Fountainhead, March 2, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 12 pages.
Fountainhead
�7
Vol. No. 53, NO.JJT
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
2 March 1978
ON THE INSIDE
Bigfootp. 3
Erosionp. 5
Music Festivalp. 9
Football banquet p. 11
Chief of police reviews recent campus crime
By JEANNIE WILLIAMS
Assistant News Editor
Three students were assault-
ed, none seriously, by a group of
males in three seperate incidents
Feb. 22, according to campus
police.
No arrests have been made in
connection with the incidents.
Campus police sad a male
student reported that while walk-
ing up College Hill Drive on the
night of Feb. 22, four whie males
in a car pulled up beside him to
ask a question.
The student said that one of
the men then got out and struck
him.
Another similar incident was
reported that night and a third
reported to campus police two
days later.
Francis Eddings, chief of
campus polioe, commented that
the incidents, although separate,
apparently involved the same four
men.
"There was some confusion in
the description of the car and
license by the witnesses. We
haven't been able to oome up with
anything yet said Eddings.
Several license plates were
stolen from cars in the area of
College Hill Drive on the night of
Feb.24.
Eddings said that the license
plates had been recovered and
returned and the persons res-
ponsible, ECU students, had
been apprehended.
The names of the students
were withheld.
In other incidents, several
articles of patio furniture were
stolen from the patio at Menden-
hall Student Center on Feb. 26.
Several vending machines in
the lobby of Wright Auditorium
FRANCIS EDDINGS, CHIEF of campus polioe.
were reported broken into on
Feb. 22 and merchandise taken.
No arrests have been made
according to campus polioe.
A student recently reported to
the FOUNTAINHEAD office and
complained that a campus polioe-
man broke into a car with a coat
hanger.
He said the policeman looked
inside then locked the car back
up.
Eddings said that he was
unaware of the incident and that
the student should call the
campus polioe and report the
incident if he has any questions.
A letter was written to FOUN-
TAINHEAD last Feb. 9 from a
group of women students from
Tyler dormitory who reported that
after waiting fa 20 minutes fa a
policeman to let them in after
hours, a campus policeman drove
past them and went on up the
Hill.
Eddings said that the officer
was responding to another call.
"Another offioer was dis-
patched to let them in Eddings
added.
SGA creates student employment service
By DOUG WHITE
News Editor
The Student Government As-
sociation (SGA) legislature creat-
ed a student employment service
at their meeting Monday.
This service is designed to
puts students seeking part-time
or full-time jobs in touch with
businesses looking fa student
help, accading to Ron Lewis,
SGA Refrigerata Manager and
ate of the aiginatas of the
program.
"We plan to set up a file of
students who need jobs, along with
the times and days of the week
they're available. Then we head
out and talk with local businesses
to see who needs help and put the
two parties in touch with each
other Lewis said.
Lewis said the plan probably
won't get off the ground until the
beginning of April.
The employment service will
not overlap the duties of the
Placement Office, since they only
find jobs fa students who are
graduating.
"Onoe it gets going, most
businesses will have fams which
they can send us when they have
an opening. That will save usalot
of leg wak and also make more
jobs available than if we had to
hunt them ourselves Lewis
said.
The program is under the
authaity of the SGA Seaetary of
External Affairs, Jerry Cox.
Both Cox and Lewis have been
waking through the Greater
Greenville Chamber of Commerce
and have received very good
response from businesses,
accading to Lewis.
Although no money la the
service has yet been appropria-
ted, backers plan to ask the SGA
Executive Council fa $100 to
cover printing oosts.
"On the whole, it's an inex-
pensive program. At the end of
the current school year, the
program will be evaluated and a
decision will be made whether a
not to continue it. Until then, I
guess you could look on it as an
experiment Lewis said.
Neil Sessoms, SGA president,
claims aedit fa caning up with
the aiginal idea of the program.
"I think this service will
benefit the student body immen-
sely. We can serve the students
with a relatively small expense by
initiating this plan. This is the
type of program SGA can sponsa
with almost no expenditures and
yet offer something to serve the
entire student body Sessoms
said.
American farmer's union
has roots in Alabama
WHEN SNOW TURNS to rain, spring must be on its way.
By FRANONE PERRY
ECU News Bureau
The recent aganization of an
American farmers' union, with its
urgent calls fa national strikes
and colorful tractacade demon-
strations, appears to be an
anomaly, but the American Agri-
cultural Movement is not without
precedent, says an ECU hista-
ian.
During the last decade of the
1800s, a similar effat was begun
by groups of farmers who were
dissatisfied with low ootten prices,
high railroad transport charges,
unfavaabie sharecropping, and
rental, tariff ana ta-ation
systems.
This movement in one state,
its causes and its effects are
examined by Karl Rodabaugh of
the ECU histay faculty in "The
Farmers' Revolt in Alabama,
1890-1896 a 120-page book
recently published under the
partial sponsaship of the ECU
Research Council.
Thae is a maja similarity
between the angry farmers of
Alabama and the American Agri-
cultural Movement of today,
notes Rodabaugh - a pervasive
feeling of powerlessnessagainst a
big oppressa.
Then it was an economic
system represented by railroads,
local tax ooilectas, cotton mer-
chants, landlads and a govern-
ment which did nothing to
alleviate the small farmer's
plight.
Now, it is an economic system
which can be control led by a
powerful federal government
whose regulations should
guarantee "parity said farmers
suffering economic loss.
"Any mass movement by
farmers is hampered by the
traditional independence of the
rural individual said
Rodabaugh
"Farmers, as a group, resist
even the best effats to aganize
fa any purpose
See FARMERS, p. 3





� � �
Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 March 1978
Bowling
Pom-pom
A-Phi-A
Who's who Hunger
All "Who's Who Among
American College and University
Students' please meet Wed
March 29 at 8 p.m. in the
BUCCANEER office fa a group
shot.
BUG
Any organization that has not
turned in their in formation sheet
to the BUCCANEER, please do so
by Tues. March 14.
Also any organization that had
any black and white pictures of
their group that they would like to
go in the yearbook along with
their group shot, please send
these pictures to the
BUCCANEER.
Internship
Deadline for application tor
summer internship with the NC
State Government has been ex-
tended to March 9.
