Fountainhead, March 30, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of o.ow,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
Vol. No. 53, No. 43 East Carolina University Greenville, North Carolina 3QJar 1978
ON THE INSIDE
Voter registrationp. 5
Special Olympicsp. 7
Jazz in Greenvillep. 11
Bucsdown Tigersp. 13
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PayneCartwright win
8yDOlG WH7E
News Edita
Tommy Joe Payne defeated two other candidates for the Student
Government Association (SGA) presidency by a margin of 232 votes.
Payne's running mate, David Cartwright, is the new SGA
vice-president, winning by 240 votes.
Payne and Cartwright will assume office after being swan in at the
annual SGA banquet April 19.
Payne was backed by the precincts at the Student Supply Stae,
White Dam Greene Dam, and Scott Dam.
Cartwrignt received support from the Student Supply Stae, White
Dam, Scott Dam, and Greene Dam.
In the treasurer's race, Zack Smith defeated Wiley Betts by 368
votes.
Lynn Bell, the sole candidate fa SGA secretary, is the official
1978-79 secretary.
The amendment to the SGA constitution was approved by a wide
margin, but it is not yet known if the required 20 per cent of the student
body voted in the election in ader to ratify the amendment.
Approximately 18 to 22 per cent of the student body voted in
Wednesday'selections, but the exact figure has not been determined.
"I'm glad it's all over now. We did our best, and I don't think
anyone can oomplain Roi Lewis, Elections Conmittee chairpersoi
said after the ballot counting.
"I think this was the fairest election I've seen since I've been
here Rudolph Alexander, associate dean of student affairs said.
PRESIDENT
Payne 1.044
Sullivan 812
Williams 508
VICE-PRESIDENT
Cartwright 1,270
Lef ler 1,030
TREASURER
Smith
Betts
1.288
94)


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Anderson speaks against Govt. energy policy
By DOUG WHITE
News Edita
The U.S. Government's
energy policy is largely controlled
by the oil and gas industries,
accading to Washington column-
ist Jack Anderson, speaking
Tues March 28, in Mendenhall.
They (the oil and gas indus-
tries) have maneuvered to plant
their people in key spots in the
government. They know every
Congressman needs money to be
reelected and they know they
can't get that money from their
constituency Anderson said.
Anderson said the line be-
tween bribery and campaign
contributiois was very thin.
"The oil and gas companies
knew years ago that we would
run out of oil. You can argue
when, but you cannot argue
whether he said.
The objective of the oil and
gas industries was, and is, to
squeeze every last dollar from
every last well.
The industries promote con-
servation of fuel because they
realize their products will oost
mae tanarow than they do
today, accading to Anderson.
Anderson suggests instead
that our government's policy
should be to replace, rather than
conserve oil.
One possible replacement
might be some type of alcohol f uei
derived from garbage.
"In Wald War II, when the
Allies bonbed Germans oil
refineries, Hitler ran his armies
on alcohol fuel made from pota-
toes. On a mass scale, "gas-o-
hd which is a mixture of
gasoline and alcohol, would pro-
bably be cheaper than pure
gasoline.
"Not only would it be cheap-
er, it would also inaease engine
efficiency and reduce emissions.
Why do you think race cars run on
aloohol fuel?' he said.
However, because of the
influence of the oil and gas
industries, no mention of this
energy alternative was mentioned
See ANDERSON, p. 6
Greenville City
Manager resigns
From the News & Observer
The Greenville City Council
unanimously accepted City Man-
ama James E. Caldwell's resig-
nation Tuesday niqht. one day
after Caldwell had been arrested
here fa public drunkeness.
Maya Pacy R. Cox said that
at his request, the council had
decided in a closed meeting
Monday to ask 39-year-old
Caldwell to step down. The
resignation of Caldwell, who has
been city manager since January
1976, will become effective May
15. But Cox said Caldwell would
be placed on sick leave immedia-
tely "to allow him to receive
medical help
"This is the most unpleasant
task that I can remember having
to undertake felt it would be in
the best interest of Greenville and
in his best interest Cox said. "I
don't think anyone can say Jim
Caldwell hasn't made a good city
managa
City Enginea Charles A.
Hdliday was named intaim city
managa.
In submitting his resignation,
Caldwell said the move was best
both fa his family and fa the
city.
Caldwell was arrested fa
public drunkeness last Saturday
night afta police received a
report that a city-owned car was
parked on the sidewalk at the Elm
Street Gymnasium. Caldwell was
arrested nearby. He was schedul-
ed to appear in District Court
April 4.
The city managa was the
subject of anotha alcoholelateti
arrest hae in April 1977, when he
was charged with following too
closely afta being involved in an
automobile accident. Caldwell
pleaded guilty to the charge and
was fined. The accident report
indicated Caldwell had been
drinking and had left the scene of
the accident.
STUDENT CASTS VOTES in yesterdays SGA election.
Will study fundine of new FM channel
Photo by Kirk Kingsbury)
Board appoints subcommittee
By STUART MORGAN
News Edita
The Media Board Wednesday
night appointed a subcommittee
to study the probability of funding
a new FM channel on campus.
The money requested,
approximately $3,000 dollars, is
needed to pay fa a frequency
search, filing fee, additional
equipment (including a new 10
watt transmitta and two new
bays, antennae) and otha costs
of going on the air.
"In recent years, alot of
people have talked about an FM
channel on this campus, but
nothing has been done about it
said John Jeta, enginea fa
WECU.
"But, now it's getting done.
We're definitely on our way.all
we need now is the money
added Jeta.
Edward F. Pary, from
Educational FM Associates of
Duxbury, Massachusetts, said if
we move now we could expect to
secure the FM channel by Christ-
mas, accading to Jeta.
Jeta said the new FM chan-
nel could opaate on the existing
budget issued last year by the
SGA.
"With existing equipment,
we're definitely not doing what
we could be doing said Jeta,
"Our transmitta is failing, our
signal is weak, etc.
Also, the quality of our audio
is vay poa-vay pea. As a
result, we have a vay small
pacentage of listenas, actually
between slim and ncne he
added.
Jeta said tht channel would
cova the entire Greenville area
including part of surrounding Pitt
County.
See MEDIA, p. 3)






�MHHVm
1
Flashes Deba,e C,UD Test results Lost & found
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 March 1978
Car bash
Psi chi
Are you frustrated with school
but have no place to take out your
aggressions?
Well, your golden opportunity
is here.
Real Crisis Center is sponsor-
ing a car bash on the mall Fri
March 31 from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m.
For a minimal fee you can
pound to your heart's content
and help out a worthy cause.
Everyone is encouraged to
come by and partake.
Flea market
Looking fa some good bar-
gains? You will probably be able
to find them at the ECU Spring
Flea Market sponsored by Mend-
enhall.
The Flea Market will be held
on Wed April 5, from 10 a.m.
until 6 p.m. on the Mall.
The rain date will be Thurs
April 6.
Beautiful pottery ware, hand-
made jewelry, and small plants
were a few of the items sold in the
Flea Market last time.
Back by popular demand is
the sale of unclaimed articles,
held by the University's lost and
Found Department. Don't miss it!
If you're interested in selling
items, any ECU student, staff a
faculty member is eligible. Each
individual must register to sell
items and a $5 refundable deposit
is required at the time of
registration.
Registration is Monday
through Friday, from 9 a.m. until
5 p.m. at the Mendenhall Student
Center Information Center.
Registration ends Mon April
3.
Psi Chi is now accepting
applications for the Psi Chi
(Prewett) scholarship and the
Carol Faulkner Wray Memorial
Scholarship.
Applications can be obtained
in the Psychology Departmental
Offioe and should be turned in to
the Psi Chi mailbox in the offioe
by April 7.
These scholarships are avail-
able to psychology majors or
members of Psi Chi and are
awarded on the basis of perfom-
ance and need.
Fa further details see the
ECU Undergraduate catalogue a
inquire at the Psychology De-
partmental Office.
SOULS
There will be a S.O.U.LS.
meeting this Thurs March 30, at
7 p.m. at the AACC. Please wear
jeans and be prompt.
Les girls
Are there any students that
find it difficult to dearly express
what is on their mind?
If you are one of these people,
the Debating Club is fa you.
The club will help develop a
student's confidence in public
speaking plus the dub will better
a student'scapadty on investiga-
ting issues.
The Debating Club will cause
a student to speak his thoughts
much faster. This ability shall
make the student mae valuable
on the job market.
Wouldn't you like to speak in
front of people without your knees
knocking?
Fa mae infamatiai, contad
Marc Adler, room 161 Umstead,
758-9523.
Racquetball
There will be an aganization-
al meeting to fam a oompetitive
Raquetball Spats Club.
All who are interested are
urged to attend.
We will be ready to oompete
next year if we can get it all
together now! The meeting will be
held at Memaial Gym, room 102
at 7 p.m. Thurs March 30.
Students who took part in the
December, 1977, Naming Study
in their Educatiaial Psychology,
4305, dass may now see their
results as compared to the
National sample.
These results are available at
the Testing Center, Speight
Building, room-105.
Symposium
Part two of a two part
symposium "What constitutes
teaching effediveness will be
held Thurs March 30, at
Mendenhall in room 224.
Professa Jack Wright will
speak from 330 to 4 30 p.m.
A panel discussion will be led
by Professa Robert Muzzarelli at
730 p.m.
The campus Lost and Found
Department is located at the
Infamatiai Desk in Mendenhall.
We have books, rings, glas-
ses, coats, watches, umbrellas,
etc.
If you have lost an item,
please come by the Infamatiai
Desk and see if we have it.
Any undaimed artides will be
sold at bargain prices at ECU's
Flea Market, sponsaed by Men-
denhall, Wed April 5, oi the
Mall.
SGA
Application fa SGA Attaney
General fa next school year,
1978-79, are now being accepted.
Applications can be picked up in
the student government office.
F-e
Gospel
The ECU Dance Theatre
Wakshop presents a Las Vegas,
cabaret style eveining of dance
entitled, "Les Girls with 20 of
ECU's finest female dancers.
Also, there are 4 male danoers to
round out the oompany. Preview
perfamanoes are April 4 and 5
with the show running April 6, 7,
and 8. Show time is 815 p.m.
Tickets on sale now at the ECU
Box Offioe. Call 757-6390.
Drawing
Blood drive
There will be a blood drive
Tues. and Wed April 4 and 5
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Wright
Auditaium.
Dai't oe chicken; come out
and give.
Sponsaed by the Red-Cross
and ECU's Co-Greek ooundl.
Tests
Five national qualifying exam-
inations will be administered at
ECU during April.
The tests to be offered, and
the scheduled dates are:
American College Testing
Assessment, April 1; Dental
Aptitude Test, April 29; Graduate
Reoord Examination, April 22;
Law School Admissions Test,
April 15; and Medical College
Admission Test, April 15.
The tests are required fa
entrance to educational pro-
grams. AppiicaJ - ais are
ufabje fro . .
106 Spe
Appiicafi �
ba m.i
Phi Kappa Tau is sponsaing
an all expense paid weekend fa
two at the Ramada Inn, Atlantic
Beach.
The winna may choose any
weekend in April a May.
Doiatiois are $1.
The drawing will be held Fri
April 14 at the Phi Tau house
during our Spring Fling disco
party, 330-630 p.m. Everyone is
invited to attend.
Coffeehouse
This Thursday and Friday
nights, the Student Union Coffe-
ehouse Committee will present
John Wathingtoi and Malloi, at
9 and 10 p.m room 15 Menden-
hall.
This talented duo has per-
famed at the Coffeehouse in the
past to satisfied audiences.
John's inaedible fingers,
coupled with Mallon's expressive
vocals provide fa a fine evening
of entertainment.
Their music is pure
Americana, capturing the purity
and simplidty of traditional
American folk music.
Join us this weekend at your
Student Union Coffeehouse.
ant i
Ml �
conaumat rrton-
OU5; little hear
Fellowship
Inter-Varisty Christian Fel-
lowship will meet this Sunday
night at 8 p.m. at the Afro-
American Cultural Center.
Slide lecture
On Fri March 31, Craftsmen
East, in cooperation with the
S.G.A.and V.A.F. will sponsa a
slide ledure featuring
Bill Hammersly, nationally known
wood waker.
The slide ledure will be at 10
a.m. in Jenkins Auditaium,
followed by a wakshop demon-
stratiai at 1 p.m. in Jenkins 114.
All students are invited.
Table tennis
If you enjoy playing table
tennis, stop by the Mendenhall
Table Tennis Rooms each Tues-
day evening at 8 p.m. when the
Table Tennis Club meets.
You will find playas of all
levels of ability partidpating.
Various adivities, induding
ladder tournaments are often
scheduled.
All ECU students, faculty and
staff are welcome.
Looking fa Christian fellow-
ship?
The Faever Generatiai invites
you to join us Monday night fa a
relevant Bible study, good sing-
ing, and delidous refreshments.
We'll be meeting Mon April
3 at 9 p.m. in Brewster C-304.
Why not join us?
Lil sis
All intelligent, good-lcoking
girls interested in being part of
the Phi Kappa Tau "little sister"
program are invited to the Phi
Tau house on Thurs March 30 at
9 p.m. We are looking fa girls
who have the time to work fa this
great program.
WRC elections
Spring eledions are being
held on April 18 fa offioe of the
WRC and the house coundls of
the women's dams fa the
schools year 1978-79.
Filing date - April 3-7.
Campaigning - April 10-14.
Eledion - April 18.
If you are interested in
running fa offioe, pick up your
filing fam in your administration
offioe.
PRO
Crusade
Leadaship Training Class,
sponsaed by Campus Crusade
fa Christ, meets on Thursdays at
7 p.m. in Brewster C-103.
Afta a time of fellowship,
thae is an opportunity to learn
mae about how to love God and
love others. The four dasses
offered are Christian life. Dyn-
ipleship, dym-
Attention PRCmajasand potent-
ial majas!
The PRC spring salute will be
at 630 p.m Fri April 14 at the
Moose Lodge.
Tickets can be purchased fa
$6 and are oi sale now.
Call Susan (752-8021) a Jan
(758122) fa infamatiai.
Outing club
The Outing Club will meet
Thursday evenings at 730p.m. in
room 106 in the basement of
Memorial G
Come and fellowship with the
Full Gospel Student Fellowship
this Thurs. night, March 30 from
7:30to9p.m. in Mendenhall 221.
During this meeting we will be
sharing what Jesus Christ is
doing in our lives, sing songs of
praise to Him, and pray fa
everyone's needs.
We know that He is alive and
is mae than able and willing to
give you a new life if you will let
Him. Everyone is invited to
attend this meeting.
Heart fund
The pledges of Gamma Sigma
Sigma Service Saaity, alaig
with the help of the sisterhood,
are sponsaing a Mile of Money
fund raising projed, the proceeds
of which will be donated to the
Heart Fund Assodation.
We invite and encourage the
members of your aganizatioi to
demonstrate the spirit of service
and involvement consioered to be
so charaderistic of adive ogan-
izatiois by partidpating in this
wathwhile project.
From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thurs
March 30, 1978, in the lobby of
the Student Supply Stae, the
pledges of Gamma Sigma Sigma
will be providing the students and
other faculty and pasonnel a
chance to donate whatever they
wish to the Heart Fund.
All caitributioiswill be taped
to a long strip of paper 1 mile
long. Our goal is to oompletely fill
this mile strip of tape with money.
The names of all members of a
recognized univasity aganiza-
tioi who oontribute will be
reoaded, and at the end of the
day, the aganizatioi who contri-
buted the most money will receive
a prize and also recognition in
Fountainhead.
Please help us to achieve our
goal and also help yourself by
being an example of an aganiza-
tioi who suppots service pro-
jed s.
Contribute to the Heart Fund!
If vou desire any further
information, please do not hesi-





