The East Carolinian, July 6, 1988






COMING NEXT WEEK:
A movie review on Big, the new comedy with Tom
Hanks, by Earlvis, the movie-goer.
FEATURES
A review of 'Jerry's Girls now playing at
McGiniss theather, see page 7.
MHMHH
SPORTS
Psychological aspects of the Summer Olympics, see
page 10.
Mz
Carolinian
Vol.63 No.S
Wednesday, July 6,1988
Serving the East Carolina campus, community since'1925
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Researchers could study Confederate ships
Bv GEORGE THREEWITTS hattln hotwwn �ho Mrmitrtr aiwl (;��.k���1 :i�-i i� it 11 . � . � ��
By GEORGE THREEWITTS
ECL News Bureau
A famous Confederate warship
that sank in the English Channel
should become the object oi an
international study by threecoun-
tnes, East Carolina University
shipwreck researchers believe.
Dr. William N. Still and Gordon
P. Watts, co-directors of the ECU
Program in Maritime History and
Underwater Research, said the
wreck of the CSS Alabama in the
English Channel could be studied
jointly by Franco, England and the
United States. All three countries
claim ownership of the historic
vessel that sank during a Civil
War battle near the coast oi
France.
Still and Watts were in France
during part of June as the only
non-French participants in a lim-
ited study oi the wreck begun bv
French archaeologists.
The Alabama sank about seven
miles from the harbor oi Cher-
bourg, France, after battling the
Union's USS Kearsarge in 1864.
Most historians consider the en-
counter as one oi the two most
battle between the Monitor and
the Merrimac at 1 lampion Roads,
'a.
Remains oi the vessel, some
badly decayed timbers and thou-
sands oi valuable artifacts lying
on the bottom oi the English
Channel area political football in
France, England and the United
States. The French claim they own
the CSS Alabama because they
found it and French divers have
already begun removing some
tion of the vessel.
"I think it is a tremendous proj-
ect said Watts, an archaelogist
who helped discover the USS
Monitor, the famous Civil War
ironclad lost in the Atlantic Ocean
near the North Carolina shore.
"It's a great opportunity for sci-
entists from France, England and
the United States to work together
on a cooperative project he said.
"That's basically what we told
them. If there is something we can
itcd to about 12 minutes on the
bottom because of the depth of the
wreck, almost 200 feet down. Fie
said more extensive work at the
site will require some sophisti-
cated equipment such as a subma-
rine chamber or diving bell.
Watts was able to sec the wreck
from aboard a mini-submarine.
to France claiming the shipwreck
as American property and re-
questing that no salvage permits
be issued until the U.S. decided
who would do the work.
The French, however, say they
own the Alabama under interna-
tional law because it is within 12
miles of shore. And the English
that is what we arc interested in
doing he said.
Watts said he proposed a plan
famous naval fights oi the Civil the work at the site and provide
War running a close second to the advice in planning future excava-
arbfacts. The English say the ship do to help achieve those ends then
belongs to them because it was
built in England.
Tine United States, especially
the state oi Alabama, is claiming
the vessel too. Alter all it was a
Conferdateship and more than 25
southerners lost their lives on the
momingofjune 19,1864 when the
two ships fought in an unusual
sea battle that drew 17.000 specta-
tors on shore and in boats and a
French band playing "Dixie
Still and Watts' of ECU who of-
fer impressive credentials as a
Civil War navy historian and
underwater archaeologist were
called in by the French to observe
the Alabama's 210-foot hull re-
mains. Its timbers and 16-foot
smokestack are badly deterio-
rated. A lot of materials associ-
ated witlv the wreck including
china, cannon, a decorative toilet
and thousands of other items are
that included training a team of strewn over a large area of the
three to four American divers to bottom.
He said only about 30 percent of are claiming the ship too because
L� 11.1'� im f. i it �. ,P . .
it was an English vessel built in
Birkenhead, near Liverpool.
"For those of us in the South, the
ship is a relic said Still. "We feel
attached to it because it is a sym-
bol of a lost cause he said.
"But there is no quesiton in my
mind that the French are the obvi-
ous people to do this project he
said.
'The ship went down in French
waters. The wreck site is very
close to a French nuclear subma-
rine facility. And the French ae
See ECU, page 2
assist in a comprehensive investi-
gation at the site.
So far the French expeiditon,
which has ended for the summer,
has taken measurements and
photographs oi the wreck and has
retrieved some of the outlying
artifacts at risk of being lost in the
strong currents and shifting sands
oi the channel.
"The work that they have done
so far has been excellent Watts
said.
I le said divers have been lim-
"Bcing able to observe the
wreck and the scope of the ar-
chaeological investigation has
given me a lot of insight that we
can hopefully use to straighten
out some of the misconceptions
about the ship that exists in the
United States Watts said.
In efforts to claim the vessel for
the U.S. Sen. Howell Heflin, D-
Ala has introduced a bill declar-
ing that the wreck belongs to the
United States. Last September the
State Department sent a message
Public caught in drug hysteria
By TIM HAMPTON
Nchs Editor
When actor John Belushi was
still making movies, America
wasn't overly alarmed about it.
When Lcn Bias still clectricified
fans with aerial dunks, the public
should be able to search homes
without a court written search
warrant.
A majority, 69 percent of those
surveyed felt school principals
and officials should be allowed to
search the lockers of any student,
thought it only happened to street even those who are not suspected
derilects.
But with the death of actors and
athletes and with the advent of
reports on inner city street gangs,
it seems America is ready to take
drastic measures, even measures
which obstruct civil liberties, to
ing less than a gram (one eighth of
a quarter ounce) of marijuana in
the crew's quarters. The fishing
vessel's catch, $58,000 of scallops,
was confiscated and later sold
with the proceeds going to the
Drug Enforcement Agency.
But with this recent hysteria
oi abusing drugs. Of the 1,012 over illegal drugs, it is surprising
surveyed, 65 percent said the that actual illegal drug use is on
United States should stop send- the decline. The Washington Post
ing monetary aid to countries article used a 12-year study on
known to cultivate drugs, such as drug use among high school sen-
Panama and Columbia, even if it iors to draw this point,
meant depriving poor people in Of high school seniors, 15 per-
thrawt the drug threat, according doing so. cent used cocaine at least once in
to a recent Washington Post sur- Approximately half,49percent, 1987 compared to 18 percent in
vey. said users of cocaine should be 19S1, according to a study con-
While there is a trend towards a given a one year sentence in jail, ducted by the University of
decline in drug use with high including those users who have Michigan. When asked if they
school seniors, public consious- never been jailed before. Another
ncss of substance abuse has con- 11 percent of those surveyed
tinued to increase, the survey thought persons convicted' of
found. This rise in public con- selling cocaine should be given
si uisness is attributed to the the death penalty.
deaths oi athletes and celebrities
and to personal experiences with
the drug problem�half of those
surveyed responsed that they
knew someone with illegal sub-
stance abuse.
With the increase in public
awareness on the issue of illegal
thought the use of cocaine was a
great risk, 90 percent of the sen-
iors answered yes in 1987 while 70
responsed the same in 1981.
For marijuana, the study found
that while the use of the drug has
steadily decreased among seniors
since 1978, the precicved risks of
the substance has increased from
25 percent in 1978 to 68 percent in
1987.
The surveyors concluded that if
the survey is indicative of the
public's view towards practicing
drug enforcement, then we aren't
headed in the vright; direction.
Infringingon civil rights may hurt
drug education and prevention
programs which are long-term
answers to the illegal drug issue
Kim Roose interrupts Carol Owens as she tries to call from one
of the campus pay phones. (Photo Jon Jordan�Photolab)
drug abuse, those surveyed felt
stern enforcement must be initi-
ated to solve the drug problem.
Over half, 54 percent thought
police should be allowed to ran-
domly stop and search cars. A
third. 34 percent, said police
This public consiousness, to
stop the drug problem regardless
of the cost of personal rights,
seems to mirror America's prc-
ceptions. The federal government
has acted with its 'zero tolerance'
program in efforts to stop the
import of illegal substances.
Under the program, any boat or
ship may be confiscated if any
amount of illegal drugs are found
abroad.
The 'zero tolerance' allowed the
Coast Guard to detain a Pamilco
County fishing vessel after find-
High schoolers delve into medicine
July Fourth celebration
entertains Greenville
By FRANCEINE PERRY
ECU News Bureau
When they return to school this
fall, 16 rising Pitt County high
school sophomores will have
some unusual experiences to re-
late if an English teacher asks
them for essays on "How I Spent
My Summer Vacation
Keisha Cratch has learned to tie
surgical sutures and practiced
stitching by sewing up tomatoes
and grapefruits. Leonard Davis
observed a pancreas transplant
and a heart by-pass operation.
Candace Garrctt has been study-
ing X-rays of cancerous tumors
and consulting with a surgeon
who performs mastectomies.
"Experiencing 'science in ac- professor who has been working
tion' and having a close mentor- as assistant to the ECU chancellor
relationship with a professional for special assignments,
scientist should make these stu- Students live on campus during
dents more comfortable with the two-week program. Each day
choosing further science studies, they observe scientific activities
pursuing college and working or perform simple chores with a
toward a science career says STEP mentor � usually an ECU
STEP program director Christine faculty or staff scientist or a pro-
Fitch, fcssional with one of the county
"It in one thing to enjoy reading health agencies who has volun-
about science ur conducting ex- tccred for STEP mentoring re-
periments in the school labora-
tory she said. "It is quite another
thing to experience the real world
of science with its exactness, ex-
citement and intellectual discov-
ery.
sponsibilities. Students are paid a
stipend for their on-the-job hours
and take their meals in ECU din-
ing facilities.
During the evenings they at-
tend lectures and seminars on a
Monday, thousands of ECU
students gathered on the bank of
the Tar River, downtown, with
the Greenville public to celebrate
the Fourth of July. Our 212th year
of independence, for many,
brought a day off from work and
young.
The Hawaiian Tropic Bikini
Contest caused quite a stir as la-
dies showed off their tans.
At approximately 7:45, North
Carolina's own, Nantucket, took
STEP offers a wide range of variety of topics, such as leader-
Stephanie Winder has done word experiences to the participating ship, career development, money
processing on a microcomputer in students, as they compile re management or workplace be-
the Health Sciences Library at search data, assist with cost esti- havior. Speakers at these evening
mates for medical and scientific programs are also volunteers �
procedures, collect water and soil from the campus and local corn-
samples, and assist with experi- munities.
was an excellent excuse for many the stage on the town common.
to listen to some rock and roll. Their program of music included
Young and old alike enjoyed a lot of their old music that many
the parade, booth exhibitions and older people enjoyed, as well as
good ol' fraternizing. The 5 kilo- the young, while the young
meter race got the day going for thrilled at their new music that
enthusiastic runners and the rub- carried a harder, screamier
ber ducky race down the Tar sound.
River provided that unique touch The day was capped off with
that every event of this sort needs, approximately 30 minutes of fire-
drawing mirthful chuckles from works; which were shot off as Def
the older and squeals of delight Leppard blared in the back-
zr.d anticipation from the very ground.
ECU.
Others have assisted in research
laboratories at ECU's main and
medical campuses and per-
formed clerical duties for ECU
scientists.
The students were participants
in ECU's annual summer Science
"The program is supported by
the various campus departments
and by contributions from local
industries Dr. Rose explained.
"It's really a cooperative effort
between the campus and the
community
STEP students have access to
ECU's recreational facilities and
go on special ou tings arranged for
them by local churches and the
minority fraternities and sorori-
ties at ECU. Some of the strictly-
for-fun activities they've enjoyed
have been horseback riding,
swimming, karate demonstra-
tions and attending Greenville's
outdoor Sunday-in-the-Park con-
certs.
The mentor relationship is par-
ticularly important to the young-
sters who work int he program,
according to Dr. Rose. This close
See STEP, page 2
ments.
It's a realistic, up-close view of
science and medicine. Students
see that the daily routine of the
clinic or laboratory offers its own
Enrollment tops 4,000
Track Enhancement Program particular rewards, seldom re-
(STEP), an arrangement devel- scmbling the sensationalized
oped by two ECU faculty mem- world populated by lab-coated
bers to encourage talented stu- actors in films and on TV.
dents to pursue careers in the "They quickly learn that it's not
fields of math and science. Em- all drama Dr. Fitch said,
phasis of the two-week program STEP was the brainchild of Dr.
is on two groups who generally Fitch, a member of the ECU
don't aspire to these fields � ra- School of Education faculty, and
cial minorities and females. Dr. Mary Ann Rose, a nursing
ECU N�w� Burrju
Enrollment for the second ses-
sion of summer school at ECU is a
record 4,331 students. Registrar J.
Gilbert Moore announced today
(628).
It marked the first time that a
second session enrollment ex-
ceeded 4,000 students, Moore
said. Last year's second session
enrollment was 3,960.
Total enrollment for the two
summer sessions reached 9,611.
The all-time record for a summer
session was for the first session
this year at 5,280 students.
Moore said there were 2324
full-time undergraduates and 888
full-time graduate students in the
second session enrollment with
1,119 part-timed students.
The total includes 1,701 men
and 2,630 women, he said.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 6,188
Swimmers can avoid earache
What is swimmer's ear?
Swimmer's ear occurs most of-
ten during the summer months
when heat and humidity are high.
Heat and humidity cause the
membranes of the ear canal to
swell. Wax (cerumen) in the ear
swells because it absorbes water
that enters the ear canal. This
causes the ear canal to become soft
and mushy making it easy for
bacteria to grow.
Symptoms of swimmer's ear
include:
� itchy ear
� mild to severe pain
� pain in the car while chew-
ing, talking, or moving the tragus
(cartilage that projects inward at
the opening of the car canal)
� hearing may be decreased if
there's enough tissue swelling of
collection of pus in the ear canal
� fever
� take aspirin for mild pain or
Health Column
By Mary Elesha Adams
see a health care provider for
medicines to help you cope with
severe pain.
� place a few drops of a drying
agent, such as alcohol, in the cars
to decrease swelling.
� take antibiotics or use antibi-
otic drops if prescribed by you
health care provider.
Prevention of swimmer's ear
includes keeping the external ear
canals dry, especially after swim-
ming or bathing.
LLACE
Donna
Edwards
owner
Treatment
includes:
of swimmer's ear
ECU researchers
invited to sunken ship
Continued from page 1
vcrv interested in the American
Civil War Still said.
'They are fascinated that a
battle in the Civil War took place
in French waters he said.
The battle date was June 19,
1864. Eight days earlier the Ala-
bama steamed into Cherbourg
Harbor, badly in need of repairs
after spending almost two years
at sea wreaking havoc with Union
trading ships.
Three days after the Alabama
docked, the Kearsarge, whose
mission was to find the Alabama,
dropped anchor outside the har-
bor. With its prey trapped inside
the Kearsarge posted a 24-hour
watch, issued a challenge to fight,
and then waited patiently.
It was an age when officers were
gentlemen. Capt. Raphael
Semmes, the commander of the
Alabama responded to the chal-
lenge.
"My intention is to fight the
Kearsarge as soon as 1 can make
the nexessary arrangements he
wrote.
News of the impending battle
spread quickly. It brought 17,000
spectators to the French coast ana
on the Sunday morning when the
Alabama weighted anchor doz-
ens of smaller boats followed as a
French band played "Dixie
The battle lasted 90 minutes.
The heavily armed Kearsarge was
too much for the Alabama which
was designed as a merchant ves-
sel rather than as a warship.
The enemy's shot and shell
soon began to tell upon our hull,
knocking down, killing and dis-
abling a number of our men in
different parts of the ship wrote
Semmes in his official report.
The Alabama tried to escape to
shore but the Kearsarge blocked
its route and fired another volley
of iron from its cannon. Down,
bow first, went the Alabama. As
manv as 15 of its sailors were
killed in the fight, 21 were
wounded and 10 were drowned.
Semmes was picked up by an
English ship and escaped to Brit-
ain as the Kearsarge celebrated its
victory.
While in France to observe the
wreck site, Watts and Still placed
wreaths on the grave sites of the
Confederate sailors on the June 19
anniversary date of the battle.
STEP teaches students
Continued from page 1
x?rsonal contact can motivate
students to work hard and de-
velop an understanding of sci-
ence, she believes.
"A caring and inspiring indi-
vidual can often make the differ-
ence between pursuing and aban-
doning a career choice. When
mentors 'adopt' students, we be-
lieve that there is greater likeli-
hood of their pursuing science
and mathematics careers she
explained.
The 1988 STEP mentors were
from the biology, chemistry, ge-
ography and sociology depart-
ments in the ECU College of Art
and Sciences, the ECU Institute
for Coastal and Marine Re-
sources, the ECU Health Sciences
Library, the Pitt County Mental
Health Center, the Regional Reha-
bilitation Center, the ECU Animal
Resourscs and Shared Research
Rcsourses laboratories, the ECU
School of Social Work, and the
surgery and radiation oncology
departments in the ECU medical
school.
I
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Their actions and comments
about the shipwreck brought
great attention from news media
in France and England where the
American Civil War is almost as
popular as it was when the war
was fought.
"I am amazed at the amount of
interest in the Civil War said
Watts. "There arc actually Civil
War re-enactment groups in Eng-
land he said. I le said the war is
also popular in France, Belgium,
Switzerland, South Africa and
Australia.
"This interest is something of a
result of the Anglo and Franco
Confederate sympathies that ex-
isted during the war Watts said.
He said the so-called "lost cause"
of the South brought great interest
and support from parts of Europe
especially England and France
during the Civil War.
The French invited Watts and
Still to be a part of the project this
summcrbecause of the reputation
the two researchers have acquired
in shipwreck study. Both have
worked with the USS Monitor
project. Watts helped find the old
ironclad in 1973. He was also the
first to dive and see that wreck
and he planned future archaelol-
gical work at the site.
Still has researched and written
several books about the Civil War.
His major interest is in the Union
and Confederate navies. One of
his most popular books is "Why
The South Lost The Civil War a
volume he co-authored.
Watts and Still say the ship-
wreck in France has the potential
of being one of the biggest ship-
wreck research projects.
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Market destroyed by what
might be natural explosion
CHICAGO (AP) � A super-
market was destroyed by two
explosions that erupted minutes
after about 40 customers were
evacuated because of the smell of
gas.
Nine people injured in the ex-
plosions Monday were treated
and released from area hospitals,
said Scott LaGreca, a fire depart-
ment spokesman.
"We could smell gas real
strong said Jack Hewitt, a cash-
ier at the Suocr Buv Grocerv on
the city's west side. "We were
opening the doors to get some air
when it blew up. I was knocked
into the street
The force from the first explo-
sion blew out one wall of the
two�story building, crushing
three cars in the parking lot. An-
other explosion followed seconds
later, arson investigators said.
"At this point, it looks like it
couldbeanatural-gascxplosion
said Detective Joe Campbell.
The East Carolinian News. On top of it.
Every week. Join Tim Hampton and the
news staff every Wednesday this summer.
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President Ah Khamen
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Iran Air jetliner shot I
U.S. Navy,
ported
He :
Tehran rcv,
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Therad
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Moslem west Beirut.
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subject (the hostages)
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Donna
Edwards
owner
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Iran threatens to avenge act
Till FAST ('AROl IN1AN
UJI Vt DSs
NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) -
resident Ali Khamenei of Iran
said today his country has the
� ht to avenge the victims of the
ran Air jetliner shot down by the
S. Navy, Tehran Radio" re-
"tod.
I le did not say it, how or when
Uhran would seek revenge. Iran
-aid all 2Q0 people aboard the air-
raft were killed in Sunday's mis
attack.
The radio, monitored in Nico-
i quoted Khamenei as saying:
' an considers it to be its definite
i ight to avenge the blood of mno-
v ent children, men and women
In Beirut, the spiritual guide
or Iranian-hacked guerrillas
lolding foreign captives in Leba-
n was quoted as saying today
tat the hostages should not suf-
� r because the U S. Navy shot
own an Iranian jetliner
Wednesday for some of those gathered Monday for a memorial
killed in the attack. service at a Shiite mosque and
Iran's revolutionary patriarch, regularly burst into chants of
Avatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, Death to America
87, vowed Monday to dedicated On Tehran radio Monday,
his "worthless life" to fighting the Khomeini said: "We must all be
United States. His designated prepared for a real was and go to
heir, Ayatollah Huss in Ah Mon the war fronts and fighl againsl
tazcri, oalled tot total w ar Amoiu a and its !a keys. I donah
Foreign Minister Ali-Akhbar my worthless life for the sake of
Velayati said Iran's revenge our victory
would extend to countries that
ha c helped the I 'nited States in
the Persian Gulf, lie did not
elaborate.
Iranian divers searched tor
more bodies from the Iran Air
Airbus A300, which was de
stroyed on a 150 mile flight from
the Iranian city of Bandar Abbas
to Dubai, across the Strait of! tor-
muz in the United Arab Emirates
The United States said the
crew ot the I ss Vincennes mis
But an anonymous caller pur- took the plane for an Iranian t ! 1
ting to speak for Islamic Jihad, fighter and said it failed to re
spend to se en radio w arnings
An Italian naval spokesman
said today that an Italian frigatern
the gulf heard the Vincennes ra-
dioing mi approaching aircraft,
requesting identification and
change ot com 11 e er, the
spokesman, Capt. Alfrei ! Sa tto
Iran's top diplomat in London said the Italian ship could not
d hinted that the attack might determine whether the Iranian
danger the lives of IS Western airliner was flvine outsid the
(h holds Americans Terry
nderson and Thomas Suther-
� d, threatened to kill one ol
m in revenge. It was not pos-
e to authenticate the call. Is-
ihad has said it would au-
nticate its statements with
tographs ot the hostage
� stagcs in Lebanon.
In Tehran, mass funeral serv-
ices were scheduled today and
common ial aircorrid r. as Italian
officials had said Monday.
In Duh
1ml
Khomeini is rurro ted to be in
poor health or near death, but the
radio did not explain what he
meant h his lastomment.
Iran accuses the I nited States,
vvhi( h it calls theirenl Satan, of
backing Iraq in its nearly 8-year-
old war with (ran.
In I ebanin. Sheik. Moham
end I lusscin Fadlallah, the spir-
tual leader of I lezbollah, or Part)
�l (.ml, was quoti d as saying he
finds "no justifi ati n for making
the hi � tag s a t. unt fur a matter
u ith vvhi( h the had no link "
I lezbollah islx li ved I � be the
ambrella tor the pro Iranian
�ihiite Moslem factions holding
�iiost ot the foreign h istages in
I .ebanon.
In London, Iranian chai
1'affaires Mohammed Basti was
. isked v hether thi � fon ign !
are n u in ater dan r
'II is a natural human reac i
t n he said. "People in the area,
th ' have s. en this thing with
ir own eve: Naturally the)
d iu�l n lin ii liften I
In the southern gull, Iranian
news reports said 168 bodies had
been recovered and the search
area had been expanded.
The commander of the search
and rescue operation said bodies
had been recovered up to five
miles from the area where most of
the jetliner's debris fell. It was hit
at 7,500 ft et by at least one o( two
missiles fired by the Vincennes, a
guided missile cruiser.
According to the Iranian re-
ports, the 38 bodies of foreigners
recovered were those of 12 United
Arab Emirates citizens, eight Indi-
ans, eight Pakistanis, six Yugo-
slavs, two Kuwaitis, cn Italian
and an Afghan.
3W

