Fountainhead, April 13, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500
this issue is 16 pages
Fountainhead
Vol No 53 No.J& East Carolina University Greenville, North Carolina DS 13 April 1978
ON THE INSIDE
Euthanasia, p. 6
Foreign med schools, p. 7
Film festival, p. 8
Pirates rout UNC-W, p. 14
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina DjS 13 April 1978
Cartwright outlines plans for term
By ROBERT M.SWAIM
Advertising Manager
David Cartwright, newly
elected Student Government As
sedation (SGA) vice-president,
said in a recent interview that he
attributes his election victory to
his one to one correspondence
with the students.
According to Cartwright, he
has begun to work on several
projects already.
"I'm starting to lay out the
freshman register and we are
trying to figure out what, if
anything, can be done about
parking and towing said Cart-
wright.
Cartwright said that SGA
President Tommy Joe Payne is
trying to determine what the
parking committee that was es-
tablished by Jerry Cox is doing
and what prrgress it has made.
Cartwright said that he and
Payne are also working to fulfill
their campaign promise of ex-
tended bus routes.
"We are going to extend the
bus routes to reach more apart-
ments during the day and more
shopping areas at night said
Cartwright. "We are working
with the transit manager on this
right now
Cartwright said that both he
and Payne are searching for an
alternative to the present dorm
contracts.
Cartwright added that he
thinks the present dorm contracts
are not flexible enough.
"I plan to confer with Dr.
Tucker, dean of student affairs,
and Dan Wooten, director of
housing, on possibly making
dorm contracts more flexible
said Cartwright.
According to Cartwright, he
and Payne are studying the
possibility of constructing bus
shelters at the bottom of College
Hill Dr. and one at Mendenhall.
"We want to build a couple of
bus shelters but we don't have
the money right now said
Cartwright. "There is the possibi-
lity that we oould include the cost
of constructing bus shelters in the
transit budget when it goes to the
legislature next Fall
Cartwright said that he plans
to work for funding of depart-
mental retreats next Fall and that
he hopes the legislature will fund
such retreats.
"I think they are a valuable
tool and should be used as
such said Cartwright.
DAVID CARTWRIGHT SGA vice-president.
Blood drive nets 557 pints
Photo by Kirk Kingsbury)
ECU largest Bloodmobile donor
ByRICKIGLIARMIS
Staff Writer
During last week's Bloodmo-
bile visit, ECU donate 557 pints of
blood.
Since July 1, 1977, ECU has
donated 1,785 pints of blood,
more than one-half of the total
quota fa Pitt County, said Ruth
Taylor, executive secretary of the
Pitt County Red Cross.
According to Taylor, ECU has
given more blood than any other
school in this region on a
percentage basis.
As explained by Taylor, the
blood that is received during the
blood drive is taken to the
Tidewater Blood Center in Nor-
folk, VA where it is processed
"Each seperate pint of blood
goes through 20 test before it is
administered to the various hospi-
tals said Taylor.
FREE BLOOD
Taylor explained that Pitt
County does not operate on a
credit system for giving blood.
The residents and student of Pitt
County always receive free blood
regardless of their previous dona-
tions to the bloodmobile.
"As long as you're a student
at ECU you will receive your
blood free if you ever need it,
whether you've donated blood
before or not said Taylor.
Giving blood takes only about
10 minutes.
One pint of blood is taken
from each individual. The ave-
rage person has 12 to 13 pints of
blood so the body replaces the
one pint quickly.
According to Taylor, the dona
should eat something befaegiviny
blood. Givng blood on an empty
stomach may cause the dona to
feel faint.
REQUIREMENTS
There are requirements fa
giving blood.
The daia must be between 17
and 66 years of age and weigh at
least 110 pounds.
A dona's medical histay.
temperatuire. blood pressure.
See BLOOD, p.3
Major American painter Krushenick
Painter lectures at ECU
ALTHOUGH IT MEANS red eyes and hay fever to many, this pollen
laden brunch innocently fulfills its reproductive duty.
Photo by Brain Stotler
By JULIE HETTIGER
Staff Writer
Nationally known artist Nick
Krushenick visited ECU on Mai
April 10 and presented a slide
lecture to art students in Jenkins
Auditaium.
Krushenick, a painter of maja
impatanoe and national reputat-
ion has been represented by the
prestigious Pace Gallery in New
Yak fa 15 years.
His waks are regarded highly
in the Whitney, Modern, and the
Guggenheim museum collections
and in many private collections.
He attended the Art Students
League and studied under Hans
Hoffman.
In Krushenicks slide retros-
pect he covered wak fran
1968-78.
His paintings are hard edge
grid patterns juxtaposed onto
large fields of cola.
Krushenick said he consider-
ed himself as a raunchy
American" and he sought to be
that.
He prefers painting in his
hard edge acrylic style declaring
it to be totally American
Krushenick commented that
American painting was in a
holding pattern" at the moment
and would soon burst fath with a
new movement.
He also encouraged young
artists to "pit themsleves against
the wald everyday and continue
the constant challenge they face
daily.
This lecture concluded a ser-
ies of lectures held throughout
the semester entitled "Sympos-
ium 78" and was sponsaed by
the Visual Arts Faum.





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Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 April 1978
Coffeehouse Fashion show
Spring fling Red pin
Pinball
This Thursday, the Student
Union Coffeehouse presents a
double bill, room 15 Mendenhall.
Opening the night at 9 p.m. is
Bill Robinson, a popular local
magician. Afterwards, Maria
Dawkins will perform her unique-
ly beautiful brand of acoustic folk
music, both traditional American
and contemporary.
As always, there'll be plenty
of peanuts, ooffee, ocokies, raisin
bread, cheese, crackers, soda,
chips, and whatever fa your
insatiable appetite.
Just 50 cents gets you in the
door for great entertainment and
free eats.
Bowling
Have you ever tried bowling in
the moonlight?
Here's you chance! Friday
evenings from 8 p.m. until 10
p.m "Moonlight Bowling" is
held at the Mendnehall Bowling
Center.
Try your bowling skills in this
different environment. If you're as
sharp as ever you may win a free
game.
The bowler with the highest
score during each hour of Moon-
light Bowling will win one free
game.
There are always two winners
and one of them could be you.
KYF
There will be a meeting of the
King Youth Fellowship on Tues
April 18, at 7 p.m. in room 309
Flanagan.
This will be the final meeting
of the year.
Elections will be held for the
upcoming year for all offices. All
those concerned about the future
of the KYF are asked to attend.
Happy hour
Every Friday from 2 p.m. until
5 p.m. is Happy Hour at the
Bowling Center in Mendenhall.
Prices are Vi off so come over and
take advantage of the great
savings.
Training class
Leadership Training Class,
sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ, meets on Thursdays at
7 p.m. in Brewster C-103.
After a time of fellowship,
thee is an opportunity to learn
more about how to love God and
love others. The four classes
offered are Christian life, dyn-
amics of discipleship, dynamics of
ministry, and life of Christ which
is open to those interested in
investigating the person of Jesus
Christ.
In memory of Ledonia Wright,
a fashion show entitled, "A
Weekend Affair of Fashions
will be held on Fri. April 21, at 8
p.m. at the West Greenville
Recreation Center.
This program will be held to
raise money for the Ledonia
Wright Memorial Scholarship
Fund.
The evening will be full of
delightful fashions with various
styles of attire ranging from
casual to formal wear.
Also, entertainment will be
provided by sororities and frat-
ernities - they all perfrom by
doing a short step, and music will
be supplied.
The scholarship will be given
to an inooming freshman student.
Tickets can be obtained from:
Shelia Bowe, Dr. Ensley, James
Green and Carolina Moss.
Tickets are $1.50 in advance
for students, and $2 for adults; at
the door: $2 fa students and
$2.50 adults.
Make checks a maiey aders
payable to: the Ledonia Wright
Memaial Scholarship Fund.
Send to: ECU, Business
Office, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Attn: Mrs. Anne May.
Family fun
'Family Fun Night' is Thurs
April 20, at Mendenhall.
From 6 p.m. until 10 p.m all
children accompanied by a parent
may bowl, play billiards a play
table tennis fa half price.
Only one adult per group must
have an ECU ID a Mendenhall
Student Center Membership
Card.
Each game of bowling will be
half price fa the children and
billiards and table tennis will be
half price fa the entire family.
You can't beat the prices and
the kids will love it, so bring the
whole family and have some fun.
SVA
The Student Volunteer Assoc-
iation will meet Mon April 17 at
7 p.m. in the downstairs lounge
of the Methodist Student Center.
Officers will be elected fa the
upcoming year during the busi-
ness meeting.
Table tennis
If you enjoy playing table
tennis, stop by the Mendenhall
Table tennis rooms each Tuesday
evening at 8 p.m. when the Table
Tennis Club meets.
You will find players of all
levels of ability participating.
Various activities, including lad-
der tournaments are often sched-
uled. All ECU students, faculty
and staff are welcome.
Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity is
having their "Spring Fling" party
the Friday of Greek Week, April
14 from 3:30-6:30 p.m.
There will beat least five kegs
of free beer with the Phi Kappa
Tau disoo sound system.
The drawing fa the beach
weekend fa two will be at 6 p.m.
There will be $100 wath of
prizes given away.
It's at the Phi Kappa Tau
house, 409 Elizabeth St.
Everyone is invited to oome.
Walk
Can you walk 20 kilometers
(12V2 miles?).
Well the ECU Hunger Coal-
ition invites you to try on April 22.
The fun starts at Green
Springs Park at 7:45 A.M.
check-in, then a pleasant walk
through Greenville. The money
that is raised will help fund the
Campus Ministers Kitchen Aid
Drive as well as a Caribbean
self-help food program.
Free lunch is provided at the
BSU after the walk. So start
looking fa sponsas to suppat
you perkilometer a help out by
sponsaing another walker. Visit
our sign carrier outside the
Student Supply Stae fa more
info a call 752-4646. Please "put
a little heart in your soul
Thanks.
F-G
Looking fa Christain fellow-
ship?
The Faever Genaatiai in-
vites you to join us Monday nights
fa fellowship and fun.
We'll be having a relevant
Bible study, good singing and
delicious refreshments.
Why not plan on being there?
That's Monday, April 17at9p.m.
in Brewster C-304.
Low rental
Whether you'd like to polish
up your game with some steady
practice a invite three friends
alaig fa sane friendly compet-
ition, you can rent a bowling lane
to use fa aie hour and it only
costs $2.50.
Lane rentals are available at
the Mendenhall Bowling Center
evay Saturday from Noon until 6
p.m. Stop by and try it out, it's a
great way to spend and hour.
Retreat
Don't come to the Full Gospel
meeting tonight, because no one
will be there.
Everybody is getting their
studying done so they can go tc
the state-wide retreat this week
end in Raleigh. There will be
singing, teaching, miracles, and
changed lives.
It starts Friday at Umstead
State Park, between Raleigh and
Durham. The cost is $12 fa food
and shelter (free if your broke).
"Red Pin Bowling is held
every Sunday evening from 7
p.m. until 10 p.m. at the Bowling
Center at Mendenhall.
If you can make a strike when
the red pin is the head pin, you
win one free game.
It's that simple! Come over
and try it out this Sunday. It could
be your lucky day!
Hungry?
Tired of peanut butter and
aackers? Did you know you
might be eligible fa food stamps?
Come to a community meeting
sponsaed by the Nath Carolina
Hunger Coalition on Thurs April
13 at 7 p.m. in the St. Gabriel
School Auditaium. No one has to
be hungry in Pitt County -
especially you.
Bahai
Do you believe it is possible
to have a new wald ader based
o sprirtual principles?
Bahai's do. Come to toom 242
Mendenhall Monday night April
17 and learn how this is beginning
to happen.
Phi Alpha
Phi AlphaTheta, international
histay haia society is planning
its annual spring picnic.
The event is scheduled fa
Tues April 18, at 630 p.m. at
Tar River Estates.
A buck and a half gets you all
the food you can eat, all the beer
you can drink, and the oppatun-
itytomeet some new and familiar
faces.
All interested members of the
university community whether
histay majasa not, are invited
to attend. See you there!
VAF flick
The silent movie, "The Gen-
eral" starring Buster Keaton will
be shown on Fri April 14 from 3
to 415 p.m. at Jenkins Audita-
ium in the Leo Jenkins Fine Arts
Center.
Interested students are invit-
ed and encouraged to attend. The
movie is sponsaed by the Visual
Arts Faum.
Visitation
The SGA needs your help in
waking ai a new visitatioi
policy. If you have some good
ideas, go to your hall advisa and
give them a list of what you think
will be a better plan.
Be sure and do it befae April
21. We appreciate your help!
Fellowship
Inter-Varsity .Christian
Fellowship will meet this Sunday
night at 8 p.m. at the Afro-
American Cultural Center.
Who's the ECU "Pinball
Wizard?" Mendenhall would like
to know.
So, to find out who's campus
champ, a Spring Pinball Tourn-
ament sponsaed by Mendenhall
will be held Moiday through
Thursday, from 9 a.m. until 11
p.m April 3 through April 20.
The amusement games area
located on the ground floa of
Mendenhall, is the site of the
three-week event.
There are 13 chances to win
with the Grand Prize going to the
person who accumulates the most
high scaes fa the tournament.
The first place winner will
choose from prizes wath $25.00
each - a Happy Stae gift
certificate, dinner la two at the
King & Queen, a billiards cue
stick with case, a a Brody's gift
certificate, plus the ECU pinball
Championship Trophy.
Fa second prize, T-shirts will
be awarded to the twelve individ-
ual winners.
If you're into pinball, get on
over to Mendenhall fa the Spring
Pinball Taunament. You may be
the ECU "Pinball Wizard
Tournament rules are avail-
able at the billiards center in
Mendenhall.
Car wash
Phi Eta Sigma will have a
carwash on April 15, at the Etna
service station on the corner of
Fourteenth and the the 264-
bypass. The charge per car is
$1.50.
All proceeds will go to a
scholarship fund.
Chess club
The Chess Club meets each
Tuesday evening at 7 30 p.m. in
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse. All
persons interested in chess are
invited to attend and join in the
competition.
SLAP social
There will be SLAP social at
Blimpies April 16, at 8 p.m.
Tickets are 25 cents if sold by
SLAP majas and 50 osnts at the
doa.
Doa prizes will be geiven
away and proceeds to to the ECU
Speech and Hearing Scholarship
Fund.
Rebel checks
The following people have
checks in the Rebel office: Tim
Wright, Roxanne Reep, Tony
Eder, John Quinn, John Maris,
and Daethea Finlay.
Circle K
The CirdeK Club will spcnsa
a chicken barbecue Sat April 15
at 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pitt Plaza.
A dinner consisting of a half
chicken, roll, slaw, dessert is
yours fa oily $? 50.





