Fountainhead, March 23, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years
With a circulation of over
8,500, this issue is tb
pages.
Fountainhead
�� :t: " �� ��: -iL 23 March 197�
ON THE IN3DE
Endasementp. 3
Jenkinsp 10
Tennis winsp. 13
Vol. No. 53, Ho.j East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina & 23 March 1978
SU Board positions open
in.� ,Mt " Ramw said of the smaller commits
R.DOUG WHITE letter outlining their quahf.ca- of the president�� Coffeehouse and The E
By DOUG WHITE
News Editor
The two day representative
positions on the Student Union
Board of Directors are vacant and
applications are being accepted to
fill them, according to Dennis
Ramsey, Student Union pres-
ident
"Applications will be taken
until 5 p.m. Fri March 30.
Applicants are required to write a
letter outlining their qualifica-
tions fa the board and submit to
an interview by the board
Ramsey said.
Applicants must also have a
2.0 grade average, accading to
Ramsey.
�' The board is the government
authaity of the Student Union. It
is responsible fa selecting the
president, approving the budget,
and approving all appointments
of the president Ramsey said.
' Anyone who has any interest
in campus entertainment should
consider this position
Ramsey also encouraged
students to apply fa positions on
any of the 11 Student Union
committees.
"Applications are coming in
at a good rate fa the more
popular committees, such asfilms
and maja attractions, but sane
of the smaller committees such as
Coffeehouse and The Entertainer,
aren t getting as many applicants
as we'd like Ramsey said.
Committee applications are
being accepted until 5 p.m. Fri ,
March 24.
Persons wishing to apply fa
either the Board of Directas a a
committee can pick up an applica-
tion in the Student Union offices,
second fioa, Mendenhall
'
Plans to join Gov. Hunt's staff
DENNIS RAMSEY
Union president
STUDENT
Jenkins begins second career
CHANCELLOR LEO JENKINS
ECU News Bureau Photo
By STUART MORGAN
News Edita
Dr. Leo W. Jenkins, president
and chancel la of ECU fa the
past 18 years, will scon be
retiring.
After retirement, Jenkins
plans to leave Greenville to
establish a permanent home at
Atlantic Beach and probably an
auxiliary apartment in Raleigh.
"We own a condominium at
Atlantic Beach, I like the people
there, and they've made me an
honaary citizen said Jenkins.
"They've also given me a key to
city of Maehead
"I'm going to join many
organizations down there. Many
people don't realize this, but
Atlantic Beach is an ideal place to
retire; actually, it's really a mecca
for retired people he added.
But, despite the description of
the seemingly ideal retirement
location by Jenkins, he has
decided to embark on a second
career.
"I plan to join Governa
Hunt's staff, but we haven't
figured out in what capacity yet
said Jenkins. "As late as last
Thursday, he and I talked a little
bit about it, and from that
discussion I believe I will serve in
a position as consultant with him
on many things
"I think the chief one may be
in the area of industry and
industrial development in rural
areas said Jenkins. "I may also
do a little work in education
Jenkins, an achiever and a
man who has a reputation fa
getting things done, said he
would do anything he is qualified
to do to benefit the state when
and if Governa Hunt should ask
him to.
"If he should decide at
anytime that I can be of no service
to him, there will be no hard
feelings on my part he added.
Jenkins said he was very
grateful to Governor Hunt fa his
invitatiai to join his staff, and
added he had known Governa
Hunt fa a loig time and had a
high regard fa him.
"I had the pleasure of giving
his commencement speech when
he was in high school as a
student said Jenkins. "He has
said since then that he had
considered me a very audacious
person at the time
Jenkins added that Governa
Hunt liked the spirit that he
instilled in him as a young boy,
"That things can be done if you
want to do them
"He followed that philo-
sophy said Jenkins.
Campus security improvements offered
Pres. vice-pres. candidates present platform
. . . .� �i.rf howlnn In On CamDUS, especially WiUl IMC e;ol intorPtf nrntlD.
Tommy Joe Payne and David
Cartwright, candidates fa Stu-
dent Government Association
(SGA) president and vice-
president, say their top priaity
projects will be three year adopt-
ion of textbooks and optional one
semester dam contracts if they
are elected.
"We want a program that
requires professas to adopt a
textbook fa at least three years.
The way it is now a professa can
require a different book from one
semester to the next, which
means that you might pay $15 fa
a book and only get a quarter
when you try to sell it back
Payne sa�d.
"With our plan you would na
only be assured that you can sell
your book back at a decent price
but there would also be a larger
selection of used books available.
This would cut the cost of books
all the way around Payne
Payne said that students need
an optional semester dam con-
trad to go along with the present
one year contract so that students
move out of the dorms after
one semester without having to
pay dam rent fa the next
semester ai top of apartment
rent.
Cartwright said that one of his
maja concerns is extending the
bus routes so that mae students
can take advantage of the service
and have access to mae areas of
the city.
"We would like to see the
night bus route extended also. If
we extend the night route, then
students would able to reach
more shopping areas
Cartwright said.
Payne said that ana her pos-
sible improvement in the bus
service is the construction of bus
shelters at strategic points along
the routes.
"It is an inconvience to have
to stand in the rain and wait fa
the bus Cartwright said.
"We would like to start with
one at Mendenhall and one at the
bottom of the hill, since las of
students wait on the bus at those
two stops Cartwright said.
Payne said he was concerned
with the present security situation
on campus, especially with the
safety of female students.
"It'sna safe fa girls to have
to stand outside the dam after
the doas have been locked and
wait fa a campus pol iceman to
come and open the dcor fa
them Payne said.
"We doit have a full time
night dispatcher to relay mes-
sages that are called in he
added.
Payne and Cartwright would
like to work with campus security
to open up jobs fa students to
wak as dispatchers, so if there is
a theft, an attack, a sanebcdy
needs to get into their dam, a
policeman can be sent to help.
This would help make the
campus safer and more secure fa
everyone, accading to Payne.
Payne and Cartwright would
like to reinstate the program fa
SGA funded departmental re-
treats.
� This is a program where
professors and students from any
department can go to the beach
and discouss academic porblems,
?he curriculum, and have inter-
place in the classroom Payne
said.
Payne said that he and
Cartwright "don't know all the
answers" and that they realize
their ideas are na the only ones.
"We want to hear what
everybody has to say and wak for
the best solution to the problems
that confront all the students
Cartwright said.
"We want to represent all the
ualr special interest group
Payne and Cartwright have
bah been active in student
activities at ECU, including SGA.
Payne has served in the
SGA legislature fa two years.
During his first year he served
on the Appropriations Commit-
tee. This past year he served fa
speaker of the legislature.
In the last election Payne
&� CANDIDATES P- 3
TOMMY JOE PAYNE, candidate
for SGA president
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
DAVID CARTWRIGHT CANDI-
DA TE for SGA vice-president
Photo by Pete Podeszwa





