Fountainhead, March 16, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of over
8,500, this issue is 1
pages.
Fountcrinhead
ON THE INSIDE
Handicapped vanp. 3
Peace Corpsp. 6
Women in lovep. 8
Lady Bucslosep. 13
Vd. No. 53, No. 4B" East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
16 March 1978
Study to be held on
overpass alternatives
By DOUG WHITE
News Editor
A new feasibility study on the
proposed overpass at the inter-
section of Tenth Street and
College Hill Drive and possible
alternatives to an overpass will be
conducted later this year, accord-
ing to Neil Sessoms, Student
Government Association (SGA)
president and head of the Tenth
Street Intersection Task Force.
The task face, composed
of Tommy Joe Payne, David
Cartwright, and Jerry Cox, met
Monday maning with Tan Brad-
shaw, seaetary of transpotatiai
with the Nath Carolina Depart-
ment of Transpatatioi, Henry
Oegg, assistant to the seaetary,
Ashley Futrell, a member of the
ECU Board of Trustees, and
Geage Harper and Joe Thomas,
members of the Nath Carolina
Board of Transpatatioi.
Search for
art dean
continues
ByJEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant News Edita
The Search Committee fa the
new dean of the School of Art is
currently completing its prelim-
inary saeenings of about 50
applicants, accading to Frances
Daughtery, chairman of the
oommittee.
The committee will soon narrow
the field to about 8 to 10
candidates.
Frances Daughtery, chairman
of the Search Committee, said
that there were about 5 candid-
ates who had not been considered
yet in preliminary saeenings
because sufficient mataial had
not been received.
"The conmittee will begin a
thaough study of the 8 to 10
candidates after the saeening
said Daughtery.
"The oommittee will oonsult
references, famer a current
associates, and the candidates
themselves in an attempt to
develop oomplete profiles of the
qualifications of each candidate,
" Daugherty said.
Daugherty explained that
when the research is completed,
the committee will make a second
saeening to produce a group of 3
(possibly 4) candidates to be
considered by the faculty as a
whole.
The 3 a 4 candidates will be
invited to visit the campus during
the last 2 weeks in March and the
first 2 weeks in April, where
See ART, p. 3
A plan to reroute traffic
through the intersection was
discussed at the meeting. The
plan resembled one proposed last
fall by Herb Carlton, a professa
in the political science depart-
ment, accading to Sessoms.
"This plan will be cheaper
than an overpass and will allow
bicycles to ctoss safely Payne
said.
Sessoms said ECU was very
fatunate to have the top highway
official in the state to come and
personally look the situation over.
" This is the surest way to get
quick action on a problem that's
been plaguing the students fa
years. I'm ootvinoed we'll see
quick steps taken to alleviate this
problem.
"We owe Mr. Futrell a lot fa
getting these officials down
here Sessoms said.
Payne added that the higher
cost of the overpass would make it
much mae difficult to get any
kind of change in the intersection.
"An ovapass would have to
be voted on by the highway board
and would compete fa funds with
other road projects throughout
the state.
"The proposed rerouting
would be funded by rechanneli-
zation, rather than the board
having to vote on the matta
Payne said.
Cartwright expressed the task
face's appreciation of Brad-
shaw's visit.
ACTION IS UNDERWAY to make the intersection of Tenth Street and College Hill Drive safer for
pedestrians.
Sessoms elected chairman
ECU Media Board meets
By DOUG WHITE
i News Edita
Neil Sessans, Student Gov-
anment Association (SGA) pres-
ident, was elected chairperson of
the Media Board at the board's
first meeting Wednesday afta-
noon.
The board familiarized itself
with the Media Board constitu-
tion, approved Feb. 22 by Chan-
cel la Leo Jenkins, and set a
regular meeting time of Wednes-
days at 515 p.m. in Mendenhall.
The faculty and student re-
fcfJ.ti�KiH"
presentatives on the board have
not been selected yet.
Persons interested in either of
these positions may apply in the
office of the dean of student
affairs, second floa Whichard
building, from March 20 to 21.
An agenda of topics to be
oovered fa the remainder of the
semester was adopted.
Included on the agenda is the
appointment of editas and man-
agers fa the 1978 - 1979 school
year, approval of the budgets fa
the upooming school year, and
review the operations manuals
which govern each medium.
A proposed $600 line item
transfer in the FOUNTAINHEAD
budget was denied.
The transfer, from the salaries
line item to the travel line item,
would have allowed Robert
Swaim, advertising manager, and
anaher advertising employee to
attend an advertising convention
in Chicago next month.
Swaim argued that represen-
tation at the convention would
benefit the paper through in-
creased advertising revenue,
See MEDIA, p. 6
Pres. candidate outlines platform
JEFF WILLIAMS, CANDIDATE for SGA president Photoby Pete
Podeszwa)
By JULIE EVERETTE
Assistant News Edita
Jeff Williams, candidate fa
Student Government Association
(SGA) president, says he would
like to see a student priaity
referendum go into effect.
"The refaendum would list
what the students would like to
see funded he said.
"It would serve as a guideline
fa appropriations.
"The money would be spent
as the students see fit
Williams, a junia fran Win-
stai Salem, isdouble-majaing in
Chemistry and Psychology and is
presently serving asaday student
legist ata.
Williams says he would also
like to see the president's office
fully suppat ECU in getting an
FM radio station.
"I believe in actively getting
out and reauiting fa funds
said Williams.
' � A lot has been said about it
but so little has been done
Accading to Williams, ECU
should have a grievance board set
up to handle the students'
complaints.
"I would also like to see the
housing contract reduced to one
semester and a professa rating
system established which would
benefit the grad students he
said.
Williams said he would like to
see a consumer board set up
which would draw up and print a
pamphlet listing the quality and
prices of local services.
Williams said he decided to
campaign fa SGA presidency
because he feels the SGA needs
"aggressive leadership that
might make a mae harmonious
waking situation"
"The SGA needs to aganize
into a waking face and dispense
with pretty partisan groups he
said.
"I'd like to see something
doie fa the students rather than
fa the SGA members' egos
Williams is a member of the
ski dub and Alpha Epsilon Delta,
an hoxxary fraternity fa pre-
mer students.





Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 March 1978
Moty
NCVA
CPR
Grafts
Register now for one of the
crafts workshops which are being
offered by the Crafts Center at
Mendenhall.
Sign up fa Beginning Dark-
room, Basic Pottery, Handbuilt
Pottery, Silkscreen, Woodwok-
ing, Crochet, Floa Loom Weav-
ing, Enameling, a Caitempaary
Basket ery.
Upoi payment of $10 sem-
ester Crafts Center membeship
fee, an individual may register fa
any of the available wakshops
with out additional charges, ex-
cluding costs of personal supplies
and a small lab fee should the
Crafts Center furnish supplies.
Fa details, call a visit the
Crafts Center during the hours of
3 p.m. until 10 p.m Monday
through Friday, and 10 a.m. until
3 p.m. Saturday.
Class space is limited and the
registration deadline fa all wak-
shops is Sat March 18.
Also, membership fees will
not be refunded after the registra-
tion deadline.
Flea market
Looking fa sane good bar-
gains? You will probably be able
to find them at the ECU Spring
Flea Market spoisaed by Mend-
enhall.
The Flea Market will be held
on Wed April 5, fran 10 a.m.
until 6 p.m. on the Mall.
The rain date will be Thurs
April 6.
Beautiful pottery ware, hand-
made jewelry, and small plants
were a few of the items sold in the
Flea Market last time.
Back by popular demand is
the sale of unclaimed articles,
held by the University's lost and
Founa Department. Don't miss it!
If you're interested in selling
items, any ECU student, staff a
faculty member is eligible. Each
individual must register to sell
items and a $5 refundable deposit
is required at the time of
registration.
Registration is Monday
through Friday, from 9 a.m. until
5 p.m. at the Mendenhall Student
Center Infamatiai Center.
Registration ends Mai April
3.
Roiy arts
This Sat March 18, the Roxy
will present its third annual
Spring Arts Festival.
There will be eight hours of
music, art, and aafts on display
and fa sale. If you are a
aaftsperson and want a table,
registration is $5. There is no
concession charge a percentage.
Please bring extension oads,
lamp, and table cloth.
This program is supported by
the Nath Carolina Council of the
Arts' "Grass Roots Fund a
state suppated agency.
Fa further infamatiai, call
758-0620 after 4p.m.
Problems
Having a problem with your
spouse, boyfriend a girlfriend, a
roommate?
The department of sociology's
Marriage Counseling Program
sepcializes in resolving inter-
personal problems.
Call 757-6883 and ask fa Dr.
Knox. He will arrange a confid-
ential (free) interview with a
graduate intern.
Musical
The Student Union Minaity
Arts Canmittee presents the
debut of Marshal B. McAden's
"Ebonie D'Lite N' Big Brite
Lites a sparkling and,oolourful
new musical on Sun. and Mon
March 19-20.
The musical will be held in
Mendenhall Student Auditaium
(aud. 244) beginning at 8 p.m.
Admission will be $1.
Tickets are available at the
doo.
Outing
The Outing Club will meet
Thursday evenings at 730 p.m.
room 106 in the basement of
Memoial Gym.
If you like the outdoas and
are intoested in leading a
participating in outdoo trips,
please attend.
Alpha Delta Mu
Alpha Delta Mu is spoisaing
a oof fee the moning of March 21
from 10 a.m. until 12 p.m. fa all
new majas to the department.
Hopefully, this will give
students and professos a chance
to get to know one another.
Refreshments will be served.
su
The Student Union will be
accepting applications fa can-
mittee members until March 24.
Canmittee members will be
selected ai the basis of qualifica-
tions.
All students in a position will
be required to complete an
application and have an intoview
with the committee chairperson.
Applications fa the positions may
be obtained in Mendenhall room
234 a the Infamatiai Desk.
Seminar
Dr. E.M. (Betty) Movers,
Analytical Chemist with the
Foods Division of Proda and
Gamble will present a seminar on
"The Synthesis, Characteriza-
tion, and Application of Chelating
lon-Exohance Resins" on March
17 at 2 p.m. in room 201 Flanagan
building.
Refreshments will be served
in the conference room.
Eleano Moty, a faculty mem-
ber of the University of
Wisconsin, will give a wakshop
demonstration oi shotoetching on
metal.
The wakshop will be held in
Jenkins Fine Arts Building fran 9
to 4 p.m. this Thursday and
Friday.
There will be a slide present-
ation of May's wak Thursday
evening at 8 p.m. in the Jenkins
Auditaium.
Moty has both national and
international reputation in her
field and is represented in many
publications and private collect-
ions.
She is a professional member
of SNAG, Society of Nath
American Goldsmiths
Funding fa this wakshop has
been provided by the SGA and
being oo-odinated by Craftsmen
East, a student design oganiza-
tioi.
F-G
The Foever General ioi meets
this Monday night fa an evening
of Christian fellowship and fun.
We'll be having a relevant
Bible study, good singing, and
delicious refreshments.
Why not join us? That's
Monday night at 9 p.m. in
Brewster C-304.
Monitor
Godon Watts, Nath
Carolina's leading underwater
archaeologist, will present a
combination lecture and slide
show, "The U.S.S. MONITOR
and Fat Branch on Tues
March 28.
This outstanding presentation
will begin at 8 p.m. in Menden-
hall room 244.
The public is codially invited
to attend. There will be no
admission charge.
Marshall
Anyone interested in applying
fa marshal I positions may do so
at the SGA Office, 228 Menden-
hall. Must have completed 64
semester hours by the end of
Spring semester 1978 and must
have an ovoall grade average of
3.0 Deadline fa applying is April
1.
The Nath Carolina American
Vocational Association (NCVA)
will hold its monthly meeting,
Mon March 20 in the Menden-
hall Multi-purpose room at 7 p.m.
Kenneth Brantley, inooming
state NCVA president will be the
guest speaker.
Refreshments will be served
and all persons interested in
vocational education are invited
to attend.
Openings
It's not too late in the year to
get involved.
SGA Legislature now has
openings: Two day students, one
Greene Dam, one Fletcher dam,
two Belk dam.
Sign up immediately in the
SGA office in Mendenhall.
Screenings will be Wed
March 22 at 4:30 p.m.
All students interested in
taking a Cardio Pulmonary Resus-
citation (CPR) course, should be
willing to devote four nights a
week, three hours each night.
Dates will be announced.
Contact Cindy Merritt at
758-3933.
Get shot
Any aganizatioi that has na
contacted the Buccaneer about a
group picture o returned their
information sheets by March 24,
1978, will not receive coverage in
the 1977-78 Buccaneer.
Call o come by the Buccaneer
office between 3-5, Monday thru
Thursday, a phone 757-6501 a
6502.
Kid ed
Crusade
The Association x Childhood
Education International will hold
an oganizatioial meeting Mai-
day, March 20, at 4:30 p.m. in
rm. 129 Speight.
All students interested in the
education and well-being of chil-
dren are invited to attend.
GMAT
A time of fun, fellowship and
Bible study sponsoed by Campus
Crusade fa Christ, meeting an
Thursday at 7 p.m. in Brewster
C-103.
This includes dynamics of the
Christian life, dynamics of dis-
cipleship, dynamics of ministry
and dynamics of the life of Christ
fa skeptics, as well as those
interested in growing in their
relationship with Christ.
Bake sale
Psi Chi will hold a bake sale on
Wed March 22 in front of the
Student Store.
Everyone come out and get
some midweek munchies on your
way to class.
Fellowship Pom-pom
The Graduate Management
Admission Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat March 18. Applica-
tion blanks are to be completed
and mailed to Educational Test-
ing Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540 to arrive by
Feb. 24. Applications are also
available at the Testing Center,
Speight Bldg, Room 105, ECU.
Are you looking fa Christian
fellowship?
Come and join us in praising
Jesus Christ and sharing test-
imonies about what God is doing
in our lives.
Tonight as every Thurs. we
will meet in room 221 in Menden-
hall from 730-9 p.m.
The Full Gospel Student
Fellowship weloomes everyone to
attend our meetings.
The ECU Pom Pom squad
tryoutswill be held March 17, 18,
and 19.
All interested girls should
meet in Fletcher Music Bldg. on
Fri March 17 at 7:30 p.m.
Tryouts will be Sat. evening,
March 18.
If vou have questions call Jo
Ellen at 752-0354 a Glenda
752-9416.
Debate club TKE sisters Mangione
Are there any students that
find it difficult to clearly express
what is on their mind?
If you are one of these people,
the Debating Club is fa you.
The club will help develop a
student's oonfidenoe in public
speaking plus the club will better
a student's capacity on investiga-
ting issues.
The Debating Club will cause
a student to speak his thoughts
much faster. This ability shall
make the student mae valuable
on the job market.
Wouldn't you like to speak in
front of people without your knees
knocking?
Fa mae infamatiai, contact
Marc Adler, room 161 Unmstead,
758-9523.
The TKE Little Sisters are having
a party at Chapter X on Sun
March 19 at 9 p.m.
There will be a golden bev-
erage chugging contest reward-
ing the winner with a free fifth of
the hard stuff.
Come on out and join the fun.
Art
Currently on exhibition in the
upper gallery of Mendenhall
Student Center is Folio, a selec-
tion of woks by artists Linda
Burney and Luden M. Koonce
This exhibit includes textdei
by Ms. Burney, along with
cermaics and drawings by Mr
Koonoe.
The Student Uniai Popular
Entertainment Committee will
present Chuck Mangione on
March 29. The concert will begin
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditaium.
. Tickets fa the conoert will be
$3 fa ECU students and $5 fa
the public.
All tickets can be purchased
from the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall.
Puolic tickets can be purchas-
ed from the following plaoes:
Apple Reoods-East Fifth Street;
School Kids Recods-University
Arcade; and The Music Shop-
Greenville Square Mall.
AH tickets will be $5 at the
0 or