Summer jobs in Raleigh are
available for 125 North Carolina
college students with the Summer
78 Internship Program.
The Office of Cooperative
Education has additional inform-
ation and can help in processing
and speeding your application.
Come by 313 Rawl before
leaving for Spring break.
Debate club
Are there any students that
find it difficult to clearly express
what is on their mind?
I f you are one of these people,
the Debating Club is for you.
The club will help develop a
student's confidence in public
speaking plus the club will better
a student's capacity on investiga-
ting issues.
The Debating Club will cause
a student to speak his thoughts
much faster. This ability shall
make the student more valuable
on the job marker
Wouldn t you like to speak in
front of people without your knees
knocking?
For more information, contact
Marc Adler, room 161 Umstead,
758-9523
Barbershop
The Greenville chapter of
S.P.E.B.S.QS.A. invites ECU
faculty, students, and friends to
join in singing barbershop har-
mony on Monday nights at 7:30
p.m. in Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church (2 blocks north of the
bypass on Elm St.) New student
members are especially welcome.
Outing club
The Outing Club will meet
Thursday evening at 7:30 p.m. in
Room 104 in Memorial Gym.
Everyone who is interested is
encouraged to attend
The N.C. Hunger Coalition
has come to Pitt County.
This organization trys to lo-
cate households eligible for food
stamp assistance that are not
receiving it.
Volunteers are needed to aid
in prescreening applicants.
If you are interested in
helping, please oontact Pat Che-
nier at 756-1593.
Phi Alpha
Phi Alpha Theta will meet
Mon March 13, at 7:30 p.m. in
the Richard Todd Room (across
from BD-110).
Requirements fa member-
ship include the following:
Undergraduate:
1) 20 quarter hours (14
semester hours) in histay.
2) A 3.1 average in all histay
oourses.
3) A 2.7 average overall.
Graduate:
1) A 3.5 average in histay.
2) Fulfillmentsof 13 the residence
requirements fa the master's
degree.
All interested histay majas
and minas are urged to attend
this meeting. Refreshments will
be served.
Nutrition
"Eye it befae you diet an
infamative oaisumer-aiented
program, will be held during
national nutrition week.
The program is sponsaed by
the Eastern District Nath Caro-
lina Dietetic Association.
Sessions will be held on
March 7 at :Wah I -Coat es Elemen-
tary School at 7:30 p.m AHEC
Auditorium, Wayne Memaial
Hospital, GoJdsbao, at 7:30
p.m March 9 at: B.F. Grady
School Auditaium, Albertson, at
7:30 p.m and on March 8 at the
Jones-Onslow Electric Member-
ship Capaatioi Meeting Room,
259 Western Blvd Jacksonville
at 7 p.m.
Pa reservation a mae
infamation, call 455-4356, 347-
4262, a 353-5951.
FG
Red Pin Bowing is back fa
Spring Semester. Held every
Sunday evening from 7 until 10
p.m. at the Bowling Center at
Mendenhall, Red Pin Bowling is a
game fa everyaie. If you can
make a strike when the red pin is
the head pin, you win one free
game. It's that simple! Come on
over and try it out this Sunday. It
could be your lucky day.
The Fa ever Generation will
meet Mon March 13 at 9 p.m. in
Brewster C-304. we invite you to
join us fa a relevant Bible study,
good singing, a delicious refresh-
ments. Our speaker will be Jim
Zimmer, a prospective missionary
to Japan. Why not be there?
Rooms
SOULS
All persons interested in
running fa a postion as an officer
of SOULS fa next year, please
oontact Curt Newby at 758-8199,
Beverly Ware at 752-9921 a
Brenda Fisher at 752-9143.
Do your part-run fa Presi-
dent, Vice-president, secretary a
treasurer
Applications fa residence hall
rooms fa Summer School 1978
and School Year 1978-79 may be
obtained from the Housing Office
as well as one of the residence hal
offices as of Tues March 14.
Room deposits fa these terms
will be accepted in the Cashier's
Office beginning March 20.
The required deposit fa Sum-
mer School is $67 ($101 fa
private room) and fa Fall Semes-
ter, $60. The deposit(s) must be
accompanied by the appropriate
application(s).
Rooms will be assigned in the
offices of the respective residence
halls according to the following
schedule:
Tues March 21: Students
who desire to return to the roan
they presently occupy fa Fall
Semester will be assigned.
Wed March 22: Graduates,
rising senias, and rising junias
will be assigned.
Thurs March 23: Rising
sophomaes will be assigned.
Detailed infamatiai pertain-
ing to the sign-up procedure will
be made available to each resi-
dence hall resident.
Day students may receive this
infamatiai by contacting the
Housing Office.
GMAT
The Graduate Management
Admission Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat March 18. Applica-
tion blanks are to be completed
and mailed to Educational Test-
ing Service, Box 966-R,
Prinoeton, NJ 08540 to arrive by
Feb. 24. Applications are also
available at the Testing Center,
Speight Bldg, Room 105, ECU.
Fellowship
Tonight, march 2 the Full
Gospel Student Fellowship will
have an open meeting fa those
who come to share what is going
on in their life in Christ.
Even if you do na have
anything to share, you are invited
to come and hear fellow students'
testimonies.
Come, meet with us from 7:30
til 9 p.m. in Mendenhall 221.
Employment
The Office of Cooperative
Education will discuss career-
related summer employment with
interested students in Rawl 304 at
the following times:
Thurs March 2, 3:30 p.m.
Fri march 3, 8:30 a.m 10:30
a.m 1 p.m 2 p.m.
The ECU Pom Pom squad
uyoutswill beheld March 17, 18,
and 19.
All interested girls should
meet in Fletcher Music Bldg. on
Fri March 17 at 7:30 p.m.
Tryouts will be Sat. evening,
March 18.
If you have questions call Jo
Ellen at 752-0354 a Glenda
752-9416.
Cheer
Want to pick up a girl?
Girls want to get picked ?
Be an ECU cheerleader.
Meeting Thurs March 16 at 5
p.m. in the lobby outside Minges
Coliseum.
All-Sing
Alpha Xi Delta presents its
eighteenth annual All-Sing
tonight with a theme of " A Saute
to America
Nine fraternities and soror-
ities will give renditiois of their
favaite patriotic songs.
At the end of the program, the
judges will decide on the winning
fraternity and saaity and each
will be awarded a trophy.
