Fountainhead, February 28, 1978







Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 12 pages
Fountainhead
Vol. No. 53, No. 38 East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
L
ON THE INSIDE
Debatep. 3
World issuesp. 5
Semi-Toughp. 7
All-State chosenp. 10
28 February 1978 7
Media Board now official
Jenkins approves constitution
By JEANNIE WILHAMS
Assistant News Editor
ECU Chancellor Leo Jenkins
approved the constitution for the
ECU Media Board Feb. 22.
The constitution wasdrawn up
by the Media Board Constitution
Committee, consisting of Neil
Sessoms, Student Government
Association (SGA) president,
Reed Warren, SGA vice-presi-
dent, Charles Sune, SGA legisla-
tor, Robert M. Swaim, Fountain-
head Advertising manager and
two administrators, James H.
Tucker, dean of student affairs,
and Rudolph Alexander, asso-
ciate dean of student affairs.
Student committee members
were appointed by Sessoms.
The constitution provides fa
the Media Board to act as
publisher of all student-sponsa-
ed publications at ECU, including
but na limited to, FOUNTAIN-
HEAD, BUCCANEER, REBEL,
and the EBONY HERALD, and
shall be responsible fa the Photo
Lab and radio station WECU.
Student Union publications
are excluded.
Sessoms commented ai the
effect the Media Board will have
on publications.
"This is a maja and needed
step Sessons pointed out.
"By having this Constitution
approved, the student putrfica-
tionsare allowed and obligated to
improve their services. The stu-
dent body will be the benificiar-
ies.
"Student Publications are
now mae closely aligned with the
ideal of a free press and are no
longer under the student
government said Sessoms.
Sources of funds fa the Board
will come from student activity
fees, generated income and all
interest earned on said funds.
The Board will receive $6,375
per semester and a propationate
amount each Summer Session
from each student paying an
activity fee.
Neil Sessoms, SGA president
and member of the Constitution
committee, explained how the
oommittee arrived at the figure.
"We went back to the figures
Trespassing charges dropped
from 1973 through 1977 and
found that publications were
appropriated an average of
56.25 of the total student
government budget said Ses-
soms.
"But the actual amount
(average) used by publications
was 52.26.
"That figure was cut to 50.
Things might be a little tighter fa
publications because of these
cuts Sessoms said.
Sessoms emphasized that the
$6,375 to be received from the
students will na be added to the
present activity fee, but merely
taken from the $12.50 each
student already pays to the SGA.
All Board funds will be
deposited in the Student Fund
Accounting Office in the Media
Board account. Interest earned on
board funds will be the property
of the board.
The constitution provides fa
the following individuals to serve
as members of the board: SGA
President, Student Union Presi-
dent, Men's Residence Council
See MEDIA, p. 6

ECU CHANCELLOR LEO Jenkins.
By STUART MORGAN
News Edita
Trespassing charges which
were filed last week against two
class presidents here have been
dropped by Kieren Shanahan,
SGA attaney general.
Aloizo Newby, freshman
class president; and Tim Sullivan,
junia class president; were both
charged by FOUNTAINHEAD fa
trespassing last week.
The incident occurted Tues-
day, Feb. 21, at 1 a.m. during
which time several staff members
of the newspaper were still
waking.
"When I walked out of the
typist's office, I naiced bah
Sullivan and Newby wandering
through the offioe said Jeanett
Coats, typesetter fa the news-
paper.
"I asked Sullivan if he had
naiced the sign (giving offioe
hours and warning unauthaized
and unescorted individuals nrt to
enter) added Coats. "But, he
didn't say anything except 'this is
public property
Afterwards, Coats said she
told the two that she and the aha
staff members were trying to
complete the next day's news-
papa.
She then requested that the
two leave the office.
Howeva, Sullivan and Newby
would not leave.
Sevaal aha staff membas
who were present at the t�m�
called campus polioe. But, the
campus polioe arrived at the
See TRESPASSING, p. 6
Legislature approves Ron Lewis
as Spring Elections chairperson
DR. JOHN EAST, ECU political science professor, participated in
� � The Great American Debate sponsored by the Men's Residence
Council. See Story, page 3. Photo by Brian Stotler
ByJULIEEVERETTE
Assistant News Edita
The Student Government
Association (SGA) Legislature
approved Ron Lewis as Elections
Chairpason fa Spring 1978 at
their meeting Moiday.
The legislature approved
Lewis' suggestion that filing fa
Elections run Feb. 28 through
March 13.
He said election campaigning
would run March 14 through
March 28, and the election would
be held March 29.
In aha business, $343.34 was
appropriated fa the annual NCSL
sessioi to be held in Raleigh in
April.
Aooading to Marc Adla,
NCSL Publicity Committee Chair-
man, 20 students will attend the
five-day session.
"The NCSL has received
consicterable television oova-
age Adla said. "Thisaganiza-
tioi is valuable statewide
In aha business, the refa-
endum results wae announced
with 292 students favaing a
media board and 881 opposing it.
A revisia amendment was
passed to update the SGA consti-
tution, concaning the change of
quarta hours to semesta hours.
The bill must be passed three
times in acter to be put on the
Spring balia, whae it then must
be ratified by 20 paoent of the
student body.
Also discussed and approved
ECU slated
campus on
By DOUG WHITE
News Edita
ECU is the oily univasity in
the United States to present A &
M recading artists Styx ai their
current national tour, aooading
to Charles Sune, chairpason of
the audent Union Popular Enta-
tainment Committee.
ECU is also the opening date
on the tour.
"We're real excited being the
only univasity and also the first
date on their tour. All the aha
dates are in commacidl coli-
seums and arenas Sune said.
Sune said tickets are the
cheapest in the state fa this
concert.
was the creation of a audent
Employment Service fa ECU
students seeking part-time em-
ployment .
The legislature approved an
appropriation of $2,500 fa the
senia class gift.
See LEGISLA TURE, p. 5
as only U.S.
Styx tour
This compares with the $7.25
and $9 ticka prioes at the band's
two aha dates in North Carolina
Seating in Minges Coliseum
will be limited to approximately
6,000 pasons due to Styx's
unusally large stage, aooading to
Sune.
Minge� usually holds 6,500
people.
"Because of limited
seating and the fact that we have
a ticka outia in Raleigh, I would
encourage the public to get their
tickets as scon as possible said
Sune.
Also appearing with Styx is
Charlie, a four pieoe rock band
who have previously toured with
the Doobie Brahas.






Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 February 1978
Styx
The Student Union Popular
Entertainment committee will
present Styx, with special guest
Charlie, on March 1, at 8 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum.
Tickets will be $4 fa ECU
students and $6 fa the public.
All tickets are available from
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall.
Public tickets are available
from School Kids Ftecads -
University Arcade, Apple
Records - East 5th St and the
Music Shop - Greenville Square
Mall. Fa further infamatiai call
757-6611.
Symposium
The ECU chapter of the
National Student Speech and
Hearing Association will present
the eight Annual Speech and
Hearing Symposium on Friday,
March 17.
The symposium will be in the
Allied Health Auditaium fran
8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m.
The speakers and their topics
are Dr. William Healey on
"Public Law 94-142: Its impact
and How to Manage It" and Dr.
David Yoder on "Current Trends
in Language Intervention
The fee fa professionals is $5
if pre-registered and $6 at the
doa.
The fee fa ECU students is
$2.
Pre-registration fams are
available at the Speech and
Hearing Clinic, Allied Health
Annex.
Pom-pom
The ECU Pom Pan squad
tryoutswill be held March 17, 18,
and 19.
All interested girls should
meet in Fletcher Music Bldg. on
Fn March 17 at 7:30 p.m.
Tryouts will be Sat. evening,
March 18.
If you have questions call Jo
Ellen at 752-0354 a Glenda
752-9416.
Bowline
Have you ever tried bowling in
the moonlighi? Here's your
chance! Friday evenings from 8
until 10p.m "Moonlight Bowl-
ing" is held at the Mendenhall
Student Center Bowling Center.
Try your bowling skills in this
different enviroment. If you're as
sharp as ever you may win a free
game The bowler with the
highest scae during each hour of
Moonlight Bowling will win one
free game. There are aJways two
winners and one of them could be
you.
VAF
V.A.F. will present a film
Occurences at Owl Creek Bridge,
Fri March 3 in Jenkins Fine Arts
Center Auditaium.
Officials
The Intramural Dept. needs
intramural Softball officials.
A required officials' clinic is
being held March 1 at 4 p.m. in
room 103 Biology.
Minimum wage will be paid
with possible raises. All interest-
ed students are urged to attend.
This is your chance to be boss.
GMAT
The Graduate Management
Admission Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat March 18. Applica-
tion blanks are to be oompleied
and mailed to Educational Test-
ing Service, Box 966-R,
Princeton, NJ 08540 to arrive by
Feb. 24. Applications are also
available at the Testing Center,
Speight Bldg, Room 105, ECU.
Russian
The time fa pre-rogistratiai
is here.
It is the time fa big decisiais
such as whether a not enroll into
the first Russian oourse to be
offered fall semester, MWF at 10
a.m.
Russian is a language with a
very simple and logical structure.
Its alphabet can be mastered after
a few lessons.
From then on reading and
writing Russian is no problem at
all.
The rest can come just as
easily if the student is willing to
invest a fair amount qf 4ime in
learning the principles of the
Russina grammar and a realistic
amount of vocabulary
In the third and fourth course-
semester of Russian a serious
student is rewarded fa his
endeavas by being initiated into
the magnificent wald of Russian
literature which he can read in the
aiginal.
Maeover, after a successful
completion of four courses of
Russian a student may qualify fa
a position of transfata with the
United States government.
This is at present a widely
open field and the number of ECU
students who have made their
career as Russian translatas in
the military and the government
is growing.
Russian Literature of the 19th
century in translation j.e.taught
in English (Russian 2220) will also
be offered in the fall, MWF at 2
p.m.
Thisooursp satisfies the hum-
anities requirement a it may be
taken as an elective.
Pre-reg
Ball
Preregistration advising fa
he first & second summer
sessions and fall semester will
take place Feb. 27 through March
3 in accadance with the following
procedures:
1. During this period, each
student will see his advisa and
have the trial class schedule cards
completed in full, showing the
course name and number, sec-
tion, credit hours, time and days.
2. Important: Section must be
completed fa fall semester Pre-
registratioi.
3. The student must take the trial
class schedule cards to Whichard
Building immediately fa final
processing and further instruc-
tion.
Want to pick up a girl?
Girls want to get picked ?
Be an ECU cheerleader.
Meeting Thurs March 16 at 5
p.m. in the lobby outside Minges
Coliseum.
Pageant
The A-Phi-A Fraternity pre-
sents a Miss Black and Gold
Beauty Pageant.
A prelude to our eight Annual
Black and Gold Ball.
Contestants will be competi-
ting fa cash awards and the title
of Miss Black and Gold.
The pageant will be held Mon.
March 13 in Mendenhall.
Contestants will be judged in
the following areas by a panel of
seven judges.
Activities (talent, bathing
suitsspats wear), personality
expression poise and intelligence.
Registration: today through
830 p.m.
Karate
Go Jo Shain karate is having
an impatant meeting this Thurs.
at 6 p.m.
Cone by Memaial's down-
stairs classrooms, Mr. McDonald
would like everyone to be there.
All-Sing
Alpha Xi Delta presents the
eighteenth annual "All Sing
March 2 in Wright Auditaium at
7 p.m. Public is invited. Free
admissioi.
Model UN
Model United Nations meet-�
ing will be held in the Political
Science Coffee Lounge Thurs
March 2 at 3 p.m.
Elections fa new officers will
be held.
All new members welcome
and this meeting is manditay to
all present members.
The Greensbao Conference
will be discussed and proposed
delegates win be interviewed.
RSVP - Sha'a Wilson 752-6044.
Get your tickets now fa the
Alpha's Black and Gold Ball to be
held Sat. March 18.
Ticket sales daily, from 10
a.m3 p.m. in the lobby of the
Students Supply Stae.
Crafts
Register now fa one of the
aafts wakshops which are being
offered by the Crafts Center at
Mendenhall Student Center.
Sign up fa Beginning Dark-
room, Basic Pottery, Handbuilt
Pottery, Silksaeen, Woodwak-
ing, Crochet, Flea Loom Weav-
ing, Enameling, Caitempaary
Basketry.
Upon payment of a $10.00
semester Crafts Center member-
ship fee, an individual may
register fa any of the available
wakshops without additional
charges, excluding costs of per-
sonal supplies and a small lab fee
should the Crafts Center furnish
supplies.
Fa details, call a visit the
Crafts Center during the hours of
3 p.m. until 10 p.m Monday
through Friday, and 10 a.m. until
3 p.m Saturday.
Class space is limited and the
registration deadline fa all wak-
shops is Sat March 18.
Also, membership fees will
not be refunded after the registra-
tion deadline.
Homecoming
All Homecoming Steering
oommittee members, there will
be a Homecoming Steering oom-
mittee meeting on Thurs March
2 in Mendenhall, room 221.
Please plan to attend.
Rooms
Applications fa residence hall
rcoms fa Summer School 1978
and School Year 1978-79 may be
obtained from the Housing Office
as well as one of the residence hal
offices as of Tues March 14.
Room deposits fa these terms
will be accepted in the Cashier's
Office beginning March 20.
The required deposit fa Sum-
mer School is $67 ($101 fa
private room) and fa Fall Semes-
ter, $60. The deposit(s) must be
accompanied by the appropriate
application.
Rooms will be assigned in the
offices of the respective residence
halls according to the following
schedule:
Tues March 21: Students
who desire to return to the room
they presently occupy fa Fall
Semester will be assigned.
Wed March 22: Graduates,
rising senias, and rising junias
will be assigned.
Thurs March 23: Rising
sophonaes will be assigned.
Detailed infamation pertain-
ing to the sign-up procedure will
be made available to each resi-
dence hall resident.
Day students may receive this
infamatiai by contacting the
Housing Offioe.
SGA Elections
Anyone planning to run fa
SGA Executive offioe (president,
vice-president, seaetary, and
treasurer) this spring must file in
the SGA offioe Feb. 28 through
March 13, between the hours of 9
a.m. and 5 p.m.
Surfing
The Surfing Club is having a
meeting tonight to straighten out
membership problems and to set
up invitational meets. Anyone
willing to participate stop by
Memaial's downstairs classroom
Tues Feb. 28 at 7 p.m.
REBEL
Artists and writers whose
wuir wi i. � � 1 WBEL'78
may pio up men cneoks this
week m the ni.oit utliu; Office
hours are 2-5 p.m.
Psi Chi
Psi Chi is offering a pre-
registration briefing fa all Psy-
chology majas and minas Feb.
28 at 7 p.m. in Speight room 129.
You will be able to find out
what courses will be offered and
the instructas of these courses.
Come and find out about your
"favaite" professas.
iSci
Pi Sigma Alpha, the political
science fraternity, will meet at 7
p.m. Tues, Feb. 28 in Brewster
D-108 to induct new members. All
members please attend.
Ski Club
There will be a meeting of the
Ski Club Wed March 1 at 4 p.m.
in the bottom of Memaial Gym.
This meeting will concern
recovering expenses and a possi-
ble trip to Snowshoe over spring
break.
Attendance is a must.
Gamma Beta
The Gamma Beta Phi Society
will meet on March 2 in room 243
Mendenhall.
The meeting will begin prom-
ptly at 7 p.m. All members should
plan to attend.
Law Society
The ECU Law Society will
meet Tues, Feb. 28 at 7 JO p.m.
in the multi-purpose room of
Mendenhall.
Dr. David Stevens will be
speaker.
All interested persons are
urged to attend.
nmnw
'





