The East Carolinian, August 30, 1988






i
Coming Thursday:
Dr. Eakin and Dr. Bloodworth explain a Wilmington
tar News article which showed ECU as having the
owest percentage of faculty holding doctorate degrees.
eatures:
oughboy Pizza joins the pizza battle
SPORTS
Hie football top 20, and a profile of the swimteam
She
(ftarDlittian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 14
Tuesday, August 30,1988
Greenville, NC
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Expansion is a must for the future of ECU
By TAMMY AYCOCK
Stilt V ritCl
By une 30, 1991, ECU plans to
purchase l.H. Rose High School.
his is only one of the many plans
. CU has in store to deal with it
increase in enrollment over the
past few years, according to
Chancellor Eakin.
In addition to plans tor physical
development, university leaders
also intend to examine the aca-
demic aspects of ECU.
We need to determine whether
ornof the academic programsand
services that we offer presently
are appropriate for peoples needs
at this tune. We need to determine
whether there are academic pro-
cams that we could and should
ffer that would be responsive to
the needs that are present Eakin
said.
In pursuit of carrying out this
planning effort, the university has
employed Sue 1 lodges as director
of planning and institutional re-
search. Since joining ECU on une
1, Hodges has been developing a
planning design which will be
submitted nd discussed at the
September 30th meeting of the
ECU Board of Trustees.
Also to be discussed at the Sep-
tember 30th meeting is the possi-
bility of a new student recreation
center. "The SCA, m alliance with
a number oi other organizations,
asked that I develop plans Eakin
said.
Our present student recreation
facility, Memorial Gym, was built
in the 1950s, Eakin mentioned
that other orth Carolina univer-
sities such as C State and Appa-
lachian State have more modern
facilities.
If plans for a new recreation
center are approved, "they (the
SGA) said it would be appropri-
ate for the university to increase
student fees to meet the expense
of building and operating the
student recreation center Eakin
said.
"Memorial Gym is clearly in-
adequate to meet the needs oi the
over 13,000 students that are cur-
rently enrolled at ECU. It's inade-
quate not only in its sie but its
need for repair. Even if it was
repaired and brought back to
original conditions, it would be
too small to meet current student
needs Eakin said.
If the ECU Board of Trustees
accepts the plans to build a new
student recreation center, Eakin
estimates that construction will
not begin before the 1989-1990
academic school year.
Another of the universities'
plans to meet the demands of
increased enrollment is the pur-
chase of J.H. Rose High School,
located on Fourteenth and Elm
streets. The county school system
intends to build a new high
school.
"The Rose High School prop-
erty which is about twenty acres.
This includes the high school
building which is ideal in termsof
future development of the univer-
sity because it is location. Tins
building is perfect for our expan-
sion needs Eakin said.
In July, the county school svs-
tem and the ECU Board of Trus-
tees signed a memorandum of
intent. ECU will be able to com-
plete the purchase of J.H. Rose
1 ligh School after the North Caro-
lina General Assembly appropri-
ates the necessary funds.
"This is an exciting time in the
history oi ECU for many reasons.
Some of the most tangible reasons
are the various construction proj-
ects that we see about us. In-
cluded in those projects are the
new classroom building, the addi-
tion to Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter, and the Sports Medicine and
Physical Education Building.
Those projects, together with the
new student recreation center,
will signal to the people oi North
Carolina that ECU is undergoing
a transformation and that the fu-
ture is bright Eakin said
- 5i.
-
&
2- �.
.� -dfc
-�Zj.m?
Minority enrollment decreases
ECU plans to buy Rose Hgh School in 1991. This is just one of the proposed expansion sites.
(Photo by Tom Walters, ECU Photolab)
ECU professor to speak in Russia on hazardous waste
By JOE HARRIS
New I ditur
ardous waste producers, about 80 try of Health is going to be more
million pounds a year, so we are a influential stated Davis.
By SEAN HERRING
s�fjn! News Iditor
The Affirmative Action Plan for
ECU states that, "the university is
open to all races and actively
seeks to promote integration i .
recruiting and enrolling a larger
number oi minority students
But according to ECU'S Plan-
ning and Institutional Research
Agency, the number oi minority
students, enrolled at the Univer-
sity, decreased from the fall
semester of 1987 to the present
semester.
Even though ECU's total enroll-
ment is a record 15,579 students,
minority students only make-up
12.4 percent oi that record. This
amounts to a decline, when com-
paring the figure of 13 percent
minoritv enrollment last fall,
which consisted oi 14,878 stu-
dents.
The Planning and Institutional
Research records show that the
Asian or Pacific Islander students
have the most significant decline
for this semester, which is down
by about 1 percent. The black stu-
dents follow by a decrease of
about 0.8 percent. The American
Tropical Storm Chris started off this years' rainy season. Be
prepared to crack out the umbrellas and raincoats for the
next few months.
Indian student enrollment, which
makes 0.5 percent of the total
enrollment, remains the same.
Further research done by the
agency shows that, the enroll-
ment for black men has decreased
in the past four years.
In the fall semester of 1984,
there were 545 black males, and
964 black females. This fall, the en-
rollment of black males is 520, in
comparison to 1,044 black fe-
males. This is a composite of 1,564
black students. This is a decrease
from last fall semester's enroll-
ment of 1,603 black students.
On the other hand, Hispanic
students' enrollment increased by
1 percent and non-resident alien
(not citizens) students enroll-
ment, at the university, increased
by 2 percent.
According to Eugene A.
Owens, Acting Director of Ad-
missions, "the figures compiled,
by the research agency, do not
represent any racial biases of
ECU. Admission is based solely
on students' academic record,
courses taken in high school,
grades earned, class rank, and
standardized test scores
Dr. Trenton G. Davis, a profes-
sor of Environmental Health at
ECU and acting dean of the
School oi Technology, will speak
at the International Seminar on
Environmental Protection in
Moscow and Kiev.
Davis, former president of the
National Environmental Health
Association, is an expert on haz-
prime example Davis said.
Topics that will be covered at
the conference are air pollution,
atomic power, waste water and
solid waste disposal. "Because the
Soviet Union is becoming so
highly industrialized, their haz-
ardous waste problem is grow-
ing said Davis.
Davis went on to say that "the
Chernobvi incident is what reallv
ardous waste management. He is Q d mdr tQ th(? fac
one of three Americans which nccd BJme hc, -
wouldn't foot the bill for some 40
or so experts to come to Russia if
there weren't a problem. They are
about 25 years behind us in waste
treatment and disposal technolo-
gies. The U.S. is far more ad-
vanced in terms of control
"We have the Environmental
Protection Agency, (E.P.A.), the
Soviet equal is the Ministry of
Health. This ministry has had to
take a backseat to production, as
to where the E.P.A. is an actual
governing body. I think now with
me Chernobyl mishap, the Minis-
an
made up of members from Hun-
gary, Federal Republic of Ger-
many, Finland, Canada, Austria,
Australia, and the U.S.S.R.
Yuri Abramov, Secretary of
Local Industries and Public Serv-
ices Worker's Union Central
Committee, sent the invitation so
Davis could come and speak on
waste management in North
Carolina. "They (the Soviets)
want to see how each individual
state manages their waste. North
Carolina is one of the largest haz-
Da vis is one of the few people
in the world that will receive a
first hand look at Soviet industrial
areas, namely facilities that pro-
duce war materials. He said war
materials are one of the largest
contributors to the hazardous
waste problem.
"The Soviets are also becoming
interested in the protection of
workers who are exposed to lethal
material, as in the Chernobyl inci-
dent. The people who worked to
contain the accident were ex-
posed to such high levels of radia-
tion that it would be amazing to
me if they are still alive. They (the
Soviets) are not only behind in
technology but safety said
Davis.
Davis hopes to accomplish two
things on his trip. He wants to
become more aware of the waste
problems in other countries, and
how thev handle them and also to
J
help identify ways and solutions
See DAVIS, page 7
Friends program teams-up students and children
By GREER BOWEN
S�ff Writer
The program began in 1986
when a student told Dr. Linda
East Carolina Friends is a pro- MooncYtha! tn?ar� o"?
gram that pairs up ECU volun- a program. In the fall of 1987 the
teers with children from first actual pairs were chosen.
These childrens names are
given to East Carolina Friends by
Greenville Schools.
ECU Alumni Association will hold Leadership
Conference in September, first alumni to attend
ECU S'cwi Bureau
napolis, Md.
school counselors. The kids range
in age from five to 13. Some are
from broken homes, some need
attention and others were abused.
But no matter what has hap-
pened, the school counselors be-
lieve that these children would
benefit positively from an adult
role model.
To become involved, one must
attend an interest meeting. These
meetings will be held at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, August 31st, Thurs-
day, September 1st, and Tuesday
The East Carolina University
Alumni Association will hold its
annual Leadership Conference
Sept. 3, from 10 a.m. until 3:45
p.m ending in time for a tailgate
party at the Harrington Field
parking area prior to the season's
opening football game against
Tennessee Tech University at 7
p.m.
The Leadership Conference is a
training and information session
developed for alumni who hold
leadership positions with the uni-
versity. Those attending will
learn how to become better lead-
ers and about ECU's current pro-
grams and activities.
Staff members from ECU's "These special individuals de- September 6th ir. BrewsterB-205.
Division of Institutional Ad- serve to be recognized for the At this meeting, applications will
vancement�School of Medicine, time, effort and resources they be distributed. Applicants will
Cooperative Education and Ath- have given for the betterment of then glvcn interviews
letics will address alumni leaders the university said James L.
in both morning and afternoon Lanier, vice chancellor for Institu-
sessions. tional Advancement. "Because
A highlight of the conferences these individuals did not attend
will be the presentation of ECU's ECU, their exceptional devotion
first class of honorary alumni, is especially admirable "
Members of this Class of 1988 are
C. Donald Langston of Winter-
ville, Clauda Pennock "Sweet-
heart" Todd of Greenville, Wil-
liam R. Roberson Sr. and his wife,
Frances Morgan Roberson of
Bath, Donald B. Boldt of Kinston,
Otha S. Rountrce of Suffolk, Va
and A. A. "Des" DeSimoneof An-
The seven were selected by the
Alumni Association Board of Di-
rectors and will receive framed
certificates designating them as
honorary members of the ECU
Alumni Association.
Also presented during the
See ECU, page 2
The actual interview will be
held in an informal setting with
volunteers there as well as fac-
ulty. After a student has been
accepted, a l.aining session fol-
lows. The training session has a
series of guest speakers and "sea-
soned" volunteers. A doctor will
be there to discuss emergency
First aid and a lawyer will be there
to discuss the volunteers legal
duties.
Then the child and volunteer
See VOLUNTEERS, page 2





I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30, 1988
Health Center offers variety of services
What kinds of services arc pro-
vided at the Student Health Cen-
ter?
The Student Health Center is a
student oriented health care clinic
that provides care to East Caro-
lina University students. You will
receive confidential, individual-
ized health care. The Student
1 lealth center is located on main
campus next to Joyncr Library
and the Flanagan Building.
Health care is offered to full and
part time students on an outpa-
tient basis. The Student Health
Center is open from 8 a.m. to 8
p.m. Monday through Friday and
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays
and Sundays. Appointments may
be made bv calling 757-6317.
Services offered by the Student
Health Center include:
�Diagnosis and treatment of ill-
nesses or injuries nurse, you must supply the anti-
Physical examinations, such as gen and an injuction schedule
student teaching, nursing and al- from your allergist.
lied health physicals, and mar-
contraceptive agents.
assignments, or physical educa-
tion for medical reasons must be
approved by the Director or
ignec.
riage physicals.
�Women's health care Contra-
ceptive education and counsel-
ing, breast and pelvic examina-
tions, pap smears, lab procedures
and written prescriptions for
contraceptive methods are pro-
vided.
HEALTH COLUMN
By MARY ELESHA-
ADAMS
�Allergy clinics. Allergy vac-
cines arc given during the hours
of 8-12 noon and 1-4 p.m. Monday
through Friday bv a registered
�Mental health. Professional
staff are available for counseling mal charge to the student. There is
during theStudcnt Health Service a charge for x-rays,
hours. Psychiatrists arc available
on request or by referral. The cost
of this service is included in the
student health fee.
�Pharmacy services. Most
medications are dispensed at no
cost by a licensed pharmacist.
Maintenance drugs, such as insn
lin and antibiotics for the treat-
ment of acne arc not provided.
Only prescriptions written by
Student Health Service physi
cians and nurse practitioners can
be filled. A reduced charge is
made for medicaitons such as oral
It you have question
would like answered I'd lil
ice to determine you were seen as
a patient. No additional informa-
�Laboratory and radiology Mon can be given to your instruc-
scrviccs. Many laboratory tests tor without your written consent,
are done at either no cost or mini-
�Spccial requests. Requests for
medical withdrawals or changes
in class schedules are handled by hear them. Send v
�Health education. The promo- the Director of the Student Health Mary Elcsha Adam- at the Stu-
tion of skills contributing to Service or dcsignee. Medical dent Health Center or
health maintenance and wcllncss forms for students who need spe- 9794
isan important part of the Student cial assistance for parking, room
Health Center's services. Educa-
tional classes, programs, and
written materials are offered
throughout the year.
�Class excuses. Written class
excuses are not provided by the
Student Health Service. It is your
responsibility to communicate
with your instructor; he or she can
contact the Student Health Serv-
Fraternity fire may have been racially oriented
(CPS) � A building that was to
h ive housed the first black fratcr-
nity on the Universitv of
Mississippi's "fraternity row"
burned down August 4 th, an eerie
parallel to the way 1987-88's na-
tionwide epidemic of campus
racial tensions begin.
In August, 1987, police at Mis-
sissippi State University refused
to arrest three white students who
threw a black classmate into a
pool, where he drowned. The in-
cident was the first in a series of
beatings, sit-ins, fights and con-
frontations on campuses from
Massachusetts to California
through the 1987-88 school year.
At Ole Miss, all black Phi Beta
Sigma's move onto the previously
all-white fraternity row was in-
tended as a symbol of racial prog-
ress.
"This is a setback to our plans to
move a black fraternity to frater-
nity row spokesman Dr. Erwin
Meek said.
The fire, which investigators
strongly suspect was started by
stranger to racial tensions. April invaded a black studies
Riots broke out on the campus class at the University of Wiscon-
in 1962 when James Meredith
became the first black student to
register at the school. In 1983,
when the school banned the use of
the Confederate flag - a symbol
of slavery and death to black
people � white students
marched to a minority student
center, shouted obscenities and
burned a small cross.
Since then, calls to ban the
song "Dixie" and "Colonel
Rebel the school's mascot have
gone unheeded.
Few foresaw resistance to the
black students' move to fraternity
row. "There was no one who
showed any negative feelings
said one Phi Beta Sigma brother.
The university said Meek,
"made a concerted effort" to
move a black frat to fraternity row
because "traditionally fraternity
row has been the scat of fraternity
power, at least symbolically
Dixon said his fraternity was
enthusiastic about the idea be-
sin-Madison, threatened a black
student and set off a stink bomb in
the classroom.
Creeks have also played pivotal
roles in racial conflicts at Farleigh
Dickinson University and the
Universities of Massachusetts,
Pennsylvania and Colorado in
recent years.
And while greeks at the univer-
sities Georgia, Illinois, Indiana,
Maryland and Texas, among
others, sponsored integrated so-
cial events and National Inter-
fraternity Council Executive Di-
rector Jonathan Brant runs racial
sensitivity seminars at leadership
schools, fraternities remain flash-
points.
Two white students, for ex-
ample, were expelled from the
Universitv of Alabama for burn-
ing a cross on a black sororities
lawn shortly before the sororitv
moved to the campus's white so-
roritv row in 1986.
"But after that, they moved
without a hitch, and there has
been no problem since Alabama
spokeswoman Dale Allison said.
"People added Reardon,
"thought it was timely. Given the
nature of fraternities, we expect
hijinks and one or two rough
spots, but nothing like this
"Racism still exists on this
campus Burton noted, though
she believed most students sup-
ported the Phi Beta Sigma move.
Yet if most residents supported
the move before the fire, it has
become a crusade to many now.
An alumnis, who wished to
remain anonymous granted a
$100,001 loan to rebuild the
house. Mabus vowed the state
"will work to make sure the
people who owned the house,
are back in business soon as
possible
The East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina canpus community sint e I �.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spen er Meyma
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0-49 Column inches
50 99
100-149
150-199
.
; 15
4
200 249
250 and above 3 75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
Charge in Addition to R . ice Ratcj
One color and black
Two colors and b!j.k
Inserts
5.000 or less
5.001 - 10,000
10,001-12.000
-
BUSINESS HOIKS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phones757-6366757-6557
757-655S 757-6309
an arsonist, "suprised me and my cause it would put black greeks
into "the mainstream of the cam-
pus
With black students in the!
mainstream, the university hoped!
to show it had come a long way"
since 1962. "They're trying tol
change the image of the South
fraternity brothers, member
Lloyd Dixon said. "It makes me
feel bad that someone would do
this
The 50-year-old building,
which Phi Beta Sigma was reno-
vating before the fire, was vacant,
and no one was hurt during the said Cheryl Burton, a Black Stu-
tVwfki
blaze.
Worried about the fire's sym-
bolism, however, other students,
alumni and Ole Miss officials
stampeded to help the fraternity.
On August 9th, Chancellor Ger-
ald Turner offered to renovate
another frat row house for the
chapter.
"This is a good opportunity to
take advantage of an ugly situ-
ation said Associate Dean
Sparky Reardon, the Interfrater-
nity Council (IFC) advisor.
"I've gotten dozens of calls
from people asking 'who do I
write a check to? added IFC
President Stuart Brunson. "This
event actually seems to have
brought people closer together
Ole Miss, of course, is no
dent Union officer and a Thi Beta
Sigma "sweetheart
"The public relations would!
have helped the university a lot
"In fact, the fraternity's was sol
important to the Mississippians!
that even Go v. Ray Mabus has!
gotten into the act. "We are not!
going to let stuff like this slow us
down Mabus said od the fire.
"We thought that kind oi stuff!
was dead and gone Meek said.
"Everything was proceeding
without a hitch and this hap-
pens
Many of the racial tensionsI
that plagued campuses in recent
years have centered around fra-
ternities and sororities A Univer-
sity of Illinois contingent of Aca-
cia members, for example, in
TOGft
�M��
1111
e,
ECU Alumni Association to
hold Leadership Conference
Continued from page 1
luncheon will be the Chapter of
the Year and Volunteer of the Year
Awards. The chapter award is
based on representation at the
board meetings, special events
and other activities. The volun-
teer award is presented each year
to the individual providing the
most service, time and support for
the Alumni Association.
Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor, will present a wel-
come at the luncheon, which will
begin at 12:45 p.m. at Greenville
Country Club. Eugene B. Home
Jr president of The Pantry Inc.
and a 1964 graduate of ECU, will
deliver a keynote address.
The conference is open to all
alumni and friends of the univer-
sity.
To reserve game tickets, call the
Athletic Ticket Office at 1-800-
435-7328 or (919) 757-6500.
Volunteers pair off
children for a year
Continued from page 1
are paired. "V want the child
and the volunteer to spend a
minimum of two hours a week
together said Dr. Mooney. The
child and volunteer are paired for
one school year.
"The worse thing anyone could
do is pair a child with someone
who leaves said Dr. Mooney. He
also said that they need more
volunteers this year than the 40
from last year. "Social Services
called and I think that they may
want to be involved with us as
well Mooney added.
Many of the volunteers saw the
children they were paired with
dunng the summer. Sometimes
the friendships last longer than
the specific time period. In many
cases, friendships are made that
last forever.
The two hours a week can be
spent in any fashion. Dr. Mooney
says that the kids want more time
than the volunteers have to offer.
The program needs more vol-
unteers to accomodate the grow-
ing number of children. Anyonel
interested in participating in the
program is invited to attend an
ECU Friends interest meeting.
For more information call:
Chris Harris at 830-5292; Karen I
Winkler at 830-3816; or Dr. Linda
Mooney at 757-6137 or 758-7401.
1.000 TITLES TO CHOOSE FROM
Movie
Rentals Per
MULTIPLE COPIES OF NEW RELEASES
New i 99
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Copyright 1988
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Quantity Rights Raaarvad
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1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30,1968
Health Center offers variety of services
What kinds of services are pro-
vided at the Student Health Cen-
ter?
The Student Health Center is a
student oriented health care clinic
that provides care to East Caro
contraceptive agents.
ncsses or injuries nurse, you must supply the anti-
Physical examinations, such as gen and an injuction schedule
student teaching, nursing and al- from your allergist.
lied health physicals, and mar-
riage physicals. Mcntal health. Professional
?Women's health care. Contra- staff arc available for counseling mal charge to the student. There is
Una University students. You will ceptive education and counsel- during the Student Health Service a charge for x-rays,
receive confidential, individual- ing, breast and pelvic examina- hours. Psychiatrists arc available
ized health care. The Student tions, pap smears, lab procedures on request or by referral. The cost
a patient. No additional informa-
Laboratory and radiology tfon can be given to your instruc-
services. Many laboratory tests tor without your written consent,
are done at either no cost or mini-
Spccial requests. Requests for
medical withdrawals or changes
ice to determine you were seen as assignments, or physical educa-
tion for medical reasons must be
approved by the Director or dcs-
ignee.
vidod.
Health center is located on main and written prescriptions for
campus next to Joyner Library contraceptive methods are pro
and the Flanagan Building.
Health care is offered to full and
part time students on an outpa-
tient basis. The Student Health
Center is open from 8 a.m. to 8
p.m. Monday through Friday and
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays
and Sundays. Appointments may
be made by calling 757-6317. Allergy clinics. Allergy vac-
HEALTH COLUMN
By MARY ELESHA-
ADAMS
of this service is included in the
student health fee.
�Pharmacy services. Most
medications are dispensed at no
cost by a licensed pharmacist.
Maintenance drugs, such as insu
lin and antibiotics for the treat-
ment of acne arc not provided.
"Health education. The promo-
tion of skills contributing to
health maintenance and wellness
is an important part of the Student
Health Center's services. Educa-
tional classes, programs, and
written materials are offered
throughout the year.
Class excuses. Written class
If you have questions you
would like answered I'd like to
in class schedules are handUxfby hear them. Send yourqucstions to
the Director of the Student Health Mary Elesha Adams at the Stu-
Service or designee. Medical dent Health Center or call 757-
forms for students who need spe- 9794
cial assistance for parking, room
Only prescriptions written by excuses are not provided by the
Student Health Service physi Student Health Service. It is your
stranger to racial tensions. April invaded a black studies
Riots broke out on the campus class at the University of Wiscon-
in 1962 when James Meredith sin-Madison, threatened a black
became the first black student to student and set off a stink bomb in
register at the school. In 1983, the classroom.
moved to the campus's white so-
rority row in 1986.
"But after that, they moved
without a hitch, and there has
been no problem since Alabama
when the school banned the use of Greeks have also played pivotal spokeswoman Dale Allison said
Services offered by the Student cincs are given during the hours cians and nurse practitioners can responsibility to communicate
Health Center include: of 8-12 noon and 1-4 p.m. Monday be filled. A reduced charge is with your instructor; he or she can
'Diagnosis and treatment of ill- through Friday by a registered made for medicaitons such as oral contact the Student Health Serv-
Fraternity fire may have been racially oriented
(CPS) � A building that was to
have housed the first black frater-
nity on the University of
Mississippi's "fraternity row"
"burned down August 4th, an eerie
parallel to the way 1987-88's na-
tionwide epidemic of campus
racial tensions begin.
In August, 1987, police at Mis- people �
sissippi State University refused marched to a
to arrest three white students who
threw a black classmate into a
pool, where he drowned. The in-
cident was the first in a series of
beatings, sit-ins, fights and con-
frontations on campuses from
Massachusetts to California
through the 1987-88 school year.
At Ole Miss, all black Phi Beta
the Confederate flag � a symbol roles in racial conflicts at Farleigh
of slavery and death to black
white students
minority student
center, shouted obscenities and
burned a small cross.
Since then, calls to ban the
song "Dixie" and "Colonel
Rebel the school's mascot have
gone unheeded.
Few foresaw resistance to the
black students' move to fraternity
row. "There was no one who
Sigma'smoveontothepreviously showed any negative feelings
all-white fraternity row was in- said one Phi Beta Sigma brother,
tended as a symbol of racial prog- The university said Meek,
ress. "made a concerted effort" to
"This is a setback to our plans to move a black frat to fraternity row University of Alabama for burn
move a black fraternity to fratcr- because "traditionally fraternity ing a cross on a black sororities
nity row spokesman Dr. Erwin row has been the seat of fraternity lawn shortly before the sorority possible
Dickinson University and the
Universities of Massachusetts,
Pennsylvania and Colorado in
recent years.
And while greeks at the univer-
sities Georgia, Illinois, Indiana,
Maryland and Texas, among
others, sponsored integrated so-
cial events and National Inter-
fraternity Council Executive Di-
rector Jonathan Brant runs racial
sensitivity seminars at leadership
schools, fraternities remain flash-
points.
Two white students, for ex-
ample, were expelled from the
People added Reardon,
"thought it was timely. Given the
nature of fraternities, we expect
hijinks and one or two rough
spots, but nothing like this
"Racism still exists on this
campus Burton noted, though
she believed most students sup-
ported the Phi Beta Sigma move.
Yet if most residents supported
the move before the fire, it has
become a crusade to many now.
An alumnis, who wished to
remain anonymous granted a
$100,000 loan to rebuild the
house. Mabus vowed the state
"will work to make sure the
people who owned the house,
are back in business s�on as
The East Carolinian
Serving the Blast Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
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Meek said. power, at least symbolically
The fire, which investigators Dixon said his fraternity wasi
strongly suspect was started by enthusiastic about the idea be-J
an arsonist, "suprised me and my cause it would put black greeksj
fraternity brothers, " member into "the mainstream of the cam-
Lloyd Dixon said. "It makes me pus
feel bad that someone would do With black students in the
this mainstream, the university hoi
The 50-year-old building, to show it had come a long waj
which Phi Beta Sigma was reno- since 1962. "They're trying tc
vatingbefore the fire, was vacant, change the image of the South,
and no one was hurt during the said Cheryl Burton, a Black Sti
blaze. dent Union officer and a Phi Bete
Worried about the fire's sym- Sigma "sweetheart
bolism, however, other students, "The public relations wouldj
alumni and Ole Miss officials have helped the university a lot
"In fact, the fraternity's was sol
important to the Mississippiansl
that even Gov. Ray Mabus hasl
gotten into the act. "We are notl
going to let stuff like this slow usj
down Mabus said od the fire.
"We thought that kind of stuff
was dead and gone Meek said.l
"Everything was proceeding
without a hitch and this hap-
pens
Many of the racial tensions
that plagued campuses in recent
years have centered around fra-
ternities and �ororities A Univer-I
sity of Illinois contingent of Aca-
cia members, for example, in I
JPECIAI
viu
G 1

