Fountainhead, January 17, 1978






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
New law, p. 5
Parking lot, p. 6
Bogie, p. 9
William & Mary, p. 13
Vol. No. 53 No. 28
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
17 January 1978
Six members resign seats in SGA legislature
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
and
By ROBERT M. SWAIM
Ad Manager
Sx members of the SGA
legislature resigned their seats at
the Mon. night SGA meeting.
The following day legislators
resigned: Kathy Dixon, Robert
M. Swaim, and Doug White;
dam legislatas were: David
Mayo, Belk, Wayne Stephenson,
Belk, Marc Adler, Umstead.
Robert Swaim and Doug
White resigned due to increased
wakloads related to their jobs
with FOUNTAINHEAD.
In his resignation speech to
the legislature, Adler asked the
legislature" not to ramrod legis-
lation fa political gain
According to Adler, members
of the legislature should have a
clearer understanding of parl-
imentary procedure and Robert's
Rules of Order.
Adler said that he had not
been a part of any political
coalition in the legislature
Ed Bean, SGA secretary of
academic affairs, said during
questions and privileges that the
Faculty Senate did not conceive
the resolution endasing SGA
funded retreats, that it passed
pria to Christmas.
Bean said that it was initiated
by members of the legislature fa
their own personal benefit.
"The resolution was in effect
a political move by members of
the SGA legislature who used the
Faculty Senate fa their own
selfish purposes said Bean.
Craig Hales also spoke during
questions and privileges and told
the legislature that he had been
infamed by the ECU Business
Office that the SGA would have
five to six thousand dollars more
than he had earlier anticipated.
In new business, Jerry Cox,
SGA secretary of external affairs,
introduced a resolution oom-
mending Rev. Hadden, an ECU
campus minister, and Dr. Fuller,
a member of the faculty, fa their
wak on the Greenville City
Council.
Cox said that Fuller and
Hadden had represented well the
interests of the ECU student
body.
The resolution passed by
acclamation.
Legislator Chubby Abshire
requested that SGA Vice-
president Reed Warren appear
befae the legislature and give a
repat on the operations of ECU
publications, specifically the
EBONY HERALD.
THESE ECU students brave the cold as they wearily trudge to dass.
Photo by Brian Stotler
Sign language to be taught
By RICHY SMITH
Staff Writer
The Program fa Hearing
Impaired Students is offering sign
language classes spring semester
beginning Jan. 17 at ECU.
The program is open to
faculty, staff, students, and
Greenville citizens as a non-
credit, non-tuitioi course, accad-
ing to Ruth Aleskovsky, instructa
fa the program.
Enrollment fa the classes is
limited to 20 persons.
"I am pleased with the
response we have had stated
Aleskovsky.
Last semester two beginning
classes and one intermediate
class was taught by Aleskovsky
and Mike Ernest, director fa the
program.
This semester the program
offers two beginning and two
intermediate classes.
"The only way to learn it is to
use it added Aleskovsky as she
referred to sign language.
She has been waking with
sign language fa about six years
and uses definite motions in ha
approach to teaching the lang-
uage.
"Natural gesture supports
and gives the tone to sianina. It
gives the feeling in the lang-
uage continued Aleskovsky.
"It's been exciting teaching
on this campus. We have strong
suppat fran the departments
here
Sign language is a flexible and
definite language. The course
introduces the art fams such as
singing and reading poetry in the
language. It inoapaates con-
cepts and ideas.
In Sign Language I (beginning
course) an introduction to psyoo-
social problems of deafness is
taught. Also basic vocabulary, the
Concert Survey
Although the contract has not been signed, the Popular
Entertainment Committee of the Student Union is reasonably certain
that STYX will appear Wed Mar. 1, at 8 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
Tickets will be $4 fa students and $6 fa the public
With this in mind, would you support another concert, DAVE
MASON and BOB WELCH, if it were scheduled only two weeks later?
YES
NO
Keep in mind that tickets would probably oost $4 fa students and
$6 fa the public in this concert. In addition, note that Spring Break
would fall between these ooncerts.
Ballot boxes will be located in the Croatan, the Old CU, and in
Mendenhall Student Center. Results of this survey will appear in next
Tuesday's FOUNTAINHEAD.
alphabet, and finger spelling is
taught.
Sign Language II is a contin-
uance of the nature and needs of
deafness, vocabulary and a con-
centration in idioms and revase
skills are taught.
Sign language benefits those
in many fields fa it helps to
undastand how people com-
municate' commented
Aleskovsky.
"It is a logical and easy
language to learn
The offioe of the program fa
hearing impaired students is
located in Brewster. Erras Luke,
Ruth Aleskovsky and Mike Ernest
are available to assist anyone with
the program.
SCHEDULE
Registration will take place at
the first dass and on Thursday.
Anyone wishing to take a course
may oome to the class at which
time they are interested.
Tues Thurs. - 8 a.m 9 am.
BEGINNING SIGN LANGUAGE
Austin 205
Tues Thurs. -12 noon -1 p.m.
BEGINNING SIGN LANGUAGE
Brewsta B-204.
Tues Thurs. - 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
INTERMEDIATE SIGN LANG
UAGE 205 Joyner Library
Tues. evening - 630 -830
INTERMEDIATE SIGN LANG
UAGE 205 Joyna Library.
Investigative journalist
Jack Anderson
will speak tonight
at 8 p.m. in MSC
Admission is by ID &
activity card. Public $3
Student Union
9- �" �
mg
presidential applications
By ROBERT M. SWAIM
Advertising Manager
Student Union President
Dennis Ramsey announced yes-
terday that he is now accepting
applications fa his successa.
Ramsey said that applications
may be picked up in room 234
Mendenhall and must be return-
ed by 5 p.m. on Jan. 27.
Accading to Ramsey, appli-
cants will be required to write a
letter to the Student Union Board
of Directas outlining their qual-
ifications fa the position and
their plans fa the Student Union
fa next year.
SELECTION
The Student Union Board of
Directas will select the new
president Feb. 2.
"The new president will take
offioe on May 1 said Ramsey.
"During the time between the
selection and May 1, the
president-elect will undergo a
period of training and will work
with the outgoing president
Aooading to Ramsey, the
president is the principle execu-
tive officer of the Student Union
and is charged with executing the
policies of the aganization.
Ramsey said that one of the
most important functions of the
president is preparing the annual
Student Union budget.
The president selects the
chairpersons of the various
Student Union committees and
recommends changes in Student
Union policy to the board of
directas, accading to Ramsey.
3amsey said that all appli-
cants must be full time students
and have an overall grade aver-
age of 2.0.