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16 March 1978 FOUnTTAINHEAD Pag 3
Dissatisfaction cited with SGA Handicapped Man
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
There is general dissatisfac-
tion with the use of the Student
Government Association (SGA)
Handicapped Van, according to
Gene Summerlin, SGA transit
manager.
Last year, the SGA was
approached by several handicap-
ped students who cited a state
statute requiring equal services
for all students.
Since the SGA provided free
ART
Continued from p. 1
faculty members will have an
opportunity to meet them.
Following the visits, tenured
faculty will be asked to vote on
the acceptably of each candid-
ate. Faculty of the School of Art
will also be asked to rank the
candidates.
Daugherty said that if the
committee is successful in finding
two candidates which meet with
the approval of the majority of
tenured faculty, those two will be
presented to the University ad-
ministration, with an indication of
preference.
The administration if free to
accept or reject committee's
preference, or to reject both
candidates submitted.
If none of the candidates are
accpetable to the majority of
tenured faculty, or if the admin-
istration rejects the two candid-
ates, the search will be continued
fa an additional year.
"At this point the committee
feels that we have an excellent
group of prospects and we are
optimistic about obtaining the
services of a Dean who will be
acceptable to all in the fall of
1978 said Daugherty.
Criteria for the position in-
ch appropriate terminal
iMFA, PhD, EdD), prev-
ious administrative experience.
I preferably 10 years exper-
ience in visual arts education at
jmversity level.
"The candidates should also
demonstrate for intellectual lead-
ership which suggests that they
would be able to strengthen our
existing program for artists, art
education, and art historians
said Daugherty.
"We also want the candidate
to be able to respond sympath-
etically to the needs and interests
of all areas and departments of
the School of Art Daugherty
added.
TOTHI
MARCH OF DIMES
transportation for the majority of
students, the statute required
that it do so for handicapped
students as well
The SGA subsequently appro-
priated approximately $6800 to
purchase a van, according to
David Cartwright, former SGA
Appropriations Committee chair-
person.
After the van was purchased,
it was sent to Raleigh several
times to be equipped with a lift to
handle wheelchairs.
It was not until early this
semester that the van began
operating, according to Summer-
lin.
Summerlin said the dissatis-
faction comes from the poor
response to the operation by the
handicapped students.
Only three students have used
the van to date, and only one
student uses the van frequently.
According to Summerlin, an
important consequence of this
peer response is that SGA funds
are being spent to pay a driver for
the van who seldom works.
"I'm paying drivers $3 an
hour to sit in my office on call
most of the time said Summer-
lin.
The reasons for the lack of
response by the handicapped
students are not easy to deter-
mine. One of the few students
who has used the service said that
since the initial request for the
van, the many delays faced some
handicapped students to pur-
chase their own vehides a find
their own alternate means of
transpatatioi.
Willie Bail, a handicapped
student who has used the service,
said "It's a great service, but
more students need to use it to
ensure that it will remain avail-
able
He does not believe that all of
the approximately 40 students
classified as handicapped on
campus have been infamed of
the service.
Bell would also like to see the
service operated at night, since
one of the SGA buses routes runs
at night.
Pitch in! Clean up
even win some



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Budweiser Announces 1978 National College "Pitch In Week
(April 10-16)
Get up a group and Pitch In! You can help improve the
environment around your college and have a shot at
one of five $1,000 first place, five $500 second place,
or five $250 third place educational awards, courtesy
of Budweiser and ABC Radio.
Any college, university, or approved organization
(fraternities, sororities, campus groups, etc.) is
eligible to participate. Just return the coupon
for rules and "Pitch In! Week program kit.
Competition void where prohibited by law
Re i imc �
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Please Rush College Pitch In' Week program kit
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Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 March 1978
PLO, Israel halt
peace process
Israel lashed out angrily Tuesday against
Palestine guerrillas by attacking Palestine Liberation
Organization (PLO) bases on the Lebanese frontier
which borders Israel. Palestine guerrillas killed 33
Israelis last Saturday in an attack on a tourist bus in
Tel Aviv.
Israel's attack, while not surprising, has only
served to set back peace negotiations even further.
The government of Israel, however, stated that the
attack was not retaliatory, but to protect 'the State of
Israel and its citizens from incursions of members of
Fatah and the PLO who use Lebanese territory to
attack citizens of Israel (N & O, March 15).
Israel cannot be entirely blamed for the halt in
peace negotiations. The PLO, upset, to say the least,
because it doesn't have a homeland, is not helping
the peace plan at all. Certainly the Palestinians want
territory for a homeland.
But, the PLO seems hell-bent on thwarting any
attempt whatsoever made to help bring peace to the
Middle East. The PLO, with Libya and Syria,
condemned Egyptian President Anwar el-Sadat when
he visited Jerusalem last November, thus recogniz-
ing Israel as a sovereign state, which no Arab country
had done before.
While the PLO and these countries, among others,
were criticizing Sadat for his historic move of visiting
Israel, what were they doing to initiate peace in the
Holy Land? Sadat should be highly oommended for
risking his political career, and even his life, for a
dramatic move to try to bring peace to this turbulent
land.
The Palestinian issue is a delicate one. Israel has
refused thus far to discuss returning occupied
territories, namely, the West Bank. Meanwhile, the
Palestinian Arabs are wandering around antagonizing
many with their terrorist activities.
It appears as if the PLO is not interested in having
peace in the Middle East. Perhaps if the Palestinian
Arabs would join the peace talks, some measures can
be taken to provide them with some territory that
they could call their own.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years.
Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the tdtter
Thomas Jefferson
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News EditorsDoug White
Stuart Morgan
Trends EditorSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Madia Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
JVU)
UlrfTBV�R tfFPPEN�t To PBMB?
f M I
Forum
Student st
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
� �:�
!s Payne, Cartwright
Election time has rolled
around again at ECU and there is
a wide field of candidates. Two of
these candidates stand out as
being very representative of
student interests: Tommy Joe
Payne and David Cartwright.
Payne is running for president
and Cartwright for vice-
president. Both are down to earth
and seem to reflect the concerns
of the average student.
I believe that we need a couple
of people in SGA who are
concerned about what students
want and not so much about
pleasing just special interest
groups. I am tired of hearing
campus politicians gripe and
grumble all of the time about
everything under the sun except
what concerns students.
Payne and Cartwright can
probably get the SGA back on the
track of giving us (the students)
more attention and more service
than we have been getting. I'd
like to see these guys get elected
so maybe the SGA can do
something besides scream about
how the big, bad newspaper has
been so mean.
Probably the most unique
characteristic that Payne and
Cartwright possess is their sincer-
ity, honesty, and the desire to do
something good for someone else.
It has been a while since anybody
with these qualities has run fa
office. I really think it is time to
put some people in office who
care about something besides
power and politics.
Payne and Cartwright are
intelligent and interested in posi-
tive work. They are talking about
extended bus routes (both day
and night routes), better dorm
contracts since the present ones
are slanted in favor of the state an
not the student, and maybe some
improved security. These are
things that interest students, and
would benefit ALL students. This
is a positive step forward in
comparison with past campaigns
and elections where some candid-
ates would go around and
promise special interest groups
the moon and everything else.
I appreciate candidates like
Payne and Cartwright who come
around to the dorms and talk to
students to find out what our
problems are and express concern
with what interests us.
I think that this year instead of
voting for a politician, I'll vote for
two good students, Tommy Joe
Payne and David Cartwright.
They deserve to be elected
and the students deserve to have
two good representatives as pres-
ident and vice-president.
I hope the students vote
PAYNECARTWRIGHT on elect-
ion day. I know that I will.
Sincerely,
Douglas Jones
Styx review blasted
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Having just finished reading the
March 14 edition of your paper, I
can't believe you write and
publish an article as biased and
shallow as Mr. White's review of
the Styx concert. The article was a
"definite disappointment" as I
see little validity in hiscomments.
It seems he let his attitude
towards true rock and roll con-
certs come through like an atomic
blast. I was shocked that anyone
could make such comments about
such an incredibly talented and
tightly performing group a Styx
In the review, Mr. White does
not attempt to hide the fact that
he did not enjoy the concert. This
was due to several reasons, one
being the "lack of substance" in
the performance. I would row like
to challenge Mr. White to define
substance
What would a concert consist
of if it contained "substance?"
Mr. White uses words as vague
as this to denounce the show, yet
fails to elaborate on why the show
merited denouncement.
He did, in fact, compare
Styx's performance to a "flashy,
flawless" Vegas show, which
contradicts this earlier remark.
Unless, of course, he feels that
Las Vegas shows lack of "sub-
stance Or, maybe this fact was
too difficult for the other 4,999
people to figure out, so he is now
kindly pointing it out.
I feel that Mr. White compris-
es a minute minority of the people
that where present at the concert.
His comment, "They seemed to
have a good time sounds like
he's shoving the fact that every-
one else enjoyed the show under a
rug. How, may I ask, can he fend
4,999 opinions like that?
See HEVIEW, p. 5





