The East Carolinian, August 25, 1988






Coming Next Week:
A feature story on the Usuals, a Local Greenville band.
FEATURES
An interview with Bill Shepperd of the Amatuers,
Greenville's very own reggae band.
SPORTS
A preview of the Pirate football season. The teams ,
players, and coaches.
She iiast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 13
Thursday, August 25,1988
Greenville, NC
22 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Education issue tops Gardner's agenda
By GRfcER BOWEN
J iXJit Writer
fim Gardner, the North Caro-
lina Republican eanidate for Lieu-
tenant Govcnerbelcives that edu-
cation, economics and drugs are
the major challenges he would
face as Licutentant Govcner.
Gardner, a native oi Rocky
Mount North Carolina, first
started his political carreer in-
volved in politics in 1963 when he
became involved in Senator
Gold water's campaign. At age 29,
he ran for Congress and received
48 percent of the vote which wasa
first for a republican eanidate at
that time.
Gardner was the 1965 state
Republican Partv Chairman and
in 1966, was elected to Congress.
In 1968 Gardner ran for Govcnor
and received 48 percent oi the
vote. Gardner was only 35 at the
time. Me thinks that North Caro-
lina needs two strong parties for
many reasons and is pleased that
the Republican Party in North
Carolina i growing.
'Politics are like business, it is
not competitive with one partv.
Two strong parties help keep both
honest and more in touch with the
people's needs he said.
Education will be Gardners'
top priority. "We need better
teachers in our classrooms and to
get better teachers, we need better
salaries said Gardner.
Govener Martin has placed
education at the top of priorities
as well. During Martin's years in
oiiko a percentage of the North
Carolina state budget has been
alotted towards education. Gard-
ner intends to continue this pro-
gram.
Economics is another area
Gardner wishes to improve. Even
though Business Week magzine
voted North Carolina as the
number 1 place in the U.S. to set
up a factory, Gardner said there is
a great deal still to be done.
Gardner would like to encour-
age more businesses to move to
North Carolina. In order to keep
North Carolina attractive to new
businesses, Gardner would like to
improve the roads. "If we are
going to develop as a state we
need better roads, particularly in
the east he said.
"I'd like to be a working part-
ner with the Govenor he said.
He wants to see the Govcnor have
veto power, and will encourage
such legislation. "Our govern-
ment was designed with a system
of checks and balances, that is
why the Govenor needs veto
power added Gardner. Elimi-
nation of the pork barrel legisla-
tion is another goal of Gardners.
Pork barrel legislation allows
members of the North Carolina
Legislature to appropriate thou-
sands of dollars to special projects
oi their choice.
The biggest problem facing our
state is drugs, according to Gard-
ner. "Drugs are the biggest men-
ace facing our state he said.
Gardner has a three-fold plan to
battle drugs in North Carolina.
The first part oi this plan is to
educate school children. Gardner
would like to see mandatory drug
education program in every
shcool. Me hopes that education
will help keep young people from
becoming drug abuscrs.
Gardner would like our state to
begin a bureau of drug enforce-
ment similar to the Drug Enforce-
ment Agency ,(DEA). This de-
partment would be set up to help
local police in their efforts to
combat the growing drug prob-
lem. Me would like to see wire
tapping and an investigative
grand jury be implimented as
well.
The third part of Gardners drug
plan would deal with punuish-
ment of drug dealers. Gardner
saiddrugs are so profitable that
there needs to be stricter punish-
ments so that drug'dealers will
think twice
Parole is the first area Gardner
would deal with. 'Taroleissolax,
that a criminal usually may only
serve but 10 or 15 percent of their
sentence said Gardner. Me
would like to sec there be no pa-
role for drug dealers.
"I'd like North Carolina to have
the toughest drug laws in the
nation said Gardner. A School
Yard bill twice as strict as the fed-
eral law is also part of Gardners'
plan to combat drugs. This bill
would be set up to sentence any-
one caught dealing drugs within
1000 yards of school yard 28 years
in jail with no parole.
"Drug dealers arc peddling
poison said Gardner. I le would
like the drug dealers who sold
drugs to a user who dies, because
of the drugs, to be given the death
penalty. Gardner hopes this will
discourage drug dealers form
coming to North Carolina.
"Any young person who has
the grades should be able to jiiorJ
college Gardner said. Gardner
said he would do everything he
could to help students receive
money for college. Me believes
that the finacial aid program was
abused by people who cither did
not need the money, or did not
pay it back.
Gardner encourages all stu-
dents to vote for the eanidate of
their choice. "Young people have
more to lose than anyone he
said. Me thinks that many stu-
dents do not realize that the deci-
sions made today in government
effect their future lives. "No one
will be more effected than the
people who are in college now
stated Gardener.
"I can make a meaningful con-
tribution to North Carolina right
now Gardner said and that is
why he is running for Lieutenant
Govenor.
Enrollment all-time high
By JOE HARRIS
c I Jitor
There are 15,500 students en-
rolled for the fall 1988 semester at
ECU, the most in the schools 81
year history.
As of August IS admissions had
a 5.3 percent increase in freshman
applications. This is after the
March 15 deadline as opposed to
last years deadline oi July 30.
This year the oiiicc of admis-
sion received 8,100 freshman ap-
plications, 6,880 were accepted
and 3,050 enrolled. Last vear 7,787
applications were submitted,
6,1 H (0 were accepted and 2,756 en-
rolled.
Transfer applications were cut-
down by design. This was done to
control growth. Only 1650 trans-
fer applications were submitted,
1,000 qualified, and 700 enrolled.
This is compared to last years fig-
ures of 1,800 submissions, 1,200
acceptances, and 750 to 800 enroll-
ments.
According to Eugene A.
Owens, Acting Director of Ad-
missions, this is an 11 percent
increase in the actual number of
applications accepted, or stu-
dents who qualify for admission,
and a 10 percent increase in stu-
dents who decided to attend.
Owens gave two theories for
the growth. He said, "There are
simply more, or a higher percent-
age of high school graduates than
in past years. Because so many
morcaregraduating, they want to
continue on with their education,
namely a four year degree. In es-
sence, they are qualified
The other main reason Owens
stated is, "the people enrolled
now, and the ones coming in are
the first generation of the baby-
boomers. These are the best edu-
cated people in the country and
they are cnstilling the idea of a 16
year education on their children.
Many kids grow up taking for
granted that after high school
they will go to college. The em-
phasis is clearly on education
The sudden growth, according
to Owens, goes against all trend
data. "Wc had to take all the data
and throw it out the door. The
phenomenon that we're experi-
encing is two-fold. One, whether
they realize or not, is that the stu-
dents are promoting the ECU
image. The other is the quality of
The registrar has been busy all
(Photo by Tom Walters, ECU Ph
students we have on campus
keeps climbing
"The school is also becoming
more attractive to students. We
have 120 to 150 majors, and nearly
200 academic programs, so there
is a good variety to choose from.
By having so many choices, 1 feel
we can cater to any prospective
students desires. We have all the
advantages of a large school and
summer. Here, one of the record 15,500 students registers
oto Lab)
yet the personality of a smal1
school said Owens.
Owens went on to say that ECU
is closing the image gap. He said,
"I strongly believe that every-
one from the greundskeepers to
the trustees have the responsibil-
itv to understand, demonstrate
'there is a lag of a period of years and carry the ECU image with
between what is happening, and
what the publics' perception is.
We have closed the party-school
gap image considerably. A big
contributor to this fact are the
student to faculty relations. "
them, either in a positive or nega-
tive way, whether they like it or
not. This is why ECU is changing
and growing in a positive way
said. Owens
Department sponsors symposium
Be sure to drop classes before it is too late. The last day to drop is
MondayOctober 3. (Photo by Tom Walters, ECU Photo Lab)
ECU News Bureau
BEAUFORT, N.C. - "Coastal
Cultural Heritage: 19th Century
Influences" is the theme of the
first North Carolina Maritime
Museum Sumposium to be held
here Oct. 23-25. The event is co-
sponsored by the N.C. Maritime
Museum and the East Carolina
University Division of Continu-
ing Education.
Sumposium sessions will focus
on seaside personalities, changes
in the coastline, the lifestyle of the
Outer Banks, coastal boats,
coastal architecture and events in
the history of the coastal region.
The symposium is designed for
persons with a personal or profes-
sional interest in the life and cul-
ture of North Carolina's coast,
said an ECU official.
Topics and speakers arc:
"Carteret County Characters
Nelson W. Taylor III, Morchcad
City attorney and native of
Beaufort: "Evaluation of the Dy-
namic North Carolina Coastal
Zone: Its Effect upon Our Cultural
Heritage Dr. Stanley Riggs, pro-
fessor of geology at ECU; "Wind,
Water and Song: Life on
Portsmouth Island and Core
Banks Constance Mason, N.C.
Maritime Museum curator-re-
searcher;
"By Their Boats Shall Ye Know
Them Michael Alford, curator
of maritime research, N.C. Mari-
time Museum; "By Ocean,
sounds, and Rivers: A Glimpse
into the Architectural Heritage of
the North Carolina Coast Dru-
cilla Haley York, head of the east-
ern office of the N.C. bivision of
Archives and History;
"The Establishment of a
Mormon Community at Harkers
Island, N.C, "Joel Hancock,
Harkers Island native and author
of a forthcoming book, "Strength-
ened by the Storm and "Not For
at All from America: The 19th
Century and Coastal Culture
Dr. Thomas Parramorc, associate
professor of history at Mcredity
College.
The symposium teatures sev-
eral tours of Beaufort's historic
area, social gatherings and meals,
among them a dinner cruise
aboard the "Carolina Princess
A Maritime Museum program,
"Traditional Trades and Pas-
times featuring local artisans
and musicians, will be offered
twice during the sumposium.
Heed warnings about the heat
By SEAN HERRING
Assistant News Editor
Low pressure systems from
the Great Lakes region has low-
ered temperatures in the area for
the time being, from the balmy
90's to the muggy 80's. Even so,
there are some safety precau-
tions that still should be taken
into consideration for animal
health care, during the heat and
humidity.
According to Dr. M.J. House
of the Animal Hospital of Pitt
County P.A "As the heat goes
up, pet owners and farmers
should protect their animals and
livestock, especially house pets
and poultry and swine
House stated that, "It is
normal for dairy cows' fertility
rate to go down, as well as the
daily weight gain of some farm
animals. But, farmers should
change feed schedules, and
provide plenty of water for the
animals, according to how the
weather situation is that day.
They should also get as much
vcntelation as possible
The effects of the heat on
house pets is not much different
than for farm animals. All
species must remain cool in
order to function at its potential.
Most dogs are most comfort-
able at a temperature of about 55
to 60 degrees Fahrenheit,
according to House.
"Air conditioning is not
always enough for most dogs,
because their temperature
comfort index is not the same as
for a human. They (dogs) often
need more air movement, such
as from a fan he said.
He added, "If your dog starts
to show unusual signs of
panting, just take a bucket of
water and throw it on him
Other house pets that are
sometimes affected arc cats,
mice, and fish.
"Cats tend not to be as active
as dogs so, they arc usually not
very affected by the heat But,
water should be kept available
for them, so when they feel at
liberty to drink it they can do
he said.
House said I cannot stress
enough the importance of not
enclosing your pets in a hot and
unvcnelatcd environment. Not
on'y Ctln large animals suffer to
death, but small pets such as
mice, hamster and fish arc
definitely at a disadvantage