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13 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Greek forum
ByRICKIGLIARMIS
Co-Greek Public Ftelations
With Greek Week 1978 half-
way over, people leave beds,
rafts, and Volkswagens behind
and look forward to "Funky
Nassau Happy Hours, and
Moser's Farm.
Looking back at four days,
now forever gone but never
forgotten, sororities and frater-
nities pat each other on the back
fa a job well done.
Pi Kappa Phi Field Day is over
for another year but not without a
little sadness. The Chi Omegas
and Sigma Phi Epsilons reigned
victorious during the day of
games, sunshine, and fun.
Monday's Greek games and
track meet proved to be quite
competitive with the Pit Kaps,
Kappa Sigs, and Kappa Deltas
coming out on top for the games
and the KA's and Tri-Sgs
capturing championship honors
for the track meet.
BLOOD
Continued from p. 1
pulse, and hemoglobin are tested
before his is accepted as a donor.
A donor may not be on any
type of medication such as
penicillin, anti-malaria medicines
a allergy medidnes. These
medications require a waiting
period before the blood can be
accepted.
Certain diseases could also
disqualify a oonor. Having had
hepatitis or having lived with a
hepatitis victim requires a six
month waiting period before
donating. The same applies to
people who have been subject to a
dialysis machine.
AFTER YOU GIVE
After giving bkxxJ there are a
few steps to fof low.
According to Tavior. he oatient
should rest for 10 to i o minutes
after giving blood to allow the
oirculatay system to adjust to the
small loss of body fiuids.
Tuesday's bed race was mo-
polized by the Phi Kappa Taus as
they both won the most creative
and the fastest bed awards.
The Volkswagen stuffing con-
test, complete with 22 cramped
young ladies, 16 a 17 brawling
men, not to mention one broken
windshield, proved to be worth
the effort to the Tri-Sigs and the
Phi Taus.
To oomplete Tuesday's full
schedule the Inter fraternity Cou-
ndl (IFC) Greek Week banquet
was held at the Moose Lodge.
The speaker fa the banquet
was John R. Ingram, N.C.
Insurance commissioner and De-
mocratic candidate fa the U.S.
Senate in the May 2 primary.
Several awards and presenta-
tion were received by various
aganizatiois, and individuals.
The winners of the Blood
Drive Award based on the highest
number of blood doias fran the
Greek system were the Kappa
Alphas and Kappa Deltas.
The patient should keep the
bandage over the wound fa at
least four hours to prevent
infection.
Many of the students give
blood regularly.
"The last time I gave blood, it
made me feel good to know that I
could have helped someone a
saved someone's life one stud-
ent said immediately after donat-
ing.
BLOOD NEEDED
Accading to layla. Thu ,ed
Cross Blood Drive is a very good
cause, because of the exteme
necessity fa blood.
"You can't just go out and buy
Wood when you need it said
Tayla.
"You need donas.
"There is no substitute fa
blood. It's something that has to
come fran the human body
MIDNIGHT
�tt
AN AlVEiTIRE II EATIM
Titt. Sat. 11-41 p.m1:30 a.m.
Ill Suit far S1.N witk parehata af saft irink
(aat valid aa tfalivariat) 7S2-1I2I
70S If aat St.
aaaa MaaSat. at 110, Saa. 12:M
The winnas were determined
on the basis of percentage of
membership.
Tayla Barkley, Sigma Nu,
was awarded with the coveted
title of "Most Eligible Batche-
la
The Most Dedicated Greek
Man Award was presented to
David Wright.
David is a member of Phi
Kappa Tau fraternity.
The scholarship trophy which
is presented to the fratanity with
the highest scholastic average
was presented by Dr. R. Holt on
behalf of th ECU Board of
Trustees.
See GREEK, p. 5
Women's enrollment increasing
Fewer men enrolling in college
(CPS)-The old aqpge that
women go to college to "find a
husband" can be officially laid to
rest. Fewer men are found to be
going to college.
Census Bureau statistics shoe
less men are enrolling in oollege
while women's enrollment is
maeasing.
The bureau's repat suggest
that fewer men are eligible fa Gl
benefits a they no longer need
draft deferments.
The repat also speculates
that young men now oonsider
college less impatant. The repat
left out an impatant issue
however.
The last few years saw a
depression economy glut an de-
creasing job market with grad-
uates.
Mae people turned to trade
schools rather than seek a dead-
end oollege degree. An inflation-
ary economy did its share to dose
avenues to higher education.
Statistics on women in oollege
does not attest to these theaies at
first.
Larry Suter of the Census
Buear said women have exceeded
male enrollment fa three years
but any gains made by women
were caused mainly by dedining
male enrollment.
Papermaking exhibit on
display at Joyner Library
ECU News Bureau
"Papermaking: Art and
Craft a Library of Congress
traveling exhibit, is on display at
ECU'S Joyner Library through
April 23.
The exhibit, developed at the
Library of Congress with a grant
from the American Paper Insti-
tut, ison atwp-year national tour.
It was shown in Seatle, at the
University of Washington's
Henry Gallery.
Histaical and very recent
methods of making paper are
illustrated by the exhibit's 40
panels and ten banners.
It is available fa viewing in
the ECU library's lobby and East
Wing areas whenever the library
is open.
Phi Kappa Tau
Spring Fling
Disco and Keg Rally
75 Kegs
Fri April 14, 3:30-6:30 pan.
Phi Kappa Tau
Fraternity house,
Elizabeth St.
FREE DRAFT
ASLONGAS
IT LASTS!
Get Down with the
Best Disco Sounds
around.
DONT MISS IT � 'A legend for all time'
SOUTHERN PRIDE CAR WASH
ALLIED SECURITY FORCES
THE CLOTHES HOUSE
SILK SCREENS
WIENER KING
ROY ROGERS
FAST FARE
BLIMPIES
STUFFY'S
GAZEBO
SPONSORS
NEWSY'S
PIPELINE
HARDEE'S
TACCO SID
TREE HOUSE
APPLE RECORDS
THE BICYCLE SHOP
RICK'S GUITAR SHOP
RUM RUNNERS DIVE SHOP
310 S. Evans
HALLOW DISTRIBUTING CO.





