The East Carolinian, June 29, 1988






COMING NEXT WEEK:
A feature on July Fourth festivities at ECU and
Greenville, until then have a good Fourth.
FEATURES
Reviews? We got 'em! Three boss critiques, on our
All-Roger Rabbit Page, page 7
SPORTS
Basketball forward Theodore "Blue" Edwards is
back. Listen to some "Blues" see page 10.
She iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 192JL
Vol. 63 No. 7
Wednesday, June 29,1988
Greenvijle, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 5,000
ECU to benefit from education
pact before N.C. Legislature
By TIM HAMPTON
rhis week, the N.C. General
Assembly is expected to vote on a
$16 education spending
b : . i includes land acquis-
reno ations line items
. orkine on the
louse and it hasn't been
said Rep. Ed Warren,
mty on the education
pact In the bill in the
Tlie land acquistion will pro
vide for new avenues of growth
for the ECU campus. With ECU
enrollment increasing each year
in the recent past, the purchase of
new land will remedy concerns of
not enough space.
The possibility of renovations
on the 31 year-old Memorial Gym
comes eight men ths after the SG A
Memorial will compliment the
new recreation facility which is
still in the planning stages.
In addition to the two appro-
priations, Warren said the pact is
expected to include a $50,000
grant to the ECU Geology Depart-
ment.
The spending bill reaches the
floor one week after the legisla-
D-Pitt Co
spending
state house, Warren said ECU is
expected to be the beneficiary of
$500 000 request for land acquis-
tions : ! �:3.3 million request
tor renovations to Memorial
( lym.
Warren, the chairman of the
Apt nations Base Budget
Committee on Education, said
approi riations for a new library
U repla e oyncr library are not
tint inning stages.
Program has
"Indiana Jones'
adventures
tty TONY M. KLMBLE
1 'v.U W w� Bureau
Perched on a small platform 35
� up a tree, the student holds
on1. illey device attached to a
cable, ikes a deep breath, shouts
and hurls himself out across open
sp ice riding the cable to another
tree 401 I distant
Called the Indiana Jones' part
. the ECU High Grounds New
Adventures Program, it is one of
many challenges nearly 300
idle and secondary students
will face while participating in the
Legislators' School for Develop-
ment being held at ECU through
July.
In addition to the adventures
program, the students are partici-
pating in workshops, lectures,
field trips, seminars, viewing
signed a resolution calling for the tors passed a supplemental pact
need of improvements in ECU's which included $100.9 million in
recreations. The renovations to operating expenses for ECU.
ECU Archaeology Department
to excavate sunken war ships
Five of the participating stu-
dents are ECU grac' js, and the
other three are fro n California,
Florida, and Missouri.
The team will work focus on
excavating under water areas on
the outside of the hull and the
midship, which were orginally
buried as deep as 25 feet, at the
bow.
The students will clean, photo-
graph, and extract artifacts. They
also will monitor various filtra-
tion systems and airlift equip-
ment.
According to Dr. Gorden Watts,
the ECU Co-director for the M HA
By SEAN HERRING
Staff Writer
Two centuries ago, the British
surrendered to the United States,
in the American Revolution, after
at least 50 British ships were sunk
by cannon fire or intentionally
sacrificed, by their commander
Lieutenant GencralCharles
Cornwallis.
On Monday July 4, 1988 eight
students, under the supervision
of the ECU Maritime History and
Archaeology Department, will
hclpin thcexcavationofa Revolu-
tionary War vessel, that was sunk
in 1781 in Yorktown, Virginia.

Taking a break from a rigorous day of studying, Lori Hobbs decides to just sit a spell in front of Joyner
Library Tuesday. Reading Melville can't compare to sitting outside. (Photo by Jon Jordan�Photolab)
project, this is the sixth year that
he has worked at Yorktown on the
project.
"This is one of the exciting
things about archaeology that we
look forward to each year. The
thrill and anticipation of not only
the students but the supervising
archaeologists is great
"The vessel we are excavating is
small and unknown. Out trom a
historical perspective this makes
it more important
"In other words, we are discov-
ering something new. So, we are
not reading ho w the history books
say it was done, but we are look-
ing at how it was done he said.
He added, "We have found so
far that the captain's quarters, of
the unidentified vessel were vary
well furnished.
"We also have reason to believe
that, the ship transported atleast
two groups of Cornwalis's sol-
diers.
"This is a feather in our hat, for
ECU and our research team to be
a part of these findings stated
Watt.
Co-op program helps students, community
f.i
musical programs.
; i i am
Emphasis during the residen-
tial sessions is placed on develop-
ing leadership, enhancing com-
munications skills and introduc-
ing the young people to new expe-
riences.
"Tin's (the High Grounds Ad-
venture Program) experience is
the pivotal experience for the
whole leadership school says
Dr. Robert Wendling, director of
the course. "This is an outdoor
adventure program and having
fun in a safe manner is the first
objective Many assistnat instuc-
tors and safety devices ensure
that the program is a safe one.
"The second objective says
Wendling, a member of the ECU
I ealth, Physical Education, Rcc-
ition and Safety (HPERS) fac-
ulty, "is to get people to stretch
themselves to go a little bit farther
than they have ever gone before,
to find what resources they have
but haven't been using, thereby
building self-confidence
A group of about 18 students
huddled in the cool shade of the
deep woods, away from the sum-
mer sun, to talk out a possible
resolution of a problem presented
by their instructors, thatof getting
the entire group from one side of a
rope tied five feet high between
two trees, without touching the
rope or entering the plane of the
rope. Their first and second at-
tempts were unsuccessful. But
after another brainstorrning ses-
sion, they reached a solution.
That solution met the third cri-
terion of the program � team-
work. "It focuses on promoting or
See ADVENTURES, page2
ECU Ncwi Bureau
An innovative program at ECU
is seeking to help meet growing
financial needs of students by
matching the university's man-
power resources to much-needed
community service.
The project, set up through
ECU's Office of Cooperative
Education, is designed to allow
students to earn money while
helping agencies deal with such
problems as homelessness, illiter-
acy, child abuse, care of the eld-
erly, drop-outs, domestic vio-
lence and rural health care.
Both governmental and non-
governmental agencies could
utilize the "tremendous man-
power" available at a university
such as ECU which has nearly
15,000 students, according to
project officials.
ECU's Cooperative Education
program has received two con-
secutive, one-year grants of
$50,000 and $56,617 from the
Department of Education's Fund
for the Improvement of
Postsecondary Education. The
funds are being used to imple-
ment the project, Compensated
Community Servies Opportuni-
ties (CCSO).
"Although these funds may not
be used as student wages, they
provide university personnel to
identify qualified students and to
assist agencies in identifying al-
ternative sources of funds for stu-
dent compensation said Caro-
line Smith, project administrator.
The Z. Smith Reynolds Founda-
tion has awarded another $10,000
to help underwrite student com-
pensation matching college
work-study money for those non-
profit organizations and agencies
previously unable to compensate.
"This support from theZ. Smith
Reynolds Foundation will allow
for the development of additional
off-campus agency relationships,
thereby providing a greater di-
versity of worthwhile employ-
ment opportunities for our Col-
lege Work-Study students said
Ray Edwards, ECU Student Fi-
nancial Aid director.
In addition, civic organizations,
clubs and associations are being
contacted for assistance in job de-
velopment and student compen-
sation, Smith said. More and mre
agencies are becoming involved,
she said.
"The CCSO program will not
only give students a chance to
earn money and pick up a most
valuable kind of knowledge but
will also give community service
agencies a chance to select the
most valuable kind of future em-
ployee Dr. Betsy Harper, direc-
tory of the Office of Cooperative
Education, said.
Kenneth Dews, a Pitt County
commissioner and member of the
project's board of advisors, said
CCSO is "a unique approach" to
address student debt burden.
Officials said that nationwide,
college student indebtedness is
increasing and college students
are being forced to put higher
earnings or earnings on general
ahead of their interest in service-
oriented careers and in public
service.
Dr. Helen V. Grove, dean of the
ECU School of Home Economics,
estimated that the annual volun-
teer effort in public service en-
deavors in the U.S. "is worth
approximately $110 billion (bil-
lion) This, she said, "indicates
the tremendous contribution
made by volunteers" but added
that the manpower needs are
even greater.
"Funds from the Z. Smith Rey-
nolds Foundation and the U.S.
Department of Education will
enable our students to become
more significantly involved in
community service activities es-
pecially in the more rural areas of
our state Dr. Richard R.
Eakin said.
DWIs linked to hard drinkers
GREENSBORO (AP) � At least
two thirds of the people convicted
of drunken driving are problem
drinkers, and only 20 percent of
them are getting professional
help, research suggests.
That's why the N.C. General
Assembly enacted a law last year
aimed at identifying and treating
drunken drivers with alcohol
problems.
That program, more than re-
voking licenses or imposing jail
terms, might offer the best long-
term hope for solving the
drunken-driving problem, said
Robert Windham, director of
substance abuse services for the
Alamance-Caswell Area Mental
Health Center.
"The whole notion is to get
people in the earlier stages of in-
tervention, rather than years from
now when they have full-blown
alcholism Whindham said.
The law, which took effect Jan.
1, set up a pilot program under
which DWI offenders must be
assessed for possible alcohol or
drug dependency. Windham
thinks the program is working.
"Our patient load has increased
dramatically he said. "And
about 76 percent of the people that
we have assessed have been
found to be in need of some treat-
ment
See DWI, page 2
fa tf emQty
Reflections on Alan Jones
ByDENABOYETTE
suffwrfm
Editor's note: Alan Jones, an ECU
student, was killed in a motorcycle
accident following a highspeed po-
Uce chase on June 15. According to
reports, Jones was neither intoxicated
nor had he committed any crime be-
yond a simple traffic violation.
This personal article by Dena
Boyette is written from the perspec-
Hoe ofafriendfeelikg (he loss that has
affected the university. U is Boyette's
last story for us because sfie gradu-
ated after the first summer session. In
a Utter attached to the article, how-
ever, she said this was her most im-
portant article.
On June 15, our university and
community was dealt a great loss.
Many people who saw the news
and read the newspapers that
night rnight remember that a ECU
student was killed in a motor-
cycle accident. Others, including
myself, do not simply remember
the manner of Alan Jones' death,
but recall rather of stories and
fond memories of the way in
which he lived.
IS. Eliot once wrote "Only in
time, but that which is only living
can only die. Words reach into
the silence And kind words and
remembrances of Alan have re-
cently been said by many people
here at ECU.
Dr. David Sanders, director of
the Honors Program at ECU, said
of Alan, "He was a quiet, bright
mannerly person wimstrong feel-
ings Sanders would know be-
cause Alan was one of the first
Scholars Award in 1985.
The University Scholars
Awards program is a $3,000 per
year scholarship established with
the best students in mind. Those
considered for the program were
expected to be in the top five per-
cent of their high school class, to
have participated in school and
community activities, and to have
demonstrated leadership abilities
along with other qualifications.
James Larder Jr vice chancellor
for Institutional Advancement,
helped establish this scholarship
program at the university. Lanier
said of Alan, "I remember his
maturity and confidence. He was
analytical on how he wanted to
live
Chuck Seeley, director of ad-
missions, said Alan did not lose
touch with him after being ac-
cepted here at ECU. "Alan was a
very nice young man; we were
certainlypleasedtohave him here
at ECU. He was a delight to be
around but probably what im-
pressed me most was his respect
and admiration for his parents
Seeley said.
Bobby and Patricia Jones of
Ruthfordton, Alan's parents,
remembered a statement of his
that was quoted in the June 1985
SCU Report Alan's comment
was on ws feelings of
picked to be a recipient of the
University Scholars Award
"it's about the best thing that's
ever happened to me he said.
"about" in Alan's quote and think
that the best thing would have
been him being their son.
Alan majored in manufacturing
under the Department of Indus-
trial Technology. He was a consct-
entiousstudent who maintained a
high grade point average. David
Hillis, who taught Alan in some of
his manufacturing classes, re-
members Alan as purposeful and
definite. "He was quiet and unas-
suming about himself, it is rare to
find people so modest when they
have so much academic abiltity "
Hillis said.
This story is not just another
news story like others 1 have writ-
ten for The East Carolinian, nor is
it an Obituary or a biographical
sketch. This particular piece was
harder because I knew Alan.
What I have written here are the
reflections of Alan Jones on cam-
pus � the scholarship recipient
and ECU student. I had the addi-
tional privilege to know and see
Alan in a different light. He was
my neighbor at Oakmont Square
Apartments. My two roommates
it would have been impossible to
remember anything but ton"
memories of oar friend. Alan'
optimistic outlook on life,
strong academic drive and sir
oaring made all the friends he
better Dcop&c to have known
an amiable and
person whose face was alw�
fun of eagerness and smiles.
tove and friendship he put in
our hearts could never be





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 29, 1988
Are you fit? Take the health quiz
I have been hearing a lot about
wellness and wellness programs.
What's it all about and how can I
find out my level of wellness?
Most people think that wellness
means not being sick; however, it
means much more. Wellness is a
positive state of "feeling good"
including the health of your
mind, body, and spirit. The goal of
wellness is to reduce your risk of
illness or injury. In order to reduce
your chances of becoming hurt or
ill you should understand which
of your present lifestyle habits arc
harmful and which are beneficial.
By answering the questions
Health Column
By Mary Elesha Adams
below you can begin to find out
how healthy you are. Answer
each question with a "yes" or
"no
� Are you a non-smoker?
� Do you have your blood
pressure checked at least 1-2 times
per year?
� Are you presently at your
ideal weight?
� Do you eat food low in fats
and cholesterol and high in fiber?
� Do you take time to relax
each day?
� Do you take minor problems
in stride?
� Do you exercise vigorously
for 15-30 minutes at least 3 times a
week?
� Do you know your alcohol
drinking "limit"?
� Do you avoid illegal drugs or
medications not intended for
your use?
� Do you wear your seat-belt
while riding in a car?
If you answered all the ques-
tions with a "yes" you are on the
road to good health! If you an-
swered "no" to any of the ques-
tions you should consider making
lifestyle change to incoporatc
wellness in vour life. Other tips to
help you become a healthier per-
son include:
� Don't drink and drive
� Women: monthly breast self-
exam and annual pap
� Men: monthly testicle self-
exam
� Have regular dental exams
� Annual colo-rectal exams
after age 50
� Use smoke detectors
COPIES
(Self Service 8 12x11 White Bond)

