The East Carolinian, June 15, 1988






mmmmmm
COMING NEXT WEEK:
Ah exclusive look at freshmen orientation, where are
c oming from and what are they looking for.
FEATURES
The blistering movie scene at Mendenhall reviewed
on page 7.
SPORTS
A profile on b-ball player, Kenny Murphy, once
walk on, now scholarship recipient, page 10.
Stoe
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.63 No. 5
Wednesday, June 15,1988
Greenville, NC
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Matthews to become new vice chancellor
ECU News Bureau
Dr. Alfred T. Matthews, vice
president for student afairs at
Slippery Rock University in Penn-
sylvania, will become vice chan-
cellor for student life at ECU effec-
tive July 1.
Ma tthe ws, 55, has been the chief
student life administrator at Slip-
pery Rock for the past eight years
and previously served for 10 years
as dean of student life at Virginia
Commonwealth University,
Richmond, Va.
With a PhD in higher education
from Indiana University, Mat-
thews has more than 25 years of
experience in student counseling,
research and administration on
both large and small campuses.
He served three years as coordina-
tor of student personnel services
at the University of Wisconsin-
Madison before moving to Vir-
ginia Commonwealth.
One of matthews's four chil-
dren, Andy, 18, is a student at the
University of North Carolina -
Chapel Hill. Another, Laura, 24, is
a graduate of the University of
Virginia and a son, Peter, 23, is a
graduate of the U.S. Naval Acad-
emy.
At ECU, Matthews will succeed
Dr. Elmer E. Meyer Jr who is
retiring after eight and a half years
as vice chancellor for student life.
The ECU vice chancellorship in-
cludes administrative authority
and oversight for student serv-
ices, residence life and housing,
public safety, student financial
aid, student health services, intra-
mural-recreational services, din-
ing services, the university
unions, counseling center, career
plainning and placement and the
program for hearing-impaired
students.
Matthews's appointment was
announced by Dr. Richard R.
Eakin, ECU chancellor, upon
approval by the UNC Board of
Governors.
pleased to have Dr. Matthews
join us at East Carolina Univer-
sity Eakin said. "His experience
as a chief student life officer and
his understanding of the needs of
students at East Carolina Univer-
Devon Francis takes time out from his busy schedule to call a friend
from a phone on the mall. (Photo by Ellen Murphy�Photolab)
Faculty of Health Sciences
granted tenure, promotions
ECU News Bureau
Twenty-five faculty members in
the ECU Division of Health Sci-
ences have been granted tenure
and 17 received promotions rang-
ing from assistant professor to
professor, vice chancellor William
E. Laupus announced.
The Health Sciences Division
includes the Schools of Allied
Health Sciences, Medicine, Nurs-
ing, and the Health Sciences Li-
brary.
Faculty members granted ten-
ure are Elbert D. Glover (Commu-
nity Health), Donald Holbert
(Biostatistics and Epidemiology),
and Susan C. Speer and Margaret
K. Stangohr (Health Sciences Li-
brary). Among those granted ten-
ure in the School of Medicine are
Drs. Harry G. Adams (Medicine),
C. Christopher Bremer (Family
Medicine), James L. Finley (Clini-
cal Pathology and Diagnostic
Medicine), Donald J. Fletcher
(Anatomy), William W. Fore
(Medicine), Roberta S. Gray (Pe-
diatrices), Jerry G. Gregory (Psy-
chiatric Medicine), J. Peter Harris
(Pediatrics), Charles L. Knupp
(Medicine), Donald R. Lannin
(Surgery), Jacqueline F. McGinly
(Anatomy), Richard H. Ray
(Physiology), Mclvin S. Swanson
(Surgery) and Edward L.
Treadwell (Medicine).
sity equip him well for this impor-
tant position
Eakin said that Dr. Meyer, a
former dean of students and assis-
tant vice president at Cornell
University, "has made a signifi-
cant contribution to the student
life area at ECU
ECU has an on-campus student
population of approximately
15,000.
Matthews was recommended
for the ECU appointment by a
search committee headed by Pam
Penland, assistant director of ath-
letics for academics. His student
life experience includes 20 years
as a senior administrator and 10
years as a chief student affairs
officer, and 18 years of his experi-
ence has been at large, compre-
hensive universities.
Matthews is a graduate of
Northern Colorado University at
Greeley, Colo having a
bachelor's degree in physical
education and a master's in edu-
cational psychology. He received
the PhD at Indiana in 1967 for
research on the evolution of stu-
dent participation in university
governance.
Dr. Alfred T. Matthews
Long distance choice for down east
By JOE HARRIS
Assistant News Editor
We have had to choose between
Coke and Pepsi, Ford end GM,
Burger King and McDonalds,
now the choice of which long dis-
tance service joins in.
Recently all telephone owners
in Eastern North Carolina were
mailed a flier from Carolina Tele-
phone Long Distance asking them
to choose CTLD as their long dis-
tance service. Actually, CTLD is
one of an estimated 50 in the state
and even more so, one of at least a
thousand in the nation, said
Cindy Sincula of AT &T.
Long distance companies are
grouped in two categories: pri-
mary, the companies which own
the actual lines, and secondary,
smaller companies that lease the
lines, said Sincula.
It used to be if you had long
distance service you went with
AT&T because they held a mo-
nopoly on phone lines. Now, with
the advent of satellite communi-
cation, microwave technology,
and fiberoptic transmission the
field of communication, namely
long distance telephone calls, has
blossomed into one of America's
fastest growing industries.
This article will examine three
long distance companies:
(AT&T)-American Telephone
and Telegraph, (BTI)-Business
Telecom Incorporated, and
(CTLD)-Carolina Telephone
Long Distance. Each firm offers
basically the same benefits:
cheaper rates, high quality sound
in the calls, and better customer to
company relations.
AT&T is clearly the giant of the
long distance industry. They have
been in business for over 100
years and have the advantage of
Bell Laboratories working for
them, according to Sincula.
This company operates not only
in the United States and its territo-
ries, but also internationally. They
have 250 locations which can be
directly dailed to throughout the
world. This means you can diall-
plus the international code the
number desired, and get through.
Sincula, a representative for
AT&T said, "No matter where
you are, if they have a telephone
service,we can get your call
through
The calling card is also a part of
the AT&T service. This card
makes the phone available even in
the event of an emergency. One
particular feature that separates
AT&T from the rest is that thev are
regt:l?.led by the Federal Commu-
nications Commission and the
Public Utilities Commission. Be-
cause they are regulated, they are
not subject to rate increases im-
posed by the state.
The smaller, independent com-
petitor, for example is BTI. This
tirm is located in Raleigh and has
service to every state and all coun-
tries.
Their pitch is that they are
cheaper than the giants like
AT&T, FON,and U.S.Sprint, ac-
cording Janice Whitmore, a
spokesperson for BTI. BTI charges
by the half minute as opposed to
the minute.This means that if a
call is one minute and 10 seconds
long, the charge will be for a min-
ute-and-half and not a full two
minutes.
BTI has been in business for six
years and serves over 60,000
people. Whitmore said, "We treat
our customers more like indi-
viduals. It'seasier to do that when
the company is smaller
BTI is a secondary leaser,
meaning they rent fiber optic lines
from AT&T which gives the cus-
tomer high quality sound in their
calls. They do not offer calling
card service, but since they are
affiliated with AT&T, an AT&T
calling card will work.
The middleman is a company
like Carolina Telephone Long
Distance, a subsidiary of UTS-
United Telephone Service. They
offer service to Eastern North
Carolina and claim to be the
"Home Team" because they are
the only long distance company
that is based in the eastern part of
the state, the home office being in
Tarboro.
A feature of this service is
single billing. All charges, long
distance, local, and taxes are in-
cluded in a single bill. Also, CTLD
boasts of one call for all services
like maintenance, billing, and
customer questions.
Thev to, argue competitive
rates. With CTLD, there will be
about a five percent decrease in
your charges.
"I feel people will go with us
because we plan to keep the
money here in this part of the
state. From Tarboro to the coast
we are the "Home Team and
when people do business with
someone close to home they tend
to feel more comfortable about it
said Al Colev, a spokesperson for
CTLD.
In the School of Nursing tenure
was granted to Genevievc M.
Bartol, Bonnie W. Duldt and Eu-
nice C. Messier.
Promoted to professor in the
School of Allied Health Sciences
are Elbert D. Glover (Community
Health) and Donald Holbert (Bi-
ostatistics and Epidemiology). In
the School of Medicine Drs. Ed-
ward G. Flickinger (Surgery) and
George J. Kasperek (Biochemis-
try) were named professor.
Frances Eason, Mary Kirkpatrick
and Mary Ann Rose, all of the
School of Nursing were promoted
to professor.
Medical school faculty mem-
bers named to associate professor
are Drs. James L. Finley (Clinical
Pathology and Diagnostic Medi-
cine), Donald J. Fletcher and Jac-
queline F. McGinty (Anatomy),
budesh Kataria (Pediatrics), Char-
les L. Knupp and Edward L.
Treadwell (Medicine), Donald R.
Lannin (Surgery) and Harold J.
May (Family Medicine).
Those promoted to assistant
professor are Phyllis N. Horns of
the School of Nursing and, in the
School of Medicine, Raja N. Khuri
of Medicine and Physiology,
Robert D. Myers of Pharmacology
and Psychiatric Medicine, and
Albert L. Wiley of Radiation On-
cology.
Signs to be replaced
The familiar rectangular signs
in front of campus buildings will
be replaced in the near future,
according to ECU'S business
manager, John Bell.
Recently, name posts were
erected outside of Rawl and
Flanagan buildings. The posts are
possible alternatives to existing
signs, said Bell.
"At this point we are just ex-
perimenting with signage said
Bell.
Bell said the name posts are
the most simple of the signs pro-
posed for construction. However,
there are some problems with the
expertimental name posts be-
cause the longer building names
can't be painted on the posts.
Bell said planning for the sign
change has been in the works
since April after the Campus
Beautification Committee's re-
port was released. The
committee's report recom-
mended the replacement of the
signs to Chancellor Eakin.
He said there is a possibility of
contracting a commericial sign
company for the job if problems
with funding can be overcome.
Without pinpointing a set
date, Bell said he would like to see
the sign replacement be com-
pleted by fall semester.





THE EAST CAROUN1 AN
IUNE15,1988
Jury awards settlement in smoking case
NEWARK, NJ. (AP) � A jury
awarded a smoker's widower
$400,000, the first damages or-
dered for disease caused by ciga-
rettes, but cleared tobacco compa-
nies of conspiring to mislead the
public about smoking's dangers.
The widower's lawyer said the
verdict boded well for future
cases against cigarette makers.
However, the attorney for the
when Congress ordered health
warnings on cigarette packs. Mrs.
Cipollone later used brands by
Lorillard and Phillip Morris,
smoking even after having part of
her lung removed in 1981.
Liggett attorneys promised an
appeal, cipollone's lawyers said
they would ask the judge to over-
turn the decision not to award
posthumous damages to Mrs.
smoker lawsuits have gone to ju-
ries and the other cases withered
in the face of the well-heeled to-
bacco industry's legal forces.
"All I know is that we're not
another notch in their gun said
Edcll.
"This jury, as every jury has documents they said chronicled context,
before, found that people have the the inner workings of the indus- The defense managed to bio. i
freedom to smoke and if they
make that choice they are respon-
sible for it
I believe that it is a victory for
try. For many anti-smoking many of Cipollone's claims, in
forces, disclosure of these docu- eluding contentions that cigarettt
ments into evidence was a victory, companies could be blamed for
The documents spoke of a
gentleman's agreement" not to
her Cipollone siad. "It wasn't
But some said the damages 100 percent. I'm glad that we won .docanccrrcsearch, of an industry
awarded might not be enough to partial, but it's a start "strategy" to create "doubt about
company ordered to pay damages Cipollone
said he regarded the award as The $35 billion tobacco industry
"sympathy" for the bereaved mounted an elaborate defense�
husband of Rose Cipollone, who one analyst put the cost at $50
died of lung cancer after smoking million � to avoid a judgment
one and a half packs a day for 40 mat might unleash a flood of
years. multimillion-dollar lawsuits. Re
The U.S. District Court jury action to the verdict, which fol
Monday exonerated the cigarette lowed five days of deliberations,
makers Liggett Group Inc Loril-
encourage other lawsuits.
"Are you going to sue if all
you're going to get is $400,000?"
asked tobacco industry analyst
Allan Kaplan of Merrill Lynch in
New York.
Financial markets were closed
when the verdict came in but
Kaplan predicted no long-term nerabiliry
negative impact on tobacco increase in
The jurors in the four-month
trial would not discuss the verdict
other than to say the process was
"emotional" and "nerve wrack-
ing
Anti-smoking groups viewed
the verdict as a first step.
It "destroys the myth of invul-
and should lead to an
such lawsuits, said
the health charge without actually
denying it" and of a research pro-
gram designed "so that (the) re-
sults cannot harm" the industry.
The companies denied the state-
ments in the documents, saying
they represented the views of
individuals and were taken out of
illnesses in smokers unaware ol
the dangers after the 1966 warn
ings, that the risk of cigarettes
outweighed their usefulness and
that the companies knew
should have known of a safer waj
to make cigarettes.
They contended that Mr;
Cipollone knew the risks but
chose to smokeanvwav
lard Inc and Philip Morris Inc. of
conspiring to mislead the public
about smoking's dangers, and re-
jected punitive damages.