J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1988
Transplant gives life, second chance, hope
By GREER BOWEN
Staff Writer
Mari Guthrie, the daughter of
A. K. Guthrie who works with
Eastern Area Health Education
Center, an ECU Medical School
affiliate, had a kidney transplant
on Monday, August 15.
Guthrie, who is in her 20's, has
dealt with a disease called Glom-
crulonephritis (kidney failure) for
four years. A kidney transplant
was the only way she could at-
tempt to have a normal life.
Guthrie had lived a normal,
healthy life up until her kidney
failed four years ago. She became
ill almost at once. One night her
mother found her in the bathroom
with a violent nose bleed. They
rushed her to the hospital and her
blood pressure was 210 over 190.
The doctors that she could have
had a stroke if her nose had not
bled. Guthrie discovered after
cxploritory surgery that she was
only born with one kidney.
Guthrie remained in the hospital
for one week.
Guthrie's life changed drasti-
cally after that. She and her doc-
tors tried to treat her disease with
diet and medication. Three years
later, there was only choice,
Guthrie had to begin dialysis
while her doctors searched for a
new kidney.
Dialysis gavcGuthric, as it docs
many people, time and a chance to
live a fairly normal life until a
kidney is located. Patients go to
dialysis three times a week.
The process removes natural
polutants that functional kidney
would remove from the body.
Often paitents retain fluid in their
body between treatments and can
weigh as much as 10 pounds more
than their normal weight.
In October of 1988, Guthrie
began dialysis. The first step was
to implant a Gortex Graph in her
arm just below her wrist. This
graph is a small, thin, white plas-
tic tube about the size of a ball-
point-pen cap.
Doctors surgically implant
these tubes by sewing a vein and
an artery together. The area be-
comes elevated naturaly and al-
lows an easy access to the blood
stream for the dialysis needles.
Guthrie's arm graph did not
work and a Perm Cath had to be
implanted in her right chest just
below her shoulder. A Perm Cath
remains partially exposed. This
did not work either, and a graph
was placed in her right thigh.
Then the actual dailysis began.
Every Monday, Wensday, and
Friday Guthrie would go to dialy-
sis for three hours. During these
next few months the search began
for a kidney. Guthrie's mother,
Harriett Guthrie volunteered to
give her daughter a kidney.
"I did not ask Mama for a kid-
ney, she just came into my room
and volunteered. It was the most
wonderful thing anyone had ever
said to me Guthrie said.
The match between Mari
Guthrie and Harriett was perfect,
the possible better match would
have been identical twins. They
began the procedures necessary
to prepare mother and daughter
for the transplant.
Guthrie continued dialysis
three times a week and became
more at ease with it. "When I first
went to dialysis I was terrified
and lonely. But the nurses made it
much easier because they are so
supportive said Guthrie.
Many dialysis patients, such as
Guthrie's partner Lonnie Grahan
Jr. aren't fortunate enough to find
a kidney right away. Graham has
been on dialysis for a year and 8
months. Graham works for
Greenville Utilitcs and is very
hopefull that his time will come
soon.
All kidney pateints must stick
to a strick diet. Ususally the diet
consists on 60 grams of protein,
low in sodium and potasiumwith
only 6 glasses of liquid a day.
Foods like soup and jcllo arc con-
sidered as liquids, and, must be
monitercd.
Kim White, a nurse at the
Greenville Dialysis Center said
that most patients have very good
attitudes. "The average age of
dialysis patient is 50 so Mari is one
of the baby's here said White.
Some reasons for kidney failure
are alcohol abuse, too much
asprin, and drug abuse.
White said that heroin and
cocaine users arc the most com-
mon drug abusers on dialysis
treatment. Often these people
have a hard time in dialysis be-
cause thier veins have collasped
due intraveinous drug use.
The weekend before the actual
transplant, Mari and her mother
had to undergo numerous tests
and doctors apointments. Each of
them was tested to insure that
they were in perfect health. If
cither of them had contracted so
much as a cold, the transplant
would have been postponed.
Mari was tested for a reaction to
an anti-rejection drug that is still
in the testing stages. This drug
was invented by the doctors at the
East Carolina Medical School.
Mari and her mother entered
Pitt Memorial Hospital an Sun-
day August 14. The long and
complicated process that began
four years ago was soon to end.
Monday morning the surgery
was preformed.
The doctors told them that the
kidney should work almost in-
stantly if Mart's body was not
going to reject it.Guthric told her
motheryou're going to give life
to me a second time and that is
what happened.
The kidney worked, by Tues-
day afternoon Guthrie was sitting
up and talking on the phone, by
Friday all tubes and moniters
were removed from her body
Tuesday of this week, mother and
daughter were at home.
The chance that she could die
did not seem to cause any hesita
tion. Guthrie received a second
chance to live a normal life. She,
like so many others found a way
to start over, to physicaly be burn
again through a gift of love.
Guthrie will remain at home for
three months and then plans to
return to school. Her strength and
couragehave helped her maintain
a positive attitude. Guthrie said it
was easier for her because slu-
trustshcrdoctor, Dr. W. Newman
South Carolina cleans coast
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) - The
South Carolina Sea Grant Consor-
tium is looking for a few thousand
good beachcombers.
They'll be needed next month
when South Carolina, for the first
time, joins 17 other coastal states
in sweeping its shoreline for trash.
Trash left by beachgocrs and
washed up on shore is unsightly.
But it also can be fatal for birds
and marine animals.
Wildlife and fish can die from
either eating trash or becoming
entangled in plastic and other
containers, Lin Dunbar of the Sea
Grant Consortium said.
The beach sweep will be held
Sept. 24 along with similar pro-
grams in other coastal states in-
cluding neighboring North Caro-
lina and Georgia. The event is
sponsored by the consortium as
well as the Center for Environ-
mental Education in Washington.
Both individuals and groups
can participate, Ms. Dunbar said.
Participants will be given bio-
dcgradablc bags in which to col-
lect the trash. In addition, they'll
get a data card on which they can
record each item of trash they
collect.
The cards will then be sent to
Washington where they'll be
tabulated and the states will bet-
ter be able to identify the various
sources of beach pollution, Ms.
Dunbar said.
The bags will also be weighed to
determine just how much trash is
recovered from the beaches.
ANNOUNCING
INTRODUCING A
CHECKING ACCOUNT V
THAT WILLOWY
COST YOU THIS
MUCH A MONTH.
PLANTERS BASOMCHKKMG
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
SORORITY RUSH
NO Minimum Balance
You don't have to keep two months of grocery money tied up in
minimum balance requirements with Planters Baseline Checking.
In fact, this account will cost you less than a chicken dinner, just
S3 per month with no minimum balance required.
10 FRIi Checks
Write your first 10 checks of every month free (50 per check
charge applies only to additional checks).
On jimbed Planters Green1" Withdrawals
Any time you get a last minute dinner invitation and need extra
cash - no matter what time of the day or night - just drop by any of
our Planters Green 24-hour automated teller machines and use
your Planters Green Card. There s no charge. No matter how many
Baseline Checking withdrawals and deposits you make.
Your Planters Green Card can also be used at other ATMs that
are part of the Relay "system. And the service charge for a Relay
tran " ion is just 50 (most other banks charge between 75
an;
Come visit your local Planters Bank to open your Baseline
Checking account today: And go ahead and splurge a little tonight.
AUGUST 28 - SEPTEMBER 2, 1988
REGISTRATION: AUGUST 22-25, 1988
AT 10:00 A.M3 P.M.
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I
pe
tubes and monitors
hoved from her body.
It this week, mother and
Iv ere at home.
nee that she could die
lorn to cause any hesita-
mric received a second
I l.ve a normal life. She,
ny others found a way
r to physicaly be born
a girt of love.
will remainat home for
iths and then plans to
Her strength and
: .i her maintain
tudc Guthrie said it
her because she
� Dr. . Newman
W
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988
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fp Deadline
ay 3:00 p.m.
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988
Children with AIDS:mountingl
number of innocent victims
BOSTON (AP) - He is 3 years
old, wearing a red T-shirt ar -
boasting how his dad had taken
him to see the fireworks. His little
sidekick sucks on a Topside and
shows off his purple tongue.
"You can't get me. Daddy
shouts one of the boys as he races
playfully down the hallway of the
hospital wing.
The illness that put them there
is masked by their innocence and
perfectly normal ways.
They are the children of AIDS.
Not all are so tree to run and
play. Some come into the world
prematurely and drug-addicted.
Many have swollen glands, some-
times enlarged livers and spleens.
Their bodies are wracked by diar-
rhea and nausea, burning with
fever and wet from night sweats.
More than 500 of them across
the United States have died of
AIDS and 3,000 a�e infected, ac-
cording to Dr. fames Oleske,
medical director oi the children's
AIDS program at Children's 1 los-
pital in Newark, X.l.
Their numbers are growing at
an alarming rate in a nation ill-
equipped to care for them: in
many places, hospitals must sci vc
a exjx?nsive baby sitters while
foster homes are desperately
sought for the infants.
Dr. Martha Rogers, chief of
pediatric and family studies for
the AIDS program at the federal
Centers for Disease Control in
Atlanta, estimates about 10,000
children under the age of 13 will
be infected with the AIDS virus
within a tew years.
That's the low end ot Oleske's
estimate; he foresees 10,000 to
20,000 infected children by 1991.
"I estimate that one in every 10 to
13 hospital beds for children in the
United States will be occupied by
a child sick with I AIDS) infection.
1 hat is a frightening statistic
About 13 percent of the child
victims got AIDS through tainted
blood transfusions.
Almost all the others, however,
were doomed before birth, born
to mothers infected with the AIDS
virus throueh intravenous drug
use or through sx mth a 4tM&tJ��.pyr Jf
user.SixoutoflOofthcsechildren
die bv age 2 or 3, Oleske said.
The tragedy is compounded
when the mother is a single parent
and unable to care for the infant
because of her drug habit or be-
cause she i incapacitated with
AIDS herself. A grandmother
may care for both daughter and
grandchild, while she watches
them deteriorate and die.
With family members
unavailable to hclpin many cases,
"Where are the increasing num-
bers of children born with AIDS
going to be cared for?" Oleske
asked. "Who's going to care for
them?"
One answer may lie in the estab-
lishment oi state-supported tran-
sitional group homes thatprovide
temporary care for outpatient
children until foster homes can be
found. Several have been set up in
the last 18 months, including
homes in Boston, Albany, N.Y
and Elizabeth, N.J. More are being
planned.
At Boston City 1 lospital, a reno-
vated wing known as Dowling 5
South can house four children.
Among current rebidents are the
two boys whose fathers cannot
care for them full-time but who
take them on outings like the
Fourth of July fireworks.
Since the Dowling wing opened
in February 1987, the mothers of
two children living there have
died.
"Give me two weeks pleaded
one mother - and she held on long
enough to make arrangements for
the care oi her child.
Anne Murphy, a 31-year-old
social worker at Dowling 5 South,
has seen dying mothers "just
coming in and spending time
with their kids, playing with
them, putting them to bed, feed-
ing them supper, some of the
daily routine kind of things that I
think take on so much more
meaning when you feel that your
time could be limited
For many of the children, how-
ever, the warmth of mothers and
fathers is absent, and nurses try to
comfort them when they cry out
with withdrawal pains.
Some of the older children,
unable to understand what is
happening to them, turn to their
toy doctors' kits and play out their
own tragic lives.
"They give us fake shots and
take our blood pressure said Ms.
Murphy. "They play out a lot of
the tilings that happened to them
in the hospital and kind of deal
with the experience removed
from it in a way
Many potential foster parents
are reluctant to consider children
with AIDS - fearful or ignorant of
the disease or unwilling to
commit the extraordinary
amount oi time and energy re-
quired.
Even so, seven children from St.
Clare's Home in Elizabeth, N.J
have been placed in foster homes,
said Terry and Faye Zealand who
founded the place of transition
between hospital and foster care
in May 1987. They plan to open
two more homes in New Jersey.
"I can't find a cure for AIDS. I
know that 1 have to leave that up
to somebody else but I know that
1 can provide a home for these
children Mrs. Zealand said.
In Elizabeth and Albany,
townspeople have been sympa-
thetic.
Local construction workers
helped renovate a two-story resi-
dence that had been vacant for
two years for St. Clare's Home. At
a zoningboard hearing in Albany,
three neighbors spoke in support
of the Farano Center for Children,
which opened in December. Civic
organizations held fundraisers
and donated furniture to the
home operated by Albany Catho-
lic Charities.
At the Farano Center, as many
as 40 volunteers take the children
for walks and visits to the park.
Three of these volunteers have
become foster parents to AIDS
children, and the applications of
four others are being considered.
The transitional homes can ac-
commodate only a half-dozen or
so children at a time, cared for by
an around-the-clock staff.
That leaves hospitals as the only
home for many children of AIDS.
That is costly not only to them, in
terms of childhood joys missed,
but also for the state.
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Pete Fernald, r i in mi
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JAMES F.J. MCKEE, DirectorofAtertfaiq
Joe Harris, nolsw-iot
Doug Jot inson, g sis &&�
Tim Hampton, r-resDi.
Mici ielle England, owa m�
Debbie Stevens,
August 25, 1988
Paul Dunn, o�h &�
Jeff Parker, m
TOM FURR,CircukiwnAlaru�g�r
SUSAN HOWELL, Product Mawjer
JOI IN VV. MEDLIN, Art Difedor
MAC CLARK, Business Mamger
VlAVge Wf 3fet;H All gglN OVR fJfeATg T2 sataPl ?
OPINION
Page 4
Temptation
Movie raises old questions
This editorial almost started out
with a Biblical quote. It could have
begun, "Let those among you with-
out sin, cast the first stone But the
controversy over the film, "The Last
Temptation of Christ" is one about
doctrine and judgement. A religious
quote would not have lent perspec-
tive to this editorial.
Why? Because though the use of
the quote would be ironical, the
appearance of it here, in an editorial
concerned with the issue of thinking
for one's self, would merely rein-
force the lack of choice prevalent in
modern day America.
This severe lack of choice stems
from the fact that the middle class
Judeo-Christian morals and ethics
(and these religious fanatics are a
minority � contrary to whatever
they shout about 150 million follow-
ers) it's both an embodiment and
desecration of the American dream.
It's great that the common people
have the power to change things. It's
a shame it's over something so igno-
rant and irrelevant.
So, reluctantly, I decided to write
this editorial. I haven't seen the
movie yet. I really have no business
writing about a motion picture I
haven't except for the fact that the
reason I haven't seen it is because I
was denied the chance to see it.
Unless I were to travel to Raleigh,
Richmond, Charlotte or any other
large city, I don't stand a chance of
Nixon no Nostradamus
are the ones most children are indoc- seeing it. Unless it comes out on
trir ated in at school and home. No home video in a few months,
other options are ever explored �"if In which case the video store will
it was good enough for me, its good probably be pressured into not
enough for the voung'uns selling the film. The whole contro-
No efforts are made to expose versy will start right back up again,
children to other ways of believing Don't these people have anything
or thinking. Thus they grow up and better to do with their time?
perpetuate the cycle. So, at the end of my editorial, I
What relation is this editorial to found myself wanting a quote that
the controversial film? The movie is
just the latest in a long line of secu-
lar-religious battles. And they all
center on the same basic things �
summed up this madness. Some-
thing that might even open up these
zealotseyes and make them think a
liftle. Something to help them see
people trying to tell other people how life really is, something to save
what to think and believe. them from their petty, ignorant
Conservative groups have tried lives,
everything possible to halt the re- Then I remembered that's what
lease of the movie. In many places Jesus had been trying to do. Perhaps
they have succeeded � especially the real "last temptation" is decid-
here in the Bible Belt. ing to live and die for yourself
If a paranoid minoritv can do this and not everyone else.
By ANDREW SULLIVAN
The New Republic
"You won't have Nixon to kick around anymore
Richard Nixon, November 1962.
The Machiavclli of the White House has become
the Nostradamus of New Jersey. Richard Nixon is
not merelu back, he's turned clairvoyant. Since 1982
Nixon has been seer to presidents, campaign manag-
ers and TV pundits, not to mention the reading
public.
To the dedicated Nixonologist, the ex-president's
statesmanlike ones, a.k.a. meditations on the pain-
fully obvious. And then there arc thcquasi-mystie.il,
inspirational ones, which, for the sake of precision,
we'll characterize as factually wrong.
The "painfully obvious" category is quintessen-
tially Nixonian. Take the July 14 Nixon memo to the
Bush camp. It contained the razor-sharp observa-
tions that the Dukakis-Bentscn ticket made Texas a
key electoral battleground; that three possibk- eon-
tenders for the Bush vice presidential slot were jack
Kemp, Bob Dole and George Deukmejian; and that
of the two men on the Democratic ticket, "one is tall,
the other is short
In 1984 Nixon wrote a similar memo to the Reagan
camp. That time he really went out on a limb: "As
of today, one week before the election, it can safely be
predicted that Reagan will win with a landslide
Nixon's examination of Edward Kennedy's for-
tunes exemplifies the "factually wrong" prediction.
Ineffective teachers spark anger in student
��. . �.j � n: iI 7 ,
To the editor:
What can we do about ineffective
teachers? It appears from my experi-
ence that the administrators of this
school don't care about students'
educational needs. 1 have talked to
everyone in the "chain of command"
except the chancellor. Dr. Eakin.
Last semester I took a class, with a
certain instructor. The man is totally
ineffective as a teacher. I had an A
average, in my third semester of the
class and cannot speak, read or write
the language, 1 think there is a funda-
mental problem with a course where
a student can make an A and not have
learned anything.
I talked with other students in the
class to see if they had similar com-
plaints about his instructional meth-
ods � preparation of material, pres-
entation to the class, means of assess-
ing student comprehension (grad-
ing), and suitability of textbooks. We
ALL agreed that Hie teacher has a
good knowledge of the language, but
that he is entirely incapable of trans-
mitting his knowledge to students in
a manner that they can understand.
We had to buy four books for the
class. We used only ONE of them; I
spent quite a lot of money for books
that were never used in the course. I
spoke with the teacher last semester
about his intimidating manner when
a student had a question to ask. His
response was that students now are
weak and timid because they have no
military experience. He rejected my
suggestion that changing times re-
quire different teaching methods.
He also made comments during
class that many of the women in the
class regarded as sexist. Duringoneof
his 'lectures" on the verb tense sys-
tem, he spent 50 minutcsconfusing us
on tenses. I went into class under-
standing the tense system and came
out bewildered. Later that day, I ex-
plained in 10 minutes to one of my
fellow students what it had taken him
50 minutes to try to explain (unsuc-
cessfully).
After two semesters of this type of
instruction, I talked with the teacher
hn,ifr tho rial's problems with his
teaching methods. He refused to con-
sider my discussion seriously. I next
went to the head of the department.
He listened politely and sympatheti-
cally, and made it quite clear that he
intended to do nothing. I next went to
the Dean of the college oi Arts and
Sciences, Dr. Eugene Ryan.
In Company with other students,
we discussed our greivances with Dr.
Ryan. He also listened sympatheti-
cally. He also did nothing. When I
went into the next class this semester,
who did I see standing in front of the
class? The same teacher!
I am now dropping the course,
rather than wasting my money and
time sitting in a classroom with an
incompetent teacher. There are three
other teachers in the department who
are qualified to teach the course. After
an entire class complains about a
teacher, one would think the school
might consider assigning one of them
to teach the class. Apparently, ECU
docs not give a damn about whether
or not students have an able instruc-
tor in the class � it just isn't really
important if we receive quality in-
struction or not,aslongas they can list
in the catalog that they offer the class
as a course.
This teacher has tenure. With no tie-
in to a review board, tenure allows
incompetent teachers to continue in
the same capacity. With tenure, the
evaluations we do each semester
have absolutely no impact on the
teacher's job status, pay scale, or mail
raises. This should be changed.
There is no greivance committee
that I know of that can judge in the
instances. Going through the proper
channels does no good. If we expect
decent instruction, where are we to go
when that is not given?
Larry Bellis
Grad. Student,
History
No to Dukakis
To the editor:
If you're planning to vote for Mike
Dukakis in November, please read on.
Firm of all if�hPrPPyprwasa'Mas-
sachusctts Miracle it occurred in
spite of Dukakis, not because of him.
The economic recovery that came to
Massachusetts in the late seventies and
early eighties was due to Proposition 2
12, a major 1980 tax cut, and large
defense contracts that resulted from
Reagan's defense buildup. Dukakis
opposed both.
This economic recovery continued
until Dukakis returned to the
governor's chair in 1983. He had been
thrown out of office in 1978 because he
had promised not to raise taxes but
raised them anyway � by $650 mil-
lion, the largest tax increase in Mass.
history.
And Dukakis, because of his huge
spending and taxing sprees, has in five
years ruined Massachusetts' economy.
In June 1986, Massachusetts still had,
as a result of the 1978-1983 recovery, a
cash surplus of $912 million. By June
1988, Dukakis had helped create a cash
deficit of over $500 million! Small
wonder that Massachusetts' voters, by
more than a 2-to-l margin, think
Dukakis has been bad for the state's
economy.
Since 1984, Massachusetts has lost
over 90,000 industrial jobs, down 13,
while the nation gained 27c! Job
growth in Massachusetts ranks 33rd in
the nation. Since 1983, Dukakis has
raised state spending 62, the highest
of any state.
Jack Flood, democratic chairman of
the Massachusetts House Taxation
Committee says: "Dukakishas been on
the wrong side of every major eco-
nomic policy issue. We're right now
driving business out of Massachusetts,
because Dukakis has overspent so
much. Business leaders know taxes are
going to have to rise again to cover the
current mess.
"Three years ago, there was a $1 bil-
lion surplus. We spent it all, and now
we're borrowing just to meet current
payrolls. And not only has this been
the worst spending spree in Massachu-
setts history, we have almost nothing
to show for it in better services
The Associated Industries of Massa-
chusetts, May 20,1988: "Dukakis has
abandoned pro-growth policies
Richaid Voke, Democrat and Choir-
man of the Mass. House Ways and
Means Committee: "There hasn't
been any will to control spending in
Dukakis' administration for at least
five years
The colossal failure of "Dutaxus"
economic policies is yet another
example of the failure of tax-and-
spend liberalism. The ultimate ex-
ample of such liberal failure is the
huge federal deficit, created and
maintained by liberal Democrats in
Congress, not President Reagan!
Dukakis claims that, if he's
elected, his administration will be
free of corruption and sleaze. "In
contrast to Reagan's administra-
tion he boasted recently, "I have
maintained a high standard of ethi-
cal conduct in my (Mass.) admini-
stration That, my friends, is a bold-
face lie.
A partial list of unethical conduct
in Dukakis' administration:
Dukakis awarded a consulting con-
tract for $275,000 for Dukakis' cam-
paign; a member of Dukakis' cabinet
voted to give a $3.7 million Lew-
interest loan to a housing project in
his own wife's name; Dukakis' edu-
cation advisor is in prison for giving
away $80,000 in bogus consulting
contracts; Dukakis' choice to head
the Metropolitan District Police
Commission is in prison for stealing
and selling police exams and answer
sheets; Dukakis' number-two man
in public safety was forced to resign
after FBI documents revealed his ties
to a convicted loan shark; Dukakis
appointed a man to a $54,000-a-ycar
college professorship who had paid
$10,000 in hush money to the family
of one student and settled out of
court a suit brought by the family of
another suit, etc etc.
And where was George Bush
during all this? Well, Mr. Teddy
"Chappaquiddick" Kennedy, he
was dry, sober, and home with his
wife!
Justin Sturz
Senior
English Journalism
In October 1982, a Nixon premonition had it that
"Edward Kennedy will be the 1QS4 Democral
nominee, with Glenn possible
Two years later, in a Reagan memo, he changed his
mind: "Most people will disagree with my conclu-
sion that as tar as Teddy Kennedy is concerned the
train has left the station
still, you never know. By early 19SS Kennedy h
become "the least discussed and most logical candi-
date for a draft suggested Nixon in The Lone!
Sunday Times.
Nixon's London column, engineered by his friend
Rupert Murdoch, is a gold mine for Nixonologi -
In seven months as special commentator on the U -
campaign, Nixon has gotten virtually everything
wrong.
In February he predicted a serious Kemp surge in
New 1 lampshire. In March he foresaw that after
Super Tuesday, "Bob Dole can make it a race by
winning California's winner-take-all primary on
June 6 land that Pat Robertson will have enough
d( legates in influence the platform
I le also ventured that "Michael Dukakis and Rich-
ard Gephardt will be the only serious Democratic
hopefuls Nixon believed a deadlocked Democratic
convention was a "very likely event He argued
two weeks later that "Republicans can relish spend-
ing the next four months watching Michael Dukakis,
Al Gore, Richard Gephardt and Paul Simon cut each
other to ribbons
For Nixon, staving on the cutting analytic edge
sometimes calls for rapid repositioning. On Feb.14
he predicted that "Jesse Jackson will be strong by the
convention that he is not going to be fobbed off by
being put in charge of the anti-drug program O:
March 20, though, he wrote that "there was never a
chance that the Democrats would have put Jackson
on the ticket But once Jackson won the Michigan
primary, he became "the most effective candidate
since Teddy Roosevelt
In March, Nixon predicted that "Dukakis would
be guaranteed a loss in November In April he
ventured that "the only ticket that has a chance in
November is Dukakis-Nunn After the Atlanta
convention, with the Democrats enjoying a double-
digit lead in the polls, Nixon seems to have changed
his mind. At a recent dinner party he is reported to
have said that Bush will be decisively defeated.
Nixon's record is no better on global than on
national matters. Three years before Gorbachev
pulled the troops out of Afghanistan, Nixon pre-
dicted, "He will be tough in keeping what he has; he
can't risk sing any part of the Soviet empire he has
inherited As late'as 19S8, in his much-hyped book
"1999, Victory Without War Nixon still held that
the Afghan invasion was "bold but well-studied
gambit" and that Moscow "took the decision to
intervene as coolly as a master chess player
In Novemb 1982 Nixon asserted thai there
u uukJ be a Middle East war if Israeli prime minister
Mcnachcm Begin did not agree to a self-governing
Palestinian state. Begin didn't and there wasn't.
Nixon noted in April 1986 that "Korea is being
l.orain �!ed as a likely candidate for American inter-
vention to bring about a change of leadership And.
he warned, "comparisons to the Philippines are
superficial and inaccurate There is not yet a viable
alternative to the Chun government Within a year
Chun had stepped down in favor of a viable, demo
cratically elected alternative.
Even on the little things, Nixon gets it wrong. He
predicted that because of the recession, 1982 would
be bad, but 1984 would be "a great year for our
Republican candidates In fact, Republicans did
worse in the Senate in 19S4 than in 1982.
In December 1986 Nixon predicted that "a summit
will take place in Washington in spring 1987 It took
place in December.
In 1984 Nixon predicted that "the Reagan margin
couldbeaslow as 11 percent or as high as 19 percent,
but I sense 15 percent is closer to the mark Actu-
ally, it was 18. The same year Nixon told Reagan,
"You will win a decisive victory in the electoral vote
approaching the one you achieved in 1980 Sure
enough, Reagan beat it.
Fifteen days before he submitted his resignation a
president, Nixon mused o.i tape that Watergate
was "the thinnest scandal in American history He
went on to predict, with all the certainty Nixonolo-
gists have come to treasure: "I will survive it
Sting op
for poacj
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To SCHOOL?

vtoe
w.
fy
SStI
l
' I vA 5 So:
?5ra ILL
f,
dm
mus
nition had it that
l? 1984 Democratic
o, he changed his
with my conclu-
lv is n crncd the
�88 Kennedy had
d most logical candi-
I Nixon in The London
c red by his friend
for Nixonologists.
mentatoron the U.S.
virtually everything
i serious Kemp surge in
trch he foresaw that after
b Dole can make it a race by
uinner-take-all primary on
rtson will have enough
p tform
chad Dukakis and Rich-
rious Democratic
eked Democratic
event He argued
� - can relish spend-
; Michael Dukakis,
tnd Paul Simon cut each
utting analytic edge
pid repositioning. On Feb.14
will be strong by the
ting to be fobbed off by
nti-drugprogram On
� thai th.re was never a
ild have put Jackson
kson won the Michigan
t effective candidate
; that "Dukakis would
in N inber In April he
ket that has a chance in
mn After the Atlanta
rats enjoying a double-
-corns to have changed
it dinner party he is reported to
I be decisively defeated.
better on global than on
hrce years before Gorbachev
f Afghanistan, Nixon pre-
in keeping what he has; he
part of the Soviet empire he has
in his much-hyped book
out War Nixon still held that
n was "bold but well-studied
Moscow "took the decision to
master chess player
32 Nixon asserted that there
ast war if Israeli prime minister
d not agree to a self-governing
didn't and there wasn't.
,pnl 1986 that "Korea is being
: .late for American inter-
hange of leadership And,
arisons to ihe Philippines are
urate There is not yet a viable
un government Within a year
n in favor of a viable, demo-
I ings, Nixon gets it wrong. He
1 e of the recession, 1982 would
ild be "a great year for our
' In fact, Republicans did
in 1 �� than in 1962.
mi Nixon predicted that "a summit
ngton in spring 1987 It took
ted that "the Reagan margin
11 percent or as high as 19 percent,
Jccntis closer to the mark Actu-
� same year Nixon told Reagan,
e victory in the electoral vote
ne you achieved in 1980 Sure
at it.
.re he submitted his resignation a
mused o.i tape) that Watergate
scandal in American history He
:t. with all the certainty Nixonolo-
o treasure. "I will survive it
TI IF FAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988 5
Sting operation indicts 43
for poaching black bear
ATTIC
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -
Wildlife officials say a massive
undercover operation, resulting
in indictments of 43 people, was
inspired when the danger to the
black bear population from
poaching became apparent sev-
eral years ago.
"We've been concerned about
the welfare of the bears forycars
said Gary Myers, executive direc-
tor of the Tennessee Wildlife Re-
sources Agency, at a news confer-
ence Tuesday announcing results
of the undercover operation.
The driving force behind the
poaching apparently was the de-
mand among Orientals for certain
bear parts, especially gall blad-
ders, for the organs' alleged me-
dicinal and aphrodisiac qualities.
Officials from Tennessee, North
Carolina, Georgia and the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service ar
ranged the operation.
Warrants were issued by U.S.
attorneys in Knoxville, Asheville,
N.C and Atlanta, and agents
began making arrests early Tues-
day.
Tim 1 lergenrader of the I WRA
said the 43 people are charged
with more than 130 federal and
.tate violations.
Hcrgenrader said eight of nine
Tcnnesseans charged had been
arrested by midday, and that An
additional 20 or so arrests are
expected in Tennessee in the next
few weeks. Most of the warrants
are against North Carolinians.
One suspect is a Georgian.
Officials estimate the black bear
�population in the southern Appa-
lachians is about 2,000 animals,
which are threatened already by a
loss of habitat. Areas in public
lands, both state and federal, are
set aside as bear habitat where
hunting is prohibited.
Hefgenrader said some of the
bears were legitimately killed.
But he said it is illegal to sell any
part of a bear no matter how or
where it is killed.
During the three-year under-
cover operation agents bought
266 gall bladders, which Hcrgen-
rader said are dried and used as a
powder believed by some Orien-
tals to enhance health, virility,
sexual drive and potency.
Agents also bought 85 claws, 77
feet, four heads, nine hides and
one live cub. Hcrgenrader said
there is a domestic as well as inter-
national market for some of the
bear parts, especially claws,
which are used to make jewelry,
and heads, which are used as tro-
phies.
Officials brought a display of
the contraband to the news con-
ference, including several plastic
food bags each containing one
ea!l bladder.
I lergenrader said many bear
poachers would use the whole
animal, but that undercover
agents occasionally found bear
carcasses from which only the gall
bladder and claws had been re-
moved.
Tennessee lias a two-week
hunting season for bears in mid-
winter, which was timed to mini-
mize the impact of hunting on the
bear population. Pregnant fe-
males usually have begun long
periods of sleep by then and so are
less likely to become prey, Myers
said.
Myers said studies of the black
bears were made years ago be-
cause the population appeared to
be dwindling. "We decided we
were driving our black bear popu-
lation to extinction he said.
Further studies indicated that
poaching accounted for half or
more of the annual deaths of the
bears, he said, and led to the
undercover operation.
Myers said the state considered
more restrictive laws but decided
that would punish legitimate
hunters without curtailing poach-
ing.
I Ic described the poachers as "a
loose, informal network of people
who knew who you needed to see
if you want bear gall bladders
Officials said the bears were
killed by various means, from
rifles to snares. Some of the bears
were killed in the Great Smoky
Mountains National Park, where
hunting of any kind is prohibited,
as well as on other public lands on
which bear hunting is banned.
Myers said the operation was
the largest of its kind in Tennessee
in at least 14 years.
Those arrested were cited un-
der the Lacey Act, which prohib-
its the interstate transportation of
illegally taken game, and the
Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
A Lacev Act violation carries a
J
maximum penalty of five years in
prison and fines up to $20,000. A
conviction for conspiracy carries a
five year prison term and up to
$10,000 in fines.
Annual I7K
Tog
with
Band
of Oz
and
180 Pro�
Orphanage superintendent faces indicent liberties
charges, D.A. wants to use previous record
OXFORD, N.C (AP) - District
Attorney I )avid R. Waters will ak
the state Court of Appeals to al-
low records of a previous convic-
tion to be admitted as evidence in
the trial oi a former superinten-
dent of the Oxford Orphanage.
David Ralph Moul faces seven
charges of taking indecent liber-
ties with children while lie was
superintendent at the orphanage, lowed a motion Friday by defense
His trial, scheduled for Monday attorney to suppress the introduc-
in (ran illc Superiorourt, was
delayed until the appeals court
makes a ruling on admission of
cvid( nee froma May 1973com ic-
tion in Lancaster, Neb on a
charge of contributing to the need
for supervision of a minor.
udce
EMBLEM
AT THE
ATTIC
dee 1 lenrv W. I licht lr.
209 E. 5TH ST. DOWNTOWN
7 P.M. - UNTIL
$4.00 IN ADVANCE $5.00 AT THE DOOR
TICKETS ON SALE IN FRONT OF THE STUDENT
STORE MON. - THURS.
Your One Stop Store For
Everything Creative
We Offer a Complete Line of
Camera Supplies and Equipment
Photofinishing by Eastman Kodak
48 Hour Kodak Slide Service
24 Hour Kodacolor Service
Nikon and Canon Cameras
A Complete Line of Kodak
Film Equipment & Supplies
Kodak, Agfa, and llford Photo Papers
art i camera hop
ri 518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE, NX. 27834
752-0888
art co�cfo hqp��
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We Offer the Best Selection of
Art Supplies in the East
Supplies for the Student,
Amateur and Professional
SOUTH COTANCHE STREE
ille. NX. 27834 Drafting Supplies
752-0888 Largest Selection of Mat Board,
Artist Boards, and Artist Papers In the E
Ready Made Frames and Framing Supplies
Framed and Unframed Potters and Prints





