Fountainhead, April 27, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,ouu,
this issue is 20 pages.
Fountainhead
ONTHEIN9DE
Poetp. 6
Col lards p. 7
James Tal ley p. 10
A wards p. 15
WECU goes FM
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant News Editor
The Media Board Tuesday
gave approval to radio station
WECU to convert to FM.
John Jeter, WECU chief engi-
neer, projected the switchover to
take place next November a no
later than January a February of
next year.
"We presented the facts to
the Media Board and they like
it Jeter said.
"A frequency search conduc-
ted by Edward Perry of the
Educational FM Associates has
succeeded in finding five frequen-
cy possibilities and has suggested
two to us said Jeter.
"One is capable of being
licensed at 3,000 watts and the
other at 50,000 watts Jeter
explained.
Jeter discussed the upcoming
changes at the station.
"There will be quite a lot of
new equipment. We'll be staying
in the same location in Joyner
Library but we will rebuild the
control room, put in a new console
and a new control board he
said.
Jeter said that the format will
be basically good music program-
ming 24 hours a day, and no
advertising except public service
announcements.
"We want a program or
format that is different, one that
the ECU mass will enjoy Jeter
explained.
"We think that album rock
and some jazz will provide what
the students want.
"Any comments on what kind
of music a programs students
would like to hear next year can
be sent to the station at WECU,
Joyner Library Jeter added.
Jeter reflected on the past
quality of the station, which was
FMin 1960.
"There used to be an FM
station WWWS, here in 1960, but
a hurricane blew down the tower
and by some mistake main-
tenance cut up the tower with a
blowtorch explained Jeter.
"A makeshift tower was used
but the station never really got
back on the air said Jeter-
"In the early or mid-60's the
station went carrier current,
which is AM" he explained
"It was successful at first but
the quality of the signal went
down after awhile, especially in
the dorms
"Reception got to be pretty
bad and the morale went down.
This was evident by the fact
that the SGA (Student Govern-
ment Association) took-away most
of our funds last year Jeter
said.
"We've been pulling through
with a basic core of 12 to 15
people whp are really dedicated
Jeter said.
Jeter commented on the pros-
pective licensing of the station.
"We will probably be one of
the last educational stationstoget
licensed sid Jeter.
"The FCC is holding hearings
in June on educational FM. If
they change the rulings, any
station not licensed now may not
get a license Jeter said.
Jeter has been doing research
on the conversion since last
summer and has been a chief
coordinator of the switchover.
See WECU, p. 9
A BUSY SIDEWALK finds students pausing todiscuss plans for the
summer or next fall.
See WECU, p. yj p
dorm, parking p
By DOUG WHITE
News Editor
Dorm rent and parking fees
were raised fa the upcoming
school year at the ECU Board of
Trustees meeting Wednesday.
Dorn rent was raised to $434
a year, a $44 increase.
Cliff Moore, vice-chancellor
fa business affairs, attributed
the increase to the rising cost of
utilities, a pa" raise fa state
employees, and the funding of a
. percent from this time last year
campus security full-time night
dispatcher. The dispatcher will
begin wak during the first
sessiai of summer school.
Parking fees were doubled to
$10 a year. The added revenue
will be used to grade and cover
with gravel the dirt parking lots
on Ninth Street, to prepare the
area around the new utilities
center across from the campus
police station fa parking, and to
pave several dirt lots on College
Hill.
Dr Jack Hane, directa of
admissions, reported that fresh-
man applications are
Dam space fa fall semester has
already been filled.
The board voted to name
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre after Curtis Hendrix,
past president of the Alumni
Association and the first person to
leave any money to the alumni
association in his will.
The board also renamed the
Afro-American Cultural Center
the Ledonia S. Wright Afro-
Amaican Cultural Center.
Wright was a university employee
who oommitted suicide in the
early 1970's.
She also waked with minai-
ties ai campus.
Kevin McCourt, sophomae
class president, spoke to the
board on behalf of the Student
Government Association (SGA)
Executive Council and called fa
the abolition of the Media Board.
McCourt argued that the
Media Board differed only slight-
ly from the old SGA Communica-
tiois Board, and that those
differences could have been easi-
ly solved through amendments
and that the student body had
vaed three to one against the
See MEDIA, p. 8
man applications are up j
Trustrated' studentscuffles
i security director
noev tMir, nc � ���' �� M 5
guy finds it agreeable.
By STUART MORGAN
Staff Writa
A couple of weeks ago, rumas
circulated throughout campus
concerning a fight between Joe
Calder, directa of security, and
an ECU student.
"I don't want to mention the
students name said Calder.
"He was just hot-tempered
and frustrated beyond his physi-
cal endurance-he wasn't drunk.
" He was frustrated because of
a series of events-not ail of which
were connected with this univer-
sity-most were connected with
his faeign-made vehide he had
been having trouble with said
Calder.
"You know, a car can La a real
pain Calder said.
Calder added he just hap-
pened to be around the student
when the student decided to
unleash his frustrations.
"I was simply an object of his
See CALDER, p. 3
Fall semester fees due
on earlier payment
By JULIE EVERETTE
Assistant News Edita
audent fees fa fall semester
will be due August 18, ten days
pria to registration day, aocad-
ing to Julian Vainright. business
manager.
audents who do not meet the
deadline will be charged a late
payment fee of $10.
Accading to Vainright,
several reasons pronpted the
decision to set an earlier payment
date.
Vainright said the inaeased
number of student loans, grants,
and financial aid requires more
time fa accessing.
He also said tfwre was not
sufficient room in the Cashier's
office and Administration build-
ing to aocornodate the students
adequately.
"The inaease in students
I See FEES P- 51





Flashes
Pap 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 April 1978
Show and sale AED picnic Bahai
Coffeehouse Fines
This Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday, the Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee presents
three nights of excellent enter-
tainment at 9 and 10 p.m room
15, Mendenhall.
Thursday and Friday nights,
enjoy Andy Shapiro, a fine
musician and singer.
Fo our last show this sem-
ester, ECU'S own Ghana Hard-
ware Co. will perform their
unique brand of oomedy in the
style of Monty Python's Flying
Circus.
The Ghana Hardware Co.
performed last year to packed
houses in the drama department,
and no less is expected this year.
As always, admission is only
50 oents, and that includes all the
free eats you could possibly want.
SOULS
This Thursday night will be
the final S.O.U.L.S. meeting of
the year. All new officers will be
installed. New officers and mem-
bers please be prompt at 7 p.m.
Thank you.
Thieves
Bike thieves are ravaging the
campus!
If you see any suspicious
activity please call ihe campus
police immediately!
We need your help to catch
these thieves. 757-6150.
Outing
The Outing Club will have its
last meeting Thursday night in
the basement of Memorial Gym.
Since this is the last meeting,
everyone isenoouraged to attend.
inter-Varsity
Inter-ffrsity Chriotian Fel-
lowship will meet this Sunday
night at the Afro-American Cult-
ural Center, at 8 p.m. This will be
the last meeting of the school
year.
Leadership
Leadership Training Class,
sponsored by Campus Crusade
fa Christ, meets on Thursdays at
7 p.m. in Brewster C-103.
After a time of fellowship,
there is an oppatunity to learn
mae about how to love God and
love others
ATTENTION: Do you yearn to
be fined?
All books are due on the last
day of class Fri April 28 in the
Health Affairs Library.
NASA
Phil Thibideau, International
Mirairs Division, Washington,
D.C. will visit the ECU campus
Fri April 28, to interview
students fa a job with NASA
Headquarters
Qualified students should be
willing to fill this position fa a
minimum of two semesters with
at least one semester of school
intervening.
Interested students should
call the Co-op office (757-6979) to
make an appointment.
Mr. Thibideau will probably
look fa students with at least a
2.5G.P.A.
Apply now
Any student who wishes to
apply fa edita of FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, BUCCANEER, REBEL,
EBONY HERALD, Head Photo-
grapher, a WECU General
Manager should go to the Office
of the Dean of Student Affairs and
fill out an application. Deadline
fa filing is Tues May 2.
Car wash
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity will
have a car wash ai Sat April 29
at the Shell Statioi on 264
By-Pass and Arlington Blvd.
Chug-a-lug
How much Dr. Pepper can you
drink in 5 minutes?
There will be a Dr. Pepper
chugging contest sponsaed by Nu
Chi oolony of Alpha Sigma Phi.
Celebrate the semester's end
from 7-9 p.m. Thurs April 27.
The contest begins at 8 p.m. and
there is a 50-cent entry fee.
First prize is a Dr. Pepper
Igloo cooler and t-shirts to top
finishers. Be ECU'S No. 1 Pep-
oer.
Fa mae infamatiai call
Alpha Slg at 752-9845 a 756-
0893
'Nother car wash
The Lambda Chi Alpha f rat-
ernity will sponsa a car wash this
Sat April 29, fron 10 a.m. to 3
p.m.
It will be held at P.O. Boys on
Diokenson Ave. and the cost will
be $1.50.
The Pitt Co. Humane Society
is having its second Annual Art
Show-Bake Sale which will be
held on May 6, at 9 a.m all day
on Evans St. Mall, during "Be
Kind to Animals Week
Free drinks and food will be
provided all day fa the participat-
ing artists and aaftsmen.
Fa infamatiai call day and
night 756-6572; nights only 758-
0468.
Will the artists who have
already signed up fa this sale
please oontact the Humane Soc-
iety at 758-0468 a 756-6572. The
aiginal list was misplaoed.
Seniors
We have a limited supply of
announcements on hand in the
Student Supply Stae. There are
five in a package fa $1.50. Also,
remember to pick up your cap and
gown if you have not done so.
Study
The extended hours at Joyner
Library during spring exams are:
Fri. April 28 8 a.m. -11 p.m.
Sat April 29 9 a.m. -11 p.m.
Sun April 30 2 p.m. -12 p.m.
Mon May 1 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Tues May 2 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Wed May 3 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Thurs May 4 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri May 5 8 a.m. -11 p.m.
Sat May 6 9 a.m. -11 p.m.
Sun May 7 2 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Mon May 8 8 a.m. -12 p.m.
Seminar
Frank Arey, a Chemistry
grad. student will present a
seminar on April 28, at 2 p.m. in
room 201 Flanagan Building on
"Analytical Methods fa Measur-
ing F and Ca Ions in the Blue
Crab, Callinectes sapidus
Luther Hodges
Volunteers needed to help
wak with the Luther Hodges
campaign. Hodges, a demoaat,
is running fa the U.S. Senate. If
interested, call 758-4666.
Bike tour
Traveling companions wanted
fa bicycling tour to South
America.
Leaving May 17 from
Winston-Salem and will be travel-
ing back country roads in the U S.
and the Pan-American highway in
Central America.
Easy pace wih plenty of time
fa taking it easy. Not as costly
nor as difficult as you may
imagine. Fa mae infamatiai
call Neil at 752-7065
The AED pre-mea nona
society will hold its spring picnic
Sat April 22, beginning at 3
p.m. at the home of Dr. Ayers. All
members and associate members
are invited to attend. The final
meeting fa this semester will be
held at Western Sizzlin Tues
April 25, beginning at 5 p.m.
Take a study break and try to
attend.
A spiritual solution to wald
economic problems, a universal
language, abolition or prejudioe-
come hear the Bahai viewpoint on
these issues Wednesday evening
at 7 p.m. in room 242 Menden-
hall.
Your last oppatunity to learn
of this newest of the religions this
semester. Everyone is weloome.
Questions and answer discussion
Installation Full Gospel
The installation of new o 'ic-
ers and members fa the League
of Scholars will be on Thurs
April 27 at 7:30 p.m. in room 248
Mendenhall.
All members please attend.
Chess club
The Chess Club meets each
Tuesday evening at 730 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse. All
persons interested in chess are
invited to attend and join in the
oonpetition.
Pinball champ
The ECU Spring Pinball
Championship was won by Rick
Autry with high scores on three
machines.
Rick's scores were made on
'Amigo 'Champ and Grand
Prix
Rick was awarded the grand
prize of a $25.00 Happy Stae gift
certificate and the championship
trophy.
The second place winners
were Cheryl Boehm, James Dail,
Gwen Daniel, John Gardner,
Robert Kricko, Virgil Leggett,
Jan McKeithen, Jeff Rickman,
and Robert Rogers.
Each winner received a T-shirt
as their prize.
The three-week competition,
which ended last Thursday, invol-
ved twelve (12) different pinball
machines.
The individual with the high-
est soores overall won the grand
prize with second prize going to
individual winners.
The event was sponsaed by
Mendenhall Student Center.
Do you feel bound a insec-
ure?
Have you been searching in
many different places fa answers
to life's questions and have found
them empty? If so what are you
going to do with Jesus
Christ?
Come and hear fellow stud-
ents tell how they searched
through many of the wald s
attractive alternatives fa the
answerstolifesquestionsbut did
not find them there.
The Full Gospel Student Fel-
lowship invites everyone to attend
this meeting in Mendenhall 221
from 730- 9 p.m.
This will not be our last
meeting fa this year. We will
meet during the summer at
Windy Ridge Townhouses, num-
ber 68 on 14th St. extention East.
Fa mae infamatiai call 756-
0206.
F-G
The Faever Generatiai will
meet this Maiday night at 9 p.m.
in Brewster C-304.
Jobs
All ECU students who took
the Civil Service Summer Em-
ployment test and who would be
willing to wak in the Washington
D.C. area this summer are
requested to contact Terry Elks,
Karen Frye, Dr. Betsy Harper, a
Sandy Green in the Office of
Cooper at i ve Educat ion, 313 Rawl,
telephone 757-6979 immediately.
The Cooperative Education
office has infamatiai concerning
a number of outstanding jobs fa
persons who have received their
rating on this test.
FOUNTAINHEAD will return
May 24 and wUl be published
weekly during the summer.
A mandatory meeting will be held
May 18 at 3 pnu in the
FOUNTAINHEAD office, on the
second floor of the Publications
Center. If interested in working on
the paper this summer, be there!
� Be m Hi
-afc






