Fountainhead, April 25, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
Vol. No. 53, NoJfr' East Carolina University Greenville, North Carolina o�ulo 25 April 1978
East Carolina University Greenville, North Carolina o�ol4 25 April 1978
ON THE INSIDE
WRC.
Honor Councilp. 6
Christp. 9
Pirates 2-2 p. 13
Cour
Law Day features Robert Morgan
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
Senator Robert Morgan
(D-NC) spoke on the topic " Law:
Your Access to Justice" in
Greenville Friday, April 21.
Morgan's address was spon-
sored by the ECU Law Society
and the Pitt County Bar Associa-
tion.
The theme observed was
suggested by the American Bar
Association in observance of Law
Day 1978, which falls on May 1.
Jerry Cox, president of the
Law Society, began the program
by briefly outlining the purpose of
the Law Society fa the audience.
Dr. David Stevens, ECU
Attaney, introduced Magan.
Stevens said that he first met
Senata Magan when he was in
the Air Face Legal Services and
Magan was attaney general of
Nath Carolina.
Stevens said that when he
related his background to then
N.C. Attaney General Magan
he didn't realize that he and
Magan had anything in oonmon.
Dr. Stevens learned that Magan
was not only an ECU graduate,
but was also chairperson of the
Board of Trustees of the school at
the time.
After attending ECU, Magan
attended Wake Faest Univer-
sity's School of Law.
Magan then waked as a
defense attaney in Harnett
County befae entering politics.
He served in the North Carolina
State Legislature, and later
served as attaney geneal.
Magan succeeded Senata
Sam Erving in the U.S. Senate.
Magan said that waking as a
defense attaney spawned his
interest in civil liberties concerns.
He said that one of the first things
he undertook as attaney general
was the disposal of surveillance
equipment that the State Bureau
of Investigation had "no legiti-
mate use fa
Shatly afta he became a
senata, he was assigned to the
Select Committee on Intelligence,
whose respoisibility is to study
misdealings by the U.S. Intelli-
gence Departments.
Magan said that his initial
wak with this committee exposed
him to "sane of the real dangers
inhaent in our society" caused
by the abuse erf power by elected
officials.
Magan said that the extent
into the ranks of those guilty of
abuse of power shocked him
See MORGAN, p. 6
THE 197778 REBEL yvas published Fridey. This
year'sower is "Simultaneous Hearts" by Roxanne
Legislature appropriates money to cheerleaders
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant News Edita
The Student Govanment
Association (SGA) held it's last
regularly scheduled meeting of
the spring semesta yesterday.
During summer school the
acting SGA will consist of the
executive council.
During the business meeting
the legislature appropriated
money to the 1978-79 budget fa
the ECU Chealeadas.
The money will be added to
the 1,000 given by athletics and
the $600 given by the Student
Union.
Visual Arts Faum president
Biff Bream and treasurer Patricia
Knight repated to the legislature
on how monies delegated to the
VAF had been used and thanked
the SGA fa their suppat.
SGA treasura Zack Smith
repated to the legislature on
SGA funds.
Smith said that thae was
$9,547.59 cash in the bank and
137,797.28 in savings fa a
sub-taal of $147,344.86.
Funds appropriated but nrt
spent trtaled $153,950.50 with
$6,394.37 left to be appropriated.
Local towing is a legitimate
and flourishing business9
FUNNY HOW A smile cm cheer its surroundings.
By STUART MORGAN
Staff Writa
If your vehicle should ever be
towed, perhaps you should think
twice befae secretly removing it
from the towing company's sta-
age area without paying the
towing fee.
At least, if you wish to avoid
being charged with a misdemean-
a.
"I've lost many vehicies-as
many as three a week, from
students stealing their towed
vehicles claimed James "Curt"
Smith, owner of Smith's Amoco
on the corner of 10th and Evans.
"You might read that memo
on the 'Mall over there suggest-
ed Smith, pointing to a sheet of
paper taped to the office's wall
just inside the dcorway.
The memo was dated March
23, 1978, and it was from the
Greenville Police Department
addressed to: AM officers, Sherriff
Ralph Tyson, all magistrates, all
towing services, ECU police, and
the district attaney's office.
It stated the punishment for
violating N.C. General Statute -
14-115: "Secreting property to
hinder enfacement of lein (claim)
a security interest" to be a fine
of not to exceed $500, imprison-
ment fa not more than six
months-a both.
Towing, despite how much it
hurts the vehicle owner ,s budget,
is both legitimate and a flourish-
ing business in Greenville.
"Yes, I'd say I make around
$240 a month towing vehicles -
sometimes, I do better than
that admitted Smith. "I take
strictly cash for my towing, I
don't accept checks
"On average, I tow four
vehicles each week he added.
"Sometimes, I never get to tow
any during the week, and some
weeks I tow as many as seven
Every summer a letter is sent
to each towing company in
Greenville which includes a list if
five requirements it must meet to
be able to tow vehides from
campus, according to Joseph
Caider, directa of security.
The requirements are as fol-
lows; The towing company must
agree to maintain a 24-hour
service, return cars during ap-
propriate hours, maintain a se-
cure staage area, pay for any
damage done to a vehicle, and
charge a lower towing fee fa
vehicles towed from campus than
those towed in the surrounding
city.
"If they obey those require-
ments, we must put them on our
list said Caider.
Right now, there are five
towing companies meeting those
requirements and regularly tow-
ing vehicles from campus.
They are: Tenth and Evans
' 76, Smith's Amoco, Dunn" s Body
Shop, University Exxon, and
Dorm's Auto Parts.
"We're supposed to tow on a
rotation basis said Smith. "No,
I don't think there is any
competition among the five of us -
we just want an equal share of the
business.
"And, if you go ask any of the
other four towing services these
f See TOWING, 7





Flashes
Dr. Browshein Psi Chi
AED picnic
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 April 1978
Cookout
Phi Alpha Theta's, (History
Honor Society) Annual Cookout,
originally scheduled for April 18
at Tar River Apts. has been
relocated to Bill Press' house at
403 Abel a.
The date will be Tues April
25 from 530 p.m. until.
Interested persons should
sign up in the history offioe.
Admission isonly $1.50 for all the
food and beer you can oonsume.
Directions will be available.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Installation
The installation of new offic-
ers and members for the League
of Scholars will be on Thurs
April 27at 730 p.m. in room 248
MendenhaJI.
All members please attend.
Show and sale
The Pitt Co. Humane Society
is having its second Annual Art
Show-Bake Sale which will be
held on May 6, at 9 a.m all day o
on Evans St. Mall, during "Be
Kind to Animals Week
Free drinks and food will be
provided all day for the participat-
ing artists and craftsmen.
For information call day and
night 756-6572; nights only 758-
0468.
Will the artists who have
already signed up for this sale,
please contact the humane Soc-
iety at 758-0468 or 756-6572. The
original list was misplaced.
Gamma Theta
There will be a Gamma Theta
Upsilon meeting Wed April 26
at 11 a.m. in rm. C-205 of
Brewster.
The purpose of this meeting is
to elect new officers for next year.
All members who will be return-
ing next year please attend.
Bowling
Lane rentals are available at
the MendenhaJI Bowling Center
every Saturday from Noon until 6
p.m. It only costs $2.50 to rent a
lane for one hour.
Stop by and try it out; you
can't afford to miss it.
"Red Pin Bowling" is every
Sunday evening from 7 p.m. until
10 p.m. at the Bowling Center at
Mendenhall.
If you can make a strike when
the red pin is the head pin, you
win one free game.
It's that s'mple.
Come over and try it out this
Sunday. It oould be your lucky
day!
Coffeehouse
This Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday, the Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee presents
three nights of excellent enter-
tainment at 9 and 10 p.m room
15, Mendenhall.
Thursday and Friday nights,
enjoy Andy Shapiro, a fine
musician and singer.
For our last show this sem-
ester, ECU'S own Ghana Hard-
ware Co. will perform their
unique brand of comedy in the
style of Monty Python's Flying
Circus.
The Ghana Hardware Co.
performed last year to packed
houses in the drama department,
and no less is expected this year.
As always, admission is only
50 cents, and that includes all the
free eats you oould possibly want.
Film
The International Students
Association of ECU will sponsor a
documentary film concerning the
Middle East on Tues April 25 at
7 p.m.
All studentsandthepublicare
invited. Admission is free.
Jobs
All ECU students who took
the Civil Service Summer Em-
ployment test and who would be
willing to work in the Washington
D.C. area this summer are
requested to contact Terry Elks,
Karen Frye, Dr. Betsy Harper, or
Sandy Green in the Offioe of
Cooperative Education, 313 Rawl,
telephone 757-6979 immediately.
The Cooperative Education
offioe has information concerning
a number of outstanding jobs for
persons who have received their
rating on this test.
Seminar
Frank Arey, a Chemistry
grad. student, will present a
seminar on April 28, at 2 p.m. in
room 201 Flanagan Building on
Analytical Methods for Measur-
ing F and Ca Ions in the Blue
Crab, Callinectes sapidus
Writing jobs
Students who signed up for
English 4890, Writing Practicum,
for Fall Semester 1978 are
reminded to submit their applica-
tions to Dr. Brett by April 25.
Those who do not have
applications (with summer ad-
dresses) in by that date will not be
allowed to take the oourse for
credit. Applications may be hand
delivered to the English Offioe,
Austin 122.
