The East Carolinian, May 25, 1988






COMING NEXT WEEK:
An interview with SGA president Larry Murphy on
things to come.
FEATURES
Bonehead checks out the Hulk, see page 8.
SPORTS
ECU Tracksters head off to Oregon, see page 11.
She 3EaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 2
Wednesday, May 25,19SS
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 5,000
International focus brings acclaim to ECU
ECU News Kurcju
Fast Carolina University has
placed "heavy emphasis" on the
international sphere in itscurricu-
lum. research and service
activities.according to university
officials.
Fast Carolina University rec-
ognizes that we live in a global
economy and community of in-
terdependent nation-states said
Or. Maurice Simon, coordinator
of ECU's newly-established Of-
fice of International Studies and
Scholarships.
He said that through Its faculty
"and a very supportive admini-
stration ECU is engaging in a
"wide variety of activities that
provide opporunities for stu-
dents, faculty and the wider east-
ern North Carolina community"
to participate in international
programs.
"Students, faculty and adminis-
trators have gained or are gaining
the expertise and experience to
become valuable human re-
sourses tor business, trade, com-
merce and government in the in-
ternational sense Simon said.
1 le said the ECU faculty "has a
wealth of talented specialists" in
languages dominant in interna-
tional commerce. Also, the faculty
has experts who research prob-
lems trends in the international
economy and global business, he
said.
Simon, a professor oi political
science who chaired the political
science department before taking
the international studies post,
siad the existing expertise extends
across the university's faculty.
"Area specialists who teach in
the social sciencesand humanities
can provide useful background
information and long-term per-
spectives risk analyses � on
main- potential trading partners
he said.
"There are many multi-lingual
faculty members available tor
translation services and consult-
ing he said. In addition, he said
"cross-national research projects
in the sciences and in medicine a re
abundant, giving the university
Academic study abroad in
semester or academic year pro-
grams is available and many EC U
students participate.
For example, students may
spend the academic year or
semester abroad through the
"Cross-national rcscarcli projects in the science and in
medicine are abundant, giving the university interna-
tional recognition and prestige
Maurice SiniOn, Conrdinntoroflntcrnntion.il Studios
international recognition and
prestige
Among the programs and ac-
tivities are international area
studies programs in African Stud-
ies, Asian Studies, Latin Ameri-
can Studies and European Studies
available to students. Such stud-
ies are offered as minors and stu-
dents who participate combine
their education in a traditional
discipline with knowledge oi a
particular region of the world.
services ot te International Stu-
dent Exchange program, paying
only the normal tuition, housing
and fees plus travel.
Summer study in French lan-
guage and culture is featured in
an ECU-Sorbonne program, Ital-
ian language and culture in an
ECU-Ferrara Summer program,
British history, politics, literature
and culture in an ECU-American
Institute for Foreign Studies Lon-
don program, and a Dentral
The International Dinner, held yearly, is one example of how ECU students and faculty are exposed to
different cultures from around the world.
N.C. governer calls for tight
enforcement of drug laws
Governor Jim Martin today
announced a package d legisla-
tive proposals that would tighten
law enforcements grip on con-
victed drug traffickers by forcing
them to serve their full sentences
without benefit oi early release
from prison.
Under present law, a drug traf-
ficker can have his or her prison
term drastically reduced through
the award of credits, known as
time and gain time. A drug
iffi ker can become eligible for
after having served only an
of the original sentence.
itime torus to get tougher'
f , ernor Martin said. "It is time
ike our drug trafficking laws
d v hat they say
Governor Martin said he will
propose legislation that abolishes
parole and good and gain time
credits for convicted drug traf-
fickers. "Drug traffickers should
know that if they are convicted in
North Carolina they will serve
even- day of the sentence im-
posed by the courts Governor
Martin said.
The Governor is also proposing
an amendment to the current
Continuing Criminal Enterprise
Statutue to provide that drug
kingpins convicted of drug traf-
ficking under that law shall re-
ceive a mandatory likfe sentence
without benefit of parole or good
and gain time credits.
Governor Martin will ask the
General Assembly to perma-
nently enact G.S. 15A-622(h)
"Drug traffickers should
know that if they are
convicted in North
Carolina they will serve
every day of the sentence
imposed by the courts
�Governor
Jim Martin
which allows a district attorney to
convene a special investigative
grand jury for the purpose of
probing drug trafficking. Al-
though this law was adopted by
the General Assembly two years
igo, it is set to expire on October 1,
1988.
The Governor is also urging
legislative action on two propos-
als pending before the General
Assembly. 1 le is urging action on
H.B. 755, introduced by Repre-
sentative Charles L. Cromer (K-
Davidson), which designates
drug trafficking as one of the
iggravating circumstances that
can be considered in the imposi-
tion of the death penalty in first
degree murder cases.
The bill has passed the I louse
and is pending before the Senate.
Governor Martin in also support-
ing passage of S.B. 213, a measure
recommended by the Governor's
Crime Commission and intro-
duced by Senator Harold Har-
dison (D-Lenoir) that would
make it a felony to possess any
amount of cocaine.
This legislation is needed be-
cause of growing use of crack, a
deadly concentrated form of co-
caine which is oftne trafficked in
small amounts. Amendments
have weakened the bill and the
Governor is urging that it be re-
turned to its original strength and
adopted.
Governor Martin says he sup-
ports these proposals in an effort
to make the state's drug traffick-
ing laws as tough in practice as
they are on paper. "These are
tough laws which, if consistently
applied and effectively enforced,
would, I believe, be a major deter-
rent to drug trafficking in North
Carolina Governor Martin said.
American Experience including
language, natural history and
culture, in a summer ECU-Costa
Rica program.
ECU has signed educational
exchange agreements with a
dozen institutions in the People's
Republic of china and a growing
studentfacul ty exchange pro-
gram with China is developing.
The Office oi International
studies and Scholarships assists
ECU students in locating other
foreign study opportunities.
Through the Rivers Scholarship
Fund, some financial assistance
for overseas study is available for
qualifying students.
Fulbright research and teaching
grants have been awarded to a
number oi ECU faculty. Such
programs also bring foreign
scholars to ECU. Large numbers
oi students from Malaysia have
enrolled in ECU's programs ol
geography and planning in recent
years. The ECU Office of Coop-
erative Education is engaged in
locating student internships that
will prepare students for interna-
tional business - areers.
Through ECl s activities and
programs, citizens i eastern
North Carolina are able to attend
and participate in such public
forums as the annual Great Deci-
sions program which has focused
on Soviet-American relations, the
Middle East i - rrends in the
Global Ec militar, I - e in
international politic and Third
World populal � pr blci
1 )ui - 7 the area studies
programs at ECU ottered
svmp ��: i pen to the general
public v n !osta Kuan art and
culture, on the African Roots oi
- uthem Culture, and the future
: Korean democracy. Various
programs I ised on European
I
U.S. leaders say gaps widen
between ethnic groups today
WASHINGTON (AD �A
commission of political, civic and
education leaders said today
America "is moving backward"
in efforts to achieve equality oi
opportunity for blacks, I lispanics
and American Indians.
The panel, including former
Presidents Gerald R. Ford and
Jimmy Carter, called for renewed
efforts to close the economic, and
educational and social gaps be-
tween members of those mino-
roty gruops and the white major-
ity.
headers of The Commission on
Minority Participation in Eduac-
tion and American Fife were re-
leasing the report, "One-Third of
a Nation at a news conferance at
the National Press Club.
The commission was chaired by
Cornell University President
Frank H.T. Rhodes.
Without blaming any one party
or sector of society, it said, "In the
last 10 years, not only have we lost
the momentum of earlier minor-
ity progress, we have suffered
actual reversals in the drive to
achieve full equality for minority
citizens.
"America is moving backward
not forward in its efforts to
achieve the full participation oi
minority citizens in the life and
prosperity oi the nation the
commission declared in its
10,000-word report.
The commission called for "a
new vision oi affirmative action
around which a broad national
consensus can be formed
Two national education
groups, The American Council on
Education and the Education
Commission oi the States, estab-
lished the commission last fall to
address "a shared deep concern
over the faltering pace on minor-
ity advancement
The panel included business
executives, college presidents
three former secretaries of state
Edmund Muskie, William Rog-
ars and Cyrus Vance), Coretta
Scott King, former Secretary oi
Education T.FE Bell, baseball
commissioner PeterV. Ueberroth,
Ted Koppel of ABC television,
and the governors of Missouri.
Arkansas, Minnesota and New
Jersey.
However, Missouri Gov. lohn
Ashcroft daclined to sign the final
report. A spokesman for the gov-
ernor. Randy Sissel, said late
Sunday in letter-on Citv that
Ashcroft would have no com-
ment until today.
A spokesman for the American
Council on Education. David
Merkow it, said he didn't know
why Ashcroft refused to sign.
The con i i said the entire
nation will face a grim future
unless it finds v I overcome
dispai: - b( '��� een minorities
and whites in education em-
polyment, income, health, lon-
gevity and other basic measures
of well-beii
"The goal we sugg st is simple
but essential: that in 20 years, a
similar examination will reveal
that America's minority popula-
tion ha-attained a quality of life as
high as that of the w hite majority.
No less ,i goal is acceptable it
said.
It took thetitleof it-report from
President Franklin D. Roosevelt's
famous lament during the De-
pression in 1933 that, "1 see one-
third oi a nation ill-housed ill-
clad, ill-nourished
No mind is too small to sit on the wall. The message has been erased, but the sentiment is still there.
Reacting to the daily warm weather, ECU students annually flock to the wall outside of the Student
Store between classes to socialize, relax and enjoy the sunshine before heading back to the quick
pace of summer classes. (Jon Jordan � Photolab)





COMING NEXT WEEK:
An interview with SGA president tarry Murphy on
things to come.
FEATURES
Bonehead checks out the Hulk, see page 8.
SPORTS
ECU Tracksters head off to Oregon, see page 11.
She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. b3 No.
Wednesday, May 25,1988
Greenville, NC
12 Pages
Circulation 5,000
International focus brings acclaim to ECU
ECU News Bureau
East Carolina University has
placed "heavy emphasis" on the
international sphere in its curricu-
lum, research and service
activities.according to university
officials.
"East Carolina University rec-
ognizes that we live in a global
economy and community of in-
terdependent nation-states said
Dr. Maurice Simon, coordinator
oi ECU's newiv-established Oi-
fice of International Studies and
Scholarships.
lie said that through its faculty
"and a very supportive admini-
stration ECU is engaging in a
"wide variety of activities that
provide opporunities for stu-
dents, faculty and the wider east-
ern North Carolina community"
to participate in international
programs.
"Students, faculty and adminis-
trators have gained or are gaining
���"?� ��- ���'
the expertise and experience to
become valuable human re-
sourses for business, trade, com-
merce and government in the in-
ternational sense Simon said.
I le said the ECU faculty "has a
wealth oi talented specialists" in
languages dominant in interna-
tional commerce. Also, the faculty
has experts who research prob-
lems trends in the international
economy and global business, he
said.
Simon, a professor of political
science who chaired the political
science department before taking
the international studies post,
siad the existing expertise extends
across the university's faculty.
"Area specialists who teach in
thesocial scienccsand humanities
can provide useful background
information and long-term per-
spectives � risk analyses � on
many potential trading partners
he said.
"There are many multi-lingual
faculty members available for
translation services and consult-
ing he said. In addition, he said
"cross-national research projects
in the sciences and in medicine are
abundant, giving the university
Academic study abroad in
semester or academic year pro-
grams is available and many ECU
students participate.
For example, students may
spend the academic vcar or
semester abroad through the
"Cross-national research projects in the science and in
medicine are abundant, giving the university interna-
tional recognition and prestige
MaUrice SimOn, Coordinator oflnternational Studies
international recognition and
prestige
Among the programs and ac-
tivities are international area
studies programs in African Stud-
ies, Asian Studies, Latin Ameri-
can Studies and European Studies
available to students. Such stud-
ies are offered as minors and stu-
dents who participate combine
their education in a traditional
discipline with knowledge of a
particular region of the world.
services of te International Stu-
dent Exchange program, paying
only the normal tuition, housing
and fees plus travel.
Summer study in French lan-
guage and culture is featured in
an ECU-Sorbonne program, Ital-
ian language and culture in an
ECU-Ferrara Summer program,
British history, politics, literature
and culture in an ECU-American
Institute for Foreign Studies Lon-
don program, and a Dentral
American Experience including
language, natural history and
culture, in a summer ECU-Costa
Rica program.
ECU has signed educational
exchange agreements with a
dozen institutions in the People's
Republic of china and a growing
studentfacul ty exchange pro-
gram with China is developing.
The Office of International
Studies and Scholarships assists
ECU students in locating other
foreign study opportunities.
Fhrough the Rivers Scholarship
Fund, some financial assistance
for overseas study is available for
qualifying students.
Fulbright research and teaching
grants have been awarded to a
number of ECU faculty. Such
programs also bring foreign
scholars to ECU. Large numbers
of students from Malaysia have
enrolled in ECU's programs of
geography and planning in recent
years. The ECU Office of Coop-
erative Education is engaged in
locating student internships that
will prepare students for interna-
tional business careers.
Through ECU's activities and
programs, citizens of eastern
North Carolina are able to attend
and participate in such public
forums as the annual Great Deci-
sions program which has focused
on Soviet-American relations, the
Middle Fast Crisis, Trends in the
Global Economy, military force in
international politics, and Third
World population problems.
During 1987-88, the area studies
programs at ECU offered
symposia open to the general
public on Costa Rican art and
culture, on the African Roots of
Southern Culture, and the future
of Korean democracy. Various
programs focused on European
art, culture and politics.
I
U.S. leaders say gaps widen
between ethnic groups today
The International Dinner, held yearly, is one example of how ECU students and faculty are exposed to
different cultures from around the world.
N.C. governer calls for tight
enforcement of drug laws
Governor Jim Martin today
announced a package of legisla-
tive proposals that would tighten
law enforcements grip on con-
victed drug traffickers by forcing
them to serve their full sentences
without benefit of early release
from prison.
Under present law, a drug traf-
ficker can have his or her prison
term drastically reduced through
the award of credits, known as
good time and gain time. A drug
trafficker can become eligible for
parole after having served only an
eighth of the original sentence.
"It is time for us to get tougher
Governor Martin said. "It is time
to make our dnig trafficking laws
do what they say
Governor Martin said he will
propose legislation that abolishes
parole and good and gain time
credits for convicted drug traf-
fickers. "Drug traffickers should
know that if they are convicted in
North Carolina they will serve
every day of the sentence im-
posed by the courts Governor
Martin said.
The Governor is also proposing
an amendment to the current
Continuing Criminal Enterprise
statutue to provide that drug
kingpins convicted of drug traf-
ficking under that law shall re-
ceive a mandatory likfc sentence
without benefit of parole or good
and gain time credits.
Governor Martin will ask the
General Assembly to perma-
nently enact G.S. 15A-622(h)
"Drug traffickers should
know that if they arc
convicted in North
Carolina they will serve
every day of the sentence
imposed by the courts
�Governor
Jim Martin
which allows a district attorney to
convene a special investigative
grand jury for the purpose of
probing drug trafficking. Al-
though this law was adopted by
the General Assembly two years
ago, it is set to expire on October 1,
1988.
The Governor is also urging
legislative action on two propos-
als pending before the General
Assembly. He is urging action on
H.B. 755, introduced by Repre-
sentative Charles L. Cromer (K-
Davidson), which designates
drug trafficking as one of the
aggravating circumstances that
can be considered in the imposi-
tion of the death penalty in first
degree murder cases.
The bill has passed the Flouse
and is pending before the Senate.
Governor Martin in also support-
ing passage of S.B. 213, a measure
recommended by the Governor's
Crime Commission and intro-
duced by Senator Harold Har-
dison (D-Lenoir) that would
make it a felony to possess any
amount of cocaine.
This legislation is needed be-
cause of growing use of crack, a
deadly concentrated form of co-
caine which is oftne trafficked in
small amounts. Amendments
have weakened the bill and the
Governor is urging that it be re-
turned to its original strength and
adopted.
Governor Martin says he sup-
ports these proposals in an effort
to make the state's drug traffick-
ing laws as tough in practice as
they are on paper. "These are
tough laws which, if consistently
applied and effectively enforced,
would, I believe, be a major deter-
rent to drug trafficking in North
Carolina Governor Martin said.
WASHINGTON (AP)�A
commission of political, civic and
education leaders said today
America "is moving backward"
in efforts to achieve equality of
opportunity for blacks, Hispanics
and American Indians.
The panel, including former
Presidents Gerald R. Ford and
jimmy Carter, called for renewed
efforts to close the economic, and
educational and social gaps be-
tween members oi those mino-
roty gruops and the white major-
ity.
Leaders of The Commission on
Minority Participation in Eduac-
tion and American Life were re-
leasing the report, "One-Third of
a Nation at a news conferance at
the National Press Club.
The commission was chaired by
Cornell University President
Frank H.T. Rhodes.
Without blaming any one party
or sector of society, it said, "In the
last 10 years, not only have we lost
the momentum of earlier minor-
ity progress, we have suffered
actual reversals in the drive to
achieve full equality for minority
citizens.
"America is moving backward
not forward in its efforts to
achieve the full participation of
minority citizens in the life and
prosperity of the nation the
commission declared in its
10,000-word report.
The commission called for "a
new vision of affirmative action
around which a broad national
consensus can be formed
Two national education
groups, The American Council on
Education and the Education
Commission of the States, estab-
lished the commission last fall to
address "a shared deep concern
over the faltering pace on minor-
ity advancement
The panel included business
executives, college presidents,
three former secretaries of state
Edmund Muskie, William Rog-
ars and Cyrus Vance), Coretta
Scott King, former Secretary of
Education T.H. Bell, baseball
commissioner Peter V. Ueberroth,
Ted Koppel of ABC television,
and the governors of Missouri,
Arkansas, Minnesota and New
jersey.
However, Missouri Go v. John
Ashcroft daclined to sign the final
report. A spokesman for the gov-
ernor, Randy Sissel, said late
Sundav in Jefferson City that
Ashcroft would have no com-
ment until todav.
A spokesman for the American
Council on Education, David
Merkowitz, said he didn't know
why Ashcroft refused to sign.
The commission said the entire
nation will face a grim future
unless it finds ways to overcome
disparties between minorities
and whites in education, em-
polvment, income, health, lon-
gevity and other basic measures
of well-being.
'The goal we suggest is simple
but essential: that in 20 years, a
similar examination will reveal
that America's minority popula-
tion has attained a quality of lifeas
high as that oi the white majority.
No less a goal is acceptable it
said.
It took the title of its report from
President Franklin D. Roosevelt's
famous lament during the De-
pression in 1933 that, "I see one-
third of a nation ill-housed, ill-
clad, ill-nourished
No mind is too small to sit on the wall. The message has been erased, but the sentiment is still there.
Reacting to the daily warm weather, ECU students annually flock to the wall outside of the Student
Store between classes to socialize, relax and enjoy the sunshine before heading back to the quick
pace of summer classes. (Jon Jordan � Photolab)





