Fountainhead, January 19, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE INSIDE
Exhibitp. 3
Infant mataiityp. 5
Faulknerp. 7
Pirates losep. 9
Vd. No. 53. No. 29 East Carolina University Greenville, North Carolina
19 January 1978
Exam hours are
By DOUG WHITE
News Edita
The library's extended sche-
dule during fall semester exams
received a successfull turnout of
students, acoording to Reed War-
ren, SGA vice-president.
"Dee Brockman, circulation
librarian, and myself were plea-
santly surprised at the turnout.
Although the figures vary, at
various times there were 100
people in the library during the
extended hours Warren said.
Brockman and Warren colla-
borated to extend the library's
operating hours an additional
three and one half hours until 3
a.m. during exam week.
A similar project was attempt-
ed several years ago but received
a pcor response, according to
Warren.
Due to the success of the
extended hours during the fall,
hours will again be extended
during spring semester.
"We hope to better publicize
the extra hours this time in ader
to insure a better turnout. We are
also planning to purchase a coffee
machine befae spring exams.
We were unable to acquire one
fa fall exams dueto lack of funds.
"When I aiginally got the
idea of extended study hours, I
had planned to seek outside
funding to pay fa the additional
employee hours. The library,
however, provided the necessary
$103 to pay the skeleton staff who
waked the extra time. No SGA
funds were used Warren said.
Warren expressed his hope
that mae students would use the
added study period next time to
further justify the library's ex-
penditures.
"Hopefully, the interest
shown by the turnout shows an
inaeased academic awareness at
ECU
REED WARREN
Beginning Monday, January 23, Student Buying Power Cards wil
be available from the SGA.
These cards entitle students to a discount from the fdlowinj
merchants: The Tree House, The Bicyde Shop, Pet Kingdom,
Headstrong Boutique, and Schod Kids Reoods.
To get a card you must be a full-time student with a valid ID anc
activity card.
Cards are available between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the SGA Of ice ir
Mendenhall. " .����
Marine Research
receives shells
Anderson cance
due to oversight
By STUART MORGAN
Assistant News Edita
The lecture by syndicated
columnist Jack Anderson aigi-
nally scheduled fa Tuesday at
8 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Uniai was cancelled.
The cancellation occurred due
to an oversight on the part of
Anderson and the agency from
which the ledure was booked.
"We were nd ndified about
the cancellation until 5 p.m
Tuesday said Dennis Ramsey,
Student Union President.
"On behalf d the Ledure
Series Committee of ECU Student
Union I would like to apdogize to
those students who woe incon-
venienced by the cancellation
added Ramsey.
It is nd known yet whetho
the ladure will be rescheduled a
a substitute program planned fa
lato in the semesto.
Howevo, an announcement
will be made scon.
ECU NEWS BUREAU
East Cardina Univosity
has been seleded to redeve a gift
of a large cdledion d rare and
beautiful seashdls.
The 10,000 item cdledion is
being donated to ECU by AJ.
(Bob) DaMdta, an Amoican
businessman living in Bangkok,
Thailand, who has spent years
assembling the cdledion.
Dr. William H. Queen, dired-
or of the Institute fa Coastal and
Marine Research at ECU, des-
cribed the Da Mdta gift as "one
of the wold's foemost cdled-
ionsd pohapsthe most intoest-
ing family d seashdls that is
known today Plans are being
made fa a repositoy fa this and
otho odledions in a coastal
marine museum on the campus.
Dr. Leo Jenkins, ECU chance-
llo, Queen and DaMdta an-
nounced the gift at a news
confoenoe. "This is ate d the
most significant odledions re-
ceived by East Cardina Univo-
sity in its history Dr. Jenkins
said. "It will do much to enrich
nd only our students and scien-
tists but the entire citizenry. It is
impotant bdh scientifically and
culturally
Da Mdta said the cdledion
will be shipped to Greenvillein tne
next few months. Presently in
Greenville hdding discussions
with ECU dficialsconconing the
conation, DaMdta said he fdt
ECU was an "appropriate" re-
positoy fo his cdledion.
He became intoested in ECU
and its coastal and marine
research programs through
friends and business acquaint-
ances Mr. and Mrs. Ed Skinno of
Greenville Skinno is a tobacco
oompany official.
Faculty
fitness
begins
By CHRIS MISENHflHER
Staff Writo
The Physical Education De-
partment is currently dfoing a
fitness program fo all faculty and
staff membos evoy Moiday,
Wednesday, and Friday fron 12-1
in Memoial Gym.
Basketball, badmitoi, vdley-
ball, jogging, swimming, and
calisthortics are some d the
activities available.
The program is headed by
Gingo Parish and Kirby Patter-
son, graduate students in Phys-
ical Education.
They wok with the faculty by
leading exodses, counting and
reooding laps, and poiodically
checking heartbeat to maintain a
safe maximum heart rate.
"Jogging seems to be the
main intoest among the 21
faculty membos currently enrd-
led in the program accoding to
Parish.
She said that one member d
the class won the 5.8 mile
intramural marathon last Ncv-
embo.
"The emphasis d the pro-
gram is nd to reduce wdght but
to break the stress d the wok day
and to decrease the chance d
heart disease said Pattoson.
Any faculty membo intoest-
ed in this free program should go
to the gymnastics room anytime
between 12 an 1 on Monday,
Wednesday, a Friday.
A stress test and physical are
recommended.
Lack of money stalls
snack bar work
Winter is here
WINTER ARRIVED IN full force this week as
temperatures dipped to a frigid 15 degrees one
night. The frost on this rear window, however, is
evidence of the delicate jeauty winter creates as it
sweeps across the land.
ByJUUEEVERETTE
Assistant News Edito
Renovation d the snack bar in
the dd student uniai is presently
at a standstill because d lack d
money, accoding to Curtis May,
assistant manago d the student
supply stoe.
"The snack bar has been
completed to a pdnt said May.
"We lack the flooing and
movable equipment, howevo we
do nd have the money right now
to complete it
Accoding to May, the deci-
sion was made to oomplde the
new book stoe and to wok as
much as posade on the snack ba
with the alldted money.
Wok on the snack bar was
started in Novembo 1976,
acooding to May.
The dd student union book
stoe and snack ba is being
renovated because more space is
needed.
Accoding to May, the dd
snack ba could nd adequatdy
serve the students.
"The new snack ba will be
self-service said May. "The
layout will be voy similar to the
Croatan
The student supply stoe,
which is self supporting, is
financing the renovation through
a loan, accoding to May.
"To oomplde the snack bo,
we will probably have to barow
mae money said May.
"Just as soon as we feel we
can wok furtho cm the snack ba,
the studoitscan rest assured that
we will oompld it as sickly as
possiWe said fvMv





Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 19 January 1978
Models
Crusade
Language
OTSA
Two castles
The O.T.S.A. will meet
Thurs Feb. 19 at 12:00 . in the
O.T. Lab.
Election of offioers for the
1978 school year will be held at
this time. All interested students
are encouraged to attend.
Law
The Law Society will meet at
7:30 p.m. Tues Jan. 24 in the
multipurpose room of Menden-
hall. District Judge Robert D.
Wheeler will be the speaker. All
interested persons are urged to
attend.
SRTP
The Southern Regional Train-
ing Program in Public Adminis-
tration is now accepting applica-
tions fa fellowships for the
1978-79 academic year. The pro-
gram prepares students in gover-
nment and is sponsored by the
Universities of Alabama, Ken-
tucky and Tennessee.
Students who are awarded
fellowships will serve a 10-week
internship during the summer of
1978. They will spend the Fall at
the University of Alabama. After
the Christmas holidays, one
group of Fellows will spend the
Spring at the University of
Kentucky and another at the
University of Tennessee. Upon
satisfactory completion of the
program, Fellows receive a Cert-
ificate in Public Administration.
In addition, course work complet-
ed in the Program will be
accepted for an M PA degree at
one of the institutions which they
attended.
The fellowships have a value
of $4,600 which includes a stipend
of $3,300 and remission of fees
and tuition i which at present
amount to $1,300. Married
students receive a grant of $400 in
addition to the regular stipend.
Candidates must be American
citizens who hold a bachelor's
degree or who expect to receive a
bachelor's degree by June of
1978. No opecific major or area of
stuc'y isrtquired. Fellowships are
awarded on the basis of high
academic achievement, scores on
the quant it i ve and qualitative
portions of the Graduate Record
Exam, and a real interest in
pursuing a career in public
administration in the South.
Applications must be received
by February 15, 1978. For infor-
mation and applications write to:
Coleman B. Ransone, Jr Direct-
or. Southern Regional Training
Program in Public Administra-
tion, Drawer I, University, Ala.
35486.
The Visual Arts Forum will
present a short animated film
"TwoCastles" Fri Jan 20 at the
Art Dept. in Jenkins Auditorium.
12:00.
Peace Corps
A Peace Corps reauiting
office will be opening here,
staffed by two famer wakers.
The office is in Flanagan 425.
Come by to ask questions and get
information, a oontad Dr.
Mattheis in the Science Education
dept.
NCFWBA
The Nath Carolina Farm
Writers and Broadcasters Anoc.
is offering a $500 scholarship to
a rising junia a senia who is
interested in a career in agricul-
ture communications and is
majaing in some area of com-
municatiois.
Entrants must write an essay
of 500 wads a less telling why
they are interested in agricultural
communications and why they
think they should receive this
scholarship. Essays should be
mailed to: Bill Humphries,
Scholarship Chairman, P.O. Box
5807, Raleigh, N.C. 27607.
Please include your name, age,
class, mail address, and tele-
phone, numbers at both school
and home with your essay.
Deadline is Fri Feb. 3.
Bowling
Get a team together and sign
up now fa the Spring Semester
Bowling Leagues. Each team
member's name must be entered
on the poster located on the
ground floa main bulletin board
in Mendenhall Student Center by
Monday, January 23. Play will
begin at 7 p.m. on Jan. 23 and 24.
The mixed doubles leagues will
meet each Mon. a Tues. evening
and will axiast of six four-
member teams composed of two
men and two women each. Fa
further infamatiai contact L.
Huntley, 752-4908.
Pria to league play, all
participants signing after January
16 should contact L Huntley,
752-4908, fa more infamatiai.
Visit the Baptist Student
Union fa Tuesdays "Celebra-
tiois A meal is served at 530
followed by programs that add
depth to your life. 511 E. 10th St.
Models needed fa Figure
Drawing Classes. Contact School
of Art, Wesley Crawley, Eliza-
beth Ross, Geage Danhires a
Marilyn Gadley in the Jenkins
Building and provide time periods
that you would be available to
wak.
Crafts
Mr. Bill Brouilliard, resident
potter of Penland School of Crafts
will be on campus Thurs. and
Fri Jan 19 and 20 fa a wakshop
sponsaed by the Ceramics Guild
in cooperation with VAF and
SGA.
Mr. Brouilliard's area of
specialization includes salt glaze
and wood fired clay. He received
his undergraduate degree at the
University of Wisconsin
(Madison) and his MFA at Alfred
University.
The wakshop is as follows:
Thurs. J-103, demo, 10-4 p.m.
Fri same as above
Sat. and Sun :Kilnyard fa firing.
Slide presentation Thurs.
evening, 8 p.m. Jenkins
Auditaium
Coffeehouse
It's back and it's better! The
ECU Coffeehouse is jumping with
new talent and new blood. Thurs.
and Fri Jan. 19 and 20. ECU
Coffeehouse will present Frank
and Mike, two professional per-
famers who will entertain you
with songs by: Seals and Croft.
Bob Dylan, James Tayla, aig-
mals and sane jazz.
Only .50 will get you in, and
let you fill up on the goodies.
PHIS
Any students who were em-
ployed by the Program fa
Hearing Impaired Students as
notetakersa tutas need to check
with the Program Office about
Income Tax statements. If you
were employed by any other
office on campus we will not have
your statement. If you were only
employed through our program
PLEASE oome get your state-
ment. Thank You
Gong show
Do you have talent?
If na, we want you fa our
Gong Show.
Auditions are Wed Jan 25
fron 7 til 9 p.m. at the Methodist
Student Center. The show will be
Thurs Feb. 2 from 8-10 p.m.
Prizes will be awarded fa the
tost and wast acts. Fa mae
infamatiai contact David Hunt
752-1919.
P.S. We accept people with talent
also.
The Campus Crusade fa
Christ will meet Thurs Jan. 17,
at 7 p.m. in Brewster B-101 fa a
time of fun, fellowship, and Bible
study. Everyone is invited to
attend.
CSO
The Center fa Student Oppor-
tunities is offering cost-free tuta-
ial help to majas in mediane,
premediane, nursing and allied
health upon request. CSO is also
offering the chance fa certain
majas in mediane, premedidne,
nursing, allied health, biology,
chemistry and physics to earn an
income at standard campus wage
per hour waking as tutas to
their peers. Students interested
in either asped of this program
should contact the Center fa
Student Oppatunities, 208 Rags-
dale Hall in oerson immediately.
The deadline is Fri Feb. 10.
French
A French cultural festival
featuring French wines and
cheeses will be held at 8 p.m.
Thurs Jan. 26 in ECU'S Inter-
national House at 306 E. 9th St
aaoss from Mendenhall. Due to
the amount and quality of wines
and cheeses to be served, a
contribution of $2 is requested.
Tickets will be sold by aganiza-
tioial members and the Faeign
Langauge departmental office.
Please buy your tickets in ad-
vance.
Physics
David Montgomery, a mem-
ber of the physics faculty of the
College of William and Mary, will
speak at a Jan. 27 program
sponsaed by the ECU Dept. of
Physics. Prof. Montgomery's
topic will be "Turbulence in
Navier-Stokes and Magneto-
hydrodynamics Fluids The pro-
gram is scheduled fa 3 p.m. in
rcom 213 of the ECU physics
building. The public is invited to
attend.
NTE
Prospedive teachers who plan to
take to National Teachers Exam-
inations on Feb 18 at ECU are
reminded that they have less than
two weeks to register with
Educational Testing Service
(ETS) of Prinoeton, NJ.
Registrations must be mailed
in time to reach ETS no later than
January 26. Registration fams
and instrudiois may be obtained
from the ECU Testing Center,
iroom-105 Speight Building,
ECU, a (directly from the
Natiaial Teachers Examinations,
ETS, Box 911, Princeton, NJ
08540. On-the-spot registration is
not permitted.
There will be an aganiza
-tiorial meeting of the Inter-
national Language Organization
fa members and guests in room
248 Mendenhall, at 8 "p.m.
Thurs Jan. 19. The purpose of
the meeting will be to discuss this
semester's adivities and make
final arrangements fa the Soiree
Francaise. Everyone is invited.
Gospel
Tonight! Thursday January 19 at
7:30 p.m. in Mendenhall 221, the
Full Gospel Student Fellowship
will meet to sing and share
testimonies about what Jesus is
doing in their lives. Everyone is
invited to attend. Any questions
a comments should be direaed
to John Crowe, 758-9538.
Auditions
Auditions fa the dinner thea-
tre produdion of "The Owl and
The Pussycatt" will be held on
Thurs Jan. 19 fron 7:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. in 248 Mendenhall and
on Fri Jan. 20 from 7:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. in Auditaium 244
Mendenhall.
The show is an MSC Produc-
tion direded by Del Lewis. Actors
will be paid.
Handball
All interested persons who
would like to join a dub,
(turopean) Team Handball,
should come to rm. 105 Memorial
Gym ai Mai Jan 23at 4:30 p.m.
Come oi out and lets get this dub
team going.
Fellowship
inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship will meet this Sunday
night at 8 p.m. in the Afro-
American Cultural Center. The
topic will be Prayer: Responding
to God.
Showtime
Barry Lyndon , a film by
Stanley Kubrick, will be shown
Fri. and Sat Jan 19 and 20, in
Mendenhall Student Center
Theater. Showtimes are 6 p.m.
and 9:15 p.m. Starring Ryan
O'Neal, Marisa Berenson and
Patrick Magee.
SGA seats
Screening fa SGA legislata's
will be held Wed Jan 25 at 4
p.m. m Mendenhall. There are
two openings in Belkoorm, one in
Umstead, and three day student
openings. Apply now in the SGA
office.