BBS H$�JSEK �5
HlHMHHBHMMHBnMMMHB9BHMB9MBIHMHiHMHiBHI
Forum
16 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Student endorses Payne, Cartwright for SGA pres vice-pres.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The time to elect SGA
executive officers is here once
again, and after studying the
candidates and talking with
people who are more knowledge-
able than myself about each
candidate's record in student
government, I have reached 'he
conclusion that two candidat s
stand out head and shoulders
above the rest.
Those two candidates are
Tommy Joe Payne, running for
SGA President, and David
Cartwright, running for SGA
Vice-President.
Both students have been
involved in many campus activi-
ties other than SGA, which I feel
makes them far more accessible
to the student body. Mae
.�'identsare likely to be in regular
contact with Payne and
C-twright though the various
aganizatiois the two are involv-
ed in, since those involved solely
in SGA, a any other aganiza-
tion, fa that matter, tend to come
in contact only with others
involved in that aganizatioi and
become somewhat isolated from
the rest of the campus.
Tommy Joe Payne's and
David Cartwright's campaign
literature lists several planks of
their platfom which are of vital
importance to the students.
Readers upset with Styx review
To FOUNTAINHEAD: ,
The Trends section rarely
offers a truly professional, much
less, collegiate scale review of
current albums and acts playing
at ECU.
We were among the 5,000
pre-pubescent population, The
Marines, and numerous juveniles
REVIEW
Continued from p. 4
In conclusion, in the future I
wish that the Trends Edita would
send a mae open-minded persai
to review concerts. Mr. White
should also try practicing judging
perfomances, not ears. Or may-
be next time, he could watch the
concert like everybody else.
Dutifully,
KyleS. Inman
who throughly enjoyed the repiti-
tious heavy metal offered by Styx.
We found the concert the best
that Maja Attract ions has offered
since Linda Ronstadt appeared at
Minges.
The music played by Styx was
loud, but compared with acts like
Yes, Kiss, Heart, and The
Eagles, Styx was like a quiet
summer evening.
As fa the band Charlie, a
group we had not heard of befae
the ccocert, we found them
rather mediocre and to our
knowledge do no have a hit song.
Styx is no a visual act. If you
wish to see a stage act, go see
Queen a Kiss, but if you like
diversified music, then Styx is the
band to see!
Signed,
Mae Decibals
Mark Rimer
MikeLange
Assist, sports ed. praised
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Re: Pressbox,
FOUNTAINHEAD, February 28,
1978. Steve Byers should be
commended. With the glaring
exception of the term "half-wit"
in the final paragraph, this
editoial column is one of the
most refreshing pieces of writing
I've read in quite a while. It was
clearly written, infomative and
as unbiased as it should be.
Mr. Byers has a potentially
great cancer of him.
FOUNTAINHEAD is very fotun-
ate.
Danny Miller
Payne and Cartwright don't
promise pie in the sky prosperity.
Instead, they promise that they
will wok towards their stated
goals, and if those goals are
unattainable, then they will try to
reach the best compromise pos-
sible.
Tommy Joe Payne and David
Cartwright have the most balano-
ed, thought-out platfom of any
Oher candidates, a platfom that
will give every student oi this
campus a voice in their student
government.
Matlynn Bryant
Vacation
HAWAIIAN
ADVENTURE
June 20 thru 27
$599.00
(cer person dbl. occ.)
Place reserved upon receipt at
$100.00 deposit. Bal. due May 2.
Jet "United" from Greensboro
To a Room in Sheraton's
"Princess Kaiulani"
Hotel in WAIKIKI
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(Fa free brochure complete & Days�7 Nights
coupon & mail o call.)
NAME Rev. & Mrs. Gilbert Mister
P.O. Box 308, Ayden, N.C.
ADDRESSPhones: 746-4102 & 3556
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Iff you haven't ordered your Class Ring yet
then now is the time to think about it
wed. thur& March 22-23 ln the
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ic.t sags :
6 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 March 1978
Carter commemorates
Peace Corps anniversary
many ziuutNii tin tne tawns toaay xo oaten muse nrst rays ot spring.
THE WHITEHOUSE- Seven-
teen years ago this March,
President John F. Kennedy sign-
ed the executive order that
created the Peace Caps.
On March 8, President Jimmy
Carter issued a statement com-
memorating its 17th anniversary.
In that statement he asked the
American people to join him in
commemorating the thousands of
American citizens of all ages who
have served in the Peace Corps
and similar programs.
Carter also called fa suppat
of the voluntary effats which he
said are so impatant both to our
own nation and the rest of the
wald.
The TI-57 The super slide-rule that'll
get you into programming fast and easy
Even if you've never programmed before.
cient use of your time in prob-
lem-solving.
All this and more is ex-
plained in our unique, illus-
trated, easy-to-follow guide-
book, "Making Tracks Into
Programming This 200-page
book comes with the TI-57. It
contains simple, step-by-step
instructions and examples to
help you quickly learn to use
programming functions to
make your problem-solving
faster, more accurate and fun.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Pawn
INNOVATORS IN vftP)
PERSONAL ELECTRONICS j
For the student who re-
quires slide-rule functions, the
TI-57 delivers an exceptional
combination of advanced
mathematical and statistical
capabilities. From functions
such as trig, logs, powers, roots
and reciprocalsto mean, var-
iance, standard deviation and
much more.
And as long as you're in
the market for a super slide-
rule calculator, why not buy
one that can also put the power,
speed and convenience of pro-
gramming at your disposal?
Programming a calculator
simply means giving it a logical
set of instructions for accom-
plishing what you want it to
do. Programming enables you
to solve lengthy and repetitive
problems
quickly Jfe&iio,
by sub-
stituting
new vari-
ables into
the set of
instructions
which you
have al-
ready entered into the machine.
The end result is more effi-
Texas Instruments
"The spirit of Peace Caps
and VISTA springs fran the
deepest wells in our culture, fran
the reasoned and stroigly felt
impulses of our people to share
with their neighbas their caring
and their laba Carter said in
that statement.
MEDIA
Continued from p. 1
since FOUNTAINHEAD dele-
gates could come in contact with
several maja national adverti-
sers.
The board gave no official
reason fa its decision.
"I was encouraged by the
attitude of the board members
and by the way business was
conducted at this initial meet-
ing said Sessoms.
"I am even more certain now
that this new media board is a
mae effective and objective way
to govern the media. The board
has a lot left to do this year, but
I'm sure we can take care of
everything officially and on sche-
dule
Sessoms said the results of the
first meeting reaffirmed his belief
that the student body would
benefit from the new arrange-
ment governing campus media.
"I'm also honaed to have
been elected chairperson. I'll do
everything I can to make the
board operate effectively and
serve both the students and the
media Sessoms added.
� 1978 Texas instruments Incorporated
I N( OR F'OR AT I
A Public Service ol This Newspaper l
4 The Advertising Council ttT�l
Would
you
help
this kid?
When the dim broke at Buffalo (reek. West
Virginia, a lot ol people werenl as lucky as
this little guy
Jarrueandlhereslol iheMoslcy family
made H up the hill iusi in the ruck of lime
Seconds later, a wall of water swept all their
earthly possessions away
Here you sec Jamie in the Red Cross
shelter, thinking it all over
One look at that lace, and were awfully
glad vu were there to help
Every year, you know, Red Cross
touchei the lives of millions upon millions
ol Americans Rich Poor Average Black
White Christian and Jew With support
Wnh comfort. With a helping hand when
they need it
S. i when you open your heart, wnh your
n.ne Of vnur money, you can be certain its
in the right place

Red Cross
is counting
on you.





