The East Carolinian, May 20, 1988






WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!
The East Carolinian welcomes all students back to
campus for the summer. We will appear
Wednesdays from now on.
FEATURES
"Colors" has a few flaws. See page 9.
SPORTS
ECU signs two golf recruits. See page 12.
QEhe SaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol. 63 No. 1
Friday, May 20,1988
Greenville, NC
14 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Edwards tells graduates
. to look toward the future
Douglas Edwards, retired newsman for the Columbia Broadcast-
ing System, said at graduation that this year's seniors could he a
bright surprise for the future. (Jon Jordan Photolab)
Book an family life by ECU professor
By CLAY DEANHARDT career minded, more pragmatic,
General Manage more practical than the preceding
The graduating class oi more generation of college graduates,
than 1,500 East Carolina Univer- "You have also vet to be heard
sitv students were told during from. You are not the vocal gen-
commensement, May 7, to keep eration that graduated in the late
an eye toward the future and to 60s and early 70s he said.
remember that "being nice isn't Edwards said he recently read
bad" by Douglas Edwards, the an article in which today's college
first network television news graduates were called "nice and
anchoranda pioneer in the broad- lie didn't think it was meant as a
casting field. compliment. However, he said,
Drawing from his 46years with he thought it was a good thing to
the Columbia Broadcasting Svs- be nice in the 80s.
tern, Edwards told the graduates "You will prove you are more
they hold the promise of the fu- than nice he said.
ture despite criticism from some "That you are also caring and
that their generation is motivated progressive and-dare I sav the
by self interest and greed. word- radical
"Much of our hope in the future Many oi the outspoken gradu-
lepends on you he said. ates of the 60s, Edwards said,
"You are different from the col- settled into material values
lege graduates of a decade or quickly when they faced the
more ago. You are said to be more world outside of college, he said
there are less expectations placed
on this generation of graduates,
and that thev may end up doing
more.
"In the years ahead you're
going to surprises I suspect.
you are going to make enormous,
significant contributions to this
world. Your political and soda!
creativity is ahead oi you, not
behind you as u seems to be with
so many of the 60s activists i
certainly hope ml"
believing the future would auto-
matically take care oi today's
problems.
He said the answer to many
problems facing the world lies in
communication- in sharing
knowledge, feelings and experi-
ence.
"We all talk too much and
rommunicate too little he said.
noting that often violence is a
misguided effort to communi-
cate.
"In the years ahead you're going to surprise us, I
suspect You are going to make enormous, signifi-
cant contributions to tJiis world. Your political
and social creativity is ahead of you
� Douglas F.dwards
I C t News Mu rv�u
Recent writings on a variety ol
family-related issues are included
in "Families in Transition: An
Annoted Bibliography" by Fast
Carolina University faculty mem-
ber Judith DeBoard Sadler. The
book is scheduled for publication
this mi'nth by Archon Books of
Connecticut.
The 251-page hardcover vol-
ume surveys published matcri i
on such topics as single-parent-
ing, step-families, faster families,
teenage-parent families, homo-
sexual relationships, child cus-
I 'dv and visitation, "latchkey"
children, commuting couples and
other issues dealing with changes
in family configurations during
the past two decades.
The book is recommended for
those with a professional or per-
sonal interest in family issues,
particularly social workers, coun-
' : mber of "tradi-
tional" two-parent families.
' No longer is the nuclear family
predominant in this country
Ms. Sadler says. "As a result, the
American family is in a state of
transition.
" There are now single-parent
families, I pfamilics, dual earner
fa mil : d cummutcr families.
he n ; s families confront
ide lat hkkids, day care,
- u : 'dv. child supp rt, displaced
homemakers, teen-ace prec-
nancv.
ntal kidnapping, sur-
id homo
sex-
;ate parent
ual parent
Altl � a number ii social
and economh f rces" have
brougl t ab ut 11 inge in the
structure ol ics, Ms. Sadler
says, the family unit retains its
important role in society.
1
�re than
sciors,
ittorne
md articles, including
fiction and nonfiction
children, alone with 40
-
the tie
major
ducators, ministers and
0G books
some 100
books tor
films and
audio or video cassettes are sur-
veyed in the Sadler bibliography.
While some publications were
designed for professionals, many
were intended for tho general
reader, among them articles form
mass-market magazines.
In a pre-publication review,
Hamilton I. McCubbin, dLn of
the University oi Wisconsin's
I ol Family Resources and
imcr Sciences, said Sadler's
. ill emerge as a classic in
1 and establish itself as a
reference document tor
family scholars
Judity Sadler, an associate pro-
f( sor ol library and information
studies at E( U, precedes her bib-
liography with an introduction
explaining changes in the make-
upof family units. The percentage
of families that fit the traditional
concept of two parents with chil-
dren is on the decline across the
nation, while divorce rates have
risen sharply.
She cited current statistics:
Approximately 75 percent of
divorced women and 3 percent
of divorced men remarry, and
remarriages have a 50 percent
"survival rate
� About half a million adults
become stepparents each year in
the U.S. with between a third and
a sixth of all children in the U.S.
having at least one stepparent.
� It is likely that by 1990 the
number of stepfamilies and
single-parent households will be
i to several indexes,
.hides an appendix
In additn
the book 1!
listing names and addresses of
numerous i rganizations and as-
sociations tl it otter information
and support to families and to
those vv
work with families.
After a few delays because of technical problems, Chancellor
Eakin addressed the crowd of parents and students assembled at
the May 7 graduation ceremony. (Jon Jordan � Photolab)
Speaking on the politics ot the
election year, Edwards said
Saturday's graduates would be
charged with reforming an elec-
tion system that hasn't boon
working weel lately.
"We are a country in which the
idea of majority rule has been
replaced by the fact of minority
rule he said. Edwards said some
way needed to be found to get
more people to vote and that
campaign spending needed to be
controlled to allow more people
to run for public office.
Edwards said he could foresee
great advances in technology in
the near future, some resulting
from the peaceful fallout oi Star
Wars technology 1 le said re-
search into the futuristic defencse
shield could benefit other re-
search into a cure for cancer, pro-
tection for rain forests from acid
rain and astronomy- along with
numerous other fields.
But, Edwards said, the key to
the future is in dreams and com-
munication.
"We must not stop with dreams
or stop dreaming them he said.
"Dreams are the touchstone of
our characters. For you, at the
beginning oi your careers, this is
the time for dreams, to try and live
the life that you have imagined
He warned, though, that gradu-
ates must not fall into the trap of
"What is truly unfortunate is
the final result he saiei.
"For violence never unites us;
violence onlv separates vis from
each other
In closing, Edwards told the
1-CL graduates he wished them
glory in th future
Edwards also addressed the
families and friends that sup-
ported the students in their quests
for degrees, commending tham
for dedication. Approximately
15,000 people-many more than
officials had expected- attended
the ceremony in Ficklen Stadium,
which had been delayed for sev-
eral minutes because oi technical
difficulties with the speaker sys-
tem.
There were also more students
walking through the graduation
sevices than had been expected,
forcing approximately 30 to stand
through the event.
The University Award, the
highest award given to graduat-
ing seniors at ECU, was presented
to Jamie Allen and Susan Benson,
both of Greenville. Both non-tra-
ditional, adult students complet-
ing degrees in education and ac-
counting, respectively-
Following Edward's speech,
ECU Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
conferred degrees ranging from
doctors in philosophy to bacca-
laureate degrees.
Rapist stabbed by victim
By TIM HAMPTON
News ! litnr
A 22-year old Kinston man has
been charged with the first degree
rapeofaE U female student in an
incident which occurred April 25
in 'ones Residen e I fall.
Maurice vr uell, who is not
an ECU student, was also charged
with attempted rape, assault on a
female and breaking and entering
a (ones room.xouell's bond was
set at $85,000.
(n April 25, ECU PublicSafery
responded to a telephone call at
4:23 a.m. saving that a fight was
taking place in ones dorm. The
suspect was apprehended 45
minutes later after officers of both
Public Safety and Greenville Po-
lice put on a search.
According to Public Safety
Chief Johnny Rose, Crouell alleg-
edly held a female at knife point
while raping her, an act which
qualifies for first degree rape. The
Kinston man also alledgely at-
tempted to rape the female's
roomate.
Rose said Crouell entered a
locked exterior door to the dorm
early the momingof the 25th after
a Jones resident opened the door
for him. The outside doors to
Jones, like doors to other ECU
residence halls, are locked at a
curfew hourof 2a.m.on the week-
ends. Residents and authorized
personnel are the only persons the suspect.
of the dorm try hitting her.
Rose said the first floor RA
chased the suspect from the dorm.
Rose also said the RA identified
the man and was "instrumental in
the detection and apprehension of
allowed to enter the dorm after
curfew.
Crouell allegedly entered the
two females' second floor dorm
room by force after one of the
women answered the door.
During the rape one of the
females stabbed Crouell with a
knive in his shoulder blade. After
being apprehended, Crouell was
treated at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital for a laceration on his
shoulder.
Rose said a Jones resident
ad visor heard a commotion on the
second floor and entered the
room while the suspect was rap-
ing one of the females. Rose said
the RA's actions "probably kept
the two victims from being seri-
ously hurt
After being intcrupted by the
RA, Crouell fled from the room
and assaulted a female in the hall
Crouell was apprehended by
the Greenville Police in a garage
behind 1007 Forbes St. shortly
afterwords.
Rose said the Jones resident
who initially allowed Crouell into
the dormitory was evicted from
the dorm for his actions.
The rape brings to light the
seriousness of allowing
unauthorized persons into a dor-
mitory, Rose said. Rose asked
dorm residents to practice pre-
caution when opening the locked
outside doors for anyone. "Be
very suspicious of any activity
Rose said.
Joseph Caldcr, director of
Public Safety, said the incident
was the first rape to occur inside
an ECU dormitory in his 19 years
at ECU. Caldcr said rapes in past
have taken place off campus or The sentiments of many graduates were expressed by this cap
outside of campus buildings. addressed to Dad and Mom. (Jon Jordan � Photolab)





TI IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20, lSS
12 steps to rape prevention
Mv roommate was raped a few
days ago. What can I do to help
her and what can 1 do to prevent
this from happening to me?
If vou or a friend are a victim of
sexual assault vou should do the
following:
1. Co to a safe place.
2. Preserve all physical evi-
dence Do not shower, bathe or
douche. Save the clothing you
were wearing.
3. Call the police or campus
security immediately. It is up to
you to file a complaint.
4. Call someone for support.
5. Co to the hospital emergency
room for medical and evidence
collection.
It is normal for the victim in
recovery from sexual assault to
have a wide variety ot feelings.
Some ot these include:
- Fear ot being alone or oi the
attacker returning.
- Anger at herself and the assail-
ant
- Humiliation.
- Guilt.
HEALTH COLUMN
By
DONNA STOWE
- Shame.
- IVpression.
- Mood swings.
- Unusually silent or talkative.
- Repression or denial of the
event.
While no one is immune to sex-
ual crimes there are va s to pre-
vent this from happening to you.
The North Carolina Department
of Crime control and Public Safety
has released guidelines to help
women in protecting themselves
against sexual assault. Sexual as-
sailants are like their victims in
that also come from all arc-as of
society and there is no formula tor
predicting who may be a potential
threat. Because of this, we should
treat strangers with caution until
they have earned our trust. This
extra caution is not rude or offen-
sive but smart and safety con-
scious. If a person is genuinely
interested in your feelings and
well being they will understand
your caution. I lere is a list of basic
strategies a woman can use to
make herself less vulnerable to
assault.
- Know whom you are dating
and stay in public areas with other
people.
- let someone you trust know
where you are going and how
long you will begone.
- Realize you have the right to
set your sexual limits and these
limits may change at any time.
Communicate these limits
clearly.
- He assertive. If something
happens vou do not like, stand up
tor your personal rights.
- Limit the use of alcohol and
drugs so vou can keep a clear
head.
- In the home make sure all
doors, windows and locks are
secure with durable hinges and
peep holes.
r
ounties fight against waste treatment plant
riTTSRORO. N.C.(AP)- Some
Chatham and lee countv resi-
dents don't want a hazardous
waste treatment plant located in
their area, and they met Wednes-
day to figure out ways to tight the
proposal.
We need to hold hands and
stick this one out together, and I
think we can beat it Chatham
resident Lisa B. Howell told the
crowd oi about 150 at the
Chatham County District Court-
room. "The state and federal gov-
ernment are not going to take care
oi us. We need to take care oi
ourselves
The North Carolina 1 hazardous
Waste Treatment Commission
announced earlier this month that
it was considering a site near the
banks ol the ; Vep River for an
incinerat r and treatment facility.
The Peep River Ironis part ot the
border between Chatham and Lee
counties.
"We're real concerned about it
because1 it is on the river Cather-
ine M. Cameron, on organizer ot
the meeting, told the News and
Observer ot Raleigh before the
gathering. 'A good share ot
Chatham County is down river
from the possible site of the facil-
ity. It there's air pollution from
incinerator stacks, we would re-
ceive our share ot that
Chatham County Planning
Board Chairman William W. Dow
and Mrs Cameron were among
the leaders oi n earlier unsuc-
cessful tight to stop a surface coal
mining operation near the
Chatham County side of the Deep
River. Dow said the residents al-
ready had seen too many scars left
on their region bv mismanagemnt
of industrial waste.
"It just goes on and on Dow
said in an interview before the
meeting. "But the good thing
about Chatham County is that
we'll stand up and fight
The tract being considered b
state officials covers almost four
square miles, with about two
miles oi river frontage. The state
has been negotiating the purchase
ot the land, which is valued at
about $822,000.
- Always have adequate light-
ing around entrances and hall-
ways.
- Never open your door to
anyone vou do not know.
- Ask for an I.D. from repair
men and if you do allow them in,
have a friend with you.
- Give no indication that you
live alone, or that you are a fe-
male, on your mailbox or in the
phone book.
- Always be alert to what is
going on around vou and act as-
sertively.
Rape, or sexual assault, is one of
the oldest crimes in history. Sex-
ual assault is any forced sexual
activity that is against the
persons's will. The force may be
physical, or mental and emotional
pressure. Contrary to popular
belief, rape is a crime oi power
and anger, not passion. Anyone
can be a victim, regardless oi age,
race, appearance, or social stand-
ing.
It is encouraging to know that
most assault situations do not
result in rape because women
have been observant and acted
quickly. We are safer when we act
to avoid riskv situations, but even
with precautions, sexual assault
can still occur. If you or a friend
are a victim of sexual assault,
report it and seek counseling
from the Rape Crisis Center, the
Counseling Center on campust
the Student 1 lealth Service. These
servicescan help you, your family
and friends deal with the after-
math ot rape. They understan
and are there to help.
LOW COST
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ORGANlZA-nOHS
Some
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James F. J. McKcc. Director of Advertising
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Richard Alan Cook Spencer Meymai
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20,1988
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Some don't celebrate birthday
(CPS) � It's almost the U.S.
Department of Education's birth-
day.
But not everyone is celebrating
the 10th anniversary of the agency
that coordinates all the federal
government's education pro-
grams, from student aid to library
support.
"The creation of a cabinet post
for education has been a contrib-
uting factor in the decline of edu-
cation said Douglas Alexander
of citizens for Educational Free-
dom, a conservative education
lobby.
Ronald Reagan, of course, ran
for the presidency in 1980 pledg-
ing to dismantle the then-new
department.
Reagan and many fellow con-
servatives, however, have come
to tolerate the creature, while
many of those who hailed its leg-
islative birth in 1979 complain it's
never had a chance to do any
good.
"It's not as bad as it could have
been conceded Gordon Jones of
the Heritage Foundation, a con-
servative think tank which helped
create much of the
administration's education pol-
icy.
Jones, who added the founda-
tion still opposes a cabinet-level
education department, credited
the administration for making it
bearable so far.
"We've had a Repuiblican
president who's sensible about
education he asserted. "And
(Sec. William) Bennett has kept
the department from doing (alot)
of damage
The ever-quotable Bennett, in
fact, has come to color most ob-
servers' opinion of whether or not
it was a good idea to create a
department. Those who like him
now tend to tolerate, if not en-
dorse, the agency. Those who
don't like Bennett, appointed in
1984, don't like Bennett, ap-
pointed in 1984, don't like the
department.
"The present incumbent said
Charles Saunders of the Ameri-
can Council on Education (ACE),
"gives us sufficient cause to ques-
tion the department's worth
"Most educators look at the
Department of Education as a
negative force added Jerry
Roschwalb of the National Asso-
ciation of State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges, who sup-
ported creating the department in
1978.
Roschwalb contended that be-
cause "the department came into
existence at the end of the Carter
administration, there was no
chance to see what its creators
would have done
"In came the Reagan admini-
stration, whose stated goal was to
destroy the department. They
couldn't do it because of political
pressure, but they set the depart-
ment in so many negative ways
it's been dead for the last 8 years
The department, for example,
asked Congress for 7 consecutive
years to slash federal spending for
student aid, campus housing, col-
lege libraries, black colleges and
civilian research. It asked for
some cuts in excess of 50 percent,
and recommended whole pro-
grams be junked.
"If anything, (the department's)
been regressive charged How-
ard Carroll of the National Educa-
tion Association (NE A), the teach-
ers union that helped elect candi-
date Jimmy Carter in 1976 in re-
turn for a promise to create the
department. "It's been a disaster
The NE A, however, was among
the few who didn't think it would
be a disaster in 1978.
Even many educators fretted
that creating a separate depart-
ment of Education from out of the
old U.S. Dept. of Health, Educa-
tion & Welfare � which had
administered most higher ed pro-
grams � would isolate college
programs, making them vulner-
able to budget cuts and political
games.
Conservatives feared a seperate
department would metastasize
into a bureaucratic monster that
would put state and local educa-
tion administrators under a fed-
eral thumb, stifling creativity and
local will.
Everyone's worst fears, more-
over, seem to have come true.
The NEA's Carroll sees the
department forcing schools "to
set us back to some good old days
that were never very good
The conservative Alexander
contended, "Part of the reason
American education has become
inflexible and noncreative and
stagnant is that it's been bureau-
cratized
The department, he said, has
taken opportunities for innova-
tion out of the hands of local edu-
cators. "It's a Soviet style of edu-
cation. It's un-American. It's Bol-
shevik
The Heritage Foundation's
Jones concurred. "It's just too
bureaucratized. They just keep
adding layers of bureaucrats
"That's simply not true coun-
tered department spokesman
Michael Jackson. "In fact, the
number of employees decreased
from 7,400 when President Re-
agan took office to 4,400 last
year The department, he said, is
one of the most streamlined agen-
cies in the federal government
department
Alexander also thought educa-
tion has indeed become a political
football. "The warfare over its
agenda has been terrible for the
children
A 1987 General Accounting
Office report also concluded the
department has the highest per-
centage�almost half�of politi-
cal appointees in top decision-
making positions.
"As excellent a secretary of
Yvmotudents receive grants
by academy of physicians
ECU News Bureau
Two students at the East Caro-
lina University School of MEdi-
cine were among four national
recipients of research grants
sponsored by the American
Academy of Family Physicians,
the nation's largest medical spe-
cialty organization.
Yates and Barbara Lennon,
third-year medical students at
ECU, were each awarded a $2,500
grant to investigate current topics
in family medicine.
The awards, supported by a
special fund from the Family
Health Foundation of America,
are given annually to provide
opportunities for students to
pursue research interests under
the direction of family physicians
practicing in an office-based set-
ting.
Lennon, a Bladenboro native,
will investigate adjustments of
physicians' fees based on pa
tients' abilities to pay for medical
services, while his wife, Barbara,
formerly of Thomasville, will
study the current status of family
practice in North Carolina as well
as changes over the last five years.
They will conduct their re-
search under the direction of Dr.
James Jones, professor and chair-
man of the ECU Department of
Family Medicine, and Dr. Frank
H. Lawler, assistant professor in
the department.
These two students are making the best of summer school by
enjoying a quiet moment in the sun between classes. (Ellen
Murphy � Fhotolab)
Education (as) we've had in Wil-
liam Bennett Alexander sighed,
"it still doesn't justify creating a
cabinet position for education
Now that there is a 10-year-old
cabinet position for education,
however, few are willing to get rid
of it completely.
"If s important to have educa-
tion issues represented at the cabi-
net level the ACE's Saunders
said.
"We'll never get out of the
morass we're in now without help
from the federal government
the NEA' Carroll argued. "The
bottom line is more funding.
Many states are unwilling or
don't have the resources to im-
prove education
"The federal govenment
Saunders added, "needs to be-
come the major partner in sharing
the costs
Both Jones and Alexander
would decrease the department's
role in funding and policy mak-
ing. Alexander wants states,
working with local education and
parents' groups, to make school
systems more sensitive to local
concerns.
The federal government, he
said, should issue vouchers to
parents, redeemable for their
children's education at the school
� public or private � of their
choice. "There would be a new
partnership between parents and
teachers. The only losers would
be the overbureaucratized
teacher's unions
"I'd close the rest down. There's
a lot of intelligent, well-meaning
people at Education, but they're
just not needed
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ST
VS I P
K OF
, YAJVC1
� � � I -A-n��Lnx For
�� n J rr�r 1 -800-
. n i. neialanaa-
clGH WOMEN'S HIAl9B
ORGANIZATK)!
Some don't celebrate birthday
SarolittUui
n
ng
andi
-M
iCrS) It's almost the U.S.
�epartmont of Education's birth
a
But not mer one is celebrating
Ithanniversan of theagen
rdinates all the federal
sent s education pro
-indent aid tolibrarv
' ci iti of a abinef post
n has boon a contrib
decline of edu
.las Alexander
' i : ducational i ree
nservative education
�x
� ain of i ourse ian
deiu in 19S0 pit I
. tie the then new
: many fellow eon
ev er ha e CO me
euro while
: ,nn
:
:
lation a v
n k hich helped
of the
- education pol
e tounda
i - a cabinet level
irtnn
&iP
Ne

