The East Carolinian, July 20, 1988






COMING NEXT WEEK:
We wind up the summer session with our last paper.
Be here for the end of summer issue, with special
features in news, entertainment and sports.
FEATURES
ECU Summer Theater's third production still
lacks Broadway finesse, see page 7.
SPORTS
Profile on basketball star Reed Lose, see page 9.
QUre i:aHt (Earoltman
Vol. 63 o. 10
Wednesday, July 20,1988
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Greenville, NC
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Dr. Mever retires,
remembers ECU
By Cl A DEANHARDT
General Manager
Sitting behind Ins temporal)
in 111 Ragsdalc, Dr. Elmer
t r looks like a man about to
11 L .
Meyer is dressed in slacks and
a short sleeve button-down. Cone
is the suit and tie that formerly ac-
� ipanicd a visit to his office in
' .hard Building. Still til
is that indefatiguable
liich has become a much a
�: !e or as he is of the uni-
ty. Students know him bo-
use i that pipe, which he often
carries clinched in the left side of
ith as he walks the univer-
roui ds.
i fl ice in Ragsdalc is
M r s temporary headquai I
he officially leaves the ui
. rsit on August 18. He moved
Alfred
ias the
ncellor for stud
there
V ' ,1.1-
W when Dr.
can !iis dutic
vr na;
tried to make tl
:� e as v mfortable as possible,
painl ngs by his wife lining
. ' isidea painti i I i
Viim vvhon Vie ett Wisconsin for
(
ell University main- years
The theme of the painting,
h is also a parallel for the
s I il sophies, is "Students
ink for themselves '
nts have been the m
� Meyer's career since he
masanadmissii mscoun-
at Carroll College in Febru-
I 50 1 le later worked for the
room he's going to be happier in
the classroom
Meyer says his goals for his
new job were originally geared to-
ward getting the department or-
ganized and molding the depart-
ments into a corporate whole.
"The kev for me all these years
lias been maintaining flexibility
and responsiveness to student
nee Is lie sa) s.
� � nt division
i I student life sex nencompassed
from the intramural
leparl nl to public safety to
dining services. Meyer had to face
the problem of organizing all
those different interests into one
division, and then managing
them properly to insure that stu-
dent services would grow and
� ind with the university.
" lhev didn't have staff meet-
ings, so we started staff meetings.
They didn't have budgets. We
made sure each department de-
veloped their own budget. It was
a bottom up approach rather than
a t. �p dow n Meyer sa) s.
M yer says they also began
nutcs from staff'
See MEYER, p.igc 2
Smith to become
vice-chancellor
By SEAN HERRING
Staff Wnier
The first assistant vice chancel-
lor for student life and minority
affairs will join the administrative
staff oi ECU on August 15, 1988.
Dr. Larry T. Smith comes to
ECU from a post as associate dean
of students for programs and ac-
tivities and director of minority
affairs at Knox College in
C lalesburg, Illinois.
Smith has a PhD in higher
education administration and
supervision, which he received
from Howling Creen State L'ni-
versitv in Ohio. He received his
"We are delighted to have a
person of Dr. Smith's caliber and
credentials become our first assis-
tant vice chancellor and director
of minority affairs Meyers � id.
Meyer headed a search
committee which conducted a
national search to fill the new
position.
"It (the position) will involve
I v I pment of programs and
activities of interest to minority
students bv advising student or-
ganizations and assisting with
student arientation Meyer said
He added, "Smith will also
dcvclopa peer mentor program at
Dr. Elmer Mever retires this month from his post of vice chancell-
or of student life which he has held since 1979. (Photo by Kllen
Murph)�Photolab).
master's degree in college student ECU and work with university
personnel from Bowling Green.
1 le later held a teaching fellow-
ship and a graduate assistants
post in the office of the vice presi-
dent for student affairs and devel-
opment at Bowling Green.
Smith is a 1978 cum laude
undergraduate in English from
Johnson C. Smith University, in
Charlotte.
Smith's appointment as ECL"s
assistant vice chancellor for stu-
dent life and minority affairs was
announced by Dr. Elmer E. Meyer
jr retiring vice chancellor for
student life.
committees on matters of minor-
it)- student life and support serv-
ices
The following is a question and
answer session with Dr. Larry T.
Smith, the first vice chancellor of
minority affairs.
Trustees elect chair, pass drug policy, hike fines
By TIM HAMPTON
i�i 1 .i,tir
ECL 's Board i'i Trustees
elected a new chairman, adopted
a new drug policy nd raised
of Wisconsin system parking fines in Friday's meeting
Cornell University be- on campus.
just, Max oyncr Sr a Greenville
�rncll
to ECL
tees also passed a new parking
iolation for illegal parking on a
private lot - a fine of $15.
Joyner, a 1956 ECU graduate
from the business school, has a
been a member of the trustees
since a 1985 appointment by Gov.
Jim Martin. I le is a former presi-
dent of Pirate Club and the
In
throne,
i:
CU
games. It will be the largest struc-
ture east oi Raleigh according to
Joyner who said, "Presently we
don't have a building oi this
magnitude in eastern North Caro-
lina
Tlie UNC mandated drug
policy requires each of the 16
UNC institutions to implement
for a period to be determined
individually. During probation,
the offender must submit to a
drug education and counseling
program, complete a term oi
community service and consent
to regular drug testing.
Second offenders oi drug pos-
session will be expelled and ic-
was going
massive institutional
. Then Chancellor, Tho-
�wcr was making struc-
busincssman, replaces Thomas
Bennett as chairman after his one Alumni Association as well as a programs to educate, counsel and ulty and staff will be discharged
year term expired. member of ECU Foundations, rehabilitate students, faculty and from their jobs.
Trustees voted to accept the Joyner is presently on the BT&T staff affected by drug abuse. The
L NC's Board oi Governors drug Leadership board. police also takes a strict stand on
rural changes to the university's policv which sets new penalities Planning for the future, Joyner trafficking and possession of ille-
administrative system. Part of for drug possession, drug testing said the trustees will be studying gal drugs by students, faculty and
s included th requirements and improvements possible locations for a new re- staff.
in substance abuse education. gional center as soon as the fund- The trafficking penalization is
Violators of campus parking ing for the land is allocated. Two broken into two drug groups.
weeks ago, the N.C. Assembly Students convicted of peddling
passed a $500,000 funding meas- heroin, mescaline, cocaine, am
Q: What is your impression of
ECU?
A: The atmosphere of the uni-
versity seems to be warm and
open to the idea of establishing an
office of minoritv affairs. An at-
mosphere like ECU isa promising
environment for this type of pro-
gram.
Q: What convinced you to ac-
cept this position?
A: It was the university's atti-
tude, and care that it seems to
have for its students, and their
needs. I can build on that type of
excitement.
Q: Did you observe any posi-
tive things about student life ac-
tivities andor the administrative
awareness of student life acitivi
ties.
A: Yes. It is evident to me that,
East Carolina University sees that
the area of minority students
n ol the Division oi Student
I ife, which every other major
university in the state had already
I nc Meyer has been the only
r I be vice-chancellor of that
It (the change) brought to-
icr all those units that are
"crncd v. ith the non-academic
: lent Meyer saysas
�mpties and refills one of two
-desk. "And if the stu-
happier outside the class-
restrictions will have to pay ap-
proximately twice oi existing
fines in the fall semester. Over-
time parking violations were
raised from $2 to $5 while fines for
parking outside of a permitted
area jnd littering were hiked from
$5 to $10.
Violations for parking a unreg-
istered vehicile on campus were
d( uibled from10 to $20. The trus-
ure which will allow the trustees phetamine, methaqualine will be in support of the measure
to purchase the necessary land for
the center.
Speaking of the regional cen-
ter, Joyner said the trustees will be
acting "in the very near future
Joyner said the center would be
able to house 10,000 people for
conventions and ECU basketball
Fire rages at apartments
By TIM HAMPTON
News I J itur
Faulty wiring is the possible
e of a tire at an Greenville
irtment complex which de-
yi ! eight units, left several
tudents homeless and inju-
� � c tennant Friday, officials
: M mday.
( ne of the building's resi
� William Slade, was treated
ii I r leased Friday from Pitt
I iunty Memorial Hospitial f r
tment of fM'c burns. Slade
rred the burns when he
ki� ked down the door of his burn
ing apartment in attempts to save
ins di .�
Walking around the burnt car-
iss "i building C at Langston
' ii V apartments Monday, city
and state inspectors said they
have ruled out the possibility of
n as the cause of the fire.
After the investigation Cliff
Wetherington of the Greenville
11 Department said, "There is
no indication that the fire was
intentionally set, while possible
trical failure may be the cause
but not definitely
Fire officials say they respon-
sed to a 6:()7 p.m. call Friday at the
apartments located off of Stancil
Drive. Fire fighters from Eastern
Pines and Wintervilie were called
to assist Greenville personnel
because ot the intense heat, ac-
cording to Captain James Tyndell
of the Greenville Fire Depart-
ment.
Wetherineton said the fire
But on his return trip from the
grocery store he saw smoke bil-
lowing high in the sky. "I wasn't
gone longer than 15 minutes and
C was ablaze all the way to the
roof Patterson said.
Eyewitness Britton Bvrd said
the fire raged quickly on the ply-
wood exterior of the building. "I
walked outside about 6 p.m. and
expelled from school which tac-
ulty and staff members will be
discharged from their jobs.
For the first offense oi traffick-
ing, marijuana, pentobarbital
codeine the minium penalty will
be suspension from school or
employment for one semester or
its equivalent.
First time offenders on charges
of illegal drug possession will be
suspended for one semester. Fol-
lowing the first offense, the per-
son will be placed on probation
Joyner agreed with the new-
drug policy because it is compa-
rable to policies in the real world.
"When a student graduates from
ECU, they will have to be tested in growth can be strengthened. So,
the work place Joyner said. they look the initiative, without
The trustee's adoption of the the students having to demand
drug policy comes five months that they (ECU) do something to
after the SG A passed a resolution help improve racial awareness for
students, faculty, towns-people,
and the community.
Q: Do you have any sugges-
tions that could improve student
life activities and or minority- af-
fairs at ECU?
A: I have gotten the impression
from some of the students that 1
In other business, the trustees
named James Hailock the new
dean of the ECU school of Medi-
cine. Hailock replaces retiring
William Laupus as dean. Hailock
is presently with the All
Children's Hospitial for the Col
lege oi Medicine at St. Peterburg have spoken too that, white and
Fla. black leaders on ECU's campus
Also, SGA president Larry do not work together. I would like
Murphy took oath on the board, to get te student leaders and
The SGA president is tradition- members of these groups to work
n .i r-tTr, j (t �, together, to achieve meaningful
ally on the ECU Board of Trustees. qq
started in the wall ceiling of the the fire burned fast, really fast,
kitchen area of apartment C-17 Byrd said
and quickly spread to the adjoin-
ing units. Fire officials estimate
the blaze caused $200,000 in prop-
erty l(sS.
Wetherington said the fire
spread in the span of 15 minutes,
engulfing the entire building. He
said the start of the fire's spread
was probably undetectable be-
cause it was sparked in the wall
and ceiling.
Eyewitness James F. Patterson
Jr who lives in complex F, said he
drove bv complex C at approxi-
mately 550 p.m. and saw no indi-
cation of a fire. "1 didn't see any
smoke, nor smell any Patterson
said.
According to The Daily Re-
flector, residents Tom Staple,
Brian Freeze and Chris San-
tevsanio jumped to safety from
the balconies of their second story
apartments.
Tyndell said fire units stayed
at the scene until early Saturday
morning to dounce the smoulder-
ing remains. "An unit was there
all night to stop hot spots caused
by falling debris from flaring up
Tyndell said.
An inspector from the State
Bureau of Investigation said the
investigation is over. "We are
pretty much through. We don't
deal with the fire codes, just the
intent of fire
Because of the extreme heat of Friday's fire at one of the Langston Park Apartment buildings, fire
personnel from area departments were called in to assist the Greenville Fire Department. Inspectors say
faulty electrical wiring may have caused the blaze. (Photo by Ellen Murphy�Photolab).