Every Tuesday College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college ID. .50 skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. REDBANKS RD.
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Reports on Iran-held hostages constrast
EIRUT, Lebanon (AP) - � me
spiritual guide for Iranian-backed
guerrillas holding foreign cap-
tives in Lebanon was quoted as
saving today that the hostages
should not sutler Ixvause the U.S.
Navy shot down an Iranian jet-
liner.
But an anonymous caller pur-
porting to speak for Islamic fihad,
which holds Americans Terry
Anderson and Thomas Suthcr-
I � treatencd to kill one them
tor Sunday's attack.
1 he caller did not elaborate and
it was not possible to authenticate
the call. Nlamic Jihad has said it
would authenticate its written
statements with photographs at
"1 firm rlo jusuficafHn for Tnak
ing the hostages account for a
matter with which they have no
link Sheik Mohammed 1 lussein
I adlallah said in a interview with
the Sohofiya News Agency, a
! cbanese newsletter based in
M slem west Beirut.
"There's no link between this
subject (the hostages) and the
�tin down of the plane
Fadlallah is spiritual leader ot
'� �!� zbollah, or Party of God, which
is belie ved to be the umbrella for
pro-Iraninan Shite Moslem fac-
- holding most oi the 18 for-
ers, including nine Ameri-
cans, missing in Lebanon.
The United States said the USS
ation
im ), ' the Ye
radio qu� �ted the anon n .
caller as saj ing toda. 11 spoki
Arabic.
Islamic ihad or Isl . '
War. i believi dm : ip ol
Shiites loyal to Iran s n
I.
llOta: .
n�ty� saidol the call:
mat ion t � h re i s
:i to 1 lezbollah or
citimate thine
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Coming Attractions
Wednesday, July 6
Watermelon Feast and
Seed Spitting Contest
University Mall - 3 p.m.
Thursday, July 7
Concert: The Amateurs
University Mall - 9 p.m.
Upcoming Events
Monday, July 11 Movie: Jagged Edge
I Iendrix - 9 p.m.
Wednesday, July 13 Watermelon Feast
University Mall - 3 p.m.
X
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Sponsored by Student Government Association
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9
:





QHfe �aat (Earnltntan
Clay Deanhardt, c�� ��,��
Chip Carter, m, �.��
)AMES F.J. MCKEE, IWrtoroM
Tim Hampton, Nn.uo.
DOUC, JOl iNSON, G Sports �.�,
Carol Weti ierington, f���s &.
Michelle England,&�&�.��.
Debbie Stevens, w�y
Paul Dunn, g sp,em�
Jeff Parker.s �,��,
TOM FURR, Cirruiiioii Manager
Mike Upci iurci i, ��. m�
JOHN W. MEDLIN, WDiredor
Mac Clark, BwrwMougcr
July 6. 1988
OPINION
Page 4
T-Shirts
Controversy all sound and fury
X JUST STOPPED BY TO TELL VA-
X THINK YOUR T-SHIRT'S REALLY
Each of us is going to die one day.
There's nothing anyone can do
about it. And once you die, you are
going to stay that way for a very long
time. Admittedly, this isn't a very
attractive prospect. It's no wonder
people get scared.
And when people get scared, they
lash out. Blindly. Most times, they
lash out at the most obvious targets,
trying to prevent the inevitable.
the "Stop AIDS" T-shirts, though
birthed from the marriage of homo-
phobia and greed, also point out this
fact. While nothing but a slam
against an alternative lifestyle, they
also raise the question of how hu-
man beings face death.
Humans can die in many slow or
quick ways. People smoke, drink or
fornicate themselves to death
slowly, or go out in a hurry in wars
or suicides.
This doesn't mean that your
average smoker is gladly puffing
away to his eternal reward, but the
minute you are born, you begin
dying. One of the illusions of control
we like to give ourselves is that we
can control our destinies, and when
we will die.
The shirts point to this illusion,
and show how futile it really is. The
real illusion though, is the contro-
versy these shirts have raised.
Surely, the designers of the shirts
had no aspirations to control the
AIDS plague with their product.
Trying to stop behavior or attitudes
with a T-shirt is would be as hope-
less as trying to give death the slip.
Has anyone ever forced their chil-
dren to pray in school because they
saw it on a bumper sticker?
But even more hopeless is trying to
stop a thing like the "Stop AIDS" T-
shirts from being sold. Aside from
the implications of free expression,
it's been seen time and again how
the more controversy a product has
painted on it, the more attractive it
looks. The best solution in cases like
this is to ignore the item and not
purchase it. Problems arise when
people try and tell other people
what to buy and what not � witness
the PMRC.
To quote Joan Armatrading,
"Don't use your army To fight a
losing battle Don't let idealism and
self-righetousness blind you to what
is really happening. If anyone really
wants to help stop AIDS, the ad-
dress for the American Foundation
for AIDS Research is 900 Wilshire
Blvd 2nd H East Satellite, Los
Angeles, C A 90036.
To act locally, information about
ERASEDjthe. EatriRepn AIDS
Support'arict Ean&ttoirgrdup is
avialable from Health Educator
Mary Elesha-Adams in the Student
Health Building.
BUT IF �U VOfiT WORK OUT fWI H6RP,M W MM HMB W $�Nt
wo to we MtPwesr mi msmueR,
Shirt doesn't show truth
To the editor:
I am appalled. After reading Mr.
Sturz's rebuttal directed toward Mr.
Lightner and Mr. Sommers, I felt
compelled to write. Is a "true AIDS
victim" just a "nasty" homosexual, a
"pathetic" IV drug-addict, or a
"naughty" heterosexual? No, of
course not. Let me enlighten every-
one a little more.
AIDS docs not select homosexuals,
promiscuous heterosexuals and IV
drug-users as its sole victims. AIDS
can kill anyone. ANYONE. As of yet,
AIDS is only known to be transmit-
tablc through blood, semen or urine.
Tsk, tsk, Mr. Sturz. I seriously
doubt that anyone "got what they
asked for" if they contracted AIDS,
and they just so happen to fall under
one of those clever judgemental cat-
agorics stated above. I also doubt
anyone would ask for a completely
debilitatinglife-threatening disease.
Mr. Sturz's obvious underlying
theism is of great concern. I don't feel
anyone should be allowed to hide
behind reverent beliefs, point fingers
and ridicule others that seem "less
desirable
His impudence toward any "unde-
sirables homosexuals most forth-
right, shows an immaturity not seen
by many so-called college educated
persons. I also feel that his trite con-
cluding statement, "How much were
those t-shirts, anyway?" was in ex-
treme distaste.
I would like to make obvious one
small detail Mr. Sturz forgot when
mentioning, "Horrors! A t-shirt that
dares to tell the truth being sold in
downtown Greenville I disagree
again.
I suppose if the t-shirts in question
depicted not one, but all of the pos-
sible ways AIDS could be contracted,
I and many others would be much
less offended. I am afraid, however, it
only depicts and reinforces the homo-
sexual aspect of the disease, and it is
quite tacky. The perverse social rami-
fications felt by the gay community
are uncalled for, and these t-shirts
only enforce this terrible ignorance,
(in regards to whom AIDS is con-
tracted by.)
I must say that B.L.Ts and Sweet
Willy's have the right to display,
advertise and sell those t-shirts. I also
feel that these two merchandisers are
exhibiting a certain type of distasteful
American capitalism� "Anything to
make a quick buck They foster igno-
rance, and ignorance only exists
through fear.
Robin Andrews
Junior
Anthropology
)
Student suggests new t-shirt
To the editor:
This letter is concerning the now
infamous "Stop-AIDS" t-shirt scan-
dal for lack of a better word. I'm sure
there will, be a few who will in fact
find a better word. Oh well
I, like my fellow students Steve
Sommers, Evan Lightner and Toni
Tage, find these t-shirts morally de-
plorable. Unfortunately, I disagree
with these students on one main as-
pect.
That aspect is that I feel the shop
owners have a right of expression as
guaranteed by the First Amendment
to the Constitution. This right to free-
dom of expression translates, in my
opinion, to the shop owners' right to
display this ignorance and for those
students showing a desire, to own
and subsequently wear it as well.
In searching for solutions to our
problems in society, we often fall into
the trap of promoting simple solu-
tions to very complex problems. By
forcing the shop owners to cease
selling this item, we are in effect doing
just that, however admirable it is on
the surface.
From the shop owner's perspective
I can't expect them to not take advan-
tage of a financial situation especially
when their loss is likely to be a gain for
other competitors. This is especially
relevant when considering their fami-
lies and their livelihood as a priority.
Again, I can't express how much
my own distaste is for these shirts.
The ultimate problem is one of de-
mand. As long as the demand exists
there will be those to exploit it. That is
a fact of life, though unfortunate, and
attempting to pressure stores to stop
selling what they have a constitu-
tional right to sell, to reiterate, is not
the answer.
In light of these facts, along with the
fact that I don't proclaim to offer a
quick remedy other than a change
from within, I would like to propose a
small suggestion to these proprietors
and whoever else sells such trash. (I
have my right to use my own words
also. Gee, isn't America great?)
In a slight way it will allow an
avenue for Sommers, Lightner, Page
and myself to promote how we feel
and at the same time probably gratify
the store owners. Offer a t-shirt with
the inscription STOP IGNORANCE
and have the symbol for a stop, that is,
a circle with a line drawn diagonally
across it, superimposed over the pres-
ent t-shirt's insignia. I guarantee there
will be more of these t-shirts sold than
the previous one. If you don't believe
me, then offer such a shirt.
As a final note, I'm glad there are
people on campus who have con-
stantly sought to rectify situations
where they feel the need. I say this
with the assumption there will be
numerous occasions (and have been),
where I am in disagreement with such
protests. Nevertheless I find it en-
couraging. As for the individual who
felt that AIDS victims, intravenous
drug users, smokers, ets. don't de-
serve compassion well, man, I feel
sorry for you.
Tim Morris
Senior
Political Science
Amoral business ?
To the editor:
It is difficult for a rational person to
deny that there is an existence of an
AIDS hysteria and that the victims of
the AIDS virus have also become a
victim of society because of this AIDS
phobia. When two little boys get their
house burnt down because they have
AIDS, one would be blind to say an
AIDS hysteria has not set in.
I have a friend who has an adorable
niece that he loves very much. Even
though there is absolutely no way
someone can get AIDS from simply
touching another person, his sister
won't allow him to see his niece be-
cause he is gay. His sister's homopho-
bia, AIDS phobia and ignorance has
torn his family apart. It seems difficult
to me that anyone would want this
type of ignorance to exist, and this is
why I was so shocked to see the
"STOP AIDS" t-shirts.
In fact, I would even say that maybe
the people who sell the shirts do not
see these social ills. That maybe they
aren't evil and immoral people, but
rather businessmen that were taught
if they have a product that sells, sell it.
This is the problem. It's called amoral
business practices and it wears the
slogan, "If it's good for business, it's
good
Unfortunately, the business moral-
ity is not uncommon in America and
the world today. This theme is bigger
and more destructive than probably
most people realize. Amoral business
practices and turning the cold-
hearted buck is not only-rapidly de-
stroying people's personat psycho-
logical security, as in the homophobia
hysteria case we arc discussing here,
but also it is destroying the land, the
sky and democracy in some parts of
the world.
A company could be ripping down
South American rain forests, increas-
ing the hole in the ozone layer, invest-
ing in the racist and anti-democratic
regime in South Africa, or selling
"STOP AIDS" t-shirts and they would
all be guilty of judging money to be
more important than things they
think are not directly and immedi-
ately affecting them.
And the truth stares us in the face.
B.L.Ts and Sweet Willy's by selling
"STOP AIDS" t-shirts, make it hip
and cool to be ignorant, hateful and
homophobic. This is why it is so
important to send a message to
amoral businessmen that rings loud
and clear, a lack of ethics is bad for
business because we won't patronize
you.
Frankly, I can't see how money
could make someone happy when the
way the money was made makes
others so miserable. But apparently,
this is the case. So, the job is up to us to
curb the demand for the shirst and do
our part in changing the business
ideology based on profit alone. Boy-
cott B.L.Ts and Sweet Willy's until
they stop selling "STOP AIDS" t-
shirts.
Steve Sommers
Philosophy Political Science
Junior
Animal options
To the editor,
Your ill-advised Editorial Opinion
in last Wednesday's paper entitled
"Animals In Science: Humanity Must
Prevail has me a bit confused. My
bewilderment stems from the fact
that I know you to be a man of consid-
erable intelligence and intellectual
capacity. Yet the views expressed in
your article on animal experimenta-
tion seem to belie the very qualities I
ascribed to you above. Please allow
me to explain.
After reading the editorial in ques-
tion I said to myself, Surely he can'tbe
suggesting a ban on the use of lab
animals. So, for clarification, I read
the article again. Upon encountering
such lines as "The number of animals
killed each year, to promote the re-
search in medical labs, animal supply
labs and other little-known aspects of
science, is phenomenal, " and "Not
only is the practice of animal defama-
tion cruel, it is useless the author's
convictions became emphatically
clear: He was indeed advocating the
suspension of lab animal experimen-
tation.
Okay, 1 thought, I'm an open-
minded kinda' guv. What are our
options to animal experimentation.
Well, the editor himself proposed one
alternative to replacing live animals:
machines. Granted,our technological
accomplishments today are astound-
ing. However, the sophisticated
equipment and technology required
to simulate the complex, and often
mysterious life functions oi a living
animal remains the stuff of Issac Asi-
mov science fiction novels.
The second choice invokes the
permanent cessation oi all experi-
mentation that would utilize live ani-
mals. This drastic measure would
most assuredly see the stagnation oi
an unacceptable amount of medical
research. Invaluable exploration into
the prevention and cure of cancer,
AIDS, cardiovascular disease, and
mvriad other human diseases and
afflictions would, lacking the pre-
ciousjdata obtained from anmyUre-
searcl, bfeffettk&craW
even halted in some areas of experi-
mentation. Progress in conquering
man's ailments is agonizingly slow as
it is. Therefore option number two is
also invalid.
This brings us to our third and final
option. Since the slowdown and stop-
page of medical progress is unaccept-
able, and per your request, we cannot
use lab animals anymore, we are left
with onlv one choice: Humans! Our-
selves! The Nazis did it in WWII,
right? Dr. Joseph Mengela won't have
a thing on us. We'll conduct our ex-
periments on some poor transients
just passing through town. Nobody
will ever miss 'cm, right?
Of course I'm only kidding. But in
all seriousness the reason the third
option is not a viable alternative
should be pretty obvious. We cannot
perform these sometimes lethal ex-
periments on people-human beings.
Option three is out. Every conceiv-
able possibilitv has been exhausted.
Thus, the inescapable conclusion
presents itself; it is not a pretty one,
but it is nevertheless the only logical
choice. We need animal experimenta-
tion. And in the end, you have to
realize that the benefits gained for all
mankind mitigate the harsh sacrifices
in the laboratory.
T. Scott Batehelor
Junior
Physics
i
)
c
A
M
F
P
O
U
R
S
u
M
Gorb
MOSCOW (AP) - The
munist Party conference
proved Mikhail S. Gorbacj
call for an overhaul of the lei
ture but did not endorse hisl
posal for a strong presid(
according to a resolution
lished today.
In his speech last week ot
the national conference he
called, Gorbachev said,
president of the USSR. Sup
Soviet should be granted
ciently broad state authj
powers.
"Specifically, the presii
could exercise overall guidai
the drafting of legislation ar
major socio-economic pr -
decide on the kev issues 11
policy, defense and national
rity, chair the Defense Cou
and name the prime mimsU
said.
That would have mad !
presidency, now a larp
monial post, the locus of
power. Most authority r
with the party general
� Gorbachev � and the pi
ruling Politburo.
The resolutions adopted
5,000 delegates, as pbulishc
day by Soviet newspapers,
silent on the question of presi
tial authontv.
Evidenc
NEW YORK (AP) � Rev
released documents show
Chicago-based FBI agent hi
knowledge planning v.
colleagues a retribution
paign against a black agenl
cording to published report
The FBI documents also
that the white agent, Garj
Miller, conceded that in
forged agent Dor I I
signature on an app
death and dismemberrr
ance for the black agent I
The New York Time-�
Tuesday's editions.
Rochon has said tl at � .
ing in Chicago, �� I
assigned from 1954 I f
family's safety was i
threatened in anonyrnot
pWbrie 'calls and obstcerit.
letters from while FBI agenj
has called the unsolicited
ance policy a death threat.
Miller, who was suspe
Jim & Tami
return to S.
FORT MILL, S.C. (AP) -
founders Jim and Tammy B
say about 2,400 followers ti
out over the Fourth oi July
end at Kevin's House to suj
the couple trying to win ha
crumbling ministry.
The receptions on Sundaj
Monday afternoons markej
second anniversary oi the
that was originally planne
home for handicapped chile
The Bakers, who left the
try amid a sex-and-monev
dal last year, used the oocasi
thank supporters ar H
they're on their way back
ministry.
Jolinny Owens, cf Orangt
snapped picturec oi the Da
Monday, thenasKed them to
graph his book abom tne Rej
USA ministry. His wife,
sported a "Welcome Back In
Tammy to PTL" button.
"I'd like to see them
back said the 40-ve.
Owens. He said he started
ing the Bakkers on teldj
while recovering from a
heart attack.
"They deserve to give it
he said.
During a prayer service.
ful Tammy Bakker suggest
the Bakkers and many '
lowers would benefit fro:
sons learned during the s�'
monev scandal that hnrU
couple into the limelight
of the PTL in March 198:
"I think we'll all be bcr
cause of this she said.
Jim Bakker has id he
$100 million line of credit
the Fort Mill-based rrunist
of bankruptcy. He has yet
lease details of that buyout
The bankruptcy trustee hi
he is not interested in havi
Bakkers take over the
and Heritiage USA theme
Bakker estimated that oi
day the couple had greetc
people over the two after
He called the turnout "one
greatest miracles I've ev(
I've never seen a support I
we had today