piW
stampeded to help the fraternity.
On August 9th, Chancellor Ger-
ald Turner offered to renovate
another frat row house for the
chapter.
"This is a good opportunity to
take advantage of an ugly situ-
ation said Associate Dean
Sparky Reardon, the Interfratcr-
nity Council (IFC) advisor.
"I've gotten dozens of calls
from people asking 'who do I
write a check to? added IFC
President Stuart Brunson. "This
event actually seems to have
brought people closer together
Ole Miss, of course, is no
it
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'Z�&n
ECU Alumni Association to
hold Leadership Conference
Continued from page 1
luncheon will be the Chapter of
the Year and Volunteer of the Year
Awards. The chapter award is
based on representation at the
board meetings, special events
and other activities. The volun-
teer award is presented each year
to the individual providing the
most service, time and support for
the Alumni Association.
Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor, will present a wel-
KROGER HOTDOG OR
Hamburger
Buns
390
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Country Club
Ice Cream. . .
$118
IN THE DELI
GARLIC OR ONION PITA CHIPS.
OR PLAIN, SEA SALT OR GARLIC
Bagel
Chips Ea
come at the luncheon, which will (
begin at 12:45 p.m. at Greenville
Country Club. Eugene B. Home
Jr president of The Pantry Inc.
and a 1964 graduate of ECU, will
deliver a keynote address.
The conference is open to all
alumni and friends of the univer-
sity.
To reserve game tickets, call the
Athletic Ticket Office at 1-800-
435-7328 or (919) 757-6500.
Volunteers pair off
children for a year
Wn
'o
�$
e
i
�Ei
Continued from page 1
are paired. "V. c want the child
and the volunteer to spend a
minimum of two hours a week
together said Dr. Mooney. The
child and volunteer are paired for
one school year.
"The worse thing anyone could
do is pair a child with someone
who leaves' said Dr. Mooney. He
also said that they need more
volunteers this year than the 40
from last year. "Social Services
called and I think that they may
want to be involved with us as
well Mooney added.
Many of the volunteers saw the
children they were paired with
during the summer. Sometimes
the friendships last longer than
the specific time period. In many
cases, friendships are made thatj
last forever.
The two hours a week can be I
spent in any fashion. Dr. Mooney I
says that the kids want more time
than the volunteers have to offer.
The program needs more vol-
unteers to accomodate the grow-
ing number of children. Anyone I
interested in participating in the
program is invited to attend an
ECU Friends interest meeting.
For more information call:
Chris Harris at 830-5292; Karen I
Winkler at 830-3816; or Dr. Linda
Mooney at 757-6137 or 758-7401.
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Med
ECL VtMi Bu
A new research lal
building at the ECU
Medicine designed to
applications of bioiechi
health care was opened
during a joint ceremony 1
North Carolina Bioteq
Center of the Research
Park.
An open house U r the
lion facility located
Brodv Medical Scien
J
began at 3 p.m. follo
bon-cuttingceremoi I
Speakers for Ihe
eluded Dr. Charles
president of the N.C.
ogy Center; Dr. Stuarl
chairman of the cent 1
Directors and dean t I j
sity of North Carolina
Medicine, Dr Richard
ECU chancellor; and J
E. Laupus, vice char.
Health Sciences Div
dean of the School I
who was recognized I -1
de'eloping the med
biotechnology pi
tablishing the new -
itv.
Trop
(AP) � The remnanti
cal Storm Chr - j
much needed rain
North Carolina Pi
but not before it sp
twisters that
damage in excess ol i
state officials said.
No deaths related to
have been reported
Carolina, official- �
The storm was down
a tropical depression a
after it moved over Ian
gan to waken Sunday
but forecasters at the
Weather Service in Raj
some sections of the TarJ
would receive about 3-
rain from the storm.
"Ithinkitwillcerta.il
iome respects, Lai
meterologist with i
service said today. "B�
too late to help crop
areas with groundwratj
ervoir problems, I thinU
will help. "
At 3 a.m the center o
was just south oi Greer
moving north, the wvj
ice said.
The total rainfalltrv
at Charlotte-D01
tional Airport was 1.7 1
:Storm caused
lines and trees, and sc
flooding, officials said
One tornado threw)
trailer rig into a I
Iredell County mdu
officials said.
Al Warhck, a spokes
state Department oi
trol and Public Safet
damage was estimateJ
$1 million in Iredell CJ
The most extensn
was done to the lrede!
Corp where Bol
watched the tornado
tainer company aboi
Sunday.
"It come up the
made a right turn.
mentioning toward
gated container mal
company, "it scared
Larrv Lipard, who
Injured hn
evades alh
HIGH POINT (A
Point woman who
ped from a mote! an J
she drove her abdul
Guilford Countv hi
listed in satiacto:
todav at High Pol
Hospital, officials ij
Her abductor later!
self in and was )ailec
High Point polu
Parker, 36. was take
will from a Red Car
29-70 about 10 a.m.
She then drove 1
McManus,33,who
knew, north along I
before exiting. The!
shot the woman on
thigh, police said.
Ms. Parker rant re
fled to a service staj
employee called rj
lance, police said.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30,1988 3
meats, or physical educa-
i medical reasons must be
ked bv the Director or des-
u have questions you
H like answered 1 d like to
Item. Send your questions to
�lesha Adams at the Stu-
I: Center or call 737-
olinian
jntatives
. ! mdl
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I0URS EVERYDAY
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DAY J
nville I
Med School gets new facility
During a reception following School of Medicine facility will sequence peptides, the subunits
the ceremony, Hamner ac- house an interdepartmental of proteins.
quainted the public with his group of molecular biology and "These new technologies are
agency's objectives to establish genetics faculty pursuing a van- widely used in biotechnology
the state as a biotechnology ety of projects ranging from space today for engineering improved
leader. North Carolina has the biology to development of alter- and safer vaccines, for large-scale
native uses of toxic chemical in- production of hormones, and for
dustry waste products, according developing molecules useful in
to Dr. Paul V. Phibbs, head of the
medical school's biotechnology
program.
Another role of the facility will
be to serve as a biotechnology re-
country's first statewide program
promoting biotechnology re-
search through distribution of
grants and identification of entre-
preneurs to support biotechnol-
ogy companies.
The Biotechnology Center has
diagnosing disease explained
Phibbs.
During Hamner's two-day visit
to ECU, he and his senior staff
members talked with university
continuation of a series of meet-
ings held across the state to fur-
ther increase awareness of the
center and its mission.
ECU Newt Bureau
A new research laboratory
building at the ECU School of
Medicine designed to explore
applications of biotechnology to
health care was opened Aug. 25
during a joint ceremony with the
North Carolina Biotechnology
Center of the Research Triangle
Tark.
An open house for the $2.1 mil-
lion facility located north of the
Brody Medical Sciences Building supported ECU's efforts in estab- search training site for doctoral officials, faculty,and area govcrn-
began at 3 p.m. followed by a rib- lishing the research site through a candidates and postdoctoral fel- rnent and business leaders as a
bon-cutting ceremony at 4:30 p.m. $158,390 grant for specialized lows in the School of Medicine,
Speakers for the ceremony in- equipment. added Phibbs.
eluded Dr. Charles Hamner, "The providing of equipment The new biotechnology build-
president of the N.C Biotechnol- for the new biotechnology facility ing includes 10,000 square feet of
ogy Center; Dr. Stuart Bondurant, at ECU is a shining example of the laboratory space, approximately
lairman of the center's Board of role the Center can play to help 4,000 square feet for offices and Hamner, who has been the
strengthen North Carolina's re- conference rooms, and is de- Center's president since Febru-
search capabilities in its academic signed to accomodate two addi- ary, also praised ECU's multidis-
institutions statewide said tional floors. ciplinary biotechnology training
Hamner. program, which encompasses
Biotechnology, which dates to According to Phibbs, the new highly successful baccalaureate
the ancient discovery of fermenta- building is equipped to carry our and master's degee components
dean of the School of Medicine, tion, includes the application of automated DNA synthesis and in the Department of Biology,
who was recognized for his role in scientific principles in the ma- sequencing, two key processes in Phibbs said the new research fa-
devcloping the medical school's nipulation of natural processes to modern biotechnology research cilities will be available for
biotechnology program and es- create practical and beneficial and development. In the near fu- bachelor's and master's students
tabhshing the new research facil- products and services. ture, Phibbs expects to add equip- to participate in projects as part of
ltv In �ts research role, the new ment which will synthesize and their biotechnology training.
Tropical storm brings rain
Local and Out of
Town Newspapers
?Full Selection of 1989 Calendars
?Greeting Cards For All Occasions
Balloons For All Occasions
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 Days A Week
Directors and dean of the Univer
sity of North Carolina School of
Medicine; Dr. Richard R. Eakin,
ECU chancellor; and Dr. William
E. Laupus, vice chancellor of ECU
Health Sciences Division and
GORDON'S GOLF
FOR THE FINEST IN
GOLF APPAREL AND
EQUIPMENT
(clubs, balls, gloves, bags, etc.)
(AP) � The remnants of Tropi- of maintenance for the company,
cal Storm Chris brought some also saw the tornado coming.
much needed rain to the parched
North Carolina Piedmont today.
but not before it spawned several
twisters that caused property
damage in excess of $1 million,
state officials said.
No deaths related to the storm
have been reported in North
Carolina, officials said.
The storm was downgraded to
a tropical depression a few hours
after it moved over land and be-
gan to waken Sunday afternoon,
but forecasters at the National
Weather Service in Raleigh said
some sections of the Tar Heel state
would receive about 3-5 inches oi
rain from the storm.
"I think it will certainly help in
some respects, Larry Lee, a
metcrologist with the weather
service said today. "But it's much
too late to help crops. In terms of
areas with groundwater and res-
ervoir problems, I think this storm
will help. "
At 3 a.m the center of the storm
was just south of Greensboro and
moving north, the weather serv-
ice said.
The total rainfall from the storm
at Charlotte-Douglas Interna-
tional Airport was 1.7 inches. The
storm caused downed power
lines and trees, and some minor
flooding, officials said.
One tornado threw a tractor-
trailer rig into a building at an
Iredell County industrial park,
officials said.
duce stand. Operators of small craft were
"I seen it hit the ground about advised to stay in port from Cape
"1 heard a wind blowing, and I 3:30 p.m. The wind got to whip- Hatteras to Virginia Beach, Va.
thought it was a plane, " Lipard ping up pretty good, clouds mov- The area most vulnerable to
said. ing in a tornado like motion, then flooding and ocean overwash is
Then I heard an explosion. I it quit raining. All of a sudden, it
told my wife that a plane had cameoutofnowhcrcVannsaid.
crashed over there somewhere, " "It sounded just like somebody
lie said, pointing in the direction throwing a match on gasoline
of the plant. Whoosh
Sections of the tin roof were as In Catawba County, a dis-
much as 1,000 yards from the patcher at the sheriff's depart-
building. Others pieces flew ment said that there were reports
across Interstate 40, according to of power outages, shingles torn
eyewitness accounts. off the roof of a building near
Ben Wilkerson, the owner, said Newton and a trampoline blown
N.C. 12 on Ocracoke Island from
the ferry terminal to the pony
stable, the weather service said.
The rain and winds could also
cause flooding from canals and
creeks on mainland Hde and
Dare counties .
& SKI SHOP
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EQUIPMENT
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264 Bypass
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that the company's 35 employees
will continue cleanup today. Li-
pard estimated that work will be
back to normal by Friday.
Several mobile homes also were
damaged, said Marty Bvers,a dis-
patcher at the Iredeil County
emergencv comuu notations cen-
tor.
across a road.
A tornado that was reported
near Maiden uprooted trees, the
National Weather Service said. A
third funnel cloud was spotted
near Clairmont.
Three funnel clouds were spot-
ted in A&xander County nefi
Love Valley, but no damage was
A number of Iredell County reported, said dispatcher Alan
residents were left without gas or
electricity as a result of the storm
damage, authorities said.
Twisters were also reported in
Alexander, Catawba and Cum-
berland counties, but there were
no reports ofinjuries authorities
said.
A tornado in Cumberland
County damaged four houses in a
subdivision and destroyed a pro-
duce stand oii U.S. 401 north of
Fayetteville, authorities said.
Steve Vann, 21, of Goldsboro,
said he was helping his uncle
move into a home when a tornado
Al Warlick,a spokesman for the ripped apart Percy Currin's pro
state Department of Crime Con-
trol and Public Safety, said that
damage was estimated as high as
$1 million in Iredell County.
The most extensive damage
was done to the Iredell Container
Corp where Bobby West
watched the tornado hit the con-
tainer company about 3:30 p.m.
Sunday.
"It come up the hollow and
made a right turn, " West said,
montioning toward the corru-
gated container manufacturing
company, "it scared me to death
Larry Lipard, who is in charge
Van Story of the Alexander
County Sheriff's Department.
Another funnel cloud was spot-
ted near Hiddenite, but there
were not reports of damage from
that twister.
Tropical storm warnings were
issued from Savannah, Ga to
Cape Hatteras, N.C, but were
lifted Sunday after the storm
moved ashore near Charleston,
S.C, and began to lose strength.
The National Hurricane Center
said that tides one to three feet
above already abnormally high
tides could cause coastal flooding
or beach erosion.
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Injured woman
evades abductor
HIGH POINT (AP) - A High
Point woman who was kidnap-
ped from a motel and then shot as
she drove her abductor along a
Guilford County highway was
listed in satisfactory condition
today at High Point Regional
Hospital, officials said.
Her abductor later turned him-
self in and was jailed, police said.
High Point police said Betty
Parker, 36, was taken against her
will from a Red Carpet Inn on U.S.
29-70 about 10 a.m. Saturday.
She then drove James Wilson
McManus, 38, who police said she
knew, north along the highway
before exiting. There, McManus
shot the woman once in her right
thigh, police said.
Ms. Parker ran from the car and
fled to a service station, where an
employee called for an ambu-
lance, police said.
The winning car number
at the
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Saturday, August 27th was
If you have this number on a specially marked
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If you have just the winning car number, you've
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Make sure you, your family and friends keep
collecting those specially marked caps and
cans from Pepsi-Cola9' products!
Pepsi is a registered trademark of PepsiCo. Inc
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I 1908 Geogrtphtc Marketing Group





i

I
ottiz iEaat Carolinian
unik �i�fc 1925
Pete Fernald, c i
Chip Carter, M�r.t &
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of AJvrrhsng
Joe Harris, NnwEiifw
Doug Johnson, g, s �.�
Tim Hampton, F�h,r� ��
Michelle England, c m�
Debbie Stevens, s��
Paul Dunn, g, spo. &���
Jeff pT.f
TOM FURR,Circi�JrfimM�Mj�r
SUSAN HOWELL, Production MMqpr
John W. Medlin, �,�
Mac Clark, Btwna�M�najer
August 30.1988
OPINION
Page 4
Incompetence
How can it be judged?
I started out my college career at a
small Baptist university. In order to
get rid of some of the undesirable
teachers, those that taught students
ideas instead of the approved Bap-
tist doctrines, the administration
suddenly began harping on some-
thing called accreditation.
These are NCAA guidelines that
state in any department, only a small
percentage of the teachers in that
department could hold degrees
solely in education. The majority of
the teachers were required to hold a
doctorate in their fields, or return to
school to finish the requirements
necessary for their degree.
A recent survey by the Statistical
Abstract of Higher Education in
North Carolina reports that in 1987
ECU had only 71 of its faculty
holding doctorates or professional
degrees. This scares me.
Why? I don't think that HCU's ad-
ministration will start weeding out
professors. No, this time it scares me
because they won't.
Private schools have the advan-
tage over state-funded schools.
They can pay better salaries, usually
have more prestige and that usually
attracts the best teachers.
There are teachers who care
enough about education that grav-
itate towards the state school sys-
tem. There are many of them. But for
every one interested teacher, there
are five that prove the old adage,
"Those who can't do teach
JUlie-eild oLaiy t'iist. semester
1LJH?, ! was pleayamK'Trrprised to
ee that th-teachers-n-aclrclass
were required to give out bubble
sheets to students, leave the room
and let the students rate the
professor's performance during the
semester. In every one of my classes
that semester I took my time trying
to give an honest appraisal ot each
teacher's methods.
I never saw my most effective
teacher again, and over the next year
and a half, I got two of the worst ones
again. Now, I just mark those bubble
sheets straight down the middle,
unless the teacher is one I really re-
spect.
Are the grading sheets wrongly
curved by cynical students like
myself? Or are they even looked at
by the administrationor the teachers
themselves? I know I should take
more time with them, but it just
seems to make things worse
An alternative would be different
evaluation forms. Ones that allowed
students to write out comments,
specific problems or suggestions.
These would take more time to
complete and certainly more time to
collate data from, but the end result
is more than worth it.
This would make students feel
they were being heard, instead of
being impersonal bubbled-in statis-
tics. And if the majority of a class
reported similar problems, the de-
partments would feel more inclined
to take a hand in the matter.
This is not a perfect solution. Cer-
tainly, angry students might try to
get back at teachers with these
evaluation forms. The extra hours
and paperwork to go over the forms
would cost a lot.
To single out the best teachers and
replace the incompetent ones
that's a goal every university should
be striving for. Admittedly, this task
is harder at schools the size of ECU,
especially now with enrollment at
an all-time high, and good teachers
in such small supply.
But to improve the ECU image �
and more importantly its educa-
tional quality � it's a job we should
be glad to do.
Editorial rings hollow
To the editor:
I am writing in response to your
August 25th editorial in which you
criticize conservative groups for ex-
erting pressure to keep the movie
"The Last Temptation of Christ"
from being shown in local theaters.
You clearly are a strong believer in
freedom of choice and abhor the
narrow-mindedness of opponents of
the movie.
May I suggest, however, that your
abstract use of emotionally charged
and stereotyped labels such as "para-
noid minority "religious fanatics
and "zealots" weakened what could
have been a thoughtful and valid
editorial postion. 1 especially find it
regretful that you must condescend
to search for "Something to help
them see how life really is, something
to save them from their petty, igno-
rant lives. " Your smug intellectual
superiority rings hollow as you mir-
ror the same intolerance that you
seek to caricature in opponents of the
movie. . c
Steve Smith
1983 Alumnus
Greenville, NC
Cartoon offends
To the editor:
Regarding your opening-of-school
issue: your "welcome back" cartoon
on page one, which "welcomes" back
the women of campus � at
swordpoint � to being bound,
gagged and possibly raped, is offen-
sive to anyone with sensitivity. Your
readers have not missed Ihe irony
that the page-one feature on Pirate
ggjgjjj Jrctir Twttm TtacHgR5
Walk � an escort service to prevent
rape � is undercut by the cartoon's
invitation to violence against
women. Sincerely,
Marie T. Fair
EnglishWomen's Studies
Bonehead offends
To the editor:
I wanted to express to The East
Carolinian my disappointment with
its first two editions.
I was discouraged to see the car-
toon on the cover of the first paper (23
August). A big muscle-bound pirate
was shown holding a sword to a
woman gagged and bound to a post.
With the high incidence of violence
against women last year on campus
(at least three rapes occurred), I am
shocked that The East Carolinian in its
first edition chose to reinforce this
behavior. Wouldn't it have been
more appropiate to have shown one
of ECU's rivals tied up? Or is the
(predominately male-run) paper
implying women are the enemies
here?
I was also upset with the
Bonehead's first article. It is quite sad
that my student fees pay for his op-
portunity to "mercilessly attack" and
humiliate others to make himself
"look better It's sad that the groups
he insensitively targets include the
elderly, handicapped, and women.
ECU is unique in that its paper is
entirely student run and edited.
fully support First Amendment free-
dom in this venue. With such a great
opportunity available to so many
talented students, I am surprised that
the first two issues were not more
effectively planned. I urge The East
Carolinian to reconsider its stance and
to better use this potentially invalu-
able resource.
Sincerely,
Mary Elizabeth Davis
Junior
Political Science
I also wonder if the goal of rees-
tablishing ECU's reputation and liv-
ing down our party image (stated in
the Editorial on page 4) is furthered
by "Welcome Back?"
Following are some suggestions in
response to "Welcome Back I
encourage The East Carolinian staff to
1. Formulate and adopt an East
Carolinian policy that (a) is in keeping
with ECU's mission, (b) communi-
cates respect and values the diverse
members of the ECU community
(including women racialethnic
minority groups, lesbians and gays,
older students, "fat girls etc.) and
(c) promotes an accurate and positive
image of ECU.
2. Self-critique articles and features
to sec if above goals are met.
3. Write articles on current efforts
to promote civility and mutual re-
spect such as on the newly formed
Human Relations Committee
chaired by Marie Farr and Ron
Maxwell, the reorganization of the
former "Buccaneer Babes" to "The
Pirate's Crew the Chancellor's
opening talk with freshmen, the
Chancellor's committee to study
ECU's sexual harrasment policy, the
Sexual Assault Awareness
Committee's video on date rape pre-
vention, etc.
4. Write a follow-up article to
"Welcome Back" and discuss reac-
tions from members of the campus
community. Discuss how the piece
offended many men and women
who abhor violence against women.
If staff members question how the
cartoon was offensive, have them
interview a therapist who treats vic-
tims of sexual violence.
Thank you for considering my
suggestions.
Sincerely,
Susan McCammon, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychology
Chair, Committee on the Status of
Women
1988.
The original Pirates were females
and were trying to escape the bond-
age of a culture that undcrminded
the rights of women. They tried to
"overcome" through education. I
could go on and on about the sexism
and racial bias that has been repre-
sented in the newspaper over the
past three years, but I am sure I
would be wasting my time.
I know everyone has the right to
"free speech but it really angers me
when I have to pay for something
which is against my rights to exist. I
also find it ironic that you would talk
about the need for a Pirate Walk and
show a woman in bondage on the
same page. Maybe you should exam-
ine the messages you are sending the
student body.
Sincerely,
Dwanda Scott
Graduate Student
Child Develpoment and Family
Relations
Obscene advice
To the editor:
In my opinion there is no excuse for
obscenity in the media. The August
25 "Advice Column" is blatent ob-
scenity in every sense of the word. I
challenge you to forget for a moment
the freedoms you have and think
about the consequences of printing
such tasteless material.
Suggestions offered Pirate history
To the editor:
"Welcome back" indeed! One
good thing about the "Welcome
Back" cartoon on the front page 6f
August 23rd's East Carolinian is that
the tied and gagged woman is not
depicted as enjoying her bondage
and proximity to the Pirate's menac-
ing sword. Thank you for at least not
perpetuating the myth that women
enjoy being abused!
I wonder if your readers will con-
nect the front page story on resuming
Pirate Walk with this image of the
bound woman. If this is the way
women are "used" on our campus,
no wonder we need an escort service!
To the editor:
I feel sorry that my first letter to the
newspaper is one that is filled with
anger, pain and disappointment. I
am proud to be a graduate of ECU,
and I have read and saved every issue
of The East Carolinian since 1985. A lot
of the issues have upset and disap-
pointed me.
I really wish you people would
wake up and realize that this is 1988
and the rest of the world is leaving
you far behind. I am sure with all of
the artistic and creative minds here at
my University, you could have come
up with a better representation of an
ECU Pirate (cover page) August 23,
First, we are supposed to be cojt
cerned about our image, right? I find
it somewaht paradoxical that just a
few days earlier your editorial was
quite insightful about image im-
provement, but on Thursday you
printed such crude phraseology on
page 14. Sure, you can print anything
you want, but if ifs immoral and
unprofitable, why bother?
Your entire concept of "entertain-
ment" is obscure. Most likely you feel
that without shock value, you don't
have people's interest. You choose to
take vocabulary straight from the
bathroom walls of Brewster and put
it in print. Thaf s what scatological
language is all about�it takes that
which is intimate and meaningful
(like sex) and reduces it to the level of
vulgarity. How sad.
If we really are serious in our de-
sire to have a decent image, why not
set standards of excellence at The
East Carolinian? Don't be afraid to
accept the challenge to grow up and
act like mature individuals. Until
that time though, as far as I am con-
cerned, the satire page which you call
"really boss I call really bogus!
David McCreary
Junior
English
Republicans fear their day came and went
By FRED BARNES
The New Republic
In New Orleans the Republicans did their best to
hide their discontent, anxiety and pessimism. They
tried, with some success, to fake the our-day-has-
come buoyancy of the GOP conventions of 1980 and
1984 and of the Democratic convention this year. But
deep down they feared that their time has come and,
at least for the time being, gone.
The unhappiest lot were those allied with the
conservative movement that catapulted Ronald
Reagan into office. The Republicans approved the
most conservative platforms of 1980 and 1984. On
virtually every major issue, including touchy social
issues like abortion, George Bush has adoped a
stringently conservative position. A decade ago
conservatives would have been giddy over all this as
a dream come true. Now they're miserable. "Conser-
vatives have a certain malaise, " said Rep. Newt
Gingrich of Georgia.
Reagan's imminent departure is partly respon-
sible for the mood swing. He showed up the day
before the convention, rushed to a gathering of
Republican youth and attacked the Democratic
Party as hcrelessly liberal. AOer Reagan's speech,
GOP national chairperson Frank Farenkopf pre-
sented him with a giant gavel. Reagan lugged it
across the stage on his shoulder, dipped behind the
curtain and was still carrying it when he ducked out
the back of the convention center. For symbolic
value, this was perfect. Reagan had no one to pass
the conservative mantle to. Bush can never be what
conservativesdesperatcly crave�a second Reagan.
Many conservatives simply don't trust Bush.
They dismiss the platform a sop. "People like Nick
Brady (the new treasury secretary) and Tom Kean
(the New Jersey governor whom Bush picked as
keynote speaker) will be running a Bush administra-
tion, not the people who put the platform together,
" said Paul Weyrich of the Free Congress Founda-
tion. Besides, said Reagan's pollster Richard Wirth-
lin, the platform means zilch politically. It affects
"one-half of one-tenth of one one-hundredth" of the
electorate.
Bush's selection of Sen. Dan Quayle of Indiana as
his vice-presidential running mate failed to inspire
either conservative skeptics or Bush supporters.
Quayle is a conservative, but not enough of one. He
was damned by faint praise or no praise. Sen. Orrin
Hatch of U tah said Quayle evoked "mixed emotions.
Richard Richards, the former Republican national
chairperson, shrugged his shoulders when asked
about Quayle. Dick Kamin, the assistant majority
leader of the New Jersey Assembly, said he'd have
"to digest it" before making a judgment. Dan Casey
of the American Conservative Union said Quayle
"was the best we could expect. Bush would never
have picked a movement conservative like (Rep.
Jack) Kemp Another prominent conservative
leader complained that Quayle is "Kemp without
the outreach" to blacks, Hispanics, organized labor
and Catholics. Michael Ranck, a delegate from Lan-
caster, Pa struggled to say something positive.
"Maybe he'll fill the carisma gap. "
What's bugging conservatives and other Republi-
cans even more is that they haven't achieved a
Klitical realignment. Conservative "thought we'd
ve Armageddon said Gingrich. "Reagan would
win, the world would get better and they'd go home.
Allen Carlson, the president of the Rockford Foun-
dation, said conservatives in 1984 and 1985 thought
they'd become "the majority. There was a real hubris
about it. " The loss of the Senate in 1986 partially
dispelled the realignment illusion, and the down-
ward drift of the Bush campaign has done the rest.
"We're Washington-focused and it's their turf said
Weyrich. 'They own it, they run it, they make the
rules He was refen g to liberals.
Worst of all, conservatives see liberalism on the1
march and their agenda stymied. The combinations
of the end of the Reagan era and "a bit of resurgent,
liberalism" has demoralized conservatives, said;
Gary Bauer, Reagan' domestic policy adviser and a
convention observer.
"There's a temendous shock because conserva-
tives thought they'd won permanently said Weyr-
ich. Instead, they're confronted with the prospect of;
Michael Dukakis, a liberal Dcmocarat, in the White;
House. "That frightens us said Gingrich. And if i
Dukakis wins again in 1992, Democrats "couldn't be
defeated maybe for a generation
Wirthlin said conservatives have to be "an integral!
part of the Bush campaign plan for the fall. Thej
intensity of conservative feelings can be hyped
How? You do what was going to be the central thrust
of the Bush campaign anyway: You go negative and j
trash Dukakis mercilessly as a liberal. Wirthlin put it
more euphemistically. "Dukakis enables you to acti-
vate the conservative support You can paint him in;
bold, liberal colors
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t