DWI offenders are treated for drinking problems
after assessment tests in Guilford pilot program
758-2400
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIME
(KBXT TO CHICO IN THE GEORGETOWN SHOPS)
Continued from page 1
North Carolina researchers say
the high blood-alcohol levels
found in the bodies of drunken
drivers indicate many of them are
problem drinkers, not just casual
inbibers.
In Guilford County, more than
half the drivers killed in wrecks
last year were legally impaired,
and their average blood-alcohol
content was more than twice the
legal standard for drunkeness,
the Greensboro News & Record
reported.
The newspaper examined au-
topsy reports on 30 drivers who
died on Greensboro, High Foint
and Guilford County roads in
1987 wrecks in which they were at
fault. Of those 30, 16 had been
drinking when they wrecked, and
all but one of those 16 were legally
impaired.
Nationwide in 1987, about 41
percent of fatal wrecks involved
drivers with blood-alcohol levels
of 0.10 or more, according to the
Highway Safety Research Center.
The state Department of Crime
Control and Public Safety re-
ported that 422 of 1,600 fatal
wrecks statewide in 1987, or 26
percent, were alcohol-related, al-
though some drivers in those
wrecks might not have been le-
gally impaired.
In the first three months under
the new state program to identify
and treat drunken drivers with
alcohol problems, the Alamance-
Caswell mental health center had
309 DWI referrals, compared to
600 in all of 1987.
Of those 309 referrals, 219 had
been assessed by the end of the
quarter. Those referred must
schedule an assessment within 30
daysofsentencing,andWindham
said his center is typically taking
from seven to 10 working days to
carry out an assessment once it's
sought.
In the 10-county pilot program,
which includes Alamancc and
Forsyth counties, every person
convicted of driving while im-
paired between Jan. 1, 1988, and
June 30,1989, must be assessed for
possible alcohol or drug abuse
problems.
In the other 90 North Carolina
counties, including Guilford,
only those whose blood-alcohol
levels were .15 percent or higher
when they were arrested, or who
refused a breath or blood test, are
assessed.
The assessment consists of a
standardized test and a one-hour
inter view with a therapist, who
will not review the test results
until after the interview.
"It's not foolproof Windham
said of the test, "but from the re-
sponses that you get, you can
pretty much tell whether
they're being honest
The average "might surprise a
lot of people, but it doesn't sur-
prise me said Dr. Arthur McBay,
chief toxicologist of the State
Medical Examiner's Office in
Chapel Hill.
James Wall, director of the Al-
cohol Information Center of
Greensboro, said the figures show
those people have alcohol abuse
problems.
But he said, "It's difficult
given community attitudes �
which tend to be fairly tolerant int
his region � to convince people
that .15 or more tends to be a
marker of a problem.
"When a person is arrested for
DWI, chances are that's not the
first time he's been drinking and
driving Wall said.
Medical Students
The United States Navy is looking for applicants I
two, three, & four year medical scholarships. I
scholarships cover the full school-related exj oi
your medical education, as well as providing a per-
sonal allowance of $650 per month while you are in
school.
To qualify you must:
Bc a U. S. citizen
Be enrolled in an AMA approved Medical
school, or AOA approved school of thy
"Meet academic qualifications
Be physically qualified
Applications for scholarships are ace pi fall
To learn more about Navy medical - . rships,
no obligation, simply give me a call:
Contact HMC Norm Rogers
1-800-662-7568
Program teaches teamwork,
communication methods
Continued from page 1
building teamwork, improving
communications skills, promot-
ing trust among people and group
problem solving skills
Wcndling said.
Each of the students spends one
seminar dav ont he adventure
course which VVendling says
could be called a "Challenge
Course, Initiative Course ot Con-
fidence Course
Successful completion of the
program is not measured on a
report card. "If the highest they
have ever gone was two feet, we
get them to go two and one half
feet. That then is their personal
measure of success. That is how
we measure success here
VVendling said.
Every Tuesday College Night
from 8:00 to 11:00
$1.50 with college I.D. .50 skate rental
SPORTSWORLD
104 E. REDBANKS RD.
756-6000
Lets have some
urnrner
DEIT PEPSI.
PEPSI FREE OR
Pepsi
Cola
109
LIMIT 3 PKGS WITH
S10 ADD L PURCHASE
Lb
Pkg
OSCAR MAYER
All Meat
Wieners
99
Catch the anna belle's
LUNCHTIME EXPRESS
It's our special quick lunch menu for people on the go!
Just choose your favorite and you'll be refreshed
and on your way in no time.
Spaghetti a generous Steak Teriyaki Our special
portion of pasta with meat cut of beef served with snow
sauce Toasted bread and peas and teriyaki sauce
Parmesan cheese$4.55 on rice$5.45
Fettuccini Alfredo Egg
pasta with a sauce of butter,
Parmesan and Romana
cheese$4.75
With Chicken
With Shrimp.
$6.75
$7.75
Hot Ham & Swiss
Sandwich Thinly sliced ham
with Swiss cheese on grilled rye
bread, plus fries$3.95
Steak & Cheese Sandwich
Our steak sandwich with
melted Provolone cheese,
plus fries$3.95
Express lunches are served from 11.30 a.m. to 2 p m daily, except Sunday
nnabdle's
I RESTAURANT & PUB
RESTAURANT & PUB
The Plaza � Greenville Blvd � 756-0315
Hours: 11:30am-11 pm, MonThurs
11:30am-Midnight Fri-Sat,
12Noon-11pm Sun.
REGULAR OR LITE
Kroger
Mayonnaise
32
Oz.
Jar
78
KROGER
Pork n
Beans .
16
Oz.
Cans
�1
REFRESHING
Sealtest
Lemonade.
Gal
Ctn
59�
ALIFORNIA RED FLAME
OR THOMPSON WHITE
Lb
Grapes
99
(MICROWAVABLE)
ALL VARIETIES
KROGER PEACHES OR
Fruit
Cocktail
Banquet
Family Entrees
$
16
Oz.
Can
66
01W
BKt V
Gal.
Ctn
Items and Prices Effective
Sun. Junu 26, 1988 thru
Sat. July 2, 1988
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Breyer's
lice Cream
$
Oz
Bag
WISE
Potato
Chips
69
12
Oz
Pkg
INDIVIDUALLY
WRAPPED KROGER
American
Singles
99�
C�y H�M 19S9
Kriir favOn
Quantity iah1� Hasar�
" 4 To Oeelen
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
)
Insid
NEW YORK (AP) - The
gest insider trading ca-t
Ivan Boesky scandal has jj
Wall Street and impli
trainee at a big broki i
Hong Kong businessman
allegedly reaped $19 millu
illicit profits
A Securities and I
Commission civil comp
Monday accused Stephen
Jr a junior analyst in I
program at �' i
Co of giving s0 rets al
pending t �.
FredC Lee, a client w il
Hon Koi '
swank Wa
"From at
through at
pla mce t
ca!U from M .
Kong and
read t: 51
fed � hei
Rich w
GREENSBORO
trustee boar Is
L'niver I rt
tern are dominated
with money and in!
membc rssaj In
white schools in the S) st -
just one appointc :
"In our system, it
fluence(that works
Eubanks Jr chairn un
UNC-Chapel Hill b
tees, "the trustees
effectively get th
Blacks make up
trustees at UN( &
mostly white enr
45 percent oi the
schools with rr
ment are white.
"The problems ��
with are traditional pi
said William Dai
black on the I
Chapel Hill. "Eit -
govern themsc Ives
tokens
j "i said wo neeucHJ tnon
(trustees) at Chapel Hill,
looks like tokenism a
Navy Captaj
ATHENS, Greece
U.S. military
was killed t d .
street where he liv.
bomb that blc
car off the road as
to work, p lice S
NavvCapt.V.
was just 100 �
home when the bl ist j
car across the sti
steel fence, a police -j
saidoncond.
The officer s de
w a s fo u nd a fe w yrai
front vard oi ar
house.
In Washington, Tc
spokesman Maj. A I
would not release
victim pending n
next of kin.
But he said I
officer
bassy in Athens a Nav
was killed this
blast near his home.
The explosion o.
a.m. vl :03 a.m. EDT
em Athens suburb
where man)
eign diplomats live.
Accord r�g t
Athens News Ac
52. was married .
daughter. He had � -
aboard the a
Saratoga before I
ing. the ageno said.
No group claimed n I
itv for the blast, but - -j
police officials believed J
work ot November 1" a
urban terrorist gorpu.
November 17 has oi
credit for 11 assasinati I
1975. including the 1983 -
of U.S. Navy Capt. Go I
tcs and te 1975 assas i j
Richard Welch, CIA stati
in Athens.
Today's explosion, felt I j
around,shattered window
Enjoy a rigl
Vote





ES
11 White Bond)
-0-
PY
loo
FAST TIME
RGETOWN SHOPS)
J
udents
for
se
s of
er-
- in
pathv
is, with
sJorm Rogers
1-7568
A
Lb
Pkg
OSCAR MAYER
All Meat
Wieners
99
ide
Gal
Ctn
59�
7 5
Oz
Bag
WISE
Potato
Chips
69
INDIVIDUALLY
WRAPPED KROGER
merican
Singles
99
� - m
� - -�- LI I' ' �
- � ' . � s-
HOURS EVERYDAY
iiie Blvd - Greenville
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
1UNE29,1988
Insider scams millions on Wall St
NEW YORK (AP) � The big-
gest insider trading case since the
Ivan Boesky scandal has jolted
Wall Street and implicated a
trainee at a big brokerage and a
Hong Kong businessman who
allegedly reaped $19 million in
illicit profits.
A Securities and Exchange
Commission civil complaint filed
Monday accused Stephen Wang
Jr a junior analyst in a training
program at Morgan Stanley &
Co of giving secrets about im-
pending corporate takeovers to
Fred C. Lee, a client with homes in
Hong Kong and McLean, Va a
swank Washington suburb.
"From at least July 1987
through at least April 1988, Lee
placed long-distance telephone
calls from McLean, Va Hong
Kong and elsewhere to Wang at
his home and office in New York
read the SEC complaint filed in
federal court here. "During these
telephone calls, Wang improp-
erly disclosed to Lee the material,
non-public information
Lee paid Wang at least $200,000
for the information, authorities
said.
Thomas C. Newkirk, the SEC's
chief litigation counsel, said an
investigation was continuing and
he did not rule out the possiblity
that others were involved.
SEC sources speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity, also said they
expected federal prosecutors to
seek criminal indictments against
Wang and Lee, the same pattern
that emerged in the Boesky case
more than two years ago.
The SEC said Lee made $19
million by trading on the tips and
shared at least $200,000 of the
money with Wang. It demanded
the pair return the money plus
pay triple that amount in penal-
ties, for a total of $76 million.
The amount is second only to
the record $100 million in profit quoted unidentified sources as mergers and acquisitions unit,
and fines paid in November 1986 saying that Morgan Stanley's Trainees are expected to leave
by Boesky, who was at the center compliance department had at the end of the program. Most
of a massive scandal in which
Wall Strectcrs illegally used confi-
dential corporate information to
profit in stock transactions.
Boesky, a speculator who impli-
cated other Wall Street profes-
sionals, was banished from the
securities business for life and is
serving a three-year federal
prison term
picked up suspicious trading in usually go to graduate business
Lee's account as early as last year.
Newkirk said the SEC began the
investigation in April but the
probe did not break until Friday,
when Lee admitted details of his
arrangement with Wang to
commission officials interview-
ing Lee in Hong Kong
school and some are invited back.
Am employee of Wang's rank
generally made a salary and bo-
nus that totaled around $35,000 a
year, Morgan Stanley sources
said.
Lee, 38, was described by Mor-
gan Stanley and SEC sources as a
Morgan Stanley officials said wealthy member of a Taiwanese
Morgan Stanley, which was an Wang lived in New York but his family who had several trading
adviser in the proposed takeovers whereabouts were unclear,
listed in Monday's complaint, Wang's lawyer, former SEC re-
said it suspended Wang last Fri- gional commissioner Ira L.
day after the SEC subpoenaed Sorkin, declined to comment
him. about he case.
The firm also said it had been Wang, 24, was only a few days
cooperating with the SEC for away from the July 1 expiration of
some time in its probe and was his two-year training at Morgan
considering separate but unspeci- Stanley, which like other big bro-
fied legal action against Wang kcrages uses an extensive recruit-
and Lee. ing system. He had spent the sec-
The New York Times today ond year of the program in the
and bank accounts, interests in
real estate, import-export
operations and public utilties.
FRIDAY
Nightwatch
Nightwatch
Nightwatch
12 Price wad
SATURDAY
Stairway
To Heaven
Tribute to Led Zeppelin
Rich whites dominate UNC boards
GREENSBORO (AP) � The
trustee boards of the schools in the
University of North Carolina sys-
tem are dominated by people
with money and influence, some
members say, and 10 of 11 mostly
white schools in the system have
just one appointed black trustee.
"In our system, it's political in-
fluence (that works) said Robert
Eubanks Jr chairman of the
UNC-Chapel Hill board of trus-
tees, "the trustees that lobby most
effectively get those positions.
Blacks make up 9 percent of
trustees at UNC schools with
mostly white enrollment, while
45 percent of the trustees at
schools with mostly black enroll-
ment are white.
"The problems we are faced
with are traditional problems
said William Darity, the only
black on the board of UNC-
Chapel Hill. "Either blacks can't
govern themselves or they are
tokens
I "I said we needed more blacky
(trustees) at Chapel Hill, but it
looks like tokenism all the way
around said Darity, who is dean
of the School of Health Sciences of
the University of Massachusetts
at Ameherst.
"Having one black is so out-
dated said Harold G. Wallace,
vice chancellor for university af-
fairs at UNC-Chapel Hill, who is
black.
There are 13 trustteesforeachof
16 schools int he UNC system, the
Greensboro News & Record re-
ported. Eight are appointed by the
UNC Board of Governors and
four by the governor, while the
president of the school's Student
Government Association makes
up the 13th member.
Every predominantly black
school int he system has at least
four white trustees and one �
Winston-Salem State University
� has seven.
At the predominantly white
schools, Gov. Jim Martin has
appointed 44 trustees since taking
office in 1984. Just three have been
biack, a situation-some otticiais
attribute to a lack of blacks
seeking the positions.
"I don't know that there is a
greater clamoring from whites to
serve on trustee boards than you
hear from blacks said a black
UNC chancellor who asked not to
be identified. "But that's no ex-
cuse
Others say competition for the
services of black trustees is keen,
and may leave some schools with-
out the strong minority represen-
tation they would prefer.
"When you consider all our
boards and agencies you run out
of leadership said Ray Swink, an
official of the Western North
Carolina Conference of the
United Methodist Church, which
confirms trustees for church-sup-
ported institutions such as the
prive High Point College.
"No group in the state is more
concerned about minority repre-
sentation than the Board of Gov-
ernors said John P. Kennedy,
recently retired secretary of the
UNC system. 'The board has
been sensitive tp thistwes
The situation is repeated across
the nation, where 90 percent of
college and university trustees
are white and almost 50 percent
have business ties, according to
the newspaper.
Kennedy said black representa-
tion has been better in the past at
University of North Carolina
schools.
"At (UNC) Wilmington, we had
three blacks two or three years
ago he said "I think it is too bad
to have only one black on a white
board
Yet Keencdy insisted things
have improved since 1972, when
the state's higher education sys-
tem was reorganized. Prior to
that, boards of trustees at even
historically black schools were
predominantly white, he said.
"In the old days, they were
appointed by the governor and
the governor tended to pay off
political debts that way he said.
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Navy Captain killed by car bomb in Greece
ATHENS, Greece (AP) � The
U.S. military attache to Greece
was killed today on the small
street where he lived by a car
bomb that blew his armor-plated
car off the road as he was driving
to work, police said.
Navy Capt. William E. Nordcen
was just 100 yards away from his
home when the blast hurled his
car across the street, lodging it in a
steel fence, a police spokesman
said on condition of anonymity.
The officer's decapitated body
was found a few yards a way in the
front yard of an abandoned
house.
In Washington, Pentagon
spokesman Maj. Alan Frietag
would not release the name of the
victim pending notification of
next of kin.
But he said the senior military
officer assigned to the U.S. em-
bassy in Athens, a Navy capain,
was killed this morning in a bomb
blast near his home.
The explosion occurred at 8:05
a.m. (1:05 a.m. EDT) in the north-
ern Athens suburb of Kifissia,
where many American and for-
eign diplomats live.
According to the semi-official
Athens News Agency; Nordden,
52, was married and had one
daughter. He had served as a pilot
aboard the aircraft carrier USS
Saratoga before his Athens post-
ing, the agency said.
No group claimed responsibil-
ity for the blast, but senior Greek
police officials believed it to the
work of November 17, a left-wing
urban terrorist gorpu.
November 17 has claimed
credit for 11 assasinations since
1975, including the 1983 shooting
of U.S. Navy Capt. George Tsan-
tes and te 1975 assasination of
Richard Welch, CIA station chief
in Athens.
Today's explosion, felt for miles
around, shattered windows, blew
out doors and twisted a thick iron
gate in a neighboring home. The
bomb had been placed in hte
trunk of a parked car.
A person living nearby, speak-
ing on condition of anonymity,
said Nordeen "lived up the street
with his wife and chilren. He
drove to work around this time
every day
U.S. embassy officials on the
scene refused to comment.
Frietag said that at about 1:15
a.m. EDT "a bomb exploded near
the home of the U.S. defense atta-
che. He was in a car and the bomb
exploded outside the car. He was
killed in the explosion.
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WANTED
APPLICATIONS
BEING ACCEPTED
FOR THE
FOT J.OWTNG POSITIONS:
?ADVERTISING TECHNICIAN
�ADVERTISING TECHNICIAL
SUPERVISOR TRAINEE
APPLY IN PERSON
MONDAY - FRIDAY
10 A.M. - 4 P.M.
' AT
THE EAST
CAROLINIAN
2nd FLOOR
PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
IN FRONT OF JOYNER LIBRARY
?COMPUTER EXPERIENCE A PLUS
?TYPING A NECCESSITY
?LAYOUT EXPERIENCED PREFERRED





