and create jobs in Brit-
ain and the Third World. It has
pledged to devote 25 percent of
the profits oi a new soap factory
into the Glasgow community in
which it is located.
Besides launching a myriad
of community projects, it uses its
stores as forums for educating
people about issues ranging from
saving whales to saving the ozone
layer.
Mrs. Roddick travels around
the world three months a year
observing women perform their
ablutions to get ideas for products
which simply cleanse, polish and
protect the hair and skin.
"It's constantly looking, us-
ing the past as a prologue, seeing
what can be dime she says.
Not all her travels are fruit-
ful, however.
She discovered that some
Japanese women rub crushed
nightingale droppings onto their
skin to whiten it.
"I haven't been able to do
anything with that she says,
laughing. BodyShopsarea farcry
from run-of-the-mill natural
foods and -cosmetics stores
which sell Vitamin F pills and
Castile soap.
Bod Shops are a hybrid of
the 1960s health ideal and 1980s
sophistication. They are cool,
dark-green and fragrant. The 300
or so products include white
grape skin tonic, Viennese chalk
facial wash, and a Moroccan mud
shampoo.
Mrs. Roddick was born and
brought up in I.ittlehampton, a
small blue-collar resort town west
ot Brighton. As a youth she
worked in the family cafe.
1 ler first passion was drama
but she was trained as a teacher.
a kind bunch.
"All right, classLet's test your New Music Knowledge!
I. Heavy Nova
Robert Palmer's latest
hit single is:
A. Irresistibly Simple'
B. Simply Irresistible
C. Simple Yet Irresistible
oro
O. Hot Water
This singer-songwriter's
fans are known as:
A. Parrotheads
B. Potheads
C. Mr Potato Heads
MCA
699 1199
LPTape I I
CD
O CROWDEDHOUSE
C Temple Of Low Men
This supergroup s last
album went:
A. Platinum
B. Aluminum
C. Round and round
fkt
Tape
12
H. Soul Searchin
Glenn Frey made his acting
debut in an episode of:
A. Miami Vice
B. Punky Brewster
C. The Smurfs
MCA
1 Tape
12"
lUTvTTMHHI
0-2 Correct - �
3-4 Correct
All 5 Correct1
5
o:a
. Day By Day
This popular instrumental
star plays the:
A. Stock Market
B. Saxophone
C. Electric Kazoo
S&33MD3?
THE PLAZA, CAROLINA EAST MALL
f





Jfc
16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1988
Kinks still sing 'Lola, Lola'
(AP) - Earlier this year, the
Kinks brought out "The Road a
collection of songs, mostly from
the 1980s, recorded live during a
1987 U.S. tour.
Now, Kinks songwriter Ray
Davies is in California, where a
musical comedy he composed,
"80 Days is playing at the La
Jolla Playhouse.
The album, the British group's
second for MCA records, was
taped in Columbia. Md and
Philadelphia. The title song was
recorded in a studio. The song "It"
is new, composed by Davies as a
dance for his wife, Pat Crosbie,
formerly with the Irish National
Ballet. He'd like to expand it so it
becomes one side of an album.
Recentlv, the Kinks did some
recording for the next album, but
that has paused while Davies
works on "80 Days
"I had seen the movie' Around
the World in 80 Davs' when I was
J
a kid Davies says. "I wasn't that
interested in it. But the show is
really more about Jules Verne
himself. He was the Steven
Spielberg of the Victorian era.
"The Director, Des McAnuff,
who did 'Big River' teased on
'Huckleberrv Finn') sent me a
telegram saying, Broadway need
you which I thought was a rather
nice introduction to the project.
"He sent me a draft script
somebody had done. We got talk-
ing about it. I wrote what I
thought a few good runes would
be. He liked them. He got a book
writer. I wasn't interested in
doing David Niven (star of the
movie) with music. This project
has been going on for four years.
You can't rush these things
Review
Davies wrote one previous
musical, which was rushed, for a
small English company in 1982. "I
had to write it in two weeks. It was
a bizarre plot of out-of-work
women in East London kidnap-
ping Prince Charles. It was
commisioned by the National
Theatre, by Sir Peter Hall. He
wanted a modern version of "The
Poet and the Women where the
women kidnap Aristophanes.
"It was good writing the song
for Prince Charles, a patriotic
song about England. It was of-
Broadway style, fun and campy.
It wasa daunting task to write it in
two weeks
He wrote music for the films
"The Virgin Soldier" and "Percy
He says, "We fired our manager
just after that. We had a top-10 hit
in America, 'Lola at the same to
me. Instead of putting us on tour
here, he said we should do the
"Percy" soundtrack. I wrote a
fantastic piece of music. The pro-
ducer got a knife and cut every-
thing. My work was completely
butchered.
'The best way I did it was a TV
film I wrote, directed and did the
music, 'Return to Waterloo A
few art-type cinemas showed it.
"I was approached to write an
experimental play with music. So
I wrote a play where the lead
character didn't speak. I ended up
directing Keith Colley, a Shake-
spearean actor, using sign lan-
guage, exploiting every facet of
his face. I felt it was like doing a
silent movie.
"They wanted me to direct
something else after 'Return to
Waterloo' but I had other things to
do, like finding a record com-
pany. I always admired the
Beatles because they stayed with
the same company. The Kinks
have been with four labels. With
no disrespect to the companies
I've been with or am with, I'd
rather my career had been cata-
loged with one record company
In the 1960s, when the Kinks
had strings of hit singles, they'd
put all their equipment into a
truck and tour in Britain on week-
ends.
Now, Davies says, "Bands like
Def Leppard tour 18 months and
never make a record for four
years. They're completely ex-
hausted.
"And I can't decide to go play in
Truro and get equipment to-
gether. I have to hire about 30
people and it's all a big deal.
"We still play requests, which
sends the light and sound crew
mad. They like to have the show
rehearsed
The Kinks were formed in 1964
with Davies as lead vocalist and
guitarist, Dave Davies on lead
guitar and vocals, Peter Quaife on
bass and Mick Avory on drums.
The current lineup is the Davies
brothers, Ian Gibbons, keyboards,
Jim Rodford, bass, and Bob
Henrit, drums.
Davies says, "It would be nice
for the Kinks to be on Broadway
for a week and do a week in Bos-
ton rather than doing one-
nighters. Next year will be our
25th year.
"The concert we did in London
Dec. 22 was one of the best ever.
We played about three hours
solid, with no intermission and no
popcorn. We used some of that
footage in the 'Road' video. The
video also has stuff from the 1960s
and 70s.
"I've got enough footage to
make an 8-hour film about the
Kinks. I'll settle for an hour and a
half
Davies believes that the best
ballad he ever wrote was "Water-
loo Sunset" and the two best rock-
ers were "You Really Got Me
which Van Halen covered, and
"All Day and All of the Night
which the Stranglers covered.
"Now when we play Tou Really
Got Me new audiences think
we're covering the Van Halen
song
Asked whether he has mel-
lowed with age, Davies recounts a
letter from a nephew stating he
was angry, discontent, ambitious,
jealous, wants to achieve every-
thing and feels there's no time. It
ended: "Uncle Raymond, what
are you like?"
He says, "I wrote a note back
saying,TJitto I'm still as hungry
for success. I take failure hard.
That's the one aspect of my per-
sonality I try to fight against.
"I've tried to mellow out several
times in my life. I finish one proj-
ect. The phone rings and I start
another. If the phone didn't ring
I'd start one myself.
"I get passionate about what I
do. I think the older you get the
less mellow you get, really. You
get angrier
98WF
i
i
i
i
5th St.
� Downtown
758-7979
12" Sub or
Regular
Size Salad
e
ke&tfllc
�SUBWRY
The Plaza
756-2110
Johnny D. comes back with Fatal Flowers
By MATT JAMES
Staff Writer
They rode over on a tidal
wave of gritty rock -n- roll quitars
in overdrive with last years
"Younger Days to stun many a
first time listener and critics alike.
For a band inspired by the
late '70's punk era, it's refreshing
to realize they stuck to a basic
sound with a modern edge. For all
of the unbridled energy found on
their last album, the new one
exhibits quiet moments that high-
light thoughtful songs and bluesy
intramentation.
Johnny D. is the imaginary
character who realizes nothing
last forever (especially stardom)
and in nine carefully crafted
songs, The Flowers perform
songs related to his life and times.
There is still a heal thy portion
of crunch rock that actually help
highlight the more evolved songs
on the album. Songs like "The
Dance the title track and the
souped-up mid tempo sound of
"Rock and Roll Star challenge
you to stared still or stay in your
seat.
From "Moving Target" to
"Dear friends" and the violin,
piano, harmonica and trombone
work inbetween, The Fatal Flow-
ers can give any band this union a
run for its money.
Coupled with record sculp-
tor Mick Ronson's , who has also
produced Lou Reed, David
Bowie, and Mott the Hople, su-
preme production, this Fatal
Rowers LP could be played all
day long. There may be a lot of
Johnny D's and a lot of Flowers,
but the Fatal Flowers are an one of
a kind bunch.
LOW PRICE
and Reebok)
Lady runs body shop, $68 million
business for search for new face
LITTLEHAMPTON, Eng-
land (AP) - Anita Roddick was the
quintessential flower child of the
'60s. She cared seriously about
pollution, whales, acid rain, all of
it. Now she runs a $68 milion
cosmetics business - and is still a
flower child at heart, and in fact.
To her competitors in this
highly competetive business,
"We may seem to be slightly
flaky she says. "But in 20 years
time what we are going to be
doing is the norm
And what is this 45-year-old
entrepreneur doing at her com-
pany, Bodv Shop International
PLC?
Among other innovations,
she uses natural ingredients in her
products, vegetable - not animal -
materials. She refuses to test her
cosmetics on animals or buy from
suppliers that do. She provides
refills to cut down on waste. She
uses recycled paper and recycles
her waste. She also plows a por-
tion of the profits into environ-
mental causes and education.
"The Body Shop approach
Mrs. Roddick says, "is non-ex-
ploitative
And, apparently, successful.
What started out in 1976 as a little
shop in the seaside town of
Brighton in southeast England
today numbers 14 stores and 317
franchises all over the world. Its
first shop in the United States
opened this summer in New York
in - where else? - Greenwich Vil-
lage.
"It's that constant looking for
a better way that gives our com-
pany its morals and sense of pur-
pose Mrs. Roddick says.
Mrs. Roddick is passionate,
with a hard edge. When she talks,
her face is alternately wide open
and closed. She is a short woman,
highly energetic, with a shock of
shoulder-length hair. She usually
wears jeans and sneakers to work.
She is breaking the rules not
just in business but in the cosmet-
ics industry in particular.
Body Shop seeks to buy its
ingredients and create jobs in Brit-
ain and the Third World. It has
pledged to devote 25 percent of
the profits of a new soap factory
into the Glasgow community in
which it is located.
Besides launching a myriad
of community projects, it uses its
stores as forums for educating
people about issues ranging from
saving whales to saving the ozone
layer.
Mrs. Roddick travels around
the world three months a year
observing women perform their
ablutions to get ideas for products
which simply cleanse, polish and
protect the hair and skin.
"It's constantly looking, us-
ing the past as a prologue, seeing
what can be done she says.
Not all her travels are fruit-
ful, however.
She discovered that some
Japanese women rub crushed
nightingale droppings onto their
skin to whiten it.
"I haven't been able to do
anything with that she says,
laughing. Body Shops are a far cry
from run-of-the-mill natural
foods-and-cosmetics stores
which sell Vitamin E pills and
Castile soap.
Body Shops are a hybrid of
the 1960s health ideal and 1980s
sophistication. They are cool,
dark-green and fragrant. The 300
or so products include white
grape skin tonic, Viennese chalk
facial wash, and a Moroccan mud
shampoo.
Mrs. Roddick was born and
brought up in Littlehampton, a
small blue-collar resort town west
of Brighton. As a youth she
worked in the family cafe.
Her first passion was drama
but she was trained as a teacher.
"All right, c
wledge!
jj
4
1.
Heavy Nova
Robert Palmer's latest
hit single is:
A. "Irresistibly Simple"
B. "Simply Irresistible"
C. "Simple Yet Irresistible"
ODD 'W99 MM
� " LPT � �� CD
Hot Water
This singer-songwriter's
fans are known as:
A. Parrotheads
B. Potheads
C. Mr. Potato Heads
699 1199
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Temple Of Low Men
This supergroup's last
album went:
A. Platinum
B. Aluminum
C. Round and round
Soul Searchiri
Glenn Frey made his acting
debut in an episode of:
A. Miami Vice
B. Punky Brewster
C. The Smurfs
MCA
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HOW TO SCORE
0-2 Correct looks like you could use some remedial c� m New
Music Better come see us soon
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needed We suggest you come see us soon
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Day By Day
This popular instrumental
star plays the:
A. Stock Market
B. Saxophone
C. Electric Kazoo
THE PLAZA, CAROLMA EAST MALL
7 UVTap iZcO
Pupp
PHILADELPHIA, (Al
Felix Smyth once had the
on a string. Fancy cars, oj
nights at the theater, a bin
coal, a cupboard full of foe
"In general, we were
off than anyone else said S
"We lived pretty well
Sometimes, too well.
Smyth's lifestyle oftcj
him in trouble with the law
'The police would takij
and gnll me about robberies
neighborhood he said. I
couldn't understand how if
live so well. They thought I
have a job
They thought wrong,
have a job giving life to
of wood, a hank of cloth, a sj
thread.
Felix Smyth was a pupi
a man who pulled the stnnj
brought laughter and ma
millions of "children from
96
He pulled down
dough, too.
Like the summer 0?
Smyth, while still atte
North Catholic High Schoc
in S3, 000 a week working
down the East Coast.
In the evenings, he die
shows for vaudeville audi(
Then, starting at midni
put on two after-hours she
gins with a wad in their
and a bulge in their coats
"1 didn't know it at thj
but I was working in spc
ies laughed Smyth. "Thj
who hired me were mobs
wasn't until years later II
Trust Baxtl
THE BAXTER TRUSf
ByJ.P. Hailey
At 35, Steve Winslow is 1
He tried his hand at acting
He tried being a lawyer,
it. Now, he drives a cab i
York City.
A real loser, right? Wro
miracle oi miracles, a dai
deep distress and badlv in j
a mouthpiece opens th
phone book and finds Wij
f