V
V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988
Classifieds
FOR RENT
ROOM FOR RENT: Female student
only. Fully furnished � full use of house.
Wahserdryer and AC. S200 includes
utilities. Call after 7:00 p.m. 758-7068.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: For 3
bedroom apartment. Has waherdryer.
Need to pay 13 utilities and rent. Call
Dave or Chuck. 355-0343.
ATTENTION STUDENTS NEW 2 & 3
bdrm homes, fully firnished, AC, within
5 mins of ECU campus, ONLY $215 a
month! Call 756-9874.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share 3
bedroom house. Excellent location, 12
block from ECU campus. SI 17 mo utili-
ties. Call 758-54S5.
FOR RENT: Stall space and pasture for a
horse or a donkev. 8 miles from campus,
dirt roads available. Call 746-4793 after 6
p.m.
OWN YOUR OWN HOME FOR HALF
THE PRICE OF RENT 1989 models are
here so 198S models have been specially
reduced to move fast. Low down pay-
ments and monthly payments. We
handle the financing! CALL DEE, 756-
9874, STUDENTS & SINGLE-PARENT
FAMILIES WELCOME
NEEDED FEMALE ROOMMATE: at
Plantation Apt. 13 rent, 13 utilities
private room 2 12 baths, fireplace,
microwave, tanning beds, pool, hot tub
and much more Call Stacy at 355-5610
before 2 p.m. ASAP.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share 2 bed
room trailer 6 12 miles from campus.
S95mo. 12 utilities. Only responsible
people apply, please. Call 752-6433.
GIVE OUR LANDLORD THE AX
Purchase your own 3 bedroom home for
as little as S145 a month! Call Gail at 756-
9S74!
APT FOR RENT: Located 3 blocks from
campus, low rent, great location. Call
Luke or Steve for more details. 830-0339.
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE: near
cmapus, for female non-smokeTwork
exchange. Call 757-1798.
ROOM FOR RENT: S165 per month.
Utilities included. Near ECU campus.
Call 758-1274 after 5:30 p.m.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Dorm room size couch �
folds out into a bed and a bookcase. Call
758-9600.
FOR SALE: Double bed mattress and
boxspring S100. Supersingle waterbed,
everthing included $100. Call 830-0898.
SNAKE FOR SALE: 4 12 foot Boll Py-
thon. Very tame, cage, water bowl & heat
rock incl.SlOO Jim at 752-1815.
LOFT AND SMALL REFRIGERATOR:
for sale. Call 758-5581.
FOR SALE: Single bed-mattress, box
springs, and fram. In great condition! Call
Rich at 752-0661 for details.
FOR SALE: Oceanfront, beautiful Myrtle
Beach condo, RCI timeshare property. Buy
this low season week at a very reasonable
price and enjoy excellent worldwide ex-
changes through RCI any time of the year.
You may decide to use it for rentals or for
a quiet week at the beach yourself! Call
756-7846 for details after 5:30 p.m.
FOR SALE: Queen size sofa bed; refin-
ished oak table, easy chair; long table; 2 end
talbles; twin bed frame. 355-4717.
FOR SALE: Televidco 64K Computer
Model TS-803, CPM Operating System
(With GSX), 14-inch Monochrome Moni-
tor, Two Built-in Double Sided 5 14 Inch
Floppy Disk Drives (Each disk holds 368.6
K), Okidata Microline 82A Dot-Matrix
Printer With Tractor Feed and Extra Rib-
bons Includes Tele-Solutions-80 Soft-
ware Package (Word Processing, Business
Planning, and business Graphics), Also
Included is a Property Management Pro-
gram as Well as a Demo Utility, CPU I las
a Keypad on its Right Side and Function
Keys at the Top as Well as Ports For a
Printer, Modem, and Mouse. This com-
puter system is around eight years old and
originally cost over $3000! The system is in
perfect operating condition. We have ex-
panded our system so this one must go! We
are asking S450 or best offer. To inquire,
call Remco East at 758-6061.
FOR SALE: 1978 Nova, Automatic, Power
Steering, AC & New Tires $800. Call 756-
8692 or 523-8354 (Kinston).
RUSTIC HARD-WOOD FRAME
FURNITURE: for sale � In good shape!
Price negotiable Call 757-1635.
SERVICES OFFERED
PARTY: If you're having a party and need
a D.J. for the best music available for par-
ties � Dance, Top 40, & Beach. Call 355-
2781 and ask for Morgan.
HAVE A COMPLIMENTARY GLAM-
OUR MAKEOVER: to help you look your
best. For information and appointment
with Mary Kay consultant call 752-9129.
SCHOOLS IN: Time to party! Call us for
your music needs. We'll beat all prices and
videotape your party. The Power Station
DJ's. 752-0946.
ECU PARTY PEOPLE: let the parties be-
gin! But don't start until you call sound
mixtures D.J. Service. Party music catered
by Greeks, for Creoles; we know what
ya'll like! Call now for more info. 752-
4916, Bob. You won't be disappointed!
SCHOOLS IN: Time to party! Call us for
your music needs. We'll beat all prices and
videotape your party. The Power Station
DJ's 752-0940.
HELP WANTED
NEEDED: Soccer coaches. Must be
available Tuesday's and Thursday's
after 2:00 p.m. Starting salary $5 per
hour. For more information contact Rita
Roy, Pitt County Community Schools at
830-4216.
SUNNY SIDE EGGS INC is now ac
ccpting applications for responsible col-
lege students who wish to earn while
they learn. Apply in person at our main
office on State Road 1708 or call 756-
4187.
NEEDED: Students interested in ba-
bysitting on week-ends. Must have
transportation. Call Mrs. Dunn at 355-
6852.
HELP WANTED: Part-time college stu-
dent. Apply in person, Larry's Carpet-
land, 3010 E. 10th Street.
HELP WANTED: Experienced with
riding mowers, string weed trimmer. 30
hours month doing grass work. Hours
flexible $4 hr. start, $5 when trained.
Driver's license 830-1882.
NEEDED: Part-time, outside sales &
counter rep, Three afternoons per week.
apply in Person: Budget Rent-a-Car,
10th Street.
ARE YOU A COLLEGE STUDENT: or
faculty member looking for part-time
employment? Are you enthusiastic, de-
pendable, and excited about working in
a fashion environment? If you are sin-
cere about working & have a flexible
schedule, apply in person, Brody's,
Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4 p.m.
HTLP WANTED: Laundromat atten-
dant mornings and evenings. For more
info call 752-5222.
BRODY'S FOR MEN: is looking for
conscientious, part-time associates who
arc personable, responsible, and fashion
forward. Must enjoy people and be able
to work flexible hours. Apply in person.
Brody's, Carolina East Mall, M-W, 2-4
p.m.
WESTERN SIZZLIN: now accepting
applications for all positions. Apply
alter 2 p.m.
HELP WANTED: AEROBIC IN-
STRUCTORS NEEDED. Apply in per-
son this this week at The Spa.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Inter-
ested in making money part-time pho-
tographing people? No experience nec-
essary; we train. If you arc highly so-
ciable, have 35 mm camera and trans-
portation, give us a call between 12 noon
and 5 p.m. M-F at 1-800-722-7033.
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseshops.
$10,000 - $105,000vr! Now 1 tiring! 320
Listings! (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. OJ-1166.
"HIRING! Federal government jobs in
your area and overseas. Many immediatf
openings without waiting list or test. $1 -
68,000. Phone call refundable. (602) 838-
8885. Ext. 5285
COLLEGE REP WANTED: to work 5-15
hours per week on campus starting Fall
term. Good income. For information and
application write to: Collegiate Market-
ing Services, 251 Glenwood Drive,
Mooresvillc, NC 28115.
WANTED: College student for occ.i
sional work, must have own pick up
truck. If interested, please call 756-9874
M-F, 9-5.
FREE HAWAIIAN TRIP: could be
yours! World's largest party plan com-
pany hiring demonstrators. Excellent
pay, bonuses! Free $300 kit; supplies. No
investment, collecting or delivering. Call
Chellc 758-6141.
PERSONALS
PHI KAPPA TAU: Welcome back you
guys. 1 lope ya'll had a great summer Get
psyched for a jamm'in semester with
your hi' sisters.
PHI KAPPA TAU LIL' SISTERS: MAN
DATORY meeting for those planning to
active this semester; at J-5 Wilson Acres
Thursday Aug 25 at 9.00. For more info
call Lori at 355-7158 or Amanda 3t 53
9006.
WELCOME BACK OX: Meet at the 1 lub
tonight at 8 p.m Let's get ready for an
awesome year and plan for our charter in
October! the Rev.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY: Mark O Brier Y U
are finally 19 (you infant) I lope you enjoy
your cake! Grecr.
KAPPA SIGMA: wants to welcome ba.k
all stew and stew runners. Come over to
the weekly Thursday late night, right
after the Pi Kappa Phi Toga Party.
WANTED: used filing cabinet, 4 or 5
drawer metal or wood, decent condition,
75S-6998.
THE BROTHERS OF PHI KAPPA TAL:
. u!d like to welcome everyone back
1 tope you had a great summer.
-i'MWJIVi
Sandwiches ft Salads
Helpwanted!
In Store and
Delivery-
Drivers. Good
Pay, Flexible
Hours,
Part-time and
Full Time.
BUDGET TIRE
& SERVICE
7620 N. Creene Street
Save S when you need & tire - go
used instead of new.
We have GOOD used tires - all
sizes - Low profile, high perform-
ance, regular street tread, a few
raised letters, and the popular
Goodyear Eagle GT.
BEWARE of used tires without a
wTitten warranty. We warrantee
our tires in writing for 3060 days,
depending on price. On the corner
of 1 Iwy 33 and N. Greene St. Infor-
mation calls velcome - 830-3772
"35; -�-�
WELCOME BACK SPECIAL
UP TO $300 OFF!
Fairiane
Farms
Greenville's
Most
desirable
address
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is recruiting for
10-14 part-time soccer coaches for the fall semester program.
Applicants must possess some knowledge in soccer skills and
have patience to work with youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people, ages 5-15 in soccer fundamentals. Hours
approximately 3-7 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Some night and
weekend coaching. Program will extend from September to mid
November. Salary rate is $3.55 to $4.35 per hour. Applicants will
be accepted starting August 20. Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
A P A R I M k N I S
� Two full baths in all two and three bedroom apartments
� Patio with all first floor apartments. Private deck with
second floor apartments. Each with sliding glass doors
and enclosed storage room.
� Cable T.V. available J
� A real wood-burning fireplace in each apartment
� Waii-to-wail carpeting; drapes for all windows, tile foyer
� Lighted tennis court
� Swimming pool
� Club room
� All energy efficient appliances
Office Phone (919) 355-2198
Office Hours M-F 10 a.m 6 p.m.
Saturday 12 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Sunday 1p.m. - 4 p.m.
SGA Judicial
Appointments
Congratulations on your
appointment to the
Fall 1988 Judicial Board to:
MB
WELCOME BACK j
ROOMMATE SPECIAL
Up To $30001
! Towards tier ill �. Months Rent On A �
12 Month Lease For A 2 BR Apartment
Crina Kern
Angie South
Pat O'Neal
Barry Nobles
Laura Sherill
Melissa Moore
Blake Hfbgg
Keith Crawford
Liz Woolen
Erma Dellinger
Joy Lorrimore
Tammy Ellis
Kris Kellv
J
Alicia Thomas
Tom Furr
Brad Cates
Robert Lorrison
Bryon Stevens a
Mandy Marlowe
Jennifer Souther
Mike Carlson
There will be a mandatory training
session Wednesday, August 31st at
4:00 in Room 221 Mendenhall.
If u lable to attend please contact
Alice Harden at 758-9923.
Please leave name and number.
Announcements
SFVIORCRAD STUDENTS
The Career Planning and Placement Serv-
icc, located in the Bloxton I louse between
Mendenhall and Creene Residence 1 lall,
is where graduating students may put
resumes and establish a credentials file.
Interview sign-ups begin soon, and you
must be registered to sign up. General In-
formation meetings will be held Aug.
30,31, Sept. 7 and 15 at 3p.m. and on Sept.
7 at 7 p.m. in the Blcxton I louse.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
If you have been awarded college work
study for Fall Semester andor Spring
Semester, you are encouraged to contact
the Co-op office about off campus place-
ments. Call 757-6979 or come by the
General Classroom Building, Room 2028.
IRS
The first annual King of the I lill competi-
tion will be held August 31 at 3.30 p.m. on
the College Hill Recreational facilities.
An information meeting will be held
August 30 at 5 p.m. in Bio 103. College
I lill Residents brign SRA cards for par-
ticipation. Sponsored by Intramural-Rec-
reational Services. For additional info call
Mary Malone at 757-6387.
FREE TICKETS
FREE tickets to Judas Priest and Cinder-
alla. The show is Sept. 9th at the Greens-
boro Coliseum. Listen to the Mctalshop
this weekend on VVZMB 91.3
UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES
Applications are now being accepted for
students wishing to serve on University
Committees for the 1988-89 school year.
Thirty student positions are open.
Committees with vacancies are: Alco-
holDrug Education Committee (1),
Residence Life and Housing Committee
(2), Status of Minorities Committee (4),
St3tus of Women Committee (5), Student
Health Services Committee (3), Admis-
sions Committee (1), Calendar Commit-
tee (1), Career Education Committee (1),
Continuing Education Committee (1),
Credits Committee (1), Curriculum
Committee (1), General College Commit-
tee (1), Libraries Committee (1), Student
Recruitment and Retention Committee
(1), Teaching Effectiveness Committee
(3), and Faculty Computer Committee
(1). Applications are available at the fol-
lowing locations: Office of the Vice
Chancelor for Student Life, 204
Whichard; Mendenhall Students Center
Information Desk; SGA Office, Menden-
hall Student Center; and Residence 1 lall
Director's Offices. Questions about Uni-
versity Committees and memberships
may be directed to the Office of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life (757-6541).
Applications must be turned in to 204
Whichard Building by Sept. 1.
CHORAL SOCIETY
The Greenville Choral Society will begin
rehearsals for its 19th season at 7:30 p.m
Sept. 6. Singers interested in joining
should audition on Sunday at St. James
United Methodist Church, 2000 E. 6th St.
between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. contact the
musical director. Dr. Rhonda Fleming, at
756-3618.
YEARBOOK STAFF
Staff positions are available for the fol-
lowing positions: layout artist, business
managers, writers and sports editors. To
apply go by the Buccaneer office or the
Media Board Secretary's office for appli-
cation. We are located on the second floor
of the Publications Building. Application
deadline is September 2.
FREE PIZZA
Tuesday, 6-8 p.m. AFROTC Det �600.
Wright Annex 3rd floor. Talk with Air
Force officers. Find out about U.S. Air
Force.
STUDENT UNION
Student Union Forum committee. We
make the decisions on which popular
speakers will come and speak at ECU.
Join us on the Forum Committee! Contact
Student Union at 757-6611 and leave a
message for Allen Manning to get your
application!
EPISCOPAL FELLOWSHIP
ESF will meet Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. St.
Paul's Episcopal Church on 4th Street
(one block towards river from Garrett
Dorm) for Holy Communion and dinner.
Call Allen Manning for more info at 758-
1440.
FORENSICS SOCIETY
Interested in competing intercollegiate
public speaking, intern, or debate? The
first meeting will be Wednesday in Mes-
sick 214 at 8 p.m.
HONORS SEMINARS
All faculty members and I Ionors stu-
dents are reminded of their opportunity
to design or request an I Ionors Seminar
of their choice. The Honors Committee
makes the final selection. Please submit
proposals to David Sanders (757-6373) at
the Honors Office, Room 1002, General
Classroom Building, by Wednesday. See
Dr. David Sanders in the I Ionors Office
for more info.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
PRIME TIME � Everyone welcome. Fun,
fellowship, teaching and training on how-
to live a more effective Christian life on
the college cam pus. Thursday at 7:30 pm.
Brewster C-103.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The first organizational meeting of the
school year will be September 8 at 7 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student Center, Room
221. All old members and interested stu-
dents are encounraged to attend. Come
on out and help us defeat the 'crats in No-
vember!
Quayle embarks on his first campaign trip, denies allegations that he flirted with and propositioned a lobbyist
WASHINGTON (AP) - Repub-
lican vice presidential nominee
Dan Quaylc is embarking on his
first solo campaign trip, indig-
nant about a former lobbyist's
claim that he propositioned her
but declaring he can put the furor
behind him by stressing "jobs,
peace, freedom
The Indiana senator travels to
Cincinnati and to Lexington, Ky
then makes an address tonight
before a national conference of
enlisted National Guardsmen in
St. Louis.
Quayle spent Tuesday at his
Virginia home working on his
stump speech as new revelations
surfaced about his entry into the
National Guard and relationship
with a woman lobbyist.
As for new reports about his
entry into the Guard and relation-
ship with former lobbyist Paula
Parkinson, Quayle said: 'This is
just getting a little bit outrageous
and I'm getting a little bit indig-
nant about just one bum rap after
another
Quaylc has denied using his
family's influence to get into the
Indiana National Guard during
the Vietnam War, saying that the
Guard had openings at the time.
Bu t a retired Indiana guard offi-
cial acknowledged Tuesday that
he asked the Guard personnel
office to "hold" a space for Quayle
after receiving a call from a
Quaylc family friend in 1969.
Retired Major Gen. Alfred
Ahner, former military support
officer for Indiana and later head
of the state's National Guard, said
he was contacted by an old friend,
Wendell Phillippi, a retired
Guard commander who then
worked for a newspaper owned
by Quaylc's family.
"Wendell Phillippi had called
and said he had a good man, and
said he thought he'd make a good
Guardsman Ahner said in a tele-
phone interview from Indiana.
After learning thre were a
couple vacancies, "I said hold one
of them, there's a good guy com-
ing over he said.
"We couldn't take him if there
wasn't any opening Ahner said.
He said Quayle was accepted into
the state's headquarters unit,
which was "pretty selective" and
looked for recruits with intelli-
gence and leadership potential.
He said he "paid attention" to
Phillippi because "he was a for-
mer commanding general" who
would have an eye for who might
make a good Guardsman. Ahner
said Quayle received no preferen-
tial treatment during his service.
Meanwhile, Playboy magazine
said Tuesday and article in its No-
vember edition includes a stste-
ment from Ms. Parkinson that
Quayle propositioned her during
a trip to Florida eight years ago
but that she rebuffed him because
she was with another man.
We flirted a lot and danced
extremely close and sugges-
tively Ms. Parkinson said in the
Playboy interview. "He said he
wanted to make love
The release by Playboy fol-
lowed a report in the Daily news
of Los Angeles in which two for-
mer attorneys for Ms. Parkinson
say she told the FBI in 1981 about
the alleged proposition.
One of the attorneys, Washing-
ton lawyer Glenn Lewis, told The
Associated Press that Playboy's
account was consistent with what
Ms. Parkinson had told the FBI.
"Quaylc made a pass at her,
said he would like to sleep with
her. She said, 'No, I'm with
Tom Lewis said, referring to
former U.S. Rep. Tom Evans, R-
Dcl who went on the golfing trip
to Florida in 1980.
Ms. Parkinson, Evans, Quayle,
then a representative, and a third
congressman shared a cottage,
and the FBI looked into the outing
in an investigation into whether
sexual favors were traded for
votes against legislation. Officials
dropped the case seven years ago
withutiiling charges.
"I had nothing to do with her
down there Quayle said Tues-
day. "I've got a wife and three
small children, and I hope there's
some respect and dignity for
things I did not do before we go
rushing off with all these so-called
rumors
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i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988 7
d. picas
call 756-9874
AW All AN TRIP: could be
- largest party plan com-
demonstrators. Excellent
scs! 1 I kit; supplies. No
ctingoi delivering Call
PERSONALS
APPA TAU: Wolc
ome back -m
at summer. Get
semester with
A IT A I"Al LIL'SISTERS: MAN-
� � � � st planning to
A . - n Acres.
i For more info
� Jor Amanda 31 830-
it. II B u K OX: Met I at the 1 lub
� read) for an
: : our charter in
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Irad Cates
rt Lorrison
Jtevens
ly Marlowe
i �. r Souther
ke Carlson
atory training
ugust 31st at
lendenhall.
lease contact
758-9923.
land number.
r Committee
� � Please submit
: - 757-6373) at
I I 2, General
. dncsday. Sec
the ! Eonors Office
CAMPUS CRUSADE
� Ever) re welcome. Fun,
and training on how
rive Christian life on
rhurs laj al 7 3 p.m.
:OLLEGl REPUBLICANS
il meeting of the
September 8 at 7 p.m.
ident Center, Room
rs and interested stu-
igcd to attend. Come
help us defeat the 'crats in No-
hvist
fmer U.S. Rep. Tom Evans, R-
, who wont on the golfing trip
1 irida in 1.980.
fs. Parkinson, Evans, Quayle,
fm a representative, and a third
ressman shared a cottage,
d the FBI looked into the outing
tn investigation into whether
cual favors were traded for
kesagainst legislation. Officials
ppcd the case seven years ago
Ithut tiling charges.
I'i had nothing to do with her
jwn there Quayle said Tucs-
jv. "I've got a wife and three
tall children, and I hope there's
ne respect and dignity for
ngs I did not do before we go
jhingoffwithall these so-called
inors
r
s
t
- sBudweiser beer We know ofZZ 5fl
Tthe famhrewcr which costs so much to b�e!lQn�P
2 �K.Tcood AqeinQ produces a taste �"fe



rEN0WNEP
iUDWEISEFl'
IttGEriEflC
SMERlCfe
KING OF

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� r
I
, AUQUSt 25; I9S8
Tickets: $4.00 Advance, $5.00 At The Gate
7 PM-Until 209 East 5th Street Downtown
Purchase tickets in front of Student Store, Monday-Thursday
�m. acili





i

I
8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988
Peace is subject at meeting
All New!
GENEVA (AP) - The Iran-Iraq International negotiations have
peace talks starting Thursday are marked Geneva's history for 116
only one set of negotiations that
bolster Geneva's century-old tra-
dition as a city of peace.
A day earlier, Greek and Turk-
ish factions from Cyprus open
two days of meetings in a new
attempt to resolve the political
years, since the settlement of a
controversy arising from the U.S,
Civil War.
At dispute in 1872 were heavy
losses inflicted on 22 Union ships
by a British-equipped Confeder-
ate frigate, the Alabama. The
have extolled the Geneva spirit
after the first summit between
President Reagan and Soviet
leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in
1985 signaled a new phase in
superpower relations.
In April, the superpowers
ence for South-West Africa. But a
complete peace package still
seems a way off.
Geneva was the launching pad
for international arbitration be-
tween Chile and Argentina on the
century-old Beagle Channel dis-
to international arbitration and a
Geneva tribunal ruled Britain
should pay the United States
$15.5 million in damages.
Nine years earlier, Henry Dun-
ant, a Geneva native, launched
the idea for the Red Cross. The
future of the island divided by United States and Britain agreed
war.
Both sets of talks arc brokered
by the United Nations, which has
its European base at the former
League of Nations building.
The Palace of Nations hosts
about 8,000 meetings a year, help-
ing make Geneva the world's
conference capital.
The heavy U.N. focus is likely to
overshadow a third major meet-
ing on the city's neutral ground: a
U.SSoviet review of the Anti-
Ballistic Missile Treaty, whose
outcome could affect superpower
arms reduction talks.
The "Geneva spirit" saw a ren-
aissance this year with the com-
pletion of a U.SSoviet treaty
scrapping intermediate-range
missiles and the signing of a U.N.
-backed accord setting a Soviet
troop pullout from Afghanistan.
Those agreements took years to
signed the U.N. agreement on Af- putc and between Egypt and Is-
ghanistan after six years of nego- rael over compting claims to the
Taba strip.
Pope John Paul II's mediaiton
was needed before a Chile-Argen-
tina settlement was signed in
1982. The Taba judges, inaugu-
rated in 1986, are still deliberat-
tiations.
Secretary of State George P.
Shultz and Foreign Minister
Eduard Shevardnadze returned
to Geneva a month later to settle
final details of the intermediate-
range nuclear forces treaty, which
was signed in Washington in last
�$�
ing
Through the ups and downs of
International Red Cross today is year. U.SSoviet talks'on cutting diplomacy, negotiators from all
based in Geneva. long-range nuclear arsenals are over the world keep flocking to
Hopes were high in 1919 when continuing.
Geneva was chosen to be the host Earlier this month, reprcsenta-
of the League of Nations. But in tives of South Africa, Angola and
the 1930s, the League could dc
little to prevent Adolf Hitler's rise
to power in Germany or Italy's
war in Ethiopia.
It collapsed in World War II.
The United Nations made Ge-
neva its European center in 1946.
Most U.Naffiliated agencies
have headquarters in the city,
including the World Health Or-
ganization and the International
Telecommunication Union.
met in Geneva under U.S. media-
tion and agreed on first concrete
moves to end the civil war in
Angola and declare independ-
this city.
"No other world city is charac-
terized by as total a calm, as total
an absence of political passion in
matters of international politics
former U.S. diplomat George
Wynne wrote during his 1970s
posting in Geneva.
GYM