n dited
lad a Repuiblican
� s sensible about
asserted. 'Arid
Bennett has kept
: alot)
m tl in

� � tl � �
� ite a
ki hmi
if nof en-
igenq tvho
. nted in
'84, � netl ap-
: the
L "All
�n
"gives us sufficient cause to ques-
tion the department's worth
"Most educators look at the
Department of Education as a
negative force added ferry
Roschwalbof the National Asso-
ciation of State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges, who sup-
ported creating the department in
1978.
Roschwalb contended that be-
cause "the department came into
existence at the end of the Carter
administration, there was no
chance to sec what its creators
w ould have done
In came the Reagan admini-
stration, whose stated goal was to
destroy the department. They
couldn't do it because oi political
pressure, but they set the depart-
ment in so main- negative ways
it s boon dead for the last 8 years
The department, tor example,
askedCongress tor 7" consecutive
ears to slash federal spending for
student aid, campus housing, col-
libraries, black colleges and
civilian research. It asked for
some cuts in excess of 50 percent,
and recommended whole pro-
grams be junked.
"If any thing, (the department's)
been regressive charged How-
ard Carroll of the National Educa-
tion Association (NE A), the teach-
ers union that helped eleet candi-
date immy Carter in 1976 in re-
turn for a promise to create the
department. "It'sbeen a disaster
The NEA, however, was among
the few who didn't think it would
be a disaster in LC$.
Even many educators fretted
that creating a separate depart-
� : Education from out of the
old t S. Dept of Health, Educa-
tion v Welfare which had
administered most higher ed pro-
ms would isolate college
� � in s making them vulner-
able to budget cuts and political
ncs.
i, Conservatives feared a seperate
irtment would metastasize
into a bureaucratic monster that
would put state and local educa-
tion administrators under a fed-
mb, stifling creativity and
local will.
Everyone's worst tears, more-
over, seem to have come true.
The NEA's Carroll sees the
department forcing schools "to
set us back to some good old days
that were never very good
The conservative Alexander
contended, "Tart of the reason
American education has become
inflexible and noncreative and
stagnant is that it's been bureau-
era ti zed
The department, lie said, has
taken opportunities tor innova-
tion out of the hands of local edu-
cators, "it's a Soviet style of edu
cation. It's un-American. It's Bol-
shevik
The Heritage Foundation's
Kmes concurred. "It's just loo
bureaucratized. They just keep
.uiding layersol bureaucrats
'That's simply not true coun-
tered department spokesman
Michael lackson. "In fact, the
number of employees decreased
from 7,400 when President Re-
agan took office to 4,400 last
year The department, he said, is
one of the most streamlined agen-
cies in the federal government
department
Alexander also thought educa-
tion has indeed become a political
football. " The warfare over its
agenda has been terrible for the
children
A 1987 General Accounting
Office report also concluded the
department has the highest per-
centage� almosthalf of polite
cal appointees in top decision-
making positions.
"As excellent a secretary of
Education (as) we've had in Wil-
liam Bennett Alexander sighed,
"it still doesn't justify creating a
cabinet position tor education
Now that there is a 10-year-old
cabinet position for education,
however, few are willing to get rid
of it completely.
"It's important to have educa-
tion issues represented at thecabi-
net level the ACE's Saunders
said.
"We'll never get out of the
morass we're in now without help
from the federal government
the NEA' Carroll argued. "The
bottom line is more funding.
Many states are unwilling or
don't have the resources to im-
pr e edueatu in
" I he federal government
Saunders added, "needs to be-
come the major partner in sharing
the ci �sts
Both (ones and Alexander
w ould det rt mm' the department's
role in funding and policv mak
ing Alexander want states,
working with local education and
parents' groups, to make school
systems more sensitive to local
concerns.
I he federal government, he
said, should issue vouchers to
parents, redeemable for their
children's education at the school
public or private of their
choice. "There would be a new
partnership between parents and
teachers. I he only losers would
be the overbureaucratized
teacher's unions
"I'd close the rest down. There's
a lot oi intelligent, well-meaning
people at Education, but they'rp
just not needed
Backstage Hair Studio
1005 Hamilton St.
752-9578
Mon Sat.
9-6
Two students receive grants
by academy of physicians
11
ir r iti nai
: - crants
c Ami rican
v 1"
nn n.
MOST
Ef
ing
5-28
iual
i� �
ville
eur
Open
1,500.00
c Prizes
set of
: i I 'asses.
nes and
i DAY.
Entrants
rial ECU.
ntry Fee.
e current topics
'
� Iip :� .1 by a
m the Family
f mi rica,
I r �. idc
�r students to
pursue research interests under
the dii ' n of family physicians
practii ing in an office-based set-
n, a Bladcnboro native,
will investigate adjustments oi
physicians' fees based on pa-
' : Is'abilities to pay for medical
� . . � while his wife, Barbara,
� �� rly of Thomasville, will
� the current status of family
in orth Carolina as well
. -so or the last five years.
They will conduct their re-
search under the direction (if Dr.
James Jones, professor and chair-
man of the ECU Department of
Family Medicine, and Dr. Frank
1 Lawlcr, assistant professor in
the department.
Clara S. Vann
Mona VanNortwick '
Angle Walker
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These two students .ire making the best of summer school by
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QJJte iEaat (Earaltman
fimumtv i�it W23
Clay Deanhardt, cnMi.
Carol Wetherington, mpH uh
James F.J. McKee, Director �AWumi
Tim Hampton,
Tim Chandler, �&��
Jot in Carter, f w.
Michelle England, &����,��
Debbie Stevens, ����
Jeff Parkerm
TOM FURR, Circutoion A1�uj�r
Mike Upchurch, m m�,
JOI IN W. MEDLIN, Art CWor
MAC CLARK, Business Manager
May 20,19S8
OPINION
Page 4
Summertime
Time for students to
recoup or regroup
?
For many, summertime means the
end of another school year; the
break needed to recoup and regroup
your senses before running into the
fall semester. For some, it's the time
to bring the academic hours up to
par, while raising the GPA and tuck-
ing some work experience under the
belt. For others, summer school at-
tendance is mandatory: academic
probation, scholarship limitations
and low GPAs are just three reasons.
A lot of students are in summer
sessions because they want to be
here. Thoughts of moving on, get-
ting ahead, raising the grades and
self-enrichment act as incentives for
the truly ambitious.
There are also students who have
to be in Greenville because the time
has come to do or die. No one likes
the idea of failing out, and summer
sessions provide needed opportuni-
ties for students on the brink. One
summer session can pull a student
out of the hole. Two sessions can
put a student back on the right path.
Last, ihere are students who have
chosen to make Greenville their
home until they get out of college.
Most hold jobs and stay here to work
during the summer. These students
find they can pass free time while
getting hours out of the way by at-
tending summer school.
Summer session can be a realoly
fun time, but it can turn into a bad
situation if we do not act responsi-
bly. Summer school schedules are
somewhat more lenient than regular
schedules, but if students do not use
their spare time wisely, GPA's can
go down, money is wasted and en-
try into fall semester can become a
grim procedure.
Be responsible. Enjoy the barbe-
que parties, road trips to the beach
and dance the night away. But know
your limits! Put your priorities in
their correct order, and with some
serious concentration and determi-
nation, summer can be fun and
rewarding: a time worth looking
forward to next year.
"Sigma House" story response
Campus
Forum
To the editor:
I am writing in response to the ar-
ticle printed in your April 12,1988
editon entitled "Sigma house a part
of history written by Jeanie Wheby.
The City of Greenville Planning
Office and the Greenville Historic
Properties Selection Committee ap-
preciates your coverage of the local
historic designation of the Sigma
Sigma Sigma house.
Although the governmental spon-
sored preservation effort is only two
years old and has not yet attracted
that much citizen support, it is not for
the lack of properties which are wor-
thy of local recognition.
I feel the article may mislead the
public into thinking that Greenville is
in short supply of architecturally.
culturally, and historically significant
structures. Admittedly, over the last
forty years Greenville has lost many
such structures but through the City's
efforts, private support, and media
coverage this trend can be abated.
The City will continue to designate
historic properties in the future and
we would like to continue to work
with The East Carolinian in further
information about our organization
and how East Carolina Universitv
may become involved, feel free to call
me during normal working hours at
830-4506.
Tamara Schatz
Planning Technician
City of Greenville
CTrQAeuht�uwrrgfgruag 9t
Quotations manufactured
by Speakes discussed
w assistants Resiemep m seckmRtes Resmev.MQ
7DpApg5 R5S(GAieP,�IGU55S ITS OOST M WM,teW�$,
3Sfr :Mrewp�ifAjWz owneofwruae
AA
By HELMUT SONNENFELDT
The New Republic
The uproar about Larry Speakes' acknowledgment that he
manufactured presidential quotations at a superpower sum-
mit is especially amusing to those of us who have been
involved in preparations for summits. A key task in those
preparations is the writing of communiques or "joint state-
ments" that purport to recount what occurcd in the discus-
sions among world leaders. These documents arc written
mostly or even entirely before the event, by staffers who later
may or may not participate in the actual discussions. They are
eventually approved for release at high levels, but the in-
volvement of those whose words they purportedly record is
generally minimal.
In the 1970 when I was in the communique-drafting
business for U.SSoviet summit meetings, we had no precise
idea what President Nixon and Secretary Brezhnev would
say to each other on the various topics that both sides agreed
should be on the agenda. But under instruction to accentuate
the positive, before each encounter we labored with our
Soviet counterparts on a string of paragraphs noting accom-
plishments on every subject. We had the sides agreeing to
improve relations, giving primary attention to reducing the
danger of nuclear war, attaching great importance to a host of
projects, taking note of favorable developments, welcoming
agreements already reached and confirming their intention to
conclude others.
The Nixon-and-Ford-cra communiques generally used
collective nouns like "the sides" and "the parties" rather than
implying that the leaders themselves had discussed every
item on the agenda. However, as the art of the communique
evolved, the language became ritualistic, and often the docu-
' mcntsdiscusscdmattersthathadnotcomcupatall. . .icmost
you could say of their accuracy as historical record is that they
were not inconsistent with what was or might have been said.
Indeed, by including a matter in the communique, reference
to it in the actual meetings could become superfluous. Re-
agan-era summit communiques are generally produced in
much the same way. But nowadays the practice is to attribute
the views and attitudes recounted directly to the "leaders" or
specifically to the president and the general secretary.
The most recent summit communique, from the Washing-
ton summit last December, actually was in part what it
purported to be: a record of agreements reached during the
summit. It had the leaders issuing detailed instructions to
their arms control negotiators. Obviously these instructions
were not worked out by the leaders themselves, but they were
the result of on-the-spot bargaining by seniorexperts, not
canned in advance. This approach has turned out to have
some disadvantages. The sides have found it impossible to
agree on the precise meaning of the passages dealing with
observance of the ABM Treaty.
Statesmen long ago agreed that if communiques are not
produced at least in rough draft before they meet, most of the
time at their conferences will be taken up with this job.
Advance drafting will thus undoubtedly remain the vogue.
And so will the mild deception whereby events and state-
ments are recorded before they take place. And some may not
occur at all but will remain recorded because the parties
would have been content to have tham occur.
Perhaps there should be a Speakes Rule according to which
no press agent may ever attribute to his master something the
latter has not actually uttered or at least approved. But
summit communiques should be held to a rather less rigorous
standard-orelse this useful art formof diplomacy would have
to be retired to the archives.

What's going on with the Noriega deal?
When Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts was
shown on the "CBS Evening News" last Thursday
night commenting on the hypothetical deal with
Gen. Manuel Noriega (the United States drops its
indictments against him, he leaves Panama), he was
quoted merely as shouting out, Teddy-Kennedy-
booster style, "That will prove that CRIME PAYS
What you get from the "CBS Evening News" is more
like the sound of conflict than the causes of it. In a
sense, that is the mirror of reality: The Democrats are
already doing what they can to discredit any deal
with Noriega as iniquitous, an invitation to con-
tempt for the law.
To be sure, Howard Baker, chief of staff of the
White House, was quoted. He said two things. The
first, that no deal had been made "that I knew of
The second, that if the United States actually suc-
ceeded in getting Noriega to leave Panama, in ex-
change for dropping the two Florida counts (the
chances of trying Noriega in Florida are about the
same as trying Idi Amin in New Delhi), that was
"pretty good plea bargaining Over to Michael
Dukakis, who expressed clerical outrage; on to Jesse
Jackson, who acted as though to drop a charge
against someone was on the order of repealing the
Constitution. He said that cither Noriega was guilty
or he was not guilty.
Down, Jesse. Every day, in your Chicago, and our
New York, the prosecution drops, or lowers, charges
against street versions of Noriega. The projected
deal with Noriega has nothing to do with whether he
is guilty or not. It has to do with realpolitik, and no
one who runs for president (or for district attorney)
should be entirely ignorant of it. In point of fact,
these pols practice realpolitik every day.
As ever, we have God to thank for Robert MacNeil
and James Lehrer, who come on as an encyclopedia
to a tabloid, giving the viewer SOME idea of what is
going on. And lo! there was Kerry, in from the
balcony where he was shouting to the Democratic
mob, back to the seminar. His principle co-guest was
Sen. Richard Lugar. They are, respectively, the
incumbent chairman of the Foreign Relations sub-
committee that deals with narcotics, and senator
who was the chairman of the Foreign Relations
Committee.
Lugar led off by saying that the raw exchange �
indictment dropped, Noriega out of Panama � just
plain didn't solve enough problems. Lugar wants to
know: What does the opposition in Panama feel
about the arrangement? What future guarantees do
we have against Norciga attempting to come back to
Panama, or perhaps controlling it from exile? And
what about Honduras? What docs Honduras think
about it? And what about other Latin American
countries? What we ought to do with all this, said
Lugar, is build Panamanian democracy! (Talk about
building the Panama Canal! That only cost 20,000
lives.)
Then Kerry came in, and get this. In fact, said
Kerry, sounding like the dean of international stud-
ies at Georgetown, we have not used aeainst
Panama "a full panoply of sanctions The flash-in-
the-pan economic embargo and freezing of funds
was something that, as we saw, Noriega easily with-
stood. We should have done more, enough to un-
nerve Noriega and cause his ouster.
Such as?
Such as threatening him with the use of force. If
necessary, we should be prepared, said Kerry, a
Democrat from Massachusetts, to use American
military force against Noriega.
And Lugar agreed. Two other guests, one a
member of the opposition in Panama, one an aca-
demic, were consulted. How would the Panamani-
ans feel about it? The opposition leader said they
would greet U.S. Marines with flowers. It's true that
Fidel Castro and Augusto Pinochet have both
warned against the use of American force, but they
are both tyrants, are they not? no wonder they
deplore the use of the military. The academic said
not so fast; Noriega has been careful not to molest the
Panama Canal or to mutilate U.S. citizens: How
would we fare elsewhere in the world, using Ma-
rines to protect a Panamanian base, when negotiat-
ing for bases in, e.g Spain, the Philippines and
Greece?
On the Right
by
William F. Buckley Jr.
But it was an emancipating moment. The same
senator transformed from the objurgative mode in
CBS to the reflective mode on PBS, saying: We
should threaten US. force, and be prepared to use it.
Kerry for president?
A coll
(CPS) � This is it. The Big
you're graduating from coll
The lilting strains of 'Pompi
cumstance" fillyourcars Shil
uneasily in your oversized
robe and mortar board, it d�
on you that you have spent a
the first 5 years of your
school.
The valedictorian rises t:
podium. The sun appears
behind the clouds and th
perature beneath your robd
to 120 degrees O J
phrases drift from the
"bright futures" "we mi
we shall" "the promisi
morrow" "the
mankind"
An elbow ii �
You stand, walk to the
cept the sheepskin to tl
muffled squeak
and march off into th
Everybody is all
familv smiles The) have
degrees. Thee
- Vi ce Chance
search
A nationals trcht
vice chance r I -
fairs at East C ti i Ui
will be re-op ed in the I
Dr. Richard R. Eakin,
chancellor, said that the
which began last O
appointment.�: tl mei
faculty search c
been completed with
a candidate to contract
As a result, the search
closed, Dr. Eakin said,
search will begin during
semester
The position is that
university's chief acadenj
cer. Dr. Eakin said that q
ham A. Bloodworth, pi
and chairman oi the En;
partment, has agreed to
serving as acting vice chj
for academic affairs un
30,1989, "at which tr.w
chancellor for academic
expected to commence c
Bloodworth has servej
ing vice chancellor vii
summer when Dr. A:1
Volpc resigned to h i
dent oi Tennessee Tech
sitv in Cookeville, Tei
the search committc
screened approximat
dates nominated for thd
vitcd three final
interviews in Mar
The three finalists
Wright State Ur
ton, Ohio. Apr
University in B
State University in K;
NEApushfi
education
(CPS) � Congress I i -
ered creating a cabinet-
partment for education
A mere 131 bills later
assented to creating a dej
in 1979.
Candidate imray C i
made the department a
promise in l0" repo
return for election help
National Education i
CNEA), the teacher- fad
occupied almost 3 p
delegate seats at the 1H
cratic convention.
"It was one ot V
in 1976 admitsNEA
Howard Carroll. "But
education should ha S
the president, and 0
post. It surprised the
naturally, we were pka
Carter signed the A
into law on Oct. 17 I
Hufstedler, a federal j
California, was named
Shortly before the ti
tion was approved
Rep.RonPauhR-Tev
a bill to dismantle the i
and effectively end
education programs
the Republican
Convention's platfor
aged the department'
In 1980, Preside
vowed to abolish the i
But his Secretary of
Terrel Bell, resisted 1
did Congress and infl
cation lobbyists.
When Bell quit in 11
appointed William
succeed him, also ct
with dismantling the'
Bennett's fiery rhc�
conservative supporj
however, convmcec1
drop the idea of at
department, Benncttl
lackson said.





