The East Carolinian, September 1, 1988






Coming Tuesday:
rhe Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity; the newest house on
campus and a starting over period for the brothers.
Matures:
IA profile and interviews with Greenville's very own
rock-n-roll quartet; the Usuals
�SPORTS
The Fearless Football Forecast, also a look at the
debut game for the Pirates against Tennessee Tech.
�he
(Earnlmiatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 15
Thursday, September 1,1988
Greenville, NC
24 Pages
Circulation 12,000
The story goes much deeper than the statistics
By JOE HARRIS
Newa TJ nor
According to a graphic that
accompanied the article "UNCW
is coming of age at 19" in the
August 21, 1988 edition of the
WilmingtonStar,71 percentof the
ECL' faculty holds doctorate or
professuial degrees.
In the article ECU is compared
with six other schools in the UNC
system: Appalachian State, UNC-
Asheville, UNC-Wilmington,
L XC-Greensboro, UNC-Char-
lotte and UNC-Chapel Hill. Of
these six, ECU ranks at the bottom
with 71 percent of its faculty hold-
ing doctorate or professional de-
grees and UNC-Chapel Hill tops
the list with 87.7 percent.
What the article does not show
are the statistics for the other
schools in the UNC system: Fay-
etteville State, Elizabeth City,
N.C School of Art, N.C. Central,
N.C Agriculture and Technol-
ogy. Pembroke State, Western
Carolina and Winston Salem
State.
Hunter Kome, the author of the
article, was asked how he came to
pick 7 oi the fiften schools in the
UNC system. Kome said, "I
thought these 7 were the best or
most widely known schools in the
state. ECU was used because it is
the only other school in Eastern
North Carolina, besides UNCW,
that has any size
What the story does not reflect
are actual statistics concerning
ECU, or any other of the men-
tioned schools.
Of ECU's 954 professors, not
including associate professors,
assistant professors, instructors
or others, 89.6 percent hold a
rh.D. Seventy nine percent of
associates, 68 percent of assistants
and 16 percent of instructors have
earned a doctorate or first profes-
sional degree.
There are significant differ-
ences in the titles. An instructor is
usually hired on a short term ba-
sis, some may be working toward
a masters degree. An assistant is
hired in hopes of staying on and
trying to achieve tenure. The asso-
ciate is one who has been pro-
moted from assistant, and is
working toward the professor
title.
Chancellor Richard Eakin said,
"the statistics are somewhat mis-
leading. You have to look beyond
the numbers and look at the qual-
ity and contributions of our fac-
ulty. Whether they have a Ph.D. or
not, each member is making a
strong contribution to ECU. Actu-
ally, I think 71 percent of the fac-
ulty holding doctorates is some-
thing to boast about
Eakin went on to say many
faculty members in the theatre
arts, music and art departments
do not hold doctorates.
"These departments are
enormous and have many in-
structors. Lotsof the faculty in the
'fine arts' are renown dramatists,
actors, artists and musicians.
There isn't any need for these
people to pursue a doctorate. In
some cases there simply isn't any
further to go, as far as their educa-
tion is concerned.
"When you look in the business
school, English department and
science area, where having a doc-
torate is the standard, a high
number of these people hold
Th.D.s said Eakin.
One reason for the lower num-
ber of faculty with doctorates is
ECU's rapid growth
Eakin said, "we had to open up
36 new positions this year to ac-
commodate the students. It is
simply impossible to hire 36
people with doctorate degrees.
Dr. William Bloodworth, Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs,
said, "the hiring process is an
extremely long one. You have to
nationally advertise, interview
and screen the applicants. Even if
we want them, it doesn't mean
they'll take the job
"The percentage will increase
over time. People have to under-
stand this is a building process, it
just doesn't happen over night. I
feel once our enrollment becomes
more stable, we'll be able to hire
more people said Bloodworth.
The university hires few
people without doctorates or ap-
Percentage of faculty holding doctorates or
professional degrees in 1987.
Source: Statistical Abstract of Higher
propriate degrees. The exception
comes in times of need, then, less
qualified applicants are hired on a
temporary basis. A common prac-
tice is to hire someone who is close
to receiving their doctorate de-
gree in hopes that they will stay on
after graduation.
Bloodworth said"it's all in
how you want look at the figures.
I think we've done an awfully
good job at hiring a qualified fac-
ulty. Our two priorities are to
always hire the best faculty pos-
sible and to encourage our pres-
ent faculty to keep doing a great
job
The statistics can be found in
Statistical Abstract of Higher
Education in North Carolina
1987-88.
Tenants, renters need to know their rights
BvGREERBOWEN
S�j Writer
Each semester, many ECU stu-
dents move into apartments
oblivious to laws and rights that
benefit them as tenants.
A large number of these stu-
dents are taken advantage of be-
cause they are unaware of the
laws designed to protect them.
When first moving into an
apartment, students should read
the lease. Mac Hines, of Davison
and Hines Reality in Rocky-
Mount, N.C. said that if vou do
not understand the lease, get
Mmeone to interpret it for you.
The lease will explain all rules of
the landlord and should explain
the rights of the tenant.
Mr. Hines said to remember all
landlords are not realitors. He
also suggested talking to other
tenants before moving in. "Stu-
dents as well as all renters should
have renters insurance, said
Hines.
Vicky Hardv of State Farm In-
surance company said that renter
insurance is not very expensive.
The average renters insurance
policy costs $120 a year, which
comes to about $10a month. It will
provide coverage in the event of
theft, robbery, fire, water damage
and any number of unexpected
events.
Hardy said most realitors don't
have insurance to cover loses of
the tenant.
When deciding on the amount
of insurance, students should es-
timate the value of their belong-
ings. "If you figure that you have
X amount of jeans and X amount
of dollars, a T.V a sofa, bed, and
dresser, you'll soon find out your
stuff is worth a great deal more
than you ever would have imag-
ined, " said Hardy. She said that if
you purchased your furniture at a
yard sale, you should still esti-
mate their value, based on their
replacement costs.
Another area students know
very little about, are the laws
designed to protect them from
poor landlords. Leslie S. Robin-
son of James M. Roberts Law Firm
in Greenville said "these laws are
written so the average person can
read and understand their
rights
First, there are many laws a
landlord must comply with.
North Carolina general statute 42-
38 details these laws as well as the
renters reponsibility.
A landlord must make all re-
pairs necessary to keep the pre-
mesis in good living conditon.
The landlord must "maintain in
good, safe working order and
promptly repair all electrical,
plumbing, sanitary, heating, ven-
tilating, air conditioning, other fa-
cilities and appliances supplied
required " According to
N.C.G.S. 42-42, a landlord, once
notified in writing must repair
any broken appliances or facility
in the apartment.
Security deposits are to be
placed in a North Carolina bank
or a furnished bond. The landlord
must notify the renter of where
his security deposit is being held
within 30 days.
When moving out, a landlord
may use the deposit to pay for
damages, upaid bills or loss of
rent due to a broken lease. 30 days
after moving out, an itemized list
of any damages and the balance of
the security deposit is then mailed
to the former tenant.
The landlord may not withhold
as damages any part of the de-
posit for normal wear and tear on
the apartment. He may not with-
hold amounts that exceed actual
repair costs.
If a landlord fails to comply
with these laws, a tenant may take
them to court to receive the de-
posit damages and court costs.
Generally, students don't try to
press charges against their land-
lords. A good understanding of
the laws makes it easier to negoti-
ate with your landlords. Byknow-
ing your rights, it becomes much
harder for landlords to take ad-
vantage of renters.
Usually, a simple letter staring
that you know your rights, and
the laws, you can keep from being
taken advantage of.
If a tenant is to be evicted, the
landlord must hand deliver the
notice or mail it to the premesis. If
a tenant leaves any belonging in
an apartment such as furniture,
the sheriff must be there and all
belongings are to be placed in stor-
age. In order to get those belongings
back, the tenant must pay all back
rent and storage costs.
ECU adopts AIDS
prevention policy
By MICHAEL LEWIS
Staff Writer
"AIDS Prevention a dilemma
that health care providers have
been faced with for the past eight
years.
AIDS, is a disease that is trans-
mitted by intimate sexual contact
or exposure to infected blood.
Because of this, the ECU AIDS
Education Committee has put out
pamplets to faculty, staff and stu-
dents, about the prevention and
spread of AIDS.
The committee, has adopted
specific guidelines to control the
transmission of AIDS. The
committee asserts that students
who have AIDS should be al-
lowed regular classroom atten-
dance in an unrestrictive manner
as long as they are physically able
to attend classes. Also, university
personel with AIDS, do not pose a
known health risk to other stu-
dents or employees thus, policy
should reflect this data.
The purpose of the pamplet is to
educate students, staff and fac-
ulty about the virus (and treat
those who have or think they may
have the virus). The better in-
formed the public is about the
virus, the higher the rate of effec-
tiveness for the new policy.
A guideline of the new policy is
to conduct educational programs
for university personel and stu-
dents. These programs will pro-
vide information to employees
and staff who need to know pre-
ventive methods to the virus if
they should come in contact with
someone who is HIV positive.
See AIDS, page 2
Student Bank offers new services
Classes are in full swing, parties are meant for the weekend and the library is reserved for
wee knights, (ECU Photoiab).
By TAMMY AYCOCK
Staff Writar
In response to many requests,
the Student Bank (MSC) is offer-
ing a new service.
"This will allow ECU students
to pay their Greenville Utilities
bill while they are on campus, "
said Janice Craft, the bank man-
ager.
The only conditions of this
time-saving service are: bills must
be paid before their due dates and
people must bring both parts of
their statements.
'If they want to pay it on the
due date, they can't pay it here.
They (Greenville Utilities) will
not allow us to take them on or
after the due date. We have to take
them before the due date and they
have to bring both parts of the bill,
Craft said.
The Student Bank also accepts
payment for Carolina Telephone.
"We can take them no matter
when they are due. If they are late,
that's between them and the
phone company Craft said.
In additon to handling bills,
"We offer savings accounts to the
students. These are not interest
bearing accounts because we are
not a commercial bank. If s just a
safe place for students to keep
their money until they need it.
They don't have to maintain any
certain balance to have an ac-
count Craft said.
"Another advantage for the
students is that we don't charge
for withdrawal. The only charge
is if you lose your passbook, there
is a fifty-cent fee to replace it, "
Craft said.
The bank also provides check
cashing. They will cash checks up
to a maximum of $125 every seven
working days of the bank.
In order to cash a check, stu-
dents must present an ECU iden-
tification card and a current activ-
ity sticker. "We cash checks
whether they are in-state or out-
of-state. If there is a returned
check, we do have a ten dollar
fine, plus whatever their bank
See BANK,page 2





7
4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1988
Toxic shock syndrome; a lethal disease
WHAT IS TOXIC SHOCK AND
WHO CAN GET IT?
Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a
rare disease believed to be caused
bv a bacterium c lied staphylo-
ooccus aureus. TS3 is a rare, but
serious disease which can some-
times be fatal. It is estimated that
6-17 of every 100,000 girls and
women who are menstruating
will get TSS each year. However,
TSS also occurs in non-menstruat-
ing women, men and children
Teenage girls and women under
thirty years oi age are reported to
be more likely to develop tam-
pon-associated TSS Approxi-
mately 78 of the cases reported
to the Federal Center of Disease
Control occurred in menstruating
women who were using tampons,
while the remaining 22 oc-
curred in children, men, and
women who were not menstruat-
ing.
What Are the Symptoms of TSS
Primary symptoms of TSS are
sudden, high fever (usually 102
degrees or more), vomiting, diar-
rhea, fainting, or near fainting
when standing, dizziness, or a
rash that looks like sunburn
Additional symptoms may in- remove your tampon at once and
elude aching of muscles and see your health care professional
joints, redness of eyes, sore throat immediately and tell himher
and weakness.
symptoms during your period, could use tamponsduring the da;
and napkins at night. In addition
it is advisable to use a tampor
with the minumum absorbcncy
that you need to control your
menstrual flow. Regardless of
which tampon you choose, you
will probably want to change you
tampon every 4 to 6 hours, or
more often if needed, recognizing
you are menstruating.
What Can I do to Reduce My
Risk of Getting TSS?
You can entirely avoid the low
What Should I Do if I Think I
Have TSS?
If you experience sudden fever
and one or more of the other
risk of getting a tampon-associ- too frequent changing may cause
ated TSS by not using tampons.
However, if you choose to use
tampons, it may be possible to
reduce your risk by alternating
tampons with napkins during
your period. For example, you
some irritation.
Can a Person
Than Once?
Get TSS More
About one in every three girls or
women who have had ISS has
gotten it again. So, if a hea'th ca-e
professional has told you that you
have had TSS, or if you believe
you have had the disease, do not
use tampons until you check with
your health care professional.
What if I Want More Informa-
tion About TSS
If you would like more informa-
tion about TSS, stop by or call the
Student Health Center at 757-
6841.
The hurricane season is here
By SEAN HERRING
AssUUnt N'cwi Editor
No high temperature records
are expected to be set during the
weekend, because 1988 is begin-
ning to see its first signs of the
rainy hurricane season.
"This is not abnormal for this
time of year said meteorologist
Richard Jones of the National
Weather Service at the Raleigh-
Durham Airport.
No high temperature records
are expected to be set during the
weekend, because 1988 is begin-
ning to see its first signs of the
rainy hurricane season.
"This is not abnormal for this
time of year said meteorologist
Richard Jones of the National
Weather Service at the Raleigh-
Durham Airport.
"The weather will fluctuate like
this, from now through the rest of
the summer and the fall he said.
"Everyone might as well get
used to the unpredictability of the
weather. It might be hot and
sunny one minute and scattered
thunderstorms the next minute
Jones added.
hven though the temperature
has dipped into the 60's and 70's
for the past few days, these tem-
peratures are nowhere near a rec-
ord.
According to Jones, the record
low for this time of year has been
recorded in the 40 degree range.
"The lower temperatures have
probably not seemed much
cooler, because the humidity has
been so high he said.
There will be little change in the
weather outlook for the next sev-
eral days, but that more sections
of the state will have a chance for
the standard afternoon and eve-
ning thunderstorms.
Police searching for attackers want help
Campus Police are seeking in-
formation about an alleged as-
sault on a female that occurred on
Friday, August 26th at approxi-
mately 1 a.m. in the main lobby of
Clement Hall.
Although rumors of this inci-
dent have been spreading that a
female was raped, facts of the case
indicate that the victim experi-
enced unsolicited and unwanted
touching. There has not been a
rape reported.
The alleged assault did occur in
the main lobby area of Clement
Hall near the lobby phone. The
incident was interrupted by an
unidentified female who walked
in on the incident, at which time
the perpetrators stopped. The
victim ran upstairs to a student's
room and called Public Safety.
Officers arrived immediately; the
perpetrators had fled the area and
have not been located.
The perpetrators were de-
scribed as undetermined number
of black males with close cut hair
and one of them was wearing
white shorts.
Campus police urge female and
male students to use caution
when confronted by any group of
two or more male subjects who
Six perish when jetliner
���
plunges into sea
HONG KONG (AP) - A Chinese
jetliner skidded down a slipper)
runway, barreled into the sea and
broke apart today while landing
in heavy rain. Officials said six of
the 89 people on board were
killed.
All of the fatalities were among
the 11 Chinese crew members,
said Chen Zhengyou, a spokes-
man for Civil Aviation Admini-
stration of China, that nation's
flag-carrier.
A massive rescue operation at
Hong King's airport involving di-
vers, a flotilla of boats and five
helicopters began after Flight 301
plunged into Victoria Harbor at
9:19 a.m.
Small rubber rafts with rescue
personnel bobbed around the
partially submerged wreckage of
the British-made Trident jet,
which had arrived from Canton,
capital of China's Guangdong
province about 90 miles to the
northwest.
Fire engines crowded onto Kai
Tak Airport's solitary runway,
which juts into the harbor. Seven
hours after the crash, a 15-foot
crane began hauling the fuselage
from the water.
"It fell into the sea at the end of
the runway police spokesman
Tony Leung said of the CAAC
jetliner.
Fifteen of the 83 people pulled
from the wreckage required hos-
pitalization and were reported in
fair or satisfactory condition.
Government-run Radio Televi-
sion Hong Kong said at least three
of the dead were recovered from
the wreckage.
The radio interviewed one un-
identified passenger who said
some of the plane's safety belts
did not work.
"That's why when the plane
landed so hard, people simply
were flying the woman told the
station. "I was in the back. It
didn't dawn on me that we were
really out of control. I was think
ing more of .how I was going to
get out
look suspicious or out of place.
Aviod making contact with those
subjects and report them immedi-
ately to Public Safety to have them
checked out.
Anyone having any informa-
tion concerning this incident or
any other crimes on campus are
urged to call Public Safety-Police
757-6150 or Pirate Crime Busters
AIDS policy
Continued from page 1
Topics such as: the use of con-
doms, transmission of the virus,
possible implements that may be
contaminated and cleansing of
contaminated surfaces will be
covered.
The new policy should have
"no adverse effect" on the enroll-
ment , said Ms. Mary Elesha-
Adams, member of the ECU AIDS
Education Committee and ECU
Health Educator at the Student
Health Center.
The brochure states, "no pro-
gram of screening for newly
admitted or current students or
other university personnel for
antibodv to HIV7 is recommended
at this time. "
Bank services
Continued from page 1
charges, " Craft said.
Last year, the student bank
began to sell American Express
Money Orders. "We charge one
dollar per money order, it can be
any amount up to $1,000, " Craft
said.
The Student Bank, located on
the main floor of Mcndenhall
Student Center and is University
operated. It is open to students,
faculty, and staff Monday
through Thursday form 10 a.m.
until 4:30 p.m. and on Friday from
10 a.m. until 5 p.m.
757-6266. All information will be
treated strictly confidential and
the caller does not have to give his
name. Persons with information
about crime on campus who call
in information thru Pirate Crime
Busters are eligible for a reward
up to $1,000.00 depending on the
type and value of the information
given which leads to an arrest.
The East Carolinian
James F.J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Open Rate$4.95 Local Open Rate$4.75
Bulk Rate (Contracts) Frequency (Contracts)
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Classified Display
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10 Insertions(4in$4.50
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Color Advertising
One Color and black$90.00 d225)$4.20
Two Color and black$155.00
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phone:
757-6366
� York free weights
� Organized activities
� Certified experienced aerobics
instructors
� Certified dynacam instructors
� CPR certified instructors
. 4 I . , � i , .
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LIIT!
Come by The Spa and see for yourselfTake advantage of our many facilities:
the changes we're making!
� Two exercise rooms
� New owner� Aerobics classroom
� New management� Wet steam room
� September addition of 50 more space� Desert dry sauna
� September nursery� Hot mineral whirlpool
� Expanded free-weight area� Wolff system sunbed
� 1500 square foot aerobic floor� Private dressing rooms
� New aerobic program coordinated by� Private tile showers
Mark Brunetz, which features high
and low impact classes, toning classes,PLUS, note our extra
seniors and resistance classes.benefits and services:
� 50 aerobic classes per week
� IPFA and AHA Memberships
And find outhonored at locations worldwide
what we ALREADY offer:� Special Interest Seminars
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After our renovations are complete,
membership prices will go up, so be sure
to JOIN NOW! or, bring in the coupon
below for a free month pass and see for
yourself why The Spa is Greenville's best
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Pitt
(AP) - Pitt County Memc
Hospital in Greenville hopd
add 143 new beds to meet
demands of a growing patl
load and educational progri
for doctors and other health
professionals, officials say
At a recent certificateof-n
hearing, Dave McRae, vice pr
dent and chief operating offij
said that without the additic
beds, the delivery c( health
ices in eastern North Carol
would suffer, and teaching
research opportunities woul
limited.
The 560-bed hospital is uni
among the four academic mec
school at East Carolina Univer
- drawing patients in need of t
ary care from a 29-county reg
in the east - it serves as the c(
munity hospital for the more t
97,000 residents of Pitt Counl
Tertiary services available
PCMH include cardiology
cardiac surgery, cancer diagnl
and treatment, high-risk obstj
cal and neonatal and pedi
intensive care, neurology
neurosugery, rehabilitation,
chiatry, trauma. All were d(
oped using a partnership betv
the countv-owned hospital
the ECU School od Medicine
Because of the lack of bed s
McRae said last week, "there
waiting lists for all thest tert
services
"More than 60 percent ofl
patients admited to Pitt Mem(
come from outside Pitt Coui
McRae said. "Most of these
tients are referred for sen
unavailable at other hospital
eastern North Carolina)
Solidt
WARSAW, Poland (AP)
Walesa said he would attemJ
make up for the years Solid
was barred form dialogue in
with Communist authontu
day, eight years to the da
government recognized sol
iry.
Authorities hoped the m
would help end Poland's
serious labor unrest since
crushed the free trade u
movement in a 1981 mil
crackdown.
Tne enterprises across the c
rrv remained idled by sti
demanding reinstatement ofl
danty and higher wages to
60 percent inflation.
Walesa planned to confer
Interior Minister Gen. Czi
Kiszczak; a senior represent
of the Roman Catholic Chi
and a member of a pro-rel
group backed by the governi
Government spokesman
Urban said Stanislaw Gosj
secretarv of the official nat
unity organization PRON,
would take part.
Walesa went to church
quarters after arriving
Gdansk.
"I'm like a cook prepannj
meal, but 1 can't tell yet i
going to be a good pie or a
one said Andrzej Stelma
ski, a senior mediator affij
with the church. Authentic-
municate with the oppoj
through the church, and Stj
chowski has played a key rj
The government deman
exchange for the talks - W
first with government o
since 1982 - that Walesa
strike at the Uenin shipy
Gdansk.
When asked bv reporter
would do this. Walesa rep
don't have the powers
asked if that meant he woul
call off the strike, the Soli
chairman said, "1 did not
Asked earlier what he
discuss with Kiszczak,
saidHow to make up for tl
seven years
Accords signed at the
shipyard on Aug. 31,1980
nationwide strike wave
Solidarity the only mdej
labor federation ever recc
in the Sovied bloc.
There was no govemi
nouncement of today's





1
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1988 3
sease
y uncn who have had 1SS has
L itten it again. So, if a hec;thcare
professional has told you that you
ave had TSS, or if you believe
u have had the disease, do not
se tampons until you check with
our health care professional.
What if I Want More lnforma-
Vbout TSS
w ould like more informa-
nt TSS stop bv or call the
Health Center at 757-
arolinian
tor or Advertising
hre$entatives
Spencer Meymandi
Adam Blankenship
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a
Pitt Memorial expands service
$
medical school in 1986, "particu-
larly in the key educational de-
partments such as medicine, ob-
stetrics, pediatrics, psychiatry,
and surgery
That marginal student-patient
(AP) - Pitt County Memorial McRae said that because the
Hospital in Greenville hopes to hospital serves as a regional refer-
add 143 new beds to meet the ral center and as a community
demands of a growing patient hospital, patients have faced de-
load and educational programs lays.
for doctors and other health care "During the past year, we have
professionals, officials say. exprienced many occasions when ratio, Laupus said, is "causing us
At a recent certificate-of-need it has become necessary to post- to postpone an increase in class
hearing, Dave McRae, vice presi- pone admissions, including delay size to 80, which has been the
dent and chief operating officer, of scheduled surgery, because no expectation of the General As-
said that without the additional rooms were available he said. sembly Marginal patient num-
beds, the delivery of health serv- "Patients who are referred to bers have also influenced the
tees in eastern North Carolina Pitt Memorial for urgent, special- number of residents accepted into
would suffer, and teaching and ized care must take precedence the various programs,
research opportunities would be over the less critical community "At present, we accept 50 first-
limited, patients year residents when we should be
The 560-bed hospital is unique The shortage of bed space also accepting about 80 per year
among the four academic medical affects the educational mission of
school at East Carolina University the hospital where, each year,
-drawing patients in need of terti- 1,000 East Carolina University
medical school students and
other health care profcssionals-
in-training receive clinical experi-
ence.
'The lack of sufficient beds, the
PCMH include cardiology and inadequacy of educational space irothofthesedepartmcntsoperate
cardiac surgery, cancer diagnosis near the bedside and the over- largely in the outpaitent setting
and treatment, high-risk obstetri- crowding of virtually all space for Similar scenarios can be devel-
cal and neonatal and pediatric support services have combined oped for the availability of terti-
mtensive care, neurology and to delay - and in some cases Hock ary training sites in nursing, Lau-
neurosugery, rehabilitation, psy- - plans for the ECU School of bus said.
chiatry, trauma. All were devel- Medicine to increase its entering Pitt County Memorial Hospital
oped using a partnership bet ween medical student class size from 72 opened in April ly, wim
the county-owned hospital and students to 80 and to expand its 400,000 square feet of space and
the ECU School od Medicine. residency programs McRae 370bcds. Thc$15.5-millionbuild-
Because of the lack of bed space, said.
The first medical school class -
28 medical students - began its
studies in 1977.
Dr. William Laupus, vice chan-
cellor for health sciences and dean
of the medical school at East Caro-
lina University, said the student
patient ratio at the hospital be
ary care from a 29-county region
in the east - it serves as the com-
munity hospital for the more than
97,000 residents of Pitt County.
Tertiary services available at
Laupus said. "Viewed in terms of
total resident numbers, our pro-
gram should provide education
for about 200 to 240 residents per
year, instead of the 155 we now
have. Only the family medicine
and emergency medicine pro-
grams operate at full strength and
McRae said last week, "there are
waiting lists for all thest tertiary
services
"More than 60 percent of the
patients admited to Pitt Memorial
come from outside Pitt County
McRae said. "Most of these pa-
tients are referred for services
unavailable at other hospitals (in came marginal when the first 72-
eastern North Carolina) student class was admitted to the
ing was designed as a community
hospital.
But an affiliation agreement
between the state and county
governments that same year
transformed the hospital into a
teaching and research facility,
which has caused it to grow to
700,000 square feet, with a value
not including the estimated $20
million in equipment, of $70 mil-
lion.
Theexpansion plans would add
230,000 square feet of new space
and renovate 80,000 square feet in
the present building, at a cost of
about $50 million.
Another 600 employees will be
needed after the expansion and
renovation is complete.
The hospital is presently Pitt
County's largest employer, with
3,016 workers and a payroll of
$57.8 million a year.
Dukakis
gaining groundl
on Bush camp
WASHINGTON (AP) - Some
state and local Democratic leaders
say that while Michael Dukakis'
Republican rivals have made
their grab for the national spot-
light, his campaign has been
making important organizational
gain in the field.
Around the country, Dukakis
field leaders and Democratic
Party state and local leaders con-
tend the appearance of flagging
momentum on the part of the
Dukakis campaign is at worst a
temporary problem - a part of the
upsand downs of a campaign that
will balance in the end.
Dukakis campaign officials
have said they were devoting
much of their summer efforts to
building organization in the
states, and party officials in some
key states point to organizational
gains.
CASH IN A FLASH FOR
THE BIG GAME BASH
Southern Gun
& Pawn, Inc.
INSTANT CASH LOANS
ON
TV'S, STEREOS. VCR'S. GUNS.
DIAMONDS. BICYCLES. CLASS RINGS.
ALL MOST ANYTHING OF VALUE
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
$
$
3$ 752-2464 gg
NEW 14K GOLD
500 N. GREENE ST. � JUST ACROSS RIVER BRIDGE
� GREENVILLE
$
Mexican Restaurant
Solidarity now 8 years
Presents
Mark Johnson
with Luke Whisnant
Thursday September 1
� Start� at lO p.m.
61.00 Admis.ion
WARSAW, Poland (AP) - Lech
Walesa said he would attempt to
make up for the years Solidarity
was barred form dialogue in talks
with Communist authorities to-
day, eight years to the day the
government recognized solidar-
ity.
Authorities hoped the meeting
would help end Poland's most
serious labor unrest since they
crushed the free trade union
movement in a 1981 military
crackdown.
Tne enterprises across the coun-
try remained idled by strikers
demanding reinstatement of Soli-
darity and higher wages to offset
60 percent inflation.
Walesa planned to confer with
Interior Minister Gen. Czeslaw
Kiszczak; a senior representative
of the Roman Catholic Church;
and a member of a pro-reform
group backed by the government.
Government spokesman Jerzy
Urban said Stanislaw Ciosek, a
secretary of the official national
unity organization PRON, also
would take part.
Walesa went to church head-
quarters after arriving form
Gdansk.
"I'm like a cook preparing this
meal, but I can't tell yet if it is
going to be a good pie or a rotten
one said Andrzej Stelmachow-
ski, a senior mediator affiliated
with thechurch. Authorities com-
municate with the opposition
through the church, and Stelma-
chowski has played a key role.
The government demanded in
exchange for the talks - Walesa's
first with government officials
since 1982 - that Walesa end a
strike at the Lenin shipyard in
Gdansk.
When asked by reporters if he
would do this, Walesa replied'I
don't have the powers When
asked if that meant he would not
call off the strike, the Solidarity
chairman said, "I did not say so
Asked earlier wha he would
discuss with Kiszczak, Walesa
saidHow to make up for the past
seven years"
Accords signed at the Gdansk
shipyard on Aug. 31,1980 after a
nationwide strike wave made
Solidarity the only independent
labor federation ever recognized
in the Sovied bloc.
There was no government an-
nouncement of today's meeting,
but the communist party's ruling
Politburo issued a statement late
Tuesday saying it endorsed a
proposal by Kiszczak for "round-
table" discussions on strikers'
grievances.
The strikes began Aug. 16 in the
coal fields of Silesia, in southern
Poland, and spread to Solidarity's
traditional stronghold in the ports
and shipyards of the Baltic coast.
At their peak, they affected 20
businesses employing about
100,000 people.
A strike at the huge steel and
heavy machinery plant in Stalowa
Wola, in southeastern Poland,
intensified this week.
Solidarity activists there said
four army helicopters circled over
the plant Tuesday and 500 troops
took up positions around it. The
mill makes heavy machinery and
military hardware, and officials
have said they cannot allow the
strike there to go on indefinitely.
Senior Solidarity advisers
called today's Warsaw meeting a
historic event.
Walesa last met with a senior
government official in early 1982,
when he was still interned.
In recent (years, he has been
spoken of by the government as a
private citizen, a tool of foreign
powers and "the former head of a
former union
But in the last few months, au-
thorities have been seeking part-
ners in an attempt to open a dia-
logue with society that might help
lead the country out of economic
despondency.
"The results of this meeting. .
.will be very important for the fate
of the whole country and world
said Adam Michnik, a senior Soli-
darity adviser.
"The talks begin exactly on the
anniversary of the 1980 accords
and we want to believe that now a
new chance begins, and it will be
at a time when Poles can make use
of this chance Michnik said.
At a news conference in War-
saw, government spokesman
jerzy Urban said "the starting of
talks would be common victory
In the fiesta Room.
Join us for
Drinks A Appetizers.
Musi be 21 or older.
INTER-
FRATERNITY
COUNCIL
PARKER'S
DINNERS INCLUDE Brunswick Stew, Cole Slaw
Boiled Potatoes or French Fries and Corn Sucks
PLATES INCLUDE Cole Slaw and Corn Sticks
ANNOUNCES
BARBECUE
LARGE BARBECUE DINNER 4.00
SMALL BARBECUE DINNER3 50
LARGE BARBECUE PLATE4.00
SMALL BARBECUE 1LATE3.50
CHICKEN
FRIED OR BARBECUED
LARGE Cl IICK1.N DINNER4.25
SMALL CHICKEN DINNER3.50
"RIED LIVER PLATE 3.75
COMBINATIONS
LARGE COMBINATION 4.25
Barbecue and Chicken (While Mrii)
SMALL COMBINATION 3.90
Btrbecue and Chjcken (Dark Meal)
FAMILY STYLE DINNERS(Each) 5.00
INCLUDES Harbcue, Fried Chicken,
Co!c Slaw, Brunswick Stew, Ituiled Potatoes
and Corn Sticks
CHILDREN Through 10 Years Old2.75
Entire Table Must Order Family Style
No Doggie Dag From Family Style
FRATERNITY
RUSH
SEPTEMBER 6,7,8
8-11 P.M.
TUES WED THURS
SEAFOOD
FISH DINNER5.00
OYSTER PRY5.00
OYSTER STEW�5.00
SIKLMPDINNER �5.00
ANY TWO COMBINATIONS SEAFOOD 5.75
SEA1OOD PLATTER (Euh. Shump. Opiera)6.75
PARKER'S WILL CATER ALL YOUR NEEDS
OPEN TO ALL
MALE STUDENTS
Two Locations To Serve You
No. 1 S. Memorial Drive No. 2. 2020 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-2388 758-9215
FOR INFORMATION CALL
DEAN AT 830-4739





