Fountainhead, November 3, 1977






Serving the campus com-
munity for ever 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE INSIDE
Winter Carnivalp. 3
The pillp. 6
Devil Worshipp. 9
ECU-vs-ASUp. 13
Vol. 53 No. 19
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
3 November 1977
Handicapped use new services
By ROBERT SWAIM
Advertising Manager
Over the last two years ECU
has implemented several new
programs and services to meet
the needs of handicapped stu-
dents.
ECU was working toward a
barrier-free campus before being
required to do so by the federal
government, according to Dr.
David B. Stevens, University
attorney.
"We were working on this
three years before HEW required
it said Stevens.
In 1973 the U.S. Congress
passed the Rehabilitation Act
which requires any university
receiving federal funds to make
HANDICAPPED STUDENTS NOW have an on campus office for information and assistance.
Hearing impaired students
enroll here for the first time
By SCOTT BARNES
Staff Writer
This fall semester is the first
semester for ECU'S special
program fro hearing impaired
students.
The program, backed by ECU
and fundings from outside vocat-
ions rehabilitation organizations,
consists of seven students and
part-time interpreters who attend
class with deaf students.
The interpreter usually pos-
itions himself between the in-
structor and the student, and by
manual communication (sign
language), the interpreter tells
the student what the teacher is
saying, according to Michael
Ernest, program director and
interpreter.
However, the student must
still watch the instructor in order
to see the facial expressions and
body movements which are
essential fa correct understand-
ings of phrases.
There are six full-time hearing
impaired students here at ECU,
according to Ernest. Five use an
interpreter and one used a
hearing aid.
Most students are freshmen in
their first semester of ooilege,
and are from the North Carolina
School for the Deaf. Up until now,
hearing impaired students had to
attend college at Gallaudet
college in Washington, DC.
Bucause Gallaudet is so far
away, deaf students were prev-
iously discouraged from less than
10 universities in the United
States that are equally equipped
with a complete service for
hearing impaired students,
according to Ernest.
Although the program is
steadily improving, Ernest is
concerned with the student's
preparation fa ooilege.
"We have found two basic
problems so far said. Ernest.
"The education that the deaf
students received in high school
does not adequately preparetnern
fa higha education. Instead, the
schools train the students fa
beginning work or vocational
tasks.
"The second problem is that
apparently their wak in high
school was not as demanding as
average high school wak. This
has been a big deal and a big
adjustment fa the students who
wae used to doing a half an hours
wak pa night and now have to
wak fa three hours
However, Ernest said no
students are having serious
academic trouble.
The students found in the
beginning much academic frust-
ration, said Ernest, but they have
had no problems with social
acceptance.
The service is expanding, and
students are looking faward to
next year.
Training courses are schedul-
ed fa intapretas, using people
who already know manual com-
munication.
"We are constantly finding
new things about this problem
said Ernest.
"We're just finding our way
and making changes as we go
along
all of its programs and facilities
available to handicapped stu-
dents.
Section 504 of the Rehabilita-
tion Act states: No otherwise
qualified handicapped individual
in the U .S as defined in section 7
(6), shall, solely by reason of his
handicap be excluded from parti-
cipation in, be denied the benefits
of a be subjected to discrimina-
tion under any programs a
activity receiving federal financial
assistance.
The main purpose of section
504 is to integrate the handicap-
ped student into the mainstream
of campus life so they can enjoy
the entire spectrum of student
activities and programs as all
aha students at ECU, accading
to Stevens.
"The law expects institutions
of higha education to respond to
the special needs of the handicap-
ped so they may indeed be given
the opportunity to develop their
fullest paential said Stevena
Aocading to Stevens, a task
faoe of top administratas, facul-
ty, and students and 25 sub-
committees are waking ai the
implementatiai of the handicap-
ped program.
One of the first maja steps
taken to meet the academic needs
of handicapped students was the
creation of the Central Infama-
tioi and Assistance Centa fa
Handicapped Students (CIACHS)
accading to C.C. Rowe, ooadi-
nata of handicapped student
services.
The centa is an off ice located
on the first floa of Caten Dam.
The purpose of the centa is to
make services available to handi-
capped students that they can't
reach on their own, such as
registration, drop-add, and job
placement, accading to Rowe.
One vital service provided by
CIACHS is the reada refaraJ
service, which is available to
Foreign Lang. Dept.
French press exhibit
The Department of Faeign
Langauges and Literatures is
sponsoring an exhibit, "The
French Press in Perspective
featuring ova 300 newspapas
and magazines depicting French
attitudes and opinions on a wide
variety of subjects. The exhibit
will be on display from 6 to 8 p.m.
until Novemba 14 in room 104
Joyna liaary.
The exhibit was officially
opened in Nath Carolina when it
was shown fa the first time at
FIREFALL
concert is not sold out!