. 3:�i
Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 April 1978
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Intersection update
could lessen traffic
Car accidents occur almost every day in most
cities, whether they are fender-benders or a serious
car accident. One problem, of course, is irresponsible
drivers. Another may be faulty mechanism in the car.
And another may be .intersections too inadequate to
handle the amount of traffic which passes through
them daily.
One such intersection is that of Tenth and
Cotanche Streets. Over the last two years, two
restaurants and a convenience store have been
constructed at this intersection. Two resturants were
already there. Now the traffic problem has been
tremendously multiplied.
This particular intersection would benefit greatly
from having left turn lanes, or at least, left turn
signals. The amount of traffic during the lunch hour
in Greenville is tremendous, with hundreds, even
thousands, of businessmen and women going to
lunch. Greenville streets are terribly congested
anyway, but the lunch hour seems to aggravate the
situation tremendously.
The assistant manager of one resturant said he
has seen 10 accidents at the Tenth and Cotanche
interesection � he has been working there only eight
months.
The manager of another restaurant at this
intersection said that once a rescue squad, on its way
to the hospital, was involved in a car accident at this
intersection.
The manager of a third restaurant this location
said that since widening the streets and installing
seperate left turn signals would run into a lot of
money, the installation of left turn arrows would help
eliminate some of the traffic problem.
Any renovation of this intersection would have to
be funded by the N.C. Department of Transportation,
not the City of Greenville. The Greenville
Engineering Department should lobby for state
funds in order to update and improve this
intersection so that, maybe, fewer accidents will
occur at this intersection.
With Greenville growing steadily each year,
various intersections in the city must be updated
periodically. The Tenth and Cotanche Street
intersection is one of them.
Fountainhead
Serving the fcasf Carolina community for over fifty years.
Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
Editor Cindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakiey
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News EditorsDoug White
Stuart Morgan
Trends EditorSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hoiloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 2oJ4.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
dOTANCHEi Otk ArrEASFCro:LECT TURVERS CTAW-lf.
Editorials
Carter not convincing in Canal defense
By RICHY SMITH
Editorial Writer
President Carter has not been very convincing in
his defense of the Panama Canal treaty despite his
all out, "go-get'em" type of campaign. He
particularly did not sound convincing in his fireside
chat urging us to give up the Panama Canal.
Perhaps this is because most Americans are
beginning to become wei I-informed.
President Carter said there had been some
misinformation and misunderstanding about the
proposed treaties. He then added to the confusion
by emphasizing that we wouldn't lose a thing and
would gain the respect of the world. Many disagree.
The treaties do not permit the U.S. toact unilaterally
on any major matter concerning the neutrality or
operation of the Canal.
Pres. Carter was happy that the so-called
neutrality treaty "guaranteed" the safety, the
security, and the operation of the Canal. He failed to
mention that the U.S. and Panama did this jointly.
Besides, the word "guarantee" does not appear in
the neutrality treaty.
The President is also happy that the members of
the Joint Chiefsof Staff enthusiastically support him
on the treaties. Would they dare disagree and still
remain a member of the Chiefs of Staff? Of 346
retired senior military officers, 343 enthusiastically
do not support the giving away of the Canal.
The President is deceiving Americans when he
says we never owned the Canal, never had
sovereignty, that the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled
repeatedly that Panama had sovereignty and the
U.S in effect, rented the zone. The original 1903
treaty uses the word- sovereignty" ind "perpetui-
ty" five times and dotib i,oi use the words "rent" a
"lease" once.
Why? Because the purchase was involved. The
annual payment is simply an act of generosity on our
part to help compensate Panama for its loss of
revenue from the Panama Railroad when it ceased
being a major operation in the Canal Zone. The U.S.
Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the title to
the zone is proper.
It seemed presumptiousto hear Pres. Carter say
that Teddy Roosevelt would agree to give away the
Canal. I think he would be angered at President
Carter for the mere thought. As the President spoke
on the proposed treaties, one had to think of broken
promises, to appoint judges and prosecutors strictly
on merit and never political considerations, to take
steps to balance the Federal budget, among other
things, Mr. Carter's credibility is slipping fast and
there are a few of us catching on.
Forum
Students: take positive approach to radio
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
It interests me that you
continue to receive letters of
complaint regarding the prog-
ramming format of WRQR-FM.
If these complaints represent
the majority of the 10,000 plus
ECU students, why haven't they
banned together in a positive
campaign, rather than throwing
stones at WRQR?
I suggest a more positive
act to get the radio they profess to
want - push their fellow elected
students who spend their activity
fees through SGA to get a
powerful campus radio station on
FM that can program non-
commercial music and train stud-
ents in radio.
No, this will never happen,
becuase those taking issue with
WRQR are the same minority that
didn't like Styx.
Why don't you" Bitchers" get
something going positive or is it
that difficult to cultivate an
original idea?
Q yde Thomas





13 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
I
ECU student expelled
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant News Editor
An ECU student was arrested
repeatedly for vaious offenses
and expelled, according to Fran-
cis Eddings, chief of campus
police.
"The student was arrested
four times in the past 10 days
said Eddings.
"He was arrested fa various
offenses, including driving under
the influence, manufacture tw
possession of marijuana, an'
auto larceny LdcJmys 3aid.
The student was identified as
Michael Martin of Be'hel, N.C.
Martin was ordered to leave
school and vacate his room by the
dean, following an incident of
auto larceny.
On the night of April 6, an
ECU student reported a vehide
stolen from a campus parking lot
at Aycook dorm.
The student had reportedly
left his keys on a desk in his room.
He claimed that the only visitor
before he retired was Martin.
Martin had talked earlier
about getting a car "to get some
dope according to the student.
The student noticed the car
was missing around 5 a.m. and
checked Matin's room. Martin
was not there.
Greenville police located the
stolen vehicle on Pine Sreet with
Martin passed out inside the
vehicle.
Martin was arrested for poss-
ession of a stolen vehicle and
simple possession of marijuana.
Another warrant was issued fa
damage to private property to a
vehicle of which Martin was the
perpetrata.
After Maritn had been served
with papers to vacate his room
police checked to find Martin still
there, with the letter unopened,
in a semi-concious conditioi. He
was taken hone by a parent.
On the night of April 9, Martin
s arrested fa trespassing on
College Hill in front of Jones
do. .nitay.
Martin was previously arrest-
ed fa driving under the influence
and manufacture and possession
of marijuana.
In other incidents, two black
males were caught unesoated in
Fleming dam ai April 7.
The two males , non-students,
were banned from campus.
The glass on the front doa of
Cotten dam was broken by three
males, non-students, who fled
from the scene.
The three males had been
visiting in the dam.
An unesoated male was found
in an Umstead dam bathroom
and charged with tresspassing.
The male was found to be a high
school student.
Several aeaking and entering
inadentsoccured, with $40 stolen
from a icon in Clement
STUDENTS RELAX BETWEEN classes and watch the world go by.
GREEK
Continued from p. 3
This year's recipient was the
Sigma Nu fraternity.
The fraternity member with
the highest average was also
awarded. The Highest Collegiate
Average Award was presented to
Robert Brinkley.
Brinkley is a Sig-Ep and is
presently maintaining a 4.0 aver-
age.
The Service Award was pre-
sented to the fraterntiy who
displayed most service both to the
community and to the school.
The w;nner of this award was
the Sigma Nu fraternity.
Kirk Edgerton, retiring IFC
president, was presented the
prestigious Outstanding Greek
Award.
Several aher presentations
were mack' during the banquet.
As the say "easy come, easy
go
Na so! The fraternities and
saaities who participated in the
previous events put much time
and effort into all of the events.
Some of these presentations
include a special recognition of
Dr. Leo Jenkins, Outstanding
Braher Awards given to a
member of each fraternity, Greek
Hall of Fame, Presidents Award,
and a check fa !??? WAS
PRESENTED TO Bill Cain and
Gus Andrews of the Pirate's
Club.
Although thae can never be
enough winners and champions,
all the Greeks should be com-
mended fa the wak and partici-
pation in Greek Week thus far
and throughout the remainder of
the week.
Take. Somcz. Western
Bird To lAoztLr's Farm'
ur
107 Discount
On All Orders
Of Kor�. TK-n
2,0 ViLCiS
Gall and Reserve
Yours TODAY I