2Ul Saar Otarolinimt
Sriif (he Ernst
Clay Deanhardt, gmnim
Carol Wetherincton, !�&, uu
ins
James F.J. McKee, oirrdorgfdw,
Tim Hampton, nfj,
LX)UG JotINSON, G, spcrts tmm
joi in Carter, �(,� e�m
Michelle England, om
Debbie Stevens, s�
Paul Dunn, cspo, u�
Jeff Parker, !�.�,�
TOM FURR, OnMtum Mmvgtr
Mike Upchurch, �,�. m�,
John W. Medlin, �&�
Mac Clark, i�m.Mmp
June 2, 1988
OPINION
Page 4
Registration
frustation
Camping out on the doorstep
OOPSi SORRY-SOlvCETniN'CrVae up-y'inoW?(
Last week ECU started second
summer session. For many who had
not pre-registered, Wednesday was
a day of utter frustration.
Our registration system is to be
hailed as a tine one. On-line regis-
tration has ended the process of
standing in line for hours while
praying for classes that may become
unobtainable at any time. Com-
pared to the old system, on-line reg-
istration has saved, for many stu-
dents, invaluable time.
But now a major problem exists
that has been showing itself more
and more the past few semesters.
Where are the instructors on regis-
tration day? Registration would be
so much easier if the instructors
were in their offices when students
need their advice, as counselors, or
when classes can only be obtained
through special permission.
Where are these instructors hid-
ing?! No one expects the teachers to
be in their offices every minute of the
day and certainly everyone is en-
titled to decent lunch time, as well as
breaks. But when prominent profes-
sors disappear for hours on end, yet
the note on the door says they will
return in 45 minutes, where are stu-
dents to turn?
This is one oi the most frustrating
feelings a student can experience in
college. Is a student suppossed to
understand that a teacher had to
"run a quick errand after they've
sat at his door for almost an hour? Is
a student suppossed to respect a
teacher who comes in, throws down
their personal belongings, and exits,
saying they'll be right back, but not
returning for 40 minutes. To top it
off, when he does return, he's car-
rying coffee and a donut? How
much respect has this student beer
shown?
These practices may sound ob-
scure, but they are not. These exact
occurences took place Wednesday,
June 22,1988. One student, who was
never able to get in touch with her
instructor, decided to just go to class
the next morning to get special per-
mission. Guess what. The instructor
did not show up.
This kind of thing is trying and
uncalled for. Most students attend
class regularly. Their want of an
education help support these
professor's habits like eating and
sleeping under a roof. So instruc-
tors, (and you know who you are), is
it too much to spend a steady day in
your office? Students want a day off
just like you do, and there are a
dozen other places we would rather
be, but priorites and obligations
sometimes prevent tis from indulg-
ing in these preference, so we just do
what needs to be done. If doing
what needs to be done is too dis-
tasteful to you, then
And to all of those diligent profes-
sors who can be found fairly easy,
THANK YOU. You are appreciated!
So, from a multitude of frustrated
college students, who really want to
be in your class, please try to under-
stand and be cooperative. Is five
minutes too much extra time to
contribute to a person's education?
Is AIDS cause misguided?
True AIDS victims defined
To the Editor,
I'd like to comment on the two edi-
torials printed in Wednesday's East
Carolinian. In these editorials Evan
Lightner and Steve Sommers both
expressed their mutual anger at a t-
shirt sold by Sweet Willy's Surf Shop
and BLT's, two Fifth Sreet businesses
that sell a variety of merchandise and
special order t-shirts, as well as, the t-
shirt in question. I respect Mr.
Lightner's and Mr. Sommers opin-
ions and their right to express them;
whether I agree with these opinions
or not.
What I do not respect or appreciate
is slanderous and one-sided remarks
directed toward anyone. I'm aware
that Mr. Lightner and Mr. Sommers
are not Jounalism majors but I would
have expected these gentlemen to
have contacted each of the businesses
attacked in their editorials before
speculating on the owners' charac-
ters. These gentlemen may have con-
tacted Sweet Willy's Surf Shop but I
know for a fact that no such contact
was made with anyone at BLT's.
If Mr. Lightner and Mr. Sommers
had gone to BLT's in the beginning
and expressed their concerns in a way
that is expected of most adults, I be-
lieve their concerns would have been
listened to. Instead, Mr. Lightner and
Mr. Sommers have childishly and
cowardly hidden behind the written
word.
Mr. Sommers, in mentioning the
"managers" of Sweet Willy's and
BLT's, uses the phrase "assuming
they are heterosexual Sweet Willy's
and BLT's had made no personal at-
tack on anyone. Why then should Mr.
Sommers? I don't believe that a per-
sonal attackof any kind is the purpose
of an editorial.
I don't know Mr. Sommers person-
ally so I wouldn't dare to speculate on
his sexual habits, his personality, or
his morality. Since Mr. Sommers has
never spoken to any of the owners of
BLT's in regard to this subject, I do not
understand where he has gotten the
idea that he should make such a per-
sonal attack.
The woners of BLT's are all respon-
sible, talented, and successful busi-
nessmen. Remarks by Mr. Sommers,
such as, "sit down with the rest of the
fellas, drink some beer and think
about clothes hangers and vaccum
cleanersare only spiteful. As I've
said, Mr. Sommers doesn't even
know the owners of BLT's.
Mr. Lightner and Mr. Sommers, I
do believe that you have a right to
your opinion. I also believe that Sweet
Willy's and BLT's have a right to their
opinion. And if you do not agree with
their opinion, then'you dorr't have to
buy thisspecrfrc't-Wrt " borneo esvi
I'm happy that the two of you have
a cause. I think it is admirable that you
are willing to stand up for that cause.
However, I don't believe that you
have gone about your mission in a
very rational manner.
I would hope that in your crusades,
you would consider that Sweet
Willy's and BLT's, being the "bud-
ding entrepreneurs" that they are,
would not be selling such a product if
there was not a market for it. Maybe,
Mr. Sommers, you and your
commrade might want to put your
encrgys toward changing the de-
mands of the public and that in itself
would take care of the supply.
Denise White
Senior
History
To the editor,
We live in a society where eighteen
year old "young adults" arc driving
BMW's to college and have different
lifestyles filled with promiscuous
sexual activity. Only recently have
two of mv more brilliant fellow stu-
J
dents recognized that AIDS is not
something to be mocked but some-
thing that demands fearful desccm-
ment. I guess the owners of the "STOP
AIDS" T-shirts have not taken
enough time to consider the facts�
AIDS is not a homosexual disease.
Perhaps it will take a few people
being put six feet under to make these
fools think before they fulfill their
sexual desires with their girlfriends.
So why the reference to BMW's?
The students who have been pam-
pered with a lifestyle where they can
have anything they want are the very
ones who feel they are somehow
immune to AIDS. Wake up, it does
nottake a genius toToalize that prom-
i iscmty iathcTootoi the problem. Stall,
the sexual disease rate is increasing
and behavior has not changed.
Need I even mention the "moral-
ity?" Let us not forget the words "In
God We Trust" are still embossed on
our currency and we supposedlv live
in "The Bible Belt The majontv of
the students at ECU are onlv inter-
ested in fulfilling their own selfish
desires and conviently disregard the
teachings of Jesus Christ. What a ca-
lamity! Facts are facts�AIDS is real
and so is Jesus Christ. Onlv absti-
nence and Biblical morality can save
us from our current pathway to obliv-
ion. Think about it, is there any other
way?
David McCreary
Junior
English
To the editor,
1 just have to respond to the two
letters in the June 22 paper. Entitled
"T-shirts spark anger" and "More
anger They were scathing de-
nouncements of the managers of
Sweet Willy's Surt Shop and BLT's T-
shirtShop. Evan Lightner called these
managers "fools and accused them
of "callous, immoral ignorance" and
"sadistic, perverted, rabid homopho-
bia Steve Sommers likewise ac-
cused them of "homophobia
And just what is the terrible
crime' these managers are commit-
ting? Selling "STOP AIDS" t-shirts
that portray two stick-figure homo-
sexuals engaging in buggery (anal
intercourse); the picture is circled and
crossed out. Horrors! A t-shirt that
dares to tell the truth being sold in
downtown Greenville! Who could
ever have dreamed up such a shame-
fess item?!
If I wore a t-shirt that said "STOP
LUNG CANCER" on one side and
had a crossed-out picture of a person
smoking on the other, would I be
guilty of "callous, immoral igno-
rance" and "sadistic, perverted, rabid
anti-cigarettc-smoker phobia"? If I
wore a t-shirt that siad "STOP BRAIN
DAMAGE" on one side and had a
crossed-out pictureofa person smok-
ing pot on the other, would Lightner
and Sommers call me a "fool?"
It's all a matter of responsibility.
Hemophiliacs, innocent people with
immoral spouses, and babies who
develop Al DS are innocent victims of
a terrible disease and arc truly deserv-
ing of our compassion and sympathy.
However, homosexuals, promiscu-
ous heterosexuals, and drug addicts
who develop AIDS are NOT innocent
victims; they knew they could get
AIDS from engaging in certain activi-
those activities anyway. They should
receive chari ty and a low level of pity,
inso much as they arc suffering fellow
human beings and as they are pitiful
people. They do NOT deserve to be
considered "innocent" victims and
they should NOT receive true com-
passion and sympathy: they got ex-
actly what they were asking for!
Likewise, a person who smokes
heavily for years, develops lung can-
cer, and dies a horrible death deserves
our charity and some pity but he does
NOT deserve true compassion and
sympathy: he was fully aware of the
risks of his behavior and he went
ahead and engaged in that behavior
anyway.
A homosexual who knows he can
get AIDS from engaging in perverted,
immoral sex acts and engages in them
anyway is the REAL fool, Mr. Light-
ner. A heterosexual who knows he
can get AIDS by engaging in immoral,
promiscuous sex and engages in it
anyway is the REAL fool, Mr. Som-
mers. An AIDS victim who was a
drug addict who shared dirty
needles, a homosexual whoindesde-
scriminately slept around is NOT an
innocent victim, but a guilty, irre-
sponsible fool who got exactly what
he was asking for.
Mr. Sommers and Mr. Lightner
should reserve their compassion for
those who truly deserve it: the inno-
cent unborn child who is torn to
pieces or scalded to death because
someone decided that they had the
"right to choose" to strip that child of
his constitutionally-given right to life;
the innocent baby who is born suffer-
ing with drug addiction or AIDS; the
innocent person who receives AIDS
from hisher immoral spouse.
How to virtually erase all chances
of getting AIDS: practice lifelong
heterosexual monogamy with only
one person and don't use drugs.
Those who follow this advice and get
AIDS anyway are the only AIDS vic-
tims truly deserving of our compas-
sion.
How much were those t-shirts,
anyway?
Justin Sturz
Junior
English
o
They ask WHY?
To the editor,
I have been keeping up with the
controversy between the merchants
downtown, who are selling STOP
AIDS shirts which were designed in
jest, and the concerned citizens who
do not think they are very funny.
Since the conplaints Sweet Willie's
took the shirt out the front window
and moved it inside the store. Nice
gesture but you missed the point. BLT
took mature measures and kept the
shirt in the front window and also
drew a comical picture of the two
citizens who complained and posted
it for all to see in the front of their store
window. These pictures wereof a two
year old's drawing capacity and en-
titled "WHY? That's a good ques-
tions that needs some light shed on it.
In my opinon this whole contro-
versy is manifested in ignorance.
Ignorance fortunately can be con-
quered by knowledge. As intelligent
businessmen, I assume you keep up
to date with the latest buyer trends,
sales approaches and consumer
needs. I think that this is merely a
action-reaction situation. You have
every right, legally, to keep the shirts
in the window and foster their distri-
bution. You know however that con-
sciousness has been raised tothe more
serious implications of this shirt that
was initiated out of humor. Consum-
ers unnamed and unnumbered are of-
fended not only by the sight of the
shirt but by the fact that it makes a
joke out of a disease whose serious-
ness leaves no room for humor. This is
one move among many to improve
buyer-seller relations. I am sure you
have discontinued an item for lesser
reasons than this. This is not a name
callin' show of power that will be re-
solved by the one with the best cover-
age or best lawyers. Morally, I think
you, as well as anyone, should do
your part to bridge the gap between
the myths and the realities concern-
ing AIDS, plus the importance of un-
derstanding this deadly disease
which has millions at its mercy.
There is not time for ignorance or
personal attacks. AIDS waits for no
one. Compassion which has been
sacrificed by ignorance must be re-
stored.
It is true that these shirts are all over
the country and a lot of people sell
them. It is true that AIDS jokes fill
many rooms everywhere. So why
sacrifice making a buck when every-
one else is doing it? Because if just one
person stands up for a just cause then
others will follow. Just do your part. I
as one cannot do business with you.
You, for one, should take the risk of a
slight monetary loss and stop con-
doning these shirts. The result of
knowledge plus cooperation will
equal progress.
I know you do not sell these shirts to
promote AIDS nor do you have a
death wish for AIDS victims. I am
sure that you as well as people in
general with tunnel visionon the
topic of AIDS become more aware of
the raw realities of AIDS and take the
time to educate yourself in this area
then each day it will become more
difficult for you to look at these shirts
and find the least bit of humor i-
ihem. Personally, at this point it
makes my stomach turn. I must con-
fess however that a few years ago
when the shirts and jokes first came
out I thought that only homosexuals
contracted and spread AIDS, and out
of ignorance I too smirked. Since then
however information of AIDS has in-
creased dramatically parallelled un-
fortunatly by its number of victims
which consist of males and females of
all ages and sexual preferences. AIDS
does not carefully screen it't victims.
It could hit any sex, any age, anytime.
Today, AIDS remains incurable,
ignorance does not.
Toni Page
Journ.Pol.Sci.
C
a
m
Pu
F s
�r
um
Telev
GREENVILLE, NX. (AP
North Carolina television
gehst Jim Whittington is dj
but he insists he's not out.
I happen to be one of
mavericks that believe that
can beat the system, that yoi
stand up like Elmer Gantrv
say, 'Yes, I've made a mist
But he walks a way and he stii
his faith he said.
Whittington, 46, is a
preacher without a studio, aj
ister without a church.
His two speedboats, w
$344,000, are gone, and so a
Cadillacs His third v.
driving a secondhand
Continental.
But the flamboyant faith H
still has his Rolls-Rovcc, hi:
r ion-dollar mansion am
conviction that God will
Party
MOSCOW (AP) - V �
Gorbachev opened the Con
nist Party's first general col
ence in nearly a half-eentui
day by acknowledging the
state of Soviet agncuiture
calling on delegates to mal
ambitious reform proj
"irreversible
Reviewing his three- ;
drive to revitalize the econJ
the Soviet leader said pro!
has been too slow. He saic
main criterion is people's
dard of living.
Delegates have cauti
against expecting great
changes or shifts in the top
elite at the conference, the pi
first since 1941. But thev sau
forum would seek to redefin
role in society of the run
million-member partv.
Gorbachev turned speci
tention today to farming, w
dismal production figures
after year show the nation
incapable of feeding itself. H(
recent production increases
kept pace with popuh
growth but failed to make
food available to consumer;
"We must overcome tl
tisngemcnt between the ra
and the soil said Gorba
himself the son of a Russian,
ant.
Gorbachev said the partv
icy-making Central Com:
had defined the main task u
the conference as "how to fui
Ohio farme
MOUNT GILEAD, Ohio
� Eric Anthonv looked ovi
farm one year ago and sai
fields soaked with water t:
summer flood.
This year, he's thank;
that water held in the groui
it may mean the ditterend
tween survival and dis
brought on by the nation's
drought in more than 50 v ej
Anthonv grows so v bear
com on his 1.400 acre farm v
this north-central Ohio coi
nitv in Morrow County.
"The flood seemed devasj
last year, but it gave us a
retained moisture' AnfJ
savs. "For every hole it droi
it made the others so muc
ter
Last Julv, the area was t
flooding after up to 6 inci
rain fell during 24 hours!
floods caused more than $21
lion in damage. The Ohio Pil
Services Agency estimated
losses at $3.4 million.
Crawford, Marion, Ma
and Richland counties wei
clared eligible for federal di
aid.
A much bleaker picture
farmers this year. Rainfall
since April 1 are as mud
inches below normal, and aj
tural officials have warn!
heavy losses from the droul
Ohio's soil moisture is 91
cent short, and less than 21
cent of the corn and soy crol
rated as good or excellentf
officials said Monday.
Anthony said that althouj
year's flooding devastate
area, it may have hel
season's rain-starved crops
than is believed.
Steve Ruhl, agricul
extension agent for M(
County, agreed.
"Our wells would be in
better shape because of tl
year Ruhl said Mondai
least, the ground was saturj
one point last summer
This season's sparse sf





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IUNE29,19�
kNOV?i
ided?
I a society where eighteen
ung adults" arc driving
liege and have different
filled with promiscuous
iviry. Only recently have
more brilliant fellow stu-
ftgnized that AIDS is not
to be mocked but some-
demands fearful descern-
s the owners of the "STOP
shirts have not taken
Ime to consider the facts�
iot a homosexual disease,
tt will take a few people
Isix feet under to make these
jik before they fulfill their
sires with their girlfriends.
y the reference to BMW's?
:nts who have been pam-
Ih a lifestyle where they can
Jthing they want are the very
lo feel they are somehow
to AIDS. Wake up, it does
i genius toToahze that prom-
therootoi the problem. Still,
disease rate is increasing
Ivior has not changed.
even mention the "moral-
us not forget the words "In
"rust" are still embossed on
Incv and we supposedly live
?;ble Belt The majority of
its at ECU are only inter-
Jiulfilling their own selfish
Ind conviently disregard the
of Jesus Christ. What a ca-
rets are facts�AIDS is real
Jesus Christ. Only absti-
kd Biblical morality can save
ur current pathway to obliv-
ik about it, is there any other
David McCreary
Junior
English
least bit of humor fa
tally, at this point it
Imach turn. I must con-
that a few years ago
rts and jokes first came
"that onlv homosexuals
id spread AIDS, and out
Itoo smirked. Since then
rmation of AIDS has in-
latically parallelled un-
its number of victims
I of males and females of
jxual preferences. AIDS
Ifully screen it't victims.
lv sex, anv age, anytime.
i)S remains incurable,
not.
Toni Page
Journ.Pol. Sci.
m
P
u
s
r
u
m
Televangelist Whittington says he is not out
GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) � even greater blessings. native, says he hasn't. bankruptcy, Whittington took a He won't give specifics about The preacher is proud of his
North Carolina television evan- "I believe the Scripture that says Earlier this month, a 71-year- $150,000 second mortgage on his the ministry's revenues and ex- material wealth and says his fol-
gelist Jim Whittington is down, in Psalms 1:3, 'Whatever you do old Florida woman claimed in a Greenville home and negotiated a penditures, but he says his salary lowers are, too.
but he insists he's not out. will prospereth" Whittington lawsuit that she was "unduly in- 50-cents-on-the-dollar payoff for is $100,000 a year. "People love a winner and will
I happen to be one of those told The Charlotte Observer, fluenced" to give her home and
mavericks that believe that you "That's the reason I can't apolo- nearly $700,000 to Whittington's
being a prosperous
Whatever I do will
can beat the system, that you can gize for
stand up like Elmer Gantry and preacher
say, 'Yes, I've made a mistake prosper
But he walks away and he still has During the past decade he has
his faith he said. appealed for, and received, mil-
Whittington, 46, is a TV lions of dollars from viewers who
$300,000 in TV-time debt.
Contributions are down,
and
The Whittingtons live in a not tolerate a loser, any they like
$595,000 house complete with a people that are doing some-
swimming pool and a hot tub. thing he told a Today show cor-
Theydri ve black and gray Lincoln respondent in December.
Town Cars around Greenville Depending on how the summer
and use his 1977 Rolls-Royce Sil- crusades go, Whittington says, he
The Jim Whittington gart and Jim Bakker thing dies ver Shadow II for weekend trips hopes to raise enough money to
a Sunday morning broad- down a little bit Whittington to Charleston, S.C, a favorite get- buy time on 25 TV stations thn
ministry, Fountain of Life. Whit- Whittington is off TV for the
tington says she gave of her own summer.
free will. 'To be very candid with you,
At its peak three or four years we're off until the Jimmy Swag
ago,
Show a 'i m rang - down a
preacher without a studio, a min- want anointed prayer cloths and cast of crusade tapes, was carried says. "If s thrown a red flag up to away
fall.
ister without a church.
His two speedboats, worth
$344,000, are gone, and so are his
Cadillacs. His third wife, Pam, is
driving a secondhand Lincoln
Continental.
consecrated coins
working prayers.
Not all those he
fans.
and miracle- by TV stations from Philadelphia a lot of people.
and Detroit to Florence, S.C, and With 15 to 20 employees, Whit-
rcachcrs are Greenwood, Miss. Whittincton tington says, Fountain of Life
says viewers sent up to $10 mil- pumps out about 125,000 pieces of
In April 1986, the Alabama at- lion a year to the address flashed
torncy general's office, complain-
But the flamboyant faith healer ing of "threats and coercion" in
still has his Rolls-Royce, his half- his letters, demanded that Whit-
million-dollar mansion and his tington cease solicitations in that
conviction that God will send state. Whittington, a Dillon, S.C,
across the bottom of the screen.
But bills mounted. In fall 1985,
he owed about $500,000 for TV
time. Three stations sued.
Shunning advice to file for
Party conference opened
MOSCOW (AP) � Mikhail S. the revolutionary restructuring
Gorbachev opened the Commu- launched in our country and
nist Party's first general confer- make it irreversible
ence in nearly a half-century to- A central item on the agenda
day by acknowledging the sorry suggested by the Central
state of Soviet agriculture and Committee would limit Commu-
"What we must have is reliable
political guarantees against a re-
currence of what happened in the
past he told reporters Monday,
speaking of the paranoia-driven
calling on delegates to make his
ambitious reform program
"irreversible
Reviewing his three-year-old
drive to revitalize the economy,
the Soviet leader said progress
has been too slow. He said the
tyranny of Josef Stalin and the
nist officials to two five-year stagnation-plagued rule of Le-
terms in the same office and rein-
force the powers of the country's
mail a month: solicitations, ac-
knowledgments, advertisements.
He said followers donate $2 mil-
lion to $5 million a year.
Whittington writes all his news
releases and computer-printed
fundraising appeals.
"The Lord spoke to me to have
you to take a $21.00 free will offer-
ing and rush it to me This offer-
ing you send will come back to
you many, many, many times
one appeal says.
Whittington's tone hasn't al-
ways been so gentle.
"Two of the people that raised
their hand against my ministry
SUMMER AIRFARE
BARGAINS
cHCAGO $183oo

are dead and the third one has
onid I. Brezhnev. chronic lung disease says one
Proposals for the conference, appeal, the subject of several
known as theses, were published complaints. "The reporter lost his
last month after being approved job and the judgement of God has
May 23 by the policy-making begun to fall upon those who have
Central Committee. lifted their hand against this min-
main criterion is people's stan- this morning filed into the main They contain a few specific istry
dard of living. hall of the glass-and-marble Pal- proposals for reform, such as lim- t0 keep interest alive while his
Delegates have cautioned ace of Congresses and were iting officials to two five-year show is off the air, Whittington is
against expecting great policy briefly applauded by about 5,000 terms in one post, and several pitching his 400-foot red revival
DALLAS $228
governing councils, known in
Russsian as "Soviets
Gorbachev and the other 12
members of the ruling Politburo
NEW YORK $128��
!2ON 180�

changes or shifts in the top party conference delegates,
elite at the conference, the party's The conference's first official act
first since 1941. But they said the was to unanimously adopt his
forum would seek to redefine the slate of 112 members to serve on
role in society of the ruling 20 the conference presidium, which
million-member party. could play a key role in detcrming
Gorbachev turned special at- who can speak at the session,
tention today to farming, where expected to last through the week.
dismal production figures year The names of the those serving
after year show the nation is still on the presidium were not an-
incapable of feeding itself. He said nounced, but they included the
recent production increases have heads of the party delegations
kept pace with population from each of the 15 Soviet repub-
grovvth but failed to make more lies and top Kremlin officials,
food available to consumers. The conference is closed to the
"We must overcome the es- foreign press, but the opening
teangement between the fanner i session was carried live on Soviet
general suggestions, including a
recommendation for some sort of
program to dismantle the
remnants of Stalin's authoritarian
rule.
The Stalinist past is likely to be a
topic of discussion as the party
tries to decide its future role in
view of Gorbachev's call for it to
withdraw from day-to-day ad-
ministration and instead set gen-
eral goals for society.
"Simply put, a party committee
tent in Atlanta, Detroit, Qeveland
and several other cities this sum-
mer.
None of the money from offer-
ing plates or direct mail pleasgoes
to mission work. Whittington
doesn't build clinics or soup
kitchens or home for unwed
mothers. His is a message of per-
sonal salvation. "Jesus never
commissioned anybody to build a
hospital, a university or an
amusement park he says. "I
LOS ANGELES 308��
ATLANTA 228��
READ THE FINE PRINT
These airfares are the lowest roundtrip rates fromCreenviile, NIC currently in effect for travel. Space is
limited and travel restrictions and advance purchase requirements apply. Rates shown are for off peak
travel Fares on other days are slightly higher. Once purchased, your ticket cannot be changed nor refunded.
Fares are subject to change at any time. Most fares now require 7 day advance purchase
and the soil said Gorbachev,
himself the son of a Russian peas-
ant.
Gorbachev said the party's pol-
icy-making Central Committee
television.
Nail B. Bikkenin, editor of the
party journal Kommunist and a that the party should keep firm
conference delegate, said the fo- control over all aspects of society,
had defined the main task facing rum must "reconstruct our politi- as it has for most of the 70 years
the conference as "how to further cal system, which is obsolete. since the Bolshevik Revolution.
must not replace a soviet (govern- think that what has happened to
ment council) or do the Soviet's the Bakkers and to Oral Roberts,
work for it Igor Shvets, a Central to Pat Robertson and a lot of other
Committee official, said Monday, people, is they' have got so in-
The theses also suggest that volved with the cares of this life
government councils the given Fountain of Life has been good
more power. Conservative assert to Whittington and his family.
TRAVEL CENTER
714 E. Greenville Blvd. �Greenville, NC 27834
355-5075
Ohio farmers thankful for last year's floods
MOUNT GILEAD, Ohio (AP) have done little more than keep quality not as good.
� Eric Anthony looked over his corn and bean plants alive. What Anthony, a farmer for 18 years,
farm one year ago and saw his rain the state has received hasn't said this is the worst drought he
fields soaked with water from a vcen enough to get much height has seen. He said many of his
summer flood. out of crops, Anthony said. neighbors are depressed over the
This year, he's thankful some of Corn stalks should be 8 feet by loss of their crops.
that water held in the ground, for July 4,but most of his stalks range
it may mean the difference be- from 5 inches to 1 12 feet. He is "Wheat yields are going to be
tween survival and disaster not as worried about his soybeans down significantly Ruhl said.
brought on by the nation's worst because he said they will sit until " ooks like hay yields are down
drought in more than 50 years. August and still grow to their full about a third of what we normally
Anthony grows soybeans and height. would have
Anthony said although the corn Although Anthony said the
will mature despite its small size, outlook for this year's crop is not
the ears will be smaller and the good, he's not ready to give up.
9S
tfver Sa
Let Us Serve You!
We Will Gladly Cash Your Checks From Home!
$&
corn on his 1,400 acre farm west of
this north-central Ohio commu-
nity in Morrow County.
"The flood seemed devastating
last year, but it gave us a lot of
retained moisture Anthony
says. "For every hole it drowned,
it made the others so much bet-
ter
Last July, the area was hit by
flooding after up to 6 inches of
rain fell during 24 hours. The
floods caused more than $20 mil-
lion in damage. The Ohio Disaster
Services Agency estimated crop
losses at $5.4 million.
Crawford, Marion, Morrow
and Richland counties were de-
clared eligible for federal disaster
aid.
A much bleaker picture faces
farmers this year. Rainfall totals
since April 1 are as much as 6
inches below normal, and agricul-
tural officials have warned of
heavy losses from the drought.
Ohio's soil moisture is 93 per-
cent short, and less than 20 per-
cent of the corn and soy crops are
rated as good or excellent, state
officials said Monday.
Anthony said that although last
year's flooding devastated the
area, it may have helped this
season's rain-starved crops more
than is believed.
Steve Ruhl, agricultural
extension agent for Morrow
County, agreed.
"Our wells would be in a little
better shape because of that last
year Ruhl said Monday. "At
least, the ground was saturated at
one point last summer
This season's sparse
fj&iZ"
showers
FOUR STAR
PIZZA
� � � �
F
78-3300
Heavy Western
Sirloin Steak
$2.88 it
T-Bone Steak
$3.19lb
Fresh Daily
Ground Beef Patties
$1.38
lb.
5 lbs. or more
FOURTH OF JULY
OPEN 8 A.M. - 8 P.M,
BIG FOURTH OF JULY
SIDEWALK SALE!
WATCH FOR OUR BIG AD IS
SUNDAYS DAILY RELECTOR
Charmin Tissue
Deli:
Cooked Hamlb. $2.99
Turkey Breastlb. $3.99
Provolene Cheeselb. $2.99
89
4 roll pkg.
Limit 2
Hours- ha ���
�O.U
�� �� COUpon m mm ssw 9 mm ssa coupon at m
758-3300A f 758-3300
�!�&
�!��
Greenville
SMALL PIZZAS
II
I I
Greenville
! (16 Slices � 1 Item)! J
PLUS
ONLY $8.20 I I
�Saw 17.15 Wkoa Buyts DbuMm 1 I
VO� Coupon Per Pta� ���,�.
Coupon Expire. �u�o� I � Coupoa Bcpsisj
mm �� COUDOn mi � m s mmrn m�
ANT BIG 12" SUB
PLUS 1 COKE
$4.25
Saw MS
One Coup
iponlcrFlzzi ��jBxw.is�s�
Expires fciss��
coupon
coupon
�IMKkt f
Bud Light BeerBud
Regular
$ 10.99
24-12 oz. cans suitcase pack
All Coke Products
99
2 Liter
Lays Ruffles
Potato Chips
79
612 oz. bag
Prices Effective Wed. June 29 - Sat July 2
Store Hours: Sun. 1-6 p.m.
MonSat. 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Mastercard & Visa Accepted
WIC - Food Stamps Welcome
Quantity Rights Reserved
211 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks From E.C.U.
OVERTONS