16 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
ByRICKIGLIARMIS
Co-Greek Public Relations
The fraternities and sororities
are entering into the busiest
phase of the school year, not to
mention the most exciting.
With the ooming of spring
fever, the Greeks leave snowballs
and midterms behind and turn
their attention to field days,
formals, and Greek Week.
One of the main events during
the spring is the annual Pi Kappa
Phi Field day, where there is
never a dull moment.
The event brings fraternities
and sororities togeher in a day of
games and field events. At Pi Kap
Field Day there in a day of
games and field events. At Pi Kap
Field Day there s seldom a dry
moment either.
The lake located at the
fraternity house proves to be a
disadvantage to those who stand
too close to the water. This is
probably the biggest unofficial
game during the day: who can
stay dry the longest.
When the weater gets warm
and shortsleeves and sandals
appear, the beach is seldom off of
anyone's mind. The fraternities
then sponsor their beach week-
ends complete with a lot of
sunshine, swimming, and party-
ing.
Endless numbers of formals
and banquets are held during this
time of the school year. Greeks
set aside their jerseys and visors,
but only for a while, as they
"dress to impress
Greek Week, a farewell and
finale to a school year full of good
times, is held for fraternities and
sororities. The week begins with a
track meet and fieid day. Other
Greek forum
activities during the week include
a Bed Race, a Raft Race, a
Volkswagon stuffing contest, a
beer drinking contest, a banquet,
and a dance.
Moser's Farm is held the last
day of Greek Week and is by far,
an appropriate finale.
Moser's Farm is a "lay back,
take it easy, enjoy yourself day
The Greeks arrive early Saturday
morning fully equipped with
blankets, ice chests, and
Kentucky Fried Chicken dinners.
Bands playing music during the
day provide the people with all
types of entertainment from easy
listening music to dancing music
to "plain ole good time" music.
Spring is definitely the best
time of the year fa the Greeks
and having a good time and
making new friends is what being
a Greek and having spring fever
is all about.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Sigma Sigma Sigma
soraity is waking ai a volunteer
basis at the Special Olympics as a
philanthropic project. The Special
Olympics will be held in April at
Harrington Field.
Marcia Goughnour, a Tri-Sig
has been named Volunteer Co-
adinata fa this year's Olympics.
The Kappa Sigma fraternity
has been busy this spring, having
inducted five pledges, initiated
eight Little Sisters, and initiated
four new brothers.
Two Kappa Sigma brothers
and one Little Sister were elected
fa the East Carolina Budweiser
Superstar team.
They are Chuck Freedman,
Roy Turner, and Rita Davis,
Tri-Siq.
The fraternity congratulates
brother Dalton Denson, new IFC
president.
Campus police busy
during spring break
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant NewsEdita
A nai-student was arrested
fa trespassing in a women's
damitay during spring break,
according to Frances Eddings,
chief of campus police.
Eddings said the non-student,
a male, was caught unesoated in
a women's dam Sat March 4,
and was arrested.
The nai-student will
charges of trespassing.
face
Two rooms were entered and
personal property stolen in ano-
ther damitay during the break.
No arrests have been made
yet, according to Eddings.
No arrests have been made in
the case where three students
were assaulted, none seriously,
last Feb. 22.
Eddings said that inquiries
into the identification of the
suspects, four males, and their
car, have been unsuccessful so
far.
Western Sizzlin
Steak House
Hours: Sun. thru Thurs. 11:00 to 10:00
Fri. �r Sat. 11:00 to 11:00
THURSDAY DINNER SPECIAL
No. 12 Chopped Sirloin Steak with or without Mushroom Bravy
Texas Toast with Baked Potato and moltod butter or Fronoh Fries
All for
$1.49
Lee Huggins is also congratu-
lated fa being inducted into Phi
Sigma Pi hona fraternity.
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity
did very well at District Day held
at UNC-C placing second in
volleyball and foot shall.
Sig-Eps would like to extend
best wishes to Terry Hartley, a
brother who was married over
spring break. Many of the
brothers attended the wedding in
Green sbao.
The Phi Kappa Tau's are
proud to announce that they will
host one of the seven regional
IMPACT programs sponsered by
the fraternity's national, on Fr
March 31 through Sun April 2.
This is a leadership develop-
ment program which is amied at
how-to-do-it sessions and open
discussions fa a purposeful and
progressive influence on the
operations of all chapters.
The Phi Taus are sponsoring a
drawing fa a Beach Week-end
fa two at the Ramada Inn at
Atlantic Beach.
The winner will receive room
expenses, fifteen dollars fa gas,
te case of your favaite bever-
age, twenty-five dollars spending
money, and ate-half gallon of
your choice of an alooholic
beverage.
��





Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 March 1978
Screen version of Lawrence novel free flick
COURTESY UNITED
ARTISTS CORP.
Women in Love, a fine screen
adaptation of the D.H. Lawrence
novel, will be shown Friday and
Saturday night in the Mendenhal!
Student Center Theatre as this
week's Student Union Free Film.
Times for the film are 7 p.m. and
9 p.m.
The latest screen interpreta-
tion of a D.H. Lawrence work is a
beautiful film, its beauty glowing
far beyond the surface.
What is relevant to the film
is its intensity, the saturation
scriptwriter Kramer and Ken
Russell, the director, have provi-
ded in a specific time and place so
that universality of human behav-
ior ana its contemporary signifi-
cance glitter throughout.
Judith Christ of TV Guide
writes, "It is difficult to recall
another film that so successfully
recreated the past with a depth
that brings to life every album
snapshot we have seen of the
time
Women in Love is the stay of
two sisters, sexually mature and
intellectually active, who struggle
against the oonfines of a rural
English mining town and its
rigidly classed layers of society.
THE CAST OF "Women in Love Oliver Reed,
Glenda Jackson, Alan Bates, Jennie Linden, and
Eleanor Bron. "The latest interpretation of a
Lawrence work is a beautiful film
The more placid sister, played
by Jennie Linden, becomes enga-
ged to local school teacher Alan
Bates, a man who longs for true
spiritual oompanionship with
everyone and represents Law-
rence himself. The other sister,
played by Glenda Jackson, has a
tangled relationship with Oliver
Reed, the son of the mine owner.
Around them, Lawrence
weaves one of his best studies of
sexual uneasiness and doubt.
Now filmed for the first time (and
called the best film adaptation of
Lawrence by most film aitics),
the stay expiates with subtle
frustrations, warped joys, and
Trends
bitter passions.
Under Ken Russell's(Tommy)
vivid, faceful direction, the four
leads strike dramatic sparks of
rare luminescence.
AsGerlad, Oliver Reed proves
to be one of the film's best
choices. The character is an
unsatisfying one but Reed waks
hard and well to realize the part.
Jennie Linden plays Ursula
with wit and passion. Glenda
Jackson isna an actress in ader
to be loved but in ader to act.
Her Gudrun catches the buried
wildness, the appetite fa self of
this Now Woman.
Of directa Russell, aitic
Stanley Kauffman of The New
Republic writes, "He shows
talent fa human revelatioi and
fa the camera ma ion dictated by
it
Admission to the film is by ID
and Activity Card fa students.
Faculty and staff may use their
Mendenhal I Student Center
Membership Cards.
The next Student Union spon-
saed free film will be Mel
Brook's oomedy The Producers
which stars Gene Wilder and the
late Zero Mostel. The film will be
shown on March 31 and April 1 in
the Mendenhal I Student Center
Theatre.
Fantastic Animation Festival comes to Greenville
A rare film, The, Fantastic
Animation Festival, will be shown
in Greenville this week. Festival
is a cumulative effort; a two-and-
a-half year project which involved
saeening over a thousand anima-
ted films from all over the wald.
Unlike the wald of Saturday
maning television a the classics
from the Walt Disney Studio, the
Fantastic Animation Festival pre-
sents a prime selection of the
avant-garde wak being daie in
animatiai today.
The review depicts the true
renaissance in the arts, namely,
the recent flowering of the
animated film. The animated film
is now over seventy years old and
European animated films began
trickling into American theatres
with regularity around 1960.
Animation is now a serious
artfam with mature themes and
new techniques. Artists are final-
ly seeing the possibilities inher-
ent in the medium and are
constantly breaking new ground.
The first feature-length ani-
mated film of this new wave to
employ a radically new visual
style and capture the public
imagination was "Yellow Sub-
marine and it is safe to assume
that its popularity was due as
much to the Peta Max style as to
the Beatles music.
Following "Yellow Submarine
came an artistic avalanche of
animated innovation. Stanley
Kubrick employed animated se-
quences in "2001 Another view
of some future wald was Rene
THE VISUAL BRILLIANCE of "Cosmic Cartoon"
earned it an Academy A ward Nomination. "Cosmic
Cartoon" is just one of sixteen innovative animation
shorts featured
Festival To be
LaLoux's "Fantastic Planet
Then Ralph Bakshi came up with
the inevitable, an X-rated ani-
mated feature where all the little
furry aeatures we grew up with
were street wise and speaking
the previously unprintable. The
feature was Fritz the Cat. Fritz
the Cat will cone to the ECU
campus as a student free flick
April 14 and 15 at 7 p.m. and 9
p.m.
Although it is the feature-
length animated waks that gen-
erate the most commentary and
publicity, the new wave in
animatiai finds its best and most
varied expression in the shat
film. Thae, artists, freed fron
many of the constraints of time
and budget, can let their visions
rule.
Animation is the most free of
the cinematic arts, and labas
uncter few of the restrictions that
limit the earthbound camera. The
animatas who yearly turn out
hundreds of films waldwide are
breaking away into areas where
the live action film simply canna
follow.
Through animation, the
natural laws of space and time,
and gravity and dimension are
surmounted. The surreal vision,
static under the brush of a Dali, is
allowed to come alive.
To Animate. Dreams, pre-
viously the taritay of mystics
and Freudians, are fleshed out
and given life. Most impatantly,
animatiai is able to present the
fantastic wald of the imagination
in a palpable, believable way.
in "The Fantastic Animation
shown in Greenville this week.
With animation, this wald be-
oomes mae than believable, it
becomes real.
Selected from ova one-thou-
sand nominees around the wald,
sixteen animated shat films
(most by artists in their 20's a
early 20 s) are being presented
together in one feature-length
program which runs 107 minutes
without the intamission. Samp-
lings fron this well deserved
showcase follow this introduction
in synopsis.
FRENCH WINDOWS
By: Ian Ernes, England
Music: Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd's "One Of These
Days" na only accompanies Ian
Ernes' striking film, it was the
inspiration fa it as well. The
music and image blend together
as one entity so that neither
seems quite oomp'ete without the
a her.
A shadowy figure is the center
of the piece, floating freely
through space, time and dimen-
sion, through recognizable land-
scapes and surroundings of the
surreal. It is the perfect mating of
picture and sound.
"French Windows" was pre-
sented with the Gold Award at the
Atlanta Film Festival.
" would like to create the perfect
experience, a musical time-space
event, not designed to convey a
'Message but more a state of
mind' resulting from the reaction
to the experience and the many
components within it
"Though it is a tedious medium,
animation gives access to the
impossible, opening up a fantasy
world where one can control every
line and every oolor, every sound
and every second
Ian Ernes
ICARUS
By: Mihai Badica, Romania
World Premiere
The Greek myth of Daedalus
and Icarus tells about a man and
his son, who when imprisoned by
King Minow, construct some
wings of wax and feathas with
which to fly ova the high
labyrinth walls. But alas, Icarus
fliestoonearthesun, which melts
See FESTIVAL, p. 11),