ly cure!
hirt
the
inien-
t
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ition.
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ii
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and final
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lest we cannot
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m onlv kidding. But in
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I a viable alternative
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metimes lethal cx-
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Junior
Physics
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Gorbachev plans overhaul
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IULY 6,1988
MOSCOW (AP) - The Com-
munist Party conference ap-
proved Mikhail S. Gorbachev's
call for an overhaul of the legisla-
ture but did not endorse his pro-
posal for a strong presidency,
according to a resolution pub-
lished today.
In his speech last week opening
the national conference he had
called, Gorbachev said, "The
president of the U.S.S.R. Supreme
Soviet should be granted suffi-
ciently broad state authority
powers.
"Specifically, the president
could exercise overall guidance in
the drafting of legislation and of
major socio-economic programs,
iecidc on the key issues of foreign
policy, defense and national secu-
rity, chair the Defense Council"
nd name the prime minister, he
-aid.
That would have made the
presidency, now a largely cere-
monial post, the locus of Soviet
power. Most authority now rests
with the party general secretary
� Gorbachev � and the party's
ruling Politburo.
The resolutions adopted by the
5.000 delegates, as pbulishcd to-
day by Soviet newspapers, were
silent on the question of presiden-
tial authority.
The resolution on political re-
form did propose creation of a
new elective body, to be known as
the Congress of People's Depu-
ties, which would meet annually
to set general policy and elect
members of a smaller, full-time
legislative council, the Supreme
Soviet.
The Supreme Soviet new has
1,500 members who meet twice a
year to give rubber-stamp ap-
proval to party policy.
The resolution also would limit
officials to two five-year terms in
the same party or government
office, eliminating the common
practice of what amounts to life-
time tenure for many officials.
The congress also would "elect
by secret ballot the president of
the Supreme Soviet the docu-
ment said. But it was silent on
what that officer's duties would
be.
Andrei A. Gromyko, the long-
time Soviet foreign minister and
Politburo member, was elevated
to the presidency of the Supreme
Soviet by Gorbachev, but he per-
forms the largely ceremonial
functions of head of state while
Gorbachev wields powei as head
of the Politburo and the Defense
Council.
It was not immediately clear
whether the 13-mcmbcr Politburo
had moved to block Gorbachev's
plan.
A senior party spokesman told1
reporters Friday night, just after
the conference ended, that the
delegates had approved
Gorbachev's proposal when they
adopted seven resolutions in the
final hours of the four-day ses-
sion.
The spokesman, Central
Committee Secretary Alexander
Lukyanov, said the party meet-
ing, the first in 47 years, had
agreed to the proposal to give the
powers Gorbachev requested to
the president.
He said the body also approved
the general secretary's more con-
troversial plan to have the party
leader at every level � local, re-
gional, republic and national �
stand for election to head his or
her governmental council, or so-
viet. That would consolidate
party and government power in
one person, who would have to be
elected not only by the party or-
ganization but by the lawmakers
as well.
Gorbachev did not specifically
say the party general secretary
should seek the presidency, but
Lukyanov said the conference
made the recommendation to
Evidence of FBI discrimation
NEW YORK (AP) � Recently
released documents show that a
Chicago-based FBI agent has ac-
knowledged planning with white
colleagues a retribution cam-
paign against a black agent, ac-
cording to published report.
The FBI documents also show
that the white agent, Gary W.
Miller, conceded that in 1985 he
forged agent Donald Rochon's
signature on an application for
death and dismemberment insur-
ance for the black agent's family,
The New York Times reported in
Tuesday's editions.
Rochon has said that while liv-
ing in Chicago, where he was
assigned from 1984 to 1986, his
family's safety was repeatedly
tlircatcned in anonymous tele-
phone calls fcfid obSctcnt; rtftfstJ
letters from while FBI agents. He
has called the unsolicited insur-
ance policy a death threat.
Miller, who was suspended
Jim & Tammy
return to S.C.
FORT MILL, S.C. (AP) � PTL
founders Jim and Tammy Bakker
say about 2,400 followers turned
out over the Fourth of July week-
end at Kevin's House to support
the couple trying to win back the
crumbling ministry.
The receptions on Sunday and
Monday afternoons marked the
second anniversary of the house
that was originally planned as a
home for handicapped children.
The Bakers, who left the minis-
try amid a sex-and-money scan-
dal last year, used the occasion to
thank supporters ar;I to say
they're on their way back to the
ministry.
Jo! nny Owens, of Orangeburg,
snapped pictures of the Bakkers
Monday, then asked them to auto-
graph hisbook about the Heritage
USA ministry. His wife, Ann,
sported a "Welcome Back Jim and
Tammy to PTL" button.
"I'd like to see them come
back said the 40-year-old
Owens. He said he started watch-
ing the Bakkers on television
while recovering from a 1985
heart attack.
"They deserve to give it a go
he said.
During a prayer service, a tear-
ful Tammy Bakker suggested that
the Bakkers and many PTL fol-
lowers would benefit from les-
sons learned during the se: and
money scandal that hurled the
couple into the limelight ;md out
of the PTL in March 1987.
"I think we'll all be better be-
cause of this she said.
Jim Bakker has said he has a
$100 million line of credit to buy
the Fort Mill-based ministry out
of bankruptcy. He has yet to re-
lease details of that buyout plan.
The bankruptcy trustee has said
he is not interested in having the
Bakkers take over the ministry
and Hcritiage USA theme park.
Bakker estimated that on Mon-
day the couple had greeted 2,400
people over the two afternoons.
He called the turnout "one of the
greatest miracles I've ever seen.
I've never seen a support such as
we had today
without pay for two weeks as a Friday and amount to the FBI's
result of that and other incidents first public acknowledgment that
aimed at Rochon, has denied he vvhitc agents may have taken part
was trying to harass Rochon, the in harassing Rochon in Chicago.
Times said. The bureau been sharply criti-
The disclosures came in court cizcd by members of Congress
papers filed in Washington on over that case and other cl
claims.
HUNGRY PIRATE
The Biggest Burrito
ifL You 've Ever Seen!
Stuffed with beef, rice,
lettuce, beans, tomato bits,
sour cream and covered
with enchilada sauce.
Guaranteed to fill you
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521 Cotanche St.
757-1666
$3.25
Served 2 - 5, Weekdays
72-5, Weekends
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The Plaza
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apply to all levels, setting the
stage for Gorbachev to seek elec-
tion to the new presidency next
year.
The texts of the resolutions
were not made public until the
day after a special meeting of the
ruling Politburo, which ordered
party and government bodies to
act without delay in implement-
ing the conference directives.
The Politburo also said a meet-
ing of the policy-making Central
Committee would be held later
this month to discuss how to
implement the proposed reforms.
Another resolution says every
Soviet citizen has an "inalienable
right" to any information on pub-
lic affairs but state and military
secrets.
The delegates also said any citi-
zen attacked in the press should
have the right to respond in the
same newspaper and that the
press must not publish "unobjec-
tive information injurious to a
citizen's honor and dignity
Another resolution attached
"prime importance to improving
drastically food supplies to the
population The shortest route to
that goal, the conference said, is
for bureaucrats to stop meddling
in the operations of collective and
state farms.
Read The East Carolinian
CATCH THE ANNABELLE'S
LUNCHTIME EXPRESS
It's our special quick lunch menu for people on the go!
Just choose your favorite and you'll be refreshed
and on your way in no time
Spaghetti a generous Steak Teriyaki Our special
portion of pasta with meat cut of beef served with snow
sauce. Toasted bread and peas and teriyaki sauce
Parmesan cheese$4.55 on nee $5.45
Fettuccini Alfredo Egg
pasta with a sauce of butter,
Parmesan and Romana
cheese$4.75
Hot Ham & Swiss
Sandwich Thinly sliced ham
with Swiss cheese on grilled rye
bread, plus fries . $3.95
With Chicken
With Shrimp
$6.75 stea'& Cheese Sandwich
Our steak sandwich with
$7 75 me'ted Provoione cheese,
plus fries . . $3.95
Express lunches are served from 11 30 a m to 2 p m daily, except Sunday
nnabdle's
V V RFSTAURANT A PUR
RESTAURANT & PUB
The Plaza � Greenville Blvd � 756-0315
Hours: 11:30am-11pm, Mon -Thurs ,
11:30am-Midnight Fri Sat,
12Noon-11pm Sun
jiffy lube
"AMERICA'S FAVORITE OIL CHANGE"
In 10 Minutes with no appointment
Heres what the J-Team can do for you:
�Change your with .i rrwijoi brand!
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Plus FREE Car Wash with full service!
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(with this ad)
126 Greenville Blvd. Phone 75G-2579 Hours: MonFri. 7:30 a.m6:30 p.m. Sat. til 5:3C
� Let Us Serve You! 3 .
r We Will Gladly Cash Your Checks From Home! �
Fresh Ground Beef
99
$
lb.
5 lb. pkgs or more
All Coke Products
99
2 Liter
$
White
Potatoes
99 �
10 lbs.
Fresh
Mushrooms
99
12 oz. carton
Local Silver Queen
White Corn
6 for
Swifts Whole Heavy
Western New York Strips
$2.99
lb.
Bounty Towels
69 $
79
dozen
Lipton Tea
Bags
100 count pkg.
$99
Limit One with 10.00
Food Order
Fab Detergent
Giant Box 42 oz. size
4.roI1 Charmin
pkg n.
Tissue
99 79
Limit one with 510.00 food
order exdudingf advertised
specials
Limit 2 with S10.00 food order
excludingf advertised specials
Orchard Boy
Apple Juice
99
12 gallon jug
Peanut City
Country Hams
l
39
lb.
Prices Effective Wed. July 6 - Sat July 9
Store Hours: Sun. 1-6 p.m.
MonSat. 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Mastercard & Visa Accepted
W1C - Food Stamps Welcome
Quantity Rights Reserved
211 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks From E.CU.
OVERTON&
Supem