Tickets are $3 at
the ticket office until
4 p.m. Friday.
Tickets bought at
the door are $5.
visually impaired students.
Individuals in Greenville,
many of them retired profesaas,
voluntea to read a textbook and
record their reading on cassette
tapes, accading to Rowe. These
tapes are then made available to
the student.
"They read on their own time
at their pleasure as long as the
tape is in on time fa the student
to oamplete his assignment
said Rowe.
"Right now I've got six
students using this service said
Rowe.
Anaha refaral service avail-
able through CIACHS is an
attendant referral service fa
wheelchair students.
Attendants assist handicap-
ped students in bathing, dressing
for class, eating, and other
pasonal functions.
Students apply fa positions as
attendants through the handicap-
ped services program, accading
to Rowe.
Rowe said that when a handi-
capped student asks fa an
attendant he is refared to one of
the applicants.
"The state pays fa this, the
school has no responsibility fa
payment said Rowe.
One of the most important
services available to handicapped
students is the scheduling of
classes so that all classes are
located in accessible buildings on
accessible fleas.
Accading to the supplemen-
tal handbook prepared fa handi-
capped students, of the 56
buildings on campus 34 are
accessible to wheelchairs, 13 have
elevatas, and 27 have modified
toilet locations.
Rowe said that when a handi-
capped student is assigned to a
class on an inaccessible floa,
then the administratiai will move
the class to an accessible floa a
See SERVICES P- 5
sponsors
in Joyner
Nath Carolina Central Univasity
on October 9.
Dr. Maria Malby, associate
professa d Gaman and Russian,
bus Acevez, assistant professa
of Spanish and Marguaite Pary,
Chairpason of the department,
attended opening ceremonies at
which Monsieur Roland Husson,
French Cultural Attache, spoke
representing the French Embassy
in Washington.
The exhibit is shown by
arrangement with the Union fa
the Expansiai of the French
Press in the Wald and Le Haut
Comite de la Langue Francaise.
Dr. Malby, Mile. Marie-
Noelle Connil, a scholarship
student assistant from France,
and Kent Johnsoi, student pres-
ident a the ECU International
Langauge Organization assist lib-
rarians Daothy Brockman and
Ralph Soott with the display.





w
I
I
Flashes
Page 2 FOUNtAINHEAD 3 November 1977
Real Estate Bridge Club FIREFALL
Pie Throw Alpha Beta
The Tri-Sigma's annual Pie
throw is set for Nov. 7 at Chapter
X from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Come
throw a pie at the Sigma of your
choice. Tickets are .26 from any
Sigma or at the door.
Bahai Faith
Discussion of the Bahai Faith,
the newest chapter in the Book of
Religion, occurs each Thursday
evening at 730 in room 238
Mendenhall. Anyone interested
in the oneness of religions,
oneness of God and oneness of
man is invited.
Alpha Beta Alpha, national
library sdence honor fraternity,
will meet Tues Nov. 8, at 4 p.m.
in the LIBS student lounge. All
members please attend.
Phi Eta
FG
The Fcxtver Generation will
meet this Friday night at 7:30 in
Brewster B-103. We invite you to
join us for a profitable and
enjoyable time of Christian
fellowship.
Auroras
Party down with the Auroras of
Sigma Gamma RhoSat Nov. 5 at
the AACC from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Admission will be .50 for ECU
students and .75 for all others.
Review
Those students who would like
to apply for a position on the SGA
Review Board are asked to fill out
a form in room 228 Mendenhall
by noon next Wednesday. The
Review Board hears appeal cases
from other judidal bodies on
campus and also hears all con-
stitutional questions. Applicants
will be notified as to when the
screenings will be held.
There will be a Phi Eta Sigma
meeting Wed Nov. 9at7p.m. in
room 221 Mendenhall. Plans fa
projects and activities will be
presented. Refreshments will be
served. All members should note
on their calenders that the second
Wednesday of each month is our
regular meeting night.
Inter-Varsity
Inter-Varsity will meet this
Sunday at 4 p.m. at the Afro-
American Cultural Center, to play
volleyball and have pizza after-
wards. Please bring $1 to help
cover cost of the pizzas.
Omnicron Pi
Alpha Omnioorn Pi invites
eveiyonedown toBlimpiesMon
Nov. 7 from 6:30 on for a "truly
oonvivial time Door prizes &
contests.
Officials
The Greenville Officials
Association will hold its first
meeting of the season in Elm
Street Gym Wed Nov. 9 at 730
p.m. Anyone interested in offida-
ting jr. high and recreation
basketball please attend. For
further information, call 752-5214
Car Wash King Youth
The N.C. Student National
Environmental Health Assndation
is having a car wash Sat Nov. 5
from 10a.m. to4p.m. at the Shell
Station near Kings on the 264
by-pass. It oosts only $1.25.