! . . VR �
� � -
)nse
tured
d
deal?
: they
i that
� both
:� r they
i lemic said
i tthe
How
rid, i ii g M i
when neg tiat-
jf hilippines and
On the Right
by
am F. Buckley Jr.
moment. The same
n the objui. - � mode in
vie on PBS, saying: We
and be prepared to use it.
"
A college degree, so what?
O
(CPS) lThisisit rheBigDay,
vou're graduating from college
1 he lilting strains ot Pomp v ir
umstance' fill your ears. Shifting
uneasil) in your oversized black
obe nd mortar board it dawns
�n you that you have spent all but
first 5 years ot our life in
hool.
valedictorian rises to the
dium The sun appears from
d the clouds and the tem-
i iture beneath your robe rises
to 120 degrees Occasional
rases drift from the stage:
ght futures" "we must and
shall "the promise ot to
� rrow the very future ot
mankind'
n elbow sinks into your ribs
stand, walk to the stage, ac
cept the sheepskin to the distant,
muffled squeals ot your family
d march oft into the future,
ervbody is all smiles. Your
I imih smiles. They have college
� ees Thecabdriversmilcs. 1 Ic
Vi ce Chancellor
search
A national search toselecta new
ice chancellor for academic af-
iirs at East Carolina University
pened in the fall,
ard R. Eakin, ECU
: said that the search
I began last October with
�� intmentofa five mi mix i
ilt search mmittee "has
mpleted without bring
indidate to contract. '
has ,) college degree. At the res-
taurant the hostess smiles. She
has a college degree. The waiter
has a college degree. So does the
bus boy, the cook and the bar-
tender.
Afterwards, caught in traffic,
you'll see the only person who's
smiling who doesn't have a col-
lege degree. 1 le's the Roto Kooter
man in the red van. 1 le's smiling
because he barely finished high
school, but Still manages to rake in
$38,000 a year.
You begin to suspect it's all an
elaborate joke. Still, you rest as-
sured that the future is all yours.
Tut it's time to choose that future
bv choosing a career.
You must choose 1 of 2 mutu-
ally exclusive goals: You want to
save the world, or you want to
own the world By choosing the
first, you'll work longer hours
than Mother Theresa (and tor less
pav), but within 20 years you'll
have a nice little louse in the
suburbs
By choosing the latter you'll
disappear into the bowels ot a
major corporation, but within 10
vears voti'll have a nice little
house in the subur bs.
What can ou expect v hen you
take the plunge into the real
world" Expect to be bored. Expect
to be appalled. Expect to trv to do
something about it.
You'll find yourself asking, "Is
this all there is1 (let up in the
morning, battle your way
through rush hour traffic, spend
S hours in an office where even
house plants won't grow, and
then battle your way home, catch
sometv and dropoff to sleep. This
is why 1 spent most of my life
doing homework?"
It's helpful to think of your col-
lege education as a small down
payment on the rest of your lite.
And it's reassuring to know that
you've got that comprehensive
knowledge of loth century
French literature to help you out
when the going get; tough.
Surprisingly enough, very few
jobs require you to write a term
paper, footnote correctly, cite
your sources, apply differential
calculus, explain tlie structure ol a
monocotyledenous plant, de-
scribe the importance of the Ruhr
Valley to kaiser Wilhelm II or
expound upon the theories ot
Freud nd lung vis-a-vis
Skinner's behaviourism.
More useful job skills, actually,
are the ability to operate a Xerox
machine, wear clean clothes, fol-
low orders nd appear enthusias-
tic about sales promotions.
Other helpful skills are learning
to balance checkbooks, frv eggs,
vacuum rugs and diagnose sexu-
ally transmitted diseases.
"No you sav. "There has to be
more! You promised
Well, there is. There's love. And
a bill. There's marriage, and a
whole pile of little bills. There's
the house, and one great big re-
current bill. There are children,
and a blizzard of bills. There's the
future. Please enclose remittance
before June 23, 1988, or service
will be terminated.
Forget the future. Hunk about
now, college graduate. Run
around while you still can (,o for
it California, Katmandu it
doesn't matter.
Spend at least 5 vears screwing,
around.
It's important. 1 he rest of vour
life is programmed. The bills can
wiat. as will that middle manage
ment position. Forget wh.it
they've taught you. Forget what
thee told you you're supposed to
be doing.
1 ind out for yourself, land
yourself. Be yourself. And have
seme tun.
VOICE YOUR
OPINION
WKIII IN UK
ro mi i)ii k
EAST CAROLINIAN
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
BIl l.Y E.CR1 1H

D I rs Par Bldg 1
tan)
Gi nvill N.C 27834
2D PROFESSK )NAL( iOURTl SY OFF
ON ALL GLASS! -
TRANSPC RTATION PR ii ED BY
GREAT BUS
OPEN MONDAY T 0
ryykan Appointments can 1 it other
� ii
hours -plea
:
After all, there's always room
n my park bench. And there's
always graduate sch
i
As a re
:It, the search will be
- in said. A new
�in during the tall
is
that
�i h,
Adcmc etti-
1 that Pr. Wil-
prof or
f the English de-
ll ' ' i
� vi . 'Hor
r,
ie
or
� �� a .
: -ii afi a
pected to commence dutti
dworth has served as act-
ig vi e chancellor since last
hen Pr. Angclo A.
; become presi-
- � '� f Tennes Tech I nivcr-
kevil rm.
� search ommittee which
re pproximat candi-
il s r minatcd tor tl ' m-
ree finalists for campus
� , ,vs in March and .April.
three finalists vv i fr �m
� State University in 1 ay-
� j ; in State
� tvinBooi md ichita
SEA push for
education
Congress first consid-
� : reatii g a cabinet-level de-
n tment for education in 1853.
� mere 131 bills later, longress
� I to creating a department
. 7 .
: late immv � arter had
l, the department a campaign
r � ise in 1976, reportedly in
turn for election help from the
� il Education Association
the tea hers union that
upied almost 5 percent ol the
eats at the 1976 1 )emo-
onvention.
i ne ol I; A's priorities
ImitsNEA spokesman
,rd i irroll. "But he agreed
:� i : ul 11 �ve the ear ol
president, and created the
it. It surprised the NT"A, but
� � . ere pleased
t�ned the department
i v n �- t. 17, 1979. Shirley
ifstcdler, a federal judge from
alifornia, was named secretary.
before the final legisla
n was approved, however,
p Ron Paul (R-Tex) introduced
i bill to dismantle the department
md effectively end all federal
. lucationprograms. Andin 1980,
the Republican National
nvention's platform encour-
1 the department's demise.
In 1980, President Reagan
owed to abolish the department
but his Secretary of Education,
ierrel Bell, resisted the idea, as
lid Congress and influential edu-
cation lobbyists.
When Bell quit in 1984, Reagan
ippointed William Bennett to
succeed him, also charging him
with dismantling the department.
Bennett's fiery rhetoric and the
conservative support is attracted,
however, convinced Reagan to
drop the idea of abolishing the
department, Bennett aide Michael
Jackson said.
u
BEAUTIFUL FULL COLOR
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Parents, grandparents and relatives watch with pride as the ECU graduates flow into I acklen
Stadium for commencement. (Photo by Jon Jordan-Photolab)
llll'i
Corner Red Banks Rd. & Evans St.
GREENVILLE. X.C.
PHONE
355-5588
Dare to be
different!
Clothing & Jewelry
that express you!
MonSat. 10-6
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ecome BaC�
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f
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rBienvenidos Estudiantes
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n 39 C
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Salad Bar
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49
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Snow White
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994
521 (otanche 757-1666
Sales Dates: Wed. May is- Sat. May 21
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C - Food Stamps Wei m
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211 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks From E.C.U.
OVEPTON&





3
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20,1988
o
'i
I
-A
TI
n
y
o
v.
b
'owse
t historically significant
Idmittcdly, over the last
(recnville has lost many
5 but through the City's
Kte support, and media
trend can be abated.
continue to designate
rties in the future and
to continue to work
at Carolinian in further
bout our organization
1st Carolina University
involved, feel free to call
)rmal working hours at
Tamara Schatz
Tlanning Technician
Citv of Greenville
.11
i
C
A college degree, so what?
(CPS) � This is it. The Big Day, has a college degree. At the res- to be appalled. Expect to try to do Other helpful skills are learning
you're graduating from college, taurant, the hostess smiles. She something about it. to balance checkbooks, fry eggs,
The lilting strains of Tomp Cir- has a college degree. The waiter You'li find yourself asking, "Is vacuum rugs and diagnose sexu-
cumstance" fill your ears. Shifting has a college degree. So does the this all there is? Get up in the ally transmitted diseases,
uneasily in your oversized black bus boy, the cook and the bar- morning, battle your way "No you say. "There has to be
robe and mortar board, it dawns r der. through rush-hour traffic, spend more! You promised
on you that you have spent all but Afterwards, caught in traffic, 8 hours in an office where even Well, there is. There's love. And
the first 5 years of your life in you'll see the only person who's house plants won't grow, and a bill. There's marriage, and a
school. smiling who doesn't have a col- then battle your way home, catch whole pile of little bills. There's
The valedictorian rises to the lege degree. He's the Roto-Rooter some tv and drop off to sleep. This the house, and one great big re-
podium. The sun appears from man in the red van. He's smiling is why I spent most of my life current bill. There are children,
behind the clouds and the tern- because he barely finished high doing homework?" and a blizzard of bills. There's the
perature beneath your robe rises school, but still manages to rake in It's helpful to think of your col- future. Please enclose remittance
to 120 degrees. Occasional $38,000 a year. lege education as a small down before June 23, 1988, or service
You begin to suspect it's all an payment on the rest of your life, wl be terminated,
elaborate joke. Still, you rest as- And it's reassuring to know that Forget the future. Think about
sured that the future is all yours, you've got that comprehensive
But it's time to choose that future knowledge of 16th century
by choosing a career. French literature to help you out
, w You must choose 1 of 2 mutu- when the going gets tough.
You stand, walk to the stage, ac- ' ally exclusive goals: You want to Surprisingly enough, very few
cept the sheepskin to the distant, save the world, or you want to jobs require you to write a term
muffled squeals of your family own the world. By choosing the paper, footnote correctly, cite
and march off into the future. first, you'll work longer hours your sources, apply differential ��1Jri;fjllI�1LU. ��.��
Everybody is all smiles. Your than Mother Theresa (and for less calculus, explain the structure of a wiat, as will that middle manage-
family smiles. They have college pay), but within 20 years you'll monocotyledenous plant, de- ment position. Forget what
degrees. The cab driver smiles. He have a nice little house in the scribe the importance of the Ruhr they've taught you. Forget what
suburbs. Valley to Kaiser Wilhelm II or they told you you're supposed to
By choosing the latter you'll expound upon the theories of be doing
disappear into the bowels of a Freud and Jung vis-a-vis
major corporation, but within 10 Skinner's behaviourism,
years you'll have a nice little More useful job skills, actually,
house in the subur bs. are the ability to operate a Xerox
What can you expect when you machine, wear clean clothes, fol-
take the plunge into the real low orders and appear enthusias-
world? Expect to be bored. Expect tic about sales promotions.
tured
d
,?,
j
?
I historical record is that they
as or might have been said,
the communique, reference
become superfluous. Re-
arc generally produced in
lys the practice is to attribute
I directly to the "leaders" or
the general secretary.
unique, from the Washing-
pially was in part what it
.�merits reached during the
ing detailed instructions to
)bviously these instructions
Irs themselves, but they were
jning by seniorexpcrts, not
lach has turned out to have
(have found it impossible to
f the passages dealing with
tat if communiques are not
before they meet, most of the
Ibe taken up with this job.
loubtcdly remain the vogue,
whereby events and statc-
ikc place. And some may not
corded because the parties
c tham occur.
akcsRulc according to which
1 to his master something the
or at least approved. But
;held to a rather less rigorous
brmof diplomacy would have
deal?
opposition leader said they
nes with flowers. It's true that
ugusto Pinochet have both
of American force, but they
they not? no wonder they
military. The academic said
is been careful not to molest the
mutilate U.S. citizens: How
here in the world, using Ma-
amanian base, when negotiat-
f Spain, the Philippines and
On the Right
by
am F. Buckley Jr.
Jncipating moment. The same
from the objurgative mode in
e mode on PBS, saying: We
force, and be prepared to use it.
�)
1
ni
m
�M

)
"D
ni
H
:i
H
0
)
M
6

D
JG
iV
iB
,T
ib
'6
Z
�i
T
J
4
-�
VOICE YOUR
OPINION
WRITE A LETTER
TO THE EDITOR
EAST CAROLINIAN
phrases drift from the stage:
"bright futures" "we must and
we shall" "the promise of to-
morrow" "the very future of
mankind"
An elbow sinks into your ribs.
now, college graduate. Run
around while you still can. Go for
it � California, Katmandu � it
doesn't matter.
Spend at least 5 years screwing
around.
It's important. The rest of your
life is programmed. The bills can
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
Vi ce Chancellor
search
Find out for yourself. Find
yourself. Be yourself. And have
some fun.
BILLY E. CREECH
OPTICIAN & MANAGER
Doctors Park, Bldg. 1
Stantonburg Road
Greenville, N.C 27834
Telephone
(919) 752-4018
ECU News Bureau
A national search to select a new
vice chancellor for academic af-
fairs at East Carolina University
will be re-opened in the fall.
Dr. Richard R. Eakin, ECU
chancellor, said that the search
which began last October with
appointment of a five-member, all
faculty search committee 'has
been completed without bringing
a candidate to contract
As a result, the search will be
closed, Dr. Eakin said. "A new
search will begin during the fall
semester
The position is that of the
university's chief academic offi-
cer. Dr. Eakin said that Dr. Wil-
liam A. Bloodworth, professor
and chairman of the English de-
partment, has agreed to continue
serving as acting vice chancellor
for academic affairs until June
30,1989, "at which time a vice
chancellor foiacadcrnte affairs �-
expected to commence duties
Bloodworth has served as act-
ing vice chancellor since last
summer when Dr. Angelo A.
Volpe resigned to become presi-
dent of Tennessee Tech Univer-
sity in Cookeville, Tenn.
The search committee which
screened approximately 90 candi-
dates nominated for the post in-
vited three finalists for campus
interviews in March and April.
The three finalists were from
Wright State University in Day-
ton, Ohio. Appalachian State
University in Boone, and Wichita
State University in Kansas.
NEA push for
education
(CPS) � Congress first consid-
ered creating a cabinet-level de-
partment for education in 1853.
A mere 131 bills later, Congress
assented to creating a department
in 1979.
Candidate Jimmy Carter had
made the department a campaign
promise in 1976, reportedly in
return for election help from the
National Education Association
(NEA), the teachers union that
occupied almost 5 percent of the
delegate seats at the 1976 Demo-
cratic convention.
"It was one of NEA's priorities
in 1976 admits NEA spokesman
Howard Carroll. "But he agreed
education should have the ear of
the president, and created the
post. It surprised the NEA, but
naturally, we were pleased
Carter signed the department
into law on Oct. 17,1979. Shirley
Hufstedler, a federal judge from
California, was named secretary.
Shortly before the final legisla-
tion was approved, however,
Rep. Ron Paul (R-Tex) introduced
a bill to dismantle the department
and effectively end all federal
education programs. And in 1980,
the Republican National
Convention's platform encour-
aged the department's demise.
In 1980, President Reagan
vowed to abolish the department.
But his Secretary of Education,
Terrel Bell, resisted the idea, as
did Congress and influential edu-
cation lobbyists.
When Bell quit in 1984, Reagan
appointed William Bennett to
succeed him, also charging him
wi th dismantling the department.
Bennett's fiery rhetoric and the
conservative support is attracted,
however, convinced Reagan to
drop the idea of abolishing the
department, Bennett aide Michael
Jackson said.
After all, there's always room
on my park bench. And there's
always graduate school.
'79
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Parents, grandparents and relatives watch with pride as the ECU graduates flow into Ficklen
Stadium for commencement. (Photo by Jon Jordan-Photolab)
�briAUWUL yULL color�
COLOR COPIES
Beautiful full color copies
from any original print or 35mm slide.
We can enlarge up to 11" x 17"�use your
imagination and give us a try!
Of course�we do the standard print shop
operations�plus a whole lot more!
DESKTOP PUBLISHING � PHOTO-TYPESETTING
BROCHURES � MAGAZINES � PROGRAMS � BOOKS
CALENDARS � POSTERS � DECALS � BUMPER STICKERS
COMPLETE PRINTING AND BINDING OPERATIONS
� MORGAN
� PRINTERS, Inc.
PHONE
355-5588
Corner Red Banks Rd. & Evans St
GKEENVTTJ.E. N.C.
Dare to be
different!
Clothing & Jewelry
that express you!
MonSat. 10-6
919 A. Redbanks Rd. Thurs. 10-8
Arlington Village
756-1058
ecome Back
j Let Us Serve You! " ,
t
We Will Gladly Cash Your Checks From Home!
Fresh Leg
QuarterFryer
,�. 39
Great For Cookouts!
JBienvenidos Estudiantes!
�Mexican Dinner &
Luncheon Specials
�Margaritas & 9 Brands
of Mexican Beer
�Open 7 Days
For Lunch & Dinner
Coca Cola or
Pepsi Cola
$2.69
12 oz. cans pkg. of 12
Assorted Varieties
Frozen Jeno's
1012 oz.
Pkg
99 $
Coca Cola
99
All 2 Liter Products
Busch Beer
Ground Fresh Several
Times Daily
Ground Beef
51b. pkg
or more
� It
r
Great For Cookouts!
White Cloud
Tissue
Assorted Varieties
Fresh-n-Good
Cookies
6oz.pkg. 2 pkg.
$1.00
12 oz. cans
12 pack
Come for the
I stay for the fun.
Ifrom Our (Deti
I Fresh Chicken Saladlb. $3.99
1 Fresh Pimento Cheeselb. $2.99
Fresh Ham Saladlb. $3.99
IVirginia Baked Hamlb. $2.99
iProvolone Cheeselb. $2.79
4 roll pkg.
Limit 2 with
$10.00 food order
excluding advertised specials
Additional pkgs. 99l
.79 ?
Extra Nice
Broccolli
Salad Bar
Hot Bar
Greenville's Best
$1.99
lb.
large
bunch
49
Snow White
Mushrooms
12oz.
Fkg-
99 $
521 CoUnche 757-1666
Sales Dates: Wed. May 18- Sat. May 21
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MonSat. 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
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j Quantity Rights Reserved
211 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks From E.CU.
OVEPTON&
SiprntfM