Dr. Browshein will talk about
some recent developments in
learning theory, at 3 p.m Wed
April 20, in Speight, room 152.
He will address the possibility
that psychologists only need talk
about one kind of conditioning.
The lecture will be titled "Pavlov-
ian Factors in Operant Schedules
of Reinforoement
Fellowship
Are you tired of temporary
answers that give you only
temporary results?
If you are, you are invited to
come and hear testimonies of how
Jesus Christ gives fellow students
permanent answers.
The Full Gospel Student Fel-
lowship invites you to attend this
Thursday's meeting in Menden-
hall 221 from 730 to 9 p.m. At
this meeting you will hear real life
stories of what Jesus Christ has
done and is doing in our lives.
Also after the meeting we will
be electing next years offioers. All
those oonoerned are asked to pray
and attend.
Economics
Omicrom Delta Epsilon, Eco-
nomics Honor Society, will hold a
meeting at Home Savings down-
town on Tuesday, April 25 at 7
p.m. New offioers will be elected
and refreshments will be served.
All members are urged to attend
our last meeting of the semester.
Apply now
Any student who wishes to
apply; for editor of FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, BUCCANEER, REBEL,
EBONY HERALD, Head Photo-
grapher, a WECU General
Manager should golo the Office
of the Dean of Student Affairs and
fill out an application. Deadline
fa filing is Tues May 2.
Bike tour
Traveling companions wanted
for bicycling tour to South
America.
Leaving May 17 from
Winston-Salem and will be travel-
ing back country roads in the U.S.
and the Pan-American highway in
Central America.
Easy pace wih plenty of time
fa taking it easy. Not as oostly
na as difficult as you may
imagine. Fa mae infamatiai
call Neil at 752-7065.
Psi Chi has awarded the two
$200 scholarships in psychology
fa the next school year.
Recipients were: Jeffery G.
Williams; and Susan Clinton and
Nancy Prewett (Psi Chi) scholar-
ship; and Susan C. Mize fa the
Card Faulkner Wray Memaial
Scholarship. Williams is a junia
majaing in psychology and
chemistry and Mize is a graduate
student in clinical psychology.
The shodarships were awarded
on the basis of perfamance and
need.
Thieves
Bike thieves are ravaging the
campus!
If you see any suspicious
activity please call the campus
police immediately!
We need your help to catch
these thieves. 757-6150.
Study
The extended hours at Joyner
Library during spring exams are:
Fri. April 28 8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Sat April 29 9 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Sun April 30 2 p.m. - 12 p.m.
Mon May 1 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Tues May 2 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Wed May 3 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Thurs May 4 8 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri May 5 8 a.m. -11 p.m.
Sat May 6 9 a.m. -11 p.m.
Sun May 7 2 p.m. - 3 a.m.
Mon May 8 8 a.m. - 12 p.m
Luther Hodges
Volunteers needed to help
wak with the Luther Hodges
campaign. Hodges, a democrat,
is running fa the U.S. Senate. If
interested, call 758-4666
Leadership
Leadership Training Class,
spoisaed by Campus Crusade
fa Christ, meets on Thursdays at
7 p.m. in Brewster C-103.
After a time of fellowship,
there is an opportunity to learn
mae about how to love God and
love others.
The four classes offered are
Christian life, dynamics of diso-
ipleship, dynamics of ministry,
and life of Christ which is open to
those intaested in investigating
the person of Jesus Christ.
Chess club 0utinS club
The Chess Club meets each
Tuesday evening at 730 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse. All
persons interested in chess are
invited to attend and join in the
competition.
The Outing Club meets Thurs-
day evenings in Memaial Gym at
730 p.m.
Anyone interested ai plan-
ning, leading, and a participat-
ing in outdoa trips is enoouraged
to attend.
The AED pre-med hona
society will hdd its spring picnic
Sat April 22, beginning at 3
p.m. at the home of Dr. Ayers. All
members and associate members
are invited to attend. The final
meeting fa this semester will be
held at Western Sizzlin Tues
April 25, beginning at 5 p.m.
Take a study break and try to
attend.
Chug-a-lug
How much Dr. Pepper can you
drink in 5 minutes?
There will be a Dr. Pepper
chugging oontest sponsored by Nu
Chi colony of Alpha Sigma Phi.
Celebrate the semesters end
from 7-9 p.m. Thurs April 27.
The oontest begins at 8 p.m. and
there is a 50 oent entry fee.
First prize is a Dr. Pepper
Igloo coder and t-shirts to top
finishers. Be ECU'S No. 1 Pep-
per.
Fa mae infamatiai call
Alpha Sig at 752-9845 a 756-
0893.
NASA
Phil Thibideau, International
Affairs Division, Washinton,
DC will visit the ECU campus
Fri April 28, to interview
students fa a job with NASA
Headquarters.
Qualified students should be
wiMmg to fill this position fa a
minimum of two semesters with
at least one semester of school
intervening.
Interested students should
call the Co-op offioe (757-6979) to
make an appointment.
Mr. Thibideau will probably
look for students with at least a
2.5 G.PA.
Happy hour
Every Friday from 2 p.m. until
5 p.m. is Happy Hour at the
Bowling Center in MendenhaJI.
Pr loes are Vi off so oome over and
take advantage of the great
savings.
Table tennis
If you enjoy playing table
tennis, stop by the Mendenhall
Table tennis rooms each Tuesday
evening at 8 p.m. when the Table
Tennis Club meets.
You will find players of all
levels of ability partidpating.
Various activities, induding lad-
der tournaments are often sched-
uled. All ECU students, faculty
and staff are welcome.
Gong show
Kappa Sigma fraternity will
sponsa a rah rah review Gong
Show at the Elbo Room Tuesday
night. Don't miss it!





28 Apr 178 FOUNTAJNHEAD Pap 3
Women's Residence Council elects officers
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant Hews Editor
Elections tor Women's Resi-
dence Council and House Council
officers were held last Tuesday.
Officers will be installed today
at 530 p.m. in the Multi-Purpose
Room at Mendenhall.
Elected officers of the
Women's Residence Council are:
President-Trish Morris; Vice-
President-Kathy Poole; Secre-
tary- Toni arayhorn; Treasurer-
Jennifer King.
Elected officers of the
women's dormitories are:
CLEMENT- PresElizabeth
Blum; Vice-PresPatty Brown;
SecTreasMaxcine Spivey.
COTTEN-PresAndrea John-
son; Vice-PresShirley Briggs;
SecTreasDeoorah Sherman.
FLEMI NG-PresCarolyn
Miller; Vioe-PresLeah Pesos;
SecTreasDiane Starks.
FLETCHER-PresAlison
Bartet; Vic-PresCindy Moore;
SecTreasKim Whitaker.
GARRETT-PresColeen Daly;
Vice-PresKathy Sears; Sec-
TreasEmily Bray.
GREENE-PresSusan Artine,
Vice-PresUnda Creech; Sec-
TreasHope Ewing.
JARVIS-PresGinger Jones;
Vice-PresLorna Durham; Sec-
TreasJanet Williams.
TYLER-PresDebra Newby;
Vice-PresDoreen Rebeilo; Sec-
TreasRobin Mans.
WHITE-PresDonna Jones;
Vice-Prea-Kendra Harper; Sec-
Treas. -Jackie Terrell.
Rugby club prepares
for two tournaments
ByMARCADLER
Staff Writer
The Rugby Club has come a
long way in a short time,
aooording to its founder, Kieran
Shanahan.
"I started the Rugby Club my
freshman year with help from Dr.
Wayne Edwards Shanahan
said.
The Rugby Club has been
supported by the Intramural
Sports Club Program fa two-and-
a-half years, Shanahan said.
"Howeva, thae are two
seasons per year acoading to
Shanahan, "a fall and spring.
Thus, we have had five seasons
The dub has received $1,000,
transportation, and n r,i from
the Intramural Sports Club Pro-
gram, aooording to Shanahan.
The athletic department does
not financially support the Rugby
Club since it is unck.r the
intramural program, Shanrhan
said.
"About 50 students are invol-
ved With the club states
Shanahan. "But 15 players are
needed on the field
During the Spring Break
(March 3-11), the Rugby Club
received a famal invitation fron
Freepot Univasity to attend a
tournament there in the
Bahamas, Shanahan said.
In ader to attend this tourn-
ament, the Student Government
Association (SGA) vtfed to fund
$1,000 to help pay the club's way,
Shanahan said.
Also, the players did many
things to raise money Projects
included car washes, raffles, and
happy hours. The dub also
manned the ballot boxer, during
the recent publications referen-
dum, Shanahan added.
The dub had four matches in
the tournament Shanahan said.
"The teams which the dub
played were the University of
Miami, a British school, and two
Freeport teams Shanahan said.
The dub won one and lost
three in this competition, acoad-
ing to Shanahan.
The dub usually plays other
college teams in North Carolina
and Virginia and the South East,
Shanahan said.
As of now, the dub is
preparing fa a tournament in
Greensbao and Richmond.
"The dub has done so well
becuaseof the quality of ballplay-
ers on the team and because of
the support from the Intramural
Department Shanahan said.
CAMPUS CANINE DANCES In celebration of life.





��nm
Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 April 1978
Congressmen didn't
represent the people
Congress made perhaps one of its most
unforgivable mistakes when it ratified two treaties
supporting the give-away of the Panama Canal. The
United States built the Canal in the early 1900's.
Construction took several years and cost the U.S.
approximately $380 million.