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30,1988 5
�nginal Pirates were females
trying to escape the bond-
culture that underminded
It o( women. They tried to
me" through education. !
n and on about the sexism
bias that has been repre-
the newspaper over the
(�ee vcars, but I am sure I
wasting my time.
U. everyone has the right to
feoch but it really angers me
avc to pay for something
cainst my rights to exist. I
it ironic that you would talk
IE need for a Pirate Walk and
:man in bondage on the
l Maybe you should exam-
usages vou are sending the
Ibody.
Sincerely,
Dwanda Scott
Graduate Student
lid Devclpoment and Family
Relations
ene advice
editor:
opinion there is no excuse for
v in the media. The August
ice Column" is blatent ob-
n every sense of the word. I
e vou to forget for a moment
ioms you have and think
he consequences of printing
iteless material.
ve are supposed to be coq
ibout our image, right? I find
waht paradoxical that just a
rs earlier your editorial was
.sightful about image im-
ent, but on Thursday you
such crude phraseology on
Sure, you can print anything
r.t. but if it's immoral and
liable why bother?
entire concept of "entertain-
i obscure. Most likelv vou feel
J J
thout shock value, you don't
iple's interest. You choose to
:abulary straight from the
m walls of Brewster and put
hnt. That's what scatological
is ail about�it takes that
is intimate and meaningful
and reduces it to the level of
Ity How sad.
really are serious in our de-
lave a decent image, why not
idards of excellence at The
irolinian? Don't be afraid to
the challenge to grow up and
mature individuals. Until
c though, as far as I am con-
' the satire page which you call
Iboss, " I call really bogus!
David McCreary
Junior
English
ent
it, they run it, they make the
ing to liberals.
frvatives see liberalism on the
ida stymied. The combinations
;an era and "a bit of resurgent;
loralized conservatives, said;
domestic policy adviser and a j
lous shock because eonserva-
on permanently said Weyr-
por.fronted with the prospect of
iberal Democarat, in the White
;ns us said Gingrich. And if
n 1992, Democrats "couldn't be
generation
?rvatives have to be "an integral
Impaign plan for the fall. The
ative feelings can be hyped
as goi ng to be the central thrust
j anyway: You so negative and
jessly as a liberal. Wirthlin put it
"Dukakis enables you to acti-
support You can paint him in
Walesa to join in negotiations I
WARSAW, Poland (AP) - Com-
munist authorities say they may
let Solidarity leader Lech Walesa
take part in broad-based recon-
ciliation talks they have proposed
after nearly two weeks of
Poland's worst labor unrest since
1981.
Polish leader Wojciech
Jaruzelski endorsed the idea of a
"round-table" discussion with
strike leaders at the end of a two-
day meeting Sunday of the com-
munist party's policy-making
Central Committee.
In a speech broadcast to the
nation, he directed his most se-
vere criticism at the party-ap-
pointed government of Prime
Minister Zbigniew Messner,
which he said helped precipitate
the strikes that began August 16
by failing to deal with economic
and political tensions.
Gen. Jaruzelski, who heads the
communist party, refrained from
directly blaming the Solidarity
free trade union movement for
the strike wave and hinted at a
government shakeup in the near
future.
Communist party spokesman
Jerzy Majka said the government
was prepared for reconciliation
talks without any preconditions,
but added that he had no informa-
tion on when such talks could
begin.
He called Walesa "one of the
possible candidates" for partici-
pation in such talks, but added
that no one could take part "as a
representative of an illegal or-
ganization
"It's up to theothcr side to make
the first move Majka added.
In addition to higher wages to
offset inflation of nearly 60 per-
cent, the strikers have demanded
the legislation of Solidarity,
which was banned after being
crushed in a 1981 military crack-
down.
Walesa last held a meeting with
high-level communist authorities
in early 1982 before he was re-
leased from internment.
In Gdansk, Walesa rejoined
striking workers at the Lenin
shipyard Sunday morning, injur-
ing himself slightly as he hauled
himself over the 7-foot fence after
a police officer tried to stop him,
aides said.
Solidarity estimated Sunday
that about 8,500 people still were
occupying 10 strikebound
workplaces. About 20 enterprises
were idled at the height of the
strike wave.
In the Baltic port of Szczecin,
talks between management and
representatives of striking dock-
ers broke off and a management
attempt to hold talks with striking
bus employees failed as well, the
state-run news agency PAP re-
ported.
But in the southwestern city of
Jastrzebie, workers at the Jas-
trzebie coal mine agreed to end
their strike after a meeting with
management, PAP reported.
Only the July Manifesto coal
mine, where the labor unrest be-
gan two weeks ago, remains on
strike in the Silcsian town not far
from the Czechoslovak border.
Police evicted strikers from
several workplaces last week, but
there was no use of force to end
strikes over the weekend.
In Gdansk on Sunday, police
blocked about 400 people who set
off after a mass at St. Brygida's
church from approaching the
strikebound Lenin shipyard a few
blocks away. The crowd dis-
persed peacefully.
The latest bid for national rec-
onciliation by Jaruzelski, who led
the 1981 crackdown on Solidarity,
appears to leave the decision on
potential discussion partners for
the round table up to the opposi-
tion.
Efforts earlier this summer to
draw senior Solidarity advisers
into informal talks with low-rank-
ing party and government offi-
cials on the economic malaise met
with only limited success.
The idea for round-table talks
was proposed Friday by Interior
Minister Czcslaw Kiszczak, who
said they would be to take up
grievances of striking workers
after the strikes, as long as they
observed the nation's legal and
constitutional order.
Jaruzelski made no immediate
recommendation to shake up
Messner's government, but said
party deputies would decide
when parliament next meets,
most likely in September.
Ending its meeting, the central
committee passed a resolution
endorsing continuation of eco-
nomic and political reform with
no "half-way measures but con-
deming "law-breaking and de-
struction a reference to strikes.
On the meeting's opening day,
a number of the central
committee's 230 members
launched harsh attacks on the
government and their speeches
were later televised.
"We are not used in the party to
criticizing the government from
the rostrum of the central commit-
tee. Th it we have always done in
the family "jaruzelski said.
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SCHOOL
SPECIALS
Navy not responsible for latest bit of shore trash
KURE BEACH, N.C. (AP) - The
Navy probably isn't responsible
for the latest batch of medical
trash that has washed ashore
along North Carolina's beaches,
state officials said.
Less than three weeks ago.
beach-goers found empty blood
vials, used syringes and other
medical debris in several loca-
tions along the North Carolina
coast. After news of the discover-
ies spread, the Navy claimed re-
sponsibility for tossing the items
overboard from ships oft the ting to be like air pollution
state's coast.
"It can be from anybody -
there's just no way to identify it a
lot of times said Will Brothers of
the state Division of Emergency
Management. "This stuff is get-
Officials said they doubted the
needles found Sunday belonged
to the Navy, as they contained no
Navy seal like much of the debris
that washed up in early August.
Iran and Iraq resume talks
GENEVA (AP) - Iran and Iraq
resumed peace talks today amid
concern the negotiations might be
near stalemate because Iraq has
demanded full sovereignty over
the Shatt-al-Arab waterway, its
,only outlet to the sea.
, The talks resumed in their fifth
aVVfa'rJldwgTaclerrechichl
level, because both countries' for-
eign ministers removed them-
:selves after a snag Sunday night.
� Late Sunday, U.N. Secretary-
General Javier Perez de Cullar
met for six hours with the sepa-
rate delegations and acknowl-
sedged that the talks had run into
difficulties over the withdrawal
of troops behind internationally
recognized borders.
In reply to a question, he said:
"We cannot say now that we have
reached deadlock but added
"the possibility always exists
The disagreement temporarily
downgraded the talks from the
political to the technical level fol-
lowing the withdrawal of Foreign
Ministers Tario Aziz of Iraq and
AH Akbar Velayati oi Iran.
"1 hope we will move back to
the ministerial level as soon as the
disagreement is settled Perez de
Cueller said.
A tough statement made in
Baghdad by Iraq's deputy foreign
minister, Saadoun Hamadi,
placed doubt on the possibility of
progress.
Hamadi reiterated Iraq's claim
to full sovereignty over the Shatt-
al-Arab. A 1975 treaty placed the
Iran-Iraq border down the middle
of the waterwav formed bv the
common estuary of the Tigris and
Euphrates rivers.
Iraq repudiated the treaty in
September 1980 shortly before
sending its army across the bor-
der to set off the 8-year-old war.
More than 1 million were killed or
injured in the war.
"Any attempt to minimize the
full sovereignty of Iraq on this
vital lane would be faced with
categorical rejection from our
side Hamadi said. He also
warned that "Iran will face from
our side full preparedness to coiv-
front any behavior of aggressive
Velayati rejected Iraq's claim to
the entire waterway. He told re-
porters Sunday night that the
1975 treaty had been accepted by
both sides and could not be abro-
gated unilaterally by Iraq.
President Ali Khamenei of Iran
had declared in Tehran earlier
that any attempt to renegotiate
the border would prolong the
peace talks for years.
Velayati said his side had ac-
cepted the plan proposed by the
secretary-general calling for a
cease-fire to be followed by a
troop withdrawal.
"We support these procedures
but now everybody knows that
Iraq is trying to make obstacles in
the way of full implementation of
the (U.N. cease-fire) resolution by
raising some preconditions
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TWO PURCHASED
ONE COUPON PER VISIT
EXPIRES
FREE
ENLARGEMENT
WITH PURCHASE OF ANY COLOR
ENLARGEMENT UP TO 11" X 14"
Receiv 2nd Enlargement
FREE
LIMIT 2
FXPIKF5
"I
INSTANT REPLAY
ONE HOUR PHOTOS AND PORTRAITS
Quality, Convenience and Personal Service'
The Plaza
(next to Annabcllc's)
355-5050
,
CjUc yi!(Jl
D&D New And Used
1504 N. Greene St. Greenville
830-9262
Store Hours: M,T,Th, F -10-6 p.m.Sat. 8-6 p.m.
New 5-piece wooden Dinette Sets - $149.95
4 Drawer Chests - $46.00 each or 2 for $79.00
5 Drawer Chests - $69.95
AndVarious Other Unique Items!
1
GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 10-14 part-time soccer coaches for the fall
semester program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills and have patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able to coach young
people, ages 5-15 in soccer fundamentals. Hours
approximately 3-7 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Some
night and weekend coaching. Program will extend
from September to mid November. Salary rate is $3.55
to $4.35 per hour. Applicants will be accepted starting
August 20. Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
Welcome Back E.C.U.
Come by and see us for
Housewares
Vitamins
Eye Care
School Supplies
Health and Beauty Aids
Film
Over 12 Merchandise 60
Below Competitors!
THE WHOLESALE
OUTLET
South Park Shopping Center (Next to The Spa)
Store Hours M-F 9-8
sat 9-6 756-8692
Stop by UBE before or after any Home pirate foot-
hall game. Choose from the worlds largest selection
ot pirate souvenirs from t-shirts, sweaters and hats to
megaphones, pom poms and even E.C.U. tote bags
-rfceOn
And while you re at UBE see our full lineof Russell
Athletic and Champion Sportswear.
It's all at University Book Exchange, downtown
Greenville the one for the fans. Stop by today.
fzmsl
Open Football Saturdays 9:00 A.M. - 6:00 RM.Afeekdays 9:00 A.M. - 5:30 P.M.
516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville





4

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30, 1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED: Pri-
vate bedroom & private bath in a trailer
about 2 miles from campus. 125 a month
plus 12 utilities. Call Michele at 752
1218.
ATTENTION STUDENTS NEW 2 & 3
bdrm mobile homes, fully furnished. A
C, within 5 mins of ECU campus, ONLY
$215.00 a month! CaU 756-9874.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Christian
male roommate to share new mobile
home. 10 minutes from campus. Non-
smoker, please Weekends call Hugh 756-
6851.
FE MALE,NO N-SMOKING
ROOMMATE: wanted to share mobile
home Upperclassman referred. SI 50
mo112 util. Call, 830-6908.
OWN YOUK OWN HOME FOR HALF
THE TRICE OF RENT 1989 mobile
home models are here so 1988 models
have been specially reduced to move fast.
Low down payments and monthly pay-
ments We handle the financing! CALL
DEE, 756-9874, STUDENTS & SINGLE-
PARENT FAMILIES WELCOME
FOR RENT: Stall space and pasture for a
horse or a donkey. 8 miles from campus,
dirt roads available Call 746-4793 after 6
p.m.
APT. FOR RENT: Located 3 blocks from
campus, low rent great location. Call
Luke or Sieve for more details. 830-0339.
ROOM FOR RENT: S165 per month
Utilities included. Near ECU campus
Call 758-1274 after 5:30 p.m.
GIVE YOUR LANDLORD THE AX
Purchase vour own 3 bedroom mobile
home for as little as S145.00 a month! Call
Gail at 756-9874'
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
FOR SALE: INXS tickets call 24 hours,
753-2263
FOR SALE: 1988 Dodge Raider, red,
four-wheel drive, automatic, AC, AM
FM stero cassette, loaded, 15,000 miles
Paid $15,500 new. Will sell for $13,000 or
best offer. Great for beach, hunting, fish-
ing, camping, etc. Call Angela at 830
8802
SLEEPER SOFA: Call 756-9225
UNIVERSITY AREA: Walk to school
from your 2500 sq. ft heated space 3
bedroom, 2 bath home. Freshly painted
interior. $95,000. Call Alice Moore Realty.
355-6712 or Bradley Gray 752-3699
FOR SALE: Double bed mattress and
boxspnng $100. Supersingle waterbed,
everything included $100 Gill 83043598.
FOR SALE: 1978 Nova, Automatic,
Power steering, AC & new tires $800. 756-
8692 or 523-8354 (Kinston).
RUSTIC HARD-WOOD FRAME
FURNITURE: for sale � In good shape'
Price Negotiable. Call 757-1635.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you're having a party and
need a D.J. for the best music available for
parties dance. Top 40 & Beach Call 355
2781 and ask for Morgan
DWI? Don't Drink & Drive Come Party
In Style Call Class Act Limousine 757-
3240.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
MOSCoe
GRippn
SHOES
FULL AND PART TIME SALES
MANAGER TRAINEES
Opportunity for better than average
pay with room for advancement.
�Health and life insurance
�Incentive bonuses
�Taid vacations and holidays
�Pension plan
�Employee discounts
�Flexible hours
Immediate openings, experience help-
ful but will train. Apply in person at
The Plaza or Carolina East Mall.
I
NEED EXTRA
CASH!
Holiday Inn is now
hiring for full and
part-time waitress
and waiter
positions.
Opportunities
available in the
restaurant and
banqLiet areas.
Accepting
applications M-F 1
p.m. - 4 p.m. 702 S.
Memorial Drive.
SCHOOLS IN: Time to party! Call us for
your music needs We'll beat all prices
and videotape your party. The Power
Station DJ's 752-0940.
ECU PARTY PEOPLE: Let the parties
begin! But don't start until you call sound
mixtures D.J service. Party music catered
by Greeks, for Greeks; we know what
va'll like! Call now for more info. 752-
416, Bob: You won't be disappointed!
HELP WANTED
BABYSITTER NEEDED: Mondays &
Wednesdays from 12 - 4 p.m. Must have
own car to pick up child at nursery school
at 12 noon. Call 756-6319.
FILE CLERK WANTED: for law firm 20
hrs week. Respond to P.O. Drawer 5026
Greenville, NC 27834 Attn: Carla
DELIVERY PERSONEL NEEDED: Part-
time 10-20 hrs. per week, must have won
car. Apply in person at 114 E. 10 &
Greenville.
NEEDED: Soccer Coaches. Must be avail-
able Tuesday's and Thursday's after 2.00
p.m. Starting slary $5 per hour. For more
information contact Rita Roy, Pitt County
Community Schools at 830-4216.
SUNNY SIDE EGGS INC is now ac-
cepting applications for responsible col-
lege students who wish to earn while they
learn. Apply in person at our main office
on State Road 1708 or call 756-4187.
HELP WANTED: Part time college stu-
dent Apply in person, Larry's Carpet-
land, 3010 �. 10th Street
NEEDED: Part tune outside sales &
counter rep. Three afternoons per week.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
CRUSTY'
M-JLt DELIVER
NOW HIRING
FOR ALL POSITIONS
25-30 Delivery Drivers. Earn $4 - $8 per hour.
Flexible hours. 8-10 inside personnel.
Must have own car and insurance.
Apply in person at 1414 Charles Streets.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is recruiting for
10-14 part-time soccer coaches for the fall semester program.
Applicants must possess some knowledge in soccer skills and
have patience to work with youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people, ages 5-15 in soccer fundamentals. Hours
approximately 3-7 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Some night and
weekend coaching. Program will extend from September to mid
November. Salary rate is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour. Applicants will
be accepted starting August 20. Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
Apply in person: Budget Kent-a ear, 10th
Street.
ARE YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT: or
faculty member looking for part-time
employment? Are you enthusiastic, de
pendable, and excited about working in a
fashion environment? If you are sincere
about working & have a flexible sched-
ule, applv in person, Brody's, Carolina
East Mall, M VV, 2-4 p.m.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Int. r
ested in making money part-time photo-
graphing people? No experience neces-
sary; we train. If you are highly sociable
have 35mm camera and transportation,
give us a call between 12 noon and 5 p.m
M-F at 1-800-722-7033.
FREE HAWAIIAN TRIP: Could be
yours! World's largest party plan
compnay hiring demonstrators Excel
lent pay, bonuses' Free $1(X) kit, supplies
No investment, collecting or delivering
Call CheUe 758-6141.
BRODY'S FOR MEN: Is looking tor con
scientious, part time associates who are
personable, responsible, and fashio tor
ward. Must enjoy people and be able to
work flexible hours. Applv in person
Brody's Carolina East Mall. M W, 2 4
p.m.
PERSONA I S
WOULD YOU LIKE TO ATTEND A
CHAMPAGNE BREAKFAST: I low
about Socials, formats & road tups
Rush Sigma Phi Epsilon
KA LITTLE Sib I ERS: Welcome ba k!
There will be a mandatory meeting
Monday, September 5 at 9 30 Officers
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
MMiM!
Sandwiches & Salads
Helpwanted!
In Store and
Delivery
Drivers. Good
Pay, Flexible
Hours,
Part-time and
Full Time.
��'�
A Beautiful Place lo Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY Al'AK I Ml N Is
28991 5thStreel
� 1 oarted Neai
� Acrov. From Highwa 'atrol Stal
Limited'��. i (275 a month
Contact J.T.orl urn
� -
Officeop�i t - � -�' p m
�AZAL1 GARDI IMS
I e�ui u rj q i
apdrtmrrtN rnergy ei - .� i I free watn
mwci optional washers, dryers, cable i
. ouples i : tii � i only. $145 a n
Was MOBILE HOMi Rl STAI S cou
ilngles Apartment and Azalea
( ardens rear Brook Valley Co
Contact .T. �'� i �-
756 -
WELCOME BACK SPECIAL
UP TO $300 OFF!
Greenville s
Most
desirable
address
APARTMENTS
� Two full baths in all two and three bedroom apartments
� Patio with all first floor apartments. Private deck with
second floor apartments. Each with sliding glass doors
and enclosed storage room.
� Cable T.V. available
� A real wood-burning fireplace in each apartment
� Wall-to-wall carpeting; drapes for all windows, tile foyer
� Lighted tennis court
� Swimming pool
� Club room
� All energy efficient appliances
Office Phone (919) 355-2198
Office Hours M-F 10 a.m 6 p.m.
Saturday 12 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Sunday 1p.m. - 4 p.m.
r
WELCOME BACK
j ROOMMATE SPECIAL
! up To $3oo on
I Towards lh� Frit Thrw Months Rent On A I
' 12 Month Lease For A 2 BR Apartment
need to be there at 830 Please be there if
you're planning on being active this fall
HIG CHIEF: Thanks for coming into my
life You're great in all ways! Your Squaw
ONE DOES NOT FALL 'IN' OR OUT
OF LOVE: One grows in love Three
years ago today 1 met the most beautiful
person in the world With this person, 1
would change my life. I just wanted to
take a minute to say thank you Thank
you for the laughter, tears, memories, and
most especially for the love. You have
made my world, and without you it
would crumble. May our love continue to
grow. Happy Anniversary As always
Yours SLS.
DAVE: TAP - TAP- TAP.
PHI KAPPA TAU: All campus party at
the Phi Tau house, Friday September 2
SEE YOU will be plaving from 10 - until
Come party with the Phi Taus No bottles
please.
TAKE PART IN GREEK LIFE: by rush
mg one of the strongest Fraternities on
campus � Sigma Phi Epsilon
N.C. STATE: A university scared to 'ac
ECU and its' unruly fans. Sigma Tau
Gamma says lets party anyway Thursday
Sept. 1 at our house with Wilmington's
best ProgressiveClassic rock band Va
I nee Fill your cooler with your favorite
leverage and party at our 2nd annual
state Still sucks Partv from H until
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
SIGMA TAU GAMMA: Invites you to a
free party on Thursday '� ptember 1, 8
pm after the pep rallv It's the s.
annual state still sin ks wreck t
partv Shirts $7.
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED A
year, shape ot cards I II pay damn m
money for any cards of any year of a
shape or condition Need partv num.
Sell your cards to Earlvis"1 Call 757 hV
1 eave message if not there
DEAR CLAY: 1 am sending you a pa
sonal ad bc we have to much space left in
the last column Love, Susan
DISPLAY CLASSIFILI)
ABORTION
s moi u i onftdenlial t
FREE Pregnancy
Testing
M-F 8:30 4 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 p.m.
Triangle Women's
Health Center
t .ill for appointment Man thr; s.i l �
ost IrnnlrQon to J't wiks of jirrjjn.i- .
1-800-433-2930
El-TORQ
$1.00 OFF
HAIRCUTS
OR STYLING
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across from Highway Patrol Slat
is- hind i ai Quest Auto Parts
2800 !� lOih Street
Greenville
Johnny Weathington
752-3318
HEY MON!
WEDNESDAY NIGHTS
ARE
HAPPENING AT
PROFESSOR O'COOLS
JAMAICAN
CELEBRATION.
GREAT SPECIALS AND
REGGAE MUSIC ALL
NITE LONG MON! DON T
MISS IT! LOCATED
BEHIND ACE CLEANERS
IN FARM FRESH
SHOPPING CENTER
SGA Judicial
Appointments
Congratulations on your
appointment to the
Fall 1988 Judicial Board to
Crina Kern
Angie South
PatONeU
Barry Nobles
Laura Sherill
Melissa Moore
Blake Hugg
Keith Crawford
Liz Woo ten
Erma Dellinger
Joy Lorri more
Tammy Ellis
Kris Kelly
Alicia Thomas
Tom Fun
Brad Cates
Robert I.orris
Bryon Stevens
Mandv Marlowe
J
ennifer Souther
Mike Carbon
There will be a mandatory training
session Wednesday, August 31st at
4:00 in Room 221 Mendenhall.
If unable to attend please contact
Alice Harden at 758-9923.
Please leave name and number.
Announcements
SF ORGRAD STUDENTS
Ther eer Planning and Placement Serv-
ice v:ated in the Bloxton House between
N idenhall and Greene Residence Hall,
is where graduating students may put
resumes and establish a credentials file.
Interview signups begin soon, and you
must be registered to sign up. General in-
formation meeting will be held Aug. 30,
31, Sept. 15 at 3 p m. and on Sept. 7 at 7p.m.
in the Bloxton House.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester and or Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the Gen-
eral Classroom Building, Room 2028.
YEARBOOK STAFF
Staff positions are available for the follow-
ing positions: layout artist, business man-
agers, writers and sports editors. To apply
go be the Buccaneer office or the Media
Board Secretary's office for applications.
We are located on the second floor of the
Publications Building. Application dead-
line is September 2.
FREE PIZZA
Tuesday, 6-8 p.m. AFROTC Dot � 600.
Wright Annex 3rd floor Talk with Air
Force officers Find out about U.S. Air
Force.
STUDENT UNION
Student Union Forum committee. We
make the decisions on which popular
speakers will come and speak at ECU. Join
us on the Forum Committee! Contact
Student Union at 757-6611 and leave a
message for Allen Manning to get your
application.
ESF will meet Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. St.
Paul 's Episcopal Church on 4th Street
(one block towards river from Garrett
Eorm) for 1 loly Communion and dinner.
Call Allen Manning for more info at 758-
1440.
FORENSICS SOCIETY
Interested in competing intercollegiate
public speaking, interp or debate? The
first meeting will be Wednesday in Mes-
sick 211 at 8 p.m.
HONORS SEMINARS
All faculty members and 1 lonors students
are reminded of their opportunity to de-
sign or request an I lonors beminar of their
choice. The I lonors Committee makes the
fin.d selection. Please submit proposals to
David Sanders (757-6373) at the 1 lonors
Office, Room 1002, General Classroom
Building, by Wednesday. See Dr. David
Sanders in the Honors Office for more
info.
IJNIIVFRSLTY COMMITTEES
Application are now being accepted for
students wishing to serve on University
Committees for the 1988-89 school year.
Thirty (30) student positions are open.
Committees with vacancies are: Alcohol
Drug Education Committee (1), Resi-
dence Life and I lousing Committee (1 off
campus), Residence Status Appeals
Committee (1), Parents Day Committee
(2), Status of Minorities Committee (4),
Status of Women Committee (5), Student
Health Services Committee (3), Admis-
sions Committee (1), Calendar Commit-
tee (1), Career Education Committee (1),
Continuing Education Committee (1),
Credits Committee (1), Curriculum
Committee (1), General College Commit-
tee (1), Libraries Committee (1), Student
Recruitment and Retention Committee
(1), Teaching Effectiveness Committee
(3), and Faculty Computer Committee (1).
Applications are available at the follow-
ing locations: Office of the Vice Chancel
lor of Student Life, 21)4 VVhichard; Men
denhall Student Center Information Desk,
SGA Office, Mendenhall Student Center;
and Residence 1 lall Directors' Offices.
Questions about University Committees
and memberships may be directed to the
Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student
Life (757-6541). Applications must be
turned in to 204 VVhichard Building by
Thursday.
T� A VEL COMMITTEE
Members and any other interested in find
ing out more about the committee will
need to be present for our first meeting on
Wednesday. We will meet in room 242 in
Mendenhall at 4 p.m.
SPECIAL OLYMPC1S
The Greenville-Pitt County Special Ol vin
pics will be conducting a training school
Sept. 17 at Dm St. Gym for anyone inter
ested in volunteering to coach soccer for
special athletes. No experience is needed.
We are ai jo looking for coaches for basket
ball, we.ghtlifting, ans swimming. All
interested persons should contact Greg
Epperson or Connie Sappenfield at the
Special Olympic office, 830-4551.
PIlYSiCALLP &flXNESSIE5.I
The physical eduction motor and physical
titness competency test is Friday at 1 p m
at Minges Coliseum. A passing score on
this tebt is required of all students prior to
declaring physical ed. as a major. I. Main-
taining an average T-score of 45 on the six
item test battery 2. 1 laving a T-score on
the aerobic run. Any student with a medi-
cal condition that would contradict par-
ticipation in the testing should contact
Mike McCannon or Dr. Gay Israel at 757-
(497. To be exempted you must have a
physicians' excuse. A detailed summary
of the test is available in the Human Per-
formance Lab (Room 113, Minges Coli-
seum).
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
Ihe first organizational meeting of the
school year will be Sept. 8 at 7 p.m in
Mendenhall Student Center, Room 221
All old members & interested students are
encouraged to attend
IRS
Rnd your thrill�at king of the hill The
first annual king of the hill competition
will be held August 31 at 3:30 p m on the
College I lil 1 Recreation facilities An in-
formation meeting will be held Aug. 30 at
5 p.m in Bio 103 College I lilt
please bring SRA cards fbt parti .
Sponsored by Intramural Recn il
Services Tor additional info call
Malone jt 757 6387.
I CU AM8ASSOPORS
General meeting will be held Wednc
in Room 212 Mendenhall Student entci
MLS2JE�L
We2fel is a Christian fellowship which
welcome- all .indents is sponsored
jointly bv the Presbyterian and Methodist
Campu' Ministries Come to the Methodr
ist Stvident Center (501 E 5th across from
Garrett dorm) every Wednesday night at
5 pm. for a meal and a short progi am The
meal is $2 at the door, $1 50 if you sign up
in advance Call 758-2030 for reservations.
NEW STUDENT REVIEWS
Anyone who purchased new student
reviews should come by the yearbook
office to pick them up 1 lours are M F, 6-8
p.m.
yAMMA BETA PHI
The National' Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold the first meeting of the
Fall semester Tuesday at 8 p.m. m Jenkins
Auditorium
Student, faculty, staff, an d)
public are invited to attend a I
sored by the I lonors Program
"Polish Public Opinion ana
Socialism the lecturer u
Siemienska-Zochowska a
from Warsaw University
takes place at 7.30 p m Sepl
1026 General Classroo: .j
free of charge
CHRISTIAN FELLol
ECU Christian f
every Thursday j: 6 ;
Center
CAMPJQEL&c
College aged ad i.
ing of the semester, Thursc
Room available from info
in Mendenhall New membj
able For inform at
after 5pm
Duke Me
DURHAM
committee at Duke
Medical Center hi
mended that anexperi
cer test, which .
earlier this y u
with eer
You
(AD Proponents -
style "shock ii a
the proposed pn raml
prison overcr f
Carolina and ir
youthful offend i
"It's very much - j
situation. The onl, il
we won't give them an
David Guth, a S
the N.C. Division of P
the Charlotte Obs r
North Carolina's
shock incarceration is
PACT Intensive M
Program of Alternate
tional Treatment
offenders ages 1&-24
to :ive years impriso
nonassaultive ci
mersed in correctional
ing instead ot : i
"We have dor
liminaries. We lookei
liked it. The General
Select Committee on 11
it. But we can't d
funding Guth said
the earliest fundmj
available is uy 1 on
it's inciuded in ni
budget. "
"The military expo
once you break do
absolute discip
absolutely control th
to authority, then you
same response to
train, " said Dw
ager of the Youth Se
mand in the N.C. Div
onsand IMPACT - :j
Jarvis hopes that
per 90-day cycle j
program in its first full
THi
Thi
Evei
Stat
2 Girls
Winner!
Finals
Winner,