COMING NEXT WEEK:
We wind up the summer session with our last paper.
Be here for the end of summer issue, with special
features in news, entertainment and sports.
FEATURES
ECU Summer Theater's third production still
lacks Broadway finesse, see page 7.
sports
Profile on basketball star Reed tosc, see page 9,
Mt
Ularulintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 10
Wednesday, July 20,1988
Greenville, NC
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Dr. Meyer retires,
remembers ECU
By CLAY DEANHARDT room he's going to be happier in
General Manager the ClaSSrOOm
Sitting behind his temporary Meyer says his goals for his
desk in 111 Ragsdale, Dr. Elmer new job were originally geared to-
Meyer looks like a man about to ward getting the department or-
retire. ganized and molding the depart-
Mcycr is dressed in slacks and ments into a corporate whole,
a short sleeve button-down. Gone "The key for me all these years
is the suit and tie that formerly ac- has been maintaining flexibility
companied a visit to his office in and responsiveness to student
Whichard Building. Still there,
though, is that indefatiguable
pipe which has become a much a
part of Meyer as he is of the uni-
versity. Students know him be-
needs he says.
The once non-existent division
of student life soon encompassed
everything from the intramural
department to public safety to
cause of that pipe, which he often dining services. Meyer had to face
carries clinched in the left side of
his mouth as he walks the univer-
sity grounds.
The office in Ragsdale is
Meyer's temporary headquarters
until he officially leaves the uni-
versity on August 18. He moved
there Monday when Dr. Alfred
the problem of organizing all
those different interests into one
division, and then managing
them properly to insure that stu-
dent services would grow and
expand with the university.
"They didn't have staff meet-
ings, so we started staff meetings.
Matthews began his duties as the They didn't have budgets. We
new vice-chancellor for student made sure each department de-
life, vcloped their own budget. It was
Meyer has tried to make the a bottom up approach rather than
office as comfortable as possible, a top down Meyer says,
with paintings by his wife lining Meyer says they also began
the walls aside a painting given to distributing minutes from staff
Smith to become
vice-chancellor
By SEAN HERRING "We are delighted to have a
'staff wer person of Dr. Smith's caliber and
The first assistant vice chancel- credentials become our first assis-
lor for student life and minority tant vice chancellor and director
affairs will join the administrative of minority affairs Meyers said.
staff of ECU on August 15,1988. Meyer headed a search
Dr. Larry T. Smith comes to committee which conducted a
ECU from a post as associate dean national search to fill the new
of students for programs and ac- position.
tivities and director of minority
affairs at Knox College in
Galesburg, Illinois.
'It (the position) will involve
development of programs and
activities of interest to minority
Wm when he left Wisconsin for
Cornell University many years
ago. The theme of the painting,
which is also a parallel for the
man's philosophies, is "Students
should think for themselves
Students have been the main
focus of Meyer's career since he
first began as an admissions coun-
See MEYER, page 2
Dr. Elmer Meyer retires this month from his post of vice chancell-
or of student life which he has held since 1979. (Photo by Ellen
Murphy�Photolab).
Smith has a PhD in higher students by advising student or-
education administration and ganizations and assisting with
supervision, which he received student aricntation Meyer said,
from Bowling Green State Uni- He added, "Smith will also
versity in Ohio. He received his develop a peer mentor program at
master's degree in college student ECU and work with university
personnel from Bowling Green. committees on matters of minor-
He later held a teaching fellow- ity student life and support scrv-
ship and a graduate assistants ices
post in the office of the vice presi-
dent for student affairs and devel-
opment at Bowling Green.
Smith is a 1978 cum laude
undergraduate in English from
Johnson C. Smith University, in
Charlotte.
Smith's appointment as ECU'S
assistant vice chancellor for stu-
dent life and minority affairs was
announced by Dr. Elmer E. Meyer
Jr retiring vice chancellor for
student life.
The following is a question and
answer session with Dr. Larry T.
Smith, the first vice chancellor of
minority affairs.
Trustees elect chair, pass drug policy, hike fines
By TIM HAMPTON
News Editor
ECU'S Board of Trustees
tees also passed a new parking games. It will be the largest struc- for a period to be determined
violation for illegal parking on a ture east of Raleigh according to individually. During probation,
selor at Carroll College in Febru- elected a new chairman, adopted
ary, 1950. He later worked for the a new drug policy and raised
University of Wisconsin system parking fines in Friday's meeting
and then Cornell University be
fore coming to ECU in August,
1979.
In 1979 ECU was going
through massive institutional
changes. Then Chancellor, Tho-
on campus.
private lot - a fine of $15.
Joyner, a 1956 ECU graduate
from the business school, has a
been a member of the trustees
since a 1985 appointment by Gov.
Max Joyner Sr a Greenville Jim Martin. He is a former presi-
businessman, replaces Thomas dent of Pirate Club and the
Bennett as chairman after his one Alumni Association as well as a
year term expired. member of ECU Foundations.
Joyner who said, "Presently we the offender must submit to a
don't have a building of this drug education and counseling
magnitude in eastern North Caro- program, complete a term of
Una community service and consent
The UNC mandated drug to regular drug testing,
policy requires each of the 16 Second offenders of drug pos-
UNC institutions to implement session will be expelled and fac-
programs to educate, counsel and ulty and staff will be discharged
rehabilitate students, faculty and from their jobs.
Q: What is your impression of
ECU?
A: The atmosphere of the uni-
versity seems to be warm and
open to the idea of establishing an
office of minority affairs. An at-
mosphere like ECU is a promising
environment for this type of pro-
gram.
Q: What convinced you to ac-
cept this position?
A: It was the university's atti-
tude, and care that it seems to
have for its students, and their
needs. I can build on that type of
excitement.
Q: Did you observe any posi-
tive things about student lite ac-
tivities andor the administrative
awareness r�f student life activi-
ties.
A: Yes. It is evident to me that,
Trustees voted to accept the Joyner is presently on the BT&T staff affected by drug abuse. The Joyner agreed with the new
mas Brewer was making struc- UNC's Board of Governors drug Leadership board. policy also takes a strict stand on drug policy because it is compa-
tural changes to the university's policy which sets new penalities Planning for the future, Joyner trafficking and possession of ille- rablc to policies in the real world. East Carolina University sees that
administrative system. Part of for drug possession, drug testing said the trustees will be studying gal drugs by students, faculty and "When a student graduates from the area of minority students
those changes included the crea- requirements and improvements possible locations for a new re- staff. ECU, they will have to be tested in growth can be strengthened. So,
tion of the Division of Student in substance abuse education. gional center as soon as the fund- The trafficking penalization is the work place Joyner said. they iook the initiative, without
Life, which every other major Violators of campus parking ing for the land is allocated. Two broken into two drug groups. The trustee's adoption of the the students having to demand
university in the state had already restrictions will have to pay ap- weeks ago, the N.C. Assembly Students convicted of peddling drug policy comes five months that they (ECU) do something to
done. Meyer has been the only proximatcly twice of existing passed a $500,000 funding meas- heroin, mescaline, cocaine, am- after the SG A passed a resolution help improve racial awareness for
man to be vice-chancellor of that
division.
"It (the change) brought to-
gether all those units that are
concerned with the non-academic
life of the student Meyer says as
he empties and refills one of two
pipes on his desk. "And if the stu-
dent is happier outside the class-
fines in the fall semester. Over-
time parking violations were
ure which will allow the trustees phetamine, methaqualine will be in support of the measure.
raised from $2 to $5 while fines for
parking outside of a permitted
to purchase the necessary land for expelled from school which fac-
the center. ulty and staff members will be
Speaking of the regional cen- discharged from their jobs.
area and littering were hiked from ter, Joyner said the trustees will be For the first offense of traf fick-
$5 to $10. acting "in the very near future ing, marijuana, pentobarbital
Violations for parking a unreg- Joyner said the center would be codeine the minium penalty will
istercd vehicile on campus were able to house 10,000 people for be suspension from school or
doubled from $10 to $20. The trus- conventions and ECU basketball
In other business, the trustees
named James Hallock the new
dean of the ECU school of Medi-
cine. Hallock replaces retiring
William Laupus as dean. Hallock
the All
students, faculty, towns-people,
and the community.
Oj Do you have any sugges-
tions that could improve student
life activities and or minority af-
fairs at ECU?
A: I have gotten the impression
from some of the students that I
Fire rages at apartments
is presently with
Children's Hospitial for the Col
emnloyment for one semester or lege of Medicine at St. Peterburg have spoken too that, white and
its equivalent. Fla. black leaders on ECU's campus
First time offenders on charges Also, SGA president Larry do not work together. I would like
of illegal drug possession will be Murphy took oath on the board, to get te student leaders and
suspended for one semester. Fol- The SGA president is tradition- members of these groups to work
By TIM HAMPTON
News Editor
Fire officials say they respon- But on his return trip from the
sod to a 6:07 p.m. call Friday at the grocery store he saw smoke bil-
apartments located off of Stancil lowing high in the sky. 'T wasn't
Faulty wiring is the possible Drive. Fire fighters from Eastern gone longer than 15 minutes and
cause of a fire at an Greenville Pines and Winterville were called C was ablaze all the way to the
apartment complex which de- to assist Greenville personnel roof Patterson said,
stroyed eight units, left several because of the intense heat, ac-
ECU students homeless and inju- cording to Captain James Tyndell Eyewitness Britton Byrd said
ried one tennant Friday, officials of the Greenville Fire Depart- the fire raged quickly on the ply-
said Monday. ment. wood exterior of the building. "I
One of the building's resi- Wetherington said the fire walked outside about 6 p.m. and
dents, William Slade, was treated started in the wall-ceiling of the the fire burned fast, really fast
and released Friday from Pitt kitchen area of apartment C-17 Byrd said.
County Memorial Hospitial for and quickly spread to the adjoin- According to The Daily Re-
treatment of face burns. Slade ing units. Fire officials estimate flector, residents Tom Staple,
incurred the burns when he the blaze caused $200,000 in prop-
kicked down the door of his burn- erty loss.
ing apartment in attempts to save Wetherington said the fire
his dog. spread in the span ofl5 minutes, apartments.
Walking around the burnt car- engulfing the entire building. He Tyndell said fire units stayed
cass of building C at Langston said the start of the fire's spread at the scene until early Saturday
Park apartments Monday, city was probably undetectable be- morning to dounce the smoulder-
and state inspectors said they cause it was sparked in the wall ing remains. "An unit was there
have ruled out the possibility of and ceiling. all night to stop hot spots caused
arson as the cause of the fire. by falling debris from flaring up
After the investigation Cliff , Eyewitness JarrF. Patterson Tyndell said.
Jr who lives in complex F, said he An inspector from the State
drove by complex C at approxi- Bureau of Investigation said the
� S P P� 1�1 � . .� . �rm
lowing the first offense, the per- aiiy0n the ECU Board of Trustees. SH'ST meaningful
son will be placed on probation J goals as a whole.
Brian Freeze and Chris San-
tevsanio jumped to safety from
the balconies of their second story
Wetherington of the Greenville
Police Department said, "There is
no indication that the fire was
intentionallv set, while possible
electrical failure may be the cause
but not definitely
mately550p.m.andsawnoindi- investigation is over. "We are
cation of a fire. "I didn't see any pretty much through. We don't Because of the extreme heat of Friday's fire at one of the Langston Paik Apartment buildings, fire
smoke, nor smell any Patterson deal with the fire codes, just the personnel from area departments were called in to assist the Greenville Fire Department Inspectors say
41 " faulty electrical wiring may have caused the blaze. (Photo by Ellen Murphy�Photolab).
said.
intent of fire





2 T? !C EAST ARQLINIAN
JULY 20,1988
Meyer helps Matthews through transition
Continued from page 1
meetings to all the different de-
partments so they could keep up
with what was going on in stu-
dent life.
After the initial struggle to get
the division off the ground, Meyer
and his staff began concentrating
on bettering student services on
campus. Meyer says the most im-
portant thing his division has
worked on is building mutual
respect between the students and
the faculty.
Just last week Meyer estab-
lished a conference committee on
human relations made up of stu-
dents and faculty. The committee
will work on a plan to educate the
university in important matters
such as sexual relations, race rela-
tions and overall tolerance. He
believes it is important that ECU
take the lead in improving rela-
tions among the university com-
munity, especially in view of the
tide of campus intolerance which
is sweeping across the country.
"I think it (the need for the
committee) has been made neces-
sary recently. It's a sign of the
times he says.
Despite that, Meyer says the
students here have made prog-
ress over the years, "When I first
came there were problems be-
cause the students weren't work-
ing together. The paper was tak-
ing often everybody. The student
government had some preten-
tious people in it. The whole tone
of it has changed for the better
over the years, and the student
leaders certainly have improved.
'This past year has been one of
the best � well, the best as far as
issue orientation � for the stu-
dent legislature since I've been
here. I have always tried to pro-
voke that, because nobody can do
it alone. The students need to
express their views he says.
Among the other accomplish-
ments of his division, Meyer lists
establishing a full-time coordina-
tor for Handicapped Student
Services, the renovation of Jones
Cafeteria (the College Hill Dining
Hall), assisting the SGA in the
establishment of a SGA Fine Arts
Board and planning the construc-
tion of the Mendenhall addition,
which he says has been in the
works since 1980.
While there is still work left to
do (he is leaving behind an "Un-
finished Business" list), Meyer
says the division of student life
and the students themselves have
come a long way in nine years.
"It's just such a pleasure to see
� well, those people who were
here in '79 and are still here now
recognize it more than others, �
the changes that have been
made he says, lighting his pipe
once more.
As he leaves, Meyer says he
sees bright things for the future of
ECU, and hopes it will continue to
READ THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
LOW COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREC'AXCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cosJ.Prcgnar.c-v Test. Birth
Control, utd Problem PrepuncjrCouaseting, For further information,
call 832-0535 (toll free number. 1-800-532-5384) between 9am and 5
p.m. weekdjys. General anesthesia available
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
99V
Used Furniture
BuySellTrade
752-3223
Beside the
Railroad Depot
FREE
CHICK-FIL-A
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BUY ANY CHICK-FIL-A VALUE MEAL� and get a free Chick-
fiA Sandwich. Value Meals� include 1 or 2 Chick-fil-A Sandwiches or 8 or
Unpack of Chick-fil-A Nuggets,� Waffle Potato Fries� and coleslaw. Coupon not
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X
HILTON INN
CREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
POOL PARTY!
FREE POOLSIDE PICNIC
WITH THE LADIES OF
RIO!
?Summer Time
Specials
$2.50 Pitchers
of Beer
Wednesdays
at 7:30 p.m.
Weather
Permitting
355-5000
develop as a regional institution,
drawing support from the region
and later returning that support
through education and other
services.
For Meyer, the immediate fu-
ture includes a move to Washing-
ton D.C, where he will live with
his wife, Nancy, full-time again
for the first time in five years. The
two have had a commuting mar-
riage since she moved from
Greenville to the Washington
area to begin an interior design
business.
Meyer will help with the busi-
ness end of her operations while
he winds down from his duties at
ECU and begins work as an edu-
cational consultant.
For now, though, Meyer will
continue to smoke his pipes in his
Ragsdale office, helping Mat-
thews make the transition to life at
ECU. Soon he will take his last last day.
vacation days to make the move You'll find him there, in 111,
to Washington, but he'll be back: a waiting for fiveo'clock, collar (in-
state law requires employees to at buttoned, enjoying his last pipe at
least show up for work on their ECU.
3Wje Caiat QtarnUnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Scott Makey Spencer Meymandi
Richard-Alan Cook Adam Blankenship
Ashley E. Dalton
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0 49 Column inches$4.25
50-994.15
100-1494.05
150 199 3.95
200-2493.85
250 and above3.75
COLOR ADVERTISING RATES
(Charge in Addition to Regular Space Rale)
One color and black$90.00
Two colors and black155.00
Inserts
5,(X)0 or less6tf each
5.001 - 10,0005.5 each
10,001 -P.000 5 each
BUSINESS HOURS:
Monday-Friday
10:00-5:00 p.m.
Phone:
.757-6366757-6557
757-6558757-6309
CATCH THE ANNABELLE'S
LUNCHTIME EXPRESS
It's our special quick lunch menu for people on the go!
Just choose your favorite and you'll be refreshed
and on your way in no time
Spaghetti a generous Steak Teriyaki Our special
portion of pasta with meat cut of beef served with snow
sauce. Toasted bread and peas and teriyaki sauce
Parmesan cheese$4.55 on nee $5.45
Fettuccini Alfredo Egg
pasta with a sauce of butter,
Parmesan and Romana
cheese $4.75
With Chicken
With Shrimp
$6.75
$7.75
Hot Ham & Swiss
Sandwich Thinly sked ham
with Swiss cheese on grilled rye
bread, plus fries $3.95
Steak & Cheese Sandwich
Our steak sandwich with
melted Provolone cheese
plus fries $3.95
Express lunches are served from 11 30 a m to 2 p m daily, except Sunday
Annabdlc's
V RESTAURANT & PUB
RESTAURANT & PUB
The Plaza � Greenville Blvd � 756 0315
Hours: 11:30am-11 pm, Mon Thurs ,
11 30am Midnight Fn Sat ,
1 2Noon 11pm Sun

Lets have some
VI
CHATAHAM SLICED
Big Top
Bologna
1
Lb.
Pkg
89
12-Pk.
12 Oz.
Cans
$
j ASSORTED VARIETIES
BigK
Soft Drinks
499

ZT-t KROGER 1-LB PKG
DINNER OR REGULAR
All Meat
Franks
BUY ONE
GET ONE
FREE
RAGU HOMESTYLE
Spaghetti
Sauce
32
Oz
Jar
990
KROGER
Pimento
Cheese.
14
Oz.
Cup
990
REFRESHING
Sealtest
Lemonade.
Gal
Ctn
590
iSLs
s tp V
SOUTH CAROLINA
Jumbo M 44
OLDE ITALIAN
BRAND DELUXE OR
Pepperoni
Pizza
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Light 'n
Lively Yogurt
$
Ct.
Pkg
-39
a
I
3
16
Oz
Pies
KROGER
NATURAL FLAVOR
Deluxe
Ice Cream
CORNED BEEF
PASTRAMI OR
DougmJes
Roast Beef
$
-188
$
Lb
449
Items and Prices Effective
Sun. July 17, 1988 thru
Sat. July 23 1988

4" .�� St ' 1
-� ����� ��.�-� t '��� ��- �� HP
� t ' �� -r v. - - r, �c- � �
Coyrl�Kt 1M
Hrofef 4a On
Quantity HtfMt ltf�r���
Nona Sot To Dealer
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
)
i
I
& i
.

Fire writers from Creep
Langston Park Apartmenj
Parking stil
By CREERBOW1
rhis till wher
pun hase parl
will tv m :
The pri
bo $50 for


raised from
dollars a wee!
tions will also
that tn kcl tocosl
that sru I nts p -
s ickcr � � � �
tanl � - rof the tr
All traffic vi
five dollars
freshman decal
is
e erp pularum I 1
- - j.
These fee increas
.
;asi istol
parkii
help t!
fora pos : � �
ing d( cks c st am
� �
The tr � c
new � � � �
� - � .
We will b
rtz have a
istered
� � �w

of the larger pi
fie office,
habil
in it parkiog 1
1 Gcrtz said that "he tr.?
has numerous ways I
3
.?
Fresh Gi
i pk
All Peps:
Natural Lighl
Beer
$4.9
12Pack i
Dudley Farmj
Apple Juice
$1.7
Gall "
Prices Effective V
Store Hours: Sun.
MonSat. 8 a.m. -
Mastercard 6 Visa Acceptc.
W1C - food Stamp NUB
Quantity Rights
211 Jarvis
2 Blocks Frl





on
Un
1 11 find him there, in 111,
g for five o'clock, collar un-
enjoying his last pipe at
. J �
T
lABELLE'S
XPRESS
pie on the go1
refreshed
ik Teriyaki
.
$5.45
If -am & Swiss
iwich
S3.95
& Cheese Sandwich
$3.95
tl'RANT & PUB
s
KROGER 1-LB PKG
DINNER OR REGULAR
All Meat
Franks
BUY ONE
GET ONE
FREE
Gal
Ctn
59
uz
Bag
KEEBLER
Tato
Skins
99
:ORNED BEEF
PASTRAMI OR
ughties
st Beef
449
IRS EVERYDAY
ivd Creenvil
3
THE EAST CAROLINIAN