:
Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 January 1978
cso
The Center for Student Oppor-
tunities isoffering cost-free tutor-
ial help to majors in medicine,
premediane, nursing and allied
health upon request. CSO is also
offering the chance fa certain
majas in medicine, premedicine,
nursing, allied health, biology,
chemistry and physics to earn an
inoome at standard campus waqe
per hour waking astutastotheir
peers. Students interested in
either aspect of this program
should contact the Center fa
Student Oppatunities, 206 Rags-
dale Hall in persoi immediately.
The deadline is Fri Feb. 10.
Ski club
There will be a ski club
meeting 4 p.m.jWed Jan 18 in
the bottom of Memaial Gym
concerning a trip to the mount-
ains Jan. 27-28.
Art show
Students are reminded that
tomarow, Wed Jan 18, is the
last day to register fa the REBEL
Art Show. Students may sign up
at the Rebel office, the Art office
bulletin board, a the Mendenhall
infamatiai desk. Unregistered
artwak cannot be hung in the
show. Fa details, call the REBEL
office at 757-6502.
Discussion
Each Thursday evening at 7
p.m. the Methodist Student
Center at 501 E. 5th St. is holding
discussions on topics of current
interest. The subject fa Jan. 19
will be "Divisionsand Unity" and
will focus on the many diverse
kinds of Christian denominations
and sects - what they have in
common and why they are
different.
Counseling
Having a conflict with your
boyfriendgirl friend a spouse
The Department of Sociology's
Marriage Counseling Program
specializes in resolving such
concerns. Call 757-6883 and ask
fa Dr. Knox. He will arrange a
confidential interview with a
graduate intern. It's the best way
to start the New Year with your
partner.
NTE
Concert
The Popular Entertainment
Committee of the Student Union
will present Arlo Guthrie in
ooncert Mon Feb. 13. The
concert will begin at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Tickets will
be $3.00 fa students and $5.00
fa the public. Seating is limited,
so get your tickets now befae
they're all gone.
The Natioial Teachers Exam-
jpations (NTE) will be given at
ECU on Feb. 18.
Bulletins describing registra-
tion procedures and containing
registration fams may be obtain-
ed from John Childers, Directa
ofTesting 105Speight Bldg. ECU,
a directly fran the Natioial
Teachers Examinations, Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 911,
Princeton, NJ 08540. The dead-
line fa regular registratioi is
January 26, 1978. On-the-sprt
registratioi is no permitted.
Bahamas
NOhing to do with all that
Christmas money you received?
Why no invest in a sure bet fa a
great time during Spring Break.
The Bahamas auise leaves Mar.
5 oi two Trail ways buses to
Miami where you will board the
fabulous Leonardo De Vinci. The
auise lasts three days and four
nights. Pots of call are Nassau
and Freepot; all meals are
included oi board.
Trip participants will leave
Miami on Mar. 10 fa the return
trip to Greenville. You can enjoy
this luxurious cruise, gourmet
cuisine, and bask in the warm
Bahamain sun fa oily $325.
Spaisaed by the Student Uniai
Travel Conmittee.
The deadline fa this trp-is Jan.
31.
Florida
Spend your Spring,Break in
Floida. The Student Union
Travel Committee has a Floida
Trip fo 8 days, March 3-11. $125
includes transpatatioi and ac-
comodations. Three days in
Daytona Beach, four days in the
Orlando area. Visit Disney Wold,
Sea Wold, and Tampa's Busch
Gardens. Registration is being
taken now at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student
Center. The deadline is Jan. 31.
Model UN
Model United Nations meet-
ing Thurs Jan. 19, at 3 p.m. in
the Political Saenoe Coffee
Lounge. All members must
attend. Country assignments will
be made at this meeting. All new
members a interested parties are
welrjome to attend.
Biology
Cheeks
The following
FOUNTAINHEAD staffers have
checks in the edita's box in the
office: Chris Misenheimer, Ken
Tyndall, Jeannie Williams, Steve
Wilson, Marena Wright, Marc
Adler, David Chriamon, Michael
Tayla.
There will be a meeting this
Wed Jan 18 at 7:30 p.m. in the
Biology Dept. Reading room. Dr.
Bland will talk about some
aspects of Crustacean aquacul-
ture. Pledges need to attend.
Sign language
A series of free sign language
classes will be offered during the
spring semester by the ECU
Program fo Hearing-Impaired
Students.
Classes are open to all inter-
ested persons.
Beginning sign langauge clas-
ses will be scheduled on Tues.
and Thurs. in two sections; one
from 8 to 9 p.m. in 205 Austin
Bldg. and the other noon to 1
p.m. in Brewster Bldg 0-204.
Intermediate sign language
classes are scheduled fa Tues
and Thurs 4-5 p.m. in 205
Joyner Library, and fa Tues.
evenings, 630-8:30 p.m. in 205
Joyner Library.
Classes will negin Tues Jan
17, with registration to take place
at the first class in each section.
Enrollment will be limited to 20
persons per section.
Hall advisor
Any student who wishes to
apply fo wok as Hall Adviso,
Assistant Residence Adviso a
Residence Adviso in either a
women's a axed residence hall
should do so now. Further
infamatiai and applications are
available from the Residence Hall
Administratos and Associate
Dean of Student Affairs, 214
Whichard Building.
Qualifications fa these posi-
tions are full-time enrollment, a
minimum of a 2.5 quality point
average and classification of at
least a sophomae at the time of
employment.
There will be training sessions
January and February fa all
present and prospective staff
members. Final interviews and
selections fo the positions will be
completed in early March.
Gospel
Poetry
The ECU Poetry Foum will
meet at 8 p.m. Tues Jan 17 in
rm. 248 Mendenhall. Anyone
interested in Poetry is invited to
attend.
Bynamics
A time of fun, fellowship and
Bible study sponsoed by Campus
Crusade fo Christ meeting oi
Thurs. at 7 p.m. in Brewster
B-102. This includes Dynamics of
the Christian life, Dynamics of
Disdpleship, Dynamics of Minis-
try and Dynamics on the life of
Christ fa skeptics as well as
those interested in growing in
their relationship with Christ.
This semester the Full Gospe.
Student Fellowship will begin
meetings on Thursday nights at
7:30 p.m 221 Mendenhall. If
you're a Christian who has been
seeking a closer walk wjth Jesus,
and power and boldness to be a
witness - oome check it out.
Fellowship
Inter-Varsity ,Christian
Fellowship will meet this Sunday
night at 8 p.m. at the Afro-
American Cultural Center. There
will also be a prayer meeting this
Thursday afternoon at the
Methodist Student Center at 4
p.m.
Crafts center
Spring Semester member-
ships are now available fa the
Mendenhall Student Center
Crafts Center. This hobby area is
fa use by all full-time ECU
students, faculty and staff. PhOo-
graphy, ceramics, jewelry, and
textiles are some of the aaft
areas in which members may
wak. Located oi the ground floo
of Mendenhall Student Center,
the Crafts Center's operating
hours are from 3 p.m. til 10 p.m
Mon. through Fri and 10 a.m. til
3 p.m Sat. Watch fo wokshops
to be offered soon. Fo moe
infamatiai call 757-6611. Ext.
260.
Music
Its back and its better! ECU
Coffeehouse is jumping with new
talent and new Wood. Thurs. and
Fri Jan 19 and 20, ECU
Coffeehouse will present Frank
and Mike, two professional enter-
tainers who will entertain you
with songs by: Seals and Croft,
Bob Dylan, James Taylo, oig-
inals and sane Jazz.
Only .50 will get you in and let
you fill up on goodies.
Rugby
There will be a mpating of
both men and women's Rugby
clubs on Wed Jan. 18 in rooms
104-105 in Memaial Gym. There
will be discussions held on the
spring seasoi. Plans made fa the
spring break trip. If you are
interested in either of the dubs
but can't make the meeting call
Bob Davis at 758-5279.
Comics
Science
The Science Education Club
will hold its January meeting
tomarow Jan. 18 at 4 p.m. in
Flanagan 303. Dr. Carolyn
Hampton of the Dept. of Scier-e
Education will show a series of
outstanding slides taken during
her summer trip to the western
U.S. Anyone can attend and new
members are welcomed.
The ECU Comic Book CI�:L
will meet Tues Jan 17 in 247
Mendenhall from 7 to 9 p.m. All
interested persons are invited to
attend.
Study skills
A non-credit, Study Skills
Class will be conducted by Dr.
Geoge Weigand beginning Jan.
16. There will be two groups. One
will meet on Mon. and Wed. at 1
p.m. and the other group will
meet on Tues. and Thurs. at 1
p.m. in rm. 305 Wright Annex.
The class is available to all
students. Attendance is voluntary
- no famal registratioi is requir-
ed.
Testing
The American College Testing
Assessment, the Pharmacy
College Admission and the
National Teachers Examinations
will be administered at ECU
during February.
Scheduled fo Feb. 18 is the
Natioial Teachers Examinations,
and the Oher two standardized
tests will be given Feb. 11.
Persons who wish to register
to take the tests may receive
further infamatiai and applica-
tion materials fran the ECU
Testing Center, 105 Speight Bldg.
Business
There will be a Phi Beta
Lambda meeting Wed Jan. 18 at
4 p.m. in Rawl 130. Anyoie
interested in joning must attend
this meeting. We encourage any
business students to join.
Management
The Society fo Advancement
of Management is sponsoing a
panel discussion en Tues Jan 17
at 4:30 in Rawl 130. The main
emphasis of the program will be
Personnel Reauiters and how to
deal with them effectively. Re-
presentatives from Burrough-
WellooneCop Wachovia Bank,
and the ECU Placement Office
will be the main speakers.
Following the program will be a
question-answer period. All inter-
ested persons are urged to attend
and members are requested to
arrive at 4 fo a shot business
meeting.
Table tennis
If you enjoy playing table
tennis, stop by the Mendenhall
Student Center Table Tennis
Rooms each Tues. evening at 8
p.m. when Table Tennis Club
meets. You will find players of all
levels of ability participating.
Various activities, including lad-
der tournaments, are often sche-
duled. All ECU students, faculty
and staff are welcome.
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17
January FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
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I
Wamtm
Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 January 1978
To fund or not?
Congress agreed last month to use federal
funds to pay for abortions for the poor only if the life
or the physical health of the mother is endangered, or
in case of rape. However, the issue of funding
abortions for the poor whose lives or physical health
are not endangered, or who were not raped, will once
again face the N.C. Legislature when it reconvenes
this spring.
When taxpayers pay their federal, state, and
property taxes, they hope that their money is being
used is some way to benefit themselves - education,
paving roads and creating highways, to name a few.
However, should the taxpayers' money be used in
order to benefit a select few, namely those who
cannot afford the price of an abortion? Consider the
fact that many people do not believe in abortions.
Should these taxpayers be forced to pay for
something that they do not believe in ?Of course not.
If such a program is started, many of those who
would benefit from it may tend to consider abortion a
form of contraception, which it is not. They may
never even consider using contraceptives if they
know the state government will pay for a terminated
pregnancy.
The program would grow, and the number of
women benefiting from state-paid abortions would
increase tremendously, which would eventually force
the taxpayer to pay more taxes to fund more
abortions.
Such an atrocity should not be allowed to happen
in this state. If money should be spent at all, it stiould
be spent teaching the poor about conception and
contraception.
If people would take responsible stands by using
some type of contraception, there would be no need
to have to fund abortions for anyone, and no one's
life would be at stake if she did not havean abortion.
National, state and local polls have shown that a
majority of the people do not favor funding abortions,
(N&O, Jan. 12). The people's voice has been heard,
but is the government listening? In order for a
democracy to remain a democracy - "government of
the people, for the people, by the people" - not only
should the government listen, it should take action in
accordance with the view of the majority of the
people.
These people can best be helped by understand-
ing and using contraceptives. Perhaps fewer
abortions would be necessary and the taxpayers
would not be forced to pay for something in which
many of them do not believe.
I PAY MY TAXES! SINCE X CAN'T GET WELFARE
X AAAO SURE X WAS EUGlBLE FOR THIS
QOVE�NMgNT pgAi
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor aver fifty years.
Senior EditorCindy Broome
Managing EditorLeigh Coakley
Advertising ManagerRobert M. 9waim
News EditorsDoug White
Joe Yaeger
Trends EditorDavid W. Trevino
Sports EditorChris Holloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and is distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
-vj twice weekly during the school year.
(ailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annuatiy.
Forum
Student describes newspaper work
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The purpose of this tetter is to
hopefully give those who read it a
clearer understanding, of
FOUNTAINHEAD and the people
who work here.
Many students were alienated
during fall by the numerous
anti-athletic editorials that ap-
peared in the paper. I, too,
disagree with them. Those editor-
ials were written by the former
senior editor, Kim Devins, as
were all other editorials. I want to
emphasize the fact that those
editorials reflected only the per-
sonal opinion of Ms. Devins and
not that of the newspaper staff. I
hope that the students and the
athletic dept. will not hold a
grudge against the newspaper or
the staff because of the editorials
that appeared in last semester's
papers.
We now have a new senior
editor, two new news editors, and
two new assistant editors. I have
complete faith and trust in these
people and their ability. With the
new leadership will come many
beneficial changes that should
please our readers.
Our new senior editor is
slowly but surely going to put to
rest any question of the credibility
of our paper. In the past many of
the newspaper's political enemies
have attempted to cast doubt on
the credibility of
FOUNTAINHEAD. This is prob-
ably because the newspaper
exposed many two-bit politicians
f�my .ym- wtaams
and newspapers have always
and will forevermore be natural
enemies, like cats and dogs.
The editor, news desk staff,
and myself have been well trained
by Mr. Ira Baker and Mr. Larry
O'Keefe in the ECU journalism
program. We have been taught
the best in reporting techniques,
ethics, style and production pro-
cedures. Our journalism teachers
are veteran journalists who have
taught us a great deal about the
world of journalism and news-
paper work, which is quite a bit.
We, the staff, have always
tried to produce and present the
best newspaper that we can with
what we have to work with. Even
though we are under budgeted,
under staffed, and have only
delapidated and usually broken
down equipment to work with, we
all oontinuetodothebest we can.
Writing, editing, and laying
out a newspaper is a strenuous
task, quite a burden on the
students who work here. We work
under a great deal of pressure
with little thanks. Many of us put
in anywhere from at least 20 to
almost 45 hours a week, depend-
ing on which dept. a staffer works
in, and still carry a full load of
classes. There have been many
days, every Mon. and Wed. as a
matter cf fact, when we come in
and work all day, sometimes
having to cut class, and all night
until 4 a.m. or later the next
morning to get the paper out. If
anyone doubts this, then I invite
them to come up and spend the
night with us and see it firsthand.
The reason for telling all of
this is that we hope in the future
everyone will think twice before
offering unnecessary and often
redundant criticism of the news-
paper. Most of our critics have
never worked for a newspaper
and know nothing about journal-
istic writing or the accepted ethics
of the journalism profession.
Just remember that we are
human, we have our limitations
and problems just like everybody
else. We ain't perfect, but we try
hard.
Robert M. Swaim
Students
FOUNTAINHEAD will begin
a weekly information column
called FEEDBACK to be publish-
ed in each Thursday edition
beginning Jan. 26. The column is
designed to help students by
providing answers to submitted
questions concerning academ-
ics, legal problems, or any
information which a student may
find pertinent in his college
career. The column will contain at
least three questions. Only ques-
tions which would benefit a
majority of the students will be
published. Questions should be
signed, although only initials will
be printed. Please include ad-
dress and ID number. Place
questions in the FEEDBACK box
in FOUNTAINHEAD.