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS 1988 17
12" Sub or
Regular
Size Salad
The Plaza
756-2110
�m
Puppeteer pulls strings to top
PHILADELPHIA, (AP) �
Felix Smyth once had the world
on a string. Fancy cars, opening
nights at the theater, a bin full of
coal, a cupboard full of food.
"In general, we were better
off than anyone else said Smyth.
We lived pretty well
Sometimes, too well.
Smyth's lifestyle often got
him in trouble with the law.
The police would take me in
and grill me about robberies in the
neighborhood he said. " They
couldn't understand how I could
live so well. They thought I didn't
have a job
They thought wrong. He did
have a job giving life to a hunk
of wood, a hank of cloth, a spool of
thread.
Felix Smyth was a puppeteer,
a man who pulled the strings that
brought laughter and magic to
millions of "children from nine to
96
He pulled down decent
dough, too.
Like the summer of 28 when
Smyth, while still attending
North Catholic High School, took
in 55. 000 a week working up and
down the East Coast.
In the evenings, he did three
shows for vaudeville audiences.
Then, starting at midnight, he
put on two after-hours shows for
guys with a wad in their pockets
and a bulge in their coats.
"I didn't know it at the time,
but I was working in speakeas-
ies laughed Smyth. "The guys
who hired me were mobsters. It
wasn't until vears later I found
out the bulges in their coats were 6-year-old boy reccieved a set of
shoulder holsters hand puppets from his mother �
Though the darkness of the not Santa Claus.
Great Depression hovered on the "I came from a very realistic
horizon, it was the beginning of family he said. "I was not al-
Smyth's sunnier days. lowed to believe in the fantasy of
Today, after an estimated Santa. I had the joy of Christmas,
half-million performances in al- but not the fantasy of it. My fan-
most 70 years, Felix Smyth's tasy would come later
sunny days are few. A wood back alley was
The veteran puppeteer, who Smyth's stage,
will be 76 in October, gets around After a while, Smyth took his
his rowhouse with a shillelagh, puppets � and his fantasies � to
He has no control over his lower
legs. He's practically blind. He
hasn't pulled a string in earnest in
more than two vears.
"I'm really bad off he said.
"He's on the shady side of his
career, but at one time he was at
the top of his profession said
Gerald VVhartenby, a retired city
detective and puppeteer who has
performed with Smyth.
"He's one of the last vaude-
ville-era puppeteers still around
added Whatenby. "He's a Phila-
delphia treasure and no one
knows it. He's a tremendous
puppeteer
Smyth started fooling around
with puppets as a youngster
growing up in north Philadelpia.
He was a "sickly kid who was in
the hospital more than out
During one of those hospital
stays, Smyth happened to hear a
puppet show on the radio. He
started imitating the various
voices and sounds heard ont the
show.
It was puppet love at first
sound.
The following Christmas, the
birthday parties, school plays and
sidewalk shows. Eventually, his
"childish hands" got too big for
his little toy puppets.
So he started making his own.
In addition to hand puppets,
young Smyth also carved mari-
onettes (stringed puppets).
Smyth turned professional
when he was 10. He remembers it
was on a Sunday because he was
supposed to go on a picnic, but
was asked to perform at a church
fair. It was an offer he couldn't
refuse.
"They paid me a man's
weekly salary, which back then
was $10, $12 he recalledHere I
was, a kid 10 years old, making in
one day what a man made in a
week. From then on, I averaged
$10 a show
Though the coal bin, pantry,
and his pockets were full, Smyth
� wanting to "keep the cops off
my back" � got a plant job in
1932. It was supposed to be only
temporary. He retired 42 years
later.
After retirement, Smyth con-
tinued his puppetry, putting on
more shows than ever. Despite
getting up in years, he seemed as
ageless as his hand-crafted mari-
onettes.
But in the winter of 1982, time
started to close in.
Smyth, who has two children
and two grandchildren, was into
the third week of a seven-month
tour of the midwest when his auto
skidded off the ice-covered high-
way near Grand Rapids, Mich. At
first, it appeared he wasn't seri-
ously injured, but it was later
determined he had suffered two
broken vertabrae.
Four years and two
operations later, Smyth was left
with no control of his lower legs
and withrut feeling below his
ankles. About the same time,
glaucoma left himblind in onecye
and almost blind in the other.
Very seldom does Smyth
open the small, drab, well-trav-
eled suitcase containing his pup-
pets.
"Why bother?" he asked
softly. "I can't see them
"I don't want to torture my-
self reminiscing, either he said.
"Over the years, I put on thou-
sands of shows for millions of
people. I wish I could do it again,
but I know I can't. I miss it, the
closeness of the kids. I miss all of
it
Smyth slowly got up from hi
easy chair. Leaning heavily on his
shillelagh, he carefully walked to
a nearby book shelf, lifting his legs
high in the air, much like a mari-
onette.
Trust Baxter, he's an one time lawyer now big city cabbie
THE BAXTER TRUST,
ByJ.P. Hailey
At 35, Steve Winslow is in a rut.
He tried his hand at acting. No go.
He tried being a lawyer. He blew
it. Now, he drives a cab in New
York City.
A real loser, right? Wrong. For,
miracle of miracles, a damsel in
deep distress and badly in need of
a mouthpiece opens the tele-
phone book and finds Winslow's
name in the lawver section. She
J
calls him. And, over he comes,
with shoulder-length hair, and
wearing blue jeans, a tan cordu-
roy jacket and a green tie.
When she answers the door, the
girl, Sheila Benton, blinks and
blinks again. But she hires
Winslow anyway and it's a good
thing she does. A corpse has been
found in Sheila's apartment,
stabbed in the back. Sheila says
she didn't do it and doesn't even
know the dead man. But the cops
think she did and arrest her, even
though they treat her very nicely
because she is one of the heirs to a
multimillion-dollar trust and
niece of one of the most powerful
men in the city.
Winslow's efforts to vindicate
Sheila are largely what "The
Baxter Trust" is all about, and
writer J.P. Hailev has done a fine
job of detailing a murder mystery
that contains some of the best
courtroom dialogue put down in
a very long time. His scenes out of
court are good, but those taking
place in court are superb. Truly,
a virtuoso performance, and one
that allows Winslow, who has
never been in court before, to
demonstrate he is not the push-
over the prosecution thinks he is.
As to who did the dirty deed �
well, Winslow pursues a lot of
false leads and comes up with a
number of interesting theories
For
insurance
call
Bill McDonald
P.O. 2429
East 10th Street Ext.
752-6680
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
STATI FARM
INSURANCE
State Farm Insurance Companies
Home Offices: Bloomington, Illinois
LUNCH SPECIAL
MONSAT.
11AM-3PM
17- 4oz. Sirloin
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Salad Bar
Hot Bar
Sundae Bar
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I1
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10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student I.D.
FREE DESSERT BAR
with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
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THE
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Delta
Sigma
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Tuesday
Meet the Delta Sigs
Wednesday
Bar-B-Q
Thursday
Bid Nite
510 E. 10th St.
(Across from Wendy's)
Call for Rides 757-0313





18 THE EAST CAROLINlAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1988
The animal halfpa2e
Bears killed for eating trees
EUGENfc, Ore. (AD - The rust-
red trail left by a black bear last
vear stands out in the green of the
Coast Range, even from a ridge a
mile away.
Sometime in the spring or early
summer before the berries rip-
ened, the animal followed a game
trail down a hillside draw. Under
a canopy of 20-year-old Douglas
fir, the bear nibbles and tasted its
way from tree to tree until it found
one it liked.
The it stood up, grabbed the
trunk with both paws, opened its
mouth wide and used its front
teeth to rake off bark to get to the
soft white cambium layer.
Doing what hungry bears have
done for thousands of years, the
bear ate the cambium off 2 or 3 feet
of trunk, gouging a band of verti-
cal tooth marks all the way
around. Then it headed down the
trail to find another tree.
The wounded fir stayed green
for months in this place where it
rains 80 inches a vear. Then it ran
out of nutrients, died and
changed color.
Seen from a distance on a hot
summer day, the jagged line of 40
or 50 red trees on the hillside
makes perfect sense once you
know it was made by a bear.
But the hillside is owned by a
timber company, and a visit to the
damaged timber reveals that
more trees have been stripped this
year. Tree-eating bears are about
as welcome in this forest as rats in
a cheese factory, and standard
procedure calls for them to be
snared and "removed One of
the steps in this process is a bullet
in the head.
Timber companies, environ-
mentalists and wildlife research-
ers want to know if there's a better
way to deal with the inherent
conflict between the state's largest
industry and the estimated 25,000
black bears that range Oregon
forests. Bill Noble is supposed to
find out.
Noble, a 30-year-old graduate
student at Oregon State Univer-
sity, is the main researcher in a
project in which bears are snared
and collared with radio transmit-
ters. Working in the forests near
Alsea, he's supposed to learn as
much as he can about bears in the
areas where rees are being killed
and in nearby "control" area
where little or no bear damage is
seen.
Noble's faculty adviser on the
project, Charles Meslow, is a vet-
eran researcher with Oregon State
and the federal Fish and Wildlife
Service. A lot of people have done
a lot of research on black bears, he
says, but no one seems to have any
hard answers about tree damage
and how to control it.
A major goal of Noble's
$130,000 project is to get some
clues as to whether all bears or
only certain bears eat trees. Forest
and wildlife managers also want
to know if there'a anything short
of death that will discourage
bears from eating trees. One the-
ory is that maybe some bears have
a nutritional deficiency that the
cambium satisfies.
And even if there's not much
short of killing bears that will
protect the trees, the timber own-
ers want to know if there's at least
a way to be more sure that the
bears they kill are the ones that
have been eating their trees.
When Noble finds a bear in a
snare, he tranquilizes it and ra-
dios for someone to help him
gather the basic physical informa-
tion on the animal. Then he places
a radio collar on the bear and
watches until he's sure that the
animal is recovering from the
tranquilizer. Over the year Noble
and others will monitor the bear's
travels using the radio collar.
Bear damage has always been a
problem in the Northwest woods,
but it's flared up over the past few
years in the central Coast range,
and no one is sure why. Timber
companies responded, as they
have for decades, by having their
employees or contract hunters
and trappers kill bears in the areas
where trees were being damaged.
Although bears are protected as
game animals, if s legal to kill a
bear that damages private prop-
erty, as long as the authorities are
notified and the carcass is turned
over for charitable or research
use.
It's an imprecise process that
draws fire from environmental-
ists who think the bears have a
right to do what they naturally do,
and from some recreational hunt-
ers who believe every bear killed
for eating trees is a bear that can't
be hunted for sport.
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756-1003
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Skis Boots Baby items. Wool Swelters, Children's Clothes, Udles 4 Mens Ski Jackets, Housewsres. Uod
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MANY ITEMS FROM 25c TO $5.00
Will be postponed if it rains
Tire & Parts Inc.
752-6838
Kangaroos used for shoe leather
ritu Release
Your school's athletic pro-
gram mav be perpetuating the
slaughter of nearly three million
kangaroos in Australia this year.
What do jocks have to do with
roos?
Kangaroos are hunted
mainly for their pelts, which are
turned into a high-quality leather
and made into, among other
things, sport shoes. Faced with a
Greenpeace-organized boycott in
Europe, many sport shoe manu-
facturers, including Nike, Puma
and New Balance have dropped
kangaroo leather from their
sneakers. However, Adidas con-
tinues to use kangaroo leather in
its promotional shoes, which it
gives to professional athletes and
school athletic programs.
After the success in Europe,
Greenpeace is turning its atten-
tion to the American market, the
U.S. is the world's largest im-
porter of raw kangaroo products.
Targeting both running shoe
manufacturers and the U.S. legis-
lature, Greenpeace hopes to pres-
sure the Australians to curtail the
kill by drying up the American
market for kangaroo goods.
The Australian kangaroo
hunt is the largest slaughter of
wild mammals in the world. In
addition to the commercial hunt
of more than 2,900,000 roos for
1988, an estimated one million
roos will be gunned down outside
Book review
MONEY TROUBLE. By Wil-
liam J. Reynolds.
"Mystery fans hate coinci-
dences says private investigator
Nebraska (first name not given),
"but they make the game
And they do, they surely do in
William J. Reynolds' "Money
Trouble a title that tells it all.
A chap named Gregg Longo
has been gunned down by the
Omaha police. The cops claim
Longo wasa bandit who'd carried
out a string of blank robberies and
they've got the circumstantial
evidence to prove it.
Now the coincidences begin.
Nebraska remembers that he
knew Longo slightly some 20
years back during high school
days. Then he is contacted by
Longo's widow, who turn out to
be Nebraska's long-lost high
school love, Carolyn. Carolyn
claims she is being persecuted by
the cops, who are trying to find
the $78,000 or so they claim Longo
got in hie scries of bank robberies.
Carolyn wants Nebraska to either
prove her dead husband innocent
or find the stolen money.
Eventually, Nebraska docs
both, but the trial is a long and
tricky one and it's full of coinci-
dences. Like the fact that Longo
had one of the stolen bills on him
when he was killed and that he
used another stolen bill to pay a
debt. Add to that the fact that
widow Carolyn worked in the
same office with a man who has
some part of another case he is
working on. A bit confusing, but
Reynolds is a good guide and the
reader need have no fear, since all
the seemingly loose ends � and
coincidences � are neatly re-
solved at the close.
the government quota. Seven
speciesof kangaroos havealready
become extinct and twelve others
are considered endangered under
the Convention on International
Trade in Endangered Spelive
kangaroos have their legs and
tails hacked off by shooters whose
first shot wasn't enough to kill.
Shooters make good money
selling the pelts and meat, which
is ground into pet food.
"Calling the Australian kan-
garoo hunt wildlife management
is a blatant misnomer, said
Leilani Anderson, Kangaroo
Campaign Coordinator for
Greenpeace USA. "The Austra-
lian government threatens to
manage the kangaroos to death
The Australian govern-
ment continues to escalate the
kangaroo genocide by sanction-
ing larger and larger quotas. In
1981 an inflated population esti-
mate of 32 million kangaroos
prompted the U.S. Fish and Wild-
life Service to lift a ban on kanga-
roo imports into the U.S. Two
years later the Australian govern-
ment revised its estimates show-
ing that a paltry 19 million kanga-
roos remained. Despite the pre-
cipitous decline, elements in the
Australian government are en-
couraging both human consump-
tion of kangaroo meat and farm-
ing roos to satiate the growing
market for kangaroo products.
Many of these products may
be on your campus. The kangaroo
issue could make a great story for
your news organization as it di-
rectly involves school athletics.
Student activism could be an-
other angle, because the Green-
peace campaign for a Congres-
sional ban on kangaroo imports
should interest many young
people.
Greenpeace will be officially
kicking off the kangaroo cam-
paign in September. If you should
want any interviews, photos or
more information aobut the kan-
garoo slaughter and what can be
done to end it contact Green-
peace.
STUDENTS
SAVE! SAVE!
ON HIGH QUALITY
USED 5Ba
STARTERS &
ALTERNATORS
Foreign & Domestic
from
$15.00
9 miles east of Greenville on 10th Street (Hwy 33)
I Western Steer,
Family
ISTERKH0USE
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Located on 10th Street
Next to Hastings Ford
of the
UK
Black Greek Order
Sisterhood
Friendship
3


&

Delta Sig�a
Theta
Togetherness
At 7:00 Sunday, September 11,1988
Mendenhall Student Center
A Convocation For The Black
College Woman!
! STRESS &
Freshmen are welcome
Pirat
Bv DOUG

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overall : -
This is 1
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passes for 128
touchdowns m the deJ
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passes tot 239 )
touchdowns and on