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25,1988
Facts, pros and cons of condoms use
HEALTH COLUMN BYSHERRI
I'm considering the condom as
a contraceptive choice�Can you
tell me more about it?
A condom is a kind of contra-
ceptive method made from either
thin rubber or treated animal skin
sheath. The condom is to prevent
the transmitting of semen from
one person to another. It is worn
by the male by placing it over the
erect penis. Some condoms come
with a reservoir or a nipple end
which allows semen to collect
there. If the condom does not have
this special tip, one-half inch of
space should be left at the end to
prevent rupture and leakage.
Specific instructions for apply-
ing and removing condoms can
be found in condom packages or
WILSON
from your health care provider. If
the condom breaks or leads, a
foam or jelly spermicide should
be inserted into the vagina imme-
diately.
Condoms, if used correctly, arc
97 effective. In actuality, be-
cause some users are careless or
use it improperly, the effective
rate is 75-85. If spermicidal
creams or foams are used with
condoms, the effectiveness is
greatly increased.
Availablity is the major advan-
tage to using the condom. There
are different qualities of condoms
available, and many drug stores
carry them. The ones found in gas
station rest rooms usually are not
the higher quality condoms. The
ECU Student Health Service pro-
vides quality condoms at a lower
cost and men or women may
purchase them.
Another advantage of using
condoms is that it allows males to
take part in the responsibilty of
providing a contraceptive
method. The final advantage is
one that had been given much
attention recently. This is that
condoms may help in the preven-
tion of sexually transmitted dis-
eases such as gonorrhea, ch-
lamydia, syphilis, genital warts,
hepatitis, and other STD's. It has
been proven in a laboratory test-
tube that the spermicide Non-
oxynol-9 kills the AIDS virus,
there are some disadvantages
to using condoms. First, some
people feel it interrupts foreplay
to apply the condom immediately
before intercourse; although
other people feel it could be fun
and add to the foreplay. Second,
heat deteriorates rubber, so con-
doms should not be stored where
heat could destroy them, like
wallets or cars. Third, on rare
occasions, there may be an aller-
gic reaction to rubber condoms or
the lubrication in some condoms.
Some lubrications will deterio-
rate the rubber, such as Vaseline.
For this reason, lubricants should
notbe used unless it is known that
it will not harm the condom. A
common complaint is that con-
doms reduce the sensation during
intercourse, but now there are
many types that cause very little
loss of sensitivity.
As a contraceptive method,
condoms are effective, and their
effectiveness can be increased by
spermicides. The most important
thing to keep in mind, is that absti-
nence is the best contraceptive
method at 100 effectiveness.
Abstinence is also the best pre-
vention against STD's, but if you
plan on engaging in sexual inter-
course, using condoms may be
the best prevention method we
have against STD's. Overall, the
advantages gTeatly outweigh the
disadvantages. Therefore, con-
doms should be used during in
tercourse even if other forms of
contraceptive methods are being
used at the same time.
Memorial honors hostage held abroad
GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) �
The brother of a hostage in Leba-
non says acts of compassion such
as the dedication of a hostage
memorial here help families cope
with the uncertainty of their loved
one's captivity.
"We are heartened by the loave
and caring and understanding
we've been shown here An-
thony Cicippio of Pennsylvania
said Monday evening. "What has
been done here today is a true
example of the brotherhood of
man
Joe Cicippio has been a hostage
since Sept. 12,1986. He was acting
comptroller of the American Uni-
versity in Beirut when he was
kidnapped.
Donald Mell, an Associated
Press photographer who saw AP
correspondent Terry Anderson
kidnapped on March 16,1985,
described the kidnapping and the
fear that he felt at the time. Mell
suggested that those gathered in
Greenville also pay tribute to the
250 Marines who died in Lebanon
when terrorists drove a care filled
with explosives into their com-
pound.
"Terry and I covered that
story he said. "He was an ex-
Marine and I saw how affected by
it all he was
Maryland Hughes, accompa-
nied by her husband, Robert, said
she and the rest of the family of
Frank H. Reed are "touched by
the caring of the people of eastern
North Carolina Her father, tl.
director of a private school in
Lebanon, was captured Sept. 9,
1986. She said she is optimistic
that the hostages will be freed
soon.
An American flag honoring
each hostage was raised over the
memorial.
A portion of the ceremony was
dedicated to Terry Waite, tne
Anglican Church official who was
taken hostage as he worked for
the release of the previously cap-
tured hostages.
A flag dedicated to the missing
in action servicemen in Vietnam
also was raised over the memo-
rial.
Pot smokers protest errupts in violence
had left unmolested in past years,
Senators Kennedy, Helms have
hideaway offices in Washington
WASHINGTON(AP)�While
Sen. Jesse Helms and Sen. Ted
Kenncdv may have little in com-
mon on the floor of the Senate,
both have had access to the same
hideaway office in the Capital.
Helms is the most recent occu-
pant of the office, where he can
sometimes be been baging out as
many as 100 letters a week on a
manual typewriter.
Few people know about the
senator's hideaway offices tucked
away in the Capitol, a block away
from their public offices.
The Capitol sanuctuaries are
where the senators with enough
seniority to get one retrat to read,
rlax and reflect, the Greensboro
News & Record reported.
Barbara Lukcns, Helms' press
secretary, wouldn't guess how
much of Helms' day is spent in his
retreat because his staff often
doesn't know he's there.
The person on Capitol Hill who
perhaps knows most about the
hideaways is Bill Cochrane, a
North Carolina native who is
senior adi viser to the Senate Rules
Committee. The rules committee
decides which raking senators get
what hideaways.
"We don't make any secret of
who has a hideaway of ficc, but we
don't announce where they are
Cochrane said.
But to list the locations, he said,
"Would defeat the whole purpose
of the offices
(CPS) � The annual University
of Illinois mass marijuana smoke-
in started in 1977 as a defiant
protest of marijuana laws but fail-
ing in recent years as students lost
interest � erupted in violence
April 20 as police arrested 11 stu-
dents.
On April 21, students then pro-
tested the police crackdown on
the event, which the university
but were locked out of a building
they had hoped to occupy.
"There is growing public con-
cern about the tolerance of drug
abuse and trafficking UI Police
Chief Paul Dollins said in explain-
ing his troops' change in tactics in
treating "Hash Wednesday the
annual event, which this year
drew an estimated 600 students.
ZU? �at (Sarolinian
Serving the EZast Carolina, canipus community since 1925.
James F. J. McKee, Director of Advertising
Advertising Representatives
Ashley E. Dalton Scott Makey
Richard Alan Cook Spencer Meymandi
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
MONTHLY RATES
0 49 Column Inches$4.25
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One color and black$90.00
Two colors and black 155.00
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mm r-r-i i i �
UI allows firearms on campus
MOSCOW, IDAHO (CPS) �
University of Idaho students ha vc
won the right to keep firearms on
campus.
They will, however, have to
store them in special lockers.
UI officials decided in late April
to reject a Safety Office proposal
to ban guns from campus dorms,
and voted instead to build a spe-
cial school storage shed for weap-
ons.
"We want to preserve the op-
portunities for hunters to go hunt-
ing and at the same time we're
trying to greatly reduce the risk
that is present with our unregu-
lated system said Dean of Stu-
dents Services Bruce Pitman.
Idaho was one of the few cam-
puses � if not the only one � in
the U.S. to allow students to have
guns. In 1982, for example, Ten-
nessee legislators made posses-
sion of a gun or hunting knife on
campus a felony.
"The overwhelming majority of
universities in the United States
and Canada have a policy against
allowing students to store fire-
arms in their rooms said Dan
Keller, the director of public
safety at te University of Louis-
ville, who trains college law en-
forcement officers.
Even letting campus police
carry guns has been controversial
at some schools, though on April 1
Michigan State University police
switched to mew semi-automatic
handguns "to better protect stu-
der ts as well as themselves
safety chief Bruce Benson ex-
plained.
At Idaho, however, the issue
dealt with whether or not stu-
dents could join hunting season.
Pitman saw the storage area as a
compromise.
The area, he said, will operate
much like a safety deposit box.
"We'll provide a security system
for the first 2 or 3 levels of entry
into the area. And the final area
will be a locker in which the stu-
dents can use their own lock
Lets have some
Summer
5�
t�
?
ARMOUR
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n
ARMOUR STAR
All Meat
Wieners
MR TURKEY
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Senior citizen plan to be presented
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$
KROGER OLD FASHIONED
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LIMIT 2 WITH S10
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q�z�
8
Ct.
Pkg.
(NEW BERN) � "North Caro-
lina cannot afford to stand still on
the issues of concern to Senior
Citizens. In 1970 8 of our citi-
zens were 65 and older.
By 1992, just four years from
now, 13 of our population will
be over 65. "We have an obliga-
tion to see that our senior citizens
can live at home as long as pos-
sible � and that they can live in
dignity and in safety Lieutenant
Governor Bob Jordan said Friday
during the Founder's Day Cele-
bration of United Tri-County
Senior Citizens Inc.
The Lieutenant Governor
stated, "We must work to guaran-
tee that our senior citizens are not
institutionalized simply because
there is a lack of home-based care
in their community
Jordan called for a $5.6 million
program recommended by the
Study Commission on Aging to
be presented during the 1988
General Assembly Session. The
plan includes:
$720,000 for In-home health
services,
$2,000,000 for Transportation
assistance,
$720,000 for Senior Centers,
$1,000,000 for Family Car-
egivers and,
$600,000 for Information and
Referral Services,
In addition to State support,
Jordan pointed out the need for
strong community efforts. "It is
important that every community
in North Carolina develop a lead
agency to co-ordinate services for
the elderly. Likewise, we must
decide on a basic level of services
which will be available to seniors
across the state�regardless of
size, location or economic base of
the community.
INDIVIDUALLY
WRAPPED KROGER
American
Singles
HALF GALLON
ICE CREAM SALE
ALL NATURAL
BREYERS
$288 $188
KROGER
DELUXE
CREAMY OR SWEET COLE
SLAW. MACARONI
MUSTARD OR AMERICAN
POTATO
SALAD
Items and Prices Effective
Sun. May 22,1988 thru
Sat. May 28, 1988
��� .�
��� ��� '����
fo �Mm
Kro�r m
Ouanlltf Ri�M� R
Hon. Sold To D�al'
on 7
Go Krogering
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Logo winne
An East Carolina studenj
been awarded the winner ct
Hank's Homemade Ice C
Logo Contest.
Hank's Homemade Ice Ci
Frozen Yogurt and Sorbe
been running a logo contest
was open to all Fast Carolm
Students who are members
Commercial Art Club Sd
students participated in th
test which ended April 14
The winning entrv was i
oped bv Mike Iverson, a
Dakota native, who is a pre
ing senior at ECU. her i
Designer of the 1988 Bucc
Yearbook along with his
other responsibilities.
Iverson was a v.
cash prize bv Robert
ompson. President of HI
Homemade Ice Cream on
1988 at Hank's on 10th Stre
Judging was conduct
Craig Malmorsa, an ECU
sor. Mrs. Robert E. Morgai
Morgan Design and the cor
staff of Hank's Homemai
Cream.
Iverson will continue w
with Hank's Ice Crearr j
ing other new artwork whi
he used in the future.
The logo will used � r ;
ogn, signage, menu c
nesscards.hu si- �
well as for T-shirt and t
ECU summei
enrollment h
all-time liigV
GREENVILLE EnrollmJ
for the first session of surm
school at East Carolina Univcn
is a record 5,280 students, E
officials announced Saturday
It marks the first time that
rollmcnt for a summer sc r
exceeded 5,000, Registrar I
Ibert Moore said. The pi
high enrollment was 4,88$
1986. Last year's first ses;
drew 4,859 students, Moore
"It's exciting and we're
pleased said Dr Trentoi
Davis, director of summer scj
and associate vice chancello
academic support. "I feel thaj
greater reason is the more
dents want to take courses tovj
a degree to speed up their cjl
ation date
Also, Davis said, 'We alloc
more teaching positions thi
so we could add a greater vai
oi courses and more sec til
giving students a greater coj
selection. As a result we
more students coming from
institutions for credit to trai
back ECU also has made
greater availability- of sun
sources known tc Lhe state'
munitv colleges r.d has
Used summer school of i J
the state's newspapers U
third straight vear, Davis sal
Moore said the first -of
enrollment total includes
full-time undergrade
793 full-time graduate
There are 1,239 part-tim i
graduate students and )
time graduate students
The total enrollment i I
2,098 men and 3 182 vv
said.
the
water's ft)
at
Memorial