�������������I
�I
Students
in9ec-
visit
Caswell
ByARAHVENAQLE
Staff Writer
Eighteen ECU psychology and
special education majors partici-
pated in "Project Inside Out"
held April 6, 7, and 8 at Caswell
Center in Kinston.
"Project Inside Out" is a
three-day live-in experience des-
igned to introduce pre-
professionals to function, organ-
ization, and structure of an
institution for the retarded.
The group lived on the
grounds of Caswell Center for the
three days, and slept in buildings
which once served as staff
housina.
The students assisted the staff
in daily activities.
Some students said they ex-
pected to find filth and inhumane
conditions in the living units.
Instead, they said they were
delighted to see the opposite.
The major deficiencies of the
institution, the students said,
were inadequate staffing, fund-
ing, and programs.
Other activities in "Project
Inside Out" included a tour of
campus and Caswell staff speak-
ers on problems and issues in the
field of mental retardation.
The students were accompan-
ied by an ECU faculty addvisor,
John Childers, assistant professor
of psycho! oqy.
The program was co-ordinated
by Mary Lingerfelt, student in-
tern co-ordinator at Caswell Cen-
ter, Zel Gilbert and Brenda
Stewart, Volunteer Services Re-
resentatives.
Participating ECU students
were: Betsy Eddins, Kay F.
Newsome, Bill Roger son, Joy
Black, Annie Madden, Sandra
Manning, Deborah Wright,
Pamela Faircloth, Jennifer
Brandt, Wanda Hill, Matlynn
Bryant, Peggy Durham, Beth
Fain, Gaylan Hoyle.
CALDER
Continued from p. 1
frustrations-l was a part of the
university said Calder.
Calder said the fight was the
first to occur in his office, except
for a "run-in" he had with a
professor several years ago.
"I could see the guy's stand-
point admitted Calder, smiling
and leaning back in his office
chair. "I saw a whole lot of myself
in him-l was very much like him
when I was his age.
"I'm not a virgin to a rough
sorap-l probably enjoyed it a little
bit said Calder. "It made me
feel young again, but I should
have known better
Calder said he has grown
mellow and wiser with age and
added he probably should have
reacted differently towards the
student.
Instead of swinging back,
Calder said he should have
pushed the student out the door
and attempted to avoid the fight.
27 April 1978 FOUNTA1NHEAD Pag� 3
final day L,
the ring sale.
$5995
save up to 22.c
Men's traditional Siladium� rings
and selected women's fashion rings
are an unusual buy at $59.95.
Today is your last chance to get really outstanding savings in this sale.
KTCTIRVED
REPRESENTATIVE
has a large collection of rings. Ask to see them.
Dates
tfML 28-28
Place
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE LOBBY
Deposit required. Ask about Master Charge or Visa.
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Hi ?.&��$ JS- � j -





n
HsVHShBbH
Editorials
Page 4 FPU NTAINHEAD 27 April 1978
Dr. Leo Jenkins �
a dedicated man
ECU was a small teacher's college when Dr. Leo
Jenkins joined the administration as dean of
academics in 1947. Dr. Jenkins became president of
East Carolina College in 1960, and chancellor of East
Carolina University in 1972.
ECU has undergone much expansion under
Jenkins' leadership, and perhaps the most important
addition to ECU'S facilities is the Medical School,
which was accredited last spring. The med school is a
long-awaited dream-oome-true which will benefit the
entire area of Eastern North Carolina.
Another of Dr. Jenkins' projects is the Ficklen
Stadium expansion, which is presently undergoing
construction. The stadium is being expanded from its
current 20,000 seating capacity to 35,000. After
completion, Ficklen Stadium will be the fourth
largest stadium in North Carolina. The expansion will
also include a three-level media facility and a
chancellor's box.
Many people have accused Dr. Jenkins of placing
more emphasis on athletics than other programs, but
one can only emphasize one or two projects at a time.
In addition to striving for the reality of the medical
school, Jenkins has at other times emphasized the
music and art programs. The condition of McGinnis
Auditorium certainly needs improving, and
Jenkins could have put less emphasis on the stadium
expansion or the medical school.
But, money for the expansion came from
donations while money for the renovation of a
building would have to come from the N.C.
Legislature. And the establishment of the medical
school was of utmost importance to the University
and the community.
Although Dr. Jenkins plans to establish a home at
Atlantic Beach, he certainly will not be content to be
idle. He has expressed a desire to join Gov. Hunt's
administration, although nothing definite has been
confirmed.
' Whatever activities Dr. Jenkins plans to
undertake, members of the ECU community can rest
assured that he will pursue them with as much zest
as he has for his projects for this university.
Fountainhead
sorting we cm gmh community tor onr firry paws.
"Weretttotttorntodedde whether we ahouks hav
a government without newepepere or newspapers
without government, I ehoutd not heertete e moment to
prefer the letter
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
NewsEdftor Doug White
Trends Editor Steve Bachner
Sports EditorChrh Hdioman
FOUNT AiHHEAD to lha studant mwffir of Eaat Carolina
University apunaaad by lha Media Board of ECU and la
distributed aaoh Tuaaday and Thuraday, weekly during the
aunvnar.
Mailing addraaa: Old Soufi Building, QroanviHa, N.C. 27834.
EdHorial offteaa: 757-638. 757-6387, 757-6308
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
Forum
Budget slights upset women athletes
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Injustice and unfairness is
and always will be an ever-
existing problem in today's soc-
iety, but it is the way one handles
this problem that determines just
how unjust and unfair the situa-
tion really is.
Such is the case in respect to
the Women's Athletic Budget at
ECU. Women athletes work just
as hard and have as much pride in
their athletic ability as any other
athlete. Why should they be
subjected to inadequate promo-
tion, facilities, traveling, lodging,
and food aJlowances?
The level of competition in
women's sports has greatly in-
creased, yet the funds available
have not been adeqaute to
compensate for this rise. Without
an increase in funds, Women's
Sports at ECU will never excell to
their potential level of achieve-
ment.
Improvements in scholar-
ships, recruiting, and adminis-
tration are necessary before this
level can be reached. All of this is
impossible to attain with the
present budget.
The progression of the
Women's Athletic Program can
only lead to the prosperity of the
entire Physical Education and
Athletic Department; and in turn,
the advancement of ECU as a
whole.
Sincerely,
Debby Newby
Donna Pendley
Jill Vaughn
Editorials
Revised bill in contempt of Bill of Rights
By JOE YAEGER
Editorial Writer
In 1973 President Nixon ordered the revision of
Federal criminal statutes, presumably because they
were out of date and had not been revised since 1909.
The resulting bill, known as S.1 was killed in
Congress because many of its provisions were
Gothic in the extreme and seriously curtailed
freedom given in the Bill of Rights.
A new form of that bill now known as S.1437, has
fewer of the repressive provisions of its
predecessors, yet remains dangerously in contempt
of the Bill of Rights. More alarming is that the
media, laijely responsible for S.1's demise, has
remained strangely quiet about an issue on which
the public knows little.
Nixon's intent in codifying the criminal code was
to curtail demonstrations and silence critics, but as
his proposals for doing that came to light, the bill's
opposition grew and ultimately defeated it.
Press silence and public ignoranoe could insure
passage of the new version unless the people are
made aware of the repressive nature of its statutes.
But the only press play the issue has been given so
far was an editorial in the Los Angeles Times in
September '77, and articles in February editions of
The Village Voice, a New York City weekly.
The press itself faces challenges from this bill.
Reporters may be held in criminal court contempt
for refusing to disclose confidential sources. A
federal obscenity statute will allow for a publisher or
distributor to be prosecuted in any uty or town with
stronger obscenity criteria than that in the bill.
This opens the way for the confusions and
possibilities for prosecutorial entrapment contained
m the 1973 " Miller" decision of the Supreme Court.
That decision permits widely variable community
standards for obscenity mnvictmns.
The Los Angeles Times is quoted in an editorial
last Septemer as saying "this legislation, since its
inception in 1973 under Nixon and in its mutations
reflects the undemocratic view that the government
requires protection from the citizens of the nation
m





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BH
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27 April 197B FOUNTAiNMEAD Pag 5
before this
Ml of this is
with the
of the
ogram can
srity of the
ation and
ind in turn,
ECU as a
Sincerely,
bby Newby
na Pendley
Jill Vaughn
ights
people are
ts statutes,
n given so
! Times in
editions of
iy-
n this bill,
contempt
ources. A
ublisher or
town with
lebill
sions and
contained
irne Court,
anmunity
m editorial
i, since its
mutations
avernment
e nation
j i���
reek forum
By RICK I GU ARM IS
Staff Writer
Right now, the Greek's atten-
tion turns to books and exams
instead of games and parties.
Fraternities and sororities
have wrapped up a year of
activities, both fun and of service
to the community and the univer-
sity.
The year has also been an
experimental time.
Student injured in
bicycle accident
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant News Editor
An ECU student was seriously
injured in a bicyde-pedestrian
accident Tuesday on College Hill
Drive.
The student was identified as
John Crowe, 21, of Rocky Mount.
Crowe is listed in stable
oondition in the intensive care
unit of Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
The accident occurred as
Crowe was riding his bicycle
behind a car on College Hill,
according to Francis Eddings,
chief of campus police.
A pedestrian stepped out
behind the car and in front of
Crowe, colliding with the handle-
bar of the bicycle.
The collision flipped the bicy-
cle and Crowe onto the ground.
Crowe was admitted to Pitt
County Memorial Hospital with
head injuries.
Eddings commented that bi-
cycle riders should be careful
riding their bicycles about cam-
pus.
Bicycle riders are suppose to
obey motor vehicle laws, accord-
ing to state law said Eddings.
"Many riders ride the wrong
way and should be more careful of
following the flow of traffic and
obeying signs Eddings added.
"I'veseen some people really
come around oorners fast he
said.
1' People should be more care-
ful
A campus police officer was
assaulted April 22 when he
attempted to gain identification of
a suspicious black male in the
woods near Jones dormitory.
The officer was struck in the
throat but was not seriously hurt.
The male fled and was not
apprehended as it was some
minutes before the officer could
summon help.
FEES
Continued from p. 1
over the years has compounded
the problem he said.
He said the students' financial
records can be posted currently
and refunds needed for rent,
books, and supplies will be
available much sooner.
"We've made provisions for
studentsto mail their payments in
and we will send their schedules
back to them Vainright said.
A complaint was received
from a parent for a 16-year-old
runaway that was believed to be
on campus.
The runaway was found in a
men's dormitory.
The semester system has been
a far ay from being easy; it's
been a year of longer, drawn-out
courses, harder finals, and long
nights in Joyner Library.
The semester system has also
been three quarters of Greek
activities packed into two semes-
ters. Perhaps there were some
things that could have been
planned at a better time but
people have benefited from the
mistakes.
Next year, when school starts
again, planning will be smoother
and budgeting time will come
easier.
It's time to turn to books and
exams and leave "Greek life"
behind for the summer. Come
August, school will open again
and another year of constant
celebration will begin.
Have a nioe summer!
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
The Phi Kappa Tau fraternity
and their little asters are having a
softball game, Sun April 30.
Their summer retreat will be
held July 14 and 15.
Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority
initiated their spring pledges on
April 15.
The Alpha Kappa Alpha soro-
rity entertained the brothers of
Alpha Phi Alpha and Kappa
Alpha Pa with a social event on
Sun April 23 at Tar River
Estates to celebrate the end of the
year.
The Sigma Sigma Sigma
sorority lost only two games
during the softball season to win
the sorority division champion-
ship.
The Tri-Sigs held their Senior
Send-On on Wed April 26, at the
home of Virginia Minges, their
chapter advisor. The seniors were
honored with a banquet.
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity
recently initiated 10 new brothers
and are planning a social with the
Alpha Phi sorority on April 30.
The Pi-Kaps have also scheduled
a Parent's Day for April 30.