I
I
Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 Mafch 1978
SOULS
Photo jobs Ministery
Bananas
Sigma Tau Gamma is sponsor-
ing a beach party Tues March
28th from 930-1 00 at the Elbo
Room. There will be a couples
chug-off, bikini contest, erotic
banana eating, disco and prizes.
Mangione
Woo
Guest speaker Lillian Woo will
speak at Woman's Awareness
Night, Wed March 29 at 7:30 in
the Mendenhall Auditorium. The
purpose of the program is to
recognize oustanding women stu-
dents on campus from each
department. The public is invited
to attend.
The Student Union Popular
Entertainment Committee will
present Chuck Mangione on
March 29. The conoert will begin
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Tickets fa the concert will be
$3 for ECU students and $5 for
the public.
All tickets can be purchased
from the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall.
Public tickets can be purchas-
ed from the following places.
Apple Records-East Fifth Street;
School Kid's Records-University
Arcade; and The Music Shop-
Greenville Square Mall.
All tickets will be $5 at the
door.
There will be a S.O.U.L.S.
meeting Thurs March 24, at 7
p.m. at the A.A.C.C.
Also anyone interested in
running for an office of S.O.U.L.
S.for next year please contact
Curt Newby at 758-8199.
FG
The Forever Generation in-
vites you to join us Monday
evening fa Christian fellowship
and fun.
We'll be having a relevant
Bible study, good singing, and
delicious refreshments.
Our speaker will be Jeff
Hedgpath of Pro-Teens, a Christ-
ian youth aganizatioi.
That's Mai March 27, at 9
p.m. in Brewster C-304. Why not
oome and join us?
Coffeehouse Management Hm market
The Student Union Coffee-
house Committee will present our
own Joe Collins Thursday night at
9 p.m. in room 15, Mendenhall.
Joe has perfamed at the
Coffeehouse several times befae
to delighted audienoss.
His repetoire includes songs
ranging fran Cat Sevens to his
own compositions, plus such
aowd pleasers as "The Rooster
Song" and "The Hole in the
Bottom of the Sea
Fifty cents gets you in the
doa fa sane fine entatarinment
and all the munchies your glut-
tonous heart desires.
Printmakers
The ECU Print Group, with
SGA funding, is sponsaing two
lecture and slide presentations by
nationally known printmakers.
The first lecture will be by Dr.
Robert Nelson, Lithographer and
professa of print making at UNC-
Chape! Hill. Dr. Nelson will speak
March 29 from 3 to 430 p.m. in
Jenkins Auditaium.
ECU alumnus Nabert
Irving teaches at Atlantic
Christian College and is an expert
in silk: aeen.
Erving will lecture April 4
from 3 to 4 p.m. in Jenkins
Auditaium.
McClancey
Geage MoQancy will speak
Tuesday, March 28 from 3-5 p.m.
in Jenkins Auditaium.
A waking artist, with post
graduate degrees in both art
histay and philosophy, Geage
McClancy has taught in these
fields and in the studio arts.
Presently, he is the co-
adinata of the Studio Semester
in N Yak City program of
Empire State College, in New
Yak City, which is considered to
be one of the most innovative
programs in the aeative arts
today, paralleling the Bauhaus
experience
The Society fa the Advance-
ment of Management will meet
Tues March 28 in Rawl 102 at 4
p.m.
The election of new officers
will occur then.
All members are urged to
attend. Ayone interested is also
welcome.
Lost ft found
The campus Lost and Found
Department is located at the
Infamatioi Desk in Mendenhall.
We have books, rings, glas-
ses, ooats, watches, umbrellas,
etc.
If you have lost an item,
please oome by the Infamatioi
Desk and see if we have it.
Any unclaimed articles will be
sold at bargain prices at ECU'S
Flea Market, sponsaed by Men-
denhall, Wed April 5, oi the
Mall.
Chess club
The Chess Club meets each
Tuesday eveing at 730 p.m. in
the MendenhaJI Student Center
Coffeehouse.
All persons interested in chess
are invited to attend and join in
the competition.
Debate club
Are there any students that
find it difficult to clearly express
what is on their mind?
If you are one of these people,
the Debating Club is fa you.
The club will help develop a
student's confidence in public
speaking plus the club will better
a student's capacity on investiga-
ting issues.
The Debating Club will cause
a student to speak his thoughts
much faster. This ability shall
make the student mae valuable
oi the job market.
Wouldn't you like to speak in
front of people without your knees
knocking?
Fa mae infamatioi, contact
Marc Adler, room 161 Umstead,
758-9523.
Looking fa sane good bar-
gains? You will probably be able
to find them at the ECU Spring
Flea Market sponsaed by Mend-
enhall.
The Flea Market will be held
oi Wed April 5, fran 10 a.m.
until 6 p.m. on the Mall.
The rain date will be Thurs
April 6.
Beautiful pottery ware, hand-
made jewelry, and small plants
were a few of the items sold in the
Flea Market last time.
Back by popular demand is
the sale of unclaimed articles,
held by the University's lost and
Found Department. Don't miss it!
If you're interested in selling
items, any ECU student, staff a
faculty member is eligible. Each
individual must register to sell
items and a $5 refundable deposit
is required at the time of
registration.
Registration is Monday
through Friday, from 9 a.m. until
5 p.m. at the Mendenhall Student
Center Infamatioi Center.
Registratioi ends Mat April
3.
Crusade
A time of fun, fellowship and
Bible study sponsaed by Campus
Crusade fa Christ, meeting ai
Thursday at 7 p.m. in Brewster
C-103.
This includes dynamics of the
Christain life, Dynamics of dis-
dpleship, dynamics of ministry
and dynamics of 'he life of Christ
fa skeptics, as well as those
interested in growing in their
relationship with Christ.
Comics
The ECU Comic Book Club
will meet Tues March 28 at the
Nostalgia Newstand, 919 Dicker-
son Ave.
Topics of discussion will in-
clude upcoming minioon in Dur-
ham on April 5 and in Greenville
April 22.
Fa mae infamatioi call
758-6909 a 752-6389 after 7.30
p.m.
There will be several positions
open fa the 197879 school year
as campus photographer. Any
interested ECU student may
come by the FOUNTAINHEAD
offioe between 9 a.m. and 4 30
p.m. weekdays to obtain an
application fa saeening.
Be prepared to list previous
work experience and photogra-
phic knowledge. Also, small
portfolio, (preferably black and
white, although cola will be
aocepted), must be submitted.
The patfolio is na necessary
until after the applicant has been
contacted fa an interview.
Tests
Fivenatioial qualifying exam-
ination will be administered at
ECU during April.
The tests to be offered, and
the scheduled dates are:
American College Testing
Assessment, April 1; Dental
Aptitude Test, April 29; Graduate
Recod Examination, April 22;
Law School Admissions Test,
April 15; and Medical College
Admission Test, April 15.
The tests are required fa
entrance to educational pro-
grams. Application materials are
available from the Testing Cen-
ter, 105Cpeight Building.
Application to take the tests
must be made in advance.
Rooms
Vacancies are expected in the
International House, located at
306 E. 9th St and in designated
areas of the residence halls fa
American students who are inter-
ested in sharing a room with an
international student fa fall
semester.
Residency at the International
House is limited to junias and
above. Fa mae infamatioi,
oontact Ron Saonce, residence
counsela of Ayoock Hall o
Eleano Bunting at the Housing
Offioe in Whichard building.
Racquetball
There will be an oganizatioi-
al meeting to fam a competitive
Raquetball Spats Club.
All who are interested are
urged to attend.
We will be ready to oompete
next year it we cm oet it all
together now! Tlr meetinc vill be
held at Memaial oym, room 102
at 7 p.m. Thurs March 30.
Table tennis
If you enjoy playing table
tennis, stop by the Mendenhall
Table Tennis Rooms each Tues-
day evening at 8 p.m. when the
Table Tennis Club meets.
You will find players of all
levels of ability participating.
Various activities, induding
ladder tournaments are often
scheduled.
All ECU students, faculty and
staff are welcome.
Tonight from 7:30 to 9 p.m. in
room 132 Austin, Wayne and
Ruth West will be ministering in
song and testimony.
Everyone is invited to fellow-
ship with us tonight as we praise
the Lad and share his wad.
Monitor
Gadai Watts, Noth
Carolina's leading underwater
archaeologist, will present a
combination lecture and slide
show, "The U.S.S. MONITOR
and Fat Branch on Tues
March 28.
This outstanding presentation
will begin at 8 p.m. in Menden-
hall room 244.
The public is codially invited
to attend. There will be no
admission charge.
WRC elections
Spring elections are being
held on April 18 fa offioe of the
WRC and the house ooundls of
the women's dams fa the
schools year 1978-79.
Filing date - April 3-7.
Campaigning - April 10-14.
Eledion - April 18.
If you are interested in
running fa offioe, pick up your
filing fam in your administration
offioe.
Heart fund
The pledges of Gamma Sigma
Sigma Servioe Sooity, aloig
with the help of the sisterhood,
are sponsaing a Mile of Money
fund raising projed, the proceeds
of which will be donated to the
Heart Fund Assodation.
We invite and encourage the
members of your aganizatioi to
demonstrate the spirit of service
and involvement considered to be
so charaderistic of adive ogan-
izatiais by partidpating in this
wothwhile projed.
From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thurs
March 30, 1978, in the lobby of
the Student Supply Stoe, the
pledges of Gamma Sigma Sigma
will be providing the students and
other faculty and personnel a
chance to donate whatever they
wish to the Heart Fund.
All contributions will be taped
to a long strip of paper 1 mile
long. Our goal is to completely fill
this mile strip of tape with money.
The names of all members of a
recognized university aganiza-
tioi who contribute will be
recoded, and at the end of the
day, the aganizatioi who contri-
buted the most money will receive
a prize and also recognition in
Fountainhead.
'lease help us to achieve our
goai and also help yourself by
being an example of an aganiza-
tioi who suppats servioe pro-
jeds.
Contribute to the Heart Fuid!
If you desire any further
infamatioi, please do not hesi-
tate to oontad Maureen Shannon,
seaetary of the Spring, 1978
pledge dass, 716 Tyler-ECU.
Phone: 758-8348.
S
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Greek forum
23 March 1978 FOUMTAINHEAD Pag 3
ByRICKIGLIARMIS
Co-Greek Public Relations
Each spring, the IFC and
Panhellenic sponsor the campus-
wide blood drive.
The bloodmobile will be at
Wright Auditorium, April 4, 5
and 6.
Times for the bloodmobile are
April 4, 11-5; April 5, 11-5; and
April 6, 10-4.
In past years, during the
Greek sponsored blood drive,
ECU's AED chapter
wins two awards
ECU News Bureau
ECU's chapter of Alpha
Epsilon Delta (AED) pre-medical
pre-dental honor society received
two awards at the recent national
AED convention in Columbia,
S.C.
ECU's N.C. Epsilon chapter
received attendance and activities
awards from Dr. M.L. Moore,
national secretary.
Accepting the awards on
behalf of the ECU chapter was
Walton Kirkman Syndor III of
Cary, chapter delegate.
Alpha Epsilon Delta has
56,000 members in 124 chapters
at campuses in the U.S. and
Canada.
i' i objectives are to enoourage
exc lence in pre-medical and
pre lental education and to pro-
mot cooperation and contact
between students and educators.
All activities of the Society,
including publication of The
Scalpel, the AED newsletter and
CANDIDATES
Continued from p. 1
� ii
received the highest number of
votes cast for any candidate.
Payne served on the Student
Athletic Advisory Committee,
and recently was appointed to
serve on the Tenth Street Inter-
section Task Force.
According to Payne, the task
force has found an alternative to
an overpass which would elim-
inate the dangers students face at
the busy intersection.
David Cartwright was elected
to the legislature last fall and
served as chairman of the Ap-
propriations Committee.
Cartwright supported this
year's retreat program and ar-
gued fa its successful approval
in the legislature.
"As chairman of appropria-
tions my main concern was to see
that everybody got a fair shake
said Cartwright.
IB t
SBF
5
yp Tonight
at 9.00 p.m.
MARIA
DA WKINS
109 E. 5th St.
AED-sponsored conventions and
meetings are supported by mem-
bership fees and contributions of
"practicing alumni.
ECU has given the largest
amount of Wood than any other
school in this region.
IFC held elections of officers
last week. The new officers are:
President, Dlaton Denson; Vice-
President, Tommy Pharo; Secre-
tary, Jay Downe; and Treasurer,
Joe Ward.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The Delta Zeta's are also
having their Annual Delta Zeta
Most Eligible Greek Batchelor
Contest, APril 3-7. Each organ-
ization is to turn in their
nominations by midnight, Sun
April 2.
Pictures of the nominees will
EASTER BREW BLAST
THE PTCMER. Of r-BBFBCOCH
PANTAM BOBS
TUESDAY NITE
8:00-UNTIL
DON'T MISS
TENTH AVENUE
BAND
THURSDAY AT THE
EISO RpOX
ALSO DON'T FORGET
SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER
be made and will be on display in
the Old C.U. April 5, 6, and 7.
Each penny contributed as a vote
will be donated to the Speech and
Hearing Clinic.
The winner will be determined
by the number of pennies he has
accumulated. The winner will be
announoed at the Co-Greek
Banquet.
The Kappa Delta's would like
to oongradulate Pam Prevette
who was inducted into Alpha
Epsilon Delta, a pre-med honor
fraternity.
Last week the Chi Omega
Sorority participated in an Easter
Egg Hunt with the Lambda Chi
Alpha's for underprivileged child-
ren.
The Sigma Phi Epsilon
Fraternity inducted fourteen new
little sisters Sunday night. The
Sig Eps are having a social with
the Sgma Kappa Sorority from
State.
The Sigma Sigma Sigma Soro-
rity has won three out of three
softball games and are ranked
eighth of fifty on the campus.
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ava.
at
College View Darners
�MICE IMMZME
MW AVAILABLE
AT BARPE.ltd.
M MtkiMM Am.
1K-41H
VOTE
WILEY F.BETTS
SGA TREASURER
FOR AN
HONEST STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ELECTION DATE
MARCH 29,1978
DISCOUNT FURNITURE
AT
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
New and used furniture and appliances
Call Tommy Williams 756-7815.
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
(264 by-pass West, across from Bill Haddock Chrysler)