17 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Pay 5
New insurance law affects
young male drivers
AFTER A RIGOROUS study session at the library, this ECU
student hurries home to warmth. Photo by Brian Stotler
Co-op
ByCANDI LaPRADE
Staff Writer
About 40 students recently
obtained jobs through the De-
partment of Cooperative Educa-
tion at ECU, a voluntary program
which will offer full-time stu-
dents the opportunity to alternate
periods of academic study with
periods of full-time off-campus
employment.
The Department of Coopera-
tive Education at ECU is three
years old.
The program seeks to place
students in jobs related to their
career goals or jobs which will
help them explore various career
possibilities, according to Dr.
Betsy Harper, Coordinator of
Cooperative Education.
"It is a program which tries to
bridge the gap between class-
rooms and the working world
Dr. Harper noted.
Three students have been
� �
selected for General Service
Administration jobs in
Washington, D.C.
Some jobs allow a student to
work part of the day and go to
school part of the day.
Selection fa Cooperative Ed-
ucation jobs is based on a
student's high school record and
academic progress in oollege.
Once selected for a job, a student
must maintain an acceptable
grade point average.
Department participating in
Cooperative Education at ECU
include art, biology, business
education, chemistry, computer
and information science, english,
journalism, geography, history,
home economics, industrial tech-
nology, music education, parks
and recreation, political science,
psychology, sociology, and phil-
osophy.
Interested students should
contact Ms. Karen Frye, of Dr.
Betsy Harper in 313 Rawl.
The controversial new insurance
law that bans the use of age and
sex in computing automobile
insurance rates in North Carolina
went into effect December 1,
1977. The bill will:
Stop charging male drivers
under 25 and their families higher
rates than other drivers. The
current rates, twice those charged
young women and adults, are
based on group driving records as
well as an individual's record.
Peg all rates to the use of the
car, the driver's experience and
driving record. And Xo a I less
degree, where he lives.
Increase surcharges on driv-
ers who violate traffic laws that
cause wrecks.
Enforce a new schedule of
insurance points that will stiffen
punishment for violations for the
first-time charge fa mina offen-
ses, such as running a stop sign
and wrecks with damage under
$200, in which the insured is
negligent.
Double the basic rate fa all
new drivers with fewer than two
years experience, whether they
are 16, 36 a 66 year old.
Apply standard surcharges on
oollision and comprehensive in-
surance as well as liability. Fa
many, this will further push up
the cost of traffic violations.
Liability insurance is compul-
sory in N.C. It pays fa damages
your car causes to otha cars and
people. Collision insurance,
which is na required pays fa
damages you cause to your car.
Comprehensive insurance is also
optional and pays fa theft, fire
and stam damage to your car.
Nkxth Carolina Insurance
Commissiona John Ingram has
said that December 1st was a
red-letta day in his carea.
Wednesday Special
at
WESTERN SIZZLIIM
STEAK HOUSE
Number 1 8 oz. of sirloin steak with
baked potato or French fries and
Texas toast. All for 2.39.
Hours
Sun. thru Thur.
11:00 to 10:00
Fri. and Sat.
11:00 to 1100
Ingram made two maja oommit-
ments when he first ran fa
Insurance Commissioner back in
1972, and that was to eliminate
N.C. motaists being cancelled in
this state with the Reinsurance
Facility and to eliminate age and
sex discrimination in insurance
in the Tarheel State.
One insurance offical admits,
"The idea of this thing is
everybody is equal until they have
had an accident The change
shifts a patioi of the
$400,000,000 paid annually fa
autanobile insurance from young
male drivers to drivas with bad
driving records.
Drivas won't begin paying
revised rates and surcharges until
their policies are renewed during
the next twelve months. Unda-25
males, howeva, can take advan-
tage of the Iowa rates by
cancelling their old policies and
taking out new ones.
Fa those males unda-25, the
changes will be a boom.
An example of this - basic
liability costs a young Charlrtte
man with a dean driving recad,
who now pays $219 a year, will
drop to $77 if he drives to wak
fewa than 10 miles aie way.
This new system also will
smooth out inequities among
families who have an uncter-25
male driver in the household and
those who have an uncter-25
female.
Families with a young male
driver have paid substantially
mae fa insurance than a fmaily
with a young female driva, even
if the parents violated a traffic
law. Surcharges fa violations are
assigned to the family driva with
the highest premium. Males
uncter 25 now pay two and one
half times the rate of young
women and adults.
If they had a young son, they
paid $700 John Ingram, Insur-
ance Commissiona, said of a
parent who got convicted of
drunken driving. "If they had a
young daughta, they paid $184
Ingram's refam proposal ap-
pealed to many who thought
insurance companies unjustif-
iably charged all young men
higher rates because seme caused
a la of accidents.
The insurance industry op-
posed the concept with equal
fava, contending the rates were
fair, because young males as a
group caused twice as many
accidents as aha drivas In-
dustry officials say those wrecks
are twice as costly as those
caused by adults.
SEIKO
Greenville's, only Dealer
No. DNOO3M-S135.O0.
Continuous readout in
hours, minutes and
seconds. Instant display of
month and date Stainless
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mar resist crystal.
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LADY SEIKO QUARTZ.
All have outstanding elegance and superb
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quartz watches.The Lady Seiko Quartz line
is exquisite and superbly accurate. For
men, Seiko Quartz models come in both Analog
and Digital styles, chronographs, world-
timers, month date models, and many more.
All have a battery life of over one year, and
renowned Seiko quality. Seiko Quartz. ��
Phone: 758-2452
r Floyd G. Robinson Jewelers
Downtown Greenville
onthsmsil
If it don't Tick Tock to us.