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�HHH
�����������i
6F0UNTAINHEAD 27 April 1978
Director of ECU Poetry Forum
Vernon Ward
7newritmg
A BUSY STUDENT pauses to reflect on the spring semester and
upcoming exams
ByRICKIGLIARMIS
Staff Writer
Somewhat different in ap-
pearance than a conventional
poet, Vernon Ward, director of
ECU'S Poetry Forum, tilted his
almost bald head and began to
philosophize and reminisce
about his life and work.
Ward is retiring after 15 years
of service to the university.
"I have found teaching quite
satisfying, but 15 years was
enough snickers Ward.
Ward continues by explaining
that teaching poetry and helping
students to get their work pub-
lished are the most rewarding
aspects of his career.
The son of a doctor, Ward was
born in Bethel, and was raised in
Robersonville.
He attended school at Carn-
egie Institute of Technology and
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill.
"I've had a rather complex
life Ward commented.
"I've done everything from
working with the Railway Express
in New York to being employed at
Writers needed
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a dairy in Philadelphia
Adding to (he list of jobs.
Ward has also been in the
meichant marines, owned a vac-
at ion resort, and operated a dance
hall.
"Well in depressions times,
people with degrees like myself
had to do hard labor expahns
Ward.
Ward believes being active
in the anti-war movement during
the Korean War to be one of the
most important facets of his life.
During this time, Ward pub-
lished "Poems for Peace a
collection of poems so powerful
that several persons lost their
jobs fa simply handing the
pamphlets out.
Other works by Ward include
"International Poems" and "Of
Dust and Stars
Several of his poems have
appreared in anthologies such as
"The Poets of North Carolina"
and "Wad Gathers
To hona Ward's wak and
service to the university, the
English department set up a
collection of coitempaary poetry
in Ward's name.
The presentation was made by
renowned poet William Staff ad
during his visit to ECU.
Ward explains that his
poetry deals with various subjects
but many are politically aiented.
Several of my poems concern
the wald, the government, and
the pubiically owned economic
Education
investment
ECU NEWS BUREAU
ATLANTIC BEACH-The fact
that two-thirds of every tax dollar
in North Carolina is allocated to
education shows "a great sense
of understanding that education
is a wathy investment fa our
future Dr. Leo Jenkins said
today.
"We must praect this confi-
dence and make the best use
possible of our people and other
resources the ECU chancella
told the N.C. Higher Education
Personnel Assn. here.
He told the assembled person-
nel managers and directas that
their wak is "vital" because it
deals with "our most important
resource - people
He ntfexJ that most maja
institutiais in Nath Carolina and
the nation spend 65 to 70 per cent
of their budgets on personnel
related needs.
"Proper management of our
people offers the best oppat unity
fa containing future growth in
cost serf operating Jenkins said.
Jenkins said East Caraina is
credited "with the best utilization
rate of any four-year college a
university - state-suppated a
private-in Nath Carolina" and
that this "really boils down to
what our people do.
"We are proud that our recad
shows we place top priaity ai
being good custodians fa the
resources provided by the tax-
to retire
system, Ward describes.
"Anything that'sbugging me,
I write about Ward further
explains.
What does the future have in
stae fa Ward after retirement?
Being single, Ward grinned
and replied that he will coitinue
the daily routine of being a
housewife.
Fa years Ward has been
cooking, cleaning house, and
doing the laundry.
Ward also expressed his inter-
est in fiddling with a vegetable
garden. He proposes to buy a
greenhouse in the near future in
ader to expand his hobby.
As fa mae exciting adven-
tures, Ward expects to reinstate
his favaite pastime, which is
traveling.
Having traveled to Europe
five times and around the wald
once, Ward feels he will find his
excursions familiar but all the
mae exciting.
And where does writing fit
into Ward's future?
"I definitely plan to continue
writing Ward confirmed.
"I have many notes and
manuscripts to wak on
The end of a teaching career is
three weeks from being ova fa
Ward.
As fa his career as a poet,
Ward is na prepared to leave that
part of his life behind, yet.
is 'worthy
of future'
payers of Nath Carolina Jen-
kins said.
The "key resource" in ser-
vices and service aganizatiois,
such as higha education institu-
tions, is "human talent he said.
"In our education andgovan-
ment professions, we represent a
significant element in the Ameri-
can laba market-the public
service secta" which comprises
16 per cent of waking Ameri-
cans, he said.
In universities and in other
state agencies, he said, "we are
without the free enterprise mar-
ket to determine effectiveness
but are measured on how well the
mission and goals are met.
"We know that we are owned
by the people, and their elected
officials help establish the job
that we are to do. And to a large
extent the citizens assess our
effectiveness he said.
"This is a good process and
instills a true uncterstanding of
the American process, and it
bears on the way we must do our
jobs
He told the personnel officials
that "public affairs is vitally
impatant
" I f we earn favaable press on
what our people have done, and
what our programs have contribu-
ted, it gives us a feeling of
satisfaction and reassures the
taxpayas that they are putting
their money to good use.
See JENKINS P A





�������IM1
��
MHnHH
Group forms Ayden Drama Workshop
27 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAP P�g 7
Community generates involvement through drama
ByEMILYKILLETTE
Staff Writer
Rita Bosse, Ayden's librarian
and last year's Collard Festival
chairperson always insisted that a
community needs more than
football, basketball, and other
sports.
According to the librarian
drama is also an important part of
the American culture and Ayden
lost that part of their culture when
high school teacher Da tas
Mitchell left.
"He (Mitchell) took histalen�
and left, and the drama club
which was very strong is gone
also sighed Rita Bosse.
But now Bosse says Ayden
has a chance to bring drama back!
"One day a friend, Ann
Creech (of Pitt County Board of
Education), and the Superintend-
ent of Pitt County Schools came
to me and asked me what would
be needed to generate oommunity
involvement in the use of public
JENKINS
Continued from p. 6
"In earning a favorable image
by the press, we are able to
attract the best prospects as
employees; we find it easier to
justify new programs-a lot of
things that are made easier if the
performance of our people at-
tracts high praise
In all cases, Jenkins said, "we
school resources.
"I figured right then and
there that it was time to act a to
get my foot out of my mouth
laughed Bosse.
So, she reocommended that
Ayden begin work on drama and
she cultivated a meeting of
interested people.
At the first meeting there
was Joel McLawborn, Louise
Moseley, Kim Dale, Ann Creech,
and ALice Keen plus Rita Bosse
and Sam Jones, who went to
generate ideas and encourage
action, Mrs. Bosse claims.
And the group elected Joel
McLawhorn to be their president
and Kim Dale as secretary. They
asked Rita Bosse and Sam Jones
to check about possible use of the
stages at the old Ayden High
School and the Ayden-Grifton
High School. The group also
agreed to apply fa a Grass Roots
Grant to help fund the drama.
The individuals at the meeting
were asked to think of ideas fa a
drama and a second meeting will
be called when news of the grant
is received.
Accading to Rita Bosse, the
group present at the first meeting
were famer students of Doug
Mitchell and they famed a group
called the Ayden Drama Wak-
shop which meets in the library.
The students of the old Ayden
High School drama department
waked under Mitchell. They
made their own stage props and
lighting equipment as well as
their own costumes.
"They once did the play
Camelct said Bosse, "and my
mother who is very aitical and
very used to Broadway plays had
no aitioismsof it
"Joel McLawhan was in the
play and he is a very talented
young man and a fantastic
person
"All we need is one suooess
and then everyone will want to
get on the band wagon, so we are
open to all kinds of talent of
all ages, remarked Bosse.
The drama will include people
of all ages and if it does not
include young people, Mrs.
Bosse, a cub scout den maher,
says she will have to fight until
she gets them involved.
But now, the group is consid-
ering ideas fa the drama and Rita
Bosse thinks they should do some
publicizing at the Collard Fest-
ival.
"I think we should have a
one-act play ai the street caner
gain some publicity at the
Collard Festval.
"But one person will have to
make the final decision as to what
we do fa the drama and I hope
they will use some fam of
publicity at the Festival Bosse
explained.
Rita Bosse would like to see
the drama become histaical but
she says that may take awhile
because she wants it get off the
ground first
must aient our loyalty and work
both to our aganizatioi and to
the individual-an obligation to
commit our resouroes to the
overall mission of higher educa-
tion in North Carolina. Fulfilling
this commitment is, in a sense,
loyalty to the aganizatioi and
sometimes takes priaity over the
individual
But he addea mat "we also
owe loyalty to the per son one of
themaja secrets to our suooess in
the university setting
Jenkins said he does not
subscribe to the theay that a
technological society tends to
depreciate the need fa a great
deal of human element.
"There is a strong sense of
belonging which possess most all
happy and successful people in
the profession of education
Jenkins said.





vwyi
��������MMIMHHH
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 April 1978
Departure' point from the conventional
Outdoor instruction includes rappeling
Saratoga Springs, N.Y.�You
stand braced against the granite
edge of the mountain top, hung
perilously between heaven and
earth.
The wind ripples through your
clothing, and far below the tree
tops sway.
A heady mixture of fear and
exhileration tingles through your
body.
You lean into the ropes, and,
moving your feet cautiously over
the rock, back off the cliff edge
into the sky.
In a moment you find yourself
facing the sheer reck of the cliff,
and with a rush of elation, you
glide down the ropes earthward.
This is one of the many
experiences provided by the
Adirondack Institute in their
summer mountain journeys.
Located at Skidmore College
in Saratoga Springs, New York,
the Institute uses the Colorado
Rockies, the Adirondack moun-
tains, and the wilds of northern
Ontario as departure points from
the conventional in education by
offering three-credit hour litera-
ture courses where all instruction
takes place outdoors.
Participants complete their
reading on their own before
gathering at the field sites for ten
days of field instruction-which in
the mountain oourses includes
rock climbing, rappleing, and
river fording. .
The program has been so
successful over the past five years
that it has attracted students from
over 100 colleges in 25 states.
Credit earned in the Institute
oourses is usually transferable
back to the student's home
institution.
Professor Jonathan Fair-
banks, aeator and director of the
Adirondack Institute, explains
that "the program is intended to
be a variation on the traditional
academic courses, and is meant to
supplement, not replace them
"Most literature oourses
taught in the dassroom are
essentially an intellectual exer-
cise Fairbanks explains.
"This program takes litera-
ture and tests it against exper-
ience
A former Outward Bound
instructor in Colorado and in
England, Fairbanks wilderness
experience ranges from climbing
in the New Zealand Alps to
canoeing white water in the
United States and Canada.
The Adirondack course in-
cludes writings by Hemingway,
Faulkner, London, and Frost,
while titles such as "Tough Trip
Through Paradise ' The Big
Sky and "The Comanches"
sprinkle the Colorado reading list.
The Canadian course emphasizes
exploration literature.
The groups are oo-ed and are
comprised of 12 students and two
instructors.
The program is open to all
undergraduates and other inter-
ested adults, and welcomes non-
credit applicants as well as those
seeking credit.
Further information can be
obtained by writing Adirondack
Institute, Dana Hall, Skidmore
College, Saratoga Springs, New
York 12866.
$ CASH $
FOR TEXTS AT
THE UBE
NOW Is The Best TVne To Sell
We have
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paying top doftars for
U.S. z
m
University Book Exchange
528 S. Cotanche St.
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Downtown
SUSPENDED BETWEEN HEA VEN
periously over the granite edge.
MEDIA
Continued from p. 1
Media Board in the referendum
held last February.
The board praised McCourt
and his colleagues for pursuing a
cause they believed in and took no
action on the Media Board.
The roster of the 1978 grauda-
ting class was approved, subject
to the students' completion of the
necessary requirements for gra-
duation.
A resolution was passed ex-
pressing the board's sympathy
for the family of Clarissa Blakely
McElmon, an ECU senior who
and earth, a rappeler plunges
was killed in an auto accident last
October, and also the board's
apprecaition of Ms. Elmon's
contributions to the university.
Wednesday's meeting was
Chancellor Leo Jenkins' 107th
board meeting and his last before
retiring.
Dr. Jenkins received a plaque
"in appreciation of 31 years of
unprecedented service and lea-
dership to ECU and eastern North
Carolina
This was also the first time
newly elected SGA president
Tommy Joe Payne sat with the
board. Vice-Chanceilor Robert
Holt delivered the oath of office
prior to the meeting.
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����IOBK1MWBH