The Alpha Xi's thank every-
one who is participating this year
and would especialy liketothank
Janette Inman fa getting it all
together!
Problems
Having a problem with your
spouse, boyfriend a girlfriend a
roommate?
The department of sociology's
Marriage Counseling Program
specializes in resolving interper-
sonal problems.
Call 757-6883 and ask fa Dr.
Knox.
He will arrange a confidential
(free) interview with a graduate
intern.
Crafts
Register now fa one of the
aafts wakshops which are being
offered by the Crafts Center at
Mendenhall Student Center.
Sign up fa Beginning Dark-
room, Basic Patery, Handbuilt
Pottery, Silkscreen, Woodwak-
ing, Crochet, Flea Loom Weav-
ing, Enameling, Contempaary
Basketry.
Upoi payment of a $10.00
semester Crafts Center member-
ship fee, an individual may
register fa any of the available
wakshops without additional
charges, excluding costs of per-
sonal supplies and a small lab fee
should the Crafts Center furnish
supplies.
Fa details, call a visit the
Crafts Center during the hours of
3 p.m. until 10 p.m Monday
through Friday, and 10 a.m. until
3 p.m Saturday.
Class space is limited and the
registration deadline fa all wak-
shops is Sat March 18.
Also, membership fees will
not be refunded after th? registra-
tion deadline.
The A-Phi-A Fraternity pre-
sents a Miss Black and Gold
Beauty Pageant.
A prelude to our eight Annual
Black and Gold Ball.
Contestants will be oompeti-
ting fa cash awards and the title
of Miss Black and Gold.
The pageant will be held Mon.
March 13 in Mendenhall.
Contestants will be judged in
the following areas by a panel of
seven judges.
Activities (talent, bathing
suitsspats wear), persoiality
expressioi poise and intelligence.
Registration: today through
8:30 p.m.
Moonlight
Have you ever tried bowling in
the moonlight? Here's your
chance! Triday evenings from 8
until 10 p.m "Moonlight Bowl-
ing is held at the Mendenhall
Student Center Bowling Center.
Try your bowling skills in this
different enviroment. If you're as
sharp as ever you may win a free
game. The bowler with the
highest soae during each hour of
Moonlight Bowling will win one
free game. There are always two
winners and one of them oould be
you.
Dynamics
A time fa fellowship Bible
study sponsaed by Campus
Crusade fa Christ, meeting on
Thurs. at 7 p.m. in Brewster
C-103.
This includes dynamics of the
Christain life, dynamics of dis-
cipleship, dynamics of ministry
and dynamics of the life of Chirst
fa skeptics, as well as those
interested in growing in their
relationship with Christ.
Ball
Get your tickets now fa the
Alpha's Black and Gold Ball to be
held Sat. March 18.
Ticket sales daily, from 10
a.m3 p.m. in the lobby of the
Students Supply Stae.
Symposium
The ECU chapter of the
National Student Speech and
Hearing Association will present
the eight Annual Speech and
Hearing Symposium on Friday,
March 17.
The symposium will be in the
Allied Health Auditaium fran
8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m.
The speakers and their topics
are Dr. William Healey on
"Public Law 94-142: Its impact
and How to Manage It" and Dr.
David Yoder on "Current Trends
in Language Intervention
The fee fa professionals is $5
if pre-registered and $6 at the
doa.
The fee fa ECU students is
$2.
Pre-registratiai fams are
available at the Speech and
Hearing Clinic, Allied Health
Annex.





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n
Definitely. . . there is somebody out there
a
2 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Professor researches possible existence of Big foot
ByRICKIGUARMIS
Staff Writer
A speech professor at EGJ is
researching the possible exis-
tence of Bigfoot.
Dr. Richard T. Keenan be-
came interested in Bigfoot in 197
after reading the book, "Tl e
Sasquatch File
"I kept hearing all the stories
about the Bigfoot said Keenan.
"When I saw "The Sasquatch
File I knew I had to read it.
"I've always had an interest
in the unexplained and the
unpredictable
After reading the book, Keen-
an learned of the Bigfoot Informa-
tion Center in The Dalles in
Oregon. The center is headed by
Peter Byrne.
Keenan traveled to Oregon to
interview Byrne. According to
Keenan, Byrne was once a big
game hunter, before opening the
center.
Byrne has since given up big
game hunting in order to devote
all his time to the center,
explained Keenan.
"He's dedicated the rest of
his life to finding the Bigfoot
said Keenan.
After interviewing Byrne,
Keenan himself began research-
ing the Bigfoot.
Keenan began hunting the
creature by first traveling to
several locations where the Big-
foot reportedly had been sighted.
Having never seen Bigfoot,
Keenan oontinues to research the
animal.
Keenan has done much read-
ing on the subject and also
receives "The Bigfoot News a
small newpaper published by The
Bigfoot Information Center.
Keenan said he had planned
to seriously hunt Bigfoot in
August, 1977, but was unable to
because of his job.
Keenan believes the Bigfoot
could very well be a missing link
in the evolution of man. He also
feels that it could be some kind of
caveperson.
"I definitely think there is
somebody out there said Keen-
an, when asked of the possible
existence of the Bigfoot.
I don't think all these people
(who have reportedly seen Big-
foot) could be operating under a
mass illusion explains Keenan.
Keenan presented a lecture
on the Bigfoot to his classes.
During the lecture he read
many eyewitness accounts of
those who have allegedly spotted
the animal.
One interesting account was
that of a man from Orleans in
1962.
According to Keenan, the man
was driving down a dirt road in
the rain when he suddenly saw a
"shaggy, orangutan-like appari-
tion of a human The man
passed the image off as a figment
of his imagination and crove on,
said Keenan.
Keenan said, the car then
suddenly went into a violent skid.
The man glanced into his rear
view mirr and saw a savage
looking face peering through the
window. When he looked again,
there was no sign of the animal so
he again passed if off as his
imagination, explained Keenan.
The man then came upon a
sapling blocking the road, said
Keenan. When the man got out of
the car to move it aside, he heard
something loud running towards
him, said Keenan.
The man turned and stood
face to face with the monster he
had seen twice before, according
to Keenan.
The monster never injured the
man but he did walk down the
road only to come charging back
at the man who tried to get in his
car.
The man finally made it back
to his car, said Keenan, but as he
was driving away he felt some-
thing holding back the car. Scon
the man felt no resistance on the
car and drove away never to see
the animal again, Keenan said.