Instead, it decided Liggett
failed to warn abou the dangers of
cigarettes and violated its prom-
ise, or "express warranty to
produce a safe product.
stocks
focused on its potential impact on "Plaintiff attorneys cannot be
hundreds of such cases pending encouraged by the small size of
Richard Daynard, a Northeastern
University law professor who
runs the Tobacco Products Liabil-
around the nation.
Cipollone's attorneys said the
decision showed the tobacco in-
dustry is not invincible.
"Any time a jury awards a
$400,000 verdict, I don't think you
can take it too lightly, particularly
in a situation where five years ago
It awarded Antonio Cipollone, people thought we were crazy
a 64-year-old retired cable splicer, and when for the past 30 yeras
damages on the warranty claim people have failed said Marc Z.
the award, which pales in com- ity Project, a support group for
parison to the $3 million they litigation against tobacco compa-
spent in time and money to try this nies.
case said a joint statement from To support the contention that
Peter Bleakley of Philip Morris Liggett violated its promise to
and Robert Northrip of Lorillard, consumers of a safe product, Edcll
both New York based. introduced advertisements for
"the fact that the jury awarded Liggett's cigarettes from the
no damages to Mrs. Cipollone was 1950s.
but not for failure to warn the
public because his wife was 80
percent responsible for contract-
ing the disease that killed her in
1984 at age 58.
Liggett faced additional claims
because it manufactured the
Chesterfields and L&Ms that Mrs.
Cipollone smoked before 1966,
Edell, Cipollone's lawyer.
Speaking today on CBS-TV's
"This Morning" program, Edell
said: 'This is the first case to be
won by the plaintiff. We'll get it
better the next time a better
verdict, a bigger verdict. We'll
recover on other claims
Fewer than a dozen of about 300
a clear signal from the jury that
smoking is a matter of personal
choice nad responsibility said
Alan Hilburg, smokesman for
Durham, N.C � based Liggett.
One featured actress Rosalind
Russell with the text reading:
"Rosalind Russell says L&M Fil-
ters are Just What the Doctor
Ordered Others said: "Nose,
Liggett attorney Donald cohn "�and cccfcssR�r�anS,Not
said today, also on CBS' "This
Morning he regarded the award
as "sympathy" for cipollone, who
pursued the lawsuit he had filed
with his wife in 1983.
Adversely AFfected By Smoking
Chesterfields and "Play Safe,
Smoke Chesterfields
Cipollone's attorneys also intro-
duced numerous secret corporate
COLLATION
IS NOT A DIRTY WORD . . .
(Ka la shan. ka-) 1. the act. process, or
result of gathering (the sections of a book)
together in proper order for binding
IT'S OUR BUSINESS
We specialize in duplicating and binding
multiple page documents
"Ninja" warrior escapes from prison
FAYETTEVILLE (AP) � Six was being held on charges of designed with a bar withing a bar.
detainees, including an ex-soldier killing a woman, injured himself He later said that type of construc-
facing a possible death sentence while falling from the fourth floor tion was not used in the bar the
for killing two people while he and was recaptured and taken to inmated sawed through.
dressed as a "Ninja" warrior, es- Cape Fear Valley Medical Center,
caped from jail, and five remained authorities said.
at large today, authorities said. The five other included Jeffrey
Two of the escapees face first- Karl Meyer, who confessed to the
degree murder charges, but one of stabbing deaths of Paul Kutz Sr
the two was quickly recaptured, 68, and his wife, Janic Kutz, 62.
authorities said. Meyer, a 21-year-old former
The detainees used a hacksaw soldier at Fort Bragg, pleaded
blade late Sunday to cut through guilty to the December 1986 mur-
cell bars, knocked out a fourth- ders, and was to appear in Supe-
floor window at the Cumberland rior Court today for a continu-
County Jail and lowered them- ation of the sentencing phase of
selves on a rope made of his trial. He faces the death pen-
bedshects, authorities said. alty or life in prison.
He said the six were assigned to
Cell Block F in the jail's top floor,
where they are allowed into a
common area during the day, but
are locked in individual cells at
night.
-e-
j
FAST COPIES FOR FAST TIMES
We are open early & late
Next to Chico's in Georgetown Shops
758-2400
S3-
The breakout occurred minutes
before the 11 p.m. lockdown,
when the inmates are returned to
their cells and locked in for the
night, officials said.
The escape apparently was
The slayings came to be known
as the "Ninja" murders because
Meyer and accused accomplice
Mark E. Thompson, another for-
mer soldier at Fort Bragg, alleg-
Charles Minnick, 22, of Hope
lete have some
10
&.
?
2P
spotted by a Fayetteville police Mills, held on charges of second
officer, who noticed someone degree burglary, first-degree sex
drop from the center, Sheriff's offense and common law robbery;
Department spokesman Harold and Rick A. Wilson, 30, of Hope
Little said. Mills, held on charges of felony
"If s just a matter of time. I think breaking and entering.
we'll catch them pretty soon he Little had said escape by sawing
said. through the bars was supposed to
Frederick Glenn Evans, 20. who be impossible because the cells are
Would Y0u)o
or $1000.00?
Round 2
Tuesday
Nights
Beginning
June 14th
Starts at
10:00 p.m.
CAROL KtAPRIDE
ftOLOGNA
CAROLINA PRIDE
SLICED
All Meat
Bologna
REGULAR
OR DIET
BigK
Cola
r'X
12-Pk
12-Oz.
Cans
Pkg
(fa "r
WIENERS
KROGER
All Meat
Wieners
12
Oz
Pkg
KROGER GRADE A1
Large
Egg�
Doz.
490
ALL VARIETIES
KROGER
Salad
Dressing .
Oz ROC
Btl
REFRESHING
Sealtest
Lemonade
59�
KROGER
RED, RIPE
California
Strawberries
Multigrain
Bread
fS�L
-Z, MITCHUM
5T Potato
Chips
s
'rf
Qt.
16
Oz
Bag
The Club


Every Friday
OLDE ITALIAN
BRAND DELUXE OR
Pepperoni
Pizza
KROGER NATURAL
FLAVOR
Deluxe
Ice Cream
DOUGHTIES
Roast
Beef
22
Oz.
PlM
Vt
Lb
399
At Charley O's Bar
At The Hilton Inn - Greenville
�Summer-Time Special
Pitchers Of Beer
$2.50
(Wednesday & Friday's Only)
Items mmJ �Hm� IfUcthr
Sun. Jvm 12, ItM thru
Sa4.JuiMlt,1tM
f0
xm � �- ��off 9 �� wjf �
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m-t urn��� ��� e �� 9� ��� �
Go Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Penta
WASHINGTON (AP) - A tof J
Pentagon official admits the milt
tary faces a tough obstacle in thej
drug was � itself
For starters, there are surveil-
lance planes with cracked wingsj
supersonic fighters that could fali
from the sky while tailing slow
moving drug planes, and military
police whose training does ncn
include reading suspects then
rights.
Nonetheless, the Joint Chiefs
Staff an? preparing battle plans f 01
an escalated anti-drug effort bs
the military. Marine It. Gen
Stephen G. Olmstead tuld
House Government Opera)
subcommittee on Fno.
As deputy assistant secretary)
defense1 for drug po
Hero ina
ABERDEEN PRO '
GROUND
sergeant decorated for h -
Vietnam was sentenced ti
years in prison and ord
charged for passing mil
documents to an FBI agent p
as a Soviet spy.
The military jury that cor
and sentenced Sgt Daniel V
Richardson.42, fined him Sv �
demoted him and stripped him
his Armv pension.
Richardson, whose 1
the Armv include two and a 1
tours of duty in Vietnam, a
mendation for heroism
there and other hoi
begin serving the prison j
immediately.
"i'm still takir
right now the Oakland, I
native said. "My law.
ad ised me not to say ai
this time
The jurv found Richardso
guiltv oi selling un j
pages from a military mam: .
describing circuitry in the N
tank on fan. 13, but m I d hi
of a charge that he met with tl
FBI agent Ian. 14 and a
S1,5 00 d o w n p a y m e n t
Pharmaculogis
(CV Vtwl Burriu
An ECU School oi M
pharmacologist has be
awarded a major National Cani
Institute grant to help d
why tumor cells become re -
to several drugs commonly usj
in cancer treatment.
The five-year invest
which NCI has awarded - - I
is expected to provide p -
with alternative approaeli
cancer treatment said Dr. 1
othanNyce assistant profes
the Department of Pharmac
and chief investigator for fl-
eet.
The development ol di
sistance in tumor cells ol patiej
undergoing chemotherap) is
of the" most important proble
facing oncologists and car
search scientists today, he sa
According to Nvcc most a
monly used cancer drugs miti
kill rapidly growing cancer t
in patients, but with I
use their therapeutic benei j
dine.
Nvce believes he may hi
identified the basic mol j
anomaly underlying the de
men! oi drug resistance.
He will work closoh with H
oncologists Drs Spencer j
Charles Scarantmo and C
GREA'
AT A
FREE - Dessert Bar
With All Entries
Take-Outs Okay
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IUNE1S.1W8
ase
P defense managed to block
of Cipollone's claims, in
ontentions that cigarette
lipanies could be blamed for
ses in smokers unaware of
rs after the 1966 warn
that the risk of cigarettes
icd their usefulness and
companies knew or
e know n of a safer wa
tfa
v ntended thai Mrs
knew the risks but
nokeam w a
noN
WORD
ss, or
' I DOOk)
SINESS
ding
PY
ast times
J
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t'm
� KROGER
All Meat
El Wieners
Pkq
99
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Gal
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59c
1
- 7
MITCHUM
t Potato
Chips
$
Oz
Bag
49
DOUGHTIES
Roast
Beef
$
399
t� PC ;�
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IURS EVERYDAY
Blvd Greenville
D
Pentagon is not prepared for war on drugs
WASHINGTON (AP) � A top
Pentagon official admits the mili-
tary faces a tough obstacle in the
drug was � itself.
For starters, there are surveil-
lance planes with cracked wings,
supersonic fighters that could fall
trom the sky while tailing slow-
moving drug planes, and military
police whose training does not
include reading suspects their
rights.
Nonetheless, the Joint Chiefs of
Staff are preparing battle plans for
an escalated anti-drug effort by
the military, Marine Lt. Gen.
Stephen G. Olmstead told a
House Government Operations
subcommittee on Fridav.
As deputy assistant secretary of
defense for drug policy and en-
forcement, Olmstead is respon-
sible for coordinating the
military's anti-drug effort, which
was ordered by Congress in legis-
lation authorizing Defense De-
partment spending programs.
Olmstead said that use of air-
borne warning planes is the only
immediate way to detect smug-
gler aircraft flying over the U.S
Mcxican border.
That's where the military's
problems begin.
Navy E2C surveillance planes,
one of three types of detection
aircraft that could be used, are "in
bad trouble with cracked wing
problems the general said.
Thirty-four planes in the fleet of
85 arc currently out of service, he
testified.
"The Navy has a major rehabili-
tation problem he added. "I'm
not sure any would be available.
We have just reduced the force by
a drastic number the past year
The Coast Guard and Customs
Service each have two E2C's on
anti-drug patrols, but they face
the same wing problems and may
be gounded.
Another solution is the Air
Force AW ACS, a much larger
surveillance plane.
But Olmstead said that the Air
Force has only 33 AW ACS on ac-
tive missions, a third of them
overseas. Of the 22 in the United
States, he said, the initial estimate
is that five or six would be needed
each day to cover the U.SMexi-
can border.
It costs $9,400 an hour to
operate such a plane, Olmstead
said, adding that the AW ACS and
the carrier-based E2C are far too
sophisticasted to be operated eco-
nomically for anti-drug missions.
Olmstead did acknowledge
that the land-based Navy P-3 sur-
veillance plane is a good option.
The plane is used by the Coast
Guard and the Customs Service in
anti-drug patrols.
Committee Chairman Glenn
English, D-Okla then asked if the
military could provide combat
aircraft � such as the F-l 4, F-15, F-
16, F-18 and F-4 � to intercept
drug smugglers.
Olmstead said using such
planes to follow slow-moving
drug planes would cause them to
stall and fall out of the sky.
The general also said that mili-
tary police are not trained to per-
form civilian arrests. "They're not
concerned with civil rights and
Miranda (reading a defendant his
rights when arrested)
And, Olmstead said, to have the
military seal the borders against
air and sea smugglers, as some
lawmakers are demanding, the
armed forced would have to "stop
everything else we're doing He
estimated that just to seal the
ground border with Mexico
would take between 20,000 and
40,000 troops.
Olmstead was asked by Rep
Bill Grant, D-Fla if the Navy
would have to cut back its mili
tary mission by increasing drug
patrols.
"Yes, I suspect it would the
general said.
Hero indicted for spying
ABERDEEN PROVING
GROUND, Md. (AP) � An Army
sergeant decorated for heroism in
Vietnam was sentenced to 10
years in prison and ordered dis-
charged for passing military
documents to an FBI agent posing
as a Soviet spy.
The military jury that convicted
and sentenced Sgt. Daniel Walter
Richardson, 42, fined him$36,000,
demoted him and stripped him of
his Army pension.
Richardson, whose 19 years in
the Army include two and a half
tours of dutv in Vietnam, a com-
mendation for heroism while
there and other honors, was to
begin serving the prison term
immediately.