r plunges
accident last
the board's
s. Elmon's
jniversity.
eeting was
ikins' 107th
s last before
'ed a plaque
31 years of
x and lea-
istern North
e first time
president
� with the
lor Robert
ith of office
vn
?r
he
Child-snatching
not unusual case
By FRANCEINE PERRY
ECU NEWS BUREAU
When "Mr. X custodial
father of two girls, saw his
daughters off to school in Delaware
one March morning, he hardly
suspected he would have to go
hundreds of miles to bring them
home again.
But during the day, his
ex-wife took the girls out of school
and set off with them to her new
residence in Florida.
An unusual case?
Hardly, according to ECU
social work professor Ken Lewis.
About 300.(XX) similar �child-
snatching" incidents occurred
during 1977
Dr. Lewis, an associate pro-
fessor at ECU, was one of the
North Carolina representatives
invited to speak in Atlanta at the
recent Southeast Regional Hear-
ings sponsored by the National
Commission for Children in Need
of Parents.
"The child-snatching pheno-
menon is not limited to any social
class or racial group, but cuts
across all strata of society he
said.
Perhaps the most well-
Known such incident is the 1975
Mellon case - a Pittsburgh
billionaire's two daughters, sent
to visit their mother in North
Carolina, were taken by the
mother to New York, where she
sued for legal custody.
"Since the father had legal
custody of the children only in
Dennsylvania, he was unable to
recover them through the courts.
Ultimately he hired several men
to bring the children back to
Pennsylvania
Recently, 22 states have pass-
ed the Uniform Child Custody
Jurisdiction Act (UCCJA) in an
attempt to curb child-snatching.
The act provides that a state
honor custody decrees in other
states, thus avoiding interstate
jurisdictional disputes between
parents.
Of the southeastern states,
only Florida has yet passed the
UCCJA, Lewis noted.
"A child who is snatched by a
separated parent and brought to
Florida may be returned to the
custodial parent with minimal
time delays and therefore signifi-
cantly fewer psychological
soars he said.
Since the act had been passed
in Florida before Mr. X's children
were taken there, his story has a
happy ending.
"A oopy of the Delaware
custody decree was presented to
the sheriff of that Florida oounty
where the children were staying,
so they flew home with their
father that night Lewis ex-
plained.
But when a state is under no
legislative obligation to honor a
previous decree in another state,
a father and a mother can have
two separate but equally legal
custody orders
Reports indicate that parents
who "snatch" their children are
about evenly divided between
mothers and fathers.
Now that more courts are
awarding custody of minor chil-
dren to fathers who seek it, the
number of mothers unwilling to
abide by the decrees is growing.
"Passage of the UCCJA in
every state will not guarantee an
end to child-snatching, but is a
move in the right direction to
reduce this psychological crime
against our children Lewissaid.
The National Commission for
Children in Need of Parents is
empowered by Congress to study
and make recommendations on
adoption, foster care, legal and
legislative issues, and social work
problems regarding children.
Its southeastern hearings
were held in the Georgia State
Capitol, with eight southeastern
states represented.
North Carolina's delegation
was chaired by Ruth McCracken,
executive director of the Chil-
dren's Home Society of N.C and
Robin Peacock, supervisor of
adoption services for the N.C.
Department of Human Resour-
ces.
Located on
E. 10th Street,
2 doors down
from Kings
Sandwich .
phone
752-6680
Bill McDonald
"See me for car, home, life, health
and business insurance
I.ike a good neighbor.
State Farm is there.
27 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pmg� 9
THIS STUDENT soaked up some sun last week while rain soaked the state most of this week
WECU
Continued from p. 1
"FM isdefinite. It is going to
happen-it's here Jeter said
proudly.
"It will be a tremendous
service to ECU he emphasized.
People don't realize how
powerful radio is, what it can
do
"There's no excuse a univer-
sity of our size and quality not
being on the air
It took a lot of hard work and
time. I'm really happy Jeter
said. "If it's the last thing I do
befae I leave school, I want to
see that the FM station gets on
the air
If ith a 10 inch pizza, get one free drink.
With a 14 inch pizza, get two free drinks.
With a 17 inch pizza, get 3 free drinks.
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�����Hl
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 April 1978
Talley headlines Singer-Songwriter Festival
By DAVID WHITSON
9taff Writer
The Grass Roots Ptogram of
The North Carolina Arts Council
is sponsoring the first annual
(many of the same also played on
the next two albums), which
helped make the record the
impressive debut it is.
But it was really the songs
which brought the album home.
Trends
Singer-Songwriter Festival fea-
turing Capitol recording artist
James Talley. The festival, also
featuring local talent, will be held
at the Roxy Theatre here in
Greenville on April 29.
Talley will conduct a workshop
for local composers at 2 p.m. and
perform in concert at 9 p.m.
His music has been called
everything from revolutionary to
reactionary, but where it all goes
is back to the roots of American
folk music, incorporating the
blues, country-and-western, and
swing, as well as traditional folk.
James Talley is a working-
class hero, trading his carpentry
skills fa studio time, producing
his own records, even to the point
of promoting and distributing his
first album a few years ago.
He's been likened to Jimmy
Rodgers and reviews of his
albums make it sound like Talley
is Rodgers, Bob Wills, and Hank
Williams all rolled into one.
It'sail very apparent, though,
from listening to Talley's albums
or from watching the man in
concert, that he is a very different
musician for the 1970's.
When other c & w musicians
are powering up their acts and
music with the beat and electric
leads borrowed from rock 'n roll,
Talley keeps his sound plain and
simple.
Sure, the instruments were
amplified at his recent Main Point
gig, but Talley is still very bound
to basics-Talley on acoustic
guitar accompanied by lead gui-
tar, bass, drums, and fiddle.
Lots of fancy playing, but no
gimmicks.
After moving from Oklahoma
to the Nashville area nine years
ago, James Talley worked on a rat
control project and then got a job
as a carpenter, using his spare
time to get some songs together.
He managed to make a deal
with the owner of a studio which
he was remodeling to take his
payment in recording time.
The fruits of his labor are
heard on Got No Bread, No Milk,
No Money, But We Sure Got A
Lot of Love, an album which he
originally released on his own
small Torreon label.
Talley mailed out his own
promotional copies to radio sta-
tions, but Capitol Records even-
tually became interested enough
to put the album out with the
nationwide distribution it de-
served.
A number of top-notch studio
men heard about Talley's versa-
tile digital dexterity when he was
literally m the construction phase
of his project, and their services
were donated on that first album
A rewrite of "Red River
Memory a western swing thing
called "W. Lee O'Daniel And The
Light Crust Dough Boys and
the poor man's optimism embo-
died in the title track typify his
variety of musical moods.
The covers of h i s records show
working-class folks right at work.
"You Know I've Got to Love
Her
Talley's story lines cut across
generations in "Migrant Jesse
Sawyer" and "Mississippi River
Whistle Town
And, of course, there's the
music, including Johnny Gim-
ble's fiddle work on "When The
Fiddler Packs His Case" and B.B.
King's guitar on "Bluesman
The songs and arrangements
for the individual cuts are vir-
tually definitive, a aedit to all
concerned and especially to Tal-
ley himself fa developing his
talents from writing to perfam-
ing to producing.
The turnout at Talley's recent
Main Point gig was disappoint-
ingly small, but Talley and
Talley may have no fatune a
have no fame. But he's sure got a
lot of talent.
Pop and rock aitics hae
responded to Tal ley's music and
the stack of favaable reviews
should be enough to cause some
Nashville powers to reconsider
Tal ley's potential.
After all, the recent (overdue)
emergence of Willie Nelson-
thanks in great part to pop and
rook support-ought to have been
enough of a warning to Nashville
that times have changed.
Significantly, Talley has arri-
ved at a time when few country
artists are dealing aeatively with
the wakingman theme.
Even Cash and Haggard have
drifted from it.
He's been likened to Jimmy Rodgers
reviews of his albums make it sound like
Talley is Rodgers, Rob Wills, and Hank
Williams all rolled into one
The second Ip, Tryin' Like The
Devil, extended Talley's roots
even further, musically and topi-
cally, with themes like "Faty
Hours" and "Are They Gonna
Make Us Outlaws Again? but in
addition to those tunes written in
defense of the oommon man,
Talley soaed with several fine
love ballads.
There is a good bit of overlap
between the music of Willie
Nelson and that of James Talley.
But while both mine the same
musical style and both have
strong individual vocal capabili-
ties, each has his own sound.
Talley hasn't attracted large
numbers of followers yet, but
among those who listen to him are
the Carter Family, whose farmers
from Geagia who now live in
Washington.
Chip Carter told Talley that
Rosalynn Carter said she wasn't
going to the Inaugural if James
Talley wasn't perfaming.
Talley obliged and Mrs. Car-
ter attended. Although Talley
received much favaabie publicity
from the showing, he has yet to
build a legion of listeners.
Things should turn around
soon, though, fa hislp, Blackjack
Choir, has ten memaable pieces,
which again run through every-
thing from folk to country to blues
to western swing.
The songs this time around
are far rrore consistent than ever
befae.
The single off the album,
"Alabama Summertime" is just
one of several light-textured
ballads, which would be very
effective on MOR radio stations
as well as those swan to c & w.
But Talley's universality in
song is what finally sets him apart
from ahers of his meddle.
It wouldn't be a surprise at all
to see other artists cover that
single, Up From Geagia a
company did a little longer set
than they had to, pulling plenty
from all three records.
Just as country music is
becoming a mae impatant part
of the American pop mentality,
James Talley adds a new stimula-
ting intelligent element to the
changes.
Though Cash oontinues to
identify with the underdog in
much of his music, the new
reoadings generally lack the bite
and artistry of his peak "Folsom
Prison" period.
On the surface James Talley's
country and western career
sounds like an Haatio Alger
stay.
After years of little success in
Nashville, Talley decided to make
a record on his own in 1974.
In exchange fa helping build
a studio, he received free recad-
ing time.
Employing some of the best
back-up musicians in Nashville,
he made Got No Bread, No Milk,
No Money, But We Sure Got a Lot
of Love, pressed a thousand
oopies and sent it to recad
companies and readio stations.
Capitol Recads picked the
album up and, though its sales
were only moderate, it received
rave reviews.
Talley most recently played at
Jimmy Carter's inauguration at
the request of the First Lady, wtio
oounts him as one of ha favaite
musicians.
As if on cue, his album,
"Blackjack Choir includes a
paean to Jimmy's state, "Up
From Geagia
One aitic said, "People have
been waiting a long time fa
saneaie like Talley If desaip-
tion of him and his music appeals
to you, you maybe one of them.
And if there is any justice left
in the music industry, the others
should na be far behind.
Admission to the wakshop is
50- .Tents. Seats fa the concert are
$2.00 and $2.50. Fa mae
infamatiai ai eitha the concert
a the wakshop call 752-8949 a
752-7483.
"JAMES TALLEY IS a working-class hero, trading
his carpentry skills for studio time, producing his
own records, even to the point of producing and
distributing his first album a few years ago





mwHin
27 April 1978 FOUhfTAINHEAD Page 11
ral
��
AfiC succeeds with 'The Champagne Complex'
By CHRISFARREN
Staff Writer
tie success in
cided to makeThe Mendenhall Student Cen-
in 1974.ter completed its second season of
helping builddinner theaters this past weekend
d free reoord-with the 'Champagne Complex
The show, Mendenhall's sixth
over the past 2 years was directed
j of the bestby Wanda Edwards and Dana
in Nashville,Mills, and catered by the East
wd, No Milk,Carolina Home Eoonomics
Sure Got a LotDepartment.
a thousandRunning Thursday through
t to recordSunday, the dinner theater wad
io stations.sold out Friday and Saturday
nights, and well received every
picked the jgh its sales

, it received
itly played at
mguration at
rst Lady, urtioV Ar�jji
f her favoritetk 1 �! wLA
his album,�sr w �t�
includes aW
state, "Upi
People have��L �
ng time for
" If descrip-
lusic appeals
one of them.
ly justice left
y, the others 9hind.