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Women '� Editor for The Daily Reflector
30 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
Rosalie Trotman speaks at press conference
By RENEE HINSON
Staff Writer
"Being the Women's Editor
of The Daily Reflector has given
me many opportunities which I
would not have had if I was not
working with the newspaper
Rosalie Trotman said at a recent
press oonference.
During the press oonference,
held by Journalism 2000 students
Trotman related her various
experiences and duties as the
Women's Editor of The Daily
Reflector.
Being the Women's Editor
also involves a great deal of
deadline pressures sinoe she
Teaching
Symposium
scheduled
ByARAHVENABLE
Staff Writer
The Institutional Survey Com-
mittee is sponsoring a two part
symposium on What Constitutes
Teaching Effectiveness
The committee consists of 10
faculty memersand five students.
Muzzarelli is the chairman of the
committee.
Part one of the symposium
was held Wednesday, March 1st.
The second part is to be held
Thursday, March 30th, in room
224, Mendenhall.
Dr. Jack Wright will speak on
"How to Keep Students on the
Edge of Their Seats While You
Put Something in Their Heads
from 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
At 7 JO p.m. a panel discussion
on effective teaching, will be
held. Professor Robert Muzzarelli
will be the moderator.
Dr. Wright is an associate
Professor of Sociology in Indiana
at Loyola University. He is a for-
mer ECU faculty member.
MEDIA
Continued from p. 1
"It would sound terrific, the
quality would increase by a
terrific amount Jeter added.
The two proposed transmitter
sites would be located on the roof
of either Green or Tyler due to the
elevation of those two dorms.
In addition to the appointed
subcommittee, a workshop for the
editorial staff of FOUNTAIN-
HEAD was approved.
The workshop will be held on
April 6, 7, and 8.
During that time, editorial
staff members from both the
FOUNTAINHEAD and THE
TECHNlQ AN, (NC State's news-
paper) will compare the opera-
tions of their two newspapers.
" M utual improvement of the
two newspapers will also be
among the topics discussed.
"Money fa the workshop, to
be held in Atlantic Beach, will be
funded by money from advertise-
ment revenue of the FOUNTAIN-
HEAD and not from student fees
said Doug White, originator of
the workshop.
must prepare the women's sec-
tion one day ahead of time.
Along with her other duties,
Trotman sometimes writes news
stories, news rewrites, church
notioes, amd obituaries.
Trotman stated that her ex-
periences of interviewing such
celebrities as Rosalyn Carter and
several Miss Americas has made
her job both educational and
enjoyable.
JOB'S BENEFITS
Her job has many fringe
benefits such as meeting famous
people but it also entails much
hard work.
Her daily duties pertain to all
matters concerning social activi-
ties and family living. The most
tedious part of her duties involves
preparing engagement and wed-
ding stories of local couples.
BEGAN WORKING
FOR
"THE DAILY REFLECTOR'1
After graduating from ECU
with a major in business and a
minor in history, Trotman began
work with The Daily Reflector.
She has worked with the news-
paper for the past 19 years.
During her first five years
with the newspaper, Trotman
worked in the darkroom lab and
shortly after that period she
assumed the position of Women's
Editor.
Her advice to future journal-
ists was to be patient, to learn
from one's mistakes and to learn
how to work with others.
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Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 March 1978
m
Cancerous Califano
spreads malignancies
North Carolinians first smelled trouble when an
anti-smoking campaign was launched out of
Washington. Farmers across the state were
outraged. Governor James Hunt traveled to
Washington for a talk with President Carter.
The University of North Carolina (UNC) system
was Washington's next target. The Health,
Education, and Welfare (HEW) department did not
approve UNC's desegregation plan. UNC President
William C. Friday was North Carolina's next traveler
to Washington.
Like a cancerous tumor, HEW Secretary Joseph
Califano has continued to spread disruption
throughout the lives of most of our fair state's
citizens.
President Carter has thus far shown no interest in
Califano'sdoings. Now that Georgia's desegregation
plan has been approved, he probably will continue to
remain as unconcerned as he has been about the
matter.
When HEW rejected North Carolina's plan,
Friday said that the plan would not be changed. He
said he felt the plan is acceptable as it is.
What right does Califano have to tell a state's
university system how the programs should be
operated? Califano does not want duplication of
programs in predominantly black and predominantly
white colleges.
Are university systems operated by the federal
government? Should students be forced to attend
universities they don't want to attend? Absolutely
not.
Apparently Califano doesn't believe in freedom of
choice. One marvelous, and compared to other
countries, often unique, facet of this oountry is that
the people are free to decide their own lines of work,
where they will live, and how many children they will
have.
Although Califano may not believe in freedom of
choice, there are thousands in this oountry who do.
Perhaps Califano should resign his position.
Someone who is more capable of the job should
replace him.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor over fifty years.
"Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News EditorsDoug White
Stuart Morgan
Trends EditorSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
Forum
Reader cites alternatives to WRQR
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
As one of thousands who
are thoroughly fed up with
WRQR's daytime, automated,
pre-teen greatest hits and Steve
Hardy's successful destruction of
every Saturday afternoon with his
"Beach Bum Show I would like
to offer some suggestions to
remedy the situation.
There are stations that can be
received in the Greenville area
with a minimun of effort. WM YK,
more oommonly known as K-94,
can be found at 93.7 on the FM
band. K-94's transmitter is locat-
ed in Moyock, N.C. - north of
Greenville near the Virginia state
line. WNOR-FM can be found at
99 on the FM band. It is located in
Norfolk, Va.
Both these stations offer
album-oriented radio suited for
the taste of adults who can
appreciate and enjoy rock music.
For those of you who live in
high-rise dorms or higher level
apartments, you may be bale to
receive both stations by aiming
your tripod antenna north or
northeast.
For those of you who are
simply not elevated enough, an
outdoor antenna pointed toward
Norfolk may be your only station.
But it's definitely well worth the
time and expense of you' re as sick
of daytime WRQR and Steve
Hardy as many of us are.
One final point - Alan
Handleman has remained with
WRQR throughout and remains
the absolute best at what he does.
He is the only ally album oriented
radio fans have on the air now in
this area.
Please continue to listen to him
on WRQR at night and his
"Forum" show on Sunday night.
He deserves our oontinued sup-
port. (Besides, he plays good
music). He is the only thing that
keeps WRQR from going com-
pletely to the dogs.
Jim Blumenthal
Home economist not 'Suzy Homemaker'
To FOUNTAINHEAD
With this being Women's
Awareness Week, we feel that the
Home Economist should be ac-
knowledged as having an impor-
tant impact upon our society.
When the average person
thinks of the Home Economist,
they tend to think of suchthingsas
sewing, oooking, and housekeep-
ing. We feel that society's
viewpoint of our role is definitely
wrong; therefore, it is necessary
to clue individuals in as to our
position in society.
Granted, our roles are orient-
ed around the home, for it is the
foundation of society. The fund-
amentals of sewing, oooking, and
other basic home activities are
necessary parts of our role.
But, have you ever considered
business, government, or even
solar energy as aspects of Home
Eoonomics? The field is unlimited
as to areas where the Home
Eoonomist oould be an asset.
Malnutrition, child develop-
ment, marital structures, conser-
vation of energy and many other
concerns of our society are being
Economist.
Reader agrees
on contract
To FOUNTAINHEAD.
I am writing in response to
the letter from two seniors
regarding the dam contracts. I
was in a very similar situation last
fall and I agree with these girls
one hundred percent. Thank you,
June and Janet for writing such
an explicit letter.
In full agreement,
Leigh Powell
When voicing an opinion of a
Home Eoonomist and her or his
role in society, be aware that we
are much more than "Little Suzy
Homemakers
Belinda Cahoon
Forum policy
Forum letters
should be typed or
printed, signed and
include the writer's
address or telephone
number. Letters are
subject to editing for
taste and brevity and
may be sent to FOUN-
TAINHEAD or left at
the Information Desk
in Mendenhall Student
Center.





�����M
30 March 1978 FOUWTAINHEAD Page 5
Deadline for voter
registration nears
lit
A STUDENT TAKES a precarious per a) to catch up on sunning and reading. Photo by Brian Stotler)
ECU political science professor lectures
U.S.S.R. and U.S. equal in military power
By TONY BAKER
Staff Writer
Russia and the United States
are equal in military power,
according to Dr. Sandra Wurth-
Hough, an ECU political science
professor.
Wurth-Hough lectured on the
Global Power Balance as part of
the Great Decisions '78 series, on
Wed March 22, at Jarvis
Memorial Church.
The main topic of the lecture
concerned the military power of
the United States and Russia, and
which nation has more weapons
in case of war.
Wurth-Hough explained that
most recent reports on the issue
are innacurate.
Russia has 25 per cent more
missies, although their missiles
are not very accurate and often
miss their target.
The same goes fa Russian
nuclear war-heads, which are
more powerful than the United
States but again, less accurate.
Russia has a stronger ground
attack while the U.S. has the
superior Air Force.
Wurth-Hough showed con-
cerned about terrorism, noting
that construction of a nuclear
weapon is not difficult. Such
weapons in terrorist hands oould
be disasterous.
Other topics Wurth-Hough
discussed included the SALT
treaties, the up-coming SALT
Two treaties, and the possible
future use of the neutron bomb.
Following the lecture, opinion
ballots were given to the audience
concerning the issues discussed.
These ballots will be tabulat-
ed, both locally and nationally,
and the results will be sent to
�o �ducahon it complete without development of
social skills. Wo offor you the opportunity to learn at
THE GATHERING
PLACE RESTAURANT
THE GATHERING PUCE RESTAURANT features
'loot's of the world Each ovouing, Hit menu
consists of two fans' price three course meals that
skilrfuHy combine international selections of appetizers,
soups, salads, entrees, vagttahlts, and homemade
broads.
The wine sat features American and European
wines carefully selected to complement the dairy menu.
Flaming desserts prepared at tabkside art a
special feature of the hosts. The owners,
management and staff of the restaurant art dedicated
to providing you with a memorable experience in
fine dining in.a warm and friendly atmosphere.
THE
GATHERING
PLACE
RESTAURANT
1112 Riekissou Avenue
Reservations requested 919-752-1112
searings from 6PM-930PM Closed Sundays A Mondays
Congress.
"Great Decisions 78" is a
program designed to increase
the interest of Americans in
international affairs.
The lectures will continue
each Wednesday evening until
May 3. Each lecture begins at 7:46
p.m.
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant News Editor
The deadline for voter regis-
tration fa the May 2, 1978
primary and election is 5 p.m
April 3, according to Margaret
Register, Pitt County Supervisor
of elections.
A voter must register in the
county of hisher permanent
residence.
Pitt County residents may
register at the Board of Elections
office before 5 p.m April 3.
The office will be open Thurs
March 30, and Fri March 31,
830-7 p.m Sat April 1, 9
a.m3 p.m. and Men April 3,
830a.m5p.m.
To register, a person must be
18 and produce some form of
identification such as a driver's
license.
Absentee ballots may be
requested from the office of the
Board of Elections in the county
in which the person is registered.
The request may be made 60
days pria to the date of the
election a primary up until the
Wednesday preceding the elec-
tion.
The May 2 primary deadline
fa the request fa application
must be received in the Board of
Election's office by April 26, 5
p.m.
The ballrts must be received
back in the election office no later
than 5 p.m. the day befae the
election.
If a person is nrt registered,
he may register and request an
absentee ballot at the same time
pria to the deadline.
The person may vote immedi-
ately a he may return the balia
by mail befae the deadline.
Offices to be voted on in the
May 2 primary are: U. S.
Senata, Associate Justice of
the Supreme Court, and U. S.
Congressman fa the district.
Nath Carolinians will vote fa
State House representatives and
State Senatas.
Local election ballots will
consist of the Pitt County Board of
Education and Greenville City
School Boards, oounty sheriff,
and three county commissioners.
PRESENTING
'he 2nd Annual
ST)fiV)iV& ARTISTS
S)Ty4PRIL 8
10An TIL fcPM
Handcrafted Uork
b3 local artiois
V the Evans St. I)
Art i Craft �hioits i Demon&trations
Hear -fne fttroMing "0�m-Pan band
-Nothing priced ooer $50.O0-
Cftnolate- Apv IS
Downtoun GrtnvjvWe.
Association Inc.
Ride, Y bus, ifs GREAT-
IS)
i





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 March 1978
Candidate agrees with HEW desecration
Senate candidate speaks at reception
By RALPH BURWELL
Staff Writer
Federal funds will probably
not be cut off as a result of the
desegregation battle between the
Univesity of North Carolina
system and the HEW, according
to Democratic Senatorial candid-
ate McNeill Smith.
Smith spoke at a reception in
his honor on Thurs March 23 in
Mendenhall.
SEEKING DEMOCRA TIC
NOMINA TION
Smith, currently a state sen-
ator from Greensboro, is seeking
the Democratic nomination in
the May 2 primary to oppose the
incumbent Senator, Republican
Jesse Helms, in the November
election.
The reception capped off a day
of campaigning by Senator Smith
in which he visited many different
spots in Pitt County.
After refreshments Smith
held a question and answer
session.
AGREES WITH HEW
Smith agreed with the basic
aims of HEW's desegregation
plan but didn't know why they
decided to pick on North Carolina.
"I don't think students can be
placed by computer, nor do I
believe in beefing up programs at
all black institutions just to
broaden appeal when there is no
demand to begin with Smith
said.
OTHER ISSUES
He also oommented on Postal
Reform, the Panama Canal treat-
ies, Middle East Policy, and
Federal Health Insurance.
The reception was sponsored
by the Pitt County Campaign
Committee for Senator Smith,
headed by Dr. John Ball, chair-
person of the department of social
works and corrections at ECU.
AAV ART STUDENT gets a new perspective as she trades the
indoors for a spot of sunshine. Photo by Brian Stotler
Buccaneer MOVIES 1 � 2
Greenville Square Shopping Center 756-3307
y.?-1! w?v�i2'sro?rvyv.
SPECIAL LATE SHOW
FRIDAY & SATURDAY at 11:30
"SEX WITH A SMILE"
ALL SEATS $2.00 R7
ANDERSON
Continued from p. 1
in President Carter's energy
proposal.
Anderson also cited rising oil
prices as the major cause of
inflation.
"Saudi Arabia produces a
barrel of oil for about 16 cents and
sells it fa anywhere from $12-16.
Oil prices have quintupled ever
recent years. The oil and gas
industries, by listing their tankers
under Liberian and Panamanian
flags, are endangering every
coastline in the world.
"This foreign listed tankers
aren't required to undergo the
safety checks of U.S. listed ships,
and, consequently, they are con-
stantly breaking up somewhere
he said.
Anderson lambasted the fed-
eral bureaucracy, and the public" s
reliance on it, saying we were
Western Sizzlin'
Steak House
Hours: Sun. thru Thurs. 1100 to 10:00
Fri. H Sat. 11:00 to 11 :00
THURSDAY DINNER SPECIAL
8 oz. Sirloin Dinner $2.39
Toms Tooit with Baktd Potato and moltod buttor or Froneh Frio
C-7
"slipping into the grip of a
nebulous tyranny
"There are 2,832,000 bureau-
crats in this country, each in his
cubicle, each with some authority
over some facet of our lives; that
is the nebulous tyranny. They
have forgotten who is the master
and who is the servant he said.
Anderson warned that we
should depend on the bureacrats
less and learn to do a little more
for ourselves.
Before too long, we won't be
able to go on vacation or change
jobs or turn around without filling
out a form and getting permission
from some bureaucracy. Visit
Russia. That'show it is there, and
we're headed in that direction
Anderson encouraged the
meager audience of approxi-
mately 150 to write their repre-
sentatives in Congress and the
president to express their discon-
tent over a growing bureaucracy
and the government's energy
policy.
When asked about Republican
North Carolina Senator Jesse
Helms, Anderson replied that he
was "making a fool of North
Carolina in the eyes of the
nation
"I have nothing against the
man personally, but he's a
horse's ass
Anderson read a quote from
Thomas Jefferson saying people
are better off with no government
at all than with a government
lacking a free press.
"On the day we lose our free
press, we lose all our freedoms
The government's ability to oover
up wrongdoing far exceeds the
press' ability to expose wrong-
doing. I've never met a govern-
ment spokesman who told me
anything the government didn't
want me to know.
"The job of a reporter is to
cover the news. The job of an
investigative reporter is to un-
cover the news
Anderson, along with Les
Whitten and a staff of 16
reporters, writes the "Washing-
ton Merry Go Round" ootumn,
which has the largest circulation
of any column.
"Washington Merry Go
Round" is syndicated in a thou-
sand papers and is read by
approximately 50 million people.
Anderson said the only people
he pays for information are his
employees. He said had never
paid a source fa information.
Anderson usually works 12
hours a day, since many of his
sources refuse to confide in
anyone but him.
He started in journalism in his
home state of Utah at the age of
12, when, he says, he was "too
young to know any better
The lecture was presented by
the Student Union Lecture Com-
mittee.