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I S 30 4 p.m.
u 10- 1 p.m.
iL;ie Women's
i lit h Center

00 433-2930
l
EY MON!
Y NIGHTS
ARE
R0COOLS
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ONG MON! DON'T
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V STl rFNT REVIEWS
: now student
b the yearbook
rsan M F.6-8
MM ft fAEiil
nrru Beta Phi Honor
Id the first meeting at the
- r ruesda) at I p m in lonkms
mm
THE EAST CAROL INI AN
I
AUGUST 30, 188 7
Announcements
� HCinciksjcickam
Student, faculty, staff, and the general
pubhc areinvited to attend a lecture spon-
Polish Public Opinion and the Crisis of
Socialism; the lecturer is Dr. Renata
Siemienska-Zochowska a sociologist
from Warsaw University The lecture
takes place at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6 in Room
026 General Classroom Building and is
free of charge.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
ECU Christian fellowship will be held
every Thursday at 6 p m. in the Cultural
Center
CAMPUS QRT SCOUTS
College aged adults meet for the 1st meet-
ing of the semester, Thursday at 6 p.m.
Room available from information desk
in Mendenhall. New memberships avail-
able For information call Nanci, 758-6701
after 5 p.m.
ADVANCEMENT OF MANAG-
MENT
Society for the Advancement of Manage-
ment, informal membership meeting,
Sept. 7, 3 p.m room 3014, General Class-
room Building. Enhance your business
interest with tours of the area industry
and great speakers throughout the year.
Not limited to business majors!
PH SIGMA PI
Our first meeting is Wednesday at 5 p.m.
GRE
The Graduate Record Examination will be
offered at ECU on October 8. Applications
are to be completed and mailed to GRE,
Eductional Testing Service, Box 955, Prin-
ceton, NJ 08540. Applications must be
postmarked no later than Sept. 2 Applica-
tions may be obtained from the ECU Test-
ing Center, Room-105 Speight Building.
HONORS ORGANIZATION
The ECU Honors Organization will meet
Thursday at 5 p.m. in Room 1004 of the
General Classroom Bldg All former
EC! lO members and new students inter-
ested in the program are invited. For more
info, acll Mary at 752-8022 or f. Sanders
at 757-6373.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
ECU Gospel Choir is open for member-
ship to all interested students. Last day to
join in Sept. 21. Rehearsals are held
Wednesdays at 5 p.m in Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT
Interested in helping others and learning
about Third World countries? The first
meetingpot luck supper is Thursday at
5:30 p.m. at 210 South Pitt St. (near the
main post office). Call Marianne Exum
830-9450 or Tonya Batizy 830-8888 for
more info.
NATIONAL TEACHER EXAM
The National Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery Exams � (Communication
Skills, General Knowledge, and Profes-
sional Knowledge) will be offered at ECU
October 22. Applications are to be com-
pleted and mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 911-R, Princeton, NJ 08541
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept. 19. Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105, Speight Building.
GMAT
The Graduate Management Admission
Test will be offered at ECU on October 15.
Applications are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R, Princeton, NJ 08540
Applications must be postmarked no later
than Sept 12 Applications may be ob-
tained from the ECU Testing Center,
Room-105 Speight Building.
LSAI
The Law School Admission Test will be
offered at ECU on October 1 Applications
are to be completed and mailed to Educa
tional Testing Service, Box 966-R Prince-
ton, Nj 08540. Applications must
be postmarked no later than Sept
1.
EOLLAW, SOCIETY
All pre-law students, freshmen to seniors,
are invited to attend our first meeting on
Thursday, at 7pm in Room 221 Menden-
hall.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
ECU Gospel Choir will be having a talent
show on Tuesday at 7.30 pm in Room
244, Mendenhall. Admission SI.
CAMEL'S SERVICE
Campus service will be held in Jenkins
Aud. 10:30 am Sept 11 come enjoy rbe
word of God at the first 88 campus service
Duke Medical Committee wants experimental cancer test reinstated
DURHAM (AP) - A special
committee at Duke University
Medical Center has recom-
mended that anexperimentalcan-
cer test, which was suspended
earlier this year, be reinstated
with certain restrictions.
The hospital stopped using the
test in March because of allega-
tions that it had contributed to a
number of patients undergoing
surgery for cancer when they did
not have the disease.
Although the review found that
was not the case, the committee
recommended that the test be
restricted to certain types of speci-
mens for diagnostic purposes. It
can be used on other specimens
for study purposes only.
The test is known as the B72.3
monoclonal antibody test, which
"recognizes" certain types of can-
cer cells and stains them for iden-
tification under a microscope.
Still experimental, it is being used
only at Duke and a handful of
other major medical centers
worldwide.
Before the committee review,
the test helped evaluate not only
pleural effusions but also fluids
from other body cavities and cell
specimens taken by needle from
tumor sites.
EXPRESSIONS MAGAZINE
The American Scholastic Press Associa
tion Award Winning Pulbication at ECU
is now accepting applications for staf
writers and a PromotionDistribution
Manager Apply at the Media Board
Secretary's office in the Publications Bldg
(second floor) by Friday Contributors are
also welcome.
Davis leaves
for USSR
Continued from page 1
to solve problems in the U.S. as
well as in other parts of the world.
"We can learn so much from
other countries I plan to come
back and share my findings with
my collegues as well as my stu-
dents. The knowledge I will gain
from this trip is invaluable
added Davis.
Davis leaves for the Soviet
Union on October 24 and returns
on the 30. He will travel from
Moscow to Kiev by train.
Young felons face boot camp
ft?- ����
�.��.I - :
?
'� I �ni
(AP) Proponents of military-
style "shock incarceration" say
the proposed program will lessen
prison overcrowding in North
Carolina and instill values in
youthful offenders.
"It's very much like a military
situation. The only difference is
we won't give them ammunition,
David Guth, a spokesman for
the N.C. Division of Prisons, told
the Charlotte Observer.
North Carolina's version of
shock incarceration is called IM-
PACT Intensive Motivational
Program of Alternative Correc-
tional Treatment. Under it, felonv
offenders ages 18-24 who face up
to five years imprisonment for
nonassaultive crimes are im-
mersed in correctional basic train-
ing instead of prison.
"We have done a lot of the pre-
liminaries. We looked at it. We
liked it. The (General Assembly's)
Select Committee on Prisons likes
it. But we can't do it until we have
funding Guth said Sunday. "So
the earliest funding could be
available is July 1 of next year if
it's included in next biennial
budget. "
"The military experience is that
once you break down through
absolute discipline and
absolutely control their resistance
to authority, then you can use that
same response to authority to
train, " said Dwight Jarvis, man-
ager of the Youth Services Com-
mand in the N.C. Division of Pris-
ons and IMPACT'S designer.
Jarvis hopes that 400 men 100
per 90-day cycle would enter the
program in its first full year. Even-
tually, the program may be of-
fered to women, as it is in a similar
South Carolina program.
For its first site, North Carolina
has chosen 150 acres at the me-
dium- and minimum-security
Cameron Morrison Youth Center
near Hoffman in Richmond
County.
The program will cost about
$650,000 to start and about
$480,000 annually to run, but pro-
ponents estimate it could save the
state $5 million a year.
If, as expected, IMPACT is fi-
nanced during the next session of
tie General Assembly, the pro-
gram could be in operation by
1990, Jarvis savs.
Then the Division of Prisons
will screen offenders for candi-
dates, who must volunteer for the
program. The parole commission
must agree to parole the candi-
dates if they complete the pro-
gram.
For 90 days, the offenders won't
speak to a corrections officer
without permission. They will
march double time to meals and
take them in silence. They will
drill. They will exercise. They will
put in 17-hour work days. They
will endure daily inspections.
They will wear uniforms.
Beards and mustaches will be
shaved and hair shorn. They will
take orders.
The 90-day training cycles will
be divided into three 30-day
phases.
The initial phase will offer few
privileges and will emphasize
physical work. By the third phase,
offenders will do less labor as thev
work on high school equivalency
certificates and parole contracts.
Shock incarceration is based on
a program designed by the Army
20 years ago, when it noted a high
failure rate among soldiers who
had returned to civilian life after
incarceration at Fort Leaven-
worth, Kan.
Five years ago, Georgia became
the first state to start such a pro-
gram.
Now, eight states have them,
and three, including North Caro-
lina, are considering them.
The IMPACT program is one of
several alternatives to longtime
incarceration the state hopes will
relieve overcrowding as it contin-
ues an ambitious prison construc-
tion program. Between 1977 and
1987, the state has built 7,400 beds
at a cost of $137 million and more
building is planned.
"We are looking for alternati ves
to incarceration to be a balance
with construction, " Guth says.
"Because of the cost, it's not prac-
tical to just build new prisons. If
we don't do something else, we're
going to drain the treasury. "
Shock incarceration has its
skeptics.
Jerome Miller, director of the
National Center on Institutions
and Alternatives in Alexandria,
Va says the program doesn't
divert people from prision be-
cause those in it probably
wouldn't have been incarcerated
for long periods anyway.
"If it did, I would be all for it. But
the people going into it are the
lighter-weight offenders. The law
says they can put these felons in
prison, but tradition is that they
do not, " he says.
Miller said shock incarceration
doesn't help those likely to return
to crime. These are often street
warriors from brutalizing back-
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f
t
8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30, 1�88
EPA moving to ban pollution sources in LA
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Environmental Protection
Agency is moving to fill a con-
gressional void with plans to ban
new pollution sources in the
nation's most populated area,
greater Los Angeles.
HP A officials, speaking on the
condition that they cannot be
identified by name, say Adminis-
trator Lee Thomas will impose the
sanction this week on a major
chunk of the smog-plagued Los
Angeles metropolitan area.
The ban on construction of new
pollution sources, and the mini-
mum penalty for failing to meet
federal air-quality standards,
would take effect at midnight
Tuesday with the expiration of a
stop-gap-law that has prevented
EPA action against cities and ar-
eas with dirty air.
Last December, Congress im-
posed an eight-month morato-
rium on EPA sanctions, suppos-
edly to buy time to produce legis-
lation; strengthening the Clean
AirActandlaunchattacksagainst
acid rain and toxic fumes.
But, that time is running out,
and when Congress returns from
recess next week, it will have only
about a month left in its scheduled
1988 session. Neither the House
nor Senate is ready for debate on
setting the nation's air-quality
goals into the 21st century.
Los Angeles is one of about 100
cities, counties and metropolitan
areas that the EPA says missed
last December's deadline to meet
health-protecting standards
restricting levels of carbon mon-
oxide and ozone, a major compo-
nent of smog.
Ozone not only causes respira-
tory problems for humans but in
high concentrations can injure
animals and damage crops, for-
ests and even building materials,
according to EPA.
It is formed in sunlight ly a
complex chemical reaction in-
volving volatile organic coin-
pounds such as gasoline and
emissions of nitrogen oxides from
transportation and industrial
sources.
Ozone pollution frequently is
worsened by the type of hot, dry
weather much of the nation has
experienced this summer.
Under the Clean Air Act, and
area formally cited by EPA for
failing to meet the standards is
subject to an automatic ban on
construction of new facilities that
would emit more than 100 tons a
year of ozone or carbon monox-
ide.
Before the moratorium was
imposed, such bans were im-
posed on St. Cloud, Minn Al-
buquerque, N.M the Kentucky
suburbs of Cincinnati and various
parts of Illinois.
The law provides for other
penalties such as a cutoff of fed-
eral aid for air-pollution control
programs and highway construc-
tion. Albuquerque was hit with
these sanctions, although EPA
has proposed lifting them.
EPA officials say Los Angeles,
which lacks an agency-approved
plan toclean up itsair pollution, is
just the first of a number of cities
that will face construction bans
with the expiration of the morato-
rium.
They said that by late October
bans could be imposed against
Ventura County, Calif Chicago,
and the northwestern Indiana
area adjacent to Chicago.
Waiting in the wings are 10
more whose air-quality attain-
ment plans are on the verge of
being formally rejected by EPA,
an action that would trigger con
struction bans.
They are Denver; Atlanta; Dal
las; Cleveland; Sacramento, Cah
fornia; Reno, Nevada; and Indi-
ana counties adjacent to louiv
ville, Kentucky.
EPA officials have indicated
that Dallas may be scrubbed from
the sanctions list because of im-
provements made to its cleanup
plan.
They say there are no immedi-
ate plans to bring sanctions
against the other cities and areas
among the 100 or so that have
approved air-quality plans but
still failed to meet the standards
by last year's compliance dead-
line.
Quayle 's first solo voyage is a rough one
WASHINGTON (AP) � As a
shakedown voyage. Sen. Dan
Quaylc's first solo campaign trip
as the Republican vice presiden-
tial nominee was rougher than
most.
Swamped by questions about
his military record and his rela-
tions with a former lobbyist,
Quayle began his week in an
angry confrontation with report-
ers as he took out the garbage at
his Virginia home. He also had to
deal with talk that he should do
George Bush a favor and get off
the ticket.
It was a tacit acknowledge-
ment, perhaps, that the jury was
still out.
Even without the distractions of
those questions, Quayle had
trouble getting his message
across, and at times seemed to
confound his aides.
He dispensed with prepared
texts, to the point that at an ap-
pearance before hundreds of sen-
Mr citizens in California, he ne-
glected even to mention such is-
sues as Social Security or Medi-
care, concentrating instead on
child care.
(n a discussion on gun control at
a billings, Mont news confer-
ence, Quayle left the impression
that he did not think felons should
be subjected to background
checks or other restrictions before
being allowed to buy firearms.
His aides had to explain later that
Quayle meant to say that such
restrictions should be left to the
states, not the federal govern-
ment.
After meeting with farmers at
the Missouri State Fair, Quayle
was challenged by reporters to
demonstrate that he understood
the technicalities of the farm price
support system. His only re-
sponse was: "I know quite a bit
about farm policy. I come from
Indiana, which is a farm state
Asked to explain why he voted
in previous years against
drought-relief legislation, Quayle
could only say that he supported
it this year and added: "I stand by
my record
Then there was his vote against
establishing a Cabinet-level posi-
tion for the Veterans Administra-
tion. Quayle said he voted against
it because he did not believe it
would get the veterans more
benefits or services. But as for
whether his vote was correct,
Quayle left his questioners guess-
ing by this response: "Perhaps mv
vote was not the right vote I still
think it's the right vote
There were other problems.
He blamed his staff for an error
in his resume overstating the pe-
riod in which he was Indiana's
chief consumer investigator. His
college performance was admit-
tedly average, but Quayle said he
did not use undue influence to get
into law school and would not in
any case make his academic rec-
ords public.
If some of his answers lacked
depth or details, if they seemed to
suggest that the candidate was
unsure, that will change with
time, campaign strategists sug-
gested.
"This is my first national cam-
paign. It's much different than
running for the United States
Senate Quayle conceded.
But his demeanor suggested
that Quayle was gaining confi-
dence by week's end. his gestures
became broader and he spoke
with more sureness as he fended
off unwelcome questions,
warmed to his stump themes and
lashed out at Michael Dukakis.
Youthful and telegenic, he rel-
ished photo opportunities that
allowed him to pitch hay, ride a
tractor and get licked in the face
by a Labrador retriever - demon-
strating that some things about
the art of politicking never
change.
Quayle insists that more and
more, he'll be able to get his mes-
sage out.
"I am going to continue to talk
about the issues that affect Amer-
ica. Sooner or later the American
people will hear what Dan Quayk
feelsabout the issuesSooner or
later they will know where 1
stand
Accused shoplifter escapes
by throwing baby at security
RALEIGH (AP) - Police say a
woman suspected of shoplifting
made a desperate attempt to es-
cape from a Raleigh grocery store
Saturday by thrusting the baby
she was carrying into a security
guard's arms and running.
Barry B. Whyte, an undercover
and took eight cartons of
Marlboro cigarettes worth $74.24.
The woman strolled down an-
other aisle, where she stuffed the
cigarettes into her bag, he said. An
older woman carrying a young
baby joined her, and the younger
woman put the bag over her
just ran he told The News and
Observer of Raleigh.
While the startled guare
handed the baby to the older
woman, he said, the younger
woman ran into the parking lot,
where a man was waiting in a
white Chevrolet.
Whyte caught the woman In-
security guard at the newly shoulder and took the child. They
opened Harris-Teeter grocery left the store together, and Whyte fore she could get in the car, and
store in north Raleigh, said he saw said he caught up to them and he led her by the arm back into the
a young woman with an empty identified himself as a security store. The man, the older woman
canvas bag enter the building guard. and the baby all got away,
around 4 p.m. The woman with the baby Police could not accuratclv
turned around, dropped the bag identify the woman, who refused
Whyte said the woman put the with the cigarettes, and thrust the to give her real name, Raleigh
satchel in a shopping cart and baby into his arms, Whyte said. police said. Bond for "Jane Doe
walked around the store to the "She didn't throw, but she thought to be in her 20s, was set at
cigarette rack, where she stopped rushed him into my arms, and she $500.
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325 Arlington Blvd.
355-6968
Doug
;
Pizza,
� n ig 1 ti
with I
Band h
B
Speakq
at fires
Rl �
K A
II
Violinist Nadja Salerno-
off- but there are many �
visiting ECU in between
ing Arts Series October





in LA
tion that would trigger con-
n bans.
are Denver Atlanta; Dal-
land Sacramento, Cah-
i Rene. Nevada, and Indi-
�ties adjacent to louis-
k
tals have indicated
is ma) be scrubbed from
- st because of im-
to its cleanup
1 HI- I S c Kol INAN
Style
AUGUSTS), 1WH Page 9
nacu
Dough Boy enlists in G'ville pizza war
there are no immedi-
to bring sanctions
other cities and areas
01 so that have
air-quality plans but
to meet the standards
s compliance dead-
me
.
m
I to talk
I Amer-
merican
)anQuayk
Sooner oi
where 1

r-
v
A
capes
?curity
In
m
d The News and
� e startled guard
b ib) to the older
said the younger
the parking lot,
ivas waiting in a
I the woman be
. I get in the car. and
i the arm back into the
older woman
. : away.
ild n it accurately
:nan, who refused
il name. Raleigh
rtd foi Poo
� in her 20s, was set at
! steaming hot;acollege student's late night preoi cu pa tion. Who is going to write the check
man, I wrote the last one. Dough Boj the new kid on the pizza block,has just opened
ty of cuisine they have Buffalo wings). (Photo b rhomas Walters- Photolab)
Rand brain hammers Susie's
1 i Rs
it
: i
it t sirm
vi I
Deliver
set up m rner next to the door
an . lages the best they can.
i mei ke the intimate atmos-
lience phereal the.New Deli; these and
ith other small venues are without a
ling doubt the be st place to house rock
ild layer and roll.
ne v ould make a listof crite-
ria foi the perfect R&R show it
1 have to include the big
. . three's combination (sweat,
js smoke & spilt beer), a hot as hell
and theirown distinct style
i and overall undis-
eribable tool in the air that only
I ro. k i orncs in small clubs.
. hi The Phut ass rockers from
rolina � � "Ricfirnond will probably return to
our sma ge town in the fu-
� ol eat i ; t beei lure, until then g( t Phat.
i � fhe band
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Stiff Writer
Ahhh, pizza! College cuisine at
its finest! It should surprise noone
that this delicious commodity is
readily available in Greenville.
And just when you thought you
couldn't swing a cat without
smashing it up rather badly on
local pizzerias, along comes an-
other.
Dough Bov Tizza, located at
1011 South Charles Street, is the
latest entry into the pasta war. In
the spirit of Dominos Pizza,
Dough Boy advertises free 30-
minute delivery within a radiusof
approximately three to five miles
around the restaurant.
Dough Boy has several attrac-
tive features. It offers a double
guarantee on deliveries: if your
order is not delivered within 30
minutes, you get three dollars off;
if it is not delivered within 45
minutes, it's free. Unlike most
local pizza places, Dough Bov has
a large, clean and well-lit dining
area (soon to include a jukebox).
And unlike most restaurants in
general, Dough Boy makes every-
thing fresh. Under no circum-
stances do they keep food under
heat lamps.
Dough Boy also offers a wider
variety of foods than most of its
competition; Buffalo wings with
four types oi hot sauces (includ-
ing "suicidal") and eleven varie-
ties of submarine sandwiches are
available.
Dough Boy's supervisor, Joel
Willey, had some further points to
make about the restaurant.
Dough Boy purchases its produce
and chicken wings locally, which
puts money back into the commu-
nity.
While there is an official five-
dollar minimum for deliveries,
this rule is occasionally bent for
students living near Dough Bov
Dough Boy also offers a 35C7C party
discount, compared to Domino's
207c discount.
Willey stresses that there is a
lot of competition in the area.
Consequently, Dough Boy is
working hard to build up a loyal
clientele by refusing to cut cor-
ners and planning many promo-
tions. For example, Dough Boy
will be staving open later than
normal during exam time, and
they held an official grand open-
ing this past weekend.
I had to check out the pizza for
myself. I ordered two 14-inch
pizzas (in the name of one oi my
roommates) plus a one-liter Pepsi
from Dough Bov on a Tuesday
night. My order was delivered hot
(except the Tepsi, of course) and
well under the advertised 30-
minute delivery time. The total
came to $10.49 (plus a tip to the
driver).
Sadly, 1 must admit that I've
had better pizza. The cheese was
its only real draw back. On a hot
pizza, the cheese should still be
mostly melted.
The cheese on the pizza I re-
ceived was hot but still about as
congealed as that on morning-
alter pizza.
It is only fair to mention at this
point that Dough Boy is literally
the new kid on the block; most of
its employees have been recruited
from other areas of the restaurant
business and are still settling in. It
is quite possible that, like a fine
wine, Dough Boy will improve
with age.
Also, I must say that Dough
Boy's policy is "If you are not
completely satisfied with one of
our products, simple return it. We
will gladly either replace it or re-
fund your money
Finally, I did not sample
Dough Boy's Buffalo wings or
submarine sandwiches. I'm not a
fan of either of these' items and SO
I di) not consider myself qualified
to make a judgement on them.
Dough Boy is available for
service from 11 a.m. through 1
a.m. Sunday through Thursday;
Friday and Saturday hours are 11
a.m. through 3 a.m.
My overall recommendation
of Dough Roy is "wait and see
Give them time with the pizza,
and in the meantime, trv their
other offerings. While you do
that, I'll be swinging my cat at
Four Stars Pizza - stav tuned.
.
peakers welcome students
t freshmen minority social
fh CRl.lR HOW I
: I
n mi
11 i i nle tor
I hii
. that tin ;
. manv ;
but tl ' � ire
.
rsity matI am o
proud '
i i 1 arry Smith, o
Singleton and the managing edi-
e, Val
I