"I'm still taking care of business
right now the Oakland, Calif
native said. "My lawyers have
advised me not to say anything at
this time
The jury found Richardson
guilty of selling unclassified
pages from a military manual and
describing circuitry in the Ml
tank on Jan. 13, but acquitted him
of a charge that he met with the
FBI agent Jan. 14 and accepted a
$1,500 down payment on a
$50,000 deal before his arrest that
day.
Richardson contended
throughout his wceklong court-
martial at this Army base nearly
10 miles northeast of Baltimore
that he was not trying to sell out
his country, but was trying to
catch a spy to impress his superi-
ors.
He was convicted of attempted
espionage, stealing government
property, the unauthorized sale
of government property and fail-
ure to report an attempt by an
unauthorized person to obtain
classified imformation, but was
cleared of a second count of at-
tempted espionage.
Richardson was demoted from
class E5 sergeant to an El, cutting
his pay in half until his discharge,
which will become effective after
the sentence is reviewed.
slaying of his son and was
troubled by alcoholism, depres-
sion and gambling problems.
Richardson's stepbrother,
Frank Workman, testified that he
believed the defendant's account.
"He did it to catch a spy, it's plain
and simple
Prosecutors portrayed
Richardson as a greedy, vengeful
man who was willing to jeopard-
ize national security for money.
"He has an anti-social personal-
ity said the chief prosecutor,
Capt. Wellington T. Matthews Jr.
"He's a crook. He's a criminal
According to testimony,
Richardson phoned the Soviet
Embassy in Washington in July
1986. Eighteen months later, the
FBI agent called him, psing as a
Soviet operative.
Richardson had been demoted
from instructor in the Tank Turret
Division at the proving ground to
supervisor of the tool room for
repeatedly failing to show up for
work.
"I figured that I needed to do
something to get everybody off
my back, so I called the Russian
Embassy, to try to get a KGB
agent Richardson testified
Thursday.
"It seemed like everything I
tried to do right, it got screwed
up he said. "I felt that I was
under so much pressure all the
time, I felt like I was going to
explode from the inside out
pharmacologist .aarjled for work �
-1� �
ECU News Bureau
An ECU School of Medicine
pharmacologist has been
awarded a major National Cancer
Institute grant to help determine
why tumor cells become resistant
to several drugs commonly used
in cancer treatment.
The five-year investigation for
which NCI has awarded $400,000
is expected to provide physicians
with alternative approaches to
cancer treatment, said Dr. Jon-
othan Nyce, assistant professor in
the Department of Pharmacology
and chief investigator for the proj-
ect.
"The development of drug re-
sistance in tumor cells of patients
undergoing chemotherapy is one
of the most important problems
facing oncologists and cancer re-
search scientists today he said.
According to Nyce, most com-
monly used cancer drugs initially
kill rapidly growing cancer cells
in patients, but with continued
use their therapeutic benefits de-
cline.
Nyce believes he may have
identified the basic molecular
anomaly underlying the develop-
ment of drug resistance.
He will work closely with ECU
oncologists Drs. Spencer Raab,
Charles Scarantino and C. Tato
Holbrook over the next several
years to develop methods to block
drug resistance in patients under-
going chemotherapy.
Nyce's grant is known as a Na-
tional Institutes of Health FIRST
award (for First Independent Re-
search Support and Transition).
Presented to promising new in-
vestigators status, said Robert
Franke, director of the Office of
Sponsored Programs at ECU.
Nyce joined the School Of
Medicine faculty las May.
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Stye �aat (ftarnltnian
Serving the Ernst Caroline campus community since I92S
Clay Deanhardt, g��,�
Carol Wetherington, .��� e
James F.J. McKee, &� ,
Tim Hampton. n�w &�-
Tim Chandler, sp. &�
John Carter, tetm E�v�r
Michelle England, oM�rr
Debbie Stevens, s
Jeff Parkerj
Tom FuRR,c,rt�,M-ui�
Mike Upchurch, ���(. m-
John W. Medlin, ah dm
MACCLARK, MNiltaq.
June 15,1988
OPINION
Page 4
Signposts unwanted
Beautification attempt fails first try
Campus beautification. When the
term beautification is mentioned,
the idea that usually follows is
"removing potential eyesores and
replacing them with organic substi-
tutes for instance . . . plants per-
haps? Not very often does the con-
cept of digging up what little cam-
pus ground there is to put in a sign-
post come to mind.
By now, most of the faculty and
students of summer session have
seen the new markers in front of
Flanagan and Rawl. Oddly enough,
it seems that the names of the build-
ings are already displayed on signs
in front of them. Upon looking at the
face of the buildings, a careful ob-
server might even notice that the
names are shown in large steel let-
ters, too. Why then, does the Univer-
sity feel it necessary to insult our
intelligence by giving us the names
in triplicate?
Even as markers, the new signs
wouldn' t be so useless except for the
fact that they happen to be very
unsightly. The black letters on white
fencepost look more like something
that would be put up temporarily
while actual signs are being made.
Perhaps such markers fit into the
environment of the backroads at
Atlantic Beach, but they would
hardly mesh with the look of up-to-
date architecture such as the new
general classroom building
So what does the Campus Beautifi-
cation Committee believe the signs
are adding? If the markers were
designed in such a way that they
conveyed a more distinguished
look, such as engraved plates, they
would be a welcome addition to the
buildings. Such signs would be
more asthetically pleasing and pro-
vide a nice "constant" to East
Carolina's myriad of building types.
Of course, the committee may not
have the funds for these elegant
nameplates. If that is true, then the
funds should be used to improve the
existing signs, or in some other area
altogether. It is not being too high-
handed to suggest that any pro-
posed additions either be done first
class or not all, especially when the
look of our campus is concerned.
That is, after all, the idea behind
creating a beautification committee.
Of course, these two signposts are
only being displayed on a trial basis.
If the general public doesn't receive
them well, they will soon disappear
in favor of a better alternative. If no
one says anything however, mem-
bers of this university will soon be
seeing them all over campus. Hope-
fully the money that would go to
making the rest of these signposts
will be channelled into some actual
beautification, and these existing
blemishes will be removed to leave
room for grass again
Why all the Noriega fuss?
Tell me again: How exactly did it
become so urgent that we dislodge
General Noriega? Everyone's using the
same word to describe the results of this
four-month-long exercise in late-impe-
rial slapstick: "fiasco See, among oth-
ers, "The Panama Fiasco" Washington
Post; "The Noriega Fiasco" New York
Times; "Anatomy of a Fiasco"
Newsweek.
Fiasco it surely is. But how on earth
did booting Noriega out of Panama
become a top priority of American for-
eign policy in the first place? The gen-
eral is no prize, for sure, but on any list
of the world's least attractive heads of
government measured by job per-
formance, if not complexion he
wouldn't even make the top 10. He' not
even on the varsity squad of Latin
American human rights abusers.
Noriega was running a capitalist
economy until we wrecked it. He has no
aggressive designs on neighboring
countries (our chief accusation against
the Sanndinistas of Nicaragua). He has
more than abided by the terms of the
Panama Canal Treaty, which gives us a
substantial military presence in the
middle of his country. Supposedly
we're only supposed to be there to de-
fend the canal, but we've used our facil-
ities there for far more ambitious mili-
tary operations, without a peep of pro-
test from the landlord.
Noriega's role in drug dealing and
other corruption was no secret to any-
one who cared before this year. Mem-
bers of the administration now say there
was no hard evidence of Noriega's drug
dealing and money laundering until he
indicted by a Miami grand jury on Feb.
4. In fact, the evidence against Noriega
has been harder for years than the
scanty evidence that led President Re-
agan to denounce the Sandinistas re-
peatedly for drug dealing - evidence he
used as a justification for the contra was.
But the folly is not limited to the Re-
aganites. On television the other night
there was an amazing scene. Assistant
Secretary of State Elliot Abrams, the
administration's most enthusiastic
Central American warrios, was discuss-
ing the Panama situation at a press
conferennce outside a Capitol Hill hear-
ing room.
Abrams was making vague and cau-
tious references to preserving all our
options. Then Sen. Chris Dodd stepped
up the the microphone to declare that
this might even mean sending in the
Marines. Chris Dodd! This is the man
who led the Democratic opposition to
contra aid. Now here he is virtually
endorsing, not just aid to indigenous
rebels (of whos there are none), but di-
rect American military intervention to
overthrow a government that no one
could seriously describe as more op-
pressive than Nicaragua's.
The formula seems to have been
something like this. Take one grand-
standing prosecutor who decides to
indict an unprosecutable foreign head
of state. Add a seasonal media relapse
into drug hysteria. Stir in an assistant
secretary of state looking for a cheap
Philiippines-style triumph with which
to restore his tattered reputation. Top it
off with Democratic pols happy to use
any stick to beat the administration.
Add George Bush to taste. Et voila! Nev-
ertheless, it's a mighty peculiar recipe,
and in the end the souffle seems to have
fallen anyway.
Although the Reagan administration
has most of the egg on it's face, and
rightly so, the Democrats deserve more
embarrassment than they've so far suf-
fered. Presidential condidate Michael
Dukakis says the inability to dispose of
Noriega demonstrates failed leadership
at the Reagan White House. But what,
exactly, would he do differently?
The Democrats can't be serious in
their hints about using American
troops. Start a war? With Panama? That
would betray every value the Demo-
crats supposedly have been defending
in their opposition to Reagan's contra
war in Nicarague. Not to mention the
catastrophic effect on our relations with
the other Latin American nations,
which arc united � from Castro's Cuba
to Pinochet's Chile � in opposing even
the economic war we've been running
unsuccessfully to pressure Noriega out.
If we really were in the mood for an
actual, bloodshed-type war, either
Cuba or Chille would have been a more
worthy target. In fact, the United States
is not about to start a war against any
country more threatening than Gre-
nada. Maybe we should have thought of
that before we started huffing and puff-
ing.
Reagan bombards the Soviet Union on fair human rights, charms Soviet college students
By FRED BARNES
THE NEW REPUBLIC
By Fred Bames
One of Richard Nixon's pieces
of wisdom, passed on to President
Reagan several years ago, is that
you get better publicity when you
go to the other guy's country for a
summit. The summit in Moscow,
Reagan's fourth in 40 months
(after, Geneva, Reykjavik and
Washington), was far and away
his best. He dozed off twice in
public events, droned on in his
speeches about movies he'd seen,
and made a bad joke about Rus-
sian dissidents being "disagree-
able But he still managed to
dominate.
At this summit, the private
meetings were less important
than Reagan's public appear-
ances. In them, he had one thing
on his mind, human rights. He
harped on the subject and turned
the four days in Moscow into a
human-rights summit. The Sovi-
ets hated, none more than spokes-
man Gennady Gerasimov, who
sneered publicly at Reagan. But
the White House gambled that
Gorbachev himself wouldn't get
his back up, and he didn't. "He
wanted the Moscow summit to be
a success, so he swallowed the
human rights stuff said a senior
Reagan aide.
A little-known pastime of
Reagan's is keeping track of So-
viet dissidents. He has a personal
rooting interest in eight or 10 dis-
sident families, including those of
Abe Stolar, an American citizen
who lives in Moscow because he
can't get his Russian wife out, and
Tatyana Zieman, a Jewish re-
fusenik. Both Stolar and Zieman
sat at Reagan's table at Spaso
House, the American
ambassador's residence in
Moscow and the scene of an
extraordinary event on day two
of the summit. On live TV, Reagan
listened to three dissidents and
then spoke himself. His aides
thought a session at Spaso House
would be less provocative than a
Reagan visit to a dissident's
home. Maybe it was. Nonetheless
it occurred a dozen blocks or so
from the Kremlin, the heart of
darkness. That was provocative
enough.
Reagann was embarrassed by
the adoration the dissidents
showered on him. He blushed. He
thinks of these people as heroes.
Yet they were so noisy in passing
the name cards they found on the
tables to Reagan for his autograph
that Jack Matlock, the American
ambassador, had to ask them to
stop. They were distracting from
the speakers.
Reagan pitched for religious
freedom in a visit to Danilov
Monastery. He delivered a long
quote about church bells from
exiled novelist Aleksandr Solz-
henitsyn, not exactly the faavorite
writer of Soviet authorities. The
next day he told a lunch gathering
aat the House of Men of Letters
that he hopes Solzhenitsyn will
soon be "published in the land he
loves At that event Reagan
nodded off while the head of the
cinematographers' union talked
up the creative fruits of socialism.
Reagan awakened in time to
address the interesting question
of how his acting background had
helped him in politics. After
learning to get "inside" different
characters he played, he said, he
started "listening to the ca-
cophonous voices of ordinary
people and trusting those mil-
lions of people, keeping out of
their way, not trying to act the all-
wise and all-powerfull, not letting
government act that way
Dissident historian Roy
Medvedev liked Reagan better
than the two Soviets who spoke at
the lunch for writers and artists.
"The Soviet cultural figures talk
like politicians he said. "Reagan
talked like a person of culture
Students at Moscow State were
the toughest audience Reagan
encountered. They sat stone-
faced as he extolled economic
freedom and denounced "gov-
ernment planners He got no
applause and one laugh during
the 32-minute speech. The laugh
came when he told of a woman
who recited a folk legend to a lazy
bureaucrat. "When a baby is born,
an angel comes down from
heaven and kisses it on one part of
the body Those kissed on the
hand are handyment, those of the
forehead are clever. "And I've
been trying to figure out where
the angel kissed you so that you
should sit there for so long and do
nothing Reagan answered ques-
tions for 30 minutes after his
speech. The students were
charmed.