BM
Harrington Field, April 5
30 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
Special Olympics scheduled
ByRICKIGLIARMlS
Staff Writer
The Special Olympics, a pro-
gram designed to encourage the
physical development of mentally
handicapped persons, will be held
at ECU'S Harrington Field Wed-
nesday, April 5.
"The Special Olympics is a
world-wide organization of sports
training and competition for the
mentally handicapped explains
Marcia Goughnouir, volunteer
co-ordinator for the program
here.
The program was developed
by the Kennedy Foundation in the
summer of 1968. One Thousand
persons participated in the first
such Olympics explained
Goughnour. Since the first
Special Olympics games, the
program has grown to include
10,400 meets with over 400.000
individuals participating, said
Goughnour.
Today, at least 20,000 com-
munities support the Special
Olympics.
According to Goughnour, the
Greenville Parks and Recreation
commission began the program
locally in the fall of 1973. She
explained that the local program
began with basketball and then
expanded to track and field in
spring 1973.
'Though few spectators were
in the stands that first year to
cheer the participants on, they
competed in the true spirit slad
Goughnour. "Since then the
program has grown considerably.
According to Goughnour, the
Mayor of Greenville opens the
Special Olympics.
Special Olympics Internation-
al Games are held every four
years with the winners from
various countries participating,
said Goughnour.
Special Olympics games in-
clude competition in track and
field, swimming, gymnastics,
basketball, volleyball, floor
hockey, bowling, ice skating, and
various wheelchair events,
Goughnour added.
Another feature of the Special
Olympics is the sports clinic.
According th Goughnour, these
clinics include a variety of activi-
ties organized by professional and
amateur athletes.
Mentally handicapped per-
sons come to these games from all
over the country, said
Goughnour.
"The participants come from
schools, rehabilitation centers,
shelter workshops, or purely on
their own said Goughnour.
According to Goughnour. the
purpose of the Special Olympics
is to improve a handicapped
person's physical fitness, emo-
tional well-being, and social
adjustment.
"Mentally handicapped indiv-
iduals face constant experiences
of failure and frustration. Sports
provide an ideal setting fa
developing confidence and a
sense of self-esteem explained
Goughnour.
"The athlete trains, develops
skills, oompetes, and as he
succeeds, he starts building a
positive self-image.
"In Special Olympics, every-
body wins.
"The Special Olympics is a
shining example for ail who
believe that a just and good
society is one which cares fa
those who may be less able, but
I
A Public Service of This Newspaper & The Advertising Council
We make
� Ji
a little
goal
way.
Give.
Red Cross
is counting
on you.
g
who are in no sense less worthy
Goughnour became involved
with Special Olympics by working
as a volunteer in New Jersey.
When Goughnour became a
student at ECU she also worked
as a volunteer here.
Goughnour was named volun-
teer oo-ordinator for this year's
Olympics. She is responsible for
recruiting volunteers for the
program.
According to Goughnour,
persons who wish to volunteer
and work with the program are
encouraged to do so.
Goughnour said that 400
participants are expected for this
year's meet. Because of this,
Goughnour is looking fa 400
volunteers in ader to have a
one-to-one relationship between
waker and participant.
"If they like helping people,
they should come out and help
said Goughnour. Those who wish
to participate can contact
Goughnour at 752-1349.
"You feel like you've done
something special when you see a
child who is handicapped run a
50-yard dash in five minutes. You
feel like you're in the race with
him.
"Evay child wins no matter
what place he comes in because
it's an accomplishment to the
individual. No matter how long it
takes him to do that 50-yard dash,
he did it and and that's all that
matters
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
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March 30,31 -Apill
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PageS FOUNTAINHEAD 30 March 1978
iajy is published by the FOUNTAINHEAD Advertising Depa
community. The map was prepared by the SGA student welfare
effort of FOUNTAINHEAD and SGA Robert M. S
To Vane
1A J Fletcher Musc Cer r
2Amphitheater
3Austin Budding
4Acork Dornvfo'
5Belk Dormitory
6Bio�ton House
7Ca'eteria Building
8Ca'oi G Beik Buiidmg
9Chancellor's Home
10Chnstenbury Memorial Gym
11Cotton Mall
12Croatan Bulding
13Drama B jiidmg
14Erwm Han
15Ficklen Stadium
16Flanagan Bu'idmg
17Fleming Hall
18Fletcher Hall
19Garage
20Garrett Hall
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
Home Economics Building
Infirmary
J Brantley and Came G
Speight Buildmg
J B Spilman Building
Jarvis HaM
Jenkins Alumni Building
Leo W Jenkins Fme Arts Center
Jones Dorm,torV
Joyner library
L F Brewste Buirting
plus Property Warehouse
Malene G Irons Building
Maintenance Building
Mary Greene Hall
MendenhaH Student Center
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
McGmois Auditorium
M.ngei Coliseum
Nursmg Building
Prate Club Building
Ftagsdaie Hall
Rawi Building
Regional Development Institute
Ruth White Hall
Sarah E Clement Hall
Sr ales F eidhouse
Science Building
Scott Dormitory
Slay Hall
Sports Medicine Building
Tyler Dormitory
Umstead Hall
Whir-hard Building
Women Hall
Wright Building
Afro American Cultural Center
i nfoi mation Center
REGiONAi DtvnoPMFM iNsruuri and icuphintshop ?75





�BHHiB
JjgM njKgS . . �

�I
30 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Ising Department as a public service to the student body and the university
mt welfare committee. The composition and publication of this map is a joint
obert M. Swaim , Advertising Manager
To Vanceboro and New Bern
Shaded areas unsafe!
14th Street





Pag 10FOUNTAINHEAD 30 March 1978
A combination of 'humor and fine brass musicianship9
comes to ECU next week with The Canadian Brass
Come to Mendenhall Student
Center on April 3, 1978 at 8.00
p.m. for an evening of high
musical adventure.
When the late Samuel John-
son described opera as an exotic
and irrational entertainment,
little did the good doctor realize
just how exotic and irrational it
would become in the hands of the
Canadian Brass.
The Canadian Brass are five
gentlemen who have shaken the
dandruff our of long-hair music.
The two trumpets, a French
horn, a trombone, and a tuba
band together to present a
delightful, skillful, and irreverent
performance of fine music.
These are first-rate musicians
with first-rate degrees from first-
rate universities and conservator-
ies playing rirst-rate music. They
are also having fun while they do
it.
A good example of how the
Brass have fun is their comic
operetta. HORNSMOKE. Like
Gunsmoke, HORNSMOKE takes
place in the old west, where men
were men and evidently, so were
women.
The show opens with the
offstage strains of brass quintet
(guess who) moseying into town.
The curtain rises to reveal a large
cactus, an equally large buzzard,
a couple of benches, and a cow in
a sunbonnet.
The cast now makes its
appearance. First comes the
oowboy hero, Blazing Bill
(Graeme Page, French horn), the
local preacher, Rev. Tubby
THE CANADIAN BRASS, "two trumpets, a trench
horn, a trombone and a tuba band togethe to present
a delightful, skillful and irreverent performance of
fine music April 3rd in the MSC theatre.
Mirum (Charles Daellenbach,
tuba), the saloonkeeper, Tom
Bone (Eugene Watts, trombone),
and finally, the local maiden,
Cornetta (Ronald Romm, trum-
pet).
The action begins as Cornetta,
in luxuriant bear, purple bonnet,
and orange dress, stops tending
Trends
her cow to answer the come-
hither French horn of Blazing
Bill.
One note leads to another, and
soon the two are before the
preacher, tooting their diatonic "I
do's The wedding ends with the
entire wedding party playing the
doxology, only slightly marred by
the saloonkeeper, who had been
sampling his own wares.
The story doesn' t end here. At
the reception, atall, dark trumpe-
ter walks slowly across the stage,
blowing a very cool horn. He is
the horn-slinger known as B Flat
Bart, who is trying to lure
Cornetta away from Blazing Bill
As Cornetta and Bart start
some sensuous brass harmony,
Bill blazes in to rescue his lady
love. Bill and Bart engage in a
trumpet shootout in which Bart
trumpets down everyone inclu-
ding Cornetta.
This brass extravaganza is the
funniest show since the Marx
Brothers spent a night at the
opera, but besides the humor,
there is also fine brass musician-
ship.
Only a master craftsman has
the facility for using music so
innovatively. All of the Canadian
Brass play seriously as well as
humorously. No matter which
style they are using, (and their
concerts are some of both) their
style is always superb.
Hear the classics redassified.
Discover the Canadian Brass-two
trumpets, a French horn, a
trombone, and a tuba, all in the
hands of virtuoso performers with
a broad musical repertoire.
Tickets are now on sale in the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Center. Rices are
$1.50 fa ECU students and $4.00
for the public. All tickets at the
door are $4.00.
Brooks' 'The Producers6 exercise in anarchy'
if firmly grasped it becomes
an exerase in anarchy that sends
one reeling back through movie
history for imprecise comparisons
the Marx Brothers, Fields, the
silent comedians THE PRO-
DUCERS Is, in my opinion, the
best American comedy since DR.
STRANGOLOVE
-Richard Schickel, Life Magazine
Mel Brooks' The Producers, a
film ranging from satire to French
farce to dirty jokes, will be shown
this Friday and Saturday night at
7 p.m. and 9 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center The-
atre a the Student Union free
flick.
MELBROOK$ -
SF LF STYLED NUT
Bra s� self-styled nut, crea-
tor of V 8 2000-Year Old Man and
writer- it rater of the classic
cartoon THE CRITIC�-made his
directc al debut with The Pro-
ducers surely one of his best
films.
Ar jr Schlesinger calls it "A
triurrn of bad taste In one
sense is right. The subject of
thefii appens to be bad taste.
What better way to express it
than through broad, often gross
burlesque humor?
The wild antics of starts Zero
Mostel and Gene Wilder are
unified by the bizarre oomic
genius of Brooks.
Mostel is endlessly inventive
as Max Bialystock, a theatrical
producer who gets old ladies to
invest in plays by giving them
thier last oomic thrill on the way
to the cemetery.
When Max falls on hard
times, pal Leo Bloom, played by
Gene Wilder, comes up with a
flawless scheme to make a
million. The two sell twenty-five
thousand peroent of a play, and
take all the steps necessary to
ensure a flop so that they won't
have to pay the backers anything.
SPRING TIME FOR HI TLER
ADOLPHANDEVAIN
BERCHTES GARTEN"
Poring over unproduced thea-
trical scripts, they finally find the
perfect vehicleSpringtime for
Hitler a gay musical romp that
has Adolph and Eva in Berohtes-
garten, written by a Nazi who
maintains that Hitler was "a
swell guy with a song in his
heart
After the first act on opening
night, the two charlatans drink
with glee in the next door bar.
They are secure in the know-
ledge that having instilled wrath
in the leading drama critic, by
DIRECTORSCREENWRITER MEL Brooks, here in a scene from
his film "Twelve Chairs won an Academy Award for his
screenplav for the movie' The Producers
attempting to bribe him, casting
the inept Dick Shawn in the title
role and engaging a .notorious
camp to direct, the audience will
hate it and our heroes will have
made a fortune.
ACADEMY AWARD WINNING
FILM IS" PURE LUNACY AND
UPROA RIOUSL Y FUNNY
But then Brooks throws in a
nasty twist of fate: The audience
loves the play and the producers
are stuck with a smash hit even
though they try to bring it to a
halt by blowing up the theatre.
The film is pure lunacy and
uproariously funny. Brooks won
an Academy Award fa his
saeenplay.
Admission to the film is by ID
and Activity Card. Faculty and
staff may use their Mendenhall
Student anter Membership
Card.
Next week's free flick is The
Seven Percent Solution which
stars Alan Arkin as Sir Arthur
Conan Doyle's legendary charac-
ter Sherlock Holmes.