ALE!
k Gordon's Golf & Ski
�ptember 10th
.�� & Mem Si Jickm, Houstwam Izod
k e Men � Pants (Sla 32 4 H etc.). Jr. k
L. Men and Lad�Colf Shoe, etc.
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ness
11,1988
nter
lack
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 Page 21
Pirates cruise past Golden Eagles 52-13
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sport Editor
"1 thought it was just a great
overall performance
This is how Pirate Head Coach
Art Baker summed up Saturday's
52-13 victory over Tennessee
Tech.
And this is about the only way
to describe the game, because of
the enormity of contributions
from a number of the Pirate play-
ers. The Pirate offense exploited
the Tech defense time and time
again in a seemingly effortless,
workman-like fashion, a defense
which according to Eagles Coach
hm Ragland was "one oi the
strong points going into the sea-
son
For example, Travis Hunter
went six for eight for 114 yards
and two touchdowns passing,
adding 29 more on the ground.
Reggie McKinnev ran for 7
yards, adding b7 more on kick
returns. Tim James rushed for 5b
yards, and caught two passes for
7 more.
And as if that wasn't enough,
Charlie Libretto came oii the
bench and went three for three
passing for 28 yards, and ran for
5 yards and two touchdowns,
junior Robinson returned a kick-
off for98 yards for a touchdown, a
record for a game in Ficklen Sta-
dium. The offensive line opened
gaping holes. The defense held
Tech to only 277 total yards and 13
points.
What else could Baker say?
The Firates set the tempo for the
game in front of the 29,700 plus
crowd from the outset, when jun-
ior Robinson returned the open-
ing kick-off from his own goal-
line out to the Firate 26 yard line.
On the first play from scrim-
mage, fullback Tim James got the
call, and carried the ball up the gut
of the defense for a 12 yard gain.
After another carry by James and
an incomplete pass, Travis
Hunter found tailback Reggie
McKinney coming across the
middle for an eleven yard com-
pletion down to the Tech 47 yard
line. Two plays later, on an option
left, Hunter pitched the ball to
running back Jarrod Moody, who
cut off a block on the corner and
ran down the sideline for a 44 yard
touchdown. "It was just a simple
option play Moody said after
the game, "what we've been run-
ning for a long time, and when
Travis pitched me the ball, I got a
great block from Reggie McKin-
ney, and the line sealed of the
backside. They did a good job
Rob Imperato added the extra
point, giving the Firates a 7-0 lead
with only 3:12 clasped.
Firate fans didn't have to wait
long for another Firate score. Af-
ter three unsuccessful offensive
plays by Golden Eagles they were
forced to punt, turning the ball
over to ECU on their own 29 yard
line. On a penalty plagued drive,
the Firate's Darren Bynum found
the end zone on a 30 yard reverse,
only to have the touchdown nulli-
fied by an illegal motion penalty.
James pounded the middle, gain-
ing 25 yards in the course of the
series to keep the Firate drive
alive, before Hunter threw a 30
yard touchdown strike to Bojack
Davenport with 7:40 remaining in
the first quarter. Imperato added
the extra point, improving the
Firate lead to 14-0.
But the first quarter was not
through, and neither were the
Firates. A stingy ECU defense
held the Eagles to only 17 yards on
their next possession, and Tech
was forced to punt, rolling the ball
dead on the Firate nine yard line.
Reggie McKinney took the ball
out to the 23 yard line before
another illegal procedure penalty
took the Firates back to the 18. On
the next play, Hunter faded back,
and flipped a short screen pass to
James on the left side. James made
a leaping, one-handed grab, then,
behind his blockers, ran through
and over the Eagle defense, finally
being pulled down 40 yards later
at theTech 42 yard line. Two plays
later, Bynum cut loose on another
end around, the same play that he
had scored on earlier, picking up
25 vardsdown to theTech 13. Two
plays later Hunter found Moody
in the end zone for a 12 yard
touchdown, Hunter's second of
the quarter. "Travis was really
sharp tonight throwing the ball
Baker commented after the con-
test. Imperato added the extra
point, and the Firates led 21-0
with 1:57 remaining in the quar-
ter.
The Golden Eagles were finally
able to engineer a successful drive
at the end of the first quarter and
the beginning of the second,
going 53 yards down to the Firate
21 before stalling. They were
forced to settle for a 38 yard field
goal by Eagle place kicker Ryan
Weeks.
Charlie Libretto cruises into the en
Walters).
Lightening struck again on the
Eagle's subsequent kick-off in the
form of Junior Robinson. Robin-
son took Weeks' kick on his own 2
yard line, and streaked 98 yards
for a touchdown, with the help of
some spectacular blocking, espe-
cially two thrown downfield bv
Willie Lewis and Glenn Willis. "I
had a big hole to run through,
because everybody had the right
block Robinson said. "I got a
really good block fromGIenn,and
I just cut of it and went in Imper-
ato added the extra point, taking
the ECU lead to 28-3.
On Tech's next series, quarter-
back Thomas DeBow was picked
off by the Firate's Glenn Willis.
The Firates couldn't move the
ball, but Imperato stepped in and
kicked a 44 yard field goal, clear-
ing up some oi the doubts about
the kickirtg-gamein the process,
and boosting the Firate lead to 31 -
3 with 8:09 remaining in the half.
d zone for one of his two toucdown scrambles. (Photo by Thomas
"Our kicking game was surpris-
ingly good tonight Baker com-
mented after the game, "I was
very pleased with our effort
The two squads then traded the
ball for the remainder of the half,
neither able to get close to the
opposing end zone. As the last
seconds ticked of the clock the
Firates started for the locker room
with a commanding 28 point lead.
ECU started the second half
much as they had ended the first.
After a kick-off to the Eagles to
open the half, the Firate defense
took the field, and forced the
Eagles to give up the ball after
only a few plays. The offense
came on and, behind runs by
Hunter of 26 yards and McKinney
of nine, nine, and 17 yards respec-
tively, the Firates drove down to
the Tech five yard line. On the
next play, McKinney took the
pitch from Hunter and cruised
across the goal line for the score.
Imperato added the extra point,
making the score 38-3.
On the next series, the Golden
Eagles scored their only touch-
down of the game, on a 71 vard
pass from DeBow to Kenneth Gil-
strap. Weeks added the extra
point, boosting the score to 38-10
At this point, the Firates began
to shuffle in their second team
players Led by Charlie Libretto
and running backs Willie Lewis,
Dcnell Harper, and David
Daniels, the Firates engineered a
time consuming 7:34 drive, end
ing with a Libretto keeper for a
four yard touchdown.
Tech drove the length of the
field on their next possession but,
once again the defense stopped
them in close, and the Eagles' had
to settle for a 38 yard field goal bv
Weeks, cutting the Firate lead to
45-10 with 11:38 remaining in the
game.
See PIRATES, page 25
Virginia wins season opener
Art Baker listens to his coaches upstairs, and makes a touchdown
call. (Photo by Thomas Walters).
Maryland wins in
strong comeback
COLLEGE FARK, Md. (AF) �
Junior Neil O'Donnell threw two
touchdown passes and ran for
another score in a 21 -0 third-quar-
ter burst that carried Maryland to
a 27-16 victory over Louisville in a
season-opener for both schools
Saturday night.
Trailing 10-3, Maryland opened
the second half with a 13-play, 78-
vard drive that culminated with a
3-yard touchdown pass from
O'Donnell to Mike Beasley to
even the score at 10-10.
O'Donnell then connected with
Vernon Joines for a 66-yard scor-
ing pass with 1:47 left in the quar-
ter, giving Maryland a 17-10 ad-
vantage. The touchdown came
one play after a Louisville punt.
On the first play of Louisville's
next possession, Maryland cor-
ncrback J.B. Brown intercepted a
fay Gruden pass at the Louisville
38-yard line.
Four plays later, O'Donnell
drove into the end zone on a 1-
yard sneak, giving Maryland a 24-
10 lead on the final play of the
period.
O'Donnell completed nine of 11
passes for 128 yards and two
touchdowns in the decisive quar-
ter. In all, he completed 22 of 33
passes for 239 yards with two
touchdowns and one intercep-
tion.
Louisville pulled within 24-16
when Gruden threw his second
touchdown pass to Chad Fortune,
a 3-yarder, with 7:44 remaining.
The extra-point attempt went
wide to the left.
Dan Flocki completed the scor-
ing with a 47-yard field goal with
2:09 remaining for the Terps.
Louisville controlled the game
in the opening quarter. The Cardi-
nals opened a 10-0 lead when
Gruden connected with Fortune
on a 40-yard touchdown pass
with 1:07 remaining in the period.
That completion moved
Gruden into second place in ca-
reer passing yards at Louisville.
Gruden completed 28 of 45 passes
for 319 yards in the game. That
yardage total gives the senior
4,823 for his career. Ed Rubbert
holds the Louisville record with
5,496 yards.
The Terps pulled within 10-3
with 10:49 left in the first half on a
35-yard field goal by Flocki.
Louisville opened the scoring
when Ron Bell made a 29-yard
field goal with 5:10 left in the first
quarter.
Maryland, which averaged 88
yards rushing per game last year,
gained 176 yards on the ground.
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AF)
� It wasn't what Virginia had in
mind as the Cavaliers prepare for
a date next week with No. 20 Fenn
State.
"They nickle and dimed us to
death in the first half Virginia
defensive back Kevin Cook said
after the Cavaliers came back
from a 17-10 half time deficit for a
31-23 victory over William &
Mary Saturday night.
"We turned it on in the second
half Cook said, "but we're not
going to be able to do it all year
against teams that are maybe a
little better
Tailback Marcus Wilson scored
touchdowns on Virginia's first
two possessions of the second half
as the Cavaliers kicked off their
100th year of football with the
victory.
The game also was the season
opener for William & Mary, a
Division I-AA school which had
won the last two meetings be-
tween the two teams.
Virginia Coach George Welsh
said the Cavaliers need to get
more aggressive when they play
Penn State.
"I d n't think this team has
foun elf yet Welsh said. "We
have .een dull. We haven't been
enthusiastic. And that's going to
hurt us
"Overall, they wore us
down William & Mary coach
Jimye Laycock said. "It took its
toll. Their quickness and ability to
come from the back side hurt us
The Indians built their halftime
advantage behind the passing of
John Brosnahan and the running
of Allan Williams.
Virginia put together a 75-yard,
seven play drive on its first pos-
session of the second half, with
Wilson running 20 yards up the
middle to tie the game at 10:55 of
the third quarter.
On William & Mary's first play
from scrimmage after the ensuing
kickoff, Viginia linebacker Ray
Savage stripped the ball from Ray
Kingsfield and the Cavaliers' Phil
Thomas recovered at the Indians'
18-yard line.
Quarterback Shawn Moore ran
18 yards for a score on the next
play, but the touchdown was
called back by a holding penalty.
Five plays later, Moore hit Wilson
on a 4-yard scoring pass for a 24-
17 Virginia lead midway through
the quarter.
William & Mary responded
with a 44-yard drive that ended
when Steve Christie tied his own
school record with a 53-yard field
goal.
Early in the fourth quarter, the
Indian's Aurelius Henderson in-
tercepted a deflected Moore pass
and returned it 23 vards to the
J
Virginia 12. But the William &
Mary drive stalled, and Christie
hit a 22-yard field goal at the 12:27
mark to cut the gap to 24-23.
After each team swapped pos-
sessions, Virginia moved 82 yards
in six plays with Moore going in
on 1-yard keeper for the final
score with 3:58 to play. The key
play in the drive was a short pass
from Moore to Kevin Morgan,
who turned it into a 51-yard gain
to the William & Mary 10.
Virginia went up 3-0 in the first
quarter on Mark Inderlied's 21-
yard field goal before William &
Mary came back with a 71-yard
march that Williams finished off
with a 1-yard scoring run.
Virginia took the kickorf and
See VIRGINIA, page23
Pirate's Booty
Credit to those deserving it
that don't. It takes these guys a
long time and a lot of effort to
transform a plot of gTass into a
football field that can serve as a
proper representative of the Ath-
letic Department and the Univer-
sity. Anyway, the field looked
great, and I think the guys in
operations deserve our gratitude.
Now to the thing that I don't
think anyone noticed, and to a de-
partment on campus that doesn't
receive nearly the credit that they
deserve. I'm referring, of course,
to the Sports Information Depart-
ment.
By DOUGJOHNSON
Sports Editor
First off, let me say that I hope
that everyone enjoyed the game. I
sureashell did. I really had a great
time watching the game. But 1 no-
ticed a few other things, a few
things that maybe some other
people noticed, and some things
that I'm sure no one in the stands
saw. So I decided that I would
devote today's column to giving
credit where credit is due.
First, the thing that some of you
probably noticed. The field.
Didn't it look great? Many people
probably take for granted the way
the field looks at the games. But I
know a few guys in Operations
Now, I'm sure you didn't real-
ize this, and I'm equally sure that
Sports Information were greatly
responsible for the story that you
just read about the game. But
don't hold that against them. I
mean, as soon as the first quarter
was over, a very attractive
woman came up to me and gave
me, and me alone, a complete list
of the first quarter stats. (Okay, so
she may ha ve gi ven a copy to all of
the other writers in the press box,
too. But let me have my fantasies.)
This same thing happened at the
half, at the end of the third quar-
ter, and at the end of the game.
Any stat, any fact, or any an-
swer that I may have needed
about the game, either team, the
coaches, etc. were immediately
supplied by a hurrying, scum ing
SI person. As a matter of fact, I
really didn't have to be in the
press box at all. I could have been
drunk and raising hell in the
stands with the rest of you. All I
would have had to do was go up
at the end of the game, and get the
little package that they gave me. It
had everything. Team stats, indi-
vidual stats, scoring drives, blah,
blah, blah. Hell, they even had
quotes from the coaches in there.
So what I guess I'm trying to
say, in a round about, is thanks a
lot, all of you, Dean and George
and Tina and Carolyn and Tom,
and anyone else that I may have
forgotten, for making my job, and
the job of all the other writers, so
much easier and more enjoyable. I
hope that the SI people at all of the
schools that the Pirates play on thi
road will be as competent ana
cooperative as you all are, al
though I really can't see this bein
the case.
And finally, thanks to the an-
nouncer in the press box, who
busted on the Tennessee Tech
Dean and his entourage when
they got too rowdy. Way to go,
guy. Later.





22 THE EAST CAROLIN1 AN
SEPTEMBER 6.1988
Blue Devils get first victory
EVANSTON, ILL. (AD- Duke
Coach Steve Spurrier summed up
Saturday night's 31-21 victory
over Northwestern perfectly.
"We came out of the box real
quick, and we played extremely
except for a few times Spurrier
said. "We wanted to run more but
we went to what we do best and
that is pass
Anthony Dilwig provided the
passing as he completed 29 of 40
passes for 353 yards and a pair of
touchdowns while Randy Jones
made a pair of 1-yard touchdown
runs set up by Dilweg's passes.
"1 just stood there and saw most
of my passes completed said
Dilweg. "My receivers were wide
open. I was amazed surprised.
The middle was wide open be-
cause they respected our deep
threat
Dilweg's touchdown passes
went to Clarkston Hines for 18
yards and Dave Colonna for 8
yards. Hines caught 8 passes for
131 yards.
"He was the hole in the win-
dow said Dilweg.
Spurrier said that the middle
was open for the medium passes
because "Their linebackers were
snug on our line of scrimmage
Northwestern Coach Francis
Peay, was aware of that because
"We wanted to take away their
screen passes but we helped them
find something they didn't have
Northwestern also found some-
thing it didn't have, the passing
combination of Greg Bradshaw to
Richard Buchanan.
The two hooked up for three
touchdowns on passes of 19, 26
and 18 yards, the last coming with
five seconds left in the game to cut
Duke's margin of victory.
"We didn' t come of f the football
and we got smacked in the
mouth said Peay.
Duke's Blue Devils took com-
mand of the game in the first half
and raced to a 28-0 lead before
North western's passing combi-
nation of Bradshaw to Buchanan
began to click.
The two hooked up for a 19-
yard touchdown with 1.03 left in
the first half and Bradshaw com-
pleted a 26-yard touchdown pass
to Buchanan midway in the third
quarter to cut the lead to 28-13.
With five seconds left in the
game, Bradshaw threw an 18-
yard TD pass to Buchanan.
Northwestern's Wildcats put
on another threat in the third
quarter but Bradshaw was sacked
on successive plays by John
Howell and Anthony Allen, forc-
ing Northwestern into a punting
situation.
Early in the fourth quarter,
Duke threatened with Dilweg
hitting Hines with passes of 16
and 10 years but the Blue Devils
settled for a 20-yard field goal by
Doug Peterson and a safe 31-13
lead.
It marked the first time North-
western had played a home night
game in 45 years, but the portable
lights did little to help the Wild-
cats who have not won a season
opener since 1975.
Dilweg was sacked by Kurt
Kundergreen on the third play
from scrimmage for a seven yard
loss. But from then on through the
first quarter, Dilweg was perfect
as he completed his first nine
passes for 143 yards before miss-
ing his first attempt in the second
quarter.
Dilweg drove Duke to the
Northwestern 27-yard line and
then completed a 21-yard pass to
Colonna. But Colonna fumbled
after the catch and Northwestern
recovered.
The Wildcats were forced to
punt and Wyatt Smith returned
42 yards to the Northwestern 13.
Randy Jones needed only three
plays to score from the 1 -yard line
for a 7-0 lead.
On Duke's next posession,
Dilweg hit Hines with an 18-yard
touchdown pass and a 14-0 lead.
The Blue Devils then put to-
gether two devastating drives for
touchdowns, They went 82 yards
in 17 plays with Randy Jones scor-
ing from the 1-yard line and then
marched 90 yards, capped by an
8-yard TD pass from Dilweg to
Colonna for a 28-0 lead �
At that point all Northwestern
backers had to cheer were kick
returns By Pat New. New re-
turned a punt for 43 yards and
also had a 43-yard kickoff return.
After Colonna's touchdown.
New returned a kick 31 yards to
the Northwestern 40. Bradshaw
then completed a 41 yard pass to
Randy McClellan and followed
with his 19-yard touchdown pass
to Buchanan to cut the Duke lead
to 28-7 at the half.
Thompson gets new start
CHARLOTTE (AP) The ex-
pansion Charlotte Hornets said
they don't plan to test David
Thompson for drugs, but under
the NBAs drug plan, front-office
employees are subject to dis-
missal if they test positive for ille-
gal substances.
The two-time national player of
the year left N.C. State for a seem-
inglv bright future in the pros in
1975. But by the early 1980s, his
star had dimmed as he lost a battle
with cocaine.
Thompson, hired as the team's
director of community relations,
admitted last week that his drug
abuse began while a star player
with the Denver Nuggets.
"The first experience I had with
drugs was just using small
amounts he told The News and
Observer of Raleigh. "It was just a
social thing. I tell you when it
really got bad was when free-bas-
ing (smoking cocaine) became a
fad. You can go through a lot of
drugs quickly. It's a lot more
addicting than just snorting
Thompson said he has been
clean of drugs since he left jail in
1987. He has been in his home-
town of Shelby for nine months,
getting his life squared away.
Several weeks ago, he ap-
proached the Hornete about a job.
"I have nothing to hide Th-
ompson said. "It's been well-
documented. It's time for me to
tell my side of it. I don't think I'm
a bad guy. I have an illness. It's a
problem that's prevalent in soci-
ety now. I'm a guy that's over-
come it and is on the road back
Carl Scheer, the Hornet's vice
president, acknowledged there's
no guarantee Thompson had
solved his problem.
"I know the percentage of re-
covery is not very high. I hope he
doesn't fail. 1 want him to
succeed he said.
"1 was overwhelmed by the
response David received from the
community here, the children and
adults who came to David, asking
for his autograph said majority
owner George Shinn. "It re-
minded me of what a great athlete
he was and what a great athlete he
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
R
U
S
H
COME AS YOU ARE
Wear a coat and tie or jeans and t-shirt. The main thing is to be
yourself. At Alpha Sig we all are individuals; a group of men
from different backgrounds which come together to form a
stronger brotherhood. Please come visit the brothers and little
sisters during rush to see what we are all about. And be sure to
come as you are.
TUES. SEPT. 6 - Pig Pickin'
WED. SEPT. 7 - Pizza and Pool Tourney
THURS. SEPT. 8 - Meet the Chi Omega's
All Freshmen Welcome
was and what he meant to our
state
"Right now, I'm looking for-
ward to having a glimmer of
hope Thompson said at a Char-
lotte news conference last week
after he was hired.
MARATHON
RESTAURANTS
Greek Owned & Operated Since 1979
Delivery Hours
Mon. - Fri. 4-11
Sat. - Sun. 11-11
SUBS
GREEK DISHES
SANDWICHES
SALADS
PIZZA
GREEK PASTRIES
'Best Deal in Town"
752-0326
or
752-3753
560 Evans St.
�Pftnans
MENS WEAR
Khaki
and
Bucks
Khakis and Dirty Bucks
have been a by-word in
every young man's ward-
robe since World War II.
We're not sure who can take
credit for first putting the
two together, but the love
affair for these two timeless
pieces of clothing continues
both on and off campus.
This fall Coffman's con-
tinues to offer you some
great values to help you
build your fall wardrobe.
Khakis and Bucksbasics for a
young man's campus or
weekend wardrobe. At all
three of our Coffman's
stores you'll find these spe-
cial values during August.
Pre-washed cotton
Duckheadspleated
vHk
� pair for T"D.30
Our Own Coffman's
Fine Quality Khakis front 2 pair for s62.95
pleated
pair tor
69.95
Our Own Coffman's
� Dirty Buckss59.50
oPPmans
MENS WEAR
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
CAROLINA EAST MALL
TARRYTOWN MALL - Rocky Mount
Wher
i A. . is
.H'l tin i
the su.
It � hild is m
m hool he will no doubt
. rite a rep rt

