The East Carolinian, June 8, 1988






:OMING NEXT WEEK:
A look into the new building signs.
FEATURES
A review of Rambo III, see page 7.
SPORTS
'88 - '89 Pitate hoopsters look tough, see page 9.
albe
(Tarultnian
Vol.63 No. 4
Wednesday, June 8,1988
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Greenville, NC
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Sports Medicine complex to better programs
By JOE HARRIS
Assistant New Editor
The ECU Sports Medicine
Physical Education Complex is
going to be the newest, most
modem, and best equipped facil-
ity in the state, if not the country.
This latest edition to ECU will
be a three-story, 82,000 square
foot building which will house
even department in the sports
medicine and physical education
programs. The new building will
provide for more classroom space
in Minges Coliseum because fac-
ultv offices will be moved next
door.
Rod Compton, Director of
Sports Medicine, said, "This is not
a football facility for Art Baker and
the Pirates, even though many
people think like that. The facility
will house the perfect marriage
between academics and athletes
He also said that ECU can now
offer a masters in sports medicine
because of the new building and
expansion of the sports medicine
program.
The first floor of the complex
will be geared mainly towards
ECU athletic teams. It will contain
men's and women's locker rooms.
equipment rooms, the weight
training facility, team examina-
tion rooms, and therapy rooms.
Also 18-19 pre-game taping sta-
tions, as opposed to eight now in
Scales Fieldhousc, will be built.
Highlighting the first floor will
be the hydro therapy room. This
particular room will house several
whirlpools and an 'Aqua Art a
seven-foot-decp pool for athletes
who have injuries that will not
allow them to walk. When using
this, athletes are strapped in a
harness, which is secured to the
four walls of the tank. While sus-
pended in the water, they can
then work on injuries without
putting pressure on the disabled
limb.
Also on the ground floor will be
a hot and cold treatment rooms,
electro-stimulation therapy, and a
office which can be used for ear,
nose and throath examination.
The distinct feature about the
therapy rooms is a glass cubicle
from which an operator can con-
trol everything occuring in the
area. In case of emergency all the
machines can be turned off at
once, as opposed to fumbling
around for the right switch.
Located on the second floor will
be coaches offices, academic
counseling, classrooms, a com-
puter lab, and the Letterman
Lounge. There are four amphi-
theater style classrooms which
scat 160 people. Each room is di-
vided by a partition. When the
partition is removed, the classes
become two large rooms, seating
80 people each. The Letterman
Lounge, which is used for recruit-
ing purposes, will seat 90-100
people.
Offices of athletic administra-
tion, external affairs, public rela-
tions, and the sports information
director will be on the third floor.
The human performance lab is
also c p the third floor. This labora-
tory is where underwater per-
formance, blood and pulmonary
testing will take place. Dr. Ken
Karr will head-up the bio-me-
chanical laboratory where ath-
letes are video taped, then each
frame of the tape is broken down
and analyzed on a computer.
The sports medicine complex is
located between Minges Coli-
seum and the practice football
field. The structure will be brick
with plenty of window space.
Inside will be decorated in grays,
earth tones, and highlighted in
purple and gold. Landscaping, a
part of the near seven-million-
dollar budget, will surround the
complex with flowering shrub-
bery and trees.
Compton said, "In 98 percent of
colleges around the nation the
department of sports medicine
and physical education do not get
takes away from the other. Well,
here its different, we have always
cooperated with each other, and I
think being together will reinforce
this.
Since the building ran under
budget, the extra money was
spent on state-of-the-art equip-
ment. Many of the weight ma-
chines are computer operated and
controlled. The therapy rooms are
the most modern in the state and
probably the country.
The projected date of comple- Construction workers are pouring the foundation posts for the
tion is mid-summer 1989, just in Sports Medical Complex. The complex will hold 81,000 square
time for the fall sports season. feet of area. (Photo by Jon Jordan�Photolab)
ECU professor evaluates super summit
By TIM HAMPTON
Ncwi Editor
In the aftermath of the fourth
summit between Mikhail S. Gor-
bachev and President Reagan,
political scholars are assessing the
outcome of the Moscow summit.
An ECU political scientist on U.S
Soviet relations said while the
summit produced nothing new,
the meeting between the super-
powers did provide for improved
relations.
"I'd characterize the summit as
productive in establishing a more
normal business-like relationship
between the U.S. and the
U.S.S.R said Dr. Maurice Si-
mon, coordinator of ECU'S Office
of International Studies.
While the Moscow summit
didn't produce any new break
throughs in superpower bargain-
ing, Simon said "both sides estab-
lished a foundation of mutual
respect and prehaps even friendli-
ness which should carry over until
the end of next year
Before Reagan departed
Moscow for London last Wednes-
day, he said "we must not stop
here of the summit. Gorbachev,
the Soviet Communist Party Gen-
eral Secretary, said their meetings
were "a blow to the foundationsof
the Cold War
Simon said the latest summit
constrast to the 'new cold war' of
arms build up on both sides dur-
ing Reagan's first term. With the
ratification of the INF treaty and
the START agreement, which if
signed would reduce fifty percent
of the nuclear arsenals, Simon
feels Gorbachev and Reagan have
made moderate progress towards
ending the cold war.
But Simon said in order for the
START to reduce the build up of
arms, first the superpowers must
overcome several obstacles. He
said the START accords would
reach fruitation "if the many
complex and techinical issues in-
cluding verification, air and sea
cruise missiles and other matter
can be resolved
In the closing days of the Re-
agan adminstration, the
President's dreams for the sicnine
of START may come true, but if
Reagan doesn't sign the arms
treaty than Simon predicts the
next President will. Simon said
the accords would be completed
in the first 18 months of the next
U.S. adminstration because "Gor-
bachev and the new president will
want to keep up the momentum
and present new avenues to re-
ducing nuclear weapons
But Simon questions
Gorbachev's 'shakey7 future as a
Soviet leader. The upcoming June
conference of the Soviet party will
be crucial to Gorbachev's consoli-
dation of power, according to
Simon. He said the Soviet leader
will have to wheel his political
power to institute his economic
and social reforms.
On endeavors to bring to light
the issue of human rights, Reagan
visited with several religious
groups in the Soviet Union who
were disenchanted with the
country's lack of freedom. "The
Soviets fall short of Western stan-
dards on human rights Simon
said.
Athough Reagan has a built a
working relationship with the
Soviets in the recent years, the
President has not changed his
view that the U.S.S.R. is an adver-
sary of the U.S said Simon.
"While he still doesn't claim the
Soviets to be an evil empire he
said adding "the Soviets (to Re-
agan) are an adversary we must
have limited and growing coop-
eration with for common con-
cern
Projecting for the future, Si-
mon said he predicts that the
Soviets will pursue even closer
relations with Western Europe
and Japan on the coat tails of the
improved U.S. relations. Simon
predicts that theSo' iets will try to
break the silence I tween China
in improving relations with
the Asian country.
On the American end, the next
president will increase the
strengthen relations with the So-
viets and forge forth towards new
agreements.
Edgecombe withdraws site plan
By STEVE SOMMERS
Staff Writer
As a result of citizen and industrial pressures, the
Edgecombe County Board of Commissioners with-
drew their proposal to volunteer 3,000 acres of
Edgecombe County to the state for a waste manage-
ment park. The announcement was made before
what was initially a hostile crowd Monday night at
Edgecombe Community College.
The gathering of approximately 800 was at what
originally intended to be a public hearing on the
matter. Instead, the board's chairperson, Tom P.
Bardin jr. delivered a prepared speech including the
announcement of the withdraw.
Barden said the decision was greatly influenced by
a resolution issued by the Tarboro Edgecombe Asso-
ciation of Manufactures. The resolution, Bardin
explained to the disruptive audience, opposed
measures to place the waste management park in
Edgecombe and it also called for a referendum.
However, Barden continued, there is "no existing
legal authority to hold a referendum
The Edgecombe proposal was brought to the
county commissioners for consideration by N.C.
State Representative, Josephus L. Mavretic.
Mavretic said he made the proposal because he felt
the site would significantly enhance the county's
economic activity and school system.
In an incentive package, Gov. Jim Martin and the
governor's Waste Management Board offered the
county approximately $5 million a year in revenues
for the use of the landfill and the treatment facilities.
This money, according to an information flyer
distributed by Edgecombe officials would be used
nesses and elected officials of Edgecombe County
and eastern North Carolina
The release further said the group has "banded
together to reflect the views of the citizens of Edge-
combe county" which they believe are not being
portrayed by the county commissioners.
In a letter issued to the comissioncrs, the group
'The stuff has got to go somewhere. What are you going to do, dump it in ditches or something? Right now we
have low-level nuclear waste and our society is going to continue to generate it
Ernie Larkin, President of the Pamlico Tar River Foundation
"to solve the NashRocky MountEdgecombe
school problem Also the package would include
"at least 300 new high paying blue-collar jobs for
Edgecombe citizens according to the tlyer.
The flyer also said that U.S. 64 Interstate to
Bethel would be completed by January 1993 under
the plan. In order to transport the waste, "Interstate
connector and rail spur to Waste Management Park
and all utilities provided by the state
The Monday night hearing was preceeded by a
rally organized by citizen organizat , such as the
waste dump opposition group, Citi? ns for Democ-
racy and Safety. Leaders of the group said that the
group "is a coalition of citizens, organizations, busi-
demanded "that the Edgecombe commissioners
participate in an intensive regional study of the
environmental and ecomomic impacts of the pro-
posed waste site The letter wasalso.signed by eight
other organizations including The Sierra Club, The
Conservation Council of North Carolina, and the
Town of Princeville.
In response to Monday night's activity, an Edge-
combe county citizen said, "It impressed me very
much like a football game instead of a display of
democracy. In any event the outcome was favor-
able
Also in response to the commisioners change of
heart and the extremely will attended hearing, Dan
Vause, a citizen of nearby Greene county, com-
mented "Maybe this type of resistence will make a
ripple effect to the source of the problem. Simply
nuclear energy is not a viable alternative
Ernie Larkin, the president of the Pamlico Tar
River Foundation, said when asked if he expected
the proposal withdrawal, "Hell no, I didn't expect it.
I think it's a good decision by the commissioners.
They saw what people had to say and they re-
ponded to it. What else could you have asked of
them(however) the state needs these facilities, if it
is the end of it here, I don't know
In further comments Larkin said, "The stuff has
got to go somewhere. What are you going to do,
dump it in diches or something?Right now we
have low-level nuclear waste and our society is
going to continue to generate it. Our society has
decided that we are doing it
"Is it better to develope a treatment center or
dump it in a ditch somewhere? Clearly you have to
have a facility. What our quarrel has been is the way
the Edgecombe commissioners went about volun-
teering this land
Larkin continued to explain that the sites are
usually chosen in an orderly way and the Edge-
combe commissioners'short-circuited' that process.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 8,1988
Legislators try to land supercollider
RALEIGH (AP)�House weekend. But they tiled several final site is scheduled to be named tion process. But he said he would million that Congress was 1.5 percentof indirect overhead of
Speaker Liston Ramsey Friday major bills, including Gov. Jim in November. advise any ligislator who asked committed to the SSC. Tom Drew defense contractors' bids, Drew
campared the superconducting Martin's plan for consolidating Martin has requested $340,000 him for advice to vote against the of the Durham-based Phoenix said, and is expected to generate
super collider to a new Mercedes- state environmental agencies and through the end of year so the $15 million this year. Communications, which is han- $1 billion to $3 billion a year if
Benz�he'd like to have both but restoring a sales tax discount for state can stay in the running for "I'd say don't do it Ramsey dling public relations for the proj- passed,
nor at any cost. merchants abolished last year. the project. He also included in his said after the meeting. "It's too ect, said Rep. Tim Valentine, D-
"I don't object to pursuing it (the Sen. Ken Royall, D-Durham, budget $15 million so the state early N.C and Sen. Terry Sanford, D-
SSC). I just want to know what it's Rep. Jack Hunt, D-Cleveland, and could begin land acquisition if it But Ramsey said he would like N.C are working on a bill that
going to cost Ramsey said after Sen. Aaron Plyler, D-Union, also were selected. would create a super science fund
legislative leaders met with state attended the meeting, along with Originally, land acquisition was the super collider to be placed in for projects such as the super col-
officials handling North Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan. expected to begin in January if North Carolina. lider.
Carolina's application for the William Dunn, the state project North Carolina were chosen, "I hope we can land that thing; The money would come from
"No state would undertake
land acpuisition without absolute
assurance it would be built on that
site Dunn said.
The estimated cost of the super
collider is $4.4 billion.
proton-smasher.
Meanwhile, the House and
Senate held brief sessions and
conducted no substantive busi-
ness before heading home for the
director for the super collider, Dunn said. But because of the
gave legislators a history of the federal budget it's expected to be
state's application. North Caro- delayed until July, he said.
Una is now of seven sites under Ramsey said he believed the
consideration for the SSC, and a state would continue the applica-
Time for shades, shorts, and a good buddy to share the Greenville heat with. While this June day swelters
and students run for the A.C this girl and her pet enjoy the warmth on western campus. (Photolab)
Food poisoning can occur in summer
I like to go on picnics in the
summer. What's the best way to
keep from getting food poison-
ing?