HHiMBB
P�g�6 F0UNTA1NHEAP 17 Jxury 1978
Seminar
it
named
for former chairman
VACA TION WAS NICE while it lasted, but now it's back to work.
Photo by Brian Stotler
Unregistered bikes to be impounded
By STUART MORGAN
Assistant News Editor
The campus police will soon
begin to enforce bicycle regula-
tions stringently, announoed Joe
Calder, director of security.
I would like to advise bicycle
owners to register their bicycles
i f they have not al ready done so
advised Calder.
Bicycle registration oostsonly
50 cents.
"We will begin cutting chains
and removing all unregistered
bicycles soon warned Calder.
In addition to registering their
DOWNTOWN
PITT PLAZA
Levis
SALE
LEVI'S
CORDUROY,DENIMS
JUNIOR SPORTSWEAR.
STUDENTS AND CHILDRENS
$12
50
VALUES TO 16.00
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
bicycles, students riding bicycles
must follow all traffic regulations.
"For example; bicycle riders
are required to stop at stop signs
and not to ride on sidewalks
stressed Calder.
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Professor James L.
Fleming Jr Professor Emeritus
of French and chairman of the
Department of Foreign Lang-
uages at ECU from 1945 to 1970,
was honored last month in
ceremonies dedicating a seminar
room named for him by the
Department of Foreign Lang-
uages and Literatures in Brewster
Building.
Participants in the dedication
program were Dr. Leo W.
Jenkins; Dr. Robert R. Morrison,
chairperson of the Department of
Foreign Languages, Southern
Missionary College, Collegedale,
Tenn who taught Spanish at
ECU from 1958 to 1967; and Mrs.
Maria Haendel Koonoe, an ECU
scholarship student from
Uruguay in 1961-62 now living in
Lauderdale Lakes, Fla.
The practice of bringing
young native speakers of French
New parking lot cleared
behind Belk dormitory
By STUART MORGAN
Assistant News Editor
Construction of an additional
parking lot behind Belk Dormi-
tory has been completed, accord-
ing to Joe Calder, director of
security.
The new, un-paved lot con-
tains about 40 spaces.
"We do not get as much
usage out of an un-marked
parking lot as we do from marked
ones, explained Calder.
Calder added that new park-
ing area will not be paved before
next summer.
"If we paved that lot now, it
would be necessary to take that
new lot out of servioe for a few
months" he explained.
The new parking lot will be
used only by dormitory students.
In addition to the new lot,
other parking areas were improv-
ed during the holidays.
"The parking area between
Garrett Dam and Jenkins Fine
Arts Center, and the freshman
parking area on 14th St. were
covered with 75 tons of crushed
rock Calder said.
and Spanish on scholarships to
ECU as student assistants in the
Department of Foreign Lang-
uages was begun under Professor
Fleming. The university con-
tinues the program, screening
applicants through the Institute of
International Education in New
York.
Under Professor Flemings
chairmanship, the Department of
Foreign Langauges grew to be the
largest in the school's history.
During thistime, the launching of
Sputnik and investment of federal
funds in intensive training fa
language teachers heightened
interest in learning languages
throughout the United States.
Concerned primarily with re-
cruiting qualified faculty and
developing quality instruction,
Prof Fleming experimented in
language education. He taught
classes in French fa elementary
school children, and introduced
an intensive language course,
first taken by veterans returning
from Wald War II.
The intensive course offered a
year's work in six weeks of
summer school. The campus
newspaper described it as a
wonderful adventure "with strait
jackets required as standard
equipment so demanding was
the five-hour class period.
Prof. Fleming attended Wake
Faest College. Harvard Univer-
sity, the University of Nath
Carolina, Emay University, the
University of Miami and
Columbia University.
He studied abroad at the
University of Paris. He holds
degrees from Wake Faest and
Harvard and a diplona fron the
Institut de Phoietique.
Living in Francs a number of
years, he taught at the Eoole
Namale de Valence. Befae
joining the ECU faculty, he
taught also at Guilfad College
and Randolph-Maoon College.
A native of Greenville, Prof.
Fleming is the son of the late Lula
White Fleming and James L.
Fleming, a state senata fran Pitt
County. He is married to the
Ellen Rion Caldwell, Professa
Emeritus of Mathematics at ECU.
Senata Fleming spaisaed
the bill in the General Assemble
to create the East Carolina
leachers Training School, now at
East Carolina University. One of
the campus damitaies is named
fa him.
SXhJUJucL
a cta
VB-fi B.5 'st.KLXOl






������iBlHHHlHHBBBH
reek Forum
17
1978 FOUNTAINHEAD
With the new year upon us
and Spring Semester underway,
the ECU fraternities will be
having their rush parties. This is
a period for you to get to know the
different fraternities as well as a
time fa them to meet you.
Rush is the prooess one goes
through in seeking membership
in a fraternity. It is a mutual
selection process in which you get
to check out each fraternity as
they check you out. It consists
primarily of visiting the frater-
nity houses and meeting their
members. Rush is free and costs
only your time. Here are a few
tips about rush.
Be sure to act naturally while
you are at different houses. A
firm handshake, a ready smile,
and natural oonverstaiton are
your best assets in rush week.
Fraternities are not looking fa
the super-suave-know-it-all. Be
yourself.
Don't permit any fraternity to
monopolize your time. Be aware
of fraternities who try to pressure
you into a decision. You are not
obligated to any farter nit y be-
cause they have shown a great
deal of interest in you. Since you
will be making a choice that will
remain with you fa your remain-
ing years of college, a definite
decision can only be made by
visiting several fraternities.
Remember not to judge the
fraternity by the house exteria,
moderness, size, a location on
campus. Character is not depend-
ent on wood, stone a cement. A
flashy exteria a an inside with
every modern convience should
na be the aiteria by which you
make your choice.
By all means ask questions. If
there are any questions pertain-
ing to rush, financial matters a
social customs that bother you,
ask someone to dear up those
points. You will find fraternity
men at ECU will be more than
willing to help you out.
Find out what measures each
fraternity takes to promote
scholarship, and if adequate
study hours are provided fa
pledges. Ask how famer pledge
classes have ranked schoiastical-
The semesta house bill of
most fratantites is about the
same; however, thae is some
variation. Find out about asses-
sments, how many and how much
they will be, pledge and initiation
fees, and monthly dues.
Ask about the pledge pro-
gram. Find out what pledge
duties you are expected to
perfam. Find out what will be
required of you. Socially, in
intramurals, in the house, and
other activities.
Do you feel at home in any
given house? The quality of hte
brotherhood in any fraternity you
consider pledging is most impor-
tant. Take a good look at the
underclassmen as they are the
ones with whom you will be
spending the most time. There-
fae, "Are these the type of men
with whom I wish to become
lifelong friends? is the prim-
ary question you must answer,
and one which is vital to your
decision as to which fraternity you
pledge.
Fraternity rush is a great
introduction to ECU social life
and a perfect opportunity to meet
a la of people. The friendships
you will make during rush will
prove to be invaluable.
Circle K reorganizes
By ROBERT M. SWAIM
Advertising Manager
The ECU Circle K. Club which
was disbanded several years ago
has reaganized and reactivated.
The dub held its indudion
banquet Dec. 11 and initiated 16
members.
Accading to John McCanney,
president of the Greenville
Kiwanis Club which sponsas
ECU Cirde K the Cirde K dub
is a service aganization that
perfams community service pro
jeds.
"The purpose of Cirde K will
be to have students serve the
college and Greenville commu-
nity, said McCanney.
Accading to Greg Boykin,
Cirde K vice-president, the dub
has already begun perfaming
dudIic service projeds.
"We had a rockathon last
weekend and raised $365 fa the
United Fund said Boykin.
Cirde K is the largest service
aganizatioi oi college campuses
aaoss the nation, accading to
Boykin.
AnrAJ
WED 7AW 18 AT HOb P. M.
OPEN TO AIL ECU STUDENTS
Pantana Bob says
WELCOME BACK
and
BE SOMEBODY !
Open Daily at 4:00
CLIFF'S
Seafood House
and Oyster Bar
SPECIAL
MON. - THURS.
FISH 99
French Fries, Slaw and Hushpuppies
LB. HAMBURGER99
French Fries, Slaw and Rolls
CRAB CAKES1.50
French Fries, Slaw and Hushpuppies
Now Salad Bar
WASHINGTON HIGHWAY (N. C. 33 Ext.j
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
PHONE 762-3172
'DISCOUNT FURNITURE"
AT
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
THESE ITEMS ARE PRICED TO SELL
COFFEE TABLE$25.00 AND UP
COUCH AND CHAIR$60.00 AND UP
WASHING MACHINES$125.00 AND UP
SWIVEL ROCKERS$20.00 AND UP
CHEST$40.00 AND UP
DINETTE SUITS$50.00 AND UP
REFRIGERATORS $80.00 AND UP
SEE TOMMY WILLIAMS TODAY
AZALEA MOBILE HOMES
PHONE 756-7815 � 264 BYPASS WEST
(ACROSS FROM BILL HADDOCK CHRYSLER)





�������MHH
Page8 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 January 1978
HOT DR PEPPER
with a slice of lemon.
if
Register to win one of six
of four Hot Dr Pepper glasses
MENDENHALL SNACK
BAR.
These beautiful
Hot Dr Pepper glasses
have stainless steel
handles and are
imprinted with the
antique Dr Pepper ensignia,
x;
V
Vfor.

f
A h
m
&Vk
;��'� j.
mm r
U. . Kr.f �: .iJ
y
kWSi
First 500 to register
receive a free Dr
this coupon
t patch.
Also watch for our BE A PEPPER
beginning in March.
"3
Jv