I
- �
�lie iEaBt daralinian
U1 Csrt .wr�i mmmIv 'r !�?
PETE FERNALD, C���IM�t�
Chip Carter, m�Vnt u
James F.J. McKee, rwtoroa!
Joe Harris, N���d.tor
Douc Johnson, spom &.
Tim Hampton, r�f�r�, &�
Miqielle England, cf M�rr
DEDniE Stevens, w
September 1,1988
OPINION
Jeff Parker.?wn
TOM FURR, Circi�l�wn M�Mj�r
Susan Howell, pro m�
John W. Medlin, &
MAC CLARK, Bksipios Manager
Page 4
Cartoon
Overreciction not expected
The complaints are still flooding in
about the cartoon we ran on the front
page of the August 23 issue of The
East Carolinian. I'm still don't be-
lieve it.
When I instructed the staff illustra-
tor to draw a banner for the front
page of the "Welcome Back" issue, I
never dreamed we would get the
overwheling negative response we
got. I didn't think we'd get any re-
sponse at all.
Call me sexist. Call me an uncaring
pawn of a patriarchal society. I've
heard it all in the past week. Doesn't
bother me at all. But it does bother
me that The East Carolinian is ac-
cused oi these things. And since I am
the editor, I am responsible for its
editorial content.
One of the plaintiffs encouraged
me to think about the effect the car-
toon would have on a rape victim,
especially one who had been tied up
and threatened. An extreme case (no
doubt &n tirtforfunately common
oje, but an extreme C�$g for our
purposes) and yet it gave me pause
As editor, my responsibility is to
provide news, features and sports
coverage that concern ECU and the
surrounding area. My editorial re-
sponsibilities are to provide
thoughtful editorials and illustra-
tions that reflect the views of the
editorial staff of this paper. During
this semester, that means my views
and my staff's.
So are we just sexist pigs? Well,
that is irregardless in this case. The
cartoon was NOT an editorial car-
toon, only the welcome back car-
toon. It was not intended to present
ANY views whatsoever not even
the illustrator's.
But, as with anything printed or
drawn, it conciously or uncon-
ciously presents a point of view.
And it influences people. That is the
power of the media any media.
At no time during the publishing
process did I see anything wrong
with the illustration. After all the
negative response we recieved, I
understood how it might be offen-
sive, but to me personally, there is
nothing wrong with it. It is simply a
historical and literary allusion, and
therefore has nothing to do with
ECU except for the pirate motif.
This summer we published the
SGA Documents for the Student
Government Association. The same
illustrator was asked to do their
cover, and he provided a picture of a
pirate captain writing in his log book
late at night. Behind him a male
crewman is sneaking up with a
knife.
Neither the SGA nor us are advo-
cating murder. It was plain and
simply another illustration with the
pirate motif. Our front page cartoon
may not be historically precise (as I
have been informed women did not
wear strapless dresses in those
days), art has always sacrificed pre-
cision for beauty.
So why write an editorial about the
controversy? An editorial that will
probabaly only stir things up again?
Well, I wanted to explain. I could
write about the fact that it was 2 a.m.
when the cartoon finally got here
and that everyone should try to put
out a 54 page newspaper in two
days, but that would be whining. I'd
rather write about the after effects of
the fact that so many people wrote in
protesting the cartoon.
A Fa Qrjy��very leOrriUtn vas
'printecflt is our policy to print any
letter recieved as long as it's not
libelous, the letter is signed and it's
legible. The policy was made so that
we could hear the reader's feedback
and so that the readers would not
feel compelled to let us have the last
word.
All the letters were printed, all
phone messages that reached me
were returned and people that came
to see me were listened to. The latter
did not have to happen, but I feel
obliged to listen to people with
complaints, whether I feel they are
serious complaints or not.
Fact Two: Another cartoon about
the conflict, similar to the first illus-
tration, has been printed in this is-
sue. We did this because all the
controversy amused us, but we also
wanted to show we were not being
intentionally sexist.
Fact Three: The most rational
plaintiff I talked to made me realize
that we may have made a mistake in
printing the cartoon. I don't think
we did, but I was pleased to know I
was open-minded enough to doubt
it.
This is not an apology. This is an
explanation. I am proud of the both
the skill and the illustration that the
artist produced. I'm also proud we
shook things up. Most of all, I'm
proud of the newspaper.
�-
Cartoon offends, cartoonist responds
To the Editor:
The cartoon on the front page of the
August 23rd edition of your newspa-
per, depicting a pirate with sword in
hand, approaching a bound and
gagged, scantillly-clad female, needs
some explaination. The only caption
is "Welcome Back Should the
reader assume that females returning
to ECU are subject to male aggres-
sion, or that sadistic treatment of
women is prevalent male behavior
on this campus? Is the cartoon a joke?
What was the intent of your newspa-
per in publishing such a cartoon?
Particularly ironic was the fact that
this cartoon appeared on the same
page as the lead article about Pirate
Walk. Indeed, females at ECU will
need escorts, night and day, if this
cartoon represents the attitudes and
behaviors of ECU males. I imagine
many men on this campus were as
offended as I was by such a cartoon. If
the cartoon was used merely as a
filler, its choice, at best, was a serious
error in judgment. If the cartoon was
deliberately chosen to illustrate a
macho attitude of males towards
females on our campus, its choice
indicates a total irresponsibility in
journalism on the part of your news-
paper. An explanation, please?
Judy Rollins, PhD
Professor Department of Child
Development and Family Relations
To the Editor:
Since I seemed to have stirred some
ires with my "Welcome Back" illus-
tration in the August 23rd East Caro-
linian, I would like to offer my views
on the matter.
I am sorry that so many people
were upset and offended by the car-
toon. That was not my intent, nor was
it to demean women, which I don't
believe I did.
That said, I have to object to what I
think was an overreaction by the crit-
ics of the picture. First off, I resent the
implication that the picture is invit-
ing violence against women and rein-
forcing rape. I am very strongly in
opposition to those kinds of behavior
and would not have drawn the pic-
ture had I believed it did either.
To draw such conclusions from the
cartoon is simply to read too much
into it. What it actually is is a por-
trayal of the stereotypical pirate
scene so often depicted in literature
and movies. It is not representational
of any situation in relation to the
campus and the student body. It is
also not going to motivate anyone
into going out and tying up women.
men is okay, just don't direct it to-
wards women. Well, violence is not
okay directed towardsanyoneof any
sex. But it is true that had 1 shown the
man bound to the mast no one would
have written in or complained that
the picture demeaned men or subju-
gated them. If anyone is going to
object to what they think is violence,
I bcleve they should measure all
material by the same yardstick
What I would like to stress is that
the picture is a cartoon. The charac-
ters involved are in a fantasy setting,
and are not representativesof all men
and women. The picture is a poke at
a stereotype of the same kind as the
top-hatted villain tying a girl to the
railroad tracks; we're not supposed
to look at this as reality and give it
such intense consideration. It is a
cartoon. And I am not sexist or chau-
vanistic, nor am I trying to encourage
others to be that way.
I hope I have helped the people
offended see that there was nothing
malicious about the illustration, and
that no more will be read into this
letter than there is, as was the case
with the picture. Thank you for lis-
I haveneaiel Urn tormnenwui� -toting.
many who suggested such alterna-
tives as, "He should have tied up a
man instead or "have the girl tie up
the Pirate What I don't understand
about this line of reasoning is that it
seems to say that violence against
Jeff Parker
Senior
Staff Illustrator
i.
Dukakis's policies distance women
To the editor:
Have you heard of the so-called
"gender gap of 1988?" It translates as
"the majority of women won't vote
for George Bush That is debatable.
Correct cr not, however, the fact
remains that it women find out about
Michael Dukakis' views on criminals
vs. victims, particularly on rapists vs.
female victims, the "gender gap"
would likely disappear.
Dukakis is an enthusiastic sup-
porter of the unique Massachusetts
prison furlough program. Until the
law was changed this year over
Dukakis' objection, Massachusettes
was the only state to grant unsuper-
vised "vacations" (furloughs) to
first-degree murderers sentenced to
life imprisonment without parole.
In 1976, the Massachusetts Legisla-
ture passes a bill to deny furloughs to
first degree murderers. but Governor
Dukakis vetoed it.
William Hortcn, jr was serving a
sentence of life imprisonment with-
out parole in a Mass. prison after
being convicted of robbing a 17-year-
old gas station attendent in 1974,
brutally stabbing him 19 times, and
stuffing his body into a trash can.
Horton was given a Massachusetts
furlough in June 1986, and he took
advantage of the opportunity to es-
cape and leave the state. On April 3,
1987, Horton broke into a Maryland
home and terrorized a man and
woman for 12 hours. Horton tied up
the man, robbed, pistol-whipped and
kicked him, and cut him 22 times
across the middle of his body. Horton
tied the woman up for four hoursand
raped her twice.
Maryland found Horton guilty of
13 crimes and sentenced him to two
life teVras.plus 85 years. The judge
states "I'm not prepared to take the
chance that Mr. Horton might be
furloughcd he now belongs to the
state of Maryland
A Lawrence, Mass. newspaper
became interested in the story, but
the Dukakis administration refused
to release information about the
Horton case because prison officials
wanted to "protect prisoners' pri-
vacy rights
The newspaper stories, however,
activated the Massachusetts Legisla-
ture. At a public hearing, victims told
how other murderers had committed
heinous crimes, including rape,
while on Massachusetts furlough.
A prison official admitted that
under Dukakis a sentence of "life
without parole" is meaningless. Af-
ter ten years, a lifer in Mass. is rou-
tinely transferred to minimum secu-
rity and made eligible for furloughs.
The sister of the murdered gas sta-
tion attendant started a petition
campaign under the name Citizens
Against Unsafe Society (CAUS).
When she and other female victims of
murderers-on-furlough encoun-
tered Gov. Dukakis, he warned them
that they were "not going to change
my mind
The CAUS women set out to gather
the issue on the ballot in a Nov. 1988
referendum, and they succeeded in
getting them by the December 1987
deadline. In April 1988, the Massa-
chusetts Legislature overwhelm-
ingly passed a bill to prohibit fur-
loughs for murders.
The issue isn't dead, however,
because Dukakis didn't want to sign
the law and did so very reluctantly.
He has never apologized to or ex-
pressed compassion for the victims
of Massachusetts-murdcrcrs-on-fur-
lough.
At present time, there are 76 con-
victed criminals (including 10 mur-
derers and 9 rapists) who are missing
as a result of being released on fut-
loughs during Dukakis' administra-
tion.
And Dukakis is the Presidential
nominee selected by the so-called
"party of compassion!?" How could
any woman vote for a man who puts
the "rights" of rapists and murderers
over the rights of women to be pro-
tected from these same rapists and
murderers.
Sincerely,
Kimbcrly Babb
Senior
tow
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accountable for the
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people died, the wife)
says she still support)
program
"The space
continue safely )an(
widow oi pilot MirJ
told The Winston-Sal
in an article publish
"I'd love to fk in th� s
when it's safe
Mrs. Smith said she
for the crew of the
shuttle, Dis over)
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said. "They are v . I
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roes, living tr
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She said her hi
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was a gn at ; fetr A ai
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longer Mrs. Smil
Lawyers fot Mrs. Si
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Aug. 22 m a $1.5 bill
against Morton Thiol
manufacturer of
Highw
Widening U S
North Car. lina shoi
priority of the statc
plan, Lt. gov. Bob
during a stop on hi
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"This road is impel
state's future and wt
to improve it, fordaj
day in Washington,
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Highway 1" that
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i

esponds
oka v. just don't direct it to-
L women. Well, violence is not
I c. irected towards anyoneo any
ut it is true that had 1 shown the
Itound to the mast no one would
ati tten in or complained that
:ture demeaned men or subju-
them. If anyone � going to
:t to what they think is violence,
;eve they should measure all
tnal by the same yardstick.
h ?t I would like to stress is that
jicrure is a cartoon. The charac-
ir volved are in a fantasy setting,
e not representativesof al! men
omen. The picture isa poke at
trtxtvpe of the same kind as the
med villain tying a girl to the
ad tracks; we're not supposed
k at this as reality and give it
intense consideration. It is a
yon. And I am not sexist or chau-
Istic, nor am I trying to encourage
Irs to be that way.
Ihope 1 have helped the people
dcd see that there was nothing
Icious about the illustration, and
no more will be read into this
ir than there is, as was the case
the picture. Thank you for Hs-
eff Parker
Senior
Staff Illustrator
women
-dcrers-on-furlough encoun-
cd Gov. Dukakis, he warned them
tt they were "not going to change
mmd
he C AUS women set out to gather
issue on the ballot in a Nov. 1988
Jfcrendum, and thev succeeded in
Itting them by the December 1987
ladline. In April 1988, the Massa-
lusetts Legislature overwhelnv
: ly passed a bill to prohibit to-
ughs tor murders.
�The issue isn't dead, however,
Icause Dukakis didn't want to sign
law and did so very reluctantly. !
has never apologized to or ex-
fcessed compassion for the victims
Massachusetts-murderers-on-fur-
fcgh.
present time, there are 76 con-
Ictcd criminals (including 10 mur-
ders and 9 rapists) who are missing
a result of being released on fui-
Highs during Dukakis' administra-
n.
And Dukakis is the Presidential
?minee selected by the so-called
of compassion!?" How could
ly woman vote for a man who puts
ie "rights" of rapistsandmurderers
l cr the rights of women to be pro-
Beted from these same rapists and
lurdercrs.
i nee rely,
fcimberly Babb
cnior
SHALL
5ARTH.
k IV
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1981 5
Widow favors program
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) - Al
though she says no one was held
accountable for the explosion of
the Challenger, in which seven
people died, the wife of the pilot
says she still supports the shuttle
program.
"The space program should
continue safely Jane Smith, the
widow of pilot Michael Smith,
told The Winston-Salem Journal
in an article published Tuesday,
"I'd love to fly in the space shuttle
when it's safe
Mrs. Smith said she prays often
tor the crew of the next space
shuttle, Discovery, and the survi-
vors of the Challenger crew.
"I support the astronauts she
said. "They are very brave men
and women. They are great he-
roes, living tributes to this
country's efforts
She said her husband believed
that the space program was
mankind's most noble effort in
pursuing our country's future. He
was a great patriot and hero long
before the world knew him as the
pilot of the space shuttle Chal-
lenger Mrs. Smith said.
Lawyers for Mrs. Smith negoti-
ated an undisclosed settlement
Aug. 22 in a $1.5 billion lawsuit
against Morton Thiokil Inc the
manufacturer of the shuttle's
rocket booster. way to handle this terrible loss
Mrs. Smith said her husband she said,
would have wanted those who Smith, a native of Beaufort, had
caused the shuttle explosion to be logged more than 5,000 hours of
held responsible for their actions, flight time as a jet pilot and had
"I'm certain he would have flown about 28 kinds of aircraft. A
wanted them to be held account-
able for a product that did not
meet government specificaitons
she said.
Smith was one of the seven
astronauts killed when the Chal-
lenger blew up Jan. 28,1986.
Mrs. Smith, a native of Char-
lotte, was in Winston-Salem to
meet with her chief legal counsel,
graduate of the U.S. Naval Acad-
emy and the U.S. Naval Post-
graduate School, he flew 198 mis-
sions as a fighter pilot in Vietnam.
He was chosen from among
3,500 candidates for the shuttle
mission. He was already sched-
uled to pilot the next shuttle
launch in September 1986 that
would have carried the first jour-
William Maready, and to thank nalist into space, his wife said
the staff of the law firm of Petree,
Stockton & Robinson for their
work on the lawsuit.
The Smith family was the last of
the seven families of victims of the
He was proud to be part of the
space shuttle Mrs. Smith said.
"He felt these people in charge
would take care of him
Mrs. Smith, who wore a replica
Challenger disaster to settle with of the Challenger patch around
the company. The lawsuit con-
tended that Morton Thiokol failed
to make a solid rocket booster that
would operate properly.
"There are people who would
differ with what I did she said.
"That's not the issue.
"The issue here is accountabil-
ity she said. "After the special
tragedy, no one was held account-
able. No one was ever punished. It
was wrong.
"I feel this is the only dignified
her neck and aviator wings with a
diamond on her dress, said that
she and her three children - Scott,
19, Alison, 17, and Erin, 11 - are
trying to move beyond the trag-
edy.
The entire family watched the
launch and explosion of the Chal-
lenger from the roof the the
launch control center.
"It was devastating she said.
"We talk about their father.
Widening U.S. 17 in eastern Transportation in 1987 desig-
North Carolina should be a top nated$81 million for U.S. 17 over
priority of the state's highway the next nine years. But he said
plan, Lt. gov. Bob Jordan said that would complete only 13 per-
during a stop on his gubernati- cent of the work that needs to be
orial campaign.
"This road is important to our
state's future and we must work
to improve it Jordan said Tues-
day in Washington, N.C. "I am fa-
miliar with the over 260 miles of
done.
"The real question that faces us
is not if Highway 17 will be four
lanes from Virginia to South
Carolina he said. "The real ques-
tion is how quickly we can make
Highway 17 that run through this happen.
North Carolina. I have driven Jordan said completion of Inter-
Highway 17 in all of North Caro- state 40 to Wilmington in 1990 provements, saying they would
Una, and I know what congestion plus expansion of US. 70, U.S. 64 cost "$1.35 in interest for every
can develop up and down this and US. 264 will give North Caro-
highway lina good east-west highways.
Jordan said the state Transpor- "It is now time to move toward
tation Improvement Plan completion of the important
adopted by the Department of Highway 17, north-south corri-
dor he said.
Jordan said U.S. 17 is important
because it connects major cities
and towns in eastern North Caro-
lina and will play an important
role in economic growth of the
region. He also cited the road as a
crucial link for tourists and mili-
tary traffic among bases in Vir-
ginia, North Carolina and South
Carolina.
Jordan rejected the use of high-
way bonds to pay for the im-
dollar in new money.
Subscribe 757-6366
� ��.j
i.sllfjMl
Tom Togs Welcomes
Students and Parents
Annual Summer Clearance
12 Off Summer Merchandise
Beat the Heat In Our New Air
Conditioned Budget Areas
Nothing Over $8��
-JACK
Tom Togs
Factory Outlet
WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
The I The
CoMedYl CoMedY
ZONE A ZONE
WED (j WED
752-7303
THURSDAY
Luther
Heavy
Metal
99c Admission Til 10
FRIDAY
CONNELL'S
New Music
Beat Tenn.
Tech Concert
Only $4.00 with
Membership
SATURDAY
Street
Variety
Rock
$1.00 with ECU
I.D. All Nite
D&D New And Used
1504 N. Greene St. Greenville
830-9262
Store Hours: M,T,Th, F -10-6 p.mVSat 8-6 p.m.
New 5-piece wooden Dinette Sets - $149.95
4 Drawer Chests - $46.00 each or 2 for $79.00
5 Drawer Chests - $69.95
AndVarious Other Unique Items!
Highway 17 on Jordan platform
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking application for
Day-Student Representative
for the 1988-89 Term
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Cornmitte Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Full-Time Student
Reside Off Campus
Independent
Deadline To Apply: Friday, September 9f 1988
yAjB
rf Cs
uU
1900 Dickinson Ave
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Trocadero Tom Togs Fashions
Come Visit A New Image Featuring
1 Quality At Off Prices Originals From
Panama Jack & Other Exclusive Name Brands.
� T A (fc

1 v
4

Located Next to Tons of Toys - S. Memorial Drive
Hours: 10-6 Mon. - Sat (Fri. & Sat til 9)
Visit Our Other Locations
Hwy. 64 East Between Hwy 70 west
Morehead City, N.C.
Bethel and Tarboro
Conetoe, N.C.
Wed. -Sat. 9-5
Wed. - Sat. 9-5
$
$$
?ttc
e&t
JUST DON'T BE ANOTHER
FACE IN THE CROWD
EXPERIENCE PIKE!
September 6,7,8 From 8-11 p.m.
For information and rides call 752-4773
PIKES PEAK LOCATED ON THE CORNER OF 5TH AND ELIZABETH
.