JULY 20.1988
Eiy by a W0j&
t
TiTIC
Fire fighters from Greenville, Winterville and i'inetops fight a blaze which consumed building C of
Lamston Park Apartments Friday (Photo by Ellen Murphy�Photolab).
Parking sticker fees and violation fines hiked
fenders. Tlacing a tag on a unregistered vehicle laws until
student's file is effective. Thctraf- the first day of class said Gcrtz.
fie office can also go through the Butonceclasscsbegin,alllawsare
Department of Motor Vehicles strictly enforced. Daytime offi-
and find the registered owner if ccrs are policemen and Gertz said
not registered with the traffic of- that traffic violations are what
fice. they deal with most. "But after 4
After a vehicle has received p.m. it's a different campus said
three tickets within 12 months, Gertz.
the vehicles can lose parking Decals can be purchased as
privileges but usually the traffic early as August 8. Gertz encour-
office will not go that far. Afterthe ages students and staff to buy
By GREER BOWEN
Staff Writer
This fall when students go to
purchase parking stickers, there
will be many surprised students.
The price of parking stickers will
be $50 for all students and staff
and private stickers will cost SI 50.
Temporary stickers have been
raised from one dollar to three
dollars a week. Parking viola-
tions will also cost more. "We felt
that tickets needed to cost more so
that students will purchase the
dickers said Pat Gcrtz, the assis-
tant director of the traffic office.
All traffic violations that for-
merly cost two dollars arc now
five dollars. No parking and
freshman decal violations will
now be $10 as will littering. The
ever popular unregistered vehicle
violation is now $20.
These fee increases will go to
help maintain existing parking
facilities as well as to finance new
parking areas. The rise in fees can
help the traffic office save monev
for a possible parking deck. Park-
ing decks cost anywhere from
53,000 to $6,000 a space to build.
The traffic office has added a
new fine to the list, a five dollar fee
for tickets not paid within 10days.
"We will be enforcing this said
(iertzWe have about 240 unreg-
istered vehicles on the towing list
right now
Unregistered vehicles are one
of the larger problems for the traf-
fic office. Many offenders are
habitual, and continuously park
in staff parking areas. -
Gertz said that the tfafflo4ncV
has numerous ways to find of-
sixth ticket of a registered vehicle,
the student is sent a letter explain-
ing that their paarking is being
monitored. Unregistered ve-
hicles are then placed on the tow-
ing list.
"We don't usually enforce the
early. This can help prevent wait-
ing in long lines.
On August 17, the traffic office
will temporarily move to Men-
dcnhall to register vehicles. "This
building is just too small for large
numbers of people Gertz said.
Ihfi. �
CoMcdY
ZONE
VVF.D
752-7303
FRIDAY
Charlie
Pasterfield &
The Believers
Blues
SATURDAY
Gibralter
HOMEMADE
CE CREAM
Greenville.NC
HANK'S HOMEMADE
Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt,
and Sorbet
321 E 10th St Greenville (Next to Wendy's)
758-0000
50 OFF DRINK
FLOATS, SHAKES,
MALTEDS
50's Weekend July 23-24!
Bop on by our soda-shop
for a keen tasting malted.
Expires 7-26-88
HOMEMADE
CE CREAM
Greenville.NC
HANK'S HOMEMADE
Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt,
and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. Crecnvillc (Next to Wendy's)
758-0000
25 OFF ANY ITEM
IN THE STORE
E.C.U. day is July 22"d! Wear
your school colors for a special
deal.
Expires 7-26-88
UAGE
Donna
Edwards
owner
Bring in this ad for a 15 Discount
on a purchase of $10 or more
with valid E.C.U. I.D.
55 Gallon Combo
Tank, Light, Hood
$Qfi24
Kj This month only
WEEKLY FISH SPECIALS!
Our Marine Room has all the fish and marine
life Tfftr-nce$for ap?rfcct SftItwaWr1mk; � '
Greenville, NC 27834 Phone 756-9222
AMERICA'S FAVORITE OIL CHANGE"
In 10 Minutes with no appointment
Heres what the J-Team can do for you:
�Change your m' with a rruijoi brand!
� Add a new oil filter!
� Lubricate the ch isms!
�Check and fill transmission,
differential, brake, power steering,
window washer and battery llukis!
�Check air filter!
� Inflate tires!
�(hock wiper tlades!
� Vacuum the ii.terior!
� Wash vour w indoivs!
Plus FREE Car Wash with full service!
$2.00 Oil (with this ad)
ireenville Blvd. Phone 756-2579 Hours. MonFri. 7:30 a.m6:30 p.m. Sal. lil 530
ver Sa
� Let Us Serve You! 3 ,
T We Will Gladly Cash Your Checks From Home! �
Fresh Ground Beef
99
?
lb.
5 lb. pkgs or more
All Pepsi Products
99
2 Liter
In Our Deli
Roast Beef
lb. $3.99
Provolone Cheese
lb. $2.99
Frosty Morn
Bacon
$NEED CASH?$
MOVING OR LEAVING?
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
12 oz. Pkg.
99
Natural Light Kingsford
Beer 1
Charcoal
$4.99 $2.59
12 Pack 12 Oz. Cans
101b. bag
Fresh Fryer
Leg Quarters
39
Limit one five lb. bag per
order per customer
Dudley Farms
Apple Juice
Old South
Orange Juice
Seedless
White Grapes
$1.79 $149 QQ
Gallon Jug 0
lb.
12 Gallon Paper
Carton
Richfood Soft
Drinks
99
3 Liter Bottle
$FURNITURE & APPLIANCES 1 - Any furniture in good
condition - Window Air Conditioners,
Microwaves, WashersDryers, Small
and Large Refrigerators, Fans, Etc.
$ELECTRONICS - T.V V.C.R CD Stereo Components.
$GOLD & SILVER! - Jewelry, Class Rings, Chains.
Charms, Gold & Silver Coins, Etc.
(Regardless of Condition.)
Golden Ripe
Bananas
29
lb.
Prices Effective Wed. July 20 - Sat July 23
Store Hours: Sun. 1-6 p.m.
MonSat. 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Mastercard & Visa Accepted
VVC - Food Stamps Welcome
Quantity Rights Reserved
211 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks From E.C.U.
OVEPTON&
Supemt
We Will Come Out To Appraise
And Pick Up Larger Items.
We Need Large Size Clothes In Good Condition
(Women Size 12 and up. Men Large and up.)
CLOTHES
At
The Coin & Ring Man
10:00-5:00 M-F
110:00-3:00 Sat.
On The Corner Below "Fizz
400 S. Evans St.
752-3866





alije iEaat (Earnltman
Clay Deanhardt, c��r�M��j.x
Chip Carter, MMPnt Editor
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Advertising
Tim Hampton, n� &
Doug Joi inson, g s tn.
Carol Wetherington, re u�
Mia ielle England, &��
Debbie Stevens, s�re��ry
Paul Dunn, c s,�i em
Jeff Parker mm
TOM FURR, Cirrwlaw Mannar
MIKE UPCI IURCH, Product Manner
JO! IN W. MEDLIN, Art Director
Mac Clark, mm Mmaer
July 20,1988
OPINION
Page 4
Passing the torch
Meyer leaves legacy for Matthews
With the retirement of Dr. Elmer advising the SGA, the Student
Meyer as the vice-chancellor for Union and the Media Board, among
Student Life (see related story page other organizations. We expect he
1), the mantle of working for the stu- will be fair in dealing with these
dents of the university has been groups and hope he will continue
passed to Dr. Alfred Matthews. Meyer's tradition of standing up for
Matthews brings a strong back- the rights of ECU students,
ground in student affairs to a job Some of Meyer's unfinished busi-
which requires both administrative ness, including plans to create an
and creative skills. At ECU he will be emergency service for times when
called upon to build on the founda- the Infirmary is closed, and moving
tions Meyer has left behind after the -presently wheelchair-inacces-
nine years of establishing student sible Handicapped Services offices
services. to a better locale are also framework
Among the many tasks Matthews Matthews can build on.
must face, stemming the rising tide But however long Meyer's
of intolerance and racism on univer- shadow may linger at ECU, Mat-
sity campuses across the country thews will ultimately need to prove
must be a high priority. ECU, with himself with creative ideas and en-
the largest minority population of ergy. We have no doubt he will do
any predominately white school in this.
North Carolina, should be at the
forefront of measures to insure It is a sad time for the students of
mutual respect among its students, this university, but it is also a time to
Establishing that movement will be look ahead with optimism and sup-
an important part of Matthews' job. port for our newest ally in the ad-
Matthews is also responsible for ministration.
TvfP&xsc
�trc ax iH(Yf
Union dissenters don't get fair shake
As an author and writer, 1 am presumptively in favor of Hcrschensohn explained to Ins listeners the importar
writers' causes, and about some of these I have expressed decision of the Supreme Court, handed down on June 2
myself; for instance, that kooky application of the 1986 tax law
that deprives the author of the right to deduct his expenses
except as income flows in from his work product. I pause to
add that authors are in an entirely neglected way major public
philanthropists, whether they like it or not. Because their
books go to libraries and there readers by the tens of millions
can pull out books and read them free of charge. If the library
exacts a fee, no part of it goes to the writer. Enough said.
But a few weeks ago I learned of a young writer who was
asked to do a script for television. He welcomed the proscpec-
tive income and the literary challenge. But � lo, he must not
do this. Why? Because, hisliterary agent advised him, to write
for the entertainment industry during the strikcof the Writers
Guild of America could result in a boycott down the line. The
agent went on to say that such a boycott could be made all but
invisible.
But however imperceptibly, the Writers Guild of America
might, to use age-old terminology, blacklist him as a strike-
breaker. My young friend turned down the commission.
Belter to endure temporary economic disappointment than to
risk lifelong discrimination.
The strike by the Writers Guild, which has all but paralyzed
thecntertainment industry, isa struggle over how to share the
proceeds of sales. The writers want a larger share of residuals
from foreign sales, and I am 100 percent on their side, exuber-
antly faithful to my profession. But as a thinker-writer (as
such, I sometimes think, a member of a distinctive minority),
1 am also aware that unless publishers make money, they go
bankrupt, even as newspapers have gone bankrupt by the
hundreds in recent years.
Accordingly, the bargaining process has got to accommo-
Harrv Beck, a member of the Communications Workers i
America, had complained to the courts that he was r
forced to pay union dues that went substantially to sup
causes with Which he was not in sympathy. The arithn
was done, and it transpired that 79 percent of dues o
by the CWA went into lobbying for labor legislation, ai
participating in various events, including political event
which Harry Beck had no sympathy at all.
The Supreme Court, in a landmark decision, ruled I
Beck's obligation to his union was restricted to contribi
his share of what they call the "financial core' ol ui
expense, i.e that money spent by the union on colk
bargaining and related work. The court declared that mem
hers of unions that didn't want to subsidize the social goals I
the unions could quit the unions without tear ot retalial
provided they continued to pay that part of union dues th tl
went into union activity professionally designed to protect
On the Right
By
William F. Buckley Jr.
union members's rights.
And so, en that broadcast, Bruce 1 lerschensohn announced
his resignation, effective noon on that day, from his own
union, the American Federation of Television and Radio
Artists, did exactly that lOyeaisago, protesting the impinge-
ment on the right of a television and radio commentator
whose job it is to discuss public rssuesDy a union mat could
order him to go on strike, as A1TRA twice did, within mem-
date the dissenters' vote. The last offer of the producers was orv' causing people like Walter Cronkite to disappear fron
roundly defeated by a vote of the Writers Guild. But one-
quarter of the writers voted to accept the producers' terms.
And the question arises: Just what arc the rights of dissenting
members of a striking union?
On July 8, a broadcaster of distinguished credentials went
n the air in Los Angeles with an important announcement,
ruce Hcrschensohn is a commentator and a sometime dircc-
the airwaves, leaving a nation disoriented
Buckley vs. AFTRA leaned heavily on the First Amend-
ment. The Hcrschensohn resignation does not. It leans on th.
right of the individual to dissent from extraneous activities of
his union. The Supreme Court has said that he may not legally
be discriminated against. And this means that writers who,
for whatever reason, choose to leave the Writers Guild, pav
tor of documentaries, and he came close to winning the their professional dues and proceed to work on terms agree
Republican nomination for senator in 1986,able to them, are free to do so. Any complaints here?
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the editorial page, The East
Carolinian features the "Campus
Spectrum This is an opinion column
by guest writers from the student
body and faculty. The columns
printed in the "Campus Spectrum"
will contain current topics of concern
to the campus, community or nation.
The columns are restricted in con-
tent only with regard to rules of gram-
mar and decency. Persons submitting
columns must be willing to accept by-
line credit for their efforts, as no en-
tries from ghost writers will be pub-
lished.
Persons interested in participating
or seeking further information may
contact the managing editor of The
East Carolinian at 757-6366, or stop by
our offices on the second floor of the
Publications Buildine.
TmUeaWTwo rypewntrenpT
Campus
Spectrum
rules
Forum
rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building, across from the entrance
ofjoyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and clas-
sification, address, phone number and
signature of the authoris). Letters are
spaced or neatly printed. All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty iiri staff
writing letters for this page are reminded
that they are limited to one every two
weeks. The deadline for editorial mater
is 5 p.m. Friday for Tuesday's edition and
5 p.m. Tuesday for Thursday's edition.
Bush attacks Dukakis' old Pledge of Allegiance veto
By MICHAEL KINSLEY
The New Republic
The Pledge of Allegiance was invented in 1892 as
part of a promotional campaign by a magazine
called "Youth's Companion The original instruc-
tions called for the hand to be removed from the
heart and extended outward at the word "flag but
this bit of stage business was dropped during World
War II as being overly reminiscent of the Nazi salute.
Although the Pledge was once described as "a
masterpiece of concise English it is clearly inferior
� both as poetry and as philosophy � to the other
sacred texts of American democracy, such as the
Declaration of Independence, the preamble to the
constitution, and even the lyrics of "America the
Beautiful
Generations of schoolchildren have proven their
indifference to what little meaning the Pledge con-
tains by butchering its text: "one nation under
guard "the republic for Richard Stands etc. Be-
fore the words "under God" were added in 1954, a
familiar joke involved the child who pledged alle-
giance to "one naked individual
What, then, is George Bush's point in trying to
make an issue of the fact that 11 years ago Governor
Michael Dukakis vetoed a bill requiring recitation of
the Pledge every morning in Massachusetts school-
rooms? Bush says this shows that he and Dukakis
have a different "approach to values Is Bush at-
tempting to suggest that Dukakis doesn't believe in
"liberty and justice tor all?" 1 dare Bush to say so. If
not, what � exactly � is his point? That an America
where people arc forced to recite words they don't
believe is superior to an Amcraica where they
aren't?
In 1943, the Supreme Court held that students
could not be required to recite the Pledge. Although
it was wartime, the court managed � as today's
Republican strategists apparently cannot � to reject
empty nationalism in favor of what America really
stands for.
Justice Robert Jackson's majority opinion is far
more eloquent than the Pledge of Allegiance. "Free-
dom to differ is not limited to things that do not
matter much he wrote. And, "a Bill of Rights which
guards the individual's right to speak his own
mind" does not permit "publicauthoritics to compel
him to utter what is not in his mind
Dukakis vetoed the mandatory Pledge law be-
cause he thought it was unconsititutional. Before
acting, he got an advisory opinion from the Massa-
chusetts Supreme Judicial Court, which held 5-to-2
� with three Republicans in the majority � that the
law denied teachers their First Amendment rights
by requiring them to lead the Pledge, even if stu-
dents were not required to participate.
But this is a farcically small point one way or
another. At bottom, Michael Dukakis undoubtly not
only shares the sentiments of the Pledge of Alle-
giance but favors reciting them as often as possible.
And at bottom George Bush undoubtedly would not
wish to force anyone to recite the Pledge who consci-
entiously objects to it.
So what is at stake here is not "values but rather
the tiniest technicality, stretched to cover one naked
individual who is running for president with noth-
ing better in which to clothe his ambition.
Much the same can be said of Bush's other cheap
shot, about Massachusetts' prison furlough pro-
gram. Republicans, Bush honks, "don't let murder-
ers out on vacations to terrorize innocent people
Dukakis owes the people of the United States an
explanation of why he supported this outrageous
program
In fact, the Massachusetts program was started
under a Republican governor, Frank Sargent. Forty-
two states have similar programs. California had
one under Governor Reagan.
Only Massachusetts' program, until recently,
gave furloughs to first-degree murderers sentenced
to life in prison without parole. That, indeed, is a
difference. But does Bush honestly believe that the
difference between giving furloughs to first-degree
murderers sentenced to life with parole and giving
furloughs to first-degree murderers sentenced to life
without parole (a matter the federal government has
nothing to do with in any event) is what the presi
dency of the United States ought to turn on?
Bush's attempts to appeal to the brutish side of the
American voter are inept, besides being demagogic
because he makes such an unconvincing thug. Who
on earth advised this consummate Yale man �
member of the pseudosecret, supersnob Skull and
Bones society � to make an issue of the fact that
Dukakis studied and taught at Harvard? How dumb
can you get?
For what it's worth, 1 larvard (where Dukakis at-
tended law school) has always been less elitist, more
open to the rest of American socity � had more
Michael Dukakises and fewer George Bushes �
than Yale. But in fact, Dukakis went to college at
Swarthmore, an academically stringent but scrupu-
lously unsnobbish Quaker school. Someone like
oeorge Bush never would have gone to
Swarthmore, even in he could have gotten in.
Dukakis and the court may Weil be wrong. It's not
clear that the law in question (which was passed
over the veto but has never been enforced) actually'
requires any particular teacher to lead the Pledge
against his or her will.
I
iNelso
; JOHANNESBURG, South A:
lica (AP) - Anno red cars n
through black townships and al
toadblock went upoutsideaCa xf
�own prison as police braced f i
the 70th birthday Monda
jailed black leader Nelson M
dela.
; Celebrations, protest- and
Church services were planned i
t least 30 countries and
Baden issued statemet
�emning the imprisonm
leader of the outlawed
National Congress
; But in South Africa, police ha
fanned events related t
Mandela's birthday
� Organizers nevcrtl
fciled a church service in (
� own today and a news j
Ince in Johannes
planned to boycott si
Lome areas. Ho w
refused to grant perm
Outdoor gatherii
Were scheduled.
� Organizers an
minute concert Sund
I
at the Universit) ipt
jhat a 11 rac ted a m. stl y bI
Cnce of about 500. But .
banned the concert al
Students pro
during week
CHAPELHIl I ,NX
Student activism is alh
tingbetter, according to
Undents wh
jJniversity of North!ai
Cnapel Hill this weel
tabtish a national netw. �- I
crease their overall t
Wearing T-shirts ui
end to South African �'�
and to injustice in V. i I
dents for Georgia I
traveled to Chapel H
Unity Meeting, a I
National Student
held in February at Rutg
pcrsitv in New lersev
ECU SocioU
iproduces ne
News Release
So logy faculty at ECL" ha
prepared a new brochure
describes their two degre
crams. The B.A. degree isa
nal liberal arts pre.
students planning care
areas as social research
analysis, criminal justic
raphv, human service- bu
nad commerce it is al jo a
background for stud
to enter professional -
as law and business as v.
graduate study in sociology
Two years ace a new degtt cj
applied socioiog) was add
This B.S. program eliminal
foreign language require j
and places greater emphas
research and computer skjj
theoretical application;
preparations for w erk in g ,
ipent, business, industry ai
vate research organizatk
According to Mary Schv
Applied Sociology Direct
new program responds to si I
concerns about career relevaf
and training. Mar
mer students had difficult
ing the two-year foreign lar -j
requirement. Schultz rep I
"Those who did often oa
plained that it didn't help then
the ob market. So we've del
oped a program that if I
more practical skills and a tf
work placement
Dr. John Maiolo, departtfl
chair, was instfumental in del
oping the applied program
reports that he is quite sati
csaaa��If
� !���
lo
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t
s
HCfc
Vi
THH CAST CAROLINIAN
JULY201988
u , w,fcy
drshake
i
On the Right!
By
Buckley Jr.
rum
rules
ce veto
like
gone to
ttcn in
be wnng. It's ni it
n (which was 1 �
t been enfoi tally
achcr to lead tiv. Pledge
Nelson Mandela turns 70
IANNESBI RG, South Ai-
. (AP) Armored ears rolled
through black townships and a
Iblock wont up outside a Cape
I n prison as police braced for
h birthday Monday oi
black leader Nelson Man
v elebrations, protests and
rch services were planned in
least 30 countries and world
rs issued statements con-
ning the imprisonment of the
ler ot the outlawed African
iongrcss.
�uth Atnca. police have
i events related to
. i.i sbirthday.
; mi; ers nc erthelcss sched-
church service in Cape
; day and a news confer
ohanncsburg. Blacks also
d to boycott schools in
�� as However, police have
grant permission for
gatherings and none
duled.
ers arranged a last-
i i ncert Sunday afternoon
: i ersity of Cape Town
icteda mostly black audi-
� : about 500. But police
d the concert about two
hours after it began and people
left the campus peacefully.
Previous police orders had pro
hibitcd a separate concert in Cape
Town as well as music festivals in
ohanncsburg and Durban and a
host of other birthday-related
events in honor of Mandela, who
most of the nation's 2h million
blacks consider their leader.
Meanwhile, security forces,
some in armored vehicles, pa-
trolled the country's major black
townships, though there were no
reports of violence. Police also set
up several roadblocks, including
one outside Cape Town's
Pollsmoor Prison, where Man
dela is held.
In the past week, more than 30
people involved in birthday
events in the Cape Town area
have been arrested.
Mandela's wife, Winnie, re-
jected a go ernment offer to have
a six-hour visit with her husband
on his birthday deciding to focus
attention on other prisoners hold
for anti-apartheid activities, said
the family's attorney, Ismail
Ayob.
The visit, which would have
been the couple's longest reunion
since Mandela was jailed 26years
ago, was a special concession by
prison authorities, who normally
grant only 40 minute visits.
Mrs. Mandela is probably the
world's best known and most in-
fluential prisoner, and his birth-
day has drawn worldwide atten-
tion.
The countries whose govern-
ments have called for Mandela's
release in the past few days in-
clude- Britain, Japan, West Ger-
many East Germany, Canada,
Italy, Sv itzerland, Denmark, Fin-
land, Iceland, Norway and Swe-
don.
The Italian Embassy in Pretoria
said it had imported a copy of
director Bernardo Bertolucci's
film, 'The I ast Emperor' be-
cause Mandela asked if he could
sec it.
World heavyweight boxing
champion Mike 1 son sent Man-
di la the boxing gloves he used in
iting challenger Michael
Spinks last month.
o, about 50,000 letters oi
support from Dutch anti-apart-
heid activists were delivered this
weekend to the Mandela home in
.oto township outside
Johannesburg.
Mandela was jailed in 1962 for
leaving the country illegally and
inciting unrest. While serving a
five- ear term, he was sentenced
to life imprisonment in 1964 for
sabotage and plotting the over-
throw of the white minority gov-
ernment.
Most black South Africans have
never seen Mandela or heard him
speak because it is illegal to pub-
lish his picture or quote his words
in South Africa. Yet he has be-
come the embodiment of black
resistance to apartheid.
Bv all accounts, Mandela is in
good physical and mental health
and closely watches political de-
velopments. He reads uncen-
sored newspapers and is ex-
pected to earn an advanced law-
degree later this year through
correspondence courses.
fowever, the goverment main-
tains that Mandela must first re-
nounce violence, and Mandela
has said he will do so only if the
ANC is no longer banned and if
the segregationist system (it
apartheid is dismantled.
Students protest South Africian apartheid, Nicaragua
during weekend gathering at UNC� Chapel Hill
( HAPELHILL,N.C.(AP) Todd Merman a conference
ent activism is alive and get � r said the network �
rding to about 100 multiracial and multi-issue. Il
nts who gathered at the students form a unified gi
of North, Carolina at they can channel the inert isii
I Hill this weekend to es- interest in activism arid create a
-h a national network to in- more powerful front he said.
tl eir overall effectiveness. Can you imagine if, instead
ng r-shirts urging an of a protestat thePit (a gatheri
th African Apartheid place in front of the student un .
added foel end of the Reagan era is contribut-
mizer. "We ing to the increase in activism.
I ha litical cffei tiv� ru ss
"It's OK to care and haveanopin-
Christii Kell; an organizer ion to act ethically and morally
. ference said the she said.
in Nicara;
at