Butyou can get .25 off if you
attend the car emissions dinic at
Pitt Plaza - Free and only takes
three minutes.
Coffeehouse
The Student Union Coffee-
house Committee will present
Mike Wells this Thursday and
Friday nights at 9 and 10 p.m.
Mike plays acoustic blues with a
little folk music thrown in for
good measure. Come on down
and have a slice of raisin bread
while listening to Mike. Admis-
sion, as always, is just .50, which
indudes all the goodies you can
eat.
The King Youth Fellowship is
a full gospel campus organization
for all ECU students and faculty.
We encourage you to join us fa-
fun, fellowship and enlighten-
ment concerning God's Word.
The meeting w'l be in rm. 308
Flanagan Tues Nov. 8 at 7 p.m.
We will hear a lecture this week
on " How to win Souls for Christ
Crusade
Training Leadership Class
sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ is free, fun, and
intellectually stimulating. Come
and oonsider the historical evid-
ence supporting the life of Jesus
Christ. Classes for skeptics and
Christians. Join us every Thurs.
at 7 p.m. in Brewster D-202 fa
good music and a good time.
There will be a Rho Epsilon
Real Estate Fraternity meeting on
Wed Nov. 9, in Rm. 221
Mendenhall Student Center. The
guest speaker will be the new
president of the Greenville-Pitt rrmrrmt
County Board of Realtas. All REBEL
members are urges to attend.
The Bridge Club meets each
Thurs. evening at 730 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center. All
persons interested in playing
bridge are invited to attend.
O.T. Club
O.T. Club meeting 5 p.m.
Thurs. In the O.T. lab, Allied
Health building. All prospective
students welcome
Workshop
A School and Community
Health Majas workshop on job
opportunities will be held Nov. 7
from 7-9 p.m. in room 206 Allied
Health. All members COHE
majas and interested persons are
urged to attend.
Peace Corps
Graduate students who are
famer Peaoe Caps Volunteers
are requested tooontad Dr. Floyd
E. Mattheis in the Science
Education Department at ECU.
Phone him at 757-6736 as scon as
possible.
Sabbath
Jewish students: Cong. Bayt
Shalom of Greenville invites you
to attend Sabbath services Friday
evenings at 8 p.m. at the
Methodist Student Center. Each
service is followed by an Oneg
Shabbat.
Film Society
All persons interested in
joining the Eastern Carolina Film
Society, an aganization designed
to allow members to choose the
motion pidures thev wish to see,
please call 758-5253. Ifthereisno
answer, phone.752-6389 a write
Box 27 Falkland, N.C. 27827.
Fencing
A group of students interested
in the art and spat of fendng are
trying to aganize into a dub. If
you are interested in learning to
fence, have fenced befae, a
know of any untapped resources
that might help us, please call
Bev a Blake at 758-4357.
Flu Vaccine
The Student Health Service is
giving flu vacdne to full-time
students during the months of
October and November. It is
strongly recommended that
students with asthma, diabetes,
chronic bronchitis, emphysema,
heart disease, and paralytics
receive the vacdne at an early
date. The vacdne will be given
Monday through Friday from 8
a.m. to4 p.m. and the charge will
be $1.50.
The Rebel, ECU'S literary-arts
magazine, is now aooepting sub-
missions in poetry, fidion, es-
says, art wak, and photography.
Submit your material to the Rebel
office or mail it to the Rebel,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Please make sure to keep a copy
of each wak of literature fa
yourself, and indude your name,
address, and phone number on all
wak.
Bowling
Red Pin Bowling is back! At
the Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Center you can have a
chance to win one (1) free game
with every game bowled. If the
red pin is the head pin and you
make a strike, you win. Every
Thursday evening, from 8 until 11
oould be your lucky day.
Pom Pom
The ECU Pom Pom girls will
be having a "fun time" at
Blimpie'sThurs Nov. 3 from 7to
11 p.m. Everyone come oi down
and drink your blues away.
Happy Hour
Don't miss Happy Hour at
Mendenhall Student Center,
prioes are V3 off on billiards,
table tennis, and bowling. The
time is3 until 6every Mon. Don't
miss it!
Eta Psi
The Eta Psi Chapter of the
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity is
sponsaing an All-Campus Talent
Show. The event is scheduled to
be held Tues Nov. 15 from 7
p.m. until 10 p.m. in the
Multi-purpose room at Menden-
hall Student Center. Part id pants
will be rewarded by a panel of
judges on a point system with 30
pts. being the most any partid-
pant can be awarded. Prizes
ranging from $25 first place,
a plaque of recognition to the
second runner up, as well as
certificates fa all those partidpa-
ting will be presented. A dress
rehearsal will take place Ma
Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. in the
Multi-purpose room and if neces-
sary, an audition date will be set.