in sch ol ma
With U :
to use
mak thai
There
k.r th
m �
(rating it
encoui
tos

the j
ol
u

blui
i ,

;k ai
Antarctic reei
at Post Office
hut
As
w!
block
rtiel
-n individu
nber i I

horiztwu.ii fcnn.ii design,
scene depicting each m,
means of travel is shown afjj
right with a map of the :
gion .is a backd black
ted line follows the route of tral
The four stamps are arrai j
chronological order, left I I
md top to bottom, start; i
Palmer, who on Nov
became the first Americai I
continent. His sailir j
i kw is based on a lir
ided b) the Old I
Museum ot Stonington Cof
the explorer's hometown.
V a v v lieutenant (
Wilkes, who proved dui
expedition ol 1839 43 that Ana
tu.i isacontiru rtt,isont
adhesive in the block. The
of Wilkes is based on an ll
painting by Samuel Ml Wat
provided by the National I
Gallery. Wilkes'ship con - a
National Geographic Society
erence materials
Admiral Richard E. Byrd i
st known American explord
the Antarctic, fie condi
expeditions to the region,
oversaw extensive scienfl
study and photographic mapn
i the continent by air It is ml
esting tor collectors to note
stamps were issued in 19 I
and 1935 to honor Rv rd S seci
Antarctic expedition, chart I
course he took in establish
Little America
The likeness of Bvrd is a 0
posite based on National Tort
Gallery photos and his plan!
based on National Geograr
Society photos.
Lincoln Ellsworth, feature)
the fourth stamp, was the firi
fly over both the Arctic and
Antarctic He was the leadej
four expeditions during
1930s in 1935, Ellsworth mac
daring four-stop, 22-day fligl
a single-engine plane His pot
also is a composite taken ft
se eral photographs from
Library of Congress. The plat
based on National Geograi
photos.
Ninety percent ot Antarctic
covered with ice, glaciated
about 170,000 years. Antarc
has the world's coldest temj
tures - 20 degrees colder than
Arctic - and at 6,000 feet, has
highest average altitude of
continent.
No wonder this fore!
continent has been a challenj
mankind!





Ill 1 As IA KOI INIAN
si I'M MBI k ��-�
RANTS
Where did the summer go ?
5 IES
1 IKS
nun'
0326
3753
is it back to
adi ' Whore did
I id is in elementary
loubl be asked
I on w hat he did
i i ation At
I va .is w hen 1 w as
- ears ago
vpensiv c eas
ficalh dc
. ti rs w In not
: t niih h more in
i. ad antages
in era Not
� il report
'his
: also be
re about
itei aca
ntribute
; as the
Id to
ework
sj :� ITie
! some
ire tak
i : hings
Lshutl �
h it, to

i i the
: forms
� c An
. I like a
Some elementary schools do
have some sort of photographic
activities tor students. At the jun
lor and senior high school levels
Photographic help is much more
prevalent. Some even have photo
clubs or regular classes where
students can take advantage ot
advanced instruction in process
ing and printing, as well as shoot-
ing.
The major problem I've en-
countered with the very young
student photographers is teach-
ing them to be more selective
about the pictures they take.
Hand a younster a new camera
and. in his enthusiasm to get out
and shoot pictures, he'll burn upa
rollot 10,12, 24, and even 3b expo
sures in no time flat indis
erectly shooting anything that
appears in front ot the camera.
When Mom and Dad are paying
the film and processing costs, that
i an sometimes be rather prohibi-
tive. It can also be disappointing
when you see all the not-so-hot
vasted pictures.
For the tirst tew rolls, parents
should help guide the younster,
not only in the economics ot
trying to make every shot count
toward An end result, but in ways
to improve the basic shooting
technique, such as making a
o erall shot to tell the whole story
and then movine in closer to show
Antarctic region
Post Office
d
ks
3J
V
r
45.95
62.95
69.95
59.50
'iul
ex i
1 I lien
tica the
. i a new
11 h a -
s ilkes
i ineoln
lil ot one
irtet
. it designs An icy
� ich man s
. w n at the
I i lar re-
ack dot-
: tra el
� in
fl to right
tarting with
- 1820,
.)� ' sight
: sh;p is
h i ing
i Lighthouse
n, Conn
. I Charles
ed during his
131 11 Antarc-
thi second
fhe portrait
on an 1870
� II IVaugh
. Portrait
n ics from
i i� ref-
rd is the
u i �; l rerof
ted five
m, and
it ntific
� mapping
air. It is intcr-
rs to l � �te that
I I , 1934
l's st v i nd
I arting the
tablishing
t B id is a com-
ttional Portrait
ind his plane is
il Q ographic
!i. featured on
is the first to
. n ti and the
tii H the leader of
during the
i irth made a
la) flight in
mc 1 lis portrait
I posite taken from
! . raphs from the
� i he plane is
t i (
graphic
I Ant.m ti( a is
ice, gla i.ited tor
ifl years. Antarctica
( l's t oltlest tempera-
�. ej �lder than the
: at 6 00(I fe t. has the
rage altitude of any
i ,q, i this foreboding
is been a challenge to
details.
For example: a long shot of the
family gathered around a picnic
talbe, followed by closer shots ot
someone cooking hot dogs, And
even closer shots ot someone eat-
ing one.
When the prints come back,
take time with tin' youngster to
evaluate the shots. I lore, the
emphasis should be on praise for
the "great" shots, with guidance
on how some of the others might
have Peen improved. For in-
stance, could one of the pictures
have been better had it been shot
from another angle or a little
closer, or was some point of the
storv missed altogether?
After having shot three of tour
rools with such guidance (in
which you've remembered to
praise and assist rather than dis
courage and i riticize), the young-
ster should be ready to solo.
It you've done your job well and
really turned the youngster on to
picture-taking, you will have set
him up with a talent that can be
further developed and used to his
advantage tor the rest ot the
school year and beyond. I he i ost
of those few rolls ot film will pay
high dividends
In school, youngsters should
seek permission from their teat h
ers to use a camera as an addi
tional school work tool. The mam
letters 1 receive from teachers
around the country make me feel
that students w ill be encouraged
and given further guidance in
improving their skills
From An illustrated report oi
summer activities, the youngster
can graduate to shooting school
activities, earn extra credit and
praise with photo reports and
work on the school newspai �
yearbook or other publicaitons.
It's not unusual tor some hi
school photographers to become
so proficient that they are used by
the local newspaper as strii
photograpcrs tor overing schi
events.
Who knows? The younj
you tin n on to pi( hire taking
today may be the great photogra-
pher ot ti imorrov
RICK HILL
CHRISTIAN FOLKSINGER
CONCERT
ON THE MALL
wins. SFPT 7
6-8 I'M

SPONSORED BY .
Bored with the class scene?
Tired of having sand kicked in your face?
Sick of seeing Doublemint S commercials on TV?
Well, we don't care. Hut join Earlvis and the Bonehead evei j
Thursday for the Boss last Carolinian Satire Pace am way.
DINNER
in F R1ONCERT
5 I'M
Kl C I PI ION
l I I K t ONCERT
AT THE
METHODIST
si l i) n I CENT1 R
ICJ iS fl
i m)
RAIN SITE:
Ml NDENHALL 244
FOR MORI INFO:
752-7240
t
4� �
rt
.f
M don't want
a lot of hype.
I just want
something I
can count on .99
5S�;�S
1

v,
Greg Riley I Iniversity of North Carolina-Class of 1989
&.�
A
Some long
panics promise youi t
but what you realh want -
pendable, high-quality service
That's just w
vchj choose AT&l - -
Service, at at sti ats
than you think buca
bw long distance rates �
i perat m" assistance, clear o ai
nections and immediate
for wkhis numbers Viui
assurance that virtualh
vour calls will go thn
first time. That's the t isol
theAI&TWorkivvidt li u y
Network
When its i
forget the gimmicks and makt
the intelligent choice, uv
Ifyoud like t� � ki
about ourpRxlucts or sen :u s
like International Calling and
the AMI Card, call us at
1 800 222 CBi
AT&T
The right choice.
-1 nd





J IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988 19
hon Where did the summer go ?
RANTS
rated Since 1979
l lours
i. 4 11
11-11
s
ISHES
CHES
DS
7 A
STRIES
in Town"
752-0326
or
752-3753
560 Evans St.
cks
r fr
s45.95
s62.95
s69.95
s59.50
EAR
i AD Wow � is it back-to-
, tool time already? Where did
the summer go?
U your child is in elementary
-v hoot, he will no doubt be asked
to write a report on what he did
er the summer vacation. At
(as! that's how it was when I was
in school, many years ago.
With today's inexpensive, easy-
use cameras specifically de-
signed for youngsters, why not
make that report much more in-
resting by adding photos?
There are several advantages
i r the child with a camera. Not
mly will he make that report
nore interesting by visually illus-
rating it, but he might also be
ncouraged to learn more about
photography so that in later aca-
demic years he might contribute
school publicaitons such as the
earbook or newspaper.
Introducing a voting child to
photography will take some work
n the part of his parents. The
luld will have to be taught some
! the basics oi good picture-tak-
ing, including such simple things
is learning to squeeze the shutter
utton, rather than punch it, to
prevent camera movement and
blurred pictures, as well as the
slightly more complicated forms
f a picture storv that have an
opening and ending, just like a
v ritten storv.
Antarctic regioi
at Post Office
(AP) The ice-capped, sub-
freezing continent of Antarctica
has posed a challenge to explor-
�r scientists and adventurers for
hundreds oi years.
As a tribute to four brave men
w ho first explored Antarctica, the
United States will issue a new
block of four commemoratives.
Featured on the block are Natha-
niel B. Palmer, Charles Wilkes,
Richard F. Byrd and Lincoln
Ellsworth.
�n individual portrait of one
member of the heroic quartet
appears to the left in each of the
horizontal format designs An icy
scene depicting each man's
means of travel is shown at the
right with a map of the polar re-
gion as a backdrop. A black dot-
ted line follows the rovite of travel.
The four stamps are arranged in
chronological order, left to right
�nd top to bottom, starting with
Palmer, who, on Nov. 18, lb20,
became the first American to sight
the continent. His sailing ship is
I lero is based on a line drawing
provided by the Old Lighthouse
' luseum of Stonington, Conn
the explorer's hometown.
Navy lieutenant Charles
likes, who proved during his
pedition of 1839-43 that Antarc-
i a is a continent, is on the second
id hesi vein the block. The portrait
t Wilkes is based on an 1870
painting by Samuel Bell Waugh
provided bv the National Portrait
.allery. Wilkes' ship comes from
Manorial Geographic Society ref-
rence materials.
Admiral Richard E. Byrd is the
i st-known American explorer of
� he Antarctic. He conducted five
expeditions to the region, and
ersaw extensive scientific
-tudy and photographic mapping
4 the continent by air. It is inter-
esting for collectors to note that
tamps were issued in 1933,1934
and 1935 to honor Byrd's second
Nntarctic expedition, charting the
course he took in establishing
Little America.
The likeness of Byrd is a corn-
el te based on National Portrait
tilery photos, and his plane is
i-ed on National Geographic
xiciety photos.
Lincoln Ellsworth, featured on
the fourth stamp, was the first to
fly over both the Arctic and the
ntarctic. Fie was the leader of
tour expeditions during the
1930s. In 1935, Ellsworth made a
bring four-stop, 22-day flight in
a single-engine plane. His portrait
ilso is a composite taken from
several photographs from the
! ibrary of Congress. The plane is
based on National Geographic
photos.
Ninety percent of Antarctica is
coveted with ice, glaciated for
about 170,000 years. Antarctica
lias the world's coldest tempera-
tures - 20 degrees colder than the
Arctic - and at 6,000 feet, has the
highest average altitude of any
continent.
No wonder this foreboding
continent has been a challenge to
mankind!
Some elementary schools do
have some sort of photographic
activities for students. At the jun-
ior and senior high school levels.
Photographic help is much more
prevalent. Some even have photo
clubs or regular classes where
students can take advantage of
advanced instruction in process-
ing and printing, as well as shoot-
ing.
The major problem I've en-
countered with the very young
student photographers is teach-
ing them to be more selective
about the pictures they take.
Hand a younster a new camera
and, in his enthusiasm to get out
and shoot pictures, he'll burn up a
roll of 10,12,24, and even 36 expo-
sures in no time flat � indis-
creetly shooting anything that
appears in front of the camera.
When Mom and Dad are paying
the film and processing costs, that
can sometimes be rather prohibi-
tive. It can also be disappointing
when you see all the not-so-hot
wasted pictures.
For the first few rolls, parents
should help guide the younster,
not only in the economics of
trying to make every shot count
toward an end result, but in ways
to improve the basic shooting
technique, such as making an
overall shot to tell the whole story,
and then moving in closer to show
details.
For example: a long shot of the
family gathered around a picnic
talbe, followed by closer shots of
someone cooking hot dogs, and
even closer shots of someone eat-
ing one.
When the prints come back,
take time with the youngster to
evaluate the shots. Here, the
emphasis should be on praise for
the "great" shots, with guidance
on how some of the others might
have been improved. For in-
stance, could one of the pictures
have been better had it been shot
from another angle or a little
closer, or was some point of the
story missed altogether?
After having shot three of four
rools with such guidance (in
which you've remembered to
praise and assist rather than dis-
courage and criticize), the young-
ster should be ready to solo.
If you've done your job well and
really turned the youngster on to
picture-taking, you will have set
him up with a talent that can be
further developed and used to his
advantage for the rest of the
school year and beyond. The cost
of those few rolls of film will pay
high dividends.
In school, youngsters should
seek permission from their teach-
ers to use a camera as an addi-
tional schoolwork tool. The many
letters I receive from teachers
around the country make me feel
that students will be encouraged
and given further guidance in
improving their skills.
From an illustrated report of
summer activities, the youngster
can graduate to shooting school
activities, earn extra credit and
praise with photo reports, and
work on the school newspaper,
yearbook or other publicaitons.
It's not unusual for some high
school photographers to become
so proficient that they are used by
the local newspaper as string
photograpers for covering school
events.
Who knows? The youngster
you turn on to picture-taking
today may be the great photogra-
pher of tomorrow!
Bored with the class scene?
Tired of having sand kicked in your face?
Sick of seeing Doublemint � commercials on TV?
Well, we don't care. But join Earlvis and the Bonehead every
Thursday for the Boss East Carolinian Satire Page anyway.
sft (
M
RICK HILL
CHRISTIAN FOLKSINGER
CONCERT
ON THE MALL
WEDS. SEPT 7
6-8 PM
SPONSORED BY
W H d��&
A CARING CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY
DINNER
BEFORE CONCERT
5 PM
RECEPTION
AFTER CONCERT
AT THE
METHODIST
STUDENT CENTER
(501 H. 5th st across from
Garrett Dorm)
RAIN SITE:
MENDENHALL 244
FOR MORE INFO:
752-7240
?r: iP"
$&
Some long distance com-
panies promise you the moon,
but what you really want is de-
pendable, high-quality service.
That's just what you'll get when
you choose AT&T Long Distance
Service, at a cost that's a lot less
than you think. bu can expect
low long distance rates, 24-hour
operator assistance, clear con-
nections and immediate credit
for wrong numbers. And the
assurance that virtually all of
your calls will go through the
first time. That's the genius of
the AI&T Worldwide Intelligent
Network.
When it's time to choose,
forget the gimmicks and make
the intelligent choice, AT&T.
If voud like to know more
4
about our products or services,
like International Calling and
the AT&T Card, call us at
1 800 222-0300.
Greg Mey University of North Carolina- Class of 1989
ATM
The right choice.