���BiMHJ
Drs. East and Yarbrough on debating panel
28 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
MRC hosts The Great American Debate'
byRICHYSMITJ-l
Staff Writer
The Men's Residence Council
(M RC) of ECU hosted The Great
American Debate" between Drs.
John East and Tinsley Yar-
brough, professors of political
science, in Mendenhall.
The two professors were
squared off equally with each
other as a panel of three fired
questions among the gentlemen.
The panel consisted of the
MRC president, a political
science graduate student and the
Student Government Association
(SGA) president.
A total of 13 questions,
ranging from the subjects of the
Panama Canal to personal candi-
date choices, were asked by the
panel.
The gentlemen were given
time fa rebuttals.
East received his Ph.D. from
the University of Florida.
He has served on the Platform
Committee of the National
Republican Convention and is one
of two National Committeeper-
sons from North Carolina.
Yarbrough received his Ph. D.
from the University of Alabama.
Both professors hold the
honor of Phi Beta Kappa.
The debate became conserva-
tive ideology vs. liberalism.
The professors did not always
disagree.
On those topics, East would
smile and answer, let's keep away
from those subjects my liberal
brethen and I agree on.
Even though the air of humor
and friendship between the two
professors was evident, they
disagreed on much more than
they agreed on.
The opening question was
addressed to East on the Panama
Canal treaties.
East responded by saying, "I
am opposed to the original treaty
of Carter's administration and
also to the second treaty as
amended
East spoke of the defense
value of the canal and the
relinquishing of U.S. sovereignity
as a "process of unraveling
Yarbrough rebutted by claim-
ing the Canal defense value was
not critical.
"We are capable of defending
ourselves without the Canal he
added.
The question arose concerning
the effectiveness of Vance, secre-
tary of state under President
Carter as opposed to Dr. Henry
Kissinger, secretary of state
during the Nixon and Ford
administration.
East stated that he feels
Vance "epitomizes Carter's ad-
ECU program offers aid
to impaired students
By SCOTT BARNES
Staff Writer
There are an estimated thirty
to forty hearing imparied stu-
dents on campus who are having
academic or adjustment problems
because they basically cannot
hear as well as others, according
to Mike Ernest, director of the.
hearing impaired program.
The hearing impaired pro-
gram would like to help these
students. Students with hearing
difficulties who come to the
program, can find aid in many
areas such as counseling, referral
to speech therapy, administering
hearing tests, and helping the
student with adjustment prob-
lems.
Ernest said the program can
also aid the hearing impaired
student who is having problems
inside the classroom.
"By providing in class inter-
preters, note takers and informa-
tion to instructors, the students
academic progress can be en-
hanced Ernest said.
According to Ernest, the first
step in helping the student
involves teaching the student to
become more aware of his or her
own problem.
Counseling, along with all
other types of aid, is free and is
confidential.
So far this semester three
hard of hearing students have
come to this program for help.
Last semester was the first
semester that the hearing impair-
ed service came on ECU.
With seven full time hearing
impaired students, ECU is one of
less than ten universities in the
U.S. with a full hearing impaired
program.
Prior to last semester, hearing
impaired students in North Caro-
lina oould receive special assis-
tance only at Gallaudet College in
Washington D.C.
This discouraged many stu-
dents from seeking a higher
education.
"While the program can
benefit the hearing impaired
student in many ways, none of the
benefits are applicable unless the
student first chooses to seek
help Ernest said.
ministration, bland.
"He personifies foreign policy
today, weak he commented.
Yarbrough, stated that Nixon
turned over the affairs to Kissin-
ger, whereas Carter is trying to
implement U.S. foreign policy
himself.
Both professors were asked if
they were to change political
parties, what would make them
switch to the oppostion.
"Why I would want to be a
democrat?" East asked as if he
did not hear the question correct-
ly-
"Well I guess I'd like to be a
democrat because they win more.
"And I'd want to leave the
Republican party because they
lose he chuckled.
"Republican" seems to have
a bad annotation, he added.
Yarbrough said, "There are
certain things one cannot con-
template.
"That's one of them he
smiled.
On the more serious side, East
responded to a question on the
Carter administration's campaign
promises.
"He hasn't done very well so
far East commented.
East referred to Carter's
promise of the federal budget
being balanced by 1981 and the
human rights issue.
Yarbrough rebutted by listing
several promises Carter had kept,
such as more public jobs availa-
ble, stopped federal funding fa
abortions and he promised to
have a press conference every two
weeks.
These are only a few accord-
ing to Yarbrough.
He added, "In ten months
time, he's done better than the
previous two administrations
As the evening ended, each
professor was asked who would
be the best candidate their party
oould run in 1980.
East responded quickly with,
Ronald Reagan
And Yarbrough answered as
quickly, "Carter
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Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 February 1978
SGA wastes $1,000
of students' money
Certain SGA politicians believe that the students
cannot think for themselves.
They proved this when they took it upon
themselves last week to hold a publication
referendum, thus insulting the intelligence of the
student body by saying the students do not know how
to vote.
An opinion poll was issued to students who voted
in the fall elections, asking whether or not they
favored independent publications. Students voted 2
to 1 in favor.
These politicians, however, obviously thought
that the students are unable to decide for themselves
what they want and what they don't want. These
people wasted approximately $1,000 of the students'
money printing publication referendum posters, an
anonymous newsletter, a "Vote No" handbill, and
paying the Rugby Club members for manning the
polls.
The referendum vote was 4 to 1 opposed to the
Media Board. However, only nine precincts were
allowed during this election. The Croatan and
Student Supply Store were designated as precincts,
but for some strange reason unbeknown to the
student body, Mendenhall Student Center was not
designated as a precinct. The student center, of all
places, should have been designated as a precinct.
But, instead of the student center, Jenkins Art
Center had a polling place. If one academic building
had a polling place, then every academic building on
campus should have had a precinct, also.
Other precincts included Jones, Fleming, and
Greene dorms; Say and Tyler dorms, and the Allied
Health building were precincts fa one day. Only
seven precincts were open at all times, as opposed to
approximately twenty during a true election.
This referendum was a mockery of voting. The
precincts were fixed in ader to assure that the vote
would be "no" to the Media Board creation.
Since these politicians purposely ruffled the
feathers of many art students by telling them that
they would receive no money next year from the
SGA, they made sure that the School of Art building
did have a polling place.
Some SGA members have accused President Neil
Sessoms of lying to the board of trustees, although
their charges have been without substance.
However, SGA Treasurer Craig Hales and
Legislata AlonzoNewby, among others, have lied to
their oonstitutencies by saying that the Marching
Pirates, the Visual Arts Faum and other organiza-
tiais will not receive any money next year from the
SGA because the Media Board has taken so much
money.
To reiterate, hopefully fa the last time,
publications are taking nomore money fron the SGA
than they have in the past. In fact, they are actually
taking sonewhat less.
Fa example, FOUNTAINHEAD's advertising
revenue is reverting back to the newspaper staff,
instead of to the SGA. WECU's budget this year
was cut almost exactly in half.
Free press is a right guaranteed to the people by
the U.S. Constitution. When politicians are so
opposed to a freedom which rightfully belongs to the
people, then those people must take steps to ensure
that these politicians are removed from government
faever.
YoM V)�AN You SPfNr 300DOLLARS ON fy &UNCH OF BCLcGNB"?
Forum
Reader likes article, but clarifies quote
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
On February 21,
FOUNTAINHEAD printed an
article entitled "The Late Great
Plant Earth" explains prophe-
cies. I thought that the article
was well written and informative.
However, I would like to clarify a
portion of a quote attributed to
me.
The quote reads, People can
speculate and philosophize sev-
eral ways about Revelations and
the propheciesRevelations is so
difficult to understand. If isn't
black and white. It has to be
mostly speculation said
Morgan.
Since my conversation with
my friend Ricki Gliarmis was not
taped, it was an honest mistake to
try to condense my comments.
But I don't want anyone to deduct
that I criticized Hal Lindsey ot
that I though that "The Revela-
tion (without an 's') of Jesus
Christ to his bond-servant John
was mostly speculation
I respect Hal Lindsey and his
consistent stand for Jesus Ohist. I
am thankful that his books and
films have been effective in
stimulating people to consider the
historical evidence concerning
Jesus Christ.
Hal Lindsey's research
exceeds mine in the area of
prophecy, so I respect his inter-
pretation of the Biblical proph-
ecies. Although, I feel there is
room fa differing interpretations
on a few points, I consider his
presentations as aedibie and
authaitive.
In reference to the Biblical
prophecies themselves, I am
convinced that they are 100
percent accurate and that "All
saipture is inspired (God breath-
ed) by God and is profitable fa
teaching, fa reproof, fa oarect-
ion, fa training in righteousness;
that the man of God may be
adequate, equipped fa every
good wak II Timothy 3:16,17.
In summary, I appreciate the
article by Ricki and hope that this
will be accepted simply as a
clarification to her good and
mfamative article. Also, please
realize that these are my opiniois
and not necessarily those of
Campus Crusade fa Christ.
Sincerely in Christ,
Edwina Magan
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years.
"Were it left to me to decide whether we should have
a government without newspapers or newspapers
without government, I should not hesitate a moment to
prefer the latter
Thomas Jefferson
EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. Swaim
News EditorsDoug White
Stuart Mwgan
Trends EditorSteve Bachner
Sports EditorChris Holloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Media Board of ECU and is
distributed each Tuesday and Thursday, weekly during the
summer.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10 annually, alumni $6 annually.
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I �� �.��
Panama Canal, Middle East, worid energy
28 Fabruyy 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD P�p S
he
us
a
nd
ise
ns
of
st,
an
World issue series planned for local groups
ECU News Bureau
The Panama Canal, the
Middle East, world energy,
human rights and other foreign
policy issues are the focus of
"Great Decisions 78 a series of
topics designed for local group
discussion in communities
LEGISLATURE
Continued from p. 1
The money will be used to
provide scholarships for ECU
students who have excelled aca-
demically and have provided
outstanding service to ECU.
Hal Sharpe, Chairperson of
the Rules and Judiciary commit-
tee, presided over the meeting as
acting speaker.
Tommy Joe Payne, speaker of
the legislature, and Ron Morri-
son, elected speaker after
Payne's removal, agreed to let
Sharpe serve as speaker until the
review board hears Morrison's
appeal, aqcording to K ieran Shan-
ahan, SGA Attorney General.
throughout the U.S. this spring.
The series will be coordinated
in eastern North Carolina by the
Division of Continuing Education
and six community colleges and
technical institutes.
"Great Decisions" is spon-
sored nationally by the Foreign
Policy Association, a non-profit,
non-partisan, public service
organization whose purpose is to
increase the American citizen's
interest and knowledge in inter-
national affairs.
Persons who participate in
"Great Decisions" discussion
groups in thier local communities
are asked to read a "Great
Decisions" booklet which pro-
vides background readings on
each topic.
Eastern N.C. groups will
receive assistance from ECU, and
from Beaufort Technical Institute,
Craven Community College,
Edgecomb Technical Institute,
Martin Community College, Pitt
Technical Institute and Wayne
Community College.
Each will begin at 7:45 p.m. in
the Fellowship Hall of Jarvis
Memorial Methodist Church in
Greenville.
SCHEDULE
Speakers and topics are:
March 15 - "The Panama
Canal Zone Dr. Edward Leahy,
geography.
March 22 The Global Power
Balance Dr. Sandra Wurth-
Hough, political science.
March 29 - "The Changing
Middle East Dr. Hisham
Barakat, medicine.
April 5- "Dilemmas of World
Energy Dr. Vincent Bellis,
biology.
April 12International Devel-
opment Dr. .Robert Bunger
anthropology.
April 19
America Dr
history.
April
Abroad,
history.
May
Foreign Policy
library services.
26 -
Dr.
Japan and
Robert Gowan,
'Human Rights
Bodo Nischan,
3 The People and
Dr. Louis Reith,
Student gets essay honors
ECU News Bureau
For the second year in a row,
an ECU journalism student has
received top honors in Howard
University's annual communica-
tions essay contest.
Joyce Evans of Greenville, a
junior drama major and journal-
ism minor, last week won third
place in Howard University's
national contest for her essay,
"Communications Here and
Abroad
Last year, Ken Campbell, a
C HEBER FORBES
Downtown On The Mall
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Knit tops, Slacks, Skirts, Shirts, DressesCoats, Sportswear
Also, find great savings on SALE MERCHANDISE
SWEATERS were up to $37, now $5 to$10
CARGO blouses were up to $35, now $8 to $12.50
SLACKS were up to $45, now $10 to $15
One group odd sportswear pieces were up to $130,
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DRESSES were up to $140, now $5 to $30
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political science major with a
minor in journalism, won first
place.
Campbell is now a graduate
student at Columbia University's
school of journalism.
Ev?ns received the award
during Howard University's four-
day communications conference
at the Mayflower Hotel in Wash-
ington, D.C.
She has also won several
poetry awards and an essay
contest sponsored by Internation-
al Publication in California in
1976 and 1977 and has contribut-
ed numerous articles to campus
publications, including
FOUNTAINHEAD and the
EBONY HERALD.
Evans is a graduate of Eppes
H igh School. She works a 40-hour
week in the ECU Computing
Center while carrying a full
academic load.
Upon graduation she plans to
continue her studies at the
graduate level, in journalism or
mass communications.
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only open 7 am till 2am Daily.





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 February 1978
Jack Anderson rescheduled for March 28
Syndicated oolumnist Jack
Anderson will appear in Menden-
hall Student Center Theatre on
Tues March 28 at 8 p.m.
Anderson, whose relentless
digging has made him one of
America's top investigative re-
porters, will appear under the
sponsorship of the Student
Union Lecture Series Committee.
Jack Anderson was born in
Long Beach, California, and
reared in Salt Lake City. When he
was twelve he got his first
newspaper job as a reporter for
the weekly MURRAY EAGLE.
By the time he was eight-
een he was working on the city
desk of the SALT LAKE
TRIBUNE.
Anderson has been at the
bottom of some of the biggest
exposes that have oome out of
Washington.
Tickets for Anderson's ap-
pearance are available at ECU
Central Ticket Office and are $3
fa the public.
Tickets may be purchased
at $2.50 each if bought
Saads Shoe Shop
113 Grande Ave.
at
College View Cleaners
TRESPASSING
Continued from p. 1
office about 15 minutes later,
five minutes after Sullivan and
Newby had left, according to
Doug White, news editor.
"We have several thousand
dollars worth of equipment in this
offioe, including heavy machin-
ery, typewriters, light tables, and
supplies said Cindy Broome,
editor.
"This isa state building, not a
public building, as some people
believe said Broome. "Students
who don't work here don't need to
be up here while we're working.
"I'm sure a student wouldn't
wander into The Daily Reflector
offices while they're working
added Broome.
Shanahan said that there are
no signs prohibiting trespassing
at the FOUNTAINHEAD office
now, but that the administration
here is presently moving to post a
sign prohibiting trespassing of
that office.
He further said that in the late
60's Dr. Leo Jenkins designated
approximately 15 administrators
ardeei
�1 GETS YOU 2
At lunch or dinner, your dollar
goes far at Hardee's. Far enough
to get you two big beautiful
Roast Beef Sandwiches. Each
sandwich made with slow-
cooked beef, sliced thin and
piled high. And you get your
choice of three tangy sauces.
So every bite is uicy, beefy,
and delicious.