American citizens labored to construct the canal,
struggling against the tropical diseases of the jungles
and swamps. Those diseases took many lives before
the canal was completed.
A poll conducted by the Opinion Research
Corporation of Princeton, N.J. showed that 75 per
cent of the American people were opposed to giving
the Canal to the Panamanians. Only 12 per cent
favored the action, and 13 per cent had no opinion or
were undecided.
Whether Congress was wise to sign the Canal
over to the Panamanians remains to be seen, but
certainly the members of Congress did not represent
the people while taking action in the House and the
Senate. When Americans go to the polls to vote
politicians into office, they expect them to do their
jobs of representation. Certainly the Congressmen
did not forget their duties while deciding the fate of
the Panama Canal.
The American people, of whom a majority were
against the treaties, should remember which of their
Congressmen represented them in the Panama Canal
issue and which of them did not. Those who did not
must not be voted back into office when elections
tumble upon the American people again.
am
Fountainhead
Samoa tha Eaat Carotin community for war fifty yaara.
fvara IX fan to ma IP CMCKM tmtatnar wt anOUHJ nava
a ojovarnmant without nawapapara or naarapapart
without Qowarnmant, I aftoutd not haaftata a momant to
or at at tha lattar
Thomaa Jaftai ton
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
Editor Doug White
Trends Editor Steve Bachner
EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD Is tha Muctont tnmoapm of Earn Carolina
UnlmHy apormxad by tha M�dia Board of ECU and It
dMrfbutad aach Tutaday and Thursday, waatdy during tha
Mailing addraaa: Old South Buikflng, Qraanvllto, N.C 27834.
EdHoriaJ orHoaa: 787'OM, 757-8367, 757-8308.
SuuauluUom: $10 annually, alumni $8 annuaMy.
THis RtnLLf mfik.es me tzeu weucoruz
Forum
Student apologizes to police officer
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I would like to make public
my sincere apologies to Officer
Dave Sherman of the Greenville
Police Department fa throwing
him in the lake at the Pi Kappa
Phi house during a field day. It
was a stupid, immature stunt
Forum Policy
which has embarrassed
and my fraternity.
myself
Sincerely,
John O'Neal
Forum letters should be typed or printed, signed and include the
writer's address or telephone number. Letters are subject to editing for
taste and brevity and may be sent to FOUNTAINHEAD or left at the
Information Desk in Mendenhall Student Center
Editorials
Lecture Series needs students
By MARTY CRAWFORD
Editorial Writer
The Lecture series is threatening to cut down on
or eliminate all together certain types of lecturers
due to poor attendance. Fa example, accading to
the committee, they have threatened the Journalism
department after a disastrous turnout fa the recent
Jack Anderson appearanoe.
Have the students of East Carolina been
culturally deprived fa such a long time they can't
realize just how entertaining and educational a
lecture can be? However unfatunate this may be,
alas, it must be true, because the blame canntf be
placed on the lap of the committee.
The Lecture Series committee has presented this
university with a diverse group of people to speak in
an effat to cater to the divase tastes on this
campus.
It is a staggering thought that college students
can sit idly by while distinguished people grace our
campus trying to fawaru and develop the minds of
tomarow's leaders. When will college students
realize that now is the time fa education instead of
making the neva-ending pilgrimages to the shrines
of the local bars?
The Lecture Series is given freely to ECU
students with the students' best interests at heart.
What a shame it would be to have it canceled fa the
select few who do wish to enrich their lives all
because of the majaity who have no drive within
themselves fa betterment.
Perhaps the blame can be given to peer
publicity. Or, perhaps it would be better said that
"hopefully " the reason is peer publicity. We want to
hope that the interest is there, but students are
unaware of the series and thus there is no
participation.
Whatever the reasons may be, something must
be done soon to save the Lecture Series. Whether it
is mae publicity, still wider variety of speakers a a
rescheduling of times in ader to accomodate mae
people, this program needs help.
Howeva, the aid should oome, not from the
oommittee which is already bending over backwards
to serve, but from the st'jdents fa which the
program aiginated.
Soon there will nolbea Lecture Series to avoid
anymae and then everyoie will realize it and feel
deprived and grumble, but the committee will have
all the right in the wald to sit back and say you
wont have the Lecture Series to kick around
anymae.





N.C. editor
addresses
SCJ students
A North Carolina editor em-
phasized the importance of pre-
paring for "three basic routines"
when he addressed the Society fa
Collegiate Journalists Thursday
evening.
Jerry Ausband, editor of the
Shelby Daily Star, urged the
journalism students and members
of campus publications staff to
learn to spell, become familiar
with the dictionary, and to write
simple sentences.
Earlier in the day he had
spoken to journalism classes and
conferred with a number of
students.
His campus visit was sponsor-
ed by the Newspaper Fund of the
Wall Street Journal, Ausband's
own paper and ECU.
The cooperative project is
known as the Editor-in-Residenoe
program.
Cindy Broome, editor of
FOUNTAINHEAD, presented the
speaker at the SCJ meeting. At a
social hour later, Ausband and
Prof. Ira L Baker, SCJ advisor,
were presented gifts of apprecia-
tion from the society.
At an earlier business meeting
the group elected new officers for
next year as follows: president,
Kay Williams; vice president,
Richy Smith; secretary, Joyce
Evans; treasurer, Arah Venable;
historian, Stuart Morgan.
The Society will co-sponsor,
along with the university Depart-
ment of Continuing Education, a
workshop for high school publica-
tions scheduled for Sept. 30.
Physics dept.
to observe
Sun Day
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Sun Day, a national day set
aside to promote awareness of the
importance of the sun and its
potential as a souroe of energy,
will be observed Wed May 3, by
the ECU department of physics.
Lectures by ECU physicists
and displays of solar hot water
collectors, solar hot air collectors
and commercial solar units and
instruments will highlight the
day's activities.
Th3 public is invited.
The lectures will begin at 1
p.m. in room B103 of the ECU
Science Complex and will feature
Dr. Edward Seykora, astronomer
and member of the Physics
Department whose topic is
"Know Your Sun Dr. Carl
Adler, an ECU physicist, will
discuss "Solar Energy Today" at
1:45 p.m. and Dr. Joseph Nor-
wood, a member of the physics
faculty, will talk about "The
Wind: Man's Oldest Friend" at
230 p.m.
Solar energy units will be on
display during the morning and
afternoon outside the Science
Complex.
25 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
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RMg 8 FOUMTAINHEAD 25 April 197B
Honor Council imposes
sentences on five students
ByTRISHA VAUGHAN
aaff Writer
Two cases were reviewed and
sentences commuted during the
last session of the Honor Council.
The first, a male sophomore
caught stealing a keg of beer,
pleaded guilty to a charge of
violating Section 5, Article G
(theft; of the Student Government
Association (SGA) handbook.
The Honor Council found him
guilty and imposed a sanction of
suspended suspension for the
remainder of the semester.
It implied that if within the
stated period of time the student
is again found guilty of a
violation, he will face an auto-
matic suspension.
The second case was for four
male freshmen who were charged
with Section 5, Article B (use of
abusive and obscene, vulgar
language) of the handbook.
With a plea of guilty, the
students were given official
reprimands by the Honor Council,
That meant that an official
letter was to be sent to each
student indicating his violation
and stating such conduct as
unacceptable.
Many students remain un-
aware of the ECU Honor Code
and Honor Council until they find
themselves in violation of its
rules.
Knowledge of the rules and
regulations of any university is an
important part of adjustment to
campus life.
The procedure of referral to
the Honor Council begins when a
student is reported to the Dean of
lArx.
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Men or Women for some viola-
tion.
If considered necessary, the
dean then refers the student to
the SGA Attorney General. The
attorney general then decides
whether the case should be
brought before the Honor Goun-
cil.
MORGAN
Continued from p. 1
greatly at first, and cited some of
the FBI's misdealings with North
Carolinians.
Morgan added, however, that
the "vast majority (of agents) are
honorable men doing the right
job
Senator Morgan said that he
learned from his experiences that
former President Nixon was not
the first president to abuse the
power of his office. Many former
presidents were guilty of abusing
their power while in office, even
such highly respected presidents
as Franklin Roosevelt.
Morgan beleived that the
"crisis of self-respect" brought
on by incidents such as Water-
gate is passing.
He also said that HEW
Secretary Joseph Galifano is
guilty to some extent of abuse of
the power of his office.
Morgan said Califano's anti-
smoking campaign is an unrea-
sonable advancement of his own
personal ideals. Funding fa
Califano's anti-smoking cam-
paign comes from a special fund
voted into existence by the
Executive Branch, and Morgan is
challenging Galifano to bring the
matter up before Congress since
it is of public concern and is
funded by the public.
YOU NEVER KNOW who you'll run into on your way to dass.
Travel Committee
sets 1978-79 trips
By DOUG WHITE
News Editor
The Student Union Travel
Committee has recently selected
the trips for the 1978-79 school
year, according to Bill Martin,
committe chairperson.
The first trip will be New York
City during Thanksgiving Break.
It will cost approximately $65.
"This year there will be two
trips at Christmas. The Hawaii
trip is fa eight days and seven
nights and will cost approximate-
ly $500. The Ski Trip, to either
Pennsylvania a Vermont, will be
fa aie week during Christmas
Break, and it should cost less
than $200 Martin said.