20 THE EAST O
ROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER t 1988
Yank up the chain saw music
EUGENE, Ore. (AD - Scream-
ing saws, crashing troos and roar-
ing trucks they can handle. Hut
that's nothing compared with
what they can do with acoustic
guitars and mellow voices.
For years, Craig lenkins and
Terry McKinnis ot Head wood.
Ore have been self-taught, "aw-
shucks' musicians. The kind of
guys who'd duck their heads, grin
sheepish grins and strum another
tune every time someone sug-
gested they should do something
with the original material that
was flowing out oi their heads
and oft their fingertips.
So now they've gone and done
it Cut an album that's a polished
mix of deft picking, smooth sing-
ing and graceful lyrics that cap-
ture the loggers' life. And - no
surprise to those who've been lis-
tening to the two guitar-playing,
songwriting buddies tor years -
the thing is selling.
Bui fenkins and McKinnis
aren t certain they want the world
to beat a path to their door. This
turor is enough to make a man
want to pick up his s.nv and re-
treat to the safety of the woods
We ve never thought ot our-
selvesas professional musicians
says Jenkins, 35. "We don't read
music. Wo have to memorize
everything wo write. We just
work on something until it sound
good. We do it tor our enjoyment
and tor the people around us
Their cassette-tape album,
"The Snag Fallers Ball is a
mostly lighthearted collection of
songs about logging in Oregon
and Alaska.
lenkins wrote nine of the 11
songs on the album and co-au-
thored two others with Don Heck,
a triend who is also a musician.
fenkins and McKinnis do the sing-
ing on the album, with lenkins'
animated, Hurl Ives-like voice
dominant.
The two partners are assisted in
the guitar work by Doug Daniels,
who owns the Eugene recording
studio where the album was cut.
The material on the album deals
with such woods scenarios as the
foibles of family-owned logging
operations and the logger's pro-
pensity to quit any job that
doesn't sun mm.
The songs are laced with the
jargon ot the woods. Loggers
who've heard the album give it
high marks for authenticity.
McKinnis, 34, mot Jenkins' sis-
tor, Kim, and married her in 1977.
The two men have boon playing
guitar together over since.
Over the past 10 years, the two
have dabbled in creating lyrics
and melodies of their own. Jen-
kins characterizes much of that
work as a diversion and describes
most of the songs as pieces that
were done for one-time special
occasions.
"1 was writing a few tunes, and
we wree playing at some places
and packing them in he says.
"We started getting a few offers
from outfits like the Rodeway
Inns. 1 figured it was time to make
a decision. So I did. I went with a
logging company up in Alaska
Hut friends kept making it
tough for them to edge a way f rom
the idea that songs about legging
was intriguing. Last fall, they
committed themselves to doing it.
ITie recording business was a
strange new world for them, as
foreign a Coast Range logging
operation might be for a studio
musician.
After a false start or two, they
found Doug Daniels Productions
in Eugene. Daniels, a folk musi-
cian who established his own
studioa yoarago, made more than
one contribution to the album.
"It was like two cultures meet-
ing when wo found him Jenkins
says. "Wo wore just a couple of
loggers with some music, and we
didn't know if he was going to
laugh at us or what. He took us
seriously
"He convinced us it would bo
ethical to do the songs live. He
really deserves the credit for
making the songs work
Jenkins and McKinnis ordered
up 1,000 tapes, thinking that they
might sell out in a matter of
months or years. But even with
highly limited distribution, the
album is going fast, and a second
production run seems a certainty.
Jenkins and McKinnis have
neither the delusion nor the desire
that the music will take them out
of the woods. Rut they are talking
about another album.
"If we do it, I want to write
about some things the logger's up
against and what his future is. I'm
going to call it 'Endangered Spe-
cies "
0
�; �
f
NYC man plays super janitor
NEW YORK (AP) He's "the
si:p.r sometimes more like a
mayor ot a small town, an obser-
vant shrink, a cat rescuer, mouse
undertaker, burglar chaser. He's
an arbiter, detective, middleman
and ultimately the guy whose
fault it is when anything goes
Wrong. The buck stops there.
Sometimes literally.
The species is most annoyed
to be called a janitor.
Its natural habitat is New
"i ork City, where complaining
about one's super is just about
second to complaints about the
weather, but migrations have
been noted as highnses prolifer-
ate across the country. Their repu-
tations vary as widely as stock-
brokers' and sink as low as used-
car salesmen's huckstering a mis-
aligned bionic wonder.
There's the drunken lout sce-
nario, true enough in some cases.
There's the crowd who speak
Yugoslav, Creek, Moroccan and
perchance Esperanto, but "no
English, please. " There's the guy
whose hand assumes the palm-up
position before lips purse into the
hello position.
There are those who. while
required to live in the building by
saw, moonlight elsewhere during
working ours. Sightings of such
supers are as rare as those of fla-
mingos on the Bering Strait.
Hut there are supers who are
ordinary folks, guys just doing a
rather complex job. Joe Thomas is
one such super, a family man with
three daughters, New Yorker
whose first job was pedaling 400
pounds of potatoes across teh isle
ot Manhattan from a West Side
Italian vegetable stand to a fancy
East Side restaurant.
He's a man who believes
strongly in doing things the old-
fashioned way.
He also really goes beyond
the call of duty to help the citizens
ot his domain.
In some ways, he's a boy
wonder. Now 31, he's already
overseeing his second building,
the current one a 22-story highrise
near Lincoln Center which houses
about 1,000 persons in 375 apart-
ments.
1 le has boon there five years,
knows all residents at least by
sight, and admits there are a few
who won't speak to him. He just
continues to say hello to them.
About 60 percent of the apart-
ments are cooperatives, the re-
mainder rentals.
He supervises a staff of 10
doormen, portersand handymen.
In 1987, he was named "Super of
the Year" by the large real estate
firm that employs about 150 su-
pers for its buildings. He received
a savings Kind and a plaque.
APPLICATIONS
BEING ACCEPTED
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CAROUNIAN
2ND FLOOR
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Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity
THERE MAY BE A BETTER WAY TO GO
THROUGH COLLEGE . . . BUT NO ONE
HAS FOUND IT YET!
t 'Emphasis on Scholastics
"Scholarships Awarded
'Excellence in Athletics
?Varsity Soccer Players
?Varsity Tennis Players
?Varsity Swimmers
?Lacrosse Members
?Varsity Cheerleaders
?Outstanding Intramurals
?Leadership in All Aspects of Campus Life
?Best Social Life On Campus
?Large Dynamic Brotherhood
?Finest Little Sisters
FALL RUSH 1988
LOOK FOR THE PARTY TENTS
"AT PKES PEAK Located on corner of W. 5th and Elizabeth St.
Tuesday Sept 6 - Meet The Pikes wLittle Sisters 8-11
Wednesday Sept 7 - Meet the Women of Chi Omega 8-11
Thursday Sept 8 - Beginning of "Pikefettie"
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR RIDES CALL 752-4773
Some
KAI 1 In tin-
ning, there were no heln
shoulder pads. The ball j
round than oblong. 1 ,
counted five points, Ui
four
What it was .�. j
The sport surfaced in
Carolina in 1888 making
day the beginning ot the i
nial year of college football
state Theharlot, i
ported ir Saturd ty's
Threes h olsthat -
first season Dul
linaandV - res! � fi
their season Satui
The football I
stands surround i
ways been a pia:
turn into I i - and at
sprc
the most triv ial matt
Even after
rionof v
official game is im-
pending up n which sc
football g :
ence, itwa s
vs Wal
Shoo
CHA R
old i named
serious condil ind a
school coa h .�
day. on la iftei . infire
out at a Charlotte U n tball
The tw a
peoph
p.m. Friday, inth
the game between Wesl -
and Garinger at Can;
Meanwhile in '
Friday night an
was wounded as he left I
box at a football .
Adkins an assistant I
coach at Glen Mills Hig
was hit in the s
and underwent surgi i
urday, authorities said.
Charlotte polic
trged Donnell Prino
18 and Albert Ang
son, 17, both of Charlotte
erson attends West I �
High, said his father,
Hankcrson.
Logan was charged
counts of assault with I
weapon, inflicting seri
while Hankerson was 1
with carrying a
weapon a 38-caliberhan
police said
A third num. Dwa
of Charlotte, was chai
carrying a concealed w
possession of a stole n fit I
ter police spotted him 1
stands with a gun in his
pocket. Charlotte Police
mander Bruce Treadv
Mints wa not ii
shooting 1 le w as i
jail Saturday.
Police said two Wesl
students apparently wei i
ing the game wh
youths approached ar
fighting. One of the VN
lotte students pulled a j
from his w listband a-
shooting police said
Tread way said tr� s
stemmed trom an oi
among the tour apparer
Continued from page 2
Virginia n
their ope tie,
m ent 80 yards on 10 p
Moore hitting tight end
McGonnigal with a 30
touchdown pass tor a 10-7
Her lead
Christie s43 yard fie
the game w ith 5 4 to r
first halt and the India s I
their intermission lead
Brosnan hit Harrv Mehre wj
8-vard scoring strike i
left
Wilson, a sophomore, It
runners with 102 vards on
rics.
Moore, a sophomore m
his first start, completed 1
passes for lb7yards and ran!
yards on 13 carries.
"I think he did very well,
also think he'll get better
said. "I think he played wit!
of poise
Brosnahan was 15-22 fo
yardsbefore lea ving the gai
in the third quarter with a iJ
tion between the third and fj
finger on his throwing hai
"The doctor's advised aj
playing him Laycock sai
played with it for a while.