I
EYE
HUES.
Arlington Blvd.
355-6968
i
I r I . Smith, the new direc-
tor ol v lin �rib) Affairs, began by
ting the beginning of Ellison's
ible Man.
Smith said that is how it feels to
be a minority at E( I Smith said
that sometimeswe do not feel a
part ol the university we have
trusted with our minds or our
careers
t k said that each person should
accept responsibility tor their
ovs n lift ud remember that there
are many people who are there to
help. Smith told the freshman
that they will experience racism
and saidmembers of the call
' consider yourself warned
eph Singleton gave a cheer-
ful wel ome to the freshman. He
said that the rate of minority stu-
dents that graduate should im-
prove
Singleton said that freshman
should become involved in cam-
pus organizations becauseIt is
all for you
Toga, toga. "Louie,Louie,Louie "Was it over
ten thousand marbles please?" These three freshmen are learning what it is all about as they attend the
toga party in the Attic. "Can we dance with your dates?" (Photo by Thomas Walters�Photolab)
He wanted the freshman to re- my aptitude but my attitude that The freshman were reminded
member that they had to "want to will determine my altitude Pas- that there are organizations and
know, ask questions, try to learn siter spoke with great conviction faculty here at ECL to help them
He concluded by saving that pre- about staving in school. when trouble arises. Lassiter told
dudice should no stop minority She said that students should students to get involved in or-
students from graduatingYou remember that no road is too hard ganizations to improve the uni-
got here, you can make it to travel. versity as students have in the
through He said for the fresh- Lassiter reminded students that past.
men to remember thatThe mind in college many temptations will she said that the students that
is the standard of the man arise and said "In college you will got involved in the past have
After welcoming the members be tempted to engage in drugs made a difference that has helped
the various organizations that and to neglect your purpose in the students today. By getting
college, there is no place for involved the students oi tomor-
drugs row will have a lighter load to
She encouaged freshman to earn
remember that they are in college
The special guest speaker was to get an education and not to Minority students were re-
Valeria Lassiter. Lassiter began play. Lassiter said that until ra- minded that it is not easy to
by saying If I can conceive it, cism is dealt with there will never graduate from college and not to
then lean achieve it. For it is not be true equality get discouraged by racism
of
were represented there, faculty
and staff were recognized. Many
members of the ECU faculty and
staff were present.
Performing Arts Series to host a plethora of top-flight talent,
including Wynton Marsalis, Atlanta Symphony, "Cabaret"
I CL Newt Hurcau
Internationally noted perform-
ers will bring u p flight concerts
and productions to ECU during
the 1988 89 seasons of ECU'S Per-
forming Arts Series and Chamber
Music Series.
These music, dance and drama
programs are featured on the
Pei forming Arts Series:
The Ohio Ballet, Oct. 12; trum-
peter Wynton Marsalis, Nov. 1;
the Atlanta Symphony, Nov. 17,
Philadanco company, an. 17; the
New York c albert and Sullivan
Players in "Pirates oi Penance
Ian 50; the Polish National Radio
(hchestra, Feb. 22; the combined
North C arolina and ECU Sym-
phony Orchestras with guest pi
linist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg,
April 20.
All Performing Arts series
events will be held in Wright
Auditorium, beginning at 8 p.m.
A touring production of the
award-winning musical, "Evita"
will be presented Sept. 22 in
Wright Auditorium at 8 p.m. This
event is billed as a "special added
attraction not part of the regular
Performing Arts Series.
Scheduled for this year'sCham-
ber Music Series will be the
Buswell-Parnas-Luvisi Trio (pi-
ano, violin and cello), Oct. 3; the
National Gallery of Art Vocal
Ensemble, Nov. 14; the Tokyo
String Quartet, March 16 and the
ance are available from the ECU
Central Ticket Oiiico in Menden-
hall Student Center. "Evita" tick-
ets are priced at $20 for the public,
and $15 for youth.
Two types of Performing Arts
season tickets are offered, one for
all 10 events and one for the
patron's choice of seven of the 10
scheduled events. These tickets
for youth are half price.
Chamber Music season tickets,
covering all four events, are $23
for the general public and $12 for
youth.
For regular concert goers, pur-
chase of season tickets is advised,
not only for the considerable sav-
ings offered over single ticket
phone Wi-73-tM-�l 1. ext 2wo
with major credit cards. The Cen-
tral Ticket Office is open on week-
days 11 a m. - h p.m.
anist Karen Shaw, March 19; a jazz quartet "Oregon" April 5. purchase, but also because Per
inist N
H but the
isiting I C
ng Arts Se
Ma Salerno-Sonn
re are many other
U in between. The
ries October 12.
enberg will play April 20, .i long way
international performers who will be
Ohio Ballet will kick off the Perfoim-
touring production of the hit
Broadway musical, "Cabaret
March 20; The Acting Company
in a performance oi
Shakespeare's comedy, "Love's
Labour's Lost April 10 and vio-
The chamber concerts will be
performed in Hendrix Theatre at
8 p.m.
Season tickets for the Perform-
ing Arts Series, Chamber Music
Series and the "Evita" perform-
forming Arts Series subscribers
will receive a card entitling them
to 10 percent discounts off meals
at four Greenville restaurants on
concert evenings.
Tickets mav be ordered bv tele-
Top 13WZMB
1. The I ast "Confession"
2 lohn Felice "Nothing Pretty
3. Fatal Flowers - "Johnny D. is
Back"
4 My dad is dead "I et's skip
the details'
5. The Weather Prophets �
"Judges unes & Horsemen"
6. color Blind lames Experience
� "Debut"
7. Pedal Jets � "Today Today"
8. I hmters& Collectors - "Fate
9.1 lot house Flowers � "People"
10. Big Audio Dynomite �
"Tighten up the vol. 88"
11. TV Pnmatives � "Lovely"
12. Lnclc Green � "15 Dryden"
13. Lvnes� "A promise is a
promise"





t

�-
t
in LA
m action that would trigger con-
struction bans.
They are Denver; Atlanta; Dal-
las; Cleveland; Sacramento, Cali-
ft rnia; Reno, Nevada; and Indi-
ina counties adjacent to louis-
ille, Kentucky.
EPA officials have indicated
khat Dallas may be scrubbed from
he sanctions list because of im-
jrovements made to its cleanup
an.
They say there are no immedi-
te plans to bring sanctions
cainst the other cities and areas
mong the 100 or so that have
pproved air-quality plans but
till tailed to meet the standards
. last year's compliance dead-
mi EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
AUGUST 30,1988 Page 9
Dough Boy enlists in G'ville pizza war
line.
ne
i am going to continue to talk
�a bout the issues that affect Amer-
ica. Sooner or later the American
U eoplc will hear what DanQuayle
tools about the issues .Sooner or
htcr they will know where I
le.and
capes
ecurity
ist ran he told The News and
11 bservcr of Raleigh.
While the startled guard
handed the baby to the older
j oman, he said, the younger
v oman ran into the parking lot,
Iwhere a man was waiting in a
while Chevrolet. i
Whyte caught the woman be-
lt re she could get in the car, and
he led herbv the arm back into the
Js:ore. The man, the older woman
and the baby all got away.
Police could not accurately
identify the woman, who refused
i give her real name, Raleigh
Ipolice said. Bond for "Jane Doe
thought to be in her 20s, was set at
$500.
i .
Pizza, cheesy, steaming hot; a college student's late night preoccupation. Who is going to write the check
tonight? Come on man, I wrote the last one. Dough Boy, the new kid on the pizza block ,has just opened
with their variety of cuisine (they have Buffalo wings). (Photo by Thomas Walters�Photolab)
Band brain hammers Susie's
By STEVE SOMMERS
buff Writci
Deliver
The Richmond Times Dispatch.
disarmed Rosebud as "brainham-
mering The author of that article
did not consider it complimen-
tary, however the members of
Rosebud did. These self-pro-
i1.limed Kings of Phat Ass Rock&
Roll brainhammered an enthusi-
astic crowd at Susie's Wednesday
night.
Someone may ask "Bui what
exactly is this That Ass' stuff all
about?" and it would be certainly
i reasonable question. First in
response I would mention a bass
I dmin combination so tight,
; well meshed, so complete and
! . vt so over whelmingly powerful
one might discribe is as "brain-
hammering
Second, I would draw a mental
picture of a transfixed audience
that exhale simultaencouslyvvith
the completion of m astonishing
guitar solo. Thirdly. I would layer
a distinctively extemporanious
yet, methodic vocal style on top
which makes the entire bound
phat. And 1 mean Phal as hell.
The show at Susie's was
marked by sweat, smoke and alot
of spilt beer. These oi course are
the three quintiscential elements
of a good rock show.
In Susie's, a place known to
some as North Carolina's stefv
ping stone to Baltimore, the home
of sweat, smoke, and spilt beer,
doesn't have a stage. The band
set-up in a corner next to the door
and manages the best they can.
Much like the intimate atmos-
phere at the New Deli; these and
other small venues are without a
doubt the best place to house rock
and roll.
If one would make a list of crite-
ria for the perfect R&R show it
would have to include the big
three's combination (sweat,
smoke & spilt beer), a hot as hell
band, with theirowndistinct style
like Rosebud and overall und'is-
eribable feel in the air that only
comes in small clubs.
The Pha ass rockers from
lucranona will probably return to
our small college town in the fu-
ture, until then get Phat.
By SCOTT MAXWELL
Staff Writer
Ahhh, pizza! College cuisine at
its finest! It should surprise no one
that this delicious commodity is
readily available in Greenville.
And just when you thought you
couldn't swing a cat without
smashing it up rather badly on
local pizzerias, along comes an-
other.
Dough Boy Pizza, located at
1011 South Charles Street, is the
latest entry into the pasta war. In
the spirit of Dominos Pizza,
Dough Boy advertises free 30-
minute delivery within a radius of
approximately three to five miles
around the restaurant.
Dough Boy has several attrac-
tive features. It offers a double
guarantee on deliveries: if your
order is not delivered within 30
minutes, you get three dollars off;
if it is not delivered within 45
minutes, it's free. Unlike most
local pizza places, Dough Boy has
a large, clean and well-lit dining
area (soon to include a jukebox).
And unlike most restaurants in
general, Dough Boy makes every-
thing fresh. Under no circum-
stances do they keep food under
heat lamps.
Dough Boy also offers a wider
variety of foods than most of its
competition; Buffalo wings with
four types of hot sauces (includ-
ing "suicidal") and eleven varie-
ties of submarine sandwiches are
available.
Dough Boy's supervisor, Joel
Willey, had some further points to
make about the restaurant.
Dough Boy purchases its produce
and chicken wings locally, which
puts money back into the commu-
nity.
While there is an official five-
dollar minimum for deliveries,
this rule is occasionally bent for
students living near Dough Boy.
Dough Boy also offers a 35 party
discount, compared to Domino's
20 discount.
Willey stresses that there is a
lot of competition in the area.
Consequently, Dough Boy is
working hard to build up a loyal
clientele by refusing to cut cor-
ners and planning many promo-
tions. For example, Dough Boy
will be staying open later than
normal during exam time, and
they held an official grand open-
ing this past weekend.
I had to check out the pizza for
myself. I ordered two 14-inch
pizzas (in the name of one of my
roommates) plus a one-liter Pepsi
from Dough Boy on a Tuesday
night. My order was delivered hot
(except the Pepsi, of course) and
well under the advertised 30-
minute delivery time. The total
came to $10.49 (plus a tip to the
driver).
Sadly, I must admit that I've
had better pizza. The cheese was
its only real draw back. On a hot
pizza, the cheese should still be
mostly melted.
The cheese on the pizza I re-
ceived was hot but still about as
congealed as that on morning-
after pizza.
It is only fair to mention at this
point that Dough Boy is literally
the new kid on the block; most of
its employees have been recruited
from other areas of the restaurant
business and are still settling in. It
is quite possible that, like a fine
wine. Dough Boy will improve
with age.
Also, I must say that Dough
Boy's policy is "If you are not
completely satisfied with one of
our products, simply return it. We
will gladly either replace it or re-
fund your money
Finally, I did not sample
Dough Boy's Buffalo wings or
submarine sandwiches. I'm not a
fan of either of these items and so
I do not consider myself qualified
to make a judgement on them.
Dough Boy is available for
service from 11 a.m. through 1
a.m. Sunday through Thursday;
Friday and Saturday hours are 11
a.m. through 3 a.m.
My overall recommendation
of Dough Boy is "wait and see
Give them time with the pizza,
and in the meantime, try their
other offerings. While you do
that, I'll be swinging my cat at
Four Stars Pizza - stay tuned.
Speakers welcome students
at freshmen minority social
ByGREER BO WEN
suit Vsntcr
The Mayor of Greenville is
trying to bridge the gap between
the Emerald City and ECU.
Mayor Ed Carter welcomed
new students at a freshmen mi-
(nority social Thursday.
( arter spoke very highly of
and told the freshman that
"All things are yours He told the
students that he is available for
them if they ever needed him.
Carter also said that the new
students would (acc many prob-
lems in college, but that there are
main people who can help. He
ended bv welcoming the students
to the University thatl am so
proud of
Also Dr. Larry Smith, Joseph
Singleton and the managing edi-
tor of Expressions magazine, Val-
eria l.assiter spoke at the mixer.
HUES.
Arlington Blvd.
355-6968
Dr. Larry Smith, the new direc-
tor of Minority Affairs, began by
quoting the beginning of Ellison's
Invisible Man.
Smith said that is how it feels to
be a minority at ECU. Smith said
that sometimcswe do not feel a
part of the university we have
trusted with our minds or our
careers
He said that each person should
accept responsibility for their
own life and remember that there
arc many people who are there to
help. Smith told the freshman
that they will experience racism
and saidmembers of the call
1992, consider yourself warned
Joseph Singleton gave a cheer-
ful welcome to the freshman. He
said that the rate of minority stu-
dents that graduate should im-
prove.
Singleton said that freshman
should become involved in cam-
pus organizations becauseIt is
all for you
Toga, toga. "Louie,Louie,Louie "Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor "May i nave
ten thousand marbles please?" These three freshmen are learning what it is all about as they attend the
toga party in the Attic. "Can we dance with your dates?" (Photo by Thomas Walters�Photolab)
He wanted the freshman to re-
member that they had to "want to
know, ask questions, try to learn
He concluded by saying that pre-
dudice should no stop minority
students from graduatingYou
got here, you can make it
through He said for the fresh-
men to remember that, "The mind
is the standard of the man
my aptitude but my attitude that The freshman were reminded
will determine my altitude Las- that there are organizations and
siter spoke with great conviction faculty here at ECU to help them
about staying in school.
She said that students should
remember that no road is too hard
to travel.
Lassiter reminded students that
in college many temptations will
when trouble arises. Lassiter told
students to get involved in or-
ganizations to improve the uni-
versity as students have in the
past.
She said that the students that
got involved in the past have
arise and said "In college you will
After welcoming the members be tempted to engage in drugs made a difference that has helped
of the various organizations that and to neglect your purpose in the students today. By getting
were represented there, faculty college, there is no place for involved the students of tomor-
and staff were recognized. Many drugs
members of the ECU faculty and She encouaged freshman to
staff were present. remember that they are in college
The special guest speaker was to get an education and not to
Valeria Lassiter. Lassiter began play. Lassiter said that until ra-
by saying If I can conceive it, cism is dealt with there will never
then I can achieve it. For it is not be true equality
row will have a lighter load to
carrv.
J
Minority students were re-
minded that it is not easy to
graduate from college and not to
get discouraged by racism.
Performing Arts Series to host a plethora of top-flight talent,
including Wynton Marsalis, Atlanta Symphony, "Cabaret"
ECU News Buiuu
Internationally noted perform-
ers will bring top flight concerts
and productions to ECU during
the 1988-89 seasons of ECU's Per-
forming Arts Scries and Chamber
Music Scries.
These music, dance and drama
programs are featured on the
Performing Arts Series:
The Ohio Ballet, Oct. 12; trum-
peter Wynton Marsalis, Nov. 1;
the Atlanta Symphony, Nov. 17,
Philadanco company, Jan. 17; the
New York Gilbert and Sullivan
Players in "Pirates of Penzance
Jan. 30; the Polish National Radio
Orchestra, Feb. 22; the combined
North Carolina and ECU Sym-
phony Orchestras with guest pi-
anist Karen Shaw, March 19; a
touring production of the hit
Broadway musical, "Cabaret
March 20; The Acting Company
inistNadjasaterno-Sonnenberg will play April 20, a long way in a performance of
off- but there are many other international performers who will be Shakespeare's comedy, "Love's
visiting ECU in between. The Ohio Ballet will kick off the Perform- Labour's Lost April 10 and vio-
ing Arts Series October 12.
linist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg,
April 20.
All Performing Arts series
events will be held in Wright
Auditorium, beginning at 8 p.m.
A touring production of the
award-winning musical, "Evita"
will be presented Sept. 22 in
Wright Auditorium at 8 p.m. This
event is billed as a "special added
attraction not part of the regular
Performing Arts Series.
Scheduled for this year's Cham-
ber Music Series will be the
Buswell-Parnas-Luvisi Trio (pi-
ano, violin and cello), Oct. 3; the
National Gallery of Art Vocal
Ensemble, Nov. 14; the Tokyo
String Quartet, March 16 and the
jazz quartet "Oregon" April 5.
The chamber concerts will be
performed in Hendrix Theatre at
8 p.m.
Season tickets for the Perform-
ing Arts Series, Chamber Music
Series and the "Evita" perform-
ance are available from the ECU
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Center. "Evita" tick-
ets are priced at $20 for the public,
and $15 for youth.
Two types of Performing Arts
season tickets are offered, one for
all 10 events and one for the
patron's choice of seven of the 10
scheduled events. These tickets
for youth are half price.
Chamber Music season tickets,
covering all four events, are $25
for the general public and $12 for
youth.
For regular concert goers, pur-
chase of season tickets is advised,
not only for the considerable sav-
ings offered over single ticket
purchase, but also because Per-
forming Arts Series subscribers
will receive a card entitling them
to 10 percent discounts off meals
at four Greenville restaurants on
concert evenings.
Tickets may be ordered by tele-
phone (919-757-6611, ext. 266)
with major credit cards. The Cen-
tral Ticket Office is open on week-
days 11 a.m. -6 p.m.
Top 13 WZMB
1. The Last � "Confession"
2. John Felice � "Nothing Pretty"
3. Fatal Flowers � "Johnny D. is
Back"
4. My dad is dead � "Let's skip
the details"
5. The Weather Prophets �
"Judges Juries & Horsemen"
6. Color Blind James Experience
� "Debut"
7. Pedal Jets � 'Today Today"
8. Hunters & Collectors � "Fate
9. Hot house Flowers � "People
10. Big Audio Dynomite �
'Tighten up the vol. 88"
11. TV Primatives � "Lovely"
12. Uncle Green � "15 Dryden
13. Lynes� "A promise is B
promise"





I
r
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30,1988
Art depicts Biltmore House
(AP)�As those who read room French chateau which has
mystery novels know, the brainy been open to tourists since 1930.
hero or heroine can always find an Nowadays, as many as 600,000
important clue, even after the visit, peering into public and pri-
authorities have gone over the vate rooms, servants quarters
premises with a fine-tooth comb, and greenhouses.
Recently, something along With all this activity at the his-
these lines occurred when a cache toric mansion, which has a cura-
of 300 drawings, water colors and
photographs by architect Richard
Morris Hunt was unearthed in
the files of the American Architec-
tor to administer its voluminous
historic documents, it seems
Then she proceeded to protect it house is surely a rare bird, Van-
by taking photographic slides, derbilt was like many other
giving each item an accession clients in his habit of vetoing his
number and placing it in an acid- architect's proposals. The fire-
free folder to protect it from dete- place, for example, was shown in
rioration. a number of different locations,
"I was very excited because and there were alternative ar-
thc find shows drawings of exist
ing spaces and some that were
never developed, " said Ward.
amazing to think anything new "Looking at some of the drawings
could possibly be discovered which showed what Biltmore
tural Foundation in Washington, about its design or construction. might have looked like, I had a
The materials depict the
Asheville, N.C mansion
Biltmore House, which Hunt de-
signed for George Washington
Vanderbilt towards the end of the
19th century. While alive. Hunt,
who died in 1895, was known as
the dean of American architecture
and his great reputation has been
restored recently with a revival of
interest in traditional design.
Hunt's massive collection of
8,000 drawings, 15,000 photo-
graphs and more than 700 archi-
tectural books was given by his
sons in 1926 to the American Insti-
tuteof Architects which he helped
found.
Biltmore only one of Hunt's
many illustrious projects is a 250-
Yet early this summer, Susan sense of listening to a conversa
hurried
Ward, curator, made a
trip to Washington to look at the
materials unearthed by Sherry
Birk, curator of prints and draw-
ings for the American Architec-
tural Foundation.
Birk just happened to take the
oversized volume off the shelf as
part of a regular cleaning pro-
gram.
Gee, 1 wonder what this is I
tion between Hunt and Vander-
bilt. "
The house is in French Renais-
sance style but early drawings
show it as much more Italianate in
style, she added.
' "I had often heard that Hunt
designed some of the furniture for
the house but I never could find
documentation of this. " The new
rangements for organ pipes and
other features. "You can see the
evolutionary process of develop-
ment, " according to Ward.
Although the information con-
tained in the photosand drawings
is likely to be of much greater in-
terest to those associated with
Biltmore or those studying
Hunt's development as an archi-
tect, the general public also bene-
fits, according to Birk. This type of
data preserves knowledge of
America's architectural heritage.
Biltmore is still here to study but
many other historical buildings
are not.
Architectural drawings and
LUNCH SPECIAL
MONSAT.
11AM-3PM
17-4 oz. Sirloin
Potato Bar
Salad
Hot Bar
Sundae Bar
$4.49
material shows that the throne "Architectural drawings ana
thought and 1 opened it and found chairs in the banquet hall, the photos are all that is left to show-
all these wonderful drawings of banquet table and the entrance now F'ftri AY�nue looked in the
hall table as well as a series of
small carved chairs were de-
signed by Hunt.
Although a client who
commissions a pipe organ, a
swineherd's cottage and a green-
I1
Daily Specials
10 Discount on
Regular Priced
Items
With Student I.D.
FREE DESSERT BAR
with All Steak Dinners
TAKE-OUTS OKAY
L
J
2903 E 10th St
'58 2712
Biltmore as well as some draw
ings for George Washington
Vanderbilt's house in New York,
" she recalled.
The first thing Birk did was to
let Ward know about her find.
19thcenturv.The records we keep
today will show the 21st century
what the environmment once
looked like. That's why we en-
courage architects to keep their
drawings and make them avail-
able, " she added.
Potter Jones puts in 14-hour days
United way
FAIRHOPE, Ala. (AP)� A
potter's work is never done if it's
pursued by Tom Jones.
The 36-year-old potter said he
works 14-hour days six days a
wcek-and sometimes a half-day
on Sunday-just to keep up with
orders. "I sell to 14 different gift
shops he said.
Tom Jones Pottery is located
east of Fairhope on the dead-end
Clay City Road, appropriately
named since Potter's Corner
marks the road's end.
"It's a comfortable living, but it
sometimes gets pretty quiet out
here Jones said. His companion
is Temmoku, a black chow-a
genuine potter's dog whose name
in Chinese means "black glaze
with red tint
Jones works where he does
because that's where the day is-in
the Fish River, located beside his
pottery. His products include
pots and planters and yard sculp-
tures like turtles, dogs and even
Album review
by Matt James
-Mob" sound-1�
track jams
Jonathan Demore's sound-
tracks are always interesting and
fun, but he has upped the ante
considerably this time.
The album starts off with a new
song from Smead O'Connors
"Jump in the River, " an airy,
mysterious song slowly thumps
its way to a triumphant end. The
album ends with the first vocal
recording by Brian Eno seen in the
1980's.
The song matches intriguing
vocals and an atmospheric back
track. Also new material from a
sorely missed Debbie Harry, who
reworks the eastaway's 60's clas-
sic "Liar, Liar. "
Ziggy Marley Jumps in with a
left over "Conscious Party" track
that carrries its own weight and a
bouncing track "Time Bums. "
Chris Isaak contributes with a
solid single, "Suspicion of Love. "
"Devil Does your Dog Bite with
a slightly trumped up pace by the
Tom Tom Club adds to the
album's versatility.
The feelings in classic foot
stomping feelings style add a tune
that's, "Too Far Gone. " Other
artist include New Order,
Qlczzaving, and the Voodooist
corporation. All this and a sultry
Michelle Pfieffer are sure to add
up to an entertaining movie, but if
nothing else, the album stands
alone as a legitimate candidate for
any record collection.
penguins and cactus plants.
"You don't have to water
them he said.
Next door to his shop is a brick
plant that digs the clay. What
can't be used making bricks
winds up on the potter's wheel.
Jones, who began working in
ceramics at age 14, has capitalized
on something the Indians always
knew about the river's clay. It can
be formed into functional objects,
including dinnerware. He moved
out to Clay City Road 12 years
ago.
Jones has customers from
Pensacola, Ha to New Orleans,
and north to Oxford, Miss he
said. A graduate of Mississippi
College near Jackson, Jones said
pottery will remain his lifetime
pursuit.
A high school student, Clint
Osborn, mixes the clay which is
allowed to age in plastic garbage
cans in the workshop It then is
readv to be "thrown or formed,
by Jones.
"I throw aboutdozen of every-
thing at a time he said. He
manufactures everything from
bird feeders Jm necklaces.
Making ihe something time af-
ter .iiv.c, hc.vcxor, gcu dull, so
Jones makes a few changes. He
once started painting irises on
plates and wound up with his
Blue Iris line of dinnerware,
which features non-toxic paint.
Jones' pottery was built by a
predecessor in the 1940s, and he
often takes passerby to the back-
yard to show them an abandoned
bee hive kilm that was used to
turn out clay pets like the six-inch
ones seen around the country
holding geraniums and other
plants in windows and around
yards