i e hai
I
Mi
ic
ua, stu v . . v v �j
Georgia to California protest at even Pit
hapel Hill for The versify across the
I - . a follow-up to the asked.
Student Convention 'f all students nationally
a me act � ii linst Star V ai ��
and nuclear w apons then we'n
try at Rutgers I
New f rsov.
F( l) Sociology department
produces new brochure
News Release with the number ol students n
gy faculty at ECU have termg the new program. "We
la new brochure which have about 30 B.S. majors that'
- their two degree pr t Ai. � an n i as we � pe ted
� degree isa tradi Mow we rued to emphasize n
v anting and retaining qualit)
students
Schultz ha . . : in d a detailed
handb r for the applied pn
j ram. It is designed to pro id
formation about curri ulum
requirements, the field oi applied
jnA career opportui
ties, and preparatii m tor the field
placement coui so.
Copies oi the brochure are
available from the Sociology and
Anthropolgy Department office
Brewster Bldg Fourth Floor A
Wing), or (.all 757 6883. 1 or infor-
mation about the applied sociol-
ogy program and handbook, ci i
tact Marty Schult; . n �� I ,
Bldg A -in ), or call 756 5 3
�fc � ��
SP0RTSW0RLD
Every Tuesday College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
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. il i arch and data
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t is also a useful
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Wed. & Thurs. Soecial
7 Round-Up
6 oz. Sirloin with Potato Bar,
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-iu
well as
il 'Study in so i I -
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B S program eliminates the
�n language requirement
i j gn ater emphasis on
in h and computer skills,
rctical aj plic itions ai
� r v ork in c .
- � lusti md
h organizations.
to Mary Schult,
I S ciology Director, the
� . ram responds to student
� ut career relevance
Many of our for-
i had difficulty meet-
year foreign language
� " s. hultz reported.
o did. often com-
mit it didn't help thorn in
market. So we've devel-
program that includes
it tical skills and a field
icement
hn Maiolo, department
as instrumental in devel-
� e applied program. He
that he is quite satisfied
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ail
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ith shirt order
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SUMMER AIRFARE
BARGAINS
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NEW YORK s128��
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l 8050
LOS ANGELES s308��
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I I
TRAVEL CENTER
714 E. Greenville Blvd. �Greenville, NC 27834
355-5075
RACK ROOM
SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
it's CHRISTMAS in JULY
FOUR BIG DAYS!
Thurs Fri Sat and Sun.
TAKE AN
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0 OFF
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ALREADY REDUCED
UP
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COUPON GOOD THURS. - SUN.
July 21-25. 1988





?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 20, 1988
i�rA�acwty
fair shake
rs tl portant
n une 29.
s �'� i kcrs ol
being
. to support
ai ithmctic
fdu i collected
. and lo
cal events, foi
. union
n on c llectivc
it mem-
tlgoalsoi
: ' iliation,
du s that
I to protect
On the Right
By
liam F. Buckley Jr.
� - nannounced
� day, from his �n
)i Television and Radio
rotesting the impinge
: radio commentator
iu - �' it
: I within mem
iisappear from
�� the � r � mend-
snot. It leans on the
us activities of
maynotlegall)
ii � that write r who,
ie Writers Guild, pay
iten icrec-
Campus
Spectrum
rules
ntty
ce veto
� ith parole and giving
irderers sentenced to life
(vernmenl has
nt) is what the presi
turn on?
leofthf
' magogicj
tl ie Who
i ei n b Skull and
in is u ol the fa t that
tat! Jarvard7 How dumb
orth, Harvard (where Dukakis at-
becn less elitist, more
American socity � had more
rid fewer George Bushes -
tact, Dukakis went to college at
icademically stringent but scrupu-
h Quaker school. Someone like
never would have gone to
k n in he could have gotten in.
I lie court may well be wrong. It's not
in question (which was passed
it has never been enforced) actually
articular teacher to lead the Pledge
?t will.
Nelson Mandela turns 70
IOHANNESBURG, South Af-
rica (AP) � Armored cars rolled
through black townships and a
roadblock went up outside a Cape
town prison as police braced for
the 70th birthday Monday of
jailed black leader Nelson Man-
dela.
Celebrations, protests and
church services were planned in
at least 30 countries and world
jeaders issued statements con-
demning the imprisonment of the
jcader of the outlawed African
National Congress.
But in South Africa, police have
banned events related to
Mandela's birthday.
Organizers nevertheless sched-
uled a church service in Cape
Tow n today and a news confer-
ence in lohannesburg. Blacks also
planned to boycott schools in
some areas. However, police have
el used to grant permission for
outdoor gatherings and none
u ere scheduled.
Organizers arranged a last-
mi nute concert Sunday afternoon
at the University of Cape Town
that attracted a mostly black audi-
tive oi about 500. But police
banned the concert about two
hours after it began and people
left the campus peacefully.
Previous police orders had pro-
hibited a separate concert in Cape
Town as well as music festivals in
Johannesburg and Durban and a
host of other birthday-related
events in honor of Mandela, who
most of the nation's 26 million
blacks consider their leader.
Meanwhile, security forces,
some in armored vehicles, pa-
trolled the country's major black
townships, though there were no
reports of violence. Police also set
up several roadblocks, including
one outside Cape Town's
Pollsmoor Prison, where Man-
dela is held.
In the past week, more than 30
people involved in birthday
events in the Cape Town area
have been arrested.
Mandela's wife, Winnie, re-
jected a government offer to have
a six-hour visit with her husband
on his birthday, deciding to focus
attention on other prisoners held
for anti-apartheid activities, said
the family's attorney, Ismail
Ayob.
The visit, which would have
been the couple's longest reunion
since Mandela was jailed 26 years
ago, was a special concession by
prison authorities, who normally
grant only 40-minute visits. ,
Mrs. Mandela is probably the
world's best known and most in-
fluential prisoner, and his birth-
day has drawn worldwide atten-
tion.
The countries whose govern-
ments have called for Mandela's
release in the past few days in-
clude: Britain, Japan, West Ger-
many, East Germany, Canada,
Italy, Switzerland, Denmark, Fin-
land, Iceland, Norway and Swe-
den.
The Italian Embassy in Pretoria
said it had imported a copy of
director Bernardo Bertolucci's
film, "The Last Emperor be-
cause Mandela asked if he could
see it.
World heavyweight boxing
champion Mike Tyson sent Man-
dela the boxing gloves he used in
defeating challenger Michael
Spinks last month.
Also, about 50,000 letters of
support from Dutch anti-apart-
heid activists were delivered this
weekend to the Mandela home in
the Soweto township outside
Johannesburg.
Mandela was jailed in 1962 for
leaving the country illegally and
inciting unrest. While serving a
five-year term, he was sentenced
to life imprisonment in 1964 for
sabotage and plotting the over-
throw of the white minority gov-
ernment.
Most black South Africans have
never seen Mandela or heard him
speak because it is illegal to pub-
lish his picture or quote his words
in South Africa. Yet he has be-
come the embodiment of black
resistance to apartheid.
By all accounts, Mandela is in
good physical and mental health
and closely watches political de-
velopments. He reads unccn-
sorcd newspapers and is ex-
pected to earn an advanced law
degree later this year through
correspondence courses.
However, the goverment main-
tains that Mandela must first re-
nounce violence, and Mandela
has said he will do so only if the
ANC is no longer banned and if
the segregationist system of
apartheid is dismantled.
Students protest South Africian apartheid, Nicaragua
during weekend gathering at UNO� Chapel Hill
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
Student activism is alive and get-
ting better, according to abouU 00
Students who gathered at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill this weekend to es-
tablish a national network to in-
crease their overall effectiveness.
Wearing T-shirts urging an
end to South African Apartheid
and to injustice in Nicaragua, stu-
dents for Georgia to California
traveled to Chapel Hill for The
Unity Meeting, a follow-up to the
National Student Convention
held in February at Rutgers Uni-
versity in New lersev.
Todd Morman, a conference
organizer, said the network was
multiracial and multi-issue. If
students form a unified group,
they can channel the increasing
interest in activism and create a
more powerful front, he said.
"Can you imagine if, instead
of a protest at the Pit (a gathering
place in front of the student union
at UNC-Chapel Hill), if there is a
protest at every Pit at every uni-
versity across the country?" he
asked.
"If all students nationally
became active against Star Wars
and nuclear weapons, then we're
going to he heard added loci end of the Reagan era is con tribut-
Segal, another organizer. "We ing to the increase in activism,
will have political effectiveness
"It's OK to care and have an opin-
Christine Kelly, an organizer ion to act ethically and morally
of the Rutgers conference, said the sc said.
ECU Sociology department
produces new brochure
Every Tuesday College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D. .50 skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. REDBANKS RD.
756-600O
News Release
So ology faculty at ECU have
prepared a new brochure which
i ribes their two degree pro-
grams. The B.A. degree is a tradi-
tion il liberal arts program for
students planning careers in such
areas as social research and data
analysis, criminal justice, demog-
raphy, human services, business
had commerce. It is also a useful
with the number of students en-
tering the new program. "We
have about 30 B.S. majors that's
twice an many as we expected.
Now we need to emphasize re-
cruiting and retaining quality
students
Schultz has prepared a detailed
handbook for the applied pro-
gram. It is designed to provide
information about curriculum
ickground for students seeking requirements, the field of applied
sociology and career opportuni-
to enter professional schools such
:s law and business as well as
graduate study in sociology.
Two years ago, a new degree in
applied sociology was added.
'his B.S. program eliminates the
foreign language requirement
and places greater emphasis on
research and computer skills,
theoretical applications, and
preparations for work in govern-
ment, business, industry, and pri-
ate research organizations.
According to Mary Schultz,
pplied Sociology Director, the
program responds to student
mcerns about career relevance
nd training. "Many of our for-
mer students had difficulty mect-
ng the two-year foreign language
.invment Schultz reported.
rhose who did, often com-
plained that it didn't help them in
he job market. So we've dcvel-
i a program that includes
e practical skills and a field
k placement
Dr. John Maiolo, department
chair, was instrumental in devel-
oping the applied program. He
reports that he is quite satisfied
ties, and preparation for the field
placement course.
Copies of the brochure are
available from the Sociology and
Anthropolgy Department office
(Brewster Bldg Fourth Floor-A
Wing), or call 757-6883. For infor-
mation about the applied sociol-
ogy program and handbook, con-
tact Marty Schultz (Brewster
Bldg A-401), or call 756-8930.
GIVE BLOOD
CLtANm
II II1
SHIRT COUPON
4 SHIRTS $036
CLEANED W M ww
for mm
This coupon must be presented
with shirt order
SHIRT COUPON
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EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 9:00 P.M. STARTING JULY 20TH.
ilton lr n Greenville355-5000
SUMMER AIRFARE
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Newark
BOSTON
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These airfares are the lowest roundirip rates from Greenville. NC currently in effect for travel. Space is
limited and travel restrictions and advance purchase requirements applv. Rates shown arc for off peak
travel Fares on other days are slightly higher Once purchased, your ticket'cannot be changed nor refunded
Fares are subject to change at anytime. Most fares now rec re 7-14 davs advance purchase
TRAVEL CENTER
714 E. Greenville Blvd. �GreermTk, NC 27834 ,
355-5075
RACK ROOM
SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
it's CHRISTMAS in JULY
FOUR BIG DAYS!
Thurs Fri Sat, and Sun.
TAKE AN
E�X�T�R�A
10�c
OFF
ALL OUR LOW SALE PRICES
ALREADY REDUCED
70�c
FURTHER MARKDOWNS have been taken on
hundreds of pairs of summer shoes for the entire
family. Save now on sandals, huaraches, espadriues,
DRESS & CASUAL SI IOES, PLUS IIANDBAGS AND ACCESSORIES.
CLIP STORE COUPON
AND SAVE AN EXTRA 10
RACK ROOM COUPON 32EC
TAKE AN
E-X-T-R-A
ON OUR
EVERYDAY
LOW PRICES
PLUS ALL OUR
SUMMER SALES PRICES
'EXCEPT NIKE, REEBOK AND KEDS
coupon cood thurs. - sun.
July 21-25. 1988