f
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1.1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3
bedroom house 5 blocks from campus.
Completely furnished except for bed-
room. $175 deposit with 6 months lease.
$180month13 ublibes & phone. Free
cable. Jacuzzihot tub. Non-smoker pre-
ferred. Call Wiley 752-4614.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Non-smoker preferred 2 bdrm, 2 bath
apt. Call 355-5127.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: $80 for
new house one block from campus, fully
furnished with AC Call Mike or leave
message 830-4728.
ATTENTION STUDENTS NEW 2 it 3
bdrm mobile homes, fully furnished, A
C, within 5 mins of ECU campus, ONLY
$215 a month! Call 756-9874.
APT FOR RENT: Located 3 blocks from
campus, low rent, great location. Call
Luke or Steve for more details. 830-0339.
FOR RENT: Stall space and pasture for a
horse or a donkev. 8 miles from campus,
dirt roads available Call 746-4793 after 6
p.m.
OWN YOUR OWN HOME FOR HALF
THE PRICE OF RENT 1989 mobile
home models are here so 1988 models
have been specially reduced to move fast.
Low down payments and monthly pay-
ments. We handle the financing! CALL
DEE, 756-9874, STUDENTS & SINGLE-
PARENT FAMILIES WELCOME
FEMALE NON-SMOKING
ROOMMATE: Wanted to share mobile
home. Upperclassman preferred. $150
mo & 1 2 util. Call 830-6908.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
Male Roommate to share new mobile
home. 10 minutes from campus. Non-
smoker, p'ease. Weekends call Hugh 756-
0851.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: Pri-
vate bedroom it private bath in a trailer
about 2 miles from campus. S125 a month
plus 12 utilities. Call Michele at 752-
1218
GIVE YOUR LANDLORD THE AX
Purchase your own 3 bedroom mobile
home for as little as $145 a month! Call
Gail at 756-9874.
FOR SALE
UNIVERSITY AREA: Walk to school
from ycur 2500 sq. ft. heated space 3
bedroom, 2 batn home. Freshly painted
interior. $95,000. Call Alice Moore Realty.
355-6712 or Bradley Gray 752-3699.
FOR SALE: Double bed mattress and
boxspring $100. Supersingle waterbed,
everything included $100. Call 830-0598.
SLEEPER SOFA: Call 756-9225.
FOR SALE: 1988 Dodge Raider, red,
four-wheel drive, automatic, AC, AM
FM stereo cassette, loaded, 15,000 miles.
Paid $15,500 new � will sell for 513,000
or best offer. Great for beach, hunting,
fishing, camping, etc Call Angela at 830-
8802.
FOR SALE: INXS tickets, call 24 hours,
753-2263.
FOR SALE: 1 pair 250 watt EP1 speakers
2 year warranty Price negotiable. Call
758-7699 or stop by Wilson Acres Apts,
ask for Matt.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you are having a party and
need a D.J for the best music available for
parties Dance, Top 40 it Beach, Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
DWI? Don't Drink it Drive. Come
Partv in Style. Call Class Act Limousine.
757-3240.
SCHOOLS IN: Time to party! Call us for
your music needs. We'll beat all prices
and videotape vour partv. The Power
Station DJ s. 752-0946.
ECU PARTY PEOPLE: Let the parties
begin! But don't start until you call sound
mixtures D.J. Service. Party music ca-
tered by Greeks, for Greeks; we know
what ya'll like! Call now for more info.
752-4916, Bob. You won't be disap-
pointed!
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED: Young
male for sales and stock. Some heavy
lifting required. Must be neat and outgo-
ing. Applv at the Youth Shop, Carolina
East Centre. No phone calls
BRODY'S FOR MEN: Is looking for con
scientious, part-time associates who are
personable, responsible, and fashion for-
ward. Must enjov people and be able to
work flexible hours. Applv ir. person:
Brody's, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4
p.m.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Inter-
ested in making money part-time photo-
graphing people? No experience neces-
sary, we train. If vou are highly socialbe,
have 35mm camera and transportation,
give us a call between 12 noon and 5 p.m.
M-Fat 1-800.722-7033.
ARE YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT: Or
faculty member looking for part-time
employment? Are vou enthusiastic, de-
pendable, and excited about working in a
fashion environment? If you are sincere
about working it have a flexible sched-
ule, apply in person, Brody's, Carolina
East Mall, M-W, 2 4pm
NEEDED: Part-time, outside sales &
counter rep Three afternoons per week.
Apply in person: Budget Rent a Car, 10th
Street.
SUNNY SIDE EGGS INC: Is now ac
cepting applications for responsible col-
lege students who wish to earn Kflilc they
learn Apply in person at our main office
on State Road 1708 or call 756-4187.
NEEDED: Soccer Coaches Must be avail-
able Tuesday's and Thursday's after 2:00
p.m. Starring salary S3 00 per hour. For
more information contact Rita Roy, Pitt
County Community Schools at 830-4216.
DELIVERY PERSONEL NEEDED: Part
time, 10-20 hrs. per week Must have own
car. Apply in person at 114 E. 10th St.
Greenville.
PART-TIME WORKERS. Needed at
Sunnyside Eggs to load and unload
trucks. I lours are from 5 p.m. to mid-
night. Call Tracy at 756-4235 or apply in
person.
WANTED � FILE CLERK: For local law
firm. Filing, light typing, and some tele-
phone work. Experience helpful. 355-
0300 ask for Carla.
PERSONALS
LOOK OUT ECU: Elvis is on his was
TCB.
SHEL I wasn't expecting such a drastic
change! But do what you want to do.
Good luck this semester. PS. I'll miss ya
this F-ball season. Kev.
HEY PI KAPPS: The IIOUSE has started
Let's get ready for a great Rush. P.S.
thanks Sigma's for all the Toga shirt sales
� We love you. The Brothers of Pi Kappa
Phi.
CALLING ALL GWECKMANS: There
is a mandatory bikers pants meeting at
Bart As House. Be there or hate.
TO: TAMMY ELLIS: I thought I'd put
this not in the paper to publisize our love
and let the whole world know what you
mean to me. I never thought that I could
love the way I have this past year. I can't
wait till the day you carry on the Smith
name and tradition. You're everthing I
always wanted in a female. Love, Kent
TAKE PART IN GREEK LIFE: By rush
ing one of the strongest Fraternities on
campus Sigma Phi Epsilon.
ECU LADIES: Get ready for Pi Kappa
Alpha's fall til' sis rush Coming soon to
Grog's.
PIKAS & PIKA I.II. SISTERS: Welcome
back! Don't forget about the tailgate party
Saturday aft. Call Bowles for more info
WOULD YOU LIKE TO ATTEND A:
Champagne breakfast � I low about
socials, formals& road trips? Rush Sigma
Phi Epsilon.
CHI O'S: Be prepared to pref full throttle
with Pepe and the Pikas Good luck with
rush The brothers.
DO YOU WANT TO GET MORE OUT
OF YOUR COLLEGE YEARS? Make
life-long friends Rush Sigma Phi Epsilon.
FRESHMEN GUYS: Get psyced to be-
come a Pike. Rush Pi Kappa Alpha next
week and find out what it means to be a
part of the best.
TO ALL SORORITIES: Good luck with
rush. We look forward to partying with
you and your pledges The Pikes.
PHI KAPPA TAU: All campus party at
the Phi Kappa Tau house, Friday Septem-
ber 2 SEE YOU will be playing from 10 -
until. Come party with the Phi Taus No
bottles please.
IT'S ALMOST TIME: KA Little Sister
Rush.
KA LITTLE SISTERS: Don't forget our
first meeting at 9:30. We've got a great
semester in head of us � so lets get
started now!
WANTED TO BUY: Used Nintendo car-
tridges with instructions for re-sale. East
Coast Music it Video 758-4251, 1109
Charles Blvd.
FRESHMEN MALES: Pi Kappa Phi
wants you! We have a brand new frater-
nity house under construction. You!
could be the first to live there this spring.
Be a Pi Kappa. Call 758-1700 for more
info.
LADIES: Free all night tonight at the
FJbo Dance all night at Greenvilles most
happening dub. The Qbo"
HAPPY HOUR: Friday afternoon $2 teas
all day and night Be there! The Qbo
Free admission. 5- 2 a.m.
CREEKS: Big time tea bash, get your "I
Survived The Elbo Tea Bash" shirts $2 tea
party Friday 5 - 2 a.m. Free admission
CARPOOL NEEDED: Want a nde to
campus by 8:00 a.m. weekdays. Can pay
for gas. Live on 4th Street on way to ECU
Call 752-0156 after 9 p.m.
K-MAY: Thanx for a wonderful 11
months! May our future be as bright a.
the past has been' I love you' JSE
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED: Any
year, shape of cards. I'll pay damn good
money for any cards of any year of any
shape or condition Need party monev7
Sell your cards to Earlvis Call 757-6366
Leave a message if not here.
HEY MON!
WEDNESDAY NIGHTS
ARE
HAPPENING AT
PROFESSOR O'COOLS
JAMAICAN
CELEBRATION.
GREAT SPECIALS AND
REGGAE MUSIC ALL
NITE LONG MON! DON'T
MISS IT! LOCATED
BEHIND ACE CLEANERS
IN FARM FRESH
SHOPPING CENTER
f All New, XM
GYM
USA
A I ' ft! �IK�"(� IKTNW. EKf.MC
pi nwtrttr cvu CHDMUtNC
Offers both
Monthly & Semester
Rates For Students
758-9584
� i i ri o rm mi v
i, rtii arsT
W
"THE
( AH PET CLEANER'
ilai !)�, .
Loanf On Ptrffng OwW
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent'
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
� Ixxratcd Near BCU
� Across From Highway I'atrol Slat ion
limited Offer - $275 a month
Contact I. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1 037
Office open - Apt. 8,17 - 5:30 p m.
� -AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartnvnts. energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable IV.
Couples or singles onv $W5 a month. 6 month
lease MOHLE 1 DME RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club
Contact J.T or Tommy Williams
7S6-7815 '
ABORTION
'Personal nnd Confidential Care"
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30-4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
Call for appointment Mon. thru Sat. Ixw
Copt TrrtM'Mtion to 20 week of prrgnancy
1-800-433-2930
CRUSTY'S
PIZZA
WE
DELIVER
NOW HIRING J&l'C As
FOR ALL POSITIONS
25-30 Delivery Drivers. Earn $4 - $8 per hour.
Flexible hcuirs. 8 10 inside pcrGonnek
Must have own car and insurance.
Apply in person at 1414 Charles Streets.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is recruiting for
10-14 part-time soccer coaches for the fall semester program.
Applicants must possess some knowledge in soccer skills and
have patience to work with youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people, ages 5-15 in soccer fundamentals. Hours
approximately 3-7 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Some night and
weekend coaching. Program will extend from September to mid
November. Salary rate is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour. Applicants will
be accepted starting August 20. Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
Announcements
SENIORGRAP STUDENTS
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
ice, located in the Bloxton House between
Mendenhall and Greene Residence Hall,
is where graduating students may put
resumes and establish a credentials file.
Interview signups begin soon, and you
must be registered to sign up. General in-
formation meeting will be helc Aug. 30,
31, Sept. 15 at 3 p.m. and on Sept. 7at7p.m.
in the Bloxton House.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off campus place-
men Call 757-6979 or come by the Gen-
era! Classroom Building, Room 2028.
FREE PIZZA
Tuesday, 6-8 p.m. AFROTC Det � 600
Wright Annex 3rd floor. Talk with Air
Force officers. Find out about U.S. Air
Force.
SPECIAL QLYMPCIS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special Olym-
pics will be conducting a training school
Sept. 17 at Elm St. Gym for anyone inter-
ested in volunteering to coach soccer for
special athletes. No experience is needed.
We are also looking for coaches for basket-
ball, weightlifting, ans swimming. All
interested persons should contact Greg
Epperson or Connie Sappenfield M the
Special Olympic office, 8304551.
PHYSICAL ED. AND FITNESS
IESI
The physical eduction motor and physical
fitness competency test is Friday at 1 p.m.
at Minges Coliseum. A passing score on
this test is required of all students prior to
declaring physical ed. as a major. 1. Main-
taining an average T-score of 45 on the si x-
item test battery. 2. Having a T-score on
the aerobic run. Any student with a medi-
cal condition that would contraindict par
tidparion in the testing should contact
Mike McCannon or Dr. Gay Israel at 757-
6497. To be exempted you must have a
physicians' excuse. A detailed summary
of the test is available in the Human Per-
formance Lab (Room 113, Minges Coli-
seum).
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The first organizational meeting of the
school year will be Sept. 8 at 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center, Room 221.
All old members & irit.restea students are
encouraged to attend.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anyone who purchased new student
reviews should cum by the yearbook
office to pick them up. Hours are M-F, 6-8
p.m.
ECU Gospel Choir is open for member-
ship to all interested students. Last day to
join in Sept. 21. Rehearsals are held
Wednesdays at 5 p.m. in Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
ADVANCEMENT OF MGMT
Society for the Advancement of Manage-
ment, informal membership meeting,
Sept. 7, 3 p.m room 3014, General Class-
room Building. Enhance your business
interest with tours of the area industry
and great speakers throughout the year.
Not limited to business majors!
HONORS PROGRAM
ftudent, faculty, staff, and the general
public are invited to attend a lecture spon-
sored by the 1 lonors Program. The topic is
"Polish Public Opinion and the Crisis of
Socialism the lecturer is Dr. Renata
Siemienska-Zochowska a sociologist
from Warsaw University The lecture
takes place at 730 p.m. Sept. 6 in Room
1026 General Classroom Building and is
free of charge.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
ECU Christian fellowshio will be held
every Thursday at 6 p.m. in the Cultural
Center.
CAMPUS SERVICE
Campus service will be held in Jenkins
Aud. 10:30 a.m. Sept. 11 come enjoy the
word of God at the first 88 campus service.
HONORS ORGANIZATION
The ECU Honors Organization will meet
Thursday at 5 p.m. in Room 1004 of the
General Classroom Bldg. All former
ECHO members and new students inter-
ested in the program are invited. For more
info, call Mary at 752-8022 or Dr. Sanders
at 757-6373.
CAMPUS GIRL SCOUTS
College aged adults meet for the 1st meet-
ing of the semester, Thursday at 6 p.m.
Room available from information desk
in Mendenhall. New memberships avail-
able. For information call Nanci, 758-6701
after 5 p.m.
NATIONAL TEACHER EXAM
The National Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery Exams � (Communication
Skills, General Knowledge, and Profes-
sional Knowledge) will be offered at ECU
October 22. Applications are to be com-
pleted and mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 911-R, Princeton, NJ 08541.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept. 19. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105, Speight Building.
GMAT
The Graduate Management Admission
Test will be offered at ECU on October 15.
Applications are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ 08540.
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept. 12. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105 Speight Building.
GRE
The Graduate Record Examination will be
offered .it EC1' n October8. Applications
aro t � I and m tiled . (IRE,
Eductional Testing Service, Iiox955, Prin-
ceton, NJ 08340. Applications must be
postmarked no later than Sept. 2 Applica-
tions may be obtained from the FCU Test-
ing Center, Room-105 Speight Building
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test will be
offered at ECU on October 1. Applications
are to be completed and mailed to Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 966-R, Prince-
ton, NJ 08540. Applications must be post-
marked no later than Sept. 1.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
All pre law students, freshmen to seniors,
are invited to attend our first meeting on
Thursday, at 7 p.m. in Room 221 Menden-
hall.
EXPRESSIONS MAGAZINE
The American Scholastic Press Associa-
tion Award Winning Pulbication at ECU
is now accepting applications for staff
writers and a Promotion Distribution
Manager. Apply at the Media Board
Secretary's office in the Publications Bldg.
(second floor) by Friday. Contributors are
also welcome.
PIRATE HOME OPENER
The 1988 Pirate Football season opens
Saturday at 7 p.m. in Ficklen Stadium
against Tenn. Tech. The Breeze Band
0ehind Scales) and Brice St. (beside
Minges) will perform liveat 4:30p.m. 1100
beach blankets will be given away at the
gate. A Pirate fan will win a 3 day3 night
Bahama vaction by putting together a
winning puzzle. Puzzles will be sold prior
to the game.
PEP RALLY TONICHT
The 8th annual ECU football pep rally
sponsored by fludweiser will be tonight at
7 p.m. in Ficklen Stadium Gates open at
6:30 p.m. The rally will feature the ECU
football players anc coaches, atnietic di-
rector, The Marching Pirates, the ECU
haerleaders, and Pirate mascot. Admis-
sion is free and several prizes will be given
away. In case of rain the rally will be held
in Minges Coliseum.
SRA
Interested in your residence hall? Become
involved by joining Student Residence
Association See your residence hall direc-
tor for information Elections for officer's
are Sept. 13.
OVERSEES DEVELOPMENT
Are you interested in dedicating6 months
of your life to an internship in Zimbabwe,
Southern Africa, living and learning with
the people? Call Marianne Exum (h) 830-
9450 or (w) 751-6271 for application and
more details. Application deadline Octo-
ber 1.
FRISBEE CLUB
Practices are in full swing. Come to the
bottom of College Hill every Tues
Thurs and Sunday at 5 p.m. New players
are more than welcome. Join the team that
tied for 5th place last year at Collegiate
Nationals in Santa Barbara, Ca.
RUGBY
All athletes are encouraged to try this
hard nosed sport and join in the fellow-
ship of Rugby. Practice is Tuesday thru
Thursday 3:30 p.m. until. For more infor-
mation call the ECU Intramural Club
Sports Dept. or Bob Eason at 757-0209.
BATTLE OF THE BANDS
Battle of the Bands, presented by the cof-
fee house committee of the student ur.ion,
will be accepting applications for this
event until Sept 8 at 5 p.m. Pick up appli-
cations at the information desk at Men-
denhall. Amateur bands only please! So-
loists and Guitarists welcome.
TEENS
DI ALA-TEEN is interested in your valu-
able time. We are looking for special teens,
between the ages of 15 & 18, who would
like to volunteer their listening skills to
help other teens in crisis. We are offering
training classes for our teen hotline begin-
ning Sept. 6. for more information call
Marlene 758-1976 or 758-HELP.
REAL CRISIS CENTER
We need your experience! Your achieve-
ments in everyday situations can be
useful to others. Real crisis center recruit-
ing volunteer counselors. We will be of-
fering training dasses on Sept. Call 758-
HELP or come by 312 East 10th Street
CAMPUS CRUSAPE
Everyone welcome � Fun, Fellowship,
teaching, and training on how to live a
more effective Christian life on a college
campus Thursday at 730 p.m. in Brew-
ester C-103.
HANG GLIDING
Be sure to attend the Intramural Har.g
Gliding registration meeting. From Aug.
22 to Sept. 6 learn how to fly high in the
sky!
CQ-QP EDUCATION
Co-op education, a free service offered by
the University, is designed to help you
find career-related work experience be-
fore you graduate. All students are en-
couraged to attend a Co-op Information
Seminar in the General Classroom Build
ing. The Seminar schedule is: Thursday
Aug. 25 4 p.m. Room 2006, Monday, Aug
29 1 p.m. Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 1 4
p.m. Room 2026, Thursday, Sept. 8 1 p.m
Room 2010, Monday, Sept. 12 1 p.m
Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 15 4 p.m
Room 2006, Monday, Sept. 19 4 pm
Room 2006, Thursday Sept. 22 1 p.m
Room 2010, Monday, Sept. 26 1 p.m
Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 29 4 p m
Room 2006.
Advertise in The East Carolinian
Classifeids Page

I
(
1
i
:
I
li
J
h
a
tl
vs
P
SC
5
Acti
RALEIGH (AP). I
activists sa
for 157 i
rtiry,butj -
it w
dcmonstral
moven � i
change fed
"It's an a
whoch
sionofthc �
compk �
cumst
their n
Zicglci
Ab �
i �
"Ba � �
find

Hill, .
Tia
ansv � �
un!
"Wh tl
thing
praj for the d
O' Kcc �
Our Lad
Church in Rale
"It's � �
or abortion or-
ers, in North C I
O'K
human I
( -
lro-Lifc

in Chi.
fctuses
search I
researcl 1
i:ts lool rl
The let uses wen
packaged and labeled!
with th
doctors, dates ar I
tions were pc i i
The fctuses v. . ro s
O'Keete, who had a si
made tor them
cese of Raleigh :
Gangs in
RALEIGl �
federal law enforccn
irmst vrk'trcvV. fXe
jhe passr effort
gangs to take over dru
mg operations in x
Attorney General 1 a
burg says.
"What makes
gangs so d
fence associated v
Simmons, Tl
man, said
of a two � '
forcement
Carolina South
gia and Florid
"When th �
move in with I
dominating the di
that means
competition, tlu
Simmon said
ders and rand
cal. That's one way
date the comm
drug deali rs hey
who's in the way
The confer nee at I
lina State Univei
reporters bee
ment agencies �� I
telligence infoi !
gangs, which have m.
into drug trafficl
as Atlanta, Miam j
"The Jamaican g j
a peculiar threat beca
vuriousness of tl
Thornburg told I
Tuesday: We have
pared to head then ot'tj
making it veryui .
the gangs to org j
Carolina.
"The Jamaican ; i
controlled and can b
but only it aU kiu ej
agencies work togethi
The conference, hoj
SBI's Criminal Intel
tion and the Raleighl
partment, is the first o
the state
Raleigh Police Chk
Heineman said thei
gangs, called posses
ous because of their
because thev move qi
"Jamaican gangs aj
space program Hen
"It doesn't take vearsl
A group of Jamaican
up and operating witlj
The conference ha
workshops on the n
law officers, as well
of federal agencies, u
maican gangs
According to StatcJ
Investigation figures,
claiming to be nativ
have been arrested in
lina in the past 10 ye
iorityinthelasttwotcj





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1988 7
f"i Tree all nighJ tonight at the
�nce all night at C.reenvilles most
bung dub The Obo"
f HOUR Friday afternoon $2 teas
and night" Be there' The Qbo
�omission n 2am
Ik Big time tea hash, get vour "I
bo Tea Bash" shirts $2 tea
day 5 2am Free admission
SUPEP: Want a nde to
� � 8 V a m weekdays Can pav
- 4th Street on wav to ECU.
.ltter Jpm
m tor a wonderful 11
M.iv mr tvirure be as bright as
been! i love vou' 1SE
lFA.11 CARPS WANTED: Any
Isk I'll pav damn good
- i anv ear of anv
Need partv monev?
irdsl larvis- Call 757-6366.
lot here
l-unt On toyfnj fcm
Stereoc Gold rmtef
mMt anything �f i
Jouthem Con .fjltg$j(
'52-1464
TVS
WE
DEIJVEM
TIONS
$4 - $8 per hour.
ifle rr-onneW
d insurance.
irles Streets.
AT I ON AND
mENT
eeded
partment is recruiting lor
-nestcr program.
� - cccr skills and
ts must be able to
n 11-rentals. Hours
S me night and
m September to mid
- tour. Applicants will
Ben lames at 830-4543.
TEEN � interested in vour valu-
� We are looking for special teens,
the ages (if 15 it 18, who would
olunteer their listening skills to
�eens in crisis. We are offering
It :ss for our teen hotline begin-
- � r more information call
- 76 or 758- HELP
iREAL CRISIS CENTER
leed vour expenence! Your achieve-
eryday situations can be
- Real crisis center recruit-
teeT counselors. We will be of-
lmng classes on Sept Call 758-
-ome bv 312 East 10th Street.
CAMPUS CRUSAPE
one welcome � Fun, Fellowship,
nz, and training on how to live a
effective Chnstian life on a college
"hursday at 730 pm. in Brew-
-103
HANG GLIDING
Lre to attend the Intramural Har.g
ng registration meeting. From Aug
I � am how to fly high in the
CO-OP EDUCATION
i education, a free service offered by
ersity, is designed to help you
�ex related work expenence be-
graduate All students are en-
Iged to attend a Co-op Information
lar It the General Classroom Build-
fne Seminar schedule is: Thursday,
2'4 pm Room 2006, Monday, Aug
m. Room 2010, Thursday, Sept. 1 4
oom 2026, Thursday, Sept 8 1 p m
2010, Monday, Sept 1? 1 pm,
2n!0 Thursday, Sept 15 4 pm.
2006, Monday, Sept 19 4 pm
06 Thursday Sept 22 1 pm
2010, Monday. Sept 26 1 p.m.
2010, Thursday, Sept 294pm
2006
Activists hold ceremonies for 157 fetuses
RALEIGH (AP) - Anti-abortion
activists say they held a funeral
tor 157 fetuses to show their dig-
nity , but pro-choice advocates say
it was a "gruesome exercise" that
demonstrated the frustration of a
movement that has been unable to
change federal abortion laws.
"It's an affront to the women
who chose the procedure, an inva-
sion oi their personal privacy and
completely insensitive to the cir-
cumstances oi their lives and to
their religious beliefs said Ruth
Ziegler, director oi the National
Abortion Rights Action League of
North Carolina.
"Basically, I think most people
find it repugnant Ziegler said.
But Lucy O'Kcefe of Chapel
Hill, who organized the service
Tuesday, said the funeral was an
answer to those who think "the
unborn are trash
"What we are doing is some-
thing very straight-forward -
praying for the dead Ms.
O'Kcefe said after the service at
Our Lady oi Lordes Catholic
Church in Raleigh.
"It's not about labs in Chicago
or abortion clinics, or even moth-
ers, in North Carolina Ms.
O'Keefesaid. "It'sabout 157dcad
human beings
Joseph Scheidler, director of the
Pro-Life Action League, a na-
tional anti-abortion group based
in Chicago, said Sunday that the
fetuses had been found during a
search through the garbage at a
research lab in Chicago bv activ-
ists looking for abortion remains.
The fetuses were individually
packaged and labeled, he said,
with the names oi the mothers,
doctors, dates and places abor-
tions were performed.
The fetuses were sent to Ms.
O'Kcefe, who had a single coffin
made for them and asked the Dio-
cese of Raleich to conduct the
Gongs in N.C.
RALEIGH (AP) State, local and
federal law enforcement agencies
Ihusf work together tohead of fat
fc pass' 'efforts bv Jamaican
gangs to take over drug traffick-
ing operations in North Carolina,
Attorney General Lacy Thorn-
burg savs.
"What makes the Jamaican
gangs so dangerous is the vio-
lence associated with them John
Simmons, Thornburg's spokes-
man, said Tuesdav before the start
of a two-day conference of law en-
forcement officials trom North
Carolina, South Carolina, Geor-
gia and Florida.
"When they move in, they
move in with the intention oi
dominating the drug trade, and if
that means blowing away the
competition, they'll do that,
Simmons said. "Drive-by mur-
ders and random killings are typi-
cal. That's one way they intimi-
date the community and other
drug dealers. They don't care
who's in the way. "
The conference at North Caro-
lina State Lniverstiy is closed to
reporters because law enforce-
ment agencies will be trading in-
telligence information on the
gangs, which have made inroads
into drug trafficking in such cities
as Atlanta, Miami and New York.
"The Jamaican gangs represent
a peculiar threat because of the
viciousness of their operation,
Thornburg told 150 lawmen
Tuesday: "We have to be pre-
pared to head then off at the pass,
making it very uncomfortable for
the gangs to organize in North
Carolina.
"The Jamaican gangs can be
controlled and can be defeated,
but only if all law enforcement
agencies work together, " he said.
The conference, hosted by the
SBI's Criminal Intelligence Sec-
tion and the Raleigh Police De-
partment, is the first of its kind in
the state.
Raleigh Police Chief Frederick
Heineman said the Jamaican
gangs, called posses, arc danger-
ous because of their violence and
recause they move quickly.
"Jamaican gangs aren't like a
space program Heineman said.
"It doesn't take years to develop.
A group of Jamaicans can be set
up and operating within a week
The conference has scheduled
workshops on the roles of local
law officers, as well as a number
of federal agencies, in fighting Ja-
maican gangs.
According to State Bureau of
Investigation figures, 278 persons
claiming to be native Jamaicans
have been arrested in North Caro-
lina in the past 10 years, the ma-
jority in the last two to three years.
service. The coffin, which was not
present at the funeral service, was
taken to Guadalupc Catholic
Church in Newton Grove for
burial Tuesday afternoon.
Monsignor James McSwceney
said even though the fetuses were
not present at the service, an enve-
lope with 157 names "chosen by
concerned people" was placed on
the church altar and would be
buried with the casket.
"We are here to give reverence
to our belief that God is the crea tor
and sustainer of life and that ev-
ery stage of human development
from conception to natural death
is sacred to God McSweeney
told about 200 people, including
many mothers with young chil-
dren. "We arc here because of the
intrinsic dignity oi these human
beings whose lives will never
"flourish
McSwceney said the world had
been "repulsed and horrified" by
the slaughter of 6 million Jews
during World War II, but he said
abortions "are a new holocaust in
which millions of lives are
snuffed out for no other reason
than that their existence is an
embarrassment
"With the enormity of this
tragic waste of precious human
life . . . our faith requires us to
make our own fervent prayer,
'Father forgive them, for they
know not what they do
McSwceney said.
He said the world would never
know what music, art, love or
compassion the fetuses could
have brought.
"We were never given an op-
portunity to know these unborn
children McSweeney said. "Our
lives will not be enriched by them.
The lives of us all have been di-
minished by their being deprived
of life
Ms. O'Kcefe, who had kept the
fetuses in her kitchen, said she ini-
tially feared she would have
nightmares with the bags of re-
mains in her house.
"But there was none of that
shesaid. "Instead, I felt a descend-
ing sense of peace that the right
thing was happening
She would not divulge the
name of the Chicago laboratory or
the North Carolina clinics noted
on the tagged remains
FOR
RUSH PHI KAPPA TAU
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY
409 Elizabeth St.
Leaders in:
A ca dem ics A th letics
Campus Organizations
Social Enjoyment
"Come See What Makes Us Best"
Call 757-1319
for a ride
jfyfa ??





i
8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1�H8
m
t
Two million needed to save Bishop College
(CPS) Bishop College, a 108-
vear-old traditionally black
school, was ordered closed by a
i deral judge after it tailed to raise
almost $2 million needed tocover
its prospective 1988-89 deficit
Bishop, whose financial woes
and enrollment problems began a
decade ago. is the latest small
private college to close as college
costs skv rocket and the pool of
available high school graduates
diminishes.
A 1982 University of Michigan
stud) predicted that as many as
1 small, private colleges like
Bishop would close by 1990.
That dire prediction didn't
materialize, said David Ray of the
National Association of Inde-
pendent Colleges and Universi-
ties, but many small, religious and
black institutions have been
forced to close or merge with
healthier schools.
Earlier this year, for example,
I oretto 1 eights College in Den-
ver, a small Catholic school, was
forced to merge with Regis Col-
lege.
In 1986, financial problems
pushed Titt College in Atlanta to
merge with Mercer University
and forced Berkshire Christian
College in Massachusetts to close
its doors. In 1984, enrollment and
financial problems forced Rhode
Island's Barrington College to
merge with Cordon College.
Generally, however, "enroll-
ments are steady" at the smaller
private campuses, Ray reported.
'The seats are still full. "
lames Miller, who conducted
the Michigan study, said he over-
estimated the number of small
colleges that would close because
he underestimated "the institu-
tional tenacity" of schools like
Bishop.
"There have been remarkably
few that haveclosed Miller said.
"Bishop provides an example of
how hard it is to kill a college, or
rather how fiercely colleges cling
to life
Bishop, the only predominantly
black campus in the Dallas area,
had struggled for 16 months to
raise the $1.85 million bankruptcy
Judge Robert C. McGuire said
was necessary to open the school
this fall.
Campus supporters, who esti-
mate th school owes about $18
million to creditors, attempted to
keep the school open with an in-
tensive fundraising drive that in-
cluded selling T-shirts outside the
federal courthouse.
George McElreath, the federal
bankruptcy trustee overseeing
the case, said attorneys told him
that donations had increased to
about $7,000 per day in early
kind of job in preparing for par- primary source of funding a;
ticipation in the culture that has to keep prices down for their tra-
been lost, " said Rev. William ditional constituencies of I
Shaw,chairmanofBishop'sboard low-income families The)
of trustees. a fine line, " said Rav
Small, black and religious Bishop's slide began in 11�
August. "But, that's not enough schools such as Bishop, whose 1970s when three top admini
"It's a sad day, " Bishop senior 1967 peak enrollment of 1,500 had tors were indicted on char.
Wayne Croomes said. "I was dropped to about 300, can find embezzling student aid funds
hoping something positive would economic pressures simply too though two were acquitted
come out of it. It's time for me to great, Ray said. the other was convicted en'
Such schools have small en- misdemeanor charge, Bis:
dowments, rely on tuition as a image never recovered
move on" from the school, which
specialized in religion and educa-
tion.
"I think there is a real need for
Bishop College in the Dallas area,
" said Dallas Mayor Annette
Strauss. "I hope it can be reorgan-
ized at a later time. It serves a
good purpose
"You have an institution that
has a particular kind of heritage
and that has done a particular
r
No room in N.C. landfills
WILMINGTON (AD - A third
of the state's 119 local landfills
will run out of space in the next
tw o years and new federal regula-
tions could shrink the- lifespan of
the rest, but local officials say the
state is gi ing the problem too low
a priority.
rheGeneral Assembly has just
n t come to grips with the prob-
lem and the money that is going to
have to be spent on it says Steve
Levitas, director of the N.C. Envi-
imcntal Defense Fund. The
Raleigh based think tank is writ-
ing a solid-waste management
in that it hopes the state will
adopt.
North Carolina's old one ex-
pired on 1985. Levitas thinks such
a plan is crucial it local govern-
ments are to deal wiselj with the
problem.
it's the obvious place to start
ic aid. It doesn't make sense to
different policies
it seems the strategy is to wait
ui til there's a critical situation
ai d then take action after the
Bets) Dorn, recycling coor-
v r Mecklenburg County
1 � t Wilmington Morning
rv
iblished Tuesday
N , i tl C arolina no! only lacks a
unifeirn policy, but also the man
powei needed to write one. Terry
Dover o( the N.C Solid Waste
Branch, the lead agency, says his
e has 17 people working in it.
1 le saj s there ought to be 65, with
time staff in regional offices.
' Basicall) he says, "we've got
enough people to react to emer-
gency situations. We're not able to roads, it's a matter of balancing tricity. The rest will have to come
spend the time necessary on re- those Jordan says. "And the from taxes or tipping fees.
search and development that we loan fund was a new program. I "It's an expensive problem
need And that's our dilema sense the legislature will find the Thaxton says. "All solutions are
It is up to us he said, "to money in 1989 to at least start the expensive But without a strong
provide a central thrust of infor- program state presence, a host of other
mation, of technical assistance, to The cost of disposing of the 6.5 public and private agencies are
these people with needs. And million tons of garbage tossed out stepping in to fill the void. There
hopefully there will be funding annually in North Carolina alone are countless private consultants
and personnel forthcoming in the has gone up steeply. What used to selling their thoughts to local
near future that will enable us to cost $5 a ton to bury now costs $20 governments. Ms. Dover of Meek-
exercise our role a ton to put in lined landfills. The lenburg County says she will quit
A $1 million proposal to beef up expense is largely the result of injanuarytobecomeaconsultant.
the branch staff failed in the Gen- 1985 state rules that prohibit bur- And while their various per-
iod garbage from leaching septic spectives are welcomed, some
or toxic residue into groundwa- worry that the state should help
ter. counties select their options.
Most North Carolinians de- "There are so many consultants
pend on groundwater for drink- out there says Gary Hunt of the
ing and bathing. state pollution prevention pro-
New Hanover County's state- gram. "Everybody's selling a
of-the-art landfill, used by the product. That's one of the prob-
stateasa model for other counties, lems. Nobody can tell you A, B, C
cost at least $150,000 an acre, or D. Well, there are hundreds of
Dover says. The same county also options and picking those options
built a steam-generating waste is difficult. And when you're
incinerator for $13 million, and is
planning to double its capacity.
John Thaxton of the Alternative
Energy Corp. in Research Tri-
angle Park says incinerators soon
will cost local governments any-
where from $30 million to $100
million. He says owners can ex-
pect to recoup only 50 percent of
this from the sale of steam or elec-
Greenvilte's Finest Baken ar over 65 years
o��it
a r
Happy Birthday
(buy your friends personalized
B-Day cakes at Dieners
Phone: 752-5251
815 Dickinson Aven
Greenville. N.C.
eral Assemble this summer. An-
other bill that would have created
a 510 million revolving loan fund
for local governments to start re-
cycling systems, line landfills and
even build incinerators also died.
1 t. Gov Bob ordan said the
funding lot out to the competi-
tion. Legislators, however, say the
state will scon have to come up
with those dollars and more.
"There's no simple or cheap
way of disposing of solid waste
says Sen. Jim Speed, D-Franklin,
co-chairman of a legislative study
committee on solid wastes. "It
really will require state funding.
Most counties are not able to af-
ford what it costs
"There are so many needs out
there, for the cities and the coun-
ties, whether they be schools or
going to spend $100 million on a
waste-to-energy system, you'd
better spend it on the right one
GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 10-14 part-time soccer coaches for tl
semester program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills and have patience to w
with youth. Applicants must be able to coach youi
people, ages 5-15 in soccer fundamentals. I lours
approximately 3-7 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Some
night and weekend coaching. Program will extend
from September to mid November. Salary rate is S3 :
to $4.35 per hour. Applicants will be accepted sta:
August 20. Contact Ben James at $30-45 tt.
THE SECOND ANNUAL
SIGMA TAU GAMMA
IMPORT SERVICE
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8 P.M.