20 THE EAST CARPI INI AN
SEPTEMBER 6. 1988
Yank up the chain saw music
EUGENE, Ore. (AP) - Scream-
ing saws, crashing trees and roar-
ing trucks they can handle. But
that's nothing compared with
what they can do with acoustic
guitars and mellow voices.
For years, Craig Jenkins and
Terry McKinnis of Dead wood.
Ore have been self-taught, "aw-
shucks" musicians. The kind of
guys who'd duck their heads, grin
sheepish grins and strum another
tune every time someone sug-
gested they should do something
with the original material that
was flowing out of their heads
and off their fingertips.
So now they've gone and done
it. Cut an album that's a polished
mix of deft picking, smooth sing-
ing and graceful lyrics that cap-
ture the loggers' life. And - no
surprise to those who've been lis-
tening to the two guitar-playing,
song writing buddies for years -
the thing is selling.
But Jenkins and McKinnis
aren't certain they want the world
to beat a path to their door. This
furor is enough to make a man
want to pick up his saw and re-
treat to the safety of the woods.
"We've never thought of our-
selves as professional musicians
says Jenkins, 35. "We don't read
music. We have to memorize
everything we write. We just
work on something until it sound
good. We do it for our enjoyment
and for the people around us
Their cassette-tape album,
"The Snag Fallers Ball is a
mostly lighthearted collection of
songs about logging in Oregon
and Alaska.
Jenkins wrote nine of the 11
songs on the album and co-au-
thored two others with Don Beck,
a friend who is also a musician.
JenkinsandMcKinnisdo the sing-
ing on the album, with Jenkins'
animated. Burl Ives-like voice
dominant.
The two partners are assisted in
the guitar work by Doug Daniels,
who owns the Eugene recording
studio where the album was cut.
The material on the album deals
with such woods scenarios as the
foibles of family-owned logging
operations and the logger's pro-
pensity to quit any job that
doesn't suit him.
The songs are laced with the
jargon of the woods. Loggers
who've heard the album give it
high marks for authenticity.
McKinnis, 34, met Jenkins' sis-
ter, Kim, and married her in 1977.
The two men have been playing
guitar together ever since.
Over the past 10 years, the two
have dabbled in creating lyrics
and melodies of their own. Jen-
kins characterizes much of that
work as a diversion and describes
most of the songs as pieces that
were done for one-time special
occasions.
"I was writing a few tunes, and
we wree playing at some places
and packing them in he says.
"We started getting a few offers
from outfits like the Rodeway
Inns. I figured it was time to make
a decision. So I did. I went with a
logging company up in Alaska
But friends kept making it
tough for them to edge a way from
the idea that songs about logging
was intriguing. Last fall, they
committed themselves to doing it.
The recording business was a
strange new world for them, as
foreign a Coast Range logging
operation might be for a studio
musician.
After a false start or two, they
found Doug Daniels Productions
in Eugene. Daniels, a folk musi-
cian who established his own
studio a year ago, made more than
one contribution to the album.
"It was like two cultures meet-
ing when we found him Jenkins
says. "We were just a couple of
loggers with some music, and we
didn't know if he was going to
laugh at us or what. He took us
seriously
"He convinced us it would be
ethical to do the songs live. He
really deserves the credit for
making the songs work
Jenkins and McKinnis ordered
up 1,000 tapes, thinking that they
might sell out in a matter of
months or years. But even with
highly limited distribution, the
album is going fast, and a second
production run seems a certainty.
Jenkins and McKinnis have
neither the delusion nor thedesire
that the music will take them out
of the woods. But they are talking
about another album.
"If we do it, I want to write
about some things the logger's up
against and what his future is. I'm
going to call it 'Endangered Spe-
cies "
NYC man plays super janitor
NEW YORK (AP)� He's "the
super, " sometimes more like a
mayor of a small town, an obser-
vant shrink, a cat rescuer, mouse
undertaker, burglar chaser. He's
an arbiter, detective, middleman
and ultimately the guy whose
fault it is when anything goes
wrong. The buck stops there.
Sometimes literally.
The species is most annoyed
to be called a janitor.
Its natural habitat is New
York City, where complaining
about one's super is just about
second to complaints about the
weather, but migrations have
been noted as highrises prolifer-
ate across the country. Their repu-
tations vary as widely as stock-
brokers' and sink as low as used-
car salesmen's huckstering a mis-
aligned bionic wonder.
There's the drunken lout sce-
nario, true enough in some cases.
There's the crowd who speak
Yugoslav, Greek, Moroccan and
perchance Esperanto, but "no
English, please. " There's the guy
whose hand assumes the palm-up
position before lips purse into the
"hello" position.
There are those who, while
required to live in the building by
saw, moonlight elsewhere during
working ours. Sightings of such
supers are as rare as those of fla-
mingos on the Bering Strait.
But there are supers who are
ordinary folks, guys just doing a
rather complex job. Joe Thomas is
one such super, a family man with
three daughters, New Yorker
whose first job was pedaling 400
pounds of potatoes across teh isle
of Manhattan from a West Side
Italian vegetable stand to a fancy
East Side restaurant.
He's a man who believes
strongly in doing things the old-
fashioned way.
He also really goes beyond
the call of duty to help the citizens
of his domain.
In some ways, he's a boy
wonder. Now 31, he's already
overseeing his second building,
the current one a 22-story highrise
near Lincoln Center which houses
about 1,000 persons in 375 apart-
ments.
He has been there five years,
knows all residents at least by
sight, and admits there are a few
who won't speak to him. He just
continues to say hello to them.
About 60 percent of the apart-
ments are cooperatives, the re-
mainder rentals.
He supervises a staff of 10
doormen, porters and handymen.
In 1987, he was named "Super of
the Year" by the large real estate
firm that employs about 150 su-
pers for its buildings. He received
a savings bond and a plaque.
N
APPLICATIONS
BEING ACCEPTED
FOR THE
FOLLOWING POSITIONS
� SPORTS WRITERS
� NEWS WRITERS
APPLY IN PERSON
MONDAY - FRIDAY
10-A.M4P.M.
AT
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
2ND FLOOR
PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
IN FRONT OF JOYNER LIBRARY
A
THERE M
THROUG
AY TO GO
NO ONE
HAS FOUND IT YET
Emphasis on Scholastics
Scholarships Awarded
"Excellence in Athletics
Varsity Soccer Players
Varsity Tennis Players
Varsity Swimmers
Lacrosse Members
Varsity Cheerleaders
Outstanding Intramurals
"Leadership in All Aspects of Campus Life
Best Social Life On Campus
"Large Dynamic Brotherhood
?Finest Little Sisters
FALL RUSH 1988
LOOK FOR THE PARTY TENTS
"AT PIKES PEAK" Located on corner of W. 5th and Elizabeth St.
Tuesday Sept 6 - Meet The Pikes wLittle Sisters 8-11
Wednesday Sept 7 - Meet the Women of Chi Omega 8-11
Thursday Sept 8 - Beginning of "Pikefettie"
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR RIDES CALL 752-4773
Some
RALEIGH (AP) �In the
ning, there were no heli
shoulder pads. The ball wai
round than oblong. Field
counted five points, touch
four.
What it was was "foot-b
The sport surfaced in
Carolina in 1888, making
day the beginning of the cj
nial year of college football
state The Charlotte Obsen
ported in Saturday's
Three schools that were pari
first season � Duke, North
lina and Wake Forest � kid
their season Saturday.
The football fields � ,
stands surrounding it
ways been a place where i
turn into foes and argul
sprout over what some woul
the most trivial matters.
Even after 100 years, thel
rion of who played the state
official game is unsettlec
pending upon which scl
football guide is used as al
ence, it was either North Ca
vs. Wake Forest on Oct. 1
Shoo
CHARLOTTE (AP) A 2(
old man remained hospitalil
serious condition, and a
school coach was released
day, one day after gunfire j
out at a Charlotte football
The two were among
people wounded at abouj
p.m. Friday, in the third qua
the game between West Che
and Garinger at Garinger.
Meanwhile, in Augusta
Friday night, an assistant
was wounded as he left thel
box at a football game.
Adkins, an assistant fo
coach at G! n Mills High S
was hit in the shoulder anc
and underwent surgery earll
urday, authorities said.
Charlotte police on Sati
charged Donnell Prince L
18, and Albert "Angelo" H
son, 17, both of Charlotte.
erson attends West Chi
High, said his father,
HanJcerson
Logan was charged with
counts of assault with a d
weapon, inflicting serious n
while Hankerson was chl
with carrying a concj
weapon � a 38-caliber hanj
police said.
A third man, Dwavne Mir
of Charlotte, was charged!
carrying a concealed wcapoT
possession of a stolen fireaJ
ter police spotted him lj
stands with a gun in his
pocket. Charlotte Police
mander Bruce Treadwav
Mims was not involved
shooting. He was released
jail Saturday.
Police said two West Che
students apparently were
ing the game when two
youths approached and s
fighting. One of the West
lotte students pulled a har
from his waistband and
shooting, police said
Treadway said the sh
stemmed from an on-gpinj
among the four, apparentl v
Continued from page 21
Virginia win
their openei
went 80 yards on 10 playsj
Moore hitting tight end
McGonnigal with a 3(
touchdown pass for a 10-71
Her lead.
Christie's43-yard field gc
the game with 5:49 to play
first half, and the Indian's
their intermission lead
Brosnan hit Harry Mehre
8-yard scoring strike wit!
left.
Wilson, a sophomore, lj
runners with 102 yards on
ries.
Moore, a sophomore
his first start, completed 131
passes for 167 yards and ran
yards on 13 carries.
"I think he did very well,
also think he'll get better
said. "I think he played wit
of poise
Brosnahan was 15-22 fc
yardsbefore lea ving the gai
in the third quarter with a Id
tion between the third and i
finger on his throwing hai
The doctor's advised aj
playing him Laycock saic
played with it for a while.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1988 23
H
)
i i
K�
i
J
Some discrepency in football's origins
RA1 EIGH (AD � In the begin- or Trinity vs. North Carolina on
ning, there were no helmets or
shoulder pads. The ball was more
round than oblong. Field goals
counted five points, touchdowns
tour.
What it was was "foot-ball
lhe sport surfaced in North
Carolina in 1888, making Satur-
day the beginning of the centen-
nial year of college football in the
state The Charlotte Observer re-
ported in Saturday's edition.
Three scruvls that were part ot the
first season Duke, North Caro-
lina and Wake Forest � kicked off
their season Saturday.
The football fields � and the
stands surrounding it � has al
Nov. 29.
For the three schools involved,
the issue is serious business. None
are willing to forfeit their place in
history to their oldest rivals.
North Carolina and Wake For-
est insists there should be no
question that their meeting, won
That statement draws a heated
rebuttal from Wake Forest sports
information director John Justus.
Wake has a singular stake in the
argument: It claims to have been
the winner not only in the first
college football game played in
the state, but also the first college
basketball and college basketball
by Wake Forest 6-4, was the state's games piayed in North Carolina.
information director Rick Brewer. Neither side is willing to budge. There have been attempts to
"My contention is that Wake "The game was supposed to be settle the dispute or drop it alto-
Forest had always been carried in played here in Chapel Hill; every- gether, but to no avail
our records as first, and you can't body knows that Brewer said,
change history said Brewer. "I "Trinity didn't come, so they had
didn't realize there was any qucs- 0 forfeit
tion about it until this year Tom Mickle, Duke's director of
H m it doesn't end there - i uke sports services, counters: "AH you
have to do is go back and look at
first football game. Duke argues
that because the Wake-North
Carolina game was played using
a combination of soccer and
rugby rules, it cannot be consid-
ered true football.
The Nov. 29 game, which Trin-
ity won 16-0, featured the "scien-
tific" rules of the day, which were
and North Carolina can't agree on
what happened the next year ei-
The NCAA recognizes Prince- ther-Part of the lore oi the ri valrV
We were told by the ACC of-
fice about 10 years ago to
straighten it out, that it looked
kind of silly said Johnny Moore,
promotions director at Duke.
"That was before (former Duke
a s been a place where friends approved by the American Inter
urn into foes and arguments Collegiate Association.
t
rout over what some would call
"The problem is what rules do
most trivial matters. you go by said Duke archivist
Even after 100 years, the qucs- Bill King. "Every authontative
n of who played the state's first article I've seen on the matter says
official game is unsettled. De-
pending upon which school's
otball guide is used as a refer-
ee it was either North Carolina
Wake Forest on Oct. 11, 1988,
. s
the North Carolina-Wake Forest
game was more like soccer or
rugby than football. As a histo-
rian, I would accept that as a con-
clusion
ton and Rutgers as having played
the first game in 1869 Justus
said. "According to the 1969
NCAA Guide, when the 100th
anniversary was recognized, that
game was played with even
looser rules than were used in the
Wake Forest-North Carolina
game 19 years later. If the NCAA
recognizes that as football, we
should, too.
"Besides, the whole thing boils
down to the game North Carolina
recognizes as first, since they
played in both. They say our game
was first, so I think that ends the
argument right there
So does North Carolina sports
is that both claim a 1-0 forfeit vic-
tory in 1889.
Trinity and North Carolina
were unsuccessful in their at-
tempts to schedule a game for the
autumn of 1889 because they
could not agree on a site or date,
historian Jim L. Sumner wrote in
the July 1988 issue of The North
Carolina Historical Review.
The failure irritated both sides
and each recorded a victory for a
game never played.
As a result, North Carolina's
current media guide lists its series
record with Duke as 38-32-4. The
Blue Devils' guide says their rec-
ord against the Tar Heels is 33-37-
4.
the records. Trinity was whipping sports information director) Ted
everybody and Carolina just Mann died, and he wouldn't hear
didn't want to get their butts of it.
kicked
BACK TO
SCHOOL
SPECIALS
Shootings interupt
CHARLOTTE (AP) A 20-year-
Id man remained hospitalized in
rious condition, and a high
school coach was released Satur-
lay, one day after gunfire broke
out at a Charlotte football game.
The two were among four
people wounded at about 9:30
p.m. Friday, in the third quarter oi
I he game between West Charlotte
and Garinger at Garinger.
Meanwhile, in Augusta, Ga
Friday night, an assistant coach
ivas wounded as he left the press
box at a football game. Sam
Adkins an assistant football
roach at Glen Mills High School,
was hit in the shoulder and side
and underwent surgerv earlv Sat-
urday, authorities said.
Charlotte police on Saturdav
charged Donnell Prince Logan,
Is and Albert "Angelo" Hanker-
son 17, both of Charlotte. Hank-
erson attends West Charlotte
I figh, said his father, Albert
i iankerson.
Logan was charged with three
counts of assault with a deadly
weapon, inflicting serious injury,
16-year-old girl.
The elder Hankerson said he
knew of a running dispute be-
tween his son and a group of
young men who had attended
Garinger and were from a north
Charlotte neighborhood.
Hankerson said the dispute
started in May. He said his son
filed an assault charge against one
of the young men in Mav.
Four people were taken to
Charlotte Memorial Hospital,
including West Charlotte Assis-
tant Coach John Overcash, who
was wounded in the left leg, hos-
pital spokeswoman Amy Farugia
said.
Overcash, 43, oi Harrisburg,
was released Saturdav.
Keith Allen Jones, 20, of Char-
lotte, who underwent surgery
early Saturdav for wounds in his
abdomen remained in serious
condition, a hospital spokes-
woman said.
Michael Lineberger, 18, of
Charlotte, suffered a bullet
wound to his right shoulder. Ms.
Farugia said the bullet went
while I Iankerson was charged through the shoulder. Lineberger
with carrying a concealed also was released from the hospi-
weapon a .38-caliber handgun, tal Saturday, she said.
police said Lineberger, a Garinger drop-
A third man, Dwayne Mims, 20, out, said he was shot in the back as
A Charlotte, was charged with he tried to run from a gunman. "1
v arrying a concealed weapon and was walking on the track, when 1
possession of a stolen firearm af- came upon a crowd of people that
ter police spotted him in the was gathered around the fight
stands with a gun in his pants
pocket. Charlotte Police Com-
mander Bruce Tread way said
Mims was not involved in the
-hooting. He was released from
til Saturday.
Police said two West Charlotte
students apparently were watch-
ing the game when two other
ouths approached and started
fighting. One of the West Char-
lotte students pulled a handgun
from his waistband and began
shooting, police said.
Treadway said the shooting
stemmed from an on-going feud
umong the four, apparently overa
Continued from page 21
Virginia wins
their opener
went 80 yards on 10 plays, with
Moore hitting tight end Bruce
McGonnigal with a 30-yard
touchdown pass for a 10-7 Cava-
lier lead.
Christie's43-yard field goal tied
the game with 5:49 to play in the
first half, and the Indian's earned
their intermission lead when
Brosnan hit Harry Mehre with an
8-vard scoring strike with 1:47
left.
Wilson, a sophomore, led all
runners with 102 yards on 20 car-
ries.
Moore, a sophomore making
his first start, completed 13 of 21
passes for 167yardsand ran for 75
yards on 13 carries.
"I think he did very w and I
also think he'll get better Welsh
said. "I think he played with a lot
of poise
Brosnahan was 15-22 for 165
yardsbefore leaving the game late
in the third quarter with a lacera-
tion between the third and fourth
finger on his throwing hand.
"The doctor's advised against
plaving him Laycock said. "He
played with it for a while.
he said.
Afterward, Lineberger said he
ran from the stadium through a
gate to the first police officer he
saw across from the school. Police
captured the two suspects there.
Tatricia Ann Pope, who was
injured when a bullet grazed her
right foot, was treated and re-
leased, Ms. Farugia said.
"When I got up my foot started
burning,and I saw my foot wasall
swelled up she said.
Within minutes, Charlotte po-
lice had two suspects in custody.
Officers also seized four weap-
ons, three handguns and a rifle.
"People were jumping over the
fences and screaming all over the
place said Elizabeth Henderson,
a senior at West Charlotte High
who attended the game.
"It was chaos said MEDIC
supervisor David Brown. "When
the policemen started leading me
in there, I didn't know how in the
world we were going to find the
patients. There were hundreds of
people jjst mshing to get ouc of
the area
Witnesses said the shooting
came out of a fight on the West
Charlotte side of the field.
Kirstcn Smith, a West Charlotte
student, said she was sitting near
where the trouble started. She
said two young men were on the
track that surrounded the field
and that they were fighting.
Miss Smith said a third man
walked up with a gun.
"I le started shooting five or six
times into a whole bunch of
people she said. "Everybody
just dropped to the ground
everywhere and on the field.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988 23
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Some discrepency in football's origins
RALEIGH (AP) � In the begin-
ning, there were no helmets or
shoulder pads. The ball was more
round than oblong. Field goals
counted five points, touchdowns
four.
What it was was "football
The sport surfaced in North
Carolina in 1888, making Satur-
day the beginning of the centen-
nial year of college football in the
state The Charlotte Observer re-
ported in Saturday's edition.
Three schools that were part of the
first season � Duke, North Caro-
lina and Wake Forest � kicked off
their season Saturday.
The football fields � and the
stands surrounding it � has al-
ways been a place where friends
turn into foes and arguments
sprout over what some would call
the most trivial matters.
Even after 100 years, the ques-
tion of who played the state's first
official game is unsettled. De-
pending upon which school's
football guide is used as a refer-
once, it was either North Carolina
vs. Wake Forest on Oct. 11,1988,
or Trinity vs. North Carolina on
Nov. 29.
For the three schools involved,
the issue is serious business. None
are willing to forfeit their place in
history to their oldest rivals.
North Carolina and Wake For-
est insists there should be no
question that their meeting, won
by Wake Forest 6-4, was the state's
first football game. Duke argues
that because the Wake-North
Carolina game was played using
a combination of soccer and
rugby rules, it cannot be consid-
ered true football.
The Nov. 29 game, which Trin-
ity won 16-0, featured the "scien-
tific" rules of the day, which were
approved by the American Inter-
Collegiate Association.
"The problem is what rules do
you go by said Duke archivist
Bill King. "Every authoritative
article I've seen on the matter says
the North Carolina-Wake Forest
game was more like soccer or
rugby than football. As a histo-
rian, I would accept that as a con-
clusion
That statement draws a heated
rebuttal from Wake Forest sports
information director John Justus.
Wake has a singular stake in the
argument: It claims to have been
the winner not only in the first
college football game played in
the state, but also the first college
basketball and college basketball
games played in North Carolina.
"The NCAA recognizes Prince-
ton and Rutgers as having played
the first game in 1869 Justus
said. "According to the 1969
NCAA Guide, when the 100th
anniversary was recognized, that
game was played with even
looser rules than were used in the
Wake Forest-North Carolina
game 19 years later. If the NCAA
recognizes that as football, we
should, too.
"Besides, the whole thing boils
down to the game North Carolina
recognizes as first, since they
played in both. They say our game
was first, so I think that ends the
argument right there
So does North Carolina sports
information director Rick Brewer.
"My contention is that Wake
Forest had always been carried in
our records as first, and you can't
change history said Brewer. "I
didn't realize there was any ques-
tion about it until this year
But it doesn't end there � Duke
and North Carolina can't agree on
what happened the next year ei-
ther. Part of the lore of the rivalry
is that both claim a 1-0 forfeit vic-
tory in 1889.
Trinity and North Carolina
were unsuccessful in their at-
tempts to schedule a game for the
autumn of 1889 because they
could not agree on a site or date,
historian Jim L. Sumner wrote in
the July 1988 issue of The North
Carolina Historical Review.
The failure irritated both sides
and each recorded a victory for a
game never played.
As a result, North Carolina's
current media guide lists its series
record with Duke as 38-32-4. The
Blue Devils' guide says their rec-
ord against the Tar Heels is 33-37-
4.
Neither side is willing to budge.
"The game was supposed to be
played here in Chapel Hill; every-
body knows that Brewer said.
'Trinity didn't come, so they had
to forfeit
Tom Mickle, Duke's director of
sports services, counters: "All you
have to do is go back and look at
the records. Trini ty was whipping
everybody and Carolina just
didn't want to get their butts
kick
There have been attempts to
settle the dispute or drop it alto-
gether, but to no avail.
"We were told by the ACC of-
fice about 10 years ago to
straighten it out, that it looked
kind of silly said Johnny Moore,
promotions director at Duke.
'That was before (former Duke
sports information director) Ted
Mann died, and he wouldn't hear
of it.
Shootings interupt
CHARLOTTE (AP) A 20-year-
old man remained hospitalized in
serious condition, and a high
school coach was released Satur-
day, one day after gunfire broke
out at a Charlotte football game.
The two were among four
people wounded at about 9:30
p.m. Friday, in the third quarter of
the game between West Charlotte
and Garinger at Garinger.
Meanwhile, in Augusta, Ga
Friday night, an assistant coach
was wounded as he left the press
box at a football game. Sam
Adkins, an assistant football
coach at Glen Mills High School,
was hit in the shoulder and side
and underwent surgery early Sat-
urday, authorities said.
Charlotte police on Saturday
charged Donnell Prince Logan,
18, and Albert "Angclo" Hanker-
son, 17, both of Charlotte. Hank-
erson attends West Charlotte
High, said his father, Albert
Hanker son.
Logan was charged with three
counts of assault with a deadly
weapon, inflicting serious injury,
while Hankerson was charged
with carrying a concealed
weapon � a 38-caliber handgun,
police said.
A third man, DwayneMims,20,
of Charlotte, was charged with
carrying a concealed weapon and
possession of a stolen firearm af-
ter police spotted him in the
stands with a gun in his pants
pocket. Charlotte Police Com-
mander Bruce Treadway said
Mims was not involved in the
shooting. He was released from
jail Saturday.
Police said two West Charlotte
students apparently were watch-
ing the game when two other
youths approached and started
fighting. One of the West Char-
lotte students pulled a handgun
from his waistband and began
shooting, police said.
Treadway said the shooting
stemmed from an on-going feud
among the four, apparently over a
Continued from page 21
Virginia wins
their opener
went 80 yards on 10 plays, with
Moore hitting tight end Bruce
McGonnigal with a 30-yard
touchdown pass for a 10-7 Cava-
lier lead.
Christie's43-yard field goal tied
the game with 5:49 to play in the
first half, and the Indian's earned
their intermission lead when
Brosnan hit Harry Mchre with an
8-yard scoring strike with 1:47
left.
Wilson, a sophomore, led all
runners with 102 yards on 20 car-
ries.
Moore, a sophomore making
his first start, completed 13 of 21
passes for 167 yards and ran for 75
yards on 13 carries.
"I think he did very well, and I
also think he'll get better Welsh
said. "I think he played with a lot
of poise
Brosnahan was 15-22 for 165
yards before leaving the game late
in the third quarter with a lacera-
tion between the third and fourth
finger on his throwing hand.
"The doctor's advised against
playing him Laycock said. "He
played with it for a while.
16-year-old girl.
The elder Hankerson said he
knew of a running dispute be-
tween his son and a group of
young men who had attended
Garinger and were from a north
Charlotte neighborhood.
Hankerson said the dispute
started in May. He said his son
filed an assault charge against one
of the young men in May.
Four people were taken to
Charlotte Memorial Hospital,
including West Charlotte Assis-
tant Coach John Ovcrcash, who
was wounded in the left leg, hos-
pital spokeswoman Amy Farugia
said.
Overcash, 43, of Harrisburg,
was released Saturday.
Keith Allen Jones, 20, of Char-
lotte, who underwent surgery
early Saturday for wounds in his
abdomen remained in serious
condition, a hospital spokes-
woman said.
Michael Lineberger, 18, of
Charlotte, suffered a bullet
wound to his right shoulder. Ms.
Farugia said the bullet went
through the shoulder. Lineberger
also was released from the hospi-
tal Saturday, she said.
Lineberger, a Garinger drop-
out, said he was shot in the back as
he tried to run from a gunman. "I
was walking on the track, when I
came upon a crowd of people that
was gathered around the fight
he said.
Afterward, Lineberger said he
ran from the stadium through a
gate t the first police officer he
saw across from the school. Police
captured the two suspects there.
Patricia Ann Pope, who was
injured when a bullet grazed her
right foot, was treated and re-
leased, Ms. Farugia said.
"When I got up my foot started
burning,and I saw my foot wasall
swelled up she said.
Within minutes, Charlotte po-
lice had two suspects in custody.
Officers also seized four weap-
ons, three handguns and a rifle.
"People were jumping over the
fences and screaming all over the
place said Elizabeth Henderson,
a senior at West Charlotte High
who attended the game.
"It was chaos said MEDIC
supervisor David Brown. "When
the policemen started leading me
in there, I didn't know how in the
world we were going to find the
patients. Theie were hundreds of
people jjst tnshing to get ouc of
the area
Witnesses said the shooting
came out of a fight on the West
Charlotte side of the field.
Kirsten Smith, a West Charlotte
student, said she was sitting near
where the trouble started. She
said two young men were on the
track that surrounded the field
and that they were fighting.
Miss Smith said a third man
walked up with a gun.
"He started shooting five or six
times into a whole bunch of
people she said. "Everybody
just dropped to the ground
everywhere and on the field.
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24 TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988
Appalachian keeps up their winning ways I pirat
(AP) - Just when everyone
thought they had the Ap-
palachain State offense figured
out, Mountaineer Coach Sparky
Woods comes up with a surprise -
the forward pass.
Once a team that relied heavily
on its rushing attack, Ap-
palachain State went to the pass
against The Citadel in its South-
ern Conference opener and came
away with a 38-14 victory. Quar-
terback Bobby Fuller passed for
228 yards and three touchdowns,
and in all, Appalachain gained
273 yards passing to go with 213
yards rushing.
"We've always wanted to be
more balanced than we've turned
out to be Woods said. 'There are
several reasons we haven't been,
including having a great running
back in John Settle and not having
the capacity to get the ball to our
receivers consistently. I think
now, we have that capability
The result was a shock to the
Citadel secondary.
"They surprised us, throwing
when they did free safety J.D.
Cauthensaid. "We expected them
to be like they've been in the past,
running on first and second
down
The victory raised Appalachain
State's unbeaten streak in regular
season conference play to 19.
East Tennessee State took a 26-
10 victory over VMI in the other
league game to open the season.
Elsewhere, Marshall took a 30-17
victory over the Morehead State
and Furman whipped South
Carolina State 38-0. Tulane de-
feated Tennessee-Chattanooga
33-19 and North Carolina State
whipped Western Carolina 45-6.
Albert Burt rushed for 125
yards and two touchdowns to
lead the Buccaneers to victory.
Burt scored on a 6-yard run in the
second quarter to put the Bucca-
neers up 7-3 and then on a 1-yard
run in the third quarter to give
East Tennessee State to a 13-3
edge.
Leading in the fourth quarter,
East Tennesee State extended
their 19-10 lead when cornerback
Rick Harris intercepted an at-
tempted halfback pass to set up its
final touchdown.
Marshall, still looking for a
Southern Quarter title despite
reaching the finals of the NCAA
Division I-AA playoffs, got a
jump on its goals thanks to Ron
Darby, who rushed for 154 yards
and one touchdown.
The Thundering Herd was trail-
ing 10-3 and on the verge of falling
further behind when Morehead
State reached the Marshall 4. But
Stanley Hall intercepted a Chris
Swartz pass to halt the threat and
turn the momentum in Marshall's
direction.
Tailback Marshall Daugherty
rushed for 103 yards and two
touchdowns, and Julius Dixon
blocked two punts to lead to two
more scores for Furman. Daugh-
erty scored on a 22-yard run in the
first quarter that was set up after
Dixon blocked a punt that was
recovered at the S.C. State 22.
Dixon's next blocked punt
came in the third quarter, and it
led to a Patrick Baynes touch-
down pass to Greg Key.
"We still have a lot to do, but the
effort is there Furman Coach
Jimmy Satterfield said.
A 93-yard kickoff return by
Michael Pierce and a 59-yard punt
return by Mitchell Price helped
Tulane get away from the Mocca-
sins in the third quarter. Brad
Patterson threw a touchdown
pass, Andre Lockhart ran for
another score and Dennis Waters
kicked field goals of 37 and 43
yards.
Western Carolina could get just
two field goals from Clay Cox and
only penetrated North Carolina
State territory twice, and one of
those was with the help of a 50-
yard kickoff return.
"1 was not prepared for this
kind of disappointing perform-
ance Western Carolina Coach
Bob Waters said. "Ican'tthinkofa
bright spot tonight. We had sev-
eral players who played hard, but
no bright area
Wolfpack gets easy victory over 'Cats
RALEIGH (AP) � The quarter-
back issue isn't settled at North
Carolina State, but Coach Dick
Sheridan found out how loaded
his arsenal is after a 45-6 victory
over Western Carolina on Satur-
day night.
Sheridan wouldn't name a
starting quarterback before the
game, but Preston Poag got the
nod and responded with three
touchdown dives. Poag was one
of three quarterbacks Sheridan
used in the season-opener.
When the Wolfpack went to
freshman Anthony Barbour to
run at tailback, he responded with
the first two touchdown runs of
his young collegiate career.
"In vour first game, you never
know what's going to happen
Sheridan said. "I thought our kids
played with a lot of enthusiasm
Sheridan said nothing to indi-
cate he would settle on one of his
three quarterbacks who all played
against the Catamounts.
"1 thought (Poag) did an excel-
lent job of running and throwing
the ball Sheridan said. "Charles
Davenport is our best running
quarterback, and I think he
showed why tonight. Shane
Montgomery is our best passer
and he did a great job in our two-
minute drill
Poag capped drives of 21, 26
and 78 yards with his 1-yard scor-
ing dives. Barbour, who had 47
touchdowns his senior year at
nearby Garner High School, fore halftime. crn Carolina 31 in the second
scored on his thrid play from Western Carolina's offense quarter, but Fowble missed a 47-
scrimmage, running 15 yards only reached N.C. State territory yard field goal attempt after the
around right end with 7:32 left in twice, once with the aid of a 50- drive stalled,
the second quarter. yard kickoff return which led to a Montgomery led the Wolfpack
Barbour also scored on a 5-yard 35-yard field goal by Clay Cox on a 65-yard drive that ended on
run with 9:56 left in the third early in the second quarter. Fowble's 31-yard field goal with
quarter, raising N.C. State's edge Cox also had a 42-yard field 1:05 left before the half,
to 31-3. Following a Chris Hartsell goal with 59 seconds left in the Western Carolina's only ven-
interccption return to the Western third quarter for the Catamounts, turc into Wolfpack territory in the
also playing their season opener, first half came after Otis
"I was not prepared for this Washington's 50-yard kickoff re-
kind of disappointing perform- turn early in the second quarter to
ance Western Carolina Coach the N.C. State 40. Quarterback
Bob Waters said. "Ican'tthinkofa Todd Cottrcll passed 15 yards to
bright spot tonight. We had sev- tight end Jon Reed on a third-and-
eral players who played hard, but 5 to keep the drive alive, but N.C.
no bright areas State's defense tightened and Cox
Davenport moved the kicked his 35-yard field goal with
Wolfpack from its 17 to the West- H:31 left in the half.
Carolina 38, Barbour rushed three
times for 35 yards to set up Steve
Salley's 2-yard scoring run with
4:26 left to play.
Barbour finished with 81 yards
on nine carries.
"Anthony Barbour had a tre-
Mark Fowble, who hit all five of
his conversions, also kicked a 31-
yard field goal with 1:05 left be-
Thc Catamounts hindered their
own offense, committing 16
penalties for 115 yards, compared
to four N.C. State penalties for 34
yards.
"We just made too many mis-
takes to be competitive in this
game Waters said. "The team
we put on the field tonight didn't
resemble the team 1 saw in prac-
tice this week. We kept shooting
ourselves in the foot
The loss was the worst open-
ing-day defeat suffered by West-
ern Carolina since a 51-0 loss to
Carson-Newman in 1937.
UCLA gains victory, but not good warm-up for Nebraska
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) �
Darryl Henley returned a punt 89
vardsfora touchdown after just
3:25 of play and Troy Aikman
threw three first-half scoring
passes Saturday night as fifth-
ranked UCLA overpowered San
Diego State 59-6 in the season
opener for both teams.
ilev, who returned a punt74
yards for a touchdown in UCLA s
47-14 seeason-opening victory
over San Diego State last season,
broke two tackles and side-
stepped several other Aztecs in
getting the Bruins off to a fast
start.
Aikman, who ranked second in
the country in passing efficiency
last season, threw a 43-yard
touchdown pass to Laurence series of the third quarter. UCLA field goal with 58 seconds left
Burkley and a 15-yard scoring led 38-0 at the time. before halftime made it 31-0.
pass to Reggie Moore to give the Eric Ball, another UCLA senior, Estwick also scored on a 3-yard
Bruins a 21-0 lead before the was the game's leading rusher run, capping a 78-yard, 10-play
second quarter was two minutes with 122 yards on 17 carries. He drive with the second-half kickoff
old. also left early in the third quarter, which gave the Bruins their 38-0
Aikman completed 13 out of 17 Aikman's 2-yard touchdown lead,
passes for 155 yards without pass to Mark Estwick with 3:47 UCLA's other points came on a ego State's touchdown on a 13-
being intercepted before coming remaining in the second quarter 2-yard touchdown pass from yard run with 10 minutes left in
out of the game after the first and Alfredo Velasco's 32-yard backup quarterback Ron Car- the contest.
agher to Corwin Anthony late in
the third quarter, a 30-yard touch-
down run by freshman Shawn
Wills with 8:05 left in the game,
and 2-yard run by Wills with 2:48
left.
Tommv Booker scored San Di-
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Continued from page 21
On the Pirates next possess
Libretto proved once again'
he could run the Pirate's run
shootoption offense, and m
ing the offense down to the
six yard line before taking tlu
into the endzone himself
keeper around the right
Imperato added the extra
giving the Pirates their final
score. After this touchdown,
was content to hold the Ea
offense, and simply run the
out. Mike Applewhite and
Willis led the stingy Pirateofi
with seven tackles each.
"We look at this as the fint
on our ladder of success. This
a must game Baker said aftt
game. "Our defense did anj
standing job tonight. An
you can hold an opponent tj
13 points you have got
happy. Individually, we h
many people that stood
Travis Hunter began tonigl
where he left off at the end
season. Jarrod Moody had a
first half runningas well as nj
ing. junior Robinson and Ri
McKinney also come to mtf
great performances he adJ
Baker also had something
ahou the attendance at
Tennis
SORGHO, Ky. (AP) -
Jessica Navarre sat down a cl
of vears ago to write letter tl
colleges, the Bolivian
didn't have any idea wh
responses would be.
It turned out to be plenum
morning, she received six oi
full athletic scholarships iJ
mail.
But considering what NaJ
had to offer, that shouldn't
as a surprise.
Navarro, 20, won her fiH
tional junior tennis tournam
Bolivia when she was 12
old. Over the next six yeai
won three more national
titles.
Navarro eventually
Union University in lacl
Tenn spuming offers froml
larger schools.
More N
BUFFALO, NY. (AP)
Bowl MVP Bruce Smith.
pended by the NFL two daj
fore the Buffalo Bills'
opener against Minnesota id
ing a drug test, savs he will!
to "put the pieces back toga
"I'm just going to get o
knees and pra v and handle M
there the defensive end tol
Buffalo News on Friday mi
"I've got a lot on my mim
added. "I just want to get el
thing back together. 1 just wj
put the pieces back togethei
Smith, the NFL's first o
draft choice in 1985 after a
collegiate career at Virginia
became the second Buffalo d
to be suspended for drug abi
four weeks. Running back
Riddick just returned to the
Wednesday following a nj
long suspension.
Asked if he felt Bills fans
be upset at the news. Smith
"I'm really not worried
(public reaction) right nowj
more concerned about m vsej
my family. 1 think that's
most important
Smith said he thought
players would understand.
know me and I'm sure there
be an v problems from that
In announcing the suspei
Bills General Manager Bill"
said Smith would undergo,
bilitation program under tl
pervision of Dr. Forrest Tei
who heads up the NFL's
rehabilitation program.
Smith had no comment
rehabilitation program.
Both Polian and Bills
Mark Levy didn't dwell
enormous cost the suspens
Smith, the NFL's defensive
man of the year last season,
i�ave on the team. Insteadl
focused on Smith the perso
"We're talking about a
health here said Poliai
knowledging the suspensiol
a "black mark" on the or
tion. There are youngstei
look up to the players. I h
rible about that
Levy called Smith "a lil