Gorbachev raised hardly a peep
of protest about Reagan's human
rights campaign. Finally, at his
June 1 press conference, Gor-
bachev said he was "not-filled
with admiration" for Reagan's
"propaganda gambits" on human
rights. Snide criticism was orches-
trated by Gerasimov. He noted
his"sense of satisfaction that we
learned President Reagan, who
has not visited libraries very of-
ten, has read the full text of
Gorbachev's Terestoika (It
took Reagan six months.) Gerasi-
mov said Reagan was talking
about the human rights situation
as it existed under Stalin, not
under Gorbachev.
Gerasimov had a cleverer strat-
egy at the daily briefing he con-
ducted along with Fitzwater. He
called of questioners who chal-
lenged the Reagan line on human
rights. How dare Reagan attack
the Soviets when he's invading
Nicaragua? asked the guy from
Radio Sandino. Gerasimov also
made sure Fitzwater was asked
about a delegation of American
Indians in Moscow to publicize
their claim of human rights
abuses by Reagan. Not surpris-
ingly, one of the students at
Moscow State asked Reagan
about the Indian protesters.
Never heard of them, Reagan
said. But it might have "been bet-
ter, he added, if Indians hadn't
gone to their "preservations, or
reservations, I should say
Soviet security forces punctu-
ated Reagan's point about human
rights. When the president was
surrounded by well-wishers dur-
ing an impromptu visit to the
Arbat shopping area on day one,
Soviet guards attacked reporters
and cameramen who tried to stay
close to Reagan. Later, Soviet
guards tried to bar the American
press from the monastery. They
relented when a White House
advance man threatened to keep
the Soviet press out of Reagan's
meeting with dissidents. At that
event, the Soviets took no
chances. They taped the proceed-
ings inside, and then photo-
graphed dissidents individually
as they left. For Gobo's sake, Re-
agan backed away from his "evil
empire" charge. But I'll bet he
didn't really mean it.
Mr. Reagan changes mind about empire
At 27, he was an agricultural economist with
Moscow's Institute of Economics and a university
lecturer. But Josef Stalin looked kindly on him dur-
ing the Great Purge, and instead of shooting or
exiling him, sent him as chief of the U.S. division of
the People's Commissariat of Foreign Af faiirs. From
there he went as counselor at the Soviet Embassy in
Washington, becoming ambassador in 1943. In 1946
he went to the United Nations Security Council and
established the Soviet tradition of vetoing any
moves designed to promote peace with freedom. In
1946 he became deputy foreign minister. And
Stalin's approval of him made him a candidate for
the Central Committee of the Communist Party. He
became first deputy foreign minister in 1949 and
foreign minister in 1957. He was directly involved in
the diplomatic and military action against the stu-
dents in Budapest, serving under Nikita
Khrushchev. Under Leonid Brezhnev, he presided
over the great purge of the Prague Spring in Czecho-
slovakia in 1968.
Andrei Andreyevich Gromyko is now the presi-
dent of the Soviet Union, and the first person to greet
President Ronald Reagan as he descended from Air
Force One at Vnukovo Airport on Sunday.
The itinerary of Mr. Reagan might have been
conceived by the Brothers Grimm. No fairy tale
could have made the trip more regally satisfying.
The rich decor was courtesty of dead czars, the last
one executed by someone in honor of whom a Rus-
sian City is named. The grand paintings and decora-
tions were done by European and Russian masters of
the 18th and 19th centuries. The children were
trained to sing American folk songs in English. And
beginning with Gorbachev himself, the Russian
court was choreographed to sing, if every now and
then with a touch of diffidence, the praises of peace
and co-existence. Ronald Reagan lectured to the
intellectuals about an obscure episode in an obscure
Russian novel and received a standing ovation. It
was a dream, it was nirvana, it was�mind blowing.
There was that one terribly sour not, sounded day
after day. Every time Mr. Reagan looked especially
pleased, especially satisfied, especially carried away
by the gemutlichkeit of it all, you would hear a voice,
and always that voice would ask the same question:
ON THE RIGHT
BY
WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY
"Is this what you called the evil empire, Mr. Presi-
dent?"
"What was that about the evil empire, Mr. Presi-
dent?"
'Tell us about the evil empire, Mr. President
Finally, worn down by this hectoring over his
melodramatic excess of years gone by, Mr. Reagan
said: "I was talking about another empire
We sinners believe because we were taught to
believe and do give internal assent to the mandate, to
forgive, 70 times seven times. But Mr. Reagan is
engaged now not in forgiveness, but in what George
Orwell called vaporization. Big Brother decides to
change a historical or a present fact, and evidence
inconveniencing to the new thesis is simply made to
� disappear.
Run the fingers lightly over the globe, pausing to
step at outposts of the Soviet empire. In Nicaragua,
using Soviet arms, they are promoting war and
aggression and drafting 17-year-olds while suffer-
Mr. Reagan does well to encourage changes in the
Soviet system. Something wildly exciting is indeed
going on in the Soviet system. But to greet it as if it
were no longer evil is on the order of changing our
entire position toward Adolf Hitler on receiving the
news that he has abolished one extermination camp.
The Soviet Union has a very long way to go before it
brings reasonable freedom to those who live under
it. But we sow only confusion when we retract the
statement that it is evil to support the systematic
suppression of human rights everywhere your
empire reaches. Gorbachev may be the spokesman
for what is being attempted within the Soviet em-
pire, but Gromyko continues as president of what
continues to be an evil empire.
Camp
(CPS) � Newsweek on Cai
pus, one of the biggest colk
newspaper "inserts" in the coi
try, last week announced that
would soon stop publishii
while Campus Voice, probaq
the slickest magazine aimed
college students, said it will tra
form itself into a wall poster.
The changes, some observ
said, might help the finances
student newspapers because tj
"inserts" � so called becai
Ironcl
Washington, D.C � Artifal
from the Civil War ironclad U.S
MONITOR will somedav havi
permanent home in North CaJ
llina thanks to the efforts of
state's first district Congt
Walter B. Jones.
The House Merchant
and Fisheries Committee, wh
'is chaired by Congressman Joij
today agreed to Mr. Jones'
jposal to direct the National
ranic and Atmospheric Admj
-stration (NOAA) to provide
Ipropriate artifacts from
4
Kollar app
ECU N'cvw Bureau
Joanne M. Kollar, former!
�publications officer at Penn bl
University, has been appon
director of the Office of Publ:
A ions at ECU.
Kollar, catalog editor at
State for the past eight yej
served as acting director and
versify editor in hte departmerl
publications at Penn State din
1987. As catalog editor, she edj
and produced six university
logs and Penn State's commej
ment programs and was alsc
sponsible for production of ol
publications as assigned.
"We are delighted to hai
person of Joanne's talent anc
to ina
Youngsters ti
attend sessio
ECU Ntwi Bureau
Nearly 300 middle and s
dary pupils, mostly from
schools, have been selected
tend the third annual Legisl
School for Youth Developing
ECU in three-week sessioi
ginning June 19 and July 10.
Emphasis during the result
sessions will be focused on
oping leadership, cnhai
communication skills and
ducing the young people tcj
experiences. The statewide
gram was authorized by thi
General Assembly in an atj
to develop leadership amoi
state's rural youth.
A similar program is hel
300 young people from the
em half of the state at Wj
Carolina University in C
hee. Divided by educatu
gions, the program at ECU
students from 31 countiesai
at WCU from 49 counties
The legislation specific
the program be designed ti
dents from rural, isolated
with a ratio of rural to urbc
dents of at least three to onej
tions of the students were
random from nomination!
mitted by teachers, couif
principals, parents and pel
the various communities
The students who atte
participate in a program ol
shops, lectures, field trips
nars, films, musical progra
recreational activities.
Dates of the sessions are
- July 7 for rising 10th tj
12th graders and July 10 tj
July 28 for nsing eighth t
ninth graders.
Names and home addre
county, of the students
for sessions at ECU this sj
are as follow: (Note that
of the preponderance ol
addresses, the students n1
dress may differ from the
county of residence).
The East Carolii





liLATCSAST
'AR M &RLS
Hxrwer.
Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
IUNE15,1988
t
.
ft: 't
fuSS:
?
re his tattered reputation. Top it
(ratic pels happy to use
boat the administration.
; sh to taste. Et voila! Nev-
s t's .? mighty peculiar recipe,
rnd the souffle seems to have
e Reagan administration
the egg on it's face, and
- the Democrats deserve more
i ont than they've so far suf-
' condidate Michael
. s tic inability to dispose of
monstratcs failed leadership
� White House. But what,
i he do differently?
rats can't be serious in
hints about using American
-t a war? With Panama? That
cverv value the Demo-
have been defending
n to Reagan's contra
. Not to mention the
i on our relations with
Latin American nations,
ted � from Castro's Cuba
hile � in opposing even
mic war we've been running
v to pressure Noriega out.
were in the mood for an
hed-type war. either
or Chille would have been a more
I f irget In fact, the United States
t about to start a war against any
ttry more threatening than Gre-
' ' be we should have thought of
we started huffing and puff-
lege students
their claim of human rights
.ses bv Reagan. Not surpris-
ingly, one of the students at
scow State asked Reagan
about the Indian protesters.
Never heard of them, Reagan
said. But it might have "been bet-
ter, he added, if Indians hadn't
gone to their "preservations, or
reservations, I should say
Soviet security forces punctu-
ated Reagan's point about human
rights. When the president was
surrounded bv well-wishers dur-
ing an impromptu visit to the
Arbat shopping area on day one,
Soviet guards attacked reporters
and cameramen who tried to stay
close to Reagan. Later, Soviet
guards tried to bar the American
press from the monastery. They
relented when a WTiite House
advance man threatened to keep
the Soviet press oul of Reagan's
meeting with dissidents. At that
event, the Soviets took no
chances. They taped the proceed-
ings inside, and then photo-
graphed dissidents individually
as they left. For Gobo's sake, Re-
agan backed away from his "evil
empire" charge. But I'll bet he
didn't rcallv mean it.
ire
?rs lightly over the globe, pausing to
of the Soviet empire. In Nicaragua,
is, they are promoting war and
drafting 17-year-olds while suffer-
oes well to encourage changes in the
-mething wildly exciting is indeed
ISoviet system. But to greet it as if it
evil is on the order of changing our
.vard Adolf Hitler on receiving the
abolished oncextcrmination camp,
kn has a very long way to go before it
!e freedom to those who live under
nly confusion when we retract the
t is evil to support the systematic
human rights everywhere your
Gorbachev may be the spokesman
attempted within the Soviet em-
rko continues as president of what
m evil empire.
Campus Voice magazine changed to poster
(CPS) � Newsweek on Cam-
pus, one of the biggest college
newspaper "inserts" in the coun-
try, last week announced that it
would soon stop publishing
while Campus Voice, probably
the slickest magazine aimed at
college students, said it will trans-
form itself into a wall poster.
The changes, some observers
said, might help the finances of
student newspapers because the
"inserts" � so called because
they are printed and published
elsewhere, and then shipped to
campus, where they're literally
inserted into the student papers
� often carried lucrative ads that
otherwise might have been in the
campus publications.
"National advertising lineage
in college papers is down to less
than 50 percent of what we got 3-
4 years ago reports Dave
Adams, president of the College
Media Advisors and faculty advi-
sor to the Kansas State Collegian.
"Many of the ads in the supple-
ments are full-color slick ads that
campus papers can't carry
Adams conceded, "but they may
be dividing the national advertis-
ing dollar
Newsweek on Campus, how-
ever, will stop trying to divide it
after its September, 1988, issue,
said Diane Pearson of the Wash-
ington Post, Inc Newsweek's
parent corporation.
She cited increased postal and
paper costs as well as increased
competition as the reasons.
"When Newsweek On Campus
was introduced there were 5
publications Pearson ex-
plained. "Now there are more
than 14. It's a very crowded mar-
ket
Newsweek On Campus never
broke even in the six years of its
existence, said Pearson, and the
higher costs didn't bode well for
pushing it over the top in the near
future.
So, in order "to protect the
quality of Newsweek" itself, the
company's directors voted April
11 to close Newsweek On Cam-
pus and a specialized sister publi-
cation called Newsweek On
Health.
"We're not giving up on the
:ollege market, though. We'll re-
turn to campus in the fall with
special subscription offers to
Newsweek Pearson promised.
Newsweek on Campus lasted
longer than most of the college
inserts and supplements, said Jim
Omastiak, publisher of Whittle
Publications, the Knoxville,
Tenn.�based firm that puts out
Campus Voice.
Ironclad relic finds home in N.C.
Washington, D.C. � Artifacts
from the Civil War ironclad U.S.S.
MONITOR will someday have a
permanent home in North Caro-
lina thanks to the efforts of the
-state's first district Congressman
Walter B. Jones.
The House Merchant Marine
and Fisheries Committee, which
" is chaired by Congressman Jones,
today agreed to Mr. Jones' pro-
�posal to direct the National Occ-
.anic and Atmospheric Admini-
stration (NOAA) to provide ap-
propriate artifacts from the
MONITOR for display in North
Carolina.