Picnics are a fun and inexpen-
sive way to enjoy the summer as
and deviled eggs, are kept cold
(below 40 degrees F.) until it is
time to cat. Meats and eggs should
be thoroughly cooked. Drinking
(or eating) raw eggs is a prime
method of getting a salmonella
GIVE BLOOD
it's great he said. "But not at any
cost
Dunn said the state's commit-
ment to the project included $140
million in transportation im-
provements, of which $60 million
was already in the highway plan.
It also includes $10 million over 30
years for additional educational
funds, the bulk of which would go
to the University of North Caro-
lina system for items such as re-
cruiting physics professors.
But Royall pointed out that the
Legislature cannot appropriate
money for 30 years and that any
request for money for the UNC
system would have to come from
the UNC Board of Governors.
The state has proposed that the
53-mile underground tunnel be
located in Durham, Granville and
Person counties. Eight-thousands
acres of surface land would be
required for the project, although
Dunn said above-ground activi-
ties would be limited on only a
small part of that land.
A total of $360 million had been
requested from Congress this year
for the SSC, but it appears that
only $100 million will be appro-
priated this year, all for research
and development. Originally, $80
million was requested for re-
search and development, Dunn
said.
But Jordan said the state would
need a clearer sicnal than $100
(Hilt East (Earalfman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
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NVouldV
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WASHINGTON (AP)�So
ticated weapon-system cox
crs are vulnerable to" vi r u
"like business and personal
putcr, but experts say effort
fight such software sabot a g(
barely bevond the plan
stages.
Viruses�actually small sti
of computer code�cant i
Hy inserted into softv.
grams, where thev mav lit'
mant for months or years
causingcomputers, and the i
ons they help control t
wire.
"Software attack, often be
ned out with the aid ot
placed insiders, is emer.
coherent new tvpe of S) j
offensive warfare S I
man, a Yale University -
professor, and Paul R
mathematician, wrote r
the military electi
nal.
"Itcanlx
race and tin fi
field to affect n I
outcomes, but ala i p a j
artces i pi ���� i r they w:
"strike key civilian I
electronic fu
financial and data comm
tions, air trafl rttrol si
Shanty to
burned
NEW HAVEN, Coni
Yale University alumnus
of torching a campu -
built to - � apart J
he'd once worked in f
according to a man wh(
him down.
"In mv opinion he a
edged he had done it ar
because he had strong I
this and felt alumni shoui
their say Dr. Michael L. i
said Sunday. "Heals -
given Yale a lot oi moneyl
Cbarnev, a Boston
L and class of 1968 1 thi
ft jogging across the camr
! dav morning he saw a r
' ning away from the I
"1 veiled 'fire' a
i him Chamey said
tan suit, tie and
: chich he took ofi as I
Charnev said he
� Dr. Elwood D. Bi
courtyard of one of ale
tial colleges, where the :j
: political discus
: Africa, apartheid and
vestment policu -
Bracey who app
: visiting the campus I
weekend, said
: three months at a
hospital and was a
: eran, Chamey -
Bracey, oi West
Flawaschaigedwit
arson in the fire that dest
shantytown, named Wi
: dela Citv after I
: Mandela, the jail dS I
: anti-apartheid
: Bracey, 56 3 Yale
: was freefon $50,000 bor
: arraignment today in N
: Superior Court. He co
: reached tor comment
despite attempts b
locate him at hotels
Sue Ellen Apte actir
of the Palm Beach Count
Society described
popular docti
He s a wi pectl
cian. not the type
would do someth j
have repercuss
"He's not hot-tempere
la
TAXPAYERS
withdeperulents
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of Hfl i! an . '
do not have thi�. numK-i
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Required reading-
The East Carol
Wal





TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
1UNE8,1988 3
: Systems prone to virus

I i rect overhead of
rontractors bids, Drew
Y expected to generate
to 53 billion a vear if
tate would undertake
uisition without absolute
tit would be built on that
I (ost of the super
n.
almtan
�PS
ertising
mandi
hip
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and

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3


WASHINGTON (AD�Sophis-
ticated weapon-system comput-
ers are vulnerable to "viruses" just
like business and personal com-
puter, but experts say efforts to
fight such software sabotage are
barely beyond the planning
stages.
Viruses�actually small strings
of computer code� -can be stealth-
ily inserted into software pro-
grams, where they may lie dor-
mant for months or years before
causingcomputers, and the weap-
ons they help control to go hay-
wire.
"Software attack, often best ear-
ned out with the aid of well-
placed insiders, is emerging as a
coherent new type of systematic
offensive warfare Scott A. Boor-
man, a Yale University sociology
professor, and Paul R. Levitt, a
mathematician, wrote recentlv in
the military electronics journal
Signal.
"It can be waged far removed in
space and time from any battle-
field to affect not only combat
outcomes, but also peacetime bal-
ances of power they wrote. It can
"strike key civilian targets, such as
electronic funds transfer, other
financial and data communica-
tions, air traffic control systems
Shantytown
burned
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AD�A
Yale University alumnus accused
of torching a campus shantvtown
built to protest apartheid said
he'd once worked in South Africa,
according to a man who chased
him down.
"In my opinion he acknowl-
edged he had done it and he did it
because he had strong feelings on
this and felt alumni should have
their say Dr. Michael L. Charney
said Sunday. "He also said he had
given Yale a lot of money
Charney, a Boston psychiatrist
� and class of 1968, said that while
�-Jogging across the campus Sun-
day morning he saw a man run-
ning away from the fire.
"I yelled 'fire' and ran after
him Charney said. "He was in a
tan suit, tie and his class button,
chich he took off as he ran
Charney said he caught the man
Dr. El wood D. Bracev, in the
courtyard of one of Yale's residen-
tial colleges, where the two had a
political discussion about South
Africa, apartheid and Yale's in-
vestment policies.
Bracev, who apparently was
visiting the campus for alumni
weekend, said he'd worked for
three months at a South African
hospital and was a Vietman vet-
eran, Charney said.
Bracev, of West Palm Beach,
Fla was charged with first degree
arson in the fire that destroyed the
shantvtown, named Winnie Man-
dela City after the wife of Nelson
Mandela, the jailed South African
anti-apartheid leader.
Bracev, 56, a 1958 Yale gradua te,
was frec'on $50,000 bond pending
arraignment today in New Haven
Superior Court. He could not be
reached for comment Sunday,
despite attempts by telephone to
locate him at hotels.
Sue Ellen Apte, acting director
of the Palm Beach County Medical
: Society, described Bracey as a
popular doctor.
"He's a well-respected physi-
cian, not the type of person who
would do something that might
have repercussions Apte said.
"He's not hot-tempered
and even the vote-tallying ma-
chinery at the heart of the demo-
cratic process
Within the last year, vinises
have "infected" computers a
NASA, the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, in-
formation systems on Capitol
Hill. George Washington Univer-
sity and Hebrew University in
Jerusalem.
Tactics that can be used to dis-
rupt computer operations in-
clude:
Viruses, essentially small pro-
grams that can hide in the
computer's operating system,
giving orders that range from a
relatively benign message that
flashes on the screen to destruc-
tion of data files or erasure of
disks. A virus differs from other
sabotage in that it clones itself and
spreads.
"Trojan horses programs that
look and act like normal ones but
contain hidden commands that
eventually take effect and cause
havoc.
"Logic bombs small sets of
instructions surreptitiously en-
tered into other software, where
they remain undetected and inac-
tive until the computer arrives at a
certain result during normal com-
putation.
"Time bombs which go into
action at a set date and time.
The supersecret National Secu-
ritv Agcncv, based at Fort Meade,
Md is responsible for safeguard-
ing the security of U.S. govern-
ment computer systems. It has set
up the National Computer Secu-
rity Center at Fort Meade to help
the military, defense contractors
and other private companies cope
with software warfare and other
threats to vital computer systesm.
Michael Harrison, a computer
science professor at the University
TAXPAYERS
with dependents
Beginning with your 1987 income
ux return that von will tile- in
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are at least five yean old by the end
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kvk aflMHH
Required reading
The East Carolinian
Watch for it
of California at Berkeley, said the
center has developed criteria for
"trusted computer system evalu-
ation. This is a practical attempt
to decide what systems are more
trustworthy than others
Boorman and Levitt said much
more needs to be done to develop
effective technical countermea-
sures, and to alert military com-
manders as well as civilian man-
agers. "Strategic, tactical and lo-
gistic planning to meet the soft-
ware warfare challenge remains
in its infancy in many cases they
wrote.
Ted Lewis, a computer science
professor at Oregon State Univer-
sity said that "certainly anyone
with an undergraduate degree in
computer science could go in and
mess up the programs of a weap-
ons delivery system or an acing
package, either one
Boorman and Levitt wrote that
the military threat of software
malfunction was illustrated dur-
ing the 1982 Falklands war, when
an unintentional flaw surfaced in
guidance software controlling the
Sea Wolf missile system used by
British warships for air defense. It
"proved unable to cope with a
combat situation that arose when
two Argentine aircraft attacked
along closely parallel courses.
Faced with the dilemma of which
aircraft to shoot at first .the soft-
ware simply shut down the de-
fense system
In their Signal article, Boorman
and Levitt argued that "software
saboteurs may be far easier to
recruit�and far harder to iden-
tify, prosecute and convict�than
traditional saboteurs"
Paul Abrahams, president of
the New York-based Association
for Computing Machinery, said,
"The problem of detection is ex-
ceedinly difficult
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2JiB iEafii (Eartfliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Clay Deanhardt, cmiMt"
Carol Wetherington, mm em
JAMES FJ. MCKEE, Dmcioraf Advertamg
Tum Hampton, ncwi Ed�or
Tim Chandler, sp� em
John Carter, F-h�� w
Michelle England, om-uiw
Debbie Stevens,
June 8.1988
OPINION
JEFF PARKER,Sf�r WutTor
TOM FURR, Circulation Meujer
Mike Upchurch, production ms
JOHN W. MEDLIN, Art Director
Mac Clark, gM�aM�uF
Page 4
Proposal ousted
Five million wasn 't enough
I
&&&BQ(Jfc. s(f9tr 7?fE �ASTOouMN
For the past few weeks, this The
East Carolinian has carried news of
the Edgecombe County Waste
Management Park Proposal. Edge-
combe, Pitt, Martin counties and
communities therein were called on
to protect the peace of mind, secure
the future for the young, and defend
the overall health of the citizens in
these counties.
And they responded. Concerned
citizens joined together and fought
the actions of the Edgecombe county
commissioners, Representative
Mavretic and other figures who
were trying so hard to get the plant.
Many felt there were having a fatal
problem slammed onto their shoul-
ders, with insufficient time to make
educated decisions.
Approximately 800 angry citizens
attended the proposal meeting held
Monday night at Edgecombe Com-
munity College. The crowd drew
great attention to themselves; show-
ing their intent to act.
This is what America is all about.
The statement read by the commit-
tee Monday night was prepared
ahead of time, but it is a good feeling
knowing that the voices of the citi-
zens helped make the decision. A
round of applause must be sent out
to those who spent hours on the tele-
phone, distributing press releases
and educating the public about the
pros and cons of this proposal.
The waste management park was
not wanted by a majority and be-
cause the public spoke up, Edge-
combe County will not be labelled
"just another waste dump Con-
cerned citizens can breath easy
again, knowing that for the time
being at least, out backyards will
stay free of hazardous waste.
Some citizens of Edgecombe
County may mourn the loss of the
five million dollars a year, but there
are even more who feel safety and
democracy were worth more than
five million dollars, and did some-
thing about it.
Changes are occurring in
the Soviet Union today
Every time a ReaganGorbachov
summit is held, our news media inun-
dates us with news about the Soviet
Union; how they live, what they think,
how long their lines are for food and
clothing, their news media, etc. Even
though it may be slightly tiring for a few
days, it can only turn out to be a positive
thing in the long run. There is so much
misunderstanding and fear between
our two peoples that anything that
shines the light of understanding be-
tween us can be very helpful indeed.
All three networks, as well as inde-
pendents like CNN, broadcast from
inside Russiam and Cjarlcs Kuralt even
gave us his own version of "on the Road
in Russia If you payed attention even
slightly, instead of letting your eyes
glaze over every time you heard the
word "USSR" or "Moscow you
couldn't help to gain a greater insight on
the Russian people, instead of just hear-
ing all the bad things their government
did. That is the main problem with
negotiating treaties with Russia, we are
dealing with their government whereas
they are dealing with our people.
Until the Russian government is a
true representative of their people we
will be dealing with each other on two
different planes, two entirely separate
playing fields. We have a system of
checks and balances, but the Politburo
has no one to answer to but themselves.
The trouble comes when so many
people confuse the nature of the Russian
government with the personality of the
Russian people. The two couldn't be
further apart. They are just people, like
us. The only reason they have such a
terrible government is because they
were born with one that happens to be
extremely sow to change, and hard to
get anything done at all, due to the struc-
ture of the government and it's residual
effects on the entire society.
Even though Russia is run by a gigan-
tic bureaucracy and is slow to change, in
and more economic reform (Pcr-
cstroika) than ever before. I have been
hearing more and more criticism from
the inside, and they are talking about
giving more authority and responsibil-
ity to local regions, even if that means
taking it away somewhat from that
huge bureaucratic machine.