ways
ineget away from the Mooca-
s in the third quarter Brad
terson threw a touchdown
Andre Lockhart ran for
rther score and Dennis Waters
ked field goals or 37 and 43
Ste n Carolina could j;ct just
icld goals from Clay Cox and
ted North Carolina
territory twice .1 d 01 e ol
u as with the help of a 50-
ofl return
- not prepared tor this
� disappointing perform-
n Carolina Coach
i can't think of a
gl : We had sev-
Ma. lyed hard, but
irea
1
1
I
ats
It � d
nit ting 16
many n
ivc in tb, 1
hoot
West-
raska
.
minute left in
N
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988 25
Pirates win big over Tech
r
���-?vj '�,���-
-i ?
Continued from page 21
On the Tirates next possession,
Libretto proved once again that
he could run the Pirate's run and
shootoption offense, and march-
ing the offense down to the Tech
six yard line before taking the ball
into the endzone himself on a
keeper around the right side,
lmperato added the extra point,
giving the Tirates their final 52-13
score. After this touchdown, ECU
was content to hold the Eagles'
offense, and simply run the clock
out. Mike Applewhite and Glenn
Willis led the stingy Pirate offense
with seven tackles each.
"We look at this as the first step
on our ladder of success. This was
a must game Baker said after the
game. "Our defense did an out-
standing job tonight. Anytime
you can hold an opponent to just
13 points you have got to be
happy. Individually, we had so
many people that stood out.
Travis Hunter began tonight just
where he left off at the end of last
season. Jarrod Moody had a great
first half running as well as receiv-
ing. Junior Robinson and Reggie
McKinnev also come to mind as
great performances he added.
Baker also had something to say
abou the attendance at the game.