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
1U1.Y6, IQSS
Classifieds
HLLP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNCILOR
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field No Monetary
Compensation, howver room utilities
and phone provided. Call Mary Smith,
Real Crisis Center 758 III 1 P.
DO YOU LOOK GOOD IN A BIKINI?
We need models for a Legs video Excep-
tional earnings Apply in person only!
Promotions Unlimited. 1902 A Charles
Street, inside the Insurance Center, right
across from the Pirates Chest M F, 1 I
pm. You must be 18-36 yrs. old 5ft to5ft.
- 8in. tall Weight must be proportional
with heteht
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND rilOTO-
COPiING SERVICES: We otter typing
and photocopying services We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also Low-
est hourly rate in town SDF Professional
Computer Services. 106 Tast 3th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville. NC 752-
3694.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE � I argef than dorm-size
retngerator Onl used for one year.
Good condition Plea -e call 830 0492 and
leave a message.
EOR SALE Matching dresser, with
mirror, night table and headboard with
frame mattress and box spring S350.00or
best otter.
EOR SALE - 5 speed girls Schwinn
Earth Crusier. Red, like new. Includes
Krv ptonitc lock S2:i1 00 or best otfer.
R1NGOLD TOW IRS CONDO � for
sale H unit. 2nd floor, fully furnished.
Tav market value S-t7"0 00 Make me an
otter 919-787 1378
month. Utilities included Near ECU
Campus. Call 738-1274 after 530 p m.
TERSON
PANTANA BOB'S � Enhancing your
summer with drink specials every night.
STEVE AND NANCY� Do vour laundry
and clean your party shirts for New Potato
Caboose on Thursday, July 7, and for Capt.
Cook and the Coconut (a tribute to Jimmv
Buffctt) on Friday, July 13, at the Attic.
GROG'S - THE LATE NIGHT PLACE
TO HE EIG1 IT NIG! ITS A WEEK July 7,
hat and band aid merit.
FOR Rl NT
R1NGCOLD TOWERS � Apts, tor rent
Furnished. Contact I lollicSimonovvich M
752 2865
IOR SI HI 1 Ash 1 bedroom apt, tire
place, pool, tennis court, washerdryer
hook up. Pets allowed Call 756 0949
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED imme-
diately to share 3 bedroom apartment. 1 3
rent (S121 00) and 13 utliocs. Call 752-
3124.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NIIDED to
share a 2 bedrot m apt Washer 'dryer fur
nished w apt NQNSMOKER please' Call
Donna at 830 5274.
ROOMS EOR KFNT $165.00 per
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent"
UNTVERSTIY APARTMENTS
2S99F. 5th Street
�txxrjtcd War t-CU
� Across From Highway Patrol Station
1 united of(er-$275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Willums
7S6-7815or8W-1937
Office open - Apt 8, 12-5.30 p m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartirk-nts. energy efliCient, free water and
siwor, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles onlv. Sl a month, 6 month
least- MOBILE 1 SOME RENTALS couples or
singles Apartmer.t and mobile homes in Ajlea
Gardens near Brook Valley Oxintrv Club
Contact J T. or Tommy Wtlhams
756-7815 '
Announcements
S.UMMERLJBRARY HOI RS
Mondays - Thursdavs 8:0a.m. - 11:00
p.m Fridavs 8:00 a.m. - (re p m Satur-
days 9 00 a m. - 6:00 p.m ; Sundays 12.00
noon - 11:00 p.m. The Media Resources
Center will be open: Mondays - Thurs-
days 8:00 a.m. -9:30p.m Fridavs 8:00a.m.
3 00p.m ; Saturdays 1:00 p.m. - 6:00p.m
Sundays 12 noon - 9 iX) p.m.
HANG GLIDING
Evervone is invited to register for a
summer hang gliding adventure trip to
Nags Head. NC June 22 - uly 12
CO-OP SUMMER FALL
Three jobs � Congressional Office,
Washington, DC. June � August. Salary:
SI000.00month. Student must have gen-
eral office skills and some experience with
word processing. Short hand skills de-
sired. ANo, Tampa i lectric Company,
Tampa, Florida, ail semester Salar)
S1135.00month. Word processing
courses andor word processing experi-
ence required. Will be expected, to return
to job Summer 1989 if work is satisfactory.
Salary will increase. Finally, Positions
available in the Nags 1 lead area begin-
ning June 1, 1988 Salary: S4hour, 30-40
hrs.wk. 1 lousing available near worksite
S50.00wcck. Students must have 2.5
CPA. Will receive S500 scholarshipsti-
pend for college expenses when returning
to school in the fall I or all these positions,
contact Ruth Peterson, 737 ty7l, immedi-
ately. Students may apply at Co-op office,
2028 CC building.
5K RUN
Faculty, staff and students are encour-
aged to register for the summer 3k walk
run uly 2 at 8 00 p m at Bunting Track.
For additional information, call 757-6387
CANOE OUTING
Faculty, statt and students are invited
to register for a anoe outing une 22-July
12 in 204 Memorial G mnasium. For addi
tional information, call 758 6387
FREE THROW CONTEST
"Swish 1 loop it up with the Intramu-
ral free throw eon; �-( to be held at 3.1X1
p.m. Julv 18, in the Memorial Gymna-
sium. For additional Information, call 737-
6387
MCAI
Candidates planning to take the Medi-
cal College Admission Test on Saturday,
September 17, 1988, are strongly re-
minded to have their registration post-
�lri ,au itn l)'s' -n- - ' . � - . .
;�.arvcnP ;iLui i'vo. inc e reg-
istration receipt deadline is September 2,
1988. Applications are available in the
Testing Center, Speight Building Room
105, East Carolina University.
BUCCANEER
All students: there arc still a few copies
of the 1983-1986 yearbooks left at our of-
fice. If you would like to receive a copy,
just comeby the Publications Building and
pick one up.
GOLF CLASSIC
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for the summer golf classic. Julv
11 at 4:00 p.m in MG 102. For additional
information call. 757-6387.
WATER POLO
Faculy, staff and studens are invited to
register for intramural Co-rec water polo
July 6 at 4.00 p.m. in MG 102. For addi
tional information, call 757-6387.
WORK STUDY
If you are work study eligible for 2nd
Summer Session andor Fall Semester,
you are encouraged to contact the Co-op
office about off-campus placements. Call
757-6'l79 of come by the Generall Class-
room Building.
Robeson Co. Indians expect
to be released after hearing
RALEIGH (AD � A hearing
for two Robeson Countv Indians
held without bond since their ar-
rest Feb. 1 on hostage-taking
charges were held in New Bern
Tuesday and both are expected to
be released following the out-
come, a defense attorney says.
A ruling last week by the 4th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in
Richmond, Va found that the
government had violated the Bail
Reform Act of 1984. The law al-
lows certain defendants to be held
without bond, but a detention
hearing must be held within five
days. A detnention hearing for the
Indians was held 16 days after
their arrest, attorney William
kunstler said in a telephone inter-
view from New York.
"We tried to get them out today
(Monday) Kunstler said. "We
thought Independence Day
would be a great day for them to
come out. "They will be released
he said. 'The circuit court has
ordereci it
But the hearing could not be
scheduled until 2 p.m. today at the
dcferal courthouse in New Bern
because of the holiday, Kunstler
said.
Fddie 1 latchcr, 30, and Timothy
Jacobs, 19, arc set to go to trial July
11 on federal charges of hostage-
taking and manufacturing illegal
firearms. The two are charged
with holding up to 20 people
hostage at The Robesonian news-
paper office in Lumbcrton in
Robeson County, near the South
Carolina border.
They are being held at the Cra-
ven County Jail in New Bern,
about 120 miles cast of Lumber-
ton.
Conditions of release were dis-
cussed Monday during a confer-
ence call that involved Kunstler
and Bob Warren, a defense attor-
ney from the Christie Institute
South in Carrboro, N.C; the U.S.
Attorney's Office in North Caro-
Hna;andUS. District Court )udge
Terence Boyle, Kunstler said.
The terms of release discussed
in the conference call include that
the two stay out of Robeson
County; that they live with
friends or relatives; and that they
not violate any aspect of the law
even though they may consider it
symbolic free speech, Kunstler
said.
"These are the condition we
proposed to the judge months
ago he said. "They are our con-
ditions
Kunstler would not say where
the two men will live, saying
"there are a lot of knives out for
them
Assistant U.S. Attorney John
Stuart Bruce would not comment
on the conference call. "1 do not
feel at liberty" to discuss it, he
said, adding there was no one
with the U.S. Attorney's Office
who could discuss the call.
"The Court of Appeals minced
no words in its opinion Kunstler
said, adding the court called the
detention "a flat violation" of the
time requirements.
The two men had gone before
Magistrate Wallace Dixon on Feb.
2 but didn't have their detention
hearing until Feb. 17. At that time,
Dixon ordered them held without
bond. Boyle upheld the
magistrate's decision at a hearing
in April.
Kunstlor said Dixon contends
the two Indians waived their de-
tention hearing, saying they were
afraid to be released. But Kunstler
said defendants cannot legally
waive their own hearing.
Although the trial is scheduled
to begin July 11, Kunstler said
there probably will be a continu-
ance. He also said he would try to
have the trial held in the Faycttcv-
illc division court, which includes
Robeson County.
"It's our position to have it in
the Favcttevillc division he said.
"That
s where everything happened;
that's where all the witnesses are.
The district will have a reasonable
proportion ot blacks and Indians
to get on that jury. To try it else-
where would raise severe consti-
tutional questions
State schools
are best bet I
RALEIGH (AD � The bottom
line for a college education these
days is cost, so the best alternative
for the majority of North
Carolina's college-bound stu-
dents is attending a public or pri-
vate school in the Tar Heel state,
educators say.
According to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education, 93 percent of
North Carolina's first-time col-
lege students attend school in the
slate.
"Knowing the number and
range of institutions in the state �
and the tuition policy and the
financial) aid policy � it would
be astonishing if the overwhelm-
ing proportion of students didn't
go to college in North Carolina
said Raymond Dawson, senior
vice president for academic af-
fairs at the University of North
Carolina.
Melva Cooper, president of the
N.C. School Counselors Associa-
tion, agreed with Dawson's
analysis.
"The bottom line is: "How
much does it cost?" Ms. Cooper,
who is a counselor at Hickory
High School, said. "Fewer and
fewer of your middle-class fami-
lies are getting financial aid
Only three other states enroll a
higher percentage of their own
residents who attend college �
�H29i
SAV A CENTER
DOUBLE COUPONS
On Manufacturer s Cents-Off Coupons See Store Fo; Details Prices Effective Sun Juiy 3 Thru
Sat July 9. 1988 Quantity Rights Reserved Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.
U.S.D.A. CHOICE GRAIN FED
Boneless Whole
Bottom Rounds
18-24 lb.
avg.
Cut Free
US DA CHOICE GRAIN FED
Bottom Round
London Broil
Great On
The Grill
1.99
SMITHFIEID
Premium
Sliced Bacon III
JAMESTOWN
1.39
Hungry 8
Franks HI iV
PLUMP & JUICY
New Jersey
Blueberries
1.59
basket
100�0 PURE
Crisco
Oil
1.89
GREAT ON ICE CREAM' SFl
Comstock
Toppings
I b4b w
MTN. DEW.PEPSI FREE.RE
Pepsi
Cola
OR MET
Limit One With
�10 Minimum
Purchase
2ltr.
btl.
LIGHT�GOl.D�RfcGUt AR
Coors
5.19
ALL FLAVORS
Ann Page
Ice Cream
ALL VARIETIES
Minute Maid
Orange Juice
SQUEEZE
Parkay
Margarine
�16 oz.
btl
1.39
1.69
85
HAM!t.TON�SPEC!AL TRIM�LOW SALT
E-Z Karve
Smoked Ham
Shank
Portion
1.08
PERDUE GRADE A
Oven Stuffer
Roasters
88
hll HiHt�AbSORTED SIZES
19c
Cut
Watermelon
RICH & NUTRlTIOUb
California QQ0
Broccoli each ww
JMP�JUICY�3 3 SIZE
California
Black Plums
COOKING GREENS
Kale or
Collards
NABISC( �RE HI AR R - ). dt E
Oreo
Cookies V
1.99
White House
Apple Sauce
98
WHIFL�Abb, RTED�DESIGNER
Bounty
Paper Towels
Limit One A lh
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58
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Towels
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703 Greenville Blvd Greenville
S11 111 111
i?i
25th
� i l
1
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'Bull
H I
and
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5 tl
i?cmsl
ing '
ch vh n t 5 1
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baseball m
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with life One e �
involves a confen
mound in which the pla
other t n their n
�-ides the 1
Thcpitchcrcan tpito
his hither i m the
second baseball cant catd
ground ball because his clove





I Ml- l-ASl ROI ININ
Features
x t I
ER
ONS
Summer Theater opens with 'Jerry's Girls'
H i
Aarve
1 Ham
08
Stutter
sters
8
19
990

l wDl H RDT
I A M.t
; ISummer Tieatcr's
had an auspicious
nda night, and it
1 1 Isis am indication,
summer should be
(ven ille And nee.
Is is an nproai sous
to tin ivork errv
gave us su h
: ' 1 : lards as
Man and "La
1 lis popular
nted in the 1 � �
1 1 llaboral
aild
I :
then
e by
r the
nent
set
I s to
md intere
tun
and keep it from being repetitive.
While most ol Monday night's
performance was entertaining
and well staged, there were
enough gliches that it at time be-
came annoying. The ECU Sum
mer 1 heater prod nction of
"Jerry's Girls" is good, but one
step below where it should be.
I he highlight ol the show, and
the sv ene stealer, is (. !amillc Savi-
ola. She performs the comic roles
through most ol the show, and her
timing is impeccable. Saviola
keeps the audience in stitches,
especially as the tap dancing
child in 1 a Your Troubles
Aw.n " and as Manic in the first
rendition ol that song.
Saviola open the show in a
comic role ol a bigshot female
executive who takes care of every-
dy elses problems, moving
1 a ilv into ' Just 1 eavc Everything
lo Mr 110m "Hollo Dolly This
sets the tone tor the rest of her
performances so that, in the end,
the audience is laughing anytime
she simply walks on the stage. In
the end, though, Saviola proves
her talent as a dramatic vocalist in
the touching 1 imc 1 leals Every-
rhe sudden change in
Saviola's character protrayals is
surprising, refreshingand believ-
able.
Unfortunately theother leads in
the show. Donna Drake and
Kirsten Childs,often have trouble
holding their own on the stage.
Drake's performance grew
stronger as the night went on, but
she suffered from a weak begin-
ning in "It Only Takes A Mo-
ment whereit was often difficult
to hear her or understand her
vocals. She performs powerfully,
though, in "ltd le Walked Into My
Life from "Mame And by the
end oi the show d es not need the
amplification system she used
earlier in the show.
It was difficult to understand
Childs throutout the night. If the
microphone was not directly on
her, her voice olid not carry to the
back oi he theater, and the mike
often made her voice sound
deeper than it is. By the end of the
show technicians wcrcturningup
the volume on the speakers when
Childs took the stage alone, and
that made tor a very unpleasant
buzzing noise from the speaker
feedback.
Childs, however, wascasily the
best dancer of the three leads, and
her performance in "That's How
Young 1 Feel a dance number
featuring the six woman en-
semble in addition to Childs, was
her strongest moment in the pro-
duction.
The ensemble, Brenna Alonso,
lamce Booth, Paula Iras, jami
Ross, Ciiia Weatherman and Babs
Winn, performed admirably both
in backup and stage-front role
Kirsten Childs, Camille Savoila and Donna Drake "Tap Your Troubles Away" in 'lei:
opened the Summer! heatre's 2sth season Monday night in McGinn is Auditorium.
1 heir stage movement and dance
moves were vv( 11 hon ographed,
and they shared the stage well.
There were a couple of times
when the group was a little out of
when C hilds sang was only one tract I
problem. Even more annoyii g
was the placement of the direc- v. I I
tional microphones so that the Girls
singers often walked in and outol . .
: I ith i i h other, but it is not range. 'The change from natural
ornia
Plums
Q0
: ibly noticablc
( )nc of the highlights oi "Jcrr) 's
CirN" is definitely the costuming.
rom Saviola's child sailor cos-
tume to the stripper outfits to the
evening gowns worn by Drake,
the costumes played an important
rolcin the effect ol the whole play.
While "Jerry's Carls" was a
good plav, several technical prob-
cms, hopefully the result ol open-
ing night jitters, proved distract-
ing and often annoying.
The buzzing of the speakers
I

ce to speaker enhanced
throws the audience off-balance.
Another, more easily remed
problem were the number of ai I I
people walking about behind the
stage. Often, when only the v r
back drop was down. shad. i -
could be seen as people walked to
and fro behind the stage arrang
ing scenery. That can be v r I
trading, especially when so much
oi the show d pt nds on wat'
the entire stage.
Often the little things can de-

car's
Pickin' the Bones
Boner moves tables in Gaston
in emm BOM HI AD
Apparently, I wasn't listening
when God decreed that then I I
my summer was � ing to be sj
Undine new and uncoi
they plan. Well, we aren't most return h me w tl
people. We like to plunge right
I 1 w r
I s i s o
hi of Hello DoII' combines the voices of Donna Drake, Camille Savoila and Kirsten
1 . � the besl highlights of the show. Although poking fun, it was a winner.
Bull' is a season hit
Bv I R1 'IS HAMPTON
ity
owels
80
1L
.
i - an
auks with
I 1 ire" and
: ill Dm
: . fe to
. �' 1 It
ill in it
ball t im
i I iv t!
I play-
in
els
399
279
reenville
1
md oul :
t I � � in m film
. �� � topi linking.
�1 on
It
much.
� � � k, j u s t t h r Meat,
i.d thi � theme
�� tl 1 A.o.
ms tei I to tlunk too
. i n they n ally should
n it be pref( rming.
A baseball movie, "Bull Dur-
scemstoconcernitscll more
t ih life )nc example ol this
dves a conference on the
tnd in which the players have
ther things on their minds be-
les the ensuing game.
ITie pitcher can't pitch because
his father is in the stands. The
� nd baseball can't catch a
ground ball because his glove has
a hex on it. 1 he third baseball and
the � h rl p can't decide what
: , t their teammates tor
a ,vedding present.
1 he coa h v omes out and tells
them to hue candle holders. And
ba: cball tans always thought the
pitcher and the catcher talk about
balls and strikes in a conference
en the mound
The storyline surrounds a
young pitcher,an v eteran catcher,
and a witch) woman.
Annie pla 1 bySusanSaran-
don, is our narrator. Early on,
Annie tplain her hoi e in the
religion ol baseball there are
s beads on Catholic w tv
beads and 208 stitches on a base-
ball and baseball is more inter-
sting. With her multitude of
andles, tassels, and her freaky
lo king house, Annie is a witch.
Hut she is a good witch and (me
which teases her male subjects.
Alter luring men into her bed-
room, Annie ties them up with
! tassels and (don't read
this next few word - if von think it
will offend you) reads poetry to
tiem!ood poetry at that, she
reads them V hitman (Walt, not
Slim) and D ki nson.
Annie cho 1 �. S one oi the Dur-
ham Bull placer every year to be
her beau and mystically every
ear her beau goes onto play in the
major leagues. Oi course she
copulates with the player and
tca hes him the essentials in both
the life game thing and the dia-
mond shaped game. Oh, by the
way Annie knows everything; she
understands zen, quantum phys-
ic, lunar thought, and how to
throw a good fastball.
Annie's choice of a designated
lover comes down to two;a young
fireballer nicknamed Nuke (Tim
Robbins), and a 12-year veteran
catcher named Crash (Kevin
Costner). After inviting them
both over to her green witch
house, she tells them that they are
both candidates in what she says
is a metaphysical attraction.
Crash, the true romantic, says the
hell with metaphysics and lets the
youngster have his share of
witchy-booty.
Crash is a cool dude. Viewers
instantly respect his character
because they know that he is
BULL (Earlvis refuses to use the
Boneian term ii "boss" to decribe
Crash). Crash spent 21 days in the
'show' (the majors) and those
three weeks were the greatest
days of his life. With most of his
career spent in the minors, Crash
has now received the shaft of the
organization and is demoted to
the pits of pro ball, the single-A
bulls.
(rash's assignment with the
Hulls is to teach young Nuke how
to control his fastball. The veteran
first educates Nuke to obey his
catcher by allowing a lead-off hit-
ter to tee-off on a fastball, sending
it over the fence. "It was like he
knew I was going to throw a fast-
ball Nuke said to Crash. "He
did, I told him was Crash's an-
swer.
So Annie and Crash are both
devoted to cultivating Nuke's
pitching and they do a pretty
good job. Nuke starts winning
games, transforming the Bulls
See 'BULL DURHAM' page 8
into adventure, even it our verte-
brae are still 1 cked into the shape
1 ; a tion mark.
The first thing we did was take
a short cruise around the cove I
ways of traveling over every miles an hour doesn't sound fast
single body ol water in North to college students used to d
Carolina. Maybe I waslistening to that over the . .d bump near
Michael Jackson sing about un
I w. - t 1
:ipl
I � �
I pulled aloi