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 March T978
Your vote counts
Participation. A widely used word. A participant.
One who participates. Everyone participates in
something. A class. A club. A game. Elections. A
project. No, not elections. Only a certain number of
people in the general public even bother to vote in
elections.
And the general public is not the only gruop of
people at fault. The student body at a university, for
example. A good-sized student body, too. Something
I ike the one here at ECU. Rarely does even half of the
student body vote in an election.
Why? Do the students feel that they are not being
represented properly in their student government?
Perhaps they feel that their studies are much more
important than extracurricular activities-which, of
course, they should be, although these acitivties
sometime, depending upon one's major or interest,
can be very beneficial in providing one with practical
experience which inevitably proves to be invaluable.
Why do so few students vote in ECU elections?
Maybe they feel removed from the whole scene, that
getting involved is simply not their bag.
Or maybe it's just plain old apathy. Students
simply do not care that they have a voioe in their
government. What a pity. Suppose they did not have
a voice in their government, whether it was their
student government or the United States govern-
ment? Only a oouple of hundred years ago, our
forefathers were not represented in the British
parliament.
The students have a voice in their student
government. They have the right to elect candidates
to offices, the very offices in which is decided what
will be done to andor for the students. Yet, only a
certain number of students even vote.
In last spring elections, for example, approxi-
mately 3,700 people voted. Only 3,700 out of
approximately 12,000 students.
Certainly these students don't think that their
vote doesn't matter. Everybody's vote matters.
Every student should study all the candidates'
platforms, talk to them individually, if possible, make
a decision, and vote.
Students, don't think that you don't count. You
do. Take advantage of your right to vote and have
your ID sand activity cards ready when you approach
the polls Wed March 29.
Your vote does oount.
SON WORSHIPERS
Forum
Reader endorses Williams for president
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
After reading the Forum in
Tuesday's edition of
FOUNTAINHEAD, one would get
the idea that there are only two
candidates runnning for SGA
president.
Maybe the students haven't
noticed, and if they haven't let me
inform them right now that there
is a third candidate running.
His name is Jeff (Chip)
Williams and in my opinion he is
the best candidate for the posi-
tion. In the last few years it seems
that two factions have developed
in the SGA.
Constant bickering has
kept the SGA from operating
efficiently and serving the stud-
ents as it should. Jeff served in
the SGA this past year as a day
student representative.
I believe Jeff is s concerned
and dedicated student who will
bring about the changes needed
in the SGA. It istimethat we have
a president who will look after the
needs of the students and not his
own interests.
Please remember to vote
Wed March 29 and vote for Jeff
Williams, SGA president.
Thank you,
Debbie Grafton
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years.
Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News EditorsDoug White
Stuart Morgan
Trends EditorSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hoiloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
Chairperson Lewis urges students to vote
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
On March 29, the SGA will
have its annual Spring Executive
officer elections. The Election
Committee has been working very
hard to assure a sound and fair
election.
Many extra precautions are
being taken. The purpose of an
election is to leave the decision up
to the voting populus which is
exactly our intention.
There will also be a constitu-
tional amendment on the ballot.
The proposed changes are
"word" or stylistic changes.
Many of them are needed be-
cause of the change from the
quarter to semester system.
Some are to change the word
President of ECU to Chancellor of
ECU. This amendment was pro-
posed by the Review Board and
was approved by the legislature.
For the amendment to become
law, 20 of the students must
vote and 15 must approve it.
Please read these proposed
changes and indicate your appro-
val or disapproval.
I would like to take this
opportunity to urge each ECU
student to oome out and vote
Wed Mar. 29. This election is
for the four Executive offices of
the SGA (pres vice-pres trea-
surer, and secretary).
It has been said that SGA is
the Students voice. Of course,
SGA consists of only a represen-
tative number of ECU students.
But on Wednesday, the entire
student body has the privilege to
have their voices heard.
You, the ECU students, can
deade who your SGA representa-
tives will be. I think the old
saying, "speak now or forever
hold your peace" is very appro-
priate.
SpeaK oj - iiece
Ron Lewi?
Election Chairperson
Student endorses Payne,
Cartwright for SGA posts
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In regard to the upcoming
SGA elections, I would like to
endorse Tommy Joe Payne and
David Cartwright as future
officers.
Tommy, in the role as speaker
of the house, and David, as
chairperson for SGA appropria-
tions committee, have shown
themselves to be worthy of the
student's oonfidenoe.
Their platform is designed to
meet important student needs
and it reflects their concern.
Their desire to do a person-
able, good job always is a
strength both Tommy and David
possess and it would be to each
st udent' s advantage to elect them
officers of the SGA on March 29.
Thank you,
MikeAdkins