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FEATURING:
GUC rate hikes to begin
complete, a fate that may befall Superpower efforts to ban all
the Iran-Iraq talks, called to settle chemical weapons and nuclear
points of conflict after both sides tests have gone on for years in
accepted a cease-fire in the 8-year- Geneva,
old Persian Gulf war. Washington and Moscow often
Escape foiled by inmate at
Guilford County jail
ously wounding another officer
in 1985.
Conner was arrested in Greens-
GREENSBORO (AP) - Six men,
including a suspected killer on
New Jersey's 12 Most Wanted list,
have been charged with plotting �ro MaY 20 on argcs of burn
to escape the Guilford County in tvvo houscs and a car
Jail.
The six allegedly planned to
overpower a guard on the fourth-
floor "D" block, use his keys to
open cells and then flee to catwalk
behind the cells and out a win-
dow, said Detective John Davis of
the county Sheriff's Department. e Court ot A
Jailers, altered to the plan by an-
other inmante, found a rope fash-
ioned from bed sheets hidden in a
shower room, he said.
The escape was slated for Aug.
8, but postponed until Aug. 12 be-
cause conditions weren't right,
Davis said. The plot was uncov-
ered Aug. 10.
Tine six were charged with con-
spiracy to escape, a felony punish-
able by 10 years improsonment.
Among those charged was
Frank Conner, 27, who also is
known as Dicn Mitchell Har-
lcston. He is being held without
bond while awaiting extraditions
to Hudson County, N.J where he
is wanted on charges of killing a
police officer in 1987 and scri-
r
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Greenville Utilities electric
rates will increase approximately
5 percent overall on utility bills
rendered on or after September 1,
1988. Tine increase is the result of a
rate hike imposed by CP&L on its
customers to cover costs of the
Shcaron Harris Nuclear Power
Plant. Greenville Utilities is one of
32 cities in the North Carolina
Municipal Power Agency; the
Power Agency purchases power
from CP&L.
This rate hike, the first of three
planned by CP&L and approved
by theN.C. Utilities Commission,
will be the first that GUC has
passed on to its customers in the
past four years. GUC did not pass
on tvvo earlier rate hikes � 2 per-
cent in September 1987and 4 per-
cent in June 1988 � at a cost of $3
million annually. GUC was able
to absorb the cost of these in-
creases because of savings ob-
tained by Beat-thc-Pcak savings,
voltage adjustments, joint genera-
tor projects and other cost con-
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Waters then filed a motion
Monday asking the court to re-
verse the suppression. When
Hight denied the request, Waters
gave notice he would proceed to
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SGA Office Room 222
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�Mandatory Meeting For All Candidates
Will Be September 6th at 7:00 p.m.
�Campaigning to begin September 7th - September 13th
ELECTION DATE - SEPTEMBER 14, 1988 - 9 A.M. - 6 P.M.
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516 S. Cotanche Street Downtown Greenville
Bush
(AP) - George Bush saysl
standing firm behind run
mate Dan Quayic despite "u
ousrumormengers" raising
tions about the Indiana
character Democrat Mid
Dukakis aimed some of the h
est criticism yet at his
opponent
Vice President Bush
plained during a V.
paign swing that the I
questions about his ch
vice pre; t runn i
wasdrownir
The Republican pr
candidate declared I
paign would g t bad
"whenever you j
these questions
But Bush . told a a
supporters gat
the Californi
Sacramcr- mi .j
seme insid
drive me to cl
standing V
Quay!
I
Victim rs
COLUMBUS, 01
suspect in dor rts I
tnbuted to I
was arrested after a
cnts lured him i traj
amateur staki
than a year, a new
today.
The parent- spent
nights a week search
daughter's attack - 1 j
warnings they were p
lives in danger and p
washngthcirtime,TheCoj
Dispatch said in a .
The father, armed
would wait in a car while
acted as a decoy on tl I
ner where hi I 1 (
raped in June lu"
per said.
Police announced V j
Robert Biddings, 34,v. a;
i, ECU facul
of Associa
ICV Ncw�l
GREENVILLE - Dr.
Chestnut oi the psyche
partment faculty at ECl
stalled last week as 2
of the Association c I
chologists at its ann j
bon in Washington
Chestnut, a member o I
faculty since 1974, said Ij
spearhead a national
focusing on: ia) identitj
documenting mental ht
grams that have proven'
in dealing with iss
mental h( b)
ment, retention and pr
of black college stud -
education an I ebh
andtheteachingof.
children.
Chestnut said one j
official duties as i
dent of the Black V-
Association was I j
ccutive meeting oi
and Policy Board oft �c
Psychological Ass 1
lanta.
The meeting was thj
that leaders oi all r-
Psychological Assocu
Day-
Re;
9U
Deadline





xM
kout Area
orkout
il pi rs
1-6
1002 Evans St.
758-9584
NS
� �
tber 2nd
idates
�eptember 13th
9 A.M. - 6 P.M.
RuMll
r.� ' ,�
M5:30 P.M.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988 9
Bush still stands tough
(AP) - George Bush says he's
standing firm behind running
mate Dan Quayle despite "insidi-
ous rumormongcrs" raising ques-
tions about the Indiana senator's
character Democrat Michael
Dukakis aimed some of the harsh-
est criticism yet at his Republican
opponent.
Vice President Bush com-
plained during a Western cam-
paign swing that the flood of
questions about his choice of a
vice presidential running mate
was drowning out the issues.
The Republican presidential
candidate declared that his cam-
paign would get back on track
whenever you stop asking me
those questions
But Bush also told a crowd of
supporters gathered in front of
the California State Capitol in
Sacramento: "I'm not going to let
some insidious rumormongers
drive me to change mv mind. I'm
standing behind Dan Quavle
Quayle also lamented Tuesday
that "the voters don't know Dan
Quayle because you haven't
given me a chance to present my-
self to America
Making his first solo flight as
the GOP vice presidential nomi-
nee, Quayle travels today to Cin-
cinnati and to Lexington, Ky
before making an address tonight
before a national conference of
enlisted National Guardsmen in
St. Louis.
Quayle is facing questions
about his National Guard duty at
the height of the Vietnam War,
admission into law school and
claims by former lobbyist Paula
Parkinson that he propositioned
her eight years ago during a golf
vacation in Florida with two other
congressmen.
Ms. Parkinson told Playboy
magazine she rebuffed Quaylc's
advances during the vacation
because she was there with then-
U.S. Rep. Tom Evans, a Delaware
Republican.
"We flirted a lot and danced
extremely close and sugges-
tively Ms. Parkinson told the
magazine about Quayle, accord-
ing to excerpts of the forthcoming
article released Tuesday. "He said
he wanted to make love
Washington attorney Glenn
Lewis, who represented Ms. Park-
inson when she was questioned
by the FBI in 1981, said Playboy's
account agreed with what she
told the FBI.
But Quayle said he had "noth-
ing to do with her adding, "This
is just getting a little bit outra-
geous and I'm getting a little bit
indignant about just one bum rap
after another
Dukakis was traveling today to
Washington to pick up an en-
dorsement from the 13-million-
member AFL-CIO. On Tuesday,
the Massachusetts governor bor-
rowed Bush's line about "voodoo
economics" to criticize the vice
president's budget plan.
"There is no Republican plan
Dukakis said. "The vice president
is talking about a flexible freeze.
That's like a melting ice cube
That's the son of voodoo econom-
ics Bush criticized Ronald
Reagan's economic proposals as
"voodoo economics" in 1980
when the two were competing for
the GOP presidential nomination.
Dukakis also questioned Bush's
support for mandatory recitation
of the Pledge of Allegiance in
schools, saying the vice president
was unfit to run for president if he
would sign such legislation after
being told by a court that it was
unconstitutional.
Bush continued to enjoy post-
convention gains in the polls.
A new Gallup poll said Bush
was leading Dukakis, 48 percent
to 44 percent, among registered
voters. However, the survey had a
margin of error of 3 percentage
points, meaning that cither figure
could be off by that much. Gallup
contacted 1,000 likely voters last
weekend immediately following
the Republican National Conven-
tion.
wrrnrtiiort w iters
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is now accepting applica-
tions for staff writers. Only students seriously inter-
ested in writing need to apply. Great opportunities.
Great company. Invaluable experience. Apply in per-
son at the East Carolinian Office.
Victim rs parents trap suspected rapist
Local and Out of
Town Newspapers
Full selection of 1989 Calendars
Greeting Cards For All Occasions1
P Ballo on for all occasions
CENTRAL BOOK
& NEWS
Bw�Bi Squf
C�m � 7S4-7177
Opwi 'TM t 30 PM �w D�Tf A WM
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - A
suspect in dozens of attacks at-
tributed to the "handcuff rapist"
was arrested after a victim's par-
ents lured him into a trap in an
amateur stakeout lasting more
than a year, a newspaper reported
today.
The parents spent several
nights a week searching for their
daughter's attacker despite police
warnings they were putting their
lives in danger and probably
wasting their time, The Columbus
Dispatch said in a copyright story.
The father, armed with a gun,
would wait in a car while his wife
acted as a decoy on the same cor-
ner where her daughter was
raped in June 1987, the newspa-
per said.
Tolicc announced Monday that
Robert Biddings, 34, was arrested
Thursday and was being held in
the Franklin County jail on one
count of rape and two counts of
kidnapping in lieu of $750,000
bond. They said they would seek
to have him charged with up to 60
rapes.
Biddings is a suspect in a scries
of attacks dating back to 1984 that
had been attributed to the "hand-
cuff rapist so called because he
used handcuffs in early attacks,
said police spokeswoman Denise
Tangborn.
The Dispatch, quoting police
reports, court records and un-
identified sources, said the rape
victim's parents decided to track
down their 23-ycar-old
daughter's attacker themselves
and find the evidence needed to
break the case.
The father said he knew police
were understaffed and could not
spend as much time on the case as
he and his wife wanted. The Dis-
patch interviewed the father
Monday but did not identify him.
The newspaper gave this ac-
count of how the trap was sprung:
On the night of Friday, Aug. 5 -
the same day of the week and the
same time of day their daughter
was attacked - the mother was
standing on the corner just cast of
downtown, when a man parked
his car and walked toward her.
The attacker grabbed her,
dragged her toward nearby Fran-
klin Park and drew a gun. The
woman's husband ran from his
car, also drew a gun and said:
"Freeze! Police
The attacker ran to his car and
fled.
The husband wrote down the
car's license plate and called po-
lice.
The license number was traced
to a car owned by Biddings, who
was arrested after police searched
his apartment.
The charges against Biddings
relate to the case involving the
couple's daughter.
So far, Biddings has been linked
to 19 additional attacks, said po-
lice Capt. Antonc Lanata.
'The victims have picked him
out of a photo display, or by
physical evidence - fingerprints
Lanata said. Interviews with
other victims were continuing, he
said.
Evidence against Biddings will
be presented to a Franklin County
grand jury, accompanied by re-
quests for indictments on 60
counts of rape and felony
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ECU faculty member elected 20th president
of Association of Black Psychologists
ICL' Ni'ns Burcju
GREENVILLE - Dr. Dennis E.
Chestnut of the psychology de-
partment faculty at ECU was in-
stalled last week as 20th president
of the Association of Black Psy-
chologists at its annual conven-
tion in Washington.
Chestnut, a member of the ECU
faculty since 1974, said he would
spearhead a national program
focusing on: (a) identifying and
documenting mental health pro-
grams that have proven effective
in dealing with issues of black
mental health; (b) the recruit-
ment, retention and progression
of black college students in higher
education and (c) the black family
and the teaching of values to black
children.
Chestnut said one of his first
official duties as national presi-
dent of the Black Psychologists
Association was to attend an ex-
ecutive meeting of the Planning
and Policy Board of the American
Psychological Association in At-
lanta.
The meeting was the first time
that leaders of all major American
Psychological Associations have
convened together to discuss Hispanic Psychological Associa-
common goals and plans, Chest- tion also attended the Atlanta
nut said. Representatives of the meeting, Chestnut said.
Society of Indian Psychologists, Chestnut, a native of Tabor
the Asian American Psychology- City, N.C also serves as Director
cal Association and the National of Minority Affairs.
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East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking application for
Day-Student Representative
for the 1988-89 Term
Responsibilities:
Qualifications:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committe Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
Full-Time Student
Reside Off Campus
Independent
Deadline To Apply: Friday, September 9, 1988
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
$100 per semester
(Student Hours Are Limited)





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August 28th.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY
SEPTEMBER 3, 1988. QUANTITY
RIGHTS RESERVED. NOT RESPONSIBLE
FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
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Stay up with Jerry and WfeTELETHCHI Musc-ular Dystrophy Association
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Prices Good In Greenville, N.C. � At 703 Greenville Blvd.
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I � I i t AS I A p
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Sunday,
ust 28th.
'E THRU SATURDAY,
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P PRECZC
THE EAST CAROL INI AN
Entertainment
AUGUST 25,1988 I'jgc 11
Amateurs: reggae-rock energy
By GREER BOW EN
M.itt liter
i like all music Bill Shep-
I i A said. Host known in
irecnville as "Shop" the musi-
un brings an energized version
i reggae-rock to Eastern North
( arolina. Shep, who is the
founder ol The Amateurs, has
-1 lusic in his blood.
1 lis mother cut about 78-rpm
.pel records and his four sisters
- i mod a gospel group known as
he Shepherd Sisters. Shop said
that he grow up with musk all
ound him. 1 had neighbors in
tuex rts that were originally from
Iiinivi.nl that were in a group
tailed Calypso Mania' and that
was my introduction to reggae
aid Shop.
Shep le med back in his big,
,n chair and gave a gentle
he spoke of his fans. "We
get a lot of mail from people we've
met along the way and people we
haven't met at all, but they all are
really supportive he said. Much
of these people write to say that
thev know of clubs that the Ama-
tours might like to play in, others
write just to saykecp it up And
that is just what they do.
This September, the band will
record a new tape in Chapel Hill
at TGS Studio. Steve Gronbeck,
the producer, has worked with
many artists some of which arc on
the Island Record label. "I'm a
slob in my daily life but I'm a
perfectionist when it comes to my
music Shop said.
The bands roster includes;
Yince Stout (base), Larry Price
(saxophone), Buddy Alcorn
(rvthum guitar), Kerry
Richardson (drums), Mike Davis
(lead guitar) and of course Shep
on lead vocals and congos. Each
member brings his own personal-
ity to the group which was voted
the best local band in a local poll
for two years in a row.
Shep is involved in many other
things besides the band. He was
the founder of doggers day here
in Greenville and the organizer of
the Reggae Festival in Nags Head.
His interests range from folk
music to classic rock and he even
enjoys blue grass. This diversity
adds flavor to the Amateurs style
of reggae-rock.
The band works out of a house
on 5th street where they reads all
their fan mail. Many of the letters
arc saved and a great number are
answered pcrsonaly by the band.
"We have a grass roots organi-
zation here Shep said. Theband
members are all great friends and
spend a great deal of time to-
gether. Even though Shep formed
the band, there seems to be no real
leader as such.
The Amateurs travel all across
North Carolina and have done
some shows in South Carolina
and other places. But Shep said he
really loves the mountains and
would one day like to settle there.
The Amateurs music is just like
the band, it is a combination of
many different elements, but
when the lights come on and the
music starts, these different
elements come together to form a
solid sound.
This reggae-rock is sure to get
the audience going this Friday
night when the Amatures start the
new school year off right at the
New Deli.
The band friendliness and
honest live of music makes them a
favorite where ever they play.
"We arc leaving at 3 in the morn-
ing to go to Hilton Head, why
don't you come along for the ride?
There is a nightmare on my street, Elm
St. five not worth one Freddy Krueger
By MICAH HARRIS
v ightmareon 11m Street: The
ream Master" epitomizes the
. dream of all movie goers: a
tc of time and monev that
A manages to be entertaining
all.
The original concept of
'Nightmare On Elmstreet" was a
freshing ariatfon on the typical
me ot splatter movies. A group
ii. nts, irate at the neighbor-
d child molester getting out of
: . ing his sentence, but the unto-
ird fc How alive in his home.
I'ut thechilci molestcr'sspirit
irrts years later to slaughter
. parent's children through
dreams. Thesedream
uJn. alU A'ed for gore to be
' sr�ensd �4th the addecW
ment of surrealism.
1hus was born Freddy
legcr. ith his pizza complex-
ion and razor blades flashing
from his fingertips, he is a much a
symbol of cinematic shock in the
'80's as the Karloff Frankenstein
was in the '30's and '40's.
But familiarity breeds con-
tempt. Universal wore their ver-
sion of Frankenstein out in a series
of films, and now Freddy Krueger
has suffered the same fate.
"Nightmare On Elm Street:
The Dream Master" has no clear
beginning or end. It picks up
where Part III, the Dream Warri-
ors, led off and woe to you if you
didn't see the previous film and
are left to tie the loose ends that
flap aboi�' like so much film
leader on a take-up red At least,
there could have been a montage
flashback sequence or a "Star
Wars: scroll e(leqt"us the movie
spewed (the ItdSWaft? almost
stream of consciousness in their
aciton, at least gave you that
muchV
1 suppose it doesn't matter
because all of the "dream warri-
ors" from the third movie are of-
fered by Freddy within thirty
minutes. And they're only the
first to go as seemingly the whole
student body of the local high
school begins to drop dead.
These characters tend to be so
obnoxious that you're rooting for
Freddy to off them. Once again,
we are presented with teens who
are not only wittier but the moral
superiors of their parents. This
attempt at "audience identifica-
tion" is nothing but a cheap,
short-cut to the heart of the "rebel-
lious teen" expected to flock to
this movie.
The only semi-appealing ex-
ceptions arc a ncrdcttc named
Sheila and .our� heroine, Alice,
played by a young actress with
"Cissy Spacck as Carrie" stamped
all over her.
You see, Alice evidently has
some psychic ability that is only
explained with some cursory
comment like "I daydream a lot
So do a lot of people, Alice, but
you don't sec them becoming a
gestalt entity of their dead friends
like you do. This aspect of the
movie is interesting but ulti-
mately a convenient plot cop-out
since all her dead friends' talents
she's absorbed just happen to be
the right ones she needs to fight
off Freddy.
We've established plot and
character as basically unredeem-
able at this point.
Docs this movie haveanything
going for it? What about those
crazy, surreal, and often times
gorcy dream sequences?
But these sequencjgre sadly,
Peking. How majyjMBPly-faced
twnior higrroyychcrai take to
conceive of such scenes as a dog
jacking off his leg to urinate flame
and a jock on the toilet suddenly
Bill Shepperd, affectionately known throughout the Emerald
City as Shep, brings his high energy reggae-rock sound of the
Amateurs to the New Deli Friday.
finding nls stall tilled with adimr- fused with our secretary) suffers
ing cheerleaders? This sopho- the most innovative of the dream
mork self-indulgence adds new deaths: a fate Kafka's Gregor
facets to the definition of "low- Samsa would appreciate. Wilcox
brow " now stars on the TV show, "Just
The gore here is pretty ho-hum the Ten Of Us with the original
stuff. Ironically, the dream sc- Elm Street girl, Heather Lang-
quences were more effective ekamp.
when restrained. Examples: a Heather's character, Nancy's
young man finds himself in an tombstone is glimpsed in the cur-
infinate maze of old cars in a rent movie. Is this the ultimate
junkyard (the terror of which can fate of Freddy's victims: to end up
be felt by anyone who's forgotten on lackluster situation comedies?
their parking place at the mall:
Sheila the nerdeUc discovers her
i ink, pen frijHung fctafct?!
Ummcolattskl 11 ' inii
One of Freddy's victims is
played by Lisa Wilcox, whose
character. Debbie (not to be con-
If so, Krueger is more benign
than The Dream Master's" pro-
ducers. Two hours workth of
'�Gilligan's Island" rerun "are
more tolerable than what they've
turned out. On our cat head scale
of five, this turkev rates a one.
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Mac and Me one real long commercial
By GREER BOWEN
MII Writci
was less than inventive and the
characters were shallow andof ten
unrealistic.
rion Pictures' "Mac and Me" The movie begins with a family
irccl lake-offon the extremely of aliens an their natural planet
ilu movie EX. The plot is drinking something out of the
htly different, but the changes earth through straws. An US
i improve the alcin-come-to space probe lands and acciden-
h story at all. taly sucks the family up in a vac-
is movie was one big en- uum cleaner attachment.
ment after another. The plot When the probe returns to
iis is � picture from the new commericial sensation "Mac and
vip " The title of the movie should be "Big Mac and Me drinking
.Coke on the way to Sears The kid is (do you care) and the other
uy looks vaintly like a girl Mr. Gil used to date.
earth, the aliens escape and in the
confusion, the smallest is sepa-
rated from the rest of the family.
The smallest, Mac as he is later
named, causes a wreck on the
interstate when he jumps on the
hood of a car. Mac then climbs
into the car of a family that is
stalled by the traffic jam.
This family consists of a mother,
teenage boy named Michael, and
the star, Eric. Eric is in a wheel-
chair but the audience is never
told why. Just as the audience is
never told what happened to the
father.
Mac secerns to be clcctricaly
charged and starts up electronic
toys and the t.v. with just a touch,
of course no one believes Ere
when he says that he has seen a
creature from outcrspacc -xcept
for the girl next door named Deb-
bie.
After a few scenes of Mac ap-
pearing and disappearing to go
out side and telepathically com-
municates with his family that is
now in the desert, Eric catches
Mac. Mac will only drink Coke
and this seems to be what keeps
him healthy as his family starves
from coke cola withdrawl in the
desert.
Eric and Debbie take Mac to a
birthday party at McDonalds
dressed as a teddy bear and Mac
sees the kids dancing around and
dances on the counter. The gov-
ernment scientists see him try to
catch him but of course Eric,
Debbie, Michael, and Debbie's
older sister who works at
McDonalds save Mac and help
him reach his parents.
They find Mac's family and
bring them to health by giving
them coke. The alcin family is
attacked by the police when they
try to take a case of coke from a lo-
cal grocery store. Eric is injured
and the aliens save him. but in-
stead of going home, the aliens are
made U.S. citizens and the movie
ends with them driving away in
their very own car.
The aliens looked like people
dressed in fair to good Halloween
costumes. The idea of having a
handicapped boy staring in a film
was a good one but not in an
unoriginal plot. It would had
Jade Category, the actor who
played Eric could have acted.
It is doubtful that even the
youngest moviegoer will find this
movie very enjoyable. E.T. was a
been at least slightly enjoyable if hit because of universal appeal
nd the depiction of boy and his
friend. Mac and Eric are never
really friends and has no univer-
sal appeal. Mac and Me is a sad
excuse for summertime entertain-
ment.
Piekin' the Bones
The BoneheacTs back and his front, his side, his left ear
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Vulture
Well, I'm back. I didn't really
die last spring. No thanks to the
dreaded ECU Association of Fat
Girls that Write Bad Poetry, or the
Legion of Toolbox Carrying Art
Pansies. The Bonchcad is back,
but people are saying I'm dif-
ferent.
I admit, some of my behavior
has been pretty bizarre lately. I
have become Greenville's biggest
Dcf Lcppard fan. The Bonchcad,
fan of such boss bands as drivin'
rt' cryin Wild Seeds and Patsy
Cline, now listening to pop rock
with slit jeans?
Believe mc, it scares me too. I
tried to find out what had hap-
pened. I retraced the steps of my
summer, seeking, searching for
clues. Was I amnesiac?
Had I two years ago passed out
downtown, woken up and just
ASSUMED I was the Bonchcad? If
so, what was my life really like? If
my memory came back, what
would be there for me to return
to?
I Would I one day wake up and
fc-cmember my life in Wilson,
working at the Kash and Karry�,
married to a domineering rcd-
icck who worked nights at the
ivcrrcady� plant? Would I have
to take care of the kids?
I reasoned that this could not be
the case. It might explain the Dcf
Lcppard tendencies, but there are
statutes in the N.C. law books that
revent Kash and Karry� em-
ployees from knowing how to
�ead. When I woke up, 1 read that
"Prisoners are allowed one phone
call" sign right off the bat.
No, amnesia was out. Perhaps 1
had been kidnapped by aliens. I
shudder to think what kind of
aliens they could have been
though. Picture a three- headed,
purple monstrosity, with tencyc-
stalks and oozing orange sores
wearing a Mctallica tank top.
Perhaps one drunken night I
stumbled into an extraterrestrial
spaceship, thinking it was the piss
closet. I befriended the creatures
and lived among them for a time.
Unfortunately, the only thing
they could hear were heavy drum
The Bonehead's back
beats and insipid lyrics, so that's
how we communicated.
No, I thought. It can't be that.
Most alien races are as Mojo
Nixon postulated � moving
toward perfect Elvisness. Any
races intelligent enough for inter-
stellar travel would find a way to
get around the cultural difficul-
ties of Bon Jovi contamination.
The most likely explanation is
all the time I spent on the Island of
Scars� Models. The long days
under the spotlights, the endless
drugs and the mindless women I
was forced to have mind-numb-
ing amounts of sex with.
It surely softened my brain to
the point where I would no longer
fight my way to the stereo and
change the tape. Instead, I said,
"What the hell and relaxed my
strict musical and moral stan-
dards.
So. FIcrc I am. Am I still THE
Bonchcad, the one so feared and
hated by the entire faculty of the
Women's Studies department? I
guess so.
What bones shall I pick this
year? What subculture can 1 mer-
cilessly attack, humiliating them
and stripping them bare like a
hungry vulture? What ideals and
social cripples can I rip apart to
make mvsclf look better?
Well, basically anybody I can
outrun. Old people, handicapped
people and people that say,
"Wanna drink some beers?" But
before I start any controversy, a
little story. What happened yes-
terday convinced mc it's gonna be
a great year.
On the first day of my science
lab, in those highly slanted rooms
in the foul recesses of the Biology
building, I went to my class, ft
seemed like a cool class.
As I sat in the back row, an
enormously fat girl wheeled in.
Strapped on the back was her art
toolbox. She stopped right in the I
middle of the door, impecding the
progress of those freshmen strag-
glers trying to make it to class.
Halfway through the lecture,
right about the time the professor
started discussing meteors, her
brake slipped. She careened
See BONEHEAD, page 14