Vinyl Review
by David Whltson
Bat McGrath: the Spy
In this age of stars and superstars, it's refreshing to hear someone
who is simply an entertainer. And Bat MoGrath's new album firmly
establishes him as one of the finest entertainers performing today.
No he " ain't got no hundred dollar suit as he sings in the title cut;
Bat's not fancy, just good. He sings the songs of small town America,
not the blues of the touring rocker. The characters evoked in
McGrath's music aren't playing with groupies in their limousines,
they're chopping wood or shopping in the I.G.A.
McGrath explores the feelings of these characters, which range
from the frustrations of a jealous lover in "The Spy to the
desperation of a veteran who kidnaps his married girlfriend in
"Angel to the comic relief of the lovelorn youth who, to win hisgirl,
threatensto: cut up her tires, beat up her pa,Then I'll takeoff my
clothes in the mall ("How Would You Like a Punch, 1978 Bat
McGrath B.M.I.).
Another fine album from a fine performer.
Automatic Man: Automatic Man
" Who's gonna be t he one
Who's gonna be my lady
Who's gonna be my love
It'sabout to drive me crazy
("Comin Through 1975 Island MusicAutomatic Man
Publishing Co B.M.I.)
Heavy stuff, guys. Real heavy. And the next song has little more to
say than "My pearl my precious little girl repeated about forty
times. Need I say more?
All right, I will. The only way this album sounds interesting is after
tooting a dime of strawberry mesc' or a few bongs of Columbian.
This band takes itself entirely too seriously; they see themselves as
great rock poets in the Hendrix vein, powered by Astral World Energy
(whatever that is), but with such fluff fa lyrics they'll never make it.
The lyrics drone and the instrumentals meander monotonously, in
keeping with thetitle cut's proclamation: "Automatic Man moves like
a computer
Thanks to Bill Sheppard at the Roxy Theater fa the Bat McGrath
LP, Bob at School Kid's Recads fa "Automatic Man
ECU graduate returns
to direct original musical
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Marshall B. McAden, a 1977
graduate of ECU is returning to
the campus to direct two per-
famancesof EBONY D' LITE N'
BIG BRITE LITES. The play,
which was written by McAden, is
a musical adaptation of Grimm's
Fairy Tale "Snow White
In the wads of McAden the
play isdesaibed as a "sparkling
and colaful new musical He
refuses to give out any other
infamatioi about its stayline
play has a cast of 15 of the most
innovative and aeative talents
avai'able. Its warmth and huma
runs throughout like a refreshing
stream.
There will be two perfam-
ancesof EBONY D'LITE, oie on
Sunday, March 19 and the other
on Monday, March 20. The play is
scheduled fa Auditaium 244 of
Mendenhall with a 8 p.m. curtain.
Tickets fa the pertamance will
be available at the doa and are
Horse Feathers! Duck Soup 16 March 1978 fountainhead pane 9
Marx bros. festival Sun.
The Student Unioi will pre-
sent its fourth film festival, this
time featuring the Marx Brtf hers,
this Sunday at the Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre. Films to
be shown are, respectively, Night
at the Opera, Monkey Business,
Horse Feathers, and Duck Soup.
The following is an excerpt
from an article by Richard F.
Shepard, Cultural News Edita
fa The New York Times.
Film has done for the Marx
Brothers and others who went on
camera what no writer can do for
the actor who faced only the
footlights It has bestowed an
immortality that is more part of us
than part of them.
The Marx Brothers foresha-
dowed today's reality for us. They
cannot be blamed that the reality
is somewhat more joyless than
their prescience. In their films,
they appear as comic supermen,
characters of no past, no ties, no
future.
A vacuum is created and they
rush in to fill it-a hospital head
who is a horse detective on the
lam, a department store detective
who revels in incompetence, an
international statesman nuttily
escalating tension. They return
the status to a questionable quo
by ousting the blowhards, the
grasping, the baddies.
The Marxes were seminal
performers. Even in the age of
artificial insemination, it must be
admitted that they were naturally
seminal. Nobody like them
appeared before they did. They
initiated a style that has been
imitated but never equaled.
What, you ask, has all this got
to do with you? What can the
Marx Brothers do for you? They
can make you laugh, dear reader,
and if you're half the worried,
beset, polluted, traffic-jammed,
debt-ridden, family-bugged citi-
zen that I suspect you are,
laughing is not something that
you can toss off lightly
NIGHT AT THE OPERA
To be shown at 4 p. m.
The Marx Brahas are at their
peak as they deliver their unique
satire oi the ponp and circum-
stance surrounding grand opera.
SeeMAFtX BROS p. JQ
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�Men's Straight Leg Jeans,
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�Misses Sundresses, $11.88
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NOW OPEN TILL 9:00 p.m. MonFri Sat. 10-6 p.m.
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USE OUR CONVENIENT LAYAWAY PLAN
the
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factory
for blue bell apparel
703 GREEMVIUE BLVD. � GREENVILLE. N.C. 2783�
919) 750-0337
Gordleys'
art shown
in Kinston
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Painting and drawings by
ECU faculty artists Marylin and
Tran Gadley are oi display this
moith at the Kinstoi Art Center.
Marilyn Gadley is showing
waks fran her "Rose" series,
and Tran Gadley is represented
by waks fran his Food series.
Bah artists, members of the
painting faculty of the ECU
School of Art, have exhibited
widely, at museums and galleries
in several states.
The Gadleys' Kinstoi show
opens March 5 with an aftanoon
receptiai given by the Kinstoi
Arts Council.
DISCOUNT FURNITURE
AT
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
New and used furniture and appliances
Call Tommy Williams 756-7815.
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
1
(264 by-pass West, across from Bill Haddock Chrysler)





Pay 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 March 1978
Wyman, Papas presented in art workshops
COURTESY
VISUAL ARTS FORUM
On Monday and Tuesday,
March 20 and 21, The Ceramic
Guild and Craftsmen East in
cooperation with the SGA and
VAF will sponsor ooncurrent
workshops featuring William
Wyman (Clay) and his wife,
Marilyn Pappas (Fiber).
The schedule is as follows:
Monday, March 20:
Pappas-9:30-3 00, Workshop
Demonstration, J-223
Wyman-1000-12.00 and 200-
WorkshopDemonstratiorvs, J-
103
Both-Slide Lecture. Auditorium.
7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 21 :
Pappas-9 30-3 00, Workshop
Demonstration, J-223
Wyman-9 30-300, Workshop
Demonstration, J-103
Both artists have exhibited
nationally and internationally and
their works are in world-wide
public and private collections.
Marilyn Pappas received her
BSin Art Education at Massachu-
setts College of Art and the M.
Ed. at Penn, State. She had
taught at Miami-Dade Junior
College and presently teaches at
Massachusetts College of Art in
located behind
THE ATTIC
752-7303
Thlir Billiards Tourn. 9 PM
Backgammon Tourn 9:30
Fri
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Boston, and at one time was the
Elementary Art Supervisor at
State College, Pa. She has written
articles for "School Arts" and has
been featured in "Craft Hori-
zons" and her work is included in
numerous books such as Objects
USA, Meaning in Crafts, and
many others. She has also taught
workshops at the Penland School,
Haystack Mountain School, Bos-
ton University, and others. Her
present work deals with soft
sculpture in fiber.
William Wyman received his
BS in Art Education from the
Massachusetts College of Art and
the MA from Columbia University
and has done further study at
Alfred University. Bill has taught
at Drake University, University of
Maryland, the Deoordova Mu-
seum and the Massachusetts
College of Art. He presently
teaches at the Boston Museum
School. He also is included in
Objects USA and has exhibited
throughout the United States and
Europe. His present work is
involved in developing a series of
fired clay sculptures called Tem-
ples, Entrances. Facades and
Interior Spaces
Both artists have a superb
collection of slides of their own
work and also work in their
respective disciplines which is
historical and chronologically illus-
trates certain styles and phases of
the contemporary crafts move-
ment.
ARTIST WILLIAM WYMAN and his wife, Marilyn
Papas, whose works have been exhibited nationally
and internationally, will be presented in workshops
March 20 and 21. See schedule above.
MARX BROS'
Continued from p. 9
Groucho, with dubious assistance
from his brothers, crosses the
ocean with an Italian opera
company and contrives to get two
young singers a break.
HORSE FEA THERS
To be shown at 5:35 p.m.
Said Allen Eyles in The Marx
Brothers, "In Horse Feathers has
some of the most direct satire of
any Marx oomedy. "In Horse
Feathers the Marxes all reach
their full sature and the area of
attack is much wilder: education,
college life, sport, love and the
Depression all come under accur-
ate and devastating fire
MONKEY BUSINESS
To be shown at 7:30 p.m.
In this film, they are on the
run as stowaways aboard a
transatlantic liner where they are
chased by the crew, become
involved with winsome wenches
and are paired off as rival
bodyguards to two feuding gang-
sters.
DUCK SOUP
To be shown at 9:15 p m
Allen Eyles in The Marx
Brothers said, "Duck Soup is the
most highly regarded of the
Marxes' pictures. Groucho him-
self thinks it's the craziestit is
almost mint-fresh today and will
be timelessly funny
ou
Oorf
fl!P
stuff
w
out
ood�
ft
AWeM- tyu Com 3ust I
BUY A REG. SUB & GET ANOTHER
Vo PRICE
FOR
Phone in order for pjck-up or delivery � Phone 752-6130 � 521 GotantfieS Georgetown Shoppes





������������(������H
16 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
Page 11
The Fantastic Animation Festival is visually brilliant
Continued from p. 8
his wings and hurls him into the
sea, where he drowns.
The film uses the innovative
Icarus character to demonstrate
incisive truths about humans
through the familiar animation of
clay figures.
As the music's vibrant tones
build, viewers see a aatered
globe moving toward them
through an empty space. As it
draws nearer, comical little heads
appear on the surface. One of the
heads, Icarus, tries to free his
arms while the others laugh and
ridicule him. He succeeds, how-
ever, and manages to swim
around among his comrades, who
soon follow suit. Icarus then frees
his legs to first crawl and then
walk while his fellow beings
snicker but eventually imitate
him. At last, when Icarus at-
tempts to fly but fails, and his
friends desert him, his persever-
ance is rewarded with the miracu-
lous transformation of his hands
into wings, enabling him to soar
in the sky.
A SHORT HISTORY OF THE
WHEEL
By: Lor en Bowie
World Premiere
This film is a mythical fantasy
about the origins of man's most
universally applied invention, and
more. It is a visual statement
Luboff choir
to perform
The international famed
Norman Luboff Char will perform
at ECU Wed March 22 at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium.
Since Luboff began touring
with his choral ensemble in 1963,
the Choir has received enthusias-
tic response from music critics
and audiences everywhere.
A typical program will include
Renaissance motets, Bach
choraJes, folk songs, "pop"
music, Beatles numbers and
avant-garde experiments.
Luboff has selected singers
who can adapt to this wide range
of choral music, and the result isa
performance of "precision,
beauty and understanding
Public tickets for the Luboff
Choir's ECU appearance are $4
each and will be sold at the door
on the evening of the perfor-
mance.
relying solely on shifting images
and a surrealistic recombination
of familiar elements to convey its
theme. As such, it is a prime
example of animated expression's
superiority to live action film or
verbal description in conveying
idea through image. The narra-
tive oonsists of visuaJ, not literary
links, the effect of which is unique
to the animated films.
Loren Bowie is currently an
assistant animator at the Walt
Disney Animation Studio in Bur-
bank, California.
COSMIC CARTOON
By: Steven LisbergerEric Ladd
Music: Hoist's "The Planets"
Stream of consciousness was
originally the province of fiction
writers, and was never well
adapted to the live action cinema
where the logic of time and place
worked always to make it seem
contrived and ridiculous. The
animated film, however, is the
ideal medium, as exemplified by
"Cosmic Cartoon From a lone
candle burning far out in the
cosmos we begin the zoom of all
zooms, which takes us through
the void and eventually to the
distant earth, to a beach, to a
metamorphosizing woman dan-
cing on the waves, then back
again to deep space.
The visual brilliance of "Cos-
mic Cartoon" earned it
Academy Award Nominee.
an
THE LAST CARTOON MAN
By: Jeffrey Hale and Derek Lamb
What better subject for an
animated film than the current
state of animation itself? "The
Last Cartoon Man" isa hilarious
5 minute entertainment that
manages to disturb as well as
entertain. Its only character is a
comic only too willing to please
hisaudience by detaching various
parts of his anatomy, only to find
that he can't find his own head,
which keeps shouting "over
here" to the bumbling body.
Whether it is taken as a
comment on the role of the artist,
or simply a bit of animated black
humor, the film is a delight.
It is the winner of the First
Prize at the World Festival of
Animated Film, Zagreb, Yugo-
slavia.
CAT'S CRADLE
By: Paul Driessen
Cat's Cradle is the simplest of
child's games where a loop of
string is transformed by the
fingers into magical shapes and
images. The transformations in
the film of the same name,
however, are much more complex
and mystifying. It begins with a
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spider instead of a loop of string,
and what transpires is striking an
unique. The metamorphoses are
alternatively funny and disturb-
ing. The plot, such as it is,
remains an enigma, and its
interpretations, from the meta-
physical to the Freudian, remain
in the eye of the beholder. The
result is a childish and simple
concept transformed into some-
thing provocative and mature.
"Cat's Cradle" is the winner
of the Special Jury Award at the
World Film Festival, Zagreb,
Yugoslavia.
ECU A NIMA TION FESTIVA L
East Carolina's own animated
film festival will be shown April
16 in the Mendenhall Student
Center Theatre and is sponsored
by the ECU Student Union. Three
feature-length films are sche-
duled: Milestones for Mickey,
Wizards, and the aforementioned
Yellow Submarine.
The Fantastic Animation Fes-
tival will be shown as a special
late show this Friday and Satur-
day night at Greenville's Plaza
Cinema. Showings begin at 11 30
p.m.
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at
College View Cleaners
Questions?
If you have
an
unwanted
pregnancy
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as your
phone
If you're troubled and uncertain
Call Hallmark Clinic and Counseling Service.
One of our telephone counselors can help you.
She can tell you about the personal and dignified
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free pregnancy test.
Our Hallmark staff includes a gynecologist,
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counseling and follow-up visit.
First
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HALLMARK CLINIC
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Charlotte, N. C. 28204
Cmtt: Charlotte � 376-1615
Long Dimtance Toll-Frem:
N. C: 1-800-432-6066
All other states: 1-800-438-4094