During Spring Break, the
Bahamas Cruise will be sponsor-
ed fa the third year. Three nights
lodging in Fat Lauderdale has
been added to the Bahamas
auise trip this year. The trip will
cost approximately $400.
The New Orleans - Atlanta
trip will also be during Spring
Break.
"Four days in New Orleans
and three days in Atlanta will cost
approximately $200 Martin
said.
After Commencement 1979, a
two week trip to England has
been planned.
The first week will be spent in
La,1on. The second week will be
spent touring the English
countryside in a houseboat driven
by trip participants.
The England trip will cost
approximately $600.
"Trip prices and dates are not
yet final. The trips will goon sale
the first day of classes in the fall.
The Travel Committee presents
these trips fa the vacation
enjoyment of students, faculty,
staff, dependents, and alumni of
ECU Martin said.
CLIFFS WEEKLY SPECIALS
MONDA Y-TUESDAYWEDNESDA Y- THURSDAY
Fish and Fries $135
Fillet, Whole Baby Flounder$135 x;
14 lb. Hamburger Steak (grilled onions & gravy if desired)
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Regular Hamburger Steak (grilled onions & gravy if desired)
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Ham steak (with Grilled Pineapple)$1.60
Veal Parmesanwith Meat Sauce)$1.60
Fried Chicken (14 Chicken Whitemeat )$1.60
Thursday
CLIFF'S SHRIMP NIGHT
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Caraway donates $1,000 to
establish Curriculum Library
F0UNTA1NHEA0
By ED WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
A $1,000 bequest has been left
to the English Department by the
late Hermine Caraway to estab-
lish a Curriculum Library.
The library will be used to
help prepare students who are
planning to teach English, ac-
cording to Dr. Erwin Hester, head
of the English Department.
It will attempt to show these
students diversified teaching
methods.
It will be part of the Under-
graduate Teachers Education
Program which is tied in with
obtaining a B.S. degree.
The library now consistsof Dr.
Caraway's books and her teach-
ing materials which were donated
by her two sisters, Mrs. William
Sineath and Mrs. J. Herbert
Hildreth, Hester said.
"We have a good nudeus to
build upon Hester said.
"We will furnish the library
with more materials once we
receive the bequest
Hester indicated that such
materials would indude books on
theoretical teaching, films and
film-strips, audiovisual aids, and
current periodicals.
Caraway was born in Wades-
boro. She received her A.B.
degree at the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro and her
M.Ed, and Ph.D. degrees at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
Dr. Caraway came to ECU in
1959.
She was Assistant Supervisor
of the Teacher Training Program
of the English Department from
19596.
In 1965 she became a full
professor at ECU.
She was named Director of
Student Teaching in English in
1966, a position she held until she
died last February, Hester said.
"She was very interested In
Teacher Education and she was
completely dedicated to her job
Dr. Hester oommented. "This is
an appropriate way to commem-
orate her
The Curriculum Library will
be open fa some use in Septem-
ber, according to Dr. Hester.
"This is the realization of a
long-felt need Hester said.
The Executive Department
voted to name the library after
Dr. Caraway, according to Dr.
Hester.
We don't make money towing'
Continued from p. 1
questions, you know what they'll
say? They'll tell you to go to
hell Smith said with a perturb-
ed fadal expression.
"You would be wasting your
time to see Donn - he doesn't tow
enough advised Smith. "He
doesn't have the proper fadlities
to store vehides, he just tows
occasionally to keep himself satis-
fied and remain in the business
Calder said there was compet-
ition among the towing compan-
ies and about once a week, one of
them calls complaining they are
not being called as frequently as
their competitors.
"We run this system as fairly
as we can said Calder. "We
give one towing company
a call, if they don't answer, we
call the next one.
"No, we don't make any
money towing cars, but no one is
going to believe you if you say
that said Calder, leaning back
in his office chair. "It has been
suggested that we should, but we
won't
"UNC receives $50 from
each vehidetowed said Calder.
"If we were to do so, how could
you oonvinoe people here that we
would not be towing for the
money?" asked Calder.
The towing fee fa cars towed
in the dty is $20 during the day
and $25 at night. But, the fee on
campus is five dollars less at $15
and $20 respectively.
Smith said he was inducted on
the dty pdioe department's tow-
ing list, along with 13 other
wreckers in Greenville. And, he
said he received calls to tow
vehides na only from the campus
police, but from the dty and state
police as well.
"That waks ai a rotation
basis also added Smith.
I have to wait fa calls to go
around the other 13 towing
services befae I get my turn
Calder said at this time of the
year, most vehides are being
towed because their owners have
oolleded and excess number of
tickets.
Owners collecting three a
more unpaid tickets, as well as
owners of illegally parked a
unregistered vehides are also
subjed to having their vehides
towed.
Bill McDonald
Located on
E. 10th Street,
2 doors down
from Kings
Sandwich .
phone
752-6680
"I've towed as many as 26
vehides in one day - that's a full
day's wak boasted Smith. In
that case, I believe a row of cars
was illegally parked on the side of
a road.
"My staage area is oi the
oaner of Washington and Tenth
Street said Smith.
The staage area was sur-
rounded by at least an eight foot
high wire fence and was secured
at the gate by a lock and chain.
" I can put as many as 40 to 60
vehides in there added Smith.
"And, if vehides are left in there
I'll charge from one to two dollars
fa staage each day - it varies fa
students
Smith said he allows the
owners of every vehide about to
be lowed around 15 minutes to
arrive and remove their vehides.
If they do so, he only charges half
the fee.
FUTURE CPA'S
LET US HELP YOU
BECOME A CPA
13 of USA
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and business insurance
Like a gotxJ neighbor.
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CHARLOTTE 704 375-3051
CLASSES BEGIN MAY 22
lime?
CPA
REVIEW
JUST WHEN THE odd and flu season passes, allergies and hay
fewer spring up.
Male student assaulted
two in dorm room
by
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant NewsEdita
A male student was injured,
but not seriously, when he was
allegedly assaulted by two male
students in his damitay roan
Tuesday night, accading to
Frands Eddings, chief of campus
police.
The injured student was iden-
tified as Mark Oravitz of Umstead
damitay.
The assault oocured in Ora-
vitz's room and was allegedly
unprovoked.
After being assaulted, Oravitz
went downtown where he
later collapsed.
He was then taken to Pitt
County Hospital where he was
treated and released.
Eddings intends to press
charges fa assault.
:ii
13 of USA
CHARLOTTE 704 375-3051
CLASSES
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Pay 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 April 1978
'Hot Wax' covers 'early days of rock and roll9
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
Two decades ago, the rock and
roll industry wasn't a billion
dollar business-it was a battle-
The protagonist in the story is
the legendary Alan Freed, ten
first whieD.J. to play R&Ron the
New York airwaves, and, accord-
ing to some, the first to call the
music rock and roll.
Through Freed, recording
oompany promoters, group mana-
gers, and individual talents
sought to reach the first rung on
the ladder of suocess.
In spite of Freed's tremen-
dous clout, all does not go well for
him.
Reck & Roll is simply too
"subversive" for some people's
tastes; so, for the bastions of
propriety, Freed is anathema.
Realtor's refuse to sell him the
estate he has been negotiating
ALAN FREBDB 1ST
ANNIVERSARY
-ROCK N ROLL SHOW
fwunouttt-
1w "
. v��J
�sw
THE CHESTERFIELDS ZOOM from ghetto streetcorners to the
opening act at Alan Freed's Big Beat Show in Paramount Pictures'
' American Hot Wax a film that re-creates the exciting early days of
rock and roll.
field.
In the late 50's, the conta-
giously energizing sounds formed
by the synthesis of black delta
blues and the electric guitar was
just beginning to invade the
eardrums of white, middle-class
America, outraging staid subur-
banites with its primal rhythms
and sexually suggestive lyrics.
"American Hot Wax" cap-
tures the hectic days of the birth
of a truly American musical
idiom, known by its slang name (a
sexual euphemism in itself)-rock
and roll.
Freed, played with aplomb by
TimMdntire, was a cult figure of
the airwaves in New York during
the '50's, much like Wolfman
Jack on the West Coast during
the '60's.
Due to Freed's immense sway
over the teeny-bop" population
segment of the local population,
what he said, went.
Fa this was the time when the
teen-age population, swollen by
the post-WWII baby boom, was
rising to numerical, and commer-
cial, ascendancy.
m ?
THE MAR JEE LIGHTS blaze bright as the crowds throng to Alan
Freed's Big Beat Show at the Brooklyn Paramount
Trends

TIM MCINTIRE, PORTRAYING
legendary disc jockey Alan Freed,
drives the audience wild as he
introduces the hottest acts in rock
and roll during his Big Beat Show
in Paramount Pictures' "Ameri-
can Hot Wax a film that
re-creates the exciting early days
of the music that defined the 50's
generation.
on, (they would prefer not to sell
toany-sniffmusic people"), his
job is threatened because he
grabs his hottest tunes from the
station's "Don't Play" list, and
rumors are circulating that his
baby Big Beat Show at the
Paramount Theatre will never
come to pass.
Tension mounts as the night
of the 1st Anniversary Rock n
Roll Show approaches. Chuck
Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats
Dominio, and Screamin' Jay
Hawkins are contracted to head-
line the show; the Planotones and
Tilm may stand as milestone in modern cinema'
the Delights are hired; and a new
band, the Chesterfields (the
movie's only fictitious act is
rehearsed to perform sweet little
Louise's music. (Say isn't she
that girl on "Saturday Night
Live?")