TUT. TASK AKOI.INIAN
MAY 25, 1988
e
it if you
vual inter-
- may be
lod we
trail, the
tweigh the
re con-
. in-
ns of
C being
araliniati
TISIG
i IS
V- �
U
r
1
Variety
Pack
�J99
59
Potato
Chips
88
i
N
POTATO
SALAD
279
lOURS EVER
vd C
ERYDAYJ
Greenville I
Logo winner
An East Carolina student has
been awarded the winner of the
Hanks Homemade lee Cream
1 Ogo Contest.
1 lank's Homemade ice Cream,
Frozen Yogurt and Sorbet has
been running a logo contest which
was open to all East Carolina Art
Students who are members of the
Commercial Art Club. Several
students participated in the con-
test which ended April 14.
rhe winning entry was devel-
oped by Mike Iverson, a North
Dakota native who is a graduat-
ing senior at ECU. Iverson is the
Designer of the 1988 Buccaneer
Yearbook along with his manv
other responsibilities.
Iverson was awarded a $200
cash prize
bv Robert G. Th-
ompson. President of Hank's
lomemade Ice Cream on May r,
1988 at 1 lank's on 10th Street.
fudging was conducted bv
Craig Malmorsa, an ECU profes-
sor. Mrs. Robert E. Morgan of I.
Morgan Design and the corporate
i of Hank's Homemade Ice
Cream
Iverson will continue working
with Hank's Ice Cream develop-
other new artwork which will
be used in the future.
The logo will used for cup desi-
gn, signago. menu cover, busi-
ness cards, business letterhead, as
well as tor T-shirt and ballons.
Michael Iverson, a former cartoonist for The last Carolinian,
won a recent contest with this logo for Hank's Ice Cream.
ECU summer
enrollment hits
all-time high
. I evv Hurcau
R ENVILLE Enrollment
r the first session of summer
school at East Carolina L'niversitv
- a record 5,280 students. ECU
fficials announced Saturday .
It marks the first time that en-
Iment tor a summer session has
exceeded 5,000, Registrar I. Gi-
M re said. The previous
h enrollment was 4,888 in
1986 Last year's first session
drew 4,859 students. Moore said.
"It's exciting and we're very
pleased said Dr. Trenton G.
Davis, director (if summer school
and associate vice chancellor tor
academic support. "I feel that the
greater reason is the more stu-
dents want to take courses toward
a degree to speed up their gradu-
ation date
Also, Davis said, "We allocated
more teaching positions this year
si we could add a greater variety
it courses and more sections,
ing students a greater course
selection. s a result we have
more students coming from other
institutions for credit to transfer
back ECU also has made the
ater availability of summer
source knewr tc the state's com-
munitv colleges ?r.ci has adver-
tised summer school offerings in
the state's newspapers for the
third straight year, Davis said.
Moore said the first session
enrollment total includes 3,079
full-time undergraduatcd and
: full-time graduate students.
rhere are 1,239 part-time undcr-
iduate students and 169 part-
time graduate students.
total enrollment includes
i(js men and 3,182 women, he
said.
Come on in
the
water's fine
at
Memorial Gym
Price family establishes ECU endowment
Professor Emeritus Charles L.
Trice and his familv have estab-
lished an endowment fund at ECU
to promote the study of military
and naval history. The fund hon-
ors Price's brother and is entitled
the Adrian Parks Price Jr Military
and Naval History Endowment
Visitors to ECU
IC U New Htirrau
A delegation of educators and
officials from the People's Repub-
licof China will visit East Carolina
University and the ECU School of
Business early next week. Hie
visit will be part of a continuing
exchange agreement between
ECU and Tianjin University.
"Hie Chinese officials will have
dinner Saturday with Chinese
members oi the faculty at EC I
The dinner will be hosted by Dr.
Philip C Cheng, ECU professor of
accounting, and Mrs. Cheng.
On Sunday, the delegates will
be guests at a beach picnic hosted
bvDr.and Mrs. 1 ouis W. Eckstein
of the School of Business.
A luncheon and business meet-
ing for Ihe guests will be hosted
Monday bv Dr. Eugene E. Ryan,
dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences, and Dr. Ernest B. Uhr,
dean oi the School oi Business,
and Mrs. L'hr will host a dinner
Monday evening.
The Chinese officials are Ma
Qing-Xiang, deputy director of
the Tianjin Bureau oi Higher
Education and vice chairman oi
the China Education Association
for International Exchange,
� -njin branch; Du Buying, presi-
ac-nt oi the Tianjin College of Fi-
nance and Economics, who are
the leader id vice-leader of the
delegation.
Also Ma Hong-shan, chief of
the Foreign Affairs Office, Tianjin
Bureau oi I ligher Education and
deputy secretary-general ot the
China Education Association for
International Exchange, Tianjin
branch; Tin Shu-Rong, vice sec-
turn chief of the Tianjin Planning
Commission, Science and I'ech-
nology Education Section; and Li
: i-Yuan, lecturer oi the Finance
department, Tianjin College ot
Finance and Economics, who will
be the group's interpreter.
A lovely sign of lovely weather. (Thomas Walters � Photolab)
GOODBYE TO HIGH CAD
THE INCREDIBLE CUPFUL
6V
TCBV
t j MS
A
�� � ' .� - imv, " �� " it taste oi
� . ihoul h.ilt
TCBV
� � � with
All HEPLEASURE. N0N1 Of IH1 GUILT. TCBV" Ih, (.iiiiiliit- Srslnjl
Fund.
Beginning with the 1989-90 aca-
demic vear, the fund will provide
grants to selected ECU history
faculty to assist with research and
publications. The chairman of the
Department of History will make
the selections based on recom-
mendations by the department's
research and publications
committee.
"My brother, Adrian, and I were
both in the service and could
appreciate and understand the
importance of the military said
Trice. "We hope this fund will
enable others to understand teh
significance of studying military
history
Price's wife, Dons; stepmother,
Muriel Price; and brother, John K.
True are assisting with the estab-
lishment of the fund.
Adrian Parks Price, r, who died
in April, 1987, was the older
brother of John and Charles Price.
After graduating from high
school, he joined the Navy in 1939.
I le served on the U.S.S. Texas, the
U.S.S. Bennington, and the U.S.S.
Saipan. He was in both the Pacific
and European theaters during
World War II and also served in
Panama.
Following the war, he main
tainod aircraft used during the
Icrlin Airlift. Also a veteran of the
Korean Conflict, he retired from
the Navy in 1959 with the rank ot
AMSC (Chief Aviation Structural
Mechanic). He moved to Ne-
lersev after his militarv retire
J
ment, where he worked for tfu
Kcebler Company and for Mon-
mouth County. He lived in
Greenvillle the last four years oi
his life.
Dr. Charles Price was in tht
Marine Corps from 194?-1946 and
was recalled to active duty from
1951-1953 during the Korean
( bnflict. I le retired with the rank
of Lieutenant Colonel. 1 r Price
received his B.S degree in history
from Davidsonollege in 194
his M. A. in 1951 and PhD. in 1959,
both from the L'niversitv North
Carolina, Chapel 1 lill. I le taught
history for a year at West Georj i
College before joinii
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1988 I
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�te East (ttaruliman
Clay Deanhardt, c��r.i �,�,
Carol Wetherington, MuPnt &�
JAMES F.J. MCKEE, Director of Adotrtismt
Tim Hampton, New.Edu,
Tim Chandler, sp eu,
John Carter, F�h�� &��
Michelle England, om
Debbie Stevens, s�r�y
May 25, 1988
OPINION
Jeff Parker m�
TOM FURR, Circulation Manager
Mike Upci iurch, � m�p
John W. Medlin, a iw�.
MAC CLARK, Business Manager
Page 4
Crackin' down
Martin is proposing stronger
drug laws for North Carolina
The first week in May, Governor
Martin announced a package of leg-
islative proposals that would en-
force the sentences imposed on
drug traffickers. Trafficking is de-
fined as the willful possession, with
the intent to sell or distribute, in any
way, to another person. Under these
strict proposals, offenders will not
be eligible for parole; there will be
no credit gained for good behavior.
So where do students fit in here?
It's a known fact that our state is
cracking down on drug misuse. It's
a known fact that high school and
college students contribute largely
to the user population. Many
people have seen their friends go to
court on various drug charges: pos-
session of a drug substance and
possession with intent to sell being
the primary ones. Many times have
we seen these people released on
probation, fined, sent to drug reha-
bilitation centers and some even
jailed.
But now things are changing.
Some may say, oh man, how many
years can .5 grams get a person?
Well, under Martin's proposals,
you'll get the same amount of time,
but there will be no reprieves, no
suspended sentences and no proba-
tion. These charges will be even
more severe and carry a stronger,
more effective penalty. With the
maximum sentence on drug-related
charges ranging from 5 years for
one ounce of cocaine, to a maximum
of 40 years for one pound of cocaine,
a student's college career could be
ruined if he is made to sit in prison
full-term. It's hard simply getting
started with a drug-related past,
especially with some of today's
employer's policies. Imagine trying
to live down a record that shows you
spent years in prison for possessing
or trafficking drugs.
Many will agree that drugs are not
worth the risk. But how many ECU
students, future ECU students or
past ECU students felt is and was
worth the risk? How many pos-
sessed, sold and trafficked drugs
and got away with it? How many
will possess, sell, traffick and get
caught? Is it worth the risk? How
many people will throw away a fu-
ture behind a nice polished desk,
income of forty or fifty thousand
dollars because they got caught up
in the drug scene? Those of you traf-
ficking now, while attending col-
lege, how much money and time
will be wasted if you're caught?
On an even more serious note,
drug kingpins convicted of traffick-
ing, under Martin's new proposals,
will get a mandatory life sentence�
without benefit of parole, ever.
These proposals are being viewed
and accepted by many. Even if some
proposed amendments weaken the
main drug proposals, they can and
will still be detrimental to students
who unwisely gamble in the drug
business.
As part of the responsiblity that
befall students and adults we must
make sure our futures are secure.
Drug involvement in any form takes
away that security. Granted, drug
dealing will be around until the end
of time, but you don't have to be a
part of it.
Reagan1fs drug policy is clear
By FRED BARNES
THE NEW REPUBLIC
President Reagan's line on the war
against drugs is loud and clear. We're
winning. In his State of the Union ad-
dress on Jan. 25, he heralded "an untold
American success story the decline of
cocaine and marijuana use by teenagers.
At the White House Conference for a
Drug Free America on Feb. 29, he saidI
believe the tide of the battle has turned,
a nd we're beginning to win the crusade
for a drug-free America And when he
spoke to the American Society of News-
pa per Editors on April 13, he tacked on
a paragraph about "signs of progress"
in the drug war. "We've stopped
America's free fall into the drug pit he
said. "We're getting our footing to
climb out
Reagan may believe his own cheer-
leading, but practically nobody in his
administration does. This was painfully
evident on April 22 at the White House
meeting of the National Drug Policy
Board. Presentation after presentation
stressed the shortcomings in the
administration's sffort. "I don't know
how I can honestly be very optimistic
about the war on drugs said Health
and Human Services Secretary Otis
Bowen. Education Secretary William
Bennett said, "We're not perceived as
winning this war Francis Keating, an
assistant treasury, likened the drive to
interdict drugs at the border to "build-
ing a 25-foot wall and facing 30-foot
tides
When the presentations stopped,
Reagan ordered a 30-day review by the
drug policy board of the
administration's drug-fighting capabil-
ity. Marlin Fitzwater, the White House
spokesman, announced that the board
will recommend ways "for increasing
the federal effort against drug suppliers
and users
Don't get your hopes up. The
review's emphasis, White House aides
said, will be on more of the same-more
massive drug testing, more drug treat-
ment centers, more talk about "zero
tolerance" of illegal drugs. What won't
hapen is an invigorated attack on drugs.
The administration is too divided for
that.
The drug debate inside the admini-
stration is three-sided. The dominant
faction, led by Attorney General Edwin
Meese, wants to get tough with drug
users. Two days before the meeting at
the White House, he told a gathering of
mayors that drug testing should be
required of all American workers, not
just federal employees. The goal, he
said, is "zero tolerance of drugs in any
place, anytime Allied with Meese is
Ian McDonald, the director of the Drug
Abuse Policy Office at the White House.
McDonald followed Bowen at the meet-
ing with Reagan and praised a state
program suspending the driver's li-
cense of anyone caught with drugs and
another requiring jail sentences for us-
ers.
The leftist faction, led by Bowen,
stresses education and rehabilitation.
"Consistent non-use messages must be
driven home by the family, the church,
the workplace, schools, governors, local
officials Bowen said at the meeting.
"As for treatment, we need more re-
search to improve the efficacy and effi-
ciency of treatment strategiesAnd we
need to get both the public and private
sectors involved
The rightist faction, led by Bennett, is
wary of more treatment centers. As
usual, Bennett is allied with Gary Bauer,
the White House domestic adviser, and
William von Rabb, the commisioner of
customs. They point to a recent analysis
of treatment programs in Washington
which foundd that a third or less of
heroin, PCP and cocaine users com-
pleted treatment, and that of those who
did a majority were back on drugs
within a year.
Bennett's chief aim is to get the mili-
tary more involved. He has sent memos
to Meese on this subject ("the military
should do to the drug barons what our
forces in the Persian Gulf did to Iran's
navy"), dispatched aides to the Penta-
gon and lobbied Pentagon officials.
He's gotten nowhere. Daniel Howard,
the Pentagon spokesman, says the mili-
tary is doing plenty and is restricted by
law from doing much more. Defence
Secretary Frank Carlucci says he's
"against giving the military arrest au-
thority or getting them into law enforce
ment
At a March session of the drug policy
board, Bennett clashed with William
Taft fV, the deputy defence secret a rv.
Bennett said the Pentagon should de-
ploy 15 to 20 more helicopters to attack
drug factories ou tsidc the Uni ted Sta Us.
as was done in Bolivia in 1986. Taft said
that would be too costly. He also said
the use of American helicopters would
only stir anti-Americanism. "Then put
Daniel Ortega's picture on the side oi
them Bennett shot back.
White House aides concede the ad-
ministration may be in for a hard time
this fall. Democrates, especially Jesse
Jackson, are trying to make "the drug
issue the foreign policy issue of 1988 as
one aide put it. Jackson calls for a drug
czar to coordinate all the agencies in the
drug war, more money for the Coast
Guard and possible use of the military.
Micheal Dukakis says roughlv the
same, and he sounds both nationalistic
and assertive.
The White House doesn't. Reagan
opposes a drug czar on the ground that
it would necessitate more "big govern-
ment (The Bennett faction wants one.
But even surveys conducted for the
White House by pollster Richard Wirth-
lin in February found the public wants a
large federal role in fighting drugs.
Asked who should do the most to fight
drug use, 55 percent said the federal
government. The poll also found that
while Reagan's standing in the drug
fight remains high-nearly two-thirds
favorable-about the same percentage
think the drug problem is getting worse.
That means the topic oi drugs is
bound to be a political problem for
Bush. He needs a drug program, and, as
luck would have it, his aides are consid-
ering one to restucturc the
administration's entire anti-drug effort.
In addition, he likes the idea of an inter-
national military force, including U.S.
forces, to interdict drugs. A drug czar
"We may be for it a Bush adviser says.
"It can't hurt It can't hurt Bush in the
campaign, at any rate.
AIDS
(CPS) � In what could
first on many college AIDS r
to come, the approach of a
April blood drive scared a
portion of the Clarion L'niv
of Pennsylvania commumn
worrying that AIDS (accj
immune deficiencv svndi
was loose on campus
"This is absolutelv rumor!
no truth to it Patricia Bledj
the campus Red Cross d
told The Clanon Call, tr
Racial h
universi
The anti-r .
tests that have closed up
mgs. attracted police, pr
suspensions and sit-ir
ally rocked do? r
recent months are, in I
changes at American colk
ts and . tost rversi
Scores oi schools ha-
tougher penalties for st
who engage in ra
Others have adopted m
gressive prograi toi ruj
minority students and
members, and the efi rl
ingtopay fi
The L'nu rsity ol
example, on Api
announce I Ireci
black facul
At the ;J
Un:
found mir i
lions for the fall. 1
morenumerou over
"Pi Dr. Del
Austin of the Ur
forma at S arbara
placed these iss t the to
agenda insl
the middle
"The chag -
about said Barbara Kai
grad student and anti- ra
tivist at the Uravers
gan. area direct i
efforts
Ransby remains �
however. etend
about broad public reJatic
ments by administral
'Our ?� . - r re-
promises
ECU Sp
ECU has been sete
site for the first Governor
guage Institute tor j
Teacherv one of thro
tutions planned this sum
promote second language!
tion in North Carolina
The institutes are beu
ducted to serve approximj
public and private school
ers of French, Germa
ish from throughout the !
next year, the Govemo
guage Institute program H
have tour sites to acco
these language- and Latii
Governor Martin feej
"learning languages i
inglv important to the eo
political and social
state.
Professor Manolita Bu I
ECU Department of Fc
Nicaragua's economy nine years after war
In July 1979, folowing a bloddy struggle, the
people of the small Central American nation of
Nicaragua (current population approximately 3.5
million) succeeded in toppling the U.Sbacked,
fight-wing Somoza dynasty, which had subjected
the country to a brutal, corrupt military dictatorship
for forty-five years. Nicaraguans were led in this
st niggle by the Sandinista Front for National Libera-
tion (FSLN), an organization which was founded in
1961 but only became capable of mobilizing massive
popular support in the late 1970s.
Today, nine years after the Somoza dynasty's
ouser, Nicaragua is a land marked by a number of
striking features. It is a poor country, even by
Central American standards, with and antiquated
economy, minimall industrial infractructure, and a
capitall city still in ruins from the 1972 earthquake. It
is a young country, with half the population under
flic age of fi fteen and a high birth rate. It is a devoutly
Catholic country, whose Church is sharply divided
between a conservative hierarchy, which is vocally
critical of the changes underway in Nicaragua, and
a grassroots movement that subscribers to the tenets
of liberation theology and supporters the Revolu-
tion as a vehicle for realizing a Biblically mandated
'option for the poor
The Nicaraguan economic picture is every bit as
complex as the nation itself. The country's economy
cannot be neatly categorized as either capitalist or
socialist. Like political pluralism, a mixed economy
is formally guaranteed in the new constitution, and
that pledge has so far been respected in practice. The
government is simply too pragmatic to saddle itself
with responsibility for administering a larger share
of the economy, since it is painfully aware that it is
barely up to supervising the portion already under
its jurisdiction. Besides the state's firm hold on a few
strategic points of the economy�most notably
banking and foreign trade, both of which have been
completely nationalized�it has a degree of influ-
ence disproportionate to its percentage of owner-
ship, enabling it to steer the economy in the general
desired direction without directly controlling every
aspect of it.
In turn, Nicaragua is currently plunged in a se-
vere economic crisis characterized by periodic short-
ages of many basic goods, skyrocketing inflation
(over 2000 last year, the highest rate in Latin
America), and acute scarcity of foreign exchange,
and a bulging trade deficit and foreign debt. This
crisis has several causes. The most immediate, and
serious one is the U.Sbacked contra war, which has
cost Nicaragua millionsofdollars in direct economic
damage, lo�t production, and foregone investment.
It has forced the goverment to shift scarce resources
from programsss promoting economic growth to the
war effort. The U.S. trade embargo and the credit
boycott the Reagan Administration has orchestrated
In the multilateral lending agencies has com-
pounded the war's impact by drastically curtailing
Nicaragua's access to foreign exchange and spare
parts.
This is not to say that U.S. policy is the sole source
of the economic crunch. Governmental mismanage-
ment has also contributed to the present mess. There
is no question that the government has been guilty of
its share of major policy blunders. The most obvious
and costly one was its overemphasis on the state
agricultural sector in the early years of the REvolu-
tion, which had the effect of depriving campesinos
(peasants) of an incentive to work, resulting in a
sharp drop in productivity. The Sardinnistas have
since recognized and redressed this mistake, even
going so far as to breaklc up a number of large state
farms into smaller plots, which are then turned over
to landless agricultural laborers.
There is another factor at work behind
Nicaragua's current economic woes, a deeper-
rooted, structural one that will be harder to deal with
then either Sandinista mismanagement or the war.
Like many Third World nations, Nicaragua's ex-
ports are mainly primary, agricultural products
(coffee, cotton, sugar, beef, etc.), and it has to import
manufactured goods, industrial parts, and oil. As a
result, the country has fallen victim to a phenome-
non known as the 'declining terms of trade its
export earnings gradually fall while the cost of its
essential imports steadily rises, producing an ever
wider trade deficit. This year Nicaragua's exports
are expected to net about 250 million dollars while its
imports are projected to cost close to 800 million.
Nicaragua is not the only nation to experience this
trend, many Third World and, in particular. Central
American countries, suffer from the same affliction.
None of Nicaragua's neighbors are much better off
economically, despite often massive infusions of
economic aid from the U.S. This structural economic
problem iscompounded by the fact that, because the
exact course and denouement of the revolutionary
process remain in doubt, Nicaraguan entrepreneurs
feel deeply uncertain about their future pro-
spectsssssss, and therfore are hesitant to invest The
result is that the economy suffers from a critical
shortage of private investment, which public funds
can only partially offset.
Even with peace and the most competent econo-
mists imaginable at the helm, Nicaragua would be
undergoing severe economic troubles. It has essen-
tially been dealt a losing hand in the international
economic system, and it's going to take the govern-
ment a long time to restructure the economy suffi-
ciently to alter this fact. But no significant improve-
ment in the economic situation is possible until the
war ends.