IIHHBHHB
PageG FOUNTAINHEAD 13 April 1978
Euthenasia, cessation of treatment
and suicide of terminally-ill discussed
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Ethical considerations regard-
ing euthanasia, withdrawal of
cal care and suicide of
terminally-ill persons were dis-
cussed by Prof James Leroy
Smith of the ECU philosophy
faculty at a recent gathering at
the University of Maryland, Col-
lege Park, Md.
Prof. Smith's presentation,
Conceptual, Empirical and Nor-
mative and Considerations Con-
cerning Euthanasia. Cessation of
Treatment and Suicide was
given during a National Science
Foundation short oourse. Ethi-
cal Issuer in Death and Dying
This was the second meeting
of the oourse. which isdirected by
Prof Thomas Beauchamp, re-
search scholar at the Kennedy
Institute for Bioethics in Wash
ington. DC.
Participants in the two meet-
ings were 24 educators involved
in teaching moral problems and
issues associated with health
care, in the medical, social
science, theology and liberal arts
fields.
At an initial meeting last
October, the group studied issues
in the ethics of death and dying
and began preparation for re-
search which was reported at the
recent event.
An associate professor in the
ECU department of philosophy,
Smith holds degrees from Penn-
sylvania State and Tulane Univer-
sities.
He is the author of several
articles in professional journals.
Located on
E. 10th Street,
2 doors down
from Kings
Sandwich .
phone
752-6680
Bill McDonald
"See me for car, home, life, health
and business insurance!9
Like a good neighbor.
State Farm is there
FRESHMAN CATHERINE FISHER takes time to study while enoying nature
15 ECU students attend 41st annual
session of NCSL in Raleigh April 5-9
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Fifteen ECU students were
among students from other North
Carolina campuses who partici-
pated in the 41st annual session
Df the N.C. Student Legislature
(NCSL) in Raleigh April 5-9.
The State Student Legislature
oonvened in the Old Capitol
Building Wednesday at 12:30
p.m.
tk�
(actory
tor Mur b�ll apparel r
WE ARE HAVING A
SMASHING SALE
I
If you LOVE TENNIS, You WILL LOVE THIS OFFER.
THE FACTORY in GREENVILLE SQUARE SHOPPING
(ENTER IS HAVING A TENNISWEAR SALE
THLRS. - FRL & SAT. APRIL 13-15.
LADIES TENNIS DRESSES by SIMONETTA
Keff.$27.00:N"w�n,y12.��
MEN S ADD-IN MATCHED TENNIS OUTFITS.
shorts reg. $16.00 now $7.88
shirts reg. $14.00 now $6.88
LADIES TENNIS SEPARATES
Reg.up to $4.00, ow onl $5.88 for shorts &skirts
and $4.88 for TOPS
Register for FREE SLAZINGER TENNIS RACQUETS
Drawing on Monday April 17. 1978.
FREE ran of TENNIS BALLS with a $20.00 or more purchase.
ECU delegate Frank Saubers
of Virginia Beach served as
governor of the state NCSL
organization.
Other ECU delegates holding
statewide office included Marc
Ad'?r of Park Ridge. N.J .
publicity chai. man, and Rich Cole
of Kailua, Hawaii NCSL treasur-
er.
The ECU delegation was
chaired by Joe Tanahey of
Asheville. Delegation secretary
was Karen Eisenmann of West
Keansburg, N.J.
Other ECU delegates were
Anne Northington and Marion
Ellis of Siler City. Stormy Ste-
phen son of Clayton. Pete Benton
of Havelock, Sharon Perry and
Delores Winston of Colerain,
Lawrence Zicherman of Green-
ville, Joynce Mourning of Wind-
sor. Bobby Talton of Princeton
and Christine Dudley of Aulan-
der.
Last year's NCSL session
produced several items of legisla-
tion now waiting action by the
N.C General Assembly, among
them bills relating to uniform
child custody, migrant seasonal
workers and executive reform.
About 40 percent of all the
student legislature's bills have
become law by act of the General
Assembly.
Delegates heard a presenta-
tion by Doug Marlet. Charlotte
Observer cartoonist, at a Satur-
day evening banquet.
Closing ceremonies tor this
year's session were held Sunday
at 10 a.m. in the Old Capitol
Building.
Earn $5.18 per hour this Summer.
Part time & full time, flexible.
Statewide openings. Interviews
will be at the placement office
on Mon. & Tues. April 17 - 18
ONLY.
Interview times are : 12:10,
1:20, 2:40, and 4:10.





�����
Hnn
45,(MM) will apply, two-thirds will he turned away
13 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
� �
Premed students apply to medical schools
(CPS)The big springtime
squeeze-it happens every year
when 1.1�-medical un(J-r
iraduates learn of their fate in the
leal school sweepstakes.
ually, 45,000 students will
apply fa entrance in one of the
try's 120 medical sch��
Two-thirds of them will be turned
lviy.
Some will try again the next
year. Some will get laborer obs
and start making big money right
away. Some-cur rent I y 8000 of
them-will go to a foreign medical
school. Over 5.000 of the US
ign medical students
(USFMS) will engage the services
of a foreign school placement
agency.
The 20 some services, located
y in New Yak, Boston, and
Los Angeles, will promote foreign
programs, process applications,
expedite visa requests and ,
vide tips on living abroad
They vary greatly in a
ency and honesty, reports David
Papke in The New Leader, but all
charge heartily: a sizeable
application a subscription feein
one case $750and as much as
$4.000-$5.000for final placement.
Although most of the agancies
the services as stated,
the shady dealings of some
3
agencies have given the business
id name.
Most of the agency activities
are not strictly illegal says Susu
Wugmeister. chief advisor in the
Yale College premed program,
�but agancies do fool peM
They hook onto panic-stricken
meds and charge huge fees
without providing totally reliable
services
For example: Recently a New
York agency was caught selling
places in a nonexistent Haitian
medical school. Mae oommon is
a ploy of stringing along a
marginal medical school cand-
didate. baiting the student with
vague promises of a transfer to an
American school, when such
transfer options are severly limit-
Another gimmick isgrantmg a
fellowship a scholar shipwhich
generally means nothing more
than a reduction in the agency" s
already inflated fee.
One of the rrxxe subtle-and
mce prevasive-dangersof many
agancies is their failure to accura-
tely distinguish among faeign
schools. The consensus of special
-ists is that the best alternative
for a person turned down by a
domes! .chool is a state-
orted European
But western European count-
have recently moved I
trict free access to America
reigners.
West Germany. Austria and
Switzerland have cut down U
ants, and Belgium and
have adopted strict quota
systems.
Consequently, agencies in-
easingly rely on schools of
lesser renown in Mexcv India.
the Phillipmes and the Garib-
an. One of the most .reputable
of these is the Autoomous Univer-
� of Gualalaiara. which has
attracted 2.500 well-aganized
and vocal American students.
There is also a quickly
growing number of undersized
propreitary schools that lack
official recognition from their own
countries, much less the Wald
Health Organization. These
primarily money-making ventures
have sprung up during the last
few years, particulanly jn Mexico
and the Caribbean in direct
response to the availabilty of
American medical school cand-
didates. They have "open" slots
in their entering classes, but their
� quality ana
students sometimes finish several
study oi
oorly prepared fa US
licensun ims. Their 90
lion thei -
�id
Overall, the agencies appear
- , and impractical
venture Apparently, there are i
quality guidelines.
The Association of American
al Colleges accreditation
process provides a screening
��oh an ism fa schools on US
terntay but na beyaid.
Perhaps the realities of
faeign placement agencies is
expressed best by one who
knows, a 1976 Yale Caiege
graduate. They charge you an
arm and a leg fa things you can
do on your own fa a ooupte
hundred bucks.
Apparently, the agencies will
continue to do sc-and success-
ful ly-as long as medical schools
keep turning the students away.
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at
College View Cleaners
'tfc
X
SPRING WEA THER BRINGS out bikes, tee shirts and sandals, as tms
student aptly demonstrates.
CAMP COUNSELOR OPENINGS
fa faculty, Graduate Studentjs and Undergraduates
(minimun 2 yrs. college). A group of 10 long
established camps located in the Adirondacks, N.Y
Berkshires. Conn. & Mass and Maine, comprising
Boys. Girls, Brother-Sisiter, and Co-Ed camps have
openings fa qualified counselas in the following
areas: 1) All Team SPats and Individual Athletic
Activities (including Gymnastics, Riflery, Archery,
Fencing, etc.) 2) Waterfront Skills (WS, Smaller aft s.
Waterskiing, Scuba. 3) Pioneering & Tripping (Canoe
Trips, Mountain Climbing, Overnights. 4) Adminis-
trative Skills - Head Counselas, Group Leaders,
Program Assistants, Office Personnel 5) Arts and
Crafts 6) Drama (Theatre Direda, Technical
Assistant, Piano Accompanist fa musicals) 7)
General Counselas fa younger campers.
One application will reach all 10 Directas. Salaries
are commensurate with experience and skills.
WRITE (enclose full details as to your skills and
experience) Kathy Singer, Counselor Placement 105
We Pat Washington. N Y 11050.
FRISBEE DISC PENTATHLON
Tuesday , April 25,1978 4:00 P.M. Intramural Fields
Come join the ranks of the real pros!
Test your skills in: curve throws
distance
bull's eye
hang time
accuracy
It's going to be a GREAT event with GREAT prizes!
$50 - 1st prize
$25 - 2nd prize
$10 - 3rd prize
Terrific T-shirts for top 40 finalists !
A coupon for FREE french fries at McDonald's for each contestant!
Registration; April 14-21 McDonald's 10th ft Cotanche Sts.
"Frisbee is a brand name and a registered trademark
of Wham-0 Mfg. Co. for flying discs used in sports games