Contrary to the hopes of
many, the show does go on,
erupting first into ecstatic exu-
berance, then into a full scale riot
as the New Yak constabulary
move in to close down the show.
Now they know better-they
can make far mae maiey by
busting the audience.
'Straight Time' realistic portrait of criminal
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
"Straight Time" is a film
which presents a straight
forward, no-nonsense portrait of
the professional aiminai.
Not the political terraist, nor
DUSTIN HOFFMAN AND Ulu Grosbard on location with
Time
Straight
the rebel without a cause, but the
man who, having "graduated
from the school of schools
chooses aime as a profession.
Fa Dustin Hoffman's earthy
patrayaJ of ex-con Max Dembo
the film is laudable.
But Hoffman's perfamanoe
cannot carry the entire film.
Something is missing in Ulv
Grosband's direction. Max's
character is never fully develop-
ed. There is a natural affinity
between the audience and the
ex-con, threatened by a society
whose rules he doesn't under-
stand, but this affinity is never
developed.
In Max, there is none of the
desperate nihilism of Al Pacino's
"Dog Day Afternoon" perfa-
manoe, only a sullen listlessness
which is somehow almost com-
pletely predictable.
Although the film involves
three getaway scenes, a bank
heist, and a jewelry stae rob-
bery, one never feels the throw-
back-your-head-and-hoot
desparado exuberance of
"Bonnie and Clyde
But, as stated, Grossman is
trying to present a patrait of a
waking aiminai rather than a
classic martyred bad guy of the
BogartCagneyeraof Hollywood.
Instead of fast-paced shoot -
'em-up action, Grossman uses
suspense-the last hectic seconds
which divide the robbers' exit,
stage left,from the oops' entrance
stage right-to achieve his drama-
tic effect.
The relationship between Max
and Jenny Meroer (Theresa
Russell), the girl who harbas him
when he skips parole to go back
into business, could have been
mae fully developed; and Max's
murder of the flustered getaway
driver scaes him no points in the
public popularity poll, but this is
all in keeping with Grossman's
realistic approach to the patrayal
of the convict.
Fa Grossman's novel
approach to an otherwise cliche-
ridden theme, this film may well
stand as a milestone in modern
cinema.
DUSTIN HOFFMAN AND Theresa Russell in a scene from
'Straight Time





'A collection of frame blow-ups from the movie9
25 April 1978 FOUNTAIN HEAD Pag� 9
Steven's 'The Greatest Story Ever Told' retold
By JOHN WEYLER
Staff Writer
The greatest stay ever told is
the story of Jesus. Or at least
aooording to George Stevens, for
so he named his 1965 film
depicting Christ's life.
That film has been made into
a book, which is the subject of this
review.
This The Greatest Story Every
Told is not the novel
The Greatest Story
Ever Told by Fulton
Oursler on which
the movie was
partially based.
This is rather a collection of
photos taken from Steven's film.
The photos are printed in a
handsome way: in cola, on sick,
glossy paper. Many of them are
printed the full size of the pages,
which measure 12" by 9
These huge frames, while not
quite reproducing the full, glor-
ious Cinermama and Ultra Pana-
vision in which the film was shot,
do show some of the films drama
and majesty.
They range from panaamic
shots of earth and sky with Mary
and Joseph a a few disciples
walking aloig in the faeground,
to a dose-up of the anguished,
tatured face of Jesus, as imper-
sonated by Max Voi Sydovt.
There are many shots of
aowds, hundreds of hooded and
robed extras, listening, following
and shouting and reaching out fa
the Son of God.
Many poignant moments are
captured: Judas receiving his
thirty pieoes of silver, the Last
Supper, the Crucifixion.
Interspersed with the large
photos are small pictures of the
individual characters that make
up the stay of Christy
A cast line is
included in the
book, which
shows a
few sur-
ple. You would expect to see Pat
Boone (as the young man at the
tomb) in a religious movie, but
John Wayne? Telly Savalas? (As
the Centurion and
Pontius Pilate,
befae it the beauty and the
extraadinary nature of Him who
represents many things, and one
thing.
To recall, a is it to challenge,
one's own image of Christ-an

respectively).
How about Jamie Farr, look-
ing very Klinger-like in a long
robe, as one of the Apostles?
Others whose pictures are
shown are Charlton Heston as a
muscular John the Baptist,
Claude Rains as Herod the Great,
and Roddy McDowall in his
pre-ape days, as Matthew.
A shat text piece, explaining
the mystery of Jesus and the
nature of the film, is included in
the slim (37 pages) book.
The film, and the patrait
achieved by the represented
Christ, do not so much attempt to
answer. Pilate's question, "What
is truth?" as to intensify each
individual's desire to discover that
answer fa himself within his own
experience, past and future.
A play, a film, a single
perfamance-any wak of art-
undertakes to provide answers
from within the beholder. The
film moves to excite the imagina-
tion of the audience by rendering
3LKM
image derived from a wad, a
panel of stained glass, a Gothio
lettered Christmas card, a burst
of agan music, an inner exalta-
tion, an experience.
See JESUS, p. 11
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 April 1978
ECU Choir heads this week's School of Music events
ECU NEWS BUREAU
The East Carolina University
Choir will perform at the First
Presbyterian Church here Wed-
nesday, April 26, at 8:15 p.m.
The Choir is directed by Brett
Watson of the ECU School of
Music faculty.
On the program are several
pieces of sacred music from the
Renaissance and Baroque eras;
songs by Johannes Brahms,
Samuel Barber and Ned Rorem;
and several folk songs and
spirituals.
The choir will divide into a
double-choir formation for its
performance of the Heinrich
Schutz setting of Psalm 100 and
the Bach Motet II, "The Spirit
Also Helpeth Us
The Presbyterian Church is
particularly well-suited fa Baro-
que music performances, said
director Watson, because of its
tracker-act ion Zimmer organ.
Membership in the 45-
member choir is based upon a
successful audition at the begin-
ning of each academic year.
Each singer in the choir is a
voice student.
The choir has toured widely in
the eastern U.S. Last spring the
choir performed before approxi-
mately 4,000 persons on a tour
that inducted performances at
Rockefeller Raza and St. Pat-
rick's Cathedral in New York and
Washington Cathedral in Wash-
ington, D.C.
The Wednesday evening con-
cert is free and open to the public.
STEVE WALLACE: ARIAS
Steve Wallace will sing songs
and arias by Faure, Massent.
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Schumann, Puccini, Rorem and
Hoist in his recital Fri April 28.
The program will begin at 8:15
p.m. in the A.J. Flecther Recital
Hall and will consist of two Faure
songs; selections from the
Schumann "Dichterlieve
Hoist's "Journey's End
Rorem's "See How They Love
Me" and two arias: "En ferment
les yeux" from M assent's
"Manon" and "Che gelida
manina" from Puccini's "La
Boheme
He will be aooompanied by
pianist Lorene Carraway.
A student of Antonia Dalapas
of the ECU School of Music voios
faculty, Walence is a junior and a
candidate for the Bachelor of
Music degree in vocal pedagogy.
During his study at ECU he
has been active in several Opera
Theatre productions, as well as in
musical productions sponsored by
the Theatre of West Virginia.
He has also appeared as a
soloist with the Greenville Com-
munity Chorus and the Carteret
County Choral Society.
TWO SENIOR
PIANO STUDENTS
Two senior piano students in
the ECU School of Music, Laura
Soles of Virginia Beach, Va. and
Pamela Wilson Wilkinsof Mount
Olive, will perform in recital April
25-27.
Both are candidates fa the
Bachelor of M usic degree in piano
performance. Each recital is free
and open to the public,
Pamela Wilkins, a student of
Dr. Charles Bath of the ECU
keyboard faculty, will, perform
Tues April 25, at 8:15 p.m. in
the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Her program will include
Liszt's"Sonetto 104 de Petrarca'
and "Etude de Concert, No. 3" ;
Debussy's "Images Book I; the
Beethoven Sonata in A flat Major,
Opus110and Prokofieff's Sonata
No. 3 in A minor.
Ms. Wilkins is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. O.E. Wilson of 513
West James St Mount Olive.
Performing Thurs April 27,
at 8:15 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre, Laura
Soles will play the Haydn Varia-
tions in F minor, three Ravel
compositions, Scriabin's Etudes,
Opus 8 and Mendelssohn's Fant-
asy, Opus 28, in F sharp minor.
MA RSHBURN IN RECITA L
Sheila Marshburn, a
student of Paul Tardif, will
perform at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday,
April 26.
Her program will include the
Soler Sonata No. 84 in D and
Sonata No. 90 in F sharp;
Beethoven's "Waldstein"
Sonata, Opus 53; Schubert's
"Impromptu No. 2, Opus 90;
and Liszt's "Sonetto 104 del
Petrarca" and Tarantella from
See MUSIC, p. 11
RIGGAN
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
vTHER GOODS
itown Girtenviile
- a�- Rt ,tS-020�
� .��





25 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag V,
'A child's view of art' subject of special presentation
ECU News Bureau
A child's view of art was the
subject of presentation by Phil E.
Phillips of the ECU art education
faculty at the recent convention of
the National Art Education Assoc-
iation in Houston.