The biggest difference between their
bureaucratic machine and our bureau-
cratic machine, aside from the represen-
tational aspect, is that ours is more oper
and accessible and therefore quicker tc
change due to changing circumstances
and ideas. The change in the Soviet
Union may be at a much slower pace,
but it is there nevertheless. Don't let that
fact lull you into a false sense of security,
though. Until some sort of representa-
tion by the people is set up in the USSR,
it will remain a closed society where
people are afraid to speak out too much.
Let me give you an example of how
much they have changed in the last 40
years. My mother wasborn to a German
architect and a Ukrainiun woman living
in the Ukraine. The revolution came
and went around them, and because my
father was a "preferred citizen" he was
issued a card which enabled him to buy
commodities such as milk, meat and
eggs without waiting in lines for hours
at a time. So much for a "classless soci-
ety Doctors, lawyers and party mem-
bers were also issued such privileges.
My grandfather saw the atrocities
committed in the name of Communism
and applied for emigration. They felt
that if he wanted to back to his home
country, he must not like them, there-
fore they decided they did not like him
and told him to pack his bags. What they
did not tell him was to bring very warm
clothes. You see, they sent him and his
oldest son (my uncle) to Siberia. It kind
of reads like a made-for-tv movie,
the last few years we have witnessed
more change in the Soviet Union than at
any time since the Russian Revolution.
Today you see more openness (Glasnot)
doesn't it? Well, to make a long story
short, my mother made her way to
Germanyand caught the last year of
Hitler) where she met my Dad (who's
family goes back 10 generations in
Georgia); he came to Germany with the
US occupation force. They met, mar-
ried, and lived happily ever after. The
point is that today the situation is
changed. To get sent to Siberia you have
to do more than apply for emigration,
you have to be a political dissident or
such.
CAMPUS SPECTRUM
BY
MIKE HIGHSMITH
Even though the Russian people are
just regular folks like us, their
government's iron fist policies are the
harsh realities our country has had to
deal with for so long. We have found
out the hard way that we can't play
mamby pamby with them. We have to
be just as shrewd as them, I just wish we
didn't have to play the same political
game with them. Besides we can't play
them as well as they can, so they have
the advantage. My prediction is that the
USSR is bound for change, or else the
internal pressure would eventually
cause another revolution. Communism
by its very nature causes laziness and
waste, without a pay-per-effort eco-
nomic situation people will just not
work as hard or produce as much. I may
be optimistic about the eventual change
in the Communist structure, but it is
only because of my basic optimism
towards humanity. I give us as a species
more credit than to think it would allow
a government like that to thrive for too
long. I just hope I'm right.
re?
Bush strategy to define Dukakis:
By FRED BARNES
THE NEW REPUBLIC
George Bush suffers from too much definition, not
to little. He's Gerald Ford without pizazz, as colum-
nist Mark Shields put it. (Michael Dukakis is Jimmy
Carter without humor.) Bush says to type, a hyper-
active unexciting klutz.
Reagan's substance has rubbed off on Bush, but
not his style. There's no magic in Bush's perform-
ance as a campaigner. He's failed to master any of
Reagan's stump specialities. Bush's funniest line is
the one about wanting to be known as the "educa-
tion president But he's not joking when he says it.
The conventional wisdom that Bush still has a lot
of defining of himself to do sholdn't be taken seri-
ously. True, his advisers pay lip service to ots cruical
to Bush's chances of gaining ground on Dukakis. But
we've heard this before.
The Bush strategy is to define Dukakis. "It is very
hard to elect George Bush in an election that focuses
primarily on George Bush argues Rep. Gingrich of
Georgia, now a conservitive stalwart of the Bush
campaign'It is remarkably easy to elect George
Bush in an election that focuses primarily on Mike
Dukakis
Bush has already likened Dukakis to Jimmy Car-
ter, which isn't a compliment In speeches in April
and May, Bush said that "Carter hangs over the
Democrats like a shadow, an unwanted reminder of
the failure of their policies that last time they were in
power Dukakis, he said, is "trying to sell that same
old Democratic bill of goods. More taxes, More
spending. More govenment control over your lives
Thaf s only for starters. The tough stuff probably
won't come until the fall, the thrust being that
Dukakis is a leftist whose views ans values clash
with those of most Americans. "Dukakis wants to be
known as the Northern Liberal Jimmy Carter'says
Gingrich. "We're going to prove he's the left of
George McGovem
Richard Bond, Bush's deputy campaign manager,
cites'Brookline syndrome, the personification of
brie-and-chablis sensibility as amajor issue against
Dukakis. Dukakis lives in the Boston suburb of
Brookline. A Bush campaign aide said the decision at
the Brookline town meeting in 1984 to dispense with
the Pledge of Allegiance will be used against
Dukakis, as will Dukakis' veto of legisation requir-
ing the pledge to be recited on public schools each
day.
The Bush plan also calls for debunking Dukakis'
role in the "Massachuttes miracle zinging his for-
eign policy views as isolationist, and attacking his
controversial program of giving prisoners, even
murdersm weekend furloughs.
One reason th e Bush campaign won't go full bore
yet is money. What's of the $27 million that can be
spent legally in the primaries must be saved to
finance the Bush operation at the Republican Natinal
Convention in August.
Still, Bush and his adivsers are alarmed at the
favorable imperssion Dukakis is creating with only
Jesse Jackson as his Democratic opponent. "He looks
like a moderate beating Jesse Jackson every week
complains Bond.
Worse, moderate and conversative Democrats are
voting for Dukakis in the primaries to thawart
Jackson. These include many "Reagan Democrats
who voted for Reagan in 1980 and 1984. Bush can't
win this year unless he holds on to a sizable chunk of
them, and tarring Dukakis as a leftist may help.
A theory voiced by dissident Bushies is that now is
the time to confront Dukakis with examples of past
leftism. Dukakis must face Denocratic primary vot-
ers in a few more states, appear before the national
convention in July, and also appease Jesse Jackson.
This makes it difficult to repudiate his past ans scoot
to the center.
Bush himself doesn't seem to but it, nor do most of
his top campaign aides. "Bush has his own internal
time clock says Bond. There's a risk that by going
easy on Dukakis now, Bush will fall so far behind
he'd never be able to make up the ground. This
happened to Ford in 1976. But Bush stategists figure
the risk is small.
What's odd about the clamor for BUsh to define
himself os that if s hard to find an issue on which he
doesn't have a position. After more that seven years
of touting Reagan's policies, he's pretty well de-
fined. Except for ame relatively minor points Bush is
the same as Reagan. What he lacks is Reagan's
passion for conservative stands. Bush is a lukewarm
Reagan.
While satisfying conservatives, Bush hasn't been
adroit enough to get credit from the press for emerg-
ing from the president's shadow. If he palyed up his
small differences with Reagan, he might. But he's
been amazingly unobtrusive.
When Bush finally trumpeted a difference he was
stupidly shortsighted. In his May 18 speech, he
saidI won't bargain with terrorists, and I won't
bargain with drug dealers either, whether they're on
VS. or foreign soil
His office made sure the world knew he was
talking about Noriega. Then word leaked that Bush
was lobbying Reagan to give up any idea of drop-
ping drug smuggling charges against Noriega. This
was hardly a profile in courage.
Reagan went along happily with Bush's apostasy
on Noriega. Bush has virtual carte blanche with him.
The only trouble Reagan caused was by trying too
hard to be helpful. When he got a draft of his May 11
speech endorsing Bush, Reagan tossed out all the
paragraphs of biographical boilerplate about the
veep.
Instead, he hand wrote a passage on a yellow legal
pad saying he'd do anything necessary to get Bush
elected. The new passage was brief and none too
fulsome, and reporters treated the endorsement as
halfhearted. Reagan was thunderstruck.
There's a simple way for Reagan to make it up to
Bush. He can lead the attack on Dukakis this fall as
a dangerous lefty. Campaigning side-by-side with
Bush will only make Bush seem smaller. But cam-
paigning noisily against Dukakis across the South
and in ethnic enclaves inthe North might win over
Reagan Democrats. No doubt Reagan's willing. All
Bush has to do is ask.
Cong
WASHINGTON (AP)
gress was fulfilling a deficil
tion agreement with PH
Reagan when it passed a $)
lion federal budget for fisc
but a hefty deficit remail
spending priorities have
shifted.
The budget, approved
House last month and the)
on Monday by 58-29, sn
deficit of nearly SI42 bilhol
not counting sales of govci
Five-oldl
I suspend
MARION, N C I �
year-old street preach I
Bible verses outside his
struck a sheriff's deput
and had to be carried
after he was suspend
day of school, officials
McDowell County Sh(
Haynes said Matthew
struck Lt John Lite once in
during the incident at
Elementary Schc
Matthew returned I
from a 10-dav suspt I
began preaching iust ins
school's exit gate Friday
according to reports "
Ohio, Nev
propose a
COLUMBUS, Ohio (.
governors oi Ohio and N
today proposed anal
that would sharply redi
rain while protecting the
of the coal-producing I
New York Cow Marie
and Ohio Gov. Richan
recommended in a joint
a 10-million-ton reductid
fus dioxide emissions fro
sources by the year
proposal also would
$900 million a year to firtf
50 percent of the capital
The plan will be prci
Congress as an amendmj
Clean Air Act. Cuoi
Celeste, both Democn
thev will push the agreei
compromise to the othej
tive proposals in Was
bogged down in regionall
to control acid rain.
Sulfus dioxide emisstf
the burning oi coal h
blamed as a major cau�
rain, which environment
is destroying waters an
lands in the North.
the sulfur dioxide coi
coal-burning power plaj
the Ohio River.
New York is one or
Northeastern states mv
U.S. Circuit Court of Apl
in Washington againstj
Evironmental Protectioi
The states are prote
EPA's refusal to r
pollution control plan;
Michigan, Indiana.
Tennessee, West Viq
nois to reduce su
emissions in those stated
The plan calls tor red
sulfur dioxide emissio:
phases: 3.3 million ton
another 4 5 million -
and another 2 millioi
2003.
states would receive
million to pay tor the CO
pliance. More than two
paid bv the oil mdusti
third bv federal official;
luters themselves woul
raise about $900 million
deal.
The agreement woul
tablish a 10-year $2.5
panded clean coal tt
program to achieve redl
sulfur dioxide and nitrcj
emissions. That money
handed out on the basi:
cent matching grants!
demonstrations of nef
ogy-
In the joint statcmei
said, "It is imperative to
impasse that now exisi
gress
Celeste's press secretj
Phillips, said the govei
ers the agreement "a
tween preserving jobs
ing up the environmcnl
But a state senator tr
richest coal county,
Robert Nay from
County, said the agrc
"hard slap across th�
Ohio's coal miners
Nay said he was u





Public
opinion

ing in
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 8, 1988
i
day
�V
-(Glasnot)
vo a long story
vr way to
ast year of
I )ad (who's
g ncrations in
'many with the
met, mar-
ker alter. The
o situation is
- ia you have
emigration,
al dissident or
MPUS SPECTRUM
BY
UKE HIGHSMITH
Russian people are
r � Iks like us, their
n fist policies are the
untry has had to
r - We have found
way that we can't play
th them. We have to
em, I just wish we
ay the same political
m Besides we can't play
. can, so they have
red .tion is that the
nd for change, or else the
' would eventually
dution. Communism
nature causes laziness and
�per-effort eco-
ple will just not
- produce as much. I may
it the eventual change
munist structure, but it is
� my basic optimism
nanity. I give us as a species
than to think it would allow
nt like that to thrive for too
I'm right.
kis ?
btrusive.
� trumpeted a difference he was
Jted. In his May 18 speech, he
pin with terrorists, and I won't
lealers either, whether they're on
sure the world knew he was
�ga. Then word leaked that Bush
an to give up any idea of drop-
ig charges against Noriega. This
e in courage.
lg happily with Bush's apostasy
is virtual carte blanche with him.
?agan caused was by trying too
Vhen he got a draft of his May 11
ash, Reagan tossed out all the
graphical boilerplate about the
'rote a passage on a yellow legal
anything necessary to get Bush
jssagc was brief and none too
lers treated the endorsement as
was thunderstruck.
iv for Reagan to make it up to
ie attack on Dukakis this fall as
ampaigning side-by-side with
e Bush seem smaller. But cam-
tinst Dukakis across the South
(res inthe North might win over
No doubt Reagan's willing. All
Congress true to deficit pact
WASHINGTON (AP)-Con- assets, which aren't counted un-
gresswasfulfillingadeficitrcduc- der the Gramm-Rudman budget
tion agreement with President balancing law.
Reagan when it passed a $1.1 tril- The president's Office of Man-
lion federal budget for fiscal 1989, agement and Budget says higher
cal 1993. afraid there's miles to ge before
'This is a paltry, pathetic and we sleep
completely meaningless rcduc- The spending ply.
tion (of the deficit) during times of Within total spending levels for
economic prosperity com- military, foreign aid and domestic
election.
but a hefty deficit remains and interest rates combined with gov- plained Sen. William Armstrong, programs that were set by last
spending priorities have already ernment bail-outs of banks could R-Colo. "We're just putting the fall's agreement with Reagan, the
shifted. drive the deficit higher. whole problem off until after the budget envisions increased fed-
eral spending on the space pro-
gram, education, AIDS research,
fighting drugs, and other election-
year priorities.
But the resolution itself is non-
binding, acting only as a guide for
production of the annual spend-
ing legislation for running the
government. And because of the
delays, the House and Senate
have been moving ahead with the
regular spending bills that stray
from the budget's priorities.