IBHBBHHMnHHH
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 April 1978
SUpresents Animated Film Festival Sunday
By STEVE BACHNEFt
Trends Editor
The Student Union will pre-
sent its fourth film festival,
featuring three full-length ani-
mated films, this Sunday at the
Mendenhall Student Center The-
atre. Films to be shown are,
respectively, Milestones for
Mickey, Wizards, and Yellow
Submarine.
The animated film is now over
seventy years old and European
animated films began trickling
into American theatres with regu-
larity around 1960.
Animation is now a serious
artform with mat .re themes and
new techniques. Artists are final-
ly seeing the possibilities inher-
ent in the medium and are
constantly breaking new ground.
The first feature-length ani-
mated film of this new wave to
employ a radically new visual
style and capture the public
imagination was "Yellow Subma-
A COSMIC CA RTOON. Mickey Mouse made his debut in 1928 and
rine and it is safe to assume
that its popularity was due as
much to the Peter Max style as to
the Beatle's music.
Following "Yellow Subma-
rine" came an artistic avalanche
of animate innovation. Stanley
Kubrick employed animated se-
quences in "2001 Another view
�EVERY ELEMENT OF "Yellow Submarine script, music,
animation and plot make this an invaluable cultural artifact and a
delightful way of understanding those fanciful times
of some future world was Rene
LaLoux's "Fantaic Planet -
Then Ralph Bakshi came up with
the inevitable, an X-rated ani-
mated feature where all the little
furry creatures we grew up with
were street wise and speaking the
previously unprintable. The fea-
ture was Fritz the Cat. Fritz the
Cat will oome to the ECU campus
as a student free flick April 14
and 15 at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.
ANIMATION IS THE MOST
FREE OF THE CINEMATIC
ARTS
Animation is the most free of
the cinematic arts, and labors
under few of the restrictions that
limit the earthbound camera. The
animators who yearly turn out
hundreds of films worldwide are
breaking away into areas where
the live aciton film simply cannot
follow.
Through animation, the natur-
al laws of space and time, and
gravity and dimension are sur-
mounted. The surreal vision,
static under the brush of a Dali, is
allowed to oome alive. To Ani-
mate. Dreams, previously the
territory of mystics and Freudians
are fleshed out and given life.
Most importantly, animation is
able to present the fantastic world
of the imaginatin in a palpable,
believable way. With animation,
this world becomes more than
immediately rose to international
believable, it beoomesreal.
'Robin and Marian' this week's
Student Union Free Flick
" Robin and Marian' is a grand Sherwood Forest turns to a high of King John.
and enthralling Romantic saga
which jells gloriously and artisti-
cally. -Rex Reed
Robin and Marian, this week's
pitch of excitement when its
legendary hero Robin Hood re-
turns from 20-yearsof fighting in
the Crusades.
His eternal love Maid Marian
'Robin and Marian is a
worldly wise and witty
response to our eternal
tvonderment of how our
heroes lived
audent Union Free Flick, will be
shown this Friday and Saturday
night at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. in the
Mendenhall audent Center The-
atre.
The tranquility of majestic
is now a nun and imprisoned in
Nottingham Castle.
Sean Connery is at his bravura
best as Robin and he and his
gallant band set out to free Maid
Marian and squelch the lyranny
What results is a sprawling
medieval adventure a
memorable, sensitive, love story .
. . all given credibility by an
international cast of celebrated
stars including Audrey Hepburn,
Robert Shaw, Richard Harris and
Niool Williamson.
"Robin and Marian is a
worldly, wise and witty response
to our eternal wonderment of how
our heroes lived
Admission to the film is by ID
and Activity Card for students.
Faculty and staff may use their
Mendenhall audent Membership
Card.
Next week's flick is Ralph
Bakshi's X-rated animated fea-
tured Fritz the Cat.
"MILESTONES FOR MICKEY"
AT 7 P.M.
This retrospective account
traces the highlights of the career
of Mickey Mouse.
11 i nd udes Plane Crazy (1928),
Mickey's Service Station (1935),
The Band Concert (1935) and
stardom.
Directly influenced by Bakshi's
work on the animated version of
Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings,
WIZARDS recalls the influence of
the past on the present and
future.
"YELLOW
9:30 P.M.
SUBMARINE" AT
If nothing else remains of the
Trends
Thru the Mirror (1936).
"WIZARDS" AT 7:45 P.M.
Ralph Bakshi who almost
single-hanaeaiy nas revived the
lost art of feature animation (Fritz
the Cat), sets up the struggle
between Avatar, the goodmagic
wizard, and his evil twin Black-
wolf, who resurrects Nazi propa-
ganda in an attempt to win the
world for technology.
psychedelic movement and the
swinging sixties, there is at least
Yellow Submarine, which dis-
plays both the Beatles and the
feeling of the times at their
height.
Based loosely (very loosely) on
the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper album,
the film hurtles on a colorful
journey through Pepperland in a
yellow submarine with the tour
Beatles and their assorted
friends.
Audrey Hepburn and
Sean Connery





�PwlnSFIRj
� QJJJ
13 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
i s
of
of
nd
AT
he
he
ISt
s-
he
sir
Dn
n,
ul
a
ur
Jonathan Edwards
comes to Greenville
this Sunday night
ByDAVIDWHITSON
Staff Writer
On Sunday, April 16, Green-
ville music fans will be delighted
with a double treatJonathan
Edwards will play two shows at
the Roxy Music Arts and Crafts
Center.
As a musician, Edwards has
covered a lot of ground during the
last few years. He played with
bluegrass bands, and electric
bands before settling into the
acoustic idiom which is now his
forte.
In high school he played with
the River men; "We weren't very
good he admits. When he
entered college in Athens, Ohio,
he joined a band called the St.
James Doorknob. While the band
didn't exactly shoot anyone to
fame and fortune, it did bring the
talents of Edwards and Malcolm
McKinney together. McKinney
still writes songs fa Edwards.
After convincing the draft
board that he was crazy (remem-
ber Vietnam?), Edwards left for
Boston, the band changing its
name to Headstone Circus. Soon
after, they changed the name
again, to Sugar Creek and
recorded an album.
"By then says EdwardsI
didn't want to do anymore electric
stuff. We played some really
tough places . . . where guys
would get drunk and fight during
the set. I decided I wanted to Dlay
acoustic guitar and forget all that
electric noise
Ever since, Edwards has
diverted his energy into his
Martin six-string, developing a
driving and rhythmically conlex
percussive playing style. ' a King
gieat pride ii, e main Mtai
aspect of his show, Edwards has
also honed his musical skills on
the harmonica, mandolin, piano,
and pedal steel guitar.
As if Edward's virtuoso musi-
cianship were not enough to
enthrall an audience, his voioe
has been praised as one of the
finest to ever grace the vinyl
grooves. And his masterful com-
bination of sensitive lyric poetry,
and acoustic guitar work has
influenced critics to rate him
between Dylan and Taylor as a
contemporary artist.
Although Edwards has never
sought the big bucks and mercuri-
al fame of the "Top 40" mass
media market, you may recall his
catchy "Sunshine" song from
"MY SONGS DON't belong on Top 40 radio. . .I'm gonna keep that old Back 40 tor my home
home
Mellow music enthusiasts -
have a night to look forward
to-for icing on the cake, Edwards
is bringing a back-up banc, rather
than the two sidemen who usually
accompany him on the road. This
event promises to be a special
conoert from a special performer.
his voice has been praised
as one of the finest to ever grace
the vinyl grooves
several years ago.
Edwards' sentiments on this
subject are summed up in his
tune, "My Home Ain't in the Hall
of Fame" "My songs don't
belong on Top 40 radio1' m gonna
keep that old Back 40 for my
ARMYNAVY STORE
Sleeping bags, camping equip
ment, rainweai, Vietnam & corr
bat boots, dishes. Military sur-
plus
1501 S. Evans Street
PHI SIGMA PI AND ALPHA XI DELTA
GREENVILLE'S BIGGEST
BIKINI CONTEST
ELBO ROOM APRIL 18
DOOR PRIZE � � FREE CASE OF BfEff"
SEE ECU PRETTIEST GIRLS STRUT THEIR STUFF
WHILE TOO HELP KHOCK OUT HEART DISUSE
A SUPER SLICKER
by BETMAP
It's a slick 'n shiny slicker ready to go any-
where, anytime, in any weather. Super for
fashion super for fun1 Sleek vinyl in eye-
popping colors. Stop Sign Red; School Bus
Yellow Starlight Blue; Gr.issy Green;
Caribbean Orange; Polar White; Jet Black.
You need one but you'll want at least two!





nm
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 April 1978
Berger mastered art of mime: his silence was golden
Whether moving or still, Keith Berger
expresses the emotions of joy, surprise,
fear and ivonder. He, the audience and
the stage are his only properties.
Photos by
Brian Stotler
Don't Miss
William Shakespeare's
A
MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM
April 18-22, 8:15 pm
East Carolina Playhouse
McGinnis Auditorium
Admission $2.50
ECU STUDENTS FREE
Pick up reserved seat tickets now
at
McGinnis Box Office
call 757-6390
PRE INVENTORY SALE
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
DRASTIC REDUCTIONS ON QUALITY MERCHANDISE AND ODDS AND ENDS
JACKETS up to 40 off T-SNIRTS up to 40 off
VANGAURD ACRYLIC PAINTS 40 off (all colors not available)
OVER 1200 COPIES OF USED D00KS up to 95 off
ONE GROUP OF NEW BOOKS
HISTORY, ART A CRAFTS, COOKING, ETC up to 75 off
MANY OTHER ITEMS
REGISTER FOR FREE DRAWIHGS
YOU DO NOT NAVE TO BE PRESENT TO WIN
SALE STARTS 8:30AM MONDAY
APRIL 17TH
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
M0N. - FRI. 8:30am-5:00 pm SAT. 9:00am-12 noon
kC rf;Jiifc&fci