�vr ��
Forum
23 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag 5
Student endorses non-partisan Williams for SGA presidency
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
For the last two years, the
SGA has been riddled with
controversy and petty politics. As
all of us know, there are two
political groups on campus who
are oonstantly fighting with one
another for control of SGA.
These two groups, the
Sessoms, Warren, Payne aowd
and the Sullivan bunch, have both
had their day.
I believe it's time to elect an
SGA president who is his own
man. We need a president who
owes no loyalty to either side, a
candidate who will approach the
office with an open fair mind.
That candidate is Jeff Williams.
Jeff is a student, first of all,
and not a campus politician. He is
here, like most of us, to get an
education, not to play politics.
Jeff is not spending hundreds of
dollars and endless hours of his
time to get elected SGA presi-
dent, as the other two candidates
Legislator endorses Payne, Cartwright for SGA posts
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
As the Election Date nears
for the students at East Carolina,
I feel that it is essential fa each of
us to take the time to oonsider
each candidates' qualifications
and attributes.
After reviewing the names fa
the candidacy of president and
vice-president, I feel the only two
men capable of per faming the
job are Tommy Joe Payne and
David Cartwright.
Having been involved actively
in student government this year, I
have had the hona and privilege
of waking with both Tommy Joe
and David. It has been an hona
because both of these guys are
gentlemen and take a sincere
interest in the happenings of our
growing university.
Tommy Joe and David not
only have the student's best
interest at heart, but they are
tfeners as well as wakers.
Payne's recad in SGA as
eaker of the legislature is
spotless in spite of the politicians
who tried to ruin his good name.
Cartwright has shown the quali-
ties of a fine leader and a devrted
legislata through his chairman-
ship of the Appropriations Com-
mittee.
These guys have some really
great ideas fa the future:
inaeased campus security, dam
contracts renewable each semes-
ter, and plans to inaease the
parking areas.
These are just a few of their
ideas, but there is one thing that
makes these two candidates out-
standing in my mind. Tommy Joe
nor David are making pronises
that will never be fulfilled as
candidates in the past have doie.
Tonmy Joe and David are just
like the rest of us on campus
except they are willing to wak fa
Reader supports Williams
for SGA presidential post
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Jeff Williams is not align-
ed with any of the political
factions that have at times
transfamed SGA into a theater of
the absurd. If elected, he will
seek to restae the function of the
SGA to that of a service aganiza-
tion.
You will not see his name
plastered on every wall because
he is a student running a
student's campaign, not a hard-
cae politioo.
Jeff isooncerned with waking
toward reasonable goals and
making reasonable promises. A
student consumer advocacy board
and a published review of profes-
sa perfamance are two pro-
grams which Jeff plans to imple-
ment.
He realizes that as SGA
president he will not be omnipo-
tent, but that he can have an
effective voice in several areas of
policy making.
Promises are nice but realistic
promises are better. Vote fa Jeff
Williams and remove partisan
politics from the SGA presidency.
R.David Miller
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I believe in honesty. I
believe in fairness fa all students
not just a select few. I believe in
rational ideas and promises. I
believe in strong leadership.
And, because I believe in all of
these virtues, I believe in Tommy
Joe Payne and David Cartwright
fa SGA president and vioe-
president.
I know Payne and Cartwright
very well and am impressed with
their potential leadership. These
two, waking asa team, make fine
uPKHrs ami '�'tll be a aedit to
ou. university.
Aftw iiMinig to their ideas, I
got the strong impression that
they were not simply making
promises to win our votes, but are
genuinely interested in improving
our campus.
They present the student body
with rational, wakable ideas
instead of unreasonable promises
which could not be kept.
Payne and Cartwright are
offering this campus a challenge
and a wonderful opportunity.
They are offering us a fair
student government, good ideas,
and the leadership that ECU need
to keep growing and prospering.
Ricki Gliarmis
the students and in doing so are
capable of putting all students
first instead of themselves.
I know they are not running
fa offioe fa fame and glay
because both candidates already
have a recad of outstanding
leadership.
Many of the students who will
be reading this letter know
absolutely nahing about student
government except what they
read a hear fron unreliable
souroes.
On March 29 when you go to
the polls to vote, trust a reliable
person who knows that the most
qualified candidate fa president
is Tanmy Jce Payne and fa
vice-president, David Cartwright.
Let's continue to make East
Carolina Number One: Let's put
Tommy Joe Payne and David
Cartwright in offioe. Vote fa
these good guys March 29 and
you will never regret it.
LynnStegall
SGA Day Legislata
are.
He seeks this offioe becuase
he feels he is qualified and can
end the petty squabbles which
have disillusioned so many
students with the SGA.
Jeff Williams is the only
alternative our campus has to to
the partisan politics of the SGA.
Jeff offers us the opportunity to
reject both sides of this mundane
political rivalry.
He is the sensible alternative
to another year of childish politics
in the SGA. With Jeff Williams as
president, the SGA can get ai
with its business of serving and
representing the student body.
Sincerely,
Rick Earleywine
Day student sees Payne, Cartwright
best candidates for SGA positions
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
As a day student at ECU I
would like to endase the team of
PayneCartwright as SGA pres-
ident and vice-president.
I know much of what follows
may seem repetitious but I need
to state the facts related to the
campaign so that the issues are
dear to all students.
The main issues upon which
Tommy Joe Payne and David
Cartwright are fa are mae
flexible dam contracts, three-
year textbook adoption, reinstat-
ing the retreat programs, improve
security on campus, construct bus
shelters, extend bus routes, and
the most important to serve all
students.
These issues are presented
straightfawardly and show that
PayneCartwright are running fa
SGA positions not fa their
persaial gain, but to aid and
represent the students of ECU.
Payne and Cartwright are
a good team due to their previous
experience in the SGA. Tommy
Joe Payne was the speaker of the
legislature while David served as
day student legislata and chair-
person of the Appropriations
Committee.
Both guys have recently re-
signed from their positions so that
mae time can be devoted to their
campaign.
One of the factas influencing
me to endase this team is their
effots to meet the students of
ECU. They have been on a
rigaous schedule fa a week now,
going from dam to dam, and
also covering the Greek's houses.
They are giving of themselves
to let the students know who they
are and what they stand fa.
In closing, I would like to
make an appeal to the entire
student body to vrte March 29. I
want to impress upon the day
students here at ECU that you
are a part of this school and your
vote is of great importance!
Take a minute of your time
and vrte fa the best team -
Tonmy Joe Payne fa SGA
president and David Cartwright
fa SGA vice-president.
Sincerely,
Don Williams
Day Student
See FORUM, p. 6
ENDORSEMENTS
Reader believes in honesty,
backs Payne, Cartwright
We. the undersigned, are concerned students who
have been involved with the issues and problems
facing SGA this year we feel that this Spring eiec
tion may be the most important one students wifl
vote on for several years This year more than ever
ALONZO NEWBY
Freshman President
DfMY BOYCI
t)i�v Lag�lafof
Appropriation Committee
Chairman
CHRIS CHIATHAM
Day Lagtaiator
KNEE HINSON
White Durm L?gilritnr
CHIC CARIAGA
Dev Legislator
KEVIN McCOURT
Sophomore President
Executive Council Chairman
CHUMY ABSHIRE
Sophomore Vice President
Scott Dorm Legislator
RON MORRISON
Day Legislator
TIMMERTZ
Jones Dorm Legi�i.itor
BERTHA PHILLIPS
Tyler Doim Lrgr lator
FRANK SAUBERS
State Governor o( NCSL
CRAJG HALES
SGA Treasurer
MIKE CUNNINGHAM
Junior Class Vice President
the students need leadership that is experienced
qualified and willing to get SGA moving again
Therefore, we endorse, and urge our friends to
vote for TitTi SuHivan and Ubby Letter.
RANDY BAILEY
Senior Vice-President
RICKY PRICE
Day Legislator
STACY COFIELD
Scott Dorm Legislator
BETTY LOU DAVIS
Green Dorm Legislator
RICHARD COLE
State Truasurrir ol NCSL
TINA PAD4LLA
Jarvis Dorm Legislator
CHIP MAYO
Senior Class Secretary Treasurer
JENNY CALDWEll
Fleming Dorm legislator
DAVID FOX
Jones Dorm legislator
DAVID DENNING
Graduate Schoel President
LYNN BELL
Clement Legislator
JOHN EPPERSON
Day Legislator
SKY LARSON
Cotton Dorm Legislator
MARSHALL McADCN
SGA Secretary of Minority Affairs 1197 771
VOTE
Tim X Libby
SULLIVAN LEFLER
President Vice-President
�� VOTE MARCH 29 ��
"V





warn
Forum
Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 March 1978
Senior student endorses Sullivan for SGA presidential post
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
As a senior here at ECU I
couldn't let another SGA election
pass without at long last voicing
my opinion.
I sat in the SGA a year ago
when Tim Sullivan was president,
and I saw and felt the effects of a
hardworking, devoted offioer.
I watched a true politician
with a sincere interest in his job
and the people he represented,
dedicate the majority of his time
to his office and its constituents.
Indeed, some toes were step-
ped on, as would be expected in
the pursuit of any controversial
issue, but the end results of
success were consistent.
Tim is honest. He based every
possible important decision on
the opinion and support of the
legislature. As a legislator, he
introduced and passed numerous
bills, which is an accomplishment
no other presidential candidate
can daim.
Tim knows student govern-
ment. He percieves beneficial
goals and achieves them. He not
only recognizes our expectations
but is now aware of his limits and
what's more, he has the know-
ledge of past experience on which
to act.
Tim is realistic. He doesn't
stand on a platform which has no
legs.
Talk to him when he reaches
you in his campaign. If you have
any doubts in his credentials, I'll
guarantee assurance in his qual-
ifications, afterwards.
I think that it's way past time
that the indignation and childish
animosities toward SGA end. It's
time our campus organizations
are agian unified and that the
students, not the publications or
administration, run the students.
Therefore, I endorse Tim
Sullivan for SGA president.
Kati Ray
Cartwright backed for vice-presidency
OVERTONS
Located on Jarvis Street,
2 blocks from ECU.
We now accept
Master Charge and Visa
VISA
Free cart service available
to students .
211 Jarvis Street
752-5025
OVERTONS
i SUPERMARKET j
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Two issues that have long
been discussed and are of great
concern to the student body are
parking and pedestrian crossing
at the intersection of Tenth Street
and College Hill Drive.
Now that the SGA elections
are coming up maybe some
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definite action will finally be
taken. These two projects are
perfect for the SGA vice-
president's attention.
I am reasonably certain that if
David Cartwright is elected SGA
vice-president this coming Wed
March 29, the students may see
some rapid results.
David Cartwright has served o
the intersection task face and has
met personally with the N.C. Sec.
of Transportation, Tom
Bradshaw. This kind of personal
connection makes positive action
almost certain. He, if anyone, can
get something done to make
crossing safer.
Judging from David's service
as appropriations chairman, I am
sure that he can work with the
appropriate officials to ease the
parking prodicament.
Because I am conoerned about
these two issues, I plan to vote fa
David Cartwright and urge ahers
who share these oonoerns to
suppat him also.
Sincerely,
Debbie Finley
Reader supports Payne,
Cartwright for SGA
ToFCUNTAINHEAD:
The election of Tommy Joe
Payne and David Cartwright fa
SGA president and vice-president
would be a plus fa student
government on this campus.
Both of these persons have
been active in student govern-
ment fa the past two years, and
despite being harrassed by what
many persons feel as unjust
aiticism, the two have perfamed
their duties admirably and with a
preserverance fa integrity.
By their being candidates fa
office, the students have a
clear-cut choioe fa two leaders
who will practice honesty and
fairness in student government.
I reoommend that all students
suppat these candidates fa
office. I firmly believe that they
will represent the intere" M
c.rionts. and i' play favaites
with any soeciai otyotnization.
i also believe tnat they will
best oo-opeate with the new
chancella, Dr. Brewer, and his
administration, in aeating a good
waking relatiaiship with student
government and the administra-
tion.
On March 31, vae Tommy Joe
Payne, and David Cartwright,
president and vice-president of
the SGA.
KirkEdgerton
IFC President
Forum Policy
When submitting letters, you must include your signature, address,
phone no and ID number, it you are a student. All letters must be
TYPED or PRINTED.





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23 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Paga 7
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WWWPBPi
Page 8 FOUNT! AINHEAD 23 March 1978
SGA CANDID A1
Vice-President
i
Libby Lefler
The vice-president's role in
SGA isonewithnoset guidelines.
Thus, it is one of initiative.
However, along with initiative,
one must be willing to take the
needed time to originate new
programs or simply improve the
old.
I have never missed a meeting
a.c SGA secretary and have only
one absence in my two years in
the legislature. This shows I am
willing to devote time to SGA.
One project I am interested in
is obtaining a seat on the
Greenville Utilities Commission.
This would allow a presentation of
student views on any increase ex-
change.
Two other pertinent issues
are allowing students to decide
upon the type visitation which
they want in their respective
dorms and improving safety on
campus.
Through your support and
votes, Tim Sullivan and I will
combine initiative, devotion and
experience to work for you, the
students.
3avid Cartwright
SGA needs responsible, effec-
tive leadership to really serve the
students. I feel that Tommy Joe
Payne and I can deliver that kind
of leadership.
I served in the legislature this
past year as chairman of the
appropriations committee that
directly oversees the spending of
ail SGA funds. I feel this
background is essential to inform-
ed and rational decision making
as vice-president.
As vice-president, I will make
it my personaJ full-time duty to
push for increased parking.
Through the special Tenth Street
Intersection Task Force I served
on this year, I feel I can now really
get relief for the constant and
dangerous probelm.
Tommy Joe and I have
experience and good ideas, but
we will constantly seek out the
student's feelings and the mat-
ters that concern them.
We want the chance to offer
REAL representation.