����IBH
Jane Abrams and Samia Halabv will speak
19 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pig 3
SGA sponsors art exhibitions and lectures
By A RAH V ENABLE
Staff Writer
The SGA is sponsoring an art
exhibition in the art department
January 24th and January 26th at
3 p.m. in the Leo Jenkins Fine
Arts Auditorium. Jane Abrams
and Samia Haiaby are the speak-
ers.
Tuesday, Jane Abrams is to
present a paper on her work.
Aaron Karp, director of Gray Art
Gallery describes her work as
being "humorousand neurotic
Abrams works deals with explor-
ation and definition of a woman,
says Karp.
Abrams is an assistant pro-
fessor at the University of New
Mexico, teaching drawing and
print making. She was educated
at Indiana University and Univer-
sity of Wisconsin and has since
received prizes in national and
international exhibitions.
She was allowed to give a
one-woman show at the Martha
Jackson Gallery in New York.
Haiaby is appearing .Thursday
and will lecture on her personal
way of seeing in an artistic-
historical context. She will also be
presenting slides.
Nationally known, Haldby is
an assistant professor at Yale
University. She received her
education at Indiana University,
Michigan State, and Univeraty of
Cinnanatti.
Her work has appeared at
places such as Susan Caldwell
Gallery and Guggenhein
Museum, both in New Yak.
The speakers will meet se-
perately with graduate art
students: Jane Abram-Monday;
and Samia Haiaby Thursday morn-
ing. They will give their personal
pants of view on the work done
by the students.
The funds have been made
available by the SGA through the
efforts of Visual Arts Forum.
Karp says that he urges
student participation. The works
of the two artists are now on
exhibit.
NA TIONALLY RECOGNIZED ARTIST Samia Haia-
by will present a lecture and slides on her personal
way ot seeing in an artistio-nistoricai ooniexi on
Thurs Jan. 26, at 3 p.m.
SHOESHOP
HEPAW ALL
LEATHER QOOOS
Downtown Graanvilte
111W��4�ha
ATiTIC
Wed
Thurs
Blaze
Semiannual Vi price Sale
Fall & Winter Merchandise

752-1828 �o
SP1CCD HAM
BOLOGNA A CHEESE
HAM & SWISS
HAM. SWISS A SALAMI
TUNA
BOAST BEEF
(7) TURKEY
(8) CLUB
(9) SUPER
(10) CHEESE
(11) HOT PASTROMI
(12) HOT CORNED BEEF
BUMP1E3BEST
Tuesday Buck Day AH Day
(any sub 1.00 wpurchase of soft drink)
Wed. Buck Day (12:00-2:30 pm)
We Deliver Everyday After 6:00 nm.
Also Watch Your Favorite Sports Events
m 6ft t.v.
REFRIGERATORS
FOR RENT
The SGA Refrigerator Service
now has 100 refrigerators
available for rent.
Come by today
and rent a refrigerator
while the supply lasts I
Total charges for one semester
$21.00 Rent
10-00 Deposit
$31.00 Total
OFFICE: 231 Mendenhall
Phone: 757- 6611 Ext. 215
Fall Semester Office hours:
M&W 12:00-2:30 TfrTh 125-3:15
.





������������I
Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 19 January 1978
Registering bikes:
for service or cash?
Campuspolice will begin impounding unregister-
ed bicycles soon, according to Joe Calder, director of
security and traffic.
In the Tuesday edition of FOUNTAINHEAD,
Calder said he "would like to advise bicycle owners
to reqister their bicycles if they have not already done
so This is, indeed, practical advice if one doesn't
want his bicycle mercilessly hauled off.
The "ECU Traffic Regulations' pamphlet states:
All bicycles operated on the ECU campus must be
registered with the traffic office and bear a bicycle
registration permit andor City of Greenville, N.C.
bicycle license.
The reason bicycles should be registered,
according to the traffic dept. is to ensure a better
chance to retrieve a bicycle should it be stolen.
Granted, this is a sound argument.
But, suppose a student prefers not to register his
bike, for whatever reason. Should he be forced to
register it anyway?
It's only logical that a student would register his
jar, the main reason being, of course, that parking
spaces are so limited that any car parked on campus
not registered with the traffic dept. should be
towed. But a bicycle? It hardly seems likely that
bicycle racks and trees are growing scarce and
bicyclists have no place to chain their bikes. Neither
does it seem likely that so many bicyclists exist on
this campus that ground space is running to short to
accommodate all bicycles.
If half the students on campus own bicycles, and
approximately 12,000 students are enrolled, (regis-
tering one's bike costs only .50) then the traffic dept.
could make approximately $3,000 if all the
bicyclists registered their bikes.
In its campaign to scare students into registering
their bikes, the traffic dept. is using the
easy-to-trace-your-bike-if-it's-stolen line to cover its
apparent interest in the money it could be making.
The bike owners should not be threatened to
register their bikes when there's no logical
explanation as to why they should. Impounding
bicycles based on a flimsy excuse as to why they
should be registered is unjust.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor war titty years.
Senior EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News Editors
Doug White
joe Taeger
Trends EditorDavid W. Trevino
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper oi East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and is distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
d twice weekly during the school year.
uiailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.
HEY chief! t think, WV� Got another
u n Registered B KBl
Forum
Student defends former senior editor
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In Tuesday s edition of the
Forum a letter appeared offering
"a clear understanding of
FOUNTAINHEAD and the people
who work here Rather than an
accurate portrait of the paper and
its staff, the letter was little more
than an unfortunate profile of a
stereotypical figure to be found
infesting all walks of life.
Whatever opinions Kim
Devins held, she was willing to
defend them in the presence of
her detractors. Whether- widely
shared or not, her positions
appeared in the editorial column
where they could not be miscon-
strued as the concensus of the
staff.
The past failure of
FOUNTAINHEAD were not the
sole responsibility of any indiv-
idual. The paper is the result of a
concentrated effort and it would
be absurd for any single person to
be saddled with blame a crowned
with praise.
If the production conditions
avaibale are less than stable they
do allow fa the achievement of a
level of excellence. East Carolina
deserves a superior college news-
paper and the FOUNTAINHEAD
staff desires nothing less. Most of
us are willing to have our
mistakes pointed out to us, if
need be repetitively, so that
problems not caused by mechan-
ical failings can be rectified in the
future.
The new spirit at
FOUNTAI NHEAD is to produce a
quality newspaper and not unsat-
isfactory equivocations.
Sincerely,
David W. Trevino
Trends Editor
A tribute to the late Senator Humphrey
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
THE UNWORSHIPPED HERO
War raged onward for victory,
Contests continue to be waged,
Leaders continue to grit their
teeth for the cause of victory,
International politics and jeal-
ousies among sovereign states
linger on with the saged,
But one world was lost.
Ethnic groups of past and present
seek fit to stereotype,
Economics evolve in a viscious
circle to beat the better types,
Races seek to blindly see the
other colors,
Yet, not a soul seeks to accent
other odors,
But one world was lost.
People will be people till seasons
run dry,
To accept the competition is to
oompare yourself,
Life is a struggle till death to us
in,
Lover of life is to triumph with
defeat,
But one world was lost.
Toolimb a mountain is to stumble
along the pebbles,
To never reach the top is a treble,
But one world was lost.
To give of oneself to others is
more than the contrary,
To laugh is the universal feeling
of pain,
To ay is another feeling of cain
But one wald was lost.
But one wald was lost
After,
One wald was oice gained,
But Hubert H. Humphrey lost
everything and gave his wald
everything.
But an H.H.H. will never be
again.
MarcS. Adler
Don't forget
Forum Policy