I
12
THE EAST CAROl IN1AN
AUGUST 25. 1988
Movie, "The Last Temptation of Christ receives national
protest from fundmentalists, including 8,000 area petitioners
BvEARLVIS HAMPTON
lecture I Jitor
With mass protest over the re-
cent release of "The Last Tempta-
tion of Christ" around the coun-
try, a local radio station has com-
piled approximately 8,000 signa-
tures from people who seek to
have the film ban from area thea-
ters.
Tom Lamprecht, general man-
ager of WG1 IB in Farmville, pre-
sented the signed petitions of
approximately 8,000 people to
theaters in Greenville last week.
Lamprecht said all ot the area
theaters, except tor the Plitt thea-
ter, told the general manager that
they would not show the contro-
versial movie.
1 amprccht said Plitt has iu.t
made a decision whether to show
the film or not. According to
lamprecht, Plitt is owned by
Universal Studios, which re-
leased the film last Friday.
According to the Associated
Tress, about 23,000 people, some
carrying crosses, protested the
film's release outside of Univcr-
sial Studios in Universial City,
California. Fundmcntalist Chris-
tians say the movie is blasphc
mous in its portrayal ot Jc u
Christ templed to abandon his
divinity.
"It 1 a distortation ot what the
Sibli1 sa s. I lollywood in general
has been inaccurate in depicting
history. I get tired of the historical
inaccuratencss said Lamprecht.
1 c said VVG1 IB started to dis-
tributing petitions about 30 days
ago. Of the number of signatures,
hesaid " I 'm surprised. 1 expected
to receive maybe a 1,000 signa-
ture
The nation's fourth-largest
theater chains-General Cinema
1 heaters-has decided against
show the film in their 1.338
st ret i'
Around the country, churches
have band together in efforts to
have the movie not shown in
community theaters. Lamprecht
said many oi the signatures on the
petitions came from members of
churches through out Eastern
North Carolina.
Opponents of the film are en-
raged by the protrayal of Jesus as
an ambivalent savior. In a halluci-
nation while dying on the cross.
Christ imagines abandoning his
divinity to live asan ordinary man
and fantasizes about sex with
Mary Magdalene.
"It has gone to far. Personal
beliefs are being infringed on
said Lamprcchet
Disney recent releases succeed, flop
ByMICAH HARRIS
Within two months, Walt
Disney Studios released two fea-
tures which are state of the art
animation.
both films exhibit a high degree
of technical innovation and art-
istry. One is a glorious success, the
other has received a compara-
tively lukewarm reception by
audiences.
The former, of course1, is the
now ubiquitous, "Roger Rabbit
The latter is "Bambi
"Roger Rabbit's" success is well
deserved. To my mind, it is only
one of a handful of recent movies
to capture perfectly the cssenceof
the classic, peculiarly American
film (the only other to come
quickly to mind is Rob Reiner's
" The Princess bride").
But 1 wonder, how much ot
"Roger's" success is due to this
quality as opposed to the mar-
ketability of the bucktoothed
hero? 1 lore, at last, since the glory
days of "FT and "Gremlins is
a fantasy figure whose fascimile
could grace sweat shirts, lunch
boxes, and plastic cups.
Children suckled on such lame
TV tare as "He-Man "G.I. joe
and "Smurfs" still retain in their
kid-nd diet the classic Warner
Bros, shorts and naturally find
"Roger ' easily accessible.
"Roger Rabbit , representing
the tradition of "big-foot" humor
of the animated short, literally
screams at the viewer from the
screen. As with most special ef-
fects laden films, the pyrotechnic
display calls attention to itself. In
"Roger Rabit the fireworks are
part of the film's fabric, not
merely sewn on, and thus they
work in the context.
"Bambi by contrast, is a quiet
film. For the time period, it was
just as "technical" as "Roger Rab-
bit But just as the story con text (if
"Roger Rabbit" allows the techni-
cal innovation to run roughshod
as a hurricane over the screen, the
storv context oi "Bambi" requires
that it come across as a whisper.
"Bambi" has been criticized tor
lacking the power to hold the at-
tention of today's children.
Yesterday's kids wailed at the
death of Bambi's mother; today's
indifferently ask for more pop-
corn. This is not a reflection on the
film, but rather the children
whose minds have been ravaged
by those demented blue trolls
(Smurfs to you) and similar
drivel.
With the possible exception of
Thumper, none of "Bambi's" cast,
including the lead himself, have
personality enough to warrant
cen so much as a 7-11 Slurpee
Cup. This "flaw however,
works as much in the context of
the film as "Roger's" self-indul-
gent twisting of physics. As John
Grant points out in "The Encyclo-
pedia of Walt Disney's Animated
I
Character (depth in characten
zation) would, have been a mis-
take, for the point of the movie is
that these are real animals aiu
animal -li ing in a real forest
As mentioned, "Roger Rabit
i : all Us technical innovation,
barely strays from the cartoon's
spawning ground: the short
"c ig"cartoon. "Bambi" remainsa
much more experimental film:
much more a work ot art.
Critic Leonard Maltin called it
"a visual poem "Bambi" is that
and more: a symbiosis ot light and
sound.
"Bambi" can be viewed as a
compliment to the Nutcracker
Suite segment oi "Fantasia" as
orchestration weds with anima-
tion to form a pagan to nature.The
,u companiment to the ballet leaps
i the young stags through the
meadow, the scattering oi autum
leaves, v Bambi's learning to
skate are just a few examples.
the upshot oi Bambi's luke-
u arm acceptance is that "Bambi"
will 1 rob ibly never have another
extensive theatrical release. As
they've done with other classic
cart n featuie, Disney will
probably opt to re-release it on
video cassette. There is little lost
in the transition with those
Disney cartoons that stress char-
acter instead oi spectacle, such as
"Lady and the Tramp and
"Cinderella
But, in "Bambi's" case, the
transfer to video wijl be like re-
producing the detailed art oi Pe-
ter Bruegel the Elder or Gustave
Here to a postage stamp.
We never see just who shot
Bambi's mother, but we know
who buried her.
OpenTheBook
That SolvesProblems.
r
�?- C- v s rtZ . S-C-i
Batgirl sayeth:
Reading the
East Carolinian
Features page is totally rad.
I mean, boss
Sorry.
Pleas don't
make me
go back to
the car show.
P'ease.
VOTE
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By STEVE SOMMER!
St��l Wnttr
If you were around Si
night while Xenon wassctti
f r the welcome back concei
would have seen a good
1 he ECU Marching Pirates
would have hung aroun.
enough to watch Xenon, th
would have sevn a real
band.
You know those 5
come on the radio and you
diatcly sv- � h � station,
were cxa tly the gutless
s. ngs that rr I
list
One of Qw
to pose, tel
CHICAGO (AP) -
�.tor Jonathan Blacl I
rr iga.ur.c says
ingl
make �
publican vi
didate Dar Q 11
nude irs the r
ber issue
Black would not saj
whether Parkinson's CO
will contradic I
prcviousl) �
shared a Florid
other congressme and
son in fanuarj Q4
never ace. I intimaj
her, and a justice Deri
investigation of Parkinsoj
tionships with members
grcss found no impropru
Playboy s mar .
graph will appear in a sd
the magazine featuring wj
Washington in tl
uled to be on the new
1.
Quaylc and I
members shared a
Parkinson during a g I
tion in 1980. The two cj
men besides Quaylc whl
We N





I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988
Movie, "The Last Temptation of Christ receives national
protest from fundmentalists, including 8,000 area petitioners
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Feature Fviitor
With mass protest over the re-
cent release of "The Last Tempta-
tion of Christ" around the coun-
try, a local radio station has com-
piled approximately 8,000 signa-
tures from people who seek to
have the film ban from area thea-
ters.
Tom Lamprecht, general man-
ager of WGHB in Farmville, pre-
sented the signed petitions of
approximately 8,000 people to
theaters in Greenville last week.
Lamprecht said all of the area
theaters, except for the Plitt thea-

5
-
:
ter, told the general manager that
they would not show the contro-
versial movie.
Lamprecht said Plitt has not
made a decision whether to show
the film or not. According to
Lamprecht, Plitt is owned by
Universal Studios, which re-
leased the film last Friday.
According to the Associates
Press, about 25,000 people, some
carrying crosses, protested the
film's release outside of Univer-
sial Studios in Universial City,
California. Fundmentalist Chris-
tians say the movie is blasphe-
mous in its portrayal of Jesus
Christ tempted to abandon his
divinity.
"It is a distortation of what the
Bible says. 1 lollywood in general
has been inaccurate in depicting
history. 1 get tired of the historical
inaceurateness said Lamprecht.
1 Ic said WGHB started to dis-
tributing petitions about 30 days
ago. G the number of signatures,
hesaid " 1 'm surpribed. 1 expected
to receive maybe a 1,000 signa-
ture
The nation's fourth-largest
theater chains-General Cinema
Theaters-has decided against
show the film on their 1,338
sv i ecus
Around the country, churches
have band together in efforts to
have the movie not shown in
community theaters. Lamprecht
said many of the signatures on the
petitions came from members of
churches through out Eastern
North Carolina.
Opponents of the film are en-
raged by the protrayal of Jesus as
an ambivalent savior. In a halluci-
nation while dying on the cross,
Christ imagines abandoning his
divinity to liveasan ordinary man
and fantasizes about sex with
Mary Magdalene.
"It has gone to far. Personal
beliefs are being infringed on
said Lamprechet.
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Disney recent releases succeed, flop
By MICAH HARRIS
Staff Writer
Within two months, Walt
Disney Studios released two fea-
tures which are state of the art
animation.
Both films exhibit a high degree
of technical innovation and art-
istry. One is a glorious success, the
other has received a compara-
tively lukewarm reception by
audiences.
The former, o course, is the
now ubiquitous, "Roger Rabbit
The latter is "Bambi
"Roger Rabbit's" success is well
deserved. To my mind, it is only
one of a handful oi recent movies
to capture perfectly the essence of
the classic, peculiarly American
film (the only other to come
quickly to mind is Rob Reiner's
"The Princess Bride").
But I wonder, how much of
"Roger's" success is due to this
quality as opposed to the mar-
ketability of the bucktoothed
hero? Here, at last, since the glory
days of "ET and "Gremlins is
a fantasy figure whose fascimile
could grace sweat shirts, lunch
boxes, and plastic cups.
Children suckled on such lame
TV fare as "He-Man "G.l. Joe
and "Smurfs" still retain in their
kid-rid diet the classic Warner
Bros, shorts and naturally find
"Roger" easily accessible.
"Roger Rabbit representing
the tradition of "big-foot" humor
of the animated short, literally
screams at the viewer from the
screen. As with most special ef-
fects laden films, the pyrotechnic
display calls attention to itself. In
"Roger Rabit the fireworks are
part of the film's fabric, not
merely sewn on, and thus they
work in the context.
"Bambi by contrast, is a quiet
film. For the time period, it was
just as "technical" as "Roger Rab-
bit But just as the story context of
"Roger Rabbit" allows the techni-
cal innovation to run roughshod
as a hurricane over the screen, the
story context of "Bambi" requires
that it come across as a whisper.
"Bambi" has been criticized for
lacking the power to hold the at-
tention of today's children.
Yesterday's kids wailed at the
death of Bambi's mother; today's
indifferently ask for more pop-
corn. This is not a reflection on the
film, but rather the children
whose minds have been ravaged
by those demented blue trolls
(Smurfs to you) and similar
drivel.
With the possible exception of
Thumper, none of "Bambi's" cast,
including the lead himself, have
personality enough to warrant
even so much as a 7-11 Slurpee
Cup. This "flaw however,
works as much in the context of
the film as "Roger's" self-indul-
gent twisting of physics. As John
Grant points out in 'The Encyclo-
pedia of Walt Disney's Animated
Character (depth in characteri-
zation) wouldhave been a mis-
take, for the point of the movie is
that these are real animals � ajiy
animals-living in a real forest
As mentioned, "Roger Rabit
for all its technical innovation,
barely strays from the cartoon's
spawning ground: the short
"gag" cartoon. "Bambi" remains a
much more experimental film:
much more a work of art.
Critic Leonard Maltin called it
"a visual poem "Bambi" is that
and more: a symbiosis of light and
sound.
"Bambi" can be viewed as a
compliment to the Nutcracker
Suite segment of "Fantasia" as
orchestration weds with anima-
tion to form a pagan to nature. The
accompaniment to the ballet leaps
ol the young stags through the
meadow, the scattering of autum
leaves, and Bambi's learning to
hkate are just a few examples.
1 he upshot of Bambi's luke-
warm acceptance is that "Bambi"
will probable never have another
extensive theatrical release. As
they've done with other classic
cartoon feature, Disnev will
probably opt to re-release it on
video cassette. There is little lost
in the transition with those
Disney cartoons that stress char-
acter instead of spectacle, such as
"Lady and the Tramp and
"Cinderella
But, in "Bambi's" case, the
transfer to video will be like re-
producing the detailed art of Pe-
ter Bruegel the Elder or Gustavo
Do re to a postage stamp.
We never see just who shot
Bambi's mother, but we know
who buried her.
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Xeno
By STEVE SOMMERJ
Staff WnMf
If you were around Si
night while Xenon was settii
for the welcome back concci
would have seen a good
The ECU Marching Pirates
would have hung aroundj
enough to watch Xenon, the
would have seen a real!
band.
You know those songj
come on the radio and you
diately switch the station
were exactly the gutless
songs that made-up Xenon
list.
Now, there's somethinj
One ofQw
to pose, tell
CHICAGO (AP) � Mai
editor Jonathan Black of ?
magazine says one-time
ington lobbyist Paula Pai
will make new commerts
Republican vice-president
didatc Dan Quayle and
r.udc :r. the magazine's
bcr issue.
Black would not say, hq
whether Parkinson's coi
will contradict what she
previously about when.
shared a Florida conagc i
other congrcssmc and
son in January 19S0. Qua
never accused of intima
her, and a Justice Dep
investigation of Parkinsoi
tionships with members
grcss found no impropru
" Playboy s managing
graph will appear in a
the magazine featuring w
Washington in the issu
ulcd to be on the ncwsstai
1.
Quayle and two othci
members shared a cottaj
Parkinson during a golfn
tion in 1980. The two c
men besides Quavle whe
We N