Tic
UL5T St.
Wildtl
California firefighters
more than 170 fires, while i
Yellowstone threatened to
90,000-acre blaze toward
ins and the park supenntej
said there was no end in sj
this summer's wildfires.
Montana ranchers preparj
possible evacuation todavf
crews fought woodland bia
Idaho, Oregon, Washn
Nevada and Utah
In California, nearlv 9,50Cl
ning strikes Tuesdav sf
scores of blazes a year I
similar barrage spawned
tatingfires Firefighters sau
than 4,600 acres had burnc
they held most of the blazt
acre or less in the dral
parched wildlands.
Crews were hampered bj
plus-degree temperatur.
and lightning in some .ire
unfavorable conditions w
pected to continue today
Altogether on state lai
lightn;ng-sparked fires
2,700 acres, said state Depai
of Forestry spokeswomai
Terrill.
US Forest Service spokJ
Matt Mathes said 43 I tj
caused fires in Southern
ma national forests burned
acres, while t0 blazes in nc
e e
Crisis
WASHINGTON (API
Soviet relations were in a
wind of confusion even
Polish workers staged thci
occupation strikes.
The United States is end
thealwavsdisonentir
choosing a new president
And the Soviet Union is
ing from a tumultuous Cj
nist Partv conference fillt
boisterous calls for econo
form and greater derru
tion.
"Not only is it a period
flux, but as far as the Sovu
is concerned, it ism the m
state since the U917
revolution said Madeli
bright, the chief foreigi
adviser to Democratic pr
tial nominee Michael
Ms. Albright, born in C;
vakia, is an expert on EaJ
relations and a professor
getown University
The latest Polish u
poses, loud and clear ml
unanswered questions aq
reform program oi kremiii
Mikhail S. Gorbachev: Ho
political power are OOl
authorities willing to han
their people in returr for!
Warning:
don't he
tCPS It doesn't pa) I
ients about how baa d t
oe for them.
Renelle Masse)
sirv oi South Florida foj
challenging students
tions that alcohol n �
funnv, brave, more socij
ler or better in some othj
the most effective wav
students to cut down th.
ing.
"We're lookking at
approach to prevention 1
hoi abuse Massev said
Some studies indicatj
manv as 82 percent of thj
collegians dnnk rcgul
excessive drinking haj
into a problem at manv
Intoxicated studenl
blamed for turning a 11
rado State University blj
into a not, while hundi
been arrested dunng
spring break riots in Pal
Cal and Talm Spring
recent vears. Drunken
Iowa State and the Um
California-Santa Barl
spring also led to arrestl
and vandalism.
Excessive drinking
several students in recej
Rutgers University
pledge died in Februal
"dnnk til you're sicP
session, for example.
University of Coloradj
pledge was killed aft
from a bridge dunng '�
party. .
Hoping to curb suchj
and comply with lowc1
age laws, most camr
developed "alcohol
programs that generl
on the ill effects of dnr�





T
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1988 9
ollege
priman surceof funding anl
keeppra - dow n tor their I
lal (tituencies of lc - 1 he vt A Ra) n in the I adminii ; on chargd si identaid funds quitted a ctedonlyJ e Bishd
� covered

tn
irthda
15 Dickinson Avenm
Greenville. N.Cl
RECREATION
ID
�ARTMENT
I IKS NEEDED

NUAL
AMMA
-I
y
WILMINGTON'S BEST
:OGRESSIVECLASSIC
ROCK I
ELCOME
USE i
THURSDAY,
SEPTEMBER
1
8 P.M.
Wildfires threatening town
California firefighters battled
more than 170 fires, while gusts in
Yellowstone threatened to fan a
90,000-acre blaze toward 600 cab-
ins and the park superintendent
said there was no end in sight to
this summer's wildfires.
Montana ranchers prepared for
possible evacuation today, and
crews fought woodland blazes in
Idaho, Oregon, Washington,
Nevada and Utah.
In California, nearly 9,500 light-
ning strikes Tuesday sparked
scores of blazes a year after a
similar barrage spawned devas-
tating fires. Firefighters said more
than 4,600 acres had burned, but
they held most of the blazes to an
acre or less in the drought-
parched wildlands.
Crews were hampered by 100-
plus-dcgree temperatures, winds
and lightning in some areas. The
unfavorable conditions were ex-
pected to continue today.
Altogether on state land, 73
lightning-sparked fires burned
2,700 acres, said state Department
of Forestry spokeswoman Karen
Terrill.
U.S. Forest Service spokesman
Matt Mathes said 43 lightning-
caused fires in Southern Califor-
nia national forests burned just 30
acres, while 60 blazes in northern
The East Carolinian
California national forests black-
ened 1,900 acres.
"We are flying over the areas to
determine if there are any (other)
hot spots Terrill said.
Near San Francisco, fire swept
through dry brush and trees Tues-
day in Orinda, destroying five
houses and badly damaging two
others.
Police believe an electronically
ignited toy rocket may have
sparked the blaze, which was
controlled in about two hours
without reports of injuries.
"This has been the worst time of
my life said Beverly Hopp,
whose 33-year-old home was
destroyed. "What do you do after
all these years?"
The only thing she and her
husband, Al, could save was a
desk containing money and in-
surance papers.
In Wyoming, flames from the
90,000-acre North Fork fire at yel-
lowstone National park moved to
within a quarter-mile Tuesday of
the Canyon hotel and camp-
ground comples.
Firefighters hoped for an early
winter to quell blazes burning
about a fifth of the 2.2 million-acre
park, but Yellowstone's superin-
tendent offered little encourage-
ment.
"When will this end? Frankly,
ladies and gentlemen, that's
anybody's guess Robert Barbee
told about 100 people Tue:day
night at a meeting in nearby Gar-
diner, Montana.
Gusty winds forecast for this
afternoon threatened to again
close some park roads that were
put off limits Tuesday afternoon
but later reopened.
Yellowstone spokeswoman
Linda young said activity on the
34,000-acre wolf Lake fire forced
closure of one road, and a flareup
in North Fork blaze closed
yellowstone's west entrance for
several hours.
To the north in Montana, wi nds
played havoc with efforts to con-
trol the 190,000-acre Clover-Mist
fire, burning in Yellowstone and
in neighboring Shoshone Na-
tional Forest.
Officials closed U.C. 212 rear
Cooke City for a time Tuesday as
soldiers chased spot fires.
Ranchers were planning for
possible evacuation today along
western Montana's Rocky Moun-
tain Front where a previously
"lct-it-burn" wilderness fire
jumped onto national forest and
private land Tuesday. Hundreds
of firefighters rushed to keep it
from spreading further.
The 39,000-acre blaze in the
Scapegoat Wilderness roared into
Lewis and Clark National Forest,
burning 7,000 additional acres.
Livestock and horses were
removed from cabins threatened
by the 9-week-old blaze, which
was sparked by lightning, and
some ranchers left as a precau-
tion.
In Idaho, crews near the Wyo-
ming line worked to protect
ranches in the Caribou National
Forest, after a 6,000-acre fire
burned to within a mile of the
properties Tuesday. One family
was evacuated because they lack a
telephone and couldn't be noti-
fied in case the blaze blew up. Sev-
enteen major fires are burning
70,000 acres in Idaho.
The number of firefighters
more than doubled Tuesday to
679 at Oregon's biggest forest fire,
which has burned 36,000 acres in
the Wallowa-Whitman National
Forest and the Hell's Canyon
National Recreation Area.
Favorable weather in eastern
Washington helped thousands of
firefighters gain a handle on fires
burning on more than 23,000
acres. Winds were light tuesday
as crews cut trails around nearly
70 percent of major fires on the
Colville Indian Reservation.
The American Scholastic Press Association Award
Winning Publicaton at ECU
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
STAFF WRITERS AND A PROMOTION-
DISTRIBUTION
MANAGER. APPLY AT THE MEDIA BOARD
SECRETARY'S OFFICE IN THE
PUBLICATIONS BLDG.
(SECOND FLOOR) BY SEPTEMBER 2.
757-6009
Crisis complicating relations
WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. -
Soviet relations were in a whirl-
wind of confusion even before
Polish workers staged their latest
occupation strikes.
The United States is engaged in
the always disorienting process of
choosing a new president.
And the Soviet Union is emerg-
ing from a tumultuous Commu-
nist Party conference filled with
boisterous calls for economic re-
form and greater democratiza-
tion.
"Not only is it a period of great
flux, but as far as the Soviet Union
is concerned, it is in the most fluid
state since the U917 Russian)
revolution said Madeleine Al-
bright, the chief foreign policy
adviser to Democratic presiden-
tial nominee Michael Dukakis.
Ms. Albright, born in Czechoslo-
vakia, is an expert on East-West
relations and a professor at Geor-
getown University.
The latest Polish upheaval
poses, loud and clear, one of the
unanswered questions about the
reform program of kremlin leader
Mikhail S. Gorbachev: How much
political power are communist
authorities willing to hand over to
theirpeople in return for a popu-
Warnings
don't help
(CPS) It doesn't pay to nag stu-
dents about how bad drinking can
oe for them.
Renelle Massey of the Univer-
sity of South Florida found that
challenging students' assump-
tions that alcohol makes them
funny, brave, more sociable, sex-
ier or better in some other way is
the most effective way of getting
students to cut down their drink-
ing.
"We're lookking at this as an
approach to prevention" of alco-
hol abuse, Massey said.
Some studies indicate that as
many as 82 percent of the nation's
collegians drink regularly, and
excessive drinking has turned
into a problem at many schools.
Intoxicated students were
blamed for turning a 1986 Colo-
rado State University block party
into a riot, while hundreds have
been arrested during drunken
spring break riots in Palm Beach,
Cal and Palm Springs, Fla. in
recent years. Drunken parties at
Iowa State and the University of
California-Santa Barbara last
spring also led toarrests, injuries
and vandalism.
Excessive drinking has killed
several students in recent years: a
Rutgers University fraternity
pledge died in February after a
"drink til you're sick" hazing
session, for example. In 1985, a
University of Colorado sorority
pledge was killed after falling
from a bridge during a drunken
party.
Hoping to curb such incidents
and comply with lower drinking
age laws, most campuses have
developed "alcohol awareness
programs" that generally focus
on the ill effects of drinking.
lar commitment to invigorate the
economy?
The wrong answer from
Moscow or Warsaw to that ques-
tion will present the next Ameri-
can president with a dilemma.
"The problem that the next
president is going to have to de-
cide is whether to continue to
demand perfection from the So-
viet bloc, or whether to just de-
clare victory and accept any
change for the better. And there is
no question that things are getting
better said jerry Hough, a Soviet
expert at Duke University.
"It seems that everybody is
holding his breath said Charles
Fairbanks of the Johns Hopkins
center for advanced international
studies. "There is a marked move-
ment toward detente, but no one
is sure how much momentum it
has
A new explosion of violence in
Poland could delay or derail the
train.
Two weeks ago Polish workers,
with their backs to the economic
wall, began a second wave of occu-
pation strikes this year, demanding
that the government recognize and
negotiate with the banned Solidar-
ity trade union.
The strikes foued Polish leaders
to meet today with Solidarity's
leader, Lech Walesa, with whom
they had vowed not to negotiate
since releasing him from martial
law internment in 1982.
Polish leader Gen. Wojciech
Jaruzelski has introduced reforms
which, like Gorbachev's program,
loosen central controls and allow a
greater role for market forces. But
the Polish reforms have not stimu-
lated the economy
nv �
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Power Lifters
Darren Broome
1st 181 lb. Hampton Roads Dead Lift Classic
1st 165 lb. USPF North Carolina State Championship
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123 lb. USPF Teenage Nationals
Robert Washington
list 220 lb. USPF North Carolina State Drug Free Championships
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Body Builders
Chris Parker
2nd Short Class NPC Team North Carolina
Ruthie WinslQw
3rd Women's Heavy Weight NPC Crystal Coast
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Dpnald "Worm" Hanna
1st Middleweight NPC Sandhills Bodybuilding Championship
Robert Jernigan
2nd NPC Junior Light Heavy Eastern Regional
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fete Clark
1st Lightweight and Overall Champion NPC Junior Mr. N.C.
2nd Lightweight NPC Mr. North Carolina
Maiam Wheatlev
1st Heavy Weight NPC South Carolina Golds Classic
1st Light Heavy Weight NPC Eastern U.S.A.
1st Light Heavy Weight NPC Mr. North Carolina
Dan Cardin
2nd Middle Weight NPC Atlantic Coast
Championships
Congratulations from everybody at Powerhouse Gym!





1
.
f
Sale Starts Sunday,
August 28th.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY,
SEPTEMBER 3, 1988 QUANTITY
RIGHTS RESERVED. NOT RESPONSIBLE
FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
DELIBAKERY ITEMS AVAILABLE
ONLY IN STORES WITH
THOSE DEPARTMENTS
USDA CHOICE GRAIN FLO
Boneless
Sirloin Steak
PARfflERf fflARHCT
kB�SPR r��CHERffi COKE�LHYin J A " �1C PURCH
Regular or Diet
Coca Cola
.SAVE.
31
SAVE.
71s
300 cl
88
LIMIT 1 W'MIN 10 PURCHASE
- ' Scolt
Napkins
98
ALL FLAVORS
Sundance
Juice Sparklers
Welcome
Students
BUTCHER MOCK
FIELDALE GRADE A �� THIGHS�( AIN . �� EGS
Fresh 18 Piece
CATCH OP THE DAV
SAVE
hill
�k
6"
FRESH � SKINLESS�MEDIUM
Flounder
Fillet
4"
26 35 COUNT I Q F
Large
� Shrimp
USD" HOICE�GR.A t-ED
Porter House or
T-Bone Steak
.SAVE.
31
4 pack
10 02 DtlS
948
JAM OR
Bama
Grape Jelly
98
DELICIOUS
Lay's
Potato Chips
99
nag SF
SAVE.
MOO!
449
GWA r
.SAVE.
3Q
1 lb
pkg
Grill Ready
Franks
69
FRESH
Pork
Spare Ribs
.SAVE.
4Q
lb
59
DEU DEUGHTI
GWALTNEY GOLD LABEL
Domestic
Cooked Ham
SWEET�18 LB A jQ
Red Ripe
Watermelon
.SAVE.
1.40f
J48
WASHINGTON STATE�RGE 90 SIZE
Bartlett
Pears
69
&
j59
RED
California
s: Raspberries
.SAVE.
11601
ib
.SAVE.
n.oof
929
NEW VORKER WHITE OR YELLOW
American
Cheese
969
&
69
lb
DELI FRESH
Cole
Slaw
DEEP PREEZE
ICE CREAM NUGGETS 18 CT PKG OR
Gold Rush
Bars
SAVE.
50c
o�g
049
ALL FUWORS�LiMiT 1 .V MIN 0 PURCH
Breyers
Ice Cream
-i' :a
BETTER UVIRG
DELICIOUS
Phillip's
Pork N'Beans
16 oz
cans
-J00
SAVE.
511
GREAT FOR BARBECUE
A&P
Charcoal
148
COUATRV DAIRV
REG �COUNTRY STYLE OR CALCIUM
Minute Maid
Orange Juice
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14c
64 0
ctn
if
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J65
6-5 OZ CTNS �ALL FLAVOR?
Light N' Lively
Yogurt
30 oz
pkg
4 ct
-J98
ORE IDA
Cob
Corn
429
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2-100
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watch the stars come out
LABOR DAY WEEKEND
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Live from Caesars Palace, Las Vegas
Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
Open Sunday 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. � Monday thru Saturday 7:00 a.m. - 12 Midnight
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Cra
RAMSTEIN, V
(AP) - Family meml
ately searched for
missing after a fierjj
crash that killed 49
jured c! ildren lay ui
hospitalsasofficialbtr
mine if their parents w
the dead.
BylateTuesdd.
tors who died in Sum
ter had been ldentifu
cials said that of
still hospitalized
not survive.
Scores of pe
bumed when thr
Italian air force stur.l
lided and one ca-
crowd at the annual
the U.S. Air Force ba
stein.
The pilots of tht
killed, and the Italian
final who coordinate
stunts said one cause!
by flying into an
maneuver at the w:
Bi-anr
RALEIGH (AP)
Carolina's failure I
the competency test
twice a year makes it hi
students from drop;
their adult high s
programs, representatl
eral communitv a
"Retention of stude
problem for commi
leges said Cavared
supervisor of the aj
school diploma progrc
Community College
cannot always wast tj
test, especially those
the service. We need
Cou
SANFRANCISC
appeals court stn. k
guidelines establis i
sentences for 1 I
mg the standard- are
tionai bggausu u.cy v-
bv judgcra$ a political
'The 9th U.S. Gra
Appeals, the h:
on the issue, said Tu
placing three fed
the sevcn-m
commissior violated
tional separations
in a 2-1 vote, the :
the use of judges t I
sion interfered with t!i
judicial impartial
the president I I
move member- j
by judge Alex Ko
"Congress ma) .
system of se i
quire judges to s
that make p
Kozinski said.
Tine decision
region covered b)
comprising r i
Guam and the N rtr
anas. However
nation's first en the!
level to rule on the all
guidelines.
Other fedcra
wide have issued
flicting rulings o :h
tnc guidelines, m j
the scparation-of-
The guidelines �
bv public defend i
dispk as : w ith p .
lengthened sent,
crimes and rcstru t( d j
thorit
-
The chairman of I
cotrunissienJudgeW !
ins oi the ' hU.S
Appeals in Richmond
hcwasdiyaojpoii I
but added. "We'll
definitive and final an
the U.5. S I'Tomo
soon '
ki-is, interviei
Wasr��r ;tor. on Larry
dicated radio talk
courts have decided
cases b1 nn validity!
tencing guidelines, wij
ingsabout evenly dhk
The Snprome Court
uled arguments on tbtj
Oct. 5 in a Missouri cas
Tuesday's ruling on
solidatcd' challenges
Diego said the comnv.
la ted the constitution;
the role of the judicial
"its function is politic
judicial in nature
Kozinski said the a
had to make rules ar
having the force cf
that only the legislative
rive branches, and not





r
I
i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1988 11
:s Sunday,
gust 28th.
"IVE THRU SATURDAY.
IPER 3. 1988 QUANTITY
D NOT RESPONSIBLE
GRAPHICAL ERRORS.
ERY ITEMS AVAILABLE
'NLY IN STORES WITH
I SE DEPARTMENTS.
neless
in Steak
'�18 LB AVG
Red Ripe
Watermelon
48
IGE 9C SIZE
Bartlett
Pears
69
RED
California
Raspberries
OR
Gold Rush
Bars
949
N 10 PURCH
Breyers
ce Cream
ORE IDA
Cob
Corn
J29
A&P
Mixed
Vegetables
2100
bciation
e, Las Vegas
Crash death toll reaches 49
RAMSTEIN, West Germany and speed.
It was that pilot's jet, having
crossed solo through two passing
formations, that tumbled into the
crowd.
Opposition to military air
shows as they tried to figure out
(AP) - Family members desper-
ately searched for loved ones
missing after a fiery air show
crash that killed 49 people. In-
jured children lay unclaimed in
hospitals as officials tried to deter-
mine if their parents were among
the dead.
By late Tuesday, only 11 specta-
tors who died in Sunday's disas-
ter had been identified and offi-
cials said that of the 282 people dangers of air shows seriously. I
still hospitalized, 20 to 30 might
emment spokesman tor Khine-
land Palatinate state, said none of
the 14 were children.
Dietzen said police received
scores of reports of missing
people following the crash.
There are even cases of people
how to make them safer, many from as far away as America who
sheim.
"There is the possibility that the
parents of both girls arc dead,
since no one has inquired about
them Bild quoted the head sur-
geon, Dr. Rudolf Zellner, as say-
ing.
One boy thought to be about 13
DAN'S
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VINTAGE CUM IIINC, 212 East Fifth St
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West Germans - including some have said'my relative has been on also had not been identified, the
not survive.
Scores of people were badly
burned when three of 10 jets in an
Italian air force stunt team col-
lided and one careened into the
crowd at the annual air show at
the U.S. Air Force base in Ram-
stein.
The pilots of the three jets were
killed, and the Italian air force of-
ficial who coordinated the team's
stunts said one caused the crash
by flying into an intersecting
maneuver at the wrong altitude
of those injured Sunday - de- vacation there for three weeks,
manded the shows be banned. and we haven't heard a word. Is is
"Now I take warnings about the possible they were at Ram-
stein? he said,
didn't before said Karl West Germany's ARD televi-
Eggcnweiler of Rothenberg-am- sjon showed pictures of a special
Neckar, whose back and arms
were severly burned and who will
likely be scarred for life.
"Now I think these shows
should be forbidden he said
from his bed at Kaiserslautern
hospital near Ramstein.
The nationalities of the identi-
fied victims was unclear.
Chief Pentagon spokesman
Dan Howard sid six Americans
were known to be among those
killed. But Jucrgen Deitzen, gov-
missmg persons
bureau set
up
Frankfurt Abendpost newspaper
said. Doctors at a hospital in Of-
fenback near Frankfurt said he
was burned over 95 percent of his
body.
The boy has not regained con-
sciousness since he was brought
after the disaster in the nearby to the hospital "and no one has
town of Kaiserslautern.
"I'm looking for my sister said
one unidentified German man.
"The whole family didn't come
home
The West German newspaper
Bild said authorities searched in
vain for the parents of two badly
burned girls - 6-year-old Nadine
and 10-year-old Melanic - who
were taken to a hospital in Oggcr-
asked about him Dr. Roberto
Avalos was quoted by the news-
paper as saying.
"The doctors have a horrible
suspicion: they are afraid his par-
ents are among the dead the
newspaper said.
In a poll by the respected Wick-
ert Institute, 82 percent of the
2,710 West Germans surveyed
said they want all military air
shows stopped.
Bi-annual testing causing drop-outs
RALEIGH (AP) - North
Carolina's failure to administer
the competency test more than
twice a year makes it hard to keep
students from dropping out of
their adult high school diploma
programs, representatives of sev-
eral community colleges say.
"Retention of students is a big
problem for community col-
leges said Cavaretta Martin,
supervisor of the adult high
school diploma program at Nash
Community College. "Students
cannot always wait to take the
test, especially those going into
the service. We need another ad-
ministration of the test
Martin made his feelings
known to the N.C. Testing
Commission. The commission
heard his and several other com-
plaints about the various tests it
requires of students in North
Carolina, The Greensboro News
& Record reported.
Besides the competency test,
the state requires schools to ad-
minister the California Achieve-
ment Test in grades 3,6 and 8;
social studies and science tests in
the same grades; and end-of-
course tests in Algebra I and sev-
eral other courses in high school.
About 50 school officials at-
tended Tuesday's hearing, but
only eight spoke. The hearing is
one of three the commission is
holding as part of its annual effort
to hear public opinion about its
testing programs The others will
be in Wrightsville Beach Sept. 15
and in Hendersonville Oct. 27.
The commission will use the
comments to consider what
changes, if any, are needed in the
testing program. It will give a
report on the hearings to the State
Board of Education on December
7.
The competency test, which all
high school students must pass to
graduate, is administered twice a
year - in February and May. Stu-
dents who drop out of high school
often go to community colleges
and enroll in the adult high school
diploma program which lets
them take courses required for
graduation.
However, once they pass those
courses, they frequently have to
wait months to take the required
competency tests. That delay, the
community college officials said
causes many students to drop ou'
without getting their diploma
Court of appeals says no
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A U.S.
appeals court struck down new
guidelines establishing a range of
sentences for federal crimes, rul-
ing the standards are unconstitu-
tional bQQause thqy. l re grafted
bv judges as a political act.
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals, the highest court to rule
on the issue, said Tuesday that
placing three federal judges on
the seven-member sentencing
commissior violated constitu-
tional separations of powers.
in a 2-1 vote, the court decided
the use of judges on the commis-
sion interfered with the "aura of
judicial impartiality" by allowing
the president to appoint . d re-
move members, said the opinion
by Judge Alex Kozinski.
"Congress may not, under our
system of separated powers, re-
quire judges to serve on bodies
that make political decisions
Kozinski said.
The decision affects only the
region covered by the 9th Circuit,
comprising nine Western states,
Guam and the Northern Mari-
anas. However, the court is the
nation's first on the appellate
level to rule on the validity of the
guidelines.
Other federal judges nation-
wide have issued numerous con-
flicting rulings or. challenges to
the guidelines, mostly based on
the separation-of-powers issue.
The guidelines wei-c challenged
by public defender who were
displeased with provisions that
lengthened sentences for many
crimes and restricted judges' au-
thority
The chairman of the sentencing
commission, Judge William Wilk-
ins of the �' h U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in Richmond, Va said
he was dit appointed by the ruling
but added, 'We'll be having a
definitive and final answer from
the "JS. Supreme Court real
soon '
Wi'kins, interviewed from
Was-T ;tor. on Larry King's syn-
dicated radio talk show, said
courts have decided about 200
cases based on validity of the sen-
tencing guidelines, with the rul-
ings about evenly divided.
The Supreme Court has sched-
uled arguments on the issue for
Oct. 5 in a Missouri case, he said.
Tuesday's ruling on two con-
solidated challenges from San
Diego said the commission vio-
lated the constitutional limit on
the role of the judiciary because
"its function is political and not
judicial in nature
Kozinski said the commission
had to make rules and policies
having the force of law, "tasks
that only the legislative or execu-
tive branches, and not the judici-
ary, may constitutionally per-
form
The guidelines, which took ef-
fect in November, recommend
minimum and maximum sen-
tences for each crime, requiring
the judge to state unusual circum-
stances for imposing a sentence
outside the range.
The appeals court also found
invalid the 1984 sentencing law
that created the Sentencing
Commission and abclishcl pa-
role in post-November 1987 cases.
Such a ruling would restrc the
entire previous law, v hich gener-
ally gave judges wide-ranging
sentencing discretion and pro-
vided for parole eligibility after
one-third of a sentence.
"We're very happy with the
guidelines being thrown out
said Geoff Hansen, an assistant
federal public defender in San
Francisco. "We're just ecstatic
that we don't have to deal with
this nightmare any more
But he said lawyers will be "in
some state of uncertainty" in deal-
ing with many recent cases, in-
cluding some where the guide-
lines helped individual defen-
dants and others involving plea-
bargains based on the guidelines.
The status of parole is also un-
clear, he said.
Kozinski said the commission's
detailed rules on sentences for
each crime inv?de the executive
and legislative policy-making
roies in many ways. For example,
it said sentences for white-collar
crimes were too short, that all
defendants except the poorest
must pay fines. The commission
also refrained from issuing any
guidelines on the death penalty,
he said.
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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MTU 1HH I l"
Lake Gaston pipeline clogged by red tape
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (AP)
Not one section of pipe has been
laid in the 85-mile lake Gaston
pipeline, which remains mired in
litigation five years after the city
sought permission to build the
$200 million project.
Thecity nevertheless, isbuying
land in the pipeline's path and is
polishing the final engineering
plan, and city officials express
optimism they can start construc-
tion next oar.
'Hopefully, we will be in a
position to begin sometime in
1989 said Clarence O. Warn-
stafl Virginia beach director ot
public utilities. Ot course, that
not guaranteed It is not under our
direct influence and control
We will not be read) to bid the
pi. (: until the first part ol I -
said 0 mas M 1 cah 111, chiel
cngin� : on the project. "Check
w ithussix to 12 months from now
and it certainly will be a dilferent
stor)
Construction isexpeett d to take
three to five ears.
The city originally had hoped to
start construction this summer so
the pipeline would be finished in
time to avoid a critical imbalance
ot water supply and demand in
1991.
o the target date has been
delayed by a lawsuit tiled b
North Carolina in 1984. The suit
. oh c - a permit granted in 1981
b the Army Corps of Engineers
: allows Virginia Beach to
I uild the pipeline to 1 akc Gaston,
which straddles the North Caro-
na-Virginia line.
V rth Carolina is chalk i cii :
look at the pivts citects on " jn 990 ve are not suffi
striped bass and to reassess Vir , . free of litigation, we will
ginia Beach's lone, term watei I . t develop interim, emcr-
needs. The corps reported back in supplies U bridge the gap
lune, once again endoi I itl slid
pipeline.
Responses by int
hat v ould in. lud� drilling
1 l irti deeper wells or building a desalt
to the new report ' ted ing plant at about twice the co I
to the corps this month and are to . i the Gaston projeel Other op
be sent to Britt b the I I n are a moratorium on build
A citv studv savs that in b M ing and freiuent water conserva-
tln re will not be enough qualit lion and rationing,
water during! i tfdroueht. I'ive of the seven localities be-
tween 1 ake Gaston and Suffolk,
where the water would be land ne ledtobu
pumped through Norfolk's treat- and the cit is el
ment plant to Virginia beach, deal with
have given thecity permission to poration 1 i i
build the pipeline. An application route. It thai
is ponding with Brunswick mated, the city wil
County. third- ot t! ie n
The last remaining locality is Progrc
Suffolk rhc design of the project the financin
is not far along enough in Suffolk A Virgini i I
icquired about t of I . , r the pip line, is I
i � . I il will dot idc
:
to apply Leahy said.
iudec ruled
ahv said Virginia Beach has city's water in : i
r to ask I i tl
iion tor b
: M ; i t.Thercl
Get Hiprrfbtized!
Read Features
FOOD LION
t
iditv ot tl
permit in i s
) strict Court in Raleigh
udgc W. Earl Britt told I
C rps f Engii ?rs I take a�. i
Preachers
taught at home
MARK V N.C (AP) - Aster
repeatev suspensions from
scf it aj pears that three
McD tvell County children who
preached at the school gates will
be taught at home.
A;ter d.n -1 ne nec� tiation -
-
v I a c
cag based advocacy orgar
I n said Davidand RobinStrode,
. children's parents had signed
a piece i I p ipe r asking that their
children be removed from
Eastficld Elementary School and
b ; taught at home.
"We pictty much got what eve-
rybody wanted said Dan Rod-
den, president of Caleb Cam-
paign, a nonprofit Christian civil
: ghts rganization.
But David Ricketts, superinten-
dent of the McDowell County
schcx Is, sa.d he was no sure an
agree mc nt had been reached.
' o. e don t know that that's
. de ision he said.
o w ould teach the cl
drcn and what arrangements
i be trade were not part i :
the agreement disclosed to re-
Strode said he and his family
aid r afford to hire a teacher
� . v for the at-home curricu-
� I 1 .w . VV. v4 �
I d n t want to run a school
he said. "But I am for the
Idren
Rodden said his nonprofit or-
zal n would help with the
. ati : rogram and even help
� . uncn pi yed Strode, 40, find a
:
K
ard
ple v
' v e know he
UitiC and we V i
would be willing to h Ip " lie said
The Strodes did not mec t with
officials Tuesday, but in-
: : ived Rodden and Ralph
Davis, another representative ol
the Caleb Campaign, to shuttle
back and forth bet w een the school
and the Strode home, about 1 12
I cks.
"I know how Henry Kissinger
feels Rodden said, referring to
hisi ' :tions
Until noon Tuesday, Rodden
and Davis were "working to save
the marriage" between the chil-
dren - Duffcy, 11, Pepper, 7 and
Matthew, h - and the school. Rod-
den said. "At noon today, I real-
ized the marriage was unsavable
a -1 we went for a divorce
Although Rodden said the
agreement satisfied everyone,
David Slradc did not appear
happv when he came out of the
bouse late Tuesday afternoon. His
cv� s were red and he appeared to
have been crying.
"As the world builds bigger and
better schools and bigger and
better churches, the children arc
going to hell by the thousands
he said before turning away.
USDA Choice Beef
BONELESS
SIRLOIN
STEAK
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, September 4, 1988
House 01 Raefcrd Frozen
Turkey BreastsLb. I.IB
i: W i :V
Golden Ripe
Lbs.
Thompson Seedless
GRAPES
3 Lb. - Jumbo
BAKING POTATOES
3 Lb. Bag - Tasty
YELLOW ONIONS
Carlo Rossi
1.5 Liter
(Chablis. Rhine. Fink
Chablis. Yin Rose.
Hurgundy. Paisano, Lt. Chablis i
100 Pure
GROUND BEEF
PATTIES
$2
s
i;
Coke, Diet Coke, CF
Coke, CF Diet Coke,
Cherry Coke, QQC
Coke Classic 2 itr 33
Sprite & Diet Sprite
$1.09
Coke & related items
I 2 1 pk 12 oz. can'
ans
$2.99
Coors
2 pk. - 12 oz. can
RegularLight
CANTALOUPES
$9
Gourmet Meat & Seafood Specials
��
v
Fresh Domestic � Whole Or rial'
LEG OF LAMB
Plume de Veau
VEAL ROUND
STEAK
$229 $$9
Large
California
Peaches Lb. .49
California Plums Or
Nectarines Lb.
Tender
YELLOW CORN
Ears V V
Imitation
CRAB MEAT
$199
o� I Lb
Your Choice - Fresh
PERCH FILET,
CATFISH FILET,
Or Shell On 60-80 Ct.
SMALL SHRIMP
$29?
Large - Melons
H0NEYDEWS
$199
Farh � i JL
10 Ct - Reg Southern
Style - Big Country
BISCUITS