workshop is' ' ' Vjg
e concert are:
For more
r the concert- i1 ��
752-6949 or� - �
night, according to Ken Ham-
mond, program director at Men-
enhall.
Dinner was first and the food,
served buffet style, was very well
prepared and nicely served, lack-
ing if anything in imagination.
The show itself was equally as
well prepared with special
emphasis on the truly outstanding
set, which according to Ken
Hammond was designed and
constructed soiey by Dana Mills.
Other standouts in the produc-
tion included Bob McCutcheon's
superb portrayal of Helms Fell
'A
s X-
JERRY ADDERTON, MASTER Technician for MSC Dinner Theatre
The Champagne Complex
Pi Kappa Lambda
honors retiring teachers
xJuoing and
ago
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Three faculty members of the
ECU School of Music who are
retiring or have recently retired,
will be honored Thurs April 27,
at a dinner.
Hosts for the event are
members of Pi Kappa Lambda
honor society in music.
Attending will be members of
the ECU music faculty and other
guests.
New frnembers of Pi Kappa
Lambda Will be inducted during
the evening, and the society plans
to perform a special induction
ceremony for their newty-elected
honorary member, Norman
Luboff, who is scheduled to
attend.
The retiring honorees include
Elizabeth Drake and Eleanor
Ethridge Toll of the keyboard
faculty, and Dr. Catherine
Murphy of the Music education
faculty.
Miss Drake retired last
spring, and Dr. Murphy retired in
December.
Mrs. Toll plans to retire at the
end of the current semester.
A member of the ECU music
faculty since 1946, Elizabeth
Drake studied at UNC-Greens-
boro, the Julliard School of
Music, Columbia University and
the Eastman School of Music.
She also did graduate study at
Miami University and participa-
ted in programs at the Aspen
Institute of Music and the Cha-
tauqua, N.Y School.
Her memberships include
Delta Kappa Gamma honor
society and the Music Teachers
National Association.
Before joining the ECU music
faculty in 1966, Dr. Murphy was
director of the Florida State
University piano pedagogy pro-
gram.
She did graduate study at
Florida State, the Eastman School
of Music and the Union Theologi-
cal Seminary School of Sacred
Music, and received her BFA
degree in voioe performance from
A & M College, Oklahoma.
In addition to teaching, she
has been active in church music in
Oklahoma City and Stillwater,
Okla.i Thomasville, Ga Talla-
hassee, Fla. and Greenville.
Harper, an aspiring young, cor-
porate executive, and also the
overall enthusiasm of the actors
and their well timed direction.
The play's shortcomings are
those evident in nearly any show
which takes place in one room
among three actors; loss of
attention, and it was the enthu-
siasm on stage which kept this at
a minimum.
Said McCutcheon, "I was very
pleased with the result" and
thought the play ran relatively
smooth and seemed to meet with
good response all four nights.
Credit goes to the entire staff
for offering a unique and pleasant
entertainment alternative to the
area.
With the success of the past
year, already three more dinner
theaters have been scheduled for
next year, in November, Feb-
ruary, and April, according to
Hammond.
Ticket prices have been $8.50
for the public and $6.00 for
students and should remain the
same through next year.
The shows are subsidized by
Mendenhall, and the ticket sales
go only to oover the balance of
expenses.
With an increasing amount of
student attendance, and the
already heavy community traffic,
I��
response has steadily been grow-
ing.
Only 100 seats are available
per night, and future dinner
theaters look forward to being
sold out all four nights.
3UM
mcL
KALIAN RESTAURANT
$1.00 OFF
ANY PIZZA WITH COUPON
2713 E. 10TH STREET
768-1042
OFFER EXPIRES MAT 4,1978.
This Week At The
J Tonite- The Best in DISCO
Fri 3 to 7 End Of The Week Party
Sat April 29th Semi-Finals of Sat Nite Fever
Every Sun. is Ladies Nite
Thurs May 4th- Tenth Ave. Band
Sat May 6th- Finals Of SaL Nite Fever L
BE THERE!
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Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 April 1978
SU Free Flicks abound during final weeks
By STEVE BACHNER
Trends Editor
Two Student Union Free
Flicks and one special movie
esentation remain on the Stu-
dent Center slate for this semes-
ter. Royal Flash will be shown
'His Friday and Saturday night;
Carnal Knowledge will be shown
ed. May 3, and Fantastic
vage will be shown Friday and
Saturday night May 5 and 6.
ROYAL FLASH AT 7p.m. and 9
o m.
There is more than enough
jrity in the cockeyed adven-
es of Captain Flashman to
satisfy devotees ot this sort of
effervescent nonsense. Lester fol-
ows his Musketeer comedies
.vi th sufficient honor Florinda
Bolkan is an earthy knockout as
tie sexy, demanding Lola Mon-
tex. wno finds a hairbrush useful
er bedroom bouts. Icy Bntt
Ekland amuses as the duchess
married to Flashman in a fraudu-
lent arrangement
William Wolf
Adventure comedy distin-
guished by its visual sumptuous-
JACK NICHOLSON AS he
appears in "Carnal Know-
ledge.
Wielkqzpi�S)St0re
ATA
AMOCO
OPEN
24HRS.
NTH
EVANS STREETS
75lb�. k�$2.50
Cooler Cat n lc� choice . '8.00
Cooler Cat n lev others �.50
CASE OF
Budw�i��r�.�! . . '6.99
Budwisr,
Stroht, K�t
Schlitx,
Miller.
.$38.00
ARMYNAVY STORE
Sleeping bags, camping equip
ment, rainwear. Vietnam & corn
bat boots, dishes. Military sur
plus
1501 S. Evans Street
rf
RIGGAIS
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER GOODS
downtown Greenville
111 Wes� 4th S� 758-02CX
ness, constant comic inventive-
ness and Malcolm McDowell's
tongue-in-cheek-swashbuckling
performance.
The story follows the irrever-
ent and ribald Captain Harry
Paget Flashman, of the 11th
Hussars, as he deflowers both
royalty and peasantry alike,
indulges his passion for inordi-
nate gambling and runs for cover
at the first sign of swordplay.
Like the recent Musketeer
movies, it manages to be by turns
delightfully witty, ridiculously
absure and maliciously satirical.
FANTASTIC VOYAGE AT 7pm.
and 9 p.m.
Fantastic Voyage is all that
amusing and exciting, and the
interior decorations have a bubb-
ly, fantastic quality you won t find
this side of Disneyland
Bosley Crowther
In the year 1995. a valuable
Czech scientist escaping from
behind the Iron Curtain is attack-
ed by enemy agents.
His brain is severely injured,
and the injury is inoperable by
traditional techniques.
A team of scientists is placed
aboard an atomic-powered sub-
marine, reduced to the size of
bacteria, and injected into the
scientist's bloodstream.
Objective. Reach the brain
and repair the injury.
First, however, they must
battle such complications as a
60-minute time limit, an attack by
antibodies in the bloodstream,
PREPARING
FOR EXAMS?
Rely on the most extensively used review book
in professional nursing
Mosby's
COMPREHENSIVE
REVIEW OF NURSING
610 pages incorporating the latest knowledge,
newest trends and current practices
New (1977) 9th Edition Now Available at the Bookstore
or call toll-free (800) 325-4177 to Order Direct.
MOSBY

TIMES MIRROR
imjamy i ir'ui wf mi iNf iNniirmAi nrtisf r;r i timr. Missouri 63141 A8Q610
turbulent sound vibrations, and
an attempt to sabotage their
mission.
CARNAL KNOWLEDGE AT 8
p.m.
Here we have three episodes
that span over two decades and
involve two friends who graphi-
cally discuss and compare their
sexual pasts.
Jack Nicholson and Art Gar-
funkel are the friends, and both
have grown from sex-starved
college students into sexually
bewildered adults.
Nicholson is a playboy who
marries a playgirl and divorces
her, turning to a prostitute to
bolster his waning virility.
Garfunkel, who has become a
doctor, likewise marries and
divoroes.then turns to a "spiri-
tual" arrangement with a naive
hippie.
The film becomes, then, an
exploration of the lives of these
two men. their totally different
personalities, but their similari-
ties in sexual frsutrations.
MALCOLM MCDOWELL GIVES a tongue-in-cheek-swashbuckling
performance in "Royal Flash
Two man boat
20 off
Sale $17.60
Reg. 21.99. Two-man boat
kit features 3 air chambers,
two oars, foot pump and
mflatible cushions 84' x50'
Th
is
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Pitt Plaza, Open 10 Am to 9:30 PM
���MnHMH





ks
ilayboy who
nd divorces
irostitute to
nlity.
as become a
larnes and
to a "spiri-
ith a naive
s. then, an
es of these
ly different
sir similari-
ions.
buckling
it
"3,
0"
27 ApriM978 FQUNTAIIMHEAD Page 13
MICHAEL RUTHERFORD AND Phil Collins of
"Genesis "Lay your body down upon the
midnight snow, feel the cold of winter in your hair .
Here in a world of your own. in a casting that's
grown, to a children's delight That arrived
overnight. And here they come to play their magic
gamesCarving names upon your frozen hand.
Here in a world of your own, like a sleeper whose
eyesSees the pain with surpriseAs it smothers
your cries They'll never never know
Vinyl Review
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
GENESIS
.AND THEN THERE
WERE THREE
I don't want to beat around
the bush but none of us are
getting any younger. There's
people out there who could take
your place. A more commercial
view 1 A fresher face'
" Down And Out")
A
Well, at least we know where
you're coming from, guys-the
Atlantic record execs back in the
States are screaming for another
album, so, fearing for your niche
in the immortal grooves of vinyl,
you crank out another disc.
ASSAULT ON AMERICAN
WEST MYTH
Passion, importance, even
meaning are all missing from this
album. An assault on the Ameri-
can West myth occupies some
scattered cuts on the album: the
tale of Big Jim Cooiey on his
cattle drive, in "Ballad of Big
coming from a British classical
rock band, sounds as meaningless
as the Eagles singing "Street-
fighting Man "Deep in the
Motherlode" delivers the mes-
sage that glory and the search for
gold isn't for everyone (isn't that
what the dO's were all about?);
while "Snowtxxjnd" alludes to
the Donner Party (I think).
BAND IS'DOWNAND OUT"
"Down And Out" from which
the lyrics above are Quoted,
seems to sum up the n jod of the
band at this point in time.
The gist of the album is that
nothing matters�not gold, nor
glory, nor conquest of women
nor this album, for that matter.
Lyrics copywright 1978 Gel-
ring Ltd. I Ram It Music, Inc.

BOB WELCH: FRENCH KISS
A fine, easy to listen to
collection of shallow love songs
that all sound alike.
All of the songs (except for
"Outskirts") land the simple
pleasures of hedonism-fall in
love, catch a quick thrill.
Perhaps, as in "Hot Love
Cold World break your little
heart.
Welch's one departure from
the love song theme, "Out-
skirts is a trivial exploration of
the life of a half-assed outlaw who
is trying to impress us with his
toughness.
While Welch doubtlessly
meant this to be a serious song, it
crumbles into self-parody.
As Fleetwood Mac fans
already know, "Sentimental
Lady" involves the combined
efforts of Mick Fleetwood, Chris-
tine McVie, and Lindsay Bucking-
ham along with Welch.
The other cuts were created
by the talents of Welch (guitars,
bass and vocals) and Alvin Taylor
on drums. Such a dual effort is
commendable, but no excuse.
SU books current
films for next year
ByMARCADLER
Staff Writer
Saturday Night Fever. Annie
Hall, and Looking for Mr Good-
bar are a few of the flicks which
are being considered for next
year, said the new chairperson
of the Films Committee. Linda
Taylor.
"These movies are among
about 27 others which the commi-
ttee is discussing but nothing is
scheduled at this time said
Taylor, who is a rising junior.
The flicks which will be shown
are newer releases due to the film
distibutors new policy, said Tay-
lor.
This new policy is being
able to rent movies which are just
12 months old instead of renting
only movies which are 18 months
old stated Taylor
"Before. ECU couldn't get
films that soon But now it is
possible to get top rate movies
which are current said
Taylor.
According to Taylor the Films
Committee might show some
J�jfe$
5"?
Thanks
For Shopping
tvith us!
MMYERSERT SALf IPML �-M
��� � tht fat to buy
At Barre, Ltd.
�05 Dtcklraon Ave.
Phone 752 51
rour
�orf
flfi�

?t
&

iwrft
qjUU� ty� Co-t 9t (
Buy A Sub & Get Another of the Same For
A l. Price h.
:
:
Y�

v

12 Pnce
Offers expires April 30th.


:
:
Ptvyw m order tar p-up or (Miv�ry � Ftiorw 7324130 � 521 QoUntftt &
Not valid on deliveries.
movies which have not been south
yet
Also before the main show
there will e cartoons or show
films (which are no-animated
short films)
This is no time
to feel insecure
If you're going to make
the most of this excit-
ing day, self-confidence
is important. And Tampax
tampons can really help.
They're uniquely comfort-
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Tampax tampon is properly
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And you never have to
worry about odor. Because
when a tampon is
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why Tampax tampons don't
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and the added expense
that goes with it.)
What's more, Tampax
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conform to individual
body contours. So
there's less chance of
an accident.
Tampax tampons. Because
there'll never be another
day quite like today.
The internal protection more women trust
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Page 14 FOUNTAINHfcAD 27 April 1978
Anita Bryant: she's still
crazy after all these years
By JOHN WEyLth
Staff Writer
Until last year, Anita Bryant
was a successful popular enter-
tainer: as singer, showgirl,
author, and television orange
juice huckster.
But since January '77, when
she began her anti-gay campaign,
she has become a controversial
figure and national target at the
center of a storm of hot discus-
sion, argument, personal ridicule,
and hatred.
Why has she choseg to wage
this battle and take so much upon
herself?
The reason is religion.
In her book Amazing Grace
she describes her religious feel-
ings and convictions.
Though the book was publish-
ed six years before her campaign
began, it explores the deep faith
that compels her to champion that
cause.
PLEDGED TO GOD & JESUS
Anita Bryant is deeply and
devotedly Christian. Her life,
family and personal, and career
are pledged to God and Jesus.
In Amazing Grace she re-
counts her many experiences with
the spirit of God and the many
people she hs brought to Chris-
tianity though both personal
effort and her religion oriented
singing career.
Much of the book describes
six weeks in her life in which she
converts or is greatly responsible
for the re-birth' � of several dose
friends.
By the end of the novel she
has converted some ten indivi-
duals.
Amazing Grace is written in
informal, conversational first-
person style. The following pass-
age is typical:
How lovingly He had appear-
ed to comfort and empower me
Without Him I would have felt
indescribably alone-a mere dot
stationed high above a wide sea of
people.
Anita's grace with God seems
to be truly heartfelt and genuine.
Exactly why this makes her want
to launch a campaign agaainst
homosexuality is not dear.
At one point in the book she
states, "God's amazing grace.
Who could pretend to compre-
hend it? The same may be said
for Anita's
ANITA BRYANT: "HOW lovingly He had appeareo to comrori tutu
empower me.
Will replace the Dance Tlieatre of Harlem
Zulu Theatre Company makes U. S. debut at Spoleto
The Phe Zulu Theatre Com-
pany from South Africa will make
its American premiere at the May
25-June 11 Spoleto Festival
U.S.A. 1978.
Christine L Reed, the Festi-
val's general manager, announ-
ced today that the Zulu company
will replace the Dance Theatre of
Harlem (which had previously
been scheduled to appear at the
Festival) in 5 performances of
�,tt ucor
RI8-Q �.5& (pC.
Umabatha.
Umabatha is the Zulu version
of Macbeth.
The Phe Zulu company per-
formed at the 1975 Spoleto
Festival in Italy and was ao-
daimed as one of the Festival's
highlights.
"We're extremely fortunate
to be able to premiere this dance
company in the 1978 Spoleto
Festival U.S.A. in Charleston
said Ms. Reed.
"The Phe Zulu Theatre Com-
pany is one of the most exdting
groups ever to partidpate in the
Festival
Tickets for The Phe Zulu
Theatre Company are available
now by mail from Spoleto Festival
Tickets, P.O. Box 704, Charles-
ton, S.C. 29402.
The Spoleto Festival Box
Office opens on May 1 at the
Gaillard Munidpal Auditorium.
Ticket holders for the pre-
viously-scheduled Dance Theatre
of Harlem will be notified directly
of the change.
They may use their tickets for
the performances of The Phe Zulu
Theatre Company, or they may
exchange their tickets fa tickets
to other Spoleto Festival events.
If they choose neither to
attend The Zulu dance company
nor other Festival events, they
may return their Dance Theatre of
Harlem tickets fa a refund.
GERALDINEPAGE TO STAR IN
"CREVECOEUR"
Ms. Reed announced that
popular Broadway adress Geral-
dine Page will star in the wald
premiae of Tennessee Williams'
play "Creve Coeur" at Spoleto
Festival U.S.A.
Geraldine Page, who became
an instant star with ha New Yak
appearance in Williams' "Sum-
mer and Smoke has pafamed
frequently ai Broadway, televi-
sion and movies.
She is a graduate of the
Mail to; POS� Ltd.
P.O. Box 486
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Professional Modeling
DO YOU EVER WANT TO BE A MODEL,
OR DO YOU JUST WANT TO LOOK LIKE ONE? WE CAN SHOW YOU HOW.
This fall your opportunity is coming.
Pose' Ltd. School ot Creative ana
Artistic Modeling is now accepting
applications to determine our fall
schedule. We will be mailing school
and course information along with
conducting registration throughout
the summer. INTERESTED ?
Then fill the application in this
ad and mail today or call us at
758-POS� (7673) to apply.
Financing is available.
NAME full
ADDRESS local
ADDRESS summer
AGEDATE OF BIRTH
SEXHEIGHTWEIGHT.
DO YOU HAVE ANY MODELING EXPERIENCE ?
if so explain on separate sheet of paper.
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN: SELF-IMPROVEMENT,
MODELING (Please circle)
If no modeling experience please circle both.
Goodman Theatre School and a
memba of Ada's Studio.
�CREVE COEUR"
TICKETS AVAILABLE
Thanks to the return of
"Creve Coeur" tickets which
were consigned to a group, some
tickets are now available fa the
evening pafamances on June 5
and June 7, as well as fa matinee
pafamances on June 6, 8, 9, and
11.
"Creve Coeur" will be pafa-
med at Charleston's histaic Dock
Street Theatre.
Joining Gaaldine Page in the
cast are Shirley Knight, Ruth
Fad and Barbara Tar buck.
KIAWAH ISLAND COMPANY
The Spoleto Festival U.S.A.
production of Tennessee Wil-
liams' "Creve Coeur" will be
sponsaed by the Kiawah Island
Conpany and the First National
Bank of South Carolina.
"We are extremely grateful
fa the genaosity of Kiawah and
the First National Bank said
Ms. Reed. "They are demonstra-
ting a maja commitment to the
Festival.
"The only way in which we will
be able to provide Festival
audiences with outstanding pro-
ductions at reasonable ticket
prices is through contributiois of
this kind.
"We need mae suppat like
this, and I hope that the signifi-
cant genaosity of the Kiawah
Island Company and the First
National Bank will be emulated
by many othas
Kiawah Island is a 10,000 acre
seaside resat community near
Charleston.
In addition to a numba of
private homes, the Island has the
Kiawah Island Inn, the Straw
Market, tennisoourts, golf and 10
miles of Atlantic Ocean beach.
I I





. . ,VI.
isisp
ori atu
eto
100I and a
idio.
IR"
48Z.E
return of
ets which
oup, some
ale fa the
on June 5
a matinee
,8, 9, and
beperfa-
SaicDock
�age in the
ght, Ruth
uck.
)MPANY
al U.S.A.
ssee Wil-
will be
rah Island
I National
grateful
awah and
nk said
emonstra-
3nt to the
oh we will
Festival
iding pro-
le ticket
butions of
sport like
�e stgnifi-
) Kiawah
the First
emulated
3,000 acre
nity near
umber of
d has the
he Straw
olf and 10
beach.
Mack, Freeman FOUNTAINHEAD
Athletes of the Year
27 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
Apr
Page15
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Sports Edita
As has been the tradition in the past several years,
FOUNTAINHEAD has selected an" Athlete" and "Coach of the Year"
fa its last yearly publicatioi.
This year's Athlete, a should I say, "Athletes of the Year" are
Debbie Freeman and Oliver Mack.
Our "Coach of the Year" is women's basketball coach Catherine
Bdton.
DEBBIE FREEMAN
For the first time in FOUNTAINHEAD histay an athlete has won
Athlete of the Year twice. But then again Debbie Freeman deserves
the rewards and respect that ECU has to give her.
Debbie was outstanding in not just one, but three separate spats.
In the fall, Debbie played volleyball. She was selected All-date fa
that spat this past year and played on the State's Volleyball All-Star
Team which she considers her greatest hota.
See FREEMAN, p. 17
OLIVER MACK
Our other FOUNTAINHEAD Athlete of the Year' i sbasket ball star
Oliver Mack.
Coming to ECU from Queens NY. via San Janito Junia College in
Texas, Mack went on a recad breaking spree that broke virtually every
ECU basketball seasonal reoad in histay.
Oliver a "O" as he is called by his teammates and fans finished
fourth in soaring in the naitai last season with a 28.0 average. He
ranked second on the Pirate team in assists and tied fa first ai the
team in steals.
Oliver was the third leading rebounder on the team even though he
played at the guard position.
He was named "Most Valuable Player" in the First Union
Invitational in Charlrtte, despite the fact that ECU lost both games.
During February Mack was named the Greenstoro Daily News
"Athlete of the Week (Feb. 4-11).
See MACK, p. 17
CATHERINE BOLTON
Catherine Baton is this year sFOUNTAINHEAD "Coach of the
Year
Bolton, who has been at ECU since 1969, had an outstanding year
as coach of the Women's basketball team.
Under her guidance this years Lady Pirates finished second in the
state playoffs and went to the Division I Regional Tournament in
Chapel Hill, N.C.
Last year's 20-11 mark was the most wins ever by an ECU women
team and contrasted with last year 6-16 recad when injuries to key
players hampered the team.
Bolton, who resigned as head coach this past season to concentrate
oi teaching, surpassed the 100 mark this year in wins. She finishes ha
career with an outstanding 113 wins and 54 losses ovaall.
In 1973 ha Lady Pirate basketball team won both the state and
regional championship.
See BOLTON, p. 17
Coach
Bolton
honored
CATHERINE BOLTON
FOUNTAINHEAD COACH
OF THE YEAR
HONORABLE MENTION
ATHLETE OF THE YEAR
D.T. Joyna
Harold Randolph
HamanMclntyre
Zack Valentine
Rose Thompson
Eddie Gates
Gerald Hall
Calvin Alston
Wayne Bolt
Jimmy Southaland
HONORABLE MENTION
COACH OF THE YEAR
Pat Dye
Monte Little
Bill Carson
Laurie Arrants
RayScharf
MacMcLendon
Sports
SPORTS IN REVIEW
By Steve Byers
DEBBIE FREEMAN AND Oliver Mack both
excelled particularly in basketball. The two are
shown here with the ball Mack used to score a ached
record 47 points vs. USC-Aiken.
(Photo by Pete Pcdeszwa)
Tyson picks ECU over Marquette,
Notre Dame , NCSU, UNC
Al Tyson, East Carolina basketball's first signee of this recruiting
year has a very mature philosophy conoaning college basketball and
national exposure.
"If you are really good the pros are gonna knew said Tyson
whose oared height is6'10V2" tall.
Tysoi shunned away reauitas from Notre Dame, North Carolina
State, Maryland, idarquette, Clemson, and the Univasity of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill, just to name a few and plans to attend East
Carolina as a Physical Education maja.
"Some of the reauitas talked about last year hae and said I
wouldn't get any exposure said Tyson. "But they can't tell me what
to do. Iknow what's best fa me
As most students already know D.H. Conely is not even ten miles
from the univasity campus, and Tyson admits his pleasure of being
close to home.
Asked if he was effected by the Bucsdissapointing past season, he
said. "I wanted to go somewhae that I'mneected feel they just need
someone toaash the boards and a little mae defense he oontinued.
"If you can play 'D' you're going to win; I think I can help
Tyson avaagoJ almost 19 points a game and nearly 15 rebounds as
a centa and he hopes to play enough to keep up his average.
Al was quick to say his parents liked him attending ECU, and it'sa
cinch Buc fans will have the same reaction.
UNDERWOOD FOUR MORE YEARS
Speaking of signee s, it is intaesiing to note that transfa David
Uncterwcod still has four years of eligibility left unda NCAA ruies.
Undawood, aiginally signed by Frank McGuire at the Univasity of
South Carolina, departed befae the season began and thaefae will be
in purple and gold attire through the 1981-82 basketball season.
GILLM AN ROBS SMITH AND SLOAN
Undawood and Tyson were both heavily reauited by "other"
schools in the state and even the most ardent Gillman antagonists have
to admit to the invasion of the Dean Smith and Nam Soan stomping
grounds.
One state papa has rumaed anotha surprising signing by the
Pirate menta and the star reauita is sure to land mae.
POWERS RE A DY TO PLAY
Though the Bucs seem to be adding heavily in the front court, one
playa who will not surrenda his fair share of playing time is Kyle
Powers. The 6 5 faward has been a diffaoit man in pickup games at
Minges the last weeks.
Seeing playas put so much into aftanoon games that the coaches
never see makes me wish the season started tommarow.
MOSELEYIN THE ��BIG APPLE"
Walter Mosely, the freshman point guard from Queens, New Yak
is talking about playing some summer pickup games with some pros in
the "Big Apple He was careful to add that he'll only hang around
during the day. "You can get hurt in Central Park at night
Moeeley, who shared point duties with graduating senia Dai
Whitaka, looks faward to possible competitioi fron entaing
freshman and transfas. "That's the way its supposed to be
Moseley who emaged from his usually "oca" state of being to
bombast rne fa not mentiaiing his name in Tuesday's column, should
be the starta in pre-seasai depth charts.
�ON THE ROAD WITH LARRY GILLMAN
Coach Gillman, who has spent mae time ai the road than Charles
Kuralt, has become a mystical being known only from phone calls to
assistant coach Dillon'soffioe. He is supposed to be back in Greenville
early next week to announoe signings, and the official schedule should
follow in about a month.
The schedule should be one of the toughest in the south; but this
year Gillman should have the talent and mae diffaently than last
year, experience to deal with it.
This ta looks faward to South Bend, Durham, Raleigh, College
Park, anu Greenville, with a particular zeal.
A8oneTV announoa said early last season, "If they're gonna beat
ECU, they betta do it this year Well boys, this year is over!