If interested in partidpating,
contact Kirk Hdston at 209-A
Scott Dam (phone 752-8766), a
Zack Smith at 251 Jones Dam
(phaie 752-9882) a Willie Battle
at 304-C Scott Dorm (phone
752-5942) fa an application
blank. All entries must be submit-
ted befae Mai Nov. 7. Admis-
sion will be .50. Proceeds will go
to the Kappa Alpha Psi Student
Revdving Loan
Ticketsarenowon sale fa the
FIREFALL conoert in Mendenhall
Student Center. Ticket prices are:
$3 fa students and $5 fa the
public. The conoert will be Sun
Nov. 6th at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum. FIREFALL is another
in a series of concerts brought to
you by the Popular Entatainment
Committee of the Student Union.
4-H Club
The ECU Collegiate 4-H Club
will meet Thurs Nov. 3 at 6 p.m.
They will meet at Peppi' s Pizza on
264 by-pass. Come and join us!
Pool
Paul Gerni, pocket billiard
trick shot champion, will be
perfaming at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center in the Multi-Purpose
Room at 8 Mon Nov. 14. With
one stroke of the cue, Gerni will
amaze you by knocking 12 balls in
six different pockets. Audience
participation will enhance his
trick shot presentation and make
it an event you won't want to
miss. This free exhibition is
presented by Mendenhall Student
Center.
Suicide
Alpha Delta Mu invites any-
one interested to the Nov. 10
dinner meeting to be held at
Bonanza, Thurs at 5:30. Follow-
ing dinner, Cheryl Coppedge,
Director of Adult Out-Patient
Services at Edgecomb Nash
MHC, will speak on "Assessing
Suicide Potential Remember,
you need not be a member to
come to this meeting. Anyone
interested is encouraged to at-
tend.
Faculty
All faculty-staff members are
invited to participate in the
faculty fitness program which is
being held Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 1200-1 tf) p.m. in
Memaial Gym. All those interes-
ted in jogging, exerdsng, basket-
ball, swimming, etc should re-
pat to the gymnastics room oi
the first floa of Memaial Gym
any Monday, Wednesday, or
Friday at 12 CO.
Karate
A Japanese Karate Club (JK A
style) is being famed. Those who
have trained JKA previously a
those who are interested in this
style call 756-3767 and leave
name and number.
NCSL
The Nath Carolina Student
Legislature (NCSL) will meet
Wed Nov. 9 at 7 p.m. All
members are strongly urged to
attend. Constitutional changes
will be considered.





HHMBHHBHHBI
3 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Carnival festivities to begin Nov. 5
Winter carnival to feature 'Mister Mogul Magic'
The 1977 Winter Carnival,
sponsored by the Tennis & Ski
Shop, Inc. will glide into full
swing at 9 a.m. Nov. 5 and
festivities will continue until 6
p.m. Sat. and begin at 12 noon
and continue until 6 p.m. Sun
Nov. 6.
The Winter Carnival, held on
the premises of the Tennis & Ski
Shop at 3814 Monroe Road, will
feature internationally known Jim
"Steel" Stelling, presently
manager of the K2 Ski Team.
Steeling was dubbed "Mister
Mogul Magic" for hm feats in
winning the nationally televised
Moguls Contest at Stowe,
Vermont in 1975.
Stelling, who resides in Sun
Valley, Idaho, also has starred in
five ski films, including award
winning "Assignment K2" and
his latest, "The High Cost of a
Free Ride Stelling directs
summer training camps and
recruits promisong young skiers.
He began his far ranging career
as a member of the first Demo
Team in 1970.
Greek forum
Greeks have been very busy
during the month of October.
Panhellenic helped work the
E-N-T Corporation's during
family and employee's day.
Carved out oranges filled with
candy were also distributed by
the Panhellenics to nursing
homes and mentally retarded
children for Halloween.
The Alpha Phi's celebrated
Founder's Day on October 10th
by collecting pennies for each
year that they have been in
existence.
On Tuesday, October 25th the
Phi s had a cookout with their big
brothers. Pumpkins were carved
out and delivered to the different
fraternity and sorority houses
after the meal.
Kappa Deltas initiated three
new sisters on October 10th. The
week prior to their initiation was
White Rose Week.
Founder s Day was celebrated
October 23rd with many alumni
returning fa this special day.
October 26th Kay Dees held a
Halloween Rush Party. This
proved to be a lot of fun for
everyone involved.
On October 21st the Delta
Zetascelebrated their 75th anniv-
ersary by sharing a Founder's
Day Formal with Delta Zetas from
Atlantic Christian College in
Wilson. Delta Zetas are also
starting a Big Brother program
this year. Inductions will be held
Tues. night Nov. 1st. About 15
guys will be inducted.
The Delta Zetas are sponsor-
ing a needy family for a Thanks-
giving dinner with all the trim-
mings.