35?
V
e5
Lb.
Fully Cooked
60-70 Ct.
Shell On
$399
'& BIB COUNTRY
AJ
MCWTS
64 Oz. - Old South
ORANGE JUICE
$119
13 Oz Vac Bag ADEP
Flaked Coffee
MASTER BLEND
$159
'Hf f � � -� � 0
These
B I
iVV.if
lenin l
- '
it tal

m. n �
� �
tells!
a d

time I s
���
fait! � .
At: r
. 5 �
Drummer
his round .
This is a purr
.They mako w
that vou rag
The Cn
laid to r
B G UO SAN
Where
twoi
i !ou
victorious
now �
sed
Lum s
the cornei
has cl -
The v -
hot :n d
or ic
phema
discern
24 hours a da
;et sometl
The -
Jazz mi
Bv STEPHAM1 FOl
MASTEH BL� NO
This summer
tious orw
lames, a jazz
time srudenJ ai I
reaching his
a musician and as
lames, a 21-y
majonnp in music ed
a minor in piano w
last April bv the G
Hightower Publish i
to work on musk arrange
In July he was gjvei
project ot the summ r
asked to do the arrangemeri
the theme sng to K ;





1
1
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,188
Lake Gaston pipeline clogged by red tape
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (AP) -
Not one section of pipe has been
laid in the 85-mile Lake Gaston
pipeline, which remains mired in
litigation five years after the city
sought permission to build the
$200 million project.
The city, nevertheless, is buying
land in the pipeline's path and is
polishing the final engineering
plan, and city officials express
optimism they can start construc-
tion next year.
"Hopefully, we will be in a
position to begin sometime in
1989 said Clarence O. Warn-
staff, Virginia Beach director of
public utilities. "Of course, that's
not guaranteed. It is not under our
direct influence and control
"We will not be ready to bid the
project until the first part of 1989
said Thomas M. Leahy III, chief
engineer on the project. "Check
with us six to 12 months from now
and it certainly will be a different
story
Construction is expected to take
three to five vears.
The city originally had hoped to
start construction this summer so
the pipeline would be finished in
time to avoid a critical imbalance
of water supply and demand in
1991.
But the target date has been
delayed by a lawsuit filed by
North Carolina in 1984. The suit
involves a permit granted in 1984
by the Army Corps of Engineers
that allows Virginia Beach to
build the pipeline to Lake Gaston,
which straddles the North Caro-
lina-Virginia line.
North Carolina is challenging
the validity of the permit in U.S.
District Court in Raleigh.
Judge W. Earl Britt told the
Corps of Engineers to take a closer
Preachers
taught at home
MARION, N.C. (AP) - After
repeated suspensions from
school, it appears that three
McDowell County children who
preached at the school gates will
be taught at home.
After day-long negotiations
Tuesday, the president of a Chi-
cago-based advocacy organiza-
tion said David and Robin Strode,
the children's parents, had signed
a piece of paper asking that their
children be removed from
Eastficld Elementary School and
be taught at home.
"We pictty much got what eve-
rybody wanted said Dan Rod-
den, president of Caleb Cam-
paign, a nonprofit Christian civil
rights organization.
But David Rickctts, superinten-
dent of the McDowell County
schools, said he was no sure an
agreement had been reached.
"We don't know that that's
their decision he said.
ust who would teach the chil-
dren and what arrangements
would be made were not part of
the agreement disclosed to re-
porters.
Strode said he and his family
could not afford to hire a teacher
o to oay for the at-home curricu-
lum needed.
'I don't want to run a school
here he said. "But I am for the
children
Rodden said his nonprofit or-
ganization would help with the
education program and even help
the unemployed Strode, 40, find a
zo.
"We know he has had hard
time and we know people who
wouldbc willing to help he said.
The Strodcs did not meet with
�hool officials Tuesday, but in-
stead allowed Rodden and Ralph
Davis, another representative of
the Caleb Campaign, to shuttle
back and forth between the school
and the Strode home, about 1 1 2
blocks.
"I know how Henry Kissinger
feels Rodden said, referring to
his negotiations.
Until noon Tuesday, Rodden
and Davis were "working to save
the marriage" between the chil-
dren - Duffcy, 11, Pepper, 7 and
Matthew, 6 - and the school. Rod-
den said. "At noon today, I real-
ized the marriage was unsavable
?d we went for a divorce
Although Rodden said the
agreement satisfied everyone,
David Strode did not appear
happy when he came out of the
house late Tuesday afternoon. His
eves were red and he appeared to
have been crying.
"As the world builds bigger and
better schools and bigger and
better churches, the children are
gping to hell by the thousands
he said before turning away.
look at the project's effects on
striped bass and to reassess Vir-
ginia Beach's long-term water
needs. The corps reported back in
June, once again endorsing the
pipeline.
Responses by interested parties
to the new report were submitted
to the corps this month and are to
be sent to Britt by the fall.
A city study says that in 1991
there will not be enough quality
water during times of drought.
"If by 1990 we are not suffi-
ciently free of litigation, we will
have to develop interim, emer-
gency supplies to bridge the gap
Warnstaff said.
That could include drilling
deeper wells or building a desalt-
ing plant - at about twice the cost
oi the Gaston project. Other op-
tions are a moratorium on build-
ing and frequent water conserva-
tion and rationing.
Five of the seven localities be-
tween Lake Gaston and Suffolk,
where the water would be
pumped through Norfolk's treat-
ment plant to Virginia Beach,
have given the city permission to
build the pipeline. An application
is pending with Brunswick
County.
The last remaining locality is
Suffolk. "The design of the project
is not far along enough in Suffolk
to apply Leahy said.
Leahy said Virginia Beach has
acquired about 25 percent of the
land needed to build the pipeline,
and the city is close to sealing a
deal with Norfolk Southern Cor-
poration for 50 miles of pipeline
route. If that deal is consum-
mated, the city will have two-
thirds of the necessary property.
Progress also has been made on
the financing front.
A Virginia Beach Circuit Court
judge ruled last week that the
city's water impact fee, created to
help pay for the pipeline, is legal.
City Council will decide on
Sept. 6 whether to ask for the vot-
ers' permission for bonds to fi-
nance part of the project. The ref-
erendum would be held in No-
vember.
Get Hip?ffiotized!
Read Features
FOOD LION
USDA Choice Beef
BONELESS
SIRLOIN
STEAK
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, September 4, 1988.
House Of Raeford Frozen 40
Turkey BreastsLb. l-lo
UntCho
ans��w
Golden Ripe
Thompson Seedless
GRAPES
3 Lb. - Jumbo
BAKIN6 POTATOES
3 Lb. Bag -Tasty
YELLOW ONIONS
Carlo Rossi
1.5 Liter
(Chablis. Rhine. Pink
Chablis, Vin Rose.
Burgundy, Paisano, Lt. Chablis.)
100 Pure
GR0UM0 BEEF
PATTIES
$2
.
Coke, Diet Coke, CF
Coke, CF Diet Coke,
Cherry Coke, QQ
Coke Classic star 33
Sprite & Diet Sprite
$1.09
Coke & related items
24 pk. - 12 oz. cans
1 (
Coors
24 pk. - 12 oz. cans
Regular Light
12 Size
? 1
CANTALOUPES
ana
$2.99
$9
Gourmet Meat & Seafood Specials
Each
Fresh Domestic - Whole Or Half
LEG OF LAMB
Plume de Veau
VEAL ROUND
$22?. $449
Tr Lb.
Large
California
Peaches Lb. .49
California Plums Or Qq
Nectarines Lb. .99
Tender
YELLOW CORN
?99
�-v
w
Imitation
CRAB MEAT
$199
o� I Lb
Your Choice - Fresh
PERCH FILET,
CATFISH FILET,
Or Shell On 60-80 Ct.
SMALL SHRIMP
$29?�
Large - Melons
H0NEYDEWS
$199
Canh B iJT
10 Ct. - Reg.Southern
Style - Big Country
BISCUITS
ha
PIB MliWW (Mi
JL.
Fully Cooked
60-70 Ct.
Shell On
64 0z. - Old South
ORANGE JUICE
13 Oz. - Vac. Bag ADEP
Flaked Coffee
MASTER BLEND
$1194E$159
THE EAST CAROL
These
By EARLY IS HAMPTON
Feature Editof a Staff Ituai
Sammy Madison, a man bare)
iwake, answers the door after
tening to five minutes of fist bar,
tng. Sliding the glass deer
he scrapes crusts of sleep from r
?yesand says, "What's uj
Asleep Madison was not
�Saturday night as he and hiK
The Usuals, blistered a pa
:rowd at Greenville's Attii i
their brand of psycho-R a: I
But now, at 10 Mondav morni
it takes the lead singer
guitarist of The Usuals a H
moments of couch slou.
collect his thoughts
"Yeah, it was a prett.
crowd Madison said
playing in front of the he-
Green vilhans.
Flashing back to Saturc
night
It's the middle of the sec
and Sammy looks down I
scribbled song line-up she
tells the audience, "We'r J
slow down a little bit and : J
Simon and Garfunkel tune
crowd stirs in antic .
time Usuals goers say J
slow song ? while ardent L
faithful scream
After a line or tw i
vocals to the classic "Cecc
Drummer Scott Srutts thur,
his round demons, exaltinc
This is a purple rag. buy thei
.They make wonderful pres
that you rag on the Pirates. 1
The C ro
laid to r
By GARY SANDERSON
Staff HUM
Where will ECU students $j
two in the morning after quail
a few too many beers or a:
victorious evening oi foot
now that The Crow's Not
closed? Originally known
Lum's, the restaurant, locate
the comer of tenth and Ch
has closed it's door after 20 v
TheCrow'sNestalwaysofrt
hot food, ice cold beer, plea
service and suitable Pirate
phemalia to make even the
discerning fan feel at ease Q
24 hours a day, one could alJ
get something good to eat.
The sign out front reads sn
Jazz mi
By STEPHANIE FOLS(
Staff Ml
MAsTt � I" '
This summer proved an at
tious one for Wayne, Jai
James, a jazz musician and
time student at ECU, st�
reaching his goals this summj
a musician and as a person.
James, a 21-year-old s
majoring in music education
a minor in piano, was conta
last April by the Chnstoj
Hightower Publishing Com
to work on music arrangem
In jury he was given his bi
project of the summer. He,
asked to do the arrangemei
the theme song to be playe





i
1
tape
nc, i- legal.
vie on
for the vot-
� - to fi-
he ref-
� n No-
Ik-
w?
Hip-motized!
ad Features
Lb.
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lb.
1.18
n Seedless
APES
Lb.
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eg Southern
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Vac Bag ADEP
feked Coffee
TER BLEND
59
Masteh OLf no
THE EASTCAROI INI AN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 1,1988 Page 13
These guys play scary music the fast way
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
tenure Iditor � Stall I suai
Sammy Madison, a man barely
� wake, answers the door after list-
ening to five minutes of fist bang-
Sliding the glass door open,
scrapes crusts oi sleep from his
w's and says, "What's up?"
Asleep Madison was not on
Saturday night as he and his boys,
"he Usuals, blistered a packed
�wd at Greenville's Attic with
r brand of psycho-R and R.
B I now. at 10 Monday morning,
I takes the lead singer lead
. tarist oi The Usuals a few
m �ments of couch slouching to
collect his thoughts.
Yeah, it was a pretty good
crowd Madison said about
pta) ing in front of the hometown
envillians
Flashing back to Saturday

tfit.
s the middle of the second set
� Sammy looks down to the
bled song line-up sheet and
tells theaudience, "We're going to
5 down a little bit and play a
Simon and Garfunkel tune The
crowd stirs in anticipation, first
e Usuals goers say "What, a
- w song ? while ardent Usuals
faithful scream.
After a line or two of slow
vocals to the classic "Cecelia
Drummer Scott Stutts thunders
his round demons, exaltinc the
other band members to up the
tempo four fold. Quick sing,
Madison blurts "Cecelia, you're
breaking my heart
"We are speeding up every-
thing. Even the songs on our
album, we now play a lot faster
Madison sas about the band's
trenzy-stvle play.
The Usuals are so involved in
the catyclysmic pace some of the
band members actually bleed.
Atter Saturday night's show, bas-
sist Tracy "Manute" Cam hugged
his much deserved Budweiser
with the bleeding fingers oi his
right hand.
In between cigarette drags,
Manute savs "Man. I thump the
chords so hard, I didn't even real-
ize the blood A week before,
while playing a gig in Greens-
boro, the demonic-looking Cain
with his goatee and shoeless feet
actually beat the thick strings on
his psychdelic-painted LOVE
bass until the chords broke.
"Yeah, it is pretty unusual to
break a has string Madison
commented later. "Munate
thought it was time to crawl outol
his shell and jam around on
stage
The bassist throws the theory
ot - rock and rollers can't even
read music out ot the proverbial
window. am la k
or.lv en
lit
semester hours, all elective
classes, trom receiving a degree in
music from F. 1
Cain's new thrashing style is
only o ne indication of The Usuals'
transformation. Loyal Usual lis-
teners say the band sounds better
than ever.
"I've seen these boys many a
times-maybe in the hundreds-but
they jammed tonight a sweat
dripping David Sanderson said.
Drummer Stutts, who along
with Madison formed the band
five years ago, is the true work
horse of The Usuals. Despite
showing up to gigs in shorts and
cut-ofl tee-shirts, Stutts always
manages to become drenched in
his ow n sweat.
Said to be the only rational one
in band, Stutts becomes philo-
sophical as he watches his partner
take the next pool shot at a local
billiards hall. "Our songs aren't
shallow, they have solid mean-
ing
During the Attic show, Stutts
drums fire into the audience with
a bamming intro to the original
"Abusing You Inbctween
songs, Stutts smiles and shakes
his head as cat calls ring 'Bonzo,
Bonzo
The latest addition to The Usu-
als is rythm guitarist Pat Dickcn-
son, who brings a new spectrum
of fast pick-licks to the band's
sound. Dickenson's multi-tal-
ented fingers are evident as he
plays the acoustic introduction to
See USUALS, page 15
hot 10.
4
&
4
i
Introductions left to right. Sammy Madison, Tat Dickenson, Scott (Bonzo) Stutts and Tracey (Manute)
Cain, the Usuals. While this isn't the best quality picture of this offensive-looking bunch, trust me they
look scarier in person. Check them out September 19 at the TKE house.
'Pirate rags' revitalized by
easy - going entreprenuer


f
This is a purple rag. Buy them. Wave them at home football games and away games if you are so inclined
. They make wonderful presents. Buy ten and send them to your favorite Wolf pack fans. Tell everyone
that you rag on the Pirates. (Photo by Thomas Walters�Photolab)
The Crow's Nest, born in '68,
laid to rest July 27,1988
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Managing Editor
"Thanks a lot for your time Mrs.
Bell I said at the end of the inter-
view.
"Thank you, and please, call me
Nancy This informality seems
typical of Nancy Bell's easy-going
and warm personality. This kind
of personality seems natural for a
retired social worker, but a busi-
ness woman?
Bell is a business woman
though, as well as a semi-retired
medical social worker. And her
first business venture seems
poised to breakthrough in a big
way.
Some graduate students and
seniors may remember the purple
"Pirate rags" that used to wave
back and forth in the stands dur-
ing football season. For some
reason, the unknown companv
that manufactured these screen
printed handkerchiefs decided to
stop making them.
But Bell and her husband, re-
cent ECU alumni, remembered
them, lor a couple oi years they
kicked the idea around, wonder-
ing if they could start producing
them. They had a couple ot the old
ones, but nothing gelled until they
watched the World Series.
The abundance of the Minne-
sota Twin "Homerun Hankies"
prompted them to make an idea
into reality. With a small inheir-
itence and money from their per-
sonal savings, they ordered the 15
inch by 15 inch purple handker-
chiefs.
The companv, Collegiate Con-
cepts of Atlanta, had no handker-
chiefs that size, so they had to be
special ordered.
Bell brought them to BLT's, a
local screenpnnter and had them
stylized with the Pirate logo and
the school seal, a substantially
different design trom the swash-
buckling pirate who used to
adorn the rags.
They are now cm sale at the
Student Store and at University
Book Exchange. 5 oi the cost
goes to the university, and 105! ot
Bell's profits goes to the Pediatric
Department of the School oi
Medicine in order to "share our
good fortune, and help children
get medical help Bell said.
mother ot two preschool
girls, this is a subject Bell is pas-
sionate about. She worked at
Greenville Dialysis, and now
devotes her time between the chil-
dren, volunteer social work and
her new business
The name of her new company
is Rags and Stuff Inc and she feels
that the new Pirate Rags will go
over well since ECU fans are "so
spirit filled anyway
As tor the future, she would like
to go into some high schools with
her product as well as the frater-
nities and sororities here on cam-
pus. She thinks the rags would be
a good project for fundraisers.
Tart oi the money used to fi-
nance the project came trom a
small inheiritenee she reeieved
alter her father died a short while
ago. She explained that her father,
a businessman, "paid her way
through college
"1 think he'd be proud oi me
By GARY SANDERSON
Staff Writer
'Born Sept 8 1968; Laid to rest
July 27, 1988 However, his wife
� lane, and literally tens of thou-
vVhere will ECU students go at sands oi students can not be so
two in the morning after quaffling easily summed up. The Brown-
a few too many beers, or atter a ings, who owned the restaurant
victorious evening of football, for nearly 20 years, developed a
now that The Crow's Nest has
closed? Originally known as
Lum's, the restaurant, located at
the corner of tenth and Charles
has closed it's door after 20 years.
TheCrow'sNestalwavsoffered
special affection for ECU and it's
students. "We were there even
before the building was com-
pletely built said Mrs. Brown-
still, things change. Time goes by
so fast one day then a month
she said.
Though the building is to be
leveled in October, traditions die
hard, and those who visited the
Crow's Nest will cherish the
memories for the rest of their
lives. Virtually every student who
has attended ECU in the last
twenty years has seen the Crow's
Nest at least onece. For many, it
was their first meal in Greenville,
n times past famous people like
Pickin' the record charts
Rolling Stone Top 100 bogus, thus Bonehead's 9
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Back-Up Singer
ing.
"A lotot former employees and
hotfood ice cold beer; pleasant regular customers were dis-
service and suitable Pirate para- traught at our closing She added Tony Orlando, FrankieValle and
phemalia to make even the most that she and Mr. Browning where Jessica Savage dined there, good
discerning fan feel at ease. Open deeply grieved for the first week, time abounded and sorrows were
24 hours a day, one could always but that she has become accus- drowned.
eet something good to eat. tomed to the change now. "You're See cROW'S, page 15
The sign out front reads simplv talking about 20 years of our lives,
Jazz musician reaches goal
By STEPHANIE FOLSOM
Staff Writer
This summer proved an ambi-
tious one for Wayne, James,
James, a jazz musician and part-
time student at ECU, started
reaching his goals this summer as
a musician and as a person.
James, a 21-year-old senior
majoring in music education with
a minor in piano, was contacted
last April by the Christopher
Hightower Publishing Company
to work on music arrangements.
In July he was given his biggest
project of the summer. He was
asked to do the arrangement for
the theme song to be played at
Somerset Place on Saturday, Sep-
tember 3.
Dorothy Redford wrote a book
about Somerset Place, tracing her
roots back to the former slave
plantation in Creswell, NC. Her
family reunites there every year
around Labor Day. This year such
prominent persons as Alex Haley
and Jesse Jackson will be present.
Another chance to use" his musi-
cal talents occurred at the Demo-
cratic banquet in Atlanta.
Last October, while James and
other members of the Brazz Band
were playing at a homecoming
reunion, James' first opportunity
to play at he convention arose.
"There was a man there (at the
reunion) from Atlanta who was
impressed with the band. He
talked about us playing with
some sort of thing relating to the
Democratic Convention said
James. The chance fell through for
the Brazz Band. Since some mem-
bers of the band had prior obliga-
tions.
"They had other obligations,
but I did have the chance to go
down there said James. "I knew
some people down in Atlanta
who knew 1 was a musician
James played at a small banquet,
which he said was mostly for
delegates. "Everything went
See JAMES, page 16
Now I'm really steamed.
Rolling Stone just put out an
issue with theblurbThe 100 Best
Singles of the last 25 years 1
know it's just blurb and I know RS
is using their 25th anniversary for
all sorts of market ploys, trying to
win back their readership from
SPIN.
The article was 98 pages long
including ads, and the singles
were picked by polling 25 of RS's
record critics. In other words, 100
pages full of maudlin reminen-
scences about album-oriented-
radio singles by critics who have
believe Bruce Springsteen created
rock the day after he rested.
I'd rather read poetry.
I mean, "Stayin' Alive" by the
BeeGees was Number 50, while
Led Zepplin's "Whole Lotta
Love" zoomed up to Number 96
It was ridiculous. Even cheese-
meistcrs Foreigner made it with "I
Want to Know What Love is in
at Number 54.
Disgusting. And not one Stevie
Nicks or Def Leppard song. So, to
rectify this, I have come up with
The Bonehead's Top Nine of the
Last 22 Years, Which Only 15 Of
He Can Vouch For As Having
Really Existed.
1Stand Back"�Stevie Nicks.
Despite her ditziness, her obses-
sion with black, witchy costumes
and her general California air-
headed nessshecanj�omejj�
with some whopper hooks. This
tune is on about three oi my party
tapes, and hasn't failed to get me
laid yet. Even the back-up singers
jam.
The plot of the song is basically
the same as everything else she's
written �"No one on this planet
knows what love is exepet me,
and I'm gonna whine about it tor
four minutes Everybody has
bad days, but I can see where hers
could be slightly worse than your
average housewife.
Back-up vocalist Bonehea'd
2. "Buddah, Buddah, Buddah"
� Rick Rock. An almost impos-
sible to find gem these days, but
when the Raleigh scene was still
worth something, Rick and his
song were the absolute most
smokin Even Don Dixon cov-
ered it in concert.
A bouncy, self-parody about
enlightenment, the folk guitar
and rock drumbeat got even the
bitter, cynical drunks in clubs
dancing. My favorite line is still
"Enemy planes in the comic books
go Buddah, buddah, buddah
3 Rock Box � Run D.M.C If
not the first synthesis of metal and
rap, the very best. The homeboys
are still trving to live up to the
genius oi their first crossover hit.
Still a valid song after so many
years (one of the most frequent
criticisms oi rap), the songs mes-
sage is simple and the groove just
plain wicked. Also it's the one rap
1 know all the words to, and have
proven it at several parties.
3 12. "Rock me Amadeus" �
Falco. 90 of this song sucks, but
the chorus on the 12-inch mix has
those girls singing some German
words 1 can't understand and
then going "ayyyeeeyiiiieeee" in
a really fixin' way.
4. "If You Love Me Let Me
Know" � Olivia Newton-John.
Yeah laugh, but 1 heard it again
the other day and was blown
away. If you can get your voice as
deep as the back-up singer's then
you can smirk all you want.
If not, the just chill out and lis-
ten to that country-pop hook.
Olivia's voice won't put Whitney
out of a job, but it was okay foi the
70s.
5. "Think" � Aretha Franklin.
The ultimate in "Boy, you better
shape up soul songs. The scene
in 'The Blues Brothers" where she
has it out with her husband in her
diner, complete with soda-sip-
ping, back-up singers will live
forever in celluloid history. (This
is Earlvis personal favorite)
See BONEHEAD, page 14