Add some of our crisp, tasty fries
and a soft drink, and your
meal is deliciously complete.
The next time you go to
Hardee's, take along some-
one you like. And take
along this coupon. Order
two Roast Beef Sandwiches
for a dollar. That s some big
beautiful savings.
�"
i
GET TWO BIG BEAUTIFUL
ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES FOR'l
Gcx ' erf all participating Hardee's. Please present this coupon before ordering.
One coupon per customer, please. Customer must pay any sales tax.
This coupon not good in combination with any other offers.
ECU
Hafdeei
Coupon expires
March 13, 1978
in groups of twenty or more.
Admission for ECU students will
be by ID and activity card while
admission fa ECU faculty and
staff will be by MSC membership
card.
as custodians of university pro-
perty. Jenkins authorized them to
order unauthorized persons to
leave campus buildings.
However, he added that no
such permission was given to
students.
�Their actions (Sullivan's and
Newby's) were antagonistic and
uncalled for said Shanahan.
'However, I'll not let political
dissention be settled within the
judicial system of the SGA
Last Wednesday, Shanahan
attempted to present a summons
to Sullivan (before charges were
dropped).
"I presented a summons to
Sullivan from the judicial commit-
tee of the SGA, but he spit at me,
balled-up the paper and threw it
on the ground said Shanahan.
"I again tried to serve the
summons to the defendant. But,
he spit at me again, crumpled up
the paper, and this time threw it
at me said Shanahan.
"Since then, I've researched
the case and talked with the offioe
of Rufus Edmisten, North Caro-
lina attorney general and decided
to drop the trespassing charges
"Mr. Sullivan's irrational be-
havior was disrespectful, vulgar,
and downright rude said
Shanahan. "But, I believe in-
stances such as these should be
noted by the student population
Shanahan said that another
SGA executive officer witnessed
the episode.
However, that person would
not comment on the incident.
Sullivan could not be reached
in order to make a comment.
MEDIA
lOontinued from p. 1
President, the Women's Resi-
dence Council President, Presi-
dents of the Inter-Fraternity and
the Panhellenic Councils (each to
have one-half vote), a day student
appointed by the Board, an
administrator appointed by the
chancellor, a faculty member
appointed by the board (in
consultation with the Chairperson
of the Faculty Senate), and the
Dean of Student Affairs (ex-
officio member without a vote).
Contrary to several rumors,
no media employees will sit on
the Board, according to Sessoms.
A student chairperson shall be
selected from the Board's mef -
bership by a majority vote of th,
Board.
Responsibilities for overall
operations of media will include:
selection and dismisssal of edi-
tors, approval of budgets and
appropriation of funds to the
individual media, selection of the
head photographer for the Photo
Lab, selection of the General
Manager of Radio Station WECU,
and approval of faculty advisors
to each of the media.
I





�iiHH
The 'I Love You, Alice B. Toklas' of the 70's

28 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
-
Semi-Tough is an 'engagingly witty film'
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
For those of you who have
been waiting, "Semi-Tough" is
finally in Greenville, and well
worth seeing.
Against the backdrop of a
professional football team's
approaching playoff game, the
dynamic trio of Billy Clyde
Puckett (Burt Reynolds), Marvin
The Shake" Tiller (Kris Kristof-
ferson, and Barbara Jane Book-
man (Jill Clayburgh) wade their
way through the psychological
bullshit which is the stuff of
modern life, seeking substance in
a world in which everything is
qualified as "semi
The approaching playoff game
has little effect on the players,
who spend more time in bars and
bed than on the practice field.
Such a life of leisure leaves the
professional athelete to pursue
the hedonistic pleasures of life,
and pursue they do.
But as Billy Clyde so aptly
summizes, "There comes a time
when a man realizes there's more
to life than football and fucking
(and darts, pinball, and backgam-
mon fa that matter.) Waxing
philosophical, Billy Clyde and
Barbara Jane follow "the
Shake's" footsteps, in search of
spiritual enlightenment.
The movie then emerges from
the athletic field to parody the
many consciousness-probing
diversions which preoccupy the
modern leisure class. Werner
Erhard's E.S.T. seminars,
psychoanalysis, pyramid energy
and a host of other foibles fall in
the axe-swing of Walter Bern-
stein's sparkling screenplay.
DRASTIC SELF-REVELATORY
AWAKENING
The trio eventually reach a
separate peace in a world where
friendship is regarded as "god-
damn unnatural all of them
arriving at a self -revel atory
awakening which drastically al-
THE "DYNAMIC TRIO Burt Reynolds, Jill
Clayburgh and Kris Kristofferson look for "sub-
lets their lives, when they meet This delightful and enga-
someone they've never met - gingly witty film will doubtlessly
themselves. stand as the "I Love You, Alice B.
stanoe in a world in wh ch everything is qualified as
'semi
Toklas" of the 70's.
"Semi-Tough" is currently
showing at the Park Cinema.
The Betty bordering on sheer sexploitation
By STEVE BACHNER
Trends Editor
Sir Laurence O'ivier made his
stage debut in 1918 in William
Shakespeare s JuIiuj. Caeser
In the 60 years ensuing, Olivier
has established himself as a
staple of drama in both Britain
and America.
With a capacity fa acting that
he extended to the saeen with
such brilliant results as his 1948
Hame?Olivier's own haunting
adaptation that he also directed
has achieved a distinguished
status with his earnest "repre-
sentative" style of acting and an
impressive track recad.
Severely marring that recad
is the grotesque imitation of his
talent, masquerading The Betsy
which is currently playing at
Greenville's Plaza Cinema Two.
Though it is less evident,
Katherine Ross' perfamance is
an equally outrageous travesty of
her ability as an actress.
Without the benefit of the
personae (cum-persona noi grata
thanks to this tired vehicle), The
Betsy wouldn't even warrant
review.
The film is billed as "a vivid
portrait of intrigue and power
within the auto industry So
what else is new? Robbins' "The
Carpetbaggers" was a vivid
patrait of intrigue and power
within the movie industry. "The
Adventurers an overlong farce
about a South American republic
Trends
that has a revolution every fifteen
seconds, was a vivid patrait of
intrigue and power within the
And so on into obliviou. Allied
Artists' useof the wad "vivid" is
a terrible iraiy in itself "Bland"
would be a far, far better choioe.
The Robbins famula is as old as
Olivier. But unlike Olivier, there
is little hope fa betterment.
Like every other film adapta-
tion of a Robbins best-seller, The
Betsy is the stay of one baaad,
really macho dude who attains
riches and power because of an
inherent drive fa the spoils that
accompany each success. Usually
an intrinsic element of his charac-
ter is also an unquenchable sex
drive-thus we have the stuff that
provacative film literature is
made of. Bunk! The Betsy
baders mae on sheer sexploita-
tion than it does adult entertain-
ment (whatever that is).
Olivier's role in this mess is a
revolting embarrassment. He
plays Number One, the founding
father of the fictional Bethlehem
Mota Capaatiai and one in a
oondusing plethaa of family
relations. The Walter Bernstein
William Bast screenplay has the
distinguished veteran of the stage
and screen playing a hypersexual
rogue whose superpotency could
easily produce as many children
ashismrta capaatiai produces
cars. Even at the ripe old age of
ninety! Really makes you en-
vious, huh?
Katherine Ross and Robert
Duvall fare no better. Ross is
asked to have an incestuous
relationships with her father-in-
law in the film, played by
you-know-who. Duvall plays
Number Threethat is to say
Laen Hardeman Three. Actually
he's Number One grandsoi. You
see Number Two killed himself
when he found out that Number
One was sleeping with his wife
and that was after he was canned
as president of the capaatiai
and anyway to hell with it. The
premise defies rational analysis.
The Betsy wastes some splen-
did location footage of Los
Angeles; Detroit, and Newpat,
Rhode Island. It wastes an
attractive cast. It wastes some
nice phaography and a solid back
ground scae by John Barry.
As the man who steals control
of the company, only Tommy Lee
Jones looks like he really belongs
in this movie.
The Grapes
this week's
By LYNN BEYA.R
Assistant Trends Edita
This Wednesday, "The
Grapes of Wrath" will be shown
at 8 p.m. in the Mendenahll
Student Center Theatre. This
movie is free to ECU student and
sponsaed by the Student Union
as a special film presentation.
The 1940 film is based on John
Stcnbeck's best-selling novel of
the same title and deals with the
struggle of the Joad family,
victims of the dust bowl. The film
becomes a kind of commentary on
the migrant waker as we follow
the Joads on their flight tc
Califania where they become
victims of a greater evil.
of Wrath is
special film
Henry Fonda plays Tom Joad,
the ex-convict son who emerges
as the leader, "through the daily
experiences of dust, hunger,
brutality, and exploitation
Jane Darwell won an Oscar fa
her perfamance as Ma Joad, the
determined backbone of the
family.
Directa John Fad subtly
caiveys the stay through much
symbolism and as Richard Grif-
fith states in The Film Till Now,
�The folkways, speech, habits,
idioms, and emotions of a vast
suppressed minaity were drama-
tized to the life by Fad with a
power, humanity and compassion
wholly admirable
Admission is by ECU ID and
activity card.
KATHARINE ROSS SHARES a bed with her
father-in-law Laurence Olivier in Harold Robbins'
"THE BETSY a vivid portrait of intrigue and
power within the auto industry. The Emanuel L
Wolf presentation, based on RtbNrtf best-selling
novel was produced by Robert �. Weston and
directed by Daniel Petrie on location throughout the
U.S from a screenplay by Walter Bernstein
I
I