�'00
These students enjoy tt
Tans, sunglasses and n
WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
The
COMcdY
ZONE
WED
The
CoMedY
ZONE
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25, 1988
s clear
Frjnk Carlucci says he'f
; the military arrest au-
ettinc them into law enforce
. March session oi the drug policv
Bennett clashed with William
. the deputy defence secretary
tt said the Pentagon should cle-
� � 2 more helicopters to attack
� ries outside the United States,
done in Bolivia in 1986. Taft said
mid be too costly. He also said
� American helicopters would
ir anti-Americanism. "Then put
Ortega's picture on the side of
Bennett shot back.
hite House aides concede the ad-
btration mav be in for a hard time
r I. Democrates, especially Jesse
n, are trying to make "the drug
� the foreign policv issue of 1988 as
ude put it. Jackson calls for a drug
coordinate all the agencies in the
war, more moncv for the Coast
rd and possible use of the military.
Dukakis says roughly the
and he sounds both nationalistic
isertive.
;te House doesn't. Reagan
i drug czar on the ground that
-sitate more "big govern-
e Bennett faction wants one.)
ven surveys conducted for the
by pollster Richard Wirth-
uary found the public wants a
federal role in fighting drugs.
?d who should do the most to fight
use. 55 percent said the federal
?rnment. The poll also found that
. Reagan's standing in the drug
umains high-nearlv two-thirds
Irable-about the same percentage
. the drug problem is getting worse,
kat means the topic of drugs is
I � be a political problem for
. He needs a drug program, and, as
would have it, his aides are consid-
jg one to restucture the
ition's entire anti-drug effort.
P he likes the idea of an infor-
mal military force, including U.S.
S, to interdict drugs. A drug czar?
may be for it a Bush adviser savs
in't hurt It can't hurt Bush in the
n, at anv rate.
r war
gradually fall while the cost of its
steadily rises, producing an ever
:it. This year Nicaragua's exports
?t about 250 million dollars while its
toted to cost close to 800 million.
3t the only nation to experience this
d World and, in particular, Central
pes, suffer from the same affliction.
ia's neighbors are much better off
�spite often massive infusions of
i the U.S. This structural economic
)unded by the fact that, because the
denouement of the revolutionary
i doubt, Nicaraguan entrepreneurs
certain about their future pro-
therforeare hesitant to invest. The
economy suffers from a critical
te investment, which public funds
offset.
ce and the most competent econo-
at the helm, Nicaragua would be
ire economic troubles. It has cssen-
a losing hand in the international
, and it's going to take the govern-
to restructure the economy suffi-
us fact. But no significant improve-
foomic situation is possible until the
AIDS anxiety strikes in northern college
(CPS) � In what could be the
first on many college AIDS panics
to come, the approach of a mid-
April blood drive scared a good
portion of the Clarion University
of Pennsylvania community into
worrying that AIDS (acquired
immune deficiency syndrome)
was loose on campus.
"This is absolutely rumor, with
no truth to it Patricia Bledsoe of
the campus Red Cross chapter
told The Clarion Call, the student
paper.
Bledsoe was reacting to a rumor
that a January campus blood
drive had turned up 15 people
who had AIDS, an invariably fatal
virus that destroys victims' im-
mune systems.
AIDS can be spread through
sexual contact and the sharing of
intravenous needles with infected
people. In 1985, blood banks dis-
covered some of their supplies
were infected with the AIDS vi-
rus. They now routinely test sup-
plies for the virus before using
them.
Blood bandks also routinely
"defer" donations given by
people with colds, who are using
some kind of medication or, per-
haps, have the flu.
Bledsoe guessed the blood bank
may have "deferred" several such
flu cases in January, and that the
action subsequently was attrib-
uted to AIDS.
But a new federal program,
which will anonymously test
some 30,000 collegians for AIDS
nationwide during the 1988-89
school year, suggests the Clarion
scare won't be the last.
The Centers for Disease Control
(CDC) in Atlanta said in April it
would anonymously test student
blood samples for the AIDS virus
at 30 campuses across the coun-
try.
In the program, students won't
know when some of the blood
they've given � either as a dona-
tion or as part of a physical exam
at their campus clinics � is sent to
theCDCforAIDStsting,orevenif
their campus is one of the 30
schools the CDC is trolling for
blood.
They also won't know the test's
results, Dr. Margaret Bridwcll
said in announcing the program
in early April.
The program's purpose, Brid-
well explained, was to find out
how widespread the virus is an
American campuses, and help
discover if it has infected signifi-
cant numbers of women and
heterosexual males.
"There are no grounds for anxi-
ety counseled Miguel Garcia-
Tunon of the Ameriacan College
Health Association when asked if
the secrecy of the program might
not provide fertile grist for ru-
mors and fears,
�n-save ���������
Racial tensions bring reform, unrest to
universities around the nation
(CPS)� The anti-racism pro-
tests that have closed up build-
ings, attracted police, provoked
suspensions and sit-ins and gener-
ally rocked dozens of campuses in
recent months are, in fact, forcing
changes at American colleges, ac-
tivists and observers now say.
Scores of schools have adopted
tougher penalties for students
who engage in racist behavior.
Others have adopted more ag-
gressive programs to recruit more
minority students and faculty
members, and the efforts arc start-
ing to pay off.
The University of Georgia, for
example, on April 28 proudly
announced it had recruited 15 new
black faculty.
At the same time, a Brandcis
University poll of 13 peer schools
found minority stvidcnt applica-
tions for the fall, 1988, term were
more numerous than ever.
"Protests said Dr. Dolores A.
Austin of the University of Cali-
fornia at Santa Barbara, "havbe
placed these issues at the top of the
agenda instead of the bottom or
the middle
"The chages that have come
about said Barbara Ransby, a
grad student and anti- racism ac-
tivist at the University of Michi-
gan, "are a direct result of student
efforts
Ransby remains cautious,
however. "We tend to be skeptical
about broad public relations state-
ments by administrators
"Our focus is on results, not
promises
Protests against campus racism
have occurred at the universities
of Massachusetts, Vermont,
Michigan, California-Berkeley,
Iowa and at Dartmouth College,
Penn State, Hampshire College,
Williams College and scores of
other schools in recent months.
In response, many schools an-
nounced broad new programs to
solve racial problems.
Notre Dame, for one, estab-
lished a $12 million plan to in-
crease its undergraduate minority
population from 11 percent to 15
percent by 1992.
North Carolina State pledged to
hire more black faculty members
and expand its African-American
Studies curriculum. The U iversity
of Colorado began working with
its black students to further in-
crease black enrollment. The Uni-
versity of Nebraska appointed
al 1 -member commission to inves-
tigate the school's problems in
recruiting minorities.
While Ransby says those efforts
may gbe sincere, she calls them
"concessions" to minority de-
mands, not "independent innova-
tions
"It's understandable to be
skeptical said Meyer Weinberg,
a University of Massachusetts
education professor who has stud-
ied campus racism.
Ransby's University of'Michi-
gan, he-said, farled'J ta reach a
court-mandated goal of 5 percent
black enrollment last fall despite
repeated vows to do so. "The uni-
ECU Spanish institute
ECU has been selected as the
site for the first Governor's Lan-
guage Institute for Spanish
Teachers, one of three such insti-
tutions planned this summer to
promote second language educa-
tion in North Carolina.
The institutes are being con-
ducted to serve approximately 60
public and private school teach-
ers of French, German and Span-
ish from throughout the state. By
next year, the Governor's Lan-
guage Institute program hopes to
have four sites to accomadate
these languages and Latin.
Governor Martin feels that
"learning languages is increas-
ingly important to the economic,
political and social life of our
state "
Professor Manolita Buck of the
ECU Department of Foreign Lan-
guages and Literature will be di-
rector of the Spanish Institute at
ECU. The staff will include Dr.
Michael Schinasi and Mrs. Raquel
Manning of the ECU foreign lan-
guage department.
The institute will be open to
approximately 20 Spanish teach-
ers from grades six through 12.
The program consists of an inten-
sive four-week residential lan-
guage institute, using only the
language that they are studying,
to communicate.
Dates of the institute are June 27
through July 22. Governor Martin
is scheduled to attend the open-
ing session at 9 a.m. June 27 in the
foreign languages department in
the new general classroom build-
ing.
vcrsity hasn't paid off
When minority students occu-
pied a UMass building in Febru-
ary to call for stiffer penalties for
white students who attacked a
black student, Weinberg noted,
there was "a long history of com-
plaints to administrators left
unanswered
The sit-in, he said, forced the
adminstration to examine the
minority students' compaints
immediately, "It called the
public's attention to the history of
this relationship
Even relatively new insults
contiue to fester.
In mid-April, a group of Univer-
sity of Illinois fraternity members
traveled to the University of Wis-
consin, where they broke into an
Afro-American Studies class, and
threatened a black student and
professor.
Solomon Ashby of UW's Black
Student Union is still waiting for
administrators to respond. "Mi-
nority students are being attacked
from the outside he said. "We
have to fend for ourselves. The
university, in deliberateness of its
investigation, is passing out the
wrong message to students
"The process of university
decision making is too slow
Austin agreed.
The UMass protests, Weinberg
reported, have been "avery pow-
erful influence among .black stu-
dents. Their morale is very high
right now. They were able to pull
their protest off
Ransby concurred that "a very
YxiYe
smart enough
to calculate
the size of a
Hydrogen
atom.
And you're
still smoking?
I S lfjrtnient ol Health Human Service'
important aspect of the protests is
that the students involved are not
the rabble rousers the administra-
tion may protray them to be. It's
usually the most serious students
who are participating in demos-
trations. They are learning about
society, law and about how the
campus works
Such knowledge, she added,
will help them play a bigger role in
future civil rights efforts and
probably spark more campus anti-
racism efforts now.
"There's been some talk about a
growing student movement
Ransby said.
"I believe it's in its embroyonic
stages now. We can expect to see a
lot more of this
Many educators say they wel-
come the new sense of empower-
ment.
When minortiy students
charged a recent New Jersey De-
partment of Higher Education
conference on campus racial ten-
sions was little more than a public
relations move, state Chancellor T.
ties she's interviewed all plan to
stay in school�and tell other
minorities to attend UCSB�in
part because they feel the are forc-
ing some changes.
They are similarly heartened by
schools' willingness to respond to
them. "At least here, we are work-
ing on it she said. "Colleges are
doing a lot to convince minorities
that they know they are not per-
fect, but they want them on cam-
pus to help with the problem
HANKS
Homemade Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt, and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy's)
758-0000
Girl Scout Cookie
Closeout Sale
BUY 1, GET 1
FREE
(Any Girl Scout Cookie Item)
Coupon good while supplies last
� �iBiHBiMi clip-n-save �����
HANK'S
Homemade Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt, and Sorbet
321 E. 10th St. Greenville (next to Wendy's)
758-0000
Buy 1 Mini
Sundae,
$1.15
Value
GETl
12 PRICE
Coupon good thru 5-31-88
$1.15
Value
-t
ecome Back f
1 Let Us Serve You! '
We Will Gladly Cash Your Checks From Home! �
Read the East
Carolinian
Kraft
Mayonnaise
Pint Jar
Coca Cola or
Pepsi Cola
$2.69
12 oz. cans pkg. of 12
Coke Products
99
All 2 Liter Froducts
Shultz
Assorted Varieties
Frozen Jenofs
Pizzas
10oz.
Pkg
99
Pretzels
$1.59
White Cloud
Tissue
Star Kist Tuna
Chunk Light regular or oil
69
6 oz. can
Theseshjderusenjohe summer sunshine as they have some good ole fun on the student mall.
Tans, sunglasses and muscles are a regular sight again. (Jon Jordan-Photolab)
WEDNESDAY
ATTIC
The i � Tte
CoMedYl OoMedY
ZONE A ZONE
WED
WED
5th St. Entrance
Now Open
752-7303
THURSDAY
Stegmonds
Stegmonds
Stegmonds
Stegmonds
FRIDAY
Brice
Street
Brice
Street
SATURDAY
GIBRALTER
GIBRALTER
GIBRALTER
16oz. bag
Buy One Get One Free
Busch Beer
$3.99
4 roll pkg.
Limit 2 with
$10.00 food order
excluding advertised specials
Additional pkgs. 99
79 C
12 oz. cans
12 pack
Sirloin Steak
. $2.89
Great For Cookouts!
lb.
Golden
Bananas
29
Sales Dates: Wed. May 25- Sat. May 28
Store Hours: Sun. 1-6 p.m.
MonSat. 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Mastercard & Visa Accepted
VVC - Food Stamps Welcome
Quantity Rights Reserved
211 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks From E.C.U.
OVERTONS
Supemt





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25, 1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
FEMALE RESIDENT COUNSLOR: In
terested in those with human service
background wishing to gain valuable
experience in the field. No monetary
compensation. However room utilities
and phone provided. Call Mary Smith,
Real Crisis Center 758 HELP.
HELP WANTED: needed salesperson to
work mornings at Carpet Rargain Center.
1009 Dickinson Ave Apply in person
between 8 am &: 1 pm
OVERSEAS JOBS: Also Cruiseships
$10,000 � $105,000yr' Now Hiring! 320
? Listings! (1) 805-687 6000 Ext OJ-1166.
HIRING: Federal government jobs in
vour area and overseas Many immediate
openings without waiting list or test. SI 5-
68,000. Phone call refundable. (602) 838-
8885. Ext. 5285.
paper up to 20 hand written pages. We
repair computers and printers also. Low
est hourly rate in town. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street
(beside Cubbies) Greenville, NC 752
3694.
FOR SALE
1985 HONDA ELITE SCOOTER: 15(Vv
Windshield, red, good condition. 758
2613 or 126 Speight Bldg.
FOR SALE: Boss cruiser vellow 5-speed
Excellent condition 195.00 or best offer
Great transportation around campus
Call 752-1031 leave message.
FOR SALE: Velour sofa and chair. Very
good condition. Cheap. 830-1584 or 752
1348.
AAA EMPLOYMENT � MANAGER
TRAINEE. 15K ,MANUF.
REP25K,PHYSICAL THERAPIST
ASST20ICPROGRAMMFR20KA1ANY
MORE. Permanent full or part time posi
lions. Lowest fee in Greenville. Compare!
101W 14th St Suite 203, 758 1393 Low
fee personnel service.
BE ON T.V Many needed for commer-
cials. Casting info. (1) 805-687-6000 Ext.
TV-1166.
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: Wc offer typing
and photcopving services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed tuping on
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSTIY APARTMENTS
2899 F- 5�h Slrw
�Located Near ECU
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limjted otter $275 a month
Contact J T. or Tommv Williams
756-7615 or 83a 1937
Office open - Apt 8, 12-5 JO p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean and quirt one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles onlv 5195 a month. 6 month
lease MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couples or
singlet Apartment and mobile homes in Aralra
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club
Contact I T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
KILLER AIRFARES

London 294 Shannon 279
Tans 299 Amsterdam 319
Rome 339 Budapest 339
Brussels 319 Athens 359
Geneva 349 Copenhagen 339
Munich 339 Frankfurt 339
Rio 350 Hamburg 339
Helsinki 369
Stockholm 339
Zurich
Tokyo
Bangkok
Sydney
Taipei
349
399
476
509
420
�Student and Youth Fares, Each Way Based on a Round Trip Purchase Plus Super
Discounts for Teachers and Adults, Some Restriction Applv
�Atlanta Departures Plus Hundreds of Fares from YOUR CIPi
1-800-876-7776
Council Travel Services 404-577-1678
Fares subject to change without notice, plus taxes and customs fees
Announcements
SUMMER LIBRARY HOURS
Mondays - Thursdays 8:00 a.m. - 11:00
p.m; Fndavs 8:00 am - 6:00p.m Satur-
days 9:00 am. - 6 00 p m ; Sundays 12:00
noon - 1100 p.m. The Med:a Resources
Center will be open: Mondays - Thurs-
daysS 00a.m9:30p.mFridaysS:00a.nv
3:00 pm; Saturdays 1:00 p.m6:00 p.m ;
Sundays 12 noon - 9:00 p.m.
CHILD ADVOCACY
Fran Kertesz will speak on Parents in
Special Education � the parents' role m
developing a special education program,
and how to become a better advocate for
your child. Wednesday, May 25, 198S,
7:30 p.m. at Saint James United Methodist
Church, 2000 E. Sixth Street, Greenville,
NC This program should interest parents
or professionals working with children
with special needs.
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid for overseas education may apply for
a Rivers Scholarship The next application
deadline is Julv 1, 1988 For further infor-
mation contact the Office of International
Studies and Scholarships in the Gerneral
Classroom building, room 1002, 757-6769
The
East Carolinia
equired reading
for the serious student
RED HOT BARGAINS! Drug dealers'
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus Your
Area. Buyers Guide (1) 805-687-6000 Ext
S 1166.
R1NGGOLD TOWERS CONDO FOR
SALE: B Unit, 2nd Floor, Fully furnished.
Tax market value $43,730.00. Make me an
offer. 919-787 1378.
FOR RENT
R1NGGOLD TOWERS: Aprs for rent.
Furnished Contact Hollie Simonowich at
752-2865.
HAVE ONE BEDROOM AVAILABLE:
in 3 bedroom apartment at Tar River
$140mo rent, $100 deposit, water, sewer,
cable included in rent, 13 utilities, prefer
female, pool available now! We're both 2
easy-going open minded people � please
hurry! Paige or Nancy 758 9844.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED, to
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GIVE BLOOD