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IUNE29, 1988
Classifieds
HI-LP WANTED
IF YOU ARE A MUSKVOICE MAJOR
and would like to put you voice to work
and make Mime cash this summer then
call 355-0355 and ask for Dena.
BE ON T.V. � Manv needed for com
mercials. Casting info. 1-800-687-6000.
Ext. T.Vllbh
OVERSEAS JOBS � Also Cnnseships
$10,000 � $105.000yr! Now Hiring'
320 listings! 1-800-687-6000. Lt. OJ-
1166
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNCILOR
Interested in tho-e with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No Monetary
Compensation bowver room utilities
and phone provided Call Marv Smith,
Real Crisis Center 758-1IELP.
DO YOU LOOK GOOD IN A BIKINI?
We need models tor a Legs video Excep-
tional earnings Apply in person only!
Promotions Unlimited, 1902 A Charles
Street inside the Insurance Center, right
across from the Pirates Chest M-F, 14
p m. You must be IS 3b vts. old ?tt to 5ft.
- Sin. tall. Weight must be proportional
with height
FOR SALF.
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS, Cars, 4X4s
Seied in drug raids for under (100.00
Call for facts todayd 602-837-3401. Ext.
711.
Donna at 830 5274.
ROOMS FOR KENT $165.00 per
month. Utilities included. Near ECU
Campus Call 758-1274 after 5.30 pjn.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED � lg
room; trailer 3 miles from campus $110.00
plus 12 utilities. Call Janet 355-7753.
PERSONALS
RED HOT BARGAINS! � Drugdealer's
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your
area. Buyers Guide. 1-800-6000. Ext. S-
1166.
FOR SALE � Larger than dorm size re
fr.eerator Only used for one year. Good 1 OUND: Female beagle dog m vicinity of
condition. Please call 830-0492 and leave a warehouse on campus. Call 756-1207.
message. ,
PANTANA BOB'S � Enhancing your
RINGOLD TOWERS CONDO � for summer with drink specials every night.
sale B unit, 2nd floor, fully furnished. Tax
market value $43,730.00. Make me an offer BASS - you SOB. Who'll give out the
919-787-1378 BCP1 The place will be a zoo. The girls
won't know what to do (well maybe they
will). The "Fiasco" will be even greater.
Good luck at BW. The Gang.
BILL AND JESSICA � Do your laun
drv early and clean your party shirts for
New Potato Caboose on Thur. July 7 and
for Capt. Cook and the Coconutz (a tnb
ute to Jimmy Buffet) on Fri. July 15 at the
Attic.
FOR RFNT
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED � for
3 bedroom townhouse. Washer, dryer,
pool tennis courts $145.00 plus 13 utili-
ties. 355-4834.
SERVICES OFFERED
NEED A PLACE TO LIVE THIS SUM-
MI R � Roommate needed to share 2
bedroom townhouse $97.00 a month, 1 3 30, B-52 mgh
utilities. Near clubhouse, pool, laundry
room Quiet neighborhood. Call 355-0355.
GROG'S - Tt IE LATE NIC1 IT PLACE
TO BE E1G1 IT N1C.I ITS A WEEK. June
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE:
758-5488, 758-8241. Call Susan.
INDEPENDANTCABSI RVICE�Call
355-5034 in evcnii
lames tor a ride
lood rates Call
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We otter typing
and photocopying sen ices. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourl) rate in town. SPF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
tboside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694
FOR RENT � 5 bedroom bouse, 3 full
baths, close to campus. NON-SMOKER.
Call Luke or Steve at 830-0339.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED �
Immediately. $140.00month, 12 utlities
and phone. Call after 3:00 p.m 752-7004.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED �
Twin Oaks, 2 bdr. 1 (2 bath, 157.50 and 1
2 utilities, 1 12 miles from campus, dish-
washer, pool, microwave, very nice, avail-
able July or August, 757-0316.
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom"
� And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 I 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
� Across From 1 Jighway Patrol Suuon
Limited offer S27S a month
Contact IT or Tommy WilUarns
756 7815 or 830-1937
Oil
pen-Apt 8, 12-5:30 p.m.
pts tor rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Furnished Contact I lollie Simonowich at
752-2865.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a 2 bedroom apt. Washer dryer fur-
nished wapt. NONs.VOkER please' Call
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean ati quiet or.c bedroom Furnished
apjrtmonts. energy efficient, free wjtcr jr.d
tewer, optional washers, dryers, cable IV.
Couples or singles onlv. $1 a month, f month
lease MOBU1 HOMi RENTALS-couples or
singles Apartment and mobile homes in Aji'j
Gardens near Brook. Valley Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 '
Announcements
SUMIN1ER LIBRARYHQVR S
Mondays Thursdays 8:00 a.m. - 11:00
p m ; Fridays 8:00 a.m. - b 00p.m Satur-
days 9:00 am -1m 0 p m ; Sundays 12:00
noon - 11 00 pm The Media Resources
Center will be open: Mondavs - Thurs
davs 8:00 a m. - 9:30 p.m ; Fridays 8:00ajn.
- V.OOp.m ; Saturdays 1:00 p.m. - (S.OOp.m
Sundays 12 noon - 9:00 p.m.
HANGGUniNG
Everyone is invited to register for a
summer hang gliding adventure tnp to
Nags 1 lead, NC. June 22 - July 12.
BACKPACKING
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for a summer Backpacking
Trip June 22 -July 5 in 204 Memorial Gym.
Eor more information call 757-6387.
CD-OP SL MMER FALL
Three jobs � C mgrcssional Office,
Washington, DC. June � August Salary:
SI000 (X)month. Student must have gen-
eral office skills and some experience with
word processing. Short hand skills de-
sired. Also, Tampa Electric Company,
Tampa, Florida Eall semester. Salary:
51135.00month. Word processing
courses andor word processing cxperi-
ence required. Will be expected to return
to job Summer 1989if work is satisfactory.
Salary will increase. Finally, Positions
available in the Nags I lead area begin-
ning June 1, 1988. Salary: S-lhour, 30-40
hrs.wk. I lousing available near worksite
- S30.00week. Students must have 2.5
C.PA. Will receive S500 scholarshipsti-
pend for college expenses when returning
to school in the fall For ail these positions,
contact Ruth Peters.mi, 77 6979, immedi-
ately. Student may apply at Co op office,
2028 GCbuildu �
MINORITY ADULTS
The ECU Testing center is needing mi
nority adults to take a new intelligence
test. The test battery will take about 3 1 2
hours. A token payment will be paid at the
end of the test It interested, contact the
Testing Center in Speight, Room 105, or
call 757 6811.
CANOl OUTING
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for a canoe outing. June 22 - July
12 in 204 Memorial Gymnasium. Eor addi-
tional information, call 758-6387.
ECU oyner 1 ibrary will be dosed
Monday, uly 4th for the holiday. Normal
summer operating hours will resume on
Tuesday, ulv 5th.
BUCCANFI-R
All students: there are still a few copies
of the 1983-1986 yearbooks left at our of
fice. If you would like to receive a copy,
just come by the Publications Building and
pick one up.
GOLF CLASSIC
Faculty, statf and students are invited
to register for the summer golf classic July
11 at 4:00 p.m. in MG 102 Eor additional
information call. 757-6387.
ECU LIBRARY
WATER POLO
Faculy, statf and studens are invited to
register for intramural Co rec water polo
July 6 at A 00 p.m. in MG 102 Eor addi
tional information, call 757-6387.
WQRKSTUDY
It you are work study eligible tor 2nd
Summer Session andor Eall Semester,
you are encouraged to contact the Co op
office about off-campus placements Call
737 6979 of come by the General Class-
room Building.
Batgirl sayeth:
Reading the
Fast Carolinian
Features page is totally rad.
1 mean, boss
Please don't
make me
go back to
the
water's fine
at
Memorial Gym
2nd ANNUAL
FLAT OUT 5K
C
&
Greenville, N.C. JTJLY4,1988
to benefit
Adventures in Health of Pitt County
Races
5K is TAC certified, flat and fast
One-mile fun run walk
Where
Both races start and finish at Greenville Town Commons
When
Monday. July 4th. 1988
Registration begins at 7.00 AM
5-K starts at 8 30
Fun Run starts at 900
T-Shirt
Original artwork by Jack Davis of MAD Magazine'
SPONSORED BY
I lasting Lord � Burroughs Wellcome Co. � Darryl's 1907 Restaurant
Art and Camera Shop � Greenville Athletic Club � 1 hlton Inn � Overtoil's
Supermarket � Overtoil's Skis � Tiger Shoes � Greenville Police � Greenville
Rescue Squad
SAV AC ENTER
DOUBLE COUPONS
On Manufacturer s Cents-Oft Coupons. See Store For Details Prices Effective Sun . June 26
Thru Sat July 2,1988. Quantity Rights Reserved. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors
U.S.D.A CHOICE GRAIN FED�BONE IN
Family Pack
Sirloin Steaks
SWIFTS TENDER
Pork
Spareribs
1.49
U.S.D.A. CHOICE GRAIN FED
Top Sirloin
Steak
2.99
FIELDALE GRADE A
Fresh Split
Chicken Breasts
FRESH REGULAR
Ground
Beef it
JAMESTOWN
Sliced
Bacon pk9
1.49
PREMIUM
California
Peaches
GENUINE IDAHO
89
AQc Large Baking ACkC
5J5JV Potatoes 57
SWEET & JUICY�PREMIUM
California
Nectarines
CAL!FORNIA�24 SIZE
Head
Lettuce
59
TENDER�IN HUSK ONLY
Yellow
Sweet Corn
RED RIPE
Cut
Watermelon
$1
DELICIOUS
White House
Apple Juice
ALL FLAVORS
Tropicana
Twisters 4T
1.19
1.79
LIMIT ONE WITH $10 PURCHASE
Del Monte
Catsup
68�
LIMIT THREE WITH 410 PURCHASE
Campbell's
Pork & Beans
24
ASSORTED COLORS�JUMBO
Northern
Napkins
Limit One With
10 Purchase
H.V.D.�LITE MILK�BUTTERMILK
Flav-O-Rich
Milk
98
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Budweiser
Beer
Limit Two With
MO Purchase
half gal.
ctn.
99
12 02.
cans
ALL FLAVORS
Dairy Charm
Ice Cream ctn
3.49
REGULAR OR HOMESTYLE
Tropicana
Orange Juice 6ct�z
ALL VARIETIES
Banquet
Fried Chicken 2PVg2
1.69
2.69
TASTEMAKER by Stevens
THIS WEEK�JUMBO 30x54'
Bath Towels
� Peach Glow
� Pale Blue
� Tea Rose
� Bisque
� Camel .
� Mint CM
4.99
703 Greenville Blvd Greenville
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TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
1UNE29,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
IF YOU ARE A MUSICVOICE MAJOR
and would like to put you voice to work
and make some cash this summer then
call 355-0355 and ask for Dena.
BE ON T.V. � Many needed for com-
mercials. Casting info. 1-800-687-6000.
Ext. TV�1166
OVERSEAS JOBS � Also Cruiseships.
$10,000 � $105.000t! Now Hiring!
320 listings! 1 -800-687-6000. Ext. OJ-
1166
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNCILOR �
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No Monetary
Compensation, howvcr room utilities
and phone provided. Call Mary Smith,
Real Crisis Center 758-HELP.
DO YOU LOOK GOOD IN A BIKINI?
We need models for a Legs video. Excep-
tional earnings. Apply in person only!
Promotions Unlimited, 1902-A Charles
Street, inside the Insurance Center, right
across from the Pirates Chest. M-F, 1-4
p.m. You must be 18-36 yrs. old 5ft. to 5ft.
- 8in. tall. Weight must be proportional
with height.
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS, Cars, 4X4's
Seized in drug raids for under $100.00
Call for facts todayd. 602-837-3401. Ext.
711.
RED HOT BARGAINS! � Drug dealer's
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your
area. Buyers Guide 1-800-6000. Ext. S-
1166.
FOR SALE � Larger than dorm-size re-
frigerator. Only used for one year. Good
condition. Please call 830-0492 and leave a
message
RINGOLD TOWERS CONDO � for
sale. B-unit, 2nd floor, fully furnished. Tax
market value $43,730.00. Make me an offer
. 919-787-1378.
Donna at 830-5274.
ROOMS FOR RENT � $165.00 per
month. Utilities included. Near ECU
Campus. Call 758-1274 after 5:30 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED � lg
room; trailer 3 miles from campus. $110.00
plus 1 2 utilities. Call Janet 355-7753.
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
SERVICES OFFERED
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE:
758-54S8, 758-8241. Call Susan.
INDEPENDANT CAB SERVICE � Call
355-5034 in evenings. "Good rates Call
James for a ride.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED � for
3 bedroom townhouse. Washer, dryer,
pool tennis courts. $145.00 plus 13 utili-
ties. 355-4834.
NEED A PLACE TO LIVE THIS SUM-
MER � Roommate needed to share 2
bedroom townhouse. $97.00 a month, 1 3
utilities. Near clubhouse, pool, laundry
room. Quiet neighborhood. Call 355-0355.
FOR RENT � 5 bedroom bouse, 3 full
baths, close to campus. NON-SMOKER.
Call Luke or Steve at 830-0339.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED �
Immediately. $140.00month, 12 utlities
and phone. Call after 3:00 p.m 752-7004.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED �
Twin Oaks, 2 bdr. 1 2 bath, 157.50 and 1
2 utilities, 112 miles from campus, dish-
washer, pool, microwave, very nice, avail-
able July or August, 757-0316.
RINCGOLD TOWERS � Apts. for rent
Furnished. Contact Hollie Simonowich at
752-2865.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a 2 bedroom apt. Washerdryer fur-
nished wapt. NONSMOKER please! Call
FOUND: Female beagle dog in vicinity of
warehouse on campus. Call 756-1207.
PANTANA BOB'S � Enhancing your
summer with drink specials every night.
BASS � you SOB. Who'll give out the
BCP? The place will be a zoo. The girls
won't know what to do (well maybe they
will). The "Fiasco" will be even greater.
Good luck at BW. The Gang.
BILL AND JESSICA � Do your laun-
dry early and clean your party shirts for
New Potato Caboose on Thur. July 7 and
for Capt. Cook and the Coconutz (a trib-
ute to Jimmy Buffet) on Fri. July 15 at the
Attic.
GROG'S � TI IE LATE NIC! IT PLACE
TO BE EIGHT NIG! ITS A WEEK. June
30, B-52 night.
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSTIY APARTMENTS
2899E.5ihStret
� I-ocatcd Near ECU
� Across From 1 lighway Patrol Station
Limited oifer-S275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8,12-5 JO p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month, f month
lease. MOBILE I KME RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Az-ilea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
Announcements
SUMMER LIBRARY HOURS
Mondays - Thursdays 8:00 a.m. - 11:00
p.m Fridays 8:00 a.m. - 6:00p.m Satur-
days 9.00 a.m. - 6.00 p.m Sundays 12:00
noon - 11:00 p.m. The Media Resources
Center will be open: Mondays - Thurs-
days 8.00 a.m. - 9:30 p.m Fridays 8:00 a.m
- 5:00 p.m Saturdays 1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m
Sundays 12 noon - 9:00 pjm.
HANC GLIDING
Everyone is invited to register for a
summer hang gliding adventure trip to
Nags Head, NC. June 22 - July 12.
BACKPACKING
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for a summer Backpacking
Trip. June 22-July 5 in 204 Memorial Gym.
For more information call 757-6387.
CO-OP SUMMER FALL
Three jobs � Congressional Office,
Washington, DC. June � August. Salary:
SlOOO.OOmonth. Student must have gen-
eral office skills and some experience with
word processing. Short hand skills de-
sired. Also, Tampa Electric Company,
Tampa, Florida. Fall semester. Salary:
$1135.00month. Word processing
courses andor word processing experi-
ence required. Will be expected to return
to job Summer 1989 if work is satisfactory.
Salary will increase. Finally, Positions
available in the Nags Head area begin-
ning June 1, 19S8. Salary: S4hour, 30-40
hrs.wk. Housing available near worksite
- $50.00weck. Students must have 2.5
GPA. Will receive S500 scholarshipsti-
pend for college expenses when returning
to school in the fall. For all these positions,
contact Ruth Peterson, 757-6979, immedi-
ately. Students may apply at Co-op office,
2028CCbuildim�
MINORITY ADULTS
The ECU Testing center is needing mi-
nority adults to take a new intelligence
test, the test battery will take about 3 1 2
hours. A token payment will be paid at the
end of the test. If interested, contact the
Testing Center in Speight, Room 105, or
call 757-6811.
CANOE OUTING
Faculty, staff and students arc invited
to register for a canoe outing. June 22 - July
12 in 204 Memorial Gymnasium. For addi-
tional information, call 758-6387.
ECU LIBRARY
ECU Joyner Library will be closed
Monday, July 4th for the holiday Normal
summer operating hours will resume on
Tuesday,July 5th.
BUCCANEER
All students: there are still a few copies
of the 1983-1986 yearbooks left at our of
fice. If you would like to receive a copjjfi
just come by the Publications Building andt
pick one up.
�QLJLOAS3I�
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for the summer golf classic. July
11 at 4:00 p.m. in MG 102. For additional
information call. 757-6387.
WATFR POLO
Faculy, staff and studens are invited to
register for intramural Co-rec water polo
July 6 at 4:00 p.m. in MG 102. For addi-
tional information, call 757-6387.
WORK STUDY
If you are work study eligible for 2nd
Summer Session andor Fall Semester,
you are encouraged to contact the Co-op
office about off-campus placements. Call
757-6979 of come by the Generall Class-
room Building.
Batgirl sayeth:
Reading the
East Carolinian
Features page is totally rad.
I mean, boss
Sorry.
Please don't
make me
go back to
Come on in
2nd ANNUAL
FLAT OUT 5K
the
water's fine
at
Memorial Gym
Greenville, N.C. JTJLY4,1988
to benefit
Adventures in Health of Pitt County
Races
5K is TAC certified, flat and fast
One-mile fun runwalk
Where
Both races start and finish at Greenville Town Commons
When
Monday, July 4th, 1988
Registration begins at 7:00 AM
5-K starts at 8:30
Fun Run starts at 9:00
T-Shirt
Original artwork by Jack Davis of MAD Magazine1
SPONSORED BY
1 Iastings Ford � Burroughs Wellcome Co. � Darryl's 1907 Restaurant
Art and Camera Shop � Greenville Athletic Club � 1 Iilton Inn � Overton's
Supermarket � Overton's Skis � Tiger Shoes � Greenville Police � Greenville
Rescue Squad
OS
SAVACENTER
DOUBLE COUPONS
On Manufacturer's Cents-Off Coupons. See Store For Details. Prices Effective Sun June 26
Thru Sat July 2,1988. Quantity Rights Reserved. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.
U.S.D.A CHOICE GRAIN FEDeBONE IN
Family Pack
Sirloin Steaks
3-5 lb.
avg.
SWIFT'S TENDER
Pork
Spareribs
1.49
FRESH REGULAR
Ground
Beef
lb.
1.49
ears
DELICIOUS
White House
Apple Juice
ALL FLAVORS
Tropicana
Twisters �
TAB�SPRITE�CLASSIC�REGULAR OR DIET
Coca
Cola
H.V.D.�LITE MILKeBUTTERMILK
Flav-O-Rich
Milk
Limit Two With
MO Purchase
half gal.
ctn.
990
U.S.D.A. CHOICE GRAIN FED
Top Sirloin
Steak
Bone
In
lb.
2.99
FIELDALE GRADE A'
Fresh Split
Chicken Breasts
PREMIUM
California
Peaches
ing
lb.
89
49
3NIA�24 SIZE
ead
ttuce
D RIPE
rmelon
LIMIT ONE WITH 10 PURCHASE
Del Monte
Catsup "ST
68
LIMIT THREE WITH 10 PURCHASE
Campbell's
Pork ft Beans
15 oz.
can
24�
ASSORTED COLORS�JUMBO
Northern
Napkins
Limit One With
�10 Purchase
250 ct.
pkg.
98"
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Budweiser
12 oz.
cans
ALL FLAVORS
Dairy Charm
Ice Cream'
ctn.
3.49
REGULAR OR HOMESTYLE
Tropicana
64 OZ
Orange Juice ctn
ALL VARIETIES
Banquet
Fried Chicken 2pkg
1.69
2.69
�� FIRST QUALITY � A
Towels
TASTEMAKER by Stevens
THIS WEEKeJUMBO 30"x54"
Bath Towels
?4.99
� Peach Glow
� Pale Blue
� Tea Rose
� Bisque
� Camel r.
� Mint CM.
703 Greenville Blvd Greenville
"Rose
By CHIPPY BOM HI A I)
feature Fditor
Editor's note: "Who Ft .
Rabbit?" turned out to be the m
EVERYOSE ha
about. Thus, u al
Carolinian features Pa I
what we think is a first
three revieu
We hope you �
Rabbit Pagt , �.
sec whit we in the
ment feel is pi
movie Of a
thought ft Gordon
hip too
What kills m
Framed Roger Ra
that it's rat d PG
Chara
ByCLA DEANHARI
General Mana
Forget ever) �
read or hoar I
Roger Rabbit
The simple facl
up with Bugs 1
Mouse, Don
Porky Pig, Droopy ai rJ
the cart n world lil
have to see tl
Steven Sp
Zemecki who bi
To the Future' ha
again to bring I
frolick stor) I
Armed w ith a solid j
Jeffrey Price and
a ton et iv :�()
million budg t)and j
advance sir n,Z�
and Spicltx rg have (i
incredible visual
the funnybonc v.
heart strings la S
cialty).
2"rBit the ' h lahry
gjHHk'ie re o und -
voiir i �
Anim
By MICAH HARRIS
"Who Framed Rabl
simultaneous- an I
tribute to the f
tionof the past and al kl
the glorious possibilil
form's future. This is that rai
thatisoriginal mtrj
a butterfly burst from it
original.
For "Who Framed F
bit?" has taken ar
next evolutionary rui
tcdly, thecombining of live
with cartoon characl rsii j
new.
Pioneers like Wii
Max Fleischer andD -
mented with the technique
cartoon's genesis Put nevef
been carried to such evtj
And never has there been
tire movie structured i
premise of a joint socw
mans and cartoon chara
Lovable Maroon Tunej
! Roger Rabbit is flubbing 1t
: formances tatter having a
crator dropped on him.
can't work up a circling
stars).
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ffective Sun June 26
voographical Errors.
RAIN FED
irloin
CM W
99
89
49c
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90
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PURCHASE
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3LORS�JUMBO
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kins
8
3 OR LIGHT
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tUALITY I
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,ER by Stevens
UMBO 30 x54'
Towels
.99
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 20,1988 Pafie 7
"Roger Rabbit" may be bossest movie ever
By CHIPPY BONF.HEAD
Features Kditor
Editor's note: "Who Framed Roger
Rabbit?" turned out to be the movie
EVERYONE has something to say
about. Thus, ice at the Boss East
Carolinian Features rage present
what we think is a first no less than
three reviews of the same film.
We hope you enjoy the All Roger
Rabbit rage, and encourage you to go
see what we in the Features depart-
ment feel is probably the most boss
movie of all time. But then we
thought "Flash Gordon"was pretty
hip too.
What ktils me about "Who
Framed Roger Rabbit?" is the fact
that it's rated VG "Some mate-
rial may not be suitable for chil-
dren I love dramatic irony, but
that's a little much.
After all this is the kind of
stuff our parents and us grew up
on. 1 guess Jessica Rabbit's ani-
mated breasts are less suitable
than an afternoon of G.I. joe zap-
ping Cobra with death rays.
In any event, I am prepared to
say that "Roger Rabbit" is without
a doubt, the best movie I've ever
seen. But 1 think I would say that
about any movie that gave me a
glimpse into the Acme Ware-
house. I always wanted a bottle of
those earthquake pills Wile E.
Coyote got once.
The movie is obviously a labor
of love. But I'd say that about any
movie that took the time and ef-
fort to cut through literal mounds
of legal red tape to sign both Daffy
AND Donald Duck, Mickey
Mouse AND Bugs Bunny. It was
kind of like the historic comic
book meeting between Superman
and Spider Man � something
you still can't believe happened.
The special effects arc awe-
some. But I'd say that about any
motior picture that brought car-
toon characters kicking and
screaming into the three dimen-
sional world. Get up on that,
Ralph Bakshi. I'll start watching
"Mighty Mouse" when MM starts
casting his own shadow.
Everything that makes a great
film got poured into "Roger Rab-
bit Plot, dialogue, acting, sets,
costume, music everything was
meticulously planned. The press
releases are claiming it took eight
years to bring this movie together.
I believe it.
There are so many highlights to
this film. The blend of high tech
animation and nostalgic cameos
made that a given. But if I had to
single out some of the moments
that will end up as classic bits of
celluloid, I guess these are them
1) The firbt glimpse into the
Acme warehouse. It takes a min-
ute to sink in that you are actually
seeing THE Acme warehouse.
Whoever thought of that was a
genius on par with the creator of
Velcro.
2) Jessica Rabbit's line, "I'm not
really bad I'm just drawn that
way They still aren't saying who
did the voice of Jessica, but if it's
not Kathleen Turner, I don't de-
serve to watch any more TV.
3) The madness of the opening
cartoon, especially the threat to
Roger that he would get sent back
to the science lab if he didn't take
good care of Baby Herman.
But perhaps the ultimate mo-
ment is detective Eddie Valiant's
journey into Toontown. I was
worried when over half the movie
had run, and we still hadn't had a
glimpse of Toontown. But the
short time spent there was worth
the wait.
For such a fantasy oriented
movie, there were a lot of subtle
touches of realism thrown in, like
the slight prejudice towards the
Toons, and the slightly warped
but still somewhat logical physics
of the Toon characters.
Eddie and Roger get hand-
cuffed together. Eddie hasa tough
time hiding Roger, and you won-
der why human handcuffs affect a
Toon.But you understand why,
after Roger easily slips out to get a
laugh. He simply couldn't do it
until it was funny.
This movie could be the reason
for 20-odd centuries of human
evolution.
And Th-th-th-th-th-that's all,
folks.
Characters carry movie
By CLAY DEANHARDT
General Manage
Forget everything else you see,
read or hear about "Who Framed
Roger Rabbit?"
The simple fact is, if you grew
up with Bugs Bunny, Mickey
Mouse, Donald and Daffy Duck,
Porky Tig, Droopy and the rest oi
the cartoon world like 1 did, you
have to see this movie.
Steven Spielberg and Robert
Zemeckis, who brought us "Back
To the Future' have teamed up
again to bring this light hearted,
frolicking story to the screen.
Armed with a solid screenplay by-
Jeffrey Price and Peter S. Seaman,
a ton of money (a reported $45
million budget) and modern day-
advances in animation, Zemeckis
and Spielberg have created an
incredible visual feast that tickles
the funnybone while pulling the
heart strings (a Spielberg spe-
cialty).
But the sentimentality in this
�u. n u- i.iu-i.arouad seeing all
vour old favorites on the big
screen in an intelligent movie. It's
been a long time since "Mary
Poppins" and "The Song of the
South" made animation an inte-
gral part of a movie plot, but
"Who Framed Roger Rabbit?"
brings the trend back with a
vengeance-
While "Roger" is a nice tribute
to the cartoons of the past, it is also
a witty send up of old-style detec-
tive movies like you see today on
late night television. Price and
Seaman turn old detective-movie
cliches on their ears, craftfully
using animation to create a whole
new range of bizzare possibilities.
Our animation hero, Roger, is
the star of dozens of motion pic-
tures. I hs only goal is, as is true of
any 'toon, to make people laugh.
1 le is framed for the murder of
Marvin Acme, the founder of
Toontown, who he thinks is sleep-
ing with his wife, Jessica Rabbit.
Think back to the Road Runner
series. Remember what company
Wile E. Coyote always bought his
gadgets from? That's right. That's
only a hint of how everything is so
intricately and lovingly tied to-
gether in this movie.
Anyway, Acme is a human, and
Roger is blamed from dropping a
safe on his head. Roger runs to
Eddie Valiant, a washed-up,
drunken P.I. for help. At one time
Valiant had been the detective for
the 'toons, but had given that up
when a 'toon killed hi brother.
The wild adventures Eddie and
Roger have trying to discover
who framed Roger, and trying to
refind Eddie's sense of humor, arc
what this movie revolves around.
Bob Hoskins, who plays Eddie
Valiant, does a wonderful job.
When the movie was being
filmed, Hoskins, of course, had no
co-star to work off of. He had to
pretend someone was there, and
that someone was later added in
by the animators. Hoskins does
indeed turn in a valiant perform-
ance as the has-been flat foot, and
the mixing of animation and
humans becomes not only believ-
able but real.
The art work in the movie is
stupendous. Words cannot dc-
This scene from "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?" shows co-stars Roger(Himself) and Eddie Valiant(Bob
Hoskins) stuck together by handcuffs. This is just one of the many classic gags the duo find themselves
reliving in what may be the greatest movie of all time. In all history. Ever.
scribe it. The movie attacks the
visual senses with an onslaught of
color, design and motion that
leaves the viewer smiling, but
dazed. The chief animation won-
der of this movie, though, is the 3-
D effect given the cartoon charac-
ters. They look human, and even
leave shadows. Jessica, as a matter
of a fact, is welcome at my apart-
ment anytime.
Which brings us to the last point
that makes this movie work so
well: casting. Christopher Lloyd
("Taxi "Back to the Future") is
positively demonic as the villain-
ous Judge Doom. Even better is
Kathleen Turner, the voice of Jes-
sica Rabbit. Turner's sensuality
comes through strong, giving Jes-
sica the credability she needs to be
a sultry toon. Roger is well, you
have to see it to believe it.
"Who Framed Roger Rabbit?"
is now playing at the Plitt Theater
in Greenville. To turn another old
cliche in support of a movie full of
them, it is well worth the price of
admission.
Animation technology reaches a new height
BvMICAH HARRIS
Stiff Writer
"Who Framed Roger Rabbit" is
simultaneously an affectionate
tribute to the golden age anima-
tion of the past and a look toward
the glorious possibilities of the art
form's future. This is that rare film
that isoriginal: original in the way
a butterfly burst from its cocoon is
original.
For "Who Framed Roger Rab-
bit?" has taken animation to the
next evolutionary rung. Admit-
tedly, the combining of live action
with cartoon characters is nothing
new.
Pioneers like Windsor McKay,
Max Fleischer, and Disney experi-
mented with the technique at the
cartoon's genesis. But never has it
been carried to such extremes.
And never has there been an en-
tire movie structured around the
premise of a joint society of hu-
mans and cartoon characters.
Lovable Maroon Tunes star
Roger Rabbit is flubbing his per-
formances (after having a refrig-
erator dropped on him, he just
can't work up a circling halo of
stars).
Seems a tabloid has spread
rumors that Roger's luscious
humanoid toon wife, Jessica,hasa
sugar-daddy in Marvin Acme
(that's right; the Marvin Acme,
creator of the Acme props you
always see in cartoons) and Roger
can't keep his mind on his per-
formance.
Detective Eddie Valiant (Oscar
nominee, Bob Hoskins) is hired by
Roger's boss to take compromis-
ing pictures of Jessica and Acme.
Valiant finds himself an unwit-
ting part of a major scam when
Acme turns up dead, and Roger,
the main suspect, turns up in
Valiant's office pleading for help.
"Roger Rabbit" has taken ani-
mation into the next century. The
animated characters appear as
three-dimensional as their live
counterparts. Sequences in which
toons move among actors at dif-
ferent speeds and levels of depth
as the camera trucks, zooms and
pans arc seamless and stunning.
Disney once defined the ani-
mated film as the impossible
made plausible. Animation direc-
tor, Richard Williams and staff
1 i veup to that definition in a virtu-
oso in performance of scintillating
grace.
"Roger Rabbit despitecoming
under Disney's Touchstone um-
brella, owes much to the late
Warner Bros, and MGM cartoon
director, Tex Avery. The opening
sequence's eye-popping violence,
Jessica's slinky nightclub act, and
the total absence of Newtonian
physics in Toontown are all
Avcry hallmarks. He pioneered
the integration of sex and violence
into candyland over forty years
ago.
Another amazing thing about
this movie is the numerous inci-
dental bits that are tributes to
American toons: Judge Doom is
tipped off to Roger's hide-out by
noticing "The Mcrry-Go-Round
Broke Down" (The Looney
Tune's theme) on the record
player and Valiant manipulates
Roger in a Bugs-Daffy reversal
routine ("Yes you do "No I
don't "No you don't "Yes I
do").
The Bugs Bunny in his cameo is
the version of the movie's late 40s
time period; the rabbit hunting
Judge Doom has a slight Elmer
Fudd's quiver just under his
voice, and his toon-destroying
substance, "The Dip seemssimi- buy. "Who Framed Roger Rab-
lar to that used to wipe painted bit?" rings with that intangible
animation eels clean.
But ultimately what sets the
movie apart is something no 40-
plus million dollar budget can
quality of love, and yes, moral
vision that sets apart the work of
such greats as Frank Capra.
This is the kind of film we talk
about when we say, "They don't
make 'em like they used to
"Roger Rabbit" rates five cat-
heads and counting.
W ttf & tt w
Pickin' the Bones
God protects the Unprepared
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Snake Snuher
the best method for transporting
the kids down the river. One was
but
bit
There was some debate ovei
what to call our vessel, but acting
appropriated easily enough, but on what had to be the quote of I"
After urinating in the water, inflating it proved to be a bit dayGod� protects the unpi
Sue didn't have the strength to harder. pared we hope we opened
pull herself back up onto the inner Seems that no normal air pump can of river temperature Natural
tube. We had to pull her up by her would fit the valve. Not that said Lite� and christened it. The Un-
elbows, almost capsizing. I took a valve even had a cap so that if air prepared.
moment to reflect on the situation, got put into it, it would stay in it. The little kid looked at us as we
"Here we are I said. "Five Luckily, tape proved able to prepared to board The Unpre-
people, struggling to survive, ease the air's transition from porai. We asked him if he thought
xund together and kept afloatby pump to tube, and a gum wrapper
a big piece of inflated rubber. It's and � sUck and a half of wrigles
almost a metaphor for life, you Spearmint� proved to seal that
know?" The others just looked at bugger shut yVe figured one tube
me blankly. would be enough for the four of
Our voyage had been grueling. thouch I argued my back
Whathastlrtedoutasaquestfor S'�"Zlud g� a g� 0f denUy warned turn aDoutf e
somesimpleadventuretokeepus "P3n luckless breed of human known
Nigel said, "I've got a tube for
them but 1 censored his com-
ments so they would never ap-
pear in public.
We searched for oars, but this
search was made in vain. The best
we could do was an old window
occupied 'til it was time to make
daquiris again, quickly turned
into a life and death battle with the
forces of nature.
This, then is The Adventures of
Bonehead in the Snake Infested
Waters of the Tar River, or I
we could do was an old window "7 , .� �r j
SB Bjto Marie, Twain utterandatwobyfou,1u8h "ZEM
for the ummate four and a half J-J j- J p-fc
Wrote Books About This Shit.
we were mad to undertake this
journey. He told us in no uncer-
tain terms: "You ain't comin
back
He asked us if we were college
students. His mother had evi-
dently warned him about the
as the collegiate drunk. We bid
him farewell, and embarked upon
our voyage.
The first thirty minutes were
fear-filled. First Amendment Lad
thought that I needed to learn the!
fact that water moccasins enjoy al
The adventure started off inno-
cently enough. Sitting around on
the porch of stately Bonehead
Manor, who knew that within a
few hours we would be breaking
all kinds of nautical, property and
safety laws.
First Amendment Lad lay back
and muttered some constitutional
clauses to himself. Bonehead and
hour length of our trip, the lack of
real paddleage probably contrib-
uted the most.
We stopped off on Arlington
Boulevard for a quick prayer at
around in the Tar River, I refused
to put my feet anywhere near theJ
water. I
This caused some discomfort!
uievaraioraHuaya, teamrnate9, who had
j� i � itfl m;o� �. �k� a while, I was so intent on getting
car and knelt in the midst of the J L w aj- i aa k.J2
traffic and asked her holiness to
Ireenville
This is another picture from "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?" You'd think a movie with this kind of budget
could have afforded to send more than two very similar pictures out to the press, but noooo
lMUSWlu ����- � -� ����- traihe ana asked her nonncss 10 �5i�w�?il�lv.�af
the visiting Bodacious Ta-ta Lass de u8 on our madness. flot of l� � WOrry ab�U
were busy treating each other to So laden with a tube, a Glad8 lazy reputes,
frozen yogurt when Nigel Im- JgwUofbeerwd J!i
ports suggested that a trip down Se newlv acquired partner, that " UP S 55 WJ"fl
Se Tar River might be �ist the JaAmOA the bW destii�Hoix:P(rtTenmr�l,wW
trungtokiUsonfimebeLethe �SSSt��32 ���
next batch of daquiris needed to �� o gj Tar River Apart- g 2S?Z4i� Si
beblended. g�EAtthebankoftteriveVvwe � f ��� j�&
Since a raft might take too long JSpcdto christen our boat, as a & j� �g� ��
tobuild,andallthereputableboat JSSdSd, fishing from the wouldn't be so badifthed quit
dealers were closed, it was de- ted roots of a tree, stared at us hang out in trees and grow
tided that an inner tube would be m puzzlement. Se BONEHEAD, page 9 '