PageS FOUNTAINHEAD 28 February 1978
Intersection makes the campus connection
DA VID DEVINE SWUNG absolutely upside-down Gong Head and
Flute Head at Saturday's "Intersection "an evening of events
designed to unify the visual and performing arts" here at ECU.
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AMERICAN RED CROSS CAMPAIGN
NEWSPAPER AO NO. ARC-78-842CJ�2 COL.
By DAVID WHITSON
Staff Writer
What's going on here?
The amazing Gong-Head
swinging from the rafters
a sultry vixen of the sands
swaying in the evening light
the little tramp
bluegrass jammers "Plank Road
String Band" and "Too Wet to
Plow
Elton Bailey
the Devine Flute-Head
TWO-Count em-TWO
Genuine' Certified, heathen
Motorcycle Daredevils
Intersection created an envi-
ronment of multi-media art
events designed to unify the
visual and performing arts and
the Greenville oommunity in a
harmonious blend of spirit.
The happening occured
Saturday night next to Ernest
Knott Glass on Clarke Street.
Events included the aforemen-
tioned, a Gong Show, and Mardi
Gras party.
More in Thursday's Fountain-
head.
THE MASTER OF ceremonies wore white, six inch, wooden
platform shoes; there was bluegrass music, a Gong Show, and a
Mardi Gras Party that swuno with the spirit of New Orleans,
Photos by Pete Podeszwa
Stamp's band in concert Wed.
By RENEE DIXON
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Concert
Band will perform a conoert
Wednesday, March 1 at 8:15 in
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. The
Concert Band, formerly known as
the Varsity Band, will be directed
by Mr. Jack Stamp, a graduate
student in the ECU School of
Music.
Jack Stamp is a graduate of
Indiana University in Penn-
sylvania, and is presently com-
pleting his Master's Degree in
Percussion Performance. He
studies with ECU faculty percus-
sionist, Mr. Harold Jones. Jack
also teaches private percussion
and a percussion class.
Wednesday evening's pro-
gram includes "Chorale and
Toccata" by Robert Jager who
recently conducted the Eastern
North Carolina All-State High
School Symphonic Band in their
conoert here on campus, and
"Circus Band" by Charles Ives.
"Circus Band a composition
written in 1894, when Ives was
only twenty years old, will be
directed by guest conductor, Mr.
Tim Hodgin. Tim, a graduate of
Appalachian State University, is
presently a graduate assistant in
marching band and trumpet in
the ECU School of Music.
i �n Torwwi hign.H'hts
include Oxx; �- ianu
uaocu ui i u ic
ilLw ,
WHAT TO DO
AFTER COLLEGE
is a question a lot ot young people in nigh school and college ate asking
Then wen it you get the finest college degree where can you use it meaningfully9
Perhaps the answer lies m becoming on Air force officer through Air force ROIC
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tv imf( mumott
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Gafeway fo a greot way of life.
�Music When Soft Voices Die
as it appears in the Phi Mu Alpha,
(men's Music Fraternity) hand-
book. Director Jack Stamp has
studied with Robert Washburn.
The Persichetti selection is a
classic of band literature, begin-
ning with a choral section echoed
ant i phonal I y between the brass
and woodwind sections. The fast
section that follows is a develop-
ment of two contrasting motifs
that combine in a final majestic
statement.
The concert is free and open to
the public.
Pianist will
give recital
ECU News Bureau
Pianist Audrey Maddox,
senior student in the ECU School
of Music, will perform in recital
Thursday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m.
in the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Her program will include two
Domenico Scarlatti Sonatas, two
Choplin Mazurkas, Debussy's
"Reflections in the Water
Bartok's "Three Hungarian Folk-
songs" and Poulenc's "Nocturne
No. 4" and "Valse
A student of Eleanor Toll
of the ECU keyboard faculty, Ms.
Maddox is a candidate for the
Bachelor of Music Education
degree.
Her parents are Mr. and Mrs.
Philip C. Maddox of Route 9,
Sanford.





w
Workshops established
for MSC Crafts Center
28 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pay 9
By JANA NOBLES
Special to FOUNTAINHEAD
Take a break after those
mid-terms and have fun learning
how to silkscreen your own
T-shirts, throw a pot, weave a
pillow or build a bookcase.
Workshops in these crafts and
several more are now being
offered by � 0ts Center at
Mendenha Student Center.
The wot ivyii mo available
to all full-time students, faculty
and staff. Dependents, aged
eighteen or over, of faculty and
staff are also eligible to partici-
apte.
Upon payment of a $10.00
semester Crafts Center member-
ship fee, an individual may
register fa any of the available
workshops without additional
charges, excluding costs of per-
sonal supplies and a small lab fee
should the Crafts Center furnish
some supplies.
All interested perosns must
register at the Crafts Center
during regular operating hours, 3
p.m. until 10 p.m Mon. through
Fri and 10 a.m. til 3 p.m Sat.
The final day to register is
Sat March 18 and class space is
limited. Also, no fee refunds will
be made after the workshop
registration deadline.
The following workshops are
now availaole:
Silkscreen & Block Printing
Learn the techniques of silk-
screening and block printing to
make your own designs on fabric
or paper.
Mondays Mar. 20, Apr. 3, 10, 17,
24 at 6 pm-9 pm.
Crochet
Learn the method of crochet
and make your own handbags,
shawls, vests, pillows, hanging
planters and baskets.
Saturdays April 1, 8, 15, 22 at 12
N-3pm
Beginning Woodworking
Techniques with handtools.
Instruction will include carving,
finishing, staining and deoou-
page.
Monday March 20, April 3, 10 &
17 at 6 pm-9 pm.
Contemporary Basketry
Create beautiful baskets and
other items by using a variety of
techniques and materials.
Thursdays March 23, 30, April 6
& 13 at 6pm-9pm.
Enameling
Basic enameling methods will
be used tocreate beautiful copper
and silver items including ear-
rings, pendants, ashtrays and
wall plaques.
Wednesdays March 22, 29, April
5, 12, 19 at 6pm-9pm.
Handbuilt Pottery
Simple instruction in hand-
building techniques, glazing, and
firing of stoneware.
Tuesdays March 21, 28, April 4,
11, 18 at 630 pm-930 pm.
Floor Loom Weaving
Learn to use a four-harness
floor loom. Techniques of weav-
ing will be demonstrated and
students wilt make a pillow of
their own design.
A. Tues. & Thurs. March 21, 23
& 28 at 6 pm-9 pm.
B. Tues. & Thurs. April 4, 6 & 11
at 6 pm-9 pm.
Beginning Darkroom
Basic instruction in darkroom
techniques
Wednesdays March 22, 29, April
5, 12 & 19 at 6 pm-9 pm.
Basic Pottery
Basic instruction in wheel-
throwing techniques, firing, and
glazing of day.
Thursdays March 23, 30, April 6,
13, 20 at 6 pm-9 pm.
ESSENCE
By Thomas Ray Daily
It arrives
Thick and sticky
Yet dilated nostrils scoop
And a heady brain
Encrusts in thought
To slowly
Move
And scrap a life
Of slots contrary to shape
Breathe a flung peppering of
,birds
Against the sky
And desperate dutch
Now fast in its fleeting
The smell dung
With youth.
Thomas R. Daily is an English
major from Fayetteville.
poetry
WINTER'76
By Carla Carter
Disguised behind my scarf I
trudge,
Across the pavement's broken
face.
It seems that winter holds a
grudge
Against the whole human race.
It bites and nips at ears and nose,
Its icey grasp goes to the bone.
Pale cheeks before, now turn to
rose,
as homeward bound I walk atone.
Carla Carter is a textile design
major from Rocky Mt.
ONE LOVE
ByMiraL. Batchelor
I have tested the honey of your
mouth
caressed your trembling hand,
I have surpassed the ecstacy of
love
through the beat of your heart,
I have experienced ail dreams
possible
with the hope in your eyes,
I have touched your soul as one�
Mira L Batchelor is a corrections
major from Sanford.
RIGGAN
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER GOODS
downtown Greenville
111 West 4th St. "758-0204
Xljnc QarilUjCksL ATJTIC
band
located behind
THE AT;YlC
752-7303
Wed ACC Playoff
3,7 & 9 PM
Thur ACC Playoff 7 a 9 PM
Billiards Tourn. begins 9 pm
Backgammon Tourn 9:30 pm
FRI Open House
Sat ACC FINAL at 4
NOW
thru
Friday March 3, 1978
ANY PERMANENT IN SALON
$19.50
Mitchell's Hair Styling Academy
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
rccnville North Carolina 37834
756-3050 or 756-4042
g�:
CLIFF'S
Seafood House
and Oyster Bar
SPECIAL
MON. - THURS.
FISH99
French Fries, Slaw and Hushpuppies
Va LB. HAMBURGER99
French Fries, Slaw and Rolls
CRAB CAKES1.50
French Fries, Slaw and Hushpuppies
Now Salad Bar
Washington Highway (N.C. 33
Greenville, North Carolina
Phone 752-3172
TRAMPS
DISCOTEQUE AND
BACKGAMMOM CLUB
Hwy. 17 Windy Hill Section
N. Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Tramping Grounds
of the Atlantic
The most exciting disco in town
invites you to spend your Easter
and summer vacations with us.
Find out why everyone on the
East Coast is talking about
Tramps