L
Tim Sullivan
This year has seen constant
fighting between the SGA presi-
dent and our SGA legislature, and
the people who have been hurt
most by it are the groups on
campus who need funding:
music, art, and academic depart-
ments.
I have served in SGA's
legislature fa two years, and I
can work to see that the arts and
others receive a fair chance.
One gripe I have heard over
and over is that the student vote
on our board of trustees is wasted
because the SGA president
doesn't represent us. Before I
would ever vote fa a fee, dam
rent, a car sticker inaease I
would hold a valid student
referendum. When it comes to
our money, that kind of input is
vital.
I have served three years in
SGA: as Freshman and Junia
president in our legislature,
where I have introduced (and
have passed) over a dozen bills.
No other presidential candidate
has ever introduced a single bill.
This ability to deliver on
promises is impatant in the
electioi, and this experience is
why I and Libby Lefler are
running fa office.
Presid
Secretary
Lynn Bell
My name is Lynn Bell and I
am seeking the office of SGA
secretary. I am rather unique
from the other candidates in this
election fa I am unopposed.
I feel that I am very qualified
to be secretary. I have represen-
ted Clement Dam as a legislata
fa the past two years. Also, I
have waked closely with the
present seaetary on several
occasions.
Most people think that the job
of seaetary involves only a little
typing and an ability to recad
minutes. This is not the stay.
The seaetary is a voting member
of the Executive Council and the
backbone of the Legislature.
I will wak hard as seaetary. I
would like to see many accom-
plishments made next year and I
will do everything possible to
make SGA the voice of the
students.

1
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DATES' FORUM
23 March 1971 FOUNTAINHEAD P�g�9
President
Tommy Joe Payne
Jeff Williams
You have heard about the
trouble in SGA this year.
The bickering is the result of
an intense political rivalry be-
tween two factions in the SGA.
Payne is supported by one and
Sullivan by the other as each vies
for control of the legislature. As a
legislator, I saw how they contor-
ted issues fa political gains.
I'm running because, like you,
I'm fed up with the situation. If
Payne or Sullivan assume office,
we will be subjected to a repeat
performance.
I'm not aligned with those
groups and intend to change the
focus of the SGA from a political
playhouse to the service organiza-
tion it should be.
That is my foremost goal;
others I will work for include: (1)
one semester dorm contracts; (2)
FM conversion of WECU; (3)
extended drop period; (4)
professor rating for pre-registra-
tion; (5) referendum to ascertain
student priorities for SGA fund-
ing; and (6) consumer union to
rate goods and services in Green-
ville.
The SGA president, above all
other things, must continually be
responsive to every student'0
ideas and desires.
I have served in SGA fa two
years, but I do not pretend to
know all the answers and I do not
hold any special interest.
As president, I would listen to
all ideas and then wak toward
what is best fa all .students.
David Cartwright, my running
mate fa vice-president, and I
would wak fa you on these
issues: (1) flexible dam con-
tracts; (2) three-year book pro-
gram; (3) better campus security;
(4) reinstate retreat program; (5)
extend bus routes and provide
bus shelters; (6) better food
service on campus; (7) inaeased
parking, and (8) serve all
students, not special interests.
David and I will serve you
responsibly in your SGA. Cast
your vote fa Payne-Cartwright
fa president and vice-president
cm Wed March 29.
Lmup
REMEMBER

VOTE!
March 29
I
���?�??��,�����?��???????????????????
Treasurer
Wiley Betts
As Treasurer
(1) I plan to wak closely with
the SGA legislature, Executive
Council and others so that we
might be able to reach a fair and
just budget fa next year.
(2) The campus is uninformed
as to the procedure fa applying
fa an appropriation from the
SGA. I intend to assist anyone in
their effat towards this goal.
(3) I suppat all academic
aganizatiois and feel that they
are the backbone of society.
(4) I will do my best at waking
closely with the SGA legislature,
Executive Council, and others so
that we might be able to reach a
fair and unbiased budget fa next
year.
(5) As treasurer, I will fulfill
all my duties to the best of my
ability in hopes that we may
obtain an efficient, productive,
financial government.
The first act I will put into
effect when elected is to show the
students just what student
monies are being spent on which
clubs and aganizatiois. I will do
this in hopes that the populus of
this campus will become fully
aware of the SGA's annual outlay.
In closing, I would like to state
that I will remain, above all,
neutral, with the ever inaeasing
issue concerning students funds
and politics, it will take a dear
and logical mind to decipher the
true ieeds from the padded needs
in a budget.
Bernard Smith
The faemost important issue
is the establishment of a better
rappat between the Student
Government Association (SGA)
and the student body. The SGA is
responsible to the student body as
itselected representative to serve
in their best interests.
This responability should be
remembered throughout the im-
plementation of policy decisions.
I decided to run fa office
because I feel that I am capable of
fulfilling the position effectively.
The treasurer doesn't neces-
sarily have an expert knowledge
of business and financial matters.
He must be able to relate to and
understand students and their
needs as well as knowing how to
prepare regular budget reports.
During my stay here at ECU, I
have participated in numerous
extracurricular activities: NCSL,
the BUCCANEER, SCJ National
Hona Society, and as a brother of
Kappa Alpha Ps fraternity.
If given the oppatunity tc
serve as your treasurer, I wil
strive to prove myself wathy by
perfaming a justifiable task
which my peers consider me
capable of dang.





uHB
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 March 1978
Jenkins in retrospect
'You've got to stay in the business, you've got
to emphasize, you yve got to do the best you can
� � �
By STUART MORGAN
News Editor
Dr. Leo W. Jenkins, Dean of
ECU from 1947 to 1960, President
from 1960 to 1972, and Chancel lor
from 1972 to this date, will remain
an important part of this univer-
sity after he retires.
Critics of Jenkins will pro-
bably say, "Alas, we have the
type of person we want in Dr.
Thomas Brewer his successor
as chancel la here.
But, the majority of his
supporters from Eastern North
Carolina will almost invariably
say, "It's a shame that the new
chancellor isn't a second Jen-
kins
Despite what anyone says,
one thing is oertain. While
Jenkins was president and chan-
cel la, at the helm of the
administration here, this univer-
sity grew by leaps and bounds.
As a result of his persistence
and leadership, ECU has achiev-
ed astonishing progress in many
of its programs.
HAPPIEST MOMENTS
"I think that when our medi-
cal school became accredited was
my happiest moment here
Jenkins said. "That was the end
of a tenure strjggle
"But, I was also exceedingly
gratified and happy when we beat
State, Duke, Wake Faest, and
Chapel Hill in football Jenkins
added. "That was a compliment
to this growing institution, our
coaches and our men
"I was also very happy to see
the summer theatre become a
reality, that brought alot of
happiness to a great deal of
people. But, I was sary when we
weren't able to continue it
because of financial difficulties
he added.
EMPHASIS ON PROGRA MS
Jenkins has often been
accused of overemphasizing var-
ious programs. "That's true
histaically Jenkins admitted.
At one time, I was overemphasi-
zing art, another time music. And
then, there were the accusations
of my overemphasizing the athle-
tic and medical programs
"You've got to stay in the
business, you've go to want to
emphasize, you've got to want to
do the best you can Jenkins
stressed.
"When a university has as
many school s and programs as we
have, it's necessary to emphasize
various programs in their differ-
ent stages he added.
LOOKING BACK
Everyone realizes that hind-
sight is 2020.
However, it is interesting to
ask someone to look back retro-
spectively to ment'on the things
that they would change if given
the opportunity. Jenkins was
asked that question.
"If I oould go back, I would
have enoouraged faster growth
Jenkins answered. "I would have
not only our people, but all people
recruit mae vigaously the bright
minaity student, and the bright
econanically disadvantaged
white student
"Studentsshouldn't have had
to fight a strive fa the things
they wanted during that period
Jenkins said.
"It taught us the importance
of freedom of movement and
expression which they were fight-
ing fa and did not enjoy at the
time Jenkins added.
Jenkins said he has never
seen so many students who were
so polite and nioe as those he has
encountered here during the last
four a five years.
"That's true almost without
exception he added.
Trends
"Too many times at high
school oommenoements, I've
learned of cases where attending
college to such students was
beyond their wildest imagina-
tion Jenkins said. "Often, their
parents were too poa, a either
anti-intellectual a anti-educa-
tioial
"Now we're doing that, we
have the programs which enable
us and all other institutions to
reauit such students Jenkins
added.
TRENDS IN STUDENTS
A little over a quarter of a
century Jenkins has been in a
position to notice various trends
in the students here.
"It has been a cyclical thing
he said. "There was a period of
the apathetic 50's, when many
students couldn't care less about
anything except their studies; the
period of protests and nonoonfa-
mity during the 60's; and then the
very friendly and cooperative
70" s
"During the 60's, the spirit of
unrest and dissatisfaction with
the Vietnam War spilled onto our
campuses Jenkins said. "Of-
ten, I would say hello to them,
and they would turn their heads
But, Jenkins said he under-
stood the situation and realized
those students were angry.
On three occassions, we had
students march on our home and
protest various things that were
happening, a theygaeme a list
of demands and so fath
Jenkins added.
"It was a depressing and
difficult period, not necessarily
fa me, but fa my family. They
too had to listen to the cat calls
late at night he added.
However, Jenkins said the
situation was not un'dup at this
university. He added that the
situation exists all over the
nation
Fa example, he pointed out
the Kent State incident where
three students were killed by
National Guardsmen
"HELLO LEO
At the age of 65, Jenkins
spends about an hour each night
walking around campus where he
meets students from all direc-
tions.
Often, girls waving and lean-
ing from their damitay win-
dows, shout "Hello Leo
But, does Chancella Leo
Jenkins mind that infamal greet-
ing? "No, I think that's a
compliment Jenkins replied.
"They do it in good spirits,
knowing that I don't object.
Occasionally , students will stop
and talk to me, telling me where
they're from
"Of course, about four a five
times a week someone will drive by
my house and roar, 'Go to hell
Leo But, I realize that they're
just having fun Jenkins added.
Jenkins then oommended the
Student Government Association
here. "Histaically, our student
legislatures have been good
Jenkins said. "They've taken
great responsibility, and we've
never had any problems with
money a dishaiesty that I know
of
"The SGA spends money as
they see fit. But, there have been
times when I've disagreed with
the arrounts of money -they've
spent hiring various singers,
groups, and lecturers Jenkins
added.
But, Jenkins said it was their
right to spend their money as they
wanted. His philosophy being
that if there is going to be a
student government it should
be "the real thing
The FOUNTAINHEAD, the
campus newspaper, was oom-
mended by Jenkins.
"During the many years that
I've waked here, I've been very
happy with and proud of our
student paper Jenkins said.
TWO WAY STREET OF
COMMUNICATION"
My gr itest achievement
here has btc-n in establishing a
two way street of communication
with many of our publics
Jenkins added. "Fa example,
our industrial people, rural peo-
ple, farming people, professional
people, students, and faculty
Jenkins has presented numer-
ous speeches to various aganiza-
tiois, including speeches at over
250 high school oommenoements.
He said communication resul-
ted in such things as the nursing
school, paramedical programs,
business programs, and the
medical school.
THE FUTURE OF ECU
When Jenkins was asked what
changes he predicted fa ECU in
the near future, he replied:
"I think that the number of
senia citizenson thiscampus will
inaease dramatically Jenkins
said. "We're giving many people
the oppatunity to retire after 20
a 30 years and many of them
want second careers.
"We're told they're going to
live longer. Men are going to live
to be around 74, women are going
to live into their 80's Jenkins
added. "These people are going
to want oppatunites, they're
going to want something to do.
"Governa Hunt might ask me
to return to school ttake a oourse
in state government a sane
other course Jenkins said. "If
so, that wouldn't be something
unusual, it would be something
many people have to do
DR. BREWER
The retiring chancella said he
was very favaably impressed
with Dr. Thonas B. Brewer, his
successa. And, he commended
the chancella selection commit-
tee fa doing a marvelous job.
"He seemed to ask the right
questions Jenkins said. "All of
the faculty here who have met
him, without exoeption, have told
me that they were very pleased
with him
Jenkins said Brewer appeared
to be a very understanding,
intelligent, knowledgeable type
of man.
"Dr. Brewer has a charming
wife, she is an asset to a man In
his position he added. "She
will have no problems continuing
to entertain guests the way we
did
BREWER'S FIRST YEAR
Eighty-five per oent of every-
one who has ever attended this
university has done so while
Jenkins was here. That obviously
means that there will be a
tremendous field of people who
will be watching, comparing
Brewer with Jenkins.
"It's going to be difficult fa
him Jenkins admitted. "Not
because of me, but because of the
length of time I've been here
Jenkins said Brewer realizes
the situation he will be facing
during his first year.
"His first year here will be
one of the busiest years of his
life Jenkins said. "He'll be
accepting numerous invitations to
present speeches to various a-
ganizatiais, such as Rotary
clubs and Kiwanis clubs, clubs of
that type
GENERA LIZING COLLEGES
Jenkins said it is very difficult
to generalize about any university
in Nath Carolina. He added it
depended on the program the
student pursued, the teachers he
receives, etc.
"You must go and judge the
program Jenkins said. "In
comparing ECU with other col-
leges, the best thing I can say is
that a third of our students come
from the piedmont region.
"They pass by several col-
leges to get here. Often the
distance is longer, , t certainly
we're na any cheape ne added
"There s something here that
they're after, and we have what
they want Jenkins said. " I n the
future, I will say that we'll hold
our own with any other institution
in this state
ADVICE TO STUDENTS
Jenkins said he would never
advise the faculty a students to
saatch a dig to get ahead.
Instead, he said he would advise
them to enjoy life, to lean back
and help their neighbas.
"I haiestly believe that has
caught oi here said Jenkins. "I
can't even recall having an
argument a even a heated
discussion with a faculty member
here.
I would say to students that
the key thing that they'll ever live
fa in all of their careers is that
thing called love Jenkins said.
Many truly successful men are
nice men who are efficent.
They re the ones who wouldn't
dream of being ugly to their
subadi nates
Jenkins said love, understand-
ing, and faith must be carried into
married life, professional life, and
cultural life. Such things would
most likely result in happiness,
said Jenkins.
"If you trv �g ool ugly, you'll
be unhappy rh 'e II always be
guys uglier than you Jenkins