8
Tt IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 29,19S8
ECU Summer Theater begins
Summer Theater Press Release
Award-winner Kim Zimmcr.
Zimmer can be seen daily as the
ficsty character Reva Shayne on
This July marks the 25th an- CBS's "Guiding Light Previous
,nivcrsay of the East Carolina
Summer Theatre. The summer
nights came alive in 1964 with six
Broadway musicals and a spirited
Eastern North Carolina audience.
As tradition would have it, the
summer evening air will be
charged once again with the
appearances on daytime dramas
include the roles of Echo on "One
Life to Live and Nola on "The
Doctors
"Diamond Studs" is a rowdy,
foot stompin' celebration about
the life and times of Jesse James
written by Chapel Hill native
power of a 24-piecc orchestra James Wann, of "Pump Boys and
when the curtain rises on July 4.
"Jerry's Girls a musical cele-
brating the talent of Jerry Herman
will open the Summer Theatre
season on July 4. This mixture of
famous Herman showstoppers,
memorable melodies and haunt-
ing songs will feature Kirstcn
Childs, Donna Drake and Camillc
Sa viola.
Childs was understudy for
Chita Rivera in the Broadway
production of "Jerry's Girls" and
appeared in Bob Fosse's Broad-
way productions of "Sweet Char-
ity" and "Chicago
Drake, who won the 1976 The-
atre World Award for per por-
trayal of Maggie Winslow in the
Dinettes" fame, and Bland
Simpson.
As the legend unfolds through
narration and sketchy scenes
filled with music, Jesse James
starts out as a frustrated South-
erner at the end of the Civil War.
Feeling hemmed in by the limits
imposed by the North on the
loser's personal freedom, Jesse
turns to bank and train robbery.
This western saloon musical will
feature Grant Gooodeve as Jesse
James. Goodevc is best known for
his portrayal of David, the oldest
brother of the Bradford family on
the popular television scries
"Eight is Enough
'Steel Magnolias" is an altcr-
original Broaday production of nately hilarious and poignant
"A Chorus Line also performed look at six women who live in
along with the original cast of small-town Chinquapin, Louisi-
This is a picture of Kim Zimmer, who they tell me is the star of
"Guiding Light I wouldn't know. But she WILL star in the ECU
Summer Theater production of "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
"1940s Radio Hour" at the White
House.
"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Ten-
nessc Williams' turbulent classic
about avarice and mendacity in a
sprawling southern plantation
ana, and like to gossip and hob-
nob at Truvy's local hair salon.
Each of the six women is facing
some crisis�some of minor pro-
portion, some, life threatening.
Over a two-year period the
house will be the second produc- quartet of regulars come and go
tion. Maggie, the gentile southern for a wash and set to gossip about
belle will be portrayed by Emmy each other's lives, and those of
their neighbors, as they thumb
through back issues of "Family
Circle" and "Southern Living
All four shows will have mati-
nee performances on Wednesday
and Saturday at 2:15 p.m. All
evening shows will start precisely
at 8:15 p.m. Monday season tick-
thru Saturday tickets are $36.00
per person. Individual tickets arc
$15.00 for evening performances
of the musicals and $12.00 for the
matinee performancs of musicals.
Individual tickets are $12.00 for
evening performances of the
plays and $10.00 for the matinee
ets are $30.00 per person. Tuesday play performances.
Trees in western NC dying
. , � � � Smokv Mountains National Tark. p1pvm�iv1 " snrl TCnhorr Rmrlr a , w, , , t"
ASHEVILLE (AP) � A mere
mention of the Blue Ridge Park-
way brings to mind scenic vistas
of mountains and trees, but tour-
ists are finding mere skeletons
where majestic trees once pros-
pered.
"We just couldn't believe it
said J.A. Johnson, a tourist from
Birmingham, Ala while parked
at an overlook near Richland Bal-
sam, southwest of Asheville.
"It just makes you sick
Johnson said. "I was looking out
here a while ago, with my binucu-
lars, and wondering what killed
the trees
The culprit has stumped scien-
tists since the early 1980s, when
trees started dying in great num-
bers. At that time, many scientists
blamed a tiny insect, the balsam
woolly aphid, that had spread
south from New England in the
mid-1950s. But the aphids only
attack fir trees, and spruce have
been dying as well.
More recently, most scientists
have blamed the destruction on a
combination of factors, such as
insects, drought, air pollution and
acid rain, The News and Observer
of Raleigh reported.
"The aphids are damaging the
plants. The acid rain is damaging
the plants. And then comes this
dry weather. It's kind of like the
coup de grace said Garrett
Smathers, a plant ecologist who
retired from the National Park
Service in 1983 and now teaches
at UNC-Asheville.
"People will come up and ask
us What killed all the trees? said
Tim Pegram, district ranger at the
park service office at Balsam Gap.
Behind him, the bone-white
trunks of dead fir trees stood out
like skeletons against the char-
coal-gray clifffs of Devil's Court-
house, a 5,462-foot knob near the
southern end of the parkway.
Ten miles to the northwest, at
6,540 foot Richland Balsam, the
devastation was even more strik-
ing.
"This is the worst I've ever seen
it Smathers said. "In some
places, 80 percent of the stands are
dead Smathers said. "If we had
been standing here in 1980, you'd
have seen very few dead trees
Similar destruction has oc-
curred near the tops of high peaks
throughout the Southern Appala-
chians - along the parkway, in the
national forests, and in the Great
Smoky Mountains National Park, elevated said Robert Brack, a
But it's most visible on the park- plant pathologist and member of
way, which winds 250 miles along
mountain ridges in western
North Carolina.
Smathers, a member of the N.C.
Environmental Management
Commission, said he suspects
drought is the primary culprit.
Rainfall this year is about half of
normal in the mountains near
Asheville, he said, and prolonged high peaks, he said
dry spells have occurred there have consistently
nearly every year since 1980.
But other scientists blame air
pollution as the leading cause.
"The air pollution is very much
a team of N.C. State University
researchers that has been here
studying the tree deaths for about
five years.
Although studies haven't con-
clusively proven that pollution is
killing the trees, Brack said the
circumstantial evidence is com-
pelling. In weather stations on
researchers
measured
ozone levels two to three times
higher than in nearby valleys, and
acid fogs 100 to 1,000 thrones
more acidic than normal rainfall.
high-altitude forests have sur-
vived in the Southern Appalachi-
ans for thousands of years with-
out succumbing to weather ex-
tremes, he said, and there is no
reason to believe that air pollut-
ants previously reached the levels
scientists have measured there
recently.
"This ecosystem has been just
like this since the recession of the
last ice age Bruck said. "It has
always been cold up here. There
has always been ice up here. There
have always been clouds
J
See TREES, page 9
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Banquet Facilities Available
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RECREATIONAL SERVICES
2ND SUMMER SESSION
Intramural Sports
Softball June 29
4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Co-Rec Water Polo July 6
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Golf ClassicJury 11
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Free Throw ContestJuly 18
(3:00 P.M. MG
5k WalkRunJuly 20
(8:00 P.M.)
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Memorial Gymnasium
Mon. - Fri11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
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Sun1.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m.
Hours may vary in accordance with department programs.
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for admittance to facilities
Equipment Room Hours
Memorial Gym 115
Mon. - Thurs10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Fri10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
SatClosed
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Student Union
Coming Attraction
Thursday, June
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University Mall - 9
Upcoming Events
'Wednesday, July 6 Watermelon Feast
University Mall - 3 p.m.
Thursday, July 7 Rock-A-Bowl
MSC Bowling Center
Boneh
Continued from page 7
some legs and maybe some ej
"Big, human shaped ears'
saidSo that can't slither so
and it gives you time to
away I agreed We saw
snakes for a while, and figui
they got tired of shinnving u
tree, waiting for us to get c
enough, seeing us drift b, c
ingand shinnving down and bj
up another tree farther dowr
It was dark by the time wq
the 264 overpass. We had ca
ahead to Domino's� and
them to deliver a pizza therj
nine p.m. We toft money tied
plastic bag on one of tr
Trees dyin
Continued from page 8
"While 1 ,i. �
is definitely
just the straw that
camel's back
Those facts
hope for Mount Mitchell, whi
6,684 feet isthi t peak id
East.
"1 was h re ir
time,and that ,
deep green withl
Bruck, whose team
search stations c:i Mitchell.
1983, there was r I :
age. By 1986, it wa
And now it's almost all
Hugh M rt r
foot Grandfather ' '
Linville, where his fan
operated atom
the 1880'S, tears ;
visiting if the natj
beautv is desti
"In every survey I
ever run, pt i pie say thai
is why the) come to
Mountain he said. "Th
erally the case in a I We
North Carolina
"If it's . "j
one attracti n ar
come, pcopleare ;to hai
realize its imj j
to protect it M
m
Overkill �e ,mm'm '
v i' - - '
3.
'
&��?: us s- � -
.
-i
5 �
� � � � -
v:
j kS B :
. -
� i � 12 j
S

v .