IE I .V-l i ARO! INI N
MAi 20 l�88
Classifieds
Ml 1 PW AN I I D
SI UDI I . AM1U S M G R
I lours 15-20 h
school year S,
merits Soph i
t
oi we k the hill
v SI wf Roq
uties on i ampus rep
rcscntativc for top fortune � mpany.
Applicant must be res croath �
and .i so startc i Sales m irkotii
ind a plus Forward resume to (
1930 hestnutSl 9thflooi Philadelphia.
Pa 19103 A ; Ann Bradv
UA I MPI in Ml 1 M I
K VIN! E 20K.SAL1 2 �
Y IC1 20K, ENGIr
VN M R1 or par!
nc positions. Lowest I .
otnpare! 101W 14
�s I3�3 low fee personnel service
Bl ON t
als Castii
rV 1166
III I P '
'
M Professional Computer Services, lOo
! i 5th Street (beside Cubbies)
i n ilk NC 752 J694
I OR SA1 I
Rl D Hi�1 B VRGAINS! Drug dealers'
ears boats planes repo'd Surplus. Your
area Ruyers Cuidi 1 805-6S7-6OO0 Ext.
si;
FOR SAI.I equi ment I acoi
masl : � rurbo Hex), snorkle gloves,
fe, dive ivuti li and bag.
� ' � 0. all imm al !35
" i 1 111 e r 6 p. m
K i I nd I iph et niibi
' " I.adi� � ten spi ed bike
'301
KINGOI I) rOWl RS ' : sale
I? unit 2nd floor, fully I d Tax
' � � . ; ' : Make me an of I i
rWO BEDROOM DUPLEX � carpet,
stove, refrig. quiet neighborhood. Near
campus. Avail June 1 1 year lease and dep.
S200mo. 752-3778.
2 ROOMMATES WAN III) MALE OR
FEMALE NONSMOKER 5 bedroom
house wthree full baths. Call Luke or
Steve at 758-0312
S60.00AVEEK per person, beach house in
Myrtle Beach. Ocean View, 100 v.irds to
beach, near Pavillion. Phone 1-803-626-
lMl)7.
PERSONALS
DAVID KOON '88 Congral
swei (heart I am so pp id : �
NEW DELI WANTS YOI
� �
11 Clist.I
I OK Kl 1
SI RVK IIS Ok II KRI I)
UOKI1 PROCI SSI ' P I'll. I It
COPYING SERVICES
! I M 1 1 R H)MM I I II D to
I blocks from
ntral C .
rver 12 utilities Call aftei
-
Ilt)l SI MALI WAN LED to si
I �. I. Call 35
I I M l 1 RO IMM I I NEEDED !M
MED1ATEIV hod apt 1 2
: to. Prefer
Announcements
SI MM! K I IBRARA
U1 Ks
t mi n .n m o
:
May WS8
p.m.al ted Mel ciist
t, Croei
'
S( HOI VRSHIP
tain I
ilucal . I


i ' .
.
Townhouses For Rent:
Best Deal In Town
KINGSTON
PLACE
� by owner
� need 2 male students
�furnished
�2 levels
�2 12 baths
�air conditioned
�pool & clubhouse
�excellent condition
�SI50 per person
�owner will pay .ill utilities except
phone & cable
� 1 eai lease
Phone 703-560-8779 call
collect if interested
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Kent
UNIVERSTIY APARTMENTS
?hn I . 5thStRe
�Ixx-Jtod Near ECU
� Across From I Iihway Patrol station
Limited otter $27S a month
Contact J.T. or Tommv Williams
7S�7S15or8.W937
Office open - Apt 8, 12 v.lOpm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quid one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV
Couples or singles only SlS a month, 6 monh
lease. MOH1I EHOME RKN'I ALS - couples or
singles Apartmrnt and mobile homes In AjU j
(. .ardens near Brtvik Valley (njntry Club
Contact J I or Tommy Williams
756 "hi 5
KILLER AIRFARES
London 294 Shannon
Tans Aimsterd
Rome 339 Budap
Brussels 319 Ath
Geneva ; Copenha
Munich 339 Frankl
Rio Haml
"studlit and il
! !� � � � ichei
'Atlanta
1-800-876-7776
Council Travel Services 104-577-1678
Fares sul Ho
DARKROOM TECHNICIAN
NEEDED
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for the position of
Darkroom Technician
Applications will be received
Monday, May 23 through
Wednesday, May 25 from 2 - 4 p.m.
Apply at The East Carolinian Office, Publication Building, (In Front ol Joyncr I.il
ECU r
science
Disabled
?
"WS�
4.�j
t
s
IN TRAM
"8M
J

m
, A
V - 7
'n
V V
,i �
j
Tm.
y.
9k
f
A

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� A "7

:ttlv
v m
AND THEY VOTED
On January 6,1988, this world-class panel of seafood lovers
voted North Carolina as having the best, the tastiest, and the most
delicious seafood in the world.
This renowned group of world travellers includes Olympic,
NASCAR, NCAA, and World Series champions, and a host of
civic leaders who have enjoyed seafood from London to Tokyo,
and from New York to Paris.
Like you, they're experts on good seafood. They've found
that nobody fixes it better than the chefs here at home. So enjoy!
NORTH CAROIJNA,FIRST IN FISH.
-
4
1
A
� 1988 JVC. Travel & Tourism






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20, 1988
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
STUDENT CAMPUS MANAGER
I lours: 13-20 hours per week For the full
school year. Salary: $100wk. Require-
ments Soph Jr. Duties: on campus rep-
resentative for top fortune 500 company.
Applicant must be responsible, creative;
and a self-starter. Salesmarketing back-
ground a plus. Forward resume to: CD.
1930 Chestnut St 9th floor, Philadelphia.
Pa, 19103, ATTN: Ann Brady.
A A A EMPLOW1ENT � MANAGER
TRAINEE20K, SALES RFP21K,
IOFF1CL 20K, ENGINEER30K.
1ANY MORE' Permanent full or part
time positions. Lowest fee in Greenville
Compare! 101W. 14th Street, Suite 203,
738-1393. low fee personnel service.
BE ON TV � Many needed tor commer-
cials. Casting info: 1-805 687-6000, Ext.
TV-1166.
HELP WANTED - Four Star Pizza is
hiring delivers personnel for our
Greenville, NC store. Drivers must be 18
years or older, have own car, and insur-
ance. Hourly pi.is commissh n and tips.
Apply in person at 111 Last 10th Street.
SERVICES OFFERRED
WORD PitOCESS'NG AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We otter typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software va A computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper up
to 20 hand written pages. We repair com-
puters also. Lowest hourly rate in town.
SDF Professional Computer Services, 106
East 5th Street (beside Cubbies)
Greenville, NC 752-3694.
FOR SALE
RED HOT BARGAINS! Drug dealers'
cars, boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your
area. Buyers Guide. 1-805-687-6000 Ext.
S-llb6
FOR SAFE � Dive equipment: Dacor
mask, fins (Turbo Flex), snorkle, gloves,
booties, dive knife, dive watch, and bag.
Used twice $100.00. Call Jimmy at 355-
7354 after 6 p.m.
RCA TV, Radio and Phonograph combi-
nation $75.00, Ladies 26" ten-speed bike
$80.00, Twin Mattress and box spring $50.
McGregor Downs, 758 7304.
RlNCOl.D TOWERS � Condo for sale
� B-unit, 2nd floor, fully furnished. Tax
market-value, $43,730. Make me an offer.
919-787-1378.
FOR RENT
FEMALE ROOMMA I L WANTED � to
share 2 bedroom house, 3 blocks from
campus - $130.00 a month, central AC,
washer and dryer. 12 utilities. Call alter
7:00 p.m. � 758-7068.
HOUSEMATE WAN I ED to share
contempory home wpool. Call 355-6686
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY � Furneshed apt. 12 utili-
ties, Rent 157.50mo. Prefer rtonsmokcr.
TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX � carpet,
stove, refrig. quiet neighborhood. Near
campus. Avail. June 1.1 year lease and dep.
$200mo. 752-5778.
2 ROOMMATES WANTED MALE OR
FEMALE NONSMOKER � 5 bedroom
Announcements
SUMMER LIBRARY HOIKS
Mondays - Thursdays 8:00 am. - 11:00
p.m Fridays 8:00 am. - 6:00p m Satur-
days 9:00 am. - 6:00 p.m Sundays 12.00
noon - 11:00 p.m. The Media Resources
Center will be open: Mondays - Thurs-
days 8:00 a jn 930 p.m Fridays 8:00 a an.
-5:00 p.m Saturdays 1:00p.m. - 6:00 p.m
Sundays 12 noon - 9:00 p m.
CHILD A1 )VOCACY
Fran Kertesz will speak on Parents in
Special Education � the parents' role in
developing a special education program,
and how to become a better advocate for
house wthree full baths. Call Luke or
Steve at 758-0312.
S60.00AVEEK per person, beach house in
Myrtle Beach. Ocean View, 100 yards to
beach, near Pavillion. Phone 1-803-626-
9197.
PERSONALS
DAVID KOON '88 . . . Congratulations
sweetheart I am so proud of you All my
love, Crista.
NEW DELI WANTS YOU to jam all sun
mer with the best music around. BOOGIE
down Saturday with the BOOMERS, the
RHINOCEROSES, and ANCELK
Cl !OIR. Be there or miss out, it's the pre-
BOOCIE jam.
your child. Wednesday, May 25, 1988,
7:30 p.m. at Saint lames United Methodist
Church, 2000 E. Sixth Street, Greenville,
NC. Tins program should interest parents
or professionals working with children
with special needs
SCHOLARSHIP
Students who wish to obtain financial
aid for overseas education may apply lor
a Rivers Scholarship. The next applk ation
deadline is July I, 1988. For further infor-
mation contact the Office of International
Studies and Scholarships in the Gcrneral
Classroom building, room 1002,757-6769.
Townhouses For Rent:
Best Deal In Town
KINGSTON
PLACE
� by owner
�need 2 male students
�furnished
�2 levels
�2 12 baths
�air conditioned
�pool & clubhouse
�excellent condition
� $150 per person
� owner will pay all utilities except
phone & cable
� 1 year lease
Phone 703-560-8779 call
collect if interested
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
� And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSTIY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
� Located Near ECU
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited offer-5275 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8,12-5 JO p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month, 6 month
lease. MOBILE HOME RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
KILLER AIR
London294Shannon
Paris299Amsterdam
Rome339Budapest
Brussels319Athens
Geneva349Copenhagen
Munich339Frankfurt
Rio350Hamburg
FARES
tt
279
319
339
359
339
339
339
Helsinki 369
Stockholm 339
Zurich
Tokyo
Bangkok
Sydney
Taipei
349
399
476
509
420
�Student and Youth Fares, Each Way Based on a Round Trip Purchase Plus Sup
Discounts for Teachers and Adults, Some Restriction Apply
'Atlanta Departures Plus 1 undreds of Fares from YOUR Q FY
1-800-876-7776
Council Travel Services 404-577-1678
Fares subject to change without notice, phis taxes and ni-irtr fees
DARKROOM TECHNICIAN
NEEDED
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for the position of
Darkroom Technician
Applications will be received
Monday, May 23 through
Wednesday, May 25 from 2 - 4 p.m.
Apply at The East Carolinian Office, Publication Building. (In Front of Joyner Library)
ECU rel
science
1CL cv I 1U. ;cu
A comparison of science I
crs in Japan tot! the I'm
Slates will be made in a
study by n -h an i
Una University
The study, supported
National Science Found
aimed at lean i
japan do better in s
youngsters in Amc ri
DrCharles R. (
the ECl : Educal i
Or. Floyd I ' '
ith Ed

ng educal
and Japan
They say tl

Disabled
surra

related
a $1
Wellcome
lina I niv(


� ?nce i v
firsl
S ence Institute I r I
r. Da
��
ai �
II
st trgent
I i

9
1 I
s
INTRAMl
First
Softball
3-on-3 Basketbal
J&
t
4 � ;3
T
fcw
yi
?
s
l'y jlf.
cF
�Lf
lx s3P�
AND THEY VOTED,
On January 6,1988, this world-class panel of seafood lovers
voted North Carolina as having the best, the tastiest, and the most
delicious seafood in the world.
This renowned group of world travellers includes Olympic,
NASCAR, NCAA, and World Series champions, and a host of
civic leaders who have enjoyed seafood from London to Tokyo,
and from New York to Paris.
Like you, they're experts on good seafood. They've found
that nobody fixes it better than the chefs here at home. So enjoy!
NORTH GROUNA,FIRST IN FISH.
Tennis Single;
Volleyball
Putt-Putt Golf
Home Run Derbl
5k Walk Run
Secoi
Softball
Co-Ree Water Pd
Golf Classic
Free Throw Con
5k WalkRun
� 1988 N.C. Travel Ar Tourism





THE CAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20,1988
all sum-
LIC
ARES
;��
AN
�.)
il
Ihl 1TY
�V
ECU researchers compare
science teachers in study
I C U New. s Ittiicau
A comparison of science teach-
ci s in apan to those in the United
States will be made in a two-year
Study by researchers at East Caro-
lina University.
The study, supported by the
itional Science Foundation, is
aimed at learning why children in
apan do better in science that
youngsters in America.
Pr. Charles R. Coble, dean of
the ECU School of Education and
Dr. Floyd E. Mattheis of the Sci-
. e-Math Education Center will
study the preparation and con-
tinuing education of American
and Japanese science teachers.
They say that wile there are some
known differences in the way the
two countries prepare science
teachers, no substantive study of
these differences has been done.
A $34,850 grant from the Na-
tional Science Foundation will
support the project. Coble and
Mattheis will present their find-
ings at a major U.S. and Japan
conference on science education
meeting in Hawaii in 1990.
In a related study completed
almost two years ago the re-
searchers from ECU and educa-
tors from Hiroshima University
in Japan compared 3,300 middle
grade students from Morth Caro-
lina with 4,500 Japanese stuends.
1 he Japanese youngsters scored
"significantly higher with reaon-
ing and integrated process skills"
than their counterparts in the
United States.
Differences in the type of in-
struction and priority given to
elementary school science were
believed to account for much of
the variance, the researchers said.
They recommended strengthen-
ing science education in elemen-
tary grades in the United States.
In the current research a com-
parative study of the pre-service
and in-service education of teach-
ers of science at the elementary,
junior high and senior high levels
in the U.S. and Japan will be
made. The findings will be made
available to educators and leaders
in both nations.
Coble is a former professor of
Science Education at ECU. Mat-
theis is a former professor and
chairman of the Department of
Science Educaiton. Both arc au-
thors of textbooks and articles
about teaching.
Plastics, plastics are the key to the future. Graduates file out of Ficklen stadium while a professor
shakes the hand of one of the many entering the employment line. (Photo by Jon Jordan�I'hotolab)
Disabled students begin program
U t Sci
� s tuirvau
A summer research program
disabled students seeking sci-
:elated careers has received
gift from the Burroughs
Icomc Co. The program will
this summer at East Caro-
a University and will involve
pants in two five-week

research program, also
: U d by a $4 0 National
rice Foundation (NSF) grant,
first externally-funded ac-
of ECU's ncwly-establiched
1 .nee Institute for the Disabled.
David Lunncy, professor of
mi try, is director of the Insti-
and said the Burroughs
v gift would help meet
st urgent need including
I c its and stipends to the
h of the participating stu-
dents will ocriorm research un-
der the direction of an ECU fac-
ultv member, matched on the
basis of the student's field of inter-
est and qualifications. Lunney
said research projects are sched-
uled in chemisrty, physics, geol-
ogy and biology.
In addition to research, the pro-
gram will include lectures and
visits by scientists with disabili-
ties. Lunney said formal lectures,
informal discussions and social
activities are planned for each
visit by a guest lecturer.
Student selection and planning
of project activities was admini-
stered by a five-person advisory
committee which includes Todd
A. Blumcnkoph, a Burroughs
Wellcome organic chemist; James
11. Maguire, a medicinal chemist
at UNC-Chapel Hill, and James E.
Mitchell, a doctoral candidate in
the School of Forestry and Envi-
ronmental Studies at Duke Uni-
versity.
"Projects like this one are
needed in order to bring more
disabled people into science-re-
lated careers Lunney said. "In
our project we hope that exposure
to hands-on scientific research
will help us to recruit a few disa
bled students into the sciences, to
strengthen the training of a few
others who are already commit-
ted to scientific and technical ca-
reers, and to improve the chances
of completing rigorous technical
curricula for both groups by in-
creasing their motivation, confi-
dence and self-esteem.
"Theultimategoal is to increase
the number of qualified disabled
students who successfully enter
productive and rewarding ca-
reers in science and technology
he said.
Newman
Catholic Student Center
953 East Tenth St.
Greenville. N.C. 27836
Phone: 757-3760
757-1991
Campus Mass Schedule
Summer session - Sunday 11:30 a.m.
8:30 p.m.
Fall - Sunday 11:30 a.m. Bio. Bldg. rm 103
8:30 p.m. at the Newman Center
For more information about these and other programs,
call or visit the center daily between
8:30 a.m. and 11:00 p.m.
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
PAID ADVERTISMKiVi
INTRAMURAL - RECREATIONAL SERVICES
SUMMER SESSIONS SIZZLE
INTRAMURAL CALENDAR
First Summer Session
Evnt Registration
SoftballMay 23
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
3-on-3 BasketballMay 25
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Tennis SinglesMay 25
(4:30 P.M. MG 102)
VolleyballJune 1
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Putt-Putt GolfJune 7
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Home Run DerbyJune 7
(5:00 P.M. Softball Field)
5k WalkRunJune 13
(8:00 P.M. Bunting Track)
Second Summer Session
SoftballJune 29
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Co-Rec Water PoloJuly 6
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Golf ClassicJuly 11
(4:00 P.M. MG 102)
Free Throw ContestJuly 18
(3:00 P.M. MG)
5k WalkRunJuly 20
(8:00 P.M.)
tea
am00
I j2
4 i:Pf
� V