A rush party will be held on
November 3rd. Cookies will be
decorated and given to the
Children's Ward at Pitt Memorial
Hospital.
In the past week the Phi
Kappa Tau Fraternity has kept
itself busy on campus. Last
Saturday, the Phi Tau-KRBK keg
party was a great success. There
was a crowd of almost 1,000
people as the K-101 sponsors and
the ECU cheerleaders held con-
tests and distributed prizes.
The Phi Taus Sunday again
showed their spirit by capturing
five first place victories out of
eight events to win the annual
Lambda Chi Alpha field day. The
Phi Taus would like to congratu-
late the Lambda Chi s for doing a
super job in organizing their field
day.
As fa future events to bo held
at the Phi Tau house, the brothers
are planning a fund raising
spaghetti dinner Nov. 15. The
brothers are also chartering a bus
to the Oyster Bowl in Nafolk, Va.
Nov. 12, to help suppat the
Pirates against the Indians of
William and Mary.
GORDON FULP
PRO SHOP
Located at
Greenville Golf and Country Club
off of Memorial Dr.
Phone 756-0504
I Following Tennis Rachets This Week:
Yonex Dunlop
Wilson Head 25 off
'ractice Golf Balls- 10 each
Lined Westwind ECU Logo Jackets-
Purple and Gold
Regular '19.50 now 14.00
All Sizes Available-
Children's 4 - Men's Extra-Large
All New Izod V-Neck Cardigan
Sweaters Just Arrived
All Sizes Available
Large Selection Ski Sweaters
and Appareil Men and Women
Festivities will include re-
presentatives from major ski
equipment manufacturers offer-
ing advice on proper ski equip-
ment and attire as well as special
demonstrations in maintenance
including filing, waxing and
proper P-tex application, which
will be of interest to ail skiers.
Travel experts and resort
representatives will be available
to assist in winter vacation
planning.
The Charlotte Ski Bee Swap
Shop will hold its annual meet on
the premises of the Tennis & Ski
Shop with many items fa ex-
change.
Free prizes, including a Fab-
ulous Weekend fa Two at Beech
Mountain, a new pair of skis and
many ahers will be awarded.
Admission is FREE.
V� lb. RIB EYE
STEAK DINNER
SAVE
60e
Reg Price S2 99 (ONLY $2.39!)
SAVE 60C with this coupon. Jack s Rib
Eye Dinner with choice of Large Baked
Potato or French Fries. Fresh Baked
Roll and Butter and FREE SALAD BAR
void Nov. 18
12 lb. N.Y. STRIP
STEAK DINNER
SAVE 60�
Reg Price $2 99 (ONLY $2.39!)
SAVE 60C with this coupon Jack s
N Y Strip Steak Dinner includes Large
Baked Potato or French Fries. French
Baked Roll and Butter and FREE
SALAD BAR
void Nov. 18
34 lb. T-BONE
STEAK DINNER
SAVE
Reg Price S3 99 (ONLY $3.25!)
SAVE 74C with this coupon
T-Bone Steak Dinner includes
Large Baked Potato or French
Fries. Fresh Baked Roll and Butter
and FREE SALAD BAR
void Nov. 18
CHOPPED SIRLOIN
STEAK DINNER
Reg Price $1 99 (ONLY $1.59!)
SAVE 40C with this coupon Jack s
Chopped Sirloin Dinner with choice of
Large Baked Potato or French Fries.
Fresh Baked Roll and Butter and
FREE SALAD BAR
void Nov. 18
HURRY! Coupon offer ends Nov. 18, 1977
4 IW
mm
ilMH i" ,1
JACK'S
STEAK HOUSE
500 W. Greenville Blvd.
And
2207 Nense Blvd.
r Bern
Dinners Include FREE Salad Bar'





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 November 1977
SGA forced to help
According to Craig Hales, SGA treasurer, the
Marching Pirates have been refused any funding by
the Athletic Dept. even after SGA President Neil
Sessoms asked the Legislature not to fund anything
connected with athletics.
Although the band serves athletics almost solely,
the SGA is now going to have to fund it, at least in
part, if ECU is to continue having the fine,
prestegious band it now has.
The fault, of course, lies in the unreasonable
refusal of the Athletic Dept. to fund a band that has
brought only pride to its football team this season.
Consequently, the SGA Legislature should allocate
some funding to the band so that the rest of ECU can
appreciate the Marching Pirates if the Athletic Dept.
does not.
BUC should be free
The SGA Legislature Monday voted to rescind the
amendment passed last week eliminating a pick-up
fee for the ECU yearbook, the BUCCANEER.
Students will now have to pay $2 to pick up their
BUCs. But actually, they will by paying close to $10
per book even though the student handbook says
yearbooks are to be free to all students.
As David Cartwright, chairperson of the
Appropriations Committee said, this is not fair.