I
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 February 1978
Freeman, Thompson All-State
By TERRY YEARGAN
Staff Writer
Girls' basketball players Deb-
bie Freeman and Rosie Thompson
have been named to the N.C. All
Division I team.
Rosie Thompson also has been
selected player of the year for
Division I by NCAIAW Sports
Information Director Bob Mont-
gomery.
The two Lady Pirates have led
their team to a successful season
which is yet to end.
Debbie Freeman, the team
captain who has had a good
season is lower statistically this
year than last.
'Debbie led the staie in
scoring and rebounding last
year said Coach Catherine
Baton.
"This year Debbie has had
much more help out on the
court
In scoring Freeman is ranked
fourth in the state with a 15.8 per
game average. In the rebound
department she is averaging 9.4
per game.
Posie Thompson is currently
leading the state in scoring with a
21.3 point average.
Rosie excels in rebounding
with an average of 10 per game.
Thompson is shooting 53
from the floor and a remarkable
75 from the free-throw line.
Tournament time will begin at
2:00 p.m. on Thursday March 3rd
at Minges.
The tournament will deter-
mine the state champions and
who will advance to the regionals.
Though all of the participating
teams will be tough, Coach Bdton
singles out one to be the strongest
competitor. N.C.S.U. iscurrent-
ly ranked 3rd in the nation, said
Bdton.
Regular admission will be
$3.00 at the door. Student admis-
sion is $1.00.
GAME SCHEDULES
Thursday: 2:00 p.m. UNC-G vs.
App 4:00 p.m. ECU vs. Duke
Friday: 6:00 p.m. UNC vs.
(winner of ECU vs. Duke); 800
p.m. NCSU vs. (winner of UNC-G
vs. App.)
Sat. :6O0p.m. -semi final play for
3rd; 8:00 p.m. -final.
DEBBIE FREEMAN
Sports
ROSIE THOMPSON
Pirates go 1 and 1 for week
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
The Pirates of East Carolina
arrived in Macon Ga. the same
way they left Richmond, Va
"red hot
However, their hot streak
soon cooled as the referees and
the Bears of Mercer University
beat ECU 92-75.
Before arriving in Macon
Saturday the 25th, the Pirates
easily beat the Spiders of the
University of Richmond Wednes-
day night 71-53, before a home-
town crowd of some 4,000 fans.
The crowd came out largely in
support of coach Carl Sloan's last
home game.
It was announced prior to
game time that Coach Sloan had
been fired after four years as
head coach of the Spiders.
After Richmond took the
opening bucket, the score see-
sawed until it was 7-6 Richmond.
Then Oliver Mack hit a
jumper, and Herb Gray made
three steals and six points.
Walter Moseley added two more
steals to assist Mack, and all
of a sudden it was the Pirates
19-6.
It wasn't until the score was
25-12 that Richmond called time.
The Pirates ran the score to
38-22 at the half and it looked like
win number 9 was within grasp of
a deserving Pirate team.
The second half showed little
difference from the first as Mack
teamed with alternating guard
Don Whitaker and forward Herb
Gray fa numerous shots and
agressive defensive work.
The only threat the Spiders
could muster was coming back
from a 15 pant deficit and cutting
the lead to nine with 13.06 left to
play.
ECU quickly re-organized
from sloppy turnovers and drove
the score back up to 15.
See BASKETBALL p. 11
PRESSBOX
By Steve Byers
Newspaper to name coach?
East Carolina head basketball coach Larry Gillman has been
verbally assaulted and orally bombasted by every anxious sportswriter
in eastern North Carolina.
Influential alumni, friends of the university and enemies have
voiced dislike of the coach, yet still his optimism is untouched.
Coach Gillman came to East Carolina to try to revive an ailing
program; one that had become a mere intermission between football
and baseball season over the past few years. Semi-respectable records
against semi-respect able Southern Conference teams kept ECU out of
minds and out of sports pages fa a three month period every year.
A damant program lost in the shadow of the omni-potent ACC East
Carolina needed a spark.
That spark came when Larry Gillman announced his outlook and
expectations fa the 1978 basketball season. Admittedly these
professions of faith and instant success were boisterous and perhaps
overstated, yet East Carolina fans looked faward to the winter as
something mae than cold rain and Christmas vacation.
Gillman's outlook was not unwarranted, however. The fast talking
showman showed his strong suit when he inked a pact with junia
college sensation Oliver Mack. Mack was touted as, and has proven
this year, that he was one of the greatest collegiate basketball players
in the country.
Mack averaged per .game mae than the top two scaers on last
year's team and almost as much as the top three put together.
Three top freshman entered the program and the Pirates returned
sophomae standout Herb Gray and junia Greg Canelius.
Suppaters surely had reasai fa optimism.
An opening game loss to Indiana showed promise fa the young
team but a highly emotional loss to UNC-Wilmington unleashed
memaies of past seasons and a barrage of boos. Whether it was the
pre season pressure put upon the team, the overall inexperience of the
squad, a the inadequacy of the first year coach; the Pirates lost seven
of their first eight games and played their wast games at hone.
In those defeats were close losses to Boston College and LaSalle,
both of which weren't seen by most Greenville patrons.
In those first eight games were loses to N.C. State, Maryland,
Indiana, and South Carolina, a schedule Dean Smith would have
sweated through.
However, spats writers failed to mentioi the caliber of Gillman's
schedule.
They also failed to see when the 1-7 Pirates whooped up on the 9-1
William and Mary Indians in Williamsburg. The victay over the team
that beat 1 ranked Carolina was found competing with hosiery ads on
page 6 of one Raleigh paper.
The Bucshave been 8-7 since that time, losing a one-point game, a
two-point game, a five-point game, an overtime game, and a dose
game with Duke. The Priates could have easily gone 12-3.
Gil I man made the mi stake of losing lopsided games at home against
lona, and Old Dominion, bringing mae pressure upai himself and the
team when things were actually progressing.
As player Herb Krusen stated, "A la of people were just waiting to
say, I told you so
In the second half of the season Greg Canelius came alive en the
boards and Herb Gray was a new man inside, but consistancy became a
team problem when sometimes it appeared that trtally different teams
wore the purple and gold on successive nights.
Gillman came underf ire fa his coaching tactics when many times a
little mae team hustle could have made the difference between a
defensive rebound and a second shot by the opposition.
Gillman's problems were na uncommon to basketball coaches
around the country and had his preseason outlook been mae
conservative, the season's outcome would have been mae acceptable
to the masses. However that was not the objective.
"When I came here my objective was to bring big time basketball to
East Carolina said Gillman. "We have made a la of progress in the
areas of scheduling, reauiting and as a team. If we could have scaed
a few mae baskets, woi a few of the close ones (this year) it would
have helped
Rumasof team maal problems and faith in the coaching system
surfaced without the first question being asked of the players
themselves.
"Hissituation is like a freshman his first year said junia center
Greg Canelius. "He learns mae each game. It shard fa a new coach
to bring to a new system
There were a la of games we should have won just mistakes he
continued, "I think he handles me better than any coach I ever had. He
tries to keep the pressure off the players, that's why he takes all the
flak he added, "I don't think anyone on the team wants a new coach,
we think we can win like this
"Some changes will have to be made said freshman reserve Ron
Stumpo, "but heck, Digger Phelpsonly won six games his first year
While the adversity of losing clawed at the team, the press
See GILLMAN p. 12





����iMWBBBBMMi
iHHH
28 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Pirates
$ �
wi Richmond and lose to Mercer
Continued from p. 10
The crowd became quite ob-
noxious with only a few minutes
to play and began throwing paper
airplanes down on the floor,
halting play and generally making
themselves a nusiance.
Even the paper airplanes
weren't enough to stop the
Pirates as they took win number
nine at the expense of the young
Richmond club.
I was very pleased with our
performance tonight said head
coach Gillman.
�We played some good,
heads up ball and whenever you
do that, you usually find yourself
winning some ballgames
Kyle Powers was a funda-
mental part in the Richmond
win
�Herb Krusen was snooting
cold and Kyle went in and did a
terrific job
Don Whitaker also handled
the job of running the offense,
keeping the tempo of the game
the way the Pirates wanted it.
In summary, the Richmond
win was a healthy one for the
Pirates, and the margin of 71-53
was a boost fa the teams moral.
A boost that carried the
Pirates into the Macon County
Coliseum beaming with confi-
dence and poise.
The start of the first half was
proof plenty as ECU dominated
and led at half by seven, only to
loose control of the second half
and throw the game away in the
process 92-75.
The game started the tradi-
tional way, tossing the ball up at
center court with the two centers
jumping trying to control the tap;
however, after that brief moment
of custom nothing else on the
floor seemed like basketball. The
game became more of a oombina-
tion wrestling match-football
game then basketball.
Oliver Mack was being push-
ed and shoved from behind so
constantly that after watching a
few moments, the practice seem-
Ihe fino slaving of guards
mutant?! ui.u Moseley greatly
influenced tne rut half perfor-
niances of Cornelius and Mack.
Mack had 16 points and Cornelius
6, but Greg had several key
rebounds.
The second half was another
story.
"The refing was horrendous
tonight exclaimed Gillman.
We have played a lot of places,
and never has it been this poor
before
Gillman let his anger be
known to referee Don Berry.
I just told him he was
bush-league explained Gill-
man. "I was furious; the game
got out of hand and one of our
guys could have gotten seriously
hurt. My only concern was fa the
safety of my players
The results of Gillman's yell-
ing bush league was that he
was assesed three technical
fouls, two shots a piece.
With ten seconds left in the
game, Jeff Linville made all six
BERNARD HILL REJECTS fPhoto
technical shots and Gillman was
escorted out of the arena.
The score 92-75, assistant
coach Herb Dillon assumed the
head command making his head
coaching debute and kept the
score from progressing any fur-
ther.
Herb Gray had a reoad 18
rebounds and Mack broke two
more school recads.
The first was a 1952-53 reoord
by Brian Stotler)
set by Bobby Hodges fa season
scaing of 662-Mack has 667.
Mack also has assured himself of
at least a 26.6 scaing average,
beating the 26.5 average set the
same year by the same Bobby
Hodges.
The Pirates will dose out the
year with a game against Va.
Tech March 1st in Blacksburg.
Tip off time is 8.00.
HERB GRA Y DOMINA TESPhotoBmStotJer mm mm
Tonite At The
E&ORMff
Wet T-Shirt Contest.
$50 First Prize
Sunday Is Ladies Nite.
End of season
SKI Clearance
20 to 50 off on ai skis
Ski boots 30 off
All ski outfits, bibs, vests,
jackets, and sweaters
50 off
Gadon D. Fulp
Located At
Greenville Country Club
Phone 756-0504, Greenville, N.C.
Open 7 days a week until dark
U ADVENTURE IN EATING
TuesSat. 11:30pm. 1:30 pm.
All subs for $1.00
with purchase of soft drink
not valid on deliveries
762-1828 706 Evans St
open ion-Sat at 1140 Sun 1240
TUESDAY NIGHT
RIBEYE SPECIAL
Why Pay $1.99 For Our Competition's
Tuesday Ribeye Dinner When You Can
Get A Larger Steak, Much Bigger Baked
Potato and Bigger Salad Bar, and Trim-
mings For Only
79 'kink
It!
TRY US!
BONANZA
WEK
CHANGED!
820 Wst GrMnvM Blvd.