�SWWJBHi
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Grammy award winner comes to ECU
23 Mtr.fr 1878 FOUNTAINHEAD Pig� 11
Mangione: 'hispopularity has exploded'
By SUSAN CHESTON
Staff Writer
On March 29 at 8 p.m
Chuck Mangione and the Chuck
Mangione Quartet will app v in
concert at Wright Auditorium.
Mangione is a composer,
conductor, and musician whose
easy style is a blend of jazz,
classical and rock, with a touch of
Latin thrown in. His unique jazz is
best known by the sound of
Mangione himself on his ever
meilow flugelhorn.
A few years ago hardly
anybody could tell you who Chuck
Mangione was, much less pro-
nounce his name! (Man-gee-oh-
nee.) Even last year his music
was best known to a small, but
fanatically loyal cult if fans. Now,
however, Mangione's popularity
has exploded.
With TV exposure on such
sports shows as the Dorothy
Hamill Special, the 1976 Olympic
Games and the ABC Superstars;
and on talk shows such as Merv
Griffin and the Tonight Show; and
with his recordings of Chase the
Clouds Away "Bellavia
"Main Squeeze and the new
"Feels So Good Chuck
Mangione has started to win the
recognition he deserves.
All this recording and per-
forming activity has culminated in
receiving the 1977 Grammy
Award for "Bellavia After
seven Grammy nominations,
Chuck was honored with receiv-
ing the award above such talents
as Stevie Wonder, Earth, Wind
and Fire, Chick Corea, Quincy
Jones and Henry Mancini.
Mangione now appears with a
If Mangione's reputation
holds true, Wright Auditorium
will be the scene of yet another
magical jam session next Wed-
nesday night. Student tickets for
Wednesday's performance may
be purchased for $3.00 at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall. Tickets fa the public and all
tickets at the door are $5,00.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Coming Soon-fl!
When: Wednesday, April 5th
Where: Harrington Field
Time: 9:00am to 3:00pm
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
For More Information Contact
Marcia Goughnour 752- 1349
or Margie 758- 8293
COMPOSERCONDUCTORMUSICIAN Chuck Mangione will
appear in concert at Wright A uditorium on March 29th at 8 p. m.
young quartet featuring Chris
Vadalaon flutes and saxophones,
Grant Geissman on guitars,
Charles Meeks on bass guitar,
and 19-year-old James Bradley,
Jr. on drums. Mangione fills in
with electric paino when not
soloing on flugelhorn.
Greenville, N.C. is just one of
the stops Mangione is making on
a 9-month tour which includes
sold-out performances across the
nation. At a time when most well
known artists are holed up in
recording studios or making
select appearances in major con-
cert halls, Mangione is one of the
few who still believe in "taking
the music to the people
Mangione is noted tor enjoy-
ing hisown concerts. Heatributes
his warm, relaxed conoert style to
the warmth and love of his early
home life. One of Chuck's favorite
stories reflects the support provi-
ded by his father.
"We would go hear somebody
like Dizzy Gillespie. Father would
walk up to them like he knew
them all his life, and he'd say,
'Hi, Dizzy! My name is Frank
Mangione, these are my kids,
they play And before you'd
know it, father would be talking
with this guy, and would invite
them over for spaghetti and
Italian wine, and we'd wind up
having a jam session in the living
room
Roffler of Greenville,
formerly HERMANS,
IS NOW OPEN.
Located across from Umstead Dorm
at 602 E. 10th Street, Suite A
By appointment 758-0880
owners- Tim Mills and Herman Hines
TRAMPS
DISCOTEQUE AND
BACKGAMMOM CLUB
Hwy. 17 Windy Hill Section
N. Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Tramping Grounds
of the Atlantic
The most exciting disco in town
invites you to spend your Easter
and summer vacations with us.
Find out why everyone on the
East Coast is talking about
PHOTOGRAPHY POSITIONS OPEN
There will be several positions open for the 1978-71 school year as
campus photographer. Any interested ECO student may come by to the
FOUNTAINHEAD office between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays
to obtain an application for screening.
Be prepared to list previous work experience and photographic
knowledge. Also, a small portfolio, (preferably black and white,
although color will be accepted), must be submitted.
The portfolio is not necessary until after the applicant has been
contacted for an interview.
Tramps HI
r