� - r� tl

'
clean girls at the time.
In any event, it was during the
t a.m. trip up to 1 .ike C Iast �n
undav nil
�rning
Cotton dorm. But over the wakes b
and swells caused by Fourth ol Not 1 h
fuly nautical traffic, 45 mph puts amii �
you that much closer to the after- I I on I r
that finally life of your choice. ites, we had
.as indeed my Then they decided it was time tim s,andt
calling. Only something akin to an the Bonchead learned how to wa- di .
almost divine commandment tcrski. 'The actual skiing was ;� :
could hav( gotten me into 11 rth- pretty easy. All you do is and
bound car at that unearthly hour, there. But getting up that's what 1 never knew I
especially after sweating through sends many screaming into the many tl ngs; . I tie I
only two hoursof alcohol induced late afternoon,
sleep. It's difficult at first. As the boat
We ate breakfast at what is starts out, it creates a big wake,
possibly the slowest Hardee's� in That wake tends to aim for
the world. Already a restaurant part of your anatomy. Those little
at lake enemas are what they don't left tl
tell you about when you learn to matose with e
ski. n the !
No, they just point and laugh as R kin the world
you trv to simultaneously hang . I Amei ! I . id �
on to the rope and protect your gued con I iti nal
rear from an unexpected liquid lions with I
an
a li
po
- � :

chain whose employees move
approximately the same pace as
blind postal clerks, the store we
ordered from took eight minutes
and 13 seconds to give us bacon
and egg biscuits And hash
brow ns.
Had we asked for ketchup, we injection. 1 was more than re- 14th
might still be there. But we didn't,
so the rest oi our journey was
xssible. Not comfortable, but
licved when it was decided to try a Kid
inner tubing. They wei
This was something I thought 1 byalargccij 1 nanwho
understood. After all, I tamed the ii I I they move p
mighty Tar River in a tube. But no, forhim ITheydidso .
this was to be a different tubing severalimp rtantl
pro, ess. bodies threal I to 1
In this one, the tube was tied to si part in pi
1
possible.
Ever tried sleeping in a front
seat that won't lean back farther
than the length of the glove com-
partment door? While strapped
into a seatbelt so scratchy that the the back of the boat. The driver It: I out t .
welts it leaves won't be covered then proceeds to cut back and task, for the nativ kefed
up, even by a good second degree
sunburn? Well, sleep may elude
vou, but one getsa new respect tor
masochists.
'Two spme compressing hours
forth as tast as the engine of the the how- ' ' dinner,
boat will allow. a night 1 ' in w;
All this turning, along with only two of us got fishing hooks
those darn wakes! tend to either snagged in oui I ads from ;
A) Lift the tube and tuber a good fishermen on the bi it was
ter, wewhccled lip into the lake foot above the surface ot the wa- time to return home,
areaIf you haven't been to Lake ter; B) Send the tuber careening to- As we trudged wea
Gaston, let me tell you what to wards shore at upwards oi 30 First Amendmentmobile, the
expect Water. Tons of it. mph in a kind of whiplash effect; large cigar smoking man d
1 don't think one can call it a lake or C) Send the tuber cartwheeling us to move the tables back 1
though. "Small ocean or headfirst into the water, going track of what happened after that,
"melted Alaska" are terms that under with the grace oi a small, but they tell me that alter mo ing
seem to fit more precisely. I un- dead animal. one table, 1 lost it
derstand they tried to map it once. Option C) also pries your eyes Thev sedated me and put me in
The expedition left in 1906, and is open bv centrifugal force, so that the car As we drove away, they
due back next year. your eyes receive the same kind ol say I tried to crawl out the win-
Most people upon reaching a treatment your posterior did on dow, all the while -creaming
set destination like to pause, sit the skis. Whatever color eyes you "Tables' I'm not leaving til 1 move
back and stretch a bit before have to begin with, the pigment is another table' 1 want to m
plunging into whatever activities forced out by the impact, and you more tables' I'm better now
I





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JULY 6,1988 Page '
Summer Theater opens with 'Jerry's Girls'
By CLAY DEANHARDT
Ccncral Manager
The ECU Summer Theater's
?5th season had an auspicious
beginning Monday night, and if
lefty's Girls" is any indication,
the rest of the summer should be
fun for the Greenville audience.
Jerry's Girls" is an uproarious
musical tribute to the work Jerry
I lerman, who gave us such
I roadway and film standards as
Hello Dolly "Mame" and "La
Cage Aux Folle� His popular
work is well represented in the
musical revue, which is also writ-
ten by Herman in collaboration
with Larry Alford.
What makes this show stand
opart from the normal revue fare
we see at Kings Dominion and
Carowinds is in part the wit and
irreverence with which Herman
I eats his own work. "Hello
oily" for instance, is sung first
a drunken piano player, then
b) the audience, and finally by
three mock-divas fighting for the
stage. The same kind oi treatment
i- given to "Mame and the
humorous light put on these
songs enchants the audience and
provides for some of the best
moments in the show.
Mixed in with the humorous
numbers are enough solid, seri-
ous vocal and dance pieces to
keep the show fast and interesting
and keep it from being repetitive.
While most of Monday night's
performance was entertaining
and well staged, there were
enough gliches that it at time be-
came annoying. The ECU Sum-
mer Theater production of
"Jerry's Girls" is good, but one
step below where it should be.
The highlight of the show, and
the scene stealcr, is Camille Savi-
ola. She performs the comic roles
through most of the show, and her
timing is impeccable. Saviola
keeps the audience in stitches,
especially as the tap-dancing
child in "Tap Your Troubles
Away" and as Mame in the first
rendition of that song.
Saviola opens the show in a
comic role of a bigshot female
executive who takes care of every-
body elses problems, moving
easily into "Just Leave Everything
To Me" from "Hello Dolly This
sets the tone for the rest of her
performances so that, in the end,
the audience is laughing anytime
she simply walks on the stage. In
the end, though, Saviola proves
her talent as a dramatic vocalist in
the touching "Time Heals Every-
thing Tine sudden change in
Saviola's character protrayals is
surprising, refreshing and believ-
able.
Unfortunately the other leads in
the show, Donna Drake and
Kirsten Childs, often have trouble
holding their own on the stage.
Drake's performance grew
stronger as the night went on, but
she suffered from a weak begin-
ning in "It Only Takes A Mo-
ment where it was often difficult
to hear her or understand her
vocals. She performs powerfully,
though, in "If He Walked Into My
Life from "Mame and by the
end of the show does not need the
amplification system she used
earlier in the show.
It was difficult to understand
Childs throutout the night. If the
microphone was not directly on
her, her voice did not carry to the
back of the theater, and the mike
often made her voice sound
deeper than it is. By the end of the
show technicians were turning up
the volume on the speakers when
Childs took the stage alone, and
that made for a very unpleasant
buzzing noise from the speaker
feedback.
Childs, however, was easily the
best dancer of the three leads, and
her performance in "That's How
Young I Feel a dance number
featuring the six woman en-
semble in addition to Childs, was
her strongest moment in the pro-
duction.
The ensemble, Brenna Alonso,
Janice Booth, Paula Frasz, Jami
Ross, Gina Weatherman and Babs
Winn, performed admirably both
in backup and stage-front roles.
Kirsten Childs, Camille Savoila and Donna Drake 'Tap Your Troubles Away" in Jerry's Girls which
opened the Summer Theatre's 25th season Monday night in McGinnis Auditorium.
tract from the overall effect of a
good show, and that seems to be
what happened here. "Jerry's
Girls" is a strong musical, and it is
obvious a lot of hard work went
Their stage movement and dance when Childs sang was only one
moves were well choreographed, problem. Even more annoying
and they shared the stage well, was the placement of the direc-
There were a couple of times tional microphones so that the
when the group was a little out of singers often walked in and out of
step with each other, but it is not range. The change from natural into its production. While some
terribly noticable. voice to speaker enhanced voice individual performances and cer-
One of the highlights of "Jerry's throws the audience off-balance, tain segments of the show are
Girls" is definitely the costuming. Another, more easily remedied, outstanding, the overall appcar-
From Saviola's child sailor cos- problem were the number of ance of the musical is flawed
tume to the stripper outfits to the people walking about behind the somewhat by these problems,
evening gowns worn by Drake, stage. Often, when only the very Still, the opening of the show
the costumes played an important back drop was down, shadows Monday told of good things to
role in the effect of the whole play, could be seen as people walked to come for this 25th season of plays.
While "Jerry's Girls" was a and fro behind the stage arrang- The opening was much stronger
good play, several technical prob- ing scenery. That can be very dis- than last year's, and it is a credit to
lems, hopefully the result of open- trading, especially when so much the theater that, even with the
ing night jitters, proved distract- of the show depends on watching glitches, this was a much better
ing and often annoying. the entire stage. performance than most of last
The buzzing of the speakers Often the little things can de- year's productions.
Hckin9 the Bones
oner moves tables in
-It i V) I
1 o�-i ; '
This rendition of 'Hello Dolly' combines the voices of Donna Drake, Camille Savoila and Kirsten
Childs is one of the best highlights of the show. Although poking fun, it was a winner.
'Bull' is a season hit
Ireenville
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Staff Writer
Sports movies are rarely good
movies. Bull Durham is an
exception. This flick ranks with
the class of "Chariots of Fire" and
"Hoosiers
But the paradox is "Bull Dur-
ham" allows the game of life to
take the start over baseball. So this
really isn't a sports movie, but
Aait they play ball baseball in it
"Bull Durham" portrays a sea-
ion of the Durham Bulls, a minor
league single-A baseball team
the bottom of the organization),
where 18 year old kids play their
first pro ball and where old play-
irs have their last reprieve in
slaying the game. This proves to
De an effective metaphor; the ins
!nd outs of baseball and life.
If I got anything from this film
was the theme � stop thinking.
When the pitcher loses control on
tj-ie mound, the catcher reminds
him to stop thinking so much.
IDon't think, just throw, Meat
as the line. And this theme
-terns to hold true in the everyday
tfiing, humans tend to think too
ltiuch when they really should
list be preforming.
A baseball movie, "Bull Dur-
ham" seems to concern itself more
Jath life. One example of this
involves a conference on the
mound in which the players have
other things on their minds be-
sides the ensuing game.
The pitcher can't pitch because
his father is in the stands. The
second baseball can't catch a
ground ball because his glove has
a hex on it. The third baseball and
the short shop can't decide what
to give one of their teammates for
a wedding present.
The coach comes out and tells
them to buy candle holders. And
baseball fans always thought the
pitcher and the catcher talk about
balls and strikes in a conference
on the mound.
The storyline surrounds a
young pitcher, an veteran catcher,
and a witchy woman.
Annie, played by Susan Saran-
don, is our narrator. Early on,
Annie explains her choice in the
religion of baseball � there are
208 beads on Catholic weny
beads and 208 stitches on a base-
ball � and baseball is more inter-
3Sting. With her multitude of
candles, tassels, and her freaky
looking house, Annie is a witch.
But she is a good witch and one
which teases her male subjects.
After luring men into her bed-
room, Annie ties them up with
ropes and tassels and (don't read
this next few words if you think it
will offend you) reads poetry to
them. Good poetry at that, she
reads them Whitman (Walt, not
Slim) and Dickenson.
Annie chooses one of the Dur-
ham Bull player every year to be
her beau and mystically every
year her beau goes onto play in the
major leagues. Of course she
copulates with the player and
teaches him the essentials in both
the life game thing and the dia-
mond shaped game. Oh, by the
way Annieknowseverything; she
understands zen, quantum phys-
ics, linear thought, and how to
throw a good fastball.
Annie's choice of a designated
lover comes down to two; a young
fireballer nicknamed Nuke (Tim
Robbins), and a 12-year veteran
catcher named Crash (Kevin
Costner). After inviting them
both over to her green witch
house, she tells them that they are
both candidates in what she says
is a metaphysical attraction.
Crash, the true romantic, says the
hell with metaphysics and lets the
youngster have his share of
witchy-booty.
Crash is a cool dude. Viewers
instantly respect his character
because they know that he is
BULL (Earlvis refuses to use the
Boneian term of "boss" to decribe
Crash). Crash spent 21 days in the
'show' (the majors) and those
three weeks were the greatest
days of his life. With most of his
career spent in the minors, Crash
has now received the shaft of the
organization and is demoted to
the pits of pro-ball, the single-A
Bulls.
Crash's assignment with the
Bulls is to teach young Nuke how
to control his fastball. The veteran
first educates Nuke to obey his
catcher by allowing a lead-off hit-
ter to tee-off on a fastball, sending
it over the fence. "It was like he
knew I was going to throw a fast-
ball Nuke said to Crash. "He
did, I told him was Crash's an-
swer.
So Annie and Crash are both
devoted to cultivating Nuke's
pitching and they do a pretty
good job. Nuke starts winning
games, transforming the Bulls
See T?ULL DURHAM' page 8
BY CHIPPY BONEHEAD
A Wafer l-ovin' Fool
pparently, I wasn't listening
icn God decreed that the rest of
summer was going to be spent
ding new and unconceived
ways of traveling over every
single body of water in North
Carolina. Maybe I was listening to
Michael Jackson sing about un-
clean girls at the time.
In any event, it was during the
eight a.m. trip up to Lake Gaston
Sunday morning that I finally
realized that this was indeed my
calling. Only something akin to an
almost divine commandment
could have gotten me into a north-
bound car at that unearthly hour,
especially after sweating through
only two hours of alcohol induced
sleep.
We ate breakfast at what is
possibly the slowest Hardee's� in
the world. Already a restaurant
chain whose employees move at
approximately the same pace as
blind postal clerks, the store we
ordered from took eight minutes
and 13 seconds to give us bacon
and egg biscuits and hash
browns.
Had we asked for ketchup, we
might still be there. But we didn't,
so the rest of our journey was
possible. Not comfortable, but
possible.
Ever tried sleeping in a front
seat that won't lean back farther
than the length of the glove com-
partment door? While strapped
into a seatbelt so scratchy that the
welts it leaves won't be covered
up, even by a good second degree
sunburn? Well, sleep may elude
you, but one gets a new respect for
masochists.
Two spine compressing hours
later, we wheeled up into the lake
area. If you haven't been to Lake
Gaston, let me tell you what to
expect. Water. Tons of it.
I don't think one can call it a lake
though. "Small ocean or
"melted Alaska" are terms that
seem to fit more precisely. I un-
derstand they tried to map it once.
The expedition left in 1906, and is
due back next year.
Most people, upon reaching a
set destination, like to pause, sit
back and stretch a bit before
plunging into whatever activities
they plan. Well, we aren't most
people. We like to plunge right
into adventure, even if our verte-
brae are still locked into the shape
of a question mark.
The first thing we did was take
a short cruise around the cove. 45
miles an hour doesn't sound fast
to college students used to doing
that over the speed bump near
Cotton dorm. But over the wakes
and swells caused by Fourth of
July nautical traffic, 45 mph puts
you that much closer to the after-
life of your choice.
Then they decided it was time
the Bonchead learned how to wa-
terski. The actual skiing was
pretty easy. All you do is stand
there. But getting up that's what
sends many screaming into the
late afternoon.
It's difficult at first. As the boat
starts out, it creates a big wake.
That wake tends to aim for one
part of your anatomy. Those little
lake enemas are what they don't
tell you about when you learn to
ski.
No, they just point and laugh as
you try to simultaneously hang
on to the rope and protect your
rear from an unexpected liquid
injection. I was more than re-
lieved when it was decided to try
inner tubing.
This was something I thought I
understood. After all, I tamed the
mighty Tar River in a tube. But no,
this was to be a different tubing
process.
In this one, the tube was tied to
the back of the boat. The driver
then proceeds to cut back and
forth as fast as the engine of the
boat will allow.
All this turning, along with
those darn wakes, tend to either
A) Lift the tube and tuber a good
foot above the surface of the wa-
ter; B) Send the tuber careening to-
wards shore at upwards of 30
mph in a kind of whiplash effect;
or C) Send the tuber cartwheeling
headfirst into the water, going
under with the grace of a small,
dead animal.
Option C) also pries your eyes
open by centrifugal force, so that
your eyes receive the same kind of
treatment your posterior did on
the skis. Whatever color eyes you
have to begin with, the pigment is
forced out by the impact, and you
return home with attractive mud-
brown pupils.
Finally, I was taught the prin-
ciples of the ski bob. This banana
shaped balloon is also tied to the
boat and pulled along at high
speeds. Only it's not just your life
at stake anymore no, they say
you balance better with infant
children and old people on the
bob with you.
Not believing this madness for
a minute, I took First Amendment
Lad on there with me. Within 15
minutes, we had capsized six
times, and the last time he had to
drag me back onto the boat by my
type-Ill Coast Guard approved
life preserver.
I never knew there were so
many things you could tie to the
end of a boat and get thrashed
around on. People actually make
a living making new things for
people to tie on the ends of boats.
The adventures on the water
left the Boating Earlvis nearly co-
matose with exhaustion. The
Bonehead fell asleep on the Most
Relaxing Hammock in the world,
while First Amendment Lad ar-
gued constitutional interpreta-
tions with his younger brothers,
14th Amendment Boy and Pre-
amble Kid.
They were rudely interrupted
by a large cigar smoking man who
insisted they move picnic tables
for him. They did so, even though
several important tendons in their
bodies threatened to rip them-
selves apart in protest.
It turned out to be a worthy
task, for the natives of the lake fed
the boys much food. After dinner,
a night ride in the boat in which
only two of us got fishing hooks
snagged in our heads from night
fishermen on the bridge, it was
time to return home.
As we trudged wearily to the
First Amendmentmobile, the
large cigar-smoking man urged
us to move the tables back. I lose
track of what happened after that,
but they tell me that after moving
one table, 1 lost it.
They sedated me ami put me in
the car. As we drove away, t
say I tried to crawl out the win
dow, all the while screamin
Tables! I'm not leaving til I mo
another table! i want to mov
more tables I'm better now