Campus Comics
N�W new
FORTTi firm tii
PARENTS sf(H MTFN'
FREMimN omewrflj
AUONo wim Trte�v
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u
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Que tal, Fun-Y-Games re;
new Ann Fall-Off Boy, coj
at night again, in spite of J
want to pay one of our sta
bucks!) And thanks to a f
going 72 on 64 East, I'm
depressed about all this,





Tl JE EAST CAROLINIAN
UNE29J9W
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7 Round-Up
irloin with Potato Bar,
alad Bar, Hot Bar,
ndae Bar and drink
ly$4.9t5M
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f & Improved Salad,
lot & Dessert Bar
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REE - Dessert Bar
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0 p.m.
evel
Bonehead makes raft voyage
Continued from page 7
some legs and maybe some ears.
Big, human shaped ears she
-aid, "So that can't slither so fast,
and it gives you time to run
away I agreed. We saw no
snakes for a while, and figured
(hey got tired of shinnying up a
tree, waiting for us to get close
enough, seeing us drift by, cuss-
tgand shinnying down and back
up another tree farther down.
It was dark by the time we hit
the 2(4 overpass. We had called
ahead to Domino's� and told
them to deliver a pizza there at
ne p.m. We left money tied in a
istic bag on one of the bridge
Trees dying
Continued from page 8
While 1 agree that tlie drought
- definitely hurting things, it's
ust the straw that broke the
camel's back
Those facts don't hold out much
pc for Mount Mitchell, which at
- I feet is the highest peak in the
1 was here in 1979 for the first
and that entire top was solid,
green with huge trees said
k, whose team has three re-
search stations on Mitchell. "By
� there was noticeable dam-
� By 1986, it was profound.
nd now it's almost all gone
h Morton, owner of 5,964-
t Grandfather Mountain near
ille, where his family has
ated a tourist attraction since
1880's, fears people will stop
rig it the area's natural
mty is destroyed.
In every survey that we've
r run, people sav that scenery
��. they come to Grandfather
' I intain he said. "That is gen-
the case in all oi Western
Carolina.
s going to be our number
ittraction and source of in-
poople are going to have to
� its importance and begin
� tcct it Morton said.
railings, and gave directions to
lower the pizza on a rope so we
could reach it.
Unfortunately, we didn't get
there til ten. The box was hanging
open, and the slices were being
gobbled up by hundreds of tiny,
fang encrusted mouths. We
paddled away furiously, but
vowed revenge on the scaly bas-
tards that ate our food.
It wasabout thirty minutes later
when Nigel decided to tell me
about another species of snake we
were going to have to worry about
� the springy-coily snakes. This
type didn't wait around to attack
hapless campers.
No, these snakes pounced on
wayfarers. We watched as they
glided across the river. But Nigel
assured us that in about 15 min-
utes, all the springy-coily snakes
would be heading out to the snake
nightclubs. "So all we have to look
out for is the moccasins. Great
Complain A Lot Girl sneered.
Meanwhile, in Atlantic City, the
Gambling Earlvis had just lost
another hundred dollars. In what
has to be the most streched plot
segue ofall time, he got snake eyes
while playing craps and lost fifty
more bucks. At the same moment
Nigel, brandishing one of The
Unprepared's planks at First
Amendment Lad's lack of propul-
sion, accidentally hit some low
lying branches.
150 water moccasins, delighted
at the opportunity to drop on not
one, but five human heads,
poured from the trees like
Morton's salt. Adrenalin rushed
through the alcohol clogged
bloodstreams of The Unprepared's
crew. While the snakes were still
falling, suspended in the air
above the river like 150 unfurling
rolls of black toilet paper, the in-
ncrtubeshot forward ataclipof at
least seven miles an hour.
In sheer panic, First Amend-
ment Lad and myself got off the
tube and became human out-
board motors. Bodacious Tata
Lass and Nigel became a perfectly
meshed rowing machine. Com-
plain A Lot screamed, but we feel
sure the sound waxes helped
propel us forward.
Well, finally we saw the buoys
of Port Terminal. Never was land
so welcome a sight as it was that
night. We looked back into the
dark river and shook our heads.
Was it possible that we had really
done it? I guess so.
As we loaded up the car, I
looked back one more time. An
uncountable number of fireflies
swarmed around the trees on
both banks of the river. The trees
looked like mile long Christmas
shrubbery, filled with those $1.98
lights from Kerr Drugs�.
Then I noticed a winking light
in the water. I focused on what
turned out to be the evil glinting
eye of a particularly large mocca-
sin. I glanced around. Nobody
else was looking, so I threw
Nigel's box at the snake's head.
The stereo hit the water, and the
18 powerful D-cell batteries cre-
ated a short circuit that blanketed
the length of the Tar River.
"Humans-150, Repulsive, No-
Reason-for-ExistcnceReptiles-O
I said as the death screams of 150
snakes filled the night.
Meanwhile, in Atlantic City, In
the second most ridiculous segue
in the history of the English lan-
guage, the Earlvis won 150 quar-
ters as a slot machine in Trump's
Tlaza short circuited due to an
overload of cable pirates trying to
tap into the electrical systems
before the fight
Truly, God� does protect the
unprepared.
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Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional cosi Prrgrvancy Test. Birth
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919 A. RcdbanksRd.
Arlington Village
756-1058
Mon. - Sat. 10-6 - Thurs. 10-8
Presidio shows no sign of life
Like many Paramount Pictures
in recent years, "The Presidio" is
slickly produced, action-filled,
well acted - and empty. Disney's
Touchstone Pictures, produced
mostly bv Paramount alumni,
exhibit the same tendencies. The
films have the same kind of homo-
geneity of the Warner Bros, mov-
ies of the 1930s, but without an
equal vitality.
The formula has obviously
worked wonders at the box-office
("Beverly Hills Cop "Top
Gun"), but the sameness of prod-
uct may be responsible for
Paramount's precipitous drop
(before "Crocodile' Dundee II")
in its share of the nation's theater
business.
There's nothing about "The
Presidio" That can't be enjoyed
between gulps of popcorn. Direc-
tor Peter I lymans provides an
abundance oi well-staged action,
some of it meaningless, and the
players are attractive. But you
have the feeling that, given a
wider range of imagination, the
film could have been more than a
generation-gap detective chase.
Mark Harmon is a former mili-
tary police officer now working
for the San Francisco police de-
partment. Sean Connery is an
army provost marshal whose
service dates back to the Korean
War (his accent is explained by his
Scottish birth). They detest each
other because Harmon did not
follow army regulations in arrest-
ing in abusive officer years be-
fore.
Larry Ferguson's screenplay
offers no real surprises except for
the identity of one of the conspira-
tors. Hyams ("2010 "Running
Scared") is an expert at this kind
of aciton.
Sean Connery is his usuallv
dominating self, though his bar-
room punchout of an annoving
punkster is one of the least con-
vincing of recent movie brawls.
Harmon is ingratiating, but he has
yet to show much behind that
puppydog smile. Meg Ryan has a
few cfecti ve moments amid all the
macho doings.
VILLAGE
Donna
Edwards
owner
Bring in this ad for a 15 Discount
on a purchase of $10 or more
with valid E.C.U. I.D.
37 Gallon Aquarium
with Hood & Light
$CtA52
,JM This month only
WEEKLY FISH SPECIALS!
Our Marine Room has all the fish and marine
life you'll need for a perfect Saltwater tank.
511 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834 Phone 756-9222
Comics that don't pay enough to cover a speeding ticket
frl'Jl:l;M
Overkill
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Campus Comics
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News ixerA
FOR THE FtRT TlE, "
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Arm Fall-Off Boy
THE LEGIONS SHIP
ISKTTPCKBPH!
By Racer X
Que tal, Fun-Y-Games readers! We have good news for a change on the Comix Page. First off, there's
new Arm Fall-Off Boy, continuing from the other week. Also, there are new David Letterman shows on
at night again, in spite of the Writer's Guild strike. Then there are bad things. The University doesn't
want to pay one of our star cartoonists, Steve Reid, for The Law this summer. (Now I owe the guy big
bucks!) And thanks to a friendly Wake County patrolman who thought it kind to give me a ticket for
going 72 on 64 East, I'm probably going to lose my driving ability for 30 days. Oh well. If you get
depressed about all this, go see Who Framed Roger Rabbit this week. Its great. Five cat-heads.
BOA1ZWfiJ6 OUR.
5fBCESHlP;
irBSu G0OP
�& ��)' v
WCKA v neeocs' "a3f'
Vcawv6 withus la
New Fan Club Additions
Angie Linder
Adam Blankenship





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 29, 1988 Page 10
Edwards Key to East Carolina's Success
year. What really got me inter-
ested in school ball was seventh-
grade P.E. The coach there saw me
play and liked what he saw. Be-
fore tryouts, though, I twisted my
By PAUL DUNN
Co-Sporti Editor
Could it be that East Carolina
University has acquired a third fa-
vorite color? The notorious
purple and gold may be linked up ?nkle and didn t go out for the
with the ever glowing "Blue team. I was then going t5 try out
Yes, Theodore "Blue" Edwards for the team my freshman year at
returns after a one year suspen- Greene Central High School,
sion to excite basketball fans from Snow Hill, N.C. but I wasn t
all around really into it at the time. My tenth-
Hallo ween of 1965 was to bring grade year the coaches and some
some years later a very special players kept telling me I should
tXi:ni RiMoFrirHc aA'i" try out for the team. I decided I
would try out for the Jr. Varsity
V�-
Blue Edwards searches for an open teammate
Pointers for Enjoying
Your Golf Game
By DOUG JOHNSON
Co-Sports TJitor
5) There are, however, some
other important considerations in
choosing the right club than just
I went out this past weekend the club's prevalent attitude. The
and tried my hand at playing a two most important of these are;
few rounds of golf. I've been
playing seriously for about two
years now, but 1 finally realized
something.
I suck.
I mean, 1 do get the ball in the
hole, but only after about ten
a) Always make sure that they
have motorized carts. Never, I
repeat never, under any
circumstances, walk while
playing the game. Carts are
indespensible when you are
searching for the balls that you hit
strokes. So I got to thinking, and I into the trees on the right, and
compiled a list of things that I feel carts are great for helping relieve
will make the game of golf more stress. Not only can you kick it or
fun for me. Try them, they may hit it with a club, but it also helps
make it more fun for you, too. to use the cart to charge over any
1) First let's start with clothes. sman shrubs or trees, not to
Always dress nicely when on the mcntion running down any small
course. You'll still play like shit, woodland creatures that you may
but you'll look good doing it.
2) After choosing your clothes,
you have to choose your
equipment. If you think it
absolutely necessary, you can go
out and spend a small fortune for
encounter. Besides, without a cart
you'll have nowhere to carry your
cooler full of beer. b)Always
make sure that the course you're
has a driving range. Not that you
should waste your time hitting a
bucket of balls, mind you, but you
treat to ECU. Blue Edwards, a 6'4
2051bs. senior would step onto the
court at Minges Coliseum and
start making Pirate history. And
the upcoming season may prove
to be his most dramatic ever.
The gifted athlete started
showing off his innate basketball
abilities at a young age. Edwards'
two older brothers, Ronald and
Dennis would shoot some yard
ball and leave the younger Blue
on the sides to observe. Theodore
would wait patiently for hours
until his brothers finished. Fi-
nally, Blue could capture a mo-
ment of the spotlight and begin to
fantasize of the future.
"I would grab that basketball
and spend a lot of fun hours pre-
tending to be some great basket-
ball player. I would imitate a
player on the tube that had just
had a great game or an incredible
play. I would also imitate my
older brothers. I wanted to slam
that basketball just like the bigger
guys said Blue.
In explanation of his nickname,
Blue said, "When I was about one
year old, my mother was feeding
me and then she had to step out of
the room for a second. I got
choked and my four year old sis-
ter lEdna went to my mother and
kept telling her she had a 'blue'
boy. Mom didn't understand at
first and decided she had best go
and check on me. When she got to
my crib, I was turning blue. As I
was growing my brothers and
team but the coaches said that I
had so much ability that they
wanted me for the varsity team. I
started out as a sixth man and at
just ability. You must also posess
the mental game to go along with
the athletic ability.
J
Blue attended a small high-
school that was in a small confer-
ence and he didn't receive much
attention from big colleges at first.
Nor did Blue, at the time, attend
any basketball camps that could
have helped him to receive the
deserved recognition. During his
senior year in high school Blue
was invited to attend the Five-Star
basketball camp. This is one of the
most prestigious camps for high
school players in the nation.
Blue's father, Willie Jr had a
heart attack days before Blue was
to depart for camp. Blue passed
side of his ill
single regret.
father without a
College ball at Louisburg College
(Louisburg, NO. After Enid
Drake, my coach at Louisburg,
watched me play, he said he
thought I could play ball at a
major college but I had lots of
work to do on my basic funda-
mentals. As time went on, I
the time didn't really know how up the camp to stay by the bed-
to play organized basketball. At
practice, the coaches would in-
struct us to do things like the
three-man weave. I was lost!
During tryouts I slipped to the
back and obscrvered others as a
way of learning. I guess I was a
little shy, too. Coach Lewis God-
win spent extra hours with me to
help shape my raw talent.
Things really started improving
for me my junior year in high
school. I began to feel comfortable
on the court, and I knew that I
could become a great player, but I
also knew I had to face a lot of
hard work and sweat. Coaches
kept telling me I had potential,but
it took me a while to really under-
stand what they meant. I would
score 25 points and grab 13 re-
bounds and the coaches would
say I could have played a better
game. I used to think that if you
could do that well, it was a great
game. I finally learned from
Coach Mike Stecle IECU Head
Coach what they meant. All my
coaches up through junior college
Louisburg-Louisburg, N.C.
would let me play on just my pure
athletic ability, but Coach Steele
took that ability and made me into
a basketball player. The other
Theodore "Blue" Edwards
I think he knew they weren't
Time was to prove positive for going to renew his contract and it
Blue. "I decided to play Junior being his last year, he just gave up.
He had no control over the team
and he made me lose all interest in
ECU basketball. I even had sec-
ond thoughts about ever playing
ball again at East Carolina. Thank
God, ECU got a coaching staff 1 ike
they did. They really got me inter-
ested again and those men will
started receiving interest from the turn around the program here,
major college scouts, but didn't
know what I wanted said Blue.
Universities such as Auburn,
NC State, Maryland and some
other forty different colleges at all
levels showed interest in the
gifted player but things just didn't
work out.
Blue stated, "I wanted to go to
Wake Forest University. This was
my dream, and it almost hap-
pened but due to a coaching
change things just fell through.
When 1 received letters from
Wake Forest, I started closing out
the other Universities. That's
where I made a mistake. Friends
Blue is going to be a kev figure
in the success of the Pirates in the
1988-89 season. "Much of the
success of the team will be due to
how well I play and how much of
a leader I will be he said. "I'm
not trying to be cocky, but I must
face the fact. The team is really
counting on me. Most people
think this is a lot of pressure for
me to handle, but the team and
coaches know that I can handle it.
1 know that I can handle it. The
team makes it easier, too. We all
have confidence in our skills and
abilities. One kev factor in our
success this season will be that the
sisters would call me 'Blue' to pick coaches would run plays to ex-
ploit my athletic abilities, but
and familv told me to shop team and coaching staff are like a
around and to give other univcr- family, on and off the court. If one
sities a chance. I really wanted falls, we all fall. If one rises to the
Wake because they were ACC, top, we all stand proud. We are
Atlantic Coast Conference) but going to prove a lot of things this
a set of top-of-the-line clubs, but I can always ride by and, when no
don't recommend doing this. Go one is looking, slip a few of the
to a pawn shop, and pick you up a practice balls in your pocket.
on me. The nickname caught on
and my friends and family have
called me that ever since. It was al-
most like Theodore didn't exist
anymore
"1 don't really like to be called or
written about as just "Blue I
prefer Theodore 'Blue' Edwards
he added.
Reflecting back upon the begin-
ning of his career, Blue said, "I
didn't start playing organized
basketball until my tenth-grade
Coach Stecle emphasized more of
a mental game. You've got to be
able to do different things in dif-
ferent situations.
I credit Coach Steele and our
talented coaching staff for mold-
ing me into a basketball player,
not just an athlete with ability.
Coach Belle (ECU Assitant
Coach told me something very
true. He said when you reach this
level of play, you need more than
not at the very top. I felt I could be
really productive there
Blue also stated, "Coach Harri-
son former ECU Head Coach
showed much interest in me. I
came to ECU on a basketball
scholarship. I didn't enjoy play-
year.
Taking a small glance into me'
future of his career after ECU,
Blueststed, "I think that I will play
somewhere, but I don't know
where. A lot of people say that I
have a shot for the NBA. I never
ing for Harrison because the man set goals, like, I want to play in the
seemed to just give up about mid-
way the season. He stopped
trying to coach us guys and I
didn't learn much playing under
him.
NBA, but I do want to play in the
NBA. It's going to be a long shot,
but playing under Coach Steele
and his staff, I realize that I have
increased my possibilities. I am
now more of a complete player
8) This leads me to another out fast, and don't worry about
point. Since you've already theball that you will leave behind,
set of cheap clubs. Save the bulkof Don't worry if they have a red broken your wedge, you can't I guarantee that you can replace it
your money for purchasing large band of paint around them. You possibly use it to hit out of the much more cheaply than you can
amounts of alcohol, which always can use them on water holes, and sand traps that you will a picture window or a sliding
makes the game more enjoyable, lose them instead of the good balls invariably wind up in. Therefore, glass door, not to mention any
that you slipped down your you have to play this shot with incurred doctor bills. If you do get
underwear while at JC some degree of finesse. First, step away, but are later confronted
Penney7s�. And don't feel guilty up to the ball, then bend at the about the erroneous shot,
3) And while on the subject of
alcohol, let's talk about the kind of
any
be prepared to take a respectable
brand of beer. So when shopping,
leave the Schaeffer� on the shelf.
Instead, pick a quality brew, like,
say, Milwaukee's Best�. It has a
true country clubish flavor, and
buv G r is a respectable about STEALING these balls, waist, pick your ball up, and toss vehemently deny having
came played by supposedly because you'll lose a few of your it out, preferably towards, if not knowledge of it. Hell, everyone
respectable people. So when own in the course of the day. on, the green. Count it as one knows that they can't fingerprint
teeing up at the club, you should
6) Always play with a partner.
If, by the grace of God, you do
happen to hit a good shot, you'll
have someone there to bear
witness to it. If not, then you'll
have someone to watch where
will be accepted by your golfing yourball entered the woods while
peers, who will throw you you throw a tantrum,
envious glances because of your
obvious good taste.
stroke ,and congradulate yourself golf balls, can they?
on successfully playing one of the
most difficult shots in golf.
9) Now that you're
approaching the green, try this
little stroke saver. When yourball
lands on the green, no matter how
far it is from the hole, snatch it up
and say "gimme This is sure to
cut strokes from your score, and
4) And while on the subject of
12) When passing houses on the
course, especially ones with
fenced in yards, always be sure to
see if there are any great looking
babes laying out. Nothing can
make your day of golf more
enjoyable than seeing a pair or
pairs of scantily
coveredwellhell, let's not
mince words here, we're all
adultsbreasts.
make the game much more
7) Okay, you're on the first tee, enjoyable,
ready to start. Instead of hitting
your first drive at this point, go to 10) If you find that there is a
country clubs (Isn't it great the your bag pim out your pitching chance that you may hit a tree that
way all of this dribble is vvedge, and break the SOB. (There some insensitive idiot has planted
is only'one club in your bag that right in your path, try this little 13) And finally, as promised and giving you dirty looks. Since I hope that these pointers aid
has the potential to get you into trick. Aim directly at the tree, and above, I'll tell you whattodo with anything on the green is a gimme you in your golfing endeavors,
more trouble than the pitching try to hit it with the ball. If you your putter. No matter when or (see 9), you will have no use for The most important thing to
wedge, and that's the putter, make an honest attempt to strike where you play, there will always your putter, except here. You remember is to drink lots of beer,
interrelated?) allow me to talk
briefly about selecting the right
club for vou. Try and find a club
that is very laid-back. If it's a
private club, pass it by. They're
probably to up-tight and
throughly obnoxious. If you go to
which we will deal with in a
a pro shop and they tell you that moment.) If you like, you can wait
you have to call in advance to until your first bad shot to wrap
reserve a tee time, or make some this club around the nearest tree,
other nonsensical demand, tell But since this first errant shot will
them to piss off and leave. They probably be your upcoming
need you worse than you need drive, I suggest that you go ahead
them. anc �et done.
your putter, except here. You
the tree, you'll have a snowball's be one asshole in front of you that have a choice. You can either fling and have a good time. I was going
chance in hell of actually hitting it. is sorrier and consequently your putter at the asshole in front to make this pointer number one,
You'll go either over, under, or slower than you are, who will of you, or the one behind you, but if you're stupid enough to
around the tree, thus impede your play. At the same whichever is in range at the time, attempt golf while sober, these
time, there will always be an Whichever you chose, I think that pointers will never help you
asshole behind you with "Stop they'll get the message, and get because you don't belong on the
Slow Play" tattooed on his out of your life. I do suggest that
forehead that will be trying to set you retrieve your putter, though,
a new world speed record for 18 for future use.
accomplishing your primary
objective.
11) If you happen to hit a shot
that shatters a window or
otherwise does damage to a
person or property, haul ass. Get
course anyway.
holes, that will be pushing you
LA Clippers pick Manning
Alcohol Repels CBA
NEW YORK (AP) � Danny
Manning, who carried lightly
regarded Kansas to the NCAA
championship, was picked No. 1
in the NBA draft by the woebegon
Los Angeles Clippers today.
The Clippers, winners of just 29
games in the last two seasons,
gained the right to draft the All
American by winning the NBA
FAYATTEVILLE (AP) � Fay- man Jim Drucker not to move
ctteville will not have Continental forward with the proposed Fay-
Basketball Association team for cttevill Surfers,
lottery on May 21. points and 8.1 rebounds. As a center Benoit Benjamin. the 1988-89 season, reportedly be- Drucker would neither confirrrp
The 6-foot-10 Manning finished senior, he averaged 24.8 points But Dener Nuggets President cause Cumberland County Me- nor deny that the liquor license-
as the Big Eight's all-time leading and 9.0 rebounds and capped the Pete Babcokc said Manning, mortal Arena does not have an al- was a major factor,
scorer with 2,951 points, the sixth- season with 31 points and a ca- "can't be labeled to a particular coholic beverage license, the
highest total in NCAA history. He reer-high 18 rebounds in the title position. He's such a good basket- league's acting commissioner
was the first player since North game against Oklahoma. ball player you'll have to find a says.
Carolina State's David Thompson Despite his size, the Clippers place for him. He's a unique Jay Ramsdell said the license
to win Player of the Year and MVP have him ticketed as a "small" for- player. He almost has guard skills was the primary factor in the
of the NCAA tournament. ward, alongside NBA rebound- in a 6-10 body, the way he passes decision by Charlotte business-
For his career, he averaged 20.1 ing champoin Michail Cage and and dribbles
But Drucker, the CBA commis-
sioner from 1978-85, said a fran-
chise will be located in Fayettev
ille in the future.
See CBA, page 11
-l
Tyson
ATLANTIC CITY, .J. AD
The fight with Michael Spink
was over with firghtemng ea
Mike Tyson's fight with h.
tractors goes on.
Tyson, casting aside his M
sonal problems, needed or
seconds to dispose ol Spunks
Monday night and retain hi
undisputed heavyweight chaH
pionship in a bout that help
ment his stature as the top I
of his time.
Afterward, he alternated b
tween the ectasy of a win ai
bitterness of a man who h
has been wronged '
porters who had qu
whether the persona t
his life would affect his ; � i
ance in the ring.
"After this fight 1 w � � �
appreciative of m
ers did to me
ending boxing - -
by putting Spinks
the first round.
"Vou try to en
try to embarrass i
try to disgrace us
Tyson, wh.
day, then hinted oi r
"As far as 1 ki
my last fight he said.
If it was his last I
believe it will be
tens oi millions of d
stands to earn - Tyson
went out with a bar
With Spinks (
course of standing ai
trade punch.
weight champion, Tysd
knocked the challenge r j
minute into the I
ished him with a left