Phillip's report was based on
research done with a group of
Chicago area school children who
were shown color slides of
realistic paintings - a selection of
individual and group portraits
'� SHOCK" RECORDING
ARTISTS "Symbol 8" will
appear in concert on the mall
tonight at 8 p. m. Rain site will
be in Rm. 244 Mendenhall
Student Center.
JESUS
Continued from p. 9
And to come as visually close
as possible to giving that sense of
Jesus' passage on earth as it is
within the power of any medium�
the word, the painting, or the
film�to convey.
The Greatest Story Ever Told
was probably made to cash in on
the movie, rather than to spread
the Gospel.
The photos and text are
profound while not exceptionally
beautiful or relevatory.
The book does its job though,
which is simply to be a collection
of frame blow-ups from a movie.
MUSIC
Continued from p. 10
Annees de Peiei inage
RIDENHOUR PERFORMS
AT 9 P.M.
Performing at 9 p.m. April 26,
Carroll Ridenhour will play a
program consisting of Josef
Haydn's Sonata in G (Hob.
XVI40); "Three Intermezzi
Opus 117 by Brahms and "Five
Piano Pieces" by George Crumb.
He is a student of Henry
Doskey of the ECU keyboard
faculty and a candidate for the
Bachelor of Music degree in
music theory and composition.
ARMYNAVY STORE
Seeping bags, camping equip
ment, rainwear, Vietnam & corn
bat boots, dishes. Military sur
pi us
1501 S Evans Street
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at
College View Cleaners
and landscapes.
Purpose of the study was to
identify what children find inter-
esting in paintings, Phillips said.
"The children were asked to
explain exactly what they were
looking at when a slide of a
painting was taken away he
reported.
"Results showed that a sign-
ifcant number of the children
within each grade level looked at
similar parts of the painting.
"Little similarity was found
when grade levels were oompare-
ed
Phillips also noticed less tend-
ency to deviate from the norm
among the younger children.
Primai -aged children looked
at similar parts of the paintings
"with much more consistency"
than high school students, he
said.
"With children of all ages, the
most realistic paintings obtained
the most similar answers
Phillips' findings are believed
relevant to classroom teachers of
art, who regularly present repro-
ductions of paintings to their
pupils.
A doctoral candidate at the
University of Illinois, Phillips
joined the ECU art faculty last
fall.
MHVERSERY SUE APRIL 26-29
Now b the time to buy
your siMimor leotards.
At Barre, Ltd.
805 Dickinson Ave.
Phone 752-Sia
TODAY!
Phi pha That
VmSVOfj riOnor rlmmtmy)
Annual Cookout 403 AM St,
from 5s30 p-m. unti
Only $1.60 for al the food and boor you want!
Sign up in Km History offico.
GARBAGE
that doesn't need
your contribution.
Last year, Americans threw away
150 million tons of materials�enough
to fill garbage trucks lined three
abreast from New York to California.
Our throwaways cost us more than $4
billion each year. This collection and
disposal of trash is now the second
largest item in most city budgets,
surpassed only by public schools.
The problem is more than litter
along the highway. It is the waste of
our nation's resources�resouces
which are becoming more scarce
and expensive.
We need to conserve materials now
more than ever. And you can help-
by not making a contribution. For
example, by repairing worn items, you
can save yourself money, reduce
energy waste and conserve materials.
For a free booklet packed with ideas
about how to reduce waste, write to:
environmental
acton
foundation
YES. I am interested in learning how I can
reduce waste Please send your free book-
let, 'The Case for Materials Conservation
to:
Address.
MAIL TO: Environmental Action
Foundation
724 Oupont Circle Building
Washington, DC 20036





p
Pag 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 April 1978
Mountaiiieering 2.
The Busch label is where it
all begins. Note
the snowy,
craggy peaks
affixed
thereto.
They
are
the
'moun
tains.
rou are the moun
taineer. And this is
an ad. The subject of
which is selecting the
proper gear for
mountaineering.
(It all fits to-
gether so nicely,
doesn't it?)
First and
foremost, you'll
need to pop the
mountain top. For
this task, faithful moun-
taineers use a church
key. Secular moun-
taineers use a bottle
opener. Don't be con-
fused by these antics
with semantics. Just
remember, the opener is
your primary tool. Be
true to it and it will be
true to you
Second, choose a
glass. Here the options
become immense.
German steins, hand-
jDlown pilseners,
jDld jelly jars,
that cute
little
lurch key used by
faithful mountaineers )
Boffo mug you've
had since tnird grade
Be adventurous.
Experiment. Most
mountaineers have a
personal preference. You'll
develop one too.
Food is next. Proper
mountaineering, not
to mention proper nutri-
tion, requires a smorgas-
bord selection of snacks.
Some mountaineers
have suffered from a
potato chip deficiency,
a pretzel imbalance or
other serious dietary de-
fects. Plan ahead.
Comfort is crucial. If you
mountaineer in
public, pick
a padded
bar stool,
preferably
one that
spins
(to facili-
tate aximir-
ing the
scenery). At
home, a com-
fortable chair or s fa will
do. Rule of thumb if it
feels good, and th police
don't seem to mini, do it.
Then turn on the
tube or spin a tune or
crack a good book. The
choice is strictly
between you and the
dominant hemisphere
of your brain Of course,
some mountaineers
say the smooth, re-
freshing taste of Busch
is entertainment enough
thank goodjiess
?they do, because
it's an excellent
conclusion
(Comfort is crucial
Dorit just reach for a beer.
BUSCH
Head for the mountains.
-
. �.�� �-�������.�.�
.���j
-�
CT l3rT�T�r7T?
J





Bucs win 11-4
25 April 1978 FOUNT AINHEAD Pag 13
Conaty two-hits Camels
SPORTS IN REVIEW
By ANDY STEWART
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Pirates
were able to score their seventh
straight win by dumping Camp-
bell College by a score of 11-4.
The Pirates were able to break
loose and score three runs in the
fourth off of three hits and two
errors.
The Pirates were able to put
together two more runs in the
fifth off two more Camel errors
and one base hit.
In the sixth the Pirates ripped
off four more runs off of four
clean hits to make the score 9-0.
In the seventh inning the
Camels were able to stop the
Pirate attack.
The Bucs still were not out of
fire power as they proved in the
eight. With Pete Paradossi on and
one out, Bobby Supel slammed
the ball out of the park to make
the soore 11-0.
The winning pitcher for the
Pirates was Pete Conaty who fired
a two hitter by the Camels. He
did not give up a hit until two
were out in the sixth. His record
now stands at 64. The losing
pitcher fa Campbell was Keith
Waters who's record is now 2-5.
LATE BOX
ECU23
Methodist 1
Maoon Moye blasted two home
runs and Bill Davis fired a four
hitter to pace the Bucs; now
25-15.
PETE CON A TY NOW stands &4 on the season with two hitter over
Campbell.
Sp o rts
Pirates nap through UNC-W
doubleheader, get whipped 7-4,4-3
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Sports Editor
The Pirates' problems on the
road continued Sunday as ECU
dropped two baseball games to
UNC-Wilmington 7-4 and 4-3.
Of the 15 games lost thus far
this season, 11 were away games.
ECU has only won 4 games on the
road and are now 19 and 3 at
home.
In the first game the Sea-
hawks drew first blood with two
runs in the first inning.
During the third inning the
Pirates soared when Butch Davis
singled and Bobby Supel hit him
home. Styons then hit and Supel
was able to soore.
Supel and pinch runner Chip
Giannettino advanced on an out.
Giannettino scored when Jerry
Carraway reached base on an
error.
In the top of the fifth ECU
loaded the bases but were unable
to soore after a UNC-W double
play.
Wilmington added 2 runs in
the bottom of the fifth when an
error allowed the Seahawks to
make it home.
UNC-W rounded out the scor-
ing in the sixth inning by adding
one more run on another Pirate
error. The run was soared by
former Raleigh Enloe standout
Ronnie Peoples.
I n the second game of the twin
bill ECU jumped out to a quick 3-0
lead only to see it vanish in the
fifth, sixth and seventh innings.
The Pirates jumped on top
first with a soore by Eddie Gates.
In the third inning ECU added
two more. Gates hit a single and
Billy Best sacrificed Gates to
second.
Paradossi then hit a single to
become the all-time hitter in
Pirate history.
Butch Davis doubled then
Gates and Paradossi came in on a
fielder's choice.
UNC-W came back in the fifth,
however, when Terry Greene
soared.
In the sixth inning another
former Raleigh Enloe standout,
Ron Broadweil hit a double and
pinch runner McLean scored
when Jerry Carraway committed
an error.
The Seahawks scored again in
the seventh and forced an extra
inning.
During the ninth inning
UNC-W scored to win the game.
The losses dropped the
Pirates record to 24-15.
By Steve Byers
Basketball just around the corner ?
After East Carolina's dissapointing basketball season, one might
think the Pirate players could do without seeing the round object fa at
least six months; but such is not the case.
One need only look inside Minges Coliseum every aftanoon to see
most of the Buc playas waking out and staging pick-up games
continously.
As if keeping in touch with the game isn't enough, the team
members have imported members of the football team to provide
behemoth, if na graceful competition. Even ex-Pirate running back,
turned TV announcer, Kenny Strayhan played in a recent pick-up
game much to the dismay of his dangaously relaxed musdes.
Howeva enoouraging this is to East Carolina supporters, it is
equally discouraging to the seldom exacised body I now passess. Just
as I have mastered the ten foot jump shot, Oliver Mack just as
effortlessly flies through the air and drops the ball through the hoop
with two-thirds of his body above the net.