I
8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IULY6.1988
'Bull Durham'brings laughs
Continued from page 7
from losers into winners, after
Annie tells him to refocus his sex-
ual power on his pitching. Nuke
vows not to have sex until he loses
and his long winning streak gets
Annie pretty damn horny.
Just as all her baseball lovers,
Nuke (or Meat as Crash calls him)
lives out the American dream of
playing in the 'show He tells
Annie he will come back, but
Annie says once you leave Dur-
ham you never come back. Maybe
Durham and Greenville really do
have something in common.
Oi course Earlvis will not tell
you the ending, but 1 will com-
ment on the overall effect of the
film. Its realism, humor, and good
one liners are its strong point
while the lone sex scenes in the
endand I said I wasn't going to
tell) seem to make it drag.
The actors have a true sense of
the game of baseball and play it
without pretending. This attrib-
ute is another plus because often
actors in sports movies look like
they can't play the sport worth a
damn.
North Carolinians will feel
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD . . .
(Ka la shan. ka-) 1. the act. process, or
result of gathering (the sections of a book)
together in proper order for binding
IT'S OUR BUSINESS
We specialize in duplicating and binding
multiple page documents
&
evrj
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
We arc open carlv & late (Next to Chico's in Georgetown Shops)
758-2400
Susan Sarandon and Kevin Costner star in the summer hit 'Bull Durham The movie combines
humor, realism and good one-liners and has consequently hit a smooth home run. Catch it.
right at home with this film. The field and sleep in Durham houses. Fayettcville. WRDU is the voice of
actors wear real Durham Bulls The team plays other teams from the Durham Bulls. This movie is a
uniforms, play on the Durham Greensboro, Winston-Salcm and great Tarheel state promotion
FEATURE WRITERS WANTED
IMMEDIATELY
MUST BE A SERIOUS, DILIGENT WRITER
RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS
APPLY AT THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OLD SOUTH BUILDING
THE MORE YOU USE YOUR HEAD,
THE MORE MONEY
YOU CAN GET FOR COLLEGE.
Up to $4000 a year. Just enroll in Army
ROTC at college and serve part-tune in
the Army Reserve or National Guard.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
Steve L. Jones - (Erwin Hall) 757-6967
The East Carolina
SINCE 1964,
BROADWAY'S BEST
AND MORE
JOIN IS THIS YEAR AS WE CELEBRATE OUR �5TH YEAR IN GREENVILLE WITH TWO MUSICALS. A DRAMA. A COMEDY AND THE STARS. OUR WAY OF SAYING, THANKS.
TENNESSIE WILLIAMS'
V
Msi! � It! I i v Hm
on a.
-yV
v.
l
UV'II � S!ns . IJUSI, �
July 11-16
Special Matinee Performances
July 13 and 16 at 2:15 p.m.
mmm mm
THE LIFE OF JESSE JAMES
A SALOON MUSICAL
July 18-23
Special Matinee Performances
July 20 and 23 at 2:15 p.m.
�i
�iii in:
July 4 - 9
Special Matinee Performances
Juh f and 9 at 2:15 p.m.
Starring
Bmadva Veterans
kKISTKN CHILDS
"Sweet Charity" and "Jerry's Girls"
DONNA DRAKE
A Chorus Line"
win if saviola
S uth Pacific" and "Jerry's Girls"
2a piece orchestra hnnes to lift- the songs "f
err Herman in this tfiMuiag musical resue Some
of Herman "s best songs from his hit musicals
Hello DolK Maine . Mack and Mahel la
( age u rUlles' . and others will he performed
4 hrillianth liel and wntillatinii evening"
NY TIMKs
Starring
KIM ZIMMER
"The Guiding Light"
GRAHAM POLLOCK
Broadway's "Big River"
AC. WEARY
Guest Star "Hill Street Blues"
This Pulitzer Prize and N.Y. Drama Critics'
Award w inner is an intense dissection of some of the
most powerful human emotions � greed, dread of
death, love. hate, despair. It is set in Mississippi in
the heat drenched home of the Delta's higgest
cotton-planter.
"One of the most -uccessftil pa of our time"
TIME Magazine
S
Starring
GRANT COODEVE
"Eight is Enough"
MIKE OCARROLL
Broadway's "On Your Toes'
CHABLES EDWABD HALL
The Films "Arthur" and "Gloria"
The life of Jesse James is hrought to the stage w ith
a series of exuberant songs peppered w ith short and
lively narrative sequences. This "saloon musical" had
its beginnings in Chapel Hill. NC, before going to
New York.
"A sprawling, brawling minival spree.
Like Juh 4 and Yen ear's fie all in one"
N.Y POST
Juh 25-30
Special Matinee Performances
Juh 27 and 30 at 2:15 p.m.
Starring
Broad wa Veterans
JULIA CURRY
"Man. Mary"
SARA CROFT
"Lib Dale"
RUTH WILLIAMSON
"Annie '
Five women w bo live in small tnw n hinijiiapin.
Louisiana, like to gossip and huhnnh at Truss s lnal
hair salon Each of the si umnen a i acini: some
crisis some of minor proportions, a couple, life
threatening
4 superb. tnnn dti pl niownc pla
DM1 Ms
WRITE:
East Carolina
Summer Theatre
Greenville, NC 27858
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL:
757-6390
SEASON TICKET PRICES
Mon $30.00 Tues-Sat $36.00
INDIVIDUAL TICKET PRICES
MUSICALS:
Evenings: $15.00 Matinees: $12.00
PLAYS:
Evenings: $12.00 Matinees: $10.00
COME BY:
McGinnis Theatre
5th and Eastern Streets
Greenville, NC 27858
Newd
LOS ANGELES '
television documentary, m
;tected in i
special 10 iv
public t .
right.
Thesui
nTmmai �
lew will pi
from among thebesl
ties produt ed in i
independent filn i
"Each filn
I execu � �
Weiss 'That r I
interc I
The � �
; rcsei �
rrw t
Uvar
laki
i
.
SCO ' I
M
: it '
ai
Th

-
ntai
� iid V
extra
nl
Have Viet nan
NEVN
em i
Vietnam �
Wasl �
ietnam i
ind on
nally w
I ran hoi
But as
( BS d
Within '
- I mil!i.
have vet l
that
.lay, and
icip �
me h
ind abuse
sxifft �
withdi :
5
Overkill
I
Cam
pus v omi
T7"�
Li v is
Sunburnt
Illustrator
And now for something c
want to pay my cartoonb
its still funny and this tin
'Listen to Rick Astlcy U
lOverkill that Taul FreidnJ
lline so it would show up.
e East Carolinian, so w
tay out of that hot sun, ai





I
8
TI IE EAST CARPI INT AN
IULY6,1988
'Bull Durham'brings laughs COLLATION
O CT IS NOT A niRTV WORn
Continued from page 7
from losers into winners, after
Annie tells him to refocus his sex-
ual power on his pitching. Nuke
vows not to have sex until he loses
and his long winning streak gets
Annie pretty damn horny.
Just as all her baseball lovers,
Nuke (or Meat as Crash calls him)
lives out the American dream of
playing in the 'show He tells
Annie he will come back, but
Annie says once you leave Dur-
ham you never come back. Maybe
Durham and Greenville really do
have something in common.
Of course Earlvis will not tell
you the ending, but I will com-
ment on the overall effect of the
film. Its realism, humor, and good
one liners are its strong point
while the long sex scenes in the
endand I said 1 wasn't going to
toll) seem to make it drag.
The actors have a true sense of
the game of baseball and play it
without pretending. This attrib-
ute is another plus because often
actors in sports movies look like
they can't play the sport worth a
damn.
North Carolinians will feel
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD . . .
(Ka la shan. ka-) 1. the act. process, or
result of gathering (the sections of a book)
together in proper order for binding.
IT'S OUR BUSINESS
We specialize in duplicating and binding
multiple page documents
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
We arc open early & late (Next to Chico's in Georgetown Shops)
758-2400
Susan Sarandon and Kevin Costner star in the summer hit 'Bull Durham The movie combines
humor, realism and good one-liners and has consequently hit a smooth home run. Catch it.
right at home with this film. The field and sleep in Durham houses. Fayetteville.WRDUisthevoiceot
actors wear real Durham Bulls The team plays other teams from the Durham Bulls. This movie is a
uniforms, play on the Durham Greensboro, Winston-Salem and great Tarheel state promotion.
FEATURE WRITERS WANTED
IMMEDIATELY
MUST BE A SERIOUS, DILIGENT WRITER
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
APPLY AT THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OLD SOUTH BUILDING
State,
THE MORE YOU USE YOUR HEAD,
THE MORE MONEY
YOU CAN GET FOR COLLEGE.
Up to $4000 a year. Jusl enroll in Army
ROTC at college and serve part-time in
the Army Reserve or National Guard.
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE T0U CAN TAKE.
Steve L. Jones - (Erwin Hall) 757-6967
The East Carolina
�- � mc
SINCEW64,
BROADWAY'S BEST
AND MORE
JOIN US THIS YEAR AS WE CELEBRATE OUR �.5TH YEAR IN GREENVILLE WITH TWO MUSICALS, A DRAMA, A COMEDY AND THE STARS. OUR WAY OF SAYING, THANKS.
Mf � mi no DOl I V I U (.l M 1'U 11, t j
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'
KAMI � 111 LIO DOLIV '
ona

�N
. I3NOIIVXHM � IJOVU

2
n
July 11-16
Special Matinee Performances
July 13 and 16 at 2:15 p.m.
-
THE LIFE OF JESSE JAMES
A SALOON MUSICAL
July 18-23
Special Matinee Performances
July 20 and 23 at 2:15 p.m.

r
� OVs I IUVHVJ 4 MVM � II lOl flsiVUO 1111
July 4 - 9
Special Matinee Performances
July 6 and 9 at 2:15 p.m.
Starring
Broadway Veterans
KR1STKN CHILDS
"Sweet Charity" and "Jerry's Girls"
DONNA DRAKE
"A Chorus Line"
CAMILLE SAVIOLA
"South Pacific" and "Jerry's Girls"
A 24 piece orchestra brings to life the songs of
Jerrv Herman in this glittering musical revue. Some
of Herman's best songs from his hit musicals �
Hello. Doll Mime "Mack and Mabel "La
Cage Aux Follcs and others � will be performed.
"A brilliantly lively and scintillating evening"
-N.Y. TIMES


� ��
m
Starring
KIM ZIMMER
"The Guiding Light"
GRAHAM POLLOCK
Broadway's "Big River"
AC. WEARY
Guest Star "Hill Street Blues"
This Pulitzer Prize and N.Y. Drama Critics'
Award winner is an intense dissection of some of the
most powerful human emotions � greed, dread of
death, love, hate, despair. It is set in Mississippi in
the heat drenched home of the Delta's biggest
cotton-planter.
"One of the most successful plays of our time"
� TIME Magazine
Starring
GRANT GOODEVE
"Eight is Enough"
MIKE O'CARROLL
Broadway's "On Your Toes"
CHARLES EDWARD HALL
The Films "Arthur" and "Gloria"
The life of Jesse James is brought to the stage with
a series of exuberant songs peppered with short and
livery narrative sequences. This "saloon musical" had
its beginnings in Chapel Hill, NC. before going to
New York.
"A sprawling, brawling musical spree.
Like July 4 and Sew Year's Eve all in one"
�N.Y. POST
1 (if C0lf?�
Julv 25-30
Special Matinee Performances
July 27 and 30 at 2:15 p.m.
Starring
Broadway Veterans
JULIA CURRY
Mary. Mary"
SARA CROFT
"Lily Dale"
RUTH WILLIAMSON
"Annie"
Five women � bo live in small town Chinquapin.
Louisiana, like to gossip and hobnob at Tru- s local
hair salon. Each of the six women is facing some
crisis � some of minor proportions, a couple, life
threatening.
"A superb. funn. deeply-moving plav"
-N.Y DAILY NEWS
WRITE:
East Carolina
Summer Theatre
Greenville, NC 27858
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL:
757-6390
SEASON TICKET PRICES
Mon $30.00 Tues-Sat: $36.00
INDIVIDUAL TICKET PRICES
MUSICALS:
Evenings: $15.00 Matinees: $12.00
PLAYS:
Evenings: $12.00 Matinees: $10.00
COME BY:
McGinn is Theatre
5th and Eastern Streets
Greenville, NC 27858
Newd
LOS ANGELES (AP) -
television documentary, mi
neglected in recent years, get
special 10-week showcase
public television beginning
night.
The summer series "P OA
filmmaker jargon for point!
view � will present a select
from among the best documcrj
rics produced in recent yean
independent filmmakers
"Each film has a point of vie
said executive producer Marc
Weiss. "That makes them m
interesting I pie i an � j
them and agree or disa
The fir-t two 1
presents two d
"American I
Alvarez and Andr
takes a hum �
American S
region to I
Pcabod) A � : �
second film is
by Michal A.
spirit er si
life and a i
The premiere.
iews of the other
"Wet
mcntai
- lid V iss. " -
extraordin �
mentark s to mal
Have Yictna
NEW YORK
seem, in view of the mu
Vietnam Veterans Men i i
Washington and the;
Vietnam movies in the the
and on TV, that Amen .
nallv welcomed the Vietnam
eran home
But as reported in tl
CBS documentary
Within" this Fnursday as rrj
is 1 million Vietnam
have yet to leave behind a
that still terrorizes them e
.iay, and little has beer
help them
Some ha ve
and abused their families. O
suffer flashbacks rtarc
withdrawal.
5
Overkill
�7
foo iAUCH
Campus Comiu
�n
Sunburnt
Illustrator
And now for something c
want to pay my cartooni;
its still funny and this tit
Xisten to Rick Astley ta
erkill that Paul FreiuriJ
line so it would show up.
e East Carolinian, so w
tay out of that hot sun, ai





I
IHII EAST CA KOI INIAN
ULY6lS
TION
Iv
WORD
' act. process, or
' onsof a book)
' for binding
USINESS
: and binding
�&
PY
4 5' TIMES
00
i?orgctown Shop

RAINING CORPS
jL
4�
IE YOUR HEAD,
WNEV
IR COLLEGE.

ITC
COLLEGE
IN TAKE.
in Hall) 757-6967
BEST
IH Nks
vrv
V-
I IM)
it Trtr
i
lMI hU
eatre
i Streets
i
i
r
I
New documentary on P.O.V.s
LOS ANGELES (AP) - The
television documentary, much
neglected in recent years, gets a
special 10-week showcase on
public television beginning to-
night.
The summer series "P.O.V �
filmmaker jargon for point of
view � will present a selection
trom among the best documenta-
ries produced in recent years by
idependent filmmakers.
"Each film has a point of view
aid executive producer Marc. N.
Weiss. 'That makes them more
itereshng. People can look at
'hem and agree or disagree
l"he tirt two-hour program
resents two documentaries:
�mencan Tongues by Louis
.hare and Andrew Kolker,
: ikes a humorous look at how
Vmerican speech varies from
gion to region. The film won a
eabody Award this spring. The
second film is "Acting Our Age
Michal Aviad, a paean lo the
irit of six elderly women facing
fe and advancing age.
The premiere also includes pre-
iewsof the other documentaries.
"We're going to show 12 docu-
lentarics during the 10 weeks
lid Weiss. "We looked at an
ttraordinary number of docu-
mentaries to make our selection.
When we asked for submissions
we got 500 entries
"That's just the tip of the ice-
berg. There are more than 25,000
independent filmmakers in this
country. They're not all turning
out films all the time. It takes sev-
eral years. They have difficulty
raising money. The very best
documentaries get made because
the filmmaker got a bug. They
latched onto something. They feel
very passionate about the subject
they're filming. It's something
they want to explore
Public television commissions
only about a dozen documenta-
ries a yearoutsideof the venues of
the National Geographic Society,
Jacques Cousteau and other na-
ture films. Documentaries once
flourished on the three commer-
cial networks but have been virtu-
ally replaced by newsmagazine
shows.
The only real sanctuary for the
documentary today is cable TV's
Discovery Channel, which offer
18 hours a day of documentaries
concerning nature, science, tech-
nology, history, human adven-
ture and world exploration.
Weiss pointed out that the pri-
mary audience for most docu-
mentaries has been at schools and
libraries.
"Very few filmmakers make
any money he said. "They do it
because they care about a subject.
Many fall by the wayside because
they haven't got the money. On
the other hand, that kind of tenac-
ity is what makes these films
extraordinary. All of the work has
an emotional punch and plenty of
intellectual meat
"Filmmakers only get a few
shots. That's why they pick their
subjects so carefully. And they're
independent because they don't
want to comform to a format
Weiss, who has been an inde-
pendent filmmaker much of his
career, said he hopes "P.O.V
will lead to a series. "People need
to know when to tune in he said.
"It needssome consistency. We're
issuing a viewer's guide to help
people find this current series
He said he believes "P.O.V
will attract viewers who quit
regular television �
Elderly featured on Public TV show
NEW YORK (AP) � Two pub-
lic television documentaries this
week give names and faces and
unique stories to a part of the
population that is often faceless,
especially on TV � the elderly.
One of the films is an uplifting
fairytale romance, the Academy
Award-winning short documen-
tary "Young at Heart airing
Wednesday.
The other is a realistic profile of
six elderly women. "Acting Our
Age" is half of the two-hour pre-
miere installment Tuesday night
of "P.O.V standing for "point of
view a new documentary series
on PBS.
The film is bv Michal Aviad, an
Israeli filmmaker who decided to
examine the effects of aging, both
physically and psychologically,
on a half-dozen thoughtful and
intelligent women coping with
different lifestyles � married,
divorced and widowed, some
lonely, some not.
"There's nobody that's young
that's not going to get old, unless
they die saysEnola Maxwell, 66,
one of the women Ms. Aviad
profiles.
Ms. Aviad allows her subjects to
speak for themselves; as a result
they are portrayed sympatheti-
cally but realistically.
Mrs. Maxwell is surrounded by
an extended family, but Irja
Friend, 74, is struggling with lone-
liness.
POPKIN AND ASSOCIATES
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW
Kevin F. MacQueen
Offering the Following jegal Services
Uncontested Divorce$100.00
D.W.I$175.00
Minor Traffic Offenses$50.00
Other For Criminal WorkFees Discussed
Fees Do Not Include Court Costs
NO FEE FOR INITIAL CONSULTATION
757-3896
Toll Free 1-800-682-3500
Fees Quoted Upon Request
Have Vietnam Veterans finally been welcomed home ?
NEW YORK (AP)- It would
�cm, in view of the much-visited
ietnam Veterans Memorial in
Washington and the popularity of
ietnam movies in the theaters
ind on TV, that America has fi-
lially welcomed the Vietnam vet-
eran home.
But as reported in the powerful
( BS documentary, "The Wall
Within" this Thursday, as many
is 1 million Vietnam veterans
have yet to leave behind a war
that still terrorizes them every
.iay, and little has been done to
lelp them.
Some have committed suicide
md abused their families. Others
suffer flashbacks, nightmares and
withdrawal.
CBS went to Washington stale,
where many veterans who suffer
from Post Tramumatic Stress Dis-
order have fled. The dense for-
ests, perhaps reminiscent of the
jungles of Vietnam, shelter them
from a world where thev cannot
J
speak of the atrocities they wit-
nessed.
"They literally took to the hills
CBS anchor Dan Rather said in an
interview. Rather interviewed
some of the veterans and narrates
the documentary, which was pro-
duced and directed by Paul and
Holly Fine and written by Perry
Wolff.
"I don't want to have to be
nobody all my life savs Terry
Bradley, one of the veterans inter-
viewed for the documentary. "I'd
want to be able to come home,
with some dignity
Bradley's reward for his service
in Vietnam was overmedication
as a paranoid schizophrenic that
left him with organic brain dam-
age. Other veterans tell of facing
rejection and indifference when
they returned from combat.
"This hour that wedo, this is not
the movie Tlatoon This is real
stuff said Rather. "These are
real people struggling to recover
from real wounds
Another of the veterans inter-
viewed desribes how he almost
killed his mother when she woke
him one morning and he thought
she was the enemy.
Some of the veterans are begin-
ning to deal with PTSD in the onlv
way they can, by talking to other
veterans in rap groups sponsored
rJy Vietnam veterans centers,
many of which will soon be closed
due to lack of funding.
One reason some of the veter-
ans talked to CBS was because.
Rather had been in Vietnam as a
reporter.
"They won't even consider talk-
ing to somebody who didn't go to
Vietnam he said. "It was slow
going to even get them to talk to
us. So mv reporting from Viet-
nam was a help Rather said he
also had to listen to a lot of com-
plaints about how the war was
reported.
Open 24 Hours
32iE,�h kjnko'S
752-0875 the COpy center
(B'xU, white 20 bond, auto-fed. at participating locations)
Overkill
I
PIRATE COMICS- It's Huckleberry fun, it's not for everyone
By Freidrich ThcLaw
l! Kl I
i
I C�
� VT'5 A UN 6 VVV
-o 7y-i� TCP
�.
Campus Comics
By Barbour
Arm Fall-Off Boy
By Racer X
7H� villains Of Urr&0K No Ru� we Captured cstof me L�610Nof
SUBS7ANtAKt HBROBS,WD HAvzEVL IVJCNTlOk FOR TH6AA
jMuiTfHd� all.
Sunburnt
Illustrator
And now for something completely different. Or is it? Thanks to tight bleeding bureaucrats who don't
want to pay my cartoonist, Steve Reid, we are treated to another reprint of The Law. But that's okay,
its still funny and this time you can examine it for deep hidden meaning. Read it backwards and it says
'Listen to Rick Astley tapesevil, eh? Also we have a good Camping Comics with Mark Trail, and an
Overkill that Paul Freidrich must have slaved over for weeks. Paul, I had to go back over every DARN
line so it would show up. Fans, please send in contributions to the BUY PAUL A BIGGER PEN FUND co
the East Carolinian, so we can see Zappa lyrics with words like 'titties' every week. In closing, you kids
stay out of that hot sun, and Michele, thanks for the moisturizing lotion. And now
Artention: Fen Club members-Arm Fell-Off Buttons
on th