X
J
r
H


V
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th
St
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Janu
Januc
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Janu
EVENT
DRAWING FOR
SET OF (4)
HOT DR. PEPPER GLASSES
Phone
Do Not Have To Be Present To Win
DRAWING AT THE END OF PROMOTION
111
Januc
Janua
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in the





Spring Free Flicks
3&;
Jan 29
Feb. 22
17 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
FILM FESTIVALS
INTERNATIONAL
Swept Away
8V2
Weit)e;orj
BLACK EXPERIENCE
6ngo Long and the Traveling
All-Stars
Save the Children
W
���,
March 19
Apr. 16
MARX BROTHERS
VgAir af r?e Opera
Monkey Business
Horse Feathers
Duck Soup
ANIMATED
Milestones for Mickey
Wizards
Yellow Submarine
W
W
&
2
FflOA Y & SA TURD A Y FILMS
7&9p.m.
Jan. 20-21
Jan. 27-28
Feb. 3
! Feb. 10-11
Feb. 17-18
Feb. 24-25
March 17-18
March 31-Apr.1
Apr. 7-8
Apr. 14-15
i Apr. 21-22
Apr. 28-29
May 5-6
SPECIAL FILMS
8 p.m.
Barry Lyndon (6 & 9 p.m.)
Silver Streak
All the President's Men
(530, 750& 10.10p.m.)
Lady Sings the Blues
(7&930p.m.)
Dog Day Afternoon
Camelot
Women in Love
The Producers
Seven Per Cent Solution
Fritz the Cat
Robin and Marian
Royal Flash
Fantastic Voyage
HUMPHREY BOGART and Ingrid Bergman from
the classic CASABLANCA. CASABLANCA will be
shown this Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the Mendenhall
I,
Student Center Theatre. Admission is free with ID
and activity card.
Jan.18
Feb. 1
March 1
March 15
Apr. 5
May 3
Casablanca
Crys and Whispers
Grapes of Wrath
Bad
Amacord
Carnal Knowledge
School of Music
January 20
January 21
January 21
January 25
January 27
January 27
January 28
January 29
January 31
Joan Woolard, flute
Tom Amoreno, clarinet
Senior Recital, 8:15
ECU Student Union and .School of
M usic Young Artist Finals Compe-
tition Mendenhall Theatec, .1-4
Eliot Frank
Guest Guitar Recital, 8:15
Everett Pittman, piano
Charles Stevens, piano
Duo Faculty Recital, 8:15
High School Choral Festival
Wright Auditorium, 8.00
Sai Musicale, 8:15
Danna Swaim, french horn
Andrea Smith, ceWo
Senior Recital, 8:15
Daniel Afeadd, cello
Faculty Recital, 815
Duke Ladd, piano
Lisa Crook, percussion
Senior Recital, 815
Unless noted otherwise, all events are scheduled for performance
in the A.J. Fletcher Music Center.
Trends
THIS STUDENT PLAYS bassoon in the East
Carolina Symphonic Wind Ensemble at the annual
Christmas assembly, dedicated to Chancellor Leo
Jenkins. Photo by Brian Stotler





�����������HBHHHiHBBI
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 January 1978
Robin Cook's first novel is a success
Coma exploits fears of modern medicine
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
Coma deals with the frighten-
ingly believable possibility of a
black-market in human body
organs. Robin Cook, himself an
opthalmologist and clinical in-
structor at Harvard Medical
School, has by his immense
knowledge in his field given his
story a verissimilitude that would
have been very difficult for a
layman to do. This is Cook's first
novel and he has chosen a
fascinatingly lurid subject and
background for it.
The story is set in the huge
Boston Hospital complex. A
green but indefatigable intern,
Susan Wilson, has just arrived to
spend her two years at the
instructional hospital when she
notices that the incidence of
patients going into coma during
surgery are markedly higher
there than at other hospitals in
the country.
At first she believes that she
is on the track of a new disease,
but as she encounters opposition
in her research from medical
personel and administrators she
becomes convinced that some-
thing sinister is going on. Her
personal investigation is partially
motivated by the fact that she is
flirted with by a hansome patient
who after his surgery fa an
injured knee becomes a mindless
human vegetable.
The first two thirds of the book
are a little dry; Cook has his
characters speak a lot of hospital
and medical shop-talk which
either bores a loses the reader,
but the last third is exciting and
suspenseful.
books
Complete Store Wide Sale
All Jeans
15 to 50 off
All Winter Coats & Jackets
30 to 50 off
A large Group of Leather Coats
'A off
All Sweaters
30 to 40 off
All Shirts (Dress & Sport)
20 to 30 off
All Suits
30 to 40 off
r
All Ties
V2 price
Shoes
30 to 50 off
1 Group of Levi Cords $8.25
1 Group of Levi Den. JA price
I Group of Levi Jkts. V2 price
University Arcade
Fa instance, at one point
Susan is chased through the
medical complex by a rather
stereo-typical but nevertheless
intimidating Mafia-type hit-man
who eventually oaners her in the
freezer where cadavers are kept.
The bodies are hanging by wires
inserted into the ear-holes in their
skulls. These wires are connected
to moveable wheels on tracks in
the ceiling, much like sides of
beef at a warehouse. Susan
escapes only by giving the
cadavers a hard push and knock-
ing the assailant down from
behind. She rushes out of the
freezer and locks the deer behind
her, leaving the claustrophobic
hit-man firing bullets into capses
which "he thought he saw
move When he is found the
next day, the man has to have
several fingers and part of his feet
amputated due to frostbite.
Another particularly exciting
segment of the book is when
Susan decides to visit the
Jefferson Institute, the ultra-
modern facility where chronic
coma victims are cared fa and
where the coma cases fron
Boston Hospital have been sent.
Here, the living human veg-
etables are suspended by wires
implanted into their long bones
and connected to moveable tracks
along the ceiling.
The dirty business of extract-
ing the agans and sending to the
various buyers is done at the
Jefferson Institute bu the exec-
utives of the hospital allow Susan
to visit the high-security facility in
hopes of giving her a PTA tour
and allaying her suspicions about
the place. While she is in the
midst of the building the ader is
given to have her caught and sent
to surgery herself. Her sub-
sequent escape is one of the most
cinematically exciting episodes of
the book.
Nowhere is one mae defense-
less than when he is anesthetized
and on the operating table; a fact
that Cook suspensefully exploits.
Cook also preys on our suspicions
of high eschelon financial man-
euvers and on the fears we have
of the impersonal, the patient-as-
Live Maria Dawkins
Thurs. Jan 19
Sat. Jan 21
Check It Out!
No Cover with E.C.U. LDs mon �r tues
Customer Appreciation Night from 8-12
a-number attitude that hospitals
have been faced to take in ader
to assure the best service fa the
greatest number of people.
Coma derives much of its
timliness from the questions it
raises about ethics and modern
medicine. No medical techno-
logy can keep a human body
functioning long after the brain
has ceased to operate and the
question is open as to the point at
which a person may be consider-
ed really dead. As the extraadin-
ary but unscientific book Life
After Life recently emphasized,
persons experiencing as much as
twenty minutes of clinical
"death" may be brought back to
life. These facts, together with
the knowledge that tremendous
advances are being made in
transplant methodology, assuring
greater success and consequently
greater demand fa transplants,
make the ideas Cook presents in
Coma particularly relevant as
popular fiction.
Opera
auditions
coming
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Eastern Nath Carolina sing-
ers who aspire to operatic careers
are invited to participate in the
annual Metropolitan Opera
National Council Southeastern
District Auditions Saturday, Jan.
28. at ECU.
The auditions are scheduled to
begin at 1 p.m. in the A.J.
Fletcher Music Center here.
Purpose of the Metropolitian
Opera auditions is to help dis-
covei new operatic talent and to
make it possible fa young singers
m all parts of the nation to be
heard and aided in regional and
national auditions programs later
in the year.
Further infamation about the
auditions is available from Dr.
Clyde Hiss, District Directa. at
the ECU School of Music. Ap-
plication deadline fa the audit-
iois is January 21.
N.CsNo. 3 Night Club
ATTIC
Wed.
ECU students
FREE until
10300
Epic Recording
Artist
Wed. & Thurs
Blaze
Fri. & Sat
Glass Moon