The man promptly forgot the
experience with the monster until
he spoke toone of his friends who
mentioned he also felt a resis-
tance on his car that same night
on the same road, said Keenan.
Keenan explained that thou-
sands claim to have seen Bigfoot,
but no sighting has been definite-
ly confirmed.
"I want to go hunt for it (the
Bigfoot) again said Keenan.
Keenan plans to pursue his
research by back-packing and
camping in the Padfic Northwest
during May and June. He first
wants to contact several people
who say they've seen Bigfoot and
then wants to retrace their steps.
"The odds of me finding the
Bigfoot are remote concluded
Keenan. "But it will be fun
FARMERS
Continued from p. 1
In late 19th-century Alabama,
the state Grange, local Alliance
cooperatives, and even the state
Department of Agriculture, with
its proposals to organize farmers
under an Agricultural Society,
met with limited success.
"The crop limits agreed upon
by farmers' organizations were an
attempt to raise the price of
cotton said Rcdabaugh.
When the supplies were thus
limited, the leaders hoped the
resulting demand would bring
about an increase in prices.
"However, while some farm-
ers did cut back their cotton ccoqi
and their oats and corn, others
took advantage of the situation
and increased theirs. The final
outcome was an overall increase
in production
When their efforts to organize
production failed, the farmers
abandoned cooperative programs
and turned to "organized political
action as a means of finding
economic relief, he said.
A more active political role did
bring about changes, albeit slow-
ly.
As the focus of an entire social
and economic class, Alabama
farmers were able to turn around
the state's power structure, with
far-reaching consequences.
What does this suggest fa
today's farmers?
Rodabaugh believes farmers'
threats of refusing to produce
crops are unworkable, because
they are hard to enforce.
"Even if most farmers give at
least lip service calls for a
who can seize the advantage of
producing more and taking in
better profits
"If the American Agricultural
Movement perceives 'big
business' as the manipulator of
government on the local, state
and federal levels, they are not
alone said Rodabaugh.
"A modern alliance of farmers
with other groups who feel
economically distressed could
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constitute a formidable political
national strike, there are some
bloc
The Rodabaugh book discus-
ses the impact of the Framers
Alliance upon politics, as a
powerful agrarian-populist force.
Thurs. Rantaektt
FriSat. Ezraiak
Questions?
If you have
an
unwanted
pregnancy
help
is as close
as your
phone
If you're troubled and uncertain
Call Hallmark Clinic and Counseling Service.
One of our telephone counstiors can help you.
She can tell you about the personal and dignified
care you receive at Hallmark . . . and about a
free pregnancy test.
Our Hallmark staff includes a gynecologist,
qualified nurses . . . and specially trained
counselors. We offer first trimester abortions
for $175.00 . . . and that one fee includes lab tests,
examination, birth control information, private
counseling and follow-up visit.
Flrat BccaMd abortion clinic in North Carolina.
HALLMARK CLINIC
1316 East Morehead Street
Charlotte, N. C. 28204
Cmii: Charlotte � 376 315
Long Distance Toll-Free:
N. C: 1-800-432-6066
All other states: 1-800-438-4094





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 March 1978
Little must be returned
Prison escapee Joan Little has claimed that she
would "be as good as dead" if she is returned from
New York State to North Carolina, where she escaped
from Central Prison in Raleigh Oct. 15.
Little escaped while completing a 7 to 10 year
sentence for breaking and entering. While waiting an
appeal of that sentence, she contended that she was
sexually assaulted by a white jailer, whom she
allegedly murdered. A North Carolina jury acquitted
her on the murder charge. Little was completing the
7 to 10 year sentence before she escaped and fled to
New York.
Governor James Hunt has declared that racist
charges made by Little against North Carolina are
"absolutely unfounded Hunt has said that Little
cites no evidence concerning her remarks, but that
"she just alleges
In a news conference last week in New York, Litte
said that North Carolina is "the most racist state
there is
Little was serving a term in a prison of the State of
North Carolina before the controversial, much-publi-
cized murder trial in 1975. If Little is allowed to
escape to another state and not finish her prison
sentence here, then it would appear that any prisoner
in any state could cross a state line in order to
discontinue serving his sentence.
If Little had been patient and had not escaped
from prison, she would probably be on parole now.
Rumors have it that she is pregnant. Could this be
another ploy fa sympathy to continue avoiding
paying her debts to society? How long will she be
allowed to slap justice in the face?
Little has received much publicity concerning the
infamous murder trial from women's activist groups
and black activists' groups. She was acquitted in this
trial, however, and she must be extradited to North
Carolina.
Governor Hunt has said that the state will
continue to "vigorously pursue the extradition of
Miss Little if fa no other reason than to discourage
other potential escapees who might think that
freedom lies just across the state line (The
Virginian-Pilot, Feb. 24).
Little should serve the sentence in the state in
which she was convicted. If any sense of a judicial
system is to prevail in this southern state, then New
Yak must surrender her to Nath Carolina.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor over titty years.
"Were it ieft to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News EditasDoug White
Stuart Morgan
Trends EditaSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6308.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
Tbis is He��rfi�e TVe See cGcc� DOWA
BlKlWlJ X hope IhworVf beWf Cold iDayrohai!
Forum
More criticism on art reviewer's article
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
May I beat your dead
horse? Since counter responses
seem to be a vogue with
FOUNTAINHEAD, I would like to
share my opinion.
This dead horse to which I
refer is David Whitson's reluct-
ance to accept criticism.
In the Feb. 14 issue of
FOUNTAINHEAD, John Walters
presented a good case against
David Whitson's so-called
"review" of Nancy Holt's visual
presentation here in Greenville on
Feb. 9.
David Whitson, you are guilty
as charged. You failed to substan-
tiate your criticism of Ms. Holt's
presentation.
You chose to fill the greater
part of your "review" with
limited quotations of other view-
ers and an occasional quote of
Ms. Holt.
You did not write a review of
the presentation, rather you
reviewed the reactions of several
random viewers. You lacked
continuity.