��
m
u
Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 March 1978

Acclaimed chamber ensemble
is next Artist Series attraction
ByLYNNBEYAR
Assistant Trends Editor
The Beaux Arts Trio, an
internationally acclaimed cham-
ber ensemble, will be presented
in recital on Thursday, March 30,
in Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre at 8 p.m. This outstand-
ing group of musicians will
appear at ECU as an additional
attraction of the Student Union
Artist Series 1977-78 season,
oo-sponsored by the School of
Music FESTIVAL'78.
The Trio, comprised,of Mena-
hem Pressler, piano, Isidore
Cohen, violin and Bernard Green-
RIGGAN
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER GOODS
downtown Greenville
111 West 4th St. 758-0204
house, oello, has garnered extrao-
ordinary critical acclaim in perfor-
mances all over the world. Since
their public debut at the Berk-
shire Festival in Tanglewood
twenty-one years ago, the Beaux
Arts Trio has played more than
3,500 engagements on three
oont i nent s and have made n umer-
ours recordings.
The prize-winning .ensemble
has recorded all the Haydn,
Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms,
Ravel .Tchaikovsky (op. 50), Schu-
bert and Dvorak trios. The Beaux
Arts Trio has been awarded the
ooveted "Grand Prix du Disque"
and is at the top of every best
selling classical list throughout
the United States and Europe.
"Their secret lies in all the
qualities listed above (virtuosity,
expert coordination, unspoken
communication, musical insight)
in such just proportions that the
the
factory
for blu� b�ll apparel w
and
Wrangler
SPORTSWEAR
thinks
Americans
should
get
what
they
pay for
That's your
and our
responsibility
Our sundresses sizzle with fashion and comfort.
Perfect example: this ruffled top self bow tie style of
easy-care polyester and cotton interlock knit. Yellow,
green, blue, red, white in sizes S-M-L. And you've got
a choice of 3 other sizzlers. . a striped tank style, a
v-neck striped top with solid bottom plus a solid with
capped sleeves and colorful multi-color trim.
listener would not have changed
anything. They are three quite
individual musicians who have
learned to defer to each other to
create a single personality fa the
ensemble This quote from The
Montreal Star is just one example
of the incessant praise which the
group has received from news-
paper critics all ever the world.
The group's reputation is
undoubtedly well-deserved, and
the members have gathered their
own individual laurels as well.
Menahem Pressler had
appeared as soloist with the
Philadelphia Orchestra, the New
Yak Philharmonic, and the
list goes on.
Isioore Cohen has appeared
with the Juilliard String Quartet,
the Budapest String Quartet, and
has been concert master of The
Little Orchestra Society in New
Yak, the achestra at the Casals
Festival in Puerto Rioo, and the
Mozart Festival in Lincoln Cen-
ter.
Cellist Bernard Greenhouse
has studied with Pablo Casals,
who has written of him Bernard
Greenhouse isnrt only a remark-
able cellist, but what I esteem
mae, a dignified artist
Tickets fa the perfamance
are $4.00 fa the public and $2 fa
groups of twenty a mae. ECU
ffl)

OPEN
24HRS
MTMl
EVANS STREETS
BUDWEISER � $569
MILLER LITE - - $6.99
PLAYERS uT,o,asr $8.00
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BLUE RIBBON $7 36
ICE $2.50
MILLER $1-79
THE BEAUX ARTS Trio will appear in the Mendenhall Student
Center Theatre on Thursday, March 30 at 8.W p.m.
students are admitted by I.D. and soi tickets may pick up a ticket
Activity Card and faculty and free of charge at the Central
staff by MSC membaship card. Ticket Office eitha pria to the
Holders of Artist Series sea- perfamance a at the dcor.
VinylReview
by David Whitson
Chuck Mangione: Feels so Good
While I realize that mellow Mangione's style of musical expression
does not mark him as a high energy player-his choice of han itself
testifies to his pursuit of the introspective rather than the dazzling in
his waks-this album drags.
There isa lack of vibrancein this album, especially when compared
to his last A & M release "Main Squeeze Admittedly, theachestral
range of instrumentation in the famer LP (the combined effat of
twenty instrumentalists and une concert master in addition to
Mangione himself) allowed fa experiments in instrumental interplay
which reach fuque-like complexity.
"Feels so Good" by contrast, marks a return by Mangione to the
tight simplicity of a quartet backup. As a result, this album is not as
good fa concentrated listening. Mangione composed and arranged
every cut on this album, but his iron oontrol stifles he imaginative
musicianship of his last L.P.
The four sidemen who accompany Mangione on this album, namely
Chris Vadala on saxes, piccolo and flute; Grant Geissman on guitars;
Charles Meeks on bass, and James Bradley on percussion) exhibit a
mastery of their instruments, which reveals a notable maturity of style.
In fact, to call them "sidemen" is nearly an insult since some cuts,
specifically "Last Dance" belong to guitarist 'General Grant"
Geissman.
PARTY
E.G.U. . You are cordially invited to a
Par�yfor th� JEFF WILLIAMS
presidential campaign tonite at Blimpies.
Your favorite BEvERage will be
served at modest prices.
Bring a friend and tie one on
tonite at Blimpies!





'�'����������BH
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23 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
faj ffiaiui iao rwniMiwnCHU rage 13
Little hopes to turn baseball team around
rams
PIRA TE BASEBALL HEAD coach Monte Little.
Sports
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
Almost as sure as the Spring
weather upon us, ECU'S baseball
team is looking to continue their
winning tradition, unfortunately
mental mistakes and lack of
aggresive play have hampered a
winning start.
Second year head-coach
Monte Little has been working his
team into top physical condition,
however problems don't seem to
be in either physical training or
preparation.
"At this point in the season
said Little, "my philosophy con-
cerning the game is not coincid-
ing with what the team is doing
on the field. I pride the team in
being aggressive, with little or no
mental mistakes-but we haven't
been aggressive enough and
mental flaws .n the field have
kept us from being 8 and 1
instead of 5 and 4
"We are definately a better
team than what our record
shows continued Little. "I
really feel bad for the team and to
the student body. They (both
team & students) deserve better
than what we have showed so far.
Mistakes in the mental as-
pects of the game seem to be the
link from a poor season to post
season play.
However last year's S.C.
champs don't look to be out of a
national tournament bid yet.
"I don't count us out yet at
all said Coach Little, "if
anything we will be stronger from
these losses. Now is the time to
prove to ourselves we can put it
all together
A very strong factor in the
Pirates season is the fact that they
play a very tough schedule.
College scouts as well as pro have
said that ECU's schedule is by far
one of the toughest in the
Southeast.
All the more reason ECU must
do well to receive some post
season action.
"Ability wise, we have mort
1978 BASEBALL STATISTICS
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
OVERALL RECORD: 7-5
HOME: 5-1
AWAY: 2-4
HITTING
NAMEG 12AB 40R 7H 142B 13B 0HR 3TB 24RBI 12BB 5SO 0AVG. .350PO 28A 29E
Pete Paradossi2
Butch Davis8293920114312.320000
FiLl ir Gat es1244111341225986.2951300
K.ivmic SLyons124231200218454.28677151
Boiby Supel123981002220359.256152512
Bi llv Best124461000010351.2271800
Ma con Moye12384810215914.2111410
Jerry Carravay1237251006244.13511263
Rort Brinkley911260006101.5451721
Mike Sar.e921440004066.1906071
ii k Raynor710230003141.300100
lev Warrtck66110001001.16 71910
l iin Mardison32100000000. 000200
Larry Anderson11000000000.000000
Randy Adams10000000000.000000
Clarence llardison 10000000000.000000
Sctt Layden10000000000.000200
Chip Giannettino40500000010.000000
Pitcher's Fielding4195
ECU IOTALS1236559969312145464538.26329212625
OPP IOIAUS1236450881315118413578.24228113123
IP: (ECU 0, OPP 5). SAC: (ECU 1, OPP 7) Supel. SF:(ECU 3, OPP 2) Paradossi 3. SBSBA: (ECU
17-24, OPP 5-11) Best 5-7, Brinkley 3-3, Cates 4-5, Giannettino 2-3, Paradossi 1-1, Carraway
1-3, Raynor 1-1, Davis 0-1. LOB: ECU 74, OPP 84. ECU DOUBLE PLAYS: 8
PITCHING
NAM 1 im t i 1 lerc 4GS 0CG 0IP 4W-L 0-0R 0H 12B 03B 0HR 0LOB 3SO 5
Boh 'at tcrson1001.670-00000022
'i� kev Br itt54330.674-05192002328
R ii Ii nev330131-214201111612
BiII Davis10040-02700134
Pelc ('fiaty54031.332-221318022821
BUI 1 in as3109.330-1810201106
Ki'n roiAi.s123947-5508813158478
OPP miAi.s12493.75-7599693127438
BB
0
5
7
6
1
12
7
ER
0
0
1
6
2
17
5
ERA
0.00
0.00
0.29
4.15
4.50
4.88
8.44
35
45
31
46
2.97
4.42
MB: Co'iaty 3, Britt 2. WP: Conaty 2, Ra-ney 1. BK: Raney. SV: Conaty PB: Styons 4,
potential than ever before said
catcher Raymie Styons. "It's just
a matter of psyching ourselves up
for each game. It think we all tend
to look towards the next game
before we play the first
Bobby Supel, a power hitting
third baseman also added, "I
think we can win 35-40 games this
year, we certainly have the
potential and I hope we can all
tighten up our act
Fan support is essential to the
performance of any sport, but in
baseball it can be of great value.
In dosing coach Little said,
"the fans have always been good
to ECU baseball, but a major
complaint of last year was that
fans missed so many of the first
games, by the time they got
involved in the season it was over,
Hopefully the same mistake won't
happen again this year
Pirates sweep
two fromECSC
By TERRY YEARGAN
Staff Writer
The Pirates met the Eastern
Connecticut State University
Warriors Monday and Tuesday
nights in baseball, emerging
victorious in both games.
In Monday night's contest the
aggressive Pirates safely won by
a four run margin (8-4).
Three of the eight runs were
homers by right-fielder Eddie
Gates, out fielder Macon Moye,
and DH-OF Butch Davis. The hit
by Davis cleared the 390 ft.
center-fence mark with ease.
Senior Pete Conaty, was the
winning pitcher going six innings
allowing no score.
In the seventh the Warriors
picked up their first two runs, and
two more during the eighth.
Conaty was replaced in the
ninth by Tim Stiller who got the
final three.
On Tuesday night ECU took
an early lead with scores by Eddie
Gates, Max Raynor, and Bobby
Supel in the first -inning.
The second inning saw two
runs scored by ECSU.
The Pirates scored one when
Billy Best knocked in Jerry
Carraway. This took the E.C.
squad to a 4-2 lead until the sixth.
ECSU then scored one to cut
the lead to one. The Pirates held
on to end with a win (4-3).
Pitcher Bill Lucas was replac-
ed in the ninth by Rick Ramey
who finished the game.
Tennis team
wins two
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Sports Editor
Last Friday and Saturday the
ECU tennis team won two
matches.
On Friday the Buc natters
defeated Tufts University 5-4 and
on Saturday the Pirates beat the
Seahawks of UNC-W 6 to 3.
See TENNIS, p. 74