Pap� 12 FQUMTAINHEAD 16 Mardt 1978
'COAT QUILT"IS one,of artist Marilyn Papas' works. She and
husband, William Wyman will teach workshops on March 20 and
21. See story p. 10.
THE BEAUX ARTS Jrio, a world renowned-
chamber ensemble will appear in Mendenhall
Student Center on Thursday, March 30at 8 p.m. as
part of the Schoof of Music FESTIVAL '78, in
conjunction with the Student Union as an Artist
Series Attraction. The group, which has had sell-out
tours season after season and won the coveted
"Grand Prix du Disque" consists of: Menahem
Pressler, piano; Isidore Cohen, violin; and Bernard
Greenhouse, cello. Admission for students is by
ECU ID and Activity card; Faculty and Staff by MSC
Card; and Public tickets are $4. For further
information about the Beaux Arts Trio, see next
week's FOUNTAINHEAD.
HALF-LIFE
poetry
The bursting of apples in sunlight
Joggle my mind into thinking of times
When we would sit upon rich tapestries
and trace the illusions from the hookah
We would skate across great diamond deserts
and climb spiral rock mountains to the too
and shout to the world below in voices
that made the eagle tilt his head in flight
This was all the half-life of my own life
Falling like dominoes all in order
Till the clock stopped ticking above me
and I looked around and I was alone.
TO LYNN
Even this day
You showed your head,
To the lights
You gave a ay.
And they licked you clean.
Oh! how you shined!
Then they cut your cord
And left you to stand.
Alone�to die.
In past times,
Even this day
Nancy Moore
Sojo
Wiener King
Apply in person
Monday thru
Friday,
1-4 p.m.
Now hiring full
and part time help wiener King
Conner of Charles and 11th Street
An � qul Opportunity Employer
MIDNIGHT
AN ADVENTURE IN EATING
TuetSat. 11:30 p.m1:30 a.m.
All Subs for $1.00 with purchatt of toft drink
(not valid on deliveries) 752-1828
706 Evant St.
optn MonSat. at 11:00, Sun. 12:00 �
Art will be
shown' sold
A special exhibition and sale
of Original Oriental Art will be
presented on the ECU campus
Thurs March 16 at the Gray
Gallery-Leo Jenkins Art Building
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Marson Ltd. of Baltimore,
Maryland specializes in exhibit-
ing for sale a collection of Original
Oriental Art totaling approx.mat-
ely 500 pieces from Japan, China,
India, Tibet, Nepal and Thailand
The oldest prints date back to
the 18th and 19th Century and
include Chinese woodcuts, Indian
miniature paintings and manu-
scripts and master works by such
artists as Hiroshige, Kuniyoshi,
and Kunisada.
The modern pieces consist of a
large group of original woodcuts,
etchings, lithographs, serigraphs
and mezzotints created by such
world renowned contemporaries
as Saito, Azachi, Mori, Katsuda
and Maki.
A representative will be pre-
sent to answer questions about
the work, artists, and the various
graphic techinques employed.
Prints are shown in open port-
folios in an informal atmosphere
and you are invited to browse





Sports
16 March 1978 FOUNT AINHEAD
13
Intramural
by JOHN EVANS
r
Softball starts,basketball overfinally!
This week promises to be a busy one around the intramural off ioe as
Softball play begins and spring registration fa numerous other
activities will get underway.
Softball for both men and women began on Monday, with over 90
men's teams and over 40 women's teams competing. Tennis play in the
mixed doubles co-rec tennis tournament also began Monday.
Registration is being held Wpdnesday and Thursday for the co-rec
Novelty swim meet on Friday March 17. Registration fa men's and
women'sHaseshoes and Badminton will also be held this week thru
Thursday and oompetitiai will begin on Monday, March 20. There will
be both singles and doubles competition. The intramural wrestling
tournament will begin next Monday and the signup dates will run from
Monday through Thursday. The weigh-in fa the tournament will be
held from 1-5 p.m. Monday in the Intramural Off ioe, 204 Memaiai
Gym. We'd like to remind fraternal aganizatiais, dams and clubs
that this spat counts toward team trophies in the President's Cup
competition.
Other events start registration next week. Among them are Team
Tennis fa the men, Co-Rec Volleyball and Innertube Water
Basketball. All will begin play on March 27.
The four-day golf tournament will run from March 28-31 and each
competita will play 36 holes. This year's event will be spiosd up with
several special awards such as closest tothe pin, longest drive, longest
putt, etc. Once again it will be played on the delightfully contoured
Ayden Gold Course. Registration will be held the week befae, March
20-23.
BELK PLEASERS TAKE BASKETBALL TITLE
The Belk Pleasers broke open a dose game early in the second half
in the intramural all-campus basketball championship and went on to a
79-49 win over the Hatchets.
The Pleasers, who went through the season on probation, proved
their power in the all-campus playoffs as they also beat Tau Kappa
Epsilon, the fraternity champs, in the semifinals by a 61-44 scae.
The Hatchets defeated last years all-campus champions, the Belk
Nutties Buddies 59-57 in overtime, to reach the finals.
Gerlad Hall led the Pleasers in the championship game with 16
points as James Robbins, Woodrow Stevenson and Eddie Hicks all
added 12 points. Stevenson soaed 20 in the semifinal victay and
finished as the high scaer with 32 points in two games.
Greg Pechman led the Hatchets with 15 points, but Terry Nobies
was held to only six points after scaing 23 in the semifinal win over the
Nutties Buddies.
The all-campus all-tournament team consisted of Hall, Robbins and
Stevensa of he Pleasers, Nobles and Pechman of the Hatchets, and
Clifton Williams of the Nutties Buddies.
The ECU Toilet Bowl championship was won by the Kappa Sigma
Cheap Thrills, who dropped a 30-15 final to Delta Sigma Phi's "B"
team.
WILLIAMS HILUARD WIN SLAM DUNK CONTEST
Clifton Williams and Avery Hilliard won the Intramural Slam Dunk
Contest held befae break. Williams wot the all-around championship
in the Under 6-3 categay, while Hilliard was the champiai in the 6-3
and over oompetitiai. Williams also woi the freestyle competition, but
Jim Knocke nosed out Hilliard fa the championship in the 6-3 and over
freestyle competition. Hilliard took second place by beating Andrew
Schaffer in a sudden death dunk-off.
The competition was tight in the 6-3 and over all-around
competition as Hilliard barely nosed out Knocke, 45-43.7. Knocke
would have won handily except that he missed his last mandatay dunk
fa a scae of 1.3 out of 10 fa the dunk.
The slam dunk playoff was judged by Pat Dye, Dr. Edgar Hooks
and spatswriter Jim Kyle of the Gfr jnville Daily Reflecta.
ICE BUSTERS WIN ICE BALL CHAMPIONSHIP
The Ice Bustas took the Intramural Co-Rec championship with a
12-6 win ova the Ioe Picks and finished the season with a perfect 9-0
mark.
Led by Kevin Cameron and Bill Bugbee, who scored six points
each, the Ice Busters never trailed and held off the Ioe Picks with a fine
perfamance by goalie Kim Carlyle.
Other members of the winning team were John Evans, Brian
See INTRAMURALS, p. 14
Lady Bucs falter in play-offs
By TERRY YEARGAN
Staff Writa
The Lady Pirates finished a
vay competitive season with a
trip to the regional play-offs.
East Carolina lost to Kentucky
(81-65), and to the University of
South Carolina (77-70).
"Our execution against U.K.
was pea said coach Cathaire
Bdton.
The Pirates shot 40 from teh
floa while Kentucky hit 48.
Kentucky out rebounded the
Pirates 42-33.
"We played well against
South Carolina, but the ball
wouldn't drop said coach Bol-
ton. East Carolina shot only 33
while the Gamecocks sha 45.
The oonsolation game against
Nath Carolina left no question of
the number two team in the state;
East Carolina.
EC-73, UNC-72 was the final
oount. The number one, NCSU
Wolf pack will go on to represent
this region.
Coach Bolton finishes this
season with an excellant (20-10)
recad. The Pirates will lose
senias Lacy and Freeman but
remain optimistic fa next seasai.
"I will expect a great deal
from returnas Lynn Emerson and
Debbie Tritt said coach Bolton.
Though the lady Pirates work
with a small budget, staff and
people they do a fine job at
representing our school.
Fa the Lady Pirates the
mission was accomplished.
LYDIA ROUND TREE
LYNN EMERSON
Football team ranks high in
nationwide NCAA statistics
Over the last five years, East
Carolina is the 14th winningest
team in the oountry, tied with
UCLA with a 41-14-0 reoad, fa a
.745 mark. During the last five
years, 125 schools have been
eligible fa this ranking amaig
the Division I schools that play
football.
Ova the last ten years, East
Carolina is the 32nd winningest
team in the oountry, with a
63-43-0 reoad, fa a .594 mark.
During the last ten years, 114
schools have been eligible fa this
ranking amaig the Divisiai I
schools that play football.
Consicter these rankins as well
as individual team categories:
East Carolina is 9th ova the
last five years in rushing offense-
276.6 yards pa game
THE TOP 15
Oklahoma
Ohio State
UCLA
Michigan
Alabama
Texas
Houston
TexasA& M
-EASTCAROLINA-
Oklahona State
SouthanCal
GeagiaTech
Notre Dame
South Carolina
East Carolina is 14th ova the last
five years in scaing defense-
13.5 points pa game.
East Carolina is 14th ova the last
five years in total defense- 271.1
yards pa game.
East Carolina is tied fa 14th ova
the last five years in scaing
defense- 13.5 points pa game
East Carolina is 16th ova the last
five years in scaing offense-
26.3 points pa game.
BASEBALL SCORES AS OF MARCH 15
ReoadECU-3
1-0Double Header
ECU-5
2-0ECU-0
2-1ECU-3
2-2Double Header
3-2
3-3
4-3
5-3
ECU-6
ECU-4
Double Heaoer
ECU-HB-
ECU-2
East Carolina is 19th ova the last
five years in rushing defense-
148.9 yards pa game.
East Carolina is 31st ova the last
five years in total offense- 357.6
yards pa game.
East Carolina is 3rd ova the
last five years in turnova mar-
gin- .93 possessions gained via
turnovas.
� This is a new category to be
released this fall. Turnova mar-
gin is based oi numba of
turnovas gained vs numba of
turnovas givai up, thus produc-
ing numba of possession gained
via the diffaenos. East Carolina
has gained 192 turnovas ova the
last five years, while giving up
141.
THE TOP THREE
SouthanCal 1.6
Ohio State 1.1
-EAST CAROLINA-0.93
Elon-2
NCState-0
NCState-5
Uni.of&C4
Purdue-2
Purdue-7
Madison-6
Madison-1