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY2r, 1988
9iq
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A4P�WHITE
Moscow summit to reap no power agreement
WASHINGTON (AP� "Busi-
ness as usual' may be the motto of
the Moscow summit between
President Reagan and Soviet
leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, a
meeting expected to produce no
major agreements but many
smiles.
lTie two leaders will be smiling
not just for the television cameras,
but in recognition that they are
inching forward in serious nego-
tiation on many issues, in contrast
to the trans Atlantic shouting
matches that characterized the
early years of the Reagan admini-
stration.
Reagan's visit to Moscow, the
first bv an American president in
14 years, is not so much a victory
for the policies of cither power as a
"truimph of logic as both sides
realize they cannot afford to con-
tinue the current pace of military
competition, said John Stein-
bruner of the Brookings Institu-
tion.
One of Gorbachev's advisers,
Georgi Arbatov, agreed, telling a
Washington news conference
May 5, "We have synchronized
phases of our development
Reagan and Gorbachev have
met three times, most recently in
Washington last December when
they signed a treaty to eliminate
medium-range nuclear weapons.
That treaty is being debated in the
Senate, and it still is not clear
whether it will be ratified before
the May 29-June 2 summit in
Moscow.
If Reagan and Gorbachev can
part company in Moscow without
arguing about the Strategic De-
fense Initiative, better known as
Star Wars, or other contentious
issues, it will mark something of a troops from Eastern Europe
saysSpurgeonM. Keenyjrpresi- business ventures, and perhaps
dent of the liberal Arms Control sign protocols on fishing and cul-
Association. ture.
Among the surprises that Gor- All those together do not add up
bachev might have up his sleeve, to the long hoped for treaty to
say administration officials, is an slash nuclear arsenals.
But they are a whole lot better
than the superpower growling
that wasgoingon during Reagan's
first years, when 115,000 Red
Army troops were newly arrived
in Afganistan, the Soviet army
was threatening to invade Poland,
and Reagan was accusing the
Soviets of violating every arms
deal they had signed
announcement of an unilateral
withdrawal of up to 100,000
victory for what Helmut Sonncn-
feldt calls Gorbachev's "high wire
actc in international diplomacy
One of those high wire acts was
the argument over SDI that ended
the second Reagan-Gorbachev
summit in Reykjavik, Iceland in range hail the withdrawal of the
Octover 1986. first Red Army soldiers from Af-
Gorbachev is not looking for an ghanistan, praise the beginning of
argument at the Moscow summit, the first ever U.S. -Soviet joint
It is more likely, according to
academic experts, that
the two leaders will use the
Moscow summit to announce
some progress on the Strategic
Arms Reduction Talks to cut long-
The East Carolinian
New Location
1 Day Service
On Most BlFocal Prescriptions
w� Cm Makt toaiMMM To Hm Yomt h m I
I To.
752-1446
GM C-cars with accelerataion problems
Federal engineers have broad
cned their examination of alleged'
sudden acceleration problems in
�neral Motors cars, adding 1.4
million C-body cars to the 703,000
ti-bodv vehicles already under
idy, it was announced today.
Meet woods because they can ac-
celerate suddenlv to produce a
"significant increase in engine
speed and power output
Hie agpney said it has received
110 complaints of sudden accel-
eration in the cars, allegedly re-
nte National Highway Traffic suiting in 67 accidents in which 43
v Administration said it was people were injured.
ng m engineering analysis Since November, the agency has body and H-body cars,
C-body cars-1985-88 model been investigating GM's H-body spokesman John Hartnett
Dldsmobile 98s, Buick Elec- cars. the company had found no me
and Cadillac DeVilles and The agency had received more chanical cause for sudden accel
inan 500 complaints of sudden
acceleration or throttle control
problems in thosecars, the 1986-87
Dldsmobile Delta 88 and Buick
LeSabre, and the 1987 Pontiac
Bonneville, resulting in more than
100 accidents.
Asked if there were throttle
design similarities between the C-
GM
said
eration in the 11-body cars.
But Sam Cole of the Center for
Auto Safety said the C-body and
11 body cars "share similar me-
chanical components, and that's
why we believe that those cars
may experience a sudden accel-
eration problem that is a bad or
worse than the H-body cars The
cars use the same electronic cruise
control system, Cole said.
B&L Ray Ban Metal Sunglasses
1
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Att County halts waste proposal
ENVILLE,N.C.(AP)� Pitt
iunty Commissioners have
adopted a resolution calling for a
It in efforts to create a waste
park for low-level radioactive and
hazardous waste disposal in east-
ern Edgecombc County until a
tact-finding commission can
gather information on how such a
facility will affect other counties in
I 'area.
The board's action, taken Mon-
ti after discussing the proposed
Grads miss
friends
CPS) Students graduating
m college this spring say
they'll miss their friends more
in anything else about campus
a new survey says.
Asked what they most regret
leaving behind at college, 68 per-
cent of the students surveyed by
Levi Strauss & Co. named their
friends.
A little more than half the stu-
dents 4 percent said they'd
mis having flexible hours most,
while 3b percent are most upset
by the prospect of not having
p-mcr vacations anymore.
fhe Levi's report, moreover,
: i 'ess materialistic picture
� American collegians than Uni-
versity of California at Los Angc-
. s American Council on Edu-
ction survev of college freshman.
In the UCLA survey � released
in anuary of 200,000 freshman
around the country, rising num-
bers of freshmen said earning a lot
of money was more important to
them than having "a meaningful
philosophy of life
In the Levi 501 Report survey of
seniors, released April 22, huge
majorities of students said having
friends, "havinga happy relation-
ship with another person" and
being a good parent" were the
most important elements in
"achieving success
"Being wealthy" was only the
13th most frequently named at-
tribute in the Levi's survey.
waste park with members of the
county's legislative delegation,
recommends the appointment of a
fact-finding body in conjunction
with other local governments.
In related action Monday, the
Farmville and Bethel town boards
adopted resolutions opposing the
creation oi the proposed waste
disposal park near the Pitt County
line.
Edgecombe County Commis-
sioners, at a puhHc meeting in
arboro last week, proposed the
creation of a 3,000-acre. "North
Carolina Waste Management
Park The park would include a
low-level radioactive waste dis-
posal site, a hazardous waste
treatment facility and a regional
solid waste
operation.
And Edgecombe officials im-
plied that millions of dollars in
state incentives would come to the
county if a low-leve: radio active
management
waste disposal site is located
there
Pitt Commissioner Eugene
James said Monday lie was con-
cerned about the effect the pro-
posed waste sites might have on
I'itt's water system.
James suggested that the loca-
tion of the waste park in eastern
Edgecombe "would not affect the
mass of people in Edgecombe
I
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GIVE BLOOD
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WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 2-4 P.M.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
MAY 25,1988 Page 8
Hulk
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Features Editor
"Don't make me angry. You
wouldn't like me when I'm an-
gT-
That quote ranks right up there
with 'To the Batcave and "Up,
up and away The real reason
"Wonder Woman" got cancelled
is because she never had a boss
quote like those. (And speaking of
WW, isn't it about time she got her
reunion special?)
Anyway, the Incredible Hulk
had his TV movie Sunday night.
Bill (I Belong To The William
Shatner School of Acting) Bixby
and Lou (I Still Can't Handle
Those Speaking Roles) Ferrigno
reprised their roles as two halves
of the scientist turned misunder-
stood monster. Only this time he
(they?) brought a friend with him
(them?).
"The Incredible Hulk Returns"
was about 40 minutes of Hulk and
his alter ego, the almost Fred
MacMurray-like David Banner.
The other hour and 20 minutes
was devoted to The Mighty Thor
in hopes he and his puny secret
identity, Dr. Donald Blake, will
get spun-off into their own series.
Comic book fans will immedi-
ately realize that Thor didn't quite
translate into television as the
same Goldilocks that runs around
�the Marvel Comics� Universe,
shouting Shakespearean oaths
4ffl
and smiting super villains with
his hammer.
Eric Kramer plays the role for
laughs though. Even when he's
psuedo-serious, it's a laugh. But
Thor and Blake (played by Steve
Levitt - whose last role was that of
the nerd turned hunk in "Hunk
See a pattern forming?) get the
best lines in the show.
Thor quips that Blake summons
him to the worst places in the
world. Blake shoots back with,
"This isn't a date If Clark and
Superman had more of this dia-
logue, the last two "Superman"
movies might have made some
money.
Oh. But Clark and Supes are the
same person. In the comic, Thor
and Blake are the same person
(until recently but that situation
defies explanation by even the
people who write the damn
comic). On TV, Blake "channels"
the "spirit of Thor" onto this
plane.
Banner supplies the audience
with the Webster's Third defini-
tion of "channeling so everyone
will understand this little plot
device. Channeling is giving a
spirit a physical form throught the
use of a medium.
Wei the medium in the case is
Blake and Thor's hammer. But
Blake also has to yell "Odin very
loudly through a reverberator.
This, unfortunately, makes the
whole process sound just a leetle
bit too much like He-Man and his
bloody "By the Power of
Greyskull speech.
In the comics, Thor's costume
has changed at least four times
over the last two years in an effort
to make him look more "like the
Thor of Earthly legend So no
wonder the TV folks just decided
to give him a whole new look.
But, Odin's beard! White fake-
fur shoulder pads? A 10 pound
belt buckle with a "T" engraved
on it? The wings on the helmet
were too low and flat, and he had
no cape. Not even close to the
Thor of ANY legend.
As for Hulk (recently turned
grey-skinned in the comic � do
these producers even READ the
comics they are adapting?), he
was pretty much the same. No
talking, lots of growling and pos-
ing and more ripped clothes than
Stallone.
Bixby is pretty much the es-
sence of Bruce � I mean DAVID
Banner. No personality, and he
has the ability to look like he's
really in pain when he changes
into Lou Ferrigno.
The plot was pretty much the
same one they used in about half
the original "Hulk" shows - in-
vention andor girl kidnapped by
bad guys. Banner gets involved,
turns into Hulk, saves the day and
walks off into the sunset to some
of the most depressing back-
ground music I've ever heard.
I've never understood why they
didn't throw some super villains
into these shows. Obviously, a
green, two-ton, steroid freak is
going to clobber any amount of
merely mortal thugs you can
throw at him. A super villain
would at least be a challenge.
Nevertheless, I enjoyed it. It
was about as ambitious as any
other reunion special I've seen.
Only Thor might actually have a
chance at a series of his own, un-
like the Austin kid from the "Six
Million Dollar ManBionic
Woman" special last summer.
What they should have done
though, if they're going to team
up heroes, is bring back Spider-
Man and Captain America. They
could form a group. I feel sure
Nicholas Hammond and Reb
Brown haven't worked since '81
or '82.
But what I really want to see is
the return of Linda Carter as
Wonder Woman. I doubt Debra
Winger would want to be Wonder
Girl again, but Chloris Leachman
must need some work, so WW
could at least see her mom on
Paradise Island.
But until that happy day, wo
can only hope for a Thor weekly
or quarterly series. So, for now, I'll
write off into the sunset with Dr.
Banner. (Haunting theme music,
please" Doot-doo-doot doo
'Willow' worth wait
By JEFF PARKER
. Staff Illustrator
This is an illustration from the promotional poster of 'Willow The movie has been panned by many
critics, but the staff of The East Carolinian seem to all think it is pretty boss.
Student Union has big plans for summer fun
BY CHIPPY BONEHEAD
Feature Editor
In the past, ECU's Student
Union has presented such diverse
entertainments as Heart, Jimmy
Buffett, Nikki Giovanni, Barefoot
on the Mall and trips to New York
and Hawaii. This summer. Stu-
dent Union president Karen
Pasch promises, will be continue
to be action packed.
Pasch says the Union members
are "very excited about the events
we are offering to the ECU family
this summer Among the regular
events scheduled are the Rock-A-
Bowls.
A deejay will be present in the
Mendenhall Bowling Center from
2-430 p.m. every Thursday. Re-
quests will be taken, so you can
listen to your favorite tunes as you
rack up the scores.
Coming up on June 7, the sec-
ond Bingo Ice cream party will
be held in the Mendenhall Multi-
purpose room. Prizes will be
awarded during the function.
Free movies and concerts are
also on the agenda. Movies to be
shown this summer include the
hip vampire flickThe Lost
Boys and the Michael J. Fox
smash, "The Secret of My Suc-
cess
For those with a taste for the
macabre, Stephen King's "The
Shining" and the thriller "The
Jagged Edge" will be shown.
Another regular feature will be
the four Watermelon Feasts.
Admission is free, and the event
will be highlighted by a seed spit-
tin' contest. And of course, there
will be plenty of watermelons.
The Student Union will also
host three free concerts. Pasch
says that everyone can "go out on
the mall and jam with each other
On June 16, local band Bad Bob
and the Rockin' Horses will ride
into some rock and roll.
June 30 will showcase The
Upper Level and July 7 will host
another local band , the reggae
masters The Amateurs. All three
concerts begin at 9 p.m.
Pasch urges all students who
wish to get involved with the
Student Union should come by
their office (Mendenhall 234) and
find out how to get on one of their
many committees. If not, just sit
back and enjoy the entertainment
they've planned for you.
It was previewed as far back as
last Christmas, and this weekend,
George Lucas's "Willow" opened
up at the box office to anxious
crowds.
Part of the selling of this movie
is the fact that it is written and
produced by Lucas, who gave us
"Star Wars" and "Indiana Jones
Lucas borrows much from his
past films for "Willow and from
Tolkein's "Lord of the Rings
Some of the big film reviewers
such as Siskel and Ebert were
bothered by the common fantasy
elements evident in the movie;
brownies, trolls, dwarves
(Elwins, in this) etc but that is not
a fair critique for fantasy. Would
you take the guns, horses, and
Indians out of a traditional cow-
boy movie? Perhaps thay wanted
some aliens and cute droids in the
film.
Actually, the movie uses classic
epic fantasy traditions in the tell-
ing of the story. The hero, Willow
himself, is swept into the adven-
ture unwillingly, in epic form.
This all begins when he and his
small Elwin family find a baby
floating down the river in Mases
fashoin. The red-haired waif,
who becomes popular for her fa-
cial expressions throughout the
movie, is Princess Elora, the child
destined by prophecy to one day
defeat the evil sorceress
Bavmorda (who bears a striking
resemblance to the wicked step-
mother in Snow White).
Willow is chosen to lead the
baby to her destiny, and along the
way meets up with the most color-
ful character in the movie, Mad-
martigan, played by Val Kilmer.
Kilmer's character owes a Tot to
Harrison Ford's Han Solo, but
Madmartigan is a much more
developed character than Solo.
The same can't be said of his love
interest Sorsha, and their rela tion-
ship is a bit "pushed" by the
writer.
An interesting theme Lucas
uses is that of making females
very critical to the storyline, an
idea often ignored in most films of
this sort. The two most powerful
magic users in the movie are
women, and the catalyst of the
entire plot is the baby girl, Elora
Danan. This is a refreshing
handle on a storyline that would
be normally dominated by
"manly" heroes.
A lot of this film's success can be
attributed by the direction of Ron
Howard. Howard uses a very
subtle hand in the direction, let-
ting the story unfold at a natural
pace, playing off the beauty of the
sets and mattes used to create the
world of Willow.
The movie effectively draws in
the viewer to sympathize with the
main characters, and even the
amusing sidebars like the Brown-
ies (who have an daccent some-
where between a leprechaun nad
an old man) and the good sorcer-
ess Razelle, who Willow keeps
transforming into different ani-
mals.
BacX to lhc argument that Wil-
lowborrows too much from J .R.R.
Tolkein and the like. Okay, so
Bavmorda's men are a lot like the
Ringwraiths of Tolkein. Maybe
Willow himself is much like
Frodo the Hobbit. And perhaps
the skull-faced "Phantom" owes
his existence to the Horned King
from the Lloyd Alexander tales.
Well, that is a trademark of clas-
sic hero storytelling. There is no
original story, these are all myths
and legends retold. The key is in
the way they are told.
Most of the elements in "Wil-
low" can be found back in stories
of the Norse, Celtic, and the Bible
Unfortunately these ancient sto-
rytellers didn't have the advan-
tage of Industrial Light and Magic
handling their special effects.
Like any good fantasy, "Wil-
low" creates a secondary world af
awe and wonder for the viewer,
and it doesn't have to get heavy-
handed to do so. Humor is used
consistently throughout, ana one
can enjoy the weli-chorco-
graphed fight scenes with Mad-
martigan. You won't cry (like
See WILLOW, page 9
Pickin' the Banes
Bonehead avoids the job scene
By CMPY BONEHEAD
Staff fdftaMy
When I stowed my best friend
all the "Fun-N-Games" and
"Pickm' the Bones" I dragged up
to Richmond, his comment on a
semester's worm of work was,
"Y'afl should be getting a govern-
ment grant for being so boss
It was a nice thing to say and an
even nker concept I should be
getting some kind of financial
compensation for this stuff. Much
as I love working here at the ol'
BC it dont pay diddley-squa t.
In fact, we get paid so h We, half
the staff can t afford telephones.
without phonage can
into pretty darn uy situ-
k adventures and report on
when
Thi is a scene from The Jagged Edge a movie starring Glenn Close and Jeff Bridges. This is only one
of � te many free films the Student Union will be presenting over the two sessions of summer school.
f you want to have a
adventure with.
So. wftti more and more wil-
(HUi tofht ptebet) piling up
i res igef etor, ami not a cent
'in the monsy Jar, I deckled to
are Just some situations I can not
work in. And unfortunately, in
the Emerald City, most of the jobs
available include at least one or
more of them.
Situation number one: Polyes-
ter. No way, my brother. Not even
a half and half blend. Polyester
wSf burn the hair right oft your
legs, arms, chest and any other
body part unfortunate enough to
be covered by it
I'm sorry, but 1 spent six years in
puberty to grow the shit 111 not
have my place of employment
turning me into a candidate for a
Bikini Bare� commercial after an
eight hour shift in those Burger
King Sburgandy bottoms.
And inevitably, the places that
ututze large furnaces and cooking
ovens are the Jobs mat require
polyester uniforms to be worn at
all times. Even during coffee
breaks and such.
Polyester makes you sweat A
lot So aside from eating the hair
off your body, you feel like hun-
dreds of little wet gnats are ding-
ing to your armpits and skies.
Situation number two: Stress
overload. 1 pride myself on 1
a fad back, stressless human.
don't know why everyone is
snickering in the background.) I
expect a certain amount of stress
in any job.
But somehow, I just can't see
spazzing out because you're two
orders behind and you have no
fries dropped. Freaking on losing
your finger in the meat sheer I can
comprehend.
It's not just fast food that puts
the pressure on. For some reason,
at 137 ajrt, Fast Fares that have
been empty all night, suddenly
bug out with long lines of people
scrambling for beers.
Talk about stress. I've seen per
fectry normal convenience store
clerks start brandishing screw-
drivers and throwing rolls of
change at those poor alcohol-less
fools standing in line.
Situation number three: Long
application forms. How can you
expect the job to be any fun when
filling out the application forces
you to dredge up transcripts of
how many days you were absent
in grade school?
And why do they want to know
the address of your junior high
See BONEHEAD, page 9
c's
1U-
ce-
icy
lm
ry.
le
ick
cs,
lid
lid
ild
ut
of
d-
ne
;se
ug
as
Jg
he
ist
�y-
ie
be
an
at
n
ie
h-
;a
Is-
ht
al
at
8
is
;e
e.
is
)r
is
i-
ie
t
r-
5
-?
s
e
s
�r
s
s
s
J
u
f
f
NC
GREENSBORO
Carolinians who
AIDS are finding tj
deal with than thei
and its symptoms.
"The actual deat
lease said Gary
Durham. "The pre
there is a little
there's no wav
what's going to haJ
now and then "
Last April, doc to.
les told him he had'
for antibodies to tl
which meant he
infected. He had be!
2 years, and no one j
to tell him why. Sur-
faced with becorrun
62,000 people in the!
with the disease,
almost 500 people n
lina.
He said he was nj
learn he had AIDS
is gay, and he said hi
with hundreds of pa
Hobby
By EARLVIS
Newt FSi
Have you ever
multitude of thing
from the rear view
cars? A Greenville
a sport out of detecj
piling various ty
mirror hangables
"Fuzzy dice are
most prolific tvpe o
Campano said of
tions. Campano
HOs are hanging ol
says come in all kn
colors and sizes.
His hobby of
hanging objects staJ
long trip from wj
Carolina last year,
boredom, Campanc
to identify the hai
Hogan
LOS ANGELES I
ber 1986, the Parai
department needo
convince journalist!
an Australian pitel
actor named Paul
problem now.
What made the di
"Crocodile' Dundei
blockbuster that
million in the L'nitt
Canada and did coi
ness wherever it pi
Hogan's back with
Dundee II which hi
be the end of the ouf
turer.
"I've completed t
said. "The new oi
movie; it stands upj
It's the end of 'Cro
dee
"Yes. I'm sure I'll
same questions in thj
five years. Like, W
Toy gun.
GRAHAM ,N.C.
Fntz Klenncr's et(
tion oi to guns wet
tion block it attract:
tention from those
bored him as an outj
an explosion while n
There was a pah
shooter with two bi
graved on the han
wom-leather Sgt. Fi
complete with a wl
emblem and six-sho)
Johnny Ringo holst
pain ted-on white sta
holding a buckaroo
There was a blaci
with two of its origin
slugs, paper ammi
super paper busterl
brown leather belt tl
12 toy bullets but o
there.
"Some kids are fas
some things, others I
with others said
Dameron, a friend o
fa mil v, as she surve
tion Saturday. 'To
just an average boy.
the same age and he i
of toy guns too
She examined a
rying a knife with a
and sharpener. Behij
toy truck sporting a
like device that firesj
About 30 people
auctioneer Robert Si!
items that included 1
as pistols, guns anc
that belonged to Frit
sisters.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25,1988
or
� r as
. " �
nder
ris x achman
� -i IVW
- � rr on
. we
music,
� I -
tit
�vn-
� - me-
mn nad
i - rcer-
�'� iilow keeps
rent ani-
I lhat Wil-
� - Mie
Maybe
� 1 King
n "Wii-
n stor
nf sto-
an-
"Wil-
: ir) a rldaf
r I . . r,
. . v-
ed
1 one
reo-
M
I cry (like
� 9
scene
I "V
why everyone is
sn the background.) I
rtain amount of stress
ehow, I just can't see
ut because you're two
und and you have no
Freaking on losing
r in the meat slicer I can
id.
fust fast food that puts
re on. For some reason,
Fast Fares that have
tv all night, suddenly
nth long lines of people
"1 for beers.
M stress. I've seen per
mal convenience store
rt brandishing screw-
ed throwing rolls of
those poor alcohol-less
ling in line,
number three: Long
forms. How can you
job to be any fun when
' the application forces
ige up transcripts of
days you were absent
1?
do they want to know
of your junior hi;
�rEHEAD, page 9
y
n
v
k
n
it
i-
t)
le
h
s
r
s
lO-
be
?n-
nal
m-
ffi-
ve-
he
NC AIDS victims learn how to cope
GREENSBORO (AP)�North
Carolinians who have contracted
AIDS are finding there is more to
deal with than the deadly disease
and its symptoms.
"The actual death will be a re-
lease said Gary Triplett, 39, of
Durham. "The process of getting
there is a little scary because
there's no way to anticipate
what's going to happen between
now and then
Last April, doctors in Los Ange-
les told him he had tested postive
put him at risk for the disease.
Struck by a cryptococcal menin-
gitis, an infeaction that oftens
preys on people with AIDS, Tri-
plett checked into a hospital.
When Triplett returned to the
concrete-block house he grew up
in on the fringes of Durham, his
family's reaction was mixed. His
mother, his father and his three
sisters have welcomed him
to help educate the his estranged wite and four chil- ways returned tot he same kind of
he wants
public.
"I cannot sit here and live out
my life and not say whats need to
be said-we are human beings he
said. "We live, we breath, we die,
we live
Kevin, a 36-year-old Greens-
boro man with AIDS who did not
want his real name used, said his
dren.
The treatmant plan succeeded;
the reconciliation failed. After 23
years of using drug, he was clean.
Kevin was just learning how to
live whan he found out he was
almost certainly going to die.
Medication eases Kevin's stom-
ach pains, the AIDS drug AZT
warmly. His two brothers, one of since learning he had aquired
life has been richer in some ways staves off most opportunistic in-
whom lives up the road, refuse to
have anything to do with him
tor antibodies to the AIDS virus, They won't come over, and they
which meant he probably was won't let their children visit.
Triplett thinks his brothers are
reacting more to his homosexual-
ity than his disease.
Triplett has heard stories of gay
men who were ostracized when
they revealed publicly that they
had AIDS. He understands their
hesitation to be identified. But he
thinks more people with AIDS
could speak up without ill conse-
quences. He talks top the press
and at seminars on AIDS because
infected. He had been sick for 11
2 years, and no one had been able
to tell him why. Suddenly, he was
faced with becoming one of some
b2,aX1 people in the United States
with the disease, which has hit
almost 500 people in North Caro-
lina.
He said he was not suprised to
learn he had AIDS antibodies. He
is gay, and he said he had had sex
with hundreds of partners, which
immune deficiency syndrome.
"I've had some good years in
my life but this past year I've seen
more growth he said.
"It helps make me a better per-
son. God has shown me that when
fections. The only persistant is
diarrhea.
By 4 or 5 p.m he starts to fade.
"There ain't no strength in my
legs at all he told The Greens-
boro News & Record. And he's
afraid that his recent headaches
something is taken away, some- are the first signs of meningitis, or
thing else is put there. And that's
not something somebody told me.
I'm seeing that every day
Even so, "it ain't all bright
sunny Mondays said Kevin, a
former intravenous drug user
who moved to Greensboro 18
inflamation near the brain and
spine.
Kevin, who grew up in New
York and New Jersey, said he
started sniffing glue when he was
about 8, and started shooting co-
caine and heroine at 13. He used
life.
That kind of life got old. He saw
himself repeating the same pat-
terns.
He had just finished a drug
treatment program when a bout
of pneumonia landed him in the
Greensboro hospital about a year
ago.
"I was numb. I didn't know if I
was going to die tomorrow he
said. "They had understanding
(of my feelings) when I didn't
even have understanding.
Whether you're gay, an addict, a
biker � whatever � at a crucial
point like that, you need compas-
sion and clarity.
XStcuotiUHL
JHBIJIJI
SHIRT COUPON
4 SHIRTS O
CLEANED V V
for fn
36
This coupon must be presented
with shirt order
SHIRT COUPON
months ago to enter a drug treat- and sold drugs most of his life. He
ment program and try to win back spent time behind bars, but al-
Hobbyist scans rear view mirror decorations
district In a recent drive through apt to hang some type of animal
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Newt Editor
Have you ever noticed the
multitude of things people hang sport.
from the rear view mirrors of their "Some people watch birds, hey
cars? A Greenville man has made man, I count air fresheners inside
a sport out of detecting and com- cars' windsheids Campano said
piling various types of rear view compassionately while driving
mirror hangables.
and compile similar objects. Sine
those auspicious beginnings, Wilson, he counted no less than
Campano has brought serious- six pairs of fuzzy dice in the dis-
ncss to his hobby which he dubs a trict.
air
freshener, which he says is
very popular in the greater
"Fuzzy dice are probably the
most prolific type of HOs Ralph
Campano said of his observa-
tions. Campano explains that
HOs are hanging objects which he Playboy emblem by saying, "It's
says come in all kinds of shapes, very popular with the brothers
colors and sizes.
through Greenville in search of Wilson area. When asked why he
some unique hanging objects. bought the evergreen smelling air
At a stop light, Campano spots frcshncr, Campano said "When
a Playboy air freshner dangling you are in Rome you do as the
from the windshield of a Buick. Romans, so when you are in
Campano takes special note of the Wilson you do as the Wilsoni-
ans
Besides the familar green trees,
he says red tree air freshners re
His hobby of watching for Campano says neighboring the second most demanded han-
hanging objects started during a Wilson is undoubtedly the HO gable on the market today. Cam- annual HO report.
long trip from western North capital of the world. Driving pano says his personal preference Soifyouscesomconepeeringat
Carolina last year. To break up the through Wilson, he says people is for the green trees because it you in your car, remember that is
boredom, Campano begin to try enter an unmarked zone which he matches the color of his car. Ralph Campano, the hanging ob-
to identify the hanging objects has designated as'the fuzzy dice He says female drivers are more ject hobbyist.
Hogan says he can't see making 'Dundee III'
such as bears from their mirrors.
But most of the time, animals are
hard to detect and go under a
category called UHOs, or Uniden-
From the rear view mirror of tified Hanging Objects. He says
Campano'sPonitacisagrccn tree UHO are an aggravation to the
hobby because the time spent
identifying UHO could be spent
trying to look for other objects.
In light of the many graduations
which have taken place in the last
month, Campano has noticed a
new influx of hanging tassels.
While white tassles are currently
in first place, he says yellow is a
close second. He says the tassels
are only a annual phase and
should not be recorded in the
LET US
PUT SOME MEAT ON YOUR
RIBS!
Try Our Wednesday Night
Al! You Can Eat
Beef Rib Special!
LOS ANGELES (AP)- In Octo-
ber 1986, the Paramont publicity
department needed a hard sell to
convince journalists to interview
an Australian pitchman-turned-
actor named Paul Hogan. No
problem now.
What made the difference was
"Crocodile' Dundee a surprise
blockbuster that grossed $175
million in the United States and
Canada and did comparable busi-
ness wherever it played. Now
Hogan's back with "Crocodile'
Dundee II which he swears will
be the end of the outback adven-
turer.
"I've completed the circle he
said. "The new one is a good
movie; it stands up all by itself.
It's the end of 'Crocodile' Dun-
dee
"Yes. I'm sure I'll be asked the
same questions in three years and
five years. Like, 'What if 10 mil-
Toy guns sell
GRAHAM ,N.C.(AP)�When
Fritz Klenner's extensive collec-
tion of tov guns went on the auc-
tion block, it attracted a lot of at-
tention from those who remem-
bered him as an outlaw killed in
an explosion while fleeing police.
There was a palm-sized silver
shooter with two bull heads en-
graved on the handle, a black
worn-leather Sgt. Friday holster
complete with a white Dragnet
emblem and six-shooter pistol, a
Johnny Ringo holster sporting a
painted-on white stagecoach and
holding a buckaroo gun.
There was a black bullet case
with two of its original three silver
slugs, paper ammunition for a
super paper buster gun and a
brown leather belt that can hold
12 toy bullets but only lOare still
there.
"Some kids are fascinated with
some things, others are fascinated
with others said Margaret
Dameron, a friend of the Klenner
family, as she surveyed the collec-
tion Saturday. 'To me, Fritz was
just an average boy. My son was
the same age and he collected a lot
of toy guns too
She examined a green belt car-
rying a knife with a 4 inch blade
and sharpener. Behind that was a
toy truck sporting a long cannon-
like device that fires red darts.
About 30 people looked on as
auctioneer Robert Smith held up
items that included 150 toys, such
as pistols, guns and fire trucks,
that belonged to Fritz and his two
sisters.
lion people write you and say they
want to see more?' That's getting
a bit unfair
"The challenge now is to come
up with another character that
surpasses
'Crocodile' Dundee That
doesn't mean I'll start playing
'The Hunchback of
Czzechoslovakia I won't stretch
credibility too far
His remarks will be filed for
future reference. Remember
when Sean Connery said no more
James Bond? Remember "Never
Say Never Again"?
If the hit of "Crocodile' Dun-
dee" has changed Paul Hogan, it's
not visible. He remains the same
wry, laid-back observer of the
passing scene.
In the new film, Dundee's girl-
friend (Linda Kozlowski) be-
comes the target of South Ameri-
can drug dealers. After escaping
Bonehead
can't work
Continued from page 8
school? Are they going to take a
road trip there and try to find out
what your childhood environ-
ment was like? They might as well
ask for your dog' blood type.
So, after dabbling in the part
time job scene, I quickly decided it
was not my bag. I returned post-
haste to my venerable offices in
the East Carolinian and quivered
for a full 15 minutes before the
enormity of my madness left me.
I had actually tried to get a job.
What was I thinking about?
Surely there was another option
open to me. Surely there was
some scam I had not tried. I
reached for the phone.
"Hi, Dad? You're not going to
believe this, but all the bookstore
had were NEW books. Yeah. But
hey, I think for another 20 bucks I
could get at least two of the books
I REALLY need
They should at least have a
grant for creative lying.
'Willow' a
fantastic myth
Continued from page 8
baby Elora does) at the end of the
movie, and you won't be disap-
pointed either. In the grand tradi-
tion of Micah Harris rating, "Wil-
low" earns three and a half cat
heads, mmm
death attempts in New York, the and was syndicated in the United
pair flee to the Australian out- States and 30 other countries.
back. The villains pursue them,
and Dundee faces seemingly in-
superable odds.
The script was written by
Hogan and his oldest son, Brett.
Hogan didn't even start out to
be an entertainer. He was making
$75 a week as a workman on
Hogan became a familiar face
here with his commercials for
Australian beer and tourism.
A visit to New York in 1984
planted the seed for "Crocodile'
Dundee Fishing with friends,
Hogan mused about what would
happen if his fellow fishermen
Sydney's Harbor Bridge in 1972 were transported to Manhattan
when a buddy dared him to ap-
pear on the Down Under version
of 'The Gong Show
The object of "New Faces" was
to humiliate the contestants.
Hogan "turned the tables and
ripped them to pieces. People all
over the country loved seeing me
get revenge. I was an overnight
sensation
Soon he became partners with
John Cornell (who directed
"Dundee II") in "The Paul Hogan
Show which drew high ratings
"they would really think they're
on another planet
$7.95
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after 5 p.m.
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(while you're here), absolutely
every Wednesday and exclusively
available at Darryl's!
Across from East Carolina University � 752-1907
ECU
GORDON'S
For Fine Golf Apparel
64 By-Pass 756-1003
Plaza Cinema
1'i.U.i Shopping Ctr. 7r(i OOHH
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126 Greenville Blvd. Phone 756-2579 Hours: MonFri. 7:30 a.m6:30 p.m.
Sal. Ul 5:30
Newman
Catholic Student Center
953 East Tenth St.
Greenville. N.C. 27836
Phone: 757-3760
757-1991
Campus Mass Schedule
Summer session - Sunday 11:30 a.m.
8:30 p.m.
Fall - Sunday 11:30 a.m. Bio. Bldg. rm 103
8:30 p.m. at the Newman Center
For more information about these and other programs,
call or visit the center daily between
8:30 a.m. and 11:00 p.m.
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister






10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25,1988
Undercover Cats
By PARKER
Jtttoft
In K! II)
Campus Comics
X RENTED A
ANP S MICROWAVE
OVE.N
WENT OUT rNp
'50U6HT AU THIS
FROZEN FOOD.
TKEN r N oncer
TtlE 51ZE OF
Y FRESHER-
SO FAR X'VE WANWED
TO SaUEeze IN TWO
FISH-STICKS ANP A
TOuAKPARl -
Apr aa nH 17 ' WHAT JUtwtwuwr -uk
Arm Fall Off Boy
By RACER X
The Li'l
Yo readers! You've probably noticed that reprint Hell is
taking place on the Li'l Pirate Comix page today. Actually the
Undercover Cats are still on vacation like many of the strips
this summer. The only reason they appear today is because
Paul Freidrich disappeared in the storm last night (we
suppose). Hopefully Overkill will be back next week; until
then, thrill to another adventure of . � � Arm Fall-Off Boy.
'MM 6uana Boy! WATS vrong
yirn ou ARM ovezrueze?
CLOTHES FAIL-OFF GIRL
sou Vl�&
I GOING TO
oeveLOP
MY
SUP6R-
P0k�Sy
ARM
rtui-off
$NEED CASH?$
We Buy & Sell
ANYTHING & EVERYTHING
$ 1 CLOTHES I - MUST BE NICE! ESPECIALLY JEANS, CASUAL
& SPORT CLOTHES
$ UEWELRYl - ANY GOLD OR SILVERREGARDLESS OF
CONDITION)
$ ISMALL APPLIANCES 1 - microwaves, fans, irons,
TOASTERS, HOT PLATES, ETC.
$ ELECTRONICS
- T.V STEREO. CD V.C.R ETC.
$ 1FURNITURE1 - must be in good condition.
(Girls - We are now buying nice costume
jewelry and nice lingerie!)
REMEMBER!
When You Need Cash
Sell To Coin & Ring Man!
When You Need To Buy Anything,
Save On 'Like NewM at Coin & Ring Man
Q�
nffTcump
At
10:00-5:00 M-F
10:00-3:00 Sat.
The Coin & Ring Man
400 S. Evans St.
752-3866
RACK ROOM SHOE
Greenville Buyer's Market
Memorial Drive
Greenville
Morehead Marketplace
4952 Arendell Street
Morehead City
MEMORIAL DAY
Thurs Fri Sat Sun. and Mon.
SAVINGS UP TO 40
OFF
MFG.
PRICES t
Special Group
MACRAME HANDBAGS
Many Styles 097
Great Values jj
Special Group
LEATHER HANDBAGS
White Only Q97
Several Styles
39
Special Group
SNAKESKIN PUMPS
byCapezio f rQr7
2 Heel Heights 1 U '
Reg. $60"
Special Group
LEATHER SANDALS
Many Styles - �
& Colors J-3
97-1 Q97
19'
Large Group
LEATHER HUARACHES
Many Styles Qf- Q
o�. 1497-2697
Reg. $33
Jordache
ESPADRILLES
Many Colors 97
Reg. $23 XT!
Special Group
LEATHER BOW PUMPS
Navy or Blk. f ft tyj
patent - Reg. $33
24'
Special Group of Ladies
DRESS SHOES
Many Styles & O Q 97
Colors Reg. $37
28'
Special Group
GLORIA VANDERBILT
Several Styles of
Dressy Wedges fy ry QJ 1Q9"7
Reg. $58 0� "DO
Special Group
LADIES' & CHILDREN'S
CANVAS OXFORDS
Compare at $14 Q
Special Group of Ladies
CANVAS CASUALS
Several Colors xOT
Compare At $13 07
9
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MESH CASUALS
Great Value - q�
Compare at $25 "1 A
RACK ROOM SHOES
TAKE
10
Store Coupon EC
Q0 OFF ALL OUR
RACK ROOM PRICES
�EXCEPT AICNER. NIKE, REEBOK AND KEDS
MEMORIAL
DAY
COUI�ON
VM0
OU
er-
be
Are
he
he
n-
in-
of
ng
I'
Lee McNeill will be one
Ore to try and make th
Morri
East Carolina head
coach Hal Morrison
selected to be inductc.
Golf Coaches Associ
America Hall of Fame.
The induction cere ml
Morrison will be held I
Morrison, who hasbeen
on the collegiate rani
years, will be one of threj
to be honored by the G
year. The Hall of Fame
located in the World Gj
Fame, which is f
Pinehurst.
The enshrinement is
festivities surround!
NCAA Division
championships.
The other two coaches
Kobe si
East Carolina head s
coach Rick Kobe has ai
the signing of 11 recruil
1988-89 season, thus
out his recruiting procej
year.
"We signed six ouj
swimmers' on the men's
have produced times alr
would qualify them
conference champioj
Kobe said. "This class!
potential to equal or suj
group from last year, wj
have been the finest grc
conference. The tiv
women are outstanding
athletes and thev give
we need this vcar to cha)
the conference title
L.A. Lakl
ByF.ARLVISH.Wj
Staff Firiv is
Aren't you sick oi waj
Lakers and the Celtics'
under dog sport fans of
will have to wait until n
see some new blood ml
finals. Like meat loaf anl
potatoes, it looks like tj
and the Celts will meef
the championship senel
But wait a minute
said. The Lakers first hs
ral the Mavericks and
to exhaust the Pistons
man, remember the
offs are like blue chipr
the crash; they are total
able.
Under dog sport 1
gavelling in the pits ol
chair last weekend as
under dogs, Utah Jazj
lanta Hawks bit the
teams played gallant!
the power houses of tht
almost sacred skeptics
there is no parity in
ball. Both the Jazz and
survived through tht
game, surprising boc
gamblers alike.
The Utah-LA series
great theatrical prefor