Granted, Whitson, everyone
has days when their work is not at
its best. (I hope your "review"
wasacase in point). Yet I can see
no excuse for defending such
works. (Whitson does this is the
Feb. 21 issue, page 4, "Art
reviewer defends stand,
review)
In defending your "review
you write "Nowehere did I intend
amassbelittlementof women in
general Well, Whitson, the
next time you review the work of a
male artist will you prove that you
are not sexist by referring to the
artist as a gentleman artist? You
were blatantly sexist whether or
not you can comprehend it.
You were also accused of
making a "slur against the
reputation of the School of Art
On the basis of your "review"
and your defense of it, I must
assume that you are simply not
capable of making a oonsaous
political statement and therefore
cannot be rightfully accused of
being political.
By this action you affirm your
insecurity toward your writing.
Whitson, if you can't take it,
don't give it.
Sincerely,
Russ Nicholson
Relics must be removed
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I am a sophomore at ECU
and a disappointed one, I might
add. it seems to me with all the
boring "ho-hum" news that the
social fraternities keep spouting
about how much they can help
you in life, then why can't they
help us in ecology?
Everytime I take the advent-
urous journey down the "hill" to
my classes, I see old and tattered
"rush" signs flying from the
trees like streamers in a used car
lot. This practice of littering is not
only a disgrace to our enviroment,
but it would seem to also be a
disgrace to the fraternities.
I think these relics of
Rushes" gone by oould be
removed just as easily as they
were put there. Perhaps the
removal of these streamers would
be a good project for a pledge
class to undertake.
I would hate to tr.nk that a
good body of men such as a
fraternity oould not handle a
simple job as cleaning up their
own mess. But if these men find
they can't handle this situation
involving everyone's ecology,
maybe the Boy Scouts of America
can.
A concerned student,
W. Stephen Price
Vet off Gillman's back
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
It is my opinion that
everyone should get off Coach
Gillman's back and allow him to
slavage what he can of the' 77- 78
season. Then he can concentrate
on recruiting and making the
necessary adjustments to make
the team a winner next year.
Rome was not built in one day.
If one will only stop to analyze all
the major oollegiate ooaches in
the U.S. today, you'd find most of
them had very shaky starts. It
took some two, even three years
to even hit a .500 season.
ECU has a very young,
talented team and a young,
talented head coach. Wc simply
need to sit back and ailow Coach
Gillman the chance to implement
his plan for success. Not to allow
that chance would be an injustice
too big to comprehend.
Dan Craver





Outer Banks migrating landward
2 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Erosion constant threat to IM.C. shoreline
By JULIE EVERETTE
Assistant News Editor
Those who own cottages along
the shoreline of North Carolina's
Outer Banks may one day sud-
denly find that their summer
beach houses are no longer
standing.
Erosion along the North Caro-
lina shoreline is constant and
there are no immediate or fore-
seeable solutions, according to
Richard Stephenson, professor of
goegraphy at ECU, and director
of the Institute fa Coastal and
Marine Resources here.
Stephenson said most of the
state's shoreline is eroding, es-
pecially in the Outer Banks
region.
Aooording to Stephenson, the
primary reason for the erosion isa
rise in sea level.
"Most erosion is due to an
increased rise in sea level. The
water level rises approximately
six inches every 100 years
Because of the rise in sea
level, the islands known as the
Outer Banks are migrating land-
ward, Stephenson said.
Another significant reason
for the erosion is storms, accord-
ing to Stephenson.
"Single storms can erode 30
or 40 feet of beach away within
hours he said.
According to Stephenson, the
beach along the Cape Hatteras in 1973.
shoreline has eroded approxi-
mately 25 feet a year for the past
150 years.
On Ocraooke Island, the ave-
rage rate of erosion in a 40-year
span is two feet per year.
"We really do not have
enough information to establish
whether the erosion rate is
inaeasing a not Stephenson
said.
"The shaelines are eroding
at a relatively rapid rate he
said.
Further, those who live along
the shaeline are in danger,
aocording to Stephenson.
"Every area has a high
probability of damage due to
either high water or high winds
he said.
"One stam could wipe out a
whole subdivision of homes
Stephenson cited hurricane
Hazel as an example.
"There was tremendous de-
vastation when hurricane Hazel
struck. There were not many
buildings that were not damaged.
"Since that year (1957), we
have tripled the number of
cottages along the shaelines
he said.
He also cited an example of a
cottage being relocated, but not
in time to avoid stam damage.
"It can happen pretty fast
Stephenson said.
Accading to Stephenson, the
last damaging stam hit the coast
"Htfels ana motels were
destroyed in the Nags Head
area he said.
"The longer we wait fa the
next stam, the greater the
probability that it will do a
tremendous amount of damage
Aocading to Stephenson,
most homeowners in the area are
aware of the danger to their
homes.
"Mae people are becoming
aware of it he said.
"The people are na warned,
however. They can see fa
themselves that the shorline is
eroding. There is evidence all
around them
Despite the fact that the
people are becoming aware of the
eroding coastline, they oontinue
to buy and build homes there,
accading to Stephenson.
"They apparently feel it is not
occurring very fast a that struc-
tures can be built to maintain a
improve the shaeline, "
Stephenson said.
"Homes in the area are in
very high demand, oddly en-
ough
Aocading to Stephenson,
there were about 450 homes along
the shaeline of the Pamlioo River
in 1951. In 1976, there were
1,300.
Stephenson strongly believes
that those whose homes are
damaged because of erosion
should na receive any state a
federal aid.
"I dot't believe in bailing
people out when they know thae
is a high probability of danger in
that area and they choose to build
there anyway he said.
"If they want to take chances
on building structures there, it's
their prerogative
"I do believe, however, that
it's all right i' they receive
govanment loans to get started
again Stephenson said.
Stephenson also said there is
flood insurance in the area.
"The designated flood areas
areoovaed by that.
"I feel sary fa some of these
people because I've heard num-
erous bad-luck stales
Stephenson said one man
spent his life savings to build a
beach cottage there only to return
to check cm it aie day and it
wasn't thae.
Stephenson said the erosion
problem has not hampered the
tourist industry.
"Since hurricane Hazel, tou-
rism is on the increase he said.
"Most of the stams occur
during the winta when tourism is
at a minumum
Aocading to Stephenson,
100,000 tourists spend an avaage
of $1 million a day on the Outer
Banks in the summer.
He said no projects are
underway to solve the erosion
problem.
"We have built a growing
field (jetty) which catches sand
and reduces the rate of erosion
he said.