The Senate Appropriations
Committee voted to include less
money for education and space
programs, shifting those funds to
energy and interior agencies.
"We urge the appropriations
committee to follow our lead and
support the nation's future
The budget, approved by the It is gets above $146 billion,
House last month and the Senate OMB is required to order auto- Senate Budget Committee
on Mondav by 58-29, shows a matic, across-the-board spending chairman Lawton Chiles, D-Fla
deficit of nearly $142 billion when cutsiscal 1989, which are designed conceded: "We've taken some
not counting sales of government to force a balanced budget by fis- steps in the right direction, but I'm
Five-old-year preacher hits cop,
suspended from school ten days









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MARION, N.C. (AP)�A 5-
year-old street preacher shouting
Bible verses outside his school
struck a sheriff's deputy Friday
and had to be carried off campus
after he was suspended on the last
day oi school, officials said.
McDowell County Sheriff Bob
Havnes said Matthew Strode
struck Lt. John Lite once in the face
during the incident at Eastfield
Elementary School.
Matthew returned to school
from a 10-day suspension and
began preaching just inside the
school's exit gate Friday morning,
according to reports from the
sheriffs department and the move his son from campus.
school Strode said he wanted to sec the
Principal Jim Corst asked the paperwork on the
suspension
kindergartener to come into tin
building, but he refused. Gorsl
then told the boy he was sus-
pended and asked Matthew to
come with him. The boy contin-
ued to preach and spun away
from Gorst when the principal
tried to escort him into the build-
ing.
Lite and Gorst talked first with
the boy's father, David Strode,
who said he was told by the dep-
uty that his son had been sus-
pended. Lite asked Strode to re-
be fore he asked his son to leave.
Strode said school officials
huddled again with the deputy,
&
SUB sTnTion i;
'A Complete Weal On A Bun
who then picked up the boy and through increased funding for
carried him to his father's arms. science and space programs said
Ohio, New York governors
propose acid rain policy
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)�The
governors of Ohio and New York
todav proposed a national policy
that would sharply reduce acid
rain while protecting the interests
of the coal-producing states.
New York Gov. Mario Cuomo
and Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste
recommended in a joint statement
a iO-million-ton reduction in sul-
fus dioxide emissions from utility
sources by the year 2003. The
proposal also would authorize
$90") million a year to finance up to
50 percent of the capital costs.
The plan will be proposed to
Congress as an amendment to the
Clean Air Act. Cuomo and
Celeste, both Democrats, said
they will push the agreement as a
compromise to the other legisla-
tive proposals in Washington,
bogged down in regional fighting,
to control acid rain.
Sulfus dioxide emissions from
the burning of coal have been
blamed as a major cause of acid
rain, which environmentalists say
is destroying waters and wood-
lands in the Northeast. Much of
the sulfur dioxide comes from
al-burning power plants along
the Ohio River.
New York is one of the eight
Northeastern states involved in a
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals suit
in Washington against the U.S.
Evironmental Protection Agency.
The states are protesting the
EPA's refusal to revise the air
pollution control plans of Ohio,
Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky,
Tennessee, West Virginia and Illi-
nois to reduce sulfur dioxide
emissions in those states.
The plan calls for reductions in
sulfur dioxide emissions in three
phases: 3.5 million tons by 1993,
another 4.5 million tons by 1998
and another 2 million tons by
2003.
States would receive about $900
million to pay for the cost of com-
pliance. More than two-thirds be
paid by the oil industry' and on-
third by federal officials. The pol-
luters themselves would have to
raise about $900 million under the
deal.
The agreement would also es-
tablish a 10-year, $2.5 billion ex-
panded clean coal technology
program to schieve reductions in
sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide
emissions. That money would be
handed out on the basis of 50 per-
cent matching grants to fund
demonstrations of new technol-
In the joint statement, Cuomo
said, "It is imperative to break the
impasse that now exists in Con-
gress
Celeste's press secretary, Debra
Phillips, said the governor consid-
ers the agreement "a balance be-
tween preserving jobs and clean-
ing up the environment
But a state senator from Ohio's
richest coal county, Republican
Robert Nay from Belmont
County, said the agreement is a
"hard slap across the face" of
Ohio's coal miners.
Nay said he was upset that a
deal by Celeste an acid rain might
conflict with the Ohio
Legislature's endorsement last
week of a resolution calling on
that slate's congressional delega-
tion to oppose the Clean Air Act
and tighter sulfur dioxide emis-
sions.
Ohio Environmental Protection
Strode's two sons have been
suspended five times each be-
cause of incidents related to the
preaching and shouting of scrip-
ture. Ten-year-old Duffcy Strode
stood outside the school gate Fri-
day morning and joined his
brother in preaching.
Strode's wife Robin, and 6-year-
old daughter Pepper were not at
the gate. Pepper has been sus-
pended four times.
"They change the rules over
there every day Strode said of
the incident. Strode said when he
was asked to come inside, he
asked that a witness go with him,
a man named Barry Weaver, who
was with him outside the gate.
Strode said when school offi-
cials said Weaver would have to
wait outside, he then refused to go
inside.
In the past, each time one of the
Strode children has been sus-
Chilcs, who had pushed hard for
that new spending.
GORDON'S
For All Your Golfing
Needs
.264Bv-Pass 756-1003
Agency Director Richard Shank pended, they have gone inside the
said the lawsuit is not involved in building with school officials to
the agreement process the suspension papers
(Self Service 8 12rll White Bond)
758-2400
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portion of pasta with meat cut of beef served with snow
sauce Toasted bread and peas and teriyaki sauce
Parmesan cheese . . $4.55 on rice 55.45
Fettuccini Alfredo Egg Hot Ham & Swiss
pasta with a sauce of butter, Sandwich Thinly sliced ham
Parmesan and Romana Wlth Swiss cheese on grilled rye
cheese. $4.75 bread, plus fries 3.yb
t 7s Steak & Cheese Sandwich
With Chicken 56.75 0ur steak sandwich with
VAU t-j 7K melted Provolone cheese,
With Shrimp. . . .3 o Qt;
plus fries)j.3J
Express lunches are served from 11 30 a m to 2 p m daily, except Sunday
3t
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Grade A I visit 0ur
"Whole Frvers Hot Bar an aiad Bar
57. $1.99
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per lb.
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bag
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OVEDTON&
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
UNE 8,1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
IF YOU ARE A MUSICVOICE MAJOR
and would like to put you voice to work
and make some cash this summer then
call 355-0355 and ask for Dena.
HELP WANTED � need salesperson to
work mornings at Carpet Bargain Center.
1009 Dickinson ave. Apply in person
between 8 am and 1 p.m.
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNCELOR �
Interested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No Monetary
Compensation, however room, utilities
and phone provided. Call Mary Smith,
Real Crisis Center 758-11ELP.
SERVICES OFFERED
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE:
758-5488, 758-8241. Call Susan.
INDEPENDANT CAB SERVICE � Call
355-5034 in evenings. "Good rates Call
lames for a ride.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low-
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
IS IT TRUE you can but jeeps for $44
through the US Government? Get the
facts today! Call 1-312-742-1142 Ext. 5271-
A.
FOR SALE � 5-drawer dresser with
matching mirror. Good condition.
$125 00. 758-8249, ask for Susan.
FOR SALE � Queen size waterbed full
accessories. Includes new sheets, never
been used. Must sell. Call Pat 830-4737.
FOR SALE � Queen size waterbed
$110.00. Must sell fast. Small desk $30.00
Call Jen-y at 758-2681.
CAN YOU BUY JEEPS, Cars, 4X4's
Seized in drug raids for under $100.00
Call for facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext.
711.
FOR SALE � Schwinn Cruiser Supreme 5
speed. Like New included is a Kryptonite
Security Lock. $200.00 or best offer. Call
Karen at 758-2861.
RINGOLD TOWERS CONDO � for
sale. B-unit, 2nd floor, fully furnished. Tax
market value $43,730.00 Make me an offer.
919-787-1378.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED � for 3
bedroom townhouse. Washer, dryer, pool
tennis courts. $145.00 plus 13 utilities.
355-4834.
NEED A PLACE TO LIVE THIS SUM-
MER � Roommate needed to share 2
bedroom townhouse. $97.00 a month, 1 3
utilities. Near clubhouse, pool, laundry
room. Quiet neighborhood. Call 355-0355.
FOR RENT � Two bedroom duplex, car-
pet, stove, refrig. Walk to ECU Campus.
Avail now. 195.00mo. Lease. 752-5778.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED � Twin
Oaks, 2 bdr. 12 bath, 157.50 and 12 utili-
ties, 112 miles from campus, dishwasher,
pool, microwave, very nice, available July
or August, 757-0316.
RINGGOLD TOWERS � Apts. for rent
Furnished. Contact Hollie Simonowich at
752-2865.
2 ROOMATES WANTED � Male or
female NON-SMOKER. 5 bedroom house
wthrec full baths. Call Luke or Steve at
758-0312.
PERSONALS
FOR RENT
NEW OFFICE SUITES
counts. 758-1983.
Faculty dis-
ROOMATE NEEDED � to share apt. in
Wilson Acres. Pay 1 3 rent in 2 bedroom
apt. Julv 1 - August 30 only. Call soon. Toni
830-3822.
NEW DELI IS STILL THE PLACE � to
find the finest live rock and roll jammin'
bands in Greenville. Catch the sounds of
VALENCE Friday, the band Saturday is
still to be announced, but don't let that
discourage you. It's bound to be some-
thing kick-ass. See ya there.
BIG AL � Your mail is piling up and your
plants are dying. Please come home.
Announcements
SUMMER LIBRARY HOURS
Mondays - Thursdays 8:00 a.m. -11:00
p.m Fridays 8:00 a.m' - 6:00p.m Satur-
days 9.00 a'm. - 6.00 p.m Sundays 12:00
noon - 11:00 p.m. The Media Resources
Center will be open: Mondays - Thurs-
days 8.00 a.m9:30 p.m Fridays 8:00 a.m.
- 5:00 p.m Saturdays 1:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m
Sundavs 12 noon - 9:00 p.m.
5K WALKRUN
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for an intramural 5K run. June
13 at 8:00p.m. at Bunting Track.
HANG GLIDING
Everyone is invited to register for a
summer hang gliding adventure trip to
Nags 1 lead, NC. June 22 - July 12.
CO-OP SUMMER FALL
Three jobs � Congressional Office,
Washington, DC. June � August. Salary:
$1000.00month. Student must have gen-
eral office skills and some experience with
word processing. Short hand skills de-
sired. Also, Tampa Electric Company,
Tampa, Florida. Fall semester. Salary:
$1135.00month. Word processing
courses andor word processing experi-
ence required Will be expected to return
to job Summer 1989 if work is satisfactory.
Salary will increase. Finally, Positions
available in the Nags Head area begin-
ning June 1, 1988. Salary: $4hour, 30-40
hrs.wk. Housing available near worksite
- $50.00week. Students must have 2.5
GPA. Will receive $500 scholarshipsti-
pend for college expenses when returning
to school in the fall. For all these positions,
contact Ruth Peterson, 757 6979, immedi-
ately. Students may apply at Co-op office,
2028 GC building.
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid for overseas education may apply for
a Rivers Scholarship. The next application
deadline is June 15,1988. For further infor-
mation contact the Office of International
Studies and Scholarships in the Gerneral
Classroom building, room 1002, 757-6769.
MINORITY ADULTS
The ECU Testing center is needing minor-
ity adults to take a new intelligence test.
The test battery will take about 3 12
hours. A token payment will be paid at the
end of the test. If interested, contact the
Testing Center in Speight, Room 105, or
call 757-6811.
BACKPACKING
Faculty, staff and students are invited
to register for a summer Backpacking
Trip. June 22 - July 5 in 204 Memorial Gym.
For more information call 757-6387.
SIT BACK

you7e Sst a1"eTnTed in alje tast Carolinian
Express yourself; Write a letter to the Editor
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Sat June 11,1988. Quantity Rights Reserved. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors
GROUND FRESH SEVERAL TIMES DAILY
Fresh Regular
Ground Beef
5 lbs.
or more
PERDUEGRADE A
Fresh Quartered
Chicken Breasts
1.19
JAMESTOWN
Sliced
Bacon Pkg
All Meat
Franks pkg
99
99
CALIFORNIA
Red F'ame
Seedless Grapes
High In
Vitamin C
99
ALL VARIETIES�REG. OR THICK & SPICY
Kraft Barbecue
Sauce
VERMICELLI OR
89
Creamettes 3 $4
Spaghetti I� 1
Limit One With
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TROPICANA
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Juice
1.19
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ALL FLAVORS
Rich & Creamy
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half gal
ctn.
ASSORTED VARIETIES
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2.39
99
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1.89
SMITHFIELD�GOLD LABEL
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Trim
LUSCIOUS�JUICY�LARGE 5 SIZE
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2.49
CONTAINS VITAMIN C
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1.99
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99
PREMIUM
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UMIT THREE WITH �0 PURCHASE
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AT 703 GREENVILLE BLVD.
OPEN SUNDAY AT 7:00 A.M. TO 11:00 P.M.
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 7:00 A.M. - 12 MIDNIGHT
'Ram
By JIM SHAMLIN
Suft VSfT
"Rambo III" is the scqi
"Rambo, First Blood Part
which is the sequel to
Blood Rambo (Sylvest
lone) has been living man
tarv ever since he -
POVVs from Vietnam ii J
movie.