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Junior Robinson turns up field and heads for the goal line on one of his kick returns. (Photo from SID).
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"I was tremendously pleased
with the turn-out for the game
he said. "1 think that this team is
really receptive to a good crowd,
and 1 thought that the students
really got into the game. We have
some really great fans here
The Tirates will be on the road
next week-end, traveling to
Blacksburg, 'a. to take on the
1 lokies of Virgina Tech.One of the
areas that the Pirates will have to
improve on when they face the
I lokies will be their penalties. The
Pirates were penalized nine times
for 69 vardsagainst Tech.
USA
Tennis player happy at small college
SORGHO, Ky. (AP) � When
Jessica Navarro sat down a couple
o years ago to write letters to U.S.
colleges, the Bolivian native
didn't have any idea what the
responses would be.
It turned out to be plentiful. One
morning, she received six offersof
full athletic scholarships in the
mail.
But considering what Navarro
had to offer, that shouldn't come
as a surprise.
Navarro, 20, won her first na-
tional junior tennis tournament in
Bolivia when she was 12 years
old. Over the next six years she
won three more national junior
titles.
Navarro eventually chose
Union University in Jackson,
Tenn spurning offers from many-
larger schools.
"I wanted to go to a small
school, a religious school, not a
state school or a big school
Navarro said. "1 come from a
small country so I didn't think 1
would like that (a larger school).
When 1 came to visit
Unioneveryone was friendly
and I loved it
Navarro spent the summer as
an instructor at Our Tennis House
in Sorgho. She returns to Union in
the fall and to her position as the
No. 1 player on the women's ten-
nis team, a spot she has held since
arriving at the small Baptist
school two years ago.
Cochabamba, the largest city in
Bolivia, is Navarro's home. She is
one of seven children, all tennis
players. Navarro's younger sis-
ter, Karen, also attends Union and
is the No. 3 player on the tennis
team.
"1 think he made a good invest-
ment Navarro said of her father.
"He trained us all when we were
young, and now he doesn't have
to pay for our education or any-
thing
Navarro, who didn't speak
English when she came to the
United States but speaks it almost
flawlessly now, quickly saw what
tennis could mean to her life.
"When I won my first national
tournament, I saw all the oppor-
tunities it gave me she said.
But while her style may not be
perfect for hard surfaces, Navarro
has proven herself at Union. Her
singles record her first year was
23-3. Last year she won 24
matches in a row before losing in
the National Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics district finals.
"Because 1 lost that match, they
seeded me 20th in the nation she
said. "I don't think that was fair
Navarro is studying business
management and marketing at
Union.
"What I really want to do is
manage the business of profes-
sional players she said.
As for her future as a tennis
player, Navarro isn't sure where
she is going. She would like to
have a professional playing career
but thinks the odds are against
her.
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More NFL players suspended
BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) � Pro
Bowl MVP Bruce Smith, sus-
pended by the NFL two days be-
fore the Buffalo Bills' season
opener against Minnesota for fail-
ing a drug test, says he will work
to "put the pieces back together
"I'm just going to get on my
knees and pray and handle it from
there the defensive end told The
Buffalo News on Friday night.
"I've got a lot on my mind he
added. "I just want to get every-
thing back together. I just want to
put the pieces back together
Smith, the NFL's first overall
draft choice in 1985 after a stellar
collegiate career at Virginia Tech,
became the second Buffalo player
to be suspended for drug abuse in
four weeks. Running back Robb
Riddick just returned to the team
Wednesday following a month
long suspension.
Asked if he felt Bills fans would
be upset at the news, Smith said,
"I'm really not worried about
(public reaction) right now. I'm
more concerned about myself and
my family. I think that's what's
most important
Smith said he thought Bills
players would understand. 'They
know me and I'm sure there won't
be any problems from that point
In announcing the suspension,
Bills General Manager Bill Polian
said Smith would undergo a reha-
bilitation program under the su-
pervision of Dr. Forrest Tennant,
who heads up the NFL's drug
rehabilitation program.
Smith had no comment on his
rehabilitation program.
Both Polian and Bills Coach
Mark Levy didn't dwell on the
enormous cost the suspension of
Smith, the NFL's defensive line-
man of the year last season, would
have on the team. Instead, they
focused on Smith the person.
"We're talking about a guy's
health here said Polian, ac-
knowledging the suspension was
a "black mark" on the organiza-
tion. "There are youngsters who
look up to the players. I feel ter-
rible about that
Levy called Smith "a likeable
person, one-on-onc. I think he's a
good-hearted person. I think he's
a great athlete.
"But, it will all go for naught if
he doesn't lick this problem and
he doesn't carry his side of the
weight
Polian said the 25-year-old
Smith is "a young man who has a
problem who needs to correct that
problem and that takes prece-
dence
Bills nose tackle Fred Smerlas
said that when Levy notified the
team of Smith's suspension dur-
ing practice, "Everybody's mouth
just dropped. Everyone was kind
of stunned
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t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6,1988
THE E.C.U
INTERFRATERNITY
COUNCIL INVITES
YOU TO RUSH ' 88!
Pi "Kappa Thi
803 Hooker Read
752-6927
nKi
Number of chapters Nationally. Over 120
Date and Place of Pounding: December 10,1904
College of Charleston, SC
National Headquarters Location:
Charlotte, North Carolina
Fraternity Colors: Cold, White, Blue
Philanthropic Organization: PUSH
(Play Unites for the Severely Handicapped)
New House Ready For Spring Semester
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Strongest Alumni Association
Thi "Kappa Tau
DKT
409 Elizabeth St.
757-1319
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 100
Date and Place of founding: March 17,1906
Miami University
National Headquarters Location:
Oxford, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Havard Red and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization: Children's Heart Foundation
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Encourage Brothers to be involved in campus functions.
Ti Kappa Alpha n K A
Corner Sth it Elizabeth 752-4773
Number of Chapters Nationally. Over 150
Date and Place of Founding: March 1,1868
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Memphis, Tennessee
Fraternity Colors: Garnet and Gold
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Group effort In reaching goals.
Sigma Tan Qamma 7. T T
508 W. 5th St. 757-0127
Number of Chapter Nationally Over 100
Date and Place of Founding: June 28, 1920
Central Missouri State Teachers College
National Headquarters Location:
Warrensburg, Missouri
Fraternity Colors: Blue and White
Philanthropic Organization:
Greenville Boys Club
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Academics, Individuality
Kappa Sigma KI
700 E 10th St. 7525543
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: December 10,1869
University of Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Charlottesville, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Scarlet, White, Green
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Leadership
Lambda Chi Mpha A X A
Tues Sept. 6th
8:00-11:00 p.m.
Wed Sept. 7th
8:00-11:00 p.m.
Thurs Sept. 8th
8:00-11:00 p.m.
raternftrj "JCife . .
Social ICife .
To be In a fraternity Is not merely to be in a social
club Fraternities are a way of life We share ex
penses as well as experiences, and we are responsi
ble to each other tor our own actions We live off
campus, for the most part, yet we are very active on
campus We enjoy a good relationship with our
university's administration and, in the past tew
decades, have become a major part of the univer-
sity's student lite.
Jfltll fraternities rfirrt my grabea?
� No, there's every evidence that joining a fraternity
Improves your chances ol graduating
� 33. of men on campus without traternities will
graduate, and
� 47 of non-members on campuses with frater-
nities graduate, but
� 65 of all fraternity members graduate.
� Scholarship programs of fraternities produce
greater academic success, and better achievement
for you.
!t never can be said that fraternity people don't en-
joy a good social life Getting to know many different
people is only natural among such a close-knit
group One seems to fall into a wealth of oppor-
tunities for things to do with his spare time Events
such as Greek Week is ust an example of some of
the activities that fraternities plan during the year.
Atltletics .
Fraternity men enjoy an active athletic existence
Whether it be track meets, field events or in-
tramurals, we enjoy competing against one another
in one sport or another
500 E Elizabeth St.
757-1367
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: November 2, 1909
Boston University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Purple, Green, Gold
Philanthropic Organization: March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
Tau K&ppa 'EpsiCon
951 E 10th St. 757-3042
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 350
Dote and Place of Founding: January 10,1899
Illinois Wesleyan University
National Headquarters Location:
Indianapolis, Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Cherry, G ray
Philanthropic Organization
St Judes Children's Hospital
What meakes this Fraternity Unique:
Individualism, Campus Involvement
"Beta Tfieta Pi
P.O. Box 7192
RUSH' 1110-B Contanche St. 757-1840
Number of Chapters Nationally Over 100
DM and Place of Founding: August 8,1839
Miami, Ohio
National Head quarters Location
Miami, Ohio
Fratenuty Colors: Pink and Slue
Philanthropic Organization:
What makes thi Fraternity Unique
Brothers helping Brothers
General Fraternity Facts
� All but two U.S Presidents since 1825 have been fraternity men. Sixteen Vice-Presidenis have been fraternity men.
63 of the U.S. President's Cabinet members since 1900 have been fraternity men.
71 of the Who's Who in America listees are fraternity members.
76 of the US. Senators & Representatives are fraternity members.
85 (40 of 47) of the U.S. Supreme Court Justices since 1910 have been fraternity men.
85 of the Fortune 500 executives are fraternity members.
� Of the nation's 50 largest corporations, 43 are headed by fraternity members.
TKE
Ben
Rush is open to all
Male College Students
Regardless of
Classification or G.P.A.
T)eita Sijjma Thi
aio
510 E. 10th St.
7S7-0313
Number of Chapter Nationally: Over 135
Date and Place of Founding December 10,1899
College oi the City of New York
National Headquarter Location:
Indiana poll. Indiana
Fraternity Colors: Nik Green, White
PhilanthropicOrganiation March of Dimes
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
The Fraternity of Engineered leadership
Sigma Thi Epsilon
505 E 3th St. 757-0487
Number of Chapter Nationally: Almost 300
Date and Place of Founding: November 1, 1901
University of Richmond, Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Richmond, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Purple, Red
Philanthropic Organization Heart Fund
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Diversity
Sigma Alpha "Epsilon Z A E
402 E. 4th St.
"58-5793
Number of Chapters Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: March 9, 1856
Univensty of Alabama
National Headquarters Location:
Evanston. Illinois
Histonal: First Greek letter Fraternity founded in south.
Only southern Fraternity founded before
Civil War that still eists.
National policy against Hazing
Fraternity Colors: Purple, Gold, White
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Those given and accepting bids will be charter
members and part of the Alpha Pledge Class.
Kappa Alpha
800 E 11th St.
757-0128
KA
Number of Chapter Nationally: Over 150
Date and Place of Founding: December 21, 1865
Washington and lee
National Headquarters location:
Lexington, VA
Fraternity Colors: Cnmson and Old Gold
Philanthropic Organization: Muscular Dystrophy
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
1st Fraternity on Campus
Theta Chi
210Whichard
ex
830-0912
Number of Chapter Nationally: 155
Date and Place of Founding: 1856
Norwich University, Norwich, Vermont
National Headquarters location:
Trenton, New Jersey
Fraternity Colors: Red and White
Philanthropic Organization: Ronald McDonald House
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Personal development and service to Alma-Mater.
Alpha Sigma Thi
AZP
422 W Sth St.
757-3516
Number of Chapter Nationally: Over 50
Date and Place of Founding: December 6, 1845
Yale University
National Headquarters Location:
Delaware, Ohio
Fraternity Colors: Cardinal and Stone
Philanthropic Organization: American Lung Association
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Individuality that comes together to form a close brotherhood
Sigma 9u
221 Mendenhall
IN
757824
Number of Chapter Nationally: Over 200
Date and Place of Founding: January 1. 1864
Virginia Military Institute, Lexlnton. Virginia
National Headquarters Location:
Lexington, Virginia
Fraternity Colors: Black, Gold and White
Philanthropic Organization: Kidney Foundation
What makes this Fraternity Unique:
Founded against hazing and First Social Fratenuty on
campus to receive National Affiliation (source for the claim
is the February 13, 19S8, The East Carolinian)





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Title
The East Carolinian, September 6, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 06, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.622
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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