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i


TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988 13
Xenon plays gutless Top 40
By STEVE SOMMERS
ftaff Writof
If you were around Sunday
night while Xenon was setting-up
for the welcome back concert, you
would have seen a good band,
The ECU Marching Pirates. If you
would have hung around long
enough to watch Xenon, then you
would have seen a really bad
band.
You know those songs that
come on the radio and you imme-
diately switch the station, those
were exactly the gutless top 40
songs that made-up Xenon's play
list.
Now, there's something about
cover bands (let alone top40cover
bands) that really makes ones face
drag. Somewhere between a
complete loss of personal integ-
rity there is a loss of artistic integ-
rity, not to mention the shut and
closed case of musicians that have
completely sold-out.
However, Xenon was worse
than your typical top 40 cover
band in that you would never
know if they were musicians. On
stage there were five guys, one
was singing, one standing, play-
ing plastic Casio drums and three
� I'll say that number again �
three guys were playing key-
boards.
It's like they all met at Pitt
County Tech and decided to get a
band together which could play at
Ramada Inns all across tourist
infected coastal plains. Landing
this gig at ECU must have been a
real career buster.
There is this word that keeps
coming in my head when I think
about this Xenon band. This word
transcends beyond words which
also apply, like "gutless "insin-
cere and "bland and that word
is "cheesy In fact, I would not be
at all surprised if this was just one
stop on a tour which of course
would be sponsored by the Dairy
Association.
I can see it now, "Xenon and
Velvetta rock America. Coming
soon to a Holiday Inn near you
Please forgive the Student
Union for the terrible error of
choosing Xenon. Hopefully eve-
rybody can find some under-
standing in their hearts and
minds to realize that the commit-
tee was working under a lot of
tension this summer considering
the intense heat and long dry
spills.
Read the new satire page
One of Quayle's croonies
to pose, tell all in Playboy
CHICAGO (AP) � Managing
editor Jonathan Black of Playboy
magazine says one-time Wash-
ington lobbyist Paula Parkinson
will make new comments about
Republican vice-presidential can-
didate Dan Quayle and appear
nude in the magazine's Novem-
ber issue.
Black would not say, however,
whether Parkinson's comments
will contradict what she has said
previously about when Quayle
shared a Florida cottage with two
other congressme . and Parkin-
son in January 1980. Quayle was
never accused of intimacy with
her, and a Justice Department
investigation of Parkinson's rela-
tionships with members of Con-
gress found no impropriety.
Playboys managing photo-
graph will appear in a section of
the magazine featuring women in
Washington in the issue sched-
uled to be on the newsstands Oct.
1.
Quayle and two other House
members shared a cottage with
Parkinson during a golfing vaca-
tion in 1980. The two congress-
men besides Quayle who shared
the cottage were Rep. Tom
Railsback, R-Ill and Rep. Tho-
mas B. Evans, R-Del.
Parkinson said she had an affair
with Evans, who later left the
House. Quayle, now the junior
senator from Indiana, has denied
having an affair with Parkinson.
Questions about the incident
were revived last week when
George Bush named Quayle as his
GOP running mate.
"That's been looked into and
there's absolutely nothing to it
said Bush campaign chairman
James A. Baker 111 when the issue
resurfaced.
At the time of the incident,
Parkinson was 30 years old and a
lobbyist for an insurance industry
group that opposed legislation to
set up a national crop insurance
program. The bill passed in the
House by a 235-150 vote in Sep-
tember 1980, but Quayle voted
against it.
The Justice Department investi-
gated Parkinson's activities in
connection with allegations of a
sex-and-influence scandal but
dropped its case in August 1981
without filing criminal charges.
IMAGINE YOURSELF
�Involved in an active, prcsitigous student
organization.
�Having a major leadership role on campus.
�Gaining valuable experience in public rela-
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�Projecting a positive image of ECU.
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government officials, and alumni leaders.
�Influencing the future of your University.
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Wednesday Mass
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14
Tl tC EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988
Advice Column
Jr. has bed wetting problem
Dear Big E,
First let me say that is about
time you incompetent journalists
started an advice column. Your
paper is horrid. I mean look at all
the typos and words usscd in-
corectly. But I'll say it is about
time you had this column.
O.K. I am a fairly attractive male
now in my third year of school
(but 1 am not a junior) hercat ECU.
I've dated four girls since I have
been here, but unfortunately I
haven't had a satisfying relation-
ship until recently.
During an English class in the
first session of summer school, I
met a hot babe who will go name-
less. She sat beside me in class and
we passed notes back and forth.
One day, she invited me over to
her pool where we laved out and
discussed life.
We found we had a lot in com-
mon and 1 asked her out. From the
fi rst date, I could tell that we could
have something together. Maybe
it was a little twinkle in her eye or
something corny like that, but we
started going out pretty seriously
and still are.
Alright, so obviously I have a
problem or I wouldn't be writing
you. It started on our fourth date
or so. We were caught in a real ro-
mantic embrace in her apartment
and she lead mc up stairs. Need-
less to say, we didn't get much
sleep that summer night as we
carrcssed and tasted each others
bodies until the sun came up.
Just Ask
BigE
Earlvis
the left side to sleep, leaving me In the past, I have been accused
on the other side in puddles of se- of being a sexist, homophobic,
crctions. Cadillac driver. But when women
While she sleeps, I just lay there over step their limits, just as in
uncomfortable and damp. Some your case, it's time to put your
nights I try to move to the left side Nike down and smell the stale
of the bed before we do it, but beer.
when I do she won't touch me. But in this case there are altcr-
1 don't know it's pretty stupid natives. Next time you sleep with
but it's really getting on my her, pull out the vaccum cleaner
nerves. I mean, I have to work and place it by the bed. After
early in the morning and I am moaning "Oh God" and crinkling
always tired because 1 can't get your toes, turn the vaccum on full
any sleep. Big E, I really like this blast and proceed to apply the
girl, but how do I tell her that lam suction to the dampen area. It may
getting tired of sleeping in the wet take some time to dry, but the
spot? Hoover will remove all of your
Signed P.D. gross and unslightly left overs.
If this doesn't work, try sheet-
Dear wet spot, ing the bed in a roll of industry
My, my you really got yourself sized Downey (the quicker
in a spot didn't you? I had a simi picker-up) and sleep moisturc-
iar situation to yours when I lived free-
in Aycock Dorm, but we shared Wr�at's the deal. Got a problem?
the misery because the bed was so Don't just carry it around in your
small. turgid head, just ask Earlvis, the
Alright man, you have to level Bi8 E- Got a gambling problem ?
Girl friend have the crabs?Think
The really boss
Satire Page
Hi kids! Welcome to The East
Carolinian Features Section's All
New Satire Page. This is a new
feature, designed specifically so
that we, the writers, can write all
sorts of slanderous and Iibelous
things AND GET AWAY WITH
IT!
Well, all we really want to do is
ENTERTAIN you, the reader. In
order to provide this service, we
have enlisted the writing ablitics
of the most famous, the most boss
writers to walk the face of the
planet.
Of course, we arc referring to The
Venerable Earlvis, and the often
perverse Bonchcad.
They have gallantly volunteered
their time, effort and their meager
paychecks in order to bring you,
the reader the highest quality
humor available. Not like we're
trying to compete with our very
own Fun 'N Games � section
though. No, sir. Not us.
So enjoy our stuff, write to the
advice column, but whatever you
do don't sue us. By the way, our
boss photos were taken by
Photolab's own, Jon Jordan.
Thanks, guy.
Bonehead back
Continued from page 11
downwards, straight tor the shelf
of jars containing fetal pigs.
The rest of the class stared in
utter horror as she tried to stop.
She fishtailed into the shelf, caus-
ing the bottles to come crashing
down on her head. The stink of
formaldehyde and rotted pig
wafted up from the bottom of the
room.
I fell over I was laughing so
hard. I guess I am still the Bone-
head. Have a good one kids, and
don't let a fat girl get ya.
Fetal pigs I love it.
with her. Tell her to sleep on the
right side or take the sheets to the y�u see Elvis? Dr0P me a line at:
Since then I have noticed that laundry mat and dry the damn Earlvis
she always edges me to the right thing. If she refuses, threaten her East Carolinian
side of the bed before we have sex. with "No more earth-shattering Publications Building
After the act, she always moves to climaxes for you Emerald City, N.C 27858-4353
Squirrel man sighted in woods
GREENVILLE, N.C (BP) �
Local authorities are investigat-
ing reports of a large "squirrel
man" that allegedly attacked two
freshmen on the ECU campus
Monday.
Wandjtna Maguire, an 18-year-
old Pamlico county native and
Missy Bainbridgc, a 19-year-old
from Wake county native re-
ported the incident to Campus
Security Monday night.
Maguire is in stable condition at
Pitt Memorial Hospital. She is
and was released Tuesday morn- ofthe "squirrel man Police Chief Both girls took a brcathalizcr
inS- Gordon O'Hara noted in his re- test and registered well below the
The two girls were returning to port, but didn't rule out the possi- legal 1.0 intoxication level.
their dorms around midnight
when a "big furry guy with a big
bushy tail jumped down from the
trees" between them. Bainbridgc
said in her statement, "He had big
teeth like this demonstrating
with her index and middle fin-
gers.
"It was horrible she said. "He
landed right in between us and
started gnawing on Jina's leg. All
bility of a "rodent-like man.
During a press conference
Tuesday, he said, "I never seen
squirrels, say, man-sized, but
back home in Conctoc I've seen
'cm get mighty big. Say, the size of
Officials have cordoned off the
area, but large crowds of curious
students and townspeople have
congregated there in the last two
days. No other sightings have
been reported, but O'Hara is
them little peoplethose midgets keeping the case open,
in the circus "You never know. It might be
He went on to say that the squir- one of them missing link kind of
rels in Greenville had never been things he said.
being treated for extensive blood I could do was just scream
loss stemming from two large Greenville police and ECU
gashes on her left leg. Bainbridgc Campus security combed the
escaped with minor abrasions wooded area, but found no traces
known to attack humans, "but it's
been a long nut-less summer.
With all these new students in
town all ot a sudden, 1 can see
where thev (the squirrels) might
be tempted to try a new diet
For Bainbridgc and Maguire,
one sighting is enough. "I ain't
going home that way anymore.
I'm still having nightmares about
that horrible tail Bainbridgc
said.
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'Someday I'll have my own bottles Young Ronny Howard, The Dobie Gillis Show
Overkill
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IU MI AH HARRIS
, you i essionable readers and
to rhe Pirate Comics Page, a
of Fast arolina foi several years
s ; in see, things are in a bit of
� we were trying to re-
modi ' befor - liool started back and ran
out
still
But
on tl
ou
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�. i.ut tin new and improved
v �. oice jw. worth the
lie qui te oi the week will
run it th top u the page. 1 xcelsior!
t think th( if isn't anything new
t hat's rubbing ofl on
you i jm. this excuse
foi Inn and (hihs. I he New and 1m-
proved I mi and Games will be back next
is� nth all kind- ot pi i.�.l treats like
tin t ond innual' Kill I anny Partridge"
contest and a special tribute to Clint
Howard, Ron's underrated brother and
star ot "Gentle Ben as well as co-star of
memoi ial episodes of The Andy Griffith
Show "(as Leon, the jelly sandwich cow-
boy) Mi "Star Trek"(as Balok, the badly
dubbed alien with buck teeth). Why Ron
has soared to fame as a respected actor and
director while Clint is still ignored by his
peers and public is one of those oft tragic
Hollywood ironies. Perhaps his genius
will only be recognied after his death as
other artists of his caliber such as James
Joyce. Excuse meI seem to have some-
thing in mv eye
by Jeffl got Miraclewoman's hair" Parker
I'm sorry. I was supposed to be telling you
about this comix page, wasn't 1? first off,
we have the triumphant return of Steve
Reid, Comicus laurelette, who is reprint-
ing rarely scene episodes of his award
winning series, "The Law Steve origi-
nally ran these strips over the summmer to
a miniscule summer session audience
who couldn't appreciate his genius. Now,
the whole student body can join the Law
in his battle against Bubblehead. Wow
Steve promises a new look for "The Law"
when it returns with new episodes later
this semester. In between drawing those
new episodes, Steve will be busy on the
editorial page as the new editorial cartoon
ist. You're a better man than I am, Gunga
Din. Can't read, though.
New to this page is "The Avatar" by
"Orpheus" writer Micah Harris and bril-
liant young buck artist Richard Haselrig.
This is a science-fiction comic, placed in
the far future but based on Hindu mythol-
ogy of the remote past. But don't think this
is pretentious clap-trap. The emphasis is
on action and adventure in this strip. Fol-
low the exploits of Tate, assassian with no
past or future, and his colorful allies,
Queequeg and Loreli the Robot. Look for
plenty of sensuous babes : - this strip
because that's what Richaru es drawing
more than anything in the world. In fact,
m&
-
���
he's otten heard to shout at Harris, "Can't
we get the chicks more scantily clad than
the way you've scripted them?" Harris,
true to his puritan instincts resists the lad
at every turn, but the artist has the last
word in this medium (even if he has to
make them up, right Rich? Just what does
"precomous" mean?)
For all you fans of the "gag cartoon Rik is
returning with "Inside Joke" and boy, will
it make you gag. That was a joke Rik.
These one-liners come natural to Rik since
he sometimes doubles as a stand-up come-
dian. The other times he's lying down.
That was another joke Rik. Feel free to use
this in your repertoire. Rik, by the way, is
a master of "Brady Bunch" trivia and an
extensive collector of Brady memorabilia.
He has the beard that Greg wore in the
hippy episode, a Kitty Carry-All of his
very own (remind me to return it to you,
Rik�Parker), and Christopher Knight
(Peter) chained in his basement where he
feeds him only Pez, sunflower seeds, and
lime Kool-Aid.
For all you thinking persons (feminists
take note), "Orpheus" is back courtesy of
artist Tom Gurganus and Micah Harris.
After a noble but failed attempt to write
serious psycho-sexual dramas, the duo de-
cided to give existentialistic ang I a break
and try their hand at wacky stuffwithout
sacrificing continuity! Some trick, eh?
You'll remember Orpheus seemed to save
his lady love from burning up with a
werewolf in a car wreck at the series con-
clusion last year. That's rightseemed to.
Next week you'll learn the truth in a se-
quence as riveting as that of Tarn Ewing
opening the shower door to find Bobby in-
side! From that point, anything can
happenAND IT WILL, BROTHER, IT
WILL!
"The Undercover Cats the strip that set
the high standard by which all subsequent
Pirate Comix are measured puts all that
behind it with this issue. "It looks tacky
Parker admits. "Tacky but honest: for this
reason I am proud to call him 'friend says
frequent collaborator Tom Gurganus.
"But then again, I'd be proud to call Clint
Howard 'friend Note the realism with
which Parker renders a cat visiting his
sandbox. And this from a guy who used to
scoop poop in a pet store for a living! He
must've shut his eyes is all I can figure.
Jeff is moving away from superhero par-
ody with this strip, and if s a good thing
since he nevered bothered to finish his
stories anyway.
Finally, we have Paul Friedrich and
"Overkill I must say that I admire
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THE EASTC AROl INI AN
Sports
AUGUST 25, 1988 Pago 16
Virgina Tech Hokies to face tough season
By DOUG JOHNSON
C'u-Sports I ditor
The Hokies of Virginia Tech
liave high expectations for the
1988 season, but the schedule that
Ihey face may be one oi the tough-
est in the nation.
Tech has a schedule compa-
rable to that of the Pirates this
war playing many of the teams
tt ECU has to face. Florida State,
West Virginia, South Carolina
,vAd Syracuse are some oi the
opponents that the two have in
i mmon while the Hokies add
the highly ranked Clcmson Ti-
gers, who they will have to play in
booth Valley.
In spite of a disappointing 2-9
ish last year, Hokie hd
Coach Frank Beamer is optimistic
about the upcoming year. "We'll
definitely have a better football
team next season he commented
at the end oi last season, "and the
big reason is that our players are
now more familiar with our style
ei' play, both offensively and de-
� : sivcly
1 lowcver, Reamer's optimism
may be a bit premature. The
kies return only 11 starters
fi m last season, the most con-
5C cuous : :heirlossesbeini;two-
year starter Erik Chapman at
quarterback. Redshirt freshman
Will Furrer and Cam Young, a
transfer student from N.C. State,
moved to the head of the battle for
the quarterback position during
spring drills, but both arc young
and neither has any experience.
"Quarterback is a big question
mark Beamer said. "Last year at
this time, we had a proven per-
former there. It makes it really
tough when you go into a season
without anv experience at all at
the quarterback position Other
key losses that the Hokies suf-
fered are tight end Steve Johnson,
the team's leading receiver with
38 catches; fullbacks Earnie Jones
Sean Donnelly; center John
FitzHugh; offensive guard Kevin
Keeffe; outside linebacker Eddie
Noel; defensive tackle Greg Drew;
inside linebacker Victor Jones;
and safety Carter Wiley. Also
goneareChuck Watson,a starting
defensive end last season, and Joe
Ledbetter, a part-time starter at
the same position. Both cited per-
sonal reasons for their failure to
return to the team for the '88 sea-
son.
The backfield for the Flokies
this season should be one of their
strong suits. At fullback will be
Richard Fox, who split starting
time the last two seasons. Fie
rushed for 135 yards last year and
caught four passes. At tailback
will be a trio of talented players in
Jon Jeffries, Ralph Brown, and
Lamar Smith. Jeffries led the
Hokies last year in rushing with
599 yards, and ranked among the
nation's leaders in kickoff returns
with 25.5 yard average. Brown
accounted for 195 yards, and
Smith finished the season with
149 yards. Running at Hanker will
be cither Jeff Roberts or veteran
Karl Bordcn, both of whom are
battling for the starting nod.
The receiving department for
Tech will be strong in one area,
and relatively weak in another.
Starting at the tight end position
will be junior Brian McCall, who
only caught one pass last year in
his backup role. However, the
Hokies return Myron Richardson,
a converted flanker, at split end.
Richardson caught 28 passes for
396 yards and four touchdowns
last season.
The Hokie offensive line should
be a plus this season for the team,
returning some good and experi-
enced players. At center will be
Chris Henderson, who will move
to this position from the backup
role that he played last year be-
hind FitzHugh. At theguard posi-
tions will be Glenn Watts, a re-
turning starter, and Tom Hall, a
chief backup last year. Running at
the tackles will be returner Todd
Granlham, who the coaches look
to to be the leader of the line, and
Larry Peerv. Both Grant ham and
Pccry are coming oii knee sur-
gerv, but should be at 100 percent
in the fall.
On defense tor Tech will be
many talented returning players.
At the ends will be returning
starter Jimmy Whittcn, who was
ranked fifth on the team in tackles
last season with 90. Al Chamblec
apparently will fill in at the other
end.
At tackle will be returning
starter Scott Hill, who was last
year's leading tackier with 117,
while redshirt freshmen Bryan
Campbell and Todd Mcade will
compete for the other tackle posi-
tion.
Linebackers, both inside and
outside, will be tough for the
Hokies. At the inside will be
Randy Cockrell, the team's sec-
ond leading tackier last season
with 133, and veteran Don Stokes
will be at the other inside gap. On
the outside will be two veteran
players in Jock Jones and Darwin
Herdman. Herdman had 23 tack-
les and one interception, while
Jones racked up 23 tackles.
Returning at the corners u ill be
veterans John Granby and Roger
Brown. Granby racked up26 tack-
les and one interception, and
Brown accounted for 62 tackles
and an interception. Scott Rice, a
two-year veteran at comerback,
will shift to the free safety this
season. Rice had 43 stops last sea-
son, and the coaches expect big r
numbers from him this year.
On special teams will be return-
ing kicker Chris Kinzer, who led
the nation in 19S6, going 23 of 27
in field goals, and lie was lech's
leading scorer last year with 47
points. Chris Baucia, a reserve
quarterback, will fill in at punter.
'Cocks high on Ellis
By PAUL DUNN
( rti I or
I Diversity oi South Caro-
. : v'c d - me national spot-
t y ar by posting an 8-4
rd md the n lor making an
I p nee at the Mazda Gator
I h eGamecocks also earned
nor ol being ranked 15th in
the nation.
The Pirates traveled to Colum-
bia. South Carolina last year
erienccd a 34-12
:U ex
n � tt game, the Gamecock's
American quarterback candi-
: ; ddElliscomplcted21of33
5ses : r a school-record 425
rds thi first time ever in South
I r lina history that a quarter-
ick had topped the 400 yard
.rk
Wi.ii his game winning per-
formance Ellis also set new school
records in passing yardage and in
mplctions. Ellis, being only a
tftior, still lias two more years of
college ball.
The almost super-human QB is
actual!v thought to be slightly
.vrrated by some, and his last
five games proved that everyone
can not be perfect. In those tinat
games Ellis only threw one touch-
down pass but had interceptions
on a constant basis, totalling 24 in
those five games. Even with the
not so great passes towards the
end of the season Ellis did still
throw for over 3,000 yards and
nobody can intercept that accom-
plishment.
Also in that game, when the
Gamecock's QB wasn't setting
records, wingback Sterling
Sharpe was. Sharpe's game, ver-
sus the Firates, caught four passes
for 107 ya rd s. Hi s performa nee sct
the new record for career catches
with 14S receptions for 2,228
yards. It also marked the 29th
consecutive contest in which
Sharpe had caught at least one
pass, tving him with the school
record. Sharpe has graduated and
will be badly missed.
Senior Flardin Brown will
likely replace Sharpe at the wing-
back slot but will be under con-
stant pressure by many talented
players. Topping the list of back-
ups will be sophomore Carl Platt
Platt has good hands and speed
and is not afraid to catch theball in
a crowd.
i ne oaitKxuLio nave an im-
pressive list oi plavcrs that should
stand out in the 1988 season.
unior I larold Green will show
oii some excellent talent at the
running back position. Green
rushed'for 1,022 yards on 229 car-
ries with 15 touchdowns in 1988.
I le set a school single season rec-
ord with 16 touchdowns and fin-
ished eighth nationally in scoring.
In his 22 college games Green has
had 23 touchdowns, while scor-
ing 96 points in 1987 alone.
Making good impressions for
the offensive line is right guard
Calvin Stephens. The sophomore
lineman has excellent strength
and possesses good techniques
and work habits. Stephens gained
valuable experience last season as
a freshmen when he started the
last nine games.
Along side of Stephens will be
two year starter Mark Fryer. The
right tackle is considered to be the
Gamecocks most consistent line-
man and has been tagged their
best pass protector. Fryer does not
only possess intelligence on the
field but is also an intelligent-stu-
dent. He received the Ed Guerard
Academic Award last year.
The South Carolina Gamecocks try to pull down an ECU ball carrier in last year's action. This year's
contest promises to be one of the most exciting in recent history. - (File photo)
nan. The full time starter from last
reason had a total of 91 tackles.
McKernan is not a flashy player
but is a consistent one that has
become known as a hard-hitter.
Being the anchor of the defen-
sive line, junior Kurt Wilson is
looking to stay away from shoul-
der injuries like the one he suf-
fered before last season's Gator
Bowl. Wilson finished the 1987
Senior Kevin Hendrix will be at season with 45 tackles, two of
the other end spot. Hendrix was a them for loss and four being quar-
part-time starter last season and terback sacks,
racked up 39 tackles including Coach Joe Morrison has imple-
three behind the line of scrimage. mentcd some new multiple offen-
year and produced 83 tackles He is an aggressive player that sives and replaced some keyposi-
making him the fourth leading can run and make the big plays. tions in the defensive secondary,
tackier on the 1987 team. Robin- One of South Carolina's better The changes should produce
son, being a two year starter, will linebackers is senior Matt McKcr- a good season.
Resuming tor the second yee.r to
tike on the duties of the
placexickcr is sophomore Collin
Mackic. Mackie is hoping to re-
peat his record breaking sea-en
he had last year when he lead the
NCAA in field goals with a total of
23. 1 lis kicking performance also
allowed him to become South
Carolina's single-season highest
be die mainstay of the 1988 defen-
sive secondary.
The Gamecocks are fortunate to
have two excellent defensive ends
returning.
Junior' Scott Windsor played
more downs than any Gamecock
defensive plavcr in 1987. Windsor
tallied 71 tackles with three of
them being behind the line of scri-
rer with 113 points. For the mage and four being QB sacks.
SCO
year, he connected on 25 of 32
field goals and was perfect on all
39 extra point attempts.
Senior cornerback Robert
Robinson had a good season last
Pirate's Booty Pirate's Booty Pirate's Booty
By DOUG JOHNSON
and
PALL DUNN
Co-Sports Yditora
� Hello, sports fans, welcome to
mother year of exciting ?irate
ports. This cloumn, when run,
ill be devoted to sports editori-
ls, current sporting events,
p rts tidbits, etc etc. and so on.
u I keep in mind, sports fans, this
is your paper, and subsequently,
'hat makes this your column, al-
though we'll be writing it, and we
don't formally recognize ANY of
.our rights. If you have any sug-
gestions, comments, (Not ones
about our writing styles, IQ's, or
eyr mothers, God bless their
souls), or questions, feel free to
drop them by the East Carolinian,
located on the second floor of the
Fublications Building.
The following letter is from
Pave Hart, Dircctorof Athleticsat
ECU. Read it carefully, and have a
5�od year. We'll be talking to you.
pear Students:
�1 first want to welcome you back
tocampus for the beginningof the
'88-69 school year. I hope that
you are in store for a successful,
memorable year which provides
you opportunities for educational
and social growth.
As I have stated on many occas-
sions since being named Director
of Athletics last winter, our stu-
dents have been, and are, our
department's biggest asset. The
support and participation dem-
onstrated by our student body for
ECU athletics has been extremely
admirable. On behalf of everyone
connected with the Department
of Athletics, I express my appre-
ciation for what you have meant
to the growth of our program.
In order for our athletic teams to
n ;
tt is mv nope that you will not
leave campus for the beach that
day but, instead, will allow us to
bring the beach to you.
It is very important that we do
all that we can to create excite-
ment and enthusiasm in Ficklcn
Stadium on September 3rd. Our
goal is to have the largest opening
day crowd in the state. Our open-
ing game promotion will be de-
tailed in an upcoming issue of the
East Carolinian. It is my hope that
our students will rally around our
collective effort to begin the sea-
son on a very positive note the
night of September 3rd.
I encourage vou to be in Ficklcn
Stadium to Kick-Off the 1988 Pi-
rate Football Season.
Sincerely,
t h 4 v
Daw Hart, Jr.
Dave Hart
best represent you and our out-
standing University, we have lo
have your continued participa-
tion in the stands.
We open our 1988 football sea-
son AT FIOME on Saturday night,
September 3rd. We have not had a
home opener since 1981, which
means that very few in our cur-
rent student body have ever made
Labor Day Weekend Plans
around a football game in
Greenville.
Pirate Tickets
Okay, all of you wild and crazy
ECU football fans, it's time to pick
up those home football tickets.
You can go and pick them up next
week on Tuesday, Wednesday, or
Thursday
The times that you can pick up
the tickets for the 7:00 p.m. kick-
off against Tennessee Tech are
8:00 a.m5:00 p.m. in the lobby at
Mingcs Colisium, or 11:00 a.m
8:00 p.m. at Mendcnhall Student
Center, for you lazier purple and
gold fans.
That's right, the athletic office is
helping out all of you impatient
students who are tired of waiting
in those 1 - o - n - g but always
exciting lines by giving you two
ticket locations to chose from.
When picking up the tickets,
vou must.you must, (deja-vu, this
is really important) not only ha e
a valid IP, but you must also pres-
ent a current activity card.
Tickets for groups of 25 or more
can be picked up next Monday
from 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m only at
Mingcs.
This will be ECU'S first home-
opener since 1981. (That's seven
years ago for those of us who can't
pass college math).
So get those coolers ready, (be
sure to tell mom that it is only for
sodas), and prepare to spend
' Labor Pay VeekenVi 'nackin at
Ficklcn Stadium.
Football pep-rally
The 8th Annual East Carolina
University Football Pep Rally
sponsored by Budweiscr will be
held on Thursday, September 1 ai
7:00 p.m. in Ficklen Stadium. The
Marching Pirates begin marching
up College Hill to the stadium at
6:30 p.rm The Pep Rally will fea-
ture the ECU football players and
coaches, Athletic Pirector Pave
Hart, the Marching Pirates, the
ECU cheerleaders and Pirate
mascot.
Everyone is encouraged lo at-
tend. Admission to the Pep Rally
is free of charge. Several prizes
will be given away including
$1000 worth of grand prizes.
In the event of rain, the Pep
Rally is scheduled to be held in
Minges Coliseum.
Southern Miss has
new head coach
By PAUL DUNN
Co-Sports Lditor
The University of Southern
Mississippi plays its 72nd season
of intercollegiate football in 19S8,
and during that almost three
quarters of a century period the
Golden Eagles have put together
one of the winningest Division 1-
A records in the country along
with a matching reputation for
excellence in all facets of the pro-
gram.
A new head coach and a re-
vamped coaching staff along with
mostly new faces in the offensive
line and defensive backfield will
be t lie most rtotic?ablQ change'
A former assistant coach at
Texas A&M, Curlcy Hallman,
will take over at the head position
for the Golden Eagles making him
the 15th coach at the university.
Hallman's staff will include a
mixture of returners and new-
comers. Thamas Coleman, ad-
ministrative assistant, will be the
top returning assistant coach.
The only returning offensive
coach from the '87 season will be
Mark McHale. McHalc will once
again be controlling the offensive
line.
Returning for the defensive side
will be linebacker coach Freeman
Horton and and the defensive
backfield coach Steve Davis.
Topping the list of impressive
assistant coaches that will be new
faces is Jeff Bower. Bower, a foi-
mer SMU standout who also pre
viously served as an assistant
coach at SMU will have manv
tasks to handle. Bower will take
control again as the assistant head
coach along with being the quar-
terback coach and offensive coor-
dinator.
Finishing up the long list of new
coaches are: defensive coordina-
tor Ellis Johnson, running back
coach Rodney Allison, wide re-
ceiver coach Larry Edmondson,
assistant offensive line coach
Pave Voth, and defensive line
coach Mike Burgar.
Major concerns facing 1 lallman
and his staff include the usually
strong schedule. Making the
schcduleevenmoredifficultisthe
fact that SMU has lost the majority
of the ot tensive line and also expe-
rienced major losses in the defen-
sive WclfeHd .
Hallman and his staff experi-
enced a hectic spring recruiting
period. Hallman said that putting
the Golden Eagles through one of
their hardest spring sessions ever,
along with a strong off-season of
weight lifting and running pro-
gram, helped bring his players
back to campus to where they
might normally be.
The offensive line being the
weak point of the offense, Hall-
man and his staff used the spring
to evaluate available talent and to
move defensive lineman over to
the offensive line. Buddy King
and Ben Crimm arc now listed to
start at left tackle and left guard
respectively.
Brett Favrc returns at quarter-
back and coach Hallman is ex-
pecting alot out of the player.
Favre earned his first letter last
season as USM's starting quarter-
back. He finished the season
See EAGLES, page 17
Mour
By DOUG JOHNSO
West Virginia i h ad i
Jehlen ln't I
success oi
(taint t rs I
1 Ic's basil

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oodch '
team NTehlcn
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this r to I
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share"
al
1
rani

the'
'
I �
i - ' '
d rt fi
v. as named
bat k n
N
drop -
ris �
.

the i
pas �
the( fl

I for a 1
lea �
0 si H n :
thei
lost b) �
Stal ' � :
Ma �
tcrb ick, bul
ph moi
I
tt 1 like
is not th
Eagles look
towards goo
football yea.
i �
is
:
Rcgi'
I 37 pi
serve at I
caugl
Sh
the:
a career
2 5
sc red six l

car. �
for 548
dott
Prestoi
end
start
Cai losl
last year witli
ved an N( '�.
offens
dame nl ill)
would also show
looksand
up more at tii
more and make ai
their o
a nee.
The d
due to th(
ersretui
trio of outst ind ng d
backs
The rel
tackles Steve Radkin ai
Wattsandd -
Rollins have . n tt
light.
Hallman said thai I
not count on the new n i I
says there is a p.
some of this yeai "esf
able to come foil
Chris Seroka will be retj
to continue his outstan I
the placekicker Seroka ha J
season last year when I
32 extra point-and nine of
goal attempts
It is going to be a tryil
exciting time for USM anj
fans as they look forward
new faces of many playcj
coaches. What is ahead
Golden Fagles very mil
mains to be seen.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988 17
on
mcrs will be
d Roger
p26tackv
- �" �n, and
2 tackles
n s. tt Kicc, a:o
at comcrback,s.
s ifety thisb
) st( pslastsca
- pect bigger
5 3 ear.j,
be return-1
- w ho ledt
g 23 of 27
1 he was Tech's
it year with 4"f
a reserve�
at punter.