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 20, 1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
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We need models for a Legs video. Excep-
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Promotions Unlimited, 1902-A Charles
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across from the Pirates Chest. M-F, 1-4
p.m. You must be 18-36 yrs. old 5ft. to 5ft.
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with height
HIRING � Federal government )obs in
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BE ON TV � Manv needed for commer-
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FOUR STAR PIZZA � is now hiring
drivers and inside personnel for the fall
semester Driver must be 18 years or
older, have a car and insurance. Mini-
mum wage plus commission and tips.
Applv in person at 1154 East 10th Street.
2 STUDENTS wanted to answer tele-
phone for local business � mornings and
afternoons. Call 75b-3241 for interview.
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
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hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
IS IT TRUE � you can buy jeeps for $44
through the U.S. government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext.
5271 A.
FOR SALE � twin bed � mattress, box
spring � like new; and head board set,
$75.00 or best offer. Call 758-3751.
RED HOT � bargains! Drug dealers'
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your
area Buyers Guide. (1) 805-687 6000- Ext.
1166.
FOR SALE � IBM Selectric (non-correct-
ing) typewrite; recently cleaned; excellent
mechanical condition, $50.00 Call 752-2174
after 6 p.m. evenings.
FOR SALE � Matching dresser, with
mirror, night table and headboard with
frame mattress and box spring. $350.00 or
best offer.
FOR SALE � 5 speed girls Schwinn Earth
Crusier. Red, like new. Includes Kryp-
tonite lock. $250.00 or best offer.
washer and drier. Rent � $150.00 and 12
utilities. Call 757-6366 between 1:30 p.m.
and 5:30 p.m. 758-2231 other times. Ask
for Spencer.
ROOMS FOR RENT � $16500 per
month. Utilities included. Near ECU
Campus. Call 758-1274 after 5:30 p.m.
ROOMMATED WANTED � to share
large 3 bedroom 2 bath house with fenced
yard. You'll get private master bedroom
with bath. Pets considered. $195.00
month and 12 utilities. Mark 756-3762.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED � to
share duplex. $75.00 rent and 1 3 utilities,
smokers welcome, Call after 5:00 p.m. 752-
5279.
WANTED � non-smoking female room-
mate to share townhousc at Sedgcfield. 2
miles from campus. Call 1-703-667-6S92.
752-
RINGOLD TOWERS CONDO for RINGGOLD TOWERS: furnished apts.
sale. B-unit, 2nd floor, fullv furnished. Tax for rent Call Hollie Simonwkh
market value $43,730.00. Make me an offer 2S65.
. 919-787-1378.
FOR RENT
PERSONALS
RINGGOLD TOWERS � Apts for rent
Furnished. Contact 1 lollie Simonowich at
752-2865.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED � for 2
bedroom condo. Personal bedroom,
microwave, T.V Stereo, VCR, cable.
PANTANA BOB'S � Enhancing vour
summer with drink specials every night
GROG'S � THE LATE NIGHT PLACE
TO BE E1GI IT NIGI ITS A WEEK. July 21,
Summer Slim Slide $$$$$
FOR SALE
FOR SALE � Larger than dorm-size
refrigerator. Onlv used for one year.
Good condition. Please call 830-0492 and
leave a message.
A Beautiful ilacc to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2b?E5thSipr�
� Located Near ECU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
Unruled offer-S275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy WYiarra
756-7815 or 830-i 937
Office open - Apt. 8,12-530 p jn.
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean ar.d qu;et one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles onlv. $1$? a month, 6 month
lease MOBrLE I lOME RENTALS - couples or
single Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy William
756-7815
Medical Students
The United States Navy is looking for applicants for
two, three, & four year medical scholarships. These
scholarships cover the full school-related expenses of
your medical education, as well as providing a per-
sonal allowance of $650 per month while you are in
school.
To qualify you must:
Be a U. S. citizen
Beenrolled in an AMA approved Medical
school, or AOA approved school of Osteopathy
Meet academic qualifications
Be physically qualified
Applications for scholarships are accepted each fall.
To learn more about Navy medical scholarships, with
no obligation, simply give me a call:
Contact HMC Norm Rogers
1-800-662-7568
Announcements
SUMMER LIBRARY HOURS
Mondays - Thursdays 8:00 a.m. - 11:00
p.m Fridays 8:00 a.m. - 6:00p.m Satur-
days 9:00 a'm. - 6:00 p.m Sundays 12:00
noon - 11:00 p.m. The Media Resources
Center will be open: Mondays - Thurs-
days 8.00 a.m. -9.30 p.m Fridays 8:00 a.m.
- 5:00 p.m Saturdays 1.00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m
Sundays 12 noon - 9:00 p.m.
CO-OP SUMMER FALL
Three jobs � Congressional Office,
Washington, DC. June � August. Salary:
SI000.00month. Student must have gen-
eral office skills and some experience with
word processing. Short hand skills de-
sired. Also, Tampa Electric Company,
Tampa, Florida. Fall semester. Salary:
SI 135.00month. Word processing
courses andor word processing experi-
ence required. Will be expected to return
to job Summer 1989 if work is satisfactory.
Salary will increase. Finally, Positions
available in the Nags Head area begin-
ning June 1, 1988. Salary: S4hour, 30-40
hrs.wk. I lousing available near worksite
- S50.00veck. Students must have 2.5
GPA. Will receive $500 scholarshipsti-
pend for college expenses when returning
to school in the fall. For all these positions,
contact Ruth Peterson, 757-6979, immedi-
ately. Students may apply at Co-op office,
2028 CC building
5KRUN
Faculty, staff and students are encour-
aged to register for the summer 5K walk
run July 20, at 8:00 p.m. at Bunting Track.
For additional information, call 757-6387.
MCAT
Candidates planning to take the Medi-
cal College Admission Test on Saturday,
September 17, 1988, are strongly re-
minded to have their registration post-
marked by August 19, 1988. The late reg-
istration receipt deadline is September 2,
1988. Applications are available in the
Testing Center, Speight Building, Room
105, East Carolina University.
PERSONAL ATTENDANTS
Employment opportunities are avail-
able to students who are interested in be-
coming personal care attendants to stu-
dents in wheel chairs. Past experiences are
desired but not required. Applications
will be taken for employment during the
Fall and Spring Semesters 1988-1989. If
interested, contact: Office of Handi-
capped Student Services, 212 Whichard
Building, East Carolina University, 757-
6766.
UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES
Applications arc now being accepted
for students wishing to serve on Univer-
sity Committees for the 198S-89 school
year. Applications are available at the
following Locations: Office of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life, 204,
Whichard Building- Mcndenhall Student
Center Information Desk; SCA f
Mcndenhall Student Center; and
dence 1 lall Directors' Offices.
The University greatly appreciates the
efforts of those studnets who have served
in the past and hopes that students will
continue their interest and participation.
Questions about University Committees
and memberships may be directed to the
Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student
Life (757-6541).
BUCCANEER
All students: there are still a few copies
of the 1983-1986 yearbooks left at our of-
fice. If you would like to receive a copy,
just come by the Publications Building and
pick one up.
WORK STUDY
If you are work study eligible for 2nd
Summer Session andor Tall Semester,
you are encouraged to contact the Coop
office about off-campus placements. Call
757-6979 of come by the General Class-
room Building.
PRODUCTION MANAGER
NEEDED
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for the position of Production
Manager. Applicants should have prior
newspaper experience, management skills,
computer experience, and ability to type.
Duties will include Classifieds and Announce-
ments sections of The East Carolinian, hiring
and management of typesetters and layout
artist, and care of the archival storage area.
Please apply In person at The East Carolinian
offices, located in the Publications Building,
M-F 10 a.m. � 5 p.m.
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I HI- I-AS I'1 AROI INIAN
Features
JULY 20, 1988 page 7
Performance lacking push
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Ceneral Manager
The ECU Summer Theatre's
third offering of this year � and
its second musical � was nearly
free of the technical problems that
marred the first production, but
still lacked the final push that
would have made the show com-
petitive with professional Broad-
way fare.
"Diamond Studs" is a musical
rendering of the life of Jesse
James. First performed in Chapel
Hill, it is really a series of musical
vignettes about James' life, trac-
ing his path from 16-year-old sol-
dier in the Civil War to his even-
tual death at the hands of one of
his own gang.
Jamesistreateciasa kind ofhero
through most of the show, and
comes across as a gentleman des-
perado. Missing from the real life
James, but then blood doesn't go
over well in musicals.
The musical is entertaining
enough, and director Edgar
Loessin and choreographer Ma-
vis Ray have made the most of the
stage and costuming in present-
ing a quick, normally fast-paced
portrait of the James Gang.
Hut the show has some inherent
problems in that there is no real
tension to the story. The slick
production numbers and well-
choreographed dance scenes just
aren't enough to make up for the
lack of a dramatic thread through-
out the play, and it is easy to lose
one's interest in the fare by the
end of the production.
Grant Goodeve stars as Jesse
James and does a good job por-
traying James the rebellious 16-
year old and James the aging
outlaw. He is slick and suave
enough to be believable as the
anti-hero that has captured the
imagination of so many people
for so long.
Goodeve can also sing, which is
definitely a plus in a musical. The
only place he seemed to have any
trouble was with the last number,
"Cakewalk into Kansas City
when his vocals just weren't
strong enough to overshadow or
even highlight the festivities tak-
ing place on the rest of the stage.
Other highlight performances
included Graham Pollock as both
Cole Younger and Zerclda James
(Jesse's mother); Steven Williford
(who directed "Cat on a Hot Tin
Roof") as Bob Ford, the man who
finally kills James, and Stuart
Maxwell in a brief but comical
appearance as Poncho Villa.
The technical glitches that
plagued "Jerry's Girls" were
solved for the most part by hav i
the performers carry micro-
phones with them on the si
when the- sang, which is visual
annoying but much better on the
ears.
Watch out, though, when
male leads get together to
Individually they sing quite w
together they are in seri
trouble.
The costuming and set dc
for "Diamond Studs" are fa.
tic. The entire musical takes
on one stage set, a saloon, w ith
even the benefit oi a curtain
makes for some interesting
tumc changes and also pro
for some of the best mom
the show as performer- con
and off the stage to play I
parts.
HOSy Tanya Tucker, play Hard Times
By PAUL DUNN
Sports Editor
Here Giant Goodeve gives it his all while portraying the infamou
lessejames. V:t admirable pei vnce it was, bringing pro-
found professionalism and style to the EC I 's Summer Theatre.
"1 li there you guys, this is
Tanya Tucker and 1 had a great
audience tonight and it wasoneof
the best we have ever had. They
were really super! It was a little
warm out there and the sound
system was awful bad, but we
hope to come back some day and
give them a really great show with
a great sound system. I hope they
were pleased and 1 hope we can
come back soon, " country and
western vocalist Tanya Tucker
commented after her show Friday
night at I laid Times.
Heart of Stone and Tanya
Tucker tans began lining up at the
door at 6 p.m. battling outside
tempatures that were almost
Rod Stewart rocks the Dome
BvMK HA I I BAR III I I
OUt!
fitti
fore
ispnere Dccausi
it isovei K(k1 St�.
mpcratures insid
ings
! 'can !
Som
wa rt. A ffer n i year
audieru es . Rockin' Kv
brant and oung
Performing before
house, Stewart left the
like his tour title, "Oul
Opening w ith ! is c
"1 o-1 in You th
audienceon theedj
wweu
throughout the evening-
Stewart, who began performing
in the 60's, played an array of the
ngs that made him famous.
i in- like, ' ! to You Think I'm
w and "The Best Days of My
i if v � re just a irw from his il-
lustrious list oi classics.
Aftera getting warmed-up with
4 k I his new releases, Stewart
t - d mio a wiLi
" wi'TPms classic ballad,
"Maggie Mae With the electric-
its- flowing through the crowd,
Stewart then manipulated the
masses with an excellently cho-
reographed show that included
ev er hit imaginable.
1 he spontaneous and energetic
stage including the tops of the guitarist, Andy Taylor, formerly
speakers.Drawmgon thecrowd's oi Duran Duran, was nothing
energy, Stewart repeatedly short of sensational and drummer
leaped on and off the speakers Tony Brock also performed an
positioned at the corners of the admirable set.
stage. These actions and his boy-
ish air intensified the audience's
responses.
This was an indication of the
organization oi the "Out of Or-
der" tour. Stewart strategically
positioned his performances so as
to bring the evening to a climactic
head. And while the word "Pas-
sion" echoed through the Dome,
it was evident that he had done
just that.
Now, of course Stewart
couldn't have been so exciting
ut utilized every inclof the without a supporting cast. Lead
But probably the biggest asset
for Stewart and the aura of the
concert was the saxophone, trom-
bone and trumpet players. They
ga vc the songs and show a certain
character and added the essential
element needed for a well-
rounded performance.
After over two hours of exuber-
ant rock-n-roll, the concert came
to a dramatic end and everyone
understood why Stewart has been
such a hot item for the past two
decades.
'Arthury proves disappointing
unbearable. The early concert
J
goers were expecting to be let in at
8 p.m. but were required to stand
outside until 8:45 p.m. This was
due to a late sound check needed
by Tucker's band, not the club,
Hard Times.
When the doors were opened,
the crowd had one thing on their
minds. All they wanted was to
charge and take control of the few
tables that were available. The
chances were slim and so only the
quickest of the quick got lucky.
At exactly 9:30 p.m the deejay
blasted over the house system, "
Ladies and gentlemen, will you
please make welcome North
Carolina's premiere country
music band, the Heart of Stone. "
Randell Nelson, lead vocalist
and guitarist, excited the over-
heated and anxious crowd with
his opening lyrics, " I've got no
reason now for going home
and at the completion of the first Palmer let his steel guitar
song, Nelson summed up the big talking and oh, how this man
thoughts of many eager audience could make it talk
members. " We're glad to have Over on the crowded . -
you all here tonight and we're beck left corner of the stage, Lewi
sorry you all had a long wait folks, Baker was thumping away at the
but sometimes that's the way it bass. Baker seemed to be a perl
goes tionist because oi his int
The crowd began to get into the checking of his sound qualit)
groove when HOS played the this is one of the many reas
song, "Train which is recog- is so good,
nized as the band's crowd partici- Thedrum-meister ol I
pation song. A rather large, is the young Linn V.
middle aged woman with bed- definitely kept the band it
room shoes sticking out of her beat.
1000 country music-1
ies took their toll on the audit i
and especially the pc I
Nelson was so thirsty fr
dehydration that he hum i usl
announced he would tal
from anybody that didn't have
AIDS. Nelson's wish was gi n I
and the show continued
The crowd really a
song, " Heart of Stone " that will
be the title cut for the bar
and near future album.
Lynn Parker, guitarist, ro
his chance to impress the audi-
ence with his Ricky Skaggs gual-
ity voice, and impress
Parker is a more laid I
former than Nelson, who is defi
nitelv labeled the "Mr. I tcite-
ment" of the band and has a oicc
that sounds very similar I
mighty Hank Williams, J:
an even wider pitch ran.
The seemingly emotionk -
BY CAROL WETHER1NG fON
I tii.re� 1 .
A
en,
readers,
it
the salisf) ing nu in
i riginal.
Ai lluir 11" p
at ross the ountr)
nately, here in C In
After "Arthur,
li - e with the v i
Dm lie) Mi re ai
Arthur Bach and
: � . .
IK
UU
an
n i
i in �
iitol MI
Ai
ia i iv
K ll U iil
II i7a M
mm
i. n m u
,i