INFORMAL RECREATION
1:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
Memorial Gymnasium
MonFri11:30 a.m.
Mon. -Thurs3:00 p.m.
Sun1:00 p.m.
Weight Rooms
Memorial
Mon. - Thurs10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Fri10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Sun1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Mingcs
Mon. - Thurs2:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.
PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAMS
Fitness Classes
Registration Dates Session Dates
May 16-19 May 18-June 17
June 22-24 June 27-July 28
Aerobics
4:00-5:00 P.M. MG 108Tues. & Thurs.
5:15-6:15 P.M. MG 108Mon. 6k Wed.
3:00-4:00 P.M. MG 108Sun.
Toning
4:00-5:00 P.M. MG 108Mon. & Wed.
5:15-6:15 P.M. MG 108Tues. & Thurs.
COST PER SESSION
$7.50studeius $15.00Facultystaff
COST PER DROP-IN CLASS
$1.00students $2.00Faeulty
All classes arc available on a drop-in basis with presentation of a
drop-in ticket and valid identification. Stop by 204 Memorial Gymna-
sium to purchase a drop-in ticket and pick up a class schedule.
Supra Class
An innovative 90 minute workout incorporating weights as light
resistence for muscular strength and endurance in addition to a 30
minute aerobic componenet. Registration is required and sessions are
the same as all other fitness classes. Cost per session is SI 1students
and S18 facu 1 ty - staff.
Tues. & Thurs2:30-4:00 P.M.
Swimming Pools
Memorial
Mon. - Fri7:00 a.m.
Mon. - Fri11:30 a.m.
Minges
Mon. - Fri4:00 p.m.
Sun1:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m.
1:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
Hours may vary in accordance with department pro-
grams. Valid ECU identification is required for admit-
tance to facilities.
Equipment Room Hours
Memorial Gym 115
Mon. - Thurs10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Fri10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
SatClosed
Sun1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
PAID ADVERTISMENT
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING ANY
OF THE PROGRAMS AND SERVICES OFFERED DROP BY
204 MEMORIAL GYM OR CALL 757-6387
OUTDOOR RECREATION OPPORTUNTIES
First Summer Session
Activity Registration Pre-Trip Meeting Trip Dates(s)
Canoe Outing 516-520 521
Whitewater Raft. 516-531 Tues. 67 610.11.12
Bike Hike 516-62 65
Hang Gliding 516-526 Tues. 531 65
Second Summer Session
Backpacking 622-75 Tues. 75 78.9,10
Canoe Outing 622-712 716
Hang Gliding 622-712 724
Outdoor Recreation Center
Hours of Operation
Monday 130 P.M. - 5:30 P.M.
Tuesday ThursdayClosed
Friday1:30 P.M. - 5:30 P.M.
Saturday Closed
Sunday1:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M.