Vv
1
)
:r:
ear's action. This year's
time starter from last
i total of 91 tackles.
- not a flashy player
nl rte that has
a hard-hitter.
r of the defen-
junior Kurt Wilson is
ly from shoul-
�. - . - the one he suf-
- r. last season's Gator
n finished the 1987
�4" I ickles, two of
rlossand: urbeingquar-
I ; M rri n has imple-
soi multiple offen-
idrepla iomekcyposi-
vc secondary.
aid produce
ss has
Vich
being the quar-
I nsivecoor-
the long list of new
nsive coordina-
is J � running back
. Ulison, wide re-
ich Larry Edmondson,
� offensive line coach
ind defensive line
' � I irgar.
r rns facing Hallman
: include the usually
dule Making the
ileeven more difficult is the
V1U has lost the majority
nsive line and also expe-
r i major losses in the defen-
jacllfield. '
Iman and his staff expen-
a hectic spring recruiting
Id. Hallman said that putting
j n Eagles through one of
hardest spring sessions ever,
fe with a strong off-season of
fit lifting and running pro-
, helped bring his players
to campus to where they
t normally be.
offensive line being the
point of the offense, Hall-
and his staff used the spring
aluate available talent and to
c defensive lineman over to
offensive line. Buddy King
Pen Cnmm arc now listed to
it left tackle and left guard
lectivcly.
ctt Favre returns at quartcr-
l and coach Hallman is cx-
ing alot out of the player.
te earned his first letter last
Ion as USM's starting quarter-
He finished the season
See EAGLES, page 17
Mountaineers under Major
By DOUG JOHNSON
Co-Sportt L'ditor
West Virginia Head Coach Don
Nohlen isn't basing his team's
success on how good the Moun-
taineers will be.
1 le's basing it on how good the
opposition will be.
'We have a good chance -a very
good chance-to be a solid football
team Nehlen said, "but as I look
at it. it's not how good we arc but
how good are the guys we play.
Fight of our 11 opponents will be
hotter than they were last year;
I'm sure of that And if we lost six
ball games last year, how much
hotter are we going to have to play
this year to turn the tide?"
!t seems that everyone doesn't
share Nehlen's concern about the
ability of his team to win, and win
big. The Mountaineers are highly
ranked in many pre-season polls,
with Sport magazine putting
them at number 10. Much of the
ado about the Mountaineers cen-
ters around their second year
quarterback Major Harris. A re-
dshirt freshman last year, Harris
was named freshman quarter-
hack in America by The Sporting
News. Comfortable in the wish-
bone, option, power I or straight
drop-back passing offenses, Har-
ris will pose a challenge to oppos-
ing defenses both in preparation
and game situations because of
his ability to scramble and make
the most out of broken plays. His
passing accuracy has improved in
the off-season, making him a very
good all-around offensive threat.
Last year against ECU he ac-
counted for a total of 106 yards in
leading the Mountaineers to a 49-
0 shutout, and eventually he led
them to the Sun Bowl, where they
lost by two points to Oklahoma
State. "There's no question that
Major Harris is a very fine quar-
terback, but he is still only a so-
phomore and still has some im-
proving to do Nehlcn said, "but
he's the guy who will do it. Hav-
ing the quarterback position
settled already is one of the things
that like best about this team
But the strength at quarterback
is not the only reason for the
Eagles look
towards good
football year
Continued from page 16
completing 79 of 194 passes for
1,264 yards and a school record 15
touchdowns.
At the fullback position will be
Reginald Warnsley. Warnsley, in
1987, proved to be a dazzling re-
serve at the position and also
caught four passes for 42 yards.
Shelton Grady will hold down
the tailback slot. Grady rushed for
a career high in '87 with a total of
1,023 yards on 225 carries and
SO red six touchdowns.
Positioned at the wide receiver
is Darryl Tillman. He also had a
career high season with 25 catches
for 548 yards with four touch-
downs.
Preston Hansford is at the tight
end spot although he had lost his
starting position in spring work to
Carlos Powell who sat out most of
last year with an injury and re-
ceived an NCAA hardship year.
Hallman said, concerning the
offense, that they would be a fun-
damentally sound team but
would also'show alot of different
looks and that would open things
up more at times, throw the ball
more and make an effort to keep
their opponents defense off bal-
ance.
The defense could be hurting
due to the fact that only four start-
ers return and the losses include a
trio of outstanding defensive
backs. However, all is not lost.
The return of end Steve Brown,
tackles Steve Radkin and Toby
Watts and defensive back Vincent
Rollins have given them new
light.
Hallman said that the staff does
not count on the new recruits but
says there is a possibility that
some of this year's signccs will be
able to come forth and help early.
Chris Scroka will be returning
to continue his outstanding job as
the placckickcr. Scroka had a fine
season last year when he hit 31 of
32 extra points and nine of 15 field
goal attempts.
It is going to be a trying but
exciting time for USM and their
fans as they look forward to the
new faces of many players and
coaches. What is ahead for the
Golden Eagles very much re-
mains to be seen.
Mountaineers' high prc-scason
ranking. Nehlen will field a squad
that boasts nine returning starters
on offense and seven starters on
defense, including last year's
kicker and punter.
"Our stcngth is in our offensive
line with our running backs and of
course wc have our quarterback
returning Nehlcn said. The
Mountaineers are returning all
five starters from last year on the
offensive line. Kevin Koken, a 6-2,
263-pound senior, returns at the
center position to acchor the line.
Koken has been a starter for the
past two seasons, and according
to the coaches, he had a very good
spring.
At the guard positions, the
Mountaineers return a good deal
of talent and experience. John
Stroia, a 6-3, 238-pound senior,
will return at right guard. Stroia
has been a starter for the last three
seasons, and was named honor-
able mention all-East last year.
Starting at left guard will be Bob
Kovak, a 6-2, 260-pound senior,
who will starting at that position
for his third consecutive season.
The tackle position for the
Mountaineers will be just as
strong as the rest of the line in
returning starters Rick Phillips, a
6-4,262-pound senior who earned
first team all-East honors last sea-
son, and Brian Smidcr, a 6-4, 297-
pound senior, who the Mountain-
eers will look to for leadership
and solid, consistent play. An-
other plus on the offensive line is
the great amount of depth that
they have at all five positions.
possesses the ability to break tack-
les with his slashing running
style, and is the 10th leading
rusher in Mountaineer history.
The wide receiver position is a
question mark for West Virginia
this season, with the loss of last
season's starters Harvey Smith
and John Talley, who combined
for 572 yards and five touch-
downs. At this point, the starting
receivers will be returning letter-
men Grantis Bell and Calvin Phil-
lips. Phillips caught nine passes
for 153 yards and two touch-
downs last year, while Bell ac-
counted for seven passes for 135
yards and one touchdown. Both
men have good hands, and speed
to boot. The tight end position will
be filled by returning starter Keith
Winn, who pulled down 13 passes
for 184 yards and one touchdown.
As for defense, Nehlcn is not as
confident in it as he is in the of-
fense. "In our offense, we've got
an arsenal to put points on the
board, but I'm concerned about
the defense he said. "For us to
win the close ones, that's where
we must show improvement
The front line for the Mountain-
eers will be it's primary weak-
ness, due to the loss of some key
personnel. The departure of Brad
Hunt, a four year stand-out and
an all-East selection, will weaken
the team at this position, even
though the coaches feel that they
have solid players in Mike Fox
and Chris Parker at the contain
and rushing tackles, respectively.
Also a strength for the offense
will be the backfield. "Wc will go
with three tailbacks again because
all three- Anthony Brown Eugene
Napoleon and Undra Johnson-
arc solid and each adds a different
dimension to our team said
Nehlen. Brown, a 5-10, 211-
pound senior, is probably the best
among the bunch. He had four 100
yard plus games last year, and
was named AP honorable men-
tion all-East. Napoleon, a 5-10,
7frpowrd senior, has good
speed for getting around the cor-
ner and on kickoff returns.
Johnson, a 5-9, 200-pound senior,
The nose guard position will be
one of question, also, with the loss
of David Grant, a four year starter
who was drafted by the Cincin-
nati Bengals. Scott Summits will
fill this position, but the coaches
feel as though it will take him a
while to play up to the standards
set by Grant. "Along the defen-
sive line, I am anxious to sec how
we do Nehlen said. "In Brad
Hunt and David Grant we lost an
awful lot of our football team.
When you have guys who have
played four years and given as
much as they did to a program, it's
nearly impossible to replace them
in one year
The Mountaineers will be
strong at the linebacker positions,
which will be a must to back the
untested defensive line. At the
outside positions will be return-
ing starters Robert Pickett and
Dale Jackson. Pickett led the team
in tackles last season with 91, in-
cluding 55 solos. Jackson, one of
the hardest hitters on the team,
was third in tackles last year with
84, including 57 solos. They also
have good depth at this position.
On the inside, returning starter
Chris Haering, who was second
on the team in tackles with 90, 53
of them solo, will fill the middle.
Haering will head a group of four
talented players that can fill in at
the middle position.
The West Virginia secondary
will contain three starters from
last season- Bo Orlando, Preston
Waters and Willie Edwards.
Orlando, the strong safety, was
fourth on the team in tackles last
season with 83. Waters, at short
corner, had 45 tackles last year,
and the coaches hope for larger
numbers from him this season.
Edwards had 57 tackles last year,
and has steadily improved in the
off season. Along with Alvoid
Mays at wide corner and Darrell
Whitmorc at strong safety, they
will round out an experienced
secondary.
The kicking game is a definite
plus for the Mountaineers this
season, with the return of veter-
ans Charlie Baumannat the kicker
position, and punter Lance Car-
ion. Baumann went 13 of 16 field
goals and 39 of 40 in extra points.
Carion averaged 40.2 yards a
punt, but was inconsistent. The
coaches look for him to correct
that this season.
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"If Major continues to improve,
and if our offensive line stays
ready and our running backs stay
healthy, then our offense has a
chance to be productive Nehlen
said. "And if our linebackers
improve and if our defensive is
solid and if our secondary comes
along, then we could stop some
people. That's an awful lot of ifs,
but I'd sure like to see it happen
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f
t
11
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1988
Seminoles could win it all
East Carolina
Tae Kwon Do
By PAUL DUNN
Co-Sports tditor
Tie Seminoles remain un-
beaten in the five game Pirate
seties, downing the Purple and
Gold 44-3 last year at Ficklen sta-
dium.
Florida State comes off an im-
prfcssive 1987 11-1 season and a
Fiesta Bowl victory over Ne-
braska and things are looking
gopd for them in '88.
The 1987 group didn't leave a
lot of room for improvement'
sajd Florida State head coach,
Bobby Bowdcn. "If these boys can
come back with the same atti-
tudes they had last year, maybe
we will be celebrating a national
championship this year
One of the reasons for their
spjendid outlook for the upcom-
ing season is that they have 43
returning lettermen and 13 re-
turning starters. Of those 13 start-
ers, seven arc on offense and six
arc on defense. Florida State also
has a foursome of talented players
who arc considered by ma rty to be
the best at their positions in the
nftion. On defense rtoseguard
Cfclcll Haggins is a terror up front
viile Jim Thorpe Award finalist
dbion Sanders leads the defense
idltheopcn field; on offense, Heis-
rqpn Trophy canidate Sammie
Smith's running will depend on a
liiie led by All-American tackle
PJt Tomberline.
�The biggest question tor the
Sfminolc offense will be to see if
(Aartcrback Chip Ferguson can
b a solid replacement for the
graduated Danny McManus.
Hprguson won the job in spring
practice after losing it briefly to
junior Peter Tom Willis, and his
oiening performance against
Miami will surely be a key one.
BJ)th players have plenty oi game
ejcpcriencc-but neither has
jumped very far ahead of another.
"Bis, in itself, could be a positive
sftuation.
Heading the group of tailbacks
vtill be Sammie Smith. At 6-2, 220
junds and with speed to boot,
jprc aren't many tailbacks who
fcvc his talents. Smith accounted
l 1,230 yards in ten games in '87.
SfMulti-talented junior Dexter
3irter would be the star at most
tivcrsitics but he has to take a
ck scat to Smith, yet because of
fispasscatching abilities, he is too
luable to sit. Smith and Carter
�all rotate series. If two outstand-
r tailbacks aren't enough then
I Seminoles will turn to the ever
impressive Victor Floyd. The
ird tcamer is the tenth leading
S"sher in FSU history. Smith
rtks only two notches above as
e steps in at the number eight
pot. The Seminoles will be able to
ffeal with those undesirable inju-
res.
JrTaking a look at the fullback
Bpsition, FSU once again will
i&ve plenty of backups. Actually,
�& this positions, they could put all
Sirec names into a bag, toss it up
tthd choose one. The starting full-
Jpck will come from a group that
Includes sophomore Edgar Ben-
nett, who is listed at first team
going into fall drills, senior Dayne
Williams and junior Marion
Butts. Williams is the incumbent
starter and scored 15 touchdowns
last year. Bennett is the flashiest
and has some tailback in him.
Both players have the ability to
passes out of the back field. Butts
is the masher of the group, and
also has good catching abilities.
With only two wide receivers
gone do to graduation, junior
Ronald Lewis will be the star of
the group. Lewis was third on the
team last year with 23 catches.
Two year letterman Terry An-
thony, a junior, will step in at the
split-end position.
Both offensive tackles will be
returning, but the coaching staff
will once again be concentrating
on the backup situation. Pat
Tomberline and Joe Ionata are
excellent linemen but depth is
always necessary.
The top three guards from a
year ago will be returning but a
little scrambling will be neces-
sary. Jason Kuipers, a two year
starter, has vacated his guard
position to move to center. Also
returning are juniors Tony Yeo-
mans and John Brown.
The defense of the Seminoles
will be a great asset that promises
to one oi the best in the nation.
There's as much talent at outside
linebacker in 1988 as there has
been at FSU in along time. Part-
time '87 starters Shelton Th-
ompson and Kevin Grant appear
to be the front runners again in '88
but the emergence oi former de-
fensive back John 1 ladley is a
definite plus.
The starters are set for the tackle
position. At the left side oi the line
will be all-star candidate Eric
1 laves. 1 layes is a big-player and
is expected to produce metre of the
same statistics in '88 that he did in
Cocktail
Nightmare on Elm St.
Part IV
Ending Thurs.
Coming To America
Starts Friday
Stealing Home
'87; six tackles for loss, four sacks,
six passes broken up, three
fumbles caused and three recov-
eries. At the right side senior
Steve Gabbard will hold down the
position. Gabbard was sidelined
for most of the '87 season.
Junior Odell Haggins will re-
main at the noseguard position
after impressing many fans in the
'87 season. Haggins had 73 tack-
les, eight sacks, four tackles for
loss, and the list goes on. The
backup spot has heavy competi-
tion. The battle is between Magdi
Ei Shahawy and redshirt fresh-
man Frank Romeo.
Inside linebacker slots have
linebacker coach Wally Burnham
worried. Losing his two starters
from last year and also losing
young players he had been
grooming -Haggins to noseguard
and John Eaford to an automobile
accident a year ago. Burnham had
no choice but to start over. Junior
Keith Carter and sophomore Kel-
vin Smith have the inside track on
the two starting positions after
spring workouts. Carter has po-
tential, now he must prove him-
self. Smith has contributed but is
coming off knee surgery.
The two safety positions are as
stable as any on the defense. At
strong safety, coaches have thrce-
year starter Stan Shiver back. At
tree safety, Dedrick Dodge has
been groomed to take over that
spot.
Everyone's AU-Amcrican, and
sure to be FSU's highest draft pick
ever at the end of the '88 season
will be back at one of the corner-
back spots. Deion Sanders is con-
sidered by many to be the best
athlete who has ever graced the
FSU campus. On the right side,
there is not much game experi-
ence to speak of. Senior Tracy
Sanders has been at the spot for a
little over a year, but he doesn't
have a lot of repetitions under his
belt.
Gone from Scminole land is
Derek Schmidt, the NCAA's all-
time leading scorer in Division
college football history and one of
the top field goal kickers in thel
nation in 1987. Also departed isl
punter Rick Tutcn, who had al
poor senior year after a prc-sca-l
son sickness that took away hisj
strength. Schmidt's understudy
sophomore Richie Andrew will
be tested. Incoming freshman
John Wimbcrly was to take over
the punting responsibilities but;
suffered a knee injury in the off-
season. Doctors think his rehab isl
on schedule. Should Wimbcrly
not be able to punt, FSU will look J
to walk-ons to fulfill this lead.
FSU is definitely one of the most
difficult challenges for the Pirates
in the near future season.
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in Room 221, Mendenhall Student Center
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ELECTION DATE - SEPTEMBER 14, 1988
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103 EASTBROOK DRIVE 758-7570
Syrac
ByDOUGJOHNSO?
C-Sp ��
I987s I . h i
Year Dick MacPtu
beat the heln
that ftnish( d tl
season.
"1987 was just .
reflected Ma
fun team to watch ai
to be around. We
ment before I
going U be tl
tenure and it .
free, we'd be
idea we'd be thai
But that was 1
Orangemen �
new faces on the I
many old
instrumental in
cess.
On the i
the Or
returning start
season's
eighth
in scor
Orangemen i i
depart
quartcrba ' I
I leisman Tr :
seas n
irreplaccal
son saidI
Orange men
Billy Scharr ai .
vying for the
back p
pound sopti
by some to
passsf r e i I
Philcox, a 6-4 2
is a good d(
situat : i
the SI
ing to coach �
Scharr cm rges i
Philcox, I feel
both of them, f '
The Oranj
thebackfield tl s
starters return
son. Senior
Johnston will I
position, ur
Drumrnond and
Owens will -
tailback posil
think that Johnston I
tial to reach
because of his all-purp
to block, run ar I
coming out of th
three backs became I
gain over 500 yai Is
season since the r il
onship team
Johnston is the K si I
country said Ia Phei
runs with powc r -
speed. He is the
blocking back ai i
hands. Put hin
great
Drumrnond
and we've got ��
On the offer
lucky to have mai
ers from last -
will be All .
Stoeppcl,a6 -
Blake Bednarz i
junior, and -
Sim (6-3 272 .
Flanncr) 6 3 21
ncry will move I
center p
guard pe-
lt appears as though :
will get the nod
there.
The receh ing t
angemen lost a lol of tak
graduation, but v
� i i w�mmtmm
Come on h
the
water's fit
at
Memorial G
Rea
The East Caroliniaj
Every Tuesday and Thij
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25,1988 19
Arts)
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And Evening
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Syracuse looks to do it again
By DOUG JOHNSON
Ci-Sports I ditor
1987s National Coach oi the
ear Pick MacPherson will again
be at the helm of a S racuse team
that finished theseason 110 1 last
season.
"1987 was just unbelieveable
reflected MacPherson. "It was a
tun team to watch and a fun team
to be around. We made the state
ment before last year that it was
ing to be the best team in our
tenure and if we stayed injury-
free, we'd be good. But ! had n
idea we'd be that good
But that was last war. The 1988
Orangemen will have a cast oi
new faces on the team, replacing
many old ones that were highly
instrumental in last year's suc-
. CSS.
On theoffensivc side of the ball.
the Orangemen will have seven
returning starters from last
season's unit that was ranked
eighth in total offense, and ninth
in scoring. The biggest l ss for the
Orangemen on offense i ill be the
departure ol highly acclaimed
larterback Pen McPhcrson a
1 leisman rrophy runner-up last
season. ' xi on do net r
irreplaceable (
son said oi Don Mi
Orangemen have two players,
lly Scharr and 'odd Phiicox,
vying for the vaccated quarter-
back position. Scharr a 6 1. 197-
pound sophomore, is considered
bv some to be the best p
:� �� , -r t.i .ittf.d S :
confident that he has the players junior Dan Bucey, can replace
to take up the slack. Bat Kelly and Ward . David Bavaro, last seasons
Tommy Kane, both honorable leading tackier, will return at the
mention All-America, will be other inside position. Bavaro mis-
rcplaced by senior Tat Davis at scd spring drills after shoulder
tight end, and Deval Glover and surgery, but is expected to return
Rob Moore at the vide-out posi- at 100 percent. The outside linc-
tions. According to the coaches, backers, seniors Keith Fribergand
Glover has good concentration Terry Wooden, return to shore up
and a great deal of determination, the corners. Friberg improved his
while comparisions have been
drawn between Moore and for-
mer SU standout Art Monk, now a
star with the NFL's Washington
Redskins.
On defense1, the Orangemen
return eight starters from last
year, but once again they will be
hit hard by losses. The defensive
pass defense over the off-season,
and Wooden may be the most
talented outside linebacker of the
MacPherson era. "Keith Friberg
has never played as consistently
well as he has this spring
MacPherson said. "So, we are
excellent at outside linebacker.
With David Bavaro not being able
line was virtually devastated by toplay this spring, it was kind of a
graduation. All-America Lorn- blessing in disguise. We were able
bardi finalist Ted Gregory, honor- to solidify that thing with four
able mention All-America Paul other people
is a
situatioi
the SU (
ing to
Seharr
I d. ision maker in tough
is and is c Ic in
(ffensivc scheme, ac �
:oaches. "Whether Billy
emerges or it's 1 odd
Frase, and jack-of-all-trades John
Dominic are gone, leaving Rob
Burnett as the sole returning
starter. Burnett led the team in
sacks last year, and the coaches
will look to him to exert the lead-
ership and experience that the
young and inexperienced line
will need. This season will see
juniors bred PeRiggi and Frank
Conover fighting for the
scguard position, while Mark
� inson, a sophomore, will start
.it the left tackle position. "The
one ingredient we have on the
defensive line is that we have the
activator or the flusher, or what-
e er term you use for the guv who
i; the catalyst, who makes things
happen. That's Robert Burnett
MacPhcrson.
At linebackers, last year's unit
In addition to a strong lineback
ing corp, SU returns its starting
The special teams for SU are
expected to perform well this
season, but there may be some
question as to the abilities of the
specialists. Neither Cooper Gar-
diner nor Ken Hawkins per-
formed at punter to the standard
that MacPhcrson set last year. But
Gardiner increased his leg
strength over the off-season, and
is expected to do the honors for
SU. Kevin Greene should do a
good job at the placckicking posi-
tion, but may suffer from inexpe-
rience, and may not hold up well
under pressure. "We were very,
very satisfied with our kicking
last year and we'd be pleased if
Kevin Greene comes to that
level MacPhcrson commented.
1 think that we arc a very, very
secondary intact. The top five for gOOCj, solid, competitive team
Phiicox, 1 feel ver 1 about
both of them MacPherson said.
The Orangemen arc strong in
the backficld this year, v thl rce
starters returning from last s
sen. Senior co-captain Daryl
Johnston will fill the fullback
position, while senior Robert
Drummond and juni �' Micl I
Owens will flank him at the
tailback positions. IP' hes
think that Johnston has tl n
Hal to reach All-America status
because of his all-purpose ability
to block, run and catch the ball
coming out of the back field.
three backs became the first trio to
gain over 500 yards in a sin
season since the national ch in .pi
onship team of 1959. I aryl
Johnston is the host fullbac k in I
country said f Ia Phci n. "1 le
runs with power, strength and
speed. He is the epitomy oi the
eking back and he has great
hands. Put him aloi I
great combination oi .
Drummond and Michael -
and we've got it D nami
On the offensive line
luck- to have many oft!
ers from last year ba k.Rel
will be All-Fast tackle Craig
Stoeppcl,a6-4,2 " Isenioi
;ke Bednarz, a 6
nior, and sophon
Sims (6-3, Z2
Flanncry (6-3,276-px lan-
nery will move to the va
center position, opening up the
guard position for a new member.
It appears as though Bobby Fuller
will get the nod from the c ich s
there.
The receiving corp for the Or-
angemen lost a lot of talented to
graduation, but MacPherson is
the Orangemen have been to
gether for four years now, and
they are very comfortable playing
together. Senior co-captain
Markus Paul returns at free
safety, and is considered to be one
of the finest defensive backs in the
country. Jeff Mangrum, who
plays the run and pass well, re-
turns at strong safety. At the cor-
ners will be David Holmes, who
has the stength to play the bump-
and-run well, and Chris Ingram,
who is strong in both zone and
man-to-man coverages. At the
nickel back will be Jeff Buskirk.
"Our secondary is a real strength
on our football' team MacPher-
son said. "These guys have been
returns intact with the exception playing together for four years
Vrek Ward. MacPherson feels now ancj they know what to do
that last year's backup to Ward, m,t there
MacPherson said, "but we're
going to have to raise ourselves to
another level to even come near to
duplicating last year's record
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THG RCB
East Carolina University's National Award
Wining Literary-Art Magazine
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR ART DIRECTOR.
I AYOUT EXPERIENCE IS ESSENTIAL.
APPLICATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED
IN THE MEDIA BOARD
OR REBEL OFFICE
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Coming August 31st
18th Annual Elbo - Sweet Willy's Bikini Contest. $200 in
cash and prizes to be given to the best bikini.