55E
14 FOUNTMNHEAD 23 March 1978
Coaches Lee and Bolton resign their basketball posts
East Carolina University's
Director of Athletics, Bill Cain,
announced today the resignation
of the women's head basketball
coach, Catherine Bolton, and that
of the men's assistant cqaflh, Billy
Lee.
In accepting the resignations,
Cain said: "We appreciate the
services rendered by Coach Bolton
over the previous une years and
her outstanding teams. We ac-
cept her desire to take a new
direction for her future.
"We also app eciate the out-
standing contributions of Billy
ARAAYNAVY
STORE
pm com. toM ���. fawnfca .
�mortal. iMkir iacfcatt. natmmmr.
parfcM. uin�oh. work ctaftMfc
diiMi 1911 S. Kvom Sirs Os�rt
11:30-5 IP
' Lee, not only to the basketball
program, but also to the athletic
department, over the previous
two years. His rapport with the
athletic staff and supporters of
our program was outstanding
Bolton came to ECU as head
women's coach in 1989-70, having
compiled a 115-54 record in nine
years. This year's team finished
20-11, the first 20-win season fa
a women's basketball team at
ECU, while finishing seoond in
the state tournament and qualifi-
ed for regional tournament play.
The Lady Pirates 1972-73
recorded an undefeated regualr
season, won the state champion-
ship, the regional championship
and participated in the national
tournament in Queens, N.Y. No
other N.C. team has advanced to
the nationals since the formation
jF.Goodrich
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of AIAW.
"My primary function at ECU
is as a physical education instruc-
tor said Bolton. "I feel the
demands on the coaching position
are such that I cannot fulfill both
positions. It's my hope that the
athletic department will hire a
fulltime coach so that we can
recruit with some of the stronger
programs in our area and can
carry the program to excellence
Billy Lee joined the men's
basketball staff two years ago as a
graduate assistant coach and was
elevated to fulltime assistant this
past season.
Prior to joining the Pirate
staff, Lee was highly successful
as head coach at New Bern High
School, guiding the 4-A Bears to a
42-18 mark, best ever at the
school. In 1972, he coached New
Bern to the school's first 4-A
conference championship and in-
BILLYLEE
to the state playoffs.
"I resign my position with
mixed emotions said Lee, "but
I think it is the best thing for my
ooaching career
Cain noted that a thorough
search will be conducted in
seeking a new head ooad, fa the
women's program, while head
ENTER
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i Special IZOD Clearance Sale
IZOD LaCosta short sleeve shirts, reg. $19.00, NOW $13.95
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Sale Ends March 26,1978.
� Large Selection of men's and women's Golf,
, nd Tennis Shoes 2A price.
� Tennis Balls, Wilson or Dunlop
Championship, 4 cans$9.99
� Jolf Balls, all brands, $11.50 dozen,
no limit
We offer a full golf club repair service for all
golf clubs, and we all also have an excellent
selection of used golf clubs priced very reasonably
We also offer special 60 day terms for
college students.
Gordon D. Fulp
GOLF PROFESSIONAL M
LOCATED AT GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE
OFF MEMORIAL DRIVE
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 27834
CATHERINE BOLTON
coach Larry Gillman will be in
charge of seeking a successor for
Lee in the men's program.
TENNIS
Continued from p. 13
In the match against Tufts the
Pirates jumped out to an early 5-0
lead and clinched the match
early. The- winner r ir thi men's
single to ctu wer Curtis
Todesco, 6-2, 6-3, Tom Durfee
6-4, 6-4, Henry Hostetler 6-2, 5-7,
7-6, Kenny Love, 6-1, 5-7, 6-4,
and Randy Bailev 6-2, 0-6, 6-0.
In the men's doubles the
Pirates lost an tne matches.
On Saturday, the Pirates,
though playing two days in a row
jumped all over UNC-W.
Winners for the Pirates in the
mens singles were Tom Durfee,
6-7, 6-2, 6-4, Kenny Love, 6-3,
6-1, and Maury Werness, 6-1,
6-2 Jn the mens doubles the teams
of Durfee - Bailey, Hostetler -
Love and Campbell - Singleton
won their matches fa ECU.
This leaves the tennis
team with an impressive 6-3
mark.
Purple downs
gold 7-0
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina head football
ooach Pat Dye had to draw one
conclusion from Saturday's intra-
squad at Jacksonville High
School. The Pirate defense is
awesome.
The purple won over the white
7-0 in a game marked by bone
crunching defensive plays.
Exoept for one strike, a 58
yard oompletion from Leander
Green to Billy Ray Washington,
and a 38 yard reverse by Mike
Hawkins, the offensive game for
both sides was relatively lack-
luster.
Eddie Hicks and Anthony
Collins showed some flashy
moves in the purple baokfield
while Wayne Banks looked strong
on the white team. Theodore
Sutton missed the game because
of a sprained ankle.
During spring drills the ooach-
es look fa extra effat to
determine positions when the fall
comes around.
Oliver" Brute Felton showed
his aedentials fa the purple
defense as his head hunting
tactics were responsible fa stop-
ping several plays behind the line
of saimmage.






�"����������Ql
VlHHMBHHiB
23 March 1978 FOUNTAIWHEAD Papa 15
SGA Elections (Wednesday, March 29th.)
This is a sample ballot for March 29, SGA Executive Office Elections:
SAMPLE BALLOT
Please read and check (X) only one candidate for each office.
FOR SGA PRESIDENT FOR SGA VICE-PRESIDENT
1. Jeff Williams
2. Tim Sullivan
3. Tommy Joe Payne
1. Libby Lefler
2. David Cartwright
FOR SGA TREASURER
1. Bernard "Zack" Smith
2. Wiley Betts
FOR SGA SECRETARY
1. Lynn Bell
Below is a constitutional amendment consisting of stylistic changes designed to update
the SGA Constitution, and to reflect the switch from the quarter system to the semester
system.
The amendment has passed on three readings in the SGA Legislature and it must now be
ratified by the student body in order to become law. "Twenty percent (20) of the ECU
student body must vote on the amendment and fifteen percent (15) must vote in its favor
for the amendment to become law as stated in the Constitution.
Please read the amendment and then indicate whether you approve or disapprove by checking
(X) one of the two blanks under the amendment.
AMENDMENT
That Article 3, Section 4 be amended to read: "The term of office of each Legislator
shall extend from the fifth week of fall semester until the end of spring semester
That Article 3, Section 12 be amended to read: "The Chancellor of the University
as he deems necessary
over leg-
That Article 3, Section 13 should be amended to read: "The Chancellor,
islative action
That Article 4, Section 1 (B) be amended to read: who has successfully completed
48 semester hours of workin attendance at East Carolina for at least two consecutive
semesters.
That Article 4, Section 4 (B) be amended to read: who has completed 16 semester
hours of work
That Article 4, Section 8 be amended to read: 30 days before the end of Spring Semester
That Article 5, Section 7 be amended to read: final appeal of the decision of the Review
Board shall be to the Chancellor of the University.
That Article 5, Section 10 (A) be amended to read: "The Attorney-General shall take office
by April 20.
I approve of this amendment.
I disapprove of this amendment
Classifieds
fa sale
FOR SALE: Elec. stove $50, 2
love seats $75 each or both fa
$120. Call 752-0102 after 5:30
p.m.
FOR SALE: 1 double bed, 1 chest
of drawers, 1 book case, 1 kitchen
table and 4 chairs. Call a come
by Apt. 200 Georgetown Apts.
758-4395 ask for Ron.
FOR SALE: '70 Buick in very
good oond. $700.00 Also '73
Honda 500 - four in exoellent
oond. Only 7500 miles $850.00
Call 756-3054.
FOR SALE: 1972 CB 350 Honda.
New engine parts, 3500 actual
miles, extended front forks. Cus-
tom paint, headlights, seat, and
sissy bar. High rise bars, 68 mpg.
$400 call Dexter Davis at 756-2380
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE. 58mm Minolta lens
w bayonet mount. 1.14. $35.00
call after 3 p.m. 758-6759 ask fa-
Steve.
torrent (ff)
WANTED: 2 roommates to share
apt. for summer school sessions
at University Condo's. Rent
$47.50 a month per person plus
utilitier. Call 758-3147.
FOR RENT: Mobile home com-
pletely furnished. Prefer single
person. Call after 530. 758-5712
located in Colonial Park.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
toshare2bdrm. apt. immediately
and through the summer at Tar
River. Call 752-0865.
MALE ROOMMATE: needed to
go in together on an apt. next fall,
with 2 other guys. All expenses
split 3 ways. Please call 758-4496
anytime soon as possible.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Central
heat and air. Call 752-0154 after 7
p.m.
MOBILE HOME: for rent. Single
person preferred. $120.00 month.
Call after 530 758-5712.
persona!�
DESPERATELY NEEDED: ride
back Greenville on Sunday,
March 26. Anyone passing
through Winston-Salem and leav-
ing late Sunday afternoon or
evening. Contact Stuart at 752-
6900 after 5 p.m.
ARTIST WANTED:To paint sign
for extra cash. Call Robert at
758-5278 after 5 XX). Two
Schwin 10-speed male and female
bikes in mint condition $150.00
for both.
PART TIME: help wanted at
Putt-Putt golf course. Call 758-
1820 and ask for Don Edmonson.
FRENCH TUTOR: available.
Reasonable rates and exoellent
service. Call 758-9758 any day
after 5 p.m Start now to pass
finals with flying colors.
WORK IN JAPAN! Teach
English conversation. No exper-
ience, degree, a Japanese re-
quired. Send long, stamped,
self-addressed envelope details.
Japan-327, 411 W. Center, Cent-
ralia, WA 98531.
VISIT ENGLAND: Italy, Greece,
Egypt - June 15 to July 19.
College credit. Call 758-5742.
FOR SALE: Student desk fa
study aiented persai. Only20
Call 752-0354 ask fa Kathy.





Pay 18 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 March 1978
PAYNECARTWRIGHT
J.
f J
ar
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!S
Pj
il
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n.aiwKWH �

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V .
��'


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Title
Fountainhead, March 23, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 23, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.491
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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