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MA1! 20 1988
Program helps businesses
RALIEGH(AP) Small and
medium sized companies strug-
gling to create new jobs in 91 rural
counties will have a new source oi
financing under a $100 million
loan program backed bv the
state's Rural Economic Develop-
ment Center.
What we seek to do today is
provide dollars to entrepreneurs
with good ideas William Friday,
the chairman of the center, said
Wednesday-
The North Carolina Enterprise
Corp. will combine investments
from banks, savings and loans,
utilities and other businesses,
plus funds from state govern
ment.
By pooling their resources and
spreading nk. the investors will
be able to provide seed capital tor
companies that could nor obtain
convential financing, officials
�aid.
"Until now, if a local bank could
not meet all the financing needsof
a sound business idea it had to say
no said Vincent 1 owe lr presi-
dent-elect ot the North Carolina
Bankers Association and vice-
chairman of the rural center
Now, the bank has ,j place to
turn
1 le likened the new corporation
to the North Carolina Reinsur-
ance Facility, through which in-
surance companies provide auto
liability coverage to high-risk
divers who cannot get one firm to
insure them.
North Carolina's rural
communities have suffered in re-
cent years in contasl to the boom
experienced by the state's urban
centers, largely because of the
decline in traditional manufactur-
ing employment and small farms.
The North Carolina bnterpnse
Corp. will target loans and invest-
ments toward the c)l counties
without a city of 50,000 people or
more, said Billy Ray 1 all, presi-
dent oi the Rural Economic De-
velopment Center. Hans call tor it
to begin operating by the end oi
this year.
Mom loans probably would be
m the $100,000 to S2tX).tX0 range,
but the cororation could make
loans up to $1 million, Lowe said.
Friday, the former University of
North Carolina president, said he
hoped the new coroporation
would grow beyond its $100 mil-
lion start-up size.
The $100 million will consist of
$20 million in stock purchases by
businesses, $20 million in state
investments and $60 million es-
tablished through lines oi credit
from participating financial insti-
tutions.
Under current state law, tax-
payer dollars can be used only tor
investments with successful track
records. State Treasure 1 larlan
Boyles said he would ask the
Legislature next month for per-
mission to invest in the new cor-
poration. The investmants could
take the form of common stock,
preferred stock or debentures, he
said.
The Legislature will not make
direct appropriations to the cor-
poration, Friday said.
When news reports oi the im-
peding announcement surfaced
last week,Gov. lim Martin said he
could not support the used ot
taxpayer money for the financing
pool.
After details ot the plan were
made public Wednesday, guber-
natorial spokesman Jim Sughure
issued a cautious statemant sav-
ing the loan fundmight be ac-
ceptable to Governor Martin
o
�v?
freshmen in b's' down from
942 in 1980 the typical 2-year
school registered 7" first-year
students,a 19.8 percent dropfrom
the 1980 average of 964 students.
"Bringing more part-time stu-
dents on indicates colleges and
universities are marketing them-
selves aggressively to people who
already have jobs or wish to be
retrained Gams added.
This excited ECU graduate has decided to share the thrill with some friends as she lets the bubbly
spray at commencement May 7. (Thotos by Ion Jordan, Photolab)
Beached whale finds new home
r
StCLCUUStl
FORT F1SHFR. N.C. AP)-
- phia, an orphan pygmy sperm
� �. I ale that washed ashore with its
n ther in Long Reach, has been
� �wn to a new home in Florida,
where it should survive, marine
expert say.
The calf, which was maned
Sophia before aquarium workers
learned it w as a male, spent Tues-
day night tied to a stretcher and
was released into a pond behind
the North Carolina Aquarium
Inesday mornii
It - stable now. c. �nsideringit's
out ot the water, away from its
mother, and had to ride in a truck
and stay on a stretcher all night
said Paul Harrington, the curator
: the aquarium at Fort fisher.
We got his circulation going by
running him through the water a
little
The calf and a 10-foot female
whale beached about 2:15 pan.
tesday. The larger whale was
� � an unknown cause.
� ternarians killed the whale,
uh was sent tot he Smith-
nstitution in Washington,
where a nccropsv will be per-
formed.
Sophia ate small herring and
small portions ot squid Wednes-
day. He had eaten about three
pounds oi food bv noon with
aquarium employees helping his
appetite by placing the food up to
his mouth. Staffers were trying to
keep the calf relaxed to allow the
food to digest properly.
A veterinarian injected the
whale, which was slightly injured
in the beaching, with antibiotics
and itamins.
On Wednesday right, YVRAL-
n hired an airplane to take So-
phia to a new home at Sea World
near Orlando, Fla. The mammal
was expected to arrive in Florida
earlv today.
Harrington said thecalf showed
no signs oi disease or severe in-
jury. It has some minor cuts and
bruises. Barnacles and crusted
pilings may have contributed to
those lacerations Harrington
said
Experts could only guess what
may have caused the whales to
beach. Pygmy sperm whales are
not common in the area, and are
usually found in temperate and
topical waters worldwide. More
timid than most vvhales, pygmy
sperm whales usually travel in
pods of 10, Harrington said.
"The mother whale might have
been hurt or disoriented Frank
Schwartz, a member of the West-
ern Atlantic Whale Consortium,
told the Wilmington Morning
Star in a telephone interview from
Morehead City. "Of course the
young one will always stav with
the mother
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"It seems to be pretty consistent
with the administration's ideas
Sughrue said. "The proposal
would limit the state's involvc-
mant to a treasurer's investment
That's much better than using
appropriated funds. The fact that
the funds would operate as a pri-
vate corporation is also a point in
its factor
It. Gov. Rob Jordan, who ap-
pointed the commission that con-
ceived the idea of the Rural Eco-
nomic Development Center,
hailed the creation of the North
Carolina Enterprise Corp say-
ing it would foster "growth from
within" the state.
"This proposal is an outstand-
ing example of how the public
and private sector can work to-
gether.
More freshmen,
part-timers
(CPS) An increasing number
I freshmen at public college1- .ire
part-timers, the college Beard
reported May (��.
In its annual survey ot who is
v;oing to college, the New York-
based education group found
freshman enrollments declined
between 0 and 1986, but that
half of he drop occurred in one
year: between 1985 and '86.
Two-year colleges, moreover,
held a harder time attracting first-
year students than four-year
schools, spokeswoman Janice
C lams noted.
While the typical 4-year col
cges enrolled an average ot 872
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8
TT IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20,1988
Program helps businesses
RALIEGH(AP)�Small and
medium-sized companies strug-
gling to create new jobs in 91 rural
counties will have a new source of
financing under a $100 million
loan program backed bv the
stale's Rural Economic Develop- divers who cannot get one firm to
ment Center.
"What we seek to do today is
provide dollars to entrepreneurs
with good ideas William Friday,
the chairman of the center, said
Wednesday.
The North Carolina Enterprise
Corp. will combine investments
from banks, savings and loans,
utilities and other businesses,
plus funds from state govern-
ment.
Bv pooling their resources and
spreading risk, the investors will
be able to provide seed capital for
companies that could nor obtain
convential financing, officials
said.
"Until now, if a local bank could
not meet all the financing needs oi
a sound business idea it had to say
no said Vincent Lowe lr presi-
dent-elect of the North Carolina
Bankers' Association and vice-
chairman of the rural center.
"Now, the bank has a place to
turn The $100 million will consist of
He likened the new corporation $20 million in stock pu chases by
to the North Carolina Reinsur- businesses, $20 million in state
ancc Facility, through which in- investments and $60 million es-
surance companies provide auto tablished through lines of credit
liability coverage to high-risk from participating financial insti-
tutions.
Under current state law, tax-
payer dollars can be used only for
investments with successful track
records. State Treasure Harlan
Boyles said he would ask the
Legislature next month for per-
mission to invest in the new cor-
insure them.
North Carolina's rural
comminities have suffered in re-
cent vcars in contast to the boom
experienced by the state's urban
centers, largely because of the
decline in traditional manufactur-
ing employment and small farms, poration. The investmants could
The North Carolina Enterprise
Corp. will target loans and invest-
ments toward the 91 counties
without a city oi 50,000 people or
more, said Billy Ray Hall, presi-
dent of the Rural Economic De-
velopment Center. Hans call for it
take the form of common stock,
preferred stock or debentures, he
said.
The Legislature wall not make
direct appropriations to the cor-
poration, Friday said.
When news reports of the im-
to begin operating by the end of peding announcement surfaced
this year. List week, Gow Jim Martin said he
Most loans probably would be could not support the used of
in the $100,000 to $200,000 range,
but the cororation could make
loans up to $1 million, Lowe said.
Friday, the former University of
North Carolina president, said he
hoped the new coroporation
would grow beyond its $100 mil-
lion start-up size.
taxpayer money for the financing
pool.
After details of the plan were
made public Wednesday, guber-
natorial spokesman Jim Sughure
issued a cautious statcmant say-
ing the loan fundmight be ac-
ceptable to Governor Martin
"It seems to be pretty consistent
with the administration's ideas
Sughrue said. "The proposal
would limit the state's involve-
mant to a treasurer's investment.
That's much better than using
appropriated funds. The fact that
the funds would operate as a pri-
vate corporation is also a point in
its factor
Lt. Gov. Bob Jordan, who ap-
pointed the commission that con-
ceived the idea of the Rural Eco-
nomic Development Center,
hailed the creation of the North
Carolina Enterprise Corp say-
ing it would foster "growth from
within" the state.
"This proposal is an outstand-
ing example of how the public
and private sector can work to-
gether.
More freshmen,
part-timers
(CPS) � An increasing number
of freshmen at public colleges are
part-timers, the college Board
reported May 6.
In its annual survey of who is
going to college, the New York-
based education group found
freshman enrollments declined
between 1980 and 1986, but that
half of the drop occurred in one
vear: between 1985 and '86.
Two-year colleges, moreover,
had a harder time attracting first-
year students than four-year
schools, spokeswoman Janice
Gams noted.
While the typical 4-ycar col-
leges enrolled an average of 872
freshmen in 1986 � down from
942 in 1980 � the typical 2-year
school registered 773 first-year
students, a 19.8 percent drop from
the 1980 average of 964 students.
"Bringing more part-time stu-
dents on indicates colleges and
universities are marketing them-
selves aggressively to people who
already have jobs or wish to be
retrained Gams added.
This excited ECU graduate has decided to share the thrill with some friends as she lets the bubbly
spray at commencement May 7. (Photos by Jon Jordan, Photolab)
Beached whale finds new home
FORT FISHER, N.C. (AP)-
Sophia, an orphan pygmy sperm
whale that washed ashore with its
mother in Long Beach, has been
flown to a new home in Horida,
where it should survive, marine
experts say.
The calf, which was maned
Sophia before aquarium workers
learned it was a male, spent Tues-
day night tied to a stretcher and
was released into a pond behind
the North Carolina Aquarium
Wednesday morning.
"It's stable now, considering it's
out of the water, away from its
mother, and had to ride in a truck
and stay on a stretcher all night
said Paul Barrington, the curator
of the aquarium at Fort Fisher.
"We got his circulation going by
running him through the water a
little
The calf and a 10-foot female
whale beached about 2:15 p.m.
Tuesday. The larger whale was
dying of an unknown cause.
Veternarians killed the whale,
which was sent tot he Smith-
sonian Institution in Washington,
where a nceropsv will be per- beach. Pygmy sperm whales are
formed. not common in the area, and are
Sophia ate small herring and usually found in temperate and
small portions oi squid W;ednes- topical waters worldwide. More
day. He had eaten about three timid than most whales, pygmy
pounds of food by noon with sperm whales usually travel in
aquarium employees helping his pods of 10, Barrington said.
appetite bv placing the food up to
his mouth. Staffers were trying to
keep the calf relaxed to allow the
food to digest properly.
A veterinarian injected the
"The mother whale might have
been hurt or disoriented Frank
Schwartz, a member of the West-
ern Atlantic Whale Consortium,
told the Wilmington Morning
SHIRT COUPON
whale, which was slightly injured Star in a telephone interview from
in the beaching, with antibiotics
and vitamins.
On Wednesday right, WRAL-
TV hired an airplane to take So-
phia to a new home at Sea World
near Orlando, Ha. The mammal
was expected to arrive in Horida
early today.
Barrington said the calf showed
no signs of disease or severe in-
jury. "It has some minor cuts and
bruises. Barnacles and crusted
pilings may have contributed to
those lacerations Barrington
said.
Experts could only guess what
may have caused the whales to
Morehead City. "Of course the
young one will always stay with
the mother
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for mm
36
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R
THE EASTCAROi INIAN
Features
MAY 20,1988 Page 9
"Colors a worthy effort,
fails due to plot problems
4
By CAROL WHTHERINGTON
m vwcinc; roiTOR
A 16 year-old youth died and two
ompanions were seriously wounded
Friday morning in an exchange of
gunfire near Crenshaw Boulevard
i nd the San la Monica Freeway in Los
ngeles that left (heir stolen ear
riddled with wore than forty bullets.
Police believe that the
i ncidentrepresents an escalation in
: ing warfare.
A police source said that two So-
viet wade AK-47 rifles were recov-
red nearbyTony Massengale, as
istani director of the Community
� Services Gaud Project, said he
� not suprised that the youths have
spohisticated
. 'aponry "You're talking about
�' � that exceeds (that of) our
. law enforcement and, in some
- he National Guard
The Los Angeles Times
August 8, 1987
I )ocs anyone remember the old
"Dirty Harry" movie in which
Harry's partner was a woman
rookie? Yeah, well, "Colors" is
done in the same style.Nothing
new in the plot department, but it
did address a very shocking issue
- street gangs.
II is a fact that there are approxi-
matelv600 street canesboastinga
membership of over 70,000 in the are uncovered in a shocking way,
greater Los Angeles area. Direc- thanks to Hopper's fine directing,
tor Dennis 1 lopper and producer The use of colors by the gangs,
Robert Solo are shining a bright which dates back to the beginning
and truthful light on this escalat- of gang fighting, carries much
ing problem, and the stark truth of symbolism in "Colors hence the
the movie is enough to excuse the name. The screen is constantly
conflict between Sean Perm, play- flooded with plaid shirts all in
ing McGavin,and Robert Duvall, blue or all in red or some other
ft
&
a
playing 1 lodges.
McGavin is the cocky, tough
rookiecop bent on proving that he
is a no-nonsense man with muscle
to back up his defiling mouth.
1 lodges, on the other hand, is
the seasoned cop with one eye on
his pension and the other eye on
the rising violence produced from
gang warfare.
"Colors" takes the viewer into
the LA. streets, to the backdoors
oi fighting gangs and hoodlums.
Only now, the fighting has
changed. Rumbles are a thing oi
the past. 1 lopper draws on the fact
that kids, some as young as 13, are
wiping out gang members with
Uzi submachine guns and Soviet
made AK-47 rifles.
The days of guns, broken bottle-
necks and chains are long gone.
The use oi high-tech weaponry is
blatant throughout the movie, as
is the use oi drugs. The drugs
usage is not a new concept, but the
drug dealing is. Many truths con-
cerning the use of children in the
transporting and selling oi drugs
color that set the gangs apart.
Hopper uses actual gang mem-
bers in many of the scenes. More
than once, Hopper found himself
having to replace a gang member
that was killed the night before
shooting. Many of the young chil-
dren and even some of the girls
used in the movie had actual con-
nections with thegangsin theL.A.
area.
See "COLORS page 10
hrten
ii
(amlfs
?n finta
Pictured here are Sean Penn and Robert Duvall as they discipline a young street urchin in the movie
"Colors a film about gang warfare in L.A The movie also focusus on the relationship between the
two policemen as they combat the gang problem in their own unique wavs
Run-PMC mess up the mix
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
I citurvs 1 dltnr
"Radio Station,
on vacation
wonder where Run is,
Damn, be patient
from you, holmes. But you and Not that I want y'all to start
Dee and Jay are back. With a new repeatin' yourselves, but I'd
Lp that may or may not be the rather pop "King of Rock" in the
soundtrack to your long awaited deck than this cassette. "Leather"
movie, "Tougher Than Leather seems like y'ali are tiying to make
Thing is, this album ain't really an album full of beach-rap, 70s
cial (and what's the deal with that
anvhow? You don't reallv need
money that bad do ya?) it is the
smoothest and simplest song.
That's the key, you know, just
cause you got access to million
tougher than leather. The songs dinosaur-rap, psychedelic-rap � dollar equiptment and producers
Well
couple
it's kinda hard. It's been r.
of vears since we heard
ain't tough, the rhymes aren't
fresh hmmm. Maybe it is a stale
kind of tough.
Prince poses nude; shocks K-Mart
even ragtime-rap.
What happened to plain old
rap? Or rock rap? Have the
Beasties intimidated vou? Have
the Fat Boys? I hate to think it, but
it would just be another example
of the lackeys rising up and get-
don't mean you have to dub a
rhyme to death. "Papa Crazv"
and "They Call Us Run-DMC"
both get swamped under all the
special effects.
"Marv, Mary" is fun stuff.
"Mary, Mary Why you bug-
By STEVE SOMM1 RS
St.lit U:M
Prince poses in the
cover of his ne
"Lovesexy Becaus
mart and Wal-mart -
sell it- .Billboard V.
�rin�21vS?ll
BJrotners seem to a
album is going to s
So, the way 1 see
candy-ass stores li
won't make anv m
bufl i n the
w record
: this, K-
tores won't
and
�that this
� 1 sell big.
I'm glad
like Wal-mart
noney oii this
ke our funky
!
get down and sha
butt record.
The sir ;1 ' Alphabet St cer-
tainly has the potential to do at
least as u ell as his other hits. Like
only Prim c can do, "Alphabet St
puts you in that sex mood with
sweat dripping off your brow.
The rest oi the record does the
same. When 1 listen to it, 1 often
find myself doing these thrust
movements that if! really thought
about what 1 was doing, I'd get
really embarrassed. But I'm usu-
ally so into it, 1 don't care. This is,
however, only a superficial
aanalysis of what Prince is up to.
He greets us in the beginning ot
hisrecord by saying, " elcome to
the new powergeneration. The
reason my voice is so clear is be-
c mse there is no smack in my
brain
Even though we all know now
that cicarcttcs are the bij
ler among the drugs, we have to
be honest with ourselves. Some
drugs are effectively keeping
some communities down
suggest love not drugs.
1 here are also a lot oi references
to a heaven and a hell, a god and a
djcvil. JJieseare brics, fron the
Urst cjrt i NoiV"ljagt tber is a
devil because he talks so loud. He
makes you do things your friends
do, ban ;out with the crowd. But
my Lord he's so quiet when he
calls your name
This, 1 suppose, is enough to
think oi Prince as a funky Cat
Stevens. The more you listen
though, the more you have to
agree. Like Prince I believe "We
need love and honesty, peace and
harmony
1 believeIt's time for new edu-
cation, the former rules don't
apply. We need a power structure
that breeds production instead of
jacks who vandalize
When he says "Nuclear Ban
never stays in tune. Theyallknow
the words but the music is
doomed he has legitimate ideas.
As a people we must "Dance On,
Dance On" to a better world.
But don't let all this make you
think that Prince doesn't have the
the female singers on the record)
and the last couple lines are bold.
"U jerk your body like a horny
Prince pony would. Now run tell your
mama about that Also, remem-
ber again, he doesn't wear any
clothes on the front cover.
So, if your looking for a funky
record to spend your summer
with, one that has hope, love, and
controversy on it, get "Lovesexy"
by Prince. You won't regret it. It's
hot, lyrically and musically and
furthermore. Sheila E. is back on
drums.
Prihce recalls "The
By STEVE SOMMERS
SUf f Writer
The song "When 2 R in Love
originally was intended to be HS
leased on "The Black Album" but
In the past few months Prince found its release on "Lovesexy
las made two records, but only One can only speculate why
ane has been released. Prince decided to pull "The Black
"Lovesexy" which contains the Album" and release "Lovesexy
single "Alphabet St is about a Prince has not made any detailed
week old and now in stores. comments on the matter.
The other record The Black The band on "Lovesexy" is the
Album was printed and accord- same band that Prince took on his
ing to Warner Brothers (the dis- European tour, where "The Black
tributor for Prince's label Paisley Album" has other players. Some
Park) has claimed to have de- say the tone of the unrelcased
stroyed all pressings on a request
made by Prince.
However, many bootlegs have
made their way to streets in some
larger cities. The Record Ex-
change in Richmond, Virginia has
bootleg copies for $100 a piece.
Tape to tape dubbing copies have
been reportedly found here in
album was not what the Minne-
sota song writter wanted for get-1
eral public consumption. There-
fore he released the much more
hopeful "Lovesexy;
Three radio stations on tip
westcoast, including the San
Fransico based KSOL has broad-
casted the controversial "Black
Album Warner Brothers imme-
ting more famous than the mas- gin'?Mary, Mary I need your
ters.
'Took a little break,
for goodness sake.
Gotta chill, get ill,
cold fishin' bv the lake.
Take my brain off rappin'
'member what's happenin'
Well, that's cool. Now you've
comeback and it's time to get cold
huggin And "Miss Elaine" is
good,straightforward heavy
beats and guitar.
I can understand v'all wantin'
to experiment. Especially Jay.
There's a lot he can do with all
those records. But it wasn't the
special sound effects that made
"Rock Box" and "Caw �1 Rock it
and COcky. Just remember there's Like This?" such gr
It was the experiments in words
and the guitar riffs. Are the good
old days already over?
I hope not. I keep trying to keep
this album in context. "It must be
a soundtrack. It must be a sound-
track I say. But then "Ragtime"
comes on.
It has pretty much the best
rhymes and story. But you both
power.ul stuff on this sound too much like that wimpy
Dana Dane. And those horns.
It's just a bad match up. It's like
one red Adidas and one white
one. It ain't balanced.
You got nothing to prove
except that you can keep finding
the right groove. So you skipped
around too much this time. It ain't
scratched permanent. I hope.
a line between cocky and preten-
tious.
It's chill to have songs like
"Beats to the Rhyme" where you
reprise your signature songs. But
things like "They Call Us Run-
DMC" and "How'd Ya Do It Dee"
are just overkill.
But I don't mean to be dissin'
you in public like this. There's
some .
record.
"Run's House" is still the shit,
even though we heard that way-
back in "Krush Groove The new
mix is tough, but nothing surpris-
ing.
The deffest song has to be
"Beats to the Rhyme Even if it is
the track on that Coke� commer-
Publishers fight AIDS
sgest kil-
of Tipper Gore and Ed Mecse
cringe with sanctimonious em-
ban asment. Prince prints the
words io Cat's rap (Cat is one ot
This June the publishing indus- publishing do its sharer-
Some thought it was crazy at
Nashville, Tenn.(AP)-Louis
Gossett Jr. and LeYar burton,
reunited for the first time since the
blockbuster 1977 miniseries
"Roots predict the Christmas
sequel will become a classic in
itself, a kind of American answer
to Charles Dickens' "A Christmas
Carol
"I think it's very wonderful to
be able to anticipate sitting down
with my loved ones and watching
not only the Dickens classic, but
'Roots Christmas' as well, and
hopefully year after year. It has
the potential to be a classic said
Burton, 31, whose career was
launched bv the miniseries 12
I At east some of the material on diatelymademestationmail�irl try will join the fight against AIDS
1 I. first, and others called it brave,
but within one year Alyson � the
founder of Alyson Publications in
Boston, a publisher of mainly r;ay
and lesbian books�had rccicved
major commitments of funds and
other contributions from such
sources as The Book of the Month
Club. The list of people and or-
ganizations who have endorsed
Producer Mark Wolper, the son which will suggest "specific ways the project includes over 20
of executive producer David L. that average individuals can help members of Congress
Wolper, said the sequel evolved make a difference in stopping This is the live
"Roots" Xmas special made
�ears ago.
"This is as close to Dickens as
we can get in an American story
Gossett said on a break in filming
on the grounds of the Hermitage,
the plantation home of President
Andrew Jackson. "This is ours
and we should cherish it. It's our
American classic
"Roots" still ranks as the high-
est-rated miniseriesever,and Part
8 was the third highest-rated tele-
vision show in history, according
to A.C. Nielsen.
The two-hour sequel, schedu-
aled to air Dec.11 on ABC, also
stars Avery Brooks, Shaun Cas-
sidv, Michael Learned and Kate
rThe Black Album" is elsewhere, copies of the record back to them. 1 with "You Can Do Something
'� ai"ul About AIDS a paperback book
that will be given away � free of
charge � in bookstores across the
country.
The book will contain 45 chap-
ters by a vast array of celebrities,
well-known writers, politicians,
union leaders � even a high
school class in Vermont � each of
Incredible WZMB Top 13
1) Camper Van Beethoven -
"Our Beloved Revolutionary
Sweetheart" - Virgin
2) Velvet Elvis - "Velvet Elvis
Enigma
3) The Rave Ups - " Book of
Your Regrets " - Epic
4) Timbuk 3 - "Eden Alley" -
FRS
5) The Young Fresh Fellows -
'Totally Lost" - Frontier
6) Living Colors - "Vivid" -
ThinVYnitfRflrm-thg
Mulgrew.
The story was written bv David
Lyre based on an outline by Alex
Haley, who grew up in the small
western Tennessee town of Hen
ning and wrote the Pulitzer Prize
winning book "Roots" after trac-
ing his ancestry 200 years.
In the sequel, Kunta Kinte
(Burton) and fiddler (Gossett)
clandestinely plan to lead a group
of slaves to freedom on Christmas
Eve in 1770.
Gossett, who in 1982 won an
Academy Award for his support-
ing role in "An Officer and a
Gentleman said he expected a
new generation to discover
"Roots" through the sequel.
"It'sa new kindof audience, the
America has evolved
from his father's idea that there
were too few black Christmas
shows.
The film's budget is about $4
million, expensive for a two-hour
television movie, said Bernie
Sofronski, co-executive producer.
In comparision, the last 12 hours
of "Roots" cost $6 million, he said.
Burton said the quality of the
script convinced him he should
participate in the sequel. Before
this, he said, he avoided roles
similar to Kunta Kinte.
"For the first five years of my
career, I did whatever I felt was
stopping
AIDS.
The story behind this book is
one of several "firsts Its publica-
tion will mark the first time that
the publishing industry as a
whole has moblized behind a
social issue and exercised its con-
siderable power to influence the
American culture by funding and
supporting a single project.
It will also be the first book ever
given away on such a grand scale,
absolutely free, without serving
Aid' or the
'Farm Aid' of the publishing in-
dustry Alyson says; "It's a mas-
sive effort to raise the public's
consciousness about this terrible
disease by showing people ex-
actly what they can do to fight it. I
think that those who decide to join
that fight will find, as I did, that
they are both surprised and grati-
fied by the enthusiasm and sup-
port they will rccicve from oth-
ers
Sasha Alyson undertook his
first publishing venture in 1968,at
the age of 16, when he started an
young people that maybe ncccssary in order to create dis
Spanish Cave" - Frontier
8) Soul Asylum - "Sometime
to Return" - A&M
9) Dancing Hoods Hallelu-
iah Anyway" - Relativity
10) Joan Jett & The Blackhearfc
- "Up Your Alley" - Blackheart
11) Bar-B-Q Killers - "ComeLy
- Twilight
12) Toni Childs Union" -
A&M
tancc between Kunta and LeVar
he said. "Five years ago, the
13) The Witnesses Scene of
the Crime" - Raizer
I
as a premium or as incentive t
buy something else.
It is also the story of how a small underground newspaper in his
company � one that few people high school, which earned articles
had ever heard of�succeeded in about the Vietnam War, the draft,
: , , - lU , mobilizingboththegiantsandthe race discrimination, student
, w i , � y fu l V ciwaniriniKindiistrv nchts, and other issues the official
thought of playing the character "�2Ed marketm? student publicaiton ignored.
again and perhaps forever and to join in producing, marketing, r o .
inextricably linking LeVar and and distributing a single product SlfLS?
Kunta was a lot more scary. - all for free. "f suspended ��"�
"I don't feel the fear so much of The project's coordinator, but for Alyson i was �iy the
never being able to step out of the Sasha Alyson, concicved the idea Tg ?f ?? "
shadow of Kunta for the book when a publishing be marked by boldness and a clear
Burton has shed the image in a friend asked a poignant n
successful new role as a member questionFashion, cntertain-
thc chance to win anybody's pri- of the crew in the syndicated tele- ment, music: all our fellow indus-
mary, much less running or think- vision scries "Star Trek: The Next tries in the Arts have found a way
ing about it? The consciousness of Generation to help fight AIDS. How can
couldn't have grasped what the
show about the first time Gos-
sett said.
"It's very special , very spiri-
tual
"It's even better because of, 1
guess, the mutual growth of all of
us and the growth of America
especially he said.
"Twelve years ago, do you
think Jesse Jackson would have
In 1977 Alyson founded a book
distribution company, Carrier
See AIDS, page 10
.
MNM��





V
10
Till EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20,1988
"Rambo" author has very
lucrative deal with movie
productions of character
m�Mmfmm&
�V YORK (AD-English pro-
sor David Morrell had been
thinking about the returning vet-
erans in his classes, and about a
World War 11 hero, when he be-
gan work in 1969 on his first
novel.
Published in 1972, "First Blood"
had an angry hero named Rambo.
Ten years later it became a movie
starring Sylvester Stallone.
"The original intent was that
the first novel would be an anti-
war novel to make vivid what it
would be like to have a war in the
United States like whal was going
on in Asia, how senseless it was
Morrell said.
A secondary theme was the
stress suffered by returning veter-
ans.
The inspiration came from vet-
erans in his classes, Morrell said,
and from the life oi Audio
Murphy, the actor who was
America's most decorated CA in
World War II.
"Audio Murphy had done a
film called To 1 Icll and back' in
which he dramatized his experi-
ences in the war Morrell said,
before his death in ls71, he had
begun a book talking about the
problems he had after coming
home, Morrell added.
The movie version of "First
Blood" was generally faithful to
the book. Both told of a fight
which began with a small-town
sheriff leaning on an unkempt
drifter and ended with a town in
flames from the rage of a single
Vietnam veteran.
In the book, Rambo's body
count exceeded 2( including
some National Guardsmen shot
in retreat. In the film, he killed
two or three.
Rambo ended the book lull oi
bullet holes and with his head
blown off by his former com-
manding officer. In the movie, he
walked off in handcuffs, ready for
sequels.
Morrell doesn't mind at all. In
fact, he wrote books based on the
first sequel, "Rambo: First Blood
Tart 11 and the upcoming
"Rambo III" as well as the first
draft of the script for "Rambo 111
"Rambo II" was not only a
much bigger film than "Rambo I
but it made the character part of
the nation's political vocabulary.
"I sort of have to chuckle at that,
that 1 should have invented a
character whose name has en-
tered the language Morrell said.
"As I look back in my lifetime, I
guess the only novelist who did
the same is Jascph Heller with
'Catch-22
Morrell owns stock in Carolco,
the production company that
bought the film and merchandis-
ing rights for Rambo.
"I have profit participation in
the pictures, and I do have profit
participation in the merchandis-
ing, and I also get a flat fee when-
ever they make a feature said the
author, who came to New York
with Stallone and co-star Richard
Crenna to promote the film.
"And, as you might expect, it's
been lucrative
Morrell owns the literary copy-
right, so he gets the lion's share of
book profits. "Rambo: First Blood
Part II" was a best seller even
before the film came out.
Morrell's "Brotherhood of the
Rose a book without Rambo,
was picked up by NBC-TV as the
basis fora mini-series planned for
next season.
"First Blood" was written while
Morrell was earning a doctorate at
Penn State University, and he
went on to teach at Iowa State
University before becoming a
full-time writer in 1986.
One of the ironies of the Rambo
phenomenon is that neither Mor-
rell nor Stallone had any part in
the Vietnam War. Born in Can-
ada, Morrell was 23 when he came
to the United States in 1967. And
like Stallone, he was something of
a tough kid.
"My father died in the Second
World War. I never knew the
man said Morrell, who grew up
in Kitchener-Waterloo near
Toronto. "I was raised by my
mother, who was a single parent
for quite a while, and was forced
to give me up at times to a foster
home.
"Larcr-we didn't have very
much money, we didn't get a
phone until I was 12-1 spent most
of my time in back alleys with
street gangs. The guys I hung
around with went to prison. I
became a professor
His salvation was the TV show,
"Route 66 Morrell identified
with George Maharis' streetwise
character, and he wrote a fan let-
ter to scries writer Sterling Sil-
liphant.
Silliphant's reply, encouraging
his young correspondent to take a
stab at writing, is framed and
hanging on a wall at home in Iowa
City, Morrell said.
The Rambo books, he said, deal
in some serious issues but are
basically escapism.
"Life for most people is at best
boring, and I use boring almost an
existential sense as Sartre docs in
'Nausea where it weighs you
down and you have a powerful
sense of what is my reason for
getting up this morning?"
As his 15-ycar-old son lay dying
oi cancer last year, Morrell said
books helped him survive.
"I'd be sitting there for like eight
hours at a time, and I would be
readine a book bv mv friend
Stephen King. And I don't know
if I could have stayed sane for
those eight houre if it hadn't been
for Steve
"I could not have read John
Updike under those circum-
stances. It would have been too
real Morrell said. "What
needed to do was get out of that
roomand an a s�ensc�4et out of my
head - and Steve did it for me. So
if I can do that for somebody else,
I think I've performed a social
function
"he
last Carolinian.
tide,
lotlvatioh,
ixperience,
rlends.
Apply today.