THE KAST CAROt IN1AN
Sports
UIA 6, 1988 Pa�e 1
Ferrante helps give psychological edge
Olympic shooter takes aim
1 Cl News Bureau
Psychology plays a part in ath-
letic competition and may well
mean the difference in winning or
losing gold medals at the coming
'88 Summer Olympic Games. It's
thejobofDr. A.P. "Hud Ferrante
to sec that the I S. shooting team
ivill be in good shape to gam a
psychological edge on the ritle
range in Seoul.
Ferrante, a psychologist and an
assistant professor for the student
counseling center at ECU, will be
in the sports psychology consult-
ant for the U.S. shooters at the
Olympics in September and he
describes the challenge bluntly.
"Working as a psychologist
with shooters is extremely chal-
lenging when one considers that
the difference between first place
� the gold medal � and fourth
place � no medal � in some
events can be as little as tenths of
a point Ferrante says. "At the
Olympic level of competition,
whoever comes to the venue that
day with the proper frame of
mind and the proper psychologi-
cal approach seems to stand the
greatest chance of being victors
because 95 percent of their per-
formance is mental
In addition to preparing the
athetcs for competition - "I'll be
there to help them with any fine-
tuning in terms of performance
anxiety, concentration, focusing,
centering oneself and avoiding
distraction" - Ferrante also assists
them in accepting the outcom
"Some of my work has to do
with helping an individual re-
frame what they would term their
'broken dreams' so they arc able
to go on and compete again with-
out losing a sense of their ultimate
athletic potential and personal
self-esteem he says.
Ferrante's involvement with
the team, which began in 1984,
consists of much more than ap-
pearances at key competitions.
He travels to the U.S. Olympic
Training Center in Colorado
Springs, Colo periodically to
conduct group training seminars
on such topics as goal setting,
team building and psychological
skill development.
"It also essential to come to
know each person - to understand
their backgrounds, what their
concerns are and any problems
they may be experiencing - the
notion being that things affect
people affect their performances
both as people and as athletes
Ferrante says. "With their per-
sonal concerns resolved, they'll
be in a much better position to
perform because they will have
that much more energy to direct
on their performance
Some of the personal issues
Ferrante has helped athletes deal
with are relationship difficulties,
academic and career concerns
and the deaths of parents and
loved ones.
"The whole area ot relation-
ships signifies a tremendous con-
cern and causes a great deal of
anxiety for many collegiate and
world-class athletes he says.
"Because these individuals have
to train and travel so much, in
many ways their relationships
with their spouses and significant
others are taxed well beyond
what would seem reasonable for
the rest of us
Ferrante's participation in the
Olympics will be the realization of
a long-term goal. "I feel extremely
privileged and gratified that the
U.S. National Team thought
highly enough oi my work to have
formally involved me with that
group he says. "I feel equally
privileged and gratified that ECU
lias supported and encouraged
my involvement. To a larger
extent, ECU shares in our suc-
cess
The field of sports psychology
is realtivcly new and is still evolv-
ing, according to Ferrante. Not all
U.S. teams have sports psychol-
ogv consultants. "Mv guess is that
some teams may be hesitant be-
cause they don't fully understand
what this type of program in
volves he savs.
In 1983, the U.S. Olympic
Committee recognized the sports
psychology field by identifying
clinicalcounseling, sports edu-
cation and sports research as SfX i-
fic areas oi professionalv service
delivery.
In addition, the U.S. Olympic
Committee Registry for Psychol-
ogy in Sport was formed to pro-
vide national teams with a list of
proven professionals. Ferrante
was named to the registry in Octo-
ber and is one of only three repre-
sentatives from the Southeastern
United States.
Ferrante's program for the U.S.
shooting team is unique due to the
range and depth oi services pro-
vided. It evolved from a similar
program he developed for stu-
dent-athletes at West Virginia
University as part of his doctoral
studies in counseling psychology.
"Student-athletes, while in
some people's minds may repre-
sent a pampered, privileged mi-
nority, in fact are young men and
women, who asa function of their
long-term athletic involvement,
may have neglected someareasoi
their psycho-social, personal and
academiccareer development
he savs. "What I tried to do with
this pro. ram was offer the other
side, the more personaldcvelop-
mental side of being a young per-
son who is also a university ,
sudenl and an athlete
' ' my student-athletes have
been SO reinforced for their ath-
letic contributions that they mav
tend ti just see themselves as
quarterbacks or swimmers or
divers or sex a r players" he adds.
' ' hey don't realize that that's just
a part of w ho tlv. v are
"The fact that many institu-
tions, the media and significant
others often play into this per-
spective only tends to reinforce
this monodimensional view fur-
ther
Although Ferrante's original .
program involved student-ath- I
letcs from main- sports "the uni-
vcrsity shooting team embraced
the program the most Ferrante
says. "1 was quite taken aback at
first because I really didn't know
they had such a team
After learning mere about
Kting, Ferrante became intcr-
ested in the team and started
working intensively with its
coaches and l members Thai
year we won the NCAA champi-
he says "I w as, in tact,
the lust national championship
for any sp :t team at West Yir-
See II UK Wll. page II
Minnesota lights up Milwaukee, led by the
"firecracking" bats ofHrbek and McGwire
1 ightning struck twice as
� l.kland's Mark McGwire and
Minnesota's Kent Hrbek used
their bats instead of firecrackers
!� r holiday explosives.
McGwire hit a game-winning
home run in the loth inning for
the second day in a row as the
�MhletTfbeaHwlevefcm �� -
"Idon'tknow what it is. I've just
always hit pretty well against this
team 1 Irbek said.
In other American League
games, it was Detroit 5, Seattle 3;
New York 13, Texas 2; Boston 9,
Kansas City 2; California 11,
3roiiuiioad Chkaoa 1 Balii-
apped a 2-2 tie with a leadoff
us 4 2. Meanwhile, Hrbek hit Twins 3, Brewers 1
xo home runs for the second Hrbek tied the score with hs
time in three games as the Twins 13th home run with two out in the
l( (rated the Milwaukee Brewers sixth inning and put the Twins
1. ahead 2-1 with a leadoff shot in
Mire, I thought about doing it the ninth. Two outs later, Brian
;ain -aid McGwire, who Harper hit his second home run.
Minnesota managed only five
other hits oii Don August.
Winner Allan Anderson
yielded four hits and an unearned
run in eight innings. Jefi Reardon
pitched the ninth for his 22nd
save.
Tigers 3, Manners 3
Arrell Evans and Chet Lemon
homered off Mike Moore in the
seventh and Matt Nokcs and Pat
Sheridan hit consecutive home
runs off Rod Scurry in the eighth
as Detroit remained 212 games
ahead of New York in the AL East.
Detroit relief ace Mike Hcnne-
man was the winner despite al-
lowing Glenn Wilson's game-
ineroif Brad 1 lavensTmtircd
t playing extra-inning ball-
;amcs. 1 thmk there should be a
limit flip a coin or something.
� It was twilight and it was get-
ting difficult to see. 1 got a good
pitch and was able to extend my
arms well. The same thing hap-
pened (Sunday) leading off the
16th with a left-handed pitcher
( Toronto's John Cerutti) on the
mound. 1 did think about that
Two outs after McGwire's
mcr, Stan Javier also con-
nected.
Hrbek left Milwaukee after
ing 9-for-16 with four homers
in the four-game series. Six ot his
16 home runs have come against
tying sacrifice fly in the eighth.
Eric King relieved in the ninth
with two out and the bases loaded
and retired Steve Balboni on a
grounder.
Yankees 13, Rangers 2
Don Mattingly hit a three-run
�. v-vMV-�e�
shot and New York took advan-
tage' of 15 hits, seven walks, two
wild pitches, four passed balls
and a hit batter.
Charlie Hough was the loser
despite striking out four batters in
the first inning.
Winner Charles Hudson al-
lowed two runs and three hits in
seven innings before giving way
to Tim Stoddard.
Red Sox 9, Royals 2
Dwight Evans had a single,
triple and inside-the-park home
run and Wade Boggs had two
singles and two doubles in fiveat-
bats, enabling Boston to survive a
triple play.
The triple play came int he
fourth after Evans walked and
came around on singles by Mike
Greenwell and Ellis Burks.
Jim Rice hit a sinking line drive
to center field. With the runners
moving, Willie Wilson made a
shoestring catch and flipped tha
ball to second baseman Frank
White for the second out. White's
relay to first baseman George
Brett completed the triple play.
Angels 11, Blue Jays 6
Johnny Ray drove in three runs
and reliever Stew Cliburn al-
lowed one run in 3 2-3 innings.
Loser Jim. Clancy lasted only 49
pitches and yielded six runs and
seven hits. He was lifted after
facing two batters in the third.
The Blue Jays got consecutive
home runs from Tony Fernandez
and Ranee Milhniks in the fifth
inning oii lack Lazorko.
White Sox 5, Orioles 1
Rookie Melido Perez, aided by
Mark Salas' solo homer and Dan
Pasqua's run-scoring infield hit
scattered seven hits in 7 2-3 in-lgj
nings to snap a personal three-
game losing streak.
Pasqua also doubled to start aSK
three-run sixth inning that chasedrSL
loser lav Tibbs and meludedsR
Darvl Boston's RBI double andg
Gary Redus' two-run single.
Edberg takes Wimbleton honors
WIMBLEDON, England (AP)
Eight years after Bjorn Borg
won the last of his five Wimble-
n titles, another blond Swede
hi Id aloft the gleaming gold tro-
on Centre Court,
lie had the same big serve, the
same crisp volleys and the same
lightning returns. More impor-
tant, he had the same mental
"oughness
t hs name is Stefan Edbcrg.
'I watched all the Wimbledon
finals he's been in. I think he's
�n a big influence on me as a
rson and as a player Edbcrg
d alter Monday's rain-delayed
impionship victory over Boris
ker.
"All of us grew up watching
n in the Wimbledon finals the
year-old Edbcrg said. "It's
always going to be in my mem-
rv "
Edlx-rg's 4 6,7-6,6-4,6-2 success
brought memories of the Borg era
flooding bat k as he took apart the
man who never had lost on the
ntre Court.
Becker, the champion in 1985
and 1986, had dropped only one
set in six matches on his way to the
final.
Edbcrg, with a reputation for
mental weakness, had dropped
sots in every except match one as
he reached the championship
here for the first time.
But in true Bore style, the
Swede peaked when it mattered
most, got his opponenet against
the ropes and squeezed the last
resistance out of him.
"It hasn't sunk into my system
yet said Edbcrg, a two-time
Australian Open champion who
had never been able to master the
grass of Wimbledon despite his
classic serve-and-volley game.
"This is something I've worked
for a long time. It could be the best
match I've ever played in a Grand
Slam tournament
Edberg, accused in the past of
lacking the killer instinct, buried
Becker with a high quality per-
formance of sustained volleying
that had his opponent slashing at
the ground in frustration.
"1 never really gave his a
chance Edberg said. "I had it in
my mind today that I was not
going to give up until the last
point
The match, the first men's final
at Wimbledon to be spread over
two days, had been halted by rain
Sunday with Edberg up 3-2 in the
first set.
When it resumed two hours late
Monday, Edbcrg quickly
dropped his serve before another
rain delay sent the players back to
the lackcrroom.
Becker wrapped up the set
when play resumed for good, but
Edberg refused to be intimidated
by the West German's fearsome
reputation or illustrious past at
the mccca of grass-court tennis.
As Becker started making un-
forced errors for the first time in
the tournament, Edbcrg took his
chance. He ripped through the
second-set tiebreaker and
stormed on to capture the third
ind fourth sets.
Becker, for once, was beaten at
his own game.
"I just felt I could hardly miss
the ball Edberg said. " 1 really
believed in myself today. That
was very important
Becker, who says he build every
season for Wimbledon, could not
get motivated for the event he
loves the most.
He said hsi earlier matches
against 1987 champion Pat Cash
and top-ranked Ivan Lcndl "took
a lot out of r body and my
mental strong 1 couldn't push
myself when 1 needed to most.
That was the bottom line. He was
more psyched up
Inothcrfinalsdecided Monday,
Americans Ken Flach and Robert
Scquso retained the men's
doubles title with a 6-4,2-6,6-4,7-
6 victory over Anders Jarryd and
John Fitzgerald in a match spread
over three days, a first in Wimble-
don history.
Steffi Graf, who won her first
Wimbledon women's singles title
on Saturday with a three-set vie.
tory over Martina Navratilova
Gaston Lake disaster
Earlvis tries his hand at skiing (
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Water Eaeou U'
Hanging on as tight as he
could, Earlvis felt the rush of lake
water fly on the surface of his skin.
It felt like he was attached to a lake
dragon speeding through the
murky waters of Lake Gaston. It
was the third of July and Earlvis
was praying to God and country
that his limbs would not be dis-
membered. Once again, he heard
this voice, "Earlvisyou can't get it
up
Water skiing looks fun, it
looks easy, it looks harmless, and
Mighty Mouse looks deceiving
too.
We disembarked on our jour-
ney to Lake Gaston too early
Sunday morn. As we passed
through Hobgood, Earlvis said
Where in the hell are we?" Bone-
head, running shot gun, couldn't
sleep on the way to the lake, he
keep envisioning a shallow pond
about one hundred yards in di-
ameter.
After lecturing us on how to
act in front of his folks, Cool Clay
took us out in the twenty feet boat
and sped over the choppy water,
bouncing our innerds in the proc
ess. Bonehead looked at Earlvis
and said he had always wondered
why people buy boats. " boa t ing is
fun, boating is great, 1 love boat-
ing said the novice nautilus
head oi Bone.
The July fourth weekend is
traditionally the biggest weekend
for boating in North Carolina.
And most of approximately
340,000 registered in N.C. waters
were in doubtlv at Lake Gaston.
Friend to the world, Cool Gay
introduced his two novice nauti-
lus friends to boat etiquette.
"When coming to a bridge,
boaters are suppose to slow
down CC. said as he pulled
backon the throttle of the massive
350 horse power engine as he
drifted towards an overpass. By
slowing down, CC. allowed an-
other boat from our rear to
abruptly pass our vessel. This
proved to Bonehead and Earlvis
that the water is like land - if
someone gi res you an inch, throw
the etiquette out the window.
After seeing how massive the
lake really was, Bonehead's vi-
sions were suddenly shattered.
He saw people being totted be
hind boats while holding on to
ropes ana weai ing skinny, long
boards on their feet and said that
he wanted to try.
So C threw Bonehead a life
jacket nd two wooden skis and
told him to get in the water. After
three attempts, he finally got it up
and he rode tor quite a while be-
fore CC decided to pull him into
a huge wake. Alter Bonehead fell
for the third time, Earlvis knew it
wasinevitable they were going to
force him into the water.
"O.K.bend your knees, put the
skis oat oi the water a little bit,
hold the rope under your knees
and lot the boat bring you up
C.C. said. Sounds easy enough
Stay calm, you aren't really scared
of the water, bend the knees, hold
the rope under our knees, and let
the boat bring ou up.
Earlvis experienced what
C.Cs daddy said was a water
cne ml 1 le thought his arms were
dislocated. He thought his neck
was broke. And oh, that lake
water tastes like Perricr. Well
maybe by the next lake trip,
Earlvis will be able to get it up.
i
5
Ferra
Continued from page 10
ginia Universitv.
We continued I
U year, and we .
tionalchamp;
Although he :
for the chain
acknow led I � �
offered wen
highly by botl I
letes and v
What is �. �
to me is how I
them as peoj
have develop
and women tl
how to devi
vience in tlv n
and are willii
responsibiht
sions, relati i
Inaddition t
tion with the -
1 errrante a I
with ECU'S S
Jacobsen
OAK BRCH K
I here's nothing
(acobsen. "I'm
game back. I have a
dence from I
(where he had a cl:
can shoot i
acobsen said.
I don't think i
ot nine-ur ierfoi
rounds,but it 1 cai
the last tw
ha nee of winnir
"I'm real!)
the weekend
day after a I
ided him w ith a tw
the halfway point :
Western Open g If 1
Jacobsen, 34, on the
a back injury that has
for four seasons.
trips over the Butl
Club course in 135, i
par.
"There's no qu
I'm playing better now I
at any time since v I
W!CHIK)Y0U
YOUR EMOTIONS
OR YOU EVIDENCE
R
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Greenville





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 6,1988 11

if ft r ihc other
dovclop-
� cning per-
a university
tc.
athletes have
their atlv
' the) may
ns Ives a
or
Kit s just
� 'leant
this per
to reinforce
tic in
ibrat .1
I I paf II
!
?

I
4
8
S
I
m
tficld hit
2-3 in-
- A
' -rirtaB
i! hased
includi .
uible anc&S&M
;n sii
skiing
�'k
�3j
ga
on to
ion
i that
. idalife
- and
. I � :
. tit up
tea wl
m into
: . : id fell
knew it
' '1
irki � . put the
' r a little 1 it.
: � your knees
� I � ing you up
� i nough,
. �� : ' : illy scared
� i the knees, hold
c under yourknees, and let
u up.
irh is c Kpcrienced w at
iv said was a water
1 le thought his arms were
ited. He thought his neck
roke. And oh, that lake
tastes like Terrier. Well
I . the next lake trip,
� mil be able to get it up.