But my own inadequacies aside, the team looks amazingly
dissimilar to the squad that left the oourt ova a month ago. A
confidence that can only be displayed by vetaans of a oollege
basketball season is evident as the team membas play.
Roga Carr has developed a new method of celebrating a basket.
Carr's turnaround jumpa is deadly from nearly anywhae on the court,
yet his practice of falling on the oourt is nearly as oonsistant. Otiva
Mack says "Roga spends half the game oi the flea Carr's oily
competition in the "odd-shots" department has to be Banard Hill.
The slenda 6-7 faward becomes a flash of elbow and knees as a shot
emerges from a doud of dust and is usually accurate Called "Ice"
because of his similarity to San Antonio's Geage Gavin, Hill showed
some of his moves this past season. Howeva, he must have spent a
week in seclusion dreaming up some of his new regailia.
Hab Krusen, refared to by some onlookas as the "great white
hope is still the deadeye of seasons past and some moves of Hill and
Carr appear to be rubbing off.
Howeva in all saiousness, Carr appears to be in his best shape
eva and is gaining confidence rapidly. Expect a stro�g battle fa the
three frait court positions as no less than eight playas have a shot.
One of Gillman's first problems will be deciding between Carr, Hill,
Hab Gray, Greg Canelius, Hab Krusen, Kyle Powas, David
Undawood, and freshman signee Al Tyson.
A tall line-up would feature 6'10" Tyson, &7W Gray, and
newcoma Undawood; but thai what becomes of Krusen, the best
pure shoota on the team, strong Roga Carr and Cornelius, a hustling
Powas and flashy Hill. Coach Gillman can only smile about this
"problem
In case you didn't notice the Pirates will have all but two of last
year's playas back whoi practice starts in the fall.
At the risk of using a sevaly ova used wad, the "optimism" in
next year's team seems to be stronga than eva. All of it will be
needed as Gillman prepares to release the schedule in about a month.
Speaking of the schedule, the Bucs will play no less than six NCAA
a NIT playoff contenders of the past season. Gillman has already
revealed NCAA participants Duke, Indiana State, and Notre Dame will
be on the schedule along with NIT teams Detroit, North Caolina State,
and South Caolina. How does the team react? "I'm ready fa South
Bend smiled Mack.
FINAL NCAA DIVISION I INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
S C C R I W G
CL G FG
1. FREEMAN WILLIAMS, PORTLAND ST. SR 27 410
2. LARRY BIRD, INDIANA STATE JR 32 403
3. PURVIS SHORT, JACKSON STATE � rR 22 235
4. OLIVER MACK, EA.T CAROLINA Jf 25 292
5. ROGER PHEGLEY, SR 24 237
6. FRANK. IE SANDERS, SOUTHERN U. - JR 27 316
7. RON CARTER, VMI SR 28 74
8. JOHN GEROY, DAVIDSON JR 26 292
9. MICHAEL BROOKS, LA 5ALLE SO 23 288
10.MIKE "ITCHFLL, SR ?1 283
II.DAVE CALIGARIS, NORTHEASTERN - SP 2
12.HEPB'e STAMPER, IT - Ifi 23 "
13.ANDREW TONEY, rW ;��� I! I ANA c.O 71 262
M.MICHAEL EDWARDS, PAN AMERICAN- SR 26 275
I5.MICHAEL RICHARDSON, MONTANA SR 27 22
16.RONNIE VALENTINE, OLD DOMINION SO 22 731
I7.MARYIN OHNSON, NEW MEXICO �� SR 23 270
18.LAWRENCE BUTLER, IDAHO 5TATI - JR 26 261
19.STEVE GRANT, MANHATTANSR 26 136
20.M1KI MUFf, MURRAY STATE R 25 247
21.JAMES BAILEY, RUTGERSJR 31 3'2
22.THOMAS WILSON, WESTFRN CARO. - SR 24 2?9
23.GARV WIN TON, ARMY�H 28 276
7VINNIE JOHNSON, (AylORJR 25 741
25.BURRELL MCGHEE. KEN STATE �- JR 27 248
FT 149Rts '069Ay 33�4
15395930.c
80(7jC29.5
'1569929.0
'6966 327.6
10821A
1887362c. 3
86570258
120696249
105671249
168640216
'71565-46
137661245
81631243
13963242
69531241 I
133673240
961823.s
14261473.6
955tt923.6
10673073.i
3956523.1
9264423.0
935750
12161722.9
OLIVER MACK
"TheFranohlse"





Pipe 14 FOUNT AINHEAD 25 April 1978
Women tracksters top field of six at USC
JA Y FORBES RUNS the 800 meter
I'
I
I
Beef n Shakes Breakfast
Special Breakfast 7 am till 11 am for .99
two scrambled eggs, sausage,
hash browns, english muffin, jelly
Our quarter pound Beefburgers
are from fresh ground chuck daily.
Downtown 5th St.
only open 7 am till 2am Daily.
Cip this coupon
And get three games for only $1.25.
( Per Person Rate )
LOCATED BESIDE RIVER BLUFF APTS
Phone 758-1820
NOW-FOR YOU.
b. :fy,
� ALL JEANS, CORDS, KHAKIS $
� 25"?. OFF ALL Suj EATERS, SELECTED SHIFTS
� 1ST. OFF ALL GOLF TENNIS SHOES
�20?0FFSPERRrTijr � IZOD SHIRTS
TOP- SiDERS InL .TENNIS OUTFIT
PRO SHOP iNc
100 m
400 m
800m
1500m
3000m
100 m hurdles
400 m hurdles
400 m relay
Mile relay
Javelin
Discus
Shot Put
Long Jump
Long Jump
RESULTS
Lydia Roundtree 2nd
Cookie 1st
McPhatter
Joy Forbes 2nd
Anna Bailey 1st
Anne Holmes 5th
Anna Bailey 2nd
Anne Holmes 4th
Maria 1st
Gudjohnson
Sandy Sampson 2nd
Linda Mason 1st
Roundtree, 1st
Suggs, Hender-
son, Gudjohnson
Mason, Forbes, 1st
Gudjohnson,
McPhatter
Debbie Freeman 1st
Debbie Knight 2nd
Elaine Davis 3rd
Debbie Freeman 1st
Elaine Davis 2nd
Debbie Freeman 1st
Elaine Davis 3rds
'personal best
�� varsity records
12.6
57.2
223.9
500.9
5:18.4
1157.7'
12.13.1
15.5
17.5
68.8
48.8
4.06.1
1378
102'10"
re'ir
123'10"
102'0"
40'912"
35'9"
1st
High Jump
Maria
Gudjohnson
Cookie
McPhatter
DianneGatlin
Cookie
McPhatter
Sandy Sampson 2nd
2nd
3rd
1st
18" W
irr
17,4"
5'2"
5'0"
Buy 2 pizzas of the same price,
get 3rd one JTRE�
This offer is good for deliveries as
well as dine-in and carry-out
Customer Appreciation
MONDAY and WEDNESDAY
20� for your favorite golden BEvERage
Now using Hot boxes in delivery cars
DIAL 758-7400
507 EAST Uth STREET
GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROLINA
Notfiinf battj � Piui from CNANELO'S
B.F.Goodrich
Car Care Service
4 POINT BRAKE CHECK
1 t�u�l From WtmK Impart Lkrtno. and Drums
1 IMP '
4. Adluw art
t rrlctJI KH�C�1 ItrvlctMytta
en AH Faur wmn for Fyti
Moot U.S. Car. Toy�M a Dal ana
rail for appointment
WRECKER SERVICE AVAILABLE IN CITY,
STUDENT PRICE $80 WITH STUDENT ID
Mart Ch.ro. BankAm.ric.rrj Amancan Eisroaa
Often m arm) .1 B.F Goodrich Mora. Como.niiv.ry prlcad .1 B f Ooodrich da.iar.
BPGtOOdrlch Coggins Car Care
The ECU women's track team
took 1st place Saturday at the
South Carolina Invitational tor the
second year straight. ECU had a
team total of 198 points this year
followed by NC A&T with 94
points. The 1st plaoe finish by
ECU came at a good time - it set
the stage for next Friday's
NCAIAW meet held at ECU.
There were quite a few
first place finishes at South
Carolina as well as some personal
best performances.
Linda Mason once again won
the 400m hurdles with a 68.8 sec.
run. This run made Linda's fourth
win out of five meets this year.
Maria Gudjohnson placed first
in the the 100m hurdles with a
time of 15.5 and she was closely
followed by Sandy Sampson of
ECU fa 2nd place. Maria also
placed 1st in the long jump with a
fine jump of 18' V2" with Cookie
McPhatter jumping for 2nd place
with a personal best of 17'9
Dianne Gatlin was 3rd with a
personal best of 17'4V2 Cookie
McPhatter placed 1st in the 400m
and in the high jump as well as
being anchor leg in the mile relay
fa anaher 1st place. Cookie
put in a fine perfamanoe in the
400m with a run of 57.2 fa a
persoial best.
Other running events ECU did
well in included the 100 m with
Lydia Roundtree placing 2nd and
the 800 m with Joy Fabes also
placing 2nd. The 1500m run was
one of the high points of the day
with Anna Bailey running a 5 09.9
fa a personal best of 17 seoonds.