I
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 February 1978
Freeman, Thompson All-State
PRESSBOX
By Steve Byers
By TERRY YEARGAN
Staff Writer
Girls basketball players Deb-
bie Freeman and Rosie Thompson
have been named to the N.C. All
Division I team.
Rosie Thompson also has been
selected player of the year fa
Division I by NCAIAW Sports
Information Director Bob Mont-
gomery.
The two Lady Pirates have led
their team to a successful season
which is yet to end.
Debbie Freeman, the team
captain who has had a good
season is lower statistically this
year than last.
"Debbie led the state in
scoring and rebounding last
year said Coach Catherine
Boiton.
"This year Debbie has had
much more help out on the
oourt
In scoring Freeman is ranked
fourth in the state with a 15.8 per
game average. In the rebound
department she is averaging 9.4
per game.
Rosie Thompson is currently
leading the state in scoring with a
21.3 point average.
Rosie excels in rebounding
with an average of 10 per game.
Thompson is shooting 53
from the floor and a remarkable
75 from the free-throw line.
Tournament time will begin at
2:00 p.m. on Thursday March 3rd
at Minges.
The tournament will deter-
mine the state champions and
who will advance to the regionals.
Though all of the participating
teams will be tough, Coach Boiton
singles out one to be the strongest
competitor. N.C.S.U. is current-
ly ranked 3rd in the nation said
Boiton.
Regular admission will be
$3.00 at the door. Student admis-
sion is $1.00.
GAME SCHEDULES
Thursday: 200 p.m. UNC-G vs.
App 4:00 p.m. ECU vs. Duke
Friday: 6:00 p.m. UNC vs.
(winner of ECU vs. Duke), 8:00
p.m. NCSU vs. (winner of UNC-G
vs. App.)
Sat. :6.O0p.m. -semi final play fa
3rd: 800 p.m. -final.
DEBBIE FREEMAN
Sports
ROSIE THOMPSON
Pirates go 1 and 1 for week
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
The Pirates of East Carolina
arrived in Macon Ga. the same
way they left Richmond, Va
" red hot
However, their hot streak
soon cooled as the referees and
the Bears of Mercer University
beat ECU 92-75.
Befae arriving in Macon
Saturday the 26th, the Pirates
easily beat the Spiders of the
University of Richmond Wednes-
day night 71-53, befae a home-
town aowd of sane 4,000 fans.
The crowd came out largely in
suppat of coach Carl Sloan's last
home game.
It was announced pna to
game time that Coach Scan had
been fired after four years as
head coach of the Spiders.
After Richmond took the
opening bucket, the scae see-
sawed until it was 7-8 Richmond.
Then Oliver Mack hit a
jumper, and Herb Gray made
three steals and six points.
Walter Moseley added two mae
steals to assist Mack, and all
of a sudden it was the Pirates
19-6.
It wasn't until the scae was
25-12 that Richmond called time.
The Pirates ran the scae to
38-22 at the half and it looked like
win number 9 was within grasp of
a deserving Pirate team.
The second half showed little
difference from the first as Mack
teamed with alternating guard
Don Whitaker and faward Herb
Gray fa numerous shots and
agressive defensive work.
The only threat the Spiders
could muster was ooming back
from a 15 point defiat and cutting
the lead to nine with 1306 (eft to
play.
ECU quickly re-organized
from sloppy turnovers and drove
the scae back up to 15.
See BASKETBALL p. 11
Newspaper to name coach?
East Carolina head basketball coach Larry Gillman has been
verbally assaulted and aally bombasted by every anxious sportswriter
in eastern Nath Carolina.
Influential alumni, friends of the university and enemies have
voiced dislike of the coach, yet still his optimism is untouched.
Coach Gillman came to East Carolina to try to revive an ailing
program; one that had become a mere intermission between football
and baseball season over the past few years. Semi-respect able recads
against semi-respectable Southern Conference teams kept ECU out of
minds and out of spats pages fa a three month period every year.
A damant program lost in the shadow of the omni-potent ACC East
Carolina needed a spark.
That spark came when Larry Gillman announced his outlook and
expectations fa the 1978 basketball season. Admittedly these
professions of faith and instant success were boisterous and perhaps
overstated, yet East Carolina fans looked faward to the winter as
something mae than odd rain and Christmas vacation.
Gillman'soutlook was na unwarranted, however. The fast talking
showman showed his strong suit when he inked a pact with junia
college sensation Oliver Mack. Mack was touted as, and has proven
this year, that he was one of the greatest collegiate basketball players
in the oountry.
Mack averaged per .game mae than the top two scaers on last
year's team and almost as much as the top three put together.
Three top freshman entered the program and the Pirates returned
sophomae standout Herb Gray and junia Greg Canelius.
Suppaters surely had reason fa optimism.
An opening game loss to Indiana showed promise fa the young
team but a highly emtfional loss to UNC-Wilmington unleashed
memaies of past seasons and a barrage of boos. Whether it was the
pre season pressure put upon the team, the overall inexperience of the
squad, a the inadequacy of the first year coach; the Pirates lost seven
of their first eight games and played their wast games at hone.
In those defeats were close losses to Boston College and LaSalle,
both of which weren't seen by most Greenville patrons.
In those first eight games were loses to N.C. State. Maryland,
Indiana, and South Carolina, a schedule Dean Smith would have
sweated through.
However, spats writers failed to mention the caliber of Gillman's
schedule.
They also failed to see when the 1 -7 Pirates whooped up on the 9-1
William and Mary Indians in Williamsburg. The victay over the team
that beat 1 ranked Carolina was found competing with hosiery ads on
page 6 of one Raleigh paper.
The Bucshave been 8-7 since that time, losing a one-pant game, a
two-point game, a five-point game, an overtime game, and a dose
game with Duke. The Priatesoould have easily gone 12-3.
Gillman made the mistake of losing lopsided games at home against
lona, and Old Dominion, bringing mae pressure upon himself and the
team when things were actuallv progressing.
As player Herb Krusen stated, "A la of people were just waiting to
say, I told you so
In the second half of the season Greg Canelius came alive on the
boards and Herb Gray was a new man inside, but consistancy became a
team problem when sometimes it appeared that totally different teams
wore the purple and gold on successive nights.
Gillman came underfire fa his coaching tactics when many times a
little mae team hustle could have made the difference between a
defensive rebound and a second sha by the opposition.
Gillman's problems were na unoanmon to basketball ooaches
around the oountry and had his preseason outlook been mae
conservative, the season's outcome would have been mae acceptable
to the masses. However that was not the objective.
"When I came here my objective was to bring big time basketball to
East Carolina said Gillman. "We have made a la of progress in the
areas of scheduling, reauiting and as a team. If we could have scaed
a few mae baskets, wen a few of the dose ones (this year) it would
have helped
Rumas of team maal problems and faith in the coaching system
surfaced without the first question being asked of the players
themselves.
"His situation is like a freshman his first year said junia center
Greg Canelius. "He learns mae each game. It'shard fa a new coach
to bring to a new system
There were a la of games we should have wonjust mistakes he
oontinued I think he handles me better than any coach I ever had. He
tries to keep the pressure off the players, that's why he takes all the
flak headded, "I don't think anyone on the team wants a new coach,
we think we can win like this
"Some changes will have to be made said freshman reserve Ron
Stumpo, "but heck, Digger Phelpsonly won six games his first year
While the adversity of losing dawed at the team, the prers
See GILLMAN p. 12)