1
f
14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1988

1
4
TV show, a vigilante dream
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Staff Writer
Fahrenheit 451 is Ray
Bradbury's classic tale of a future
America in which mere posses-
sion books is highly illegal. Its
hero, Guy Montag, at first sup- toward Gne who killed for per-
ports the Establishment but later sona profit,
rebels against it. In the end Mon- On the omer hand, shades
tag kills a man who represents all of Montag's run through the city
that Montag had come to hate run through my mind. While I
about his society, and he is forced have no doubt that our iegai sys.
with this evidence . infringement on Fifth Amend-
The viewer knows further ment rights. It is, simply, that this
that the suspect is avoiding the show is popular-and its popular-
police (which suggests, though it ity is growing. America's Most
is not evidence of, guilt). Cer- Wanted is a reflection of - and, I
tainly we feel more kindly dis- suspect, a contribution to - the
posed toward a man who killed vigilante-style mentality that has
for literary freedom than we do been growing in popularity in this
to flee.
Montag is considered such
a dangerous criminal that the
entire city is awakened in the
middle of the night to watch the
chase. Eventually, the populace is
encouraged to throw open its
doors and watch for Montag in
the hope that one of them isbound traCking a man�down like a dog
to spot him. Surely the more people who are
And this, in a way, is how I
country.
America's Most Wanted is
popular because it makes the
American citizen a police infor-
mant. It gives him a sense of strik-
ing a blow against a crime situ-
tem does a good job, it is not and ation that he feels is hopelessly
cannot be perfect. Is it not possible out of control. And perhaps it
that this show could be partly gives him a sense of added secu-
responsible for sending an inno- rity.
cent man to prison? Or, worse yet, But America's Most
to the electric chair? Wanted won't make crime go
I also have serious qualms away. Nor, I suspect, will it make
about involving the populace in crime any less prevalent. And
see the television show America's
Most Wanted. I've spent a lot of
time pondering my feelings about
this show, and I still can't quite
decide what to think.
On the one hand, the men
and women "featured" on the
shown the face of the suspect, the
more likely it would be that one of
them would happen to know
someone who looked an awful lot
like the suspect.
After all, everybody looks
like somebody - I, for example,
bear a strong resemblance to the
show are accused of reprehen- Phantom of the Opera - and I fear
sible crimes, usually murder or a that citizens could be detained for
combination of murder and rape, the heinous crime of happening to
And, though the presumption of look like this week's featured kil-
innocence presumably prevails, ler.
the viewer knows that there exists What worries me most,
at least enough evidence to create though, is neither possibilities of
suspicion of guilt and is presented mistaken identity nor possible
The Bonehead top 9
Continued from page 13
6. "Hey, Hey What Can I Do?"
� Led Zcppplin. I never even
liked Led Zepplin till I heard the
flip side of "The Immigrant
Song The little ditty about a
"woman who won't be true" is
quintessential Zepplin.
It has guitars, screams and
some killer back-up singers. Hey,
hey, what can 1 say?
7. "Kiss Me Deadly" � Lita
Ford. Lita IS pretty much dain
bread, but soaring guitars, growl-
ing vocals and lyrics that are just
the damn story of my life make it
for me.
The acapella opening lines, "I
went to a party last Saturday
night I didn't get laid, I got in a
fight L'hn-uh It ain't no big
thang just send chills up and
down my spine. Strangely
enough, no back-up singers. 45s
are dead.
8. "You Better, You Bet" � The
Who. A great song about getting
laid, and a song who's meaning
made it past my mom when I
asked her to buy it for me. I don't
think she realized what "welcom-
ing me with open arms and
open legs" meant. It's really the
last good thing the Who did, and
if they'd stopped after this song, I
might be more excited about their
upcoming reunion.
9. "You Can't Always Get What
You Want" �The Rolling Stones.
Maybe the most gothic of their
songs and almost overproduced,
but it skirts that fine line neatly.
From the choir singing at the
beginning to the guitar solo at the
end, there's not a moment on this
song that's wasted.
So there you have it. As you can
see, I'm a big fan of back-up sing-
ers. I almost made it a top ten so I
could include Kim Wilde's re-
make of "Keep Me Hanging On"
for the "wooo-wooo" back-ups.
No doubt I will end up being a
studio back-up singer when I
grow up.
It's kind of ironic that "Rolling
Stone" did a top 100 list of 45s, a
product that will be dead in an-
other year, replaced by the CD
three-inch. This will kill scratch
rapping and probably the three
minute single.
But to all of us who grew up,
singing the chours of our favorite
seven-inch pieces of vinyl this
column's for you. Next week:
More of my regularly scheduled
abuse.
while the show has aided in the
catching, and therefore in the
convicting, of some criminals
who might never have been
caught or convicted without it,
I'm still not convinced that it does
more good than harm.
If nothing else, a criminal
who was featured on the show
might go free by claiming that, as
a result of the show, no jury could
be unprejudiced. And before you
treat this thought too lightly, note
that this is one objection that has
been raised to the upcomirg trial
of one particularly photogenic
suspect - Lt. Col. Oliver North.
And one more thing: Guy
Montag escaped. But his pursu-
ers, realizing that Montag had
eluded them, saved face by killing
another man in his stead. Think
about it.
HE PIRATES
BLAZE OF
PURPLE AND GOLD
� V"
Pirate Raggs Available
At UBE, ECU Student
Store, Pirates Chest and
Concession Stands At
The Game.
ew St
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
500 W Greenville Bivcl
Pictured here are the Connells, Michael Connell, George Huntley,
Doug MacMilan, David Connell, and Peele Wimberley. Compared to
the Smithsand Simon and Garfunkcl, the Connells bring their melodic
collection of folk-rock to the Attic Friday night.
Originating from the rock and roll town of Raleigh (more satire), the
Connells were voted the best new local band in the Spectator's 'Best in
the Triangle in 1988.
Their second album, Boylan Heights (named after a Raleigh Mrect)
has earned critical acclaim both in the U.S. and over seas in England. At
one time the record ranked second on many college radio station c harts.
Expect some guitar lickings in originals, "OT Squared" and bagpipe
sounding six-string in "Scotty's Lament Cover songs include, a blast-
ing Alice Cooper tune "I'm Eighteen" and a Doors tune here and there.
Besides being compared to every band ever, save Led Zeppeb n, the
Connells are said to sound like early REM. You remember early REM
and the music they played before they SOLD OUT. If this comparsion
is true,this features editor looks forward to seeing the proof Friday
nishL
Banquet Facilities Available
"We're doing our
part to meet the
student's budget"
ECU Students Get 10 Off With I.D.
LUNCH DINNER
featuring
Help Yourself Home Cooking
�� All You Care To Eat! v�
vr One Low Price Does It All!
$4
fit
49)
Entrees � Dessert � Salad Bar � Vegetables � Drinks
Great Food Within Your College Budget
Entertainment This Month
September
Thurs1Deadhead Jam
Fri2Stingrays
Sat3Pattersons (Tennessee SoulR&B)
Wed7Open Mic Nite
Thurs8Deadhead Jam
Fri9Mike Lightnin' Wells
Sat10Boomers
Wed14Open Mic Nite
Thurs15Deadhead Jam
Fri16Blues Defenders
Sat17Liquid Sound
Wed21Open Mic Nite
Thurs22Deadhead Jam
Fri23Knockedout Loaded
Sat24Slurpeeeee (Formerly Soul Train)
Wed28Open Mic Nile
Thurs29Deadhead Jam
Fri30TBA
SatOctlBad Bob & The Rockin Horses
For more information please call 758-0080
RUSH
Delta Sigma Phi
September 6, 7, 8
510 E. 10th St.
Across From Wendy's
757-0313

year ago, I reviewed the just-
mien ng "Star Trek: The Next
cration" with misgivings.
w, will a full season behind
a new one ahead, I hate to sav
se doubts remain. "Star Trek
Next Generation" has vet to
the federation bX)ts of the
inal series.
Ironically, this failure seems
in part to Gene Roddenberry
tuation with his first bom
s gone to extremes to make
e the "Next Generation" 1 -
�the original series in his
e of col r, set, and format.
fhat Roddenberry has for.
is that 20-plus years have
sed not only for "Star Trek
all television as well The
ry-hook i ilors and obviously
stic indoor "outdoors" - I
rked well and were the norm
row's Ne
Continued from page 13
clrs. Browning recalls crowded
it ;hts especially around Hallow-
and after football games.
re always busy the night of
fc )tball games, win or lose she
sa d. It was on one such crow
ening that those gatr
te rned of the tragic plane rr i
w uch killed the Marshall I
te im the very night ECU had
p ived them.
'The television program .
ir errupted and everyone ins
lc irned of the accident said 1
B owning. She added that
ti les were not commonp
r) wevcr, and said that the g
ti e outweighed the bad I
"he Brownings have not all
tc ;ethcr laid down their spatulas,
Jteuals spee
p sound,
hit the road
Continued from page 13
Pifik Floyd's "Wish You Were
Hfcre" before turning around and
5t: apping on a green six-string I -
H sndrix's "All Along the Watch
lower
Dickenson "made it easier for
to play, he picks songs up r
a ray Madison said about the
itanst who joined the ba
ei ;ht months ago.
Their album "Nothing to Feai
But Life Itself which
ined what Madison once
xibed as 'scary music
lessage is only beginn
le Usuals' originals cuts K '
�n says he has six new or
1st waiting to be perfectc if rgi
av.
Off their first recording
ibva a track co-w:
ichael Fletcher and Mad I
iich adventures into the land q
�onsm, flving there via e
litars and bombing with a bac
Kuncing beat "Fletch
�ote that song two montl s I
re Reagan sent the planes,
fcdison said oi the song I -
fc of those weird thir
It's now 10:30 and Samr
,nching on a mid-m -j
cakfast oi nachos and pica
uce left over from the nig!
fore. His eves, still tinad -
the light of the day, stare
sliding glass door as he CO
iplates a week of travel on th
�en road.
'We are booked five n
ek for the next couple
nths. This week we travel t
apel Hill and then to Naj
fad and then back to Chapj
111 Madison says
On the road, the band trie-
the seemingly endless ga
:ween the horizon of paintJ
I tted lines. As Madison rea.
'Jen and the Art of Motorcvc
tintenance Stutts beats tl
(t ?ering wheel oi the van like
?re a bongo.
Bored in the passenger's se.
mute Cain bends a dnnku
aw and mounts the just create
N sketball rim on the van's coj
e. Taking a roll of duct taj
iich no band is without, ti
�ist balls a gob of the silvj
e to form a basketball.
rhrowing the ball to Dickens
1 le back seat, he says "Hey ma
ike a three-pointer
Inbetween criss-crossing 0
tate and the southeast, Madi;
lid the band has made a teni
lively date to play at the TKE a
arty on September 16.
Maybe by then Dickenson wl
able to convert a three-pointe1
It





PIRATES
,AZEOF
GOLD
Available
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Tllli FAST CAROLINIAN
SEFTHMBCR 1, 1988 15
New Star Trek show has misgivings
By MICAH HARRIS
SUH Writer
A ear ago, 1 reviewed the just-
remiering "Star Trek: The Next
eneration" with misgivings.
,nv will a full season behind
and a new one ahead, 1 hate to say
se doubts remain. "Star Trek:
ic Next Generation" has vet to
the federation boots or the
riginal series.
Ironically, this failure seems
n part to Gene Roddenberry
infatuation with his first born.
! s gone to extremes to make
re the Next Generation" looks
ke the original series in his
ko of color, set, and format.
a hat Roddenberry has forgot-
i n is that 20-plus years have
ssed not onlv for "Star Trek"
I all television as well. The
book colors and obviously
i-nc indoor "outdoors" sets
�ked well and were the norm
in the 's simply because color
was new and audiences had no
other frame of reference. Today,
they're as obsolete as the NBC
peacock.
ambiguity and hence any poten-
tial for moral dilemma. This may
make for easy audience accessi-
bility (we know wh6 the good
guys are; the only thing missing is
a white hat) but the end result is
The episodic format is also
annoving today. Again, following something akin to having Charlie
the typical '60's TV format, the GaddV and the Action ;
original Trek was guilty of having
Kirk fall deeply in love with Edith
keeler, see her die, then never
mention her once over the next
episode (or the next two years); in
"The Next Generation Lt. Yar
New
Team man the Enterprise.
For contrast, consider the char-
acters of "Blake's 7 a British sci-
ence-fiction series airing Satur-
day nights on PBS. Although the
special effects arc pitiful corn-
dies and is conveniently forgotten pared to the new (or old, for that
next week. matter) "Star Trek's the charac-
Charactcr development is ham- tcrization is light years ahead of
pered without continuity, and "The Next Generation
this brings us to "The Next Gen- The shifty Avon, cowardly
orations" mostgrieviousflaw: the Villa, egotistical Tarrant, and
characters are bland to the point impudent Dayna are all flawed
of being generic. Everybody is individuals as apt to act selfishin-
just so stinking nice! They all get shly as hcriocally. They are also
along too well. more interesting and likable due
This valium-injected character- to these flaws than the flawless
iztion cancels out any moral philanthropists aboard the Enter-
prise.
Avon alone is a more wonder-
fully complex creation than any to
walk across Roddenberrys refur-
bished starship bridge. Of course,
the original "Star Trek" had char-
acters of depth, but in his rush to
imitate form and not substance,
Roddenberry seems to have for-
gotten this. The new characters
(except Will Wheaton's Wesley.
The sooner he's shoved in a black
hole, the better) have potential.
But sadly, we were made a ware
of how little it has been realized in
"Skin of Evil" when Lt. Yar dies.
Although the episode itself was
one of a thimblcfull that managed
to capture the essence of the origi-
nal series (the other two being
"Haven" and the new Trek's
Shining Moment: "Conspiracy"),
Yar's eulogy had no resonance
because the characters' interac-
tion and development have been
superficial at best.
Now I'm not suggesting that
"Star Trek: The Next Generation"
turns into a futuristic "thirtysom-
ething" of wimps in space, lt is,
after all, adventure show (al-
though "the Next Generation"
has been severely weak in the
action dept. as well). But conflicts
should mean something, and they
mean less that nothing when no
one cares about the people in-
volved.
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RATED R YOUNG GUNS
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
Continued from page 13 for Mr. Browning, who hasappar- EvcnthoughThcCrow'sNestis
Mrs. Browning recalls crowded 0ntly turned his efforts towards closed and the building is to be
'specially around Hallow- hot dogs, is affiliated with a new leveled, many patrons have ac-
restaurant on highway 17 in quired memorabilia in order to
Jacksonville appropriately jog their memories. At least two
named The Hot Diggidy Dog. He people have bought the tables
takes with him the warmth and
smiles of many years well spent at
The Crow's Nest.
i n and after football games. "We
a ;re always busy the night of
ill games, win or lose she
f ij. It was on one such crowded
evening that those gathered
3 le imed of the tragic plane crash
- h killed the Marshall football
j � im the very night ECU had
ived them.
he television program was
in errupted and everyone inside
k le irned of the accident said Mrs.
jf B owning. She added that bad
I ri fies were not commonplace,
f .sever, and said that the good
ti no outweighed the bad tenfold.
Brownings have not all
L 'her laid down their spatulas,
t Isuals speed
up sound,
hit the road
they always dines at and many
others have bought Crow's Nest
aprons, menus, serving trays
along with beer signs, I'irate pic-
tures, lanterns, mapkin holders
and salt and pepper shakers.
Even though many ot the inte-
rior furnishings have been sold,
many tables and chairs still re-
main. Perspective buvcrs should
call 756-4194 or 752-6311.
RA'i ED PC.


HOT TO TROT
1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
FUNNY FARM
RATED PG 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00

OoenTheBook
That Solves Problems
w
m
Wk
. Continued from page 13
file Floyd's "Wish You Were
rtere" before turning around and
r pping on a green six-string for
ndrix's "All Along the Watch-
r
kenson "made it easier for
- play, he picks songs up right
. Madison said about the
rist who joined the band
I � months ago.
ir album "Nothing to Fear
ut Life Itself' which con-
1 j what Madison once de-
; tcd as "scary music with a
i sage is only beginning of
i suals' originals cuts. Madi-
ays he has six new originals
�. siting to be perfected tor gig
I
()ff their first recording comes
a track co-written by
lei Fletcher and Madison-
h adventures into the land of
fan rism, flying there via evil
rs and bombing with a back-
incing beat. "Retch and 1
Jr v that song two months be-
)� Reagan sent the planes
, n said of the song, "it's just
ol those weird things
It's now 10:30 and Sammy is
inching on a mid-morning
� fast oi nachos and picante
uce left over from the night
re His eves, still unadjusted
light of the day, stare out of
E sliding glass door as he con-
lates a week oi travel on the
rn road.
e are booked five nights a
;vk for the next couple of
nths. This week we travel to
ipel Hill and then to Nags
ad and then back to Chapel
11 Madison says.
On the road, the band tries to
the seemingly endless gap
N tween the horizon of painted
lotted lines. As Madison reads
en and the Art of Motorcycle
Vaintcnance Stutts beats the
l ienng wheel of the van like it
re a bongo.
Bored in the passenger's seat,
' anute Cain bends a drinking
� aw and mounts the just created
i skctball rim on the van's con-
ic Taking a roll of duct tape,
� iich no band is without, the
be ssist balls a gob of the silver
tato form a basketball.
ITirowing the ball to Dickcnson
irJthe back seat, he says "Hey man
take a three-pointer
Inbetween criss-crossing the
�tate and the southeast, Madison
viid the band has made a tenta-
tively date to play at theTKE lawn
party on September 16.
Maybe by then Dickcnson will
be able to convert a three-pointer.
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-?
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��
You're in school-with a pile of books to
plow through every week. So the last thing
you need is another book, right?
Wrong. The Student Banking check
book actually makes your life easier.
Much easier. Student Banking is a no-
hassle checking account created expressly
for you-at a time when you don't have
much time to manage money.
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No Surprises: You'll know exactly how
much money will be deducted from your
account in service charges each month.
Just $3.00.
For just $3.00 a month, you can make
up to 12 withdrawals from your account
each month. You can make these with-
drawals by check, at a First Citizens Bank
"24" ATM or a combination of both.
You won't be hit by any extra charges
as long as you make no more than 12
transactions Kr month.
Free Checks: To get you started, well
give you 50 free checks, personalized with
your name and address. (Hometown and
major not included.)
Free ATM Card: With this card, you
can withdraw cash anytime you need it
24 hours a day. 1 'se it for last-minute lab
fees or late night pizza runs.
You'll find a First Citizens Bank 24"
ATM on-or very near-your campus. You
can also use your ATM card at 1,800 Relay"
ATMs in five Southeastern
states. Great for road trips!
Keep in mind that you
will be charged normal ser-
vice fees for using ATMs
other than First Citizens
Bank "24" ATMs.
Free Check Safekeep-
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FIRST
CITIZENS
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don't have a lot of space to spare, so we'll
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And if you ever need a copy of a check,
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of your check.
Special Perks: You'll receive a $UMX
life insurance poticy-al no charge-when
you open your account.
Plus, you'll receive discounts on rental
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offices Great for spring
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Come by the First Citi-
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pus t id open a Student
Banking account today
It just may be the most im
portant bmk you open
all vear.
MF.MBKRH1K
OMKFHrn ITIZK.VsHANkATKI STm'MJUM





t
V
16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1988
The incredible animal half page
Alligators look like dead meat
CORKSCREW, Ha. (AP) �
Drawn by adventure and hopes of
big profits. Florida's 238 newly
licensed alligator hunters are get-
ting ready to begin the state's first
legal gator hunt in 26 years.
More than 5,000 novice and
skilled hunters alike scrambled to
apply for the permits after game
officials announced the hunt,
designed to trim an alligator
population that was once threat-
ened by poachers but is now an
estimated at 1 million.
Wide-eyed amateurs will be
stalking freshwater swamps,
lakes and streams with hopes of
cashing in on their catch, which
can bring as much as $1,000 for a
10-foot gator's skin and meat.
But some experts are wonder-
ing if the permit holders really
know what they're in for.
"You got to laugh when you
hear these people say they're
going to make money off this
hunt said 37-year-old Dale
Dunaway, who operates one of
florida's few alligator processing
plants.
"They don't figure in the time,
expenses � and don't forget the
danger Dunaway said Tuesday.
TdTike to see some people's faces
the first time a gator takes a bite at
their airboat
For 30 days beginning at sunset
Thursday, the randomly selected
permit holders will be allowed to
hunt in designated areas where
the gator population is
extraordinarily high.
Waterfront resident all over
Florida called for a hunt against
the carnivorous reptiles after a 10
12�foot bull gator killed 4-year
-old Erin Glover in the Gulf Coast
community of Englewood in
June.
But game officials have placed
tight restrictions on the hunt.
PErmit holders will be working at
night, when flashlights make the
reptiles' eye glow eerily red. And
they are not allowed to use guns,
relying on clubs, traps and hooks
attached to poles.
The harvest is limited to up to
3,435 gators, with each hunter
limited to 15 gators each.
"We expect to be ud non-stOD
from Thursday until about Mon-
day, either skinning or hunting
Dunaway said at his 2-year-old
processing operation in this re-
mote southwest Florida town.
"We're gonna be looking at a lot of
dead gators
Skinning an average alligator is
a full day's work, Dunaway reck-
ons.
First he plunges his hunting
knife through the gator's thick
hide at the tip of it tail. Then, it's a
slow and difficult cut to the snout.
"You got to look at it as an hour
a foot to properly skin and gut a
gator said Dunaway. "There's
no way around it. It's hard work,
you bet
Some of the experienced hunt-
ers will be permitted to use the
equipment at the gator house, a
cement frame enclosed by screen
wire and decorated by deer ant-
lers.
But the novice trappers will
have to sit and watch their catch
be pried apart.
Alligators are cut up the back to
preserve the valuable hide cover-
ing the belly and underarms, said
Dunaway. The hide, which sells
for about $42 a foot to foreign
manufacturers, is submerged in a
brine solution for about a week.
The excess flesh is then scraped
off and the skin is sun dried.
"And we bury the innards as far
away as possible said Dunaway.
"They got a powerful smell and if
you ever cut open the stomach
you better start running
The meat, which Dunaway says
makes a nice addition to spaghetti
sauce, must be frozen within
hours after the alligator is killed.
Turbo pig wins the 10th annual race at Pork Chop Downs
COLUMBUS, OHIO (AP)�
The Swine Arena on the Ohio
State Fairgrounds became Pork
Chop Downs as 15 pigs saun-
tered, sprinted and stumbled
toward the finish line a slop
trough in the 10th annual pig race.
The winner was Turbo Pig,
whose time of 3.9 seconds shaved
more than a second off the 2.7-
second mark set last year by
Squealing Demon.
Three hogs painted with or-
ange, green and blue racing
stripes competed in the first of
nine heats Thursday. It was a
close race until Joan Jett and Slop
Buster collided halfway down the
50-foot track.
Seizing the opportunity, Al-
berto Clipper won it by a snout,
clocking in at 4.4 seconds.
Other first-round winners were
eventual champ Turbo Pig, Boar-
ing Down, Fried Bacon, New Deal
Charlie, Burning Buns, Crisp
Cutlet, Calvin Swine and Bugsy.
Second-round eliminations
narrowed the field to Boaring
Down, New Deal Charlie, Burn-
ing Buns and Turbo Pig.
As anticipation grew and ver-
bal bets were placed, Turbo Pig
broke loose from the starting gate
and headed for the feed trough.
Race action was stalled until five
officials cornered the pig and cor-
ralled him into the starting gate.
With all four pigs in place, the
starting bell sounded.
Burning Buns took the early
lead but squealed and slowed
down as Boaring Down darted in
front of him. New Deal Charlie
ran to the outside and stopped for
a fraction of a second to check out
the crowd. Turbo Pig took advan-
tage of Charlie's curiosity, cross-
ing the finish line to claim first
place.
Amy Herbkersman of Collins,
who won $234 for Turbo Pig's
performance, said she doesn't do
anything special to prepare her
hog for race day.
"He's just a really fast pig she
said. "I give him really good feed,
but I don't train him much
Under New Management
Hrs: Sun. Wed. 11-2
Thur Fri Sat. 11-3
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One coupon per customer per visit
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�With purchase of a
ir.c(i:um soft drir.k
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3k3tdj4tmlm
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Stop cutting up cats, professor
GREENSBORO (AP)�An ani-
mal rights group picketed on the
University of North Carolina at
Greensboro campus tuesday
night in an effort to get a professor
to stop using cats and kittens in
his work.
About 30 protesters of the
North CartMna NeKttfc
mals contend the research con-
ducted by psychology Professor
James at 21
Continued from page 13
pretty good. It was very interest-
ing said James.
James' big personal project
began with paperwork this sum-
mer. He hopes to have everything
completed by next year to lift an
organization, HYPO , oft the
ground. "HYPO" stands for
"Help Young People Overcome
"What I mean by HYPO is to
overcome drugs and alcohol
"This idea all comes from a guy
who has gone through quite a few
problems in his life with alcohol
said James. "I want to try to get
through to as many young people
as I can who want to overcome
drugs and alcohol. These young
people have to grow up some-
time
When asked what he wants to
do in the future, James said, "I
want to repay God for all his bless-
ings by helping other people is
I'm able to be of service. I guess
that's what I'm all about
Walter Salinger is painful and
stressful to the animals including
altering their vision and that it has
no known human application.
UNCG officials said that
Salinger's research benefits the
understanding of a disease that
affects about two percent of the
million people
"The benefits to humans make
this research worthwhile. Other-
wise, we wouldn't do it, " said
Stephen Mosier, UNCG's director
of research services, who said he
spoke for Salinger and the univer-
sity. "We don't torture animals,
and we don't subject animals to
pain. Just as human surgery is
done under anesthesia, so is ani-
mal, surgery, "
;
Mosier said he spoke for Salin-
ger so that the professor could
spend time on his teaching and
research.
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ANNOUNCING
Elections for Executive Officer's
for the
Student Residence Association
Area Residence Councils
Residence Hall House Councils
September 13,1988
Filing Dates Are September 6-8
For more information and applications
See Your Residence Hall Director
ECU
STUDENTS
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Opan TM 9 30 P.M. tmn Days A WMk
idyice ColurA
Fros
Dear Big r
lama freshmen girl livii
dorms. I enjoy ECU,
have to share myd rm ro
: razed � ,
hell
( �mii .� from a si
c arolina town, I never
enced what you pe ipleat
Carolinian call "The pa;
and n i 1
such devilish acti it) 1
the bad reputation that I-l
receivi ;rs
wholesome ! iod I
ran also attend tl
out staying out all
drunken stupor
It ,� rted
irsl lei i
mate. She I
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laeement
111 2
1-3
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The Plaza
OFF
ANY
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nity
torn
?uncil's
Avard"
Summit
iris
iris
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Irt"
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Ifo� litt CoiroOBtnite �@ttll(r� Pogjd
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SOTEMBCR 1, lV8fe 17