�- . H PPfflBjRS Pwsp
��HHB
growing rapidly in popularity'
30 M�fdi 1878 FOUWAINHEAD P�fl� 11
Jazz has a bright future in Greenville area
By DAVE THOMPSON
Staff Writer
Jazz has been growing rapidly
in popularity over the past few
years, and ECU is starting to lend
an ear as a major regional
supporter of this resurgenoe.
Fa example, the Preservation
Hall Jazz Band sold out here two
years running, Jean Pierre
Rampal's classical jazz filled the
student theater, and Chuck
Mangione is expected to draw a
full house.
ECU is now in a good position
to become an influential jazz face
in Eastern Nath Carolina.
In addition, the popularity of
Tom the Jazzman's Sunday night
show on WRQR-FM, and the
enthusiasm displayed fa the jazz
shows offered at The Line, a local
club, further indicate that jazz has
great appeal in Eastern Carolina.
Although all types of jazz have
been flourishing during this ren-
aissance, Tom the Jazzman said
that fusion jazz, better known as
jazz-rock, seems to be the favaite
here.
Fusiai jazz is also currently
the hottest selling brand on the
market. If often inoapaates
blues traits, rock rhythms, and
Latin percussion beats with elec-
tric instrumentation.
Tom the Jazzman (a her wise
known as Tom Mallison) aired his
jazz show on WRQR-FM four
years ago.
Tom has waked the show from
the beginning and holds a regular
nine-to-five job. His program was
the first show of its kind in
eastern North Carolina, and four
stations have since copied his
famat fa their own jazz shows
(including Raleigh's WQDR-FM).
The disc jockey uses the term
mass appeal jazz" to describe
the type he hears the most
requests fa ai his Sunday night
show. He defines mass appeal
jazz in almost the same wads
used to define fusion jazz � an
incapaatioi of pop and rock
rhythms into the basic jazz sound.
Some artists enjoying great
commercial success with the new
sound. Their ranks include
Geage Benson, Rainie Laws,
Chick Caea, Herbie Hancock
Gmo Vanelli, and Geage Duke.
This year, ECU is presenting
more jazz ooncerts than ever on
campus although aitics have
found fault with such programs in
recent years.
Tom the Jazzman feels the
blame fa the bad shows lies
squarely on the shoulders of
university officials in charge of
promotions.
"What has really hurt the
university Tom explained, "is
promotion when a band a finally
booked hae. We'll (WRQR-FM)
give them free advertising, pos-
sibly arrange fa a studio inter-
view, and then have to buy our
own tickets because the univer-
sity won't give us any. What mae
can we do?
While the university has ex-
perienced both no shows and bad
shows, some of the slack has been
taken up by Greenville's first
jazz-aiented night dub, The Line
The Line has offered the like
of ECU music professa Paul
Tardif and his trio, blues vocalist
Lulu Godfrey with the Preserva-
tion Jazz Co and Gallery,
featuring jazz singer Bisa Staton.
Response to these shows at
The Line has been favaable, as
witnessed by the sizeable crowds,
and demand fa their return is
high.
Until the last few years,
however, jazz was relatively
unappreciated in this area.
The wad jazz used to turn a
lot of people off remembered
Tom the Jazzman. "They said
VinylReview
by David Whitson
Lou Reed: Street Hassle
"Hey, if it ain't the rock and roll animal (suitcase in his hand)"
Yes, America, the patron saint of the youth of the rock and roll era,
bored to the point of violence, has returned.
"Gimmie, gimmie, gimmie some good times,
Gimmie, gimmie, gimmie some pain
to me they always look the same
Armed with guitars, bass, and pianos,and the lilting nihilism of his
voice, Lou Reed is once again assaulting everything that gets in his
way, which is everything, befae reach- the impassioned plea of
"Leave me alone" ("Leave Me Alone").
Reed has emerged, a refugee of the psycho-social upheaval of the
60's and 70's, as a stunning social satirist. Unlike the breezy beach
zombies of the Buffet Generation, a the "Laid Back" reteatists of
the psychedelic era, Reed refuses to "mellow out Instead, he
remains at the fae, combatting rampaging namalcy (that terrible
aippler of youth) wherever he finds it.
His plans fa the future?
"I wanna be a Panther,
Have a girlfriend named Samantha,
I don t wanna be a fucked-up middle-class college student no
mae ("I Wanna Be Black")
(All lyrics Metal Machine Music, Pub BMI.)
Horslips: Aliens
Haslips is one of the finest new bands in America. Their fusion of
the sentimental lyric poetry of old Irish ballads with the anarchic
questioning of American rock produces some of the cleanest, tightest,
and most beautiful music I've heard.
Like their first album, "The Book of Kell this is a concept album.
As chronicled in The Book of Invasions, the Sons of Mil inherited
Ireland from the mystical Tuatha De Danann in 350 B.C. The 1840s
were the Famine Years, and once again the Sons of M il were driven to
search fa a new hone. Exiled, they were fated to begin a new life as
aliens.
This album is the voioe of the emigrant, the hades who flocked
from the Old Wald to the New, in search of a Promised Land
Stowing away on ships to the land of oppatunity, where the streets
are paved with gold, they find nothing but disappointment:
"So this is the life you dreamed of
Don't wary if it's not as good as it seemed.
You've enough on your plate-that's business;
You know you can buy the American Dream
("A Lifetime to Pay")
A well-wrought and meaningful album.
(All Ivrics Dick James Music Inc. 1977.1
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they didn'tknowmuch about it,�
they didn't bother to listen to it
But, during the past two to
three years, may factors have
influenced the growth in popula-
rity of jazz.
For example, because of the
diversity of ECU students, jazz
may have made the trip down
from the metropolitan areas
where there is a greater exposure
to the sound.
Many others find that the
spontaneity and improvisation of
jazz fits in well with their
lifestyle.
And, still others are simply
bored with repetitious rock music
and are seeking a new musical
direction.
Whatever the reasons are for
getting into jazz, it's insignificant
because its future is bright in this
area.
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P�g�12 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 Man 1978
Choir's performance 'authentic, ever tasteful'
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
Norman Luboff introduced a
total entertainment concept in
Wright Auditorium last Wednes-
day night. The veteran arranger-
director delighted his near capa-
city audience with a wide variety
of choral music.
Luboff first achieved fame as a
singer and arranger of pop tunes.
In the 1940's he branched into
choral directing and his choir was
in hot demand as a backup in
radio and TV.
Now Luboff has added serious
worksto his repertoire. His varied
program of classical and popular
tunes has attracted a world-wide
audience that has kept his group
one of the few professional choirs
still touring today.
Luboff s ECU performance
occured near the end of a ten
week tour that will include 64
appearances across the nation.
Although the choir is highly
professional, and the tour is
arranged for a maximum of
variety and a minimum of repeti-
tion, the vocalists lacked the
vitality that hopefully sparked
their earlier performances.
The 24 voice choir opened
with the masculine, mature anti
-phony of "Singet dem Herrn
from Psalm 98 Mendelssohn's
powerful work fa a double choir
and solo quartet. An immediate
oontrast in tone color followed
with Nystedt's "Kyrie from
Thanksgiving Mass The per-
fectly controlled voioes lent a
distant purity to the work that
contrasted with the heavy pres-
ence of the Mendelssohn.
Is it sick
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Is it crazy to love marker pens that give you the smoothest, thinnest line in
town and feel so right in your hand7 Is it mad to worship pens with clever
little metal "collars" to keep their plastic points from getting squishy?
Not if the pen is a Pilot marker pen.
Our Razor Point, at only 69c. gives
the kind of extra-fine delicate line you'll flip
over And for those times you want a little less
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actually write through carbons.
So. don't settle for a casual relationship.
Get yourself a lasting one, or two, to have
and to hold at your college book store.
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Port Chester, New York 10573
fineHne marker pens
Available
at ECU Student Supply
Store
This change in tone quality
was remarkable throughout the
performance. The choir captured
every shade of tone cola and
interpretation with impeccable
taste, from the soaring lyricism of
the Faure "Madrigal" and the
Italian melodrama of Rossini's
"La Passengiata" to the aban-
doned naivete of "Skip to My
Lou" and the traditional rever-
ence of "Amazing Grace
The conoept of style and the
message of the wads highlighted
both the sacred and secular waks
of the first half of the program
and the lighter folk, gospel and
pop selections of the seoond half.
Naman Luboff is above all an
entertainer, and he has found a
successful entertainment famula
that is unfatunately dominated
by commerciaJ music. Sane may
call it tacky, but it certainly
pleased the audience. And no
matter what the choice of music,
the perfamance itself was
authentic, professional, and ever
tasteful.
Weekend events include two concerts
ECU News Bureau
FRIDA Y
ERIC HAAS
COMPOSITION RECITA L
Student composer Eric Haas
of the ECU School of Music will
be featured in a perfcvnance of
his wak this Friday in the A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall. Haas is a
senia fran Lexingtai, N.C. His
program will begin at 730 p.m.
Haas's program, consisting
entirely of his own compositions,
includes "Benedictus" (Psalm
67) fa soprano and harp, a string
quintet, Three Inventions fa
Oboe and Bassoon, Partita fa
Unaccompanied double bass,
"Grendel" fa magnetic tape,
Fugue fa woodwind quintet and
"Cantide-Fanfare" (Psalm 24)
fa mixed chaus, brass quintet
and agan.
poetry
My Lcve a Yesterday
By Michael McPherson
Without her love I
No longer wish to enjoy
The beauty of this World.
The wonders of nature
Seem to escape me
With every passing day.
The sun no longer Shines
And I do not care to reach
Into the heavens fa truth.
I now see through our parting
That I was in wrong. I now only
Wish to give of my life,
To the one I loved and lost.
Thursday Night Only
, Rock- N- Roll with
RAZZMATAZZ
� At The ,
EBOR9MT
Friday
3 - 7 End of the Week Party
? Sat. - Sat. Night Fever
Sun. - Ladies
PHOTOGRAPHY POSITIONS OPEN
There will be several positions open for the 1978-79 school yoar is
campus photographer, Any interested ECU student may coma by to the
FOUNTAINHEAD office between 9 a.m. and r 30 p.m. weekdays
to obtain an application for screening.
Be prepared to list previous work experience and photographic
knowledge. Also, a small portfolio, (preferably black and white,
although color will be accepted), must be submitted.
The portfolio is not necessary until after the applicant has been
contaettd for an interview.
Perfaming in the Haas con-
cert will be faculty cellist Daniel
Mellado, faculty oboist David
Hawkins and violinist Fairya
Mellado, as well as the following
student perfamers: soprano
Belinda Bryant, harpist Paula
Scarangella, violinist Linda Han-
son, vidist Karen Coupe, double
bassist Janet Reeve, bassoonist
Freddie McLean, flutist Mary Jo
White, oboist Harvey Stokes and
clarinetist Laurie Nicholson.
Also featured are the follow-
ing student brass instrumental-
ists Elizabeth Weeks and Robert
Burfad, han; Billy Grimmett,
tranbaie; Connie Ribelin, tuba;
and Bill Frazier and Scott Carter,
trumpets; several members of the
ECU Concert Choir oonducted by
Brett Watson; and student agan-
ist Elyce Brown.
Haas is a candidate fa
Bachela of Music degrees in
theay and composition, and a
student of Brett Watson and
Gerald Dunbar
SUNDAY
SYMPHONIC BAND CONCERT
The ECU Symphonic Band,
conducted by Geage Naff of the
ECU School of Music faculty, will
perfam in concert Sunday, April
2, at 3:15 p.m. in Wright
Auditaium.
The concert features the
premiere perfamance of a com-
position by graduate student Jack
Stamp of College Park, Md
entitled "Antithigram
Stamp will conduct the per-
famance of his oompositiai.
Other waks ai the program
include Alfred Reed's "Armenian
Dances Vincent Persichetti's
"Divertimento fa Band W.
Francis McBeth's "Divergents"
and the Samuel Barber "Con-
mando March
The Symphonic Band includes
67 student instrumentalists from
the ECU School of Music. The
Sunday program is free and open
to the public.
6USSM00N
Wed. Thurs.
N.C. lo. 3 Rock Nightclub
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Fri, Sat. I Sun.
Coming in April- Eaze, Pearl, Blaze, Slitters,
Brice St Josaa Bolt, Hawk and many more!
IHHIHH





�����
Intramurals
30 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
by JOHN EVANS
Time Outs take early season lead
Action hasn't slowed down a bit in men's Softball action as the Soott
Time-Outs continue to be the team to beat. The Time-Outs, 3-0 so far
this season, added 21-0 and 22-8 wins to establish themselves as the
top-ranked team on campus. Right behind them in the men's ranks are
the Sultansof Swat, Laid Back and the Belk Carolina Stars, teams from
the Independent and Dormitory league.
In the fraternity league, a surprising, but powerful early season
leader is Phi Kappa Tau. The Phi Tausare SO, with wins of 17-0,13-3,
17-9 and 12-1 to their credit. The Lambda Chis also stand near the top!
at 4-0, with 14-4 and 18-5 wins among its victories. In the biggest
fraternity game to date, the defending campus champion, Tau Kappa
Epsilon, was upset by Kappa Sigma, 10-9.
Other teams to watch in weeks to oome are the Heartbreak Kids,
the Soott Studs, Lumber and Lightning and the Belk Castaways.
The women are tearing it up in their softball ranks, too, with Tyler's
Going For Two on top of the Intramural Women's Top Ten and the
Gotten Bunnies dose behind.
The Star of the Week was Tammy Whited of Tuf-E-Nuff. She went
seven-for-eight for the week and smacked four home runs, including a
grand slam blast against Fletcher's Soft-N-Pretty in a 14-4 win. She
batted in a total of nine runs in that game. On the season, Tuf-E-Nuf
stands third in the Top Ten with a 4-0 mark. The night before their
game with Tuf-E-Nuf, the Soft N' Pretty dub had taken a 40-9 win ever
some poor unsuspecting foe. Wow!
The Top Ten Softball Teams for this week:
MEN
I.Scott Time Outs
2. Sultansof Swat
3. Laid Back
4. Belk Carolina Stars
5. Phi Kappa Tau
6. Heartbreak Kids
7. Soott Studs
8. Lumber and Lightning
9. Belk Castaways
10. Lambda Chi Alpha
WOMEN
1. Tyler's Going Fa Two
2. Gotten Bunnies
3. Tuf-E-Nuf
4. Tyler Clowns
5. Alpha Phi I
6. Hypertension Last Chance
7. Fletcher Soft N' Pretty
8. Felming Floozies
9. Clement Un Kappa Fifth
10. Sigma Sigma Sigma I
Nathaniel Wigfall reigns supreme as the ECU Intramural Wrestling
champion in the Unlimited Division, after he beat Steve Bengal and
Harold Randolph in back-to-back matches to win the crown. Wigfall, a
former state high school champion at Jacksonville High School, truly
earned his title over the li kes of Bengal and Randolph.
In other weight dasses, Brad Middleton repeated as the champion
in the 142-pound dass, beating Al Simmons, and Paul Prewett took the
190-pound title dropping James Barrow of Sigma Nu.
Soott Dorm won the team title and had two champions and one
runnerup, while Attik-Line was second. Scott had 97 team points and
the Attik-Line had 87 points.
Other individual winners were Dave Jerose at 126 pounds, Joe
Valente at 134 pounds, Joe Collins at 150 pounds, Kirk Tucker at 158
pounds, Harry Rumley at 167 pounds and Roger Burns at 177 pounds.
Scott Dormitory took the men's swimming title and Alpha Xi Delta
took the women's swimming title in the annual Intramural swim meet
held a while back.
Individual winners in the men's events were John Pere, in the
200-yard freestyle and 50-yard freestyle; Brad Chapman, 50-yard
backstroke and 50-yard butterfly; Stan Joyner, 50-yard breaststroke;
and Mark Price, 100-yard medley. Scott Dorm won both the 200-yard
freestyle and 200-yard medley events.
In women's events Delta Zeta's Dana Dragstedt took four events,
the 100-yard medley; the 25-yard freestyle, the 50-yard freestyle and
the 25-yard butterfly; Alpha Xi's Janette Inman won the 25 and 50 yard
backstroke events and also swam on both the Alpha Xi's winning relay
teams; Janet Burke won the 25-yard breaststroke; Sue Thornton won
the 50 breaststroke and Polly Jarvis won the 50 butterfly.
Baseballers split with Clemson
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Sports Editor
The Pirate baseball team,
under coach Monte Little, has had
the benefit of ups and downs over
the past week of play.
The Bucs played two games
against Atlantic Coast power-
house Clemson on consecutive
days, winning the first game in a
night contest 4-3 and dropping a
3-0 dedsion the next afternoon.
Mickey Britt was the winning
pitcher in a game neither team
seemed very exdted about win-
ning.
Clemson left nine players on
base and East Carolina stranded
five as pitchers on both teams
pitched their way out of sticky
situations.
One situation that the Clem-
son change-up artist could not
pitch his way out of was a game
opening homerun over left field
by Eddie Gates.
The Clemson starter had
trouble with his elbow after only a
few pitches and his relief was
greeted by Gates with a shot over
the 320 ft. mark.
Clemson, a high finalist in the
NCAA play offs last years count-
ered in the second inning with a
single by Pete Peltz. He scored on
a double by Tony Masone and it
was 1-1 as the Bucs came to the
plate in the second inning.
Sports
EDDIE GA TES, 8, rounds the
to home.
as Robert Brinkley ooaches him
See INTRAMURALS, p. 15
MICKEY BRITT REMAINED undefeated pitching the Pirates past
Clemson 4 to 3.
Max Raynor smacked a double
off the centerfield fence, stole
second and scored on a passed
ball to put the Pirates back up
going into the third.
M ickey Britt was faced with 3
men on base with one out in the
third when he foroed two batters
to go after bad pitches that led to
the two grounding out to end the
inning.
The Pirate fireballer was not
so lucky in the sixth inning
however as designated hitter
Alan Hoover doubled to open the
frame. Steve Youngman then
popped out to bring up Tony
Masone.
It was obvious to the fans and
the press alike that Britt blew two
right past the Clemson outfielder
but such was not the case as
prescribed by the umpire.
The questionable eyesight of
the ump led to extra pitches and
the last one Masone punched over
the fence for a 2-run homer.
Buc catcher Raymie Steyons
scored in the bottom half of the
sixth to make the score 3-3 and it
remained that way going into the
eighth.
Third baseman Bobby Supel
stepped to the plate with two out
in the eighth frame and rapped a
single.
Macon Move, the Pirate cen-
terfielder, then smacked a double
to score Supel and score the
fourth and final run of the
evening.
The Clemson record went to
14-4, 7-0 in ACC play. The ECU
vidory broke the Tigers 11-game
winning streak.
Eddie Gates, who went 3 fa 4,
had no quims about the viday.
"We knew we oould play with
them he said.
Britt, the winning pitcher and
now 5-0 on the year, didn't have
many comments on the umpire
erras. "You just have to put it
out of your mind and finish the
game
The next afternoon Pete Con-
aty was not to be as fatunate as
the Pirates lost 30.
Conaty pitched an adequate
game but he was failed by the
erratic bats of the Bucs.
Coach Little's troops left no
less than eight batters stranded
as EC was never able to put a
consistent inning together.
Catcher Raymit Steyons and
leftfielder Robert Brinkley both
went 3 fa 4 at the plate, but
Clemsai retired the side with 2
men left in the third, fourth, and
eighth innings.
On Saturday afternnon, East
Cardina split a pair with South-
eastern Massachusetts winning
the opener 130 and sleeping
through the second game, losing
2-1.
The loss was to a lesser known
opponent and those losses could
prove very detrimental to Pirate
post season play.
On Monday night the Pirates
lost a heart breaka to UNC-CH
4-2.
The Pirate s next game will be
Friday against the Indians of
William and Mary at 300.





Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 March 1978
All-Americans Alston and Mdntyre pace Pirate track
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
If you think that two All-
Americans on the track team can
change an outlook fa the season,
you're right!
Calvin Alston and Herman
Mdntyre have set new standards
of performance here at ECU and
many of their fellow runners have
followed suit. They have been
practiang harder and setting
their goals towards the nationals
and an All-Amencan plaque.
Few people here know that
Alston and Mdntyre are probably
the best trackmen ECU has every
fielded.
Currently Calvin Alston is
ranked 5th in the nation and
Herman Mdntyre ranked 7th.
Both guys stand a good chance in
moving up in nationals since
many of the people who beat each
last year have graduated.
Calvin runs in several events,
but is All-American for only one,
that being the 200 meters.
Herman runs the triple jump,
an event the requires not only
physical conditioning but mental
preparation.
"I'm still the same person I've
always been since last season
said Calvin, "I still practice hard
and work as hard as last year, but
this year I want the number one
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plaque
Herman Mdntyre has a dif-
ferent viewpoint on the subject.
"I think I am different, I've
matured, and developed. I've
learned a lot since last year and
look forward to this year's nation-
als
Both Alston and Mdntyre
have already qualified for this
year's nationals and things took
good.
"I exped several other of our
guys will make it to nationals
commented Mdntyre, "four or
five guys are just fradions away
from accomplishing an exoeptable
time
Calvin Alston added, "How
many people know that our 440
team (which consists of Alston,
Carter Suggs, Larry Austin, and
Otis Melvin) are nationally rank-
ed and our mile relay team is 6th
in the nation. Not many, and
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these guys are really looking to do
good in nationals
By the way, Otis Melvin,
probably the most unsung here on
the team is nationally ranked, too.
He is 10th in the nation and 18th
in the world.
Being the quiet man on the
team Melvin doesn't get as much
recognition as he deserves.
"I don't mind the lack of
press said Otis, "my actions
speak louder than words
With that in mind it should be
interesting to watch the results of
this year's track club.
Red Cross
is counting
Ion you.
PIRA TE ALL-AMERICAN Calvin Alston
EAST CAROLINA
INVITATIONAL TRACK
AND FIELD
110-M High Hurdles Heat 1
1.M. Rankins(ECU) 13.76, 2.
Miller (UNC) 14.57, 3. A.
McKnight (How) 14.90, 4. A.
Kearse(Del St.) 15.30.
Heat 2.
1.B. Duren(NCS) 13.99, 2. E.
Carter (NCA & T) 14.66, 3. M.
Harrison (Del St.) 14.69, 4. R.
Simons (Nor. St.) 14.80
Heat 3.
1.T. Black (ASU) 14.58, 2. B.
Bulceiski (SH) 14.80, 3. E.
George (NCCU) 14.98, 4. A.
Valentine (ASU) 14.99
Heat 4
1. T. Bouler (WSS) 14.61, 2.
B. Walsh (UNC) 15.03, L. Fields
(NCCU) 15.25, 4. K. Shoe (NCS)
15.29
100-M Dash Heat 1
1. A. Lomotey(NCS) 10.22, 2.
M. Keys (Norf. St) 10.52, 3. J.
Rankins(ECU) 10.60
Heat 2. P. White (Norf. St)
10.40 2. H. Boss (DS) 10.89 3. C.
Dill (SH) 10.90
Heat 3 1. D. Mack (ECU)
10.61, 2. P. Hagan WSS) 10.82,
3. H. Peart (DS) 11.16
Heat 4 1. E. Waiters (H),
10.69, 2. A. Bryant (Nor. St)
10.97, 3. M. Williams (NCA&T)
11.02
Heat 5 1. R. Ray (Nor. St)
9.94, 2. C. Lanier (NCS) 10.41, 3.
A. Harvey (Del St.) 10.44
Women's 100-M Dash
Finals
1. J. Marshall (Del St.) 12.06,
2. Crawford (St. Aug.) 12.26,3. L.
Rountree(ECU) 12.29, 4. Borden
(How.) 12.48, 5. Brown (NCCU)
�nette(NCCU) 12 54
1
M.
2. S.
James
Young
1. C.
Women's High Jump
Langam (UNC) 5'4
Sampson (ECU) 5'2 3. J
(NCS) 5'0 4. B.
(NCA&T) 4'8
Men's Shot Put Finals
Shipman (PSU) 55'4, 2. J. Han-
nah (NCS) 54'8, 3. Leavitt (NCS)
50'3, 4. S. Yannati (ASU) 47'4, 5.
Merritt (Del. 9.) 471
Women's Javelin Finals 1. B.
Hardaway (UNC) 11110, 2. L.
Crowley (UNC) 107'2, 3. L.
Martin (NCS) 99'2, 4. D. Knight
92'V2, 5. J. Toomer (NCA&T)
64'8V2, 6. T. Johnson (NCA&T)
63
110-M High Hurdles-Semifinals
Heat 1 1. M. Rankins(ECU)
13.70, 2. S. Miller (UNC) 14.50, 3.
T. Black (ASU) 14.65, 4. E
George (NCCU) 14.67
Heat 2 1. Bi Duren (NCE)
14.22 2. T. Bouler (WSSU) 14.49,
3. B. Walsh (UNC) 14.69, 4. E.
Carter (NCA&T) 14.70.
100-Mt. Dash-Semifinals
Heat 1 1. R. Ray (Nor. St.)
10.13, 2. C. Lanier (NCS) 10.38,
3. D. Mack (ECU) 10.41, 4. E.
Waiters (How.) 10.64
Heat 2 1. A. Lamotey (NCS)
9.94, 2. P. White (Nor. St.) 10.30,
3 M. Keys(Nor. St.) 10.41, 4. A.
Harvey (Del a.) 10.64
Women's Discus Finals
1. S. Redvict (D. St.)123'1, 2.
R. Riddick (UNC) 114'2, 3. D.
Freeman (ECU) 104'53-4, 4. C.
Norton (NCS) 99'53-4, 5. Hols-
hourser (UNC) 93'83-4, 6. T.
Johnson (NCA) 85' Vi
Womens 400-M Relay Finals
1. NCCU 50.37, 2. ECU 50.40,
3. St. Sug. 51.01, 4. UNC 51.34,
5 NCA&T no time, 6. De. St. no





������1
�����
�HHH
30 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
Golf team places ahead of Wake Forest, LSU
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
The East Carolina golf team
concludes its spring schedule this
weekend when the Pirates travel
to Jacksonville to compete in the
Camp Lejeune Invitational. The
54-hole event opens Friday and
will end Monday.
Last weekend, East Carolina
finished in 11th place in the rain
shortened Furman Interoollegiate
tournament played on the Fur-
man University oourse in Green-
ville, S.C. The Pirates had a
36-hole total of 614 which put
them ahead of powerhouses
Wake Forest, LSU, and Georgia
Tech.
"I think it's a real tribute to
our players and our program to
beat teams like Wake Forest and
LSU even though neither team
had a good tournament said
ECU coach Mac McLendon. "We
ENTRAMURALS
Continued from p. 13
In the Intramural Bowling all-campus championships the Belk
Headhunters took the men's title and the Miller Killers took the
women's title. The Headhunters beat Definitely in the men's finals,
2010-1912, and Miller's Killers beat the Alpha Phis fa the women's
title. Alpha Phi was a surprise finalist after downing Greene's FFWC
in the semifinals and White Lightning in the first round.
L. Huntley led the Headhunters in the finals, rolling a high set of
584 and a high game of 219.
played more consistently as a
team at Furman and I was
certainly encouraged with our
performance.
Low man for the Pirates was
senior Mike Buckmaster with
rounds of 74-76-150, good f or 11 th
place in the individual stand-
ings. Keith Hiller shot 76-76-152
while sophomore David Brogan
had a 77-78-155 total.
Clemson won the overall team
title with a 593 total followed by
Georgia at 594 and Georgia
Southern close behind 601.
The individual medalist was
Alabama's Gary Trivisanno with
rounds of 71-71-142.
Although most of the top
teams in the area will bypass the
Camp Lejeune tournament,
McLendon is hopeful his Pirates
will oontinue their improved play.
"I'm hoping we will oontinue
to play well and maybe even win
this tournament noted
M cLendon. " Dav i d Brogan,
Keith Hiller, Mike Buckmaster
have been playing well lately. W�
should definitely be contenders ir
the tournament
McLendon said he will prob-
ably use Brogan, Hiller, Buck
master this weekend and fresh
man Steve Jones with the fina
two positions up fa grabs be
tween Jim Parkin, Carl Beamon,
and Kenny Powell.
A Swim Program fa Handicapped Students will begin this Sunday
at 6:30 in Minges Pool. The program will be open to ECU's
Handicapped student sand will run fa an hour and a half every Sunday
fron 6:30-8 p.m.
PIRA TE GOLF
McLendon
COACH Mac
A Public Service of this newspaper & The Advertising Council TOM
Today is the first da
of the rest of your life.
Champiois have been decided in each one of the four classes of
intramural badminton competitioi. The champion in men's play were
Larry Means, over John Russ, in singles and Chip Couch and Ricky
Haugg, over Steve Wilson and David Fields, in men's doubles. In
women's doubles, Moli Jones and Belinda Judkins teamed up to win
the title in a match against Sylvia Jones and Jackie Daggs.
Watch in next week's intramural newsletter and in this column fa
infamatiai ai the ECU Frisbee Tournament to be oo-sponsaed by the
ECU Intramural Department and McDonald's. The tournament is
ooming April 25 and will include $85.00 in cash prizes.
Intramural Co-Rec Water Basketball Co-Rec Volleyball start next
week in Intramural Golf takes place this week. Watch fa mae
infamatiai next week.
Classifieds
Give blood
so it can be the first day
of somebody else's, too.
9
Red Cross is
ouitfing on you
for sale
FOR SALE: Nikai F2 camera
body fa sale, black in perfect
shape. $320. 752-5692.
FOR SALE: PA system. Shure
vocal master, 6 channel inputs
complete bass, treble and reverb
seperate fa each channel, Master
volume, 2 VA300s oolumbias and
all by Shure. $1640 retail asking
700.00 Call 752-5692 after 10 p.m.
FOR SALE: Reel to reel by Akai
GX-280D w glass X'lac Ferrite
heads. Complete elec. switching.
Sound on sound, mic. and line.
Mixing auto reversing. 2 yrs. old.
$520 new, asking best offer over
$160. Need money fast. Call
752-5692. after 10 p. m
FOR SALE: '69 Dodge Caoiet.
Slant six cylinder eng. Straight
shift standard. Excellent ocnd.
Good gas mileage Perfect econo-
Caii Raymaici L. Brown
FOR SALE: '73 Haida Civic
hatchback with radial tires. Clean
and excellent ccnd. $1400.00 Call
752-7227.
FOR SALE: One twin bed with
box springs and frame. Great fa
apt. Excellent cond. $50. Call
758-8409.
FOR SALE: Used Magnavox
AM-FM, 8-track stereo with
turntable. $55. Call 758-8076 a
758-9372.
FOR SALE: Pair of A76X Audio-
analyst speakers like new. 150 a
best offer. List price 250. 373
Ayoock Dam. Also large variety
of 8-track tapes. CHEAP!
FOR SALE: One Epiphone Ao-
ooustic guitar, 2 yrs. old. and in
very good oond. $100.00 Call
752-9675.
FOR SALE: One NadMende
Receiver 25 watts per channel.
Two NadeMende speakers. All
?or $65 00 Call 756-3129.
FOR SALE: Abraham Lawsoi
Robot Kits. Coming soon In-
quire 758-7434.
torrent �"
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
starting fall semesta. Get your
own room in 2 bdrm. house. Rent
87.50 month. Call Winstoi at
756-1468.
FEMALE ROOMMATES:needed
fot summer. Rent 63.33 each plus
13 utilities. Call 752-6592 a oome
by 12 River Bluff.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: fa the
summer. Fa a fully furnished
apt. at East brook. Share V2
expenses. Call 752-6068 anytime.
FOR RENT: I wish to sublease
Apt. fa summer, 2 bdrms, air
oond. One mile fron campus. Call
Charlie 752-9311.
WANTED TO SUBLET: Fa
summer, two bdrm house
. Ivgi - I Great
I uties
JOa?' iston
MALE ROOMMATE: wanted to
share 2 bdrm. apt. fa the
summer. Canpletely furnished,
has air ooid washer, dryer and
pool Located on 10th St. on SGA
bus route near campus. Call
758-7239 a cane by Apt. 8 Faest
Mana beside the Pizza Hut.
FOR RENT: 2 males need room-
mate to sub-lease apt. fa the
summer. New apts. located on the
river not far from campus.
ROOMMATE NEEDED, fa 3-
bdrm. apt. at Eastbrcok. Phone
752-8127.
FOR RENT: Two bdrm. mobile
home with air oond. and washer.
Located near ECU. Call 758-5137
after 5 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE, needed.
Responsible girl needed by May
1st to share 2 bdrm. townhouse
with 2 other girls. 58.00 mo. and
"3 utilities. Call Lee- 758-9721
bptwe 9-1 a Man ?58-9802.
personaKj)
ALTERATIONS: Spring things
too long, a too big? Call 752-8642
a 752-8444.
WANTED: Bike, either Peugeot
a Raleigh. Call 752-8676.
HELP! need ride to Chariate and
back (if na Chariate, then any
pant between Asheville and
aatevilleand back) fa April 7-9
Can leave anytime. Will be glad
to pay fa gas, expenses, etc.
John Weyler 458 Ayoock 752-
8525
SPECIAL FRIENDS: deserve
meaningful and lasting relation-
ships. Enlighten their lives with
fine art. Call Raymond L. Brown
758-7434.
lost

stnut dtcarun-
' Private i toolen in-Jay
Air oond -2-N returnana
1 p.m.��-8708.





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 March 1978
fMBBk Great StorewMe
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roadtly avoMabto for aalo at
or boiow tho advarttaed prtoa m oach AP
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PRICE S EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. AWN. 1 AT AAP M
GREERVILLE
LOOK FOB THC ACTION PRICE SIGN - THROUGHOUT
YOUR AAP STORE Whan A4P buyar. maw � ip�cl�l pur-
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lowsr prlca is sn action prtca. And lhasa AcHon Prlcaa ara m
addition to our monayaving waakly spaclals.
BOROEN S BREAKFAST
DRINK Wf 169
ouaker 44e
INSTANT GRITS SS 43c
73c
99e
KRAFT MIRACLE WHIPPED
MARGARINE
BIRDS EYE FROZEN LITTLE EARS
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FRENCHS
MUSTARD
KRAFT
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BUCKET IF
FRIED CHICKEN
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BEEF BOLOGNA
OR NEAT B0L0GRA
COOKED SALAMI
AAP QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
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BLADE CUT CHUCK U
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SMOKED PICNICS
4T0ILB
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BOX-O-CHICKEN
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ITEMS OFFERED FOR SAU NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS AHO WHOUSALEM
DEL MONTE
CREAM STYLE OR WHOLE KERNEL
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FINAL WEEK
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THE EZU
35
LARGEST CIRCULATION OF ANY PAPER ON CAMPUS
"All the news thafs
print to f it"
Serving it up to the campus community for quite a
while.
LAMPOON
a
Students vow 'never again
Man-eating roach
devours student
WEZU goes
Braille
Page 3
Media Board,
Union
absorb SG A
� Page 3
Christ's
coming
flops
Page 7
LeeO.
upset over
Spillmun
towing Page
Page 5
"
Rabid dog
A RABID DOG is loose on the campus of EZU!
� � Foamy as the ENQUIRER staff has affectionate-
ly nicknamed him, was last sighted near the ghetto
dams on the Mall. Other reports have placed him
near Bilge dorm. Should you come in contact with
�Foamy DO NOT, under any circumstances.
attempt to lure him ino a trap baited w�h
ZghL no otter him anchc.es on -
toodswill only further enrage him. Snoolduhave
any information as to the whereabouts of Foamy ,
please call the ENQUIRER at 752-1212.