"��������wH
������
iHnm
� I
8:15 p.m Wright Auditorium
13 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
Piano and Wind Ensemble concerto April 16
ECU News Bureau
A new oonoerto for Piano and
Wind Ensemble by contemporary
composer Gerald Dunbar will
have its premiere performance at
ECU Sunday, April 16, when it
will be among works performed
by the ECU Symphonic Wind
Ensemble at its spring concert.
The program scheduled for
8:15 p.m. in Wright Auditorium,
is free and open to the public.
Dunbar, now a member of the
music theory faculty of the ECU
School of Music, will be featured
pianist in the performance of his
work.
He is a native of Port Barre,
La an alumnus of the University
of Southwestern Louisiana and a
doctoral candidate at Florida
State University.
The ECU Wind Ensemble,
directed by Herbert Carter, will
also peform "Toccata marziale"
by Ralph Vaughan Williams, a
work noted for its contrapuntal
interplay of brasses and wood-
winds; an unpublished composi-
tion by Kentucky composer R
Bernard Fitzgerald, "Soliloguy" ;
and the Robert Russell Bennett
"Suiteof Old American Dances
which includes "Cake Walk
"Sohottische, "Western One-
Step "Wallflower Waltz" and
"Rag" movements.
Conducting a portion of the
program is Jack Stamp of College
Park, Md a graduate student in
the ECU School of Music.
Dunbar's piano concerto is
unusual in it's being written fa
wind ensemble rather than orch-
estra
The composer chose this
medium because not only iStl -
wind ensemble "more aocessit,
for performance but also offers
avast array of timbres to be
against the piano.
The concerto is classical in
design, consisting of three move-
ments which are performed with-
out interruption. Many aspects of
H "o performance are utilized�
lyric solo passages, percussive
rhythmic sections, and virtuoso
passages of scales and arpeggios.
A NEW CONCERTO for Piano and Wind Ensemble
by contemporary composer Gerald Dunbar will have
its premiere performance at East CArolina
University Sunday, April 16, when it will be among
works performed by the ECU Symphonic Wind
ENsemble at its spring concert. Dunbar will be
featured pianist in the performance of his work.
Here, he rehearses with the ensemble.
TNlffi. CONCERT KITE AT THE
U30 R0OM
TEKTH ME BMD
last time before school is out dont miss them
FRI.3-7 END OF WEEK PARTY
SAT
F1HALWKS. OF SAT MITE FEVER
SUN.� LADIES MITE
Scholarship Weekend will be held
on the ECU campus April 15-17
ByRENEEDIXON
Staff Writer
Scholarship Weekend will be
held on the ECU campus Satur-
day through Monday, April 15-17.
Approximately one hundred high
school juniors from across the
state of N.C are expected to
attend.
The purpose of Scholarship
Weekend is to provide to oppor-
tunity for outstanding North
Carolina high school students to
visit the campus, consider ECU
degree programs, and exper-
ience various facets of college life
such as the dass room situation,
dorm life, and social activities.
Originally. Scholarship Week-
end was open only to Merit
Scholar semi-finalists, but the
program has expanded.
Letters are sent to the princ-
ipal of every high school in N.C.
requesting the nomination of two
highly qualified junior year stud-
ents to part ia pate in Scholarship
Weekend.
Not all nominees are accept-
ed.
The Committee invites an
equal number of young men and
women and tries to select a group
that is geographically represent-
ative of the entire state. Budget
allowances limit the number of
participants to approximately one
hundred.
Three aspects of Scholarship
Weekend that past participants
have evaluated as most helpful
are classroom visits, living in the
dormitory, and academic interest
groups
The students spend two nights
m dormitory rooms with ECU
students who have offered to act
as host or hostesses to the visiting
guests. The students will attend
ECU classes Monday morning,
April 17th according to their
respective interests.
Each department head has
chosen classes which he deems
most beneficial to the visiting
students, and the students then
choose which classes they would
like to attend.
The Academic Interest Group
meetings are held on Sunday
afternoon, and along with class-
room visits, are one of the most
important activities of the week-
end
The students choose the two
subjects that interest them the
most and attend a short seminar
on the degree programs that ECU
offers in that field. These meet-
ings aid the students in choosing
which classes they will attend on
Monday morning.
Other activities planned for
the weekend include a meeting
with college chaplains, a panel
discussion on campus life (spon-
sored by the League of Scholars),
tours of the campus and Green-
ville, and ECU athletic and
cultural events.
A highlight of the weekend is
the Sunday evening banquet with
guest speaker, Dr. Leo Jenkins.
The Scholarship Weekend
Committee is composed of 28
faculty and administrative mem-
bers, and three students from
various ECU departments.
FRI. i SAT.
AND A SUN.
Epic Recording Artists .t
BLAZE
Sun FREE Admission with
MRC or WRC Cord! 11 1111





ilJBpfg
12 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 April 1978
THE BAND NEVER emerges as being larger
than life, the instrumental work is uninspired, the
vocals never surpass nicety, and tne band is
spinelessly bland
RIGGAN
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER GOOOS
downtown Greenville
111 Wes 4th Sr 75&-021V
Students perform in recital
ECU News Bureau
Eddie Henderson of Winter-
0WCL
$1.00 OFF
ANY PIZZA WITH COUPON
2713 E. 10TH STREET
( OFFER EXPIRES APRIL 20,1071)
ville and Teresa Watkins of
Kannapoiis, student pianists in
the ECU School of Music, will
perform in recital this month.
Henderson is a graduate
student and Watkins is a
junior. Both programs are sched-
uled fa the A.J. Fletcher Music
Center Recital Hall.
A student of Dr. Charles Bath
of the ECU keyboard faculty,
Henderson will perform lues.
April 18 at 730 p.m.
Teresa Watkins, whose recital
is Friday, April 21, at 8:15 p.m
will perform the J.S. Bach
Prelude and Fuge in F sharp
minor; Beethoven's Sonata in C
Major, Opus 2, rk. 3; the Bartok
Suite, Opus 14; Chopin's Etude in
C sharp minor, Opus 10, Ho. 4;
and Rachmaninoff's "Moment
Musicale" in E minor.
She is a student of Dr. Everet
Plttman and a candidate for
Bachelor of Music degrees in
piano performance and peda�.
gogy.
VinylReview
by David Whitson
Ian Thomas Band: Still Here
In order to slow the onslaught of AMerican and European rock
bands, Carcada has passed a law requiring radio stations to devote a
fixed proportion of air ply to works produced in Canada.
They are now based in Toronto; this will help the Ian Thomas Band
in Canada, but in the States they will be left to flounder.
While the band has a nice sound, they are too bland. The lyrics are
meaninglessly contradictory-for example:
Well, here's the message
The tears just wet things till they're wetter
The occasional down makes up seem better
Or so the story goes
(from "Gearing Sailing")
This is followed by:
What was late is early now
As insignificant as it seems
("Tinker bell")
Come on guys, if you don't believe yourselves, why should we
believe you? This band never emerges as being larger than life, the
instrumental work is uninspired, the vocals never surpass nicety, and
the band i spinelessly Wand.
David Spinozza: Spinozza
David Spinozza appears courtesy of A & M Records, Inc.
You may have seen the ditty above on some of your albums.
Spinozza has played session guitar fa years now, backing up many
great artists, and producing albums as well. (That explains the asterisk
gracing the album's title.)
Eventually Spinozza felt it was time to branch out on his own and
produce a solo album, and here it is.
He should remain a session man, and after the sales recad of this
LP is established, he undoubtedly will.
Admittedly, Spinozza is a virtuoso of jazz guitar. But in spite of his
excellent instrumental mastay, and the effortsof the LPs contributing
sidemen, (most notably, the Beokman brothers, Michael and Randy;
Mike Manieri, and Eric Weisberg) Spinozza lacks the charisman
necessary to serve as a canerstoie from which to build an entire
album.
The album lacks the unity which a band achieves because each cut
is played by a different ensemble of musicians. Spinozza is like the
proverbial kid in the candy stae, explaing diffaent styles, idians,
and achestratiois.
Yet this allows him the freedom to extend himself, and he does so
admirably, encountering a diversity of moods with the mastery which
marks him as a musician's musician.
The album opens with yet another version of Leon Russell's
"Superstar with Spinozza'sguitar singing the melodic line, followed
by the instrumental, "On My WaytotheLiqour Stae The remainder
of the first side is filled by "The Ballerina" with its pompous prelude
and lackluster vocals, sung by Spinozza.
Side two consists of five instrumental which contain beauooups of
mellow, jazzy licks in the Chick Caea and Chuck Mangioie vein, yet
no aiginal musical statement is made.
All lyrics published by Torano Music, ASCAP (CAPAQ. Thanks to
Bob at School Kid's for the Spinoza LP, the folks at A&M for "Still
Here
Price
performs
sax recital
OPEN 8:30 WED�SUN
APRIL FOOL'S PRICES
Pinball
Footsball
College ID required
B gammon to urn. (W)
NO COVER
Come down and see how foolish we can be
Greenville's Newest Downtown Alternative
ECU News Bureau
Michael Price of Atlanta, Ga.
and Concad, N.C graduate
saxophone student in the ECU
School of Music, will perfam in
recital Sun. April 16, at 3:15 p.m.
p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher Music
Center Recital Hall.
His program of saxophone
compositions and transaiptions
will include Telemann's Sonata in
C mina, Koechlin's "Epitaphe
de Jean Harlow Tomasi's Bal-
lade, Bozza's Andante et Scherzo,
a Scnumann Fantasy Peice and
Ibert's "Concertino de Camera
He will be accompanied by
pianist-haprsichadist Bobby
Sullivan, and assisted by
bassoonist Cindy Cooley, flutist
Vickt lannotta and members of
the ECU saxophone quartet.