���iHHHHHMHHBHI
HBH
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Nursemid-wife credits better prenatal care
19 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Infant mortality rate declines in Pitt County
ByJEANNIE WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
The infant mortality rate in
Pitt County has declined about 50
per cent since 1970, according to
Josephine Hookway.
The infant mortality rate
(IMR) is the number of infants
who die before their first birth-
day, according to Josephine
Hookway, a member of the
Department of Obstetrics and
Gynecology in the ECU School of
Mediane.
There has been a gradual
improvement in the infant mort-
ality rate, but there remains much
to be done she said.
Ms. Hookway said that the
national I MR is also declining.
In 1960 the national IMR was
26 per 1,000 live births, and by
1975 it had fallen to 16.1 per
1.000, Hookway said.
Pitt County rates have declin-
ed from 36.5 in 1970 to 17.9 in
1976, said Hookway.
The bulk of infant deaths
occur in the first 28 days of life
said Ms. Hookway.
The leading cause of death is
prematurity, she said. "Next
comes respiratory disease,
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
and, fourth, congenital abnormal-
ities.
A study of premature births in
Pitt County by Ms. Hookway
showed that non-white women
had more premature births than
white women.
Figures fa 1974 and 1975
showed 183 premature births fa
nai-whites as compared to 83 fa
whites.
Ms. Hookway noted that these
figures oarespond with national
statistics that show higher pre-
mature birth rates fa nai-whites.
Nineteen per cent of all Pitt
County births between 1970 and
1976 were to women age 18 a
under. Thirteen per cent were to
those age 30 and over.
Ms. Hookway found that Pitt
County white women are follow-
ing a national trend of waiting
until their twenties to have their
first child.
In 1974 and 1975 more white
wonen between the ages of 23
and 29 years had more babies
than any other age group.
Non-white women have babies
relatively early. The peak years
are between 17 and 26, according
to Hookway.
Ms. Hookway said that
women in general were postpon-
ing pregnancies fa many
reasons, including time to com-
plete their education, waking to
help put their husbands through
MATTRESS MART
Wholesale to Everyone
RetailOur Price
WATERBEDS $52.00$37.00
FRAMES $70.00$35.00
MATTRESS & $149.00 FOUNDATION$87.00
1302 N. Greene St.758-1101
"DISCOUNT FURNITURE"
AT
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
THESE ITEMS ARE PRICED TO SELL
COFFEE TABLE�25.00 A!ND UP
COUCH AND CHAIRS60.00 AND UP
WASHING MACHINEStl25.00 AND UP
SWIVEL ROCKERS20.00 AND UP
CHEST S40.00 AND UP
DINETTE SUITS$50.00 AND UP
REFRIGERATORS 80.00 AND UP
SEE TOMMY WILLIAMS TODAY
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
PHONE 756-7815 � 264 BY-PASS WEST
(ACROSS FROM BILL HADDOCK CHRYSLER)
school, and waiting to beoome
financially secure.
Pitt County has been able to
improve its infant mortality rate
gradually through the dedicated
efforts of area obstetricians and
pediatricians, Ms. Hookway said.
Ms. Hookway also cited the
high risk fa mothers and infants
that was established three years
ago at the Pitt County Health
Department.
She also credited a govern-
ment-sponsored nutrition pro-
gram fa pregnant mothers and
newban babies that was started a
year ago. The program provides
cheese, milk, and eggs to xip-
piement inadequate diets.
Women are becoming more
conscious of the need fa prenatal
care and are seeking it earlier,
said Ms. Hookway.
"A significant number, how-
ever only seek pre-natal care
just befae delivery she said.
Ms. Hookway feels that the
establishment of the ECU
Medical School will have a very
positive impact on future mat-
ernal and infant care in the area.
The Department of Obstetrics
and Gynecology, directed by Dr.
Robert G. Brame, will wak
towards the early identification
and treatment of high risk
pregnant women.
The greatest gain in im-
provement in prenatal care will be
made through prevention of pre-
maturity and identification and
treatment of women of high
risk, said Dr. Brame.
Pitt Memaial Hospital is the
designated regional center fa
pregnant wonen and newban
infants who need specialized
attention.
A new neonatal critical care
nursery is presently under con-
struction at Pitt Memaial Hos-
pital.
The center is scheduled to
open in April a May.
AT
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Fri Sat GRAND REOPENING
First 50 people each
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Dance Contest $50.00 Grand Prize Finals Sat.
This Weekend Fri 3:30- 7:00
Don't Forget Sun is Ladies Night





�����������S
Papa 6 FOUNT AINHEAD 19 January 1978
HHi Great A&PQuaBty
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each A&P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY JAN 21 AT A�P IN Greenville
at Low Cost!
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH WHOLE
S1000 cash bonanza
SIM WMNtH I' "
t �
GAMIS ilts
121 mm $374,946 CASH PRIZES
Mf� 163.4S6 CASH WINNERS
IS
M . �� onf or ffoueit'
�Pw. S'OI SH BONANZA
�4UHRT McCitA
MtfORO N C �it�ltl� Mwlt

dei�ng � M �CmtK 4
oooi oooa oooi
u �
�' �,T� lOOO CASH BONANZA sm
� NW riKJi UN
� loerw onfetHLurj'0 i9?fl
" " t'OOC -
t nmt itcfcrh �' A
( A&P picks the best dairy ")
PARKAY QUARTERS �AO
MARGARINE 2 pU� 5Iou
PILLSBURY BUTTERMILK -�j
BISCUITS J& 59
(a&P picks the best bakery )
JANE PARKER BAKE N SERVE
TWIN 3
ROLLS
12 CT.
11-OZ.
PKGS.
JANE PARKER CRACKED WHEAT
BREAD
( A4P picks the best frozen foods)
"sEALTESfTiGHT N LIVELY
�j
SAVE 36c
49
CUT FROM
THE CHUCK
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
� Bjfejaj Mfe MM! � MB A�H UUALII Y MtAVY WtbltMN UMHin-I-CU DEtr
ICE MILK e��Enw QQC roast
' ��aaaiB a Bjjm n wm a ajafcr �tp country hum po�� shop
89
CHEF-BOY-AR-DEE
A4P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
GROUND 3
MORE
PORK CHOPS
ANN PAGE BRAND
SLICED
PIZZA
SAUSAGE 13'j-OZ.
HAMBURGER 14-OZ
PEPPERONI 13-OZ
GROUND 3 LBS AAA SLICED AIAQ
CHUCK 199 BACON " 2 $1"
TEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL OEALERS AND WHOLESALERS
MILLER LITE BEER
CAW ON OF
12 OZ CANS
rffriscoV
THOMPSON CORN
MUFFIN MIX
LUCK S (WITH PORKj
PINTO BEANS
BETTY CROCKER LAYER
CAKE MIXES
5
3
8-OZ 3� I
PKGS
POUND CAK� it 0
VtLLOW BUTTtfl IB rOl
DfVIUS FOOD U , 01 EA.
CfRMANCMOC IIjO OMIV
yh i ntM i� nr w�-�
$-100
59c
ORANGE GRAPE. OR FLORIDA PUNCH
MI"C S3
� I
We pick the best produce
WASHINGTON STATE RED OR GOLDEN
DELICIOUS APPLES
SAVE UP TO'
3
99�
IL0 AND TENOER
YELLOW ONIONS3 da 49c
79
YOUR CHOICE SALE!
RFSH KALE OR
io oz LlC
BAG
SPINACH eSSS.
OR OUR LITTLE FRIENDS - -
BIRDSEED 10 babg 177
RED GHAPEFRUIT (48 SIZE) EACH
WHITE GRAPEFRUIT (4S SIZE) EAC
FRESH LEMONS 1140 SIZE) EACH
2 TANGERINES (176 SIZE)
TEMPLE ORANGES (100 SIZE)
WHITE POTATOES U S SIZE A LB.
10
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SHORTENING
LIMIT ONf WITH
COUPON AND
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GOOD THRU SAT. JAN 21 AT A4P IN GHEENVILLE
PRICE t PRIOE � PRICE A PRIDE �
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LIMIT ONE BOX WITH 40c nnu
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LIMIT ONE COUPON �M2
OOOO THRU SAT, JAN 21 AT A4P IN GREENVILLE
PRICE PRIDE � PRICE A PRIDE �
PRICE A PRIOF