Jones' mother, Ann Jones, runs
the cash register in the store while
her son creates his pottery in the
rear, using a 6-by-8-foot kiln that
heats his products to 2,200 de-
grees. It takes 16 to 20 hours to
cool his creations after they are
heated for about the same amount
of time.
His buyers have to drive to Clay
City Road to pick up their orders
because Jones doesn't deliver.
And he never goes to craft shows.
"If we breakeven at craft shows,
we're doing good he said.
Jones said he generally does not
produce any piece over 40
pounds, although the clay planter
boxes sometimes weigh 50
pounds. "The larger the piece the
more potential it has for crack-
ing he said.
Riverbluff
Apartments
Welcomes
New and Returning
Students
�Fully Carpeted
�Iarge Pool
�Free Cable
�Bus Service 1.5 miles from campus
�Under New Management
10th Street Ext. to Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
l i
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Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance
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Licensed And Accredited By The State of North Carolina
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TOP
Of all the satiric funnies as Chip
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Sept. 6 - Meet the Sorority Girls
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"The House With The Heart'
ji
Sued
GREENSBORO (ApJ
Liuzzo, a 34-year-o
immigrant, followed ij
to the advertising
Paris, then N .w York,
allow his la k ot cord
knowledge of f rench al
stand in his way
"You had to kn
said hib wii , Q J
national advertisi
Greensbon ba
Bride magazine
"He was quite a
son. He was i
most ambitious peop
met in mv lift!
However, I m.
in an accident thai w
even bv Nevi
Liuzzo, who i
advertising busn
boro in April
was crushed tod
of concrete ti I
came crashii . fi
his New I rk
New ii
(AD- Wall
Usher of "Art -
investment r
astic about th
Altman, v. I
church in I
cializesinpai I
Washington
hibits three
selling for - 35
Buczynshi al
Pcna, a Nev M
uses patels,
create work:
"soft, dec �
derstand
ings and I
twecn I
�Car? In n
buyers of
and carl
have set n I
value Si
prietor
the Car:
Wallinj I i I
Dick I"ra
Harri
THE SILEN
LAMBS B
Martin's. 33H ;
Thomas ! fai
many novels, b
turn one out, it
sizzler
The ?iU ;
only his thii d I
immensely su
Sundav" 197
Dragon" (1981
were made into
"Lambs is a j
thriller so d ;
ping that a read
through one senl
Bradon
TO BETH!
Taylor Bradfi
Pages. $19.95
Barbara Taj j
Be the Best
volume in a saga :
1979 with the p
Woman of Substaix
natelv, "To Be thi j
match the power or'rj
two predecessors.
novel. Hold the Pi
putshedinl985.)thj
has a weak nd pre,
and Btde character d
Taula McGill, hj
bined raising a fami
ning the fab ed Hai
ment store chain,
shrewd business acuj
Novelist,
Schulmal
LOS ANGELES
Shulman, a novelist
and playwright bed
creating the love-sej
teen-ager Dobie Gillr
day- He was 69.
Shulman's first tv.
comic novels were '
With Cheek" in 19
Feather Merchants'
He was perhaps bej
creating the character
became the basis fof
picture 'The Affairs
lis" and the popu'�
The Many Loves t
lis which ran on CI
1962.





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30, 1988 11
Immi
GREENSBORO (AP) - Carmelo
l.iuzzo, a 34-year-old Italian
immigrant, Followed his dreams
to the advertising capitals of
Paris, then New York, refusing to
allow his lack of contacts or of
knowledge of French and English
stand in his nay.
"You had to know Carmelo
said his wife, Cheryl Rowland,
national advertising director tor
Greensbon based Southern
Bride magazine.
"He was quite a dynamic per-
son. He was probably one of the
most ambitious people I've ever
met in my life
However, Liuzzo died une 24
in an accident that was freakish
even bv New York standards.
l.iuzzo, who had moved his
advertising business to Greens-
boro in April to be with his wife,
was crushed to death by two tons
or concrete and insulation that
came crashing from the ceiling of
his New York City hotel room
dies in freak accident
onto the bed where he slept.
It was just so bizarre that no
writer would ever write about it
because nobody would believe
it Rowland said during a recent
interview. New York attorneys
she has hired are preparing a
wrongful death lawsuit against
the Helmsley Windsor Hotel
where the incident occurred.
Charles M. Smith Jr the city's
brought in by the hotel to study
the roof collapse have yet to file a
report on the incident, said hotel
spokesman Douglas Hearle. Ho-
tel officials will not respond to the
allegations until that happens, he
said.
The 1 lelmsleys, one of the rich-
est couples in the world with an
estimated $5 billion in real estate,
hotels and other business assets.
buildings commissioner, said his are already beset by legal prob
investigation turned up "clear
evidence of neglect" by the hotel.
1 le said his inspectors found evi-
dence that the 60-year-old hotel,
run by celebrated hoteliers Harry
and Leona 1 lelmsley, had cut cor-
ners rather than fix a dangerous
roof problem.
"It was a criminal act as far as
I'm concerned Mrs. Rowland
told the Greensboro News & Rec-
ord "I don't see the difference
between that nd running some-
body over with a car
A team of structural engineers
lems. They were indicted by fed-
eral and stategrand juries in April
for tax evasion and filing false and
fraudulent tax returns. Both have
pleaded innocent.
Last Year, Mrs. Rowland was
recruited by Pace Communica-
tions as national advertising di-
rector for its recently launched
Southern Bride magazine. With
her husband's blessings, she
moved to Greensboro and started
work in September 1987. Liuzzo
stayed in New York and prepared
to move his business to Greens-
boro.
"We had just had the baby and
were ready for a change in life-
style Mrs. Rowland said.
"Carmelo was a workaholic, and
he decided that he needed to
spend more time with the baby
During the next few months,
she and Liuzzo commuted fre-
quently between New York and
Greensboro. He completed the
move to Greensboro in April, and
the family finally was reunited.
She and Liuzzo flew to New
York Wednesday, June 22, on
business - she for the magazine
and he to tie up loose ends. They
checked into the Helmsley Wind-
sor Hotel at the suggestion of a co-
worker who had enjoyed her stay
there.
Tlie $120-a-night room they had
reserved was no longer available,
so hotel officials gave them the
$200-a-night Suite 1628 for the
same price. When they arrived at
the room, an interior decorator
was there. Rowland assumed the
hotel was preparing to redo the
four-room suite.
She also noticed the drop ceil-
ing in the bedroom, which city
buildings officials now allege the
hotel had erected to cover up
damage caused by a leaky roof. It
meant nothing to her at the time,
though.
Mrs. Rowland wrapped up her
business Thursday and returned
to Greensboro late that afternoon.
Liuzzo stayed behind another
day because his business took
longer.
Shortly after 5 a.m. the next day,
the ceiling fell, crushing him to
death.
Mrs. Rowland said it hasn't
occurred to her to think of what
might have happened if she had
decided to remain another day in
New York with her husband.
"God took Carmelo she said.
"He did not spare me
�georges
hair designers
v �����
New investments: cartoons, gum cards
(AP)�Walt Buczynski, pub-
sher of "Art Smarts a new art-
investment newsletter is enthusi-
astic about the prints of Harold
Airman, who works out of an old
church in Pennsylvania and spe-
cializes in par k scenes. P&C Art, a
Washington gallery, recently ex-
hibits three Altman titles, all
selling for $-85 unframed.
Buczynshi also likes Amado
Pena, a New Mexico artist who
uses patels, pencils and chalk to
create work that Buczynshi call
soft, decorative and easy to un-
derstand Pena's framed etch-
ings and lithographs soil tor be-
een $551 and $850.
Cartoons: In recent times,
buyers of original comic strips
and cartoon animation drawings
have seen their collections rise in
value. Stuan Reisbord, co-pro-
prietor iiL his wife, Miriam, of
the Cartoon Carnival Gallery in
Wallingford, Pa says origional
Dick Tracy strips by Chester
Gould and Mutt and Jeff strips
have been largely overlooked bv
investors. Mutt and Jeff strips
from the lc20s are especially
appealing because oi frequent
Prohibition gags and their large
size, about lit inches by 30 inches.
Originals oi both strips can be
bought for less than $500, says
Reisbord.
Baseball Cards, there � �
hugh market for classic baseball
cards of bygone days. The secret
to busing recent cards is to find a
future Mickey Mantle, Ted Wil-
liams, or Warren Spahn. Arthur
iottheim, owner of Collectors
Stadium II, a New York City
sports memorabilia shop, sug-
gests buying the full Topps 1C)S5
series, consisting of 792 cards for
about SI 15.
For those who think cards are
o erdonc, consider the 1950 New
York Yankees yearbook. The at-
traction, says dealer Gottheim, is
th it it v as the first Yankee year-
book, it came out in the midst of
the Bronx Bombers' record run of
five straight World Series victo-
ries and it features some of
baseball's greatest names, includ-
ing Joe DiMaggio and Yogi Berra.
The yearbook, which originally
cost 50 cents, costs S350 at
Gottheim's store.
�Silver: Most silver pieces you
see are stamped with a
manufacturer's label. But hand-
made silver is more enduring in
value. "The really great silver ol
an era, of any country, is made by
top-notch craftsmen says
Rosalie Berberian, owner oi ARK
Antiques in New J laven, Conn.
Berberian notes that Katherine
Pratt (1891-1978) was one oi the
most distinguished female silver-
smiths of her time. Yet, Pratt's
work remains largely undiscov-
ered and undervalued.
Speaking of silver, you can have
your cake and cat it, too. Peg
Harrison, owner of Harrison's
Antiques in Orlando, Fla recom-
mends investing in a set of ster-
ling silver flatware. Among oth-
ers, she offers a 47-piece set by
International in the Courtship
pattern for $750. "Once people
understand estate silver, they'll
hardly ever buy new silver
�Lunchboxes: 1950? and 1960s
vintagelunchboxesarc appreciat-
ing at astronomical iaies, says
Scott bruce, publisher of "Hot
Boxing a quarterly newsletter
devoted to lunchbox collecting.
Bruce is about to publish two
books, one a price guide, and the
appearance of such books oftcr
causes prices of undcrdiscovercd
collectibles to jump.
Harris novel, a pscho-sizzler
nil- SILENCE OF TH1
LAMBS. Bv Thomas Hams. St.
Martin's. 338 pag s $18.95.
Thomas Harris doesn't write
many novels, but when he does
turn one out, it's a cinch to be a
sizzler.
"The Silence of the Lambs" is
onlv his third. Others were the
immensely successful "BKuk
Sunday" ,1975) and "Red
Dragon" (1981), both oi which
were made ir to movies.
"Lambs" is a psychological
thriller so deftly woven and grip-
ping that a reader can hardly get
through one sentence fast enough
to discover what's in the next.
And the plot probably has no
parallel in modern mystery narra-
tives
For one thing, two key charac-
ters, no less, are serial murderers.
One of them is a brilliant psy-
i hiatrist, now in a hospital for the
criminally insane tor doing awav
with some oi his patients in cun-
ning ways. Yet, he's still writing
for professional journals, so gifted
is he.
The second killer is a terror on
the loose, committing unspeak-
able atrocities on the bodies of
young females. He is planning
even more horrifying deeds for
the kidnapped daughter of a
woman U.S. senator.
To make matters even more
complicated, there seems to be
some kind of link between the a o
murderers.
The book's major charai ter,
however, is a young woman
about to complete a course to
become a full-fledged FBI agent.
She is called on to use her out-
standing intelligence and percep-
tion to trv to fathom what lurks in
the minds of the two killers, as
well as win a desperate race to
save the senator's daughter.
Bradford's third novel in saga is plot weak
TO BE THE BEST. B Barbara
Taylor Bradford. Doubleday. 514
Pages. $19.95.
Barbara Taylor Bradford's "To
Be the Best" is the third and final
volume in a saga that began in
1979 with the publication of "A
Woman of Substance Unfortu-
nately, "To Be the Best" does not
match the jx wer or passion of its
two predecessors, (the second
novel, I fold the Dream was
pulbished in 1985.) this third book
has a weak and predictable plot
and little character development.
Paula McGill, who has com-
bined raising a family with run-
ning the faked Harte's depart-
ment store chain, possesses a
shrewd business acumen. In this
Novelist,
Schulman dies
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Max
Shulman, a novelist, screenwriter
and playwright best known for
creating the love-seeking 1950s
teen-ager Dobie Gillis, died Sun-
day. He was 69.
Shulman's first two successful
comic novels were "Barefoot Boy
With Cheek" in 1943 and "The
Feather Merchants" in 1944.
He was perhaps best known for
creating the character Gillis, who
became the basis for the motion
picture "The Affairs of Dobie Gil-
lis" and the popular TV series
'The Many Loves of Dobie Gil-
lis which ran on CBS from 1959-
1962.
book, she is offered an opportu-
nity to expand the business, but
not without predictable conse-
quences. Several dissident cous-
ins challenge her for control, but
in the end Paula's beloved empire
remains intact, and Paula is
stronger for it.
This lack of character develop
ment is most evident in the new
character of Madelana O'Shca,
whose role model is Paula's late
revered grandmother, Emma
Harte, the chain's founder.
SfBASTlAN
UNIVERSITY
MAIRCUTTERS
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Located on corner of
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at Affordable Prices
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Shrimp Plate $3.65
Fri. & Sat.
Flounder, Shrimp,
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V
12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUcusT.mms

Graffiti artists sharpen skills
DENVER (AD � Hoping to
curb the spread of graffiti, the city
of Denver has brought 60 to 70
graffiti artists into a program that
gives them artistic tips and a sanc-
tioned place to display their
spray-painting skills.
The construction walkway at
the new Denver convention cen-
ter will be the canvas for partici-
pating "taggers known for their
Stylized signatures, and "writ-
ers who specialize in flashy
murals.
"Graffiti started in prehistoric
davs (with cave writings) but it
didn't really become vandalism
until someone owned the walls
savs Amy lingg, communica-
tions director for the Denver
Department of Fublic Works.
Lingg, who got her artistic
training at the Colorado Institute
oi Art, is supervising the city's
anti-graffiti program.
Taggers and writers have
emerged from underground to
work on "pieces" (short for mas-
terpieces) in a makeshift studio at
a Fublic Works facility.
Working on boards donated by
convention center contractor
Hensel-rhelps and using donated
spray paints (Krylon is the graffiti
ai tist'sfavorite), taggersand writ-
ers are coached by artists from the
Denver Art Museum's neighbor-
hood artists program.
Dennis Wakabayashi, 17, cred-
ited by Lingg with the program's
initial success, approached Lingg
last month after finishing a two-
year sentence at the state juvenile
correctional facility at Lookout
Mountain.
He said he had been associated
with a gang, was "stressed out"
and wanted to do something for
the people of Denver, something
legal.
Considered gifted and talented
as a child, Wakabayashi had
dropped out of school after the
eighth grade and had been
"bombing or painting, graffiti
since he was 13.
During his meeting with Lingg,
Wakabayashi told her he wanted
to "give" his art, but graffiti-style.
Wakabayashi provided an un-
expected link to the graffiti under-
ground, which has taken the city
program forward faster than
Lingg had expected, she said.
"They do it (graffiti) anony-
mously. I thought the first contact
1 would have would be through
the courts Lingg said. "He
(Dennis) has educated me. He has
brought the message back to the
underground
The program is part of a four-
part campaign by Clean Denver,
formed during the Keep America
Beautiful campaign a decade ago,
that consists of muralization, en-
forcement, education, and
cleanup, officials say.
With the muralization phase
under way and enforcement of
anti-graffiti laws continuing,
Clean Denver Director Valerie
Purser will launch the education
effort by taking a traveling graffiti
education show into the Denver
public schools. Children in kin-
dergarten through fifth grade will
be introduced to a character
named Gertie Gradditi" who
will lecture them about graffiti.
Property owners will be told
how to go about removing graf-
fiti, and landmarks that have been
spray-painted will be cleaned up,
.viid Lingg.
Graffiti artists aren't all
adolescents, Lingg says. By one
report, a woman drove up to a
downtown wall one night, got
The animal half page
Wandering ram found in yard
out of her Mercedes and popped
her spray can. And there's Dee
Dee, an adult woman who plas-
ters the city's dumpsters with her
version of colorful flamingos.
Writers usually work in groups
of two or more and take great care
in planning and executing their
work, sometimes spending weeks
sketching and detailing their de-
signs, Wakabayashi said.
Graffiti artists are an organized
group with a set of unwritten but
strongly adhered to ethics, ac-
cording to Wakabayashi.
While a writer may discuss
style with another writer, no
tagger or writer may steal
another's work. And no one may
write over an already tagged or
written piece, he said.
After the convention center
walkway is completed, Lingg
hopes there will be other ci ty loca-
tions where taggers and writers
legally can display their work, but
Lingg isn't naive enough to be-
lieve the projects will put an end
to all graffiti in the city.
"This is (just) a pressure re-
lease she said. "We're looking
ahead to how to prov ide the pub-
lic with art and provide an author-
ized outlet to lessen public at
tacks
YOUR SPORTS STATION
Professor
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ELO COLLEGE. N.C (AD -
Schleppy the wandering ram,
found romping in the front yard
of a Elon College home Sunday,
has been taken home to his owner,
leremv Bass, the 14-year-old
animalphile who rounded him
up, said the owner, G.W. Rudd,
lr called Tuesday night follow-
ing media reports about the es-
capee.
body left the gate open and the
ram seized the opportunity, Hass
said.
"He (Rudd) thanked us and
offered to pay us for keeping him,
but we wouldn't take it Bas
siid.
Schleppy had been lodging in
the fenced back yard oi Bas
neighbor. Sherry Carter, to pro
Rudd explained that during a tect him from dogs running loose
hay delivery to his farm, some- in the neighborhoods.
Hev, hev we're the Monkees
CHICAGO (AP, � It's been
two decades but fans still go ape
for the Monkees � the musicians,
not the primates.
A new generation of fans gath-
ered by the thousands this week-
end to pay homage to the group at
the 19SS'Official Monkees Con-
vention.
"1 have practically memorized
Dog survives
12 floor fall
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) �
A 3-pound Yorkshire terrier sur-
vived a fall from a 12th-floor bal-
cony and may be walking again
by the end of the week, a veteri-
narian says.
"It's really a lucky dog said
veterinarian Earl Johnson, who
treated the tan and black doy
named Missy. "I didn't think she
was going to make it, to tell you
the truth it's a definite miracle
Doctors said Monday the dog
had an 85 percent to 90 percent
chance oi total recovery.
Missy fell Friday from the pent-
house balcony of the Sea Mark
Tower condominium.
Her owners, Roy and Ann Gip-
son, said strong winds created a
vacuum that sucked the small dog
through a 5-inch-wide opening in
a guard rail.
Missy landed in a sandy area,
just missing a brick walkway and
an air conditioner. A tree limb
apparently helped break her fall.
Missy was in shock with a bro-
ken leg when taken to an animal
hospital.
Pork in Pandaland
TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) - Two
giant pandas on loan from the
People's Republic of China are
proving to be porkers.
Since the Toledo Zoo exhibit
opened more than three months
ago, Le Le has gained 15 pounds
and Nan Nan has put on 10.
The weight gain is not unusual,
zoo officials say, especially con-
sidering the pandas sleep 14 to 16
hours a day and when thev are
awake feast on a diet of bamboo, a
seven-grain "panda bread" and
apples.
But there's no plan to put the
portly pandas on a diet. The 5
percent weight gain of the pair
still keeps them within normal
range for panda weight, said
Bruce Clark, the zoo's senior
mammal keeper.
Sunday was to have been the
last day of the 100-day exhibit, but
zoo officials plan to continue the
exhibition into next month.
every show said Lisa Mason, 15,
of Portsmouth, Va about the tele-
vision series that showcased the
madcap Monkees.
"I have a crush on Mike
(Ncsmith) because he's the
strong, silent type
The band, which had six Top 11)
hits during the series that ran
fromd 1966 to 1968, is enjoying a
re ival of its show on cable televi-
sion.
"I'm closer in spirit to their ages
now guitarist Peter Tork, 46,
said Saturday before performing
at convention. "I thought I was
older then
Tork was joined by fellow
Monkees Micky Dolenzand Davy
Jones at the convention, but
Ncsmith declined to attend.
Despite the ram devouring her
day hlhes, Ms. Carter said she
developed a soit spot for the
sheep. "Shedidn't want tosechim
go Bass said. "It didn't take her
long to get attached
Goats fired from
grass cutting job
CHERRYVALE, Kan. (AP) �
The city's goats were doing their
job all right, but just couldn't seem
to stay on the job site.
City commissioners voted
Monday to sell the three goats,
who have acted as living lawn-
mowers for grass near the city's
sewage treatment plant since
July.
Mayor John Litteil said the
goats were not being tired be-
cause they did a bad job.
'They were eating the grass
he said.
The fence surrounding the area
was not in good enough condition
to contain the animals. When the
fence is repaired next summer,
the city may purchase new goats,
Litteil said
For now, the goats probably
will find a home with Archie
Canon, Cherrvvale's dog catcher.
Litteil said Canon has made pets
out of the animals, and gets a gal-
lon of milk a day.
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Kobe
' h
mm

Kick K
thin
and .
Y Top
Piratt 's �
Pre-gt
m ii
(I jusi
H
this i
say .M
Frcru
Pirate s
ind (
umn

I t ns
Thi
one with 1
freshrm n l
r
I the NC
irres
up, etc. And
abovemention d �
know the real
A simple little four
fear And 1 could thii �
other four letter woi
NCSU Put I will trv and
myselt above that. AnywaJ
becau- E I kicks a htt
thev don't want to play us.
big deal. I think that we d
without them. ECU pi 1
the best teams in the natidj
can do without playingont
lesser schools in the state
.said�





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39
THE EASTC AROl INIAN
Sports
AUGUST 30, 1988 Page 13
Kobe expects good things from swimmers
By GREER BOWEN
Staff Writer
With a large number of out-
standing recruits, the East Caro-
lina swim team hopesto be number
one in the conference. Rick Kobe,
the head coach of the swim team,
said this team is the best he's had
in his years at ECU.
"We not only have the strongest
returning nucleus, we have 14 of
the most talented newcomers
said Kobe. Three of the returning
men were conference champions,
junior Raymond Kennedy was
the winner of the 100 yard breast
stroke, sophomore John Farrell
won the 200 yard back stroke and
sophom Tom Holston won the
400 yai dividual medley.
"Everyone on the team was
recruited said Kobe. He said
that last year's freshman class was
the best class in the conference
and that the newcomers can be
every bit as talented.
Kobe is glad to have Andy
Johns return to the team. Johns sat
out last year because of a knee
injury and is the current varsity
record holder in the 200 yard but-
terfly. Johns was a finalist at Inde-
pendant Nationals and is a co-
captain of the swim team.
Two junior college transfer re-
cruits join the freshman this fall.
Eric Hoyos, a two time All-Ameri-
can in the 50, 100, and 200 yard
freestyle and Tod Stebbins who
swims the 100 and 200 yard but-
terfly.
The other new members are the
freshman. Tim Boyd, Mark Cook,
Billy Haughton, and John Sprin-
ger were all Junior National quali-
fiers.
Kobe looks for many of the team
members to do well this season. In
the 50 and 100 yard freestyle,
Kobe expects Eric Hoyos, Tim
Boyd, and Billy Haughton to lead
the team in scoring. Andy Jetter, a
junior and team co-captain, John
Farrell, and Eric Hoyos should
stand out in the 200 yard Frees-
tyle. In the distance swims, the
500 and the 1000 yard freestyle,
Kobe looks to J.D. Lewis and
Mark Cook to excel.
In the 100 and 200 yard butter-
fly, Andy Johns, Ted Christensen
and Todd Stebbins are the favor-
ites. George Walters, Mark
O'Brien and John Farrell are the
three back strokers.
The team should do well in the
breast stroke with Raymond Ken-
nedy and John Springer swim-
ming those events.
The individual medley will be
swam by Raymond Kennedy, Ted
Christensen and Tom Holston,
who all scored in the conference
meet. Tom Holston and Ted
Christensen will be swimming
the 400 yard individual medley as
well.
The women's team has 9 return-
ing conference finalists, 3 of
which were conference champi-
ons. Patti Walsh, co-captain of the
women's team, won the 200 and
500 freestyle as well as winning
the 100 butterfly. Meredith Bridg-
crs won both the 100 and the 200
yard breast stroke and Sherri
Campbell won the one and three
meter spring board. Meredith
Bridgcrs, a sophmore was within
one second of NCAA qualifica-
tion and participated in the Can-
dian Nationals this summer.
Kobe expects sophomore Sonja
Hemingway and freshmen Page
Holt and Erin Reilly to do well in
the 50 and 100 yard freestyle. In
the 200 yard freestyle, Patti Walsh
and Ryan Philyaw will be ex-
pected to do well. In the distance
freestyle sophomore Carolyn
Greene and freshman Chantal
Morris will be looked to for good
performances.
Patti Walsh and Robin Wicks
should do well in the butterfly,
and Wendy Smith is expected to
do well in the backstroke.
Meredith Bridgersand Jennifer
Muench should do well in the
breast stroke, while the 200 indi-
vidual medley will be dominated
by team co-captain Leslie Jo
Wilson, Shelly Mica and Ryan
Philyaw. Leslie Jo Wilson and
Shelly Mica will swim the 400
individual medley as well.
Along with the new swimmers,
the team has a new head assistant
coach, Max Obermiller. Ober-
millcr, a native of Fayettville, is
very qualified. "He is the most
qualified assistant coach we've
had in years said Kobe. Ober-
miller is married and has two
children. There is also a new stu-
dent assistant coach, Eric Hawk-
ins. Hawkins swam here from
1982-1986.
The swim teams first compe-
tion, the purple and gold meet, is
on Thursday October 20 at 4 p.m.
in Minges. The next two meets,
against American University and
James Madison, are away meets.
But the swim team will return
home on November 12 to compete
against Old Dominon. Kobe en-
courages all students to come out
and see the team compete.
Last year the swim team took
second place in the conference
and Kobe thinks the team can win
it this year. Kobe also expects to
have many independent National
finalists.
Kick Kobe watches as his swimmers practice. Kobe expects great
things from the team, including a possible conference victory
and post season activities. (File Photo).
NY Yankees question pride factor
AP Top Twenty
i i in- rop fW�ut tM111Sin13. Notre Dame
t regular bLisvsn 1 1 ess college footballAbiOt. poll�14. Alabama
. loridaSt. (41)15. Michigan State
2Nebraska (4)16. West Virginia
3.Oklahoma (1)17. LSU
I lemson (3)18. Tennesse?
SUCLA (2)19 South Carolina
6Miami, Fla. (1)
53!
7. Auburn
8. Southern Cl. (1)
9 Iowa
10. Michigan
11. Texas A&M
12. Georgia
20. lYnn State
Other receiving votes: Tcx
118, Washington 99, Syracuse 85,
Oklahoma State 69. Brigham
Young 29, Arkansas 28, Ohio State
21, Pitt 18, Arizona State 17, Bos
ton College 17, Indiana 17, Florida
11, Oregon 11, North Caroline
State 3, Arizona 2, Texas-El Paso 1
Virginia 1.
(AP) - Lou Piniella is starting to In Other games, Milwaukee beat
question the pride of the Yankees. Detroit 12-10, Baltimore beat
"1 feel as bad as anyone, and if Oakland 2-1 in 11 innings, Kansas
the players don't feel the same City beat Minnesota 12-3, Boston
way, they don't have any pride beat Seattle 7-2, Cleveland beat
the Yankees manager said Sun- Chicago 5-4 in 11 innings and
day after California beat New Toronto beat Texas 6-5 in 11 in-
York 13-2, sweeping a three-game nings.
sorter by a combined 32-8.
The Yankees led Friday's Brewers 12, Tigers 10
opener 6-0 in the third inning and Paul Molitor's two-run, sev-
then gave up 32 consecutive runs cnth-inning homer snapped a 10-
over the next 26 innings. 10 tie after Milwaukee bounced
New York has lost four straight back from deficits of 5-0 in the
and eight of 10. The Yankees, 6-13 third and 9-4 in the sixth,
since Aug. 9, have allowed 10 or Milwaukee scored six runs in
more hits in 14 of their last 19 the sixth to go ahead 10-9 on
games and 184 runs in 26 games Molitor's sacrifice fly, run-scoring
this month, a 7.08 average. singles by Jim Adduci and Rob
"This whole scries was embar- Deer and Joey Meyer's three-run
rassing. It really was said Don double off Mike Henneman, 7-4.
Mattingly. "We're only 5 12 Gary Pettis tied the score 10-10
games out, but it's hard to feel like with an RBI single in the seventh
we're in a oennant race. It's hard before Molitor's 10th homer.
to stay positive. You can't avoid it
once in a while, but this has hap-
pened too often We've gotten
blown out too many times
There's nothing to say to the
team, according to Piniella.
'I've said no more meetings
Odell Jones, 5-0, the second
Milwaukee pifchcr, allowed one
run and two hits in 1 2-3 innings.
Orioles 2, Athletics 1
Joe Orsulak tripled and scored
on Pete Stanicek's two-out, 11th-
Piniella said. "We've already had inning single off Gene Nelson, 7-
more meetings than the Kremlin 6, as four Baltimore pitchers com-
bined on a four-hitter. Orsulak
had singled and scored the tying
run off Dennis Eckcrsley in the
ninth.
Mark Williamson, 4-5, pitched a
hitless 10th and Tom Niedenfuer
pitched a one-hit 11th for his 14th
save. Jose Bautista allowed two
hits in seven innings and Don
Aase allowed one hit in the eighth
and ninth.
Royals 12, Twins 3
Pat Tablet's two-run triple
keyed a five-run sixth inning and
George Brett and Bo Jackson hit
three-run homers in the seventh
as Kansas City completed a three-
game sweep.
Jackson's last five hits have
been home runs as have nine of
his last 19 since July 29.
Allan Anderson, 12-8, who had
won six straight since July 19, al-
lowed six hits and five runs in 4 1-
3 innings. Jeff Montgomery, 7-2,
threw 2 2-3 innings before Steve
Farr finished.
Red Sox 7, Mariners 2
Bruce Hurst pitched a five-hit-
ter for his seventh consecutive
victory since July 6 and Mike
Greenwell hit a three-run double
in a five-run sixth-inning, rallying
Boston to within a game of first-
place Detroit.
Hurst, 16-4, struck out 11,
equaling his season high, and
walked one in his fifth complete
game. He struck outSteve Balboni
in the first for his 1,000th career
strikeout. Mike Moore, 7-14, gave
up five runs and five hits and
struck out six.
Indians 5, White Sox 4
Ron Kittle homered off Barry
Jones leading off the 11th inning
as Cleveland won for the fourth
time in five games.
Kittle hit his 17th home run of
the season and his third as a
pinch-hitter. Jones, 0-1, had re-
lieved to start the 10th.
Doug Jones, 2-3, gave up three
hits and one run in four innings.
Blue Jays 6, Rangers 5
Craig McMurtry misplayed a
bunt, then walked three consecu-
tive batters in the 11th inning to
force in the go-ahead run, and
Toronto rallied from a 5-0 deficit.
Pirate's Booty
Pre-game festivities to highlight season opener
By DOUG JOHNSON
Co-Sports Mitor
Buenos diassenoresysenoritas.
; got out of Spanish 3 and I'm
feeling pretty spanishy, although
this is about all 1 have learned to
say.) Or, tor those of you taking
I r nch, Buenas dias senores y
senoritas. (1 don't speak french.)
Welcome to another addition of
Pirate's Booty, the informative
and ever entertaining sports col-
umn. I was going to write a sting-
litonal about the conspicu-
ous absence of NCSU from the
football schedule this season, but
I reconsidered.
I he way I see it, by now every-
one, with the exception of a few
freshmen, has heard all about the
reasons that ECU was dropped
from the NCSU schedule. Our
irresponsibility, tearing things
up, etc. And most of you, with the
abovementioned exceptions,
know the real reason. Fear.
A simple little four letter word,
fear. And I could think of many
other four letter words to apply to
NCSU. But I will try and keep
myself above that. Anyway, just
because ECU kicks a little ass,
they don't want to play us. Okay,
big deal. I think that we can live
without them. ECU plays some of
the best teams in 4he nation. We
can do without playing one of the
lesser schools in the state. 'Nuff
�said. ��
Now, on to bigger and better
things. As promised in last
Thursday's issue (for those of you
who read it), we have details on
the festivities surrounding this
weekend's home opener against

Tennessee Tech. Entitled "The
Pirate Bahama Beach Tailgate
Party it promises to be loads of
fun. The party will run from 4:30-
6 p.m. Saturday afternoon, and
will include an assortment of
events. There will be two bands
playing, with an array of music to
satisfy almost everyone's taste.
Brice Street will be playing or.
the field beside Minges. They play
a variety of music, including the
Beatles, old rock-n-roll, and
beach. The Breeze Band, a beach
and top forty band, will be play-
ing on the south side. There will
be places roped off for students to
sit in and listen to the bands.
There will also be free Pepsi
beach towels given to the first
1,100 people at the game.
Perhaps the highlight of the day
will be the three day'three night
Bahama vacation that will be
given away. It is very simple to
register for the trip. When you
enter the stadium, or while you're
boozing it up in the parking lot,
look for a person selling puzzles.
You will be given the puzzle for
a one dollar donation, all pro-
ceeds of which will go to the Pirate
Club Educational Fund. Put the 15
piece puzzle together, or for those
of you who will be too intoxi-
cated, have a friend help. At
halftime, the winning puzzle,
which quite obviously will be
somehow different from every-
one elses, will be announced.
So not only will you get to see a
great home-opener football game,
but you may win a trip, or get a
towel, or hear a band, or get lai
well, you'll have a good time.
ECU Football
ticket pick-up
Also of interest to students is
the pick-up times and places for
tickets for the game. For those of
you who missed them last week,
or have just forgotten, you can
pick up your tickets from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. in the lobby at Minges
Colisium, or from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
at Mendenhall ticket office.
(Many apologies to those horren-
dously overworked and pitifully
underpaid workers at Menden-
hall who suffered from the erro-
ncous times that were printed last
week.)
Remember, to get your tickets,
you must have a valid student ID
and a current activity card. If you
show up without these two
things, they will laugh at you for
standing in line for hours, only to
be turned away like a complete
and utter fool. As a student, you
are entitled to one (1) free ticket,
(Although I think the price is in-
cluded in the mysterious "Other"
column on your fees statement,
which, by the way, is ridiculously
high, so it's not free), one (1) tickel
at half price, and as many as you
want at the full price.
Until next time, adios.






t
V
:14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30,1988
ft

Female swimmer suspended for drugs
: LOS ANGELES (AP) - Angel
: Myers of Georgia, who won three
� events at U.S. trials and may have
: had a shot at fiveOlympic medals,
:was disqualified from the Seoul
j Games next month for use of a
�banned drug, the U.S. Swim Team
:said Sunday. The team refused to
'disclose the drug.
: Richard Quick, Olympic coach,
jsaid Jill Sterkel and Janel Jor-
�gensen were both named to re-
�place her.
One of Myers' coaches said that
�Myers, 21, was taking birth con-
jtrol pills and no banned sub-
jstances.

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP)
�- Phil Blackmar guided home a 30-
foot birdie putt from the back
fringe on the first playoff hole
Sunday to defeat Payne Stewart
and win the $450,000 Provident
Classic.
Blackmar, who had made the
cut in only one of his last nine
tournaments, put his second shot
on No. 1 on the back fringe of the
green and then deftly guided his
winning putt home.
FRANKFURT, West Germany
(AP) - Three-time British Open
champion Sevcriano Ballcstcros
won the German Open gol f cham-
pionship Sunday, shooting a
course record-tying 9-under-par
62.
The Spaniard finished at 263,
five strokes ahead of Scotland's
Gordon Brand Jr. Mike Clayton of
Australia and Bill Longmuir of
Scotland tied for third at 269.
LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) - Bob
Charles shot a 1-over-par 71 Sun-
day to win the $250,000 Senior
Golf Classic, his fourth victory on
the Senior Tour this year.
Charles finished with a three-
day total of 10-under-par 200 and
now leads the Seniors money list
with $395,258.
Dick Hendrickson was one shot
back in second, while five players
tied for third.
CRANSTON, R.I. (AP) - Patty
Jordan scored her first LPGA vic-
tory Sunday when she put to-
gether a steady 2-under-par 70 to
win the $150,000 Ocean State
Open by two shots.
Jordan, a third-year pro from
Eden, N.Y had a 54-hole total of
5-under-par211.
BRISTOL, Tenn. (AP) - Dale
Earnhardt twice came back from a
lap down, then outdueled Bill
Elliott over the last 100 laps Satur-
day night to break an 11-race
winless string with a victory in the
Busch 500 at Bristol International
Raceway.
Elliott, who moved into the
Winston Cup point lead with his
second-place finish, tried hard to
get past Earnhardt several times
in the last 10 laps on the high-
banked half-mile oval. But
Earnhardt used slower cars to
fend off the repeated challenges.
It was the second straight vic-
tory for Earnhardt in this race and
his fifth victory at Bristol in the
last eight starts here.
SPA-FRANCORCHAMPS,
Belgium (AP) - Ayrton Senna of
Brazil all but clinched the world
Formula One drivers title Sunday
by winning the Belgian Grand
Prix for his fourth straight victory
of the season.
ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) -
Craig McMurtry misplayed a
bunt, then walked three consecu-
tive batters in the 11th inning
Sunday to force in the go-ahead
run, and the Toronto Blue Jays
rallied and beat the Texas Rangers
6-5.
McMurtry's error allowed Nel-
son Liriano to reach and
McMurtry, 2-2, balked him to
second. McMurtry then walked
Tony Fernandez, Lloyd Moseby,
loading the bases, and walked
Manny Lee on four pitches to
score Liriano.
Tom Henke, 2-3, pitched 3 1-3
innings on one-hit relief, striking
out five.
Earnhardt rallies to win Busch 500,
lissues warning to the other racers
; BRISTOL, Tenn. (AP) Dale at the end. Lapped traffic hurt us track.
ftarnhardtdid exact. what he had both. I felt his car kind of giving There were a race record 23 lead
�to in order to win Saturday night, up, but slow cars just held me up. changes among 13 drivers, break-
� He overcame adversity, " ing the record of 22 set in the 1974
�avoided numerous accidents, Earnhardt twice had to make up event. But Earnhardt led five
�held off a late challenge from Bill lost laps during the race, while times for 218 laps, easily the most
iElliott and won the Busch 500 Elliott came back from two laps of any driver.
JNASCAR stock car race at Bristol down early in the event. Heavcraged a slow 78.768 mph,
International Raceway. It was the second straight vie- but crossed the finish line about
: "I was running my race on the tory for Earnhardt in this race and
jracctrackand it worked out for us, his fifth victory at Bristol in the
said Earnhardt, who ended an last eight starts here.
� 11-race winless string. "But I was The two-time defending Win-
�dodging it all night. Everything ston Cup champion led the final
that happened out there, I think I 110 laps in the 500-lap, 266.5-milc
�was almost in it. " race as he picked up his third Kuhvicki and, another lap down,
� At the end, Elliott made a val- triumph of the season and the Harry Gant, Richard Petty and
�iant effort to catch Earnhardt, 34thof his career. He won $48,500. Darrell Waltrip.
�coming up just short. Earnhardt was leading on lap Rusty Wallace, who came into into turn one on lap 208. Jarrett
j "I was losing it a little there at 98 when he had to put up with a the race leading the Winston Cup lost control and spun through the
: the end. My car was pushing up flat tire, losing a lap. He used one point standings by 21 points over infield grass and back onto the
: and once it came off the corners, it of the 13 caution flags to get back Elliott, started the race, but gave banking, where Mark Mar
one car-length ahead of Elliott,
who early in the race make up two
laps after a similar tire problem.
Geoff Bodine wound up third, a
lap behind, followed by Davey
Allison, pole-starter Alan
Wallace and 126 ahead of the
third-place Earnhardt.
The caution flags came early
and often on the rough and
treacherous oval.
Brad Noffsinger and Dave
Madcr III tangled on the back-
stretch on the second lap, bring-
ing out the first yellow flag and
setting the tone for the night.
Other entries finding the walls
at Bristol included Rick Wilson,
Butch Miller, Bobby Hillin jr
Dave Marcis, Den Schrader, Lake
Speed and Phil Parsons.
In another incident, Elliott
nudged Dale Jarrett into the wall
as the two headed side-by-side
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SERVED THIS TL'ES WED. & THURS. 11 A.M. - 9 P.M.
758-0327105 Airport Rd.
2 took off pretty good, " Earnhardt
said. "That was my ace in the hole.
i ft
Elliott, who took over the Win-
: ston Cup point lead with his scc-
fond-place finish, said, "We did
everything we needed to do to-
on the lead lap on his 114th trip
around the short oval.
The aggressive driver got back
to seventh place before another
flat tire sent him to the pits on lap
168, costing him nearly two laps.
Again he was able to use cau-
� night to win this race, but we came tion periods to get back among the
up just a little short. leaders by lap 243. From that
� "I just wish wc would have had point on, Earnhardt appeared to
� a few better breaks to go our way have the fastest cars on the race-
up the driver's scat to Larry Pear-
son on lap 209, trailing the leaders
by a lap. Wallace was suffering
from a sore neck after crashing in
practice Friday and spending Fri-
day night under observation in a
Bristol hospital.
Pearson wound up ninth, with
the points going to Wallace. But
Elliott moved into the season lead
with 3,027 points, 16 ahead of
into him hard.
Another accident came on lap
253 when Allison and Brett Bod-
ine, both running a lap down,
came together on the main
straightaway and lost control.
Bodine slid down the track and
Allison slid into him. Rodney
Combs then slid up and tapped
the front of Allison's car.
Golfer hit with course antics
THGRGBGL
East Carolina University's National Award
Wining Literary-Art Magazine
IS NOW ACCEFriNG APPLICATIONS
FOR ART DIRECTOR.
LAYOUT EXPERIENCE IS ESSENTIAL.
APPLICATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED
IN THE MEDIA BOARD
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APPLICATIONS SHOULD BE
TURNED IN NO LATER THAN
THURSDAY, SEPT. 1, 5:00 P.M.
757-6502
i OWENSBORO, Ky. (AP) Den-
:nis Walters can hit golf balls two
:at a time or with a raw egg sitting
:on top of one and not break the
egg-
: He can hit balls blindfolded or
�with a paper cup covering them.
: But one thing remains constant.
�Walters always hits the ball far
:and straight.
j A pretty mean feat. Meaner still
� for a man who is a paraplegic and
�makes said shots while strapped
�into a swivel seat on the passenger
jside of a golf cart.
: Welcome to the Dennis Walters'

:Golf Show.
� Walters' resume shows he
�played golf at North Texas Uni-
�vcrsity, finished 11th in the U.S.
: National Amateur Champion-
ships and played the pro mini-
jtour and the Sourth African cir-
jcuit.
� He had hopes of qualifying for
� the PGA Tour, but failed in his
� first qualifying attempt. Just be-
: fore his second attempt in 1974, he
: was involved in a freak golf cart
: accident.
j Playing on a mountainous
j course in New jersey, Walters
� came down a steep hill with a
� sharp curve. He hit the brake
� pedal, but the brakes failed and
; he cart overturned. Walters'
: spine was damaged, paralyzing
: him from the waist down.
: But Walters, 24 at the time,
I didn't know the extent of his in-
� jury tor the next three for four
� months.
"I figured I was going to get
� better he said. He didn't.
"I didn't know what I was sup-
: posed to do, " he said. "I was so
j confused. I was so angry, so mad.
: I don't think you ever get over it.
: I haven't. All I'm trying to do is
: make the best of a bad situation
: because I know ifs not going to go
� away
S When he started getting a little
� better physically, he started hit-
: ting balls out of a wheelchair into
� a net.
"The biggest thing is that I love
: to play golf he said. "I lost a lot
� of things, but I wasn't about to
: give this up. I had to figure out a
5 way 1 could do it. I thought about
: things, and this is what I came up
�with
He got the idea for his seat by
sitting on a barstool and swinging
back and fourth. The legs were cut
off and attached to a cart. Then he
began watching films of trick-shot
artists. He started working on
those, and others he invented,
using clubs made of different
materials and varying lengths.
Walters, 38, has been doing his
show of 10 years, mixing humor
with his athletic skill. He is now
up to about 75 shows a year.
He frequently plays nine holes
and, on occasion, 18. He shoots in
the mid-to high-70s for 18.
"People told me it would be
impossible for me to play golf
(after the accident), " he said. "If
anybody sees this and they think
there's something they think is
impossible, it shows that if they
persevere, success can be
achieved. When you think about
it, there are very few things that
arc impossible. "
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GREENVILLE
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking application for
Day-Student Representative
for the 1988-89 Term
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committe Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Full-Time Student
Reside Off Campus
Independent
Deadline To Apply: Friday, September 9f 1988
COPIES
5
(Self Seruice 8 12k 11 White Bond)
L
758-2400
FRST COPIES FOR FRST TIMES
(NEHT TO CHIC0S IN THE 6EB06ET0UIN SHOPS)
SGA ELECTIONS
�All Positions Open:
Day Reps
Dorm Reps
Class Officer Positions
�Filing Date - August 26th - September 2nd
SGA Office Room 244
Mendenhall Student Center
�Mandatory Meeting For All Candidates
Will Be September 6th at 7:00 p.m.
in Room 221, Mendenhall Student Center
�Campaigning to begin September 7th - September 13th
ELECTION DATE - SEPTEMBER 14, 1988 - 9 A.M. - 6 P.M.
LAD
(AP) - Philadelphia provkj
plenty of brotherly love to the
Angeles Dodgers this season
The Dodgers entered the vs ej
end series with the Phillies havi
lost three straight games and tl
lead being threatened in the
tional League West
On Sunday, John Tudor
lowed four hits in seven mm
as the Dodgers defeated the P
lies 5-0 for a sweep of the thi
game series. It was the I i
11 th straight victory over the P
lies this year, the onlv
in Los Angeles
The Dodgers sv
games in Phila.
sented the first time a
done that since Veterans
opened in 1971.
Los Angeles left I
with a 5 12-gan
ond-place Houston
over San Francw
On Saturday, L,
Philadelphia 4 2 I -
Lasorda's IjOOl . ton
Dodgers' manag -
Tudor, 8-6, struck
walked one in imj -
ord against the Phiil
to 4-0 with a i -
average. He's 12-4
against them
"I don't understand
Graf, Swe
NEW YORK ��
Slams mav be com
1988 U.S. Open
Graf, the other bv a
Graf can becon-u.
in 18 years to win the four m
tennis championsh
year.
Her quest has been v.
cized. Another p
not
If Mats Wilander St
Edberg or a lesser-k-
wins the Open, it v.
den a sweep of the
titles in 1988. Wilander
Australian and French Opi
while Edberg beat Bi ris Becki
win the Wimbledon cl
ship.
Wilander and Edb( -
action when the US I j
its two-week run at the Kal
i Tennis Center.
Wilander, seeded second
hind Ivan Lendl, iypt
center court aga Arr
Greg Holmes d berg
third, played I
Czechoslovak1,
stand court.
Other seeded men s
play today were N
13 Jonas Svenssor v
Gomez and No 16
Becker met Todd N
Taylor su
CHICAGO I AH - La
Taylor, the All-Pro I.
the New York Giant
pended from the Nat-
ball League team tor vk
league's substance abuse
The Chicago Tribune, in u
editions, said two NFI -
the newspaper did not iderj
confirmed the suspension o
lor and "more than two
unidentified players
r
v
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tfcMurtry misplayed a
?n walked three consecu-
hers in the 11th inning
to force in the go-ahead
the Toronto Blue Jays
jnd beat the Texas Rangers
irtrv's error allowed Nel-
riano to reach and
r 2-2, balked him to
McMurtry then walked
?rnandez, Lloyd Moseby,
the bases, and walked
ee on four pitches to
iriano.
snke, 2-3, pitched 3 1-3
l one-hit relief, striking
ing Seafood
aurant
Special"
s vDiyy
IMP
1 KM -9 T.M.
ort Rd.
B�L
ational Award
Magazine
'plications
tor.
essential.
obtained
IOARD
:ICE
HE
tILDING.
ULD BE
ER THAN
L 5:00 P.M.
rs
ntative
nt Union President
te Chairpersons
jent Union Budget
te Student Union
ber 9, 1988