He finds out that hi i
and mentor, Colonal
(Richard Crenr
hired by the Sovi
stan, so he leaves the I
the aid of a lil i
heads across ll
of Trautman.
Like its prequ
chock full
fights, helicopter !
hand-to-hand con
this is what the F
all about, ai
thing to pass '
Under
'Krush
PnTSBURGI
just one seasoi
Law Blair Ui
carved out a tidy r
in the hit sho
brash, young att rr
Rollins
rxmldn't ask I -
- and that's an
mei
out of college three j I
hav band workii
is p irl of it. A
- npts Hk. �
A. Law I mean worli i
ist
"These I of th I
give you sometl
and 1 th -
And then the i j
that the public and J
vnjoy the show
Underwood 23, was
recently to pick i
arts degree from C
University.
He cast I
rated. Em� -
season as a "j
of Harvard aw �� j
ambition oc
him acres-
and even ethics
"He's been real -
said Rick Walia
executive producer I
to fit in. Then
anv difficulty makiri g
ot the enesemble
Underwood - rtg
lawyerlike in a go! I
shirt and pleated b
that's one o: the mail
between himsi
plays.
"The difference betwo
one like onathan J
myself is Jonathan
arrogance and extreme
dence in himself and
Teriod. 1 think it s a d
between that and having
confidence that you cai
plish what you believe
said.
His fast track to stardc
monv to that kind of deej
Inspired by his older
interest in acting Uni
began performing at
ters while in junior
He entered Carnegie
prestigious drama depaj
the fall of 19S2 as a musicl
major, but dropped out
through his junior year
Underwood went to r
where he eventually lanl
in the rap film "Krushf
with Sheila E. and on
soap opera "One Life to
1986, he was cast as a
parolee in the CBS senei
town
The show was cancels
episodes and for the fit
his short career. Under
unemployed.
Underwood did a 1
shows, then auditioned
mer for "L.A. Law Tl
producers, including
producer Stephen Bochl
negie Mellon alumnus.
add a black attorney to
viewers' request.
"1 don't feel as if he ii
dressing because theJ
ing a full, fleshed-outj
(who) happens to





R
NS
live Sun. June 5 Thru
jographical Errors.
GRAIN FED
s Beef
teak
9
OLD LABEL
Pork
IGE 5 SIZE
2.49
1.99
.UICY
rnia
urns
0
irma
sots
3
24 oz
loaves
$!
RTY�GARDEN SFYLE
1.08
�R LIGHT
ft
naise
0
RTED COLORS
Cloud
le
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 8,1988 Page 7
'Rambo III' is just more of the same thing
ByJIMSHAMLIN
Staff Writer
"Rambo III" is the sequel to
"Rambo, First Blood Part Two
which is the sequel to "First
Blood Rambo (Sylvester Stal-
lone) has been living in a monas-
tary ever since he rescued the
POWs from Vietnam in the last
movie.
He finds out that his only friend
and mentor, Colonal Trautman
(Richard Crenna) has been cap-
tured by the Soviets in Afghani-
stan, so he leaves the East, enlists
the aid of a little arab brat, and
heads across the desert in search
of Trautman.
Like its prequels, "Rambo III" is
chock full of explosions, gun-
fights, helicopter battles, and
hand-to-hand combat. Of course,
this is what the Rambo trilogy is
all about, and plot is simply some-
thing to pass the time between
spectacular combat scenes.
As usual, there is a smattering
of blue-collar humor and dry one-
liners, such as "I'm your worst
nightmare another line that
Ronald Reagan can use in a politi-
cal speech somewhere.
Filming was done on location in
Arizona, Thailand, and Isreal. In
Isreal, the filming was done near
the unstable Jordanian border.
There were threats of kidnapping
Stallone and over 90 reported ter-
rorist actions in the vicinity.
One involved a firefight within
150 yards of the cast's hotel. There
was even an occasion when Isreali
soldiers had to defend the movie
set from a band of three Jordanian
terrorist groups.
As fate would have it, nobody
got hurt and the film was com-
pleted on schedule. One could
argue either way about the effect
of this instability upon the pro-
duction.
Once a good movie has been
made, its sequels can only attempt
the quality of the original movie.
"First Blood" was, admittedly, a
pretty good film. "Rambo" sold
out for action and left the plot
behind.
Opinions split about the second
film; some called it a thrilling
adventure movie, others called it
boring and poorly written.
"Rambo III" is much the same as
"Rambo and viewers' opinions
will inevitably be the same.
Rambites (those who liked
"Rambo") will say that it was a
thrilling adventure, and that it
kept them on the edge of their
seats. Anti-Rambitcs will say that
the movie has a plot that is thin to
the point of translucency and that
the action scenes were utterly
unrealistic.
Rambites will hail the movies
stunning special effects. In mak-
ing the film, the crew trashed
three helicopters.
Working on the film were over a
dozen stunt men, four stunt
horses, and a double handful of
"expert" coordinaters, one of
whom was World Middleweight
Kickboxing Champion Harold
Diamond. Anti-Rambites will say
that all the explosions and action
scenes merely obscured the scen-
ery.
Rambites will claim that it is a
timely movie about an American
hero who rescues his friend from
communist clutches in Afghani-
stan. Anti-Rambites will be quick
to mention that Stallone spent the
Vietnam era in Sweden, teaching
soccer at a girl's school, and the
film is poorly timed, as the Rus-
sians are presently pulling out of
Afghanistan.
Rambites will claim that Stal-
lone portrayed John Rambo, the
half-Indian, half-German pro-
tagonist, well. Anti-Rambites will
be amazed that the Rambites used
a three-syllable word, and then
ask them what they know about
good acting anyway.
Lastly, Rambite critics will pro-
claim that "Rambo III" is the ad-
venture film of the summer, and
that no avid cinemite should miss
it. Anti-Rambites will say that it
isn't worth seeing, even at a mati-
nee, and that they'll watch a docu-
mentary on Arts and Entertain-
ment Network when the film hits
cable.
Underwood goes from the
'Krush Groove' to law firm
GHT
PITTSBURGH (AP) � After
just one season on NBC's "L.A.
Law Blair Underwood has
carved out a tidy niche for himself
in the hit show's ensemble cast as
brash, young attorney Jonathan
Rollins.
"I couldn't ask for anything
better, and that's an understate-
ment' said Underwood. 'To be
out of college three years and to
have a job and working as an actor
is part of it. And then working
with scripts like the quality of rL.
A. Law I mean working with the
cast
"These actors, all of them, will
give you something to play off of,
and I think that shows on camera.
And then the icing on the cake is
that the public and critics alike
enjoy the show
Underwood, 23, was in town
recently to pick up a belated fine
arts degree from Carnegie Mellon
University.
He joined the cast of the high-
rated, Emmy-winning series last
season as a sophisticate fresh out
of Harvard Law whose mega-
ambition occasionally pushes
him across the lines of decorum
and even ethics.
"He's been real well received
said Rick Wallace, the show's co-
executive producer. "He seemed
to fit in. There didn't seem to be
any difficulty making him a part
of the cnesemble
Underwood, looking very un-
lawyerlike in a gold chain, striped
shirt and pleated trousers, said
that's one of the main differences
between himself and the part he
plays.
"The difference between some-
one like Jonathan Rollins and
myself is Jonathan has a type of
arrogance and extreme confi-
dence in himself, and that's it.
Period. I think it's a difference
between that and having faith and
confidence that you can accom-
plish what you believe in he
said.
His fast track to stardom is testi-
mony to that kind of deep belief.
Inspired by his older brother's
interest in acting, Underwood
began performing at dinner thea-
ters while in junior high school.
He entered Carnegie Mellon's
prestigious drama department in
the fall of 1982 as a musical theater
major, but dropped out midway
through his junior year.
Underwood went to New York
where he eventually landed roles
in the rap film "Krush Groove"
with Sheila E. and on the ABC
soap opera "One Life to Live In
1986, he was cast as a streetwise
parolee in the CBS series "Down-
town
The show was canceled after 13
episodes and for the first time in
his short career, Underwood was
unemployed.
Underwood did a few guest
shows, then auditioned last sum-
mer for "L.A. Law The show's
producers, including executive
producer Stephen Bochco, a Car-
negie Mellon alumnus, decided to
add a black attorney to the cast at
viewers' request.
"I don't feel as if he is window
dressing because they are creat-
ing a full, fleshed-out character
(who) happens to be black
Underwood said. "As opposed to
writing a black character who's
going to say, 'Yo, Yo, Yo, we're
gonna go to court now you
know, stereotype
With the role have come atten-
tion and fame, including being
named by a popular magazine as
one of America's sexiest bache-
lors.
His family strives through con-
stant contact to keep him humble,
however, said Underwood. Even
though he lives in Los Angeles
and his parents arc in Petersburg,
Va they're on the phone almost
daily.
His father, Frank Sr 56, a re-
tired Army colonel, serves as his
manager, His brother, Frank Jr
26, an "artist-slash-writer-slash-
actor has written an adventure-
action story Underwood hopes to
produce.
Pictured here are Sylvester Stallone and Richard Crenna as Rambo and Trautman in the new hit
filmRambo III The film shows pop hero John Rambo invading Afghanistan to rescue his only
friend. With friends like these the State Department doesn't need any enemies.
Run proves that it really is his house
BY CHIPPY BONEHEAD
SUrff B Boy
"We've had a whole lot of su-
perstars on this stage here tonight.
But I want y'all to know one thing.
This is�MY HOUSE
So Run said. And so it was,
Sunday night at the Charlotte
Coliseum, the second floor of the
"Run's House" tour. Despite val-
iant efforts by the rest of the rap-
pers, Public Enemy, Kool Moe
Dee, DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh
Prince and EU, this building re-
mained under Run's control all
night.
Public Enemy were the first in
effect. Despite a strong version of
"My Uzi Weighs A Ton their set
was kind of dull. Chuck D. came
on too strong with the anti-drug,
anti-violence messages.
Flavor-Flave lightened things
up, but the highlight of all their
cuts was Terminator X's scratch-
ing. I'm surprised they didn't
play "Sophisticated Bitch but
like all the other acts, they are
probably getting tired of playing
their hit singles over and over.
Kool Moe Dee busted out next.
He had a lot more to say to the
crowd, especially concerning his
feud with LL Cool J. To be fair, he
didn't dis LL bad, but it was obvi-
ous he enjoyed the loud audience
support in his court.
He did "How Ya Like Me
Now a rocking "Wild, Wild
West and a fresh preview of his
new single that's coming out next
week.
Jazzy Jeff, The Prince and
Ready Rock B. came out next. The
stories about Jeff's driving experi-
ences fell kind of flat even with
Ready Rock's sound effects.
But Jeff and Ready Rock's
"Human Jukebox vs. Scratching"
battle was amazing. You haven't
lived until you've seen Ready
Rock hold his own against two
turntables.
The duo had the deffest danc-
ers of all the acts, but Kool Moe
Dee's run a close second. Rap
concerts don't depend on the
special effects popmeisters like
David Bowie need.
Groups either have body-
guards standing around looking
oad, or have dancers. That may
have been one of Public Enemy's
failings, they had no dancers and
the guards kept pointing guns at
the audience.
But The Fresh Prince's ladv and
her two companions had some of
the roughest moves since that
second or third Janet Jackson
video.
Jeff and the Prince did their big
hit, "Parents Just don't Under-
stand and mixed it in with the
earlier and structurally similar
hit, "Girls are Nothing But
Trouble
EU came out and framed a reg-
gae-tinged song with instrumen-
tal and reprise versions of "Da
Butt They were the only group
that used instruments during the
show, and they showed the crowd
how glad they were to be back in
the Queen City by tossing shirts
and hats into the crowd.
By this time, the crowd on the
floor was crushed up against the
stage. After EU went off stage, it
took a while for the roadies to
strike the stage and set up for Run-
DMC.
But it was worth the wait.
"Beats to the Rhvme" started
playing, while descending plat-
forms brought Dee and JamMas-
ter Jay down to the stage. Run
climbed down a metal ladder and
Porno films are no longer in dem
(CPS)�It was a scene repeated
on hundreds of campuses:
University of Missouri at Co-
lumbia students picketed the
campus showing of a pom movie
in this case "The Opening of
Beethoven" �one night in
y April, and then retired to a
nearby auditorium for a heated
debate between Gloria Leonard
pi&Usher of "Higher Society"
and Delores Alexan-
founder of Women Against
y-
news however, is that
scene hasn't been repeated on
many campuses during the
987-88 school year,
m short, pom films are beconv
ng scarcer on VS. campuses.
Observers think ifs because of
ncreaaing competition from
Videotaped sex movies, a creep
ng fear of controversy, changing
tastes and maybe even
student consciousness.
The scarcity, asserts National
anization of Women's
Junior Bridge, is
to all the work done over the
all organiztions in the
movement to point out
file fun ends and me harm
attribute it to money,
pick the films that wiS
am violent films like 'Robocop
AtArizonaStateDmversity,the
most successful campus money-
makers mis year have been "the
Gods Must Be Crazy "ta
Samba1 "ttaSum and "Attack
of the Kilter Tomatoes reported
activities advisor Rosalyn Munk.