I
Page 2 EZU ENQUIRER 1 April 1978
Satan
Potted Hamm Get shot
Billy Hamm will speak at
EZU Thursday at 8 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Theater. He will
crusade for the legalization of pot
and the discontinuation of all
education Tickets are $10.
Eat out
The I Eta Sigma fraternity will
sponsor an eat-out party on the
carpet of the IES house this
Friday night. All members are
encourgaed to bring guests as
there may not be enough to go
around.
Gross out
Remember dead baby jokes?
And all those "Mommie. Mom-
mie" one-liners? Well, you
should enter the Bamma Bamma
Bamma 'Gross Out Joke
Contest' this weekend at the
BBB house. The person with the
sickest joke wins a free case of
brew and a $50 gift certificate to
Larry's Whip and Leather House.
Hollywood. No refunds.
Get out
The Outing Club, going
against its constitution, has dec-
ided to meet in for the next
meeting. All members must
attend whether they like it inside
or not.
Dr. Z
"Dr. Z that infamous and
mysterious visitor from the east
will hold his annual lecture on
Zeeism, or the art of oonstant
sleep. The lecture will be held
sometime this week as scon as
Dr. Z wakes up to do it. The
public is invited to ZZZZZZZ
Marshals
Bodge City needs a marshall.
Anyone who can shoot a gun
straight should apply at Clark's
Bar bout sundown.
Lingo
All right, people - it's time
you learned some snoptalk here.
Cause we're sick o it, man. I
mean really. Why even tell you
about a centerfold truck of you
don't know what it is? And what
about a font9 Look it up, dummy.
Stick it in your column-inch. Run
your finger over my kicker tape.
And straighten your copy.
Frat rats
Tap-A-Keg-Of-Beer, socialite
sorority will have a Happy
Weekend party at the Knee
Room. It will start Friday at 4:00
and continue till Sunday at 1 O0.
Special contests will include an
erotic nose-picking contest, jock-
strap contest and dunce contest.
Bummers ?
Do you have problems? Well,
we do too. Come Sunday night at
8 p.m. on the second floor of the
Psychiatrist's Building. We'll all
cry together. All persons inter-
ested in ooming must bring their
own box of kleenex.
Fight
The Debate Club will meet
Friday night ai 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall. Anyone who wants
to argue on having a meeting
Friday, just try it.
Thanks
Hemp
A time for fellowship, fun,
and hot dogs will be had by all
this Thursday night at the Cam-
pus Search for Satan meeting to
be held in Brewster B-102. Be
there at 4:30 to help us raise some
hell!
To anyone who wants to get
shot: the firing squad will line up
Saturday at 7 a.m. All victims
must bring their own guns.
Men only
All men interested in fellow-
ship should meet at the docks on
Saturday at 9 a.m. No girls
allowed; only fellows.
Fck Flick
This week's Mendenhall free
flick is the award-winning Tuni-
sian bedroom farce loosely trans-
lated as "Coming my Way?
starring Montana Wildhack, Billy
Pilgrim and a cast of thousands of
Trafamadorians. ID and Activity
Card holders will not be admitted.
So it goes.
Dance
Hey, wow, like, we really had
a fine time last Friday night, man,
and we're glad as hell the whole
thing's over with. But you know,
there's some folks we'd like to
tahnk for making it all happen -
like Sherne and Mr. T and Head
- you guys are outta sight. ANd
also, hats off to Bozo and his
Connection - thanks for the
samples, man. Anyway, me and
the Weed hope we can do it again
real soon. Okay, how's that, man?
Can you get that in tomorrow's
paper? great.
The Disco Dog! The Saint
Bernard Shuffle! The Basset
Hound Bump! Come cut a couple
of rugs at the Third Annual
Campus Canine Cutie Contest &
Dance at the Alpo-American
Cultural Center tomorrow night at
9 p.m.
Narks
Everyone is invited to attend
the first meeting of the Junior
Narcotics Officer Club. Mr.
Ramond Chockworthy, our guest
speaker will be bringing several
bags of material to illustrate his
lecture, "Identifying Illegal Sub-
stances and afterwards there
will be a coffee, a smoker, a
mixer and chaser. Don't miss it!
That's the Junior Narcotics Of-
ficer Club, 3:30 yesterday in BD
511.
S.0.B.S
The Society of Bigots will
meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the
Lily-White Room of the Ramada
Inn on the 264 Bypass. Chairman
Robert M. Swaim will lecture
briefly (we hope) on "The Joy of
Crossburnings" after which he
will lead a group sing-along
beginning with the old favorite
"Rock of Ages Refreshments
will be served by Omega Psi Phi
fraternity brothers.
Fencing
The Fencing Club is begin-
ning an active new year. We have
planned workshops on barbed
wire, chain-link, redwood, picket,
and split-rail fences, and we
intend to attend the National
Fencing Open in New York next
January. Touche.
ERA
The Pitt County ERA Group
will hold a seminar entitled "Ban
the Missionary Position" next
month at Pitt Tech. According to
an ERA spokesperson, the
emphasis of the seminar will
center around trying to "stop the
fucking rip-off of women through
use of this male chauvinist
position
D.T.s
Attention all perspective D.T.
students. Join us for dinner and a
dub meeting Thursday, Feb. 31,
at 5:30 p.m. at the Alcoholic
Rehabilitation Center. Bring
along your favaite (salad) bar
ingredient. And drive carefully.
NHSA, National Hemp Smok-
ing Association will meet Monday
at 5 XX) to toke on present and
future plans. Guest speaker will
be the Park Ranger.
Coffeehouse
This weekend at the Coffee-
house there will be two fine
entertainers.
Freshman Class President
Almozo Nubbly will lead a group
tap-dance and a Spititual Sing-A-
long, assisted by Sigma Nu
Chaplin Tin Summlavin.
The second act will feature
Tommy Jo Pain destroying a
six-string guitar, a piano, a
decrepit dulcimer, two micro-
phone stands, an Advent sound
system, two 13th century wall
hangings, and much more, during
his impression of the Wild Man of
Borneo.
sim peaj j(uoq
punoje
jaded aqj ujnj asia jo peaife
aj.noA" eiuM nb c$ sjapeaj
-joojd jajinbug Aq Aiqeiou jsouj
' peaj o 6unduja�e suosjad
Aq Apeaje pajjodaj uaoq 9abu,
uiejjsaAa jo saseo ajaAas asneoeq
useij siu,) peaj j,upnoqs noA
Bad news
Don't read this flash either.
This is a fair warning: there is
some bad news in this flash. If I
were you I would stop reading it
right now. After all, you can't just
ignore bad news and hope it'll go
away. Especially something as
bad as this. And you still have a
chance to stop reading. But your
time is running out. Pretty soon
the bad news is going to appear
before your eyes. So quit while
you're ahead. Here it comes.
You'd better stop reading this.
It's not too late. Your mother is
dead.
ick
The Pick Your Nose Club
will meet every night this week.
Bring some big ones.
Addicts' delight
The EZU Infirmary will spon-
sor a pill grab-bag party April 1.
Medications to be given away
include Quaaludes. Dexidrine,
Valium, and other readily non-
available perscriptions sub-
substances. Students must show
ID and activity cards to the
campus police offioers at the head
of the line and state reasons
andor rationals for wanting
andor needing these pills.

Get it up
Wrigte!
ECU Enquirer needs writers.
If you can t spell, punctuage, an
don't know no grammer, then you
are welcum to join the staff.
Are there any students who
have difficulty speaking to others
aboui yenerea; disease, oral sex, or
black fishnet stockings If so.
these students should oontact the
EZU Counseling Servioe.
The servioe attempts to make
students oomfortable by conduc-
ting all clinics and group encoun-
ter sessions in the nude (exoept
for those members who want to
wear the fishnets). Topics will
include "Breaking it to Her
Gently "What to Do When
Once is Not Enough and
"Double Dating at the Drive-In:
Four on the Floor Participation
in the clinic should improve the
student's value in the job market
and increase his earned run
average dowtown.
Announcement
This announcement appears
only on the Flashes page of
today's Enquirer, and does not,
nor will it, appear anywhere else,
not now or at anytime in the
future. And that's a promise.
Who's who
Who is who? And who cares?
BeeGees
There will be a meeting of the
"Assasinate the BeeGees" Club
at 10:30 tomorrow night at Village
Green. Apt. 7. Doug White,
EZU Enquirer News Editor and
president of the club, will speak
on the various methods of assasi-
nation, including poison gas,
tweesers, hot coals, castration
with a dull X-acto, and cheerfully
being beaten to a pulp. After-
wards White will treat dub
members to a pre-recorded six-
hour concert featuring Kiss, Styx,
Patti Smitn. the Babies, and,
Doug's favorit 'he Sex Pistols.
Be there. Aloha.
Don't do it
What we're talking about is
lighting the last match in the
pack. Or walking under a ladder.
Or knocking over the salt shaker.
Or breaking a mirror, opening an
umbrella indoors, or killing a
black cat. These things are not
good for your health. In fad, Dr.
Umbaga Bashanti of the Anthro-
pology department daims that in
certain sccities superstitions like
these are nonexistant. Instead
they have oomplex and paradox-
ical religious beliefs like those of
the Jinto, people of the sacred
Duck. The Jinto believe that
reading a newspaper may bring
bad luck in the form of a winged
sheep or perhaps a lion with
dentures. The Jinto also believe
that sexual intercourse is a
oommunist plot. This superstition
was taught to them by a team of
Shaker missionaries in the late
1880's. So, register for an inter
esting oourse next semester -
ANTH 4444 with Dr. Bashanti.
And stop reading this newspaper.
It's for your own good.





�����������-W

MHMBBBi
1 April 1978 EZU ENQUIRER
Lee O. approves takeover of SGA
Pag�3
Chancellor Lee 0. Jenkins
approved the takeover of the
Student Government Association
(SGA) by the Media Board and
the Student Union Friday.
Services famerIy provided by
the SGA were divided between
the two organizations. No in-
crease in student fees is expected
due to the takeover, according to
Jenkins.
"In recent years, the SGA has
become more and more unrepre-
sentative of student opinion and
has become virtually ineffective
when dealing with the public and
the administration. We felt the
student body would be better
served if SGA services were
handled by more efficient and
better organized organizations,
such as the Student Union and the
Media Board Dennis Ramrod,
Student Union president said.
The Student Union is organi-
zing a Transit Committee to
oversee the bus system, a Legal
Aid Committee to handle free
legal aid to students, and a
Handout Committee to fund the
art, music, and drama depart-
ments.
The Media Board has assum-
ed responsibility for refrigerator
rentals, emergency loans, and
retreats.
"Looking at the SGA's record
of the past two years, we couldn't
find many useful services, and
the handful of services we
thought should be continued we
thought could be better handled
by a non-political body Kneel
Sessions, chairperson of the
Media Board said.
The takeover was first propos-
ed to Dr. Jenkins by Charles
Soon, legislator.
"I had been considering a
takeover of some sort for a long
time, From my experience with
the Union and my observations of
the Media Board, I felt confident
the student body would be much
better off without a bickering,
cackling mob like the SGA
Soon said.
CHA RLES SOON INSTIGA TOR of the takeover.
WEZU to begin Braille broadcasts
Campus radio station WEZU
has been lioensed by the FCC to
broadcast in Braille, according to
Bob Saxon, station manager.
"This is a giant step forward
for the station. Before we went
Braille, a large segment of
campus simply couldn't get in
touch with our station, but I think
that's all changed now Saxon
said.
The station will begin Braille
broadcasts in about two weeks,
since some equipment remains
uninst ailed.
"We'll be using a 1500
Megadot transmitter broadcast-
ing at 4,000 cycles per hour, with
our antennae situated in the
basement of Joyner Library and
another at the bottom of College
Hill Drive. Our signal will probab-
ly extend as far as the oity
limits Saxon said.
Efforts to convert WEZU from
Spillmun
towed;
Lee O.
angered
Campus cops looked on as the
administrative building was tow-
ed away last Thursday. The
building was towed away because
the space was needed to oonstruct
a parking lot, according to Joe
Balder, director of campus secur-
ity and traffic .
Dr. Lee OM Jenkins, ECU
chancel la, was reportedly out-
raged when he learned that
Balder had called for 25 tow
trucks to tow Spillmun building
that afternoon.
According to eyewitensses,
Lee Old's face turned purple with
rage and he shook his fists and
shouted at Balder, who was
directing tow trucks to various
positions.
"We're really upset about
this snarled Colonel Dick
Bleak, his eyes glittering hate-
fully. "Of all the buildings on
campus, they have to pick ours
EZU Enquirer was unable to
interview Lee Old, as he was busy
turning cartwheels around the
building in a futile attempt to stop
the two trucks.
its present closed circuit signal to
a more accessible signal have
been underway for several years.
"The single thing that made
us pursue Braille wholehearted-
ly was last summer when a local
station switched from its immen-
sely popular Big Band format to a
more commerical ragtime pro-
gram. We knew how much the
student body loved the swinging
sounds of Glen Miller and Tommy
Dorsey, so we felt like it was our
duty to program fa the EZU
student body.
"However, we also knew that
if we were to have any impact at
all, we would have to changeover
to a mae widely available
medium of broadcasting. That's
when we started the ball rolling
and applied fa a Class X Braille
license said Saxon.
The statioi also plans to
include less popular music, such
as jazz, classical, and disco, in its
famat in ader to have something
every student will want to listen
to.
"The beauty of the change-
over is that it only oost the Media
Board $12,000. Of course, aitics
may charge that this is mae than
our annual budget, but that's
beside the point. The Media
Board can affad it. Everybody
knows how rich the media are
after we stole all that money from
the Student Government Associa-
tion.
They wouldn' t have funded a
move like this in a million years.
But we don't have to wary about
that anymae. In fact, to cele-
brate, our entire staff is going on
a retreat next weekend. We've
already made reservations at the
Sheraton in Miami Beach
Saxon said.
What has 2 Legs, mumbles incoherently,
and acts uncoordinated?
Find out when you visit the all new Carolina Zoological Park. Pictured above is
our newest zoo member. Almozo , as we call it, fits the above characteristics
perfectly. This species is almost extinct (thank god) and was found stumbling
aimlessly through Mendenhal
Visit The Zoo Today!
Carolina Zoological Park
DasheborOjN.C.