"Colors" gives an accurate picture of gang life
� r I C. .� O B n( ViL L-i f!imranni'e 1'H VV.lit until it rnmrc nn in thr
Continued from page 9
Another good move on
topper's part was the casting.
Penn and Duvall worked well ,
creating just enough conflict to
carry off the inner plot and, at the
same time, expose the raw, hu-
man side of both actors. Tenn has
played in movies of this sort be-
fore, but his acting is honed to a
sharpness that has, until now,
remained dormant.
One of the best scenes in the film
is after the climactic shootout that
costs Hedges his life. McGavin
shows he has learned something
about the job when he tries to pass
on some of Hodges' knowledge
on to his new, hotheaded partner.
The movie's best asset was the
soundtrack. It was great! Thanks
to Ice-T, Salt and Pepa, Los Lobos,
Big Daddy Kane, Rick James, Erik
B. and Rakim and many others,
"Colors" carries one of the livliest
soundtracks imaginable for a
movie of this sort. The music is
strong, tough, fast-paced with
just enough softness and heart to
appeal to everyone. The big
winner is the title track, "Colors
which was written and per-
formed by Ice-T .
In filming "Colors Hopper
used a sharp eve to spot the ideal
street locations. Most of the shoot-
ing was done on location, which
gave the viewer a special surprise1.
Many muralled walls in L.A. were
used as backgrounds. One par-
ticular wall displayed a painting
o! Nikki Giovanni's I'd wait until it comes out in tnc
poem"Dreams It was a bcauti- video store before I'd spend $4.50
fill piece obviously done by an to see it at the theater. Penn and
actual street "militant perhaps Duvall have both played in better
one such as Giovanni's poem movies. In the Micah Harris tradi-
talks about. tion, I rate this movie 3 catheads.
Overall, this movie was okay.
�a
lUnttad
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not com by th� REAL Crisis Intsrvsntlon Csntsr 312 E.
10th St; or call 7S8-HELP, For Frso Confidential Counseling or As-
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Our Voluntsors snd Staff srs on duty 24 hrs. s day, yaar around,
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Our longstanding goal has always boon to prasarvs snd anhsnes
tha quality of Ufa for you and our community.
Ltc�nMd And Accredited By Th� Stat North Carolina
t
UDS book is
distributed
Continued from page c
Pigeon, to meet the needs of small
progressive and feminist publish-
ers in the U.S. and Great Britain,
and 1979 he began publishing
books under his own imprint,
Ah son Publications.
AJyson Publications has been
active'in the fight against AIDS
since 1982, when it published the
first! book to deal with the issue,
The Advocate Guide to Gay
Health and the company is
donating one third of its mail
order income during the month of
March 1988 to the People with
AIDS Coalition and the American
Federation for AIDS Research.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20,1988
,1ILY RESTAURANTS
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752-3866







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Pirates hopes in CAA tourney
dashed by Pats and Spiders
Sports
By TIM CHANDLER
Spoils Editor
East Carolina's hopes of
winning its second straight
Colonial Athletic Association
baseball championship were
dashed last Saturday when the
Pirates were trounced 15-2 in the
loser's bracket of the tournament
by Richmond.
The loss was the second straight
for the Pirates, who opened the
tourney, which is played at the
Diamond in Richmond, with a
solid 9-1 victory over William &
Mary.
The problem for the Pirates in
the contest came in the pitching
department as Brian Berckmann,
who started the game and took
the loss, went only one-plus
inning, giving up three runs
before he was removed.
Johnathon Jenkins then got the
call and he gave up seven runs,
three earned, in one and one-
thirds inning of pitching as the
Spiders went on a eight-run tear
in the third frame.
Richmond added four more
runs to close out the scoring in the
contest and placed a few more
nails in the Pirates coffin.
The sixth-seeded Spiders, on
Linksters pick up
signees Thursday
East Carolina Universitv head
golf coach Hal Morrison
announced the signings of two
high school seniors for the
program next year.
Douglas Hoey, from Dearborn
Mich and Donnie Cooper, from
Knoxville, Tenn are the two
signees.
Hoey was the medalist this year
at the Michigan PGA Junior
Tournament and finished 16th
overall at the PGA National
Tournament.
"He's (Hoye) very good and he
wins about everything up there
(Michigan) Morrison said.
"He's also an honor student. He is
going to graduate as
valedictorian of his class with a
3.98 grade-point-average and
attend the medical school here
(E�U)
Cooper, who attended Hall's
High School, was the 1988
Tennessee state high school
champion.
"Cooper is a very strong golfer
and I feel that he has a lot of
potential here at ECU Morrison
said
Needless to say, with the
credentials these two golfers
possess, Morrison is pleased to
have them aboard.
"I think these two are as good of
golfers as we could have hoped to
get Morrison said. "Both of
them are good enough to play in
our top three or four right off I
believe.
"I feel fortunate that we got
both of them Morrison said. " I
was going after three golfers that I
felt were top notch and I had said
that if I got just one of them that I
would be very fortunate and I am
just real pleased to get both
Morrison also said he hopes to
sign a third golfer, a junior college
transfer from Florida, to a
scholarship within the next week.
� TIM CHANDLER
the other hand, got a solid
performance from Don Rehman,
who hurled all nine innings on the
mound giving up eight hits to
push his record to 6-4 for the year.
The Pirates only scoring of the
contest came in the first inning
when Calvin Brown walked and
scored all the way from first on a
double to left by Jay McGraw.
After McGraw had moved to
third on the throw to the plate at
home, he scored on a bunt single
by John Adams.
In the Pirates first loss of the
tournament, George Mason
ripped 12 hits to pull away to an
easy 10-2 victory.
Jim Richbourg was the main
cog at the plate for the Patriots as
he picked up a quartet of RBI's
with a pair of hits.
Also aiding George Mason was
Kevin Kobylinski and James
Timbers as each collected three
hits each.
The Pirates again broke out to
the lead in the first inning when
David Ritchie scored on a run-
scoring single by Brown.
The Patriots battled back with a
pair of runs in the second to lead 2-
1.
The Pirates managed to tic the
score in the third inning when
Brown delivered an RBI double to
center to score catcher Chris
Cauble. ECU, however, would
not see the lead again.
The Patriots exploded for five
runs in the fourth inning to grab a
7-2 lead and from there, they
never looked back.
Jake Jacobs picked up the loss
for the Pirates as he went three
and one-third innings gave up
seven hits and seven runs.
The tournament results for the
young Pirate squad brought their
season to a close with a final mark
of 33-14 being posted. The Pirates
will return everybody from this
year's squad next season except
for senior first baseman Jay
McGraw and senior pitcher Gary
Smith.
i v
i
I



i
li
The Pirate baseball team's season came to a close last weekend with a pair of losses in the Colonial Athletic
Association baseball tournament. In the above photos, which were taken earlier this year, Calvin Broun (top
photo) tries to leg out a play at first base at Harrington Field and senior slugger Jay McGraw prepare to swat
a pitch. The baseballers wound up the season with a 33-14 mark. (File Photos)
Impressive list developing for Eastern Carolina golf event
By TIM CHANDLER
Sports Editor
There is already quite an
impressive list of stars set to join
Michael Jordan for the fourth
annual Eastern Carolina
Celebrity Golf Classic scheduled
for June 19 at the Greenville
Countrv Club.
J
According to tournament
heads, this year's tournament
may just be the biggest one yet.
One reason for that could be
linked to the change in timing for
the tournament.
In year's past, the tourney has
been held in the fall when a lot of
stars had little time set aside in
their schedules to make guest
appearances. The obvious answer
to that was to move the date of the
event up some.
Among those stars who have
already promised to appear at the
tournament along with Jordan are
Kim Zimmer, star on "The
Guiding Light" soap opera; A.C
Weary, television and movie star;
Ron Wooten, New England
Patriots football player; Bob
Debardelaben, weather man for
WRAL-TV, and Leslie Nielson,
television and movie star.
Also, Dudley Bradley, former
All-American for North Carolina
and current New York Nets
basketball player; Claude Atkins,
Sheriff Lobo on television and
movie star; Mike Caldwell,
former pro baseball player; Dinah
Goodman, former actress on Hee
Haw, and Tim Culbretson, owner
of Cinema Sports and actor, who
has appeared in such movies as
Star Trek II, Cannery Row and
television shows Hill Street Blues
and The Love Boat.
Also, Mike Steele, ECU head
basketball coach; Gary Overton,
ECU head baseball coach; Billy
Packer, CBS Sports basketball
commentator; Dr. Richard Eakin,
ECU Chancellor, and Chris
Shinkle, ABC Sports
commentator, and Thad Dabcr of
Durham, who hold the record for
the one-club championship.
And the list is still growing,
according to tournament officials,
who just last week announced
that the Golfing Gorilla would
attend. The gorilla has made
appearnaces on national
television and at professional
golfing events. The gorilla is said
to be golf's answer to the San
Diego Chicken.
"We are still waiting to hear
from many more stars from
television, motion picture and
professional athletes said Joe
Clark, Golf Classic Chairman.
"But the response has been
phenomenal
All funds from the tournament
go towards the operating
expenses of the new Ronald
McDonald House of Eastern
North Carolina in Greenville.
For more information about the
event phone 757-1241.
Mason wins CAA
Tracksters pick up pair of second spots
East Carolina's men's track
team picked up a pair of second-
place finishes last Saturday at the
Wolfpack Twilight Invitational
track and field meet held at North
Carolina State University.
In the 200-meter run, the
Pirates' Eugene McNeill picked
up a red ribbon by stepping across
the finish line with a clocking of
20.6.
The other second-place medal
brought back to Greenville came
in the form of the Pirates' 400-
meter relay team, which posted a
time of 39.81 to better the NCAA
Division I qualifying standard
and make the team eligible for the
U.S. Olympic Trials.
Also at the meet, former NCAA
champion Rosalind Council
easily qualified for the U.S.
Olympic Trials when she won the
100-meter hurdles in 13.21
seconds The N.C. State men's 400-
meter relay team also qualified for
the Olympic Trials in the event,
while the Lady Wolfpack 1,600-
metcr relay team also bettered
NCAA Division I qualifying
standards with their
performance.
Council, a former track star at
Auburn, won her event by more
than five seconds when she
dipped under the qualifying
standard of 13.68 seconds.
Two other athletes also
qualified for the July 15-23 trials in
Indianapolis that will determine
the U.S. track and field team for
the 1988 Olympics.
Joan Nesbit, a former NCAA
All-America at North Carolina,
won the women's 3,000-meter run
in 9:08.72 and North Carolina
State's Terry Reese won the men's They included Appalachian
110-meter hurdles in 13.78
seconds.
Several other athletes qualified
for various NCAA
championships at the meet also.
State's Warren Posey, who
bounded 53-5 in the triple jump,
and N.C. State's Bob Henes, who
ran the men's 500 meters in
13:54.49.
The ECU men's 400-meter relay team brought home a second-place finish Saturday from a meet held at N.C.
State that qualified them for the U.S. Olympic Trials in Indianapolis in July. (File Photo)
(AP) � George Mason's
pitching staff hurled the Patriots
to the Colonial Athletic
Association baseball
championship, allowing
Richmond only two runs in the
final game of the tournament.
"Every pitch was important
said George Mason coach Bill
Brown after the Patriots held off
the Spiders 4-2 last Sunday. "Our
defensive play is what carried us
through
Frank Laviano, 5-1, took the
win after giving up one run in six
innings of work on the mound.
Rob Larrick came in and picked
up his first save, as well as
catching a line drive off the bat of
Greg Harding in the ninth inning.
The Patriots' John Styles, who
shut out top-seeded James
Madison 2-0 Saturday, was
selected as the tournament's Most
Valuable Player.
In the Saturday victory over the
Dukes, Dayton Moore knocked in
one George Mason run and
scored the other one and the
Patriots tagged James Madison
pitcher Dana Allison with his first
loss of the season.
Styles, who allowed only five
hits, took advantage of his team's
two unearned runs in the cigth
inning to improve his record to 4-
4 for the year.
Allison, who also only gave up
five hits for the Dukes, struck out
nine in dropping to 12-1 for the
season.
"It was a total team effort
Styles said. "There was no one
person that won this, no one
person that came through all the
time. We did it, we all played
together and this is great
In an afternoon game, the
Spiders defeated George Mason,
who came out of the winner's
bracket, 7-6 to force a second
game. Richmond, seeded sixth
heading into the tournament, had
surprised James Madison with a
6-3 victory Saturday to put the
Spiders in the final round.
"I told our kids I'm real proud
of you said Richmond head
coach Ronnie Atkins after
Sunday's games. "It hadn't been
the best of years but you gave me
100 percent and peaked when you
had to
"We got lucky Brown said.
"You have to remember that this
was an all new infield from last
year. Going into the season they
had only played together for
about two weeks. I'm really
proud of them ;
The Patriots, 34-25-1, scored
twice in the first inning on a two- '
run single by Rod Billingsley.
Richmond scored in the second
to cut the lead to 2-1. The Patriots m
added single runs in the fifth and
sixth innings. Kevin Kobylinski's
sacrifice fly in the fifth and an RBI
single by Chris Lawrence
accounted for the Patriots' final
runs.
The Spiders chalked up their
final run of the game thanks to an
unearned run in the eighth
inning.
Richmond starter Chris
Wagner, 3-5, went the first seven
innings and took the loss.
ACC
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.
The ACC basketball tour
is coming back to Charloti
Paul Buck, who i
Charlotte 20 years ago v,
tournament was last heU
couldn't be happier, call
ACC tournament "tl,
the business
"I always say you i
hold this in the mi
Pacific ocaean at 4 o'cloc
morning and fill it up
director of muni.
Charlotte. "You cou
the job
The league - V
representatives, a
recommend a.
athletic dire(
unanimously W(
IheACCbasketba .
the new 23,50
Coliseum in the
seasons.
ACC offici
possible I
Citrus Bowl
reached during I
annual spi
concluded W
The Charl tl
officially open
have to wait unl
its first ACC I
"We arc
Commissioner
said of the d
tournament in Cl
like we got
got a good d
Thetoum
Oriole
like th
(AP) � Hired 1:
sitting back er i : i
interim mana ;ei
Orioles. Then the teai
well like the Baltirr
"For a while, wht
8-2, 1 thought thai
Hendricks. filling in foi
Frank Robinsi n
hospitalized with a rup
I thought we had ti
where we wanl
Before the Oi
their sixth vi
Hendricks saw
Angels rally : - I
final two innings
the game wher
charging catch t I
by Johnny Ra
"I'm drained
after Baltim - B
Wednesday ni
thought 1 suffered in tl
In other A
games, it was
Milwaukc. tori
1; Clew land Zc
4; To rent.
Minnesota 2. Tito
York game was p
rain.
Baltimore t
eight walk- and j
by loser Mike
"We had some 1
and I guess I bn J
too Hendricks -
know what was j
He usualh pitches
us
The On - a
the sixth inning
on four walks, a s
misjudged line drive
into a three-run d
A walk to �
single by Cal
intentional wall I
loaded the bases. 1
none out in the
Larrv Sheets dro
with a eound
Jim Dwyer was
walked to load tl j
The second run w)
when Witt walkj
Tettlcton. One out
Ripken's line dro
bounced past chili
three-run double.
The five-run outbil
The East Ca
Pick ii