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at
College View Cleaners
New members initiated into Chi
Beta Phi, science honor society
ECU News Bureau
Twenty-one ECU students
have been initiated into ECU's
Alpha Gamma chapter of Chi
Beta Phi hona society in science.
Chi Beta Phi is a national
aganizatioi whose purpose is to
promote interest in science and to
recognize scholarly achievement
in the fields of natural science and
mathematics.
Its first chapter, the Alpha
chapter of Randolph-Macon
College, was founded at Ashland,
STYX
No not really,
but those of us
who went had a
great time
Don't miss the
next
Major Attraction.
Va. in 1916.
In 1935 the society was
approved as an associated society
by the American Association fa
the Advancement of Science.
ECU s Alpha Gamma chapter was
chartered in 1953.
Chi Beta Phi now has 29
chapters and a membership of
approximately 10,000.
Alpha Gamma chapter's activ-
ities include regular seminars,
annual community service pledge
projects, assistance in ECU'S
ACADEMIC
RESEARCH
ALL SUBJECTS
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quality. Choose from our library of
7.000 topics. Send $1.00 for the
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LOS ANGELES. CALIF 90025
(213) 477-8474
Our research papers are sold for
research purposes only.
Regional Science Fair and pub-
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M ADVENTURE IN EATING
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�Address
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State
��





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 March 1978
Intersection'created an environment of multi-media art events
designed to unify the visual and performing arts and the
Greenville community in a harmonious blend of spirit.
The happening occured last Saturday night and featured a Gong
Show and Mardi Gras party. Photographer Pete Podeszwa
captured the spirit of 'Intersection' on film for this pictorial.
�H





�������(��WPHBBHHi
P
2 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7





Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 March 1978
AOVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each A4P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad
Great Storewide
Savings For You!
AAP QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN-FED BEEF
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. MARCH 4 AT A�P IN (II j I 1 '
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HUNTS PRIMA SALSA
SPAGHETTI SAUCE
LIBBV S
TOMATO JUICE
AAPFROZEN
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 3
BIRDS EVE
ORANGE PLUS
VANITY FAIR PRINT
PAPER TOWELS
KEEBLER SAVE 10c!
VANILLA WAFERS
PETER PAN SMOOTH OR CRUNCHV
PEANUT BUTTER
6 02 $1 00
CANS I
99
59
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CREAM OR PALE DRY
Taylor Sherry
Magnum size
$319
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A&P is a poultry shop
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH FRYER
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fr)ffer Good Only In Greenville, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE
ILABLEJXJJJTHER RETAILDEALERS AND WHOLESALERS
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'World-renowned ensemble' to perform
2 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Music festival features Speculum Musicae
ByLYNNBEYAR
Assistant Trends Editor
The ECU School of Music "all
chamber music" FESTIVAL '78
will commence on March 15 with
the arrival of Speculum Musicae,
billed as "the world's most
renowned contemporary chamber
music ensemble The eight-
piece ensemble will perform in
the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall on
Wednesday. March 15 at 8:15
p.m and will hold a workshop
the following day from 8:30 to
11 JO a.m.
Speculum Musicae first com-
bined their talents in 1971 to
perform music of the Twentieth
Century, and made their debut at
the Public Theatre in New York.
Since that time, they have appear-
ed at the Dartmouth Festival of
the Arts in New Hampshire, the
Berkshire Festival in Tangle-
wood, and have won various other
appear ances.
These virtuosi were presented
in a formal New York debut at
Town Hall as a result of winning
the 1971 Young Concert Artists
International Auditions. The en-
semble also won the first Naum-
burg Chamber Music Award,
which gave them two conoerts at
Alice Tully Hall in Linclon Center
and the right to commission new
works.
Among the works commis-
sioned for Speculum Musicae is
Donald Martino' "Notturno"
CONTEMPORARY CHAMBER ENSEMBLE Speculum Musicae is
a wonder The 20th oentury composer could not possibly have more
eloquent interpreters
Trends
of the concerts at AlioeTully Hall
in 1973, and which also won the
by distinguished oomposer Elliot
Carter, entitled "A Mirror on
which the group premiered in one 1974 Pulitzer Prize. A song cycle Which to Dwell" was commis-
sioned for the ensemble by the
New York State Council on the
Arts and premiered in February
1976 as part of the Council's U.S.
Bicentennial Celebration.
The group has also been
conducted by Pierre Boulez,
former music director of the New
York Philharmonic, performing
his own compositions; has per-
formed in Linooln , Center's
"Great Performers Series and
has recorded on the Nonesuch
record label.
Speculum Musicae performs
an annual New York series and
has toured the United States,
giving conoerts in Chicago, Los
Angleles, Baltimore, Philadel-
phia, Louisville, and Buffalo
under the auspioes of Young
Concert Artists.
The FESTIVAL '78 commit-
tee, under the chairmanship of
Dr. Richard Lucht of the ECU
School of Music piano faculty, has
also engaged The New York Vocal
Arts Ensemble and The Beaux
Arts Trio.
The New York Vocal Arts
Ensemble, the Festival's second
attraction will be presented on
Thursday, March 16 in Fletcher
Recital Hall, also at 8:15 p.m.
The ensemble, which is com-
prised of four singers and a
pianist, has the unique reputation
of being the only professional
organization in the U.S. which
performs master works for solo
vocal ensembles from the 18th
and 19th Centuries.
This group will hold a work-
shop on March 16, from 3 to 5
p.m. and as with the Speculum
Musicae, both the workshop and
conoert are free and open to the
public.
The third event, The Beaux
Arts Trio, is oo-sponsored by the
Student Union and will be held in
Mendenhall on March 30.
In previous years, the Festival
has featured such distinguished
lecturers as Paul Hume, music
critic fa the WASHINGTON
POST, and renowned musico-
logist Barry Brooks. Last year,
the guest artists were the Amade
Trio and the Greenwood Consat.
Aooading to Dean Everett
Pittman, of the ECU School of
Music, "Thisfestival has been an
annual feature of the cultural life
on our campus since its inception
in 1962 and has not only enriched
the professional training of music
students but provided enjoyment
fa the campus and community as
well.
The FESTIVAL '78 committee
is oomposed of Chairman Dr.