"A MONITOR museum in
North Carolina is important to the
state and especially to the people
of the Outer Banks who have his-
torical tics to this shipwreck that
lies so close to our shore. While 1
had an agreement with the former
head of NOAA to make certain
items available, his departure
from that post made it necessary
to put the understanding we had
into statutory language Chair-
man Jones explained.
Specifically, the Jones plan di-
rects NOAA to develop � in
consultation with the state of
North Carolina � a plan for the
permanent display of artifacts
within six months after enact-
ment. The plan shall, among other
things, identify possible display
sites and suitable artifacts, and
suggest an interpretative plan for
display.
The requirements of the Jones
plan do not affect the designation
of the Mariners Museum in New-
port News, Virginia, as the princi-
pal museum for MONITOR arti-
facts.
The Jones plan was added to a
reauthorization of the National
Marine Sanctuaries program
under consideration by the
Committee. The Sanctuaries pro-
gram was established in 1972 to
provide recognition and compre-
hensive protection to marine re-
sources of special national signifi-
cance. The MONITOR was the
first of seven sites that have thus
far received this designation.
HANKS ICE CREAM,
FROZEN YOGURT,
AND SORBET
HOMEMADE
CE CREAM
Greenville.NC
BUY 1 GET
1 FREE
BLEND IN
Exp. 6-21-88
Kollar appointed ECU publications director
ECU Ncwn Bureau
Joanne M. Kollar, formerly a
publications officer at Penn State
University, has been appointed
director of the Office of Publica-
tions at ECU.
Kollar, catalog editor at Penn
State for the past eight years,
served as acting director and uni-
versity editor in hte department of
publications at Penn State during
1987. As catalog editor, she edited
and produced six university cata-
logs and Penn State's commence-
penence said James L. Lanier,
Jr ECU vice chancellor for insti-
tutional advancement. "The Penn
State program is recognized as
one of the top in the country and
we are confident that she will help
improve our external publicat-
ions and make them more consis-
tent in presenting ECU's posi-
tion Lanier said.
Kollar, born in North Braddock,
Pa grew up in Franklin, Pa and
received a BA degree in English
from Bucknell University in 1971.
She received an MA in journalism
ment programs and was also re- at Penn State University in 1978.
ponsible for production of other She joincd the Pcnn Statc publica-
publications as assigned. tions department as a proofreader
"We are delighted to have a in 1976 and was appointed an
person of Joanne's talent and ex- t.djtor jn 1978.
1, tfit ')��� � )fi'j ti y iiyj ���.��
Youngsters to
attend session
ECU Nw� Bureau
Nearly 300 middle and secon-
dary pupils, mostly from rural
schools, have been selected to at-
tend the third annual Legislators'
School for Youth Development at
ECU in three-week sessions be-
ginning June 19 and July 10.
' Emphasis during the residential
sessions will be focused on devel-
oping leadership, enhancing
communication skills and intro-
ducing the young people to new
experiences. The staiewidc pro-
gram was authorized by the 1985
General Assembly in an attempt
to develop leadership among the
state's rural youth.
A similar program is held for
300 young people from the west-
ern half of the state at Western
Carolina University in Cullow-
hee. Divided by education re-
gions, the program at ECU draws
students from 51 countiesand that
at WCU from 49 counties.
The legislation specified that
the program be designed for stu-
dents from rural, isolated areas
with a ratio of rural to urban stu-
dents of at least three to one. Selec-
tions of the students were made at
random from nominations sub-
mitted by teachers, counselors,
principals, parents and persons in
the various communities.
The students who attend will
participate in a program of work-
shops, lectures, field trips, semi-
nars, films, musical programs and
recreational activities.
Dates of the sessions are June 19
- July 7 for rising 10th through
12th graders and July 10 through
July 28 for rising eighth through
ninth graders.
Names and home addresses, by
county, of the students selected
for sessions at ECU this summer
are as follow: (Note that because
of the preponderance of rural
addresses, the students mail ad-
dress may differ from the actual
county of residence).
Serving as acting director and partmcntal budget and super-
universitv editor from February vised a full-time professional staff
until August of last year, Kollar of 11 employees and four part-
was involved in implementing a time employees,
graphic identity system and su- The Penn State department of
pervised the editing, design and publications office edits and pub-
production of Penn State's publi- lishes more than 1,000 publi-
cations. She administered a de- tions each year.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$205 Abortion from 13 lo 18 weeks at
additional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information, call 832-0533 (toll free
number: 1-800-532-5384) between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. weekdays tieneral anesthesia available.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
CATCH THE ANNABELLE'S
LUNCHTIME EXPRESS
It's our special quick lunch menu for people on the go!
Just choose your favorite and you'll be refreshed
and on your way in no time
Spaghetti a generous Steak Teriyaki Our special
portion of pasta with meat cut of Deef served wrth src
sauce Toasted bread and peas and teriyaki sauce
Parmesan cheese $4.55 on nee b.4b
Uot3W�V
Joanne M. Kollar
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not co.ne by the REAL Crisis Intervention Center: 312
E. 10th St; or call 758 HELP. For Free Confidential Counsel-
ing or Assistance.
Our Volunteers and Staff are on duty 24 hrs. a day. year
around, in order to assist you in virtually any problem area
you might have. Our longstanding goal has always been to
preserve and enhance the quality of life for you and our com-
munity.
Licensed And Accredited By The Slate of North Carolina
t- cc
Fettuccini Alfredo
pasta with a sauce of butter,
Parmesan and Romana
cheese $4.75
With Chicken
With Shrimp
$6.75
$7.75
Hot Ham & Swiss
Sandwich VfMff sliced em
with Swiss cheese on grilled rye
bread, plus fries $3.95
Steak & Cheese Sandwich
Our steak sandwich with
melted Provolone cheese.
plus fries . $3.95
Express lunches are served from 11 30am to 2 p m daily, except Sunday
Aflnabelle's
V V RESTAURANT & PUB
The Plaza � Greenville Bivd � 7560315
Hours: 11 30am-11pm, MonThurs
11:30am-Midnight Fri Sat ,
12Noon-11 pm Sun
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED SHOES
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Summer Savings
w'
UM
FINE DINING
Sheraton Greenville
Open"
Monday-Saturday 10-9
Sunday 1-6
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
(Except Algner. Nike and Reebok)
3C3WfSTGHtCNVii.il SOot.E��D GREENVIllE
The hospitality people of ITT
REENVillE NOATH CAACXIN 9'9MS26�
Weekday Buffet
i
$3
IncCudes:
95 Soup
Salads
L
Mon. - Fri.
11:30 - 2:30
Leo's is located
in the Sheraton
The East
ist Carolinian
203 West Greenville
Blvd Greenville,
North Carolina
2Entries
0iot-cDessert
Cakes & (Pies
Carved oast
pund Of Beef
355-2666
Student Union
Coming Attractions'
Thursday, June 16
Rock - A - Bowl
MSC Bowling Center - 2 p.m. - 4:30 p.m
Thursday, Tune 16
Concert
University Mall - 9 p.m.
Upcoming Events
Monday, June 20 Movie: The Shining
Hendrix Theatre - 9 p.m.
�Thursday, June 16 Rock - A - Bowl
MSC Bowling Center - 2 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
i-J





THE EAST CARPI IN! AN
UNI 15, 1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
IF YOU ARE A MUSICVOICE MAJOR
jnd would like to put you voice to work
and mako some cash this summer then
call 355-0355 and ask tor Dena
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNCILOR
interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field No Monetar)
Compensation, howver room utilities
and phono provided Call Mary Smith,
Real Crisis Center 758 1IELP
PART-TIME HELPNE1 DI D to work
in optical lab No experience necessary.
We will tram vou Will work around stu
dent schedule Call 752 4018 and ask for
manager for an interview Good working
conditions
HIRING Federal government iobs m
your area and o ersoas. Main immediate
openings without waiting list or test. 515
68 000 Phone call refundable (6 12) 838-
8885 Ext. 5285
HUP WWII D � Ladies, it you are
between IS "5h vrs old, enjo showing
yourlegs then call 756-6163 M Fbetween
1 p.m. and 4 pjn. for an interview and
screen test It vou are i h sen �. id o pro
tion work pa) s up toS25
SERVICES OFFERED
PROFESSIONAl IM'INC SERVIC1
' IS 188 758 8241 Call
INDI PI ND ANT CAB SERVICE � Call
355 5034 in evenings "Good rates Call
lames tor a ride
WORD PROCESSING AM) THOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer tvping
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours m and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 Past 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694
NEW OFFICE SUITES
counts. 758-1983.
Faculty dis-
FORSALE
ROOMATE NEEDED � to share apt. in
Wilson Acres. Pay 13 rent in 2 bedroom
apt. July 1 - August 30only. Call soon. Toni
830-3822.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED � for 3
bedroom townhouse. Washer, dryer, pool
tennis courts. $145.00 plus 13 utilities
.355-4834.
NEED A PLACE TO LIVE THIS SUM-
MER � Roommate needed to share 2
bedroom townhouse. S97.00 a month, 13
utilities. Near clubhouse, pool, laundry
room. Quiet neighborhood. Call 355-0355.
IS II mil vou can but jeeps for S14
through the US Government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312 742-1142 Ext. 5271-
,
CAN YOU BUY JIEPS, Cars, 4X4's
Seized in drug raids for under $100.00
Call tor tacts todayd. 602-837-3401. P.t.
711
FOR RENT � Two bedroom duples, car-
pet, stove, refrig. Walk to ECU Campus.
Avail now. 195.00mo. Lease. 752-5778.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED � Twin
Oaks, 2 bdr. 1 2 bath, 157.50 and 1 2 utili-
ties, 112 miles from campus, dishwasher,
pK)l, microwave, very nice, available July
or August, 757-0316.
1 R SA1 E Schwinn Cruiser Supreme 5
speed I ike New included is a Kryptonite RINGGOLD TOWERS � Apts. for rent
Security Lock $200.00 or best otter. Call Furnished. Contact 1 lollie Simonowich at
Karen al 758 2861
�75.1.7
52-2865.
RINGOI D rOWlRSCONDO� for sale.
B unit, 2nd floor, fully furnished. Ta
n irk�: valueS43,730.00. Make me an offer
919 787 1378.
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
THE NEW DELI WANTS YO'J to come
out and jam to the best music around.
Friday catch ROBERT KIRKLAND AND
Tl IE 11ANKS, and on Saturday don't miss
NOBLE SAVAGES.
Announcements
SUMMER LIBRARY HOURS CO-OP SUMMER FALL ATTENTION ALL IRATES
Mondays Fhursdavsfi i.m 11 iH) Three jobs Congressional Office,
p rn . Fridays 8 10 a.m 6:00p Satur Washington. DC une � August Salary;
days 9 lOa.m 6 lp.m Sundays 12 0 $1000.00 month. Student must have gen-
noon - 11:00 p.rri The Med i R - urces eraloffi skills and some experience with
Center will tx i �er M ndays - Thurs- word processing Short hand skills de
da-s i.rn � "� p.n Fridays8 � a.m sired Mso Tampa Electric Company,
5 D.m Saturdays 1 Onm - r�m fampa Fl rida. Pall semester Salary:
p m
Facult
to regisl
13 al - �
5K WALKRUN
stall and si tents an
' i i ural 5K run hine
� al E inti b Track
SI 135
once r
:
,tt
and
i Word processing
Na
HANG GLIDING
Lvervone is invited to register tor a
mmer hang gliding adventure trip to
s Head NC une 22 July 12
MINORITY ADU1 IS
ECU festin center is r ed ne mi-
v'r word processing experi-
i Will be expected to return
: I 89ifwi rk is satisfactory.
increase finally, Positions
availa the Nags Head area begin
I 1988 Salar) S4hour, 3O40
�available near worksite
S50 week Students must have 2.5
GPA. Will receive S500 scholarshipsti-
pend tor college exj crises when returning
ti s hi - �. the fall For all these positions,
. : R ith Peterson 757-6979, immedi-
� tsm r a plj tC op office,
2 28 G building
call
P
�I the test I
ng Center tr
57 6811
MHMRi
BACKPACKING
it 3 12 staff and students are invited
I tr a - mei Backpacking
ict th 22 ' � 2 IMemorialGym.
�r For more information call 757-6387.
Ultimate is not dead. CometJn down to
the bottom of the hill Tuesdays, Thurs-
days, and Sundays at 6:00 p.m. Get ready
to get horizontal. Anyone interested in
Fnsbce is welcome
SOFTBALL
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for intramural Softball June 29
at 4:00 p.m. in MG 102. For additional in-
formation call 757-6387.
CANOE OUTING
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for a canoe outing. June 22 - July
12 in 204 Memorial Gymnasium. For addi-
tional information, call 758-6387.
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid tor overseas education may apply for
a Rivers Scholarship. The next application
deadline is June 15,1988. For further infor-
mation contact the Office of International
Studies and Scholarships in the Gerneral
Classroom building, room 1002, 757-6769.
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2"Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent �
l iLRSin APARTMENTS
2899 r 3th Street
� Ixxjted Neai ECU
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
;mtet! Offer $275 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Wilkams.
756-7815 or 830-1437
Office open - Apt. 8,12 - 5 JO p m
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water anJ
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles on!v. $N5 a month, 6 month
teas. MOffil E I iOME RE.VI ALS � couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in A. ;a I
C'ardcns near Brook ViHey Country C lul
C ontact i T. or Tommv Williams
756-7815
Individimlrthoug
Like a circlein a rectangle, each of us nas
to be unique. Individual thought. FreedoN
of expression.