'�����'���IHBHMB
NNNflMHNNaNNNai
28 February 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Pirates down Richmond and lose to Mercer
Continued from p. 10
The crowd became quite ob-
noxious with only a few minutes
to play and began throwing paper
airplanes down on the floor,
halting play and generally making
themselves a nuaance.
Even the paper airplanes
weren't enough to stop the
Pirates as they took win number
nine at the expense of the young
Richmond club.
"I was very pleased with our
performance tonight said head
coach Gillman.
We played some good,
heads up ball and whenever you
do that, you usually find yourself
winning some ballgames
"Kyle Powers was a funda-
mental part in the Richmond
win
"Herb Krusen was shootinq
cold and Kyle went in and did a
terrific job
Don Whitaker also handled
the job of running the offense,
keeping the tempo of the game
the way the Pirates wanted it.
In summary, the Richmond
win was a healthy one for the
Pirates, and the margin of 71-53
was a boost for the teams moral.
A boost that carried the
Pirates into the Macon County
Coliseum beaming with oonfi-
denoe and poise.
The start of the first half was
proof plenty as ECU dominated
and led at half by seven, only to
loose oontrol of the second half
and throw the game away in the
process 92-75.
The game started the tradi-
tional way, tossing the ball up at
center court with the two centers
jumping trying to oontrol the tap;
however, after that brief moment
of custom nothing else on the
floor seemed like basketball. The
game became more of a combina-
tion wrestling match-football
game then basketball.
Oliver Maok was being push-
ed and shoved from behind so
constantly that after watching a
few moments, the practice seem-
The fmo -naming of guards
miitaK&i ad Moseley greatly
influenced tne nca half perfor-
mances of Cornelius and Mack.
Mack had 16 points and Cornelius
6. but Greg had several key
rebounds.
The second half was another
story.
"The refmg was horrendous
tonight exclaimed Gillman.
We have played a lot of places,
and never has it been this poor
before
Gillman let his anger be
known to referee Don Berry.
"I just told him he was
bush-league explained Gill-
man. "I was furious; the game
got out of hand and one of our
guys oould have gotten seriously
hurt. My only concern was fa the
safety of my players
The results of Gillman's yell-
ing "bush league was that he
was assesed three technical
fouls, two shots a piece.
With ten seconds left in the
game, Jeff Linville made all six
BERNARD HILL REJECTSPhoto
technical shots and Gillman was
escorted out of the arena.
The � score 92-75, assistant
coach Herb Dillon assumed the
head command making his head
coaching debute and kept the
score from progressing any fur-
ther.
Herb Gray had a record 18
rebounds and Mack broke two
more school records.
The first was a 1952-53 record
by Brian Stotler
set by Bobby Hodges for season
scoring of 662-Mack has 667.
M ack also has assured himself of
at least a 26.6 scoring average,
beating the 26.5 average set the
same year by the same Bobby
Hodges.
The Pirates will dose out the
year with a game against Va.
Tech March 1st in Blaoksburg.
Tip off time is 8:00.
IERB GRA Y DOMINA TEotBta�mS(Jwmtmmm
Tonite At The
Wet T-Shirt Contest.
$50 First Prize
Sunday Is Ladies Nite.
AN ADVENTURE IN EATING
TuesSat. II :30pm. 1:30 pm.
All subs for $1.00
with purchase of soft drink
not valid on deliveries
T62-1S2S 706 Evans St f�$?r
opan Non-Sat at 11:00 Sun 12:00
End of season
SKI Clearance
20 to 50 off on aN skis
Ski boots 30 off
AN ski outfits, bibs, vsst
jacksts, and swostor
50 off
Gordon D. Pulp
Lotted At
Greenville Country Club
Phone 7960S04, Gremvll, u
Open 7 deye a week urr
TUESDAY NIGHT
RIBEYE SPECIAL
Why Pay $1.99 For Our Competition's
Tuesday Ribeye Dinr Sen You Can
Get A Larger Steak ger Baked
Potflfflfl and Trim-
Ifllr





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 28 February 1978
ECU'S Roger Carr: muscle bound finesse
a 6'5" freshman that has a
vertical leap of about 48"? In
other words he could lump from a
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
What would you do if you had
Gillman, cont. from p. 10
concentrated on the ooach himself, hoping to stir up a scandal where
none existed.
"You always hear about what coach said before the season
started said Herb Krusen, "Why don't they talk about Mack scoring
47 points. Sure, he came in and said we would win, but we could easily
have won 13 or 14. I think it's unfair to judge after only one year
As it turned out most publicity was oral ejaculations by writers no
closer to the players or the program than an AM radio on game night.
Such unprofessionalism is something that no ooach should have to
deal with.
Surely writers who can write about the four oorners without
laughing can stick to the facts concerning a coaches' career and a
university's basketball team. Come on boys we're not in high school
journalism class.
"I feel a sincere obligation to the university, the team, and the
players I've recruited commented Gillman. "The question I'd like
answered is do they feel an obligation to me
"I still believe we can be a top 20 team in 3 years. Next year we play
South Carolina and Detroit in Minges. We visit Notre Dame, N.C.
State, Duke, Maryland, and Tennessee. Recruiting has gone well. It's
promising
Oliver Macn had some more definite plans I think definitly we can
win with coach Gillman The coach can do only so much though.
In the bee nning he would say one thing and the players would say
ordosomethr gelse. You've got to let the ooach, coach. We have some
good players but he thought everyone would be super. He brought a
different style of play here and not everyone could play it. But with
what we have now and recruiting next year, we will have the type
players he's used to working with and we will win
Overall the piayers had confidence in the coach and showed it
winning 5of tne last 6 games. Whether the school will stay behind him
remains to be seen.
"I appreciate the fans and the way they have treated me said
Gillman. "I have had some flattering and lucrative offers, but I feel an
obligation here
If Gillman ioes stay at East Carolina the possibilities are limitless,
if he leaves the deterioration of the credibility of this atheletic
department could make it very hard to find a ooach with similar high
ambitions.
If East Carolina is to succeed in all areas of atheletic excellence,
professional m will have to be exercised throughout the system.
Coach Gillman might have been able to do better this year, the
conditions oould have been better, but every program has to walk
before it can run. Every program deserves a chance to mature.
East Carolina should also mature and judge its programs according
to its own limitations, and not the expectations of some half-wit with a
typewrit er. in ajown 85 miles away.
stationary postion and grab a
quarter off the top of the
backboard?
And what would you do if that
same freshman was so muscle
bound he looks like he oould play
football fa any major college
team and probably would if he
didn't love the game of basketball
so much?
Well that is exactly the
problem facing head coach Gill-
man about freshman Roger Carr.
"I've had some excellent
results from Roger said Gill-
man.
"I've switched him from his
usual position on the inside, to a
more outside position because of
the type ballplayer he is. Roger is
a tremendous athlete, incredibly
strong, and has proven himself in
many situations
Boasting a 6'5" frame, Roger
possesses a more than substantial
amount of muscle, and an equal
amount of charisma.
He is a gentleman on and off
the oourt, although he is not
afraid of rebound contact while on
the oourt.
"Roger's mam asset is his
fine mental attitude toward the
game, he possesses an excellent
concept for basketball.
His strength; well, he's intim-
idating just to look at, much less
play against commented Pirate
mentor Gillman.
Watching Roger play, one can
denote shades of the same kind of
play and style of a young Rod
Griffin; slow starter, good re-
bounder, and numerous moves to
the hoop.
Hailing from the small town of
Garland, North Carolina, Roger
was a two time Scholastic Coach
All-American, received best
athlete in Garland,and MVP m
the Carolina's IA divisions of
schools.
Look fa Roger to be a
building block in the developmen-
tal stages of ECU basketball.
PIRATE HEAD COACH Larry Gillman takes his team to Virginia
Tech Wednesday night for the final game of the season.
Photo by Brian Stotler
Classifieds
for sale
FOR SALE Speakers made by
OHM, Model D $125.00 fa
the pair. After 5 p.m. 752-7817.
FOR SALE Two used wood
burning Moves. Call 752-6702.
FOR SALE: Dam-sized refngera-
ta (frost free). Excellent oond.
Approx. 4.5 cubic ft. Call 752-
1147 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE 22 rifle semi-auto 7
shot dip, so pe $45.00. Assated
8 track tapes and a few albums $1
each fa tapes$2 each fa albums.
AM radio fa car in good oond.
$10.00 Call 752-0352 Paul.
FOR SAL jnavox AM-FM
8-track oompad stereo. Excellent
oond. 752
FOR S Sankyo stereo
cassette di i dolby system,
dual reca -el, filter, Cr02
switch, p " counter, con-
tra, oily cassettes ever
reoaded lem Lists fa
200.00 wi or 125.00. Call
Paul 752-0352.
MUST SELL: Bose 501 speakers
recently purchased. Call John
752-7692.
torrent �
FOR RENT: Apt. on 127 Avery St.
Water and air oondition induded
in rent. Call 752-7572.
ROOMfvATE NEEDED: Female
needed by March 1 to share apt.
dose to campus. Rent 58.75
month plus Vi utilities. Call
758-7786.
NEEDED: New ECU faculty
member and family seek furnish-
ed apt. while house-hunting fa
three. Fran March 1. Write care
of this newspaper.
FOR RENT: 2 bdrm. townhouse
apt 1 v2 baths, all appliances,
wall-to-wall carpet, swimming
pa laundry facilities. 758-2089.
nthiy. Available March i.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Grad
student needs responsible room-
mate at Village Green. Right by
SGA bus stop 3 min. ride to
Memaial Gym. Call 758-3830.
FOR RENT:1 bdrm. apt 201 N.
Woodlawn 11. Heat and water
paid. Call afternoons. 758-0478.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: A third
person needed to share 2 bdrm
apt. at Langston Park Apts.
$66 75 plus 13 utilities. Call David
at 758-8536.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
immediately fa 2 bdrm. apt. 3
blocks from campus. Rent is $55
plus V2 phone and Vi utility. Near
Overtons. Call Meg at 758-5865.
lost
2
LOST: an ECU composition book
last seen in Biology Bldq roan
103 on Mon Feb. 2( It had
Psychology 3225 notes in it. If you
found it please, please call
752-8050.
LOST: Handmade silver ring with
turquoise inlays lost between
Austin and Nursing Bldgs. on
Wed Feb. 22. Much sentimental
value. Reward. Contad Dr.
Sullivan in the English Dept. a at
756-3756.
personal�
FOUND: Anything you lost that
has metal in it. I will search with
professional detedion equipment
fa a small fee to be paid only if I
find what you have lost. Call
Chris at 758-1175.
REWARD: Fa lost brown 2 fold
wallet. Last seen on W. Long-
meadow Rd. Please call 758-5130
fa further info. Necessary ID
i nv loved.
REWARD :For lost navy ski jacket
with key ring and lighter in
pockets. If ofund call 752-8380.
HELP WANTED: Chanelos Pizza
needs delivery help. Must have
own car. Help needed fa days
and nights. Apply at Chanelos a
call 758-7400.
WANTED: Open fishing boat 14
ft. a laiger. Call 752-4434.
EARN: $250-$500 stufir�g 1000
envelopes: Homewak a spare-
time. Details $1, self-addressed,
stamped envelop. J. Lee 904
Sawyer Hill, 2910 Sdoto a
Cindnnati, OH 45219.
NEEDED: Ride to Richmond Va,
Fri March 3 after 3 p.m. Will
help with gas. Call Barbara at
758-6445.
RIDE NEEDED: to Orlando Fla.
fa spring break a riders wanting
to carpool to Orlando call 758-
6367.
NEED RIDE: to Fat Lauderdale
fa break. CaM 758-0495 and
752-875
RIDE NEEDED: to Nag Head,
Fri, March 3. Will help with gas.
Cindy 752 w





Title
Fountainhead, February 28, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 28, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.488
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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