��MH
�HnnnnH
1 Loving Gentleman
biography
By SUE ELLEN McLEOD
Trends Staff
Meta Carpenter has written a
detailed expose of her intimate
relationship with one of the most
noted authorsof thisage, William
Faulkner. Considering the nature
ot Faulkner s adversity to public
display of his private life, one
wonders why a woman would
write an account of their affair
and make it available to anyone
with a dollar and ninety-five
cents.
Carpenter writes of her loving
and sensitive relationship with
Faulkner while he was in Holly-
wood writing screen plays. She
claims that they shared a com-
plete understanding of each
other s mutual needs and wants.
Yet, after his death, the woman
who knew him so well, chooses to
reveal their aose and private
moments with anyone who will
take the time to read them.
In her fa ward, Carpenter
states her reason tor writing this
expose is to prevent other people
Iran distorting the relationship
she ana Faulkner shared. While
this reason seems valid to a
certain degree, Carpenter s book
uestroys this validity by relating
intimacies about which no one
could speculate. True, people in
Hollywood who knew Faulkner
and Carpenter could recount
places they were seen together
and the times they spent with
each other, but no one could
relate the intimate actions and
vvords which passed between
them when they were alone. Only
Meta Carpenter can reveal those
intimacies, and, unfortunately,
she chooses to do so in A Loving
WILLIAM FAULKNER, NOBEL Prize winning Southern novelist is
the subject of Meta Carpenter's intimate expose, "A Loving
Gentleman Rather than a sensitive explanation to prevent future
distortion, Carpenter's novel is little beyond an explotation of her
relationship with one of the 20th centuries maor writers.
Gentleman.
Carpenter uses the book and
her relationship with Faulkner as
a vehicle to present the story of
her life. As a script girl in
Hollywood, Carpenter worked
among many well-known stars.
She makes a habit of dropping
names which eventually begins
to read iiKe a list of major motion
picture stars of the Twentieth
Century. Ihe purpose of this
repetitive ana unnecessary listing
could only be to boost Carpenter s
seit-image in the eyes ot her
readers. It failed to make the
desired impression.
fhe tame Faulkner s writing
and person have achieved com-
Dined with the notoriety ot
scandal will no doubt ease Meta
Carpenter s financial concerns. It
is pity that Faulkner's work, as
wen as his family must be faced
with this story which should have
remained untold. The nature of
carpenter s story reveals that it is
merely exploitation of the
affection and trust placed in her
Dy her lover.
Pianists Pittman and Stevens
to give duo-concert Jan. 25th
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Pianist Everett Pittman
and Charles Stevens will present
a duo-piano reatal Wednesday,
Jan. 25, at 8:15 p.m. in the A.J.
Fletcher Ftecital Hall.
Dr. Pittman is dean of the
ECU School of Music, and Dr.
Stevens is assistant dean. Their
program will include the Bartok
Sonata fa Two Pianos and
Percussion and the Poulenc Con-
certo in D mina.
Assisting them in the Bartok
are percussionists Patrick
Flaherty of Base, Idaho, and
John Stamp of College Park, Md.
Both are graduate students in the
ECU School of Music and are
studying with ECU faculty per-
cussionist Harold Jones.
The reatal is free and open to
the public.
Trends
19 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
Hemingway's wife
describes fife with Papa
By TON A BLACK
Staff Writer
The list of superlatives one
could string behind the name of
Mary Welsh Hemingway isextra-
adinary. To save those of us
would-be stringers the task of
researching these superlatives,
particularly the ones which were
ban during her fairly loig
innuendo with Ernest
Hemingway, Mary Hemingway
does it fa us. By the end of How
It Was one is as well infamed
about Mary as one is about
Ernest. Beginning the book is an
auspicious, inherent promise that
once it is read, an intimate
acquaintance with Ernest will
have been acquired. By page one
hundred and seventeen, where
Hemingway finally appears, the
reader is on edge, feeling saely
denied and distressed at Mary's
usfructcny of Ernest's fame to
find her own immatality.
By repating her life
in her jaunty journalistic fashion,
Mary Hemingway has aeated a
book which reads like a Time
Magazine; through, with dates,
speafic settings, and multitudes
of literary and faeing allusions.
Wisely, fa Hemingway is a topic
nearly overwaked. Mary lures
the reader into her share with the
bait of, heretofae unpublished
exerpts from letters written by
Hemingway. (This bait I found
offensive, yet alluring, fa Mary
Hemingway had violated a writ-
ten request by her husband which
stated that none of his personal
letters were to be published. Ah,
sweet executrix!)
Mrs. Hemingway, a really
good reporter, had always kept a
day by day journal. With material
from her journals neatly consum-
ing the space between Ernest's
letters, she fulfills the book
inherent promise within it's bulk
See PAPA, p. 8
ERNEST HEMINGWAY BATHING in Africa before the plane
crashes.
Renowned Jazz orchestra
to appear in Wright
DR EVERETT PITTMAN (right) and Dr. Charles duo-piano reatal next Wednesday at 8:15 in the
Stevens of the School of Music will present a A.U. Fletcher Recital Hall.
By RENEE DIXON
Staff Writer
The Thad JonesMel Lewis
Jazz Orchestra will appear in
concert in Wright Auditaium ai
Maiday, January 23,1978 at 800
p.m. This renowned jazz aches-
tra lends itself to expression of
the total jazz scene. Their variety
in repertoire ranges from Big
Band selections to modern pro-
gressive, realizing jazz styles of
the past, present, and tuture.
Rather than the loud, brassy
style of many big bands, the
JonesLewis achestra aims fa a
mellow, "laid back" sound, dis-
playing their versatility and sub-
tlety in instrumentation. Much of
the band's music is aiginal,
written and a arranged by the
band members.
A clinic will be held Monday
afternoon at 300 p.m. led by
Jones and Lewis with the aid of
their achestra.
Student tickets (concert) -
$1.50 Students will be admitted to
the wakshop by showing their
tickets to the evening concert plus
ID and activity card. ECU faculty
and staff (concert and dime) -
$3.00. Non-ECU students
(concert only) - $2.00. Public
(concert only) - $4.00, and
(concert and clinic) $5.0C





'age 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 19 January 1B
Art film
TRENDS STAFF REPORT
The Challenge: A Tribute To
Modern Art will be shown in the
dendenhall Student Center
heater on January 22 at 7 p.m.
ind January 24 and 26 at 8 p.m.
This unprecedented film
itilizes unique footage of great
xxlern artists in their studios
reating and commenting on their
ork. Academy Award-winning
9 �
to be shown at Mendenhall
director Herbert Kline combed
the world for rare footage of
Picasso, Matisse and Braque.
Among the other artists in-
cluded in Kline's film are Dali,
Chagall, Moore, Mondnan and
De Kooning
The film shows great
galleries of the world,
including the Louvre, the
Museum of Modern Art and the
Guggenheim, but it is more than
a mere travel film about art
around the globe.
Narrated by Orson Wells, The
Challenge begins by asking,
What is modern art?" Relation-
ships between different styles are
explained as well as how Cubism
oompleted the revolution begun
by Cezanne.
The film also investigates
stylistic development including
Impressionism, Expressionism,
Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism,
Dadaism, Surrealism, Pop, Op,
and the Conceptualists.
Students are admitted free
with ID and activity cards and
faculty and staff by MSC mem-
bership card. Public admission is
$1.00.
The Challenge: A Tribute to
Modern Art is presented by the
Student Union Art Exhibition
Committee, "lllumina
ATTIC
Sun
Bands
Rascal Jade
Marz Fingergie
PAPA
Continued from p. 7
of 681 pages. One emerges from
it, refreshed and enlivened to
have read a documented account
of how Mary and Ernest did
indeed live, so fully and so well.
Hemingway looms only more
realistically, not only as a demi-
god of prose, but as an embodi-
ment of fortitude.
What of Mary? Does her
presence in Hemingway's life
more quickly exhaust or extend
his talents? Mary makes no bones
about her need to assert herself in
the Hemingway relationship.
"The heat of exuberanoe he
engendered around him seemed
tome, to rrelt away my identity, I
reflected occasionally and al-
though I was entirely enthralled
by him, especially when we were
alone, I felt dubious about the
11:15 pm
obc
Pitt
DOWNTOWN
'�n seatt l00
FILM
5fcS,
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4 YOU LIGHT UP MY LIFE'
With the number One hit song of 77!
Shows Fri7:30, 9:05 SatSun -4:24, 5:55, 7:30,9:05
wisdom of any formal commit-
ment between us
Hemingway obviously needed
her and used her strength at
times during hisdispair. She was
not only a' durable wife, but his
comrade. Hemingway said of
Mary, "She does not suffer fools
gladly. She does not suffer them
at all That she loved him is a
fact undisputed. Theirs was an
ideal relationship, amidst cham-
paigne breakfast, bullfights, and
airplane crashes. Only
Hemingway's suicide, for reasons
of age and health, ended it.
The lady deserves a brass ring
fa her effort. She has proven her
talent and her zest for life by
containing with simple book and
adventure stay of fact. How It
Was is a travel log within it's
poetic descriptions of locale, a
love stay and a diary. Most
definitely Mary Hemingway
knows it was.
NOW OPEN
WED - SUN
752 7303
located behind THE ATTIC
fm PAUL TARDIF
TRIO
SAT
"preservation
JAZZ CO-
Members are urged to make reservations
Watch for aai FRY Jan 28tn
JmM ; MW-MlM
mM&mmm$m