D
i
NS
er 2nd
lates
tter
itember 13th
l.M. � 6 P.M.
LA Dodgers sweep Phillies
(AP) - Philadelphia provided said of his success against Phila-
plenty of brotherly love to the Los delphia. "I can't understand why
Angeles Dodgers this season. they don't score more runs. I
The Dodgers entered the week- know they're not playing well
end series with the Phillies having and 1 guess slumps are conta-
lost three straight games and their gious, but I really don't like to face
lead being threatened in the Na- them
tional League West. Elsewhere in the NL, it was
On Sunday, John Tudor al- Pittsburgh 4, Houston 3; San
lowed four hits in seven innings Francisco 7, New York 4; St. Louis
as the Dodgers defeated the Phil- 5, Cincinnati 3: Atlanta 4, Chicago
lies 5-0 for a sweep of the three- 2; and San Diego 5, Montreal 3.
game series. It was the Dodgers' The loss was the Phillies' fifth
11th straight victory over the Phil- straight and the 13th and 14
lies this year, the only loss coming games,
in Los Angeles. Franklin Stubbs' three-run
The Dodgers' sweep of all six double in the first inning gave the
games in Philadelphia repre- Dodgers a 3-0 lead.
sented the first time a visitor has
done that since Veterans Stadium
opened in 1971.
Los Angeles left Philadelphia
with a 5 12-game lead over sec-
ond-place Houston and 6 12
over San Francisco.
They got three runs on one
base hit and against a pitcher like
Tudor, right away you're in
trouble Phillies manager Lee
Elia said. "His fastball isn't that
overpowering, but he changes
speeds and hits corners. He really
On Saturday, Los Angeles beat knows how t u h
Philadelphia 4-2 for Tom
Lasorda's 1,000th victory as the
Dodgers' manager.
Tudor, 8-6, struck out five and
walked one in improving his rec-
ord against the Phillies this season
to 4-0 with a 0.68 earned run
average. He's 12-4 lifetime
against them.
"I don't understand it Tudor
And, he knows how to beat the
Phillies.
Pirates 4, Astros 3
Pittsburgh rallied for three runs
in the eighth inning to beat Hous-
ton at the Astrodome.
Doug Drabek, 13-6, pitched
seven innings, allowing two runs
and six hits, jim Gott pitched two
innings for his 27th save.
Trailing 2-1 against starter
Danny Darwin, pinch-hitter John
Cangelosi led off with a walk and
Gary Redus, hitting for Drabek,
was hit by a pitch, bringing on
reliever Juan Agosto. One out
later, pinch-hitter Jose Lind
singled in Cangelosi and Andy
Van Slyke singled in Redus. The
Pirates scored the third run of the
inning on reliever Larry
Andersen's throwing error, al-
lowing Lind to score.
Giants 7, Mcts 4
San Francisco scores four runs
in the ninth inning off reliever
Roger McDowell to beat New
York at Shea Stadium.
The Giants stopped their four-
game losing streak and won the
season series against the Mcts, 8-
4.
The Giants loaded the bases
with one out in the ninth and
McDowell hit Joel Youngblood
with a pitch to force in a run. Kirk
Manwaring followed with a
three-run single.
Cardinals 5, Reds 3
Tony Pena hit a three-run
homer in the sixth inning off Tom
Browning as St. Louis beat Cin-
cinnati at Riverfront Stadium.
Bob Forsch, 9-4, allowed six hits
in six-plus innings for his third
consecutive victory. Forsch is 5-1
in his last six starts, allowing just
10 earned runs. Ken Dayley
pitched 2 2-3 innings of one-hit
ball and Todd Worrell got the last
out for his 26th save.
Braves 4, Cubs 2
Rookie John Smoltz allowed
four hits in eight innings and
doubled to key the winning rally
as Atlanta beat visiting Chicago.
With the Cubs leading 2-1,
Smoltz led off the fifth with a
double, and two outs later, scored
on Gerald Perry's single. The
Braves then loaded the bases and
Paul Runge walked to force in the
go-ahead am.
Padres 5, Expos 3
Tim Flanncry went 4-for-4 and
pinch-hitter Keith Moreland's
sacrifice fly snapped a ninth-in-
ning tie, lifting San Diego past
Montreal at Olympic Stadium.
With the score tied 3-3, Roberto
Alomar walked with one out off
reliever Ncal Heaton and ad-
vanced to third on Tony Gwynn's
single. Gwynn moved to second
on the relay and Carmelo Marti-
nez was intentionally walked.
Graf, Sweden goes for a grand slam victory
NEW YORK (AP) - Two Grand Diego, Svensson faced Todd
Slams may be completed at the Witsken of Carmel, Ind Gomez
1988 U.S. Open - one by Steffi was paired against Javier Sanchez
Graf, the other by a country. of Spain and McEnroe played
Graf can become the first player Leonardo Lavalle of Mexico,
in 18 years to win the four major Six women's seeds were sched-
tennischampionshipsinthesame uled to play today -No.5Gabriela
year. Sabatini, No. 8 Natalia Zvereva,
Her quest has been well publi- No. 9 Lori McNeil, No. 10 Claudia
cized. Another possible Slam has Kohdc-Kilsch, No. 11 Zina Garri-
Mats Wilander, Stefan
son and No. 16 Larisa Savchenko.
Sabatini played Bettina Fulco of
not.
If
Edberg or a lesser-known Swede Argentina, Zvereva met Kim
wins the Open, it will give Swe- Steinmetzof St. Louis and McNeil
den a sweep of the major men's faced Iva Budarova of Czechoslo-
titles in 1988. Wilander won the vakia. In other matches, it was
Australian and French Opens, Kohde-Kilsch vs. Angeliki Kancl-
while Edberg beat Boris Becker to lopoulou of Greece, Garrison vs.
win the Wimbledon champion- Nicole Provis of Australia and
ship. Savchenko vs. Laura Golarsa of
1969, and Margaret Court in 1970.
Lendl hasn't won any Grand
Slam events this year, but he is
seeking his fourth straight U.S.
title. The last man to win four in a
row was Bill Tilden, who cap-
tured six straight from 1920-25.
"Four in a row would be nice
Lendl said, "but I'm not really
thinking of that. I'm just focusing
on trying to win the tournament
To do that, he may have to beat
Andre Agassi in the semifinals.
The 18-year-old from Las Ve-
gas, Nov has won seven tourna-
ments this year and risen from
No. 25 to No. 4 in the world rank-
ings.
"I haven't won a Grand Slam
tournament vet. If I do it thisearlv,
it would be icing on the cake he
said.
Wilander and Edberg were in
action when the U.S. Open started
its two-week run at the National
LTennis Center.
' Wilander seeded second "be-
hind Ivan Lendl, opened play on
center court against American
Greg Holmes. Edberg, seeded
third, played Libor Pimek of
Czechoslovakia on the grand-
stand court.
Other seeded men scheduled to
play today were No. 5 Becker, No.
13 Jonas Svensson, No. 14 Andres
Gomez and No. 16 John McEnroe.
Becker met Todd Nelson of San
Italy.
The top four women's seeds -
Graf, Martina Navratilova, Chris
Evert and Pam Shriver - att
scheduled to play Tuesday.
Navratilova has won four of the
last five U.S. Opens, including the
last two. But Graf enters the tour-
nament as the heavy favorite,
having lost only one set in Grand
Slam competition this year.
If Graf wins, she will become
only the fifth player to win the
Grand Slam. The others were Don
Budge in 1938, Maureen Connolly
in 1953, Rod Laver in 1962 and
Taylor suspended
CHICAGO (AP) - Lawrence The report said suspension will
Taylor, the All-Pro linebacker for be announced by Commissioner
the New York Giants, will be sus- Pete Rozelle.
pended from the National Foot- Taylor and the others will miss
ball League team for violating the four games of the regular season,
league's substance abuse policy. which starts Sept. 4, the Tribune
The Chicago Tribune, in today's reported,
editions, said two NFL sources The Giants begin their season
the newspaper did not identify, Monday night, Sept. 5, against the
confirmed the suspension of Tay- Washington Redskins - last year's
lor and "more than two" other Super Bowl champions,
unidentified players.
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)
16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30,1988

It
tf
Brewers in cartoon land
MILWAUKEE (AP) - Tom Tre-
belhom could have been thinking
about the old cartoon - the one
where the stadium announcer
said: "Playing first base, Bugs
Bunny. Second base, Bugs Bunny.
Third base, Bugs Bunny "
The Milwaukee Brewers man-
Mike Hcnneman in the seventh. that he was in the third spot, lineup
But Trebelhorn's lineup card That's fine. I mean you can have Reilly acknowledged differ-
smacked of Looney Tunes. all Yount's in your lineup, but ences of opinion, even among the
"That's the strangest one I've then thcre all out except the real four umpires,
had in 17 years in this business one "Obviously there was a little
home plate umpire Mike Reilly With the Brewers taking the doubt among us because we had
said. field in the top of the third, the never seen it before he said.
Yount popped out to second in umpire crew held up play for 21 "I goofed Trebelhorn said. "I
ager had Robin Yount batting the first inning. After Young lined minutes discussing the situation stupidly wrote out the fifth spot
third and playing center field out to shortstop in the second, before agreeing with Anderson with Yount's name instead of
Sunday against the Detroit Tigers. Tigers manager Sparky Anderson and dismissing Trebelhorn's ar- Young's. I checked it and didn't
He also had Yount batting fifth as brought the lineup error to the gument that there were no see it and I now have one of.my
attentionof Reilly. grounds to remove Yount from embarrassing moments in base-
Anderson argued that Yount, the game. ball. It's the first time I've done
the Brewers' career leader with "They approved Yount as the that and I guarantee I'll never do it
XX3 RBI, should be out of the third hitter said Trebelhorn, again Milwaukee announced it
the designated hitter, instead of
Mike Young, the intended DH.
"I can spell better than that
said Trebelhorn, a schoolteacher
in the offseason.
Milwaukee's 12-10 victory over
the Detroit Tigers Sunday was
wacky enough. The Brewers
battled back from 5-0 and 9-4 defi-
game because Young had, in ef-
fect, pinch hit for him.
"I just said he's out of the game
automatically Anderson said.
"Once you pinch hit for a batter,
who was ejected in the ensuing was playing under protest, but
argument. "He made an out and the ensuing innings might have
was allowed to go into center made Anderson think twiceabout
field, and Young was allowed to what he had done,
go up as the DH. Once the other Yount's replacement, Jim Ad-
cits and snapped a 10-10 tie on he can never go back in. Young ciub allows players to bat in that duci, hit a double, single and sac
Paul Molitor's two-run homer off pinch hit for Yount. I don't care order, that becomes the official rifice fly, driving in two runs.
ECU-NCSU discusses the possibility
of resuming series in the future
RALEIGH (AP) - North Caro-
lina State and East Carolina both
open their respective football sea-
sons Saturday, the only strange
thing being they won't be playing
one another for the first time in 18
seasons.
"There's no question the game
will be missed said N.C. State
Athletic Director Jim Valvano. "1
alreadv miss it, and I think that's
true for most football fans in this
area
"It was a headliner regional
event that was capable of drawing
60,000 or more fans on an annual
basis. It served as a tremendous
launching device for football in
this state. In that regard what it
generated in interest for college
football is hard to put a price tag
on. But it was significant
The Pirates and Wolfpack
played for 18 straight seasons
1970 through 19S7, but Saturday's
game was cancelled in the wake of
a melee following East Carolina's
32-14 victory last season. Several
fans and an NCSU security officer must be made to play some games
were injured and damage was in Greenville.
done at the stadium.
Officials at both schools would
not rule out resuming the scries,
but N.C. State's future schedules
are filled through the 1993 season,
according to Valvano.
"Our earliest possible opening
is in 1994 Valvano said. "But
then on the 1995 schedule, we're
booked completely. What could Carolina's operating budget for
happen, if it could be worked to
the satisfaction of both schools,
might be a possible 'test' game in
1994, and then a renewal agree-
ment beginning in 1996
Valvano said he and ECU Ath-
letic Director Dave Hart Jr. had
discussed future games.
"We still have reservations
about making it home-and-
home Vah ino said. "But we are
talking
Hart told The News and Ob-
server oi Raleigh ECU was "ex-
tremely" interested in a revival
but he reiterated arrangements
encompassed more than dollars
and cents, however.
"Particularly Hart said, "if we State's games against East
enlarge our stadium to 50,000 Carolina accounted for the Nos. 1,
seats, which is a challenge we 2,4,6,7,9,11 and 12 largest draws
fully intend to meet" in Carter-Finley history.
N.C. State, which led the series Hart said that the loss of a re-
12-6, was the host for all 18 games gional rival made an impact on
in Carter-Finley Stadium. ECU's program.
Hart said the N.C. State game "Ideally, we would like to play
constituted a large portion of East all four other Division I-A schools
each season Hart said. "And I
don't think that games against
some other in-state schools can be
ruled out. We are pursuing some
interest in those areas
Hart would not specify which
schools, but discussions report-
edly have been held with Duke,
Wake Forest and Appalachian
State, a Division I-AA team.
Hart said he hoped long-range
contracts would be secured with
Virginia Tech and South Carolina.
Outside the area, the Pirates are
believed to be pursuing series
with Navy, Rutgers, Boston Col-
lege and Army.
football. By comparison to the
$202,000 payoff last season, the
Pirates made about $125,000 from
their share of the College Football
Association television package
and grossed $150,000 from a 1986
trip to Auburn.
Valvano said that although this
season's opener against Western
Carolina probably would not
draw as many people, State stood
to realize more of a profit. State
will pay Western Carolina
$75,000 to play in Carter-Finley.
Valvano noted the scries, which
often opened the football season,
Reid wins World Championship of golf,
Beating Tom Watson in a rainy playoff
AKRON, Ohio (AP) - The
themes from Mike Reid and Tom
Watson were adversity and de-
feat.
But, since this was the World
Series of Golf, the talk eventually
got around to birdies and bogeys.
"It is not the birdies you make to
win, it's the bogeys you make to
lose Reid said.
That's the way it turned out.
Watson made a bogey and he
lost.
Reid made a par and he won on
the first playoff hole Sunday of the
rain-delayed tournament.
Watson - the five-time British
Open champion, once the greatest
player in the game and a recent
inductee into the World Golf Hall
of Fame - went head to head with
Reid, a shy, soft-spoken man
whose major claim to fame was
that he'd won $1 million without
winning a tournament.
It's David and Goliath.
It's one of the great players of all
time against that skinny little guy
who sweated out 11 years on the
PGA Tour before he finally crept
in there and won a golf tourna-
ment in Tucson last season.
The little guy won.
Watson let him off the hook on
the first playoff hole, pushing a
30-inch second putt for a three-
putt bogey, while Reid got it
down in two for the routine par.
The birdie didn't win.
But the bogey lost.
"It's disappointing said Wat-
son, winner of only one title in the
last tour years. missed a short par putt on the first
"It's disappointing said Wat- playoff hole.
son, a five-time British Open "I can't believe it Reid said,
champ who was seeking his 33rd "I'm the most surprised guy
American tour title. here
"It's disappointing in that 1 With the victory, he won
didn't make it happen when I had $162,000. That was the prize Wat-
a chance to make it happen he son needed to pass Jack Nicklaus
said. and become the No. 1 career
"My putter let me down a little money-winner,
bit Watson repeated, then let As it was. Watson won $97 200.
some of the disappointment and It pushed his career earnings to
frustration creep through as he $4,971,113, still behind Nicklaus'
added:
"But that's been the norm for
Tom Watson here lately. And he
doesn't like it any better than
anybody else
'But in defeat you have to take
leading $5,002,824.
"It's not the amount of money
you win. It's the number of titles
you win that your career will be
judged by Watson said.
Ian Baker-Finch, a 27-year-old
positives. I played well. I hit the Australian hoping to play the
ball well. For the most part I
putted well. 1 have to take that and
build on it he said.
Reid spoke of adversity and
positive thinking.
"You have to look at the chal-
lenges as opportunities he said.
"I'm not supposed to win on
this golf course. It's too long. It's
raining. They're saying it's rain-
ing and the golf course is playing
long and Mike Reid is a short hit-
ter.
"And I'm saying it's more op-
portunities. A challenge is an
opportunity and they're talking
about adversities and I'm saying
'Give me more adversities
He got them. Rain. Long course.
Great players in contention. He
beat them all. He won with a rou-
tine par when the great player
American Tour, had a piece of the
lead until he bogcyed the final
two holes and dropped back into
a tie for third with Larry Nelson at
277. Baker-Finch and Nelson each
had a 71.
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AST RUTHERFORD, N.J
�) - Nebraska's football team
s ailing prior to Saturday
ht's season-opening Kickofl
issic, but not as much as Texas
CM was hurting when it was
ler.
Jot only did the second-rani
rnhuskers polish off the N
�ies 23-14, they also left them
th a long list of walking
funded.
ones
iUFORD. Ga AP)
ics almost lot what she callec
e biggest round of her profe
bnal career slip away
j'i played poorly ti day,but 1 du
tfold she said "Ipia
Lough. I beat the rest
IAfter blowing a five-sh A
Jncsused a 12-fi t birdieputto
le 16th green to bn ak
jpe-way logjam and wenl nl
in the $265,000
lampionship Sunday.
She garnered the ?- '
ize with a closii
kat left her with a 9-un
btal for four trips aroui
ffly, 6,107-yard Stouffer Pine Isl
lesort course
1 She left some of the game - I
Icrformers in her wake,
ig playing partner Nancy
ie Hall oi Famer who appeare
ornhus
hemselv
(AP) - Thanks to an lmpr
lctorv over Texas A&M in 1
�ason-opening Kickoff C
'cond-ranked Nebraska i
pa good deal of gn ur I
to. 1 Florida State in the
ssociated Tress regular
ollege football poll.
Nebraska's 23-14 tr
heonlv game played I
mocked the Aggiesout of the!
Ten, dropping them fi
Uth.
Florida State, which op
Sdiiirday night again-
national champion V
ceived 41 oi 53 first-pl
America
eady to
�NEW YORK (AP) rhe co
oom battle is over No v the ya
acing battle begins.
After a year of legal mar
ng, the America s Cup -
lown between Dennis Conner
tars & Stripes and Michael Fa
Jew Zealand is scheduled to stai
?pt. 7 oii the coast of San I
"I'm happy it's finally g ng :J
edecided on the water ins! I
n the courtroomnner sail
'uesday. "I think even oneisglaj
bout that, with the p ss
option oi New Zealand. "
INew Zealand enters the best-
hree series as a heavy und.
because oi a judge's ruling '
ared the way for Conner to rad
ijmulhhull 60-foot catamaraj
Ifainst Fav's monohuil 120-fod
:p. Traditionally, thl
erica's Cup has been
ted in 12-meter boats.
ome sailors say matchinj
nner's 6,000-pound boaj
�ainst Fay's 70.000-pound yacrj
like racing a Ferrari against
pickup truck. But Conner says hi
Meed advantage may be offset bj
Lewis named

(AD Scott Lewis, a part-tirrj
sistant basketball coach at Eaj
irolina last season, was prJ
jted Wednesday to full-time a
Jtant under Tirate coach Mil
tbele.
?wis replaces Dan Bell, wi
hired as the new head coa
Northwestern State in Loui;
iiia last week. ,
tewis plaved four years on t
jllcgiate level under Steele
fcFaul University, where he w
jfour-vear starter leading tl
ers to four consecutive HMM
isonsand one trip to the NCj
vision 111 final four.
Lewis will be involved in
hases of the Firate basketb
program, including recruitif
id day-to-day operations, Stc





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30,1988 17
Nebraska wins their second classic game
lEAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.
(AP) - Nebraska's football team
das ailing prior to Saturday
night's season-opening Kickoff
classic, but not as much as Texas
AJ&M was hurting when it was
ojrer.
Not only did the second-ranked
Cprnhuskers polish off the No. 10
Aggies 23-14, they also left them
with a long list of walking
wounded.
Meanwhile, Nebraska played
without tailback Tyreese Knox,
placekicker Chris Drennan, nose
guard Lawrence Pete and center
Jake Young. One could hardly tell
they were missing.
Ken Clark filled in for Knox and
carried 20 times for 80 yards in his
first collegiate start, including a 1 -
yard run in the third quarter that
put the Cornhuskcrs ahead to
stay, 12-7. His backup, Terry
Rodgers, rushed for 65 yards on
10 carries.
Gregg Barrios, who had never
attempted a field goal at the var-
sity level and looked it when he
shanked a 35-yardcr early in the
game, later tied a Kickoff Classic
record by connecting from 44, 38
and 48 yards, the last one the long-
est in the game's six-year history.
Replacement center Jeff Ander-
son handled the snap exchange
well with quarterback Steve Tay-
lor, and nose guard Mike Murray
was an integral part ot a detense
that held the Aggies to 227 total
yards.
"I'm on Cloud 9 said Barrios,
whose first two field goals trig-
gered Nebraska's comeback from
a 7-0 first-quarter deficit.
"This is something every kicker
dreams about. The 48-yarder was
the longest I've ever made. I was
nervous on the first one, and I
guess it showed, but by the time I
hit the second one I knew what to
expect
After being held to 100 yards in
the first half, Nebraska got rolling
in the third quarter behind Taylor,
who was voted the game's out-
standing player after completing
11 of 22 passes for 125 yards -
including a 20-yard touchdown to
tight end Todd Millikan early in
the final period that gave Ne-
braska a 20-7 lead - and rushing 18
times for 34 yards.
Taylor thus became the top
rushing quarterback in Nebraska
history with 1,333 yards, 16 more
than Turner Gill.
Meanwhile, Texas A&M sopho-
more Bucky Richardson, under
severe pressure most of the time,
managed only five completions -
one in the second half - in 17 at-
tempts for 42 yards.
Jones edges to World win
BUFORD, Ga. (AF) - Rosie
(jnes almost let what she called
i'io biggest round of her profes-
sional career slip away.
ayed poorly today,but I did
to be on her way to her 40th pro
victory when she wrested the lead
from Jones on the eighth hole.
"Nancy's a great competitor
Jones said. "I love her to death. 1
"It's tough playing with
Nancy she said. "When she's
hot, it's intimidating and it's
scary
not fold she said. "I played good love beating her more, though
ejtough. 1 beat the rest
; After blowing a five-shot lead,
dnes used a 12-foot birdie putt on
tie lMh green to break out of a
!ive-wav logjam and went on to
win the $265,000 LPGA World
Championship Sunday.
She garnered the $81,500 first
prize with a closing 2-over-par 74
that left her with a 9-under 279
total for four trips around the
hilly, 6,107-yard Stoutfer Pine Isle
Resort course.
She left some of the game's top
performers in her wake, includ-
Lopoz, who started the day not handling a five-shot lead very
with two birdies, faded in the well at all.
Sherri Turner and Patty Shcchan, she birdied the last hole last year
both of whom had eagles on the to beat Lopez by one shot.
16th to highlight their closing 70s. "I'm not pleased with the way I
Jones appeared ready to make handled the pressure she said,
this a stroll in the park, rolling in a "I think I learned a lot. At times
12-foot birdie putt on the first I thought I was aggressive. At
hole. times I thought I was a real
"It was unbelievable I made the wimp
putt because I was nervous she Jones became the first player to
said. "I was scared. I was really win this event in her first appear-
ance since the initial World
stretch with bogeys on two of the
last four holes. She fell into a
three-way tie for third, one shot
behind the best scorer of the day,
U.S. Open champion Liselotte
Neumann of Sweden.
Neumann, who started the day
nine shots back, closed with a 6-
under 66 and claimed the $43,000
ing playing partner Nancy Lopez, second prize with a 280 total.
the Hall oi Famer who appeared Lopez, 71, fell into a tie with
"I wasn't playing my game. I
don't know where Rosie was.
Finally on 16 I canned one. That
kept me in it
Actually it gave her the third
victory of her seven-year career,
and by far the most important.
She won the USX Classic earlier
this year and will defend this
week her only other Tour
triumph, the Rail Classic, where
Championship nine years ago.
Neumann got her round going
on the back side to move into
contention, scoring birdies on five
holes in a six-hole stretch.
"I thought it could be a playoff,
bu 11 knew they had hole No. 16 to
play Neumann said.
"When I started the round I
didn't even dream I'd be up
there she said. 'To finish second
alone is wonderful
Cornhuskers win, close gap between
themselves and top-ranked Seminoles
(AP)-Thanks to an impressive and 1,032 of a possible 11,130 with three first-place ballots and
victory over Texas A&M in the points from a nationwide panel of 832 pointsand UCLA isagain fifth
season-opening Kickoff Classic, sports writers and sportscasters. with two first-place votes and 754
-ocond-ranked Nebraska made Nebraska received four first- points.
i:p a good deal of ground on idle, place votes and 939 points. However, Miami moved up
In the preseason poll, with 60 from eighth'to sixth with one first-
voters participating, Florida State place vote and 714 points. Auburn
led Nebraska 44-2 in first-place remained No. 7 with 707 points
votes and 1,161-952 in total and Southern Cal dropped from
points, sixth toeighth with one first-place
Although this week's 20 ranked vote and 687 points,
teams are the same as the prcsea- lowa held onto ninth place with
son poll, there was some shuffling 619 points and Michigan moved
in the order. Up from 11th to 10th with 562
Oklahoma held onto third place� points.
with one first-place vote and 845
points, Clemson remained fourth
No. 1 Florida State in the first
Associated Press regular-season
college football poll.
Nebraska's 23-14 triumph in
:he only game played thus far also
nocked the Aggies out of the Top
Ten, dropping them from 10th to
11th.
Florida State, which opens next
Saturday nig,ht against defending
national champion Miami, re-
ceived 41 of 53 first-place votes
The Second Ten consists of
Texas A&M, Georgia, Notre
Dame, Alabama, Michigan State,
West Virginia, LSU, Tennessee,
South Carolina and Penn State.
The preseason Second Ten had
Michigan, Georgia, Notre Dame,
Alabama, Michigan State, West
Virginia, Tennessee, LSU, South
Carolina and Penn State.
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America's Cup is
ready to start racing
NEW YORK (AP) The court-
� om battle is over.Now the yacht
racing battle begins.
After a year of legal maneuver-
ing, the America's Cup show-
down between Dennis Conner's
Stars & Stripes and Michael Fay's
New Zealand is scheduled to start
Sept 7 off the coast of San Diego.
"I'm happy it's finally going to
be decided on the water instead of
in the courtroom, " Conner said
Tuesday. "I think everyone is glad
about that, with the possible ex-
ception of New Zealand. "
New Zealand enters the best-of
mechanical problems.
Because the legal dispute over
the rules wasn't resolved until last
month, Conner has had less time
to prepare than he did in 1987,
when he won back the Cup he had
lost in 1983.
"Last time we had seven
months. This time, it's about six
weeks, " he said. "We haven't
even had a real race yet. Our first
race in this boat will be the
America's Cup. "
The lengthy court case con-
fused the public and shook up the
tradition-bound sport. But Con-
tfjMMMl � t n � - 1 y �� ��
three series as a heavy underdog nucr yS thu contruov,crSy ma� ta
because of a judge's'ruling that the "� thinS that s cver haP"
4ared the way for Conner to race P1" to yacht racing,
ijmultihull 60-foot catamaran
iiainst Fay's monohull 120-foot
si)op. Traditionally, the
America's Cup has been con-
utcd in 12-meter boats.
jSome sailors say matching
(nner's 6,000-pound boat
against Fay's 70,000-pound yacht
is! like racing a Ferrari against a
pickup truck. But Conner says his
�eed advantage may be offset by
SHIRT COUPON
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CLEANED
FOR
This coupon must be presented
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Lewis named
j(AP) Scott Lewis, a part-time
distant basketball coach at East
Carolina last season, was pro-
mpted Wednesday to full-time as-
sistant under Pirate coach Mike
Sticele.
Lewis replaces Dan Bell, who
wfes hired as the new head coach
al Northwestern State in Louisi-

ara last week.
ewis played four years on the
collegiate level under Steele at
DbPaul University, where he was
a ; four-year starter leading the
Tigers to four consecutive 20-win
sdasons and one trip to the NCAA
Division 111 final four.
Lewis will be involved in all
phases of the Pirate basketball
program, including recruiting
and day-to-day operations, Steele
said.
Tues: Shot Night
Your favorite liquor shot $1.00
Wednesday, August 31st
Elbo - Sweet Willy's
Bikini Contest
1st Place $100
2nd Place $50
3rd Place $25
All winners receive suntanning package,
free t-shirts, and door prizes
Wed: Hunt the lizard man
Try our new lizard man drink
Thur: Ladies Night
Ladies free all night
Elbo is a private club for members and guests only.
Membership special $1.00 now thru Sept. 1, 1988





IS S1RO INI N
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Southern tradition
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Tuesday Wednesday Thurs
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For Rides and Information Please Call 757-0128
We are located at 500 E. 11th St.
Mr





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18 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST W. 1088
f
2L Southern 'Tradition
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We are located at 500 E. 11th St.





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Title
The East Carolinian, August 30, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 30, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.620
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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