Pay 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 March 1978
'Small' D. T.Joyner looks toward national tourney
After losing a narrow 7-5
decision to Waft Groteof the N.Y.
Athletic Qub earlier in the season
during the Wilkes Open, East
Carolina heavyweight D.T.
Joyner stormed off the mat rather
frustrated with his performance
"I was mad at myself because
I didn't wresHe hard against
him Joyner remembers, "I was
kind of scared of him because I
had heard he had broken three
ribs in a match against another
guy
"I changed my style against
him because of that, but after I
lost I told Coach Hill I was going
to wrestle my way and nobody
else was going to beat me the rest
of the season
Joyner wasn't kidding.
Since his loss to Grote in the
Wilkes Open, Joyner's only set-
back of the year, the Norview, Va.
native has won 12 straight
matches, pinning five of his
opponents during that stretch.
Last weekend, Joyner upset the
defending champion and number
one seed Bob Pfeiffer of Virginia
Tech in the finals to win the
favfo)Strt

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Eastern Regionals.
The victory qualifies Joyner
for the NCAA Championships
which opens Thursday at Cole
Field House in College Park, Md.
"I'm really looking forward to
this tournament said Joyner,
who now boasts a 20-1 overall
record. "I feel like I can hold my
ground against the best of them.
I'm just determined to do well in
the nationals. I've wrestled hard
all season and I don't want to
mess up here at the end of the
year when it really oounts
Joyner has oompiled a most
impressive list of wrestling cred-
entials this season. He manhan-
dled Oregon State's Howard
Harris 16-3 and topped N.C.
State's highly regarded Lynn
Morris 11-3 in dual matches.
Harris finished fifth in the nation
last year at 190 while Mans was
the Atlantic Coast Conference
champion.
Joyner is currently ranked
sixth in the nation at heavyweight
by Netional Mat News and is
listed as the number two prospect
in the south behind Kentucky's
Harold Smith.
"D.Ts attitude has been
tremendous all season long
said ECU head coach Bill Hill.
"Heavyweightsdon't have to run
�s much and watch their weight
RIGGAN
SHOE SHOP
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LEATHER GOODS
downtown Greenville
111 West 4th. St. 758-0204
as everybody also on the team,
but D.T. works as hard as
anybody. Everyone really res-
pects him on the team. He's been
our leader all year
At 230 pounds, Joyner is not a
"big" heavyweight oompared to
most of the monsters who will be
oompeting in the NCAA tourn-
ament like Jimmy Jackson of
Oklahoma State, Harold Smith of
Kentucky and John Bowl by of
Iowa. Joyner admits wrestling
300 pounders is no easy task.
"Yes, it does kind of bother
me when I'm wrestling against
guys who weigh a lot more than
me said Joyner, who also plays
defensive tackle on the Pirate
football team. "Winning's great,
but I don't want to get torn apart
doing it.
"But wrestling against those
big guvs makes me wrestle even
harder' continued Joynei 'When
I' m smaller the best thing to try to
do is get control of my man. Most
of the real big guys are slow and I
think my quickness really helps
me there. But I've always believ-
ed if I get out there and hustle
and wrestle hard, anything can
happen
Hill, East Carolina's only
wrestling Ail-American, feels
Joyner is certainly capable of
placing in the nations but admits
it will take a superb performance
for three straight days. "The
nationals is an endurance test as
much as anything noted Hill.
"All the wrestlers who make it
this far are good. But D.Ts
confidence has improved so much
H.L. Hodges
Fun in the Sun Special
All Day Friday Only!
� Large selection of men's and ladies
tennis shorts and shirts - V2 price
� Large selection of warmup suits- 54 price
� Large selection of tennis dresses- Y2 price
� Large selection of Softball and
baseball aluminum bats- $5.00
� Large selection of softball and baseball
wooden bats- $2.50
�All swim suits- 10 off Ladies by Head,
Adidas, Speedo and Arena Men's bv
Adidas and Birdwell
�All tennis jackets- V off
� All men's and ladies brown maple leather
deck shoes- $16.95
PltlS- During our 3- 5 p.m. Happy
Hour Special WRQR'S Steve Hardy will
be broadcasting live from H.L. Hodges.
Free t- shirts and other gifts
to be given away, plus extra special
items at great savings I
from his freshman and sopho-
more year that I think it might
just make the difference. He's
capable of placing, but he's
certainly going to have to pull off
some upaets along the way
Joyner has pointed all season
towards the nationals and feels
his teammates have been his
biggest fans.
"Coach Hill and his assistants
Willie Bryant have spent a lot of
time with me explained Joyner,
"Any my teammates have been
pushing me hard. They all want
me to do well. I just don't want to
let any of them down
Continued from p. 13
Webb, Joanna Denton, Carrie Johnson, Qaudia Mundit, Debbie
Justice, Patty Collins and Jo Bradberry.
The Ice Busters advanced to the finals with a 10-5 win over Teke
Bourbon on Ice and a 12-2 win over the Macaroni Malefactor. The Ice
Picks reached the finals with a 6-0 win over the Who Knows and a 6-3
win over the Necromancers.
HEADHUNTERS, MILLER KILLERS WIN BOWLING A WARDS
Intramural Bowling has closed its regular season and for the second
year in a row the Miller Killers have won the dormitory title, as they
defeated The Greene FFWC.
Representing Fleming Dorm, the Miller Killers rolled their way to
an easy 1665-1341 win over the FFWC's. Gaylan Hoyle led the Miller
Killers with a 514 series.
The women's sorority title was won by Alpha Omicron Pi, which
took a 1574-1465 win over Alpha Xi Delta.
In men's play, the dormitory division was won by the Belk
Headhunters. Led by Bill Rhyne the Headhunters whalloped the Soott
Studs, 2133-1943. Rhyne rolled a 595 set fa the Headhunters, but
Soott's Doug Boyette was the high bowler in the finals with a 600 set.
In the fraternity division, Sigma Nu beat Kappa Sigma 1994-1830.
John Fox led Sigma Nu with a 566 series and a 223 high game.
Definitely ran its season record to 40-0 in the Independent league
with a 1911-1618 win over the Beer Frame. Lee Moore and Colin Leisy
led Definitely with three-game sets of 490 and 487, respectively.
The regular season men'stop bowler was JeffForsythe of the Jones
Zack Attack. Forsythe rolled a 175.4 average for the season, beating
out the Headhunters' Rhyne by two pins. Rhyne had a 173.4 average.
Mark Matthews was the men's leader in the race for high game and
high set. He had a high set of 585 and a high game of 234. Matthews'
regular season high was topped in the playoffs, though, by Boyette's
600 set. Rhyne rolled a set of 584.
Over in women's play, Jeannie Williams finished with the highest
average. She rolled a 146.5 average during the season as she helped
lead the Miller Killerstothedorm championship. Williams' teammate,
Gaylan Hoyle, had the second highest average of 144.2.
Hoyle also had the highest set of the year with a 532 set. White
Dorm's Nancy Quincy rolled a 217 game to take the honors in that
category.
AT LONG LAST WE,RE DONE
Weil this has been a lengthy newsletter thi : I hope you
got ail the way through it. I thank the h
indulgence and their typing skills. And thanks to J
Large Selection of Golf Suoes
12 Pric' by Foot Joy and
ETOINIC TITLFIST,
TOPFLITE, AND

PROSTAFF Golf balls,
$11.50dozen
All IZOD LaCosta shirts L
in stock $13.95, reg. $19.00.
20 off on all golf bags,
over 100 to chose from
located at
Greenville Golf & Country Club
OK of Memorial Dr.
Gordon Pulp Phne 756-0504
Pro Shoo