CH :
. Mt!
;ora
, Oprah
�re and
irclj too hard fi ra
I tin v. on Id ridi I
Aitliui " fhis is no e
tion. A few weeks agi
Winfrey featured Mo
Minnelli on her afternnon talk
show. I lere they openly admitted
that they had received numerous
. rip! - lo n ad ir m v iri ; i writ
ers. I hey also admitted that none
had been good enough to even
consider.
Maybe they should have passed
this one over, u 11
'1 he opening oi the
introduces us to the
From here the plot builds. We
find out that Susan Johnson's fa-
ther, (remember him?), has en-
acted a pretty devious plan to ruin
the Bach family if Arthur doesn't
divorce Linda and marry his
bitchy daughter, who, by the way,
is running a tacky-art museum.
Flow's that for a hearty plot?
From there, Arthur and Linda
proceed to rent a really raunchy
apartment, (the likes of those
found in The Emerald City), and
go into a state of poverty. Linda
waitresses at her old hangout and
Arthur attempts to find a job after
Linda tells him to, get this, GROW
UP. When did Arthur's immatur-
theplotwego. Minnelli ity become a problem?!?
laughingly tells Arthur, in posh After getting fired from a job,
restaurant, that she can't have Arthur decides to give up. Di-
children. At this news Arthur, vorce Linda, marry that Johnson
who presumably wants to be- girl, and get his 750 million back.
Now comes the dumbest part of
it hoy were we wrong.
Next Moore and Minnelli give
i a cute, love-inspired couple
ith a lot of money. 750 million to
� c tact They joke around,
iddle, provide lots of inane con-
'rsation and just plain mushy-
M ore is as intoxicated as
: and Minnelli has gained
: lo top Has off, his jokes
just aren't funny anymore. Sure,
lie got in a few good one-liners,
but it they were lost in the awk-
ward feeelings emanating from
most oi the scenes. There are
s m funny moments with the
butler, but, hey, when they're not
1 lobson, how funny can they be?
The adoption comes through,
Linda has her own parade-party
when Arthur comes like a knight
in a black limo to take her home,
butshe has some news for Arthur.
See 'ARTHUR' page 8
pocket book (I ASSUME she was
preparing for the standing) was
clapping to the beat as gallons of
sweat poured from her body.
Into the fifth song, Nelson
played a demanding, up-beat,
guitar solo that stunned the audi-
ence.
The overwhelming 90 degree
plus heat from the climate and the
Heart of Stone continued I
excite the audience, wl :our
aging them to join in. .
audience did so. especi ill) dur
ing HOS's final tune of the eve-
ning, " Rolling cm the River "
At 10:50 p.m Tuckei
began another anno) ing but nec-
SeeTUCKl R' page B
movie re-
liquor-sod-
come a father, replies, "That
sucks Now, what is wrong with
this picture?? Maybe the pro-
ducer thought that was funny,but
this sure was an awkward mo-
ment for the women in the audi-
ence.
But they don't stop there. Then,
w hile dam ing in the middles of a you like the ghost-flashback-idea,
restaurant, they decide to adopt. From here, Arthur decides not
From there we are thrown into an to give up, but to fight Johnson
interview with an adoption and the shrew. He digs up some
the whole movie. Hobson ap-
pears. You find yourself saying
"What the hell?" Anyway, he
gives Arthur some fatherly advice
and Arthur, in turns, gives on-
lookers, in a park, a drunken eye-
ful. It has it's moments, I guess, if
Pickin' the Bones
Bonehead fights record execs
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff CD Mooch
campus. To get that kind of from behind the 45 sectiion He
money I'd have to start raiding the beckoned me over and told me to
snack machines and the change shout his name in the most mek-
machine in the library too. dramatic fashion I could manage
I looked around helplessly. I felt Right there in the record store. I
as if some stablizing factor in the yelled, ' Cho-co-winity
den Arthur. I le's riding through agency representative who blows old grimy,nasty information with
reenville
oii Arthur's drinking problem an intent to blackmail the old
and practically assures the Bachs geezer. In the confrontation
that they arc excellent parent scene, Arthur also quit drinking,
material and that they will, after One thing leads to another,
an indeterminable wait, rccieve a Arthur slugs Johnson, and the
child Now your mind is really problems are resolved and we
blown! also get the feeling that Arthur has
From there we are catapulted gained some respect from these
into a baby store, where perhaps bigwigs who had previously felt
the funniest scene, involving a he was a no-good, shiftless waste,
stuffed, floppy cat and a wagon Now it's clear sailing. Arthur
believe it was general consensus takes place. We have to watch gets his money back, plans to get
that the audience was expecting a them giggle, frolick and act totally Linda back, who has left him after
slightly rehabilitated Arthur, inane, while spending indiscrimi- a visit from the pirhana, and is
After the first movie, it seemed nate amounts of money on a child once again affluent. The best
that Marolla was going to do that they don't even have yet and thing about aH of this;is ARTHUR
something positive for Arthur, are not sure they will get.
the park in New York, having a
merry,drunken time, accosting a
fellow affluent, KWW, (liehad his
initials on his car door), in a teri
Really stupid scene. We watch
Moore make a spectacle' of him-
self, subsequently wringing em-
barrassment from the crowd
while KWW berates Arthur ver-
bally for his misconduct and fri-
valous, embarrassing attitude
NO LONGER DRINKS
I knew this was going to hap-
pen.
X, one of the former Greatest
Bands in North America (things make up of the planet had just "paleyellow cardboard cut out o a
went to hell after Billy Zoom quit), careened spacewards and died of lightning bolt came down, trans-
releases a double live Lp. Aside explosive decompression. CDs forming me into Captain Bone-
from the Star Search Winners were supposed to have stopped head!
album, I can't think of a more this kind of madness. With the wisdom of ALF, I real-
appropriate record to be the first What could I do? Write a letter ized there was only one thing to
compact disc I own. to Warner Brothers? No. No, they do. And it wasn't the purchasing
Not that I own a CD player or don't care if some bonehead in of frozen yogurt. I flew to Holly-
anything. Being the face of pov- North Carolina gets ripped off. wood, and located the executive
erty (and the shoulders, arms and Even if he is the biggest X fan in responsible for dropping three
legs too), I have to be friends with the world. songs off of what could have beer
people who own CD players. But Picket the record stores? I like the most boss CD of all time.
I figure it's an even trade � my East Coast, and while Record
sparkling personality and com- Bar� can go to hell, I don't have With the speed of a slim, non-
pany in exchange for a few hours the resources to hit three record smoking, kind of crabby typeset
a day of illegally taping CDs with- stores at one time. Besides, it's not ter, I locked him in the nearest
out prior written consent really their fault orange pick-up truck I saw. 1
So I'm looking at the back cover Write a column about it? Well, equipped it with Jensen� speak-
of the CD, "X Live at the Whiskey yeah. But even the fame, fortune ers and an Alpine� CD player.
A Go Go on the Fabulous Sunset and free toilet paper that I possess
Strip And I see a sentence that as The Most Famous Bonehead on
sends my vertabrae snapping. campus isn't enough to combat
"Due to time limitations, the the recording industry,
following songs are not included
on the CD package They've had years to perfect
I was stunned. How can they their capitalist techniques of blind Rick Astley CD, Jammed it into
leave off three songs? What do greed and slimy indifference. I've the car player and pressed play.
they expect a college student only been doing it for a year or so. Then I flew off, leaving him to his
already the fingernails of poverty, So. I had fust about gotten to the fate.
to do? Buy the CD for the sound point of giving up. I was going to The next time I looked in on hi m
quality, and the Lp or cassette for just bend over and let the record with the vision of Mom, I saw him
the last three songs? companies violate me. What the soil driving around, drooling and
My god, I already subsist off the hell. Maybe I could get some t- muttering, "never gonna give you
change I find in the coin return shirts made. up.J
slots of the Cokefr machines ort Then, an old wizard appeared t. Justice is served.
I welded the doors shut and fi t-
ted the windows with unbreak-
able glass. Before 1 flew back
home, I stopped off at the CD
store.
I purchased (X forgive me) the





8
V
TH E FAST CARPI INI AN
JULY 20, 1QS8
Tucker rocks Hard Times club
Continued from page 7
cssary sound check that would
v ausc a delay of 25 minutes.
IT WAS FINALLY TIME!
lucker's band came onto the
stage and started pining without
a singer. Curiosity hovered but it
helped create a grand entrance.
Voices were shouting, " Where's
Tanya?"
1 he crowd let out another in-
credible roar as the very sew,
country music performer entered
and danced around on stage.
Tucker went immediately into her
opening number, "I wonder what
ou're doing tonight ?"
Tucker was wearing a glamor-
ous, green halter top that was
trimmed in black. She had on
black tights that were covered by
a black ruffled mini skirt. Around
her waist was a shiny western belt
that sent out laser beams of light.
She continued her show with the
tast paced tune, "Any Otter Love.
"I'm really glad to be here to-
night and I am now going to carry
you all back a few years. 1 always
do this song for all the men in the
audience from all the gals.
Women, " teased Tucker before
she Sting, " 1 Don't Believe My
Heart Can Stand Another You. "
Tucker then played another
crowd favorite tune, "What's
Your Momma's Name Child
Feedback was a problem for her
band that wasn't a hassle for the
Heart of Stone band. This was due
to her band's late arrival. Her
band was to supposed to arrive at
the club by noon to set up and
complete a sound check. The
members didn't show up until six
and one half hours after noon.
At the completion of "What's
Your Momma's Name Child ?"
Tucker noticed the band and her-
self had to cover one car to hear
themselves sing. She couldn't
stand it anymore.
"Is it possible to get the highs
turned down in the house? Can
you get the highs down? It's really
hard tor us to hear up here, but it
doesn't really matter because
we're going to have fun anyway
she said.
Knowing she was on a roll,
Tucker said Isn't it hot in here
tonight? That's alright too, be-
cause we can sweat together
Tucker continued talking to the
crowd telling them about some
events that had been going on
with her. She said she had just
completed shooting a Roger
Miller Television Special on the
Mississippi Queen, floating down
the Mississippi River. The show is
to be aired October 4.
"We didn't know if we were
going to finish the trip because the
water level was so low, but we
made it, " said Tucker.
The female vocalist also told
about her near adventure to
GreenvilleSouth Carolina instead
of North Carolina for the concert.
" What a mistake that would of
been. My daddy caught me at the
Atlanta airport and told me I was
headed for the wrong Greenville.
I am so glad I got the right plane
and city. "
Tucker then dedicated another
one of her hits to the audience.
The crowd responded well to,
"Love Me Like You Used To. "
"You're a beautiful audience
and I can't thank ya'll enough. We
are going to be in North Carolina
about ten more times, "said
Tucker.
"I would like to take ya'll back
to 1972 when I had my very first
hit record. It has given me a ' 'if
wonderful opportunities that I
would have never have had, '
said a sentimental Tucker.
As she sang " Delta Dawn" the
audience sang along. About mid-
way the song, Tucker stopped
singing and stuck her mic out
towards the audience and let
them take over.
After performing the "San An-
tonio Stroll" and other hits,
Tucker made her grand finale
with, "When I die may not go to
1 leaven. "
Tucker told the audience she
loved them,saluted and then ex-
ited the stage. All the anger from
heat and delay was all forgotten.
It was a night to remember.
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THE RESUME PEOPLE
Next to Chicos in the Georqetown Shops
Kellerman takes on two new roles this summer
LOS ANGELES (AD � The
ever-versatile Sally Kellerman
appears this summer in two di-
ergent movie roles: as a film ac-
tress shattered by the end of her
marriage, and as operator of a
. ar-games school for women.
Is there anything Kellerman
can't do? Apparently not. When
she isn't playing her wide range of
acting roles,you might find her in
. cal stage plays, doing voice-
overs for commercials and car-
toons or singing her own brand of
bluesy music in New York and
1 lollywood night spots.
Kellerman recently chatted
about her life at the Hollywood
Hills home she shares with her
produccr-husband onathan
krane and a pair of friendly dogs.
1 ler blond beauty remains un-
touched as she nears 50, and she
talks more level-headedly than
you would expect from seeing her
in eccentric film roles.
She currently appears in
"Someone to Love which has
drawn raves from some review-
ers for its free-form, humanistic
qualities It's another idiosyn-
cratic film from Henry Jaglom.
"Henry and the character he
plays in the movie had the idea of
finding out why various friends
oi his were alone on Valentine's
Day Kellerman said. "He in-
vited them all to a theater (the
Mavfair in Santa Movica). He said
I'd be a movie star who just left her
husband. That was it.
"So wcall arrived, and he asked
questions and had us think about
our characters. It was essentially
improvised, and he ended up in
the editing room putting it all
together. People say, 'Oh, it's
real But it wasn't really real
Kellerman first impressed the
film world as I lot Lips Houlihan
in the landmark comedy, "M-A-S-
H which brought her a 1970
Academy nomination as support-
ing actress.
"After 'M-A-S-H' 1 was out to
prove that I was not just Hot Lips
but I could be a million other
people. So I looked for the most
serious drama I could find she
said. "I tried to dodge around but
I often ended up with roles that
were not Hot lips but were this
kind of zany, kookie, larger-than-
life character
Sally Kellerman was born in.
Long Beach but grew upin the San
Fernando. Valley, "before they
raped the land and before smog "
Then she attended Hollywood
Vh School.
RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
Arthur' still a drunk
Continued from page 7
4
But where does it all end? It all
ends with a poignant scene just
after they have returned to their
posh house. The servants all greet
them and Arthur's butler and
valet, a stiff old dude, plays a joke
on Arthur. I Icre is a chokingly,
soft moment that stands out of the
script nicely. But I won't tell you
what inc:
i. luiidv luu'
thing happens here.
The directing of the movie is
sufficient and the casting was
once again, excellent. But the plot
and storyline failed. What a
disappointment. If you have seen
"Arthur, "but have not seen
"Arthur 11" yet, don't do it Your
great memories of the original
will become warped and you'll be
sorry.
OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS ON THESE
DOORS FIRST.
7hy9 Because Army ROTC reaches you
loader ship ar.ri . 3U
need for success � . : �
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE Y01 CAN TAKE.
For Further Information Contact
Capt. Steve L. Jone
(Erwin Hall) 757-6967
M2T35
Overkill
Comics that can punch into your chest and pull your heart out so fast it'll be the last thing you see before you
By Friedrich The Law
die
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v:t7'
t-K.
.
.
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( ,i :n piis C 1)111 i( s
L THIS AIN'T ME WCsi
BUT XT'LL DO
Arm Fall-Off Boy
STILL IN CAPTIVITY �
"reuoiA LeGioNHefsces)
TheU'l
Bruce Lee,
Jeff Parker Look-a-like
Yo yo homeboys and homegirls. Here's another chilly-fresh comics page that is so stupid-def it'll
make you laugh hard enough to damage an organ. Once again there is Classic Law (but with no
mutants), Campus Comics has an implied dirty joke if you look hard enough, and Friedrich snuch
"titties" in Overkill again. He did it so artfully that I decided to spell his name right this week. We
wish him good luck biking to Raleigh this weekend, and don't forget to take along the Junior
Woodchuck's Manual. And last but not least, I still have my license! HAAAAA See you all next weeK
for the last edition of Li'l Pirate Comix and the wrap-up of the Arm Fall-Off Boy story, before we com�
back in the Fall bigger and better than ever. Scoal.
AKPB
V