Hm 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 April 1978
Pirates destroy Methodist 23-1 , win 25th
By ANDY STEWART
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Pirates
demolished Methodist College by
a score oi ?3-1 in seven innings.
Intramurals
The game started off as it was
going to be a close game, being
decided by a couple of runs. The
Pirates were able to get their
scoring attack together. Bobby
Supel reached first by means of a
by JOHN EVANS
Last of the year
This is the last edition of this
column for this year and we would like to draw it all to a close by
making note of a few special things and persons that have taken place
this school year, while wishing others well.
The results fa the Men's Intramural Chancellor's Cup point
standings are in and the school year winners have been determined.
walk. Jerry Carraway then
Doubled to send Supel home to
make the score 1-0 in favor of the
Pirates.
In the third the bottom fell out
on the Methodist defense as the
Pirates scored 14 runs off of 10
hits and 5 errors. The inning was
a complete disaster fa the
Methodist and a field day fa the
Pirates as Maoon Moye and Scott
Layden both slapped three run
The Chanoella's Cup signifies the intramural championship fa all
spots In the damitay diviston, the top damitay was Scott Dam,
winning the Trophy fa the third straight year and retiring the trophy to
the Damitay trophy case by winning three straight years.
The club division champion was Phi Epsilon Kappa, also fa the
third year in a row-retiring that trophy.
The fraternity division was the closest race of all. This year's
winning fraternity was the Kappa Sigma fraternity. The Kappa Sigs
narrowly nosed out the Tekes fa first place. The Tekes (Tau Kappa
Epsilon) won the trophy last season. In the last four years, the
Chancella'sTrophy has been won by four different aganizations, with
Kappa Alpha and Pi Kappa Phi winning the trophy the two previous
years
The ECU Team Handball Club will be leaving Thursday, May 4 fa
Long Island, New Yak whae they will play in the Natiaiai Team
Handball Champioiships at Hofstra College.
Sixteen teams will be entered fa the natiaiai championships and
the ECU club will be competing in both the oollege and open divisions.
It is the first time an ECU team has oompeted fa the natiaiai
championship in this spat. Also oompeting will be teams from UCLA,
Navy, Air Face, the Military Academy, Ohio State, Notre Dame and
the U.S. Army, among othas. The goalie fa the U.S. Army team
played on the 1976 United States Olympic team and the coach from the
1980 Olympic Handball team will be on hand to watch the
championships.
One of the ECU team members, Jim Chastain, has already been
invited to try out fa the 1980 team this summer in Colaado Springs and
it is hoped that other members of the ECU team may be invited.
The ECU team will play its first game on Friday night and three
rrxxe games on Saturday and Sunday, befae returning home on
Monday, May 8. The field will be divided into divisions in both the
open and oollege classification and the divisional leaders will be
decided by Round Robin play. The top two teams from each division
will then meet fa the overall title in single elimination play, while the
other teams will play in consolation games.
While the ECU team does not expect to win the overall tournament
title, Team Coach and ECU Intramural Directa Wayne Edwards is
looking fa the team to get some valuable experkxice and perhaps win a
few games.
"Wedon't know yet who we will be playing said Edwards. "They
decide that by random drawing on the first night, but we'll be playing
in both classifications so we will be playing a lot of games. We are
mainly going up there fa the experience.
"None of the guys on our team have ever played handball befae
except against themselves in scrimmages and in practice, so we'll be a
See INTRAMURALS, p. 18)
N0W-FORY0UI
6 0A'
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homers. The Pirates sent seven-
teen men to the plate during the
third inning.
In the fourth inning the
Pirates were able to together four
more runs.
In the sixth the Pirates were
able to produce duel homers
again. Maoon Moye slapped his
second of the night with Butch
Davis aboard. This made the
fourth horrwr of the year fa
Moye. Jary Carraway also slam-
med a homer with Sage on base.
This was Carraway's third on the
season.
In the seventh inning, the
final inning of the game, Billy
Williams relieved pitcher Bill
Davis Davis gave up four hits
and one run to up his record to
2-1. In relieving Williams made
his first appearance of the year
and did it in perfect stride. He
blew the ball past the only three
batters he faced
The leading hitta fa the
Pirates was Maoon Moye who
went 4-5, with two bomeruns and
7 RBI's, Jerry Carraway who
went 3-5 with one homerun and
three RBI's, Scott Layden who
went 2-4 with one homerun and
three RBI's; and Butch Davis who
went 3-4.
Thinclads
attend
Penn
relays
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Spats Edita
The East Carolina men's track
team travels to Pennsylvanai
tommarow fa the Penn Relays.
Some of trv strongest athletic
competitas in the country are
expected to be on hand fa the
annual event.
Pirate coach Bill Carson cited
the 400 meter relay as the
highlight of the meet. "Three of
the top teams in the country will
be there in Villanova, Tennessee
and us he stated.
Several Pirates will be striving
fa nation qualification times fa
the final NCAA meet later in the
year.
Calvin Alston, Otis Melvin
and Herman Mclntyre will lead
the Pirate entrouge.
The INCAIAW
Division 1
Tournament for
women's Softball
will be held April
28-29 at Graham NC
Support the Pirates!





�'�
MB
�MBBIBBBB
sent seven-
3 during the
inning the
ogether four
Crates were
uel homers
slapped his
with Butch
made the
e year for
y also siam-
ge on base,
third on the
inning, the
game, Billy
)itcher Bill
p four hits
is record to
Hams made
of the year
stride. He
i only three
er for the
Moye who
meruns and
raway who
merun and
ayden who
merun and
1 Davis who
ids
1
i
ERS
Editor
men's track
ennsylvanai
tnn Relays,
jest athletic
xxintry are
and for the
�arson cited
ay as the
"Three of
xxjntry will
Tennessee
be striving
t times for
later in the
hs Melvin
3 will lead
AW
1
it for
ftball
April
am INC
i rates!
27 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pay 17
leading home run
This week the
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
'Athlete of the Week" award is presented to
FREEMAN
Continued from p. 15
During the winter Debbie played basketball. Although she would
like to have played guard, the 58" senior from Jacksonville, N.C.
played at forward where she could use her rebounding ability.
In her three seasons on the basketball team, Debbie was on the
All-Division I team fa three years straight and the Greensboro Daily
News All-State team for three years.
This past year Debbie also made the All-Tournament team in this
year's N.C.A.I.A.W. Division I tournament. She set school records fa
career rebounding and carried scaing this past season.
In the spring Debbie was oi the women's track team. She threw
the javelin, the discus and sha-put.
The best way to sum up Debbie's three outstanding years fa ECU is
with a comment from her basketball ooach Catherine Baton.
Debbie is without a doubt the most outstanding 'emale athlete in
ECU histay Baton said. "In the nine years we've had a women's
spats program here at ECU I've never seen such a fine athlete as
Debbie has been. She has done a lot fa wanen's spats at ECU
MACK. Continued from p. 15
During the year Mack scaed over 30 points 13 times, over 40 points
twice and over 20 points 21 times.
Oliver Mack also became ECU'S first "Honaable Mentioi"
Ail-American basketball player in histay. He was also named
All-District.
The best way to sum up'O's" ability is to let the coaches he played
against do the talking.
South Carolina's Frank McGuire- "Mack is a very good basketball
player. We knew him in New Yak-he's fran Queens�so his ability
was no surprise to us
N.C. State's Nam Sloan Mack is a fine athlete. We've known about
him fa a loig time. I was impressed by him when he was in the eighth
grade. I doit think he hogged the ball a took bad shas
UNC Chariate's Lee RoseHe'sa fine player. It's a oompliment to
him that the press vaed him MVP (in First Union Invitational
Tournament won by UNG-Q"
LaSalle's Paul West headMack was just unstoppable. He was an
even better shcoter than we thought. He'sga a pure jumper
Boston College's Dr. Tom Davis- "He gets points from so many places
it makes him so effective. He's a beautiful player. We tried tooontain
him in our defense and thought we were doing a respectable job, but
then we were shocked to see he had 23 points at halftime. I think he
would be tough to handle with a special defense
St. Peter's Bob KeHyOliver Mack is the finest college basketball
player I ve ever seen
William and Mary's Bruce ParkhillWary about diva Mack in the
final minutes of play? We had to wary about Mack the entire 40
minutes of the game because he's such a tremendous shooter from
anywhae oi the court
USC-Aiken'sLew Pakins (Following school reoad 47 points)Oliva
was just outstanding. We did everything possible to stop him and
couldn't. I think tonight was just one of those special nights. I don't
care if Jo Jo White was covaing him tonight, he couldn't have stopped
him. His physical strength surprised me some. We knew he was a
super shcota, but he got a lot of three-point plays. He's by far the best
we've played against this year
Reoads Broken This Season:
Single season scaing reoad: famaly 662 points, set 25 years ago,
1952-53(694) (667)
Single season scaing avaage: famaly 26.5, set 25 years ago,
1952-53 (currently is 28.0)
Sngle game scaing reoad: 47 vs USC-Aiken-famaly 42 set in
1969-70
Single game most field goals: 19 vs USC-Aiken-famaly 18 set 25
years ago, 1952-53
Single game field goals attempted: 36 vs Marylana -famaly 29 set in
1967-68
Single seasai most field goals: famaly 218 set in 1959 (currently has
277)
Single season most field goals attempted: famaly 421 set in 1959-60
BOLTON Continued from p. 15
She is the only ooach in Nath Carolina since the aeation of the
Al AW to qualify a team fa the national tournaments. ECU is still the
only N.C. team eva to advanoe to the AIAW finals. That year the
Pirates finished with a 15-0 mark, defeated Madison College,
Tennessee Tech and South Carolina, and lost two of three in the
National Tournament.
Catha.ne Baton's reoad this year certainly makes ha vay
desaving of this year's honaa
Gates selected
athlete
of the week
EDDIE GATES, EAST Caro-
lina's all time seasonal home-
run hitter, Athlete of the
Week.
baseball standout Eddie Gates.
Transferring fran the College of Albamarie, Eddie has made many
significant contributions to the program hae. This past week, he broke
the season homaun mark by hitting his ninth of the season, and
thirteenth carea. The old homaun reoad was set in 1968, by Jim
Snyda, who hit 8 homauns in one season.
Eddie is one of the most complete ballplayas on the team said
head ooach Monte Little. "I am vay pleased and have enjoyed these
past two seasons with Eddie
Howeva, the season is not quite ova, with nine games remaining
on the schedule.
"I hope Eddie can knock a few more out befae the season ends
continued Little. "He has just learned how to really stroke the ball.
Eddie has got tremendous fae-arm strength and he oonoentrates all
the time
But thae is a paradox in this situation.
Eddie is the lead off batta in the rosta, even though he leads the
team in homauns.
Next, ooach Little claims that Eddie has the best speed on the team.
So, a decision has to be made, eitha put Eddie Iowa in the ada,
and get more runs batted in, a have Eddie lead off and get on base.
"We decided to put Eddie first in the lineup. He has tremendous
speed and if he gets on base, he can steal a will somehow advance
said Little.
So it goes, Eddie Gates, lead off batta, leading honaun hitta,
and leading base steala, will dose out his season of Pirate baseball
afta leaving his mark in the ECU recad book.
"Eddie isafine citizen. I'll miss his mental and physical aspectsof
the game concluded Little.