I 'v5S-?7f ?SHK f:f-
nHI
Intramurals
by JOHN EVANS
Top two teams to meet
Tonight will mark oie of the biggest intramural games of the
season, and it won't even oount in the standings as the Belk Enforoers
and the Belk Nutties Buddies will meet in an exhibition game prior to
the East Carolina - lona College varsity basketball game in Minges
Coliseum.
Not only are the two teams rates as the top two dormitory teams on
campus intramural basketball, but the winner of the game will
represent ECU's dormitories againt a team from Camp Lejeune Marine
Base. The Marines will be visiting the ECU campus next Saturday,
January 28, fa a series of four basketball games, three men's games
and one women's games. Then on Feburary 4 four different teams from
ECU will travel to Camp Lejeune. fa another series of four games.
In addition to the winners of the Nutties Buddies - Enfacers game
two other men's teams will be chosen to represent the school One
women steam will also be chosen. Themens' teams will play one game
each. The women's team will play at 4 p.m. Saturday. Times fa the
mens games will belOa.m 12 noon and 6 p.m. All four games will be
played using the 30 second clock.
The teams fa the ECU hone games will be picked this coming
week from the leading intramural teams. The four teams that will
travel to Camp Lejeune will be picked the following week.
The Nutties Buddies were last season's intramural basketball
champions and the Enfacers are expected to be the best team from
their damitay division. This will be the oily meeting between the two
teams unless they meet in the campus playoffs. Although the game
won't oount in either team's regualr season intramural record, there
could be a lot of disputes settled since one team is ranked atop each of
the two men s intramural top ten rankings published by the Intramural
Department.
The game should begin around 5:30. Cone at out and see what
caliber of basketball the ECU student has to offer. Then stay around
and watch the ECU Pirates battle a fighting lona College team.
The best dressed award fa the first week of intramural piay goes to
Ja.ec. Damitay s fine intramural team, the Dealers. Clad in aange
and blue ierseys and shats, the Dealers are certainly the flashiest
team so far this season. In addition, they have been playing good
basketball. So far they have compiled a 3-0 mark
Although the team hasn't been picked yet it seems a certainty that
ECU will send a Handball team to the national championships at
Hofstra University in May. The Pirates will be meeting some of the top
collegiate handball teams in the country in the competition and will be
the only school represented from Nath Carolina.
That is quite an accomplishment fa this school considering the
program had only been an intramural spat fa 12 months. The Team
Handball dub won't hold its first meeting until Monday, January 23.
The time and place fa that meeting will be 430 p.m. in room 105
MemaialGym. JimChastain. perhaps the best team handballeroi the
ECU campus, is in charge of aganizing this dub and some of the team
members fa the ECU competitive team will be picked from the ECU
dub. Tryouts will be held later on to complete the team.
The women were aoadentaly omitted from Tuesday's intramural
basketball roundup, so let's give them their just due this time around.
There seems to be a number of fine teams competing this time around -
the best of which will come from one of three teams: the Peace Pirates,
the Tyler team of Cool and the Gang, and the Cotten Bunnies. All three
teams started off their play with one-sided vidaies. Cool and the Gang
beat Unread 53-5 to open their season, while the Bunnies and Peaoe
Pirates scored two lopsided vidaies. Lillian Barnes scored 45 points
fa the week's highest output while Tammy Whited of the Jolly Greene
Giants pumped in a single game taal of 26 points. Other top teams in
the girl's rankings are the P.E. Majas, the Jarvis Jumpshots and the
Garrett Yardapes. The leading saaity teams so far seem to be Sigma
Sigma Sigma and Alpha Xi Delts.
There are new hours of operation fa the two pools at ECU. These
pools will be available fa student reaeational swim at different times.
The Minges pool will be open from 8-10 p.m. during the week and from
2-8 p.m. on the weekends and the Memaial Gym pool will be open
from 12-1 and 4-6 Monday through Friday. The upcoming handicapped
swim program, which will start in early Feburary, is expeded to run
from 5-8 p.m. Sunday's. Only a part of the pool will be used fa the
program
19 January 1978 FOUKTAINHEA age 9
Pirates
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Spats Edita
He lives by the swad, he dies
by the swad. It was never rrore
true than in the game Tuesday
n�flnt, when the Pirates of coach
In a second half where refer-
ees thought the "elbow" was a
Greenville night spot, the William
and Mary Indians nipped the
Pirates 77 to 76 to snap a three
game winning streak.
inside game with assists from
referees Hank Nichols and Jerry
Austin. Using Pirate frontoourt
men as footstools, William and
Mary turned a 16-12 rebound
defidt of the first half into 43-38
WALTER MOSELEY AGAINST W & M
Sports
Larry Gil I man canned G7 percent
of their shots in the first half
much to the delight of 5,250 fans
in Minges Coliseum.
However, the game of Basket-
ball is 40 minutes long and a 36.4
shooting percentage in the rest of
the game spelled defeat fa the
ever maturing Bucs. The percen-
tages, however don't show all of
what was painfully obvious to the
fans on hand.
The Pirates jumped out to 17
to 10 lead after a three pant play
by Cornelius, and led by 13 with
1:48 left in the first half oily to
have the tribe stage a gradual
comeback in the second stanza.
Led by Jack Arbogast and
John Lowenhaupt, the tribe cut a
56 to 46 Pirate lead to two with
11 09 in the second half. Ted
O'gaman and Rooky Copley
literally hacked away at the Pirate three years
Photo by Brian utotlerl
lead at game's end.
The tribe cause was aided by a
cold shooting second half fa the
Bucs to which William and Mary
Coach Bruce Parkhill commented,
"We were lucky to be down by
only 11 at the half the way they
(the Pirates) were shooting" (in
the first half).
Coach Gil I mar, offered no
excuses but the experience of
William and Mary's four senia
starters.
"We both learned fron this
game he said, Jbut they will
benefit the next 14 a 15 games,
while we will benefit fa the next
UNC
0 0
wns Pirates
Ice Ball registration was held this week and ends this afternoon.
Adual piay begins on Tuesday with games to be played at the Twin
Rmks floureation Center.
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
The battle fa in-state wrest-
ling supremacy began last Thurs-
day in Chapel Hill and afta round
one Bill Lam's Nath Carolina Tar
Heelshave taken the early season
lead.
The Heels used their strength
in the lower weight dassesto take
an early 16-0 lead and held on in
the upper weights to win over the
Pirates 25-15.
Although East Carolina picked
its first win of the season last
Wednesday over West Chester
35-7, the loss to UNC dropped Bill
Hill's youthful grapplers to 1-4
this season. It Mas ECU'S first
loss to Nath Carolina after six
straight wins.
"I have to give Bill Lam and
the rest of this team aedit said
Hill after the match They were
ready fa us and they just went
out and did what they had to do to
beat us
I don't think the fad that we
were wrestling two nights in a
row really bothered anybody
continued Hill. "However, I think
our home aowd will probably be
an impatant fada when they
oane down here to wrestle us
The Tar Heels jumped to a
quick start when Bobby Monahan
upset BobPassno12-6inthe118
weight dass. UNC'shighly touted
freshman CD. Mock pinned John
Koenigs at 126 and ECU was
down 9-0.
Kenny Evans made it three
straight vidaies fa the Heels
with the big upset of the evening
with a dose 8-7 dedsion over Paul
Osman.
Dave Jurgens nailed the cor-
ner on the Pirates coffin with a
14-4 maja dedsion at 142. That
gave to Heels an insurmountable
16-0 lead although the Pirates
came back to win four of the next
six matches.
"Passino's losses at 118 and
Osnian's loss at 134 really hurt
us said Hill. 'That turned the
match around early and they
certainly had the advantage after
Paul was beaten
"I'm not really waried about
the loss to UNC because we've
got too good a team: I think our
home crowd might make the
difference in the next match
Frank Schaede defeated Bill
Rumley at 150, while freshman
Butch Revils edged his old school
teammate Mike Benzel 4-3 at 167
to give ECU its first two vidaies.
Jay Denver won another dose
match at 190 with a 6-5 dedsion
over Dean Bna and D.T. Joyner
had no trouble whatsoever pin-
ning Jody Truesdale another
highly regarded freshman.
"D.T. is just wrestling super
fa us said Hill. "Hegot beat m
the Wilkes tournament and told
me after it was over that nobody
else is going to beat him this vtiar.
He really has his mind made up
that he is gang to place in the
nationals this year. His attitude
has improved 100 percent this
year.
The Pirates will get another
chance at the Heels February 16
which will be in Minges.
However, the next key match
fa ECU will be January 26 when
N.C. State comes to town.
East Carolina returns this
Wednesday when the Pirates
travel to Boone, N.C. to face
Appalachian state.
�MBBHMHHMI





Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 19 January 1978
D.T. Joyner striving for All-American status
Although East Carolina Uni-
versity's wrestling team was
soundly trounced in all three of its
opening matches in a quad up at
Lehigh, one positive element
came out of the meetD.T.
Joyner can wrestle with anyone
this season.
All Joyner did was beat a
national place winner by a 16-3
oore, and handle two other
ighly-reyarded wrestlers with-
ut much problem.
The junior heavyweight from
(orfolk, Va destroyed Howard
�arris of Oregon State in the
�nale of the opening night's
tction. Harris placed sixth in the
nation last season at 190 for the
Beavers in helping them to a fifth
place finish in the NCAAs.
He was an ail-American last
year?" said a somewhat sur-
prised Joyner after the match. "If
I had known that coming into the
match, I would have wrestled
more cautiously. Now I'm glad I
didn't know
It was the aggressive style
employed by Joyner that first-
year Pirate coach, Bill Hill, cites
as the key to victory.
Since last year D.V has lost
20 pounds and gained a lot more
strength with the weight program
he's been in said Hill. "That's
why he's a lot better. It's given
him more confidence on the
mat
During his first two years at
East Carolina, Joyner has had
seasons of 7-3 and 9-7, not really
setting the world on fire. He was
twice runner-up in the Southern
Conference although the Pirates
are not currently affiliated with
that organization.
"D.T. is definitely due
added Hill. "Heck, this is only his
fourth year of wrestling, period. It
takes most wrestlers five or six
years to reach their peak, but
most wrestlers begin wrestling in
junior high
Joyner is an impressive 6-0 for
the season with a first place finish
in the Carolina Invitational. He
has one pin, one superior deci-
sion, two major decisions and two
regular decisions to his credit. In
the five matches that he did not
pin his opponents, the combined
score of his victories is 57-14.
The victory in the Carolina
Invitational came right on the
heels of football season. Joyner
had practiced just one day prior to
the tournament.
Hill dtes the hiring of Willie
Bryant as graduate assistant as
an asset to Joyner. Bryant is a
two-time national junior college
place winner and two-time South-
ern Conference champ at East
Carolina.
"Willie has helped D.T. quite
a bit noted Hill. "For the past
two years, D.T. has not had
anyone on the team that was big
with him
Joyner agrees, saying, "It has
helped having Coach Bryant
around. He has a lot of knowledge
of the sport. Everyone on the
team has been helping me learn
new moves and they've all given
me a lot of support on the mat
As far as goals go, Joyner is
no different from any other
wrestler In America.
"I want to make all Amer-
ica he says. "But, so does
everybody else I feel if I work
hard enough, I can make it. But,
I'll have to take each match one a;
a time-consider each a chal-
lenge
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave. at
College View
Cleaners
Pirate tankers down Maryland 65-48
CHRIS HOLLOMAN
Sports Editor
The East Carolina Swimming
f
UNLESS YOU
PRINT YOUR
OWN
e
it seems like a student never comes up with enough money to cover
school expenses and have anything left over to just �njoy.
It you re one of ttiose people who has to spend too much study time
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Look into AFR0TC scholarships And while you re at :t ask about the
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world of opportunity
ROTC
Gateway to a great way ot life.
team remained undefeated last
Sunday with a 66-48 win over the
University of Maryland. The win
marked the third straight year
that the Pirates had defeated the
Terps.
In the 400 medley relay the
Pirate team of Tudor, Newhaller,
Schnell, McCauley won with a
time of 3:36.08.
The 100 freestyle was won by
Carpouyis of Maryland with
Nieman and Meisel of ECU
finishing second and third.
Billy Thorne took top honors
in the 200 yard freestyle and Ross
Bohlken placed second giving the
Pirates a 1,2 sweep.
In the 50 freestyle Fehling of
ECU placed first and John
McCauley finished second for the
Pirates.
Joe Kushy a junior from New
York won the 200 individual
medley with a time of 2:00.47.
In the one meter diving event
IvatlisWJf
Live Maria Dawkins
Thurs. Jan 19
Sat. Jan 21
Check It Out!
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Customer Appreciation Night from 8-12
Maryland placed 1 and 2 with
Lund Sox of ECU placing third.
The Terps took first and
second place in the 200 butterfly
event with the Pirates, Mark Lov-
ette finishing third.
The 100 freestyle was won by
Billy Thorne with a time of 47.39.
Bill Fehling was second for the
Pirates with a time of 47.83.
ECU'S domination continued
as John Tudor took the 200
backstroke with Barny McCarthy
finishing third.
This win leaves the Pirates
with a 5-0 won-loss mark. The
Pirates next meet will be Jan. 21
against the University of Rich-
mond at Richmond.
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Open 7 days a week until riark