nation that left Sp -
on his back beneath the i
unable to get up.
"When I came into tli
looked at him, I saw the j
knew it would be a first-i
knockout Tyson said.
Tyson landed or
punches in the brk -
from the time the first left hM
found its intended mark
Spinks' chin, the fight
asover. Spinks threw 1
landing just two.
"The first punch I I
wobbled a bit said Tyso
Right there, 1 knew i had him
Spinks, who had now-
knocked down, much less
CBA passes (
Continued from pagi
'Tart of this -
fault. 1 misevaluated son -
aspects said Drucker, w h
the rights to a frar
CBA seasons includ j
scheduled to open- �
"There will be a team j
tcville, and it will be su j
Drucker said that in the
borhood o; l,00G j
where" season tick ts � I
for the team that w f
played its 1989 B9 home gamej
the arena.
Ramdeil said the pr
Surfers franchise was not subq
ted to the 12 league ou nc i -
vote on possible CBA expar
during meetings Friday and
urday. The minor-league bas
ball circuit will remain 12 te
for the upcoming season, he
Ramsdell said Drucker
other interested team owl
didn't obtain the liquor Ik
they were seeking "and w
prepared to move forward -j
put it
"Even as late as this wcck
he (Drucker) was excited al
Fayatteville's chances
fceing disappointed about J
lurnofevents Ramsd I
Described the "turn of t
Uhe liquor board that tun
?"or was about to turn do n
liquor license request
"There's no liquor licen
Never has been said arena nj
fegcr Wilson Rogers. 1 w
ihinkit would beawfullv diffi
BRANDED S
Greenville Buyer's 1
Memorial Drive
l l'T!l
� im1'





I
f
T IE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 29,1988 11
Pa v 10
SS
1
re
"Blue" Edwards
v weren't
trad and it
istgaveup.
r � ic team
: rest in
� : laying
� I Thank
� itafflike
t me inter-
men will
ram here
. kc y figure
i the
: the
. iueto
. hof
pie
: u : for
� im and
in handle it
il The
We a
and
I r in our
:hat the
iffarelikea
rt. If one
: 5 to the
We are
f things this
into the
: ECU,
it 1 will play
� know
e say that I
BA. I never
play in the
i play in the
) be a long shot,
. r Coach Stcele
that I have
lities I am
te player.

L ,
?XK�KZ
I inters aid
; endeavors.
rtant thing to
ts of beer,
v.I was going
nter number one,
tupid enough to
ile sober, these
1 never help you,
t belong on the
av.
s CBA
i n Drucker not to move
with the proposed Fay
Il -urfers.
Eker would neither confirm
piy that the liquor license
it ajor factor.
rucker, the CBA commis-
from 1978-85, said a fran-
ill be located in Fayettev-
; e future.
ee CBA, page 11
Tyson KO s Spinks In First
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) �
The fight with Michael Spinks
was over with firghtening ease.
Mike Tyson's fight with his de-
tractors goes on.
Tyson, casting aside his per-
sonal problems, needed only 91
seconds to dispose of Spinks on
Monday night and retain his
undisputed heavyweight cham-
pionship in a bout that helped ce-
ment his stature as the top fighter
of his time.
Afterward, he alternated be-
tween the ectasy of a win and the
bitterness of a man who feels he
has been wronged, blasting re-
porters who had questioned
whether the personal turmoil in
his life would affect his perform-
ance in the ring.
"After this fight I wasn't really
appreciative of what you report-
ers did to me Tyson said after
ending boxing's richest fight ever
by putting Spinks down twice in
the first round.
"You try to embarrass me, you
try to embarrass my family, you
try to disgrace us
Tyson, who turns 22 on Thurs-
day, then hinted of retirement.
"As far as I know, this mav be
my last fight he said.
If it was his last fight - and few
believe it will be considering the
tons of millions of dollars he still
stands to earn - Tyson certainlv
wont out with a bang.
With Spinks choosing a riskv
course of standing and trying to
trade punches with the heavy-
vveight champion, Tyson
snocked the challenger down a
minute into the fight, then fin-
ished him with a left-right combi-
nation that left Spinks sprawled
on his back beneath the ropes,
unable to get up.
"When I came into the ring and
looked at him, I saw the fear and I
knew it would be a first-round
knockout Tyson said.
Tyson landed only eight
punches in the brief fight, but
from the time the first left hook
found its intended mark in
Spinks'chin, the fight was as good
as over. Spinks threw 10 punches,
landing just two.
"The first punch I threw, he
wobbled a bit said Tyson. '
T"&ht there, 1 knew I had him
Spinks, who had never been
knocked down, much less out, in a
professional career that spanned
11 years, tried to make it a fight.
He went to Tyson and tried to
throw an overhand right, but the
champion responded with a right
of his own that crashed into
Spinks' left temple.
Tyson followed with a three-
punch combination that sent
Spinks backward into the ropes.
Spinks bounced off the ropes and
crossed part of the ring where
Tyson met him and landed down
a left to the head and a right to the
chest that put the challenger
down.
"I said I would come to fight
Spinks said. "I thought I would
take my shot when I could and I
tried
Spinks was up at the count of
three and after taking the manda-
tory eight-count, went right back
to Tyson. It was a mistake that
proved fatal to his chances.
As Spinks tried to throw a right
hand, Tyson crashed a short right
uppercut that put Spinks down,
this time for the count.
Av

NBA Announces Draft Picks For 1988
NEW YORK (AD � Round-by-
round selections in the NBA
college draft:
First Round
1, Los Angeles Clippers, Danny
Manning, 6-10, f, Kansas. 2,
Indiana, Rik Smits, 7-4, c, Marist.
3, Philadelphia, Charles Smith, 6-
10, f. University of Pittsburgh. 4,
Now fersey, Chris Morris, 6-8, f,
Auburn, 5, Golden State, Mitch
Rochmond.fv g, Kansas State. 6,
Los Angeles Clippers (from
Sacramentao), Horsey Hawkins,
6-3, g. Bradley. 7, Phoenix, Tim
Perry, 6-9, t, Temple. 8, Charlotte,
Rex Chapman, 6-5, g, Kentucky. 9,
Miami, Rony Seikaly, 6-11, c-f.
Syracuse. 10, San Antonio, Willie
Anderson, 6-7, g, Georgia. 11,
Chicago (from Now York), Will
Perdue, 7-0, c, Vanderbilt 12,
Washington, 1 larvev Grant, 6-9, f,
Oklahoma. 13, Milwaukee, Jeff
Grayer, 6-5, g, Iowa State. 12
Phoenix (from Cleveland), Dan
Majerle, 6-6, f, Central Michigan.
15. Seattle, Gary Grant, 6-3, g,
Michigan. 16, Houston, Derrick
Chievous, 6-7, f, Missouri. 17,
Utah, Frie Lcckner, 6-11, c,
Wyoming. 18, Sacramento (from
Atlanta), Ricky Berry, 6-8, g, San
Jose State. 19, New York (from
Chicago), Rod Strickland, 6-3, g,
DePaul. 20, Miami (from Dallas),
Kevin Edwards, 6-3, g, DePaul.
21, Portland, Mark Bryant, 6-9, f,
Seton I fall. 22, Cleveland (from
Detroit trought Phoenix),
Randolph Keys, 6-9, f, Southern
Mississippi. 23, Denver, Jerome
Lane, 6-6, f, Pittsburgh. 24,
Boston, Brian Shaw, 6-6, g, Cal-
Santa Barbara. 25, Los angeles
Lakers, David Rivers, 6-0, g,
Notre Dame.
Second Round
26, Portland, (from Los Angeles
Clippers), Rolando Ferreira, 7-1,
C, Houston. 27, San Antonio from
New Jersey through Chicago,
Shelton Jones, 6-9, f, St. John's. 28,
Phoenix (from Golden State
through Milwaukee), Andrew
Land, 6-11, c, Arkansas. 29,
Sacramento, Vinnic Del Negro, 6-
5, g North Carolina State 30,
Detroit (from Phoenix through
Sacramento through New York),
Fennis Dembo, 6-6, f, Wyoming.
31, Philadelphia (from San
Antonio), Everett Stephens, 6-3, g,
Purdue. 32, New Jersey (from
Philadelphia), Charles
Shacklcford, 6-10, f, North
Carolina State. 33, Miami, Grant
Long, 6-8, f, Eastern Michigan. 34,
Charlotte, Tom Tolbcrt, 6-7, f,
Arizona. 35, Miami (from New
York through Chicago through
Seattle), Sylvester Gray, 6-6, f,
Memphis State. 36, Washington,
Ledell Eackles, 6-5, g, New
Orleans. 37, New York (from
Indiana through Chicago), Greg
Butler, 6-11, f-c, Stanford. 38,
Phoenix (from Cleveland), Dean
Garrctt, 6-10, f-c, Indiana. 39,
Milwaukee, Tito Horford, 7-1, c,
Miami, Fla. 40, Miami (from
Seattle), Orlando Graham, 6-7, f
Auburn-Montgomery. 41 Golden
State (from Houston), Keith
Smart, 6-2, g, Indiana, 42, Utah,
Jeff Moc, 6-4, g, Iowa. 43, Denver
(from Chicago), Todd Mitchell, 6-
7, f, Purdue. 44, Atlanta, Anthony
Taylor, 6-4, g, Oregon. 45, Los
Angeles Clippers (from
Portland), Tom Garrick, 6-2, g,
Rhode Island. 46, Dallas, Morion
Wiley, 6-4, g, Long Beach State. 47,
Denver, V'ernon Maxwell, 6-5, g,
Florida. 48, Detroit, Michael
Williams, 6-2, g, Baylor. 49, Dallas
(from Boston), Jose Vargas, 6-10,
c, Louisiana State. 50, Phoenix
(from Los Angeles Lakers), Steve
Kerr, 6-3, g, Arizona.
Third Round
51, Los Angeles Clippers, Rob
Locke, 6-9,f-c, Kentucky. 52, New
Jersey, Derek Hamilton, 6-6, f,
Southern Mississippi. 53,
Portland (from Golden State),
Anthony Mason, 6-7, g,
Tennessee State. 54, Atlanta (from
Sacramento), Jorge Gonzalez 7-
6, c, Argentine National Team. 55,
Phoenix, Rodney Johns, 6-2, g,
Grand Canyon, Colo. 56, San
Antonio, Barry Sumpter, 7-0, c,
Austin Peay. 57, Philadelphia,
Hernan Montenegro, 6-10, f,
Louisiana State. 58, Charlotte, Jeff
Moore, 6-7, f, Auburn. 59, Miami,
Nate Johnson, 6-8, f, Tampa. 60,
Washington, Ed Davender, 6-3, g,
Kentucky. 61, Indiana, Herbert
Crook, 6-7, f, Louisville. 62,
Chicago (from New York),
Derrick Lewis, 6-7, g, Maryland.
63, Milwaukee, Mike Jones, 6-7, f,
Auburn. 64, Cleveland, Winston
Bennett, 6-7, f, Kentucky. 65
Seattle, Corey Gaines, 6-3, g,
Loyola, Marymount. 66, Denver
(from Houston), Dwight Boyd, 6-
4, g, Memphis St. 67, Utah, Ricky
Grace, 6-1, g, Oklahoma. 68,
Atlanta, Darryi Middleton, 6-9, f,
Baylor. 69 New York (from
Chicago), Phil Stinnie, 6-8, f,
Virginia Commonwealth. 70,
Dallas, Jerry Johnson, 5-11, g
Florida Southern. 71, Portland,
Craig Neal, 6-5, g, Georgia Tech.
72, Detroit, Lee Johnson, 6-9, g,
Norfolk State. 73, Indiana (from
Denver through Los Angeles
Clippers), Michael Anderson, 5-
11, g, Drexel. 74, Boston, Gerald
Paddio, 6-7, f-g, Nevada-Las
Vegas. 75, San Antonio (from Los
Angeles Lakers), Archie
Marchall, 6-7, f, Kansas.
The
East
Carolinian
CBA passes on Fayetteville Franchise
Continued from page 10
"Part of this situation was my
fault. I misevaluatcd some key
aspects said Drucker, who owns
the rights to a franchise for throe
CBA seasons including the one
scheduled to open Nov. 17.
"There will be a team in Fayat-
teville, and it will be successful
Drucker said that in the neigh-
borhood of "1,000 and some-
where" season tickets were sold
for the team that would have
played its 1988-89 home games at
the arena.
Ramdell said the proposed
Surfers franchise was not submit-
ted to the 12 league owners for a
vote on possible CBA expansion
during meetings Friday and Sat-
urday. The minor-league basket-
ball circuit will remain 12 teams
for the upcoming season, he said.
Ramsdcll said Drucker and
other interested team owners
didn't obtain the liquor license
they were seeking "and were not
prepared to move forward with-
out it
"Even as late as this weekend,
he (Drucker) was excited about
Fayatteville's chances before
being disappointed about the
turn of events Ramsdell said. He
described the "turn of events" as
the liquor board that turned down
"or was about to turn down" the
liquor license request.
"There's no liquor license here.
Never has been said arena man-
ager Wilson Rogers. "I would
think it would be awfullv difficult
to obtain a liquor license in Cum-
berland County Arena. I think
you have to be a restaurant
Drucker said full refunds on
season-ticket sales should be
completed by the end of next
week. "We guarantee we will not
take advantage of any one cus-
tomer he said.
Tlans already arc going made
on a CBA team in Fayatteville tor
the 19S9-90 season, according to
Drucker.
But Ramsdell said the possibil-
ity of locating the CBA franchise
elsewhere remains an option �
"At this point he's (Drucker) re-
evaluatine; whether he wants to
explore another city Ramsdcll
aid.
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Welcome Back ECU
Students For The Finest
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Our Representative at the Student Stores
June 29 & 30
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12
TllH EAST CAROLINIAN
IUNE29 l
OVER $10 MILLION IN CASH AND PRIZES.
Millions of chances to win all summer!
Here's how to play!
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� Collect a race
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July 2 and Septen
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� Match the winnir
number with the HA
KXTorNASCAF
and you win 51OC .
More ways to win!
You could also bettx
winner of:
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Next NASCAR RACE
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Saturday, July 2
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I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 29,1988
OVER $10 MILLION IN CASH AND PRIZES.
Millions of chances to win all summer!
Here's how to play!
� Look for specially marked
bottle caps on any Pepsi
products.
� Collect a race car number
that wins one of seven (7)
NASCAR races between
July 2 and September 4 and
you can win a Whopper
sandwich at Burger King
� Match the winning car
number with the "NASCAR
100" or "NASCAR 500" logo
and you win $100 or $500.
More ways to win!
bu could also be the instant
w&tn@f of
i A 4988 Pontlac Grand Prix
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refute fries at
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purchase necessary to enter.
Next NASCAR RACE
Pepsi
FIRECRACKER 400
Saturday, July 2
Daytona, Florida
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 29, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 29, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.613
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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