Students should not be required to pay for their
yearbooks twice, especially since the handbook says
they are free.
When the money appropriated to the BUC is
divided by the number of books to be printed-over
$49,000 divided by 5,000-students are paying
approximately $8 out of their activity fees for their
yearbook.
Because of this, students are not going to expect
to have to pay an additional $2. Last year an attempt
was made to sell subscriptions for the BUC with no
success. Students expected to get the book free as
the handbook said. It was a form of protest.
This could very well happen again, which would
mean, almost certain death for the 1978-79 BUC
There are a number of legislators who would like
to see the BUC die so its funds could be given to the
special interest groups they represent. But the
yearbook is for the entire student body, and the only
way to keep these interest groups from killing it is for
the students to go ahead this year and pay the $2 to
prove they do value the book. Perhaps next year the
Legislature would see how important the books are to
ECU and return to making them free fa the students
as they should be.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years.
Senior Editor �Kim J. Devins
Production ManagerBob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert 9waim
News EditorCindy Broome
Trends EditorDavid W. Trevino
Sports EditorChris Hdloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and is distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
and twice weekly during the school year.
Mailing address: ad South Building, Greenville, N.C 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions. $10.00 annually.
Forum
Reader praises ECU Marching Pirates
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I would like to say how
impressive the East Carolina
Marching Pirates are to me. The
Marching Pirates work very hard
and they add so much to the
football games. It would really be
sad to see such a good band go
under because of lack of funds.
Other students and myself
feel it is important that the
Marching Pirates be funded by
the SGA because they are not
totally an athletic organization.
They serve the entire student
body.
The Marching Pirates, like the
Drama Department, provide
entertainment fa all. The March-
ing Pirates manned the election
polls in the first set of truly clean
elections. They should not be
totally under the mercy of the
Athletic Department because
they are so fickle .
It is our SGA and we, the
student body, deserve to see
some money spent fa us.
Esther Snyder
A thetics, intramurals are different
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I would like to make a few
comments regarding the subject
of allocation of student fees.
Kim Devins made a statement
in the editaial Oct. 27 that close
to 50 per cent of each student's
fees is given to Athletics, and part
of that 50 per cent ($7.55) is given
to Intramurals. Even though
cooperation exists between Intra-
murals and Athletics, since they
share some of the same facilities
(Mingesgymnasium, pool, tennis
courts, etc.), they are two inde-
pendent departments with sepa-
rate budgets, purposes and con-
tributions to the student body.
ECU Athletics gives the above
average athlete the oppatunity to
participate on an interoollegiate
baas, and the rest of the student
body the oppatunity to suppat
the teams as spectatas during
their contests. That is fine.
Intramurals, on the other hand,
allows every full-time student no
matter how athletically inclined
the opportunity to participate in a
number of sports and reaeational
activities.
The intramural and reaea-
tioial programs are funded solely
by the money received from
student fees. These funds are not
only used fo the oanpetitive
program and maintenance of
fields and facilities, but also to
suppat spats clubs, reaeatioial
swimming and free play. In
addition, Intramurals maintain
the nets fa all 16 tennis courts,
maintains the equipment in both
weight rooms and purchases and
maintains all of the equipment
available fa student use through
the reaeatioial equipment check-
out service. Approximately 40 per
cent of the Intramural budget is
used to pay STUDENT wakers
hired in such capacities as
scoekeepers and timers, equip-
ment room managers, gymna-
sium supervisos, lifeguards and
officials.
Last year 57.7 per cent of
full-time male enrollment and
25.1 per oent of full-time female
enrollment participated in one a
mae phases of the competitive
intramural spots program. The
statistics do not include students
who used the pools, gymnasiums
during free play, tennis oourts,
weight roans a those who took
advantage of the equipment
check-out service. This figure
does reflect an increase of
approximately eight per cent and
4.5 per cent respectively over the
year befae. Goitrary to what was
stated in the editaial Oct. 21 the
Intramural Department only re-
ceives $7.50 per student per
semester from student fees. This
is the same amount that has been
alloted the program fa the past
three years. Therefoe, it is not
accurate to state that student fees
were inaeased to upgrade the
Intramural program.
I do not contend that either
Intramurals o Athletics is mae
important than the other, justthat
they serve different purposes and
therefoe it is unfair to both to
lump them together as one.
Candy S. Wedemeyer
ECU Intramurals





9
mnBHMRBHSBHHIVVHSIHHHflHHInHBnnflHHnEnHHHl
3 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Med student plans family practice clinic
William Edward Perry of
Kinston, senior medical student
at the University Medical School
at Chapel Hill, will be graduated
early in December and plans
eventually to locate in a family
practice clinic in this area. He
received his educational start at
Lenoir Community College and is
one of the first Lenoir Community
College(LCC) alumni to complete
training for a medical career.