She took 1st place with a strong
kick in the last 200 yards of the
race. Anne Holms had a personal
best of 518.4 fa fifth place, Anna
Bailey also did well in the 3000m
with an 1157.7 fa 2nd place.
And Anne Holmes placed 4th
with 12:13.4.
In the field events, Debbie
Freeman was a triple 1st place
winner with 2 personal reoads. In
the javelin she threw a 137'8
followed by Debbie Knight and
Elaine Davis in 2nd and 3rd
respectively. In the shotput
Debbie heaved a fine 40'912" put
and the discus in 12310 Debbie
has shown consistent improve-
ment this year and will be a top
oonpetita this Friday at the state
meet.
Laurie Arrants, ooach of the
winning team, feels that this
year's team has great depth with
two a three gcod competitas in
each event. The NCAIAW meet
this Friday begins at 12.00 .vith 8
wonens teams in competition.
East Carolina is favaed with
UNC-Chapel Hill and NC A & T
in dose competition.
TOTAL
I
maTIRE CENTER
Fttona Ma Oaa
m W HWV. 3M BY FASJ
MBCNVrlXANC
ECU
NCAT
USC
SC State
JC. Smith
L. Rhyne
198
94
68
51
35
0





25 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
End of regular season baseball draws near
PITCHING
NAME Bill DavisG 4GS 0cg i? 0 10.3W-L 1-1R H 4 1121 03B 0HR 1LOB Rso 9BB 3ER ERA 2 1.74
Tim Stiller921 231-111 23202741A17 2.74
Mickey Britt12115 78.78-233 6712135761?828 3.20
Bill Lucas1052 46.72-326 4581143401917 3.28
Rick Ramey1070 43.34-230 5261340281716 3.32
Pete Conaty1292 70.65-441 661305�il442336 4.58
Bob Patterson300 3.70-00 200064?0 0.00
Earle Moblev ECU TOTALS30 340 30-01 10004341 3.00
10 279.321-13145 2654031523320796107 3 45
OPP TOTALS349 272.713-21229 3 9371538248133157179 5.91
Pirates hope
for NCAA
playoff bid
HB
Conaty 3, Britt 2, Lucas 2, Stiller 1, Ramey 1, Mobley 1. WP: Conaty 4,
Ramey, Davis. BK: Ramey 2. SV: Conaty, Ramey 2, PB: Styons 10.
REMAINING SCHEDULE:
April 25, at Atlantic Christian, 7:30pm
April if. VCU, 7:30pm
April 28, VIRCunia wtbLAXAK, 7:30pm
April 29, AVLA1TTI CURISTIAH, ' 7:30pm
May 6, at Virginia Tech, 1:00pm
May 7, at Virginia Tech, 2:00pm
GAME-BY-GAME RESULTS:
ECU3,Elon 2
ECU5.N.C. State 0
ECU0,N.C. State 5
ECU3,S. Carolina 4
ECU6,Purdue 2
ECU16, James Madison 6
ECU4,Purdue 7
ECU2,James Madison 1
ECU5,Richmond 9
ECU3,Campbell 1
ECU5.Campbell 9
ECU8,Eastern Conn. 4
ECU4,Eastern Conn. 3
ECU4,Clemson 3
ECU0,Clemson 3
ECU13, SE Mass. 0
ECU2,SE Mass. 3
ECU2,North Carolina 4
ECU6,William & Mary 7
ECU3,Old Dominion 4
ECU10, Old Dominion 11
ECU16 Va. Wesleyan 4
THE ECU BASEBALL team is still hoping to gain an
at large bid to the NCAA playoffs. Their current
record is 25-15.
ECU 12, North Carolina 3
ECU 8, Elon 2
ECU 15, VCU 10
ECU 9, Va. Tech 8
ECU 4, Va. Tech 2
ECU 8, Pembroke St. 9
ECU 25, UNC-W 1
ECU 0, N.C. State 3
ECU 5, N.C. State 2
ECU 8, UNC-W 0
ECU 9, S. Carolina 7
ECU 7, Maryland 6
AS OF APRIL 17
Classifieds
for rent (jf)
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share
furnished 2 bdrm. apt. Call
758-6755.
WANTED: Responsible female
roommate to share 2 bdrm. apt. at
Riverbluff with two other girls fa
both summer sessions. Call
Audrey a Patty at 758-9871 for
more details.
TO SUBLEASE: 2 bdrm. fully
furnished apt. at Langston Park
for 2nd session summer school.
Call 752-1545 after 6 p.m.
ROOMMATES NEEDED: 1 a 2
females to sublet furnished apt.
for the summer or first session.
$60 per month and 'a utilities. 2
bdrm. townhouse on bus route.
Call 756-5181 as soon as possible.
NEEDED: 1 or 2 roommates
needed for both summer ses-
sions call 756-5159.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share beautiful 2 bdrm.
riverfront apt. with 2 other girls
thru the summer or year round.
Rent is $67 mo plus utilities.
Available June 1. Call 758-3497.
FEMALE ROOMMATES: 1 or 2
needed fa summer to share apt.
at Tar River Estates. If interested
call Linda 752-8643.
NEEDED: roommates fa 2 bdrm.
apt at ViIIlage Green. Rent is$160
moith plus low utilities. Can
move in May 1 Call Glenn at
752-0755 a oome by 64.
NEEDED: Female roommates to
share 2 bdrm. house in Winter-
ville beginning in May. $50 mo.
plus utilities, 6 mi. from ECU.
Call Susan 752-9270.
FOR RENT: To sublease fa
summer a 2 bdrm. apt. at
Riverbluff. 758-2892.
FOR RENT: 2 bdrm. 10x58
trailer. Fully furnished with 2 air
conditioners. Available both sum-
mer sessions. Located Vz mi. from
campus on 10th St. at $120 a
month. Call Allen 752-9887 after 6
p.m. 758-9505 days.
MALE ROOMMATES: wanted to
share apt. fa summer near
campus. Separate bdrms. $35 mo.
plus utilities. Prefer reasonably
quiet and clean person. Call
752-4043 befae 9 a.m. and after 9
p.m.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE: to
sublease end of May. $135 mo.
and furnished in Tanglewood
Apts. on Avery St. (within
walking distance of campus)
758-6367.
FOR SUBLEASE: Apt. starting in
May 72 River Bluff. Call Gisele
at 758-6624.
NEEDED: 1 a 2 roommates to
share apt. at Riverbluff rail
semester. Rent plus V utilties.
Call Cindy a Bobbi at 758-3933.
for sate
FOR SALE: Dam size refrig.
Ranex delux model. Only used 8
mos. Call 752-0352.
SNOW SKIING: equip, fa sale.
Call 752-0352.
FOR SALE: Sanyo cassette deck
with ddby system. Only about 30
cassettes reoaded on system.
Will sell fa $120.00 Call 752-
0352.
FOR SALE: '69 VW Van with new
tires, shocks, AMFM cassettes
deck. 16,000 mi. $1500.00 call
752-0352
FOR SALE: Impated dark brown
mid-length leather coat size 44. 1
yr. old. fa $45 a best offer.
758-8037 ask fa Dai
POSTERS: Mounted and acetated
full oola screen printed recading
artists promos. Wide variety.
Cheap. Come by 317 Umstead
between 9 and 10 weeknights.
FOR SALE: Dam size refrig.
with stand in good oond. $75 call
758-8122.
FOR SALE: '68 Mercury Monter-
ey. White 4-doa, tires and
engine in good oond. Will make a
great around town car. Asking
$400 Call Spellman Johnson
758-3234 afta 4:30 p.m.
FOR SALE. Kallrof 10-speed in
excellent cond. $65 Call Bill
758-2159 a 758-7243.
FOR SALE: A 1215S Dual turn-
table fa $50 a best offer. Call
758-7724 ask fa Mark.
FOR SALE: '69 Dodge Caaiet
slant six engine with standard
shift. Great econony Call 758-
7434
FOR SALE: Man's 10-speed
Murray bike, hardly ridden. $50
Call 75 7684 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: Two tickets to the
Beach Music Festival Sat April
22 near Raleigh. Call Tom
752-1998 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: Reel to reel by Akai.
2 yrs. old. Asking $205 Call
758-3497 a oomp by 2& Stand 11
Dr.
WANTED TO BUY: Old one
speed bike. Any oondition exoept
expenave. 752-6398.
WANTED: A good used car
cassette stereo (underdash). Call
Bill 758-2159 a 758-7243.
-
personal�
RIDE NEEDED: To Winstav
Salem fa April 28. Will help with
expenses and driving. Call Susan
at 758-7854.
RIDE NEEDED: to upstate New
Yak, leaving after May 3. Will
share driving and expenses. Call
Michelle 758-8724. Also, return
fa summer school, if possible.
WANTED: Swim coach age group
swimming summer program May
29 thru Aug. 15. Salary based on
experience. Send resume to Swim
Coach P.O. Box 1967, Greenville.





Page 18 FOUNTAINHEAD 25 April 1878
SECOND
CHANCE
WAREHOUSE SALE
GRADUATION GOODIES!
PRICES SLASHED
We have bought a large supply of
Demo & New Equipment from a Nor-
thern dealer who needed money!
HIS LOSS IS YOUR GAIN!
YAMAHA
TEAC
AKA1
ONKYO
PANASONIC
0PT0NIC&
TRADES
SERVICE
INFLATION
YOUR TAX
H an
HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH
162-3661





Title
Fountainhead, April 25, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 25, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.646
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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