TOE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20. 1988
13
nial U hie tic
( al in Brown i top
a pr parr to swat
ent

istern
utthe
:aa
-i all the
methe
a son,
rvr's
cond
1sixth
. had
ith a
tie
: r ud
I head
after
tdn't been
ive me
n said.
r that this
: fr m last
rt tl
r for
� really
A 25-1, sci �
on a two-
I Bi3 � gsley.
n the second
ad to 2-1. The Patriots
� ins in the fifth and
gs Kevin Kobylinski's
in the fifth and an RBI
C hris Lawrence
for the Patriots' final
balked up their
the game thanks to an
run in the eighth
� nd starter Chris
went the first seven
d took the loss
ACC hoops tourney heading to Charlotte
MYRTLE BEACH, S. C. (AP) �
The ACC basketball tournament
is coming back to Charlotte, N.C.
Taul Buck, who was in
Charlotte 20 years ago when the
tournament was last held there,
couldn't be happier, calling the
ACC tournament "the greatest in
the business
1 always say you guys could
hold this in the middle of the
'acific ocaean at 4 o'clock in the
morning and fill it up said Buck,
director oi municipal buildings in
Charlotte. "You could. We'll do
the job
The league's NCAA faculty
representatives, acting cm a
recommendation by the league's
athletic directors, voted
unanimously Wednesday to hold
ACCbasketball tournament at
the new 23,500-seat Charlotte
Coliseum in the 1990 and 1991
seasons.
ACC officials also discussed a
possible football tie-in with the
atrus Bowl, but no decision was
reached during the league's
innual spring meetings that
ncludcd Wednesday.
The Charlotte Coliseum will
officially open Aug. 11 but will
lave to wait until March 1990 for
its Mrt ACC tournament.
"We are delighted ACC
Commissioner Gene Corrigan
said oi the decision to hold the
urnament in Charlotte. "We feel
like we got a good deal and they
t a good deal
The tournament waslasihcldin
Charlotte in the 1969-1970 season
at the old 11,666-scat Charlotte
Coliseum, which hosted three
ACC tournaments before losing
its chance at landing the event
when Greensboro (N.C.)
Coliseum was enlarged in 1971.
Since then, only three sited �
the 16,000-scat Greensboro
Coliseum, the 16,541 -seat Omni in
Atlanta and 19,400-seat Capital
Centre in handover, Md � have
held the tournament.
The 1SS9 tournament will be in
Atlanta, while Greensboro had it
this past season
Corrigan said the mam reason
for picking the Charlotte
Coliseum was its seating capacity.
"The prospect of having 3,500
more tickets than we would have
at handover and at least 5,000
more than we would have at
Atlanta or Greensboro was
something the athletic directors
just couldnjt turn away from
Corrigan said.
The ACC considered putting
the tournament in Charlotte for
one, two and four years, Corrigan
said. I le said the conference shied
away from a four-vear
commitment because that would
have locked up the event for five
years.
North Carolina Athletic
Director John Swofford said there
was "no compelling reason" to go
more than two years.
The tournament has not been at
the same site two years in a row
since it was held in Greensboro
from 1977-80.
Greensboro officials presented
a proposal to the league Tuesday,
saying they planned to expand
seating capacity to 23,000 before
the 1992 tournament. Swofford
said the Greensboro presentation
"had some effect" on the league's
decision to restrict its
commitment to Charlotte to two
years instead of four.
But Swofford acknowledged it
would be hard to go to a smaller
arena after playing the
tournament in Charlotte.
"One of the concerns we'll
eventually have after having the
number of seats that each school
will have in Charlotte is, how do
you go back to a smaller arena?"
Swofford said. "That's not to sav it
J
couldn't happen. But I think that's
one of the concerns that we
certainly have
Leading up to the ACC
meetings, there were reports the
conference was looking at
workingon a tie-in with the Citrus
Bowl in Orlando, Fla.
Clcmson defeated Penn State
35-10 in this year's Cirtus Bowl.
Corrigan said the experience at
Orioles still acting
like the same team
(AP) � Elrod Hendricks was
sitting back enjoying his stint as
interim manager of the Baltimore
Orioles. Then the team acted like,
well like the Baltimore Orioles.
"For a while, when we were up
8-2, I thought that was it said
1 lendricks, filling in for manager
"rank Robinson who is
hospitalized with a ruptured disc.
I thought we had them right
where we wanted them
Before the Orioles sewed up
heir sixth victorv in 37 games,
I lendricks saw the California
Vngels rally for five runs in the
final two innings and almost tie
the game when lred Lynn made a
irging catch of a sinking liner
y Johnny Ray for the final out.
"I'm drained I lendricks said
ifter Baltimore's 8-7 victory
Wednesday night. "And 1
hough 11 suffered in the bullpen
In other American League
imcs, it was Detroit 3,
'�' Uvaukce 1; Boston 4, Oakland
I; Clev( land 2; Chicagod 1; Texas
: fbronto 0; and Kansas City 8,
Minnesota 2. The Seattle-New
: rk game was postponed by
Baltimore took advantage of
' it walks and two wild pitches
� r Mike Witt, 1-5.
"We had some timely base hits,
i I guess the walks helped,
Hendricks said. "I don't
v. what was wrong with Witt.
tie usually pitches well against
us
The Orioles snapped a 2-2 tie in
iixth inning, scoring five runs
n four walks, a single and a
misjudged line drive that turned
ntoa three-run double.
A walk to Lynn, an infield
-ingle by Cal Ripken and an
intentional walk to Lddie Murray
loaded the bases against Witt with
none out in the Baltimore sixth.
Larry Sheets drove in the first run
with a goundour to second and
Jim Dwyer was intentionally
walked to load the bases again.
The second run was forced in
when Witt walked Mickey
Tettleton. One out later, Bill
Ripken's line drive to right
hounced past chili Davis for a
three-run double.
The five-run outburst matched
the biggest inning of the season
for the Orioles.
Lynn led oii the seventh with
his fourth homer oi the season,
increasing the ORioles' lead to 8-
2. It proved to be the winning run.
"But the Angels just kept
coming back I lendricks said.
Rookie Jose Bautista, a 23-year-
old right bander making his
second career start, gave up five
hits in seven innings and retired
11 straight batters in one stretch
for his first major-league victorv.
But he began the California eighth
by walking Dick Schofield and
giving up a single to Brian
Downing. Reliever Doug Sisk
came on and walked Mark
Mcl.emore to load the bases.
Walk' Jovner singled home two
runs, and after Sisk walked Davis,
Don Aase relieved, johnny Ray
singled in MeLemore with
California's fifth run before Aase
halted the rally.
The Angels scored two more
runs in the ninth oii reliever Tom
Nicdenfuer. Downing tripled but
had to hold when MeLemore beat
out an infield single. Jovner
singled to right, scoring
Downing, and MeLemore came
home on Davis' groundout.
Then Lynn came up with his
game-ending catch.
TAXPAYERS
uithdepcndenti
HHRF'S A TAX TIP:
Beginning with your 18 income
tax return that you will tile in
l'Sh, you generally must list social
security numhers tor dependents
who are at least five years old by
the end of 1987. If any of your
dependents do not have this
number, got an application torm
todav from the Social Security
office in sour area.
IJM4MU
PuMli (mki at Mw MM
the bowl by ACC and Clcmson
officials led the league to look at a
possible tie-in.
He said league officials did
discuss the matter this week but
that they were not looking to
make a decision in the near future.
"There is not anything specific
to discuss Corrigan said. "We
just discussed it in a general way,
about getting together with them;
what their aspirations are and
whether there would be a fit or
not
Corrigan said the league likes
the bowl because it's on New
Year's Dav, is shown on ABC and
plans to increase the stadium
seating capacitv from 52,000 to
72,000 by 1990.
" think that bowl is
continually moving up a step
Corrigan said. "(But) not all our
coaches fell that it (a bowl tie-in)
would be a good idea
Clcmson coach Dannv fird gas
said he doesn't like the idea of a
bowl tie-in because of the
restrictions it would place on the
league, especially on a team with
a chance at the national title.
Clcmson won the national title
in 1981.
PARKER'S
DINNERS INCLUDE Brunswick Stew, Cole Slaw
Boiled Potatoes or French Fries and Corn Sucks
PLATES INCLUDE Cole Slaw and Corn Sticks
BARBECUE
LARGE BARBECUE DINNER 4.00
SMALL BARBECUE DINNER3.50
larch; barbecue plate� oo
SMALL BARBECUE PLATE3.5a
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FRIED OR BARBECUED
LARGE CHICKUN DINNER
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"kllD LIVER PLATO
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INCLUDES Barbecue, Fried Chicken,
Cole Slaw, Brunswick Stew, Boiled Potatoes
and Corn Sticks
CHILDREN Through 10 Years Old2.75
Fntire Table Must Order Family Style
No Doggie Bag From Family Style
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FISH DINNER
OYSTER fRY
OYSTER STEW
SHRIMP DINNLR
ANY I WO COMBINA1 IONS SLAIOOD
SEAFOOD PLATTER (Pish. Shrimp. Oysters).
South Memorial Drive
756-2388
2020 Greenville Blvd.
758-9215
In other action, the league:
- Will change the lennis format
fur league matches and the
conference tournament, going
from six singles and th:
matches to tour singl I one
doubles match next year.
Corrigan said the change was
being made in hopes ol
shortening the l ngth of tennis
matches, which can take t: .
hours.
"Our feeling wa this is
nitcly an i xperiment It's not
in anyway locked in concrete
Corrigan said. "But it is a bold
experiment. It's never been done
" my knowledge during the
n
� nounced the ACC
: rage is "basically"
ted. The schedule is
i be announced soon.
ted to hold the volleyball
rtt in Raleigh, N.C. next
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14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
V Y2(l I �-
Hornets battle in rare triple-header outing
tue
GREENSBORO (AD A. bad On his li i vintd
case ol poison i came just in cap
time tor eight year old I lal
Clcndcnin to take in a rare
baseball occurrence a triple-
header I i rd :
rhe tii eensboi o t lornets qui
plaved three games against the Mis
Columbia Mets Wednesday i
"hat s illegal under the rules of
the National Assot iation ol
imets your frustrations, ho said.
raphs Gourley said he never tires
But the three other guys vv r n't J�ml 11 i di i game.
p " 1 an raul Murd said
baseball. rhe team was sch dull d for a d ' ' rr) ! r '
:n. ack The players enjoy it too, but double-header agaii t the Mets. said, is not a
vjrankhil Vspotol some weren't so thrilled about Wednesday morning, players
as he playing three games in one day, werecalledoutofbedat 10a.m. to
said Joe Turek, who was called off play a third game. Iliey were
the golf course this morning in expected on the field at noi n
order to come in early and play "Most of the guys are tired,
the afternoon game. said player AdamCasillas. "Tlv
re you ran "I didn't mind so much because didn't expect to play. It took a lot
� �
Professional Baseball, said Kevin AN
Carpenter, assistant general
manager of the ! lornets.
But the team got around those
rules because one of the games
was suspended after three
innings Mondav night and the
remainder of that game was
plaved Thursda
i 1 t lioie were - i
and trn
lot I was playing terrible he said, out of their sails when they hi u I
I they've got 2 � � �'� �
I ; � n't play tl
that's something he
"It tin rerunning inthesti
. oingn re tl in that
verthi lc -s, Angela Caj :
�� d Shane I " '
EXTRA LOW
:
piaveu.
or tans like
iuei '
w,
i
-
v as
- �
a is great
;in m '
� � d mine, v I
s that
� il lier, t lam l I
�t( 1 him. "Vou
he said.
rhursda - ill rnoon
�� iusc he ,vas out of
told him he wi
v ml
ird e
the first
.
Kite hopes
for big
Texas luck
:��
� il 'al
un in � �
esob lattei
r-i ir 68 in a pi
t tim
tationj
i 2 m
am prelude to todax pcnii
md I the 42nd spnngtii
� il
I �. rativc word,
re d, is patience.
"I need to be l ng on patience,
id Kite, the f inner Uni crsity - �'
Texas ace who freely admits he
tries so hard to pale well in Texas
that Iv tei Is to put too much
pre � n him - I
. , ! . � ' I !
It �� - uli is Boi j twi c a
vvii � � � re, first provid I
the formula tor conquering the
Colonial u i I I
you a bi: patient.
And you gotta have
I :� You gotta ; '
hots, and its : �
� just hit tl . � � � : i
tta hit 'cm in I i hi ; ' i
. � � casv I :
� : ' . he said, adding
�: � �. n i � .there
� urnament in t! .�. rid
: � � r win that tl nial.
� ild cl ne, this
. : � c il I lid, lavishing
: � . n the 7,096-yard, par 70
kn la n fondl � i H ;ai i
'�' . in honor ol fiv tii
impion Ben 1 h �gan.
aei I ty River
ivout ranks ai i is
� I . � � 11 is t to Ki I i 1
hmc tear ni l ' is third
h land only a k Nick ms and
for �'� il ' n i recr earning
,11 i n-winner since
ipturing th k 'mp r Open
i n wn last year, kite urrently
ran, i th on the mi nc I .t and
; he is not at all
unhappy with hi i game
i m plav ing well he said,
suggesting that he will be a
Meanwhile, defending
champion Keithlearwater sa) -
his game is coming around ai i
nothing would please him more
than to win here again.
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USDA Choice Beef
LONDON BROIL OR
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USDA Choice Beef Bottom
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Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, May 22, 1988.
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tSfc
$188
Holly Farms
i?
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"Lowest Price Of The Season"
Genuine Georgia Grown
VIDALIA ONIONS
25 Lb. Bag

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Pepsi-Free, Wet Pepsi. Diet Pepsi-Free
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Pkg. of 12 12 Oz. Cans
Miller
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$279
Pkg. of 6 12 Oz Cans Reg & Lt
EXTRA LOW PRICES
Everyday
Apple
Juice
99
64 Oz. - White House
Bama
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Scot i
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69�
Large Roll Assorted Decorator
Flowers
ig Country 1
Biscuits m
2$1
Pillsburv
10 Ct - Pillsbury Buttermilk
Southern Style
BIB CDUNIRY
Orange 1
Delirjht I
m
FOOD I ION
nscurrs � u -J
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ab
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m
8 Oz - Assorted
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I

-

t
14 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 20,1988
Hornets battle in rare triple-header outing
GREENSBORO (AP) � A bad
case of poison ivy came just in
time for eight-year-old Hal
Clendenin to take in a rare
baseball occurrence: a triple-
header.
The Greensboro Hornets
played three games against the
Columbia Mets Wednesday.
That's illegal under the rules of
the National Association of
Professional Baseball, said Kevin
Carpenter, assistant general
manager of the Hornets.
But the team got around those
rules because one of the games
was suspended after three
innings Monday night and the
remainder of that game was
played Thursday afternoon, he
said. Technically, there were 21
2 games played.
For fans like Clendenin,
watching three games � or 2 12
games � in one day is great.
"I've seen 500 games in my life
he said. "I started coming when I
was three
His father, Harry Clendenin,
corrected him. "You started
coming when you were less that
one he said.
Hal saw Thursday's afternoon
game because he was out of
school with poison iny. His father
told him he would have to miss
the third game because it was past
his bed time. But Hal said he
would "hot dog" his way into
staying for the third game.
"He usually gets his way with
that his father said.
After the first game, the
Clcndenins spent the two-hour
dinner break at the tec-ball
practice of the Hornets' little
league team. Harry Clendenin is
the coach.
Hal, who plays on his father's
team and wants to be a
professional baseball player,
returned to the second game
wearing a mock Hornets' outfit.
Kite hopes
for big I
Tfexasluck
FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) �
Texan Tom Kite says he's going to
rclaz this week, take it easy, have
a good time and maybe just win
the $750,000 Colonial National
Invitation golf tournament.
"At least I hope so he said after
firing a 2-under-par 68 in a pro-
am prelude to today's opening
round of the 42nd springtime
Colonial classic.
The operative word, he
revealed, is patience.
"I need to be long on patience
said Kite, the former University of
Texas ace who freely admits he
tries so hard to paly well in Texas
that he tends to put too much
pressure on himself.
"I think that's a little bit of what
happened last week in Dallas he
said, referring to an opening-
round 75 that caused him to miss
the cut in the Byron Nelson
Classic.
It was Julius Boros, twice a
winner here, who first provided
the formula for conquering the
Colonial course. Said he:
"Well, you gotta be patient.
And you gotta have some
experience here. You gotta hit
different shots, and it's not
enough to just hit the greens. You
gotta hit 'cm in the right places
Kite agrees.
"But it's easy to put so much
pressure on yourself that you
can't play well he said, adding
that, aside from the majors, there
is no tournament in the world
he'd rather win that the Colonial.
"If I could choose one, this
would be it he said, lavishing
praise on the 7,096-yard, par 70
course known fondly as Hogan's
Alley in honor of five-time
champion Ben Hogan.
The rose-covered Trinity River
layout ranks among the world's
top courses, at least to Kite, a 10-
time tour winner who is third
behind only jack Nicklaus and
Tom, Watson in career earnings.
Although a non-winner since
capturing the Kemper Open
crown last year, Kite currently
ranks 18th on the money list and
maintains he is not at all
unhappy with his game.
"I'm playing well he said,
suggesting that he will be a
Meanwhile, defending
champion Keith Clearwater says
his game is coming around and
nothing would please him more
than to win here again.
On his head sat a vintage Hornets
cap complete with autographs
under the visor.
Across the staduim, Jack
Gourlcy drank his beer. A spot of
mustard marked his nose as he
quietly watched the second game.
His voice was hoarse from
screaming during the first.
'It's a place where you can
he
come enjoy yourself and get rid of I was playing terrible he said
your frustrations he said. "But the three other guys weren't about the extra game
Gourley said he never tires of happy Fn Paul Murdock said
baseball. The team was scheduled for a doesn't fe sorry for the players.
The players enjoy it too, but double-header against the Mcts. Baseball, he said, is not a
some weren't so thrilled about Wednesday morning, players strenuous sport,
playing three games in one day, were called out of bed at 10 a.m. to "If they've got 20-year-old boys
said Joe Turek, who was called off play a third game. They were playing and they can't play three
the golf course this morning in expected on the field at noon. games, that's something, hesaid.
"Most of the guys are tired "If they were running in the street,
said player Adam Casillas. "They they'd be doing more than that,
didn't expect to play. It took a lot Nevertheless, Angela Capps,
out of their sails when they heard whose boyfriend Shane Letteno double-header 3-0 and 4-0
order to come in early and play
the afternoon game.
"I didn't mind so much because
plays second base, said she
doesn't expect a night out on the
town after the games.
"Usually, we at least make it out
to dinner after the game she
said. 'Tonight, I would gather,
that he'd want to go to a drive-
through restaurant and straight
home to sleep
Greensboro won the suspended
game 5-4, and then swept the
EXTRA LOW
USDA
CHOICE
PRICES!
'�
USDA Choice Beef
LONDON BROIL OR :
TOP ROUND ROAST
USDA Choice Beef Bottom
ROUND ROAST
vA- �O

" -5Cj�,
� �-��:
Prices in this ad good thru
Sunday, May 22, 1988.
We Reserve The Right To Limit
Quantities On All Items
$188
Holly Farms
ii
QUARTERS I
Grade A
"Lowest Price Of The Season"
Genuine Georgia Grown
VIDALIA ONIONS
10 l
Lb.
25 Lb. Bag 8.99
Head - California
EBERG LETTUCE
Lb - Red Ripe
TOMATOES
99�
Dew, Diet Mtn. Dew
Pt. tf12 - 12 Oz. Can
Miller
Beer
$279
fk. tf 8 � 12 Oz.
EXTRA LOW PRICES
Everyday
JFG
Mayonnaise
&�
64 0z. - White House
32 Oz.
ig Country j
Biscuits W
10 Ct. - PMsbury Buttermilk
Southern Style
Orange
Bama
Grape Jelly Or
JamApple Jelly
Sturdyware
Plates
if
2 Lb.
nterstate
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Half Gallon � Food Lion 10 Juice
light N'lively
Yoaurt
20 Oz. - Frozen Shoestring
r scot
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Fab
Detergent
Large Rod - Assorted Decorator
42 Oz.
Page
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Friskle's Buffet
Cat Food
6 0z. - Beef-Liver
CourTurkey-GiWet





Title
The East Carolinian, May 20, 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 20, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.607
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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