Closest audition center is Greenville S.C.
Auditions to be held
17 January 1978 FQUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Spoleto Orchestra
Trends Staff Report
Auditions for the Spoleto
Festival 1978 Orchestra will be
held in New York City (Feb.
1,2,10,11), Bloomington, Indiana
(Feb. 4), San Francisco (Feb.
6,7), Syracuse (Feb. 21),
Charleston, S.C. (Mar. 20) and
Greenville, S.C. (Mar. 21).
Members of the Festival
Orchestra may participate in
Spoleto Festival U.S.A. to be
held in Charleston May 25-June
11 or the Spoleto Festival held in
Italy in late June. Spoleto Festival
Orchestras typically indude
students from most American
conservatories and many
colleges. Partidpation provides
an excellent opportunity to per-
form a varied and demanding
program and work with many
many masters of the performing
arts. The Festival's music activ-
ities indude opera, symphony,
ballet and chamber music.
In 1977, fa example, the
Spoleto Orchestra performed for
Menotti's "The Consul
Tchaikovsky's "The Queen of
Spades Mozart's "Cosi Fan
Tutte a Scriabin concert, a
Ravel and Strauss Marathon
concert, and Haydn's "The Crea-
tion
The South Carolina auditions
Poetry
UNTIII.ED
By SHERRIE REESE
p�
ou are
ke the quiet pool of water
that lends its colour
vvy-
. are
� �� slendei wisp of tree
tahi ��no its grace
to your in-
ess�
you h
the fresh rush of wind
ends its adventure
Uf spirit.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC students as they performed at the annual
program of traditional Christmas music in Wright Auditorium
last December 13. Several groups from the School of Music per
formed m honor of Dr. Leo Jenkins' last year as Chancellor of
the University. Photo by Brian Stotler
f "I admire
,fJ God because
SherriQ Reese, a sophomore from
Fayettville, hopes to major in
teal Therapy
Saada Shoe Shop
I I 3 (irande Ave. at
Clollege View
Cleaner
God is man's
greatest invention
Spend 90 minutes with
the longshoremanphilosopher.
Eric Hoff er
"The Crowded Life"
Produced by Wpbi . Miami, Fla.
Tunem Tues. January 17th, Time 8:00 P -M.
WUNK
25
�s-
PUBLIC
BROADCASTING
SFPVCf
will be held on March 20 at the
College of Charleston's Physic-
ians Memorial Hall and on March
21 at Furman University's
(Greenville) Recital hall. All
inquiries should be directed to
Carol Kleinert, Spoleto Festivasl
U.S.A Post Office Box 157,
Charleston, S.C. 2401. To
schedule an appointment to audit-
ion, please call Ms. Kleinert at
(803)722-2764.
Individauls who audition must
be 18-30 years old. Orchestral
auditions last about seven min-
utes and involve a prepared piece
of the individual's choice and one
piece of sight reading. There will
be no accompanist.
Vocal auditions will last about
ten minutes and involve two
prepared pieces, again at the
choice of the individual, who may
bring an accompanist.
The Spoleto Festival is con-
sidered the world's most comp-
rehensive arts Festival. Founded
over 20 years ago by Gian Carlo
Menotti, it held its premiere
American season last spring.
Acclaimed throughout the
country as an outstnading suc-
cess, the Festival will be 50 per
cent longer this year and cover
the 18-day period of May 25 -
June 11.
Joan tooolard to
perform on Friday
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Flautist, Joan Woolard,
senior student in the ECU
School of Music, will perform in
recital Friday, Jan. 20 at 8:15
p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall.
Her program will include
Telemann's Trio Sonata in A
minor fa Flute, Viola and Con-
tinuo;a Julius Baker transcription
of the Choplin Nocturne in C
sharp minor; Three Short Duos b
Marcel B. Frank; and x bonata tor
Flute and Piano by contemporary
American Emma Lou Deiner.
Miss Woolard will be accom-
panied by pianist Karen Hause
and assisted by violist Rodney
Schmidt and clarinetist Tom
Amoreno.
A candidate for the Bachelor
of Music Education degree. Miss
Woolard is a flute student of
Beatrice Chauncey. Her parents
are Mr. and Mrs. Herbert W.
Woolard of 309 Sourwood Drive.
Hampton. Va.





�HHPPlPSl W?&8!Ba
BBBH WBI
Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 January 1978
Classical guitarist
in concert here
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Classical guitarist Elliot Frank
will perform Saturday, Jan. 21�at
8:15 p.m. in East Carolina
University's A. J. Fletcher Recital
Hall.
His performance here, which
is free and open to the public is
sponsored by the Visiting Artist
Program, a cooperative undertak-
ing of the N.C. Arts Program and
the N.C. Dept. of Community
Colleges. Frank is based at Lenoir
Community College, Kinston.
A native Georgian, Elliot
Frank began his guitar study in
Atlanta and earned the Bachelor
of Music degree in guitar perfor-
mance from the University of
Georgia. During his study there
he was the first guitarist to win an
Atlanta Music Club scholarship, a
competitive award open to in-
strumentalist of all types.
He has also studied with
Oscar Ghiglia at the Aspen Music
Festival and with Joe Tomas in
Spain. Since ooming to North
Carolina he has oontinued his
studies with Jesus Silva at the
N.C. School of the Arts and with
Pepe Romero of the Romeros
Quartet.
MARCELLO MASTRQINNI PLAYS Guido, a
43-year old director in 8 . This autobiographical
film by Italian Federico Fellim will be shown
January 29 as part of the International Film Festival
in the Mendenhall Student Center Theatre.
'After the Rain'is a one-man album
Rypdal's music suggests outerinner space
By JEFF ROLLINS
Assistant Trends Editor
On his latest album Terje
Rypdal plays electric and acoustic
guitars, string ensemble, piano,
electric piano, soprano sax, flute,
tubular bells and bells all by
himself. "After the Rain" is an
album conceived and executed by
one man. The songs (less songs
really, than mood pieces) are
constructed by his playing one
instrument and taping it, then
plying another on top of that tape,
and then another, until the piece
is completed.
The mood of the album is very
Beef n' Shakes
Breakfast Special
Special Breakfast 7 a.ra till 11 a.m. for .99
two scrambled eggs, sausage, hash browns, english
muffin, jelly
Our quarter pound Beefburgers are from fresh
ground Chuck daily.
Downtown 5th St. only open 7 a.m. till 2 a.m. Daily.
Become a
lawyers assistant
and put your
education to work.
The National Center for Paralegal Training offers qualified college
graduates the opportunity to enter the legal field as a lawyer s
assistant This intensive 12-week graduate program taught by
attorneys in Atlanta may qualify you for an active and challenging
role as an accepted member of the legal community.
Specialize in Corporations Litigation, or Real Estate and Probate.
For a free Catalog about the Program, call (404) 266-1060 or
simply mail the coupon below
Name.
.Phone.
Address.
City.
State.
.Zip.
School Name
Summer 1978
Fall 1978
Yr.Grad
? Spring 1979
The National Canter
for Paralegal framing
Sandra Jennings Director
The National Center tor Paralegal Training
3376 Peachtree Road NE Suite 430
Atlanta. Georgia 30326
Tel (404) 266 1060
A Representative from The National Center tor Paralegal Training's
Lawyer's Assistant Program will be on campus on Friday, Jan. 20 from
900 am- 4.00 p m. at the Placement Office to meet interested stu-
dents For more information contact the Placement Office or The Na-
tional Center for Paralegal Training, 3376 Peachtree Road, NE, Suite
430, Atlanta, Georgia 30326, (404) 266-1060
The National Center admits students on the basis ot individual merit
and without regard to race, color, creed, sex. age or national origin
soft. Without exception the sele-
ctions on the album are dreamy
and mild, with definite preference
shown to the piano, and foremost-
ly to the guitar. Rypdal succeeds
in coaxing from the modified
electric guitar sounds which are
haunting and misterioso. Sounds
which one might think are the
music of a race benevolent and
sensitive of being living on a
distant planet. This effect is
hightened by the uncanny res-
emblence the opening bars of
"Autumn Breeze" bear to the
five note sequence the people of
Earth use to communicate with
the extra-terrestrial beings in
Close Encounters of the Third
Kind.
Yet Rypdal never abandons
himself to the merely eerie, to the
uninteresting creation of strange
noises by electrical means. His
music is never overly "spacey
rather it is of a quality that
suggests the beauty of Alpha
Centauri rising over the horizon
of one of its planets.
The album is done in melli-
fluous pastels, and though it is
often unexciting it is never
abrasive. Rypdal's musjc is pen-
sive and introspective; out atten-
tion may leave it, but we part
friends.
Dance courses offered
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Want to shake off the
mid-winter doldrums, while
learning an enjoyable new skill?
Enroll in one of the non-credit
evening courses in dance soon to
be offered by East Carolina
University.
They include "Round Dance"
(Mon. and Thurs Feb. 6-Mar.
2), "Beginning Jazz Dance Exer-
cise" (Wed Jan 18-Mar. 1) and
located behind
THE ATTIC
752-7303
MATTRESS MART
Wholesale to Everyone
Retail
WATERBEDS $52.00
FRAMES
$70.00
MATTRESS fr $149.00
FOUNDATION
Our Price
$37.00
$35.00
$87.00
1302 N. Greene St. 758-1101
"Intermediate Jazz Dance Exer-
cise" (Mon Jan 16-Feb. 27).
"Round Dance a "couples"
dance, is made up of dance
patterns taken from both folk and
ballroom basics. These patterns
are set to given measures of a
specific tune, involving all dan-
cers doing the same steps tog-
ether, in established circles
"round" the hall.
Persons who take the round
dance class may wish to join one
of several round and square
dance groups in the Greenville
area. Class instructors are two
representatives of these groups;
Sarah Roberts of the Tar River
Twirlers and Homer Yearick of
the Tryon Twirlers.
The jazz danoe classes are
designed for individual men and
women who acquire physical
conditioning and coordination
skills while learning basic jazz
dance techniques.
Dress fa the jazz dance
classes can consist of any loose
fitting clothing or leotard and
tights, and footwear may be
danoe shoes or lightweight
sneakers. Bare feet will also be
acceptable.
Jazz dance instructor is
Michele Mennett, former mem-
ber of the ECU danoe faculty, who
studied ballet and other danoe
forms at the Alvin Alley School in
New York and has taught and
performed throughout the U.S.
Further information about
these and other non-credit course
offerings is available from the
Offioe of Non-Credit Programs,
Division of Continuing Education
ECU.
�HHi
4M � H IBS