3
I HI S I M(OI ININ
Sports
11
�u
�r-
?e
v'C
le
ic
n-
n-
oi
Pirate track team heading to Oregon
for 10th straight appearance at trials
McNeill will bt
tr and m,
one of the Pirate ti
ike the .S. Ohmi
a K hopefuls to I
ic team. I ile I'
lead out In I !ugene
into I
By CAROLYN l STIC1
s(.(tx V t lei
E Is men's track team makes
its 10th consecutive appearance at
the NCAA Division I hark and
Field Championships, .is it travels
to Eugene, c he, une 1 4 to
compete.
c ompeting tor the Pirates will
be All American 1 ee Mi Neil! in
the 100 meter dash, E ugene
McNeill in the 200 motor dash
and E( Is 400 meter relay team.
I ee McNeill, who has vet to win
at the N( AA's qualified tor this
year's event as he ran a 10.26 in the
100 meters at this year's North
( anlinaollegiate IVack and
Field � hampionships, held in
Raleigh during April.
The qualif ing time for the
NCAA'sis 10 29 while M Neill's
fastest time this vear was the
10.26
nnis Mitchell of Honda has
run the fastest qualify ing tin -
N A s u ith a ! race
McNeill, w hi i did not qua
for the finals in last v ti
competition in Louisiana, h
the E( l n i ord in th I m 'tors
with a 10 ! 1
"1 ee can ha e his best fit
. i r at the N s this i
says E( I track coa h Hill (Larson.
"I think ho ran finish fifth or even
higher, but in the 100 motors you
can never predict what will
happen
Eugene McNeill finished
seventh at the NCAA's
Championships last une in the
200 motors, running tho race in
2i 15 seconds
I his spring McNeill was
hampered by injuries that almost
stood in the way of his qualifying
for the event this time around.
"The competition in the 200
motors .it the N A A's is going to
be awesome this year says
( arson. "There are some
tremendously fast runners and
there will be five guys out in front
and then the rest will just group
� ;ether
McNeill qualified tor the
NCAA's, running a 20.51 in the
1 motors as woll as qualifying
for the 1C4A Championships,
whi( h were held at i ale
I niversity May 19-22. 1 le came
away with a first-place finish in
tht � -sand a second-pl i
-h in thi meters.
Lee McNeil was expected to
tako first in the 100 meters but he
� :
W righ toi
ton and a n � �
: i muscle
durii ; l narv race and


m went on to v i
t a lot of i :
� � I
pel
I for usat I " ' ' . :
- ' '�'� r . � � ingi
in I � that
ervoi
their b
� �

ther our newordei
Morrison honored
am
-
I



which is located m

I
M � � on as indue tees,
aro I Mam f Arizona
A'oosl
: i to s f( r the L'vv
the total number of
n the a 1 lall of
. hin
-
S6and
� :� rs to
in
d tho Lira
cutive
tiongoll championships.
i"o hinggot started in 1958 when
he began directing the Last
�� : � team Such
fan - fii names as .C.
� '� idkins and Mike
1 lulbert ha e played for Mi �ris
hed �
Kobe signs recruits
The � ruits foi the m n s
swim: t am include Eric
i twi -time junior colli
All n at Broward
imunitv ;c in Fort
Lauderdah Todd
ins of i Bea h, Fla Tim
: ! Alexandria a Marc
V of North Palm Bea h, Lla
Billy Haughton of Roswell, Ga
and ohn Springer of ritusville,
� ' that
I tii that
hamph
was disqualified after a false start won tb i
and brother Eugene wont on I
tako the win.
Both McNeills will compete as
members of the 400 motor relay
team along with funior Robinson
and Ike Robinson at the NCAA's
The relay team qualified f r the
competition this year when thev
traveled to Jamaica and compef
with last oar's top 10n la) ti
ECl finished fourth with a
clocking of � nds behind
the running of the McNeill's,
Junior Robinson and Kelvin
Wrighton.
At last year's NCAA's, the n
team finished fourth in
seconds, with Texashristian of
the Southwest O inference,
taking first pla a th a tin
38 82.
AnotherSouth
foam is at the top of I
year as the relay squad fr
A&M has recorded tl ison's
fastest qualifying time with , � � : �
king of 38.83. Last, Al
ThePiratei
! r th ���'� mpetil M :
with a first-pla e fii
IC4A events.
The Pirates qu il�
finals at the (
Bradley advances
Former East Cai ting
standout Mike Brad I
rham, took the first si
quahh. ing for ty in I thus
U.S. Open
making it past the firsl
� irnament Sunda and M
at the Alamar mtn
ib
Bradli v carded a tw lay tota
of 144 to tie tor sixth pi i
� iirnann ntv hMarl
Andrew of -ML' n Onlv '�
! til )
roton-

� �� .
Tennis and volleyball
coaches hired Friday


ist yeai es tor the women's
finest group in I quad include Paige 1 lolte of
young Wilmington, Del Shelly Micka of
lent- ( hantal Morns of
: lepth Durham, iennv Muench ol
for Sanibel, Fla and Erin RoilK' of
Wilmington, Del.
Former Fast Carolina golfer Mike Bradley made it past t
qualifying in hopes of advancing to play in the t
Championship. Bradlej recorded a to-da total of 144.
he first stage of
S. Open Golf
(File Photo)
LA. Lakers and Boston Celtics again?
1 AKI IS MAMPIDN

rid
.
I in the !
� md
il '

t i
ninute, some
r
'o prob
� r the NBA pla)

port fa wi n
pits of the arm
� � kend a ' th the
tah la and At
. bit the du: I Both
: gallantly against
csof the NBA and
kepti s wh i said
: irit m pr i r und
� th( izz ind tho 1 lawks
sun i I through Ihe se enth
iurprising bookies and
� alike
I series was like a
theatrical preformance I A
a M
I
kid tt in Act I. Super fan lark
Nil n eats his own words in
tah takes a V in the
kton pro1.i all and
' 1 lilman powered over
eryone while Mark Eaton even
ibbar
B) A. t VI, game six, the ritics
,vi ro impn �sed as Karl Malone's
j r nii'j � ame to fruitatii n as the
it was the lazz's turn to ku k butt,
ro) all) But the 30 point win by
la v as merely a lh atri al
de ice '��� hi h the I akers used to
I up Utah tor the winni
pun
In I ton Atlanta serii At
lanl ere put through a;
ruin h ha is the Braes put
thom thn tugh in 162 games ne
v hy did Mike 1 artello
ide to give the ball to lift
Livii . I n in the w and ing sc
ondsof game 6? Not only did the
1 Lo 1- igivethcC eltsthegameon
a fine silver platter, but the) gave
the ball t i a scrub in a crucial
positii 'ii
( . uno seven of the Boston At
lanl i ��� ries was one t the greatest
game Earh is has ever witnessed.
I smoked a whole pa k of igs
during the game and didn't even
have a Let on it. A nail bitter, c )ne
for the record Looks A barn
burner All those corny sports
castor terms held true for that
game.
Little Washington native 1 om
iniquc Wilkens and superstud
I arry Bird went unconscious
fr im the field in the fourth quar
ter. It was more than a personal
duel between two great players, it
was an escalation i �f an art.
Nique's three point bomb with
two mmutos to go in the game
gave the Hawks hope. After the
shot, Wilkens shook his hst defi
antly ashe jogged down court and
1 law ks fans were stunned as thev
saw their team on the verge of a
series i tory.
But it was ine itable, jusl .is the
lakers with their theatrics, the
Celtics had an epic hero (A their
own, and in the final screen ol the
seven act, he proved whv he is
great Bird hit the tall down shot
in the lane over 1 rec Rollins and
the rest is history
So enjoy those mash potatoes
and meat loaf, Because the partici
pants in the NBA finals will be the
same as last year except a little
more salt and pepper.
Thompson
concerned
East � �a Director
Athletics 1 )avc 1 lart anno
the hiring of a tennis coach I i I
men's and women's programs
and a women's volleyball
the Pirates' staff Frida)
Bill Moore b - the L
ich of the ECU teni i ram
after serving as the Direct r
tennis at Last Stroudsburg La
University for the past year. 11
was the assistant coa h for
men's and women's pr
the University of Virginia tor Iv
seasons while he received his
doctoral degree from Virginia in
1986. Moore, a certified member
oi the United States Professional
Tennis Association (USPTA) has
also served as a teni
professional at various dubs in
the state ol Virginia since 1976
Moore was the top seeded
playerduring hiscollcgiate "areer
at Pfeiffer College from 1977
1979.1 lew as ranked second in the
state ol North Carolina by the
United States Tennis Associati n
tor the age 21 and under class in
1Q7Q
.
I
-

� �
- '
-
men s soft
-
. . r
; se en
� '
r
'
N(
Yeai � �
this i
II scl ' '
I for sol

in v
She i II cr Lav
and a master sdegree U
Madisoi 19$
We are er pleas d I
two fine
and ud -
rhe th cai hl
� � : i and are
respected amoi peers in
their respective sj
M ore replace- Pat rman,
KirV rick repl aces
� Turner, bol �
( Ol ORADO SPRINGS, Colo.
(AP) ohn Thompson has to be
on guard when he selects the 1988
I S. Olympic team.
1 hingsseem more than solid up
front tor the team that will try to
defend the gold medal in Seoul in
September.
1 here are names such as David
Robinson, Panne Manning,
( harlcs Smith, Sean Elliott and
high school phenom Alonzo
Mourning.
But the most interesting part of
the list oi approximately 20
players who will continue in the
selection process is the guards
rhompson spoke Sunday ot his
concern with outside shooting
and at point guard
"It we can play good defense
and run, shooting's not as
important, it we don't play good
defense and are forced to play
haltcourt then outside shooting
becomes extremely important
Thompson said after watching
the four teams in a public
doubleheader scrimmage at
NL Nichols Arena make pist eight
ol 24 3-point shots
4

Former
the uni
Kast Carolina tennis coach Pat Sherman has left her position at
ersitv and has now heen replaced. (File Photo)