Perry completed a month's
practice at the Mount Olive Clinic
this past week. He was associated
with Dr. Robert Shackleford, Dr.
H.B. Kornegay and Dr. Bob
Meyers in the Mount Olive
Family Medicine Center there.
The Mount Olive doctors have
two nurse practitioners, a phys-
ician's assistant, a first year
family practitioner from Duke
Medical School and a fourth year
medical student from UNC. Perry
was that student for October.
Others will rotate from month to
month during their senoir year,
Perry stated.
Perry iscurrently interviewing
communities in Eastern North
Carolina and throughout the
country for his choice of a place to
do three-year residency in family
medical practice. He will be in
contact with a total of 15 different
SERVICES
Continued from p. 1
to another building if necessary
so the handicapped student can
reach the class.
According to Buzzy Pierce,
a handicapped student, more
elevators are needed but it is
doubtful the university could
afford them.
"One elevator will run in the
neighborhood of $70,000, and
that is totally out of the ques-
tion said Pierce.
The construction of ramps has
made most campus buildings
accessible to wheelchairs, how-
ever, there remains some room
for improvement, according to
Pierce.
"They have a temporary ramp
at the bookstore that needs to be
modified said Pierce. "There
are ramps that need to be
redone
According to James Lowry,
director of plant operations at
ECU, "in excess of $100,000" has
been spent in the removal of
barriers and construction of
ramps.
Pierce said that over the last
year he has seen improvements in
ramps.
Unlike wheelchair students,
visually impaired students must
be oriented to the campus so they
become familiar with the location
of buildings, streets and side-
walks.
Blind students are oriented to
the campus by a representative of
the N.C. Commission of the
Blind.
I he orientation places specific
emphasis on routes to classes,
including auditory and tactile
landmarks.
According to Pierce, the ECU
administration is "pretty good"
about providing services to the
handicapped.
Panel discusses existentialism
ByCANDI LaPRADE
Staff Writer
Existentialism will be the
subject of a panel discussion
Mon Nov. 7 at 8 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse featur-
ing two English professors and
two Philosophy professors spon-
sored by Sigma Tau Delta, the
English honor society. ,
The purpose of the panel
discussion is to enable students to
better understand the philosophy
of existentialism and its implica-
tions in literature.
Ernest Marshall will represent
?he Philosophy Department.
Representing the English
Department will be Dr. David
Sanders and Dr. Norman Rosen-
feld.
All interested persons are
communities before he chooses
his spot for the residency.
He pointed out that the Area
Health Education Center program
at East Carolina University has
been a major factor in the
encouragement of family practice
clinics in North Carolina in recent
years.
The Eastern Health Education
Center at ECU has worked closely
with the family practice centers at
Mount Olive and in Greene
County and other places, Perry
noted.
Since Perry's three-year res-
idency will not begin until early
summer in 1978, he has several
months to enjoy his practice on
the Indian Reservation in Utah.
He will be located at Roosevelt,
Utah, a community of about 6,000
persons, during the first half of
1978.
Perry's educational back-
ground makes him a firm booster
of LCC and the community
college system in North Carolina.
He lacked motivation at the
conclusion of his high school
career in Kinston and failed to
make satisfactory grades at N.C.
State College or at LCC.
He finally enlisted in the Navy
in December 1967 and served as a
medic until his release in Feb-
ruary 1972. Because of his college
grades, he had to re-enter college
on a probationary basis.
The only place that would
admit him even on this basis was
LCC. He had made up his mind to
become a family doctor and he no
longer lacked motivation. He
studied hard and was able to
transfer to ECU for his under-
graduate degree. He was grad-
uated with honors in 1974 and
admitted immediately at UNC
Medical School.
His work there has been
completed ahead of schedule and
he is now anxiously awaiting the
start-up of his residency and his
final plans to locate permanently
in a family style clinic somewhere
ip the Kinston area.
It is good to be this far along
on my goal, but what comes next
is even more important he said.
None of this would have been
possible had Lenoir Community
College not been willing to give
me a second chance at higher
education. will always be
grateful fa itsoonfidenceinme
Dr. James Smith and Dr. invited to attend.
Psyc prof co-authors article
By BILL HARRINGTON
Assistant News Editor
Psychology professor Dr.
Rosina C. Lao is oo-author of an
article appearing in a recent issue
of the Journal of Cross-Cultural
Psychology
The article is based on a joint
research project involving 517
Chinese students presently living
in Taiwan.
The resultant research show-
ed that these students precep-
tions concerning the amount of
internal and external control over
their lives is comparable to
studies of students in other more
industrialized countries.
According to Dr. Lao and the
other co-authors of the article, the
Chinese emphasis on family clan,
and country has been somewhat
minimized by the students ex-
posure to the modernization
presently taking place in Taiwan.
The study shows that cont-
emporary Chinese students,
along with their European and
American counterparts, rely most
heavily upon themselves in their
search for success.