s
20
THE CAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1088
Hurricanes expect to excel
By DOUG JOHNSON
Co-Sports I Jitor
The Miami Hurncancscnter the
1988 season riding the crest of a 32
game regular season winning
streak, including a perfect 12-0
mark and a National Champion-
ship victory last year.
Despite the loss of 13 starters
from last year's squad, including
stars Michael Irving, Mclvin Brat-
ton, Brian Blades and Daniel
Stubbs, the Hurricanes remain
one of the top teams in the nation,
although Head Coach Jimmy
Johnson warned in a Sport maga-
zine interview, "It would be crazy
to expect us to be perfect
On offense, the Hurricanes will
have only four starters from last
season, the most important of
these being Steve Walsh, who
started all 12 games at quarter-
back last year. Walsh, a 6-3,195-
pound junior, had 176 comple-
tions in 298 attempts for 2249
yards and 19 touchdowns last
season, while throwing only
seven interceptions. According to
coaches, Walsh's greatest attrib-
ute ishisabililtv to change playsat
the line of sen mm age in order to
set the best offense for the existing
defensive set-up.
In the backfield for Miami will
be two new faces due to the depar-
ture of Mclvin Bratton and War-
ren Williams At the fullback posi-
tion will be Cleveland Gary, a 6-2,
226-pound senior. Gary carried
the ball 39 times for 157 yards and
five touchdowns in his back-up
role to Bratton last season, and he
is expected to be more of a receiv-
ing threat coming out of the back-
field this year. Filling in at half-
back will be Leonard Conlcy, a 5-
9, 170-pound sophomore, who
became Miami's all-time loading
freshman rusher last season, to-
talling 423 yards on 66 carries.
The offensive lino will return
three starters front last season,
one at each oi the throe lino posi-
tions. Rod Holder, a 6-3, 270-
pound junior, returns at center to
anchor the line. Holder missed
spring practice while rehabilitat-
ing from a knee injury, but is
expected to be at 100 percent for
the fall. He will be counted on to
provide the leadership and expe-
rience that the line will need. At
loft guard will be another re-
turner, Mike Sullivan, a 6-4, 274-
pound sophomore, who is, ac-
cording to coaches, capable of
playing all three positions on the
line. Filling the right guard posi-
tion will be Bobby Garcia, a 6-3,
253-pound junior, who was nick-
named "The Cat by his team-
mates because oi his quickness
and agility, according to the Mi-
ami media guide. Returning
starter John O'Neill, a 6-3, 267-
pound senior, will line up at right
tackle for Miami. O'Neill missed
spring drills because of a knee
injury, but will be back as the
Hurricane's leading pass protec-
tor. On the left side at tackle will
be Darrin Bruce, a 6-3,260-pound
senior, a 1987 transfer from Cerri-
tos Community College in Cali-
fornia.
The Hurricane receiving corp
was the hardest hi t by graduation.
A trio of new faces will step in to
giveQB Walsh targets to throw to.
Rob Chudzinski will start at tight
end, Randal Hill at split end, and
Dale Dawkins at flanker. Of the
three, only Dawkins caught a pass
last season, pulling down two for
a total of 20 yards.
The Hurricane defense is in a
little better position than the of-
fense, returning five starters from
last year's squad. At the ends will
be Willis Pcguese, a 6-4, 245-
pound junior, and returner Bill
Ha wkins, a 6-6,260-pound senior.
Hawkins was the fifth leading
tackier for the Hurricanes last
year with 84 and third in sacks
with b.5. At the tackles will be
Jimmic Jones, a 6-4, 261-pound
junior, and returning starter Greg
Mark, a 6-4, 238-pound junior.
Mark was the fourth leading tack-
ier with 88, and the team's leading
assist tackier with 53.
Middle linebacker will sec a
new starter in Bernard Clark,
while the outside will be occupied
by returning starters. Randy
Shannon and Rod Carter. Clark, a
6-2, 238-pound junior, was voted
Miami's most valuable player in
last year's championship game
when he filled in for starter
George Mira. Shannon, a 6-0,224-
pound senior, finished as the fifth
leading tackier with 87 stops,
while Carter earned All-South
honors, and finished second on
the team in tackles with 138.
Only one starter, Bubba
McDowell, will return in the sec-
ondary for the Hurricanes.
McDowell, a 6-1, 195-pound sen-
ior, averaged nearly six tackles
per game after becoming the
starter at free safety in the third
game of the season. At strong
safety will be Bobby 1 larden, a 6-
2,195-pound junior, while Donald
Ellis, a 5-11, 195-pound senior,
and Kenny Berry, a 6-2, 185-
pound junior, will start at the
corners.
On special teams will be Edgar
Bonos at kicker and Tim Kalal at
punter. Bones kicked all but one of
Miami's kick-offs last season, and
Kalal had an average of 40.1 yards
per punt.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT
SOCCER COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville Recreation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 10-14 part-time soccer coaches for the fall
semester program. Applicants must possess some
knowledge in soccer skills and have patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able to coach young
people, ages 5-15 in soccer fundamentals. I lours ap-
proximately 3-7 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Some night
and weekend coaching. Program will extend from Sep-
tember to mid November. Salary rate is S3.55 to $4.35
per hour. Applicants will be accepted starting August
20. Contact Ben James at 830-4543.
Shoe Outlet
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SI.51
Temple Owls to rely on strong kicking
By DOUGJOHNSON
Co-Sports Lditur
Offense promises to be the
strong suit of the 19SS Owls from
Temple, but the squad from the
City of Brotherly Love will be
hard-pressed to surpass last
year's 4-7 mark.
"Our schedule is very demand-
ing, especially in the first halt of
the season temple ! lead Coach
Bruce Arians said. "We play foui
bowl teams in the first five games,
including two-Penn State and
Alabama-who will be picked to be
the top team in their conference or
region
The Owls will line up on offense
with a great deal oi depth and
experience. At the quarterback
position, the Owls feel confident
that thev have the depth and ex-
oerience in Matt Baker and Tonv
Lerro to get the job done. Baker, a
sophomore, completed 39 Oi 77
p sses for 499 yards and two
touchdowns in just five games.
Lerro, a junior, was 14 of 37 for 219
yards. "If 1 had to name a starting
quarterback coming out of spi ing
practice it would be Matt Bal i
said Arians.
Fullback is a very questionable
position for the Owls, because of
the inexperience oi the players
there. Nelson Herrera, who
started only three games last sea-
son, will be the starter this season.
Herrera netted 129 yards on 37
carries last year. "Nelson has all
he tools necei�!ary to boewme a
great player Arians com-
mented, "but he needs to become
more committed to being great
According to Arians, halfback
"would have to be the strongest
position on the team with three
quality running backs (Todd
McNair, Ventres Stevenson and
Tom Quinn), all of whom have
started MacNair, a senior who
earned first team All-ECAC, sec-
ond team All Fast and honorable
mention All-America honors,
was the Owl's leading rusher List
season, gaining 1,058 yards on 249
carries. "1 would rank Todd as one
oi the besi backs in the count;
slid Arian .
Thcoffensivc line is also strong,
according to Arians. "1 think our
offensive line will be as good as
any we've ever had he said.
"Tackle Chris Possenti received
the John Rienstra Award for most
outstanding improvement in the
off-season conditioning. Center
Dick Beck was extremely consis-
tent, as was guard Tete Bernard.
Guard Rich Gould had a very-
good spring. Tackle Ray Haynes
was probably the best player we
had this season Arians is, how-
ever, concerned witht the depth oi
his line. "The key to our season is
the dcvelopcment oi Marcus
Gibbs, Brian Krulikowski, and
Gary Thompson he said.
Another area lacking depth is
the receiver positions. "Wide re-
ceiver is a question mark after you
go past Rich Drayton and Mike
Payls Arians said. As for tight
end, the Owls have one player,
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95
Cinci
By PALL DUNN
Co-Spcrts 1 rf.tjr
Approaching the 1988 i
reason, the Univer .
nati looks to improve on ii
mark from last year
Head coach Dave Currc)
in order to be a su.
?hey must tighten up �
bat a quick glance at tl J
makes him realize that r
challenges await the Bear Gt
The return of 23 s
ers creates a veteran i
can but only he
nati to the desir I
son.
Even the 1 I
experience, tl
will not see any �
position.
The leader
that g od pi
scnier
pointed out 1
die experi r matur
ent to ha ,
that he I
those a
� The prcs
fend his �
flayers at I
Donasrx -
plav at 1
j Thedi � �
much needed strcnj
run the F ir ' '
defense S i
ind Andre ��� ,
cpmmand I I
Asbc - � �
has had a stai
former years. I k
�xitt :
hem I to I
ras : �
for loss. Lasl eai
into the insidear
fjfth-leadir I
6-4, 2 0-p 1 5l
much a relative r
trench; s.Sl
Temple kiek
to be their s
Continued from ;
Maurice Johnson, that can I
slot. They hope that Frank V
or George Dcvaney will coi
a? the season progresses.
On defense. Arians was
antly surprised with the
opement of his linebackinj
and his secondary. But
pectedthclinctobc ti ng.1
have eight quality
experience in the d 1
tront ho said. "It v I be thf
diefensh efi nt we vet
up Seniors Andy Tapp
and Camell .
up at the ends, while at ret
starters Kenyatta Rush.
Gonstantatos and Eric
will fill the tackle spots
At inside lir - rs i
WilliaiT
�charlotte (Ar - J
hnms, a prep all-star vn h pi
to plav basketball at j
tipa before he failed
�om high school la j
carolled at a junior
Kansas.
- Williams, an0 plaj a
Northeastern High ir I
Citv. started classes M 1
Barton County Commun
tcge in Great Bend Kai
Barton coach Dan McGov
$ "1 think he'll do fine a
callv, McGovcrn told trd
Totte Observer. "He sa I
here to h i t the book -
basketball is secondary
. McGovcrn said Barto
grong academic progra
basketball program and
rcrcncc the 15-s IKarj
lawk Junior College
has also been sua i -
Barton players going o
ditionally strong NCAA Iff
rprograms include Todd,
and Andre Harris at lndil
Marvin Branch at Kansaf
Smart oi Indiana, HaVvcxJ
Oklahoma and Armon G
Nevada-Las Vegas, all
K'BA rosters, played atcoj
Schools.
Before Williams will bd
.� plav basketball, Bart
Save proof he has obtal
general Equivalency j
ince he did not g
&lcGovcrn said
$





THE CAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 25, 1988 2 1
ATION AND
TMENT
ES NEEDED
or the fall
L l
to w o: k
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tlet
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1 Si iers.
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tion
orts
Cincinnati will need help
By TALL DUNN
Co-Sports Idiiot
Approaching the 1988 football
season, the University of Cincin-
nati looks to improve on its 4-7
k from last year.
Head coach Dave Currey said
n i rdcr to be a success in 1988
must tighten up the defense,
but i quick glance at the schedule
�r ikes him realize that many big
tenges await the Bear Cats,
return of 23 senior perform-
ers creates a veteran presence that
can but only help guide Cincin-
� iti to the desired improved sea-
Evcn with all the returning
LTvperience, the quarterback slot
not sec any experience at that
tion.
leader of the Bear Cats said
. ,ood programs have good
: leadership. He also
p nted out that his seniors had
vperience, maturity and tal-
: � have their best vears, and
that he hopes they will ultilize
� assets.
jresent objective oi Currev
staff is to place the right
rs at the right position as
. - possible and to get them to
at their fullest potential.
c defensive line will have the
needed strength it takes to
the Bear Cat's Multiple 40
tense Seniors Chris Asbcck
Andrew Stewart will take
nand oi the line.
Asbeck,a 6-3,2t-4-pound tackle,
I a starting role all three
r years. He showed his vcr-
� ty his sophomore year when
m cd to the end position and
ond on the team in tackles
ss. Last year he moved back
,e inside and was the team's
ading tackier.
4, 2(-0-pound Stewart is very
ich a relative newcomer to the
nehes. Stewart gave up football
� i i-
after his sophomore season in
high school but was coaxed to
return to the game his sophomore
year in junior college. His diligent
weight-training has paid off, for
he led the Bear Cats last season in
tackles for loss and sacks and was
the teams fourth-leading tackier.
Tom Szabados, a 6-1, 260-
pound senior, complements the
line with his steady, hard-nose
play. Szabados was a starter and
backup last season and was an all-
star performer during spring
practice.
Chris Carmon, a 6-3,255-pound
redshirt freshman is the top can-
didate for the other end spot but
the position is still up for grab.
Scott Britt, 6-2,230-pounds, a jun-
ior college transfer could see ac-
tion there.
The return of Ron Traut to the
outside linebacker post should
considerably strengthen the line-
backing contingent. Traut had the
starting position last year but
broke his wrist before the season,
which kept him out for the year.
He is considered to have the best
overall ability of the linebackers
for the this season.
Traut's return allowed the
coaching staff to move Art Shef-
field, who took over the starting
position at outside linebacker last
season, to strong safety. Vincent
Munlin, who was backup at
strong safety last season, has be-
come the chief backup at outside
linebacker.
Donnie Robinson, a 6-foot, 218-
pound senior is the lone veteran
with experience as a starter
among the returnees at inside
linebacker.
Jeff Schipani, a b-3, 215-pound
senior, and Kyle Stroh, a 6-3, 226-
pound sophomore, will be chal-
lenging Robinson for the starting
job this year.
Top linebacker newcomers "bat
will also contribute are jack Brus-
cianclli , a junior college transfer
and freshman Mark Rankin.
All four starting all-senior sec-
ondary players have departed
and those created a major rebuild-
ing effort. The Bear Cats have set
there starters at that position
coming out of spring practice.
Marvin Bowan a 6-3, 191-
pound junior who saw action last
year as a backup has won the spot
at free safety.
The cornerback jobs are still up
in the air. Sophomore Corey Wil-
liams and junior college transfer
Lionell Dozicr were the starters at
the end of spring drills, but re-
dshirt freshman John Cockrcll is
in the picture.
A key to the success of the Bear
Cat's offense will be the rebuild-
ing of the offensive line, where
experience is also thin.
Junior Troy Dixon and redshirt
freshman Greg Zawie arc the
prime candidates at right tackle.
Senior Mike Bennett lost his
starting job at left guard when
sophomore Mark Eilerman out
performed him during spring
drills.
Rob Hausfeld has been moved
from left guard to left tackle to
take advantage of his fine range
while senior Greg Hcitkamp has
taken over the starting assign-
ment at right guard.
Currey will welcome back the
two top performers at the two
running back and two receiver
posts, and all but one of these
veterans arc seniors.
Cincinnati's key to their run-
ning game will be balance.Scott
Tackct and Leonard Cry arc back
at fullback where the two com-
bined for 642 yards and five
touchdowns last season.
But Al McKinney should again
be the feature of the running
game. McKinney who had his
first start last year, rushed for 950
yards. McKinney had a good
spring practice and his future is
looking even better.
The receiving corps could be
one of the best in the school's his-
tory. Bill Davis, who shared the
flanker position with Roosevelt
Mukes combined with him for 81
receptions and 1,161 yards last
fall.
Making an effort to get them
both on the field more this year,
Davis has moved to split end
where he will compete with the
sure-handed Joe Hicc who saw
limited action last season due to
injuries.
Steve Sanders, who replaced
the wounded Hice at split end
most of last season, has been
switched to flanker.
Roundingout the pass-catching
crew is tight end Daryl 1 luber, a
three year starter.
For the first time since 1980, the
Bearcats will not have the luxury
of beginning the season with an
experienced quarterback.
Sophomore Glenn Farkas, who
served as backup for most of last
season, emerged on top of the
three-way battle for the QB slot.
Redshirt freshman Don Hoogand
junior college transfer Carl
Johnson will continue to battle for
the all-important role of backup
quarterback.
The kicking game for Cincin-
nati should show a lot of strength.
Gary Overgaauw, senior, had
stiff competetion when he slightly
beat out sophomore Jeff Jones for
the right to do the punting. Over-
gaauw will be under constcnt
pressure from Jones.
Thil Insalaco is back to handle
the placekicking duties. The sen-
ior led the team in scoring last
year.
Coach Currey said his team
needs to gain confidence in their
selves and that winning breeds
confidence
P
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read the east
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THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
2ND FLOOR
PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
IN FRONT OF JOYNER LIBRARY
Continued from page 20
Maurice Johnson, that can fill the
slot. They hope that Frank Pollock
or George Dcvaney will come on
as the season progresses.
On defense, Arians was pleas-
antly surprised with the devcl-
pement of his lincbacking corp
and his secondary. But he ex-
pected the line to be strong. "We'll
have eight quality players with
experience in the defensive
front' he said. "It will be the best
defensive front we've every lined
ip Seniors Andy Pappalardo
and Carncll Washington will line
up at the ends, while at returning
starters Kcnvatta Rush, Mike
Jenstantatos and Eric Warren
: till the tackle spots.
At inside linebackers will be
Anthonv Tezsla and Loranzo
Square, both of whom were very
impressive in spring drills. On the
outside, a position that Arians
was concerned about, will be Jeff
Thomas on one side and cither Pat
Dudley or Greg Taylor, who are
battling for the starting job.
The secondary was "a very
good surprise this spring" said
Arians. Expect to sec John Arm-
strong, a converted linebacker, at
free safety, while Joe Greenwood
and Willard Cooper will occupy
the corners.
The kicking game should be
strong this season, with third year
man Ed Libcrati returning at
punter, and Bill Wright, who the
coaches think has the potential to
reach All-America status, return-
ing at kicker.
Williams in college
CARLOS SOSA
GRANT JONES
SUSAN KRUSE
Cl 1ARLOTTE (AP) Kenny Wil-
liams, a prep all-star who planned
to play basketball at North Caro-
. before he failed to graduate
m high school last spring, has
� rolled at a junior college in
Kansas.
Williams, a 6-9 player from
Northeastern High in Elizabeth
ity, started classes Monday at
irton County Community Col-
;e in Great Bend, Kan said
Barton coach Dan McGovcrn
1 think he'll do fine academi-
tlly, "McGovcrn told the Char-
' tte Observer. "He said he's out
' re to hit the books and that's it,
basketball is secondary. "
McGovcrn said Barton has a
strong academic program. The
basketball program and its con-
n nee the 15-school Kansas Jay-
hawk Junior College Conference
has also been successful.
Barton players going on to tra-
ditionally strong NCAA Divid ion
T programs include Todd Jadlow
and Andre Harris at Indiana and
Marvin Branch at Kansas. Keith
smart of Indiana, Harvey Grant of
Oklahoma and Armon Gilliam of
Nevada-Las Vegas, all now on
R A rosters, played at conference
si hools.
Before Williams will be eligible
to play basketball, Barton must
have proof he has obtained his
General Equivalency Diploma
since he did not graduate,
McGovcrn said.
"He's been taking that near his
home, I'm not sure exactly where,
and we are in the process of hav-
ing his results forwarded to us, "
McGovcrn said. "If he has com-
pleted them, he's fine. If not, we'll
enroll him in that program out
here
The first games on Barton
County's 31-game schedule is
Nov. 1. In the meantime, Williams
will go to class and workout with
the team, McGovcrn said.
Two former North Carolina
assistant coaches arc head
coaches at NCAA schools in Kan-
sas. Eddie Fogler is at Wichita
State and Roy Williams is at Kan-
sas.
McGovcrn said no one at North
Carolina guided Williams to Bar-
ton.
"I became aware that he would
not be going to Carolina, just like
coaches at a lot of junior colleges,
" McGovcrn said. "I made three
visits to Elizabeth City and got to
know Kenny and his parents, and
he came out here for a visit.
"I think Kenny is committed to
making things work academi-
cally, and he knows we demand a
lot of discipline. I told him in the
recruiting process, (players) are
not allowed to suit up for games
and are barred from practice if
they miss class.
"He felt he would do well in
that environment. "
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New Achievers in
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 25, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 25, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.619
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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