Advice Column
Frosh roommate problems
Dear Big E,
1 am a freshmen girl living in the
dorms. I enjoy ECU, except that 1
have to share mv dorm room with
a crazed sinner who 1 am oon-
inced i going to hell.
Coming from a small N rth
Carolina town, 1 never experi-
enced what you people at the East
Carolinian call "The party life"
and nor do 1 care to partake in
such devilish activity. 1 know of
the bad reputation that ECU has
received over the years, but 1 feel
wholesome God-fearing people
can also attend this school with-
out staving out all night in a
drunken stupor.
It all started on the first day of
school when we were moving in.
1 ;irst let me describe my room-
mate. She has bleached-blond
hair which is spiked at the top.
She wears nothing but tight
loans and navel showing tops. She
applies her make-up with a paint
brush. On top of that she can
quote every Poison song ever
written.
But it gets worse. She chews
with her mouth open and often
speaks with a full mouth of food.
I can't stand people who chew
with their mouth open. Ven ot sin-The Elbo. 1 just put in you think.
Anyway, she was carrying a my ear plugs and try not to imag- 1 don't propose you forget
suit case full of her slutty looking inc what they are doing. your self identity and become a
clothes through the doorway and The following day, which is hell raiser, 1 just think it's time for
muttering obscenities whcn'l first every day, she sleeps through all you to see the perspective of oth-
laid eyes on her. Before even in- her classes and wakes up about crs. In my eight years ot college, 1
two in the afternoon to smoke have learned much from other -
marijuana. once thought to be weird and dif-
Scriously, I have tried every- fcrcnt-people,
thing. I have read scripture to her. On the other side of the porta-
1 have read Revelations to her and John, I think you need to heed the
East Carolinian under siege
over buxom cartoon
troducing herself, she said "It
never gets this (obscenity) hot up
Just Ask
BigE
in Jersey
At that point 1 knew that God
had placed this dirty, vile
mouthed Yankee in my sight for a
reason. HE was testing my claim.
She comes in every morning
about 4 a.m loud as can be and
sometimes with something she
has dragged home from that ha-
told her that she needs to repent
from eternal damnation, but she
just laughs and turns up Toison.
I have talked to my RA and to
the people in the housing depart-
ment. They say that there are no
rooms open and that I will have to
put up with the way it is. What can
Ido?
Signed, Tired of the Vile Yan-
kee.
Dear Yankee fan,
Lighten up. Kids that have been
held captive in their parent's
home for 18 years ha vea tendency
to explore unsought depths of
banality once they come to col-
lege Maybe you need to enter one
of those what vou call "havens of
sin" and see if it's as demonic as
words of the great Pat Stevens
who says "Take a look at yourself,
have you looked at yourself, look
at yourself Should you really
inflict your beliefs on everyone
who comes in contact with you.
Although I do think you are
taking this situation a little too far,
I do agree with you on one issue. I
hate when girls chew with their
mouths open too.
Gotta beef with your room-
mate?, wish the wholeEast Caro-
linian staff would go to hell?
Tlink people use too much scato-
logical language (consult dic-
tionary)Drop me a line at:
Earlvis
East Carolinian
Publications Building
Emerald City, 27858-4353
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
The East Carolinian, East Caro-
lina University's student-run
newspaper, has come under fire
by women's rights groups for
what they term "a blatantly sexist
cartoon
The cartoon, depicting a
buxom female tied up by a pirate,
was run on the front page of their
Back to School" issue on August
23. Dolores Ccllulite, head of
Women Against Practically Evc-
ything (WAPE) screamed Mon-
day at a press conference, 'That
paper is run by unwitting pawns
of the patriarchal system
The editorial staff of the news-
paper could not be reached for
omment. A terse statement is-
sued Tuesday said only'Stop the
madness
Ccllulite and her group have
tried to bring suit against the
ety! Of course they threw it out!
Any kind of social reform in this
country is laughed right out o
court Ccllulite cried out when
questioned during the press con
ference.
When it was pointed out that
one of the judges was a woman,
Cellulite became incoherent and
had to be sedated with 30 ocs o
Valium.
A BP opinion poll taken Sunday
night, consisting exclusively of
women, brought forth these star-
tling results:
25 of those responding
thought the pirate was cute.
5 thought the girl was cute.
30 said they had always
dreamed about being tied up.
17 indicated they wished they
were as buxom as the girl
The remaining 23 replied tha
?apcr and force it to shut down, they had no opinion about
lie case has come before three bunch of purple lines arranged
judges. Each one has thrown it out the bottom of hr,ironrMage of
f court. some college rag in eastern NortI
'Mon! Maldnminated soci- Carolina.
'Squirrel many strikes once again
GREENVILLE, N.C. (BP) �
(Irccnville's mysterious "squirrel
man" has struck again!
Three self-proclaimed "skate
rats" were attacked in the parking
lot of Eastbrook Apartments
Wednesday night. Thirteen-year-
old Bryan "Slash" Wheeler was
killed in the first reported death
caused by a six-foot tall human-
oid squirrel that allegedly at-
tacked two freshmen girls last
week.
The two surviving skate-
boarders were released from Pitt
County 1 lospital this morning.
Police Chief Gordon O'Hara
told reporters todavThe boy
was cut up had. Looked like he'd
been pushed through a blender
on the puree setting
Alex Cuervos, 12, told
policeWe were doing some rad
jumps off the curbs. Throwin' a
few rocks at cars. Then, all oi a
sudden this big hairy guy with a
tail ran across the road on all
fours
"He bit Slash on the leg. Me and
Tony tried to pull him off. The
squirrel guy's teeth just pulled
out a chunk of his leg when we
finally got him off he said.
O'Hara said Cuervos and the
remaining survivor, Tony
Bacardi, 13, pelted the creature
with rocks. The squirrel man then
ran back across Greenville Boule-
vard, nearly missing being hit by a
red Cadillac convertible.
"Those kids did the smart thing.
No squirrel, no matter how big, is
gonna stick around to get hit by
rocks he said.
The two boys then attempted to
pull their friend to the hospital on
their skateboards. Wheeler was
pronounced dead on arrival, due
to excessive blood loss.
O' Hara is filming public safety
announcements that begin airing
tonight. In them he gives advice
for Greenville citizens that may
run into the creature Don't walk
alone. Carry rocks with you at all
times
During an interview, Dr. Thy-
roid Glans stated his main con-
cern. "This thing may be in-
fected with rabies. We have found
no trace of it in the victims, but it
is a possibility
Glans had no specific theories
concerning the origins of the
squirrel man. "It may be some
kind of mutation, or a missing
link. Whatever it is, it's danger-
ous
O' Hara urges anyone with
sightings of the creature, or infor-
mation to call the Squirrel Man
Hotline at 757-6366.
Man harassed by the pizza men
GREENVILLE, N.C. (EP)� if I didn't stop stuffing my face
Once was funny, but after a week Whittley explains.
Porter John Whittley was getting Following his doctor's advice,
a little fed up with the practical he went on a strict diet of 500
joke. calorics a dav which included
Maybe fed up isn't the right "SaladandtofiiToday,Whittley
words to describe Whittley's is at the normal weight of 155
emotions You see, a practical pounds.
joker has been sending food deli v- Pizza, submanne and sand
ery men to Whittley's 5th street wich delivery men have been
address for the last week. approaching the Whittley house
"I just can't understand it, in herds. "At one time there were
somebody has a sick sense of four of them at the door at one
humor around here Whittley
said.
Whittley, a worker at a local
tampon factory, says he is a vegi-
tarian who gave up eating meat
five years ago after a close call
with death.
'1 used to be a junk food junky
time he said.
Whittley said he is suffering
from mental harassment becasue
of the constant ringing of the door
bell. "1 can't work, I can't sleep, ail
I think about is food
'I don't know if 1 can handle it
until I weighed almost 300
Warning: Do not bug Campus poands and suffered from a con- smelling all this food brings back
Security about this matter! Only dition of extreme cholesterol memories Whittley said
the Squirrel Hotline can help! jevcl My doctor said I would die hefore crying.
BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE
V
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pizza Suy
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18 Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1988
"Womens be thinkin' too muchIke Turner, from his biography
Overkill

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�THE NEW-
Avast, readers, and welcome to the NEW Pirate
Comics and NEW Fun and Games. To celebrate
our new look we're going do something unpre
cedented on the comics page-let you actually
SEE the Cartoonists! Crazy, eh?Now meet our
very own version of The Cosby Kids so when
you see them around campus you can form a
mob and mob them. And for fun, help Elvis
find his favorite snack, or the Memphis Mafia
will be lookin' for ya. .droW
Meet the Cartoon Gang!
Overkill Orpheus
Orpheus,
The Avatar
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Pirate
BY DOUG JOHNSON
Sp ! -
There are a v-
between the E
Golden Eaglesol
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Help Elvis Find the Peanut Butter and 'Nana Sandwich
Faul "Dumb Donald" Friedrich
The Law
Tom "Russell" Gurganus
The Avatar
lohclx s raeer
THIS AAiT
GRACELAMD
BUB!
EQ
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ATi'cah "Weird Harold" Harris
Inside Joke
Elvis
Fat Albert"
Presley
Undercover Cats
Bondage Monthly
jUJTBBj
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choice
Steve "Bucky Reid
A meal fit for a King!
"Rudy" Haselrig
Rik "Mushmouth" Elliot
pr � m
Teff "Old Mudfoor" Parker
Next Week:
Because you demanded it-
The Clint Howard Tribute

East Carolina Fans hope t
end when the Pirate's h�
GAMES
Tennessee Tech at v I
VirginaTech at Clec
Tennessee at Georgia
Louisville at Mai
Duke at Northwestc
North Carolina at S
Temple at Syracuse
Texas .UM at LSI
San Piece State at I C
Florida State at Miai
Vikin
(AH - Minnesota
lerback ade ilson sa -
ask to be traded it Tomm K
isnanuxi to start Sunda - -
opener in Buffalo.
Wilson has been k -
battle tor the si
with Kramer since lead .
Vikings to the Nati
ence championship
year with stunning p!a
over New Orleans and
Cisco
Pirate's
"1 -80
B DOUGJOHNSO
Sport iditor
How many ot you ot
have heard or seeij
advcrtisments tor ECl w j
the end proclaims that al
who mav be inclined to J
pursuaded bv the comnurj
send moncv to the L'nivert
purchase season tickets ma I
by calling 1-800-HEL.r E(j
show of hands, please.
Well, regardless of w
ou've heard it or not, rm
try an make a point. Th





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 1,1988 Page 19
Pirates are ready to start football season
BY DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
There are a lit ot similarities
between the ECU Pirates and the
Golden Eagles of Tennessee Tech.
They both wear purple and gold
uniforms. Thev bom utilize the
run-and-shoot offense. And they
both were 5-6 last season.
This Saturday, these
similarities won't mean anything.
Both teams will be out to
establish themselves, and to start
the 1988 season with a win. No
one is more ready for this than
Pirate Head Coach Art Baker.
"We're as anxious as any team in
the country right now to get
started he said during a press
conference held at the Pirate's
Club. "Our pre-season drills have
been very productive, and I can
say that we're ready to hit
someone besides our
teammates
However, Baker is under no
illusion that the task ahead will be
an easy one. "Tennessee Tech is
always a tough, hard-nosed
football team he said. "They will
be very ready to play us, I can
promise you that. They always
have good size and play with
agressiveness
"Coach (Jim) Ragland is a top-
notch coach Baker added. "We
have been friends a long time and
I know that he'll have his troops
prepared
Other developments that may
affect the Pirate's performance
Saturday:
Junior tailback Willie Lewisand
senior rover Bryan Haywood,
both starters last season, are listed
as questionable for the contest
with the Golden Eagles. Lewis has
a strained groin, and Haywood is
reported to have a slightly
separated shoulder. Also, the
question of who will perform the
kicking and punting du ties for the
School Officials would like to see a crowd of this magnitude at all ECU sporting events, but
especially at this season's home opener. Come out and cheer for the Pirate's (File photo).
Pirate's has been settled. Saturday's game. "We're looking numbered 35,047, on October 26,
Sophomore Robb Imperato will for a big turnout from our fans this 1985, when the Pirate's hosted the
be the place-kicker for Saturday's Saturday he said, "I think this Gamecocks of South Carolina,
game, while redshirt freshman team is the type of team that will There are hopes that this home
John Jett will do the punting. respond well to a big crowd opening game will shatter this
Baker also expressed hopes that The largest crowd to ever see a record
there would be a large turnout for football in Ficklen Stadium
NFL, Rozelle crack down on drug abuse
East Carolina Fans hope to see this sight often this week-
end when the Pirate's host Tennessee Tech (File photo).
(AP) - The question arose on
July 26, when Pete Rozelle sus-
pended Dexter Manley for 30
preseason days for violating the
NFL's susbatnee abuse policy for
a second time.
What's the penalty when all it
docs is free Manley from two-a-
day workouts in 90-dcgree heat
and humidity?
We now know the answer.
For just as Manley returns for
the Washington Redskins' opener
against the New York Giants - to
the applause of his teammates
and Washingtonians who
cheered his early suspension - the
Giants' Lawrence Taylor leaves
for the first of four regular-season
games for essentially the same
intraction. from that uneven justice?
Which leads to a very basic Taylor who flaunted his late-
question, night lifestyle even after his first,
What good is the NFL's drug voluntary commitment to treat-
policy if there's uneven justice for ment, richly deserves to miss four
Lawrence Taylor and Dexter games and the $250,000 that goes
Manley, two talented young men with the suspension. He also
both in need of help? What good is seems in desperate need of treat-
the policy if a large part of the ment that will cure his illness.
nation's capital gets pleasureSee DRUGS, page 20
Fearless Football Forecast
BR IAN BAILEY
WNCT-TV Sports Director
DEAN BUCHAN
ECU Sports Information
DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Editor
CHIP CARTER
Managing Editor
Dr. RICHARD EAKIN
ECU Chancellor
GAMES
Tennessee Tech at ECU
Virgina Tech at Clemson
Tennessee at Georgia
Louisville at Maryland
Duke at Northwestern
North Carolina at South Carolina
Temple at Syracuse
Texas A&M at LSU
San Diego State at UCLA
Florida State at Miami
ECU
Clemson
Georgia
Maryland
Duke
South Carolina
Syracuse
Texas A&M
UCLA
Florida State
ECUECUECUECU
ClemsonClemsonClemsonClemson
Georgia Maryland DukeTennessee Maryland DukeGeorgia Maryland DukeTennessee Maryland Duke
North CarolinaSouth CarolinaSouth CarolinaSouth Carolina
Syracuse Texas A&MSyracuse Texas A&MTemple LSUSyracuse Texas A&M
UCLAUCLAUCLAUCLA
Florida StateFlorida StateMiamiFlorida State
Vikings have to pick their quarterback
(AP) -Minnesota Vikings quar-
terback Wade Wilson says he will
ask tobe traded if Tommy Kramer
is named to start Sunday's season
opener in Buffalo.
Wilson has been locked in a
battle for the starting position
with Kramer since leading the
Vikings to the National Confer-
ence championship game last
year with stunning playoff upsets
over New Orleans and San Fran-
cisco.
"I'm not conceding anything
Wilson told the St. Paul Pioneer
Press Dispatch in an interview
Tuesday. "But I figure Tommy
will get the nod because that's the
way it's always been around
here
Wilson said he feels insulted,
unappreciated, and most of all,
grossly underpaid by the Vikings.
"1 certainly don't want this to
sound like a case of sour grapes
Wilson told the newspaper.
"Outwardly, I'll remain a nice
company man, but I'm definitely
very disappointed and unhappy
here if I'm just looked at as insur-
ance
Wilson, who has played in 20 of
the last 21 games, will earn
$250,000 this year, roughly 25
percent of the money being paid
to Kramer and backups Steve
Young in San Francisco and Jay
Schroeder in Washington.
At New Orleans, nose tackle
Ted Gregory, in his first newscon-
ference as a member of the Saints,
said the Denver Broncos expected
too much of him too soon and
gave up on him too quickly.
Gregory, the Broncos' No. 1
draft choice this year out of
Syracuse University, was traded
by Denver on Monday for nose
tackle Shawn Knight, the Saints'
No. 1 draft choice a year ago.
"I don't think you can term
someone a bust in just five
weeks Gregory said. "I'm just a
rookie. I've only been in the
league for five weeks and I felt
that these last two weeks I played
pretty well in preseason games,
and I've been coming along with
my professional techniques as far
as playing defensive line Gre-
gory said.
Gregory said the Saints showed
good judgment in acquiring him.
"They know the kind of player I
have the potential of being and
the kind of player I was in col-
lege he said.
Denver officials said they
traded Gregory because he didn't
fit into the Broncos' system.
Many teams began reshuffling
their rosters following Monday's
mandatory reduction to 47. Some
of the players 1st to go almost im-
mediately found themselves with
new addresses, in most of those
cases, with a lesser team.
Pirate's Booty
"1-800-HELP
needs to be reconsidered
BY DOUG JOHNSON
Sport Editor
How many of you out there
have heard or seen the
advertisments for ECU, which at
the end proclaims that anyone
who may be inclined to, or was
pursuaded by the commercial to,
send money to the University or
purchase season tickets may do so
by calling 1-800-HELP ECU. A
show of hands, please.
Well, regardless of whether
you've heard it or not, I'm going
to try an make a point. The point
being, 1 find that ad highly
past couple of years, has I contend, however, that this
undergone a vast transformation, marketing strategy, this 1-800-
degrading, demeaning, and
inappropriate. Please allow me to
elaborate.
East Carolina University, in the
and is still in the process of great
change and improvement. This is
all well and good. As a result of
these changes, there has been a
concentrated effort on the part of
University officials tc up-grade
the image of the University, not
only in how we are viewed by
outside persons and our in-state
constituents, but also in the way
that the staff, faculty, and above
all, the students, view the
University, whose image is a
direct reflection upon themselves.
HELP ECU, is in no way
consistent with the efforts to
better the University's image.
Rather, it would seem that it is the
very antithesis of our collective
efforts. I ask you, do you think
you will ever see an ad that ends
with Call 1-800-HELP UNC?"
Don't be ridiculous, you laugh.
How about one saying Call 1-
800-HELP NCSU?" Give me a
break, you scoff. (Besides, it
would be too many numbers.)
But you get my drift. At a time
when we are struggling for
recognition as one of the top
schools in the East, against
schools much older, more
established, and wrongly, more
respected, this ad deals us a
damaging blow. I mean, begging
for money. Come on folks. Whose
idea was this? If we were an Easter
Seals group, fine. If we were
collecting for the American
Cancer Society, all the better. But
we're not.
Don't get me wrong. I'm not
saying that we don't need
contributions. That would be
ludicrous. But I do believe that we
could effectively pursue the same
end through different means.
Well, Mister I don't-like-it-so-
we-should-change-it, you may be
saying, what do you suggest? I
don't know. I admit it. I'm a
journalist (supposedly), not
marketing director. But give me
time. If I come up with something,
you will be the first to know
Until next time, later.







f
20
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1S8
Drugs a problem in the NFL
Continued from page 19
Taylor and the others must un-
dergo treatment and check in
regularly with the league's doc-
tors. And Taylor, who wrote in his
autobiography "the golf course
was my detox tank will, in fact,
undergo drug rehabilitation, ac-
cording to his agent, Gary
Kovach.
Giants coach Bill Parcells, who
in 1982 took over a drug-ridden
team and not only solved most of
the problem but built a Super
Bowl winner in the process, took
the league policy philosophically.
"They can't do it at every time
for everybody he said. "Teams
report to training camps at differ-
ent times. They have their veter-
ans in at different times. The
league has a problem structuring
all those things
Perhaps.
But the NFL could make sure
that all penalties are created
equal.
It could test everyone over a
two-week period in July - either
just before camp or during it - or
announce nothing until just be-
fore the start of the season, then
mete out the suspension so that
Manley, Taylor, Riddick,
Townsend, et. al. get four games
apiece.
The league argues that it
doesn't have the resources to do
the first and that it would be abdi-
cating its responsibilities if it did
the second.
"Suppose someone turned up
dead from an overdose while we
were waiting for all the tests and
we knew he had a problem?" asks
league spokesman Joe Browne.
"Where would we be then?"
Still, it's self-defeating to the
program when LaVern Torgeson,
Washington's defensive line
coach, rationalizes Manley's sus-
pension with the fact that he'll be
back for the regular season. And
linebacker Monte Coleman ex-
ults:
"I'm very happy. I think 30 days
is a blessing for him. You know, I
don't think we're really hurting
We'll get Dexter back soon
And where was the league in
January 1987, when the Dcnvei
Broncos removed tight end Clar-
ence Kay from a drug rehabilita
tion program for the playoffs,
then let him go back to rehab after
the Super Bowl? The answer: it
was a first offense, so no suspen-
sion is involved.
Perhaps, as John F. Kennedy
said when he called up the mili-
tary reserves in the 1961 Berlin
crisis "life is unfair
But when a suspension for drug
use elicits cheers, somebody
could try to make life just a little
fairer.
Taylor had acknowledged that
he underwent treatment for a
cocaine problem in 1986 and he
outlined his problems with the
drug in his book "LT: Living on
the Edge
"He is a person who has clearly
stated that he has not found the
answers in life that he has found
on a football field David
Falkner, the co-author of Taylor's
book, said in a television inter-
view.
Most of Taylor's teammates
declined to talk about the suspen-
sion.
A RESUME
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Next to Chicos in the Georgetown Shops
ast Carolina
II , r; - �� : 1' 11
j,
A?) - Marc Wilson and Rusty
Hilger, who competed with each
other for the same job last season,
arc now without one. So are some
former high draft choices who
never quite became the NFL play-
ers the scouts thought.thev would
be.
"There willtie mistakes in draft
choices San Diego Coach Al
Saunders said Monday after cut-
ting cornerback Lou Brock Jr son
of the baseballHall of Famer and
a second-roundlrhoice a year ago.
"YoQ never know for sure how
people will develop, and we're
disappointed this high pick did
not pan out
Monday was the NFL's annual
Heartbreak Day, the deadline for
teams to get down to the47-plaver
limit for the start of the season.
Not only did the usual comple-
ment of rookies and free agents
go, but so did dozens oi veterans
and some former high draft picks.
Not only did the Green Bay
Packers cut Wilson, whom they
would have had to pay $550,00
this year, but the Los Angeles
Raiders waived Hilger, with
whom he alternated at quarter-
back last season.
"From day one, it was one of
those deals that was not meant to
be said Wilson, who signed with
the Packers at the start of training
camp after being released by Los
Angeles. "I wanted it to be. A lotof
people wanted it to be. For what-
ever reason, it just didn't happen.
Now 1 can get on with something
else
Like the Chargers, the Raiders
were another team that admitted
making a mistake with a high
pick. They cut Bob Buczkowski,
their first-round pick in 1986.
Buczkowski. a defensive end, had
spent almost all of his first two
vears on injured reserve with a
bad back.
And the New Orleans Saints
and Denver Broncos swapped
disappointing first-rounders, the
Saints sending last year's top pick,
defensive tackle Shawn Knight to
the Broncos tor Denver's 1988
first-rounder, nose tackle Ted
Grecorv.
Gregory was third on the Bron-
cos' depth chart while Saints
Coach Jim Mora said of the 6-foot-
6, 288-pound Knight, who has
never come close to starting:
"Denver likes Shawn's size and
strength
Among the other oddities were
the Los Angeles Rams, who left
themselves with just one quarter-
back, Jim Everett, after cutting
backups Hugh Millen and Steve
Dils. Atlanta immediately
claimed Millen and Coach John
Robinson said he hoped to re-sign
Dils once he cleared waivers.
Some of those cut were more
bitter than others.
"I know what the business is
like, how ruthless it can be 32-
ycar-old Doug Betters, an 11-year
defensive end and one of the last
of Miami's "Killer B's" said after
being waived by the Dolphins. "I
was just an insurance policy the
last two years. I don't think I was
ever given a chance to compete for
a starting job
Among the other veterans to go
were a group with recent Super
Bowl rings: tight end Clint Didier
and running back Keith Griffin of
the defending champion Wash-
ington Redskins; wide receiver
Stacy Robinson, guard Chris
Godfrey and safety Greg Lasker
of the New York Giants' 1986
champions; and wide receiver
Keith Ortego and defensive back
Reggie Phillips, who returned an
interception 26 yards for a touch-
down in Chicago's 46-10 Super
Bowl victory over New England
after the 1985 season.
"It was probably the toughest
cut we had to make Redskins
general manager Bobby Beathard
said of Didier, who lost his job to
second-year man Craig McEwen.
Among the other cuts were Paul
McFadden, whose 91 field goals
were more than any Philadelphia
Eagle in history; strong safety
Lester Lyles, a two-year starter for
the New York Jets; wide receiver
Frankie Neal, Green Bay's sec-
ond-leading receiver as a rookie
1st year with 36 receptions; mr m
receiver Mike Jones, New
leans' leading receiver in 1
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if r t a a r t�i
Let Us Serve You
We will Gladly Cahs Your Checks From Home!
Whole Rib Eye Loins Sliced Free ,t$2.79Golden BananasMiller Beer Regular or Light 12 oz cans - case of 24 $9.99Lays Potatoe Chips 7 oz. bag 99Salad Bar ,J2.19 Hot BarHome Cooked Food ib$2.19Coca Cola Products All 2 LitersLimit4 79
Ice 8 lb bag 79Coors Beer 12 oz. cans -12 pack s5.99Deli Specials: Roast Beeflb. $3.99 Virginia Baked Ham lb. $2.99 Turkey Breastlb. $3.99 Cooked (boiled) Ham lb $2.99 Low Salt Boiled Ham lb $2.99 Swiss Cheeselb. $2.99 Yellow American Cheese lb. $1.99 White American Cheeselb. $1.99In The Box - You Assemble Charcoal Grills � $6.99Kingsford Charcoal 10 lb. bag $2.49Solo Foam Cups 9 oz. 50 count 59
Richfood Smoked Fully Cooked Tenderized Hams Whole or Half ib97cRed Ripe Watermelons 18 lb.average 99 and UpDixie Party Cups 16 oz. size - 20 count 99New Sundance Sparklers 23 oz. bottleassorted flavors $1.19Coca Cola 12 oz. canscarton of 6 $1.39Vintage Tonic, Club Soda, or Ginger Ale28oz bottle l.OO
Prices Effective Wed August 31-Saturdya, September 3,1988
STORE HOURS:
OPEN 8 AM - 8 PM
MON. THRU. SAT.
SUNDAYS 1-6 PM
OVERTON'S SHOPPING CENTER IS
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED
WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE OF ECU
ON THE CORNER OF
3RD AND JARVIS STREETS! JUST
2 BLOCKS FROM ECU!
Come by and visit our newly remodeled
laundromat!
New equipment and a fresh new look!
Watch for specials later!
SHOP WHERE THE PIRATES SHOP FOR PRICE,
QUALITY, AND CONVENIENCE!
OVEBTONS
Iports Briefs
harlot
CHARLOTTE (AP) - The Char-
He Coliseum will get a score-
ard just like the old one that fell
irith some added safety features
American Sign & Indicator
ynp. will install a new eight-
ied scoreboard beginning Oct
I, in time for the Charlotte Hor-
:ts' first home game, an Oct 29
BA exhibition against the Dallas
avericks
The sign company took respon-
bility after the $1.2 million, 20-
�n scoreboard fell 55 feet to the
rfiseum floor on Aug. 12. The
�rnpany said new safety features
ould prevent a similar accident
On Monday, the city's coliseum
ithonty said it wants the com-
my to install a new scoreboard.
'Jliot takes over
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) -
ill Elliot's second-place finish in
eBusch 500 at Bristol, Tenn
oved the Dawsonville, Ga j
�ivcr into the lead in the NAS-
AR Winston-Cup point stand-
gs
With nine races left on th�
ice Winston Cup schedule. Elliot
is a 16-point lead over Rusty
Wallace of St. Louis 3,027-3,011 in
ie sencs standings, NASCAR
lid Mondav. Wallace finished
inth in the Bristol race Satur
Defending Winston Cup cham-
ion Dale Earnhardt of Kannapo-
s, N.C, was third in the seri
landings with 2,901 points after
inningat Bristol, NASCAR -
Earnhardt was followed by Ken
chrader of Fcnton, Mo with
,702 and Terry Labonte of Cor
us Chnsti, Texas, with 2 -r4
funding out tfae top 10 arc C
odine, 2,640 Sterling Marlin.
,544; Phil Parsons, 2,511p; Dar-
rfl Waltrip, 2,504; and Hobby
lillin, 2,369.
Earnhardt continues to lead all
Srivers in the money won cate-
pry with $730,085, while Wallace
i second with $718,935. Elliot is
hird with $677345, followed b
.atonte with $620780 and
)avey Allison of Huevtown. Ala
rith $579,015.
Completing the top 10 money
dinners were Waltrip, $473,715
chrader, $443,690; Hobby Alli-
on, $408,795; Bodine, $384 345
nd Parsons, $369,245.
The next race will be the S
n 500 at the Darlington Interna
tional Raceway in South Car
Sept. 4.
Soviet healthy
NEVV YORK (AP) - Arvidaj 1
Sabonis, the Soviet Union's stai
basketball center, has been pro
nounced fit to play for the Sovk
team in the upcoming Oa mpio
according to a published report
The announcement abou
Sabonis' torn Achilles tendon was
madebv Soviet officials foliowmj
a consultation with Soviet special
ists, Aleksandr Gomelsky, 9 I
coach of the team, told the officiaj
news agency Tass. according
Tuesday's editions of the Net
York Times.
Sabonis had been undergo
rehabilitation program design�
and paid for by the Portland Trai
Blazers - the team that dratted thj
Soviet citizen - to overcome th
injurv vrtuch has sidelined bin
for 18 months.
J
CO
2 Free Tannin
with
Haircut Bk
Yearly Mem
to tanning
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(
T
ME
IRIBLE
WASTE
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1988 21
- jes el
ecu
4
v
PEOPLE
400
Martial Arts)
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igh School
lor In Seoul. Korea
st Masters
ling Pay
I ening
v lasses
Available
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' Mon Fn w -10 p m
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Coca Cola
Products
,11 2 Liters Limit4
79
olo Foam
Cups
OZ, 5 lint
59c
intage
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1.00
September 3,1988
y
Sports Briefs
Charlotte Coliseum
gets board
CHARLOTTE (AP) - The Char-
lotte Coliseum will get a score-
board just like the old one that fell
- with some added safety features.
American Sign & Indicator
Corp. will install a new eight-
sided scoreboard beginning Oct.
10, in time for the Charlotte Hor-
nets' first home game, an Oct. 29
Virgina football Olajuwon cuts
UNC football
HOUSTON (AP) - A television
cameraman suffered a cut to his
head when Houston Rockets star
Akeem Olajuwon grabbed his
video equipment after a reporter
CH ARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP)
- Virginia enters its 100th football
season with much of its hope for
success riding on inexperienced
quarterback Shawn Moore,
Coach George Welsh said Mon- questioned him about a lawsuit
NBA exhibition against the Dallas day. filed against him by his former
Mavericks. "Our offense will depend a lot girlfriend.
on him Welsh said of his sopho- KHOU-TV cameraman Jim
more quarterback from Shipley was treated and released
at a local hospital for the small cut
The sign company took respon-
sibility after the $1.2 million, 20-
ton scoreboard fell 55 feet to the
coliseum floor on Aug. 12. The
company said new safety features
would prevent a similar accident.
On Monday, the city's coliseum
authority said it wants the com-
pany to install a new scoreboard.
Elliot takes over
DAYTON A BEACH, Ha. (AP) -
Bill Elliot's second-place finish in
the Busch 500 at Bristol, Tenn has
moved the Dawsonville, Ga
driver into the lead in the NAS-
CAR Winston-Cup point stand-
ings.
With nine races left on the 29-
race Winston Cup schedule, Elliot
has a 16-point lead over Rusty
Wallace of St. Louis 3,027-3,011 in
the series standings, NASCAR
said Monday. Wallace finished
ninth in the Bristol race Saturday.
, Defending Winston Cup cham-
f)ion Dale Earnhardt of Kannapo-
is, N.C was third in the series
standings with 2,901 points after
winning at Bristol, NASCAR said.
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)
North Carolina football coach
Mack Brown announced Deems
May will be the starting quarter-
back as the Tar Heels face a diffi-
cult South Carolina team.
"I can't imagine opening with a
tougher opponent than South
Carolina Brown said Tuesday at
a news conference. "I talked to
(athletic director) John Swofford
Martinsville, who will start Satur-
day when the Cavaliers open their to ms forehead and was doing about putting it off a year, but he
season at home against William & nne' said Marc Watts, a sports didn't think that was a good
Mary. reporter at the television station, idea
The 6-foot-2, 210 pounder re- He did not need anY stitches, May, a redshirt freshman, and
places the graduated Scott Watts said. junior Jonathan Hall had been
Secules, who earned all-ACC The incident began when Watts competing for the starting nod
honors in 1987, when Virginia and Shipley went to Olajuwon's throughout preseason workouts,
went 8-4 and defeated Brigham House at about 11 a.m. to get a Hall, who sat out last season with
Young in the All America Bowl.
Moore was known as a running
quarterback when he was named
state Group AA player of the year
in 1985, but Welsh said he does
not plan to change Virginia's of-
fense to take advantage of those
abilities.
"We haven't changed much
Welsh said. "Everybody knows
that we run the option
William & Mary, 5-6 last year,
defeated Virginia 41-37 in 1986,
the last time the two teams
played.
Clemson football
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) - The
Clemson Tigers went through a
Earnhardt was followed by Ken light workout Monday as they
Schrader of Fenton, Mo with
2,702 and Terry Labonte of Cor-
pus Christi, Texas, with 2,654.
Rounding out tbe top 10 are Geoff
Bodine, 2,640 Sterling Marlin,
2,544; Phil Parsons, 2,51 Ip; Dar
rell Waltrip, 2,504; and
Hillin, 2,369.
prepare for the season opener
against Virginia Tech on Satur-
day.
"We had a light workout in
terms of hitting. That is normally
the case on Mondays Ford said.
Hobby "We will do some hitting later in
the week
Earnhardt continues to lead all "Hopefully, we won't get any
drivers in the money won cate- more players hurt Ford said,
gory with $730,085, while Wallace "We want to get as many people
is second with $718,935. Elliot is ready to play as possible. This
third with $677345, followed by time of year it is important to be
Labonte with $620780 and two-deepatall positions. With the
Davey AMisonof Hueytown, Ala heat factor this time of year, you
with $579,015.
Completing the top 10 money
winners were Waltrip, $473,715;
Schrader, $443,690; Hobby Alli-
son, $408,795; Bodine, $384,345;
and Parsons, $369,245.
The next race will be the South-
ern 500 at the Darlington Interna-
tional Raceway.in South Carolina
Sept. 4.
Soviet healthy
NEW YORK (AP) - Arvidas
Sabonis, the Soviet Union's star
basketball center, has been pro-
nounced fit to play for the Soviet
team in the upcoming Olympics,
according to a published report.
The announcement about
Sabonis' torn Achilles tendon was
made by Soviet officials following
a consultation with Soviet special-
ists, Aleksandr Gomelsky, senior
coach of the team, told the official
news agency Tass, according to
Tuesday's editions of the New
York Times.
Sabonis had been undergoing a
rehabilitation program designed
and paid for by the Portland Trail
Blazers - the team that drafted the
Soviet citizen - to overcome the
injury wtirch has sidelined him
for 18 months.
need a deep team.
Ford singled out some players
for their performances and lead-
ership roles during the preseason,
including defensive lineman
Mark Drag and linebacker Vince
Taylor.
comment from him about a law-
suit filed late Friday by Lita
Spencer, who claims the 6-foot-l 1
inch center deserted her because
he wanted a taller woman to bear
his sons.
College steroids
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - An
off-season program begun last
spring by the National Collegiate
Athletic Association at 25 schools
found nearly one-third of football
players at some colleges tested
positive for steroids.
Frank Uryasz, director of sports
sciences for the NCAA, told The
Kansas City Star, that positive
rate ranged from 0 to 30 percent.
He told The Associated Press that
the overall average of players
who tested positive was between
3 and 4 percent.
NCAA officials said the find-
ings, to be released in greater de-
tail this fall, suggest the current
policy of testing players only
prior to NCAA championship
events and bowl games may deter
abuse, but has not ended it.
Steroids, synthetic versions of
the male sex hormone testoster-
one, have been linked to increased
sports injuries and serious health
risks
I in i
a shoulder injury, "has had a lot of
soreness after the scrimmages
said Brown.
May, who has never taken a
snap in a college game, "has a
great mentality for football
Brown said.
"He's a very aggressive guy,
and he has not been intimidated
he said.
HOMEMADE
ICE CREAM
Greenville.NC
Expires 9688
Hank's Homemade Ice
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and Sorbet
312 E. 10th St. (Not to Wenajr-s)
758-0000
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Any Item
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Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream, Frozen Yogurt
and Sorbet
312 E. 10th St. (Next to Wendy's)
758-0000
25 Off A Regular
Serving With
Purchase of "Start
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bandanna"
ECU
YOUR SPORTS STATION
Proft
Fating & inking
MONDAY NITE y FOOTBALL
Casual Dining at its Finest!
Featuring our soon-to-be-famous Double-Shot Margaritas!
Don't Miss our Reggae Celebration Every Wednesday Night
LOCATED IN THE FARM FRESH
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11 am-l am Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm Sunday 355-2946
Welcome
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COUPONS GOOD THRU SEPTEMBER 88' ONLY
2 Free Tanning visits
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Special good with couupon only Appointment helpful but not necessary!
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xinaia
Elbo's 20th Anniversary
Thur: Ladies Night
Ladies free all night
Fri: The Famous "Late Dav Tea
Bash"
5 p.m. - 2 a.m. $2.00 Ice Teas and
free admission for all until 9:00
Sat: Dance Partv-
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Sun: Kamikaze Night - $1.00 Kamikaze shots
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GetYour "I Survived The Elbo Tea Bash"Shlrts
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7 New 16 oz. Frozen Drinks Every Night
featuring $2.00 dacquiri's