Intramurals
17 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
by JOHN EVANS
ECU faces W&M
Team Handball makes debut
Another dub sport has been organized on the East Carolina
University campus and it is a spinoff from one of the many intramural
activities offered.
The new club is the European Team Handball club and the principle
founder of the club is team handballer Jim Chastain.
The first meeting of the dub will be held on next Monday, January
23 at 430 p.m. in Room 105 Memorial Gym.
The handball dub is the eighth dub sport to be organized on
campus. The other dub sports are Karate, Skiing, Fendng, Outing
Club, Rugby Club, Lacrosse Club and Surfing Club.
Members of the Handball Club will be selected to help form an ECU
Handball Club that will travel to the U.S. Team Handball
Championships in New York in May.
Among the other teams partidpating in the U.X. Collegiate
championships will be UCLA, Notre Dame, Marquette, Army, Navy
Michigan State and the Air Force Academy. East Carolina will be the
only school from North Carolina in the championships.
CAMPLEJEUNE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
Three men's basketball teams and one women's team will be
traveling to Camp Lejeune Marine Base on February 4 to face teams
from that camp.
The three men's and one women's team to be chosen will be
selected by Dr. Wayne Edwards and Marty Martinez from among the
teams with the best intramural basketball records at that time.
In April, the Camp Lejeune base will send four Softball teams down
to ECU fa competition.
HA NDICA PPED PROGRA MS TO BEGIN
Fa the first time ever ECU will condud intramural and reaeational
programs fa handicapped students.
The program will be headed by Assistant Intramural Directa, Rose
Mary Adkins, and it isexpeded to begin an February 1. Helping Miss
Adkms will be two qualified students to handle separate aspeds of the
program.
Troy Robertson, a graduate student at ECU, will handle the
weight lifting adivities fa the handicapped. Debbi Justice, a student
majaing in Therapeutic Recreatiai and with experience in the field,
will be in charge of the swimming aspect of the program.
Future programs which will hopefully be added will be wheelchair
basketball and floor hockey. We'll have more details later.
MEN'SBASKETBALL RANKINGS
Last week Marty and I pretty much agreed on our pre-season top
ten fa men's basket ball, but this week shows us changing our opinions
just a little bit, especially as a result of some big upsets last week.
Gone f ran bah top tens are the Aycock Giants, who lost two games
last week, and the Hatchets, who were unimpressive in their opening
games. Other teams dropping from oie ranking a the other were
Kappa Alpha, Belk Dr. Love, Soott Razabacks, Every Mother's Son,
the Scott Semitoughs and Kappa Alpha Psr
Martinez and I both predid the same three teams at the top last
week and Martinez stayed with those three teams as his top teams this
week; picking the Belk Enfacers as the number oie team, the Belk
Nutties Buddies as the number two team and the Belk Carolina Stars
fa third.
Lambda Chi Alpha, fourth last week, dropped to fifth behind the
Jones Dealers. Rounding out the Martinez top ten were six new teams.
In ader they were the Mud Sharks, the Heartbreak Kids, the FCA,
Belk's Our Gang, the Soott Kids and the Jones Bones.
In my top ten I disagree with Martinez. I have to take the Nutties
Buddies as the top team. Na only are they the defending champions,
but they also opened their season with an easy 66-26 rout of Aycock's
Cockroaches. In second place are the Carolina Stars, who won two
games by 42-22 and 41 -28 scaes. In third place are the Jones Dealers,
2-0 after two big wins. The Enfacers drew my fourth-place spot, just
ahead of the Heartbreak Kids, who beat Every Mother's Son 70-46 in
their first game.
Rounding out my top ten in ader are the Kappa Sigma, the Jones
Bones, Sadaharu Ohs, Sigma Tau Gamma and Phi Epsilai Kapps.
Befae gang on to the women's top ten we'd like to congratulate
Sigma Tau Gamma fa winning its' first intramural contest ever by
topping Delta Sigma Phi, 35-22.
ARM WRESTLING STARTS THURSDA Y
The annual ECU Arm Wrestling tournament starts Thursday,
January 19 and registration will be held Monday through Wednesday
Ir 204 Memaial Gym.
Canpetitiai will be in four separate weight dasses: under 150
Pounds, 151-175 pounds, 176-200 pounflOfTo 'ahlTrnitea' cfaiss
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Sports Edita
On January 7, the writers of
Sporis Illustrated magazine came
to William and Mary Hall to do a
stay on the surprising 9-1
Indians. What they saw was
Oliver Mack, Herb Krusen, and
Bernard Hill leading the Pirates
to a 58-56 viday in frait of 4,800
stunned fans.
The Bucs, riding high after
their third straight viotory 117-
MACK A BUSES St. Peters in 90- 77 victory Photo by Brian stotler)
Sports
IHESE GUYS are going to make me old said Coach Larry Giliman
affer a53-56 Pirate vi'dory' 10 days' ago Photo by Brian Stotler j
107 over Athletes in Adion take
on those same Indians tonite in
Minges Coliseum at 730.
In the first game the Pirates
relied on oohesive zone defense
that made many of the Tribe's
shrts oome in the 25 foot variety.
The Bucs shot 65 per cent from
the floa in the second halfand
lod the rebounding department
fa the entire game 31-24, an
impatanoe, Coach Larry Giliman
was quick to pant out. 'Our
game is to get off the boards and
go he added, "When we get
the rebounds we're tough
Oliver Mack led scaing in
that first game with 24 points,
while Bernard Hill played an
inspired game at faward soaing
12 points and grabbing 6 re-
bounds. Greg Canelius led re-
bounding with 11.
Hill, known as "loe" by fellow
teammates has led a resurgence
in the inside play of the Pirates,
something seldom heard of in
pre-Christmas games. "We went
home over break and got our
'confidence back" he explained.
"We call this Part II, it's a new
season
Greg Canelius has improved
his rebounding game immensely
and even scaed 20 points against
AIA at the center position.
Even with all these improve-
ments Coach Giliman doesn't
exped tonite's game to be easy,
by a long shot. "I exped them to
really be ready after the last
game Perhaps the one thing
that surprised tribe menta Bruce
Parkhill the most was the use of
the zone defense against them.
The Pirates, who had used the
defense sparsely in the first nine
games, played like they had used
it all their lives and ended up
fadng many long range shots
from the befuddled Indians.
However, no one expects
Parkhill to be surprised tonite and
the green and gold has shrtguns
of their own to counter Mack and
company.
John Lowenhaupt, a 6'5"
senia leads the barrage and the
people in Williamsburg tout him
as an All-Amerioan candidate.
Lowenhaupt soaed 17 points
against the Pirates in, the last
outing hitting many of those shots
from deep in the oana. "Some
up here (Williamsburg) call him
the Havlicek of odlege basket-
ball said Coach Giliman, "We
did a pretty good job on him, but
he still got his p.
A sixth man that could be a
fada fa the Pirates is senia Don
Whitaker. Whitaker altered the
game at W&M when starter
Walter Mosley made a few
turnoversand helped stabilize the
offense while giving Mosley a
breather. "Whitaker is a very
poised player and I've learned I
can count on him in pressure
situations said Coach Giliman,
"I think overall as a team we
played our most patient game of
the season he oonthued.
"We're young though and we're
learning, I'm still learning But
these guys are gang to be here a
while, and a lot of things are
going to fall intoplaoe