Lucht, James Fager, David
Hawkins, Gladys White, and
Ruth Shaw of the School of Music
faculty, and music students Glenn
Davis, Jean Murdoch and Mike
Kincaid.
The entire FESTIVAL' 1978 is
funded through the oourtesy of
the Student Government Assoc-
iation.
Mozart work last week's Opera Theatre production
BELINDA BRYANT AS Pamma and Mike McDonald as Papageno sing of their
longing for a t, ue love in a scene from ' The Magic Flute.
THE PRINCE T AM I NO portrayed by Max Galloway is about to embark on
his mission oi rescue. Dr. Clyde Hiss directed. Photos by Brian Stotler





Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 March 1978
The National Health: A superlative black corned
kim SMirLt y is coldly unsympathetic in his colloquy with the alchchoiic Tom
' Castenbaum. Kim Woolen, Dennis Chestnut, Cheryl Pierce, Mary Williams, and-
Karen Alkofer observe.
�M)4 Pianists are runners-up
STEVE ANDERSON, CHERYL PIERCE, and Mary Williams in a scene from '�The
- National Health The drama department's production of Nichot's black comedy is'
being performed in the ECU Studio Theatre. Photos by Brian Slot let

OPEN
24HRS
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IVANS tTRCETS
BUDWEISER ����" �.69
MILLER UTE ��-�� 16.99
PLAYERS, gjjp" W-00
Pepsi cwnitioicin o.yy
BLUE RIBBON �rU $7.36
ICE lh" $2.50
MILLER $179
ECU News Bureau
Two student pianists in the
ECU School of Music were
runners-up in the recent Young
Artists Competition sponsored by
the Greensboro Music Associa-
tion.
They were Alisa Wethering-
ton, a senior, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. M.G. Wetherington of
Kinston, and Shelia Marshburn, a
graduate student, daughter of
Mrs C.J. Marshburn of Jackson-
ville.
The competition was held on
the campus of Greensboro
College and was chaired by Fran
Mosley of Greensboro.
A Public Service of this newspaper & The Advertising Council
Injust
one day you
can become
a life-saving
expert.
Call Red Cross
today about learning CPR-
� � i
ut

Red Cross
is counting
Ion you.
Vinyl Review
by David Whrtson
LeBlanc and Carr: Midnight Light
So you've heard Le Blanc and Carr's" Falling" on the radio, and
you're wondering if you'll like their premiere album-well, the answer
is yes, if you like the sounds of Dan Fogelberg, David Gates, Lynyrd
Skynyrd, Al Greene, a the Allman Bros. Band.
That's how diverse this dynamic duo's musical abilities are. They
manage to integrate the genius of calypso, reggae, southern rock and
roll, and soul into one cut or another on the L.P.
The oombined efforts of vocals by Lenny Le Blanc and lead guitar
and engineering by Pete Carr (the same combination of music and
technology which makes Boston's LP such a smoker) makes nearly
every cut on the album well worth listening to. The two exceptions are
"Desperado" and "Stronger Love a journey into the world of
commercial disco in which the pair seem as comfortable as two canaries
at a cat convention.
Hopefully, a later effort will produce a more unified, unique sound
fa the duo, who obviously have tremendous potential.
Album courtesy of Atlaptic Records.
Santana: Moonflower
From the fragile intoductory notes of "Dawn-Go Within" through
the energetic farewell of the" SavorTouissaint Overture" theSantau.a
band's new LP is more than a brilliant anthology of their work; it is a
testimony to lead guitarist Carlos Santana.
Santana's soaring lead guitar work reaches transcendental peaks in
the live sequences. During the medley renditions of "Let the Children
Play" and "Black Magic Woman the virtuso's impassioned
instrumental mastery gives new life to these Santana classics.
The scope of the album spans the continents, capturing a variety of
moods ranging from the awesome majesty of Moroccan horsemen
raging across the North African plains in "El Morocco" to the frantic,
mysterious tribal dance of the Zulu warrior in 'Zulu
Gone are the days of Santana's sterilely angelic association
with Mahavishnu John.McGlaughlen, yet his reverential respect fa
the celebration of life lives on.
Thanks to School Kids for the Santana LP.
located behind
THE ATJTIC
782-7M3
o
Wed ACC Playoff
3,7 & 9 MM
Thur ACC Playoff 7 & 9 PM
Billiards Tourn. begins 9 pm
Backgammon Tourn 9:30 pm
FRI Open House
Sat ACC FINAL at 4





IBmBHiWH
2 March 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Pirate football players honored last week
East Carolina University's
1977 football team, which finish-
ed the season with an 8-3 record
and back-to-back wins over N.C.
State and Duke University, was
honored last week at the Green-
ed to senior running back Willie
Hawkins. While the Grimesland
native was noted fa his outstand-
ing running ability, he was
repeatedly praised by Coach Pat
Dye over the previous two years
Sports
ville Country Qub with the
team's annual awards banquet.
Senior awards and letters
were presented to 15 seniors,
while 36 other players also
received ECU letters. Eleven
special awards were presented,
along with the R.W. Moor "King
of the Gridiron' scholarships,
and the 1977 team captains.
Senior Harold Randolph, who
played high school ball fa Rose
High in Greenville, topped the
award winners with three indiv-
idual awards and the hona of
being defensive captain fa the
1977 team. Randolph's awards
included Most Valuable Player,
Outstanding Player and Out-
standing Defensive Player. The
honaable mention all-Amencan
linebacker finished his career
with an outstanding J58 solo
tackles, 135 assists and 43 tackles
fa a loss of minus 195 yards, he
was named to the all-Southern
Independent team as well.
Named to be offensive captain
fa the team was senia Jimmy
Southerland. The quarteback
from Wilmington led the club in
scaing this season with 48
points, while setting two single
game school recads and a career
recad fa the highest passing
canpletioi percentage with 57.1
per cent of his passes completed
from 1974-77. Southerland ranks
in five other career statistical
lists.
Senia split end Terry
Gallaher, fron Warner Robins,
Ga was presented with the
Lansche Outstanding Senia
award and the Swindell Menrxxial
Award fa putting team befae
self, dedication and leadership.
Gallaher started fa three years at
split end and set career recads
fa most pass reception yardage
with 1214 yards and tied fa msot
touchdown receptions with 11. He
led the team in pass receptions fa
three consecutive years while
being named second team all-
Southern Independent this year.