By REID
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By RACER X
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MEMORIAL
DAY
COUPON
srtt-irx
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MAY 25,1968 Page 11
Pirate track team heading to Oregon
for 10th straight appearance at trials
Lee McNeill will
Ore to try and
be one of the Pirate track hopefuls to head out to Eugene,
make the U.S. Olympic team. (File Photo)
By CAROLYN JUSTICE
Sports Writer
ECU's men's track team makes
its 1 Oth consecutive appearance at
the NCAA Division I Track and
Field Championships, as it travels
to Eugene, Ore June 1-4 to
compete.
Competing for the Pirates will
be Ail-American Lee McNeill in
the 100-meter dash, Eugene
McNeill in the 200-meter dash
and ECU's 400-meter relay team.
Lee McNeill, who has yet to win
at the NCAA's, qualified for this
year's event as he ran a 10.26 in the
100 meters at this year's North
Carolina Collegiate Track and
Field Championships, held in
Raleigh during April.
The qualifying time for the
NCAA's is 10.29, while McNeill's
fastest time this year was the
10.26.
Dennis Mitchell of Florida has
run the fastest qualifying time for
the NCAA's with a 10.10 race.
McNeill, who did not qualify
for the finals in last year's
competition in Louisiana, holds
the ECU record in the 100 meters
with a 10.11.
"Lee can have his best finish
ever at the NCAA's this year
says ECU track coach Bill Carson.
"I think he can finish fifth or even
higher, but in the 100 meters you
can never predict what will
happen
Eugene McNeill finished
seventh at the NCAA's
Championships last June in the
200 meters, running the race in
20.45 seconds.
This spring McNeill was
hampered by injuries that almost
stood in the way of his qualifying
for the event this time around.
"The competition in the 200
meters at the NCAA's is going to
be awesome this year says
Carson. "There are some
tremendously fast runners and
there will be five guys out in front
and then the rest will just group
together
McNeill qualified for the
NCAA's, running a 2051 in the
200 meters as well as qualifying
for the 1C4A Championships,
which were held at Yale
University May 19-22. He came
away with a first-place finish in
the 100 meters and a second-place
finish in the 200 meters.
Lee McNeill was expected to
take first in the 100 meters but he
was disqualified after a false start
and brother Eugene went on to
take the win.
Both McNeills will compete as
members of the 400-meter relay
team along with Junior Robinson
and Ike Robinson at the NCAA's.
The relay team qualified for the
competition this year when they
traveled to Jamaica and competed
with last year's top 10 relay teams.
ECU finished fourth with a
clocking of 3959 seconds behind
the running of the McNeill's,
Junior Robinson and Kelvin
Wrighton.
At last year's NCAA's, the relay
team finished fourth in 39.15
seconds, with Texas Christian of
the Southwest Conference,
taking first place with a time of
38.82.
Another Southwest Conference
team is at the top of the list this
year as the relay squad from Texas
A&M has recorded the season's
fastest qualifying time with a
clocking of 38.83.
The Pirate relay team geared up
for the stiff NCAA competition
with a first-place finish at the
IC4A events.
The Pirates qualified for the
finals at the competition as they
won their preliminary heat with a
time of 39.86, a new Clinton-
Frank Stadium record.
Wrighton, a junior from
Edenton and a member of last
year's relay team, pulled a muscle
during the preliminary race and
was replaced by Ike Robinson for
the finals.
The relay team went on to win
the finals with a time of 40.25.
"We beat a lot of really good
teams at the IC4A's and the
competition and the win will be
good for us at the NCAA's said
Carson. "We're going to change
the order in the relay so that
everyone will be in position to do
their best for the team. We're
going to have a practice meet with
N.C. State, who also qualified for
the NCAA's, and that will give us
an idea of whether our new order
works
ECU finished sixth in the team
standings at the IC4A's, which
consisted of teams from the Big
East, Atlantic 10 and the Ivy
League.
James Madison and George
Mason, both of the Colonial
Athletic Association, also
finished in the top 10 in the team
standings.
Morrison honored
East Carolina head golf .
coach Hal Morrison has been
selected to be inducted into the
Golf Coaches Association of
America Hall of Fame.
The induction ceremonies for
Morrison will be held Sunday.
Morrison, who has been coaching
on the collegiate ranks for 30
years, will be one of three coaches
to be honored by the GCAA this
be joining Morrison as inductees,
are Bill Mann, of Arizona State
and Bob Nye of Wooster College.
The three inductees for the 1988
year brings the total number of
coaches in the GCAA Hall of
Fame to 37.
Morrison began his coaching
dutiesat East Carolina in 1986 and.
has since led the Pirate linkstersto
two consecutive Colonial Athletic
Association golf championships.
Morrison's career in collegiate
Bradley advances
Former East Carolina golfing top six golfers from the event,
standout Mike Bradley, of which consisted of 64 hopeful
Durham, took the first step to golfers, were allowed to advance,
qualifying for eligibility in the thus Bradley and Andrew had to
US. Open Golf Championship by battle it out for the final spot in a
making it past the first qualifying sudden death playoff,
tournament Sunday and Monday
year. The Hall of Fame shrine is
located in the World Golf Hall of
Tame, wltWfc is. o�ate4fc im -eeachinggot started in lft58wh�j
Pinehurst. he began directing the EasT
The enshrinement is part of the Tennessee State team. Such
festivities surrounding the familiar golfing names as J.C.
NCAA Division I golf Snead, Bobby Wadkins and Mike
championships. Hulbert have played for Morison-
The other two coaches, who will coached teams.
Kobe signs recruits
East Carolina head swimming The recruits for the men's
coach Rick Kobe has announced swimming team include Eric
the signing of 11 recruits for the Hoyos, a two-time junior college
1988-89 season, thus rounding All-American at Broward
out his recruiting process for the Community College in Fort
year. Lauderdale, Fla. Also, Todd
"We signed six outstanding Stebbins of Cocoa Beach, Fla Tim
swimmers'on the men's side that Boyd of Alexandria Va Marc
have produced times already that Cook of North Palm Beach, Fla
at the Alamance County Country
Club.
Bradley carded a two-day total
of 144 to tie for sixth place in the
Bradley secured the sixth spot
with a par on the second hole of
the playoff.
Bradley will now advance to the
Billy Haughton of Roswell, Ga
and John Springer of Titusville,
Fla.
would qualify them for the
conference championships
Kobe said. "This class has the
potential to equal or surpass our
group from last year, which may The signees for the women's
have been the finest group in the squad include Paige Holte of
conference. The five young Wilmington, Del Shelly Micka of
women are outstanding student- Sarasota, Fla Chantal Morris of
athletes and they give us depth Durham, Jenny Muench of
we need this year to challenge for Sanibel, Fla and Erin Reilly of
the conference title Wilmington, Del.
qualifyingtournament withMark second ��� of qualifying for the
-Andrew of Albermarle. Only the Qpo� which will bo held June 6 7.
Tennis and volleyball
coaches hired Friday
East Carolina Director of Judy Kirkpatrick has been
thletics Dave Hart announced named the women's volleyball
he hiring of a tennis coach for the coach for the Lady Pirates, as she
nen's and women's programs comes to ECU following seven
mda women's volleyball coach to seasons as the head volleyball and
the Pirates' staff Friday. women's softball coach at West
Bill Moore becomes the head Georgia College in Carrollton,Ga.
coach of the ECU tennis program Kirkpatrick was named the
after serving as the Director of Gulf South Conference Coach of
Tennis at East Stroudsburg, Pa the Year for women's volleyball
University for the past year. He this past season at the NCAA
was the assistant coach for the Division II school. Her career
men's and women's programs at coaching record for softball was
the University of Virginia for two 123-88,buthermarkforhercareer
seasons while he received his in volleyball was unavailable,
doctoral degree from Virginia in She received her bachelor's
1986. Moore, a certified member degree from Winthrop in 1979
of the United States Professional and a master's degree from James
W Tennis Association (USPTA) has
also served as a tennis
professional at various clubs in
Former East Carolina golfer Mike Bradley made it past the first stage of the state of Virginia since 1976.
qualifying in hopes of advancing to play in the U.S. Open Golf
Championship. Bradley recorded a two-day total of 144. (File Photo)
Madison University in 1981.
"We are very pleased to add
two fine coaches like Bill Moore
and Judy Kirkpatrick Hart said.
Moore was the top-seeded They both came highly
reccommended and are well
LA. Lakers and Boston Celtics again?
By EARLVIS HAMPTON
Staff Eartvis
Aren't you sick of watching the
Lakers and the Celtics? It seems
kicks butt in Act I. Super fan Jack during me game and didn't even
Nicholson eats his own words in
Act II as Utah takes a V in the
forum. Stockton proved all and
under dog sport fans of the world the Mailman powered over ev-
will have to wait until next year to eryone while Mark Eaton even
see some new blood in the NBA blocked Jabbar.
finals. Like meat loaf and mashed
potatoes, it looks like the Lakers
and the Celts will meet again in
the championship series.
But wait a minute, someone
said. The Lakers first have to cor-
ral the Mavericks and Boston has
to exhaust the Pistons. No prob
man, remember the NBA play-
offs are like blue chippers before
the crash; they are totally predict-
able.
Under dog sport fans were
By Act VI, game six, the critics
were impressed as Karl Malone's
promises came to fruitation as the
it was the Jazz's turn to kick butt,
have a bet on it. A nail bitter. One
for the record books. A barn
burner. All those corny sports
caster terms held true for that
game.
Little Washington native Dom-
inique Wilkens and superstud
Larry Bird went unconscious
from the field in the fourth quar-
ter. It was more than a personal
device which the Lakers used to
set up Utah for the winning
punch.
royally. But the 30 point win by duel between two great players, it
the Jazz was merely a theatrical was an escalation of an art.
Nique's three point bomb with
two minutes to go in the game
gave the Hawks hope. After the
shot, Wilkens shook his fist defi-
antly as he jogged down court and
Hawks fans were stunned as they
saw their team on the verge of a
series victory.
But it was inevitable, just as the
Lakers with their theatrics, the
Celtics had an epic hero of their
own, and in the final screen of the
Thompson
concerned
player during his collegiate career
at Pfeiffer College from 1977-
1979. He was ranked second in the
state of North Carolina by the
United States Tennis Association
respected among their peers in
their respective sports
Moore replaces Pat Sherman,
while Kirkpatrick replaces
for the age 21 and under class in Imogene Turner, both of whom
1979. have left the ECU coaching staff.
In Boston-Atlanta series, At-
lanta fans were put through as
much havoc as the Braves put
gavelling in'the'pits of the arm them through in 162 games. One
chair last weekend as both the question; why did Mike Fartello
under dogs, Utah Jazz and At- decide to give the ball to Cliff
lanta Hawks bit the dust. Both Livingston in the wanding sec-
teams played gallantly against onds of game 6? Not only did the S�l�SIIdiSfcS
thepoXrLusesoftheNBAand ��JZ BWnttSdTwnshot
almost sacred skeptics who said tf Tthe lane over Tree Rollins and
the rest is history.
So enjoy those mash potatoes
Game seven of the Boston-At- �ffu8fSl
lantaserieswasoneofthegreatest pants m the NBA fmalfl be the
there is no parity in pro-round
ball. Both the Jazz and the Hawks position
survived through the seventh
game, surprising bookies and
gamblers alike.
same as last year except a little
The Utah-LA series was like a game Earlvis has ever witnessed,
great theatrical preformance. LA I smoked a whole pack of cigs more salt and pepper.
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.
(AP) � Jqhn Thompson has to be
on guard when he selects the 1988
U.S. Olympic team.
Things seem more than solid up
front for the team that will try to
defend the gold medal in Seoul in
September.
There are names such as David
Robinson, Danny Manning,
Charles Smith, Sean Elliott and
high school phenom Alonzo
Mourning.
But the most interesting part of
the list of approximately 20
players who will continue in the
selection process is the guards.
Thompson spoke Sunday of his
concern with outside shooting
and at point guard.
"If we can play good defense
and run, shooting's not as
important, if we don't play good
defense and are forced to play
halfcourt then outside shooting
becomes extremely important,
Thompson said after watching
the four teams in a public
doubleheader scrimmage at
McNichols Arena make just eight
of 24 3-point shots.
the valveisMji





I
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25,1988
Votkins finally realizes dream
v ORTH, Texas (AP) �
eran he'd like to admit,
� Vacl kins' romance with
o of oh s grand old dames was
'y affair, one-sided and a
lit .c orrassing.
Tl it ndcd Sunday with a
Hr v j flourish.
Fi� shots off the pace entering
the final round, Wadkins lashed
an -i, on to within three feet of the
pi o: the final hole, dropped the
pu it ai d escaped with a dramatic
ontst. oke victory in the $750,000
Colonial National Invitation
championship.
"It wasn't pretty he said of the
winning putt, "but fortunately
they don't have to be pretty to be
effective
The bold, brash Wadkins, 38,
fired a 5 under-par 65 in Sunday's
windswept finale to beat Ben
Crcnshaw, Mark Calcavecchia
and Joey Sindelar by a shot and
earn his second title of the year
and his 18th since joining the Tour
in 1971.
His 67-68-70-65-270 was 10
under par and worth $135,000.
The top prize hiked his 1988
winnings to $447,465 and his
career earnings to $3,538,546,
fourth behind Jack Nicklaus, Tom
Watson and Tom Kite.
"It's special to win here, and
winning in your backyard is
exciting said Wadkins, who
lives in nearby Dallas and spent
Friday and Saturday nights at
home after checking out of his
motel on Friday.
"Force of habit he quipped,
implying that he was so
accustomed to missing the cut
here that he routinely headed
home after two rounds.
In 11 previous encounters with
the challenging Colonial Country
Club course, Wadkins merely
flirted with a sub-par score, never
embraced one. He played 35
competitive rounds without
breaking par and finished no
higher than 24th.
"Hey, I nver disliked this
course he said after Sunday's
nationally televised cliffhanger.
"I love the course. I just didn't
play it good
In what several players
described as an incredible
afternoon of pressure golf under
nightmare conditions, Wadkins
overtook third-round leader
Clarence Rose with birdies on
three of the first four holes and
then gunned down Crenshaw,
Calcavecchia and Sindelar in the
stretch.
Calcavecchia closed with a 66,
Crenshaw with a 67 and Sindelar
with a 68. Rose was in the hunt
until a double bogey at the 18th
added a dismal end to a 74 that left
him three strokes behind the trio
in second place.
For Wadkins, it was a "miracle"
chip shot at the 17th green that
enabled him to save par and set
the stage for the 18th-hole heroics.
He confessed it was a shot he
couldn't hit again with a bucket of
balls.
"I had no green to work with
he said. "I was just trying to play a
soft little plop shot
The ball cleared a trap by inches
and rolled almost to the lip of the
cup.
"It was a heck of a pitch he
said. "I told myself, 'Let's not
waste it. Let's go to 18 now and
make a birdie
He did.
Pirates blown off by wind and Scott
PITTSBURGH (AP) � The
Pittsburgh Pirates were nearly
blown off the field in the ninth
inning by swirling 50-mph wind
gusts that accompanied a sudden
thunderstorm.
But even the storm couldn't
compare to the way Houston
pitcher Mike Scott blew through
the Pi rates' lineup.
The unbeaten Scott, armed with
a n.arly unhittable split-finger
fastball, registered his sixth
consecutive victory with a four-
hitr er as the streaking Astros beat
rh Pa ates 3-0 Monday night.
was awesome the Pirates'
E yBonillasaid. "Theman was
great. We didn't score any runs,
we didn't have many hits. He
pretty much blanked us
In the only other National
League game, Cincinnati beat St.
Louis 8-3. The Atlanta-Chicago
game was rained out.
The Pirates' big guns � Andy
Van Slyke, Bonilla, Sid Bream and
R.J. Reynolds � fired blanks all
night long and were a combined
l-for-10. Scott didn't allow a hit
until the fifth inning and his six-
game winning streak is the
longest of his career.
"The split-finger was the best
I've had all year said Scott, who
beat the Pirates for the second
time in a week. "I've been in a
pretty good groove all season,
really, from the end of spring
training. I haven't had a bad day
Scott was removed in the top of
the ninth for a pinch hitter but
received credit for a complete
game when the rains came before
the Pirates could bat in the ninth.
Scott was dressed and ready to
conduct interviews when he
found out the game had been
called after the umpires waited
one hour, 15 minutes.
"It's the first time I've ever
finished a game in my street
clothes he said.
Newspapers and hot dog
wrappers swirled out of the
stands and into the player's faces
and Jim Gott, Pittsburgh's 6-foot-
4,220-pound reliever, was nearly
blown off the mound several
times.
"There was a strange satanic
glow over the stadium Gott
said.
"I thought we were going to
blow to Kansas Scott said.
Scott, who beat the Pirates 3-2 in
Houston last Tuesday night, got
the only run he needed in the fifth
on Kevin Bass' leadoff double and
Rafael Ramirez's RBI single off
John Smiley, 3-4.
The Astros, winning for the
sixth time in seven games, scored
a run in the seventh on Chuck
Jackson's sacrifice fly. Gerald
Young's single and reliever Barry
Jones' throwing error in the
eighth preceded Jim Pankovits's
sacrifice fly.
"If you're hitting, you don't
mind seeing the same guy again
Pirates manager Jim Leyland
said. "But when the pitcher's
going good, it works the other
way. It's a shame we lost because
I thought John smiley pitched
great, probably his best game of
the season. But we didn't have
much of a chance against Scott
Nixon hopes sun will shine on Braves
CHICAGO (AP) � Russ Nixon
says he doesn't like rainy days or
doubleheaders and hopes the sun
shines today when he makes his
managerial debut for Atlanta.
Nixon succeeded Chuck
Tanner, who was fired Sunday
night, but must wait until today to
manage his first game with the
Braves. Monday's game against
the Chicago Cubs was rained out
and rescheduled as part of a
doubleheader today.
"I never liked doubleheaders
and I never liked rain delays
Nixon said. "At least we haven't
been scored upon yet
However, Nixon conceded the
rainout gave him a chance "to get
my thoughts together and time to
meet with and talk to some of the
players. It's something that's
needed but I would rather have
played, definitely
When Nixon does lead the
Braves, he will be in charge of a
team with a 12-27 record, the
worst in the National League.
"This isn't the first time I've
been in that situation said
Nixon, who took over Cincinnati
in July 1982 and managed them
through 1983 with the team
finishing last each year.
"I don't think anybody wants to
be in last place, but usually when
you take over a team it is in last
place or close to it Nixon said. "If
a club is going good, you don't
replace the manager unless there
is a complete breakdown in
communications
Unlike some situations where
the incoming manager says he is
taking the job with mixed
emotions and feeling empathy for
his predecessor, Nixon said he
was elated.
"I'm glad they made the
change, I'm happy, I'd be a fool if
I said I wasn't before being
called up to Atlanta by General
Manager Bobby Cox.
"The club is struggling said
Nison, "got a ways to go. We've
got some work to do
He does expect better results
than he produced when he was at
Cincinnati.
"I have a better grade of placrs
here than I had at Cincinnati
Nixon said. "The biggest name I
had there was (Mario) Soto and
we knew (Johnny) Bench was in
his last year
Nixon doesn't believe Atlanta's
poor record can be blamed on the
everyday position players.
"My primary concern is to get
the pitching staff going Nixon
said. "Zane Smith is a wquestion
mark and there are other question
marks. The younger guys are
having problems and that's a
primary concern
Zane Smith led the Braves with
a 15-10 record last season but is 2-
3 this year. He has a bone spur in
his left pitching elbow which will
be re-examined Tuesday.
Nixon, 53, was brought in from
Greenville, S.C, where he had
been managing the Braves' Class
AA farm club in the Southern
League.
Cox, who made the changes,
said "It was just a situation where
we had to make a move
Tanner, 58, had managed for 17
consecutive seasons in the major
leagues. He also managed the
Chicago White Sox, Oakland and
Pittsburgh. He led the Pirates to
the World Series championship in
1979.
"This is the first time I've ever
been fired in my life (in a season)
a stunned Tanner said, before
leaving for Atlanta Monday
morning. "We were improving.
We had a lot of young players on
this team
Tanner came to the Braves from
Pittsburgh in 1986 and was in the
third year of a five-year contract.
The Braves finished fifth in 1986
and last in 1987 with a 66-96
record.
Tanner's record at Atlanta was
153-208 and his overall record in
the major leagues was 1,352-
Utt
Pack receives bid
RALEIGH (AP) � North
Carolina State, which finished the
regular season in second place in
the Atlantic Cioast Conference,
has received an at-large bid to the
NCAA baseball tournament, the
school announced Monday.
The Wolfpack, participating in
postseason play for the third
straight year, will meet Tulane in
a first-round game Thursday in
the Eastern Regional in
Tallahassee. Fla.
The Wolfpack, 44-14, is the third
seed in the six-team regional,
behind Florida and host Florida
State.
"Obviosly we're very excited
about receiving a bid said first-
year Wolfpack coach Ray Tanner.
"Hopefully we'll be able to play
well in Tallahassee. There are
some outstanding teams in our
regional, but I think we have the
talent to compete on that level
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Title
The East Carolinian, May 25, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 25, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.608
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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