Express yourself in The East Carolinian.
Positions are now open for editors, staff
writers, production manager and layout
artists
The experience, the friends, they can't bj
beat.
Team e:
y today
SIT BACK
Youve just advertised in (illC tOSt (Earoltmatt
P2�
SAV-A-CENTER
DOUBLE COUPONS
On Manufacturer's Cents-Off Coupons. See Store For Details. Prices Effective Sun June 12
Thru Sat June 18,1988. Quantity Rights Reserved. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors
SHADY BROOK�HOTEL STYLE
Fresh Young
Turkey Breast
5-9 lb.
avg.
U.S.D.A. CHOICE GRAIN FED BONELESS
Chuck Shoulder
London Broil
1.99
JAMESTOWN
Sliced
Bacon
JAMESTOWN
Sliced
Bologna Pkg
99
99
CALIFORNIA
Red Flame
Seedless Grapes
High In
Vitamin C
PLUMP & JUICY
Carolina
Blueberries
pint
basket
1.59
LIMIT ONE WITH MO PURCHASE
Fab Laundry
Detergent
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Michelob 12
Beer
1.28
6.49
MTN. DEWcPEPSI FREE�REGULAR OR DIET
Pepsi
Cola
HOMOGENIZEDVITAMIN D
Silverbrook
Milk
Limit Two
With
10 Purchase
1.78
QUARTERS
Blue Bonnet
Margarine 1pk�gz
ALL VARIETIES
Banquet
Fried Chicken 2p8k�gz
39
2.69
SELECTED VARIETIES�STOUFFER'S
Lean
Cuisines 11r
1.49
IMPORTED
Danish Pork
Riblets
89
PERDUE GRADE 'A'
Fresh Chicken
Drumsticks or Thighs
LUSCIOUS JUICY�LARGE
Honeydew
Melons each
2.49
CONTAINS VITAMIN C�CALIK,
Black
Raspberries
1.99
PLUMP & JUIC
California
Red Plums
990
PREMIUM
California
Apricots
3APDE.N SiENCr STYLE " t:Ns'�
Del Monte 2
Vegetables
79
DELICIOUS
A&P Pork 3
& Beans
i
REGULAR OR BUTTER FLAv
Crisco
Shortening
Limit One With
10 Purchase
1.98
WHITE OR ASSORTED
Cottonelle
Bath Tissue
Limit One With
10 Purchase
4 roll
pkg.
MONEY
ORDERS
PRICES GOOD IN GREENVILLE, N.C
AT 703 GREENVILLE BLVD.
OPEN SUNDAY AT 7:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M.
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 7:00 A.M. - 12 MIDNIGHT
I HI
Mend
This is a picture from '
hit movies bcinu
4Star Trek: I
Shakespeare
LOS AN(
classical ad r
credits Shakesp
him on the
Enterprx
A year ag Si
asCapt. loarv!
Trek: The Next Genei
more familiar
and Paduar -
IGingons
was virtuall) a n
"The r
the 'Star Tre k
because of the actor's
youneverknow win
he says.
A friend asked St
some dramatic extract!
ary lecture at UCLA
audience was
who had been a pi
original "Star Trek
series and was ca;
Television's new
ries.
"Allegedly, he tui
wife and said. 'We haw
our captain -
"Well, it took six
got the role. I wenl
don and was h
revival of "Wh Afi
ginia Woolf intc
I had, 1 wouldn : �
returned to 1
and got an offer
"It surprised -
other offer I've h id
unusual tor an Er
involved in an Ami
ries. Certainly one
cult-Jike following
Trek
Stewart was vag
with Star Trek
watched it with
tween matinee and e e i
formances at
Shakespeare
The new Star k
launched last Sc
into orbit in the ratings I
Safan makcs
LOS ANGELES V i
poser Craig Safan was - 1
the nght sound to expi j
feeling oi NBC's Che i -
"One of the most
things a film composer doi
come up with a sound ter a
ect he said. "Every movi
television show sounds
After reading the first so j
'Cheers' the sound came to n
"1 said I wanted an instrui
that sounds like a bar
Burrows, who s the director
one of the executive prodti
suggested a clarinet. Then it cl
to me: Woody Allen playing
clarinet at 3 a.m. in a bad ban. J
not slick. They're not tryirJ
impress anyone. It's just Wcj
Allen and a few guvs plaj
because thev love to play'
Safan writes the backgrd
music for "Cheers He didf
write the theme song that
the show.
"We do the music for 'Choc:
a studio said Safan. "I pla
piano
Safan has composed the thl





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THE EAST CAROI INI AN
Features
JUNE 15,1988 Page 7
Mendenhall movies are summer highlights
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Stiff Writer
Movie madness continues at
Mendenhall during the summer
sessions. Scheduled so far are four
outstanding films.
"The Lost Boys" started off the
madness Monday. The movie,
played by a cast of unknows,
portrays a single woman and her
two teenage sons who are making
a new life for themselves with
their bizarre grandfather in a
modern coastal town.
The four of them, along with a
pair of pint-size mercenaries from
a comic book store, fight for their
lives against a coven of vampires
who dispel many beliefs about
their classical counterparts. Aside
from the trite humor and melo-
drama, the film is well worth see-
ing.
The terror continues on June 20
with "The Shining a classical
horror film based on the story
written by Stephen King in his
pre-hack days, when his material
was worth reading. Starring Jack
Nicholson and Shelley Duvall,
two actors who have never played
a bad role, it is a definite must-see
for fans of gothic horror.
"The Secret of My Success a
critically acclaimed film starring
Michael J. Fox, shows on June 25.
It is about a young man who seeks
his fortune in New York through
the most unconventional meth-
ods ever conceived.
On his way top the top, he is
caught in a quadrangle of love,
the chaos of the ci ty, and a danger-
ous double-identity. With its in-
tricately interwoven plotlines and
hilarious incidents, this film is,
perhaps, the comedy of the dec-
ade.
Showing on July 11 is "Jagged
Edge starring Jeff Bridges and
Glenn Close. It is a gripping
drama about a man accused of
brutally murdering his wife.
This film has everything: ro-
mance, action, humor, and a sur-
prise ending whose startling ef-
fect is second only to "Angel
Heart It is well written, convinc-
ingly portrayed, and marvelously
produced.
These four films represent a
cross-section of the best movies of
the decade, and are well worth
seeing. Showings are at Hendrcx
Theater at 9 p.m. on their
respective dates, and admission is
free to all ECU students with
current activity stickers.
Chapman's debut album proves her to be the
best new artist for 1988 9 and possibly beyond
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Writer
This is a picture from "Jagged Edge a movie starring Glenn Close and Jeff Bridges. It is only one of the
hit movies being shown at Mendenhall this summer.
'Star TrekiTNG' captain more familiar with
Shakespearean roles than starship command
LOS ANGELES (AD � British
classical actor Patrick Stewart
credits Shakespeare with putting
him on the bridge of the Starship
Enterprise.
A year ago, Stewart, who stars
as Capt. Jean-Luc Picard on "Star
Trek: The Next Generation was
more familiar with Richard III
and Paduans than Mr. Spock and
Klingons. "Beam me up Scotty
was virtually a mystery.
"The role has made me part of
the 'Star Trek' legend, and it's
because of the actor's adage that
vou never know who's out there
he savs.
A friend asked Stewart to read
some dramatic extracts at a liter-
ary lecture at UCLA, and in the
audience was Robert Justman,
third-highest rated syndicated
show, behind "Wheel of Fortune"
and "Jeopardy The original se-
ries, which ran three years on
NBC in the 1960s, is frequently the
highest-rated off-network syndi-
cated show. The four "Star Trek"
movies have taken in nearly $350
million. Nearly four million vide-
ocassettes of the series episodes
and the movies have been sold.
On a recent visit to a television
festival in Cannes, France, he
learned the show's power. "I was
entirely unknown in the city he
says. "But onejpight I went with
many others to visit the American
aircraft carrier Eisenhower. I was
immediately recognized by a
young officer. I was soon sur-
rounded by crewmen. They had
weaving sheds in the bottom and
sheep on the hills he says.
"When I was 121 started spending
my evenings rehearsing and per-
forming. Nobody thought it
unusual. It didn't become
unusual until I turned profes-
sional
After he was cast as the captain
of the new Enterprise, a lot of
discussion went into how he
should sound. He experimented
with various accents, finallv set-
tling on a standard Enlish accent.
'We continue to have disagree-
ments about how certain words
arc pronounced he says.
"I'm the director of a teaching
group at Santa Barbara and I fre-
l, u V T(7� " , y , '� -V quently hear student actors say
who had been a producer ot the all seen the show in Virginia and thcy should U5C a Brjtjsh
tar thcir families scnt thcm forShakcspcare.Ipointoutthatin
ong
scries and was casting Paramount
Television's new syndicated sc-
ries.
"Allegedly, he turned to his
wife and saidWe have just found
our captain Stewart says.
"Well, it took six months before I
got the role. 1 went back to Lon-
don and was hoping to take a
revival of 'Who's Afraid of Vir-
ginia Woolf into the West End. If
1 had, I wouldn't be here today. I
returned to Los Angeles to read
and got an offer
ipes.
was an overwhelming experi-
ence
Prior to "Star Tek Stewart wj -
relatively unknown in this coun-
trv. He was in the movies "Excali-
bur" and "Dune" and the TV
miniseries "1, Claudius Fie
played Karla, the head of the KGB
in the miniseries based on two
John LeCarre novels, "Smiley's
People" and "Tinker, Tailor,
Spy Most of his acting experi-
ence, however, has been on the
stage. He is particularly associ-
Shakespeare's time the accent
was close to today's American
accent
Pickin'the Bones "
album comes through her guitar tune Was having mountains o'
strumming and low-key vocals, nothing at birth
not by hysterical yelling and re- It's amazing how much opti-
Okay. She looks and sounds corded whining. mism she retains in songs like
like Joan Armatrading. She writes Chapman is a sure bet for Best "Fast Car" and "Across the Lines"
lyrics like (dare we compare?) New Artist of 1988, if critics de- considering how depressing the
Dylan, and plays guitar just like cide her unashamed folk singer topicsare. But especially in "Car
that Vega woman. So how much image is more happening than she keeps looking forward,
of Tracy Chapman's debut album Terrence Trent's delusions of While her social and political
is uniquely her Princehood. songs ARE entertaining, her
Well, I think the essential Tracy The album is cut after cut of strength lies in her ballads.
is her ability to write and play simple pleasures. From the single They're filled with social rele-
songs about social and personal "Fast Car" to the commercially vance anyway. But "Baby Can I
topics and make them entertain- unplayable 'Talkin' Bout a Revo- Hold You" and "For My Lover"
ing stories. Let's face it, shit like lution every song showcases her show where the real problems are
"Born in a Paranoid, Militarily- talent. - love, lust and all their accompa-
Obsessed Country" may have a The best song on the Lp is with-
message, but it's boring. out a doubt, "For My Lover Her
And I can't see Tracy agonizing voice surges every time she re-
over the "identity" of her song's peats the lines 'Two weeks in a
characters in an interview like the Virginia jailFor my lover20,000
Blue Jean God. I think Tracy dollar bailFor my lover but she
probably puts herself in every holds back until the last refrain,
song. Then she lets loose. If s not a
She may not live every expert- violent explosion, but her voice
ence she sings, but you can tell and her guitar subtly let you
she's lived all the emotions be- know this is the climax you've
hind them. They aren't your basic been listening for. A few more
Debbie'T write about my big songs like this, and MTV will shut
sister's boyfriends, since my par- down.
ents control me way too much for
me to have a life of my own" "Mountains o'Things" is a wry
Gibson emotions either. tune concerning all things yup-
They're more like journalistic pie. It also manages to sideswipe
observations of fucked-up love religion and snobbery along the
affairs, family responsibilities way. Especially amusing is the
and prejudice. The feeling in the line 'Those whose sole misfor-
nying obsessions.
I haven't seen a bad review for
this album yet. I can't see how
there could be, unless the re-
viewer owned a lot of Rick Astley
12-inch singles. The only criticism
raised has been that Chapman
jumped on the folk bandwagon
after Suzanne Vega's success last
year with "Luka
Well, there are worse band wag-
ons to ride on. And "Woman With
a Guitar" hasn't exactly become a
cliche yet.
It probably will be soon. But as
these neo-Chapmans and Vegas
flood the nightclubs, I'll just save
my money and sit home with this
Lp. And wait for her next one
"It surprised me more than any ated with the Royal Shakespeare
other offer I've had. I thought it Co.
unusual for an English actor to be
involved in an American TV se-
ries. Certainly one with a large
cult-Jike following like 'Star
Trek
Stewart was vaguely familiar
with "Star Trek He sometimes
watched it with his children be-
tween matinee and evening per
formances at the
Shakespeare Theater
The new "Star Trek" series,
launched last September, blasted
into orbit in the ratings. It's the
He also taches at the University
of California at Santa Barbara.
Stewart's wife, Sheila Falconer,
is a choreographer who staged
"The Wizard of Oz" in London. A
son is a student at the California
Institute for the Arts. A daughter
is in school in England.