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foment t
.W nn� �- ta to savor
$iit, it was the last
for quite a while.
�n the v n
victory oi bn
rriftnbers oi tl s
basketball team wc i
r&e in an incident in a v'
Vs. hotel room
j"he three later were
lri-a trial filled with �
si�rn But the notoriet)
bvinning for Minnesota
islunong the nation
Irsities.
! With 4493 undcrgra
gHiduate students and
eliension students the Mini
sola campus spraw 5 r bJ
bAkks oi the Mississippi Rr
iimr downtown Minneapx -
ilie misdeeds, impro j
aa embarrassments
n$t 31 months were dizzying j
$-The men's basketball to
Ws placed on probation by
Nlliional Collegiate Athletic .
station for numberous intrj
twobs, mostlv over Us recruitinj
student athletes.
jP University President il
Vcller resigned in a scandal o
mind reds oi thousands of doll
spent on his official residence
� Keller's interim replacenul





i
1
� ��
E A
IMOb
I
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I ill I SI t K( l INI N
����Mi
Sports
Jl 20, 1988 page 9
,ose looks foward to a winning season
Inmate team
ByCRKER BOWEN
surrwdui
"1 just can't wait to get
started said Reed Lose. I ose isa
junior on the basketball team and
with new confidence he looks
forward to the season starting.
1 ose came to East Carolina from
Camp llill Pennsylvania and
even though he misses the snow
he is happy with his college
choice. Lose decided to come to
East Carolina because he liked the
people and the area. As a child
Lose played basketball, football,
and baseball but decided to con
cent rate on basketball.
lose is majoring in 1 lotel and
Restaurant management, but he
said that he really doesn't want to
! tart at the bottom. "1 just don't
want to have to deal with too
main boscs he said. Lose be
lieves that he could be h tppy here
without basketball, but that it
adds a great deal to his coll .
cart er
Playing college basketball is
ver) demanding. During the
season, Lose says that he goes to
class, practice,study hall and then
he goes to bed and does it all over
again. "We don't have time tor
much eKe because' we travel a
lot said 1 ose.
I ose was the offensh c player
ol the year last year and was on
the all tournament team oi the
Musk- City Invitational of Van-
derbilt University as well. But he
said he had doubts as a freshman.
1 wasn't sure that 1 could com
pete on the college level Hut
with the support ol his family and schooloranything, 1 know I could
the encouragment of the coaching count on any of my coachs 1 ose
staff. Lose has no doughts now. added.
"My Mom used to help me shot This year Lose thinks that the
free throws and my Dad even team will win the Conference
started a booster program at my championship. "I came off a
high school Lose said. Lose's pretty good year and I want to
parents have been more than just
supportive. "My parents have
been to see every away game in
the conference except Wilming-
ton Lose said. This type of sup-
contribute as much, as I can to the
team Lose Mid. Blue Edwards,
Jeff Kelly and Lose are the only
returning starters but with six
new recruits and new found team
port carries over to the coaches as confidence, Lose looks for a great
well.
Lose spoke very highly of
1 lead Coach Mike Steele and the
entire basketball coaching staff.
I o c was involved in the basket-
ball program under coach Harri-
son and said that even though he
thinks a great deal of 1 larrison.he
believes Steele has had a great
influence on the team. "1 didn't
interact with Coach Harrison as
much 1 do with the coachs now
Lose said.
"Coach Steele is a family man
and we have gotten to know his
family I ose said. "Weeven go to
his house he added. Lose says
that coach Sleek' encourages the
team members to be complete
people and will even let team
members live anywhere they
want to on campus. "A lot of ath-
letes don't have that option said
Lose
According to lose, Coach
Steele is there for the players
whenever they need him. " Coach
Steele told us 'You're not here for
basketball. ou're here to get your
degree It 1 had a problem in
year. Hie recruits are going to be
an asset to the team, Losebelie es
"The recruits are all well know -nin
their comuni ties and should add a
lot
Lose is also Add to have Blue
back. "Blue is the hi t and now
that he's ba k i won't beexpe I
to be as much of a s. orer, I
said. But tins de�. not damper
Lose's spirits He believes this
vear will be tl e team I I
Lose says that Coach Steeh
let them become a one man team
I hats net how coach Steele
W( rks 1 ose said
Everyone is expet ting
great things to m the team
I ose believes that a.Ids
because "You can talk all you
want but you still have to go out
Md do It "
looking
for
vou
. t ar
ire f)
port
round and
loan
por-
also
� save
Lit or
le they
I a tour-
on
I start a
. men
nt the
� sport
mpete
im level
. ist be a
I lurley
- fast .nd
i tru tured
aid
1 lurley. Each team has seven men.
The field is sot up like a football
held. Ultimate is not a contact
sport ,nd you can't run with the
frisbce. "You must have a pivot
foot, like in basketball
Hurley. Games are played to
15,17, or 19 points and there is no
time limit.
0 s ore, v ou must
catch the frisbce in our
opponent's endone. If the Iris-
bee is droped or a throw is not
completed, the other team gains
control.
Hurley encourages any inter
ited students to come out during
a practice, "lust because you can't
throw a frisbce is no reason not to
try out said Hurley. Team
members are very understanding
of new players. "We all under-
stand that you have to start some-
where, we were all in the same
spot
I'r.u ti( es in the tall will be held
en ! ucsday, Thursday, and Sun-
day afternoons in the field at the
bottom oi the hill. Oi course ev-
eryone that comes to a practice
will not travel with the team
1 lurley said that the people who
keep coming out travel with us
niversiiv of Minnesota continues
their downhill slide into scandal
igiar-
ine article
� � -r
n
ise-
of them in the
under Coach
resigned alter the rape
i
� � �
: itn s

'
at) offi lal
es of swin-
. . ing it to ath-
ilar athletic
.� as tired.
be unprece-
. univ( rsitics.
. li nt i 1 the
ling B( tards
ind , re-
. " ' 'is skid
"They would
r de ils E ery-
.i to them at
'� '�
si I
isn't clear.
� be more difficult
I fun tion in ,n
I i
m because the
� the Mis .
Is, imj
.
rtths were dizz
- � n's I'm .ketball t
.i . I oi
ilolli giate Al
on i for nu nberous infrui
mostlyover its re i uitii
fcudent
rsil I ident I
wod in a si andal i
Is of th us mds i f dollars
is ffi ial rcsidi i
i sinterim n pla ement.
to be looking
: : a lot more
ist said.ale.
rape charges,
in Km-king over
houlder.
� I later that vear
I athletic depart
nit 'nt had tl ference's lowest
nation from 1978
tl
! v is still rvi I
' NM A A lines
! t � investigate re
the NCAA an
ii ilations, most
isketball program
im Dutcher, who
trial.
In the same month, Keller re-
signed after a six-week contro-
versy over university financial
management. It was sparked by
his SI.5 million renovation ol the
official residence at more than
twice the budgeted amount.
Keller also approved a $21H 1,1 N Hl
remodeling oi his offices, includ-
ing a $15,822 mahogany desk and
credenza. 1 le eventually paid tor
them himself.
Students picketed the mansion
and a local radio stations's ditty
referred to Keller as the "Renova-
tion Man His "Commitment to
Locus" plan to upgrade some
programs, cut others dnd reduce
enrollment by 8,(XK), was mock
ingly referred to as "Commitment
to Furniture
A widening probe turned up a
$221 million reserve fund Critics
called it a slush fund, and it
rankled professors whose pro-
grams had been targeted for
elimination and angered some
contributors and alumni, who
quit giving.
When Sauer took over the
president's duties, he remained in
lus own home, accepted a used
desk and set out to mend fences.
I hen the plagiarism scandal hit
him while he was applying for the
presidency of North Dakota State
University.
Park offers tips
for better games
By NEEDHAM I'RK
surr Writer
There vou are, amidst the green
rass with lavish woods and spar-
kling ponds all around. You're
eyeing two squirrels p!a fully
chasing each other w ith a harmo-
nious background oi bird- chirp
ing in the distance, when sud-
denly some clod knocks a ball
only a few feet away. Anger
surges through your entire bod)
because it comes back to vou that
.
tl
fast cart it makt s the
woi th w hile.
Now is the time tor the I
ti n to tx cm - the ! I Be sure
and give
friendl) tips Tell them I
their tee real high in tl and.
therefore causing the b ill t
straight up. The next hole the
sure to know vou were joking and
practically burv the tee causing
the club to dig a I enough
to throw a coffin in.
you're searching for your third First off, Select an op
lost ball of the day (each costing
$1.50). If you throw a new one out
it will cost vou a stroke (stroke is
golf terminology for "point" but
in somethiscan actually "cause" a
stroke), and if you are not quick
making up your mind vou could
get beaned by the ball t s, me
impatient player tr ing to play at
the speed of sound s they can get
sauced at the clubhouse.
Who was first to proclaim golf
"relaxing" or a "gentleman's
sport"? Perhaps they were the
ancestors of those ou see with a
shiny new set of clubs each ear
because their old ones got
wrapped around a tree in an an-
gered frenzy. 1 personally adore
the game of golf not for its relaxa-
tion or its competition but be-
cause it's fun to have a temper
tantrum every once in a while.
Take for example a typical da)
around the ol' golf course. Lirt
off, select an opponent whose
never played before or at least
someone who really stinks at the
l .ii.e and has no chance e: beat
ing you. Alter shelling out your
entire savings for that week as a
green fee, or claiming your uncle
owns the joint and playing tor
free, rent a cart - the most exciting
asrx ct of golf. If you get a good
portent whoso never
played before
Some pel ;
process r . I
toasted It's a pr.
suitable tor mar
ally prefer being mi -
sober. Another tip is to be on I
leek, ut r tru . . COJ -
they're a couple of rough lo -
guys wearing plaid pants Md
green sweaters who work in the
pro shop. They w ill d
from the start that ou are tree:
and m-ist upon following
around and finding a reas - I
lecture.
After a couple . : h urs a s�
of 72 is obtained; not bad t�
holcsofg � .
tood and back to the se
When you get toaboi : I
hole it's pi
it hopeless and sj 11
the day doing d nuts
and searcl for lost I
on I
Finally, when it'sovei it's I
to get intoxicated it you're n
already. Then it's time to st
sa ing up tor the nt el tu
you hope w ill come -
around the course.
After he apologized to the Uiv-
ersity oi Minnesota regents, they
gave him a unanimous vote oi
confidence. North Dakota State
since has asked him to renew his
application for the presidency.
Sauer's troubles were followed
by the athletic department com-
ing under further investigation.
Luther Darville, former acting di-
rector of the school's Office of
Minority and Special Student
Affairs, was indicted in May on
three counts of felony theft by
swindle.
Darville has fled to his native
Bahamas nd authorities have
started extradition proceedings.
University officials acknowl-
edge that the turnover among top
personnel has caused problems,
but they say the school is running
more smoothly than might be
expected.
' I think the fact is that the
univenstv is being will-governed
by the interim people said
David Lebedott, chairman of the
University oi Minnesota Board of
Regents.
David Merkowitz, spokesman
for the American Council oi Edu-
cation, said he couldn't recall any
other university having so many
problems recently.
Still, Merkowitz said, "I am
absolutely sun" a university like
Minnesota w ith 45,(XY) students is
going to survive these things
c;
Ballesteros edges to
British Open win
LYTHHAM, England (AH
eve ballesteros ot Spain birdied
the lhth hole with the help oi a
magnificent iron shot that hit the
flagstick, and won his third Brit-
ish Open title by two strokes over
Nick Price today.
It was match-play condition
through the final 18 holes, with
Trice nd Ballesteros playing to-
gether stroke for stroke until le.
And it wasn't over until Bab
lesteros scrambled from behind
the 18th green with another in-
credible iron shot to save par w ith
a two-inch putt
Ballesteros finished at 11 -under
par 23,
with a tinal round of 6
under 65, the lowest IS holes of
the weather plagued tourna-
ment.
TheSpaniard won his first open majot victor)
here in 1979, and it was loth hole
heroics that lifted him to victory
that time too.
Price, the Zimbawean who led
after the second and third rounds,
left a 12-foot birdie putt short and
to the right on No. lb. He then
bogeyed the final hole, tying for a
last-ditch birdie, and finished at
69-275.
Nick Ealdo oi Inland, last
vear's winner, shot an even par 71
and finished third at 5 under 279.
Faldo, who turned 31 as the open
had its first today finish ever, won
last year with a round of 18 pars,
but had three birdies and three
fcogevs this time.
Two Americans Fred v
and Gary Koch finished a:
under 281. Beth shot ; . r 68s
on the final day, withCoupl
under before taking b at the
17th and 18th
Sandy I yleofScotland the 1985
champion w ho started the day at
4-under par. also taded in the late
going, taking a boge) sen No 17
and a double boge) 6 on the final
hole to finish at l-under283 �
a round ot 4
In 1979, the last time the open
was played at the Royal 1 wham
and ST. Annes GoM Club Bal-
lesteros was a T2 year old who
alroadv had led the IV.A Lure
pean Lour m menev winnnings
but still was looking tor his first
He got it in the open that year
pla ing a shot out of a parking lot
on the 16th hole tor a birdie 3 and
went on to victory
rhe parking lot was out ol
bounds this year, but Ballesteros
never came near it Tied with
Price at 10 under as they teed ofi
for the 16th hole his tec shot was
right in the middle ot the fairway,
and his second shot almost was
right in the middle ot the hole.
It hit the stick and stoppec
dead Ballesteros tapped in. anc
never looked back.