I
22 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1,1988

THE WORLD'S LARGEST FRATERNITY-
RECIPEINT OF:
-TOP SCHOLAR AWARD (PAST 3 YEARS)
-GREEK MAN OF THE YEAR
-TOP GREEK ATHLETE
MEMBERS INVOICED IN:
-STODENrf dOVERNMENT
-EAST CAROLINIAN
-WZMB
-ECU IRATES
-ECU RUGBY
-RESIDENT ADVISORS
-LOCAL BAND (THE BOND)
-ECU BASKETBALL TEAM
-ROTC
-SPECIAL OLYMPICS
RUSH DATES
SEPTEMBER 6,7,8
8 P.M. TIL 11 P.M.
TUES. SEPT. 6 - SEAFOODFEMALE STRIPER
WED. SEPT. - PIG ROASTSORORITY NITE
AND
The Bond
THURS. SEPT. 8 - SUBSMEET THE BROTHERS
FRESHMEN WELCOME!
FOR RIDES AND INFO: 757-3042
"THE HOUSE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE HILL"
Clem
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) -
Clemson senior fullback Ti
Johnson isn't on the football f)
running the football or bloclj
linebackers, he might be pee
down at a chessboard.
Or he might be in the kite
cooking. Or he might be in
apartment watering plants,
eluding a huge philodendroni
he's seen grow from just a sprl
"Chess, it started out wh'
was in the fourth grad. Mvbr
ers were interested, so I wasd
petitive with them and I leai,
it. Cooking, my mom alJ
wanted us to be able to ta ke cai
ourselves he said "So I
cooking for myself in tlv
second grade
"I really don't know how
plant interest came aboi
Johnson said "1 just like to so
can get the plants growing
Obviously Johnson in't
typical 6-foot, 23 ;
player. He enjoys the phyj
nature of football, but he's
drawn to the mental a j
chess. He said both arc
that have one goal - "conque
your opponent
"Both are one-on-ow
tions.
"Chess is like war You ti
outmaneu ver your op
David T
CHARLOTTE, N (
mer North Carolina Si
American and NBA star D
Thompson has been hired i
Charlotte Hornets to .
communitv relations, a - .
told a Charlotte now -paper
day.
The Hornets have schedule
p.m. news conference Tuesda
announce Thompson's hii
Thompson is expected t I
much of his time worl
youth programs for the Hor�
Hornets majority ow
George Shinn and vice presid
Carl Scheer have been discus
a job with Thompson for sevi
weeks, according to The Chary
4-


Some assembly requ!rec,
The Baskm-Robbi
Sundae! Start with
sundae in your favc
flavor. Add the top
real cream, nuts ar
a cherry.
mierMM Creams" addftontf





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1988 23
I

Clemson prepares for Hokies
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) - When a mental challenge. I haven't got- too much
Clemson senior fullback Tracy ten to the point where I know the Johnson
Johnson isn't on the football field
running the football or blocking
linebackers, he might be peering
down at a chessboard.
Or he might be in the kitchen
cooking. Or he might be in his
apartment watering plants, in-
cluding a huge philodendron that
he's seen grow from just a sprout.
"Chess, it started out when 1
was in the fourth grade. My broth-
ers were interested, so I was com-
petitive with them and I learned
it. Cooking, my mom always
wanted us to be able to take care of
ourselves he said. "So I was
cooking for myself in the first or
second grade
"1 really don't know how the
plant interest came about
Johnson said. "I just like to see if I
can get the plants growing
Obviously Johnson isn't your
typical 6-foot, 230-pound football
player. He enjoys the physical
nature of football, but he's also
drawn to the mental aspect of
chess. He said both are contests
that have one goal - "conquering
your opponent
"Both are one-on-one competi-
tions.
"Chess is like war. You try to
outmaneuver your opponent. It's
did not come to
great moves the Kannapolis, Clemson expecting to play full-
back. He was a linebacker and
tailback at A.L. Brown High
School, which also produced for-
mer Clemson star fullback Kevin
Mack, who is now with the Cleve-
land Browns.
After arriving on campus,
Johnson saw Clemson had several
talented tailbacks. So, he decided
N.C. native said. "But it's fun to
corner your opponent and to put
him in a position where he's vul-
nerable
Johnson also likes to make op-
ponents of fourth-ranked
Clemson vulnerable, which he
does with his tough running style
and bullish blocking. Last season,
Johnson was stopped behind the to try linebacker. But he didn't
line of scrimmage just once while like that, either.
gaining 557 yards and scoring
nine touchdowns.
Johnson set a school record for
rushing touchdowns in a bowl
game when he scored three times
in Clemson's 35-10 victory over
Pettn State in the Citrus Bowl last
just be without sense and run into
someone who may outweigh you
20 pounds, that was sort of hard to
get used to
Johnson learned well, however.
He may be Clemson's best all-
around blocker and runner. But
that doesn't mean he enjoys
blocking more than running.
"I like to run the ball he said.
"No doubt about it
But he also knows his job often
means to be an offensive lineman
who wears a running back's
number. That's OK with Johnson.
The offensive line made Johnson
"I don't know why I changed
my mind. For some reason I didn't
feel that comfortable with the
linebacker position Johnson
said.
So, after talking with running and Lancaster honorary members
back Coach Chuck Reedy, and had the two fullbacks pose
year. His best rushing effort last Johnson decided to go where he with the line during picture day
year came against North Carolina hoped to get the most playing last year
when he gained 124 yards. time - fullback. The transition was
Johnson shared duties with not overly difficult, but Johnson
Tailgating ECU Pirate Fans
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All Your Tailgaiting Needs
Including
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Plus Streamers, Cups,
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Everything You'll Need
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Member of Pirate Club
Bells Fork Square Hwy 43 South
2 mi. past The Plaza
Chris Lancaster last year. But
Lancaster will not be on the field
this year, having had his football
career ended by a neck injury.
Johnson figures he will play 20 to
30 more plays this year because of
Lancaster's absence.
"It won't put too much more of
a burden on me Johnson said. "I
think if I get in condition during
the preseason it won't affect me
had to get used to blocking, some-
thing that was not often required
of a tailback.
"Blocking was the hardest
part Johnson said. "A tailback,
you block every once in a while,
maybe on a pass. But you never
had to lead for anybody. That was
a very hard skill to obtain.
"The technique was a little diffi-
cult. But the fact that you have to
While the Tigers are known for
their option attack featuring the
tailback, Johnson said the fullback
is an integral ingredient in the
offense.
"I like playing fullback because
it puts a lot of pressure on you. It's
so important to this offense' he
said. "The tailback is a very im-
portant position, but they can't
run without the fullback. I like the
responsibility and knowing that 1
am contributing to the game
David Thompson returns to basketball
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - For-
mer North Carolina State All-
American and NBA star David
Thompson has been hired by the
Charlotte Hornets to work in
community relations, a source
told a Charlotte newspaper Mon-
day.
The Hornets have scheduled a 2
p.m. news conference Tuesday to
announce Thompson's hiring.
Thompson is expected to spend
much of his time working in
youth programs for the Hornets.
Hornets majority owner
George Shinn and vice president
Carl Scheer have been discussing
a job with Thompson for several
weeks, according to The Charlotte
Observer. Scheer signed Th-
ompson to his first pro contract in
1975 when Scheer was general
manager of the Denver Nuggets,
then of the American Basketball
Association.
Thompson could not be
reached for comment by the
newspaper Monday.
When Thompson first signed
with the Nuggets, rejecting an
offer from the Atlanta Hawks, he
had already won two awards as
Associated Press college basket-
ball player of the year. Thompson
played in four NBAall-stargames
during a pro career that spanned
eight seasons - six with Denver
and two more with the Seattle
SuperSonics.
Then Thompson suffered a ca-
reer-ending left knee injury in
1984.
Starting with a 1983 stay at a
drug rehabilitation center in Boul-
der, Colo Thompson experi-
enced a long string of problems,
including several brushes with
the law. He entered a second drug
rehabilitation center in Seattle in
1986 and declared bankruptcy
shortly after that, despite having
made more than $2 million from
his original six-year contract with
the Nuggets.
He has also been arrested twice,
once serving four months in a
Washington prison camp for as-
saulting his wife, Cathy, in subur-
ban Seattle. Thompson was or-
dered to receive counseling as
part of an in tervention progra m to
have the simple assault charge
dropped. However, he failed to
attend the counseling sessions
and was sent to a prison camp
from April to August 1987.
Thompson was also charged
with public intoxication at a top-
less bar in Indianapolis and was
involved in a fight at Studio 54, a
New York nightclub.
SUMMER
SALE
starts Saturday,
September 3rd.
25 Off
All Summer
Merchandise,
Selected Jewelry
and Accessories.
Some fall and
winter merchandise.
919 Red Banks Rd.
Arlington Village
756-1058
KAPPA SIGMA RUSH
fW
Some assembly required
Two Scoop Sundae in a
B��
4 s
Mini Helmet
The Baskin-Robbins Football Helmet
Sundae! Start with a resular two-scoop
sundae in your favorite Baskin-Robbins
flavor. Add the topping of your choice,
real cream, nuts and top it all off with
a cherry.
BASKIN
All Served in a mini NFL helmet, com-
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team logo sticker.
Collect all 28 mini helmets. Save 'em,
trade them with your friends or re-use
them at home.
ROBBINS
3Qfetaf?i (Hfyapte
fflljartereb 1966
700 E. 10th St.
Phone 752-5543757-1005
International Creams additional
Greenville Square Shopping Center
(Next to K-Mart)
756-4477
� 1988 Baskm-aobbmj incorporated
The Brothers Of Kappa
Sigma Invite You To Stop
By During Fall Rush.
September 6th, 7th, 8th





t
24 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 188
STUDENTS - FACULTYSTAFF
FANS - FRIENDS
s TBSNESSfc
V
"II
1
P
THE PIRATE BAHAMA
BEACH TAILGATE
SPONSORED BY PEPSI-COLA
C
c-
C

tttitVVL

�L'VV
;v
IVV
EP6'
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3
KICKOFF 7:00
IT'S YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO DISPLAY YOUR PRIDE IN EAST
CAROLINA!
Make the ECU vs Tennessee Tech Football Game the Best Spectator
Crowd in the State on September 3!
IT ALL BEGINS WITH THE PIRATE BAHAMA BEACH TAILGATE
SPONSORED BY PEPSI COLA
LIVE BANDS IN THE TAILGATE LOTS 4:30 - 6:00
The Breeze Band - Brice Street
,
4
� "VV

-1100 Pirate Beach Blankets given away at the Stadium Gates jv
Sponsored by Pepsi Cola
and
-Win a 3 day - 3 Night Bahama Vacation for 4 people
(Courtesy of Mike's Travel and Adventures), by putting together the winning puzzle. Souvenir puzzles (sponsored by
Pepsi Cola) will be sold for a $1.00 Donation prior to the ECU vs Tenn. Tech football game only.
All proceeds go to support the Athletic Scholarship Fund. The winning puz le will be
announced at Half-time - So bring your puzzles to the game.
(All Athletic Staff, their families, current scholarship Athletes and Athletic Recruits are not eligible to win.)
ft.

Be a Part of the Fun & Excitement
Student Ticket Pickup with I.D. and Activity Card at Minges Coliseum
Athletic Ticket Office Hours 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. - call 757-6500
jr
L

PIRATE FOOTBALL - STEPPING UP THE PACE
�Winner responsible for Bahamian Taxes and Departure Taxes. Trip must be taken by Dec. 15, 1988.





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Olympics event lf the U S
wins a meda in that event,
you m McDonald s fooo-
start redeeming date after
the event medal is av.arded
Save your game pieces
Greco-Romai �
Sep- .
IF THE U.S. WINS
GOLD�VOU WIN
aBiG VAC- Sandw eti
SILVER�YOU V
a Regi.ar Sze
Orcer 0' F'es
BRONZE-C. A N
a VeC'u Sze
Coca-Cc a
YOU MAY WIN INSTANTLY S100.000 in Gold.
Oidsmobi'e Cutass Sp'ee i"te'naiica Se- es
RCA- 40 "ich Coior TV Reenok - Saos Gea- tx McDo-a d s Fooo
No purchase necessary 12 years or older to play






S AVI ON A 2-LITER BOTTLE OF DIET COKE.
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE OR DIET SPRITE , see other side.
'4900CT00020
Coktu
Not good m conjunction with any other offer
Limit one coupon redeemable per food item
per customer per visit Cash value 120 of 1C
Void where prohibited by law A P
G S
WHEN THE U.S. WINS YOU WIN
Thts is not a complete listing of the rules Promotion subject to Official Rules posted at
participating McDonald's. Restaurants and participating Coca-Cola retailers
1 No purchase necessary to play or to receive prize 12 years or older to play
2 Game Pieces available in the L) S at participating McDonald's Restaurants and on
specialty marked 2-Nter bottles of Coca Cola products
3 Prizes available are listed in the Odds Chart posted at partiapating McDonald's Restau
rants and partiapating Coca-Cola retailers rood prizes redeemable on future visit
4 The scheduled end date for the When The IIS Wins You Win" game at McDonald s rs
October! 1988 Redemption is scheduled to end October 31.1988 See Official Rules for
complete conditions affecting end date and redemption ALL POTENTIAL WINNING
GAME MATERIALS ARE SUBJECT TO VERIFICATION
c 1988 McDondd's Cocporation Al Rights Reserved Printed m the United Stales of America
HOW TO WIN
MCDONALD'S FOOD (
RuC ofl :e gold soot on the Game Piece on the
cover :e v S . r,s a 'eda in the event
revea ed ou n VcDc-a c s 'cog�start
redeem ng the date after the ever,t medal is
awarded Save your Game peces
WHEN THE U.S.WINS

A GOLD MEDAL
YOU WIN A
BIG MAC
SANDWICH
A SILVER MEDAL
YOU WIN A REG.
SIZE ORDER OF
FRENCH FRIES
'i i. i
A BRONZE MEDAL
YOU WIN A
MED. SIZE
COCA-COLA
'JXFA-
INSTANT WINNERS
WIN A 1989 OLDSMOBILE
Cutlass Supreme International Series
The Cutlass Supreme International Series challenges the best
the world has to offer with front-wheel drrve. four wheel power
disc Drakes, a fully independent suspension system and a.multi-
port fuel injected V6 engine. The ride and handling are incredibly
responsive. And the aerodynamic styling is truly a step ahead
Cutlass Supreme International Series.
It's a new generation of Oldsmobtle
f.rt�
A deluxe 40 big screen
monitor television with
dynamic stereo sound
through four speakers,
cable ready and with
state of the art picture
processing circuitry
The full function TVVCR
unified remote control
delivers full access to
this TV's outstanding
capabilities
An exciting prize package
that includes the "New-
port Classic a com-
fortable all-leather
tennis shoe, a Reebok
special edition" tee-
shirt, baseball cap.
sports socks and a
sports gear bag that
carries it all. It's a win-
ning combination1
YOU CAN ALSO WIN MCDONALD'S FOOD & (fCa'a INSTANTLY
SAVE ALL YOUR MCDONALD'S & COCA-COLA
EVENT GAME PIECES AND WATCH FOR
YOUR EVENTS ON NBC-TV.
Broadcast schedule courtesy NBC Sports. &-
OPENING CEREMONY
DAY 3
Sun Sept 18
730 pm-12 mid
DAY a
Mod SepJ '9
730 pm-12 mid
SWIMMING
Men's & Womens
DIVING
Mens
Springboard
Final
GYMNASTICS
�Ifin s
Team
Competition
GYMNASTICS
Women's
Team
Competition
BASKETBALL
DAY 5
Tues Sept 20
730 pm-12 mid
DAY 6
Wed Sept 21
� 12 m :
DAY 7
Thus Sept 22
730 pm-12 mid
DAY 8
Fi Sept 23
1"ifi om-12 n I
SWIMMING
� Women:
Fina -
GYMNASTICS
Mens
Ail-Around
Final
GYMNASTICS
TRACK
Mens
100 meter
Final
EQUESTRIAN
Cross-
country
Competition
BASKETBALL
Men's
Preliminaries
BOXING
Preliminaries
TENNIS
Mens
Singles
BOXING
Prenminaries
DIVING
Men's
Springboard
Preliminaries
BOXING
Preliminaries
VOLLEYBALL
Men's
Preliminaries
VOLLEYBALL
Mens
Preliminaries
BASKETBALL
Mens
Preliminaries
BOXING
Preliminaries
BOXING
re m nanes
TRACK
Womens
Marathon
GYMNASTICS
lividua
VOLLEYBALL
Men's
Preliminaries
SWIMMING
Men s & Women's
Heats
ROWING
Finals
ROWING
Semi-
Fmals
VOLLEYBALL
Women's
Preliminaries
WATER
POLO
Preliminaries
CYCUNG
Track
Events
BOXING
Preliminaries
DIVING
Womens
Springboard
Preliminaries
BASKETBALL
Mens
Preliminaries
VOLLEYBALL
Men's
Preliminaries
DAY 9 Sat See 24 7:30 pm-12 midGYMNASTICS Women's Individual Finals (4)DIVING Womens Springboard FinalTRACK Women's 100 meter FinalROWING FinaisBOXING Preliminaries
DAY lO Sun Sept 25 7 30 pm-12 midTRACK Mens & Womens 800 meter FinalDIVING Men's Platform PreliminariesBASKETBALL Mens Quarter-FinalsCYCUNG Women's Road RaceBOXING Pre rn -1 �
DAY 11 Mon Sept 26 730 pm-12 midDIVING Mens Platform FinalCYCLING ' Mens Road RaceBOXING Quarter-FmalsBASKETBALL Womens Semi-FmaisVOLLEYBALL Womens Semi-Final
DAY 12 Tues. Sept 27 730 pm-12 midBASKETBALL Mens Semi-FmalTRACK Decathlon Day1BOXING Quarter-FinalsEQUESTRIAN Team Jumping FinalWRESTLING Compel: on
DAY 13 Wed Sept 28 730 pm-12 midWEIGHTUFTING Super-heavyweight FinalBOXING Semi-Fmals (12)BASKETBALL Women's FinalTRACK Decathlon Day 2CANOEING Semi-Finals
DAY 14 Thurs. Sept 29 7 30 pm-12 midBASKETBALL Mens FinalTRACK Women's 100 meter Hurdles FinalVOLLEYBALL Mens Semi-FmalSYNCHRO SWIMMING Solo FinalTENNIS Smg.es � �
DAY 15 Fn . Sept 30 730 pm-12 midTRACK Men's & Womens 1500 meter FinalsBOXING Fmals (6)SYNCHRO SWIMMING Duet FinalTENNIS Women's SinglesCANOEING Finals
DAY 16 Sat. Oct 1 730 pm-12 midBOXING Finals (6)VOLLEYBALL Men's FinalsEQUESTRIAN �rc Pr k Jumping Final
DAY 17 Sun Oct 2 7 00 pm 1100 pmC L () S I NG C ER E M0 N Y
ALL TIMES IN THIS VIEWERS GUIDE ARE US TIME EASTERN DAYLIGHT TIME
- -
���!& i
I TOf US NS
rtO
H)PUW �
-�-s firs � �
HOW TO PLAY ALONG WITH THE US. OLYMPIC TEAM
AND WIN MCDONALD'S FOOD AND COCA-COLA�
Rub off the gold spot on the Game Piece on the cover or on
game pieces available at participating McDonald's You'll
reveal a 1988 Summer Olympic Event If the U.S. wins a
medal in that event, you win McDonald's food (see
above) Start redeeming the date after the event
medal is awarded You may also win GREAT
PRIZES and McDonald's food instantly Only one
prize redeemable per game piece per person
per visit No purchase necessary
Save your Game Pieces
YOU CAN ALSO WIN WITH COCA-COLA
2-LITER BOTTLE CAPS
Look under the cap of specially marked
2-liter bottles of Coca-Cola products, to
reveal a 1988 Summer Olympic Event
If the U.S. wins any medal in that
event, you win a McDonald's food
prize (see above). You may also
win GREAT PRIZES and
McDonald's food instantly
No purchase necessary
See official rules to obtain
a free Game Piece





GM
. � '
The New Generation of Oldsmobile.
Cutlass Supreme International Series
The Cutlass Supreme International Series
is a new generation ( i jmobile. It chal
lenges Lhe best the world has to offer, with
built-in acvar.taes like fron: wheel drive,
: r wheel power
aDSMOBILL li : brakes, fully
independentsus
pension and a multi
port fuel-injected V6 engine. A sophisticated
ride and handling system, power rack-and
pinion steering and available anti-lock
braking system add incredible responsive
ness and control. State-of-the-art aero-
dvnamic design is combined with low-profile
performance radials on aluminum-styled
16-inch wheels, fascia-mounted foglamps
and wraparound glass to create style that's
truly a step ahead.
What's more, on the inside. Cutlass
Supreme International Series is just as
striking as it is on the outside. An electronic
digital instrument cluster translates every
driving function. Climate and sound sys
terns can be controlled with available
steering wheel touch controls. And contour
front bucket seats with power-operated
lumbar and side bolster supports tune the
seating for extraordinary driving comfort.
Cutlass Supreme International Series.
The new world class competitor. Visit y ir
nearby Olds dealer for a test drive : day.
You'll agree that this generation of
i ldsmobile will be hard to beat.
II The New Generation of
8 OLDSMOBILE
TV
WIN A NEW CUTLASS SUPREME INTERNATIONAL SERIES!
VALASSIS INSERTS





Title
The East Carolinian, September 1, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 01, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.621
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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