He grew up in Yorkshire, in a
Royal town called Mirfield, which sup-
ports 12 drama clubs with a popu-
Sir Bonehead goes on a quest for six
impossible things to do before breakfast
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Staff Qucatcr
art school theater department,
women's studies stair and the
East Carolinian advertising de-
partment like me so much they all
would send me lots of gifts.
I set about at once. Marrying
lation of 11,000.
"It was a typical mill town with
Safari makes 'Cheers' music
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Com- music for ABC's "Supercarner '
poser Craig Safan was looking for and "Amazing Stories He wrote
the right sound to express the music for such TV movies as
feeling of NBC's "Cheers "Samaritan: The Mitch Snyder
"One of the most important Story "Timeslalkcrs" and "Get-
things a film composer does is ting Married and more recently
come up with a sound for a proj- the theatrical feature "Stand and
ect he said. "Every movie and Deliver
television show sounds different.
After reading the first script of
'Cheers' the sound came to me.
"I said I wanted an instrument
that sounds like a bar. Jimmy
Burrows, who's the director and
one of the executive producers
suggested a clarinet. Then it came
to me: Woody Allen playing the
clarinet at 3 a.m. in a bad band. It's
not slick. They're not trying to
impress anyone. It's just Woody JJSJJfjg
Allen and a few guys playing
because they love to play
Safan writes the background
music for "Cheers He did not
write the theme song that opens
the show.
"We do the music for 'Cheers' at
a studio said Safan. "I play the
You can't write about it unless
you live it first So, in order to
provide you, the reader, with
some humor and enlightenment Ms. Burstyn was probablythe
this week, I went on a quest. easiest thing. She'd heard of me
This is the story of that quest. It and all it took was a phone call
is called, apprpriately "The Quest from my good friend Aim Jiltian
for Six Impossible Things To Do to set us up.
Before Breakfast The title, for The marriage was finished by
the unread in the audience, comes 10 am I was getting hungry, but I
uncontrollably and the computer
nerd in the second row started
' I slipped out among the com-
motion and headed for my next
feat
other two "doo-wah'd" in the
background.
On the second floor, I found a
large Garfield� stuck to the win-
dow by those little suction cups
Although I was nearly faint from
I met Youcia, Chance and Tow- hunger, I managed to violate that
anda in Farm Fresh. Yo-Yo was
all she had to do was sing, and I
wasn't from Dance Party USA.
� The other two were eager to go,
so we bought them some match-
little stuffed pussy cat in 36 differ
ent ways, 10 of which are cur-i
rently unknown to mankind,
even Mickey Rourke
The girls sang an upbeat dance
number about my latest triumph,
est teat before breakfast.
Summoning all the various
department heads of all the
groups that hate me so incredibly
much to the conference room of
Ordinarilv, Safan records most
of his music in the little studio in
the converted garage behind his
home. He works primarily with
electronics, but may find a tune in
anything from a plastic water
bottle to his son's xylophone.
from one of the incredibly helpful resolved not to eat until ML w? " sePxed into a ballad about
and informative books in the tasks were completed. But the to Zg!5f �? what was to be my last and great
"Hitchiker's Guide To The Gal- nine months neccesary for the talSSf? f? ?Ut
axy" series. gestation of our child was u tohttWadKWia.Theaonghada
Somewhere in there it says that hard part. 'rSSf611
if you've done six impossible Luckily, a head appeared on the lTOfyPwlwiO
things before breakfast, why not wall of the chapel as we walked ty l f �venous. "ten
ftop it off with dinner at the Res- out It said that he wastheCod of ,�J' : Mendenhall, I asked them nicely
taurant at the End of the Universe, contrived plot devices, and he �fc � � NlS� WH5$m. to be my friends. Many blunt ob-
Having always wanted to hang would be glad to slip Ellen fc$St4 her oil the cheek �d tok jects sailed across the room, and
out at such a happening place, I through a little time warp and get htxT&Hty iofce twmeeafff.The Yo-Yo, ran out, screaming into the
figured I'd do the Six Impossible her back by about noon. g�l Wfa& fcsawnfttg and then late afternoon.
Things, and some way or another I thanked him for the favor and � about the Joys of father- Chance and Towanda stuck by
I'd get to the End of the Universe, jetted back to the Emerald City to aood and the impending doom me, and sang a ditty about my
So, before breakfast, I made a start working on my next thing. about to be visited upon the vile courage in facing such over-
list of what had to be the most I got to class two minutes late, banking establishment whelming odds alone. But I had
impossible tasks I could perform. This in itself was enough to en- IkiiewttiwiAItakealongtime an ace up my sleeve
Although daunting, the list rage my prof. But I needed gpn fc pertonally biff everyone who I told the garnered Anti-Boners
helped me focus on the job ahead, hopping and skipping about m a worked Mt 1$aehw4a �pe that my infamy was all a sham. I
1) Marry Ellen Burstyn so that jolly manner. ; dairy since feefer me Awe In
we could have a kid and name it I sent many mental commands GW vflte atone. But I had allot-
"Nuts or "Cherry to hinvbut he shrugged them off. ted an hour and a half for it
piano.
Safan has composed the theme
mimic sounds. I used a water
bottle for a conga. I recorded it
and played it back
through the computer. The guiro
is a gourd with little ridges you
sera pe wi th a piece of wood. I took
a lag bolt and scaped wood along
the threads and recorded it digi-
tally in the Synclavier. You can
record every possible sound into
the computer. That's how you
turn a lag bolt into a percussion
instrument
2) Drive my teacher so insane Finally, I nesortecMO t� lia
that he would begin dancing honored trick of staring Steadily
around the class singing, "What a at the clock for the next 30 min-
ium, what a cut, stick a finger up utes.
your butt" in a loud grating voice. Unable to cope with the fact that
3) Hire three black girls to walk hecould ru)tholdmyatte�tion,he
around with me andsing about started gibbering wildly, Now,
my Bfe as crucial events occurred, with his mental defenses down, tl
hist like in "Little Shop of Hor- was easy to hypnotise
rors started dancing, and
4) Biff the entire staff of around the podium.
Wachovia� upside the head. He began singjng, and
5) Rape and otherwise degrade hi aims up and "
perfectly innocent stuffed ani- students, &t(jj
nnal belonging to a fat girl.
Andnumhprsixwat-MaVh, horror. One
car waa about to be towed
told them I spent many nights
reading poetry, that I owned a
black Siouxie and the Banshees
tee shirt, that I felt Sylvia Platri
ZS aauLZ goddess and that ALF was
���M?t? Weed a bastion for intellectual
entranced bjr the gprw nee- hanatm
They believed me, and show
ered me with money and gifts.
So, laden with cash (and a two
for one coupon for the Restaurant
at the End of the Universe�a gift
fromd�ArtSchoolIthink)Itook
Charke and Towanda to the Res-
taurant for a much needed
branch. Ellen met us there, and a
Mod time was had by all. And all
faore breakfast Imagine that





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IUNE15, 1Q88
The
East Carolinia
equired reading
for the serious student
VILLAGE
Donna
Edwards
owner
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Overkill
Bv FREIDRIC1
. j
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ui-CM vij Vftftomtr .An Sjjj rv-QW. j �ajE
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Arm Fall-Off Boy
Master of the Page TheLyi
ATTHCLO&SHMUT, I6UAMA BOY
HAS ABUS!
J�fT US A NCT&!
by Racer X
VIHO'S VOLDMps
&Jj
VILLAINS Of LITTLE
OK NO PQveZS
Vootie, loyal Fun-N-Gamcs readers. Yes, there's another stupid greeting because noone will send me
in any better ones. You'll notice that the column grew a little. Perhaps we will recapture the former
glory of having a whole page during the summer! Naahhh.
Anyway, we are in for more Armless adventures, bigger than usual! How about that. And you don't
pay a damn thing for all this, you lucky souls. Racer X works his fingers to the bone, and who
appreciates this? Why, the Arm Fall-Off Boy Fan Club of course!
Many of the members have recieved their first club newsletter, and this week we are running an
updated roll call for those members who have recently joined. The first meeting of the fan club will be
announced soon, during which many important decisions will be made. Or at least the membership will
get soused.
Hopefully talks will begin soon with WZMB about producing the proposed Arm Fall-Off Boy radio
show, making Arm our first bi-media hero. The membership is going to have get behind this, however,
to keep up the quality that makes Arm the legend he is. Anyone who wishes to join this prestigious
organization, drop off a dollar with your name and phone number attached at the East Carolinian, in
care of Jeff Parker. And now, the updated roll call. Vootie.
M6ANUHIL6, AT TH� HlD&eM I
'HA-HA f IN A ftW HOURS
rfc� MIL &ABLS TO teSTRW
THE LOSS H OUR tR5At
, eN�AieSf(ev�hJ THOUOH
' TH�i P0? 'NOM US') ?
V
V
The updated
Arm Fall-Off Boy Fan Club
Summer 1988
Official Lackeys
Paul Dunn Sven VanBaars
Alex Maiola Jon Jordan
Racer X -Creator Stacy Hickman Jennifer Pearson
Allan Guy Earlvis Hampton
Doug Johnson
Steve Reid
McKay Sundwall
Micah Harris
Tom Gurganus
Carol Wetherington
Jennifer Vandenburg
Sharon Goodwin
Mur

Clemens
Roger CU n
and in the
Clemc -
Award w
and nine m
as the Yanke -
ton Red Sv I!
e of the 15
ball s
lack Clark - �
"
Uw Mast, said
who d cm Mod -
had three RBI
:
: � �
Padres
coach i
Th. -

McK�
word- a '
deeds
!u n I ai:
manager c
wore I i
behind I
the National 11
McKc
general n
si no. I -
the Padres w i!
first
The Padi -
Ihree-game sw
over the week�
torvewrt; .
'





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� J �V'
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vf�� flrOHU INTO
A TRAP
Gurganus
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tifer Vandenburg
ron Goodwin

THE EASTCAROl INI AN
Sports
JUNE 15, 1988 Page 9
Murphy touted as a defensive specialist
By PAUL DUNN
SportiWriler
Augusl,14,1966 will go down in
the history books at East Carolina
University. Kenny "Special-K"
Murphy was the first born boy of
Ann.j R. Murphy. Twenty-one
years later, Kenny was to walk
onto the ECU court and catch the
attention of Coach Mike Steele.
Kenny received a challenge in
his 11 th grade of high school that
would change his direction in life
and thus greatly benefit the
basketball program and
University at East Carolina.
Peer pressure from one of
Kenny's "homeboys" set up the
competition for the two young
men to try out for the Northern
Durham High School basketball
team. (Durham, N.C.) After much
hard work and struggle, Kenny
made the team by filling in the
13th and final spot. Kenny, not
only, met the challenge by making
the team, but his friend got cut
after the first practice.
Kenny stated, "Looking back, I
really owe that guy a 'thank you'
because I would have never tried
out for the team without his
nagging. I didn't think I was good
enough. I was only 5'6" in the 10th
grade but I gained a little more
confidence in the 11 th grade when
I grew 8" in less than a year
Near the end of his senior year,
Kenny received another big
challenge in his basketball career.
The starling point guard had been
injured and Kenny was required
to step in and fill the position. He
averaged six points and six assists
per game and dominated the
defensive end for his high school
team.
Murphy, by his own admission,
didn't turn many heads in high
school.
The senior season was coming
to an end and it was time to make
a choice concerning his college
plans. Murphy chose to attend
college at A&T.
Murphy stated, "I was going to
try and walk on to the team but
then being a freshman, I was
hesitant. I decided I would wait a
year and play intramurals
instead Murphy's team lost only
one game that season, and that
was the championship game.
After a short stay at A&T,
Murphy decided it just wasn't the
place for him. His college road
would now lead him to East
Carolina.
Murphy said, "I chose ECU
because someone from A&T had
told me that they (ECU) had a J.V.
team. I was going to play that for
a year then hopefully play with
the big boys. I guess they fooled
me about the J.V. team Murphy
also said, "I had heard that ECU
was a really good school
academically
After becoming a student and
finding out that there wasn't a JV
program at ECU, Murphy
thought his chances of playing
college ball were over. Murphy
commented, "I never dreamed I
would now be playing basketball
for ECU
Feeling a bit awkward about the
mistake of the plan he had laid
out, he decided to return to the
intramural program. Murphy
organized his team, "Get Fresh
Crew" and helped lead them to
two consecutive All-Campus
ECU Intramural Championships.
Blue Edwards (senior, ECU
Basketball) approached Murphy
a while back and told him that a
new coach was coming, Mike
Steele, and that he should try out
fcr the team as a walk-on.
Murphy s?.id, "I decided to give
it a try. I was a nervous wreck, at
first, until Coach Dan Bell
(Assistant Coach) told me to chill
out. Coach Bell came to me later
and told me again to relax because
I was going to be part of the team.
I couldn't wait to call my mother
and tell her the news. I owe it all to
my mother. I LOVE THAT
LADY
Murphy also stated "My entire
family has been supportive & the
coaching staff is like my second
family. Coach Steele is a tough but
caring man. With him, you get the
entire package. He wants you to
Clemens stunned by NY Yanks
The New York Yankees beat
Roger Clemens on the ground
and in the air.
Clemens, a two-time Cy Young
Award winner, gave up 15 hits
and nine runs, both career highs,
as the Yankees defeated the Bos-
ton Red Sox 12-6 Monday night.