Nationwide, the most popular
movie rentals at ce&
been "River's Bdge
A Dog "Kkyaanfsqatei
She's Gotta Have It said Amy
Heller of New Yorker Kims,
which distributes second-rut
films.
Ifs a fa cry fiom Ibe control
versy and anger that attended
movies like "Wanda Whips Watt
Street "Debbie Does Dallas
"Deep Throat" and blue movie
"Students added Don Haley,
a publicist tor several Los Angeles
X-rated movie theaters, "don't
ha veto go to a theateror a campus
showing. They go straight to the
video store
Videos, shown at home, also
relieve students of the embarass
ment of being seen at the mote
om showings at campus
stores, Munk added, "there's no
big mystery about these things
now
With the mystery gone and the
titillation readily available in
video stores, the controversy has
been harder to generate.
Yet some film sponsors com-
plain they need the controvery to
attract campus audiences.
"Anotherfrat showed a double
feature of pom films recenuy
said Rick Rgftra,presidentof the
Northern fitinios University Tau
sponsored a "Deep tSloat
screening last September. "There
was no protest, so they didn't get
as large a Srowd as we got with
protesters
Gordon Schell, Tuamefs new
film advisor, said the most contro-
versy he's faced was last spring,
when his group announced it was
Mary � provoked Catholic pro-
tests at the universities of Okla-
homa (twice), Kansas,
Dakota and Nebraska,
other schools, to become the
year's most cesured film.
No one is sure what the general
student taste is governed by,
Lehigbs Sacarakis shrugged.
She does know ifs getting
touchier. The biggest controvers
she's encountered mis year was
about whether to advertise a stu-
The Big Easy.
The students who work
Sacarakis chose the tame stili
"We don't vant to deal
those
Archer of the
pulled the curtain down as the
song segued into "Run's House
The marquis lights behind the
stage lit up and spelled out "RUN,
" as dry ice smoke flooded across,
bringing the bodyguards out on
stage.
Rub and Dee stalked back and
forth across the stage, whipping
out the words to "Run's House"
and "Rock Box Jay eventually
drifted to another set of turntables
on top of the marquis lights for
"Walk This Way "Mary, Mary"
and "It's Tricky
Most of the cuts they played
came off the "Raising Hell" Lp
and the new release, 'Tougher
Than Leather The abbreviated
"Rock Box" was the only thing
thev did off their first album, and
"King of Rockexcept for the title
track, was all but ignored.
Their set was the longest by far
of anyone else's. Since the head-
lined (and have more albums than
anybody else) they had more lee-
way of what cuts they wanted to
do during the show.
Run sounded strong through-
out the show, evidently com-
pletely recovered from his col-
lapsed lung from a years or so ago.
Both bovs have lost weight since
the days of "Raising Hell but
Run is again chubbing up.
Their set featured the most
pyrotechnics I've seen since Kiss
took off their make up. The best
effect was the shower of sparks
that exploded upward after "My
Adidas
For the finale, they did "King of
Rock When they hit the lines,
'To burn my house You must
use fire two giant columns of
fire spit up from both ends of the
stage.
The rest of the rappers and their
posses came out after that, and
milled around on stage as Run
and Dee finished the song. After
an hour and a half of Run-DMC,
and two hours of short sets split
between the other acts, the con-
cert was over.
Run only made one mistake
during his tenure as host of his
house. He told the audience, T
don't see one motherfucker in the
house fighting I guess he wasn't
watching the scuffle over at the
soundboard.
The situation looked for a while
like it was going to escalate. But,
aside from that one incident, the
crowd, though hyped, was
pumped up for a good time.
And you can't blame the host
for doing his job.





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNES, 1988 Page 7
'Rambo III' is just more of the same thing
By JIM SHAMLIN
Staff Writer
"Rambo III" is the sequel to
"Rambo, First Blood Part Two
which is the sequel to "First
Blood Rambo (Sylvester Stal-
lone) has been living in a monas-
tary ever since he rescued the
POWs from Vietnam in the last
movie.
He finds out that his only friend
and mentor, Colonal Trautman
(Richard Crenna) has been cap-
tured by the Soviets in Afghani-
stan, so he leaves the East, enlists
the aid of a little arab brat, and
heads across the desert in search
oi Trautman.
Like its prequels, "Rambo III" is
chock full of explosions, gun-
fights, helicopter battles, and
hand-to-hand combat. Of course,
this is what the Rambo trilogy is
all about, and plot is simply some-
thing to pass the time between
spectacular combat scenes.
As usual, there is a smattering
of blue-collar humor and dry one-
liners, such as "I'm vour worst
nightmare another line that
Ronald Reagan can use in a politi-
cal speech somewhere.
Filming was done on location in
Arizona, Thailand, and Isrcal. In
Isreal, the filming was done near
the unstable Jordanian border.
There were threats of kidnapping
Stallone and over 90 reported ter-
rorist actions in the vicinity.
One involved a fircfight within
150 yardsof the cast's hotel. There
was even an occasion when Isreali
soldiers had to defend the movie
set from a band of three Jordanian
terrorist groups.
As fate would have it, nobody
got hurt and the film was com-
pleted on schedule. One could
argue either way about the effect
of this instability upon the pro-
duction.
Once a good movie has been
made, its sequels can only attempt
the quality of the original movie.
"First Blood" was, admittedly, a
pretty good film. "Rambo" sold
out for action and left the plot
behind.
Opinions split about the second
film; some called it a thrilling
adventure movie, others called it
boring and poorly written.
"Rambo III" is much the same as
"Rambo and viewers' opinions
will inevitably be the same.
Rambites (those who liked
"Rambo") will say that it was a
thrilling adventure, and that it
kept them on the edge of their
seats. Anti-Rambitcs will say that
the movie has a plot that is thin to
the point of translucency and that
the action scenes were utterly
unrealistic.
Rambites will hail the movies
stunning special effects. In mak-
ing the film, the crew trashed
three helicopters.
Working on the film were over a
dozen stunt men, four stunt
horses, and a double handful of
"expert" coordinates, one of
whom was World Middleweight
Kickboxing Champion Harold
Diamond. Anti-Rambites will say
that all the explosions and action
scenes merely obscured the scen-
ery.
Rambites will claim that it is a
timely movie about an American
hero who rescues his friend from
communist clutches in Afghani-
stan. Anti-Rambites will be quick
to mention that Stallone spent the
Vietnam era in Sweden, teaching
soccer at a girl's school, and the
film is poorly timed, as the Rus-
sians are presently pulling out of
Afghanistan.
Rambites will claim that Stal-
lone portrayed John Rambo, the
half-Indian, half-German pro-
tagonist, well. Anti-Rambitcs will
be amazed that the Rambites used
a three-syllable word, and then
ask them what thev know about
J
good acting anyway.
Lastly, Rambite critics will pro-
claim that "Rambo III" is the ad-
venture film of the summer, and
that no avid cinemite should miss
it. Anti-Rambites will say that it
isn't worth seeing, even at a mati-
nee, and that they'll watch a docu-
mentary on Arts and Entertain-
ment Network when the film hits
cable.
Underwood goes from the
'Krush Groove' to law firm
CHT
PITTSBURGH (AP) � After
just one season on NBC's "L.A.
Law Blair Underwood has
carved out a tidy niche for himself
in the hit show's ensemble cast as
brash, young attorney Jonathan
Rollins'
"I couldn't ask for anything
better, and that's an understate-
ment said Underwood. "To be
out of college three years and to
have a job and working as an actor
is part of it. And then working
with scripts like the quality of rL.
A. Law I mean working with the
cast
"These actors, all of them, will
give you something to play off of,
and I think that shows on camera.
And then the icing on the cake is
that the public and critics alike
. ujoy the show
Underwood, 23, was in town
recently to pick up a belated fine
arts degree from Carnegie Mellon
University.
He joined the cast of the high-
rated, Emmy-winning series last
season as a sophisticate fresh out
of Harvard Law whose mega-
ambition occasionally pushes
him across the lines of decorum
and even ethics.
"He's been real well received
said Rick Wallace, the show's co-
executive producer. "He seemed
to fit in. There didn't seem to be
any difficulty making him a part
of the enesemble
Underwood, looking very un-
lawyerlike in a gold chain, striped
shirt and pleated trousers, said
that's one of the main differences
between himself and the part he
plays.
"The difference between some-
one like Jonathan Rollins and
myself is Jonathan has a type of
arrogance and extreme confi-
dence in himself, and that's it.
reriod. I think it's a difference
between that and having faith and
confidence that you can accom-
plish what you believe in he
said.
His fast track to stardom is testi-
mony to that kind of deep belief.
Inspired by his older brother's
interest in acting, Underwood
began performing at dinner thea-
ters while in junior high school.
He entered Carnegie Mellon's
prestigious drama department in
the fall of 1982 as a musical theater
major, but dropped out midway
through his junior year.
Underwood went to New York
where he eventually landed roles
in the rap film "Krush Groove"
with Sheila E. and on the ABC
soap opera "One Life to Live In
1986, he was cast as a streetwise
parolee in the CBS series "Down-
town
The show was canceled after 13
episodes and for the first time in
his short career, Underwood was
unemployed.
Underwood did a few guest
shows, then auditioned last sum-
mer for "L.A. Law The show's
producers, including executive
producer Stephen Bochco, a Car-
negie Mellon alumnus, decided to
add a black attorney to the cast at
viewers' request.
"I don't feel as if he is window
dressing because they are creat-
ing a full, fleshed-out character
(who) happens to be black
Underwood said. "As opposed to
writing a black character who's
going to say, 'Yo, Yo, Yo, we're
gonna go to court now you
know, stereotype
With the role have come atten-
tion and fame, including being
named by a popular magazine as
one of America's sexiest bache-
lors.
His family strives through con-
stant contact to keep him humble,
however, said Underwood. Even
though he lives in Los Angeles
and his parents are in Petersburg,
Va they're on the phone almost
daily.
His father, Frank Sr 56, a re-
tired Army colonel, serves as his
manager, His brother, Frank Jr
26, an "artist-slash-writer-slash-
actor has written an adventure-
action story Underwood hopes to
produce.
Pictured here are Sylvester Stallone and Richard Crenna as Rambo and Trautman in the new hit
film'Rambo III The film shows pop hero John Rambo invading Afghanistan to rescue his only
friend. With friends like these the State Department doesn't need any enemies.
Run proves that it really is his house
BY CHIPPY BONEHEAD
SUffli Bov
"We've had a whole lot of su-
perstars on this stage here tonight.
But I want y'all to know one thing.
This is�MY HOUSE
So Run said. And so it was,
Sunday night at the Charlotte
Coliseum, the second floor of the
"Run's House" tour. Despite val-
iant efforts by the rest of the rap-
pers, Public Enemy, Kool Moe
Dee, DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh
Prince and EU, this building re-
mained under Run's control all
night.
Public Enemy were the first in
effect. Despite a strong version of
"My Uzi Weighs A Ton their set
was kind of dull. Chuck D. came
on too strong with the anti-drug,
anti-violence messages.
Flavor-Flave lightened things
up, but the highlight of all their
cuts was Terminator X's scratch-
ing. I'm surprised y didn't
play "Sophisticate . itch but
like all the other acts, they are
probably getting tired of playing
their hit singles over and over.
Kool Moe Dee busted out next.
He had a lot more to say to the
crowd, especially concerning his
feud with LL Cool J. To be fair, he
didn't dis LL bad, but it was obvi-
ous he enjoyed the loud audience
support in his court.
He did "How Ya Like Me
Now a rocking "Wild, Wild
West and a fresh preview of his
new single that's coming out next
week.
Jazzy Jeff, The Prince and
Readv Rock B. came out next. The
J
stories about Jeff's driving experi-
ences fell kind of flat even with
Ready Rock's sound effects.
But Jeff and Ready Rock's
"Human Jukebox vs. Scratching"
battle was amazing. You haven't
lived until you've seen Ready
Rock hold his own against two
turntables.
The duo had the deftest danc-
ers of all the acts, but Kool Moe
Dee's run a close second. Rap
concerts don't depend on the
special effects popmeisters like
David Bowie need.
Groups either have body-
guards standing around looking
bad, or have dancers. Thai may
have been one of Public Enemy's
failings, they had no dancers and
the guards kept pointing guns at
the audience.
But The Fresh Prince's lady and
her two companions had some of
the roughest moves since that
second or third Janet Jackson
video.
Jeff and the Prince did their big
hit, "Parents Just don't Under-
stand and mixed it in with the
earlier and structurally similar
hit, "Girls are Nothing But
Trouble
EU came out and framed a reg-
gae-tinged song with instrumen-
tal and reprise versions of "Da
Butt They were the only group
that used instruments during the
show, and thev showed the crowd
how glad they were to be back in
the Queen City by tossing shirts
and hats into the crowd.
By this time, the crowd on the
floor was crushed up against the
stage. After EU went off stage, it
took a while for the roadies to
strike the stage and set up for Run-
DMC.
But it was worth the wait.
"Beats to the Rhyme" started
playing, while descending plat-
forms brought Dee and JamMas-
ter Jay down to the stage. Run
climbed down a metal ladder and
Porno films are no longer in demand
(CPS)�It was a scene repeated
cm hundreds of campuses:
University of Missouri at Co-
lumbia students picketed the
campus showing of a porn movie
j in this case The Opening of
Misty Beethoven"�one night in
early April, and then retired to a
auditorium for a heated
te between Gloria Leonard
publisher of "Higher Sodety
and Delor es Alexan-
founder of Women Aga inst
phy.