She mrb
EZU ENQUIRER
1 April 1978
We love work
Do you know what madness is? Have you ever
slaved away at a job for long, long, l-o-n-g hours?
And being a full-time student on top of all that? Yes,
we know how you feel. Especially on Monday and
Wednesday nights.
Boy, is it a lot of fun working till 3 a.m. and then
going home to study unitl 5 a.m then going to bed to
get back up at 7 a.m. or 8 a.m isn't it? We just love
it.
Especially when we have a test a a paper due the
next day. That's when we are really glad that we're
working full-time. And some people even think we' re
up here just fa the money! Can you believe it?!
No, we're up here 'cause we love hard work so
much.
(Do you want to know the truth? The real truth?
Actually, if we weren't working here.we don't know
what we would do on Mondays and Wednesdays. We
would be lost if we couldn't go mad twice a week.
That's why we love it.)
More promises
Last year we promised never to say anthing bad
about our SGA. We kept that promise. Finally, after
light years of fighting for our independence we
finally achieved it-much thanks to those who granted
it.
But now, to those of you who opposed
independent media from the every beginning, we
have a solution for you to apologize to all of the
publications fa all the bad things you said about
them.
Each time you meet a staff member of a
publication, WEZU, a the Photo Lab, simply state
the following ten times:
We promise never to say anything bad about our
publications.
We promise never to say anything bad about our
publications.
We promise never to say anything bad about our
publications.
We promise never to say anything bad about our
publications.
We promise never to say anything bad about our
publications.
We promise never to say anything bad about our
publications.
EZU ENQUIRER
Searching the truth for over 52 years. Still haven't found it
EdiMop
Managing EditorCoke
Advertising ManagerSwaimstein
News EditorsWhitey
I
I
Stew I
Trends EditorBotohner
Sports EditorDr. Z
EZU ENQUIRER, for the students but no longer by the student
government association, saturates EZU with too much
propaganda too often.
Mailing address: The EZU Penetentiary
Idiotorial offices: (haven't got any; the SGA took 'em away, but
we're gonna get 'em back)
Subscriptions: Free to anyone silly enough to believe this trash,
unavailable to all others.
APUr- JoSity He SG) BleC-f-iorVs Por �
COncecuive Jecirs Tim SulUWi A'kL oltCiJtu �
Ji'Yc Up hope. -Ptr a bnoharcty. e 4aW Up Us'rM
pi�hfTry
� � r ,
�tyer 2borb�
Coed scared of profs whips
To ENQUIRER:
I think I might have a problem
and I don't know what to do about
it. I have this really weird
professor. I mean, really
WEIRD. Sometimes he wears
chains to dass. He almost always
wears something leather�a jack-
et, pants, shirt�almost anything
leather.
Well, the other day I was
going to his office (I had an
appointment to talk about a
project I was working on), and
when I got there, somebody was
already in there. The door was
partially open and I heard all
kinds of mumbling or something.
I sort of leaned over so I could
see mside.and hewasCHAINED to
the wall! Somebody (I couldn't
see who it was) was flashing this
whip all around the place! Well, I
was scandalized.
I just stood there with my
mouth open, and all of a sudden,
my professor jerked his head
towards the door and saw me.
That's when I ran away.
Now every time I go to class,
he looks at me real funny. I just
don't know what to do. After
dass it seems like he's always
going to talk to me and I run out
as fast as I can. What can I do? I
am
A Scared Coed
The King' may visit Dick
To ENQUIRER:
I
I
I am just outraged. I have
tried and tried to serve the
students but they won't let me.
They insist on believing those
bunch of no-goods who don't
know what they're doing. I know
what I'm going 'cause I do it all
the time.
I am mad cause the press
don't like me. I try all the time to
be real nice but they don't believe
me. Well, I don't like them
either. I will print my own
newspaper 'cause I know all
about everything. I like to control
everything, see.
Well, I just don't know what
I'm going to do now. I just might
go out to California and oompare
notes with Dick. We should have
a lot in common to talk about.
I just might go to Brussia or to
Beast Chermany. I think those
people there will like me
Tt- K-nq
What is your name, newspaper?
To ENQUIRER:
I
I Okay, you newspaper people,
j I am really tired of this. I wish
you would make up your biased
j minds as to what your name really
is. Sometimes I think you must
forget and have to make up
another one on the spur of the
moment.
First, (at least as far back as I
remember) your name was the
Teco Echo. Then it was the East
Carolinian. Then you changed it
toFOUNTAINHEAD. Next it ws
Fountainblah and then you chan-
ged it back to FOUNTAINHEAD
(apparently you remembered it.)
Next thing I knew it was
Buglehead and then FOUNTAIN-
HEAD again. (Boy, you ail sure
are flighty.) Now you have to
change it again. The EZU
ENQUIRER. Are you gonna
leave it this time? I'm gettin'
tired of trying to remember the
name all the time. I wish you
would just leave it alone. Don't
you know that it is a hassle for the
students to remember your name-
-ALL of them???
Why don't you just let it be
named the EZU ENQUIRER? I
think the students would appred-
ate.
Handicapped with a Short
Memory






MSmHHBl
1 April 1078 EZU ENQUIRER Py S
Giant killer roaches plague Jones
A giant roach attacked several
students in a dormitory last night,
killing one and seriously injuring
two others.
The attack occured around
1:15 a.m. in a third-floor bath-
room in Jones dormitory.
The dead student was identi-
fied as Joe Higgy, 20, of
Fairview, New Jersey.
Higgy died of multiple lacera-
tions on his head, chest and legs,
according to doctors at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital.
The injured were identified as
Jon 9teele, 19, of Durham, and
James McMac, 19, of Raleigh.
A hospital spokesman said
that Steele and McMac were
suffering from lacerations and
severe shock.
According to eyewitness
reports, Steele and McMac were
injured when they tired to save
Higgy from the killer roach.
"We were coming in from
downtown said Paul Bun, an
eyewitness to the attack.
"We all had to go the head
really bad. Joe (Higgy) went in
first said Bun.
"We were sitting in Steele's
room when we heard a scream
Bun said.
"It wasthegod-awfulest thing
I ever heard. We ran to the
bathroom and there was Higgy,
or what was left of him, on the
floor while a huge roach was
Fleeming quiet dorm
cracks down on noise
Twenty-five students were
evicted from Fleeming dormitory
over the past week for violation of
quiet hour rules.
The 24-hour quiet rules state
that no noise is to be made in the
halls at any time of the day or
night. Students violating these
rules will be evicted upon first
offense.
One student oomplained that
the rules were too strict and were
unreasonable.
"For instance, I was thrown
out for dropping my shampoo in
the hall said Mary Koed, a
former resident of Fleeming.
"The bottle slipped. I couldn't
help it she said.
Other students were evicted
for dropping pens, books, papers
and other items in the halls.
One student claimed that she
was evicted fa dripping water in
the hall.
"I forgot my towel, so I just
put my housecoat on and went
back to get it said Nita Noise.
"A girl told me that the noise
of the water dripping was driving
her crazy and she couldn't
study said Noise.
Marilyn Full Gums, dean of
women, says the rules aren't
oppressive at all.
"I don't think asking for
absolutely no noise is unreason-
able at all said Full Gums.
"We do let them breathe. Of
oourse, they can't sneeze. That
would make just too much noise
said FullGums.
"We've done everything
possible to ensure quietness.
Door hinges have been oiled and
special soundproof windows and
bathroom doors have been instal-
led she said.
"The intercom has even been
dismantled. Callers have to send
up notes by a messenger if they
want to see someone FullGums
added.
"Of oourse, there are no
radios, television sets, or stereos
allowed FullGums said. "We
have surprise checks to see if
anyone has any
"The sidewalk area even has
signs posted telling passerbys
that this is a quiet area
FullGums said proudly.
"I think we've done a good
job she said.
FullGums denied the rumors
around campus that a Hollywood
producer has approached her with
offers to make a movie about the
quiet dorm situation.
Rumor claims that the movie
will be billed as another One Flew
The SGA Bookstore
We have just received a
shipment of new titles for
your reading enjoyment.
let the Students Decide'
by Tim Sullivan (fiction)
The End Justifies the Means'
by Tim Mertz (non-fiction)
1 Seduced and Abandoned'
by Cliff Page (Art)
Over the Cuckoo's Nest, starring
the "inmates" of Fleeming as a
parallel to Nicholson and his crew
and FullGums as Nurse Retched.
hauling him towards a big hole in
the wall Bun said.
"Steele and McMac tried to
grab Higgy said Bun, becoming
emotional.
"The thing let go of Higgy
and attacked Steele and then
turned on McMac. We grabbed
them and dragged them out. But
it was too late for Higgy Bun
sobbed, wiping tears from his
eyes.
Bun said that someone had
called the police and they arrived
next.
According topolioeman Bruce
Bern, the students were fighting
off the roach with Raid and Black
Flag when poiioe arrived.
"I've never seen such a big
roach said Bern. "The damn
thing was big as a dog
Police finally trapped the
roach in a corner urinal and shot it
to death.
According to Will Howard of
the Housekeeping staff, the roach
measured tree feet from anten-
nae to tail.
"I've heard stories of big
roaches, but this damn thing was
like King Kong said Howard.
Students in Jones dorm have
organized groups armed with
cans of Raid to patrol the halls at
night and are being advised not to
walk anywhere in the dorm alone.
"Something like this will
never happen again said Jerry
Keenar, a friend of the dead
student.
"That thing killed my best
friend said Keenar quietly.
"I'll get every last one of
those mothers if it's the last thing
I do
Maybe we'll cure the
SGA budget
without your help,
but don't bet your life on it.
The way it stands today, one student out of four will be affected by the SGA. That means it will strike
some member intwooutof three ECU dorms. To change those statistics we have to bring the promise
of early political truth to everyday reality. And to expand our detection program and techniques. And
that takes money. Lot of money. Money we don't have, especially this year. The American SGA
Society will never give up the fight Maybe we'll find the answers even without your help. But don't
Pet your life on it.
We want to cure SGA money
problems in your lifetime.
American SGA Society
i





��� ��� i ��� ��
Page 6 EZU ENQUIRER 1 April 1978
This is YOUR SGA.
5)eS folks, tbeSe are your legislators to tubom you baue
entruSteb tbe care of $250,000 tf)iS year. 93oy bib tbey take
care of your mouey tf)is year�f your organisation can
beliuer uoteS in a Spring election you are guaranteeb just
about any rfmnk of money tyat you loant. akt a goob took
folks, because tbey toil! proably ask for your oote next Rail
i
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T
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Charies Soon saddled with blame
1 April 1978 EZU ENQUIRER Page 7
J. Christ and 'Second Coming' bombs
It's always a disappointment
to see a show with as much
promise as last week's "Second
Coming" fail so miserably.
This production was one more
nail in the coffin of major
seeing Christ's return? I doubt if
many people even knew he was
gone.
But that's all over and done
with. Spilt milk. Water over the
dam. A well done vasectomy.
Tremors
attractions here at EZU, thanks to
the efforts of EZU's mad pro-
gramer, Charles Soon, chairper-
son of the Student Union Major
Attractions Committee.
Alright, granted he pulled a
big deal in getting the only North
Carolina appearanoe of Jesus
Christ and his All-Star Second
Coming Revue, but did he ever
stop to consider that perhaps no
one on campus was interested in
The fact is, almost $30,000 in
student fees was blown to bring
what was billed as "the greatest
event in the history of mankind
And what did we get for our
money? A sleazy, off-key celest-
ial choir; an overly messianic
Christ, ranting some gibberish
about peace and love, the stand-
ard hippie spiel; one of the
hokiest good vs. bad battles this
reviewer has ever seen; and
enough fire, brimstone, dry ice
and stage blood to supply a
thousand Kiss oonoerts.
Theatrics is one thing; self-
annihilation is quite another thing
entirely.
The performance began with a
medley of Christ's greatest hits,
sung by the aforementioned
sleazy chorus of angels.
These lovelies managed to
bump and grind their way
through some of the trashiest
hymnsever written, including the
infamous "They Nailed Me to a
Tree, But That Won't Stop Me
banned in five nations.
At last, the choir exited, and
there, descending from a hook
high above the stage, in gleaming
white sequins and amid showers
of glitter, was the Son of God
himself.
I was duly impressed.
"Good evening children, I
Campus drunk spills guts
Back in the year 902 A.D a
man named Leo Beerstein in
Greenville discovered a stange
new powder which he called
"ALKUHL The Greenville
women of this tie used this fine
powder as a make-up coloring for
their eyes. The rectified spirits of
it have been coloring the eyes of
its users ever si nee bloodshot
red.
Like the fortunate caveman
who discovered fire, and brought
to mankind a stimulating new
ideathis unsung Greenville he-
ro discovered firewater and, with
it, brought EZU the stimulator to
error aloohol.
But, until the fifteenth cent-
ury, the powerful potential of this
great new discoverey lay hidden.
The infirmary used it only fa
medicine, until one imaginative
doctor was more than pleasantly
surprised by the amorous effect a
deliberate overdose had upon a
sweet, innocent, young coed
patient he knew.
After that, the Greeks on
campus (who never miss a trick)
quickly adopted the habit. "Frat
rats" began using it to a great
extent. With the establishment of
a drinking fraternity called "I
Tappa Keg a firm foundation
for the present-day reputation of
the Greek temperament was
established.
In the sixteen'h oentury, the
use of distilled spirits spread
throughout the entire campus at
EZUand spirits rose with it -
which explains how, and when,
the entire student population
came into their own.
Things got pretty wild after
that. Downtown, during the reign
of Sir Jolly Roger, an Act was
passed encouraging the manu-
facture of spirits. Retailers of
intoxicating beverages offered
their customers a package deal -
as much as they could drink, and
a slippery, beer-puddled dance
floor which to dance the whole
thing offall fa the exabitant
sum of one penny.
Thus, the pattern was set.
From the barto the bed. And
male imbibers at EZU have been
having a corking time ever sinoe.
Yes, we owe it all to this great
man, Leo Beerstein. He has
definitely set a trend hae at EZU.
In fact, the school newspaper,
which by the way had its name
changed from Beerhead to
FOUNTAINHEAD because of the
famer names' loose connaa-
tions, ran the following ad which
brought fast results:
Convivial gent with quart of
gin desires to meet congenial lady
with pint of Vermouth. Object:
cocktails.
Here's looking at you, Leo!
Cheers!
Do you sit at home alone on Friday nights?
If so, then we have the answer
to your problems. Lovely Lippy Leper's Beauty
and Charm School can bring out the hidden
traits inside you. After just one session with
Lippy you will be amazed at how many heads
you'll turn!
�p
. P
Located at 405 Hooker Road
Another satisfied
customer
have cone to give you eternal
life He said.
Any member of the audience
who will believe in me will not
perish he went on.
It was then that the Campus
Crusaders rushed the stage in a
sickening display of hero waship.
Jeeezus, guys. Even Pres-
ley's fans had a little dignity
about them.
Christ's back-up band wasn't
so hot either.
You'd think, out of all the
great musicians in Heaven, Christ
could have found a better sup-
pating group than the lackluster
collection of incompetent spoon
players he is touring with.
The aowd of approximately
5,000 looked on in amazement as
Jesus fed the entire cast with one
Twinkieandashotglassof Mogen
David.
Wow.
Next, and perhaps wase,
sane poor fanatic lunged fa ward
fron the audience and tried to
tough the robe of Christ when a
burly security guard stepped out
of nowhere and bashed the poa
sucker's skull in sideways.
It was all in a night's wak fa
Jesus, though. At the end,
he tipped his aownofthans
and summed uptheevering:
"Good night it was a pleasure
business with you
ARE YOU PLAGUED with doubt when you light up? Has your
favaite weed been douched with government surplus herbicide?
Will your happy, healthy vitality go up in smoke? Why suffer from
PAINFUL VACILLATION? Send herb samples, along with $25.00
service charge to: EZU ENQUIRER, Trends Desk, Old South Bldg.
THE DREAD CROSS WANTS WHAT YOU'VE GOT!
we'll BE COMING AROUND TOUR PUCE
IN THE NEXT FEW WEEKS
PREPARED TO MAKE A DONATION. IT ONLY
TAKES A MINUTE, AND WHEN IT IS ALL OVER
YOU WILL FEEL
COMPLETELY
DIFFERENT.
IN FACT YOU WON T FEEL
OF ANYTHIHG.