I
?:
3
I
I
Ferrante guides US shooters
Continued from page 10
ginia University.
We continued the program the
next year, and we won the na-
tional championship again
Although he doesn't take credit
for the championships, Ferrante
acknowledges that the services
offered were evaluated very
highly by both the student-ath-
letes and coaching staff.
What is of greater importance
to me is how I may have helped
them as people he says. "They
have developed as young men
nd women; they have learned
ow to develop greater confi-
dence in themselves as people
and are willing to take risks and
responsibility for their own deci-
sions, relationships and careers
Inaddition to his full-time posi-
n with the Counseling Center,
rerrrante serves as a consultant
with ECU'sSports Medicine Divi-
sion. "Rod Compton (director)
and his staff deserve a lot of
credit Ferrantesays. "They have
developed a premier sports medi-
cine program that we can be very
proud oi. Their comprehensive
approach to student training and
service delivery speaks for itself"
Through this affiliation, Fer-
rante conducts seminars for
Sports medicine majors, takes re
ferrals on student athletes, pro-
vides class lectures, and spends a
lot of time out on the practice field
getting to know the players and
the coaches.
"1 t's important to lettheathletes
and coaches know that psycholo-
gists are people too, to familiarize
them with the roles and services
ol the Counselingenter, and to
build a sense ot trust and rapport
so that when we are needed, they
are in a much more willing posi-
tion to seek our services Fer-
rante says.
Ferrante is originally from Dar-
ien. Conn but moved to Miami,
ITaata young age. "That's where
1 went through school he says.
A former student-athlete him-
self, and the son of an All-State
football player, Ferrante knows
firsthand of the problems which
face the athletically elite.
"I was a 17-year-old freshman
student-athlete, and I could have
use these kinds of services he
says. "If there had been somebody
oul there who had recognized the
unique problems and needs that
student-athletes have, my lifeand
personal development could
have been enhanced tremen-
dously
Ferrante eventually left school
"to figure out where I fit and what
Jacobsen regains game at Western
OAK BROOK, 111. (AD
�-re's nothing cov about Peter
bsen. "I'm just getting my
. ime back. I have a lot of confi-
s nee from the (U.S.) Open
ere he had a clsing (-4) that I
in shoot low rounds again
bsen siid.
I don't think 1 can expect to
�ot ninc-under for the next two
. minds, but if I can putt like 1 have
Ihc last two days, I have a good
ha nee of winning.
"I'm really looking forward to
the weekend Jacobsen said Fri-
day after a bogey-free 65 pro-
� ided him with a two-shot lead at
the halfway point of the $900,000
estern Open golf tournament.
iaco.bscn, 34, on the mend from
a back injury that has slowed him
for four seasons, completed two
tripsover the Butler National Golf
Club course in 135, nine under
There's no question about it
I m playing better now than 1 have
at anv time since '84 said jacob-
sen, who won two tournaments
that season.
"Mv game is coming back ever
so slowly. But it's coming. It's
evident to me that it's getting back
to where it was four years ago
said Jacobsen, who scored an
eagle-3 after hitting a 5 iron sec-
ond shot to within eight feet ol the
cup on the 12th hole.
Ed Fioi i and Dan i orsman
shared second at 137. Fiori had a
67 and Forsman a 69.
It was another two strokes back
to Joey Sindclar, Tom Sicckmann,
Jim Bcnepc and Rocco Mediate,
ties at 139.
Bcnepc scored two eagles in a
round of 68. Sicckmann matched
par 72, Mediate shot 70 and Sindc-
lar 69.
PGA champion DA. Weibring
and Tom Watson, a three-time
winner of this title, were six shots
off the lead at 141. Weibring shot
71, Watson a 69.
Mark 1 laves and Morris 1 latal-
skv, who shared the first-round
lead, each went 13 strokes higher,
from 66 to 79, and were at 145.
Brian Mogg, also tied for the first
round lead, shot 75
rj�) .nrsiw
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I wanted Four years later he
enrolled at Appalachian State
University, where he earned a BA
in psychology in 1974 and the MA
in clinical psychology in 1978.
Ferrante came to ECU in Janu-
ary 1987, from the College of
Charleston in South Carolina,
where he was a psychologist with
the counseling center, an assistant
professor in the health and physi-
cal education department and an
adjunct professor in psychology.
"I think ECU is really at an excit-
ing period in its evolution; that's
one of the reasons why I came
here he says. 'This seems to be
an institution that is growing and
interested in taking the lead in a
number of areas. I'm really ex-
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12
THE EASTCAROI I MAN
U'l 6, !88
Lebo's leg checks out, he's ready to play
(AD Fresh oil his second
doctor-ordered rest period oi the
ear. lei 11 ,ebo says he is feeling no
ill effects from his stress fracture
and is ready to get in shape tor his
tmal year at North Carolina.
'My leg feels fine, and I'm glad
surgery wasn't needed lebo
told The News and Observer ot
Raleigh. "I'm ready to get going
again. It's time tor me to start
getting back in shape. 1 ve got to
get ready
1 ebo, who ended a six-week
sabbatical last week, said he
needs to improve his point-guard
play to help the Tar 1 leels this
season
! or us to improve, 1 need to
improve 1 ebo -aid recently. "Oi
course, that t; . s tor everyone on
the teame cry ear. Bui thisismy
last season, and 1 want to make
sure I've done ever) thing 1 can to
make it as good as possible
1 ike most ot coach Dean
Smith's pupils. I.ebo. a 6-foot-3
ird has become a consummate
team player despite being a sho
machine in high school
but last season, there were indi-
cations that lebo's offensive
s. a got out of balance through
no fault ot' his own.
c departure of first-round
'h pick Kenny Smith had left
the Far 1 leels i ithout an experin-
.1 floor lead, i and w ith a shert-
c oi backcourl plavcrs in gen-
eral. I ebo, who tor years had
madehis athletic name by sinking
� impcrs, was rno ed to the point.
n aftei ; ird, Lebo s shoot-
percentage went - iur. The
. trd who had shot 51.4 percent
: . : J as a fn shman and
S( ; 'more
liU turnovers and 51 steals and
shot finished 27-7.
But there are questions, not the
least ot which is Lebo's health. A
non-stop, year-round player,
Lebo has suffered the effects of
fatigue and physical wear for the
past year. 1 hs lower leg stress
fracture caused him to decline an
invitation to participate in the
U.S. Olympic team selection try-
outs
Contrary to some off-season
perci nt a;
mpei
- �
to
last sea-
� a e
fa: rin U'(
also :
rnt i"1 imi '� - i
.it ilb�l3l3. I
day onl) b)
and his steal total dn
� iti( v iteg :
nificant. As a so
gu �rd Li bo had
in(: cased that to-
a r
kcr,
d from
46 to 34. His turnover made a
moderate increase, from (4 to 76
Kcnm Smith Iv.d 209 a isl
No lock on Citrus
Bowl forACC
ORl WDO, Ra AD
Atlantic Coast Conference will
lose its bid for an automatic berth
in the Florida Citrus Bowl, a
newspaper reported today.
An ACC delegation including
Commissioner Gene Corrigan,
v :iems( n Athletic Director Bobby
binson and North Carolina
Athletic Director John Swot'lord
recently made a presentation in
( Vlando to Citrus Bowl Executive
Director Chuch Roheand several
officers, the Orlando Sentinel
reported today.
Roddy confirmed try presenta-
tion and that a full executive
committee meeting was called for
today to act on the proposal.
"We had a nice discussion.
.�b,t now, we're in the dating
stage snd Corrigan from his
me in Greensboro, NC. "I
I vvif cither of us is ready
� slip on a ring. 1 love the Citrus
I iwl, personally. There are so
many positives with that bowl
But an inforn al survey of the
: rity of theitrus Bowl's 11-
r executive committee
�ted that while there is a
; are to maintain good n lati us
ith the ACC, thrcrc is little scnti-
nt for .m automatic tie-in with
tl � � rcn( e.
M � I immittee n i n I ei -
in I il ! that the fre( d m i I two
berths has been a factor in
the bowl's rapid rise in the
n peck g
newspaper said.
ter.
the
member alsi� i xprc
speculation, point guard again
will be the position I ebo prepares
to play. The late-season emer-
gence ol freshman King Rice as a
productive substitute and the
team's year-long perimeter shoot-
ing problem against Top 10 oppo-
nents had led to predictions that
Lebo would be returned, at least
part time, to the wing next season.
"1 don't think so Lebo said of
that suggestion. "1 haven't talked
a lot with Coach Smith about new
plans, but I think most of my time in that regard. I'm sure King will pom' th said. I'm i I
will be at point guard again. 1 play more this season, though worn
don't see my role changing much Smith agreed. "Jeff will be the i b If h 1
The East Carolinian
Sports Writers Needed
Appl at the Fast Carolinian office on the second floor of the Publication building across from
the entrance of Joyner library.
EXTRA LOW
FOOD LION
PRICES!
USDA Choice Beef
Untrimmed 1
USDA
CHOICE
20-25 Lbs. Avg. � Sliced FREE!
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, July 10, 1988.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items.
rnl it an ACC tie-m would
i mpromisc relations with Flor-
. ! i Stah ,Florid�i and other South-
ern powers that have been vital t
the bowls growth. Having an
Aho 4 tram virtually would
eliminate other Southern team
because of the need to provide
ABC-TV with intcrsectional
matchup, the newspaper re-
ported.
The conference has ottered to
commit its annual league cham-
pion but give the Citrus Bowl the
option oi turning elsewhere tor a
host tern in alternate years.
In the past dozen games, the
Orlando bowl has matched two
at large berths.
USDA Choice Beef Boneless
CHUCK ROAST
USDA
CHOICE
Holly Farms
Mixed Fryer Parts
Or Leg Quarters
Lb
South Carolina Packaged
PEACHES
100 Pure
GROUND BEEF
PATTIES
California
PLUMS
NECTARINE
Northwest
CHERRIES
2 Liter
Coca-Cola
1 -� Cherry C ke, Classic Coke, Diet (
I afli ine Free Coke. Caffeine Free Diet C
99
Sprite, Diet Sprite $1.09
2�Er53
'il
Old Milwaukee
$1.99
Pkg. ol (" 12 oz. cans rc. & light
Budweiser
$11.99
Pkg. of 24 12 oz. cans
Wise
Potato Chips
89
6 Oz - BBQ Reg Salt & Vinegar
6 5 Oz - Reg & Ridgie
EXTRA LOW PRICES Everyday
Duncan Mines
Cake Mixes
79�
18 5 Oz Butter Gold18 25 Oz
Devils FoodWhiteYellow
Food Lion
Potato Chips
69�
k 8 Oz - Reg.Ripple
Old El Paso
Taco Shells
Half Gallon
Food Lion
Lemonade
59
Pepperidge
Farms Cakes
$169
I Frozen
17 Oz � Coconut German
Chocolate Golden Layei Chocolate
Fudge
Orange Jg Light N5 Lively
Stokely
Vegetables
399
14 0z Cut Or French Style Green
Beans15 Oz Whole Kernel Or
Cream Style Corn14 5 Oz Honey
Pod Peas
Juice
$119
��a i hv c
64 Oz Chilled Old Soul
Yogurt
39�
8 0: Assorti I
64 Oz Detergent
White Cloud
Toilet Tissue'
89'
4 Pack WhiteYellowBlue
Cadillac
Dog Food
$499
25 Lb Beet Dinner





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 6,1988
Lebo's leg checks out, he's ready to play
(AP) � Fresh off his second
doctor-ordered rest period of the
year, Jeff Lcbo says he is feeling no
ill effects from his stress fracture
and is ready to get in shape for his
final year at North Carolina.
"My leg feels fine, and I'm glad
surgery wasn't needed Lebo
told The News and Observer of
Raleigh. "I'm ready to get going
again. It's time for me to start
getting back in shape. I've got to
get ready
Lebo, who ended a six-week
sabbatical last week, said he
needs to improve his point-guard
play to help the Tar Heels this
season.
For us to improve, I need to
improve Lcbo said recently. "Of
course, that goes for everyone on
the team every year. But this is my
last season, and I want to make
sure I've done everything I can to
make it as good as possible
Like most of coach Dean
Smith's pupils, Lcbo, a 6-foot-3
guard, has become a consummate
team player despite being a shoot-
ing machine in high school.
But last season, there were indi-
cations that Lebo's offensive
scales got out of balance through
no fault of his own.
The departure of first-round
NBA pick Kenny Smith had left
the Tar Heels without an experin-
ccd floor leader and with a short-
age of backcourt players in gen-
eral. Lcbo, who for vears had
made his athletic name by sinking
jumpers, was moved to the point.
Soon afterward, Lebo's shoot-
ing percentage went sour. The
guard who had shot 51.4 percent
from the field as a freshman and
53.2 percent as a sophomore
slumped to 43.6 percent last sea-
son.
His scoring average, never a big
factor in UNC's offensive system,
also fell slightly - from 13.5 points
per game as a sophomore to 12.2.
Two other statistical categories
were more significant. As a so-
phomore wing guard, Lcbo had
144 assists. He increased that to-
day only by 15 as a play maker,
and his steal total dropped from
46 to 34. His turnover made a
moderate increase, from 64 to 76.
Kenny Smith had 209 assists,
No lock on Citrus
Bowl for ACC
ORLANDO, Ha. (AP) � The
Atlantic Coast Conference will
lose its bid for an automatic berth
in the Honda Citrus Bowl, a
newspaper reported today.
An ACC delegation including
Commissioner Gene Corrigan,
Clemson Athletic Director Bobby
Robinson and North Carolina
Athletic Director John Swofford
recently made a presentation in
Orlando to Citrus Bowl Executive
Director Chuch Rohe and several
officers, the Orlando Sentinel
reported today.
Roddy confirmed tr presenta-
tion and that a full executive
committee meeting was called for
today to act on the proposal.
"We had a nice discussion.
Right now, we're in the dating
stage said Corrigan from his
home in Greensboro, N.C. "I
don't know if either of us is ready
to slip on a ring. I love the Citrus
Bowl, personally. There are so
many positives with that bowl
But an informal survey of the
majority of the Citrus Bowl's 11-
member executive committee
indicated that while there is a
desire to maintain good relations
with the ACC, threrc is little senti-
ment for an automatic tie-in with
the conference.
Most bowl committee members
indicated that the freedom of two
at-large berths has been a factor in
the bowl's rapid rise in the
postseason pecking order, the
newspaper said.
Some member also expressed
concern that an ACC tie-in would
compromise relations with Flor-
ida State, Horida and other South-
ern powers that have been vital to
the bowl's growth. Having an
ACC host team virtually would
eliminate other Southern teams
because of the need to provide
ABC-TV with intcrsectional
matchup, the newspaper re-
ported.
The conference has offered to
commit its annual league cham-
pion but give the Citrus Bowl the
option of turning elsewhere for a
host tern in alternate years.
In the past dozen games, the
Orlando bowl has matched two
at-large berths.
104 turnovers and 51 steals and
shot finished 27-7.
But there are questions, not the
least of which is Lebo's health. A
nonstop, year-round player,
Lcbo has suffered the effects of
fatigue and physical wear for the
past year. His lower-leg stress
fracture caused him to decline an
invitation to participate in the
U.S. Olympic team selection try-
outs.
Contrary to some off-season
speculation, point guard again
will be the position Lcbo prepares
to play. The late-season emer-
gence of freshman King Rice as a
productive substitute and the
team's year-long perimeter shoot-
ing problem against Top 10 oppo-
nents had led to predictions that
Lebo would be returned, at least
part time, to the wing next season.
"I don't think so Lcbo said of
that suggestion. "I haven't talked
a lot with Coach Smith about new
plans, but I think most of my time in that regard. I'm sure King will point guard Smith said. I'm not
will be at point guard again. I play more this season, though worrying about him doing a good
don't see my role changing much Smith agreed. "Jeff will be the job. If he's healthy, he will
The East Carolinian
"1
Sports Writers Needed
Apply at the East Carolinian offices on the second floor of the Publications building across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
EXTRA LOW
PRICES!
USDA Choice Beef
Untrimmed 1
USDA
CHOICE
ililiM
20-25 Lbs. Avg. - Sliced FREE!
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, July 10, 1988.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items.
USDA Choice Beef Boneless
CHUCK ROAST
rr VK
Holly Farms
:rvi
Or Leg Quarters
Mixed
Parts5
South Carolina Packaged
PEACHES
USDAi
CHOICE
Lb.
Lb
Lb.
100 Pure
GROUND BEE
PATTIES
Northwest
CHERRIES
2 Liter
Coca-Cola
Coke, Cherry Coke, Classic Coke. Diet Coke,
Caffeine Free Coke. Caffeine-Free Diet Coke
Sprite. Diet Sprite $1.09
Old Milwaukee
$1.99
Pkg. of 6-12 oz. cans reg. & light
Budweiser
$11.99
Pkg. of 24-12 oz. cans
A Case
Wise
Potato Chips
6 Oz. - BBQ RegSalt & Vinegar
6.5 Oz. - Reg. & Ridgie
EXTRA LOW PRICES Everyday
i b'wi n
Fi'rnc "akx
k Ketchup
499
yiM320
s lf Food Lion
Duncan
Cake Mixes
79�
18.5 Oz. Butter Gold18.25 Oz
Devils FoodWhiteYellow
Potato Chips
69�
8 Oz. - RegRipple
Old El Paso
Taco Shells
Half Gallon
Food Lion
Lemonade
59�
m
Pepperidge
Farms Cakes
$16?
LAYER
Frozen
17 Oz. - CoconutGerman
ChocolateGolden LayerChocolate
ta Fudge
1
OrangeJb! Light N' Lively
luirp (Mm Ynmirt
Stokely
Vegetables
399
14 0z - Cut Or French Style Green
Beans15 Oz. - Whole Kernel Or
Cream Style Corn14 5 Oz - Honey
Pod Peas
Yogurt
Juice JH! Yogurt
$11911 39�
64 Oz. - Chilled Old
South I �
8 Oz Assorted
White Cloud
Toilet Tissuel
89
4 Pack - WhiteYellowBlue
Cadillac
Dog Food
$499
25 Lb. - Bee! Dinner





Title
The East Carolinian, July 6, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 06, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.614
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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