�g news, however, is that
scene hasn't been repeated on
ery many campuses during the
987-88 school year.
In short, pom films are becom-
scarcer on VS. campuses,
ers mink it's because of
creasing competition from
taped sex movies, a creep
rear of controversy, changin g
tastes and maybe even
student consciousness.
The scarcity, asserts National
anization of Women's
Junior Bridge, is
rdne to all the work done over the
fears by all organiztiorta m the
women s movement to point out
where the fun ends and the harm
attribute it to money.
most a'
Sacarakis of
Pennsylvania, which
The
are violent films like 'Robocop
AtAri2ona$tateUniversity,me
most successful campus money
makers this year have been "The
Gods Must Be Crazy' "La
Bamba "Dim Sum and "Attack
of the Kilter Tomatoes reported
activities advisor Rosalyn Munk.
Nationwide, the most popular
movie rentals at colleges have
been "River's Edge "My Life As
A Dog "Koyaatusoatsi" and
She's Gotta Have It said Amy
Heller of New Yorker Rims,
which distributes second-rut
films.
If s a far cry from the contro-
versy sxvi anger that attended
movies like "Wanda Wraps Wall
Street "Debbie Does Dallas
"Deep Throat" and blue movie
"Students added Don Haley,
a publicist for several Los Angeles
X-rated movie theaters, "don't
have to go to a theater or a campus
showing. They go straight to the
video store
Videos, shown at home, also
relieve students of the embarass
ment of being seen at the more
public porn showings at campus
mmseries.
"We'd lose about half me audi
ence in 20 minutes Ross recalls
of his days of sponsoring dirty
movies at Tulane Uni
iney wereuiwappyur
sed at being lf
filled their desire to see wnat this
kind of movie was about?
With so much pom
stores, Munk added, "there's no
big mystery about these things
now
With the mystery gone and the
tttiHation readily available in
video stores, the controversy has
been harder to generate.
Yet some film sponsors com-
plain they need the controvery to
attract campus audiences.
"Another frat showed a double
feature of porn films recently
said Rick Ptghini, president of the
Northern IHinios University Tau
Kappa Epsilon chapter, which
sponsored a "Deep Throat"
screening last September. "There
was no protest, so wey didn'tget
as large a crowd as we got with
protesters"
Gordon Schell, Tualne's new
film advisor, said the most contro-
versy he's faced was last spring,
when his group announced it was
showing 5The Ro y Horror Pic-
ture Show" instead of a pom
movie, thus provoking a spate of
protest calls to his office.
festivals at the unrVersities of
Chicago and Tennessee, at Louisi-
ana State and Galtfotnlilttstile
of Technology, at DePaul and ht-
eratty hundreds of other schools
Mary � provoked Catholic pro-
tests at the universities of Okla-
homa (twice), Kansas, North
Dakota and Nebraska, among
other schools, to become me
year's most cesured film.
No one is sure what the general
student taste is governed by,
Lehigh's Sacarakis shrugged.
She does know ifs getting
touchier. The biggest controversy
she's encountered mis year wa�
about whether to advertise a stu-
dent film series with a
from the movie "The
ables" or a more erotic stifl from
"The Big Easy
The students who work wiml
Sacarakis chose the tame stut
"We don't want to deal with
those problems" said Leslie
Archer of the University of CalN
fomia-Davis's $H Club, which
used to raisemoriey by showing
"Misty BeeuteveaJF
These days. Archer
club would screer "
releases, not contro
HellerofNewYoi
pulled the curtain down as the
song segued into "Run's House
The marquis lights behind the
stage lit upand spelled out "RUN,
" as dry ice smoke flooded across,
bringing the bodyguards out on
stage.
Rub and Dee stalked back and
forth across the stage, whipping
out the words to "Run's House"
and "Rock Box Jay eventually
drifted to another set of turntables
on top of the marquis lights for
"Walk This Way "Mary, Mary"
and "It's Tricky
Most of the cuts they played
came off the "Raising Hell" Lp
and the new release, "Tougher
Than Leather The abbreviated
"Rock Box" was the only thing
they did off their first album, and
"King of Rock'except for the title
track, was all but ignored.
Their set was the longest by far
of anvone else's. Since they head-
lined (and have more albums than
anybody else) they had more lee-
way of what cuts they wanted to
do during the show.
Run sounded strong through-
out the show, evidently com-
pletely recovered from his col-
lapsed lung from a years or so ago.
Both boys have lost weight since
the days of "Raising Hell but
Run is again chubbing up.
Their set featured the most
pyrotechnics I've seen since Kiss
took off their make up. The best
effect was the shower of sparks
that exploded upward after "My
Adidas
For the finale, they did "King of
Rock When they hit the lines,
'To bum my house You must
use fire two giant columns of
fire spit up from both ends of the
stage.
The rest of the rappers and their
posses came out after that, and
milled around on stage as Run
and Dee finished the song. After
an hour and a half of Run-DMC,
and two hours of short sets split
between the other acts, the con-
cert was over.
Run only made one mistake
during his tenure as host of his
house. He told the audience, "1
don't see one motherfucker in the
house fighting I guess he wasn't
watching the scuffle over at the
soundboard.
The situation looked for a while
like it was going to escalate. But,
aside from that one incident, the
crowd, though hyped, was
pumped up for a good time.
And you can't blame the host
for doing his job.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 8, 1Q88
Campus Comics
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�The Li'l
Ahoy, crew! (I know that sounds gay, but I'm trying to come up with a new greeting,
everyone's tired of "What it is) This week, THRILL to new Hubie action in
"Overkill CHILL to those manic depressive students in "Campus Comics
SPILL to the new adventures of "The Law" and his new villain, Bubblebutt,
or whatever they call him. And get ready, this week begins the first
CONTINUING adventure of the most popular hero on campus, ARM FALL-OFF BOY! Oh, and for all you fan club members, sorry about the delay in your buttons and posters.
The posters will be done by the end of the week (if I can find that damn picture I drew) and the buttons-next week maybe? We will also list the roll call again next week, so there.
I also need a new "word" to end with. Feel free to send in suggestions. Sayonara!
The Student Place To
SELL Anything
AXD ALSO
The Place To Buy
Everything
?Faded Levi Jeans
Worn & Weary$3.95 Up
'Great "T" Shirts$1.95 up
�Beautiful Shirts & Tops$3.95 up
Beach Wear
Dress Wear
etc.
Used But LUce New
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"Bronson's -
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10:00 - 5:00 M-F 7RI) QQfifi
10:00 - 3:00 Sat. i OA'OOOU
SGA New
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rientation
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Any Campus
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Orientation
Program (NSICO)
Please Contact SGA Offices
at 757-6611 ext. 218
Dates: June 13,16, 20, 27, 30
July 7
Pirat
C
Pirate sophomore point u
his cat-quick speed and ab
E. Mcr
Eugene McNeill imprc
his 1987 NCAA appeararl
took sixth place m I
NCAA Track am
Championships in Euger
McNeill, who finis!
last year, ran a 20 -1 in
meter finals on Fnda
The race, one of th
challenging oi
produced a new NCAJ
and Field record as
Daniels of Miss - pi Stj
the race in 19 v 7 9 ndsf
McNeill also ran wit
100-meter relay team.
s which consisted of Euj
I Drugs
e
5�
w
NEW YORK
basketball star Spend r
says his cocaine add I
his career and mania
him to hire a mobster to
Paul VVesthead after
suspended Havwood dul
1979-80 NBA finals
"I left the (Los Angi
and drove oii in my Rj
night thinking one th
Westhead must die H
says in a first-person artii
? his cocaine addiction
I week's Teople ma g&z
Baseba

��
Greenville's Tom Mc
leading pitcher on Roj
School's unbeaten baset
announced lat month
plans to play baseh.
Carolina University am
coach Gary Overt on neel
Move, a right-hand. I
perfect 9-0 with four save
time including an earl
average of less than 2 Q
who is also a fine hit
Linkst
By DOUG JOHNS
Sports Writer
Most golf coaches w
worried about the proj
I fielding a team consn
primarily freshmer
sophomores for the fl
� season. But for East
Head Coach Hal Morns
I has guided the riratesl
I consecutive conference r
I was recently inducted
sGolf Coaches Assocw
; America Hall of Fame, th
I squad, with a few chang(
j the same one that captj
Colonial Athletic Assj
(CAA) conference cham
during the spring golf
The only player fj
I year's squad that willj
returning for the fall s
I Chris Reilly, who gTadl
� the spring. Reilly
Academic All-Americai
experience and leaders!
missed by the younger j
the team.
"When you have a yoi
i





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
IUNE8. 1988 Page 9
Pirate hoopsters look for big year on court
Pirate sophomore point guard Jimmy Hinton hopes to continue to excite Pirate fans in MInges Coliseum with
his cat-quick speed and ability to nab opponent's pockets of the basketball. (File Photo)
E. McNeill improves on finish
Eugene McNeill improved on
his 1987 NCAA appearance as he
took sixth place in this year's
NCAA Track and Field
Championships in Eugene, Or.
McNeill, who finished seventh
last year, ran a 20.61 in the 200-
meter finals on Friday.
The race, one of the most
challenging of the meet,
produced a new NCAA Track
and Field record as Lorenze
Daniels of Mississippi State won
the race in 19.87 seconds.
McNeill also ran with the 4 x
100-meter relay team. The team,
which consisted of Eugene and
Lee McNeill, Ike Robinson and
Junior Robinson, was among one
of the fastest fields ever to
compete in the championships.
Although they took a first-place
finish at the IC4 A Championships
two weeks ago, the team did not
advance past Thursday's NCAA
preliminaries.
Last year the team brought
home a fourth-place finish from
the NCAA's. All-American Lee
McNeill also, surprisingly, did
not advance to the finals in the 100
meters.
McNeill, who has advanced to
the finals for the past three years,
including a seventh-place finish
last year, finished third in his
preliminary heat. The top eight
times went on to compete in the
finals, but McNeill's 10.38 was
only the tenth best.
McNeill's best time of the year
was his 10.26 which qualified him
for 'he NCAA's.
Lee and Eugene McNeill's
competing for this season did not
end with the NCAA's. The duo
will compete as members of the
Mazda Track Club at the TAC
Championships to be held later
this year in Tampa Fl. June 23-25.
� CAROLYN JUSTICE
By PAUL DUNN
Spoils Writer
The 1988-89 Mens Pirates
basketball season guarantees to
"Rock Down" the house.
Coming off an 8-20 record last
season, with a squad consisting
mostly of freshman and
sophmores, the 1988-89 "Steele-
workers" will earn their much
wanted RESPECT.
The recruiting class was the first
for the second year coaching staff
as Steele was forced to sign last
years class after April signing
date.
The ECU team will experience
new growth with the signing of
six outstanding recruits.
"We are extremely pleased with
the group of young men and we
know that we filled much of our
needs Steele said. "We needed
players with size, who were fine
athletes and could shoot the
basketball. Dan Bell and Chris
Benetti (ECU assistant coaches)
did an excellent job of finding
young men who would fit into
our program both academically
and athletically
The freshman recruits are
Casey Mote (6-7, 185, Demorest,
Ga.); Jeff Perlich (6-2, 185,
Huntsville, AD; and Broke Bryant
(6-9, 230, Huntsville, Al.).
Mote was the all-time leading
scorer in school history at
Haversham Central High School
in Demorest, Ga. He averaged
20.3 points, 10.5 rebounds and
shot 63 percent form the field
during his senior year. He was
named to the all-area team and
was ab all-star at two different
B.C. All-Star Camps in Georgia
and Alabama.
Perlich was the second-leading
scorer in the Indiana high school
ranks last season as ne averaged
32 points p� game for
Chururubusco ! ;h School in
Fort Wayne. He is named the
Fort Wayne player of the year and
has been chosen for several
prestigious post-season all-star
games.
Schercr and Bryant both came
to ECU after playing together at
Grissom High School in
Huntsville. Scherer was named
the player of the year in
Alabama's hughest rated 6A
classification.
Schercr was also a first team all-
state selection and most valuable
player in the city of Huntsville in
leading Grissom to the Alabama
state champioship. He averaged
20.6 points per game, while
connecting on 82 percent of his
free throws and 55 percent of his
three-point field goals.
Bryant was the post man for the
state championship Grissom
squad as he averaged 19 points
and 9.3 rebounds, while
connecting on 81 percent of his
free throws and 58 percent form
the field. He was named the most
valuable player of the state
tournament as he averaged 29
points, eight rebounds and three
blocks during the three games.
Two junior college transfers
that will be wearing the purple
and gold. They are; Jerome Obey
(6-6, 225, from Calhoun
Community College in Decatur,
Al.) and Kevin Staples (6-5, 205.
from Southern J.C. in
Birmingham, Al.).
Obey was a highly-recruited
selection from Calhoun
Community College, where he
averaged 17 pionts, 8.2 rebounds
and had 98 blocked shots last
season. The 6-6, 225 pounder led
his Williamston (W.Va.) High
School team to the state
championships durng his senior
year.
Staples won two different slam-
dunk contests at B.C. All-Star
Camps in Georgia and Alabama
and helped lead his Logan
(W.Va.) High School team to
back-to-back state
championships.
Some returning players that
will bring much needed
leadership to the team includes an
alluminating list.