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By Racer X
AM YOU ?
0
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JULY 20,1988 page 9
Lose looks toward to a winning season
Ultimate team is
looking for you
ByGREERBOWEN
SUIT Writer
"I just can't wait to get
started said Reed Lose. Lose is a
junior on the basketball team and
with new confidence he looks
forward to the season starting.
Lose came to East Carolina from
Camp Hill Pennsylvania and
even though he misses the snow
he is happy with his college
choice. Lose decided to come to
East Carolina because he liked the
people and the area. As a child
Lose played basketball, football,
and baseball but decided to con-
centrate on basketball.
Lose is majoring in Hotel and
Restaurant management, but he
said that he really doesn't want to
start at the bottom. "I just don't
want to have to deal with too
many boscs he said. Lose be-
lieves that he could be happy here
without basketball, but that it
adds a great deal to his college
career.
Playing college basketball is
very demanding. During the
season, Lose says that he goes to
class, practice, study hall and then
he goes to bed and does it all over
again. "We don't have time for
much else because we travel a
lot said Lose.
Lose was the offensive player
of the year last year and was on
the all tournament team of the
Music City Invitational of Van-
derbilt University as well. But he
said he had doubts as a freshman.
"I wasn't sure that I could com-
pete on the college level But
with the support of his family and
the encouragment of the coaching
staff, Lose has no doughts now.
"My Mom used to help me shot
free throws and my Dad even
started a booster program at my
high school Lose said. Lose's
parents have been more than just
supportive. "My parents have
been to see every away game in
the conference except Wilming-
ton" Lose said. This type of sup-
port carries over to the coaches as
well.
Lose spoke very highly of
Head Coach Mike Steele and the
entire basketball coaching staff.
Lose was involved in the basket-
ball program under coach Harri-
son and said that even though he
thinks a great deal of Harrison, he
believes Steele has had a great
influence on the team. "I didn't
interact with Coach Harrison as
much I do with the coachs now
Lose said.
"Coach Steele is a family man
and we have gotten to know his
family Lose said. "We even go to
his house he added. Lose says
that coach Steele encourages the
team members to be complete
people and will even let team
members live anywhere they
want to on campus. "A lot of ath-
letes don't have that option said
Lose.
According to Lose, Coach
Steele is there for the players
whenever they need him. "Coach
Steele told us 'You're not here for
basketball, you're here to get your
degree If I had a problem ii
school or anything, I know I could
count on any of my coachs Lose
added.
This year Lose thinks that the
team will win the Conference
championship. "I came off a
pretty good year and I want to
contribute as much as I can to the
team Lose said. Blue Edwards,
Jeff Kelly and Lose are the only
returning starters but with six
new recruits and new found team
confidence, Lose looks for a great
year. The recruits are going to be
an asset to the team, Lose believes.
"The recruits are all well known in
their comuni ties and should add a
lot
Lose is also glad to have Blue
back. "Blue is the best and now
that he's back I won't be expected
to be as much of a scorer Lose
said. But this does not damper
Lose's spirits. He believes this
year will be the teams best yet.
Lose says that Coach Steele won't
let them become a one man team.
Thats not how coach Steele
works Lose said.
Everyone is expecting
great things from the team, and
Lose believes that adds pressure
because "You can talk all you
want but you still have to go out
and do it
By GREER BOWEN
"&frUr'ur mm
late frisbee has oecomc a
papular club sport at East Caro-
lina in the past few years. The
:rates, the East Carolina ultimate
have no unitorms and there are no
fU&L anyone can ojgy. The sport-
SrTbe played year round and
there are no referees.
The team receives funding from
the university as well as transpor-
ter has become a nationaly rec- tation for their trips. They also
�ajftized team. For the past two have fund raisers and try to save
. irs the Irates have gone to the money by either camping out or
"ational Competition, where this staying with friends while they
vgkr they tied for fifth place. travel. The Irates do host a tour-
fhe Irates spent spring break in namcnt once a semester here on
Cfcytona Beach Fla. competing in campus
Hurley. Each team has seven men.
The field is set up like a football
field. Ultimate is not a contact
a practice. "Just because you can't
throw a frisbee is no reason not to
try out said Hurley. Team
9b National Collegate Sports The men's team helped start a sport and you can't run with the members are very understanding
�stival. The festival was held women's team and the women
$King the three weeks of spring competed in the tournament the
ak. The teams that won during men hosted this spring
jija h individual week will meet in
(It sober to compete against each
qher. Gary Hurley, vice presi-
dent of the Irates, says the team
gDks forward to this trip.
�The Irates were voted club of
ir last school year. Being a club
it's advantages over being a
iiversity team. The players
Hurley said he enjoys the sport
because it allows you to compete
on an individual and a team level
at the same time. "It must be a
team effort said Hurley. Hurley
said that the game moves fast and
is full of action.
The game is like a "structured
version of frisbee football said
frisbee. "You must have a pivot of new players. "We all under-
stand that you have to start some-
where, we were all in the same
spot
Practices in the fall will be held
on Tuesday, Thursday, and Sun-
day afternoons in the field at the
bottom of the hill. Of course ev-
foot, like in basketball said
Hurley. Games are played to
15,17, or 19 points and there is no
time limit. To score, you must
catch the frisbee in your
opponent's endzone. If the fris-
bee is droped or a throw is not
completed, the other team gains eryone that comes to a practice
control. will not travel with the team.
Hurley encourages any inter- Hurley said that "the people who
ested students to come out during keep coming out travel with us
IJniversity of Minnesota continues
their downhill slide into scandal
ss
gMINNEAPOLIS (AP) � The
st-second basketball victory
f&er neighboring Big Ten rival
fjfisconsin in 1986 was a proud
foment for the Univeristy of
Minnesota to savor. As it turned
�it, it was the last proud moment
fee quite a while.
&n the morning after the 67-65
voctory of Jan. 23, 1986, three
numbers of the Golden Gophers
basketball team were accused of
ripe in an incident in a Madison
Ws hotel room.
�The three later were acquitted
irtia trial filled with sorid testi-
ntpny. But the notoriety was only
banning for Minnesota, which
lamong the nation's largest uni-
versities.
;With 44,293 undergraduate and
graduate students and 18,000
ej$ension students, the Minne-
sota campus sprawls over both
bjiks of the Mississippi River
nit downtown Minneapolis.
he misdeeds, improprieties
an embarrassments over the
njt 31 months were dizzying:
-The men's basketball team
vfe placed on probation by the
ional Collegiate Athletic As-
iation for numberous infrac-
ts, mostly over its recruiting of
sjjodent athletes.
?�- University President Ken
Jjtllcr resigned in a scandal over
mind reds of thousands of dollars
spent on his official residence.
�Keller's interim replacement,
Richard Sauer, admitted plagiar-
izing part of a magazine article
while applying for a job else-
where.
� A former university official
was indicted on charges of swin-
dling money and giving it to ath-
lcsc; the school's popular athletic
director, Paul Gicl, was fired.
The troubles may be unprece-
dented among major universities.
Robert L. Gale, president of the
Association of Governing Boards
of Universities and Colleges, re-
calls discussing Minnesota's skid
with colleagues. 'They would
say, Those poor devils. Every-
thing has happened to them at
once
The long-term effect isn't clear.
"It is going to be more difficult
for the university to function in an
autonomous fashion because the
Legislature is going to be looking
over their shoulder a lot more
than it has in the past said Gale.
After the 1986 rape charges,
many people began looking over
the univeristy's shoulder.
A Big Ten report later that year
said the men't athletic depart-
ment had the conference's lowest
rate of graduation from 1978
through 1983.
While the school was still reel-
ing from the report, NCAA inves-
tigators arrived to investigate re-
cruiting.
In March, the NCAA an-
nounced 40 rule violations, most
of them in the basketball program
under Coach Jim Dutcher, who
resigned after the rape trial.
In the same month, Keller re-
signed after a six-week contro-
versy over university financial
management. It was sparked by
his $15 million renovation of the
official residence at more than
twice the budgeted amount.
Keller also approved a $200,000
remodeling of his offices, includ-
ing a $15,822 mahogany desk and
credenza. He eventually paid for
them himself.
Students picketed the mansion,
and a local radio stations's ditty
referred to Keller as the "Renova-
tion Man His "Commitment to
Focus" plan to upgrade some
programs, cut others and reduce
enrollment by 8,000, was mock-
ingly referred to as "Commitment
to Furniture
A widening probe turned up a
$221 million reserve fund. Critics
called it a slush fund, and it
rankled professors whose pro-
grams had been targeted for
elimination and angered some
contributors and alumni, who
quit giving.
When Sauer took over the
president's duties, he remained in
his own home, accepted a used
desk and set out to mend fences.
Then the plagiarism scandal hit
him while he was applying for the
presidency of Norm Dakota State
University.
Park offers tips
for better games
By NEEDHAM PARK
SUV Writer
There you are, amidst the green
grass with lavish woods and spar-
kling ponds all around. You're
eyeing two squirrels playfully
chasing each other with a harmo-
nious background of birds chirp-
ing in the distance, when sud-
denly some clod knocks a ball
only a few feet away. Anger
surges through your entire body
because it comes back to you that
you're searching for your third
lost ball of the day (each costing
$1.50). If you throw a new one ou t
it will cost you a stroke (stroke is
golf terminology for "point" but
in some this can actually "cause" a
stroke), and if you are not quick
making up your mind you could
get beaned by the ball of some
impatient player trying to play at
the speed of sound so they can get
sauced at the clubhouse. "ST
Who was first to proclaim golf
"relaxing" or a "gentleman's
sport"? Perhaps they were the
ancestors of those you see with a
shiny new set of clubs each year
because their old ones got
wrapped around a tree in an an-
gered frenzy. I personally adore
the game of golf not for its relaxa-
tion or its competition but be-
cause it's fun to have a temper
tantrum every once in a while.
Take for example a typical day
around the ol' golf course. First
off, select an opponent whose
never played before or at least
someone who really stinks at the
game and has no chance of beat-
ing you. After shelling out your
entire savings for that week as a
green fee, or claiming your uncle
owns the joint and playing for
free, rent a cart - the most exciting
aspect of golf. If vou get a good
fast cart it makes the whole thing
worth while.
Now is the time for the real ac-
tion to begin - the betting. Be sure
and give your opponent some
friendly tips. Tell them to stick
their tee real high in the ground,
therefore causing the ball to go
straight up. The next hole they're
sure to know you were joking and
practically bury the tee causing
the club to dig a hole big enough
to throw a coffin in.
First off, select an op-
ponent whose never
played before
Some people by r.ow are in the
process of getting good and
toasted. It's a process that may be
suitable for many, but I person-
ally prefer being miserably stone
sober. Another tip is to be on the
-lookout for the golf cops. Usually,
they're a couple of rough looking
guys wearing plaid pants and
green sweaters who work in the
pro shop. They will determine
from the start that you are trouble
and insist upon following you
around and finding a reason to
lecture.
After a couple of hours a score
of 72 is obtained; not bad for nine
holes of golf. Then its off for some
food and back to the second nine.
When you get to about the twel fth
hole it's probably time to declare
it hopeless and spend the rest of
theday doing donuts with the cart
and searching for lost balls to sell
on the black market.
Finally, when it's over, it's time
to get intoxicated, if you're not
already. Then it's time to start
saving up for the next time which
you hope will come soon. See you
around the course.
After he apologized to the Uiv-
ersity of Minnesota regents, they
gave him a unanimous vote of
confidence. North Dakota State
since has asked him to renew his
application for the presidency.
Sauer's troubles were followed
by the athletic department com-
ing under further investigation.
Luther Darville, former acting di-
rector of the school's Office of
Minority and Special Student
Affairs, was indicted in May on
three counts of felony theft by
swindle.
Darville has fled to his native
Bahamas and authorities have
started extradition proceedings.
University officials acknowl-
edge that the turnover among top
personnel has caused problems,
but they say the school is running
more smoothly than might be
expected.
1 think the fact is that the
univeristy is being will-governed
by the interim people said
David Lebedoff, chairman of the
University of Minnesota Board of
Regents.
David Mcrkowitz, spokesman
for the American Council of Edu-
cation, said he couldn't recall any
other university having so many
problems recently.
Still, Merkowitz said, 1 am
absolutely sure a university like
Minnesota with 45,000 students is
going to survive these things
Ballesteros edges to
British Open win
LYTHHAM, England (AP) �
Seve Ballesteros ofSpain birdied
the 16th hole with the help of a
magnificent iron shot that hit the
flagstick, and won his third Brit-
ish Open title by two strokes over
ick Price today.
It was match-play condition
through the final 18 holes, with
Price and Ballesteros playing to-
gether stroke for stroke until 16.
And it wasn't over until Bal-
lesteros scrambled from behind
the 18th green with another in-
credible iron shot to save par with
a two-inch putt
Ballesteros finished at 11 -under
par 273, with a final round of 6-
under 65, the lowest 18 holes of
the weather-plagued tourna-
ment.
The Spaniard won his first open
here in 1979, and it was 16th hole
heroics that lifted him to victory
that time too.
Price, the Zimbawean who led
after the second and third rounds,
left a 12-foot birdie putt short and
to the right on No. 16. He men
bogeyed the final hole, tying for a
last-ditch birdie, and finished at
ijtt275.
Nick Faldo ol Enland, last
year's winner, shot an even-par 71
and finished third at 5-undcr 279.
Faldo, who turned 31 a the open
I had its first today finish ever, won
year with a round of IS para,
t had three birdies and three
thiitinifr
Two Americans, Fred Couples
and Gary Koch, finished at 3-
undcr 281. Both shot 3-under 68s
on the final day, with Couples 5-
undcr before taking bogeys at the
17th and 18th.
Sandy Lyleof Scotland, the 1985
champion who started the day at
4-under par, also faded in the late
going, taking a bogey-5 on No. 17
and a double-bogey 6 on the final
hole to finish at 1-under 283, with
a round of 74.
In 1979, the last time the open
was played at the Royal Lytham
and ST. Annes Golf Club, Bal-
lesteros was a 22-year-old who
already had led the PGA Euro-
pean Tour in money winnnings
but soil was looking for his first
major victory.
He got it in the open that year,
playing a shot out of a parking lot
on the 16th hole for a birdie-3 and
went on to victory.
The parking lot was out ol
bounds this year, but Ballesteros
never came near it Tied with
Price at 10 under as they toed off
for the 16th hole, his tee shot was
right in the middle ol the fairway,
and his second shot almost was
right m trie middle of the hole.
It hit the stick and stoppoc
dead. Ballesteros tapped in,
never looked bark.





f

10
1 HE LAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 20,1988
NASCAR teams return to Allison crash site
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Interest
in Bobby Allison's health has inten-
sified in recent days as NASCAR
Winston Cup teams prepare to
make their second visit of the
season to the track where the vet-
eran driver almost died in a crash
last month.
Several top competitors have
indicated that returning to the
Pocono, Pa track will be espe-
cially hard because they'll be
11 linking about Allison during the
running of this weekend's AC
Spark Plug 500.
"It's hard for me to put Bobby
out of my mind said three-time
Winston Cup champion Darrell
Waltrip, who had sizzling runs
with Allison for the title on four
occasions. "I dwell on how he"s
doing when I'm away from the
track
"We had our troubles between
us, but that was a long time ago
Richard Petty told The Charlotte
Observer. "I've been missing
Bobby because with him out I
haven't had anybody to argue
with. But I know all of us arc going
to be thinking of him, specifically
when we run this time at Pocono
Meanwhile, members of
Allison's family said they "fully
expect" the injured star to resume
his stock car racing career if he
wishes.
"There is no reason to expect
anything else Tom Kincaid,
Allison's brother-in-law, said.
"We anticipate a 100 percent re-
covery
"However, we're venturing a
guess when it will be that Bobby
will drive again. No one can
Kincaid spoke after a Thursday
visit with Allison, 50, at the Le-
high Valley Medical Center in
Allentown, Pa where Allison has
been hospitalized since a crash
June 19 at the Miller 500 at
Pocono.
A spokesperson for Allison's
Stavola Brothers team said the
operation is "working on the as-
sumption that Bobby probably
won't be back in 1988 and is
planning on Mike Alexander
driving the No. 12 Buick the rest of
the season "or until Allison is
ready
Alexander, the NASCAR Busch
Series Grand National (sports-
man) points leader, has filled in
fore Allison in the two races since
the Pocono accident.
"Bobby started physical ther-
apy Thursday, and he had an-
other session Friday said Kin-
caid, who is married to Allison's
sister, Cindy. "We're not sure
what is involved not even Judy
(Allison's wife) or Davey (his son,
who is also a Winston Dup driver)
have been in to watch the proce-
dure during the therapy.
"But I can tell everyone that has
been so wonderful in caring about
Bobby that his doctors are
absolutely excited about his prog-
ress.
Allison was the 1983 Winston
Cup champion and is third on
NASCAR's all-time victory list
with 84 triumphs, trailing only
Petty with 200 and David Pearson
with 105. He has been the circuit's
most popular driver six times. He
won the sport's biggest race, the
Daytona 500, in February,
extending his superlative as the
oldest Winston Cup victor.
Allison suffered contusions of
the brain, a broken shoulder, bro-
ken ribs, abdominal trauma and a
broken leg in the accident, which
occurred after a faulty tire blew
out. I le lapsed in and out of con-
sciousness and was on the critical
list for several days. He remains in
guarded condition.
But a hospital spokesman said
Friday that Allison "Is respond-
ing consistently to commands, his
vital signs are stable and he con-
tinues to show improvement
overall
Kincaid said Allison, who has
been visited b y racing rivals such
as Dale Earnhardt, Rusty Wallace,
Phil Parsons and Mario Andretti,
is "fully alert now
I le conceded that communica-
tion with allison continues to be
with hand signals. "Bobby hasn't
yet regained his speech, but doc-
tors are expectant that he will
Kincaid said.
Festival brought benefits
RALEIGH (AP) � The U.S.
Olympic Festival held in North
Carolina last year brought intan-
gible benefits to the state that will
prove more important than its
isible contributions, officials
say.
Perhaps the festival's biggest
residual is credibility.
Hill Carrow Jr last year the
chief executive officer of North
Carolina Amateur Sports, the lo-
cal organizing committee, said
the festival had boosted the state's
reputation in amateur athletics.
"I definitely see the festival as
the beginning, not the end Car-
row said. "It was the departure
point
Ken Smith, now executive di-
rector of NCAS, said the amateur
athletic world had looked on
North Carolina merely as a state
that produced outstanding bas-
ketball and golf.
'But as far as diving or gymnas-
tics, people just didn't think that
we were that interested Smith
said. But after the festival, sports
officials around the world know
that there is interest in North
Carolina in hosting many differ-
ent events
Short-term benefits of that
change are evident. This year the
state has been the site for an exhi-
bition volleyball match between
the United States and Cuba, an
exhibition baseball game between
Team USA and Taiwan, plus
Olympic trials in canoe-kayak,
boxing and taekwondo. The na-
tional championships in canoe-
kayak will be held at Lake
Wheeler outside of Raleigh in
August.
Next year, the pace will
quicken. The national swimming
championships will be March 22-
25 in Chapel Hill, the synchro-
nized swimming national cham-
pionships will be March 30 - April
2 at N.C. Central University and
the national diving champion-
ships will be July 27-30 in Raleigh.
Next year's national gvmnas-
tics championship could go to the
Smith Center in Chapel Hill,
where the largest audience to at-
tend a gymnastics compeitition in
the United States watched the
festival's women's competition.
In 1990, Duke University will be
the site for the NCAA outdoor
track and field championships.
North Carolina has a shot at get-
ting a natioal figure skating cham-
pionship in the next few years,
too, Smith says.
"We are now in the enviable
position of having national gov-
erning bodies (federations that
govern each of the various sports)
contacting us to ask if they can
return to North Carolina to hold
this or that meet said Allen
Keep, communications director ot
NCAS.
"We are having to turn some
down. Next year, for example, we
have so many major events al-
ready scheduled that it would be
difficult to add many more
NCAS officials also hope that
more multisport events such as
the festival can be lured.
World University Games offi-
cials have asked that NCAS to
make a bid to host the 1993 event.
The World University Games,
with 12 to 15 sports, are open to
every country in the world and, in
Europe, are regarded as the sec-
ond most prestigious amateur
sporting event. They have never
been held in the United States,
Recp says.
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Joyner set new world record mark
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) � Two
years ago, Florence Griffith
Joyner was an overweight secre-
tary. Now, she's the fastest
woman in the world.
sprinter Sunday by winning her
semifinal heat in 10.70 and taking
the final in 10.61, with Ash ford
finishing second in both races.
"I don't think Horence's per-
Griffith Joyner set a world rec- formance Saturday makes things
ord of 10.49 seconds, in winning a
qualifying heat Saturday at the
U.S. Olympic Trials, then showed
it was no fluke by beating the
previous record-holder, Evelyn
Ashford, in the semifinals and the
final on Sunday.
Carl Lewis, Jackie Joyner-
Kerscc, Edwin Moses, Willie
Banks and Mary Decker Slaney
a!� � gave fans at the Indiana Uni-
v rsity Track and Field Stadium
viosions of Olympic gold with
weekend victories.
But it was Griffith Joyner who
stole the show.
Prior to her record-setting run,
she posted a wind-aided 10.60
that was below the existing world
rxcrd of 10.76 set by Ashford in
Switzerland shortly after winning
an Olympic gold for the Unites
States.
There was controversy over her
world-record performance, be-
cause the wind gauge showed an
uncharacteristic 0.00 reading. At
the same time, the wind reading at
the triple jump area was over the
allowable 2.0 meters per second
for record consideration.
But she laid to rest any doubts
that she was a world-class
WMWM
easier on the rest of us said
Gwcn Torrence, who also earned
a trip to Seoul by placing third in
the final. "10.49' is so incredibly
fast that I don't think it will be
broken for decades. I think we can
think about 10.76 or 10.79, but I
really don't see 10.49 as being
approachable
Lewis, 27, took the first step
toward duplicating his 1984 feat
of winning four Olympic golds
Saturday by winning the men's
100 with a wind-aided 9.78 time
� the fastest time ever in that
event, but not eligible for recrod
consideration.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 20, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 20, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.616
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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