MIMMMHMMMHBPMHBB
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�������I
19 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
East Carolina to be Division 1-A
By WOODY PEELE
Reflector Sports Editor
East Carolina University has
nothing to fear from the newly
voted-in legislation by the NCAA
creating the so-called "Super
Conference according to Athle-
tic Director Bill Cain.
Cain, who returned Friday
night from the NCAA Convention
in Atlanta, said that as far as he
oould tell, East Carolina would
remain in the upper bracket of the
collegiate governing body's foot-
ball division, now designated
Division l-A.
The NCAA, during the con-
vention, voted in the controversial
"split" of Division I, into a two
groups, l-A and l-AA. The idea
had been fermenting for several
years, brought up by the nation's
super football powers, who wan-
ted more say in their future.
To a certain extent, they got
what they wanted, but according
to Cain, it will take several years
fa further legislation to be
brought in to put things together
as those powers want it.
The main thing achieved isthe
right of the Division l-A schools to
vote on what will affect them,
with no voting on the same
proposals by the schools in
Division l-AA. Division II and
Division III. n the past, all
groups voted as one on proposals.
Under the rules passed this
week, there will be three criteria
for membership in l-A. The first
calls fa a school to field eight
varsity spats, including football.
Rules were also established that
set up how many games a team
must play to be oounted as a
"spat" and how many people
must partiqpate as a team to
count.
The second criteria calls fa
those schools to schedule at least
60 per cent of their games with
other Division l-A schools.
The third is an option group-
ing. A school may meet any one of
three stipulations: they must
average 17.000 per home football
game over a four-year period:
they must have a 30,000 seat
(permanent seats) stadium, and
have 17,000 attendance reoaded
in one of the past four years; a
they must participate in a total of
12 intercolletiate spats recog-
nized by the NCAA.
This last proposal, accading
to Cain, brought in many schools
that would not otherwise have
been listed as l-A.
"There will probably be 125 to
130 Division l-A schools now
Cain said. "Division l-AA is
going to be made up largely of
some of the more ambitious
Division II schools, who want
mae televisiai maiey. Actually,
the big schools ga very little of
what they wanted exoept the
voting rights
So unless the current rules are
changed again at next year's
NCAA Coiventioi, East Carolina
is secure as a Division l-A school.
Cain said that each member
NCAA school was given 60 days
to let the NCAA office know
which division it will be a member
of. After that, a school has three
years to meet the aiteria if it does
na already.
Cain naed that one reason the
1978 East Carolina football sche-
dule hasn't been announced is
that he has been waiting to see
the results of the NCAA vote. He
added that he expects the sche-
dule to be announoed later this
week.
As far as future scheduling is
concerned, Cain said he is waiting
to see the list of who gets in which
divisions. "We'll see which
teams are l-A and work from
there
A aitical point, he observed,
came with the 12-spat qualifica-
tion. "A la of schools that
wouldn't have been in the l-A
group will be with this rule. There
was some question as to whether
this might not have been voted
down in a recall on Thursday, but
it never materalized
Cam said he discussed sche-
duling with other schools at the
meeting, but most of them were,
like East Carolina, independents.
Most conference schools are
waiting to see who is on the list,
too.
"The conferences are reluc-
tant to schedule until they see
who is where Cam said. "But I
don't see how any shoool can be
less reluctant than they are now
to talk with us. So I can only see
things getting better when the list
comes out
Cain added that published
lists late last week which did not
include East Carolina among the
l-A schools were pure speculation
by The Associated Press and had
no meaning as far as the NCAA
wasooncemed.
Cam also said that there was
some mae mfamal talk with
sane schools about the possible
famatioi of a new conference in
the south, but that nrthing
hard has oome about yet.
The key, apparently, is the
12-spat rule, which will allow
sane schools without big sta-
diums, a big attendance, to
remain in the l-A grouping and
thus qualify as part of East
Carolina s 60 per cent I sche-
duling, at least until the schedule
can be improved in the future.
Young Basketball team is improving with age
The East Carolina University
basketball team faces a crucial
week of play with two games at
home in Mi nges Coliseum befae
hitting the road again fa three
strenuous tests.
The Pirates, winners in their
last three outings, although one
was an exhibition game against
the Athletes in Action, appear to
have aled the machine and have
things clicking far mae than
early m the seasoi. Wins have
oome over William and Mary
58-56 on the road, 90-77 over St.
Peter's an 117-107 over the
Athletes in Action.
This team has had a chance
to play with each other fa several
games now and I think they are
beginning to understand each
other and what each one is
doing said first-year coach
LarryGillman. "We'rebeginnmg
to play mae as a unti. We're
beginning to get it together
Several factashave been very
apparent in the last three games.
All are most impatant in regard
to the upcoming games this week.
One, the Pirates rebounded
much better over the last three
games, with 31-24 margin over
William and Mary, 35-29 over St.
Peter's and 57-37 over the
Athletes in Action. The one key
person in the rebounding differ-
ence has been junta center Greg
Canelius. Over the three-game
span, the 6-9 Canelius has had
11,11 and 15 rebounds.
"Greg has been getting the
ball off the boards and getting it
down the court on the outlet
pass noted Gillman. "This has
allowed us to get our fast break
going mae often and that has
been a big help
Another facta is patience.
The Pirates have shown mae
willingness to get the good shot
on- offense than earlier in the
year. That in turn has resulted in
the third key improvement area,
shooting percentages.
The Pirates have been over 50
fa three oonsecutive games,
the only times this year over the
50 mark exoept fa the LaSalle
game back on Dec. 9.
On Thursday night the Pirates
face an up and coming team in
lona. The Gaels feature one of the
nation? best freshmen centers in
Jeff Ruland at 6-10, and a fine
freshman faward, 6-10 Kevin
Vesey. Top scorer is sophomae
guard Glenn Vickers, 19.8 per
game. Ruland is averaging 19.4
per game with 9.8 rebounds.
UNC-Asheville will finish off
this home stand on Saturday
night, a team that is greatly
improved over last year.
"We've got a chance to
almost even our recad with three
wins this week said Gillman. "I
wish AIA had counted and we
oould have gone back on the road
at .500. But it didn't and if we're
up to6-7, then I'll have to be very
happy
Junia center Greg Canelius,
6-9 fran New Albany, Ind has
suddenly gaten physical and his
rebounding has shown consider-
able improvement. In the last
three games, Canelius has had
11,11 and 15 rebounds. His best
perfamance in the Pirate unifam
came against the Athletes in
Action, which, unfatunately fa
Greg, will na count in his
statistics. He had 20 pants on
eight of 14 field goals, four of five
free throws and 15 big rebounds.
After a season's low rebound-
ing percentage after the First
Union Invitational Tournament of
45.9 fa the team, the Pirates
have gradually upped that per-
centage with board play of late.
The Pirates are now up to 48.1
on the year. Over the last four
games, the Pirates have captured
52.4 of the rebounds.
The improved rebounding by
the Pirates should mean mae
wins says ooach Larry Gillman.
"If we can continue to get the
rebounds off the board and down
the oourt fa our fast break, we
will soae ala of pants and win
ala of games
And, sheeting percentages
from the floa can't be overlooked
either. The Pirates are currently
shooting the best of the year,
45.7.
Classifieds
FOR SALE.lQne good quality
Astronomical telescope with
triple axis equataial mount and
3ettir�g drdes; 2 good 10-speed
b'kes; 1 good guitar with case.
Good prices, must move. Call
758-9526.
STEREO FOR SALE: All equip.
Purchased recently. Yamaha CR
620, BIC 980, Bose 501, Teac
2300SD. Call John Marcus 316
Belk Dam 752-7692.
FOR SALE: 35mm Asahi Pentax
camera spotmatic II, with a
135mm telephao lens, a wide
angle lens, bellows extender, UV
haze filter and mae !160. Call
Steve at 758-8688.
WANTED TO BUY: A good old
used car fa around town will pay
100-150. Call Joe 752-5214.
mJ
FOR RENT: 2 private rooms close
to campus with kitchen priv-
iliges 114 E. 12th 9. 752-2647.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Prefer
female in mid-to-late 20 s to share
half of expenses of a 2 bdrm. apt.
on 10th St. Call 752-5344.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY.a fa
the beginning of Feb. Female
roommate fa house on 4th St.
near ECU. 56.00 month plus
share of utilities. Call 758-2840
Soon
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY fe-
male to share 13 expenses at
Eastbrook Apts. Call Diane at
758-2522.
FOR SUBLEASE: Til May. 2
bdrm 2 mi. from campus. 85.00
mo. Call 756-4834.
(ptwonaffil
JOBS: On a off campus. We
place students on jobs that are in
their maja fields whenever pos-
sible. If there is anything that we
an do please call.
SUMMER JOBS: Guaranteed a
money back. Nations largest
directay. Minimum fifty employ-
ersastate. Indudesmasterapplic
at ion. Only $3 Sumchace, Box
645. State College. Pa. 16801.
WANTED. Wedding photo-
grapher. Samples of past work
desired. Call 756-1536.
RIDERS WANTED: to Rocky
Mount Wed. - Fri. at 730 Call
7586967.
LOST: Bulova watch - white gold
casing - tiny diamond each end of
faoe - mesh type band - lost in
vidnity of Elbo Room and parking
lots there abouts. Lost Sat. night
Jan 15. Reward. Please call Pam
758-9637.
RANO AND GUITAR lessons by
Richard J. Knapp, B.A. Cajl
756-2563 befae 7 p.m.





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 19 January 1978
Help Insure The
Continuation Of The
Yearbook Tradition
At ECU
A photographer will be here from Tuesday,
February 14th through Friday, February 24th
from 9-5 in the BUC office.
It does not cost you a cent to have your
picture takenthere is no sitting fee.
There will be no waiting rff you will make an
appointment early. Group pictures will also be
taken at the same time.
P3"
V7

If your group does not
receive

sheet by January 24th
nail the BUC office.
Make your
YEARBOOK
PORTRAIT
appointment
q� io� late
0
now
at
�&
���
'llllllft
BUC office: 757-6501, 6502





Title
Fountainhead, January 19, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 19, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.483
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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