He holds the NCAA recad fa
average yards per catch fa three
a fewer passes in a single game
with catches of 82, 59 and 77
yards vs. Appalachian State in
1975 fa a 72.7 average.
The Blocking Trophy was
presented fa the second straight
year to Wayne Bolt, four-year
starter at offensive guard. Bolt
was named all-Southern Indep-
endent this year and was all-
Southern Conference in 1976.
A new award this year, the
Best Blocking Back, was present
fa his superb blocking in the
wishbone attack.
The E.E. Rawl Memaial
Award fa character, scholarship
and athletic ability was presented
to senia Vince Kolanko of
Wierton, W. Va. Kolanko was a
reserve running back and fullback
fa three years and returned
kickoffs.
Another new award, the Rick
Bankston Memaial Award, given
in hoia of the famer coach at
East Carolina who was tragically
killed in June of 1977, was
presented to senia Eddie
Murphy. This award will be given
annually to the outstanding mem-
ber of the scout team. Murphy,
from Raleigh, has been singled
out several times over four years
fa his dedication to the scout
team wak.
The specialty team award
went to Larry Paul. Larry is a
senia who played at Raleigh's
Broughton High School.
The Outstanding Freshman
award was given to Anthony
Collins, a running back from Penn
Yan, N.C. Collins carried the
football 21 times fa 95 yards, a
4.5 average per carry, and cne
touchdown while playing in var-
sity games. He was outstanding
in two JV games.
The Coach's Player award,
selected by Coach Pat Dye fa the
player that gets the most from his
ability, was presented to senia
Rickie Holliday of Williamston.
At only 5-9, 188 pounds, Holliday
was the starting center in 1977
and the backup center in 1976.
The R.W. Moae "King of the
Gridiron" scholarship is present-
ed to the outstanding East
Carolina player as voted by the
media from two nominees of the
coaches at each home Pirate
game. Moae, fran Raleigh pre-
sents the $1,000 scholarship to
the educational Foundation, the
Pirate Club, in the name of the
outstanding player. Those win-
ning such distinction this year
were fullback Theooore Sutton
(VMI), safety Gerald Hall (South-
ern Illinois), quarterback Leander
Green (Southwestern Lousiana)
and Terry Gallaher, Wayne Bolt
and Jimmy Southerland (Rich-
mond-three-way tie).
Speakers fa the evening
included Dr. Leo Jenkins,
Chenoella; Troy Pate, Jr Chair-
man of the Board of Trustees; Bill
Cain, Directa of Athletics; and
Pat Dye, head football ooach.
HA ROLD RA NDOLPH 92 in action against William
the ECU football banquet.
& Mary. Randolph won three individual awards at
SENIOR QUARTERBACK JIMMY Southerland
seen here against VMI was named offensive captain
for the past season. He set a record for the highest
pass completion percentage in ECU history with
57.1 per cent from 1974-77. Photo by Brian Stotler
WAYNE BOLT right of center in white is shown
last season making a block against Duke tor fullback
Theo Sutton. Bolt was presented the blocking
Trophy for the second straight ynn
Photo by Brian Stotler





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 2 March 1978
Pirate's baseball season opens this Saturday at Elon
The East Carolina University
Baseball team, with memories of
last year's 30-12 record and
NCAA playoff bid fresh in their
minds, begins what is regarded
as the toughest schedule in the
school's history Saturday as the
Pirates travel to Elon.
ECU will undertake a 48 game
schedule for the first time ever,
with many of the top teams from
the region slated as opponents.
The Pirates face such teams as
South Carolina, the runner-up in
the College World Series in 1977,
Purdue, Madison, 1977
ACC season champ Clem-
son, North Carolina, N.C. State,
Virginia Tech, Maryland, and
other strong baseball schools.
"This is definitely the most
difficult schedule I've ever seen
said second year ECU head coach
Monte Little. "But since we are
independents this year, we felt
we had to win a lot of games while
playing an attractive schedule
Though the schedule is de-
Just irrivtd
Stirling Silver
and Gold Filled
manding, East Carolina does not
lack the talent to meet the
challenge. The Pirates return six
everyday regulars from last
year's Southern Conference
championship team, along with
the top two pitchers.
All-State and all-Conference
selections Mickey Britt and Pete
Conaty head the list of returnees.
Britt as a freshman last year
compiled a 9-1 reoord, with an
E.R.A. of 1.68. Hisonly loss came
in the NCAA Atlantic Regionals.
Conaty, meanwhile, finished the
year with an 8-3 mark and a 1.90
E.R.A. He led the squad in
innings pitched (90) and in
strikeouts (80). The Annandale,
Va. senior is using an extra year
of eligibility to pitch for the
Pirates again.
Elsewhere, another all-star
candidate returns at second base.
Pete Paradossi hit .319 last year
fa ECU, but is expected to
greatly improve upon that mark
this year. Speedstar Eddie Gates
is back for his final year, and will
be in rightfield. Gates set a new
school record last year with 23
stolen bases, and could well get
quite a few more this season.
Bobby Supel returns as the top
power hitter on the team, as he
led the summer circuit with 48
RBI's in 36 games. A thirdbase-
man last year, Supel will be used
at short in '78.
These top returnees are back-
ed by a solid group of newcomers
to give ECU balance and depth.
Several of the new arrivals
may step in and help right away.
Mike Sage, a freshman from
Virginia Beach, Va will step in
as the regular first baseman. He
was named the Virginia Beach
Sun Player of the Year in '77.
Louisburg Junior College transfer
Bill Lucas will probably be a
member of the starting pitching
rotation, as he was for the
Hurricanes last year. Another
Louisburg product, Max Raynor,
oould open the season as the
Pirates' leftfielder.
Overall, the Pirates have one
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of the most talented baseball
squads ever. There is depth and
talent, power, speed, and de-
fense. However, there is also the
schedule.
ECU
The schedule: March 4 at
Elon Colelge (31)0); 5 at N.C.
State (2) (1.00); 7 at South
Carolina (300), 8 at South
Carolina (3.O0); 10 Purdue (2)
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20 E. Conn. (730); 21 E. Conne.
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Clemson (7:30); 25 SE Mass. (2)
(1:00); 27 at North Carolina
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17 Maryland (730); 18 Atlantic
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Title
Fountainhead, March 2, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 02, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.489
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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