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Page 18 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 April 1978
Ken Smith resigns Sports Information post
The resignation of Ken Smith
as sports information director at
East Carolina University was
announoed today by athletic
director Bill Cain. The resignation
is effective the end of May.
Smith served four years as
sports information director for the
Pirate athletic teams and three
years as coordinator of the
school's Pirate Sports Network,
the radio network for football and
ENTRAMURALS
Continued from p. 16
little behind at the start. I think we'll have worked our way intohowto
play, though, by the last three games. It will be a physical field and
we'll have to adjust. I know our guys are ready to play and in shape,
though, so we are looking to have a good time. I think we can win some
games, too
The money for the team to travel to the Championships was raised
through the SGA. through team fund raising and with a little help of
the Intramural department. Half the money was raised through efforts
by the team members themselves.
"This is a big chance fa us and East Carolina to get some national
recognition added Edwards. "It will be good publicity for both our
school and our intramural department to fiJd a team
Rain has delayed the men'sail-campus championships three times
this week and the four teams vying fa the title will try again tonight.
In the first-round of the double elimination tournament, the Scott
Time-Outs will face last year's champion, Tau Kappa Epsilon and the
Belk Castaways will meet the Lumber and Lightning.
basketball.
"I leave East Carolina with
mixed emotions said Smith, but
I have accepted a very enhancing
management position with a
growing firm in Greensbao. One
must oonsider future directions
and advancement possibilities,
and I feel this decision is best fa
my future interests.
"My four years with the
Pirate athletic department has
been very rewarding to me, and I
hope to the school as well
Smith came to East Carolina
in the fall of 1974 after previously
serving as spats directa fa a
radio station in High Point.
A native of Rookingham,
Smith graduated from Ragsdale
High School in Jamestown in 1967
and received his B.A. degree
from the University of Nath
Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1971,
with a double maja in journalism
and radioTVmrtion pictures.
While at East Carolina, three
spats brochures compiled by the
staff under Smith won national
recognition. In 1972, Smith was
named an Outstanding Young
Man of America.
East Carolina will be losing its Assistant Intramural Directa at the
end of the summer, Rose Mary Adkins.
Rose Mary will be leaving ECU at the end of second sessioi
summer school and will be getting married in August and moving to
Greensbao. Fa the past two years she has served as Dr. Edwards'
assistant and been in charge of the women's program, the oo-rec
intramural program and the reaeational swim program. In addition,
she has been responsible fa starting an intramural program fa
handicapped students, which will be put into full gear next fall.
Not only will Rose Mary'soompetent wak be missed, but mae so
her sense of huma, charm and friendship will be missed by her friends
and all who knew her. We all wish Rose Mary the very best.
KEN SMITH
Under Smith's ooadinatioi,
the Pirate Spats Netwak grew
fran oily ten radio stations fa
football in 1975 to 25 stations last
year. Also, basketball tripled in
stations on the netwak during
that same period.
Smith has held memberships
in the College Spats Infamatiai
Directas Association of America,
National Association of Spats
Writers and Spatscasters, Sigma
Delta Chi, United States Basket-
ball Writers Association, Caro-
Imas Golf Repaters Association
and the Nath Carolina Associa-
tion of Spats Broadcasters.
Classifieds
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ROOMMATES. Grad. student
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APT. FOR RENT: fa summer
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FOR RENT: Three bdrm. furn-
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WANTED: Responsible female
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TWO ROOMMATES: needed im-
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FEMALE NEEDED: to share a
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not least, '69 V.W. Van with
16,000 miles on re-built engine.
Set up as camper. Call 752-0352.
FOR SALE: 2 Jensen Model 4
stereo speakers in good cond.
Midrange and tweeter oontrdson
back $190. Call 752-8862 ask fa
Brian.
FOR SALE: Box spring and
mattress in excellent cond. Must
sell. Call 758-4390.
FORSALE:Refrigeratas5cu. ft.
used 1 men. $90. 2.5 cu. ft. $40.
Call Rob 752-1593.
FOR SAl6. Pander twin-reverb
amp. and Shure microphone with
stand-all fa $225. Call Rob
752-1593.
FOR SALE: '71 Vega hatchback,
3-speed, 4 cylinder. $450. Call
Nancy 758-9481 a Bob 758-3833
FOR SALE: GMC Van '64. Stock
ready to customize $650.00 Call
752-9489.
FOR SALE: Honda 350 in good
cond. Only 4,500 miles. Helmet
included $300.00 Call 758-7675.
FOR SALE: '69 Dodge Caoiet
slant six engine with standard
shift. Excellent economy. Call
758-7434.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Leaving
Greenville & must sell double
bed, rugs, lamps, large bookcase,
2 desks, chairs, stools, couch.
Come by 820 College View Apts.
off 10th St. Go down College View
Road & take first left, last apt. on
right. 6 to 7 JO evenings. Ask fa
Kirk.
FOR SALE: Dam size refrig.
with stand in good oond. $75.00
Come by rm. 244 Umstead if
FOR SALE: One Midland FM
oonverter that is 2 mos. old $12.
Also 1 Audiovox FM antenna
booster fa autos. Inaeases FM
reception 2-3 times. One month
old. $9. Call 752-8050.
FOR SALE: Realistic STA-65C
rebever, AMFM stereo, filters,
2 realistic 60 watt speakers. Two
turntables, one BSR, one Gar-
rard, plus oak cabinet all fa $125.
Must sell. Call Steve 758-8491
early a late.
FOR SALE: SVT Ampeg Amp.
plus 2 SVT cabinets which contain
8-10" speakers. Will sell all fa
$950, a will sell seperately.
736-1866 after 4 p.m.
FOR SALE: Romex refrig. in good
oond. Resonable price. 752-8428
a oome by 308D Belk Dam.
FOR SALE: Piaieer SX-650 rec-
eiver, 35 watts $215. Sanyo
STD-1510 stereo cassette deck
with dolby $110, Realistic stereo
frequency equalizer $60. Craig
FM stereo cassette deck $60. Call
Ed 758-2363.
FOR SALE: 75 Vega Hatchback
with low miles. Excellent cond.
Yellow with balck interior $1750.
22,400 actual miles. Call 756-
6747.
FOR SALE : Household furniture.
Call Jim at 756-6797.
pOR SALE: One genuine Framus
guitar with built-in fuzz pickup
and carrying case. Needs neck
adjusted, aehrwise excellent
cond. $75 a best offer. 752-8600
after 6 p.m. a visit 132-Ayoock.
FOR SALE: L60-14 inch tires
mounted on Keystone rims, 36
miles on tires. No scratches. $150
752-9908.
FOR SALE: VW engine parts.
Everything in good oond. 752-
9908.
FOR SALE: '77 Yamaha 360CC
street bike with 243 miles. Great
oond. with 2 helmets. $900 fa
whole deal. 752-9908.
FOR SALEM Michelin ZX radial
tire, Size 18570 Sr14. Great oond.
Only 1200 miles on tire. $40.00
752-9908.
Everything must go; Grad stud-
ent leaving Greenville. Furniture
fa bdrm living room, dining
room, rugs. Kitchen appliances
and accessaies. Various assated
junk. Everything reasonable. Sale
begins Sat. man. a call Mike
758-0534 anytime befae June 1.
309 Student St.
FOR SALE: Waterbed. brand
new, never unaated. Inflates to
fit any queen size bed. Fa info.
call 752-4461.
FOR SALE: Raminez classical
guitar with hardshell case fa
$400. Also fiberfili sleeping bag
almost new fa $35. Call Jeff
750345.
personal�
SUMMER SCHOOL: students
Hanemaker desires help with
1, usecleaning duties 1 day per
week, within walking distance of
camuus 752-2077
HELP! need ride to and fran
Chapel Hill this weekend and to
Asheville the weekend after that.
Can leave just about any day, any
time. Will pay fa gas, expenses,
etc. Join Weyler. 458 Aycock
752-8525.
WANTED: Keyboard player fa
top 40 funky band this summer.
Good money. Call Steve early a
late 758-8491.
WANTED: Happy Stae wants to
buy used a old taps. Contact Al
at 752-6303 after 3 p.m.
HELP! Need ride to and from
Chapel Hill this weekend, and to
Asheville next weekend. Can
leave just about any time, any
day. Will pay fa gas, expenses
etc. John Weyler, 458 Aycock,
752-8525.
TYPIST: Excellent service, low
rates. IBM typewriter used. Call
756-3815 anytime after 5:15 p.m.
RIDE NEEDED: to upstate New
Yak (a that general area), to
leave after May 3. Will share
driving and expenses. Return fa
summer school if possible Call
Michelle 758724.
BIRTHRIGHT: an aganizatiot of
trained volunteers, offers help to
pregnant women. Free, complete-
ly confidential. Phone
758-L-O-V-E.
lost
(2)
FOUND: German Shepard puppy
in Chestnut St. area. 752-9489.
LOST: Two blankets at the Brice
St. concert. One is green with
black stripe and aher is baby
blue. Please return. Reward
7529080.





���Hin
LM
��������bI
27 April 1978 FOUNTAINHfcAD Paga 19
coordination,
letwork grew
stations for
j stations last
all tripled in
work during
Tiember ships
5 Information
t of America,
n of Sports
isters, Sigma
tates Basket-
at ion, Caro
Association
lina Associa-
sasters.
i help with
s 1 day per
1 distance of
o and from
kend and to
d after that,
any day, any
s, expenses,
458 Ayoock
i player fa
iis summer,
eve early or
xe wants to
Contact Al
m.
) and from
end, and to
ikend. Can
' time, any
s, expenses
58 Aycock,
ervice, low
' used. Call
ir 5:15 p.m.
pstate New
il area), to
Will share
Return fa
ssibJe Call
anization of
ers help to
i, oomplete-
Phone
2
ard puppy
'52-9489.
t the Bnoe
jreen with
r is baby
Reward
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items Is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each A&P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. APRIL W AT ASP IN
LOOK FOR THt ACTION PRICE SIGN - THROUGHOUT
YOUR A4P STORE When AAP buyers make a special pur-
chase at a lower price, we pass the savings on to you Thai
lower price is an action price And these Action Prices are in
addition to our money-saving weekly specials
.79'
ROLLS OO
tS WISHBONE ITALIAN. 1000 ISLANO. OR DELUXE
7 FRENCH DRESSING
,a HI-ORI
$ PAPER TOWELS 2 SK
U VAN CAMP �-��
? BEANEE WEENEES 3?aS100
?MRS PAULS FROZEN
ONION RINGS p2 63c
tvl LONO ORAIN �
$ MAHATMA RICE 3 & 99c
� MTTV CROCKER MEF NOODLE S LASAQNA
7 HAMBURGER HELPER ISl 69c
? B-8Q SAUCE 2 bo.t.e M"
WHIPPED
$ CHIFFON MARGARINE aX73c
�. WILCMS
Tjf GRAPE JAM
. SKIN CARS LOTION
f ROSE MILK
tg MOUTWWASH
7 LISTERMINT
� ALL VARKTICS-CAT FOOO
7 WHISKER LICKINS 3
� CANNED DOG FOOO BLUE 1 ABEL
7 KEN-L-RATION
55'
REOULAR
JNSCENTED
S1
io $139
�TL
12 OZ $H
BTL
� oz- $100
rxGS I
; tivi oz $1
I CANS I
29
BUDWEISER
BEER
On. of 12 oz. �-
Cans in a �
g Ctn.
good only in Greenville
( A&P is aDe�i Shop J
WHOLE KUCKMIS
B-BQ CHIKENEACH $249
White, Yellow American9 toad
CHEESE LB. BEEF LB. �
Freshly MadeFresh
0011 fiAe SUW LB. osrmm a or 7k MILS 0 only 7ST
AAP QUALITY TENDER FULLY COOKED
SMOKED HAMS
� WHOLE OR
BUTT PORTION LB 88
� CENTER M
SLICES LB. 148
SHANK
PORTION
( AAP Is a butcher shop )
AAP QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
ROAST
A&P quality heavy western Grain fed beef
WHOLE RIB EYES
$969
BLADE CUT
CHUCK
9 to 13 ib. avg. wt.
LB.
AAP is � country farm pork shop
PORK CHOPS
ASSORTED
PKG.
Freshly
3 lbs.
or more
1"
AAP QUAUTY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
RIB STEAKS
( AAP l � sti�9 ��op
MARVEL BRAND
SLICED BACON
L
LB.
LB.
ITEMS OFFER D FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS ANO WHOLESALERS
STOKELY SPRING VEGETABLE SALE
AAP picks the best frozen foods
SEALTEST LIGHT N'UVELY
ICE MILK
V: GALLON
CARTON
A&Pooupon
CRISGO SHORTENING
BONUS RACK M OZ � � OZ FREEI
HEINZ KETCHUP
ANN PAOt MAIN OR WITH ONION
w 79c
BARBECUE SAUCE 2ft�f100
ASP QUALITY Cfr
LUNCHEON MEAT Vi 89c
JANE PARKER WHEAT ANO WHITE OR
Limit one with this coupon and
additional 7.50 order
32.M29
CRACKED
WHEAT
BREAD
24 OZ.
LOAF
c
We pick the best produce
RED RIPE-TOP QUAUTY
U.S. 1 BURBANK
STRAWBERRIES RUSSET POTATOES
GIN
Limit one coupon good thru
Sat April 29 at A&P in Greenville
AAP
GRADE A
DOOM
ONLY
I LSBtT TWO CTNS WITH
I COUPON ANO AOOmONAL
i rssonocR
LNHT ONE COUPON
OOOO THNU SAT. APNM. IS AT ASP IN Greenville
� �
FULL
QUART
00
LBS
�ourCRHP , s�
GREEN CABBAGE 5
ENDIVE OR ESCAROLEl. 39c
POPS MTI pUSSTO pW�
POPCORN
MtAOf TO POT
� oz
49'
10 LB.
BAG
SAVE SB PCN LBTENOM
YELLOW SQUASH
SUO S KOOSSFWtM POTTED tAgn
ROSE BUSHES .a 3"
FNOM A"� (mWIISWV CONNS fr .U SO
POTTING SOIL 99� 169
�-c
ASP COUPON
ZD-
WHITE OR ASSORTED
CHARMIN
BATHROOM
TISSUE
NOLL
ma.
. LWIT ONI WITH THIS
I COUPON ANO
� ADDITIONAL r M ONOER
LBAIT ONE COUPON
oooo thnu sat ApNH n at asp in Cjreenville





,
JCSSWBmir�i�SSr!iei ���� is the sum. the
Qvnont for cases of extreme thirst or a leaiuiis
3S3SS.rihs
glass, siypuig 10 ui�, xxxv iT -
sustained mountaineering. I Next
lugging
��(��"
the proper posi-
tion. Some
swear by sit-
SSS'sSSe tttow that the most successful
runtfineers are flexible, so you 11 find.
both sitters and standers.
(Except on New Year s Eve
when it's almost impossible
to find a sitter.) � Which
brings us to additives. Occa-
sionally a neophyte will
sprinkle salt in his Busch;
others mix in tomato juice;
and a few on the radical
fringe will even add egg.
While these manipulations
Sum?ShWt of B�Sr�
glass be used. But bad P vqU should minimize
KStiffly(3 Fig- 4). Happy MounUmeermg!
Don't just reach for a beer.
BUSCH
c Anheuser-Busch. Inc St Louis Mo
Head for the mountains.





Title
Fountainhead, April 27, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 27, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.647
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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