�S- v 5 �
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAP 17
1978
Pirate tankers in National rankings
By DAVID MERRIAM
Staff Writer
Could it be possible that
East Carolina is holding national
records in a sport where only
three athletes are on scholar-
ships out of a team of over
thirty? And could it also be
oossible if one added up the
All-Americans in every other
sport in ECU history, they still
would not have nearly as many
All-Americans as this sport has
fielded fa the Pirates?
Well, the answers to these
rr
questions are yes, and after
watching this team in action one
might ask, why only three
scholarships?
The team is the ever popular
and undefeated swimming team
of ECU.
Ever popular because
with each win the student body
desides to support the swimmer
just that much more.
Undefeated, well that speaks
for itself or does it?
Operating on a budget -that is
sub-par for an athletic team the
size of his, Coach Ray Scharf has
developed one of the most
respected programs in the state,
and the Eastern Seaboard.
"These guys work hard
everyday, not just part of the
time. When they dive in that
water they're going after a
win commented Coach Scharf,
"I believe in hard work and
tough conditioning
After placing fifth in the
Penn State Relays behind
winners UNC, the Pirates show-
ed more poise and class than
was expected of them and
defeated that same UNC team in
the season opener, 61 to 52.
Next the Pi rates defeated the
Mountaineers of Appalachian
State handily 77 to 35.
Thursday night the Pirates
extended their winning streak to
three by defeating the Univer-
sity of Maine, 63-50 here at
Minges.
In Thursday nights romp of
Maine, several swimmers broke
meet records and cut seconds off
of their own personal times.
Outstanding swimmers in
the meet included the 400 meter
N
WELCOME COLLEGE STUDENTS
You may be eligible for a two-year Air Force ROTC scholarship. The scholarship includes full
tuition, lab expenses, incidental fees, a reimbursement for textbooks, and $100 a month tax free.
How do you qualify? You must have at least two years of graduate or undergraduate work remain-
ing, and be willing to serve your nation at least four years as an Air Force officer. Scholarships are
available to students who can qualify for pilot, navigator, or missile training, and to those who are
majorinc in selected technical and nontechnical academic disciplines, in certain scientific areas, in
undergrc iuate nursing, or selected premedical degree areas. Non-scholarship students enrolled in
the Air F rce ROTC two-year program also receive the $100 monthly tax-free allowance just like the
scholarship students. Find out today about a two-year Air Force ROTC scholarship and about the
Air Force way of life. Your Air Force ROTC counselor has the details.
in rtfunrctt
ROTC
Gotewoy to o greot way of life.
Captain Ashley Lane
ECU WRIGHT ANNEX
or call 757-6598
relay team of John Tudor, Dan
Newhaller, mack Lcvette and
Billy Thorne. Thome pulled out
an exciting win coming from
behind to insure victory. That
opening win put ECU ahead to
stay.
Kevin Meisel and Doug
Brindley dominated the 1000
meter freestyle and John Tudor
and Ross Bohhlken mastered the
200 freestyle.
Unfortunately in the diving
events the Pirates didn't quite
place as well as expected. A
main reason for this is because
dividing ace Tom Bell hit his
forehead on the board, causing
him 15 stiches and a 10 day
layoff.
Looking ahead at upcoming
meets the Pirates will have to
face the number 2 ranked
Alabama, L.S.U. and Rival
Duke.
"We have achieved several
goals this season said Scharf,
"we have a national ranking and
several boys have improved.
John McCauley currently leads
the nation in the 50 yard
freestyle. He also is second in
the 100 yard freestyle and Billy
Thorne is ranked 4th nation-
ally
The 400 meter freestyle relay
team of McCauley, Thorne,
Tudor, and Bill Fehling also lead
the nation.
TWE PIT04ER. Of PERfECTlOM
THE (NEW)
Lt
ANNOUNCES IT'S
GRAND REOPENING WEEKEND
TUES.fr WED. THE FINEST IN DISCO
THURS. BILL DEAL & THE RHONDELLS
FRI. ErSAT. GRAND REOPENING
FIRST 50 PEOPLE EACH NITE - FREE ELBO T- SHIRT
DOOR PRIZES - GIFTS - CONTESTS AND MUCH MORE
DANCE CONTEST '50.00 GRAND PRIZE
FRI SEMI FINALS SAT FINALS
FRI. AFT. 3 TO 7 END OF WEEK PARTY
SUN. IS LADIES NITE ALL LADIES FREE
DONT MISS IT THIS WEEKEND AT THE NEW
EDO






Classifieds
17 January 1978 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
lfc�� @J
FOR SALE: AKC Waimarainer
dog - 1 yr. old. $50. Gas Range
and Hotpoint refrig. $75 a piece.
Appliances available the end of
month. Moving. Call Lynn 756-
4827.
FOR SALE: Akai GX-280D auto
reversing reel to reel. Includes
tape and all patch cards. Call 6
p.m. 752-5692. $230.
FOR SALE: New Pioneer Reverb
completely elec. Still in box. Must
sell fast. Call and make an offer.
752-5692.
FOR SALE: P.A. system: Shure
vocalmaster complete p.a. in-
cludes all cables, 2 vocalmaster
columbs5 2feettall, pa. head 200
watts and 2 high frequency
mating vocalmaster tweeters.
Call 752-5692.
MOVING-MUST SELL: or rent 2
bedrm Oakwood mobile home;
total elec central air, shag
carpet, large bar, washer and
dryer; completely furnished. 752-
0568 after 7 p.m.
FOR SALE: Beautiful AKC Irish
Setter puppies. 1 male, 1 female.
8 wks. old, shots, wormed. Price
negotaible. Call 758-7187 6-7
p.m. a 758-1546 anytime.
FOR SALE: Wooden darinet with
accessories. Also reading lamp,
perfed fa i dorm use. If inter-
ested call 752-1871.
FOR SALE: Hernandas Grand
Concert classical guitar for $325.
Call 752-2179 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Single bed with
frame, antique sofa-bed and
rocker, metal plant stand, and
wooden barrel. Best offer. Call
758-9790 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE69Chevy van, long
wheel base, panelled and carpet-
ed, tear drop windows, 307 V8
engine, 3 speed auto. Asking
$1195. May accept partial trade.
Phone 758-7397.
FOR SALE: Beautiful AKC Irish
Setter female puppy. 8 wks. old,
shots and wormed. Price negot-
iable. Call 758-7187 6-7 p.m. or
752-1546 an ytimer
FOR SALE: 4.2 cubic ft. Magic
Chef refrig. Perfed for dorm,
game room. Excellent cond.
$95.00 Call 752-8970 or see at 311
Greene.
FOR SALE: 2 Crai power play
speakers. Like new $35.00 Call
756-6056.
FOR SALE: 1 Pilot 360 4 channel
stereo receiver, 60 watts at stereo
30 watts at quad; 1 BJC 940
turntable, 1 Wollensak top load-
,rg cassette deck. Call 756-6094.
�0 SALE: BSR turntable for
W-OO. Price negotiable. Also
wardrobe for $35.00. Call Dave
752-6746 p.m
FOR SALE: Schwin Surburban
old style frame. $50.00 752-5001.
FOR SALE: dorm size tefrig. 3.5
ft. good oond. Call 756-3351 after
5 p.m.
FOR SALE: '67 Plymouth station-
wagon. Good cond. 758-6836 or
758-0542.
FOR SALE: AKC Weimaraner
dog 1 yr. old. All shots etc. Gas
range and refrigerator in good
oond. $75 a piece. Available the
first of Feb. Call 758-4827.
FOR SALE: Baby crib and
dressing table and golf dubs and
bag. If interested call 756-0680.
MUST SELL: Audi 100LS, '71.
Automatic, AMFM cassette
deck, It. blue, $1250. Call 758-
6295.
FOR RENT: Private room 2 blocks
from campus with private en-
trance fa rent to male student.
Call 758-2051 - 756-2160 a
756-3832 ask fa Mrs. White.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: at
Willow St. Apts. 5 blocks from
campus. Call Dave between 4 and
6 p.m. at 758-1744.
FEMALE: desires roommate fa
two bedrm. apt. at Eastbrook.
Call 756-5942.
FEMALE ROOM MATS: .needed
fa 2 bdrm. apt. located 12 mi.
from campus. Call 752-3706.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Mature
graduate student to share 3
bedrm. house with 2 others. $58
and 1 3 utilities. Call Mike a Jeff
758-0534 a cane by 309 Student
St. 2 blocks from campus.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Male
One half rent and utilities.
407-409 Holly St. 752-3447.
LOST: Opal ring between Cotton
and Spillman. If found oontad 605
Greene 752-9033. Ring is very
meaningful. REWARD
LOST .Green folder with I. D. card
and driver's license endosed.
Lost on Brown bus at 830
between Speight and Menden-
hall. If found please call Debaah
at 752-8383.
CHILDCARE: Needed own trans-
patatioi. 4 days a week. Call
756-0907 after 6 p.m.
ardepx
BUY ONE ROAST BEEF.
GET A BIG DELUXE FREE
At Hardee's one good thing leads to another. Free.
With the coupon below, when you buy one
Roast Beef Sandwich, it'll lead you to a Big Deluxe
absolutely free.
The roast beef is slow cooked, juicy, sliced
thin, and stacked high, with your choice of tangy
sauces. The Big Deluxe is a quarter pound of
sizzlin charbroiled beef topped
with real fresh fixin's plus
cheese and pickles.
Take this coupon to
any participating
Hardee's. You buy a
Roast Beef Sandwich
and the Big Deluxe
is on us.
And it's all I
in good taste.

,
$fe'
i
jfy-
m
.
M
-M
'jjyigr
SB
wittfa
BUY ONE ROAST BEEF.
CETA BK DELUXE FREE.
Good at all participating Hardees. Please present this coupon before ordering.
One coupon per customer, please. Customer must pay any sales tax.
This coupon not good in combination with any other offers.
r
14,
"ECU
99
VtablfMTir January 29, 1978
� �GvKdPfftffiov� Coupon expires





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 17 January 1978
KROGER SAV-ON
SPRING SEMESTER MEAL PLAN
Quality and Savings at the words which best describe our Spring Semester
Meal Plan being offered to students by our DeBcates irt Quality best
describes the delicious food prepared dairy by our cooks in the Dei, and savings are
exactly what we are offering to students this semester. Save up to $160 � cancel
the worries of where your next meal is coming from.
Let it come from our Deli at KROGER SAV-ON
Each Meal Consists Of:
Choice OF Entree
Roast Beef Pork Chops
Bar-B-Q-Beef Bar-B O-Rrbs
Fried Chicken Chopped Steak
Smoked Sausage Delicatessen Sandwich
Choice Of Two Vegetables:
:xd
'
Squash
Lima Beans
Green Beans
Candied Yams
CoHard Greens
Mashed Potatoes
Okra
Tomatoes
ComOn Cob
Whole Potatoes
Zuchinni and Tomatoes
t.
Dinner Rols and Butter Free Beverage with Refife on Tea and Soft Drinks
Breakfast Also Served Between 7:15 & 10:30 am
Four Different Meal Plans 14 Weeks
$115.50
$161.70
5 meals per week
7 meals per week
10 meals per week
14 meals per week
Each Meal $1.66
Payment will be made in full in exchange for meal cards at to
Cash, credit caTd, check, or money otder will be accepted. Late Applicants will be
accepted. Contact BRUCE HALL - Deli Manager at Kroger Sav-On 756 7031
Meal Plan Begins Jan. 23
Meal Plan





Title
Fountainhead, January 17, 1978
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 17, 1978
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.622
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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