The results of the project were
presented at the 84th annual
convention of the American Psyc-
hological Association in
Washington, D.C. last year by
Dr. Lao and her co-authors.
Dr. Lao received her PhD
degree horn the University of
Michigan.
��������
FOUNTAINHEAD is looking for another oompugraphic
typist to begin spring semester. Pays minimum wage
by the hour. Applicants must already have speed
and accuracy in regular typing and be available to work
long hours on Monday and Wednesday nights.
Compugra phic typing is a valuable skill to learn so apply
at the FOUNTAINHEAD office NOW.
The Pro Shop
Of Greenville, Inc.
(Adjacent to King & Queen Restaurant)
� WARM-UP SUITS
Complete Shipment of Beautiful
White Stag Has Just Arrived
For Men, Ladies, & Children
COME IN AND SEE THEM!
(Open Till 8:00pm Mon Fri.
Till 600 on Sat.)
752-1526
Give her one of the greatest fashion statements
around an opal ring!
a. Butterfly ring, 2 diamonds, 4 genuine opals
in 14 karat gold, $135
b. 6 Diamonds, 1 genuine opal, 6 genuine
sapphires in 14 karat gold, $200
Charge it!
Open a Zales account or use one of five national credit plans.
ZALES
The Diamond Store
Illustrations enlarged
Pitt Plaza
756-0141
Open 10AM 9:00PM Monday thru Saturday





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 November 1977
I
I
I �
I
I
Lesbian mothers discuss child custody rights
UNC group sponsors newly released film Nov. 10
A newly released film about
lesbian mothers and child custody
"In the Best Interests of the
Children will be shown Thurs.
Nov. 10 at 7:30 p.m. at the Law
School building on the UNC
campus m Chapel Hill. There will
be no admission charge and the
public is invited.
Two of the filmmal ers, Frances
Reid and Elizabeth Stevens, will
be present for discussion. Child-
care will be provided, although
children are welcome.
The film, made in 1976-77, is a
presentation of eight lesbian
mothers talking about their ex-
periences as lesbian mothers.
Also presented are an attor-
ney and a clinical social worker,
both of whom have done exten-
sive work with lesbian mothers.
They offer their professional
opinions around the issue Of
lesbians' rights to maintain
custody of their children.
Two mothers who have been
through custody fights talk of
those experiences. Other mothers
discuss what being a lesbian
means to their children, how they
have talked about lesbianism, how
it has affected their friendships.
What the film says, ultimately
is yes, lesbians, are good
mothers, and yes, lesbian
mothers do have problems but
those problems stem from
society's and the courts attitudes
toward them.
The solution to these prob-
lems is not to take children away
from lesbians, but to change
those attitudes. The film is a
direct challenge to the prevailing
myth about the lesbian as a
mother.
Iris Films, who produced the
film, is a feminist and is
oommitted to presenting films
and discussion geared towards
organizing women and showing
their struggles and strength.
Because of the expensive
research done for the film, the
produoers are prepared to speak
both about the making of the film
as well as the situation for lesbian
mothers facing child custody
battles.
In addition to showing this
film, they will also be showing
one other short film selected from
several that they are distributing.
Women in Law, an organiza-
tion of women law students
is sponsoring this presentation.
For science teachers
ECU hosts annual conference
Science teachers from North
Carolina schools will gather at
ECU for the annual oonferenoe of
the N.C. Science Teachers Assoc-
iation Nov. 18-19.
Host fa the event is the ECU
Department of Science Educa-
tion.
Keynote speaker for the oon-
ferenoe is Dr. Uri Haber-Schaim,
Director of the Institute for
Curriculum Development in
Science and Mathematics at
Boston University.
His topic will be The
Challenge to Science Education in
Today's World
Dr. Carl Adler of the ECU
physics faculty, will address the
group on "The Leaning Tower
Revisited
Other conference events
include several concurrent ses-
sions and research reports on
topics in biology, chemistry,
geology and physics; conducted
field trips and displays of current
science educational materials.
Your
Each
challenge is to spell a word, or words, using the letters shown below,
word must contain the letter the indicated number of times.
When there's a challenge,
quality makes the difference.
We hope you have some fun with the challenge.
Pabst Blue Ribbon is the Number 1 beer in
Milwaukee, beer capital of the world.
That's why we have the confidence to issue
another challenge�the Pabst challenge. Taste and
compare Pabst Blue Ribbon to any other premium
beer. You'll like Pabst because Blue Ribbon quality
means the best-tasting beer you can get.
Since 1844 it always has.
PABST Since 1844.The quality has always come through.
PABST BREWING COMPANY, Milwaukee, Wis . Peoria He.ghts, III , Newark, N.J . Los Angeles, Call) . Pabsl, Gi ori
snoniinwni snoindmisun S woojiooqas