mm
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Sp O ftS Bucs bomb Seahawks 25-1
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 April 1978
Intramurals
by JOHN EVANS
Top rankings challenged
Someone out there in intramural land takes the top ten rankings
seriously. I have always taken these rankings seriously, but last week
there was quite a stir over the top tens.
I had a lot of arguments thrown my way this week and I managed to
get out and see some of the top teams play. And while I figure that a
few will disagree, I figure I might as well go out on a limb.
The result is a new number one team fa the top ten.
While I still think the Time Outs are the team to beat, I was thrown
a challenge by Lumber and Lightning last week, so it is now time fa
them to �' put up a shut up" as I decided to give them a .top-ranking
this week. Let's see how they do!
Overall, 13 teams remain unbeaten and the playoffs begin on
Thursday with a total of 60 teams still in competition fa the
all-campus championship.
Teams in the playoffs and their first-round oppoients will be
decided Wednesday night. The schedule will be posted Thursday.
You can call 757-6562 after 10 a.m. Thursday fa that infamatioi.
Here is this week's top ten ranking.
1.Lumber and Lightning9. Joies Jailers
2.Scott Time Outs10. Phi Sigma Pi
3.Phi Kappa Tau
4Beik Sensations
5.Unstead Orioles
6Heartbreak Kids
7.Scott In Your Pocket
8Phi Epsilon Kappa
Liz Weeks and Warren Marshall defeated Janice McVeigh and
David Helms in the finals of the mixed doubles tennis tournament.
The Frisbee Pentathalon will on April 25 and registratioi begins
April 14 and runs through April 21.
Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three finishers overall. The
fivepentathalaievents are Curve Throw, Distance Throw, Accuracy,
Bull's Eye, and Hang Time.
Registration will beheld at the McDonald'son Tenth Street.
There were sane big upsets last week in women's softball play, but
somehow the top five teams remain intact.
Six teams are still unbeaten entering the last week of regular
season play, but oie of those teams will lose this week when Tyler's
Going For Two meets Fleming Flcozies on Wednesday in a
matchup of unbeatens. The Delta Zetas and Alpha Phis also meet in a
big game - the Alpha Phis are the only unbeaten saaity team, as all
others have at least two losses.
Several key games took place last week that will help to determine
which teams make next week's playoffs.
Fletcher's Soft-N-Pretty downed Fleming's Fielder's 13 to 11, to
clinch a playoff spot and second-placer in the Batter's Leauge. Given
Satterwhite' s three-run homerun in the last inning was the winning hit
for Fletcher.
Flemings' Elephinos beat aement's Un Kappa Fifth, 7 to 4, to tak
no wase than a tie fa second in their league and a playoff berth.
Donna Davis led the Elephinos with two homeruns and a triple.
The Alpha Phis are the only team that has clinched a playoff berth
in the saaity league, but six other teams have a shot at the playoffs
entering this week's action.
Tyler's Going Fa Two and I leming Floozies are tied at the top of
the Fielder's league at 5 to 0, but still must face each other befae the
playoffs. Both teams are assured of a playoff berth.
Other teams assured of playoff berths are the P.E. Majas,
Hypertension, Gotten Bunnies, Greene's Tuf-E-Nuf, Tyler's Clowns
and the Greene Mad Batters.
This week's tcp ten teams in ader are:
1. Tyler's Going fa Two
2. Tyler's Clowns
3. Greene'sTuf-E-Nuf
4. P.E. Majas
5. Cctten Bunnies
6. Alpha Phi
7. Fletcher Soft-M-Pretty
8. Fleming Floozies
9. Alpha Xi Delta
10. Hypertension
By ANDY STEWART
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Pirates
blitzed the UNC-Wilmington
Seahawks by a soore of 25 to 1
Tuesday night at Harrington
Field.
The Pirates went through five
UNC-Wilmington pitchas as if
they owned them They battered
the Seahawk pitchers to the tune
See INTRAMURALS, p. 15
"ATHLETE OF THE WEEK" Butch Davis
Butch Davis is
FOUNTAINHEAD
'Athlete of the Week'
by David Merriam
This week's " Athlete of the Week award goes to a very young and
promising athelte.
Butch Davis has been selected "Athlete of the Week" fa his
continuous and steady baseball perfamanoes, most recently this past
Butch is playing in the designated hitter position. A position which
requires excellent batting and total concentration on batting skills.
"I'm very glad Butch has received this week"shona stated head
skipper Monte Little. "Butch is a very deserving athlete and I'm sure
Butch will be pleased to hear of this hona
Bearing a striking resemblance to baseball super-great Hank
Aaron, Butch appears to have sane of the same tools that made
Hammsrin' 'Hank so great.
"Butot has a beautiful swing in the batters box said Assistant
Coach Hal Baird. he looks mean when he gets up to bat
"He (Butch) has all the necessary equipment to be a success
oontinued Little. "First he has that innate ability to swing the bat.
Second, he has a tremendous amount of courage in the box
Monte Little obviously must know what he is talking uxxt, because
this past week Butch has hit 16 of 29 times up at bat. He also leads the
team in batting average.
"Butch is hitting at a clip of .352, the best on the team said Little.
" He has hit 4 homeruns this season, three this past week. He also had
16 hits this week, 10 have been fa extra bases
Right now we' re waking on Butch's defense said Little, Should
his defensive ability mature as well as his batting he will become a
full-time player
In closing Monte said Butch can only get betta, that's the kind of
guy he is. Butch is very dedicated
of 18 hits including two home
runs.
In the first inning the Pirates
were able to produce their first
run by alert :ase running and
the mistakes of the Seahawks.
With Butch Davis on first and
Pete Paradossi on third, the
Pirates per famed the double
steal.
The Seahawks diagnosed the
play perfect with the second
baseman coming aaoss on the
throw from the catcher, to cut the
ball off, in ader to stop the
runner heading home. But on the
throw home, the ball was out of
the reach of the catcher, and it
allowed the runner to scae.
In the second inning the
Pirates where able to put four
mae runs on the scaeboard.
With the bases loaded, the
Seahawk pitcher walked Eddie
Gates, sending Max Rayna
hone. Then Billy Best was hit by
the pitcher to send Robert
Brinkley in.
Butch Davis then drove in
two mae runs to make the scae 5
toO.
In the fourth inning the
Seahawks did manage to scae
their oily run of the game. They
were able to score by batting
three consecutive hits. This was
the only time during the game
UNC-Wilminton ever appeared to
be putting a rally together.
In the bottom half of the
inning the Pirates answered to
the Seahawks one run with five of
their own. With one man on,
Eddie Gates jacked the ball out of
the ballpark fa his fifth homer of
the year. Then with Best and
Davis en base, Raymie Styons
slammed his fifth haner of the
year to make the soae 10 to 1.
In the fifth inning the Pirates
were able to put five mae runs ai
the scaeboard. The inning
started off with Jerry Carraway
hitting a single followed by Eddie
Gates and Billy Best both receiv-
ing walks.
With the bases loaded, Para-
dossi singled to scae Carraway
and Gates. Best then scaed on a
wild pitch. He was followed by
Paradossi on another wild pitch.
Bobby Supei then received a
walk to put one man on
Styois the doubled to scae
Supel to make the scae 15 to 1.
The Seahawks managed to
shut the Pirates out in the sixth
inning, but the Pirates came back
strong in the seventh to scae
eight runs.
Butch Davis started the inning
off with a double fa the
Pirates.
Mike Sage then singled to
Davis. Larry Anderson then sin-
gled to send two mae runners
hone and put Carraway ai third.
Tim Hardison then hit a sharp
grounder to the shortstop who
bobbled the ball enabling
Carraway to scae.
Paradossi then singled to
scae Anderson. Hardison sca-
ed on a wild pitch from the
pitcher. With Davis receiving a
walk and Paradossi already on
base, r tip Giannettino tripled to
See BASEBALL, p. 16





waimHH
HsnH
HV
13 April 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
Bill Carson's trackmen scholars as well
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
hast Carolina rack is a spat
where one hears mae about
individuals rather than the team.
A spat where prestige is
limited and success depends on a
materr of seconds.
A spat that na oily takes
physical preparation but mental
concentration.
The program here fa track is
one of the best athletic programs
at the school. A dose tie is kept
between members of the team
and the ooachina staff.
"Coach Carson takes pride in
his guys stated assistant coach
Curtis Frye. "His main objective
in this program is to see that
every trackman does his best in
school. Track, in competition is
one thing, but academically he
wants all the boys to graduate.
We have a 90 per cent
graduation level on our team
continued Frye. "We are very
proud of that fact, and I feel that a
team must do well in the
classroom to be successful any-
where, needless to say the
track
Apparently the high academic
level of Carson's program has
lured some of the top track
prospects around.
"I feel not only does the
athlete benefit from this program,
but the team as a whole bene-
fits stated Frye.
Aside from the academics,
Carson has established several
goals fa himself and the team.
"My first goal was to win the
U.S.C. transfer David Underwood
adds new dimension to Buc basketball
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Spats Edita
East Carolina head basketball
coach Larry Gil I man may have
signed his most prized recruit fa
the ooming year months ago.
David Underwood, a transfer
student from the Universtiy of
South Carolina, signed a scholar-
ship pact with ECU befae last
basketball seasoi, but was ineli-
gible because NCAA rules re-
quire a player who transfers to sit
out a year.
Underwood, like Oliver Mack
and Walter Moseley, is a native of
Queens, New Yak.
He played against Mack as a
sophonae representing August
Martin High School.
Averaging 24 points and 17
rebounds per game, Underwood
was named all-city and to several
All-American teams.
Ater deciding to transfer,
David was contacted by many
schools along with Pirate Head
Coach Gillman.
"Coach Gillman recruited me
while he was at San Francisco
said Underwood. "He called me
again and I talked to (Oliver)
Mack
Asked about what part he will
play with the Bucs next year, he
respondedIt doesn't matter
who starts on this team because
we have a dimension that didn't
exist last year, depth.
"If they push up on Oliver,
you got Herb Gray, Roger Carr,
Bernard Hill, Greg Canelius, and
myself. I'm not the only one; we
will complement each other
Watching David Underwood
play with his future teammates it
is easy to see he has style to
complement East Carolina bas-
ketball.
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Southern Conference title said
CArson. "Next, I wanted to have
someone qualify fa nationals
And third, I would like to
place our 440 team in nationals
All but the 440 have come
through with Carson's goals,
however, the season isn't over
yet.
Already several people have
accomplished acceptable times
fa Natiaials and the 440 team is
not very far off.
The energetic head coach Bill
Carson will undoubtably go down
in HISTORY as one of ECU'S
best and most suooessf ul coaches.
Bill Carson
INTRAMURALS
Continued from p. 14
The Ultimates and the Bumpers remain as the only unbeaten teams
in oo-rec vollyball play. The Ultimates lead the Spike League with a 4
to 0 recad and the Bumpers head the Volley League with a 3 to 0
mark.
The Catfish, the Waterbugs, the Necromancers, the Monkberry
Moon Delight and the Unsinkables remain undefeated after one week
of Co-Rec Water Basketball play.
Monkberry's Moon Delight start defense of their title on Tuesday
with a 56 to0 win over the Auuaxins, but the Aquakings learned how to
play real fast and topped the Slashing Sammers, 32 to 23, in their next
game.
Registration fa the Co-Rec Putt Putt tournment takes place this
week, April 10 through 13, Memaial Gym.
One guy and one girl on each team, please.
Ray starts next week.
Golf balls, all brands $11.95dozen,
Tennis balls, $1.99can limit 2 cans)
Automatic Golf Shag Bag,
holds 70 balls, reg.
$23.00 now $13.95
All men's IZOD swim suits,
reg. $17.00, now $9.95
All men's IZOD and
MUNSINGER sweaters 12 price.
Etonic KM men's and ladie's jogging shoes
reg. $29.95 now $23.00.
Large selection of men's H�&B drivers
(right and left handed)
reg. $44.50 now $33.50.
a All IZOD short sleeve shirts
J reg. $19.00 now $13.95
no limit.).
We also have a large
selection of golf shoes
on sale.
Friday, April 14th, 1st 25
custemors making a
iy L-l purchase get a free
golf ball.
Free golf rule book for all customers.
Gordon D. Fulp
Golf Professional
Greenville Golf A Country Club
. Off of Memorial Dr
on Country Club Dr.
Phone 754-0504
Open 7 days a week until dark