PgQe 8 EZU ENQUIRER 1 April 1978
Fritz Kalder's Kampus Sekurity stymied
EZU's elite Kampus Sekurity
Task Force (KSTF) has been
"running our collective asses all
over campus since the publication
of that idiotic map" according to
KSTF Oberkommandant Fritz
Kalder, referring to the campus
safety map published by a
notorious local publication last
week
Now that coeds know where
to go to get ravaged, the campus
bushes are really burning, so to
speak, it's all our troopers can
handle to arrive in time to catch
any of the action griped the
respondent task Force Feuhrer.
Kalder was optimistic, how-
ever, that his troopers will be able
t "keep on top of things
Pending the arrival of their
special, limited edition jack-boot
Keds from Frederick's of Holly-
wood, troopers have been sup-
plied with Field telesoopes and
binoculars so they can at least
catch a flash
9
A.
KAMPUS SECURITY TASK Force Oberkommandant Fritz Kalder.
A T THE SCENE of the crime: here lies another victim of the mad rapist.
H. Waif banger in mutated triangle recital
Harvev Wallhannpr mpmhw d �.n��� .
Harvey Wall banger, member
of the EZU School of Music
Percussion faculty, will be pre-
sented in a faculty triangle recital
onThurs Oct. 15at 7:30p.m. in
the lobby of the Music Building.
southeastern 7
The program will include
various Baroque, Classical, Rom-
antic, and Contemporary works,
in addition to some which have
not yet been written. From the
aforementioned repertoire, Wal-
Ibanger will most likely choose to
perform as his opening selection
Ogre Straminsky s "Mutation on
a Theme by Bozart a standard
triangle concert piece.
The major work to be perfor-
med in the recital is not yet
known, but rumor has it that
Harvey will give the premiere
performance of "Concerto for
Triangle and Jazz Ensemble"
(1978) by EZU School of Music
graduate student Jake Stomps.
Stomps will conduct the piece
himself, and the EZU Trombone
Ensemble, augmented by horns,
saxes and percussion will play the
parts written fa Jazz Ensemble.
Wallbanger joined the EZU
School of Music faculty in the
beginning of July. He holds a
Master's degree in triangle per-
formance from Junior Occupa-
tional Institute of Northeast Ten-
nessee (JOINT) and is a doctoral
candidate at the Tijuana Hills
Conservatory of Music (THC).
Wallbanger has the distinc-
tion of being the only classical
trianglist ever to perform the
"Suite for Triangle and Jazz
Piano and has recorded it on
the Unknown Records label.
The recital is free and open to
the public, but seating capacity is
limited to the stairs and floor.
EATATTHE
RUN DOWN INNF
POPULAR PRICES
(WE LiKE EM)
WEEKLY SPECIALS
OUR GUARANTEE:
IF YOU ARE IN
ANYWAY C
DISSATISFIED
WITH OUR FOOD,
WE'LL THROW YOU OUT!
COMING ATTRACTION UNCLE TOMS CABIN
starring Alonzo Newojr
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL!
T-BONE�1.00
with meat4.00





?son (bHBbxSs '
T-JfflfVi 1 "
1 April 1978 EZU ENQUIRER
Pag9
Slavic summer school schedule slated
Summer
Schedule
Economic Theory: A systema-
tic application and critical evalua-
tion of the basic analytic concepts
of economic theory, with an
emphasis on money and why it is
good. Fixed coefficient produc-
tion functions, cost and supply
curves, and nonconvexity com-
prise the first semester.
SECOND SEMESTER
Second semester is comprised
of a concentration on spending,
making change, and keeping a
neat wallet. The Federal Reserve
System is analyzed, and advanced
students are coached in the
proper method of filling out a
deposit slip. Other topics include:
Inflation and Depression-how to
diess for each. Loans, interest,
welching.

History of European Civiliza-
tion: Ever since the discovery of a
fossilized eohippus in the men's
washroom at Jones Cafeteria, it
has been suspected that at one
time Europe and America were
connected by a strip of land that
later sank or became College Hill,
Greenville, or both. This throws a
new perspective on the formation
of European society and enables
historians to conjecture about
why it sprang up in an area that
would have made a much better
Asia. Also studied in the course is
the decision to hold the Renais-
sance in Pitt County.
Introduction to Psychology:
The theory of human behavior.
Why some men are called " lovely
individuals" and why there are
others you just want to pinch. Is
there a split between mind and
body, and, if so, which is better to
have?
WINTER COURSES
Introduction to hostility; Inter-
mediate Hostility; Advanced Hat-
red; Theoretical Foundations of
Loathing. Special consideration is
given to a study of consciousness
as opposed to unconsciousness,
with many helpful hints on how to
remain conscious.

Psychopathology. Aimed at
understanding obsessions and
phobias, including the fear of
being suddenly captured and
stuffed with Cavettini Supreme,
reluctance to return a volleyball
serve, and the inability to say the
word "mackinaw" in the pre-
sence of a woman. The compul-
sion to seek out the company of
music majors is analyzed.

Philosophy 1: Everyone from
Plato to Camus. The following
topics to be covered:
Ethics: The categorical
imperative is explored and six
ways to make it work for you.
Aesthetics. Is art the mirror
of life? If so, should we comb our
hair in it?
Metaphysics: What happens
to the soul after death? Should
You can do it too! 55,000
other people have done it! People
with different mouths! Different
teeth! Different tastes! Our gra-
duates are people from all walks
of life with all kinds of taste
preferences. These people have
at least tripled eating speed
without changing taste prefer-
ences.
"LET ME SHOW YOU
HOW TO CUT YOUR
EATING TIME IN HALF
&
TRIPLE YOUR CONSUMPTION
IN JUST FIVE DAYS
HERE ARE SOME OF THE SKILLS
TAUGHT AT THE EVELYN FOOD
EATING DYNAMICS INSTITUTE
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
II.
12.
How to eat without chewing and swallowing.
How to eat many foods at once.
How to eat various foods in any sequence -ice
cream, pickles, sardines, cream puffs, chili, steak,
Cheez Whiz.
How to finish everything.
How to spit out bones and seeds while actually still
eating.
How to remember what you have eaten
How to eat up and down as well as from right to left
across the plate
How to eal fal fast
How to keep track of what you've eaten
What to do for constipation
w hat to do for diarrhea
How to walk after a meal
we bring a change of underwear?
Epistemology: Is knowledge
knowable? If not, how do we
know this?
The Absurd: Why existence is
often considered silly, particular-
ly for men who wear brown-and-
white shoes. Manyness and one-
ness are studied as they relate to
otherness, (Students achieving
oneness will move ahead to
twoness.)

PhilosophyXXIX-B: Introduc-
tion to God. Confrontation with
the Creator of the universe
through informal lectures and
field trips.

The New Mathematics: Stan-
dard mathematics has recently
been rendered obsolete by the
discovery that for years we have
been writing the numeral three
backwards. This has led to a
reevaluation of counting as a
method of getting from one to
ten. This oourse appears in your
catalogue under the English
Dept. heading.

Astronomy: A detailed study
of the universe and its care and
cleaning. Students will be taught
to indentify various constella-
tions, such as the Big Dipper,
Cygnus the Swan, Sagittarus the
transsexual, and the thirty-seven
stars that form the intersection of
fifth and Cotanche.

Modern Biology: How the
body functions, and where it can
usually be found. Blood is
analyzed, and it is learned why it
is the best possible thing to have
it running through one's veins.

M usic A ppreoiation: I n or der
to "hear" a great piece of music
correctly, one must: (1) know the
birthplace of the composer, (2)
keep his eyes open, (3) be able to
tell a rondo from a scherzo, and
back it up with action. If a student'
fails in one or all of these
departments then class atten-
dance will suffice. The student's
ear will be trained for it is the
most easily deceive organ and can
be made to think it is a nose by
bad placement of stereo speakers.
Other topics include the four-bar
rest and its potential as a political
weapon or a guide fa the
downtown oriented student. The
Gregorian Chant: Which monks
kept the beat.

Drama 1000: All dwma is
oonflict. Character development
is also very important. Alto what
they say. Students learn that
long, dull speeches are not so
effective�especially when render-
ed by the professor. Short funny
speeches seem to go over well.
History will be explored. For
example: Before the invention of
italics, stage directions were
often mistaken fa dialogue, and
great actas frequently found
themselves saying, "Butch rises,
aossesleft The phenanenon is
analyzed in detail and students
are guided in avoiding mistakes.
Required pamphlet: Edgar Loes-
sin's Dramatic Innovations in
Greenvecondensed veraoi.

Yeats and Hygiene: The
poetry of William Butla Yeats in
analyzed against a background of
proper dental care. (Course limi-
ted to six students.) Praequi-
sites: An extensive knowledge of
the poetry and suicide of Sylvia
Rath a root canal surgery.
Musioology III: The Reoader
The student is taught how to play
"Stayin' Alive" on this end-
blown wooden flute, and pro-
gresses rapidly to the Bradenburg
Concertos. Then slowly back to
"Stayin' Alive

Introduction to Social Work:
A oourse designed to instruct the
social waker who is interested in
going out "in the field Topics to
be oovered include: how to
aganize street gangs into basket-
ball teams, and vice versa;
playgrounds as a means of
preventing juvenile aime, and
how to get potentially homicidal
cases to try the sliding pond;
discrimination; the broken home;
what to do if you are hit with a
bicycle chain.

Rapid Reading: This course
will increase reading speed a little
each day until the end of the
term, by which time the student
will be required to read Milton's
Paradise Lost in fifteen minutes.
The method is to scan the page
and eliminate everything except
the pronouns from one's field of
vision. Soon the pronouns are
eliminated. Gradually the student
is encouraged to nap. A frog is
dissected. Spring comes. People
marry and die. Joe DiMaggio
does not return.
SECOND SEMESTER
The second semester will be
devoted to techniques in "speed
eating" and will be directed at
those studentson the meal plan at
EZU. A guest lecturer, the
distinguished Mrs. Evelyn Food,
will relate her now revolutionary
skill taught at the Evelyn Food
Eating Dynamics Institute (see ad
page 8).
become a legally orbaineb imtd)!
5)e$ frienbs, for only $3 (or 5 Sount Sbocula box tops)
you too can become a uritcf)! ibe toil! Senb you our
beluse, fleSf) cooereb anb book of $bitcbcraft
m Turn your enemies
into kitty litter!
-i �aSt Spelfe!
ftmcye your frienbs!
93e tbe life of tf)e party!
R@. 93ox 13
2)arkMey S?��� ,
9tticf)igan






Page 10 EZU ENQUIRER 1 April 1978
Your Legislature At Work
HMMMM'
WHY IS THIS man laughing
inn'?
I THINK I'LL eat my words
before I write them.
WE HAFF VAYS to makes
you talk.
WHAT OFFICE SHOULD I
run for now�MRC or WRC?
LETS SEEIF I had two
apples and gave one to Ricky,
how many will I have left?
SAY AHHH AND put your
foot in your mouth again!
LA Dl DA! Ladi da'
THIS MAN IS definitely hun-
gry for power.
rnai
OLI





HHi
Thrillman to open car lot
Pirate head basketball coach
Larry Thrillman is planning to
start a new car dealership
sometime in the next two weeks.
The news came as a surprise
to most people but Thrillman
insists that he can sell cars sell
EZU basketball and do both well.
"I feel that selling cars and
recruiting basketball players are
very similar things Thrillman
said. "I decided then to pursue a
double carrier
When asked to draw a parallel
between recruiting and selling
cars Thrillman cited one fa us.
'Look at it this way Thrill-
man exclaimed, "if I can sell
Oliver Sack and Al Myson on our
basketball program I can sell
anything. I feel I have good ability
asa salesman and can talk people
into most anything
Thrillman was asked how he
hopes to compete with all the
more established dealerships in
the area being a new comer to the
game.
"I feel my dealership will be
competitive right from the start
Thrillman stated. "In fact I plan
to outsell every car dealership in
Greenville this year! I may not
sell 10,000 cars but 8 or 9000 will
be O.K. with me
Coach Thrillman was also
asked if selling cars would hurt or
hip the basketball program at
EZU
"Why no it won't hurt the
program one bit said Thrill-
man, in fact now I will be able to
lease cars to my staff and players.
We may not win every game we
play but we will sure look good
driving to play them (the
games)
The question was raised to
Thrillman that the National Col-
legiate Athletic Association
(NCAA) may not be too happy
about Thrillman leasing cars to
his playf rs.
"Well if they object I will sit
down and work out some arrange-
ments with them Thrillman
said. "I'm sure I can sell them on
the idea
LARRY THRILLMAN practices
holding out his hand for money in
his car lot.
Sack plans to turn pro
EZU's star guard Oliver Sack
has applied for the National
asketball Association's (NBA)
hardship draft.
The 6 3" guard from Queens
New Vork was the number four
it in the nation last year with
a 28.0 point average per game.
EZU head basketball coach
Larry Thrillman admitted he was
a bit surprised about Sack's
decision bul had talked with him.
Oliver and I had a serious
iiscussion on his future Thrill-
man sai
"Oliver has decided that it is
in his best interest to pursue a pro
carrier at this time. I personally
feel that he (Sack) will make a
great pro guard and had he
stayed here at EZU would have
been the top college guard in the
nation next year
In talking with Oliver Sack,
Sack insisted that last year's
record (9-17) had nothing to do
with his decision to leave.
"Last year's team was the
first losing team that I have ever
played on Sack said. "How-
ever, that did not affect my
decision at all. I've enjoyed it
here at EZU and I plan to come
back here in the off season to
finish my degree
When asked about how next
year'steam will fare without him,
Sack's answer was quick and
straight to the point.
"There is some super talent
on our team Sack insisted. "I
think with or without me that they
will have a winning season
regardless. The guys really want
to win every badly next year
In discussing Sack's possibili-
ties, one pro scout felt that Sack
had a good chance of going in the
first round. The Chicago Bulls
and Atlanta Hawks are believed
to have a a genuine interest in
him .
6purte
1 April 1978 EZU ENQUIRER Page 11
Talkin'Trash
with Dr. Z
GARBAGE:
one cause
that doesn't
need your
contribution
Last year, Americans threw
away 150 million tons of art -
enough to fill garbage cans lined
three abreast from New York to
California.
Our legislature oosts us more
than $20,000 each year. This
collection and disposal of our
money is now the second largest
item on the SGA budget surpass-
ed only by the Drama Depart-
ment.
The problem is more than art.
It is the waste of the rest of our
student funds which are becom-
ing more scarce.
ULIVtH SACK SHOWN here practianc vt levitation will turn pro





Page 12 EZU ENQUIRER 1 April 1978
Pirates will join conference Cane says
. . .�,� orranncwH einht Vfiai S in iritfiP Hi HH
8y Dr. Z
It was announced jointly by
eight maja southern independent
school s that a new conference wi 11
be famed this week.
The member institutions will
be EZU, the College of William
and Mary, the University of South
Carolina, Flaida State Univasi-
ty, the University of Miami (Fla.),
the University of Richmond,
Virginia Polytechnic Instutute
and the University of Southern
Mississippi.
On hearing the news Pirate
athletic directa Bill Cane was
very pleased.
'This is what we have been
hoping to happen fa a long
time Cane stated.
"We talked with these schools
last year about the subject of a
confaence, but Virginia Tech and
South Carolina were busy trying
to apply to the Atlantic Coast
Conference (A.C.C.). Due to
recent developments, however,
these schools have decided they
can wait no longer fa the A.C.C.
to admit them
The recent developments
Cane is refaring to is first of all,
the rejection of Virginia Tech's
bid to the A.C.C. last year and the
admittance of Geagia Tech this
week.
South Carolina, a tamer
A.C.C. member until they with-
drew in 1971, had been trying to
regain admittance to the confer-
ence but the Geagia Tech bid
bars the doa fa readmittiai fa
the faeseeable future. So
apparently U.S.C. felt that they
must join some kind of conference
or remain independent.
U.S.C. football head coach
and athletic directa Jim Carlen
oonfimed that the Geagia Tech
decision had a lot to do with the
faming of a new coiference as
did fcotbali head coach and
athletic directa Bill Dooley of
Virginia Tech.
"Yes, the Geagia Tech deci-
sion was a maja facta fa our
decision to pursue a new confer-
ence affiliation Carlen admit-
ted.
"We really wanted to get back
in the ACC very badly but our
chances of rejoining them now
appear to be very pea.
"I felt that we could no longer
live without the advantages of a
confaence sofa the best interest
of our programs we are joining
the new confaence.
"We simply oould, wait no
longa Tech's Bill Dooley said.
"It upsets ne a bit that the ACC
would turn us down last year and
then allow Geagia Tech to join
this year.
"When I was at Carolina last
year I was in fava of UP1 joining
the ACC and so was UNC athletic
directa Bill Colby. But I feel that
the new confaence will be a great
one with some vay fine institu-
tions in both academics and
athletics. We will certainly be
competitive with the ACC
Southern Mississippi's Bobby
Collins, the Golden Eagles head
football coach, felt that it was a
great step fa ward fa USM's
athletic program.
"This is great news to all of us
here at USM Collins said.
" We catainly feel that we can
compete with the aha oonfa-
ence membas and we really look
fa ward to starting our confaenoe
schedule.
To Flaida State's foaball
caoch Bobby Bowden, the sched-
ule was going to cause problems.
"Many of our football games
are arranged eight years in
advance Bowden said
"The only league membas
we play in 1980 are EZU and
USM. We'll have to wak sane
teams in and get the schedule
straightened out.
"It's wath the trouble, though,
because we've wanted to be in a
confaoice fa a long time
The name of the new oonfa-
ence is believed to be the Mid
South Confaenoe.
p!�"�!Kb7 Ca 9rins at hmringconferennews





Title
Fountainhead, March 30, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 30, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.492
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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