Nine of the 15 hits were ground-
ball singles. Clemens also gave up
Jack Clark's three-run homer.
"We got bloops, choppers and
�. tUe blast said Dave Winfieid,
who doubled, singled twice and
had three RBI. "Maybe he was
missing one mile-an-hour on his
fastball. Those things happen, but
he's still the best pitcher in the
league
Elsewhere, it was Baltimore 6,
Detroit 4; Cleveland 8, Toronto 6;
Chicago 4, Minnesota 1; Milwau-
kee 3, Seattle 1, and Kansas City 5,
California 3.
Clemens started the game with
a league-leading 1.82 earned run
average and left with a 2.37 mark.
He struck out five, raising his
major league-leading total to 140.
It was the right-hander's third
consecutive home loss.
'The guys scored some runs. I
just didn't do my job siad Qe-
YTiefis, who pitched 6 2-3trtnings.
"I didn't have velocity, move-
ment or location. Those are three
things needed to win
Rafael Santana led an 18-hit at-
tack with three singles and his
second homer, a three-run shot in
the ninth. Jose Cruz and Claudcll
Washington had three hits each.
Okay, let's face it. Summer school is a pain. You know it. I know it. And fortunately for us, the Intramura.
Recreations Service (IRS) knows it, too That's why they have slated an exciting and fun-filled variety of
events for the up-coming summer session.
You can choose from any of the following events:
EVENT REGISTRATION DATES
Softball June 29,4pm
Co-Rec Water Polo July 6,4pm
Golf Classic July 11,4pm
Freethrow Contest July 18,4pm
5k WalkRun July 20,4pm
The IRS will also offer students a chance to enjoy the great outdoors, sponsoring a backpacking excursion
(Registration June 22-July 5), a canoe outting (Registration June 22-July 12), and a hang gliding trip
(Registration June 22-Julyl2).
Registration for all of the events will be held in Memorial Gym 102.
For more information contact the IRS offices at 757-6443.
Padres doing good deeds, playing well for new head
coach and manager McKeon; 10 out of 16 games
The San Diego Padres can't
explain the difference since Jack
McKeon took over as manager in
words, so they're doing it in
deeds.
When Larry Bowa was fired as
manager on May 28, the Padres
were 16-30 and 11 12 games
behind first-place Los Angeles in
the National League West.
McKeon, who also is the team's
general manager, has won 10 of 16
since taking over and has moved
the Padres within eight games of
first.
The Padres followed their
three-game sweep of the Dodgers
over the weekend with a 7-3 vic-
tory over the San Francisco Giants
on Monday night at Jack Murphy
Stadium.
Mark Davis preserved Eric
Show's victory with his 10th save
in 10 opportunities and also hit a
two-run homer.
"I haven't changed my style
and the club hasn't changed since
Jack took over Davis said.
"Larry used me and Jack's using
me. Essentially that's all I ask.
We're just doing the little things
better
Elsewhere in the NL, it was
Pittsburgh 8, Chicago 0; Philadel-
phia 5, Montreal 2; Houston 6,
Atlanta 5; and New York 2, St.
Louis 1 in 12 innings. Los Angeles
and Cincinnati were not sched-
uled.
The Padres beat Mike Krukow
despite the right-hander's fifth
career homer, a one-out shot off
Show in the third. Show, 5-6,
pitched 7 2-3 innings and allowed
four hits before giving way to
Davis.
Leading 5-3 in thrt eighth, Tim
Flannery walked d two outs
later Davis hit his first major-
league homer.
With the score tied 2-2, Roberto
Alomar led off the bottom of the
third with his fifth homer. The
Padres added two more in the
fifth on Carmelo Martinez's two-
run double.
The Giants took a 1-0 lead in the
first on Will Clark's 16th homer,
but the Padres came back to take a
2-1 advantage in the second.
Keith Moreland, Martinez and
Flannery hit consecutive singles
for one run, and Martinez scored
the second run of the inning when
shortstop Matt Williams bobbled
Dickie Thon's grounder.
Pirates 8, Cubs 0
Bob Walk continued his pitch-
ing mastery over Chicago and
Bobby Bonilla and Barry Bonds
each hit their 14th home run as
Pittsburgh defeated the Cubs at
Wrigley Field.
Walk, 7-4, pitched his first
complete game and shutout of the
season despite a 15-mph wind
blowing out. He allowed eight
hits, struck out five and walked
four.
Phillies 5, Expos 2
Chris James, Luis Guayo and
Mike Young each hit solo home
runs as Philadelphia beat Mon-
treal at Veterans Stadium and
snapped the Expos' four-game
winning streak.
Shane Rawley, 5-6, pitched a
seven-hitter and struck out seven.
Hubie Brooks had three hits for
the Expos, including the 1,000th
of his career.
Astros 6, Braves 5
Denny Walling's eighth-inning
single scored Kevin Bass from
second base to break a 5-5 tie as
Houston beat Atlanta at the As-
trodome.
Juan Agosto, 3-0, got the victory
with one inning of relief. Nolan
Ryan started for the Astros and
struck out eight in seven innings
Jo regain the NL lead from team-
mate Mike Scott. Ryan has 97 and
Scott is second with 96.
Mets 2, Cardinals 1
Switch-hitter Lee Mazzilli
broke an 0-for-13 slump as a right-
handed hitter when he singled
home the winning run in the 12
inning to lift New York over visit-
ing St. Louis and snap the Mets'
five-game losing streak.
Mazzilli bounced a single over
charging third baseman Tom
Lawless that easily scored How-
ard Johnson from second base
with none out.
Starter Larry McWilliams of the
Cardinals and David Cone of the
Mets were brilliant, yet neither
got a decision. Cone and winner
Rany Myers combined to hold the
Cardinals to just one hit.
excel academically as well as
athletically
"Winning the CAA
Championship is the team goal,
and my personal goal is to be the
best defensive player on the
team stated Murphy.
The 6-3,170 lb. senior forward is
excited about the 1988-89 season.
The one game he can not wait to
play is the home game this season
against James Madison. "I
especially want that game
becair of lefty Driesell. That
man w i ten k k king a job, said he
didn t want to come to ECU
because we wouldn't leave the
"too strong" CAA Conference.
Now the man has gone to James
Madison, which is in the same
conference. That night is going to
be even more special for the fans
Murphy said, "t knew I could
play, but I didn't know I could
start. Now, I have earned a
scnolarshipand that will help out
me and my family. Mom told me
to never give up. She said as long
as I try as hard as I can and put
forth my best effort, good things
will happen
Wallace takes
Riverside win
DAYTONA BEACH, Ha. (A
� Rusty Wallace used his victory
in Sunday's stock-car race at Riv-
erside (Calif.) International Race-
way to ease past Dale Earnhardt
and take a four-point lead in the
NASCAR Winston Cup stand-
ings.
Wallace's edge, 1790-1786, is
the closest in NASCAR history
after the first 12 races of a season.
Previously, that distinction had
belonged to Bobby Allison's 30-
poini lead over Darrell Waltrip
after the first dozen runs in 1979.
"The lead is the lead, and it sure
beats anything else there is
Wallace said after Sunday's
Budweiser 400. "But as close as it
is, it's not going to change our
strategy by any means. Look what
happened in 1979
Richard Petty, who trailed by
199 pointsafter the first 12 racesof
the 1979 season, came back to win
the Winston Cup championship
that season. This year, six drivers
are within 182 points of first place.
Terry Labonte moved into the
third in the Winston Cup stand-
ings with 1,702 points, followed
byBillP'i, rt 56;St '
lin, l,b7; Allison, l,ouo, Ken
Schrader, 1,531; Bobby Hillin,
1,478; Geoff Bodine, 1,474; and
Phil Parsons. 1 46Q.
The Sunday victory was
Wallace's first of the year and
made him the ninth different win-
ner this season. The modem day
Winston Cup record is 13 differ-
ent winners in a season, while the
all-time record is 16 different win-
ners.
Labonte leads the circuit in
money-winnings with $476,910,
followed by Earnhardt ($433,895);
Davey Allison ($405,375); Bobbv
Allison ($398,990); Elliott
($323,525); Waltrip ($316,360);
Marlin ($267,475); Neil Bonnett
($256, 710); and Pasons
($250,760).
The tour next moves to Pocono
(Pa.) International Raceway for
Sunday's 500-mile run. Qualify-
ing for the 500-mile race at the 25-
mile triangular-shaped track is
scheduled Friday.
Following Pocono, the Winston
Cup teams move to Michigan In-
ternational Speedway for a 400
miler, then to Daytona Interna-
tional Speedway for the Fire-
cracker 400.
Sunday's race in Pocono will be
sponsored by Miller High Life.
Hornets win toss to assure getting 8th pick
NEW YORK (AP) � The Char-
lotte Hornets selected the eighth
pick in the regular NBA draft June
28 by winning a coin toss at the
commissioner's office Monday.
The Miami Heat, losers in the
coin flip, will pick first in the ex-
pansion draft and ninth in the
regular draft.
As the winner of the toss, Char-
lotte had the option of the eighth
pick in the college draft or No. 1
choice in the expansion draft.
Hornet vice president and gen-
eral manager Carl Scheer said the
decision was influenced by their
philosophy to "build a young
team through the college draft
The ceremony, which took
under two minutes, was decid-
edly downscale in comparison to
the NBA draft and draft lottery,
which are broadcast live on televi-
sion. Miami Heat managing part-
ner Lewis Schaffel explained the
lack of hype by comparing the
coin toss to the lotteries which de-
termined the rights to Patrick
Ewing and David Robinson.
The first seven picks for the
college draft were determined
May 21 by a lottery among the
teams that didn't make the play-
offs. After Charlotte and Miami,
the 10th through 25th choices will
be made in reverse order of the
teams' regular-season records.





10
TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
IUNE15.1988
Williams short of 20
player of the year in North Caro-
lina last season, averaged 31
points and 12 rebounds.
Williams's troubles in the class-
room began in his sophomore
year at Northeastern. He decided
to transfer to Fork Union Military
Academy in Virginia for his junior
year, saying the disciplined at-
moshpere would improve his
study habits.
Officials said Williams did
improve in prep school, but his
performance slipped when he
returned to Elizabeth City for his
senior year.
Williams has been trying un-
successfully to reach 700 on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test � the
minimum score for freshman eli-
gibility in college as set by the
NCAA. North Carolina Coach
Dean Smith has said he would ask
the UNC Board of Admissions to
admit Williams as an exception if
the recruit failed to make the 700
score.
W1NSTON-SALEM (AP) �
Kenny Williams, this year's top
basketball recruit at North Caro-
lina, did not graduate last week
with his high school class.
Williams, a 6-9 forward from
Elizabeth City, did not have the 20
credits required for graduation by
the North Carolina Board of Edu-
cation and is considered to still be
a senior at Northeastern High
School.
Carl Harris, basketball coach at
Northeastern, said, "Kenny did
not meet the criteria for gradu-
ation. He came close, but he just
didn't have enough credits
Harris said he could not say
how much work Williams needs
to earn a diploma. The Williams
family has asked that no other
information be released, Harris
said.
Harris said published reports
that Williams failed the state corn-
potency test required for gradu-
ation were not true.
Williams, The Associated Tress
Brown leaves Kansas to take
head coach postion for Spurs
LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) - statement released through the
Larry Brown has resigned as school's sports information office.
Kansas basketball coach to be- "And it was a very difficult dcci-
come head coach of the San Anto- sion to leave. I can't believe that
nio Spurs of the NBA, the univer- �Y collc8c coach in thc country
sitv announced Monday. has a bcttcr situation than I did at
Brown, 47, guided the fay- KU- And lm S?"1' �� ?
hawks to thc NCAA college bas-
ketball championship this past
season.
Media reports in San Antonio
have said Brown was offered a
S3.5 million, five-year contract.
"Kansas has been a very special
place to inc Brown said in a
and the chancellor for that
'The offer at San Antonio was
simply a once-in-a-lifctime op-
portunity which I couldn't turn
down Brown said in the state-
ment.
Chaney named as head coach
of NBA fs Houston Rockets
HOUSTON (AP) � Don
Chaney, chosen for his ability to
communicate with his players,
was named head coach of the
1 louston Rockets on Monday.
Chaney, a former University of
Rouge, La. to team with Elvin
Haves and lead the Houston Cou-
J
gars to the NCAA College Einal
Four two straight vears, the last in
1968.
Chancy played for the Boston
Celtics in the NBA and was head
Houston player and former head
coach of the Los Angeles Clip- coachof the Los Angeles Clippers
was the early favorite to and had two assistant coach as-
pers,
replace Bill Fitch, fired June 6 after
five seasons with thc Rockets.
"It's a dream come true
Chaney said.
Rockets general manager Ray
Patterson said Chaney had the
qualities to fit the Rockets' needs.
Chaney, the eighth coach in the
21-year history of the franchise,
signed a multi-year contract.
Chanev rame out of Baton
signments with the Detroit Pis-
tons and this season with the At-
lanta Hawks.
The Rockets hope Chaney's
skills as a communicator will
soothe angry feelings created by
last season's turmoil.
The Rockets finished last season
with a 15-17 record over their final
32 games and lost three of four
games to the Dallas Mavericks
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two, three, & four year medical scholarships. These
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Applications for scholarships are accepted each fall.
To learn more about Navy medical scholarships, with
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Read The East Carolinian
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 15, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 15, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.611
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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