16 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page IS
Joyner, Northrup qualify for nationals
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
The finals of the Eastern
Regional Championships las
weekend in Williamsburg, Va.
looked more like a dual match
between old Southern Conference
rivals East Carolina and Wiliam
and Mary.
The Indians sent seven
wrestlers into the finals and
advanced five to the NCAA
Championships as they outdist-
anced East Carolina for first
place.
East Carolina had six in the
finals, and came away with two
individual champion to finish with
75.5 points just ahead of third
place Virginia Tech with 67.5
coins.
D.T. Joyner and Vic Northrup
won their respective weight
classes to qualify lor the NCAA
Championships which opens to-
day at Cole Field House in
College Park, Md.
Joyner upset the defending
champion and number one seed
Bob Pfeiffer of Virginia Tech in
the heavyweight finals while Vic
Northrup edged Slippery Rock's
John Stroup 10-8 in the 177 pound
weight class.
"We wrestled well as a
team said ECU head coach Bill
Hill. "I think we suprised a lot of
teams there when we got six in
the finals. I was real pleased to
see D.T. Joyner and Vic Northrup
advance to the nationals, al-
though I wish we could have
gotten a few more individual
champions
Joyner, currently ranked sixth
in the nation by National Mat
News, pinned Bruce Uvegas of
Farleigh Dickinson and John
Ceremina of Williams and Mary
and decisioned Chuck Tursky of
Slippery Rock 6-1 to reach the
finals before upsetting Pfeiffer.
"Although Pfeiffer was bigger
than D.T. he really handled him
with very little trouble noted
Hill. "He was probably the
biggest heavyweight D.T. has
wrestled this season. But I was
glad to see him wrestle well
against a much bigger opponent
because it will certainly help him
in the NCAA tournament
Probably the tournament's
biggest suprise was Vic Northrup.
Northup, a native of Waverly,
N.Y. pinned two of his oppo-
nents and took a narrow 4-3
decision over Va. Tech's Bob
Reisch to reach the finals.
"Vic has consistently im-
proved through the season
explained Hill. "He was definite-
ly an underdog going into the
tournament, but I thought it was
the first time he wrestled to his
potential in quite awhile
The Pirates had a total of
seven place winners in the
tournament. Jay Dever defeated
Cincinnati's Mith Kearby 8-7 to
win third place in the 190 weight
class.
Paul Osman took second at
134 after losing in overtime to Old
Dominion's Anthony Lee. Frank
Schaede lost to William and
Mary's Max Lorenzo 9-3 in the
150 weight class while Steve
Goode dropped another overtime
decision to Gary Drewry of
William and Mary to finish
second at 158.
William and Mary's Greg
Fronczak avenged an earlier
season loss against Butch Revils
Women's softball team abuses North Carolina
Central in doubleheader debut ; Tarheels next
Q nA m A4PQD A kA .ui. . . .
By DAVID MERRM
Staff Writer
Girl's softball, East Carolina's
newest sport, opened its season
Saturday with a double header
against North Carolina Central.
The Lady Pirates softball
debut oegan with proper style,
taking a double header 10-4 and
16-6 .at the expense �f an
unsuspecting NCCU team.
Womens softball has arrived
at ECU and thus another step in
the development of a well roun-
ded athletic program has been
taken.
'We felt that we needed to
expand women's athletics. It
definitely will be well worth the
schools time and continuing ef-
forts supporting a program such
as this said first year coach
Alita Dillon.
"We have developed a varsity
program here, and although this
is Softball's biggest year at ECU
many people have expressed
support and an excellent display
of desire to keep women's softball
at East Carolina
"Since we are a young team
and first starting out, our budget
is not quite as high as other
school we play.
"Fortunately fa us, the girls
know many of the other teams
from either summer league a
high school commented Dillon.
Womens softball has evolved
from what used to be a sandlot
game to a very competitive level
of play.
In November, 40 girls tried
out for the first ever softball
team; after a few weeks of
practice, twenty girls were cut.
"After we had the team, we
went through a seven week period
of weight conditioning and prepa-
ration for the season opener, said
Dillon. "We worked hard and I
am pleased to say that the girls
Classifieds
really look good
And look good they did as the
Lady Pirates handed two lopsided
defeats to NCCU.
"We played very well toge-
ther said senior co-captain
Gaye Hines.
"It surprised me to see a
group of girls like us play so well
together, after never playing as a
team before
A truer word hath never been
spoken as ECU pounded a total of
over forty hits, twenty-six runs,
and only one error.
"All the girls played well,
everyone on the team played, and
I kept switching teams to see how
the girls could play together.
All combinations were win-
ners and now I'm faced with the
dilemma of deciding who plays
when stated Mrs. Dillon.
Hobm Faggart and Gae
Hines are co-captains fa this
years squad.
A real test comes to the girls
this Friday when the Tar Heels of
UNC-Chapel Hill invade Pirate
territay to play a double header
against ECU.
Fan support is essential and a
good aowd can change a whote
game.
for sale �?
FOR SALE: Used Electrophonic
stereo fa $50.00. Call 756-6307.
FOR SALE: Lafayette 950-A 100
watt stereo amp. and RK-84
8-track tape player. Call Brian in
evenings. 756-1459.
FOR SALE: Calssic sports car.
Triumph GT6. Very sound mech-
anically. Radials, new battery
$1295.00. May trade. 758-7397
days.
FOR SALE: 1971 BMW motor-
cycle. 750CC. "Best road mach-
ine in the world $1200.00
partial trades considered. Phone
756-7059 4 to 10 p.m.
FOR SALE: "69 Mustang in good
cond. $500.00. Ftrone 758-1491.
FOR SALE: Variety of house-
plants, potted and unpotted,
$1.00 and up, all extremely
healthy; 2 plant stands hand
built, 6 hand framed pictures.
Call 758-4395 ask fa Rai Apt.
200 Geagetown Apts.
FOR SALE: AMFM 8-track
stereo system. Call 752-8676.
FOR SALE: Nickel-plated piccolo.
New pads and wires. Appraisal of
$195.00 Will sell fa $130.00
Includes case and tun'ng rod. Call
752-9039 ask fa Sue.
FOR SALE: '70 Buick in very
good cond. $700.00 Also '73
Honda 500-four in excellent cond.
Only 7500 miles $850.00 Call
756-3054.
FOR SALE: 7 cubic feet refrigera-
ta in good oond. $40.00 Call
758-8688.
FOR SALE: Used guitar with
steel strings. Black. $25.00 Call
758-2577 after 530 p.m.
for rent (jj
ROOMMATE WANTED: College
View Apts. $55.00 month plus Vi
utilities. Call 758-2580 a come by
Apt. 914.
NEEDED: Furnished apt. fa 2
responsible females from May
20th to July 15. If you can help
call 752-4461 a 752-8014.
NEEDED. A responsible female
roommate to share a 2 bedroom
apt. Call 758-5794.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Third
person needed to share apt. at
Langston Park Apts. $66 plus V4
utilities. Call David at 758-4406.
ROOMS AVAILABLE: Super loc-
ation fa serious and a waking
male students. 136 N. Library St.
On brown SGA route. Washer
and dryer, central air and heat,
private bath adjoining 2 bed-
rooms in back. $65.00 plus Vi
utilities. Call Steve Aldridge,
proprieta 75&O022.
FOR RENT: Partially furnished
apt. on Chicod St Grimesland.
$35 mo. Contact Roland Howell at
N. Chicod St. beside Sears.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
to share apt. dose to campus.
$58.75 per month plus V utilities.
Phone 758-7786.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Grad
student needs responsible person
at Village Green. Right at SGA
bus stop. 3 minute ride to
Memaial Gym. 758-3830.
WANTED TO RENT: Room in
house, a small apartment fa
summer and fail. Call Sharon at
756-6137.
ROOMMATES NEEDED: fa 3
bdrm. apt. in Eastbrook. Summer
and fall. Call Cindy at 752-8405.
lost
2�
LOST: Pair of brown frame
glasses between White Dam -
Bus stop - Speight - Austin.
Glasses were in a blue jean case
with gold stitching on front.
Anyone knowing the whereabouts
please call 758-8100 a cane by
315 White. REWARD
LOST: A man's Bulova watch at
the Styx concert. Great senti-
mental value. Substantial reward
offered. Call 758-1744 befae 12.
$20 REWARD: Lost etched silver
Parker Fountain Pen of aentimen-
tal value. If still intact, "P"
monogram on each end. Call
752-6710 a 752-8579.
personaKj)
FOUND: One ladies "Cross" pen
and pencil set with case in front of
Graham Bldg. Tues March 14.
Call 752-0752 to identify. Ask fa
Taiy.
NEED SEVERAL people to assist
Associated Photographic Services
and the Greenville Rescue Squad
in a fund raising project. Earn
$3-5 per hour on commission. Call
Jim Anderson at 752-7497 a
Capt. DR. Daniels at 752-4090.
ALTERATIONS: Winter things
too long - too big? Call Kathy
752-8642 a 752-8444.
FLEA MARKET: Pitt County
located on Pactolus Hwy 33 eighth
of a mile off Greene St. Open
Wed. & Fri. 12-5 Sat. 10-5 Sun.
1-5. Las of used furniture and
brie brae.
WANT TO BUY: Used bike either
Raleigh a Pega. Call 752-8676.
WORK IN JAPAN: Teach English
caiversatiai. No experience,
degree, a Japanese required.
Send loig, stamped, self-addres-
sed envelope fa details Japan
327, 411 W. Center, Centralia,
WA 98531.
PROFESSORS: Lawn care service
- now taking aders fa summer
sessiai, beginning May 1. Inex-
pensive, expert wak. Call now;
we do have a quota. Phone
758-8226. Greenville area oily.
NEEDED: Persot who goes home
to Kinston a drives through
Kinston evay Friday. Will help
pay fa gas expenses. Canna leave
until 3 p.m. Call Mike 752-5238
after 3 p.m. MW & after 2 p.m. T
TH.
EXCELLENT MONEY-MAKING
oppatunity. Make good money
part-time - campus representative
needed fa fun and easy to sell
product - no gimmicks - proven
campus winner. Send your name,
address, phone, school, year of
graduation, and self-addressed
stamped envelope to: Fantasy
Productions, Inc. 23 Stone Ave
Ashland, Ma. 06721.





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 16 March 1976
AOVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each A4P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
prices effective thru SATURDAY, mar 1. at ap in Greenville
A4P is a poultry shop
Wrida Feelin
Sweepstakes
A4P is a butcher shop
A4P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE BEEF RIBS
18 TO 24 LB.
AVERAGE
7
) CUT FREE
INTO STEAKS
& roasts'
$39
A4P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
BONELESS TOP
ROUND
OR BONELESS BOTTOM
ROUND STEAK
Y WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
STEAK
A ONE WEEK TRIP ��
FOR TWO TO tfel
Busch Gardens
Tampa Florida
GRAND
PRIZE
TRIP
Includes
PORK CHOPS
$29
79
Trip lor two to Buch Gardans
Including round top air far hold
accommodations tor aavan nights
ground transportation athlla In Flonda.
and unlimited admlaaions to lh� Dark
Continent Busch Gardens Tampa. Florida
rani a car
�13-877-6051
y Sheraton-St l�-t�
MARINA � TENNIS CLUB
�13'8�7-1151
ASSORTED
PKG. OF 10
A4P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
BONELESS TOP
ROUND
i wesitBN GRAIN-FED BEEF
ROAST
RATH BRAND MILD BREAKFAST
SAUSAGE
A& P Quality Heavy Western Fed Beef
SIRLOIN STEAKS
PORTERHOUSE OR
T�BONE STEAKS
$1.78
lb.
3"er good only in Greenville
OR BONELESS
BOTTOM
ROUND
ROAST
OR
NAVY BEANS
NORTHERN
BEANS
4 $100
15 02. TTi
CANS
"�nrcL VUI
GREEN BEANS 4 M ��
MARVEL CUT
Busch Gardens is 300
acres of wild animals
in their natural
surroundings, plus
rides and other
attractions. The
area Is covered by train,
monorail, and boat It is
second to Disney World
in Florida attractions
with a 2,500,000 attendance
�, year ��
WtlhUMl Hum
Ct�.t, �,� r B-Ww �, � ����� �n
� � � �, MM �. MMM, an. ��
at � A.F � ��� -U7L �
ENTRY BLANK
Florida Feelin Sweepstakes
BFKaSjrjS WIN A �lp TOR 2 TO FLORIDAS BUSCH
55( ,&'�'���"� GARDEN?. OR ONE OF MANY OTHER
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���m �miHs. M afj sum, I fpv-y
rrj TELEPHONE
"�- 0�( il it's He cat
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LOOK FOR THE ACTION "WICE
SIGN�THROUGHOUT YOUR
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maka a spatial purchaaa at a
lowar prtca. ara pass tha aav-
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QUAKER
INSTANT
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AUNT JEMIMA ORIGINAL
1 PANCAKE MIX 2
STOKELY HARVARO. TINY. OR SLICED
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MEIN7 MUSHROOM OR HOT
�f BARBECUE SAUCE
- HANOVER FROZEN
CUT BROCCOLI
MRS SMITH'S FROZEN COCONUT CUSTARD OR
� DUTCH APPLE PIE ,
M KRAFT SHREDOED SHARP
CHEDDAR CHEESE
aj LAY S
POTATO CHIPS
a. KEESLEA TOWN HOUSE
�CRACKERS ,
WITH MFP COLGATE
TOOTHPASTE T1
CYCLE CONNED
DOG FOOD varies 3 &
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A4P DESSERT TOPPING
HANDI-
WHIP ,B�
SCHLITZ BEER
OF 6 120Z CANS
Otter good only in Greenville
STATE
ZIP CODE
ENTER OFTEN�NO PURCHASE
JS-C!HARY
second prize
aAJVI!
10 speed bikes
. ladies) for secondary prizes.
FLORIDA PRODUCE SALE!
JUICY-RICH IN VITAMIN C
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DUKES
MAYONNAISE
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LIMIT ONE WITH
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BAG
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Title
Fountainhead, March 16, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 16, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.636
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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