Gus Hill, (unior, will be
returning to fill his old shoesat the
forward position. Hill was first-
team all-conference and New-
comer of the year last season.
Second leading scorer of last
season, Reed Lose, junior, returns
for the guard position.
Kenny Murphy, senior;
impressive walk-on, returns to
carry out his highly needed
defensive skills.
Jeff Kelly, senior, will give the
Pirates some valuable time at the
guard position.
Blue Edwards, senior, will be
wearing the high tops this season,
after sitting out one season due to
ineligibility.
Assistant coach, Dan Bell,
stated, "We are expecting big
things out of Blue. Blue is a great
player and we are looking
forward to his needed
contributions
Coach Bell also stated, "We
have a strong team and staff. If we
can get the students and fans out
to ONE game; I guarantee they
will be back. We want to fill
Minges with roaring supportive
fans. Its time we get some
RESPECT. ECU mens basketball
is HERE!
"Drugs ruined Hay wood's life
With coach at hand, Hornets
turn attention to personnel
. . . . r. , , . , � j- � ic
NEW YORK (AP)�Ex-
basketball star Spencer Haywood
says his cocaine addiction ruined
his career and marriage, and led
him to hire a mobster to kill coach
Paul Westhead after Westhead
suspended Haywood during the
1979-80 NBA finals.
"I left the (Los Angeles) Forum
and drove off in my Rolls that
night thinking one thought�that
: Westhead must die Haywood
says in a first-person article about
his cocaine addiction in this
week's People magazine. "I drove
through the streets plotting the
man's murder
"In the heat of anger and the
daze of coke, I phoned an old
friend of mine in Detroit. . .a
genuine certified gangster . We
say down and figured it
out.Westhead lived in Palos
Verdes, and we got his street
address. We would sabotage his
car, mess with his brake lining
But the mother of the former
Olympic basketball star
persuaded him not to go through
with the plot against Westhead,
then coach of the Los Angeles
Lakers.
During the finals against the
Philadelphia 76ers, Haywood
passed out at a practice after a
night of smoking cocaine; that
was followed by an argument
with teammates Jim Chones and
Brad Holland. Westhead
responded with the suspension
following Game 3.
The Lakers went on o win the
NBA title under Westhead, who
now coaches basketball at Loyola-
Marymount University
Baseballers add Moye to team
Greenville's Tom Moye, the
leading pitcher on Rose High
School's unbeaten baseball team,
announced last month that he
plans to play baseball for East
Carolina University and head
coach Gary Overton nect spring.
Moye, a right-hander, was a
perfect 9-0 with four saves at press
time including an earned run
average of less than 2.00 Moye,
who is also a fine hitter, has
helped the Rampants to 21
consecutive victories prior to
entering the state 4A playoffs in
late May.
"We are very pleased to sign an
outstanding student-athlete in
TOm Moye said Overton, who
will enter his fifth season in the
spring. "We are projecting him to
become one of the starters in our
rotation
Moye is Overton's only signee
thus far, but he expects to sign ar
least one more prospect to a grant
this month. The Pirates lose only
two seniors off of the 1988 team
that finished 33-14.
Rose High's David Danieals, a
teammate of Moye, will also play
for the Pirates in the spring.
Daniels signed a grant to play for
the ECU football team in April,
and will play both sports.
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Now
that the Charlotte Hornets have
landed a coach, officials are
turning their attention to filling
the roster for the NBA expansion
team.
Already, the names of Utah's
Kelly Tripucka and Seattle's Tom
Chambers have surfaced as
possible acquisitions, Gene
Littles, director of player
personnel, told The Charlotte
Observer.
Littles said Thursday that
Tripucka might be easier to
acquire, having been hurt and
seeing little playing time at Utah.
But Littles said the Hornets would
probably have to assume most of
a salary reportedly as high as
$900,000 per season.
Chambers is available through
the new free-agency stipulations
of the collective bargaining
agreement, but he has said in
recent weeks that he would rather
stay with the SuperSonics, a
contender, than go to a lesser team
for slightly more money.
Hornets coach Dick Harter said
he may be more interested in the
expansion draft than with an
eighth or ninth pick in the rookie
draft. The Hornets and the Miami
Heat will flip a coin in two weeks,
with the winner deciding
whether to take the first pick
between the two teams in the
expansion draft or the higher pick
in the rookie draft.
Carl Scheer, Hornets' vice
president, said he'd rather have
three of the top five players
available in the expansion draft
than the eighth and 33rd picks
overall in the college draft.
While few details of Harter's
contract were available at the
announcement Thursday, The
Charlotte Observer in its Friday
editions quoted unidentified
sources as saying it stipulates a
two-year deal and some
compensation if he doesn't
continue with the club after two
years.
The pact also reportedly
contains retirement benefits, a
morality clause establishing
standards of behavior and
character and a stipulation that
Harter be available for civic
appearances. In addition to a
salarv, Harter reportedly will be
provided with a car and will be
given the opportunity to appear
on a radio or television talk show
Harter's s
revealed but N BA sources iu ute
newspaper a first-time h�d
coach currently makes aobut
$200,000 a season.
S
Linksters to field young, quality team
By DOUG JOHNSON
Sports Writer
Most golf coaches would be
worried about the prospect of
fielding a team consisting of
primarily freshmen and
sophomores for the fall golf
season. But for East Carolina
Head Coach Hal Morrison, who
has guided the Pirates to two
consecutive conference titles and
was recently inducted into the
Golf Coaches Association of
America Hall of Fame, this young
squad, with a few changes, will be
the same one that captured the
Colonial Athletic Association
(CAA) conference championship
during the spring golf season.
The only player from this
year's squad that will not be
returning for the fall season is
Chris Reilly, who graduated in
the spring. Reilly was an
Academic All-American, and his
experience and leadership will be
missed by the younger players on
the team.
"When you have a young team,
nobody will step up and take the
lead. Chris was a good leader, and
he was good for the younger
players. His leadership ability
will be missed Morrison said.
"We played primarily freshmen
this year, and I think that
inexperience was our biggest
drawback. In the fall all of the
players will have a year's
experience, and I think that this
will help us out, but we will still be
a young team he added.
Returning for the Pirates in the
fall will be Team Captain Mark
Hidlay, Atlantic Christian
College transfer Tee Davis,
Francis Vaughn, Simon Moye,
Jeff Craig, and Paul Garcia.
Morrison expects Hidlay to lend
to the team the leadership and the
experience that the young squad
will need. Also returning will be
John Maginnis, who did not play
during the spring season, but will
be participating in the fall.
There will also be some much
needed and much welcomed new
faces on the team, thanks to a
fruitful recruiting effort by the
Pirate coaching staff. Donnie
Cooper, out of Knoxville, Tenn is
a high school state golf champion,
as is Doug Hoey from Dearborn,
Mich. Hoey also captured the
State Junior Championship, a feat
which impressed Morrison.
"Most of the time, freshmen
don't come in and start playing
immediately, but we expect
Cooper and Hoey to step right in
and start for us he said.
Other recruits that may have an
immediate impact on the Pirate
line-up are Travis Wolfe, who
placed second in the Virgina high
school golf championship, and
Lennie Boyett, the only in-state
recruit, from Zebulon.
The Pirate golfers are slated to
participate in four tournaments
during the fall season. According
to Morrison, all of the
tournaments that ECU
participates in consist of a field of
18 to 20 teams, which gives the
Pirates an opportunity to tee up
with some of the top teams in the
nation.
The first of these tournaments
will be the John Ryan Memorial
Tournament held at Duke
University, where the Pirates will
meet teams from Duke, UNC,
N.C. State, Wake Forest,
Richmond, South Carolina, and
Georgia Tech.
The Pirates will then travel to
the prestigous Augusta National
Golf Course in Georgia to play in
the Augusta Invitational, where
they will challenge such teams as
Georgia, Tennessee, and
Kentucky, among others.
Then it's on to the Seascape
Invitational at Nags Head, which
is, according to Morrison, "like a
conference tournament for us
because most of the teams from
the CAA will be participating,
along with Temple, Maryland,
and Old Dominion.
The linksters will close out the
season with the Hargrove Davis
Invitational, being held at
Cambell University.
The ECU golf team will try to defend its two-year hold on the CAA golf
title with a young band of linksters next year. (File Photo)





10
Tl IE EAST CAROL INI AN
JUNE 8, 1988
Wilander half
PARIS (AP)� He's halfway to if anybody will get there It's still quarterfinals, has been No. 1 since court backhand passing shop,
accomplishing what no man has possible but it's still a dream winning the 1985 U.S Open "He was really like a
done in 19 years but Mats Also in the running for the Wilander ws ranked No. 3 bulldozer, Leconte said. All the
Wilander says winning the Grand Grand Slam this year is Steffi Graf, coming into Paris, but his victory time I was coming to the net he
Slam is "still a dream" who won the women's title is expected to push him past was passing me. 1 played poorly,
Wilander, showing why many Saturday by blowing out 17-year- countryman Stefan Edbcrg into
consider him the world's best clay old Natalia Zvereva of the Soviet the No. 2 spot,
court player, dominated France's Union 6-0, 6-0 in the most one- In Sunday's final, Wilander
Henri Leconte7-5,6-2,6-1 Sunday sided final in French Open used his counter-punching style
to capture the French Open for his history. Australia's Margaret to frustrate Leconte i
but he made made me play
badly
Leconte also hurt himself by
serving poorly and making
numerous unforced errors,
VILLAGE
Donna
Edwards
owner
second Grand Slam title of the Court in 1970, was. the last
year. He won the Australian Open woman to win the four major
in January. tournaments in the same year.
Fellow Swede Bjorn Borg in Wilander said winning the
1980 was the last man to win the French Open enabled him to
first two legs of the Grand Slam, accomplish one goal,
but the last to win all four "What's important to me is that
tournaments in the same year was I've won two Grand Slam
17,500 fans hoping to see him mostly on his backhand. In
become the first Frenchman since contrast, Wilander connected on
Rod Laver in 1969. Next up is
Wimbledon starting June 20,
followed by the U.S. open in late
August.
"Everybody's always on the
way (to the Grand Slam)
Wilander said after winning his
third title on the slow red clay of
Roland Garros. "But I don't know
tournaments in a row Wilander
said. "I've never done that before.
Now I have to win Wimbledon
and the U.S. Open
The 23-year-old Swede also
served notice that he could be
ready to challenge Ivan Lendl for
the No. 1 ranking. Lendl, who lost
to Jonas Svcnsson in the
Friendly golf round
winds up in lawsuit
GREENSBORO (AP) � A
friendly round of golf has led to a
lawsuit filed by one golfer against
a member of his foursome, whose
ball ricocheted off a tree and
struck him in the face.
The accident last September left
former Guilford College baseball
coach Stuart T. Maynard blind in
one eve. A lawsuit filed Friday in
Guilford Superior Court on
behalf of Maynard seeks more
than $10,000 in damages from his
golfing buddy, Gwyn Franklin of
Greensboro.
According to the suit, Franklin
tried to hit his ball through a
dense growth of trees toward the
13th green at Longview Golf
Course just west of Greensboro.
The ball, about 200 yards from the
green, ricocheted off a tree and
struck Maynard in the face.
Franklin was negligent, the
lawsuit alleges, because he did
not give Maynard proper
.sarning before he hit the ball.
Franklin also should have known
that if he hit the ball, it would
likely ricochet wildly and hit
someone playing in the adjacent
fairway, the suit said.
"The defendant is not a skilled
golfer, and he knew or should
have known that he had no
probability of driving his golf ball
��BHrVVS.
When you fill out your Form
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If ou can be claimed on your
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the- instructions that came with
your Form W-4 or W-4A.
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Yannick Noah in 1983 to win the
title.
Leconte served for the first set at
5-4,but double-faulted, made two
backhand errors and blew a
backhand volley to give Wilander
the break. The Swede then held
serve at love and broke again in
the next game, hitting a forehand
passing shot into the open court to
close out the set.
"The first set was very
important Wilander said. "If he
had been able to win it, he would
have had the crowd on his side
Leconte never was in the match
the rest of the way. He rushed the
net whenever he could, but
Wilander was invariably in
perfect position to rip a cross-
97 percent of his first serves.
Leconte, always second to
Noah in the hearts of French
tennis fans, got no help from the
crowd, many of whom whistled
in displeasure at his unforced
errors.
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through a thick stand of trees the
lawsuit says.
Maynard, 69, said he had no
hard feelings toward Franklin.
And Franklin said he was hoping
to play golf with Maynard again.
"We're looking forward to
when he can play golf with us
again said Franklin, a retiree.
"We play every day, but he
(Maynard) hasn't been playing
recently. I guess he wants to get
this settled before he starts
playing again
Beside the
Railroad Depot
Medical Students
The United States Navy is looking for applicants for
two, three, & four year medical scholarships. These
scholarships cover the full school-related expenses of
your medical education, as well as providing a per-
sonal allowance of $650 per month while you are in
school.
To qualify you must:
BeaU. S. citizen
Be enrolled in an AMA approved Medical
school, or AOA approved school of Osteopathy
Meet academic qualifications
Be physically qualified
Applications for scholarships are accepted each fall.
To learn more about Navy medical scholarships, with
no obligation, simply give me a call:
Contact HMC Norm Rogers
1-800-662-7568
History has proven that size and strength alone do not
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 8, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 08, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.610
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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