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 13 April 1978
Women gain athletic equality in courts
Women fighting for access to
team sports once thought for men
only recently scored victories in
the courts-the law courts, that is.
A federal district judge in
Dayton, Ohio ruled on Jan. 9 that
it is unconstitutional to keep
qualified girls from playing on
boys teams in any inter scholastic
sport, including contact sports
like basketball, football, ice hock-
ey and wrestling.
Similar rulings were issued in
Wisconsin and Massachusetts.
The two girls filing the suit in
Ohio were barred from playing on
an all boys junior high basketball
team in 1974 because of state
athletic association rules. There
was no team for girla
In his decision Judge CArl
BASEBALL
Continued from p. 14
send two more runs home.
In the eigth the Pirates were
still able to produce two more
runs. With Max Raynor and Mike
Sage on base, Anderson doubles
to send Raynor home and putting
Sage on third. Sage then scored
on a wild pitch for the final run of
the night.
The winning pitcher was Rick
Ramey, whose record now stands
at 4-2. He was relieved by Bill
Davis in the seventh, Bob Patter-
son in the eigth and Earle
Mobley in the ninth.
The losing pitcher was Danny
Houston. His record now stands
at 4-3.
The leading hitters for the
Pirates were Eddie Gates who
went 2-2 with one home run,
Larry Anderson and Jerry Carra-
way who both went 2-3, Butch
Davis and Raymie Styons both
went 3-5 with Styons hitting a
home run and Chip Giannettino
going to the pi ate once knocking a
triple.
Rubin said that the athletic
association rules violated the 14
th Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution.
Sex discrimination in sports is
not only a violation of federal
regulations, but also a violation of
a person's constitutional rights,
according to Judge Rubin.
The Ohio High School Athletic
Association plans to appeal the
decision.
Other court decisions over the
past two months solidified gains
won in 1972 when the law
popularly known as Title IX was
passed. Title IX makes it illegal
fa schools receiving federal
funds to discriminate on the basts
of sex in school programs,
including physical education and
athletics.
The National Collegiate Athle-
tic Association (NCAA) failed
again in its long-running effat to
keep interscholastic athleticsfrom
being covered by Title IX.
In its suit filed in Feb. 1976
against the Department of Health
Education, and Welfare (HEW),
the main government agency that
enfaces Title IX, the NCAA
argued that federal requirements
to provide equal opportunities fa
women were too costly and would
take money away from emns
programs.
U.S. District Judge Earl E.
O'Conna in Kansas rulled on
Jan. 9 that the NCAA has no
standing to file the suit and had
failed to prove that it a-its
member institutions and their
athletic programs would be "in-
jured" by Title IX.
A settlement was reached
Dec. 28 in a three-year-old suit
brought by the Women's Equity
Action League (WEAL) and other
civil rights groups who charged
HEW and the Department of
Labor with failure to enface
anti-bias laws
institutions.
The court settlement requires
HEW to substantially inaease its
investigation of bias complaints.
HEW is also required to dear up
a back log of nearly 3,000
complaints by Oct. 1979, and to
conduct independent checks of
institutions to see if they aie
complying overall with civil rights
laws.
To meet the terms of the
agreement HEW is seeking to
double the size of its enfacement
branch, the Office fa Civil Rights
(OCR), by adding about 900 jobs
in 10 regional centers. Funding
fa the staff inaease depends on
supplemental appropriationsfrom
Conoress which should be acted
in educational on this sorinr
HEW Actions
HEW made headlines with the
following actions against colleges
and socondary school districts:
School officials in Oak Ridge,
Tenn. were told that they could
lose about $750,000 in federal
funds unless they equalized treat-
ment of girls and boys in
interscholastic and physical edu-
cation programs. As examples of
inequities. MFW pointed out in a
letter that girls play half-court
basketball while boys play
full-court rules, and that boys
varsity basketball games were
plaved at 8 D.m. with airls aames
at 6 p.m.
HEW rules that prime time (8
p.m.) should be shared equally,
that there should be equal pay fa
coaches fa girls teams, equal
assignment to gymnasium sche-
dules and integration of physical
education classes except where
they are totally voluntary.
Six university campuses were
visited by investigatas from OCR
fa checks co overall oompliance
with anti-bias laws. Tentative
agreements to oared certain
"Defidendes" were made be-
tween OCR and Columbia Univer-
sity, the Unviersity of Michigan,
Ohio State University, Purdue
University, Wayne State Univer-
sity and the University of Wiscon-
sin at Madison.
THE SUN SHINES through new steel superstructure
of Ficklen Stadium. The expansion is well underway
and work should be completed by the fall. Ficklen
will hold 35,000 and be North CArolina s fourth
largest stadium.
Photo by Brain Stotler
Classifieds
(or rent�
APT. FOR SUBLEASE: May 1 -
Aug. 31. 2 bdrm kitchen, liv.
rm furnished. Great location -1
block from campus, 2 blocks from
Overtons, 2 blocks from down-
town. Prefer responsible female
grad. student a marrieds. call
758-1636 after 6 p.m.
NEEDED: Roommate fa two
bedroom apt. in Brentwood sed-
ioi of Villiage Green Apts. Rent is
$80, and utilities are $10-$25 (you
pay half). Prefer male graduate
student, but will consider female.
If interested, call 752-5705, a see
Tim POwell in Biology Bldg. Rm.
N-205.
ONE OR TWO: Roommates need-
ed fa summer and next year -
King's Row Apts. Call Burlon at
752-1929.
WAnTED TO RENT: Private
room in apt. a house within
walking distance a en SGA Bus
route fa fall Call Janet 752-8270.
APT. FOR SUBLEASE: One
bdrm fully furnished apt. one
block from campus on 4th St.
$150.00 a month (May 1 - Aug.).
Two double beds in bdrm and air
cond. Please call 752-1009.
FEMALE DESIRES: roommates
by June 1st Call 758-3497.
WANTED: Female roommates
fa summer. Share rent and
utilities fa 2 bdrm. apt. (town-
house style) on Willow St. Close
to campus, AC, 112 bath. Call
Carol a Suzy at 752-9972.
FEMALE ROOMMATE, needed
to share 2 bdrm. apt. dose to
campus. Your own bdrm rent
55.00 month. Call 758-5568 fa
details.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share
3 bdrm. house starting in May.
Rent $55 and Vi utilities. Call
758-6293.
fbrsde
FOR SALE; Weightlifting equip-
ment. Best offer 758-0445.
FOR SALE: '69 Dodge Coronet
slant six cylinder standard shift.
Excellent economy in great cond.
Call 758-7434.
FOR SALE: 3.09 cubic ft. refrig.
slightly larger than dam size.
$50. Call 758-8736 between 5-7 a
after 10 p.m.
FOR SALE: Sankyo STD-1510
stereo cassette deck with dolby,
chrome bias. Twin recading
meters, input and output level
controls. SN ratio: 55db. Great,
aisp sound. $100.00 Call Jay
Hurst 752-9435 316-B Belk.
FOR SALE: Handmade jewelry
fa guys and girls, turquoise,
tigereye, jade, ivay, oaal,
mother of pear! more Summer
is the time of yejt toexpost; your
body, so why nut do it with a little
style? Good quality at good
prices. Call Jeff 752-5070.
FOR SALE: Double bed frame
and matching dresser and mirra.
Braided hoop rug, 9'x12 Call
752-7497.
FOR SALE: AMFM 8-track
conpad Magnavox stereo system
in excellent cond. Call 752-8676.
FOR SALE: I wonder what ever
happened to that little man?
Abraham Lawson Robot Kits.
! (Coming Soon Inquire 758-
7434.
FOR SALE .HEAD (Professional)
tennis racket. Call Tom Durfee
758-8806.
FOR SALE: Datsun 2402 Green,
air, mags, AMFM, new Mich-
elin radials. 443-7914 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: '74 450 Honda, hi
rise, headers, king queen seat,
3000 miles. Bought bigger bike,
$600.00 758-2415.
FOR SALE: '76 CB125 Honda,
2700 miles. Best offer. Call
758-6787 after 1:30 p.m.
' � i � i if in
personald)
HELP: Ride to ana from Charlrtte
needed. Have to be there night of
Apr. 23. Can leave any time, any
day, befaeand after. Will pay fa
gas, expenses, etc. (If not Charl-
otte, then need ride to and from
Chapel Hill on same dates). John
Weyler, 458 Aycock 752-8525.
WANTED: group needs exper-
ienced drummer and keyboardist
fa weekend and summer work.
Call Jeff 752-8776.
HELP WANTED: Part time typ-
ist. Must have didaphone exper-
ience. Call 758-3145.
SUMMER JOBS: at the beach!
Established real estate firm needs
dependable home repair person
(male a female). Requires gen-
eral maintenance skills plus pipe
soldering, plumbing skills, etc.
Located in Emerald Isle, N.C.
Call JoAnn at 746-4623, a
Singleton Realty, 326-5333.
ALTERATIONS: Summer things
too long, too bigCall Kathy at
752-8444 a 752-8642.
lost
2
LOST: White gold Seiko watch
blue face. If found, please oontad
Amanda Britt, 214 Garrett Hall.
758-5452. Reward.
LOST: Gold digital sensa watch
in Austin, this was a spedal gift.
Reward. 758-2415.
� V Mitflf�Sv' � '





Title
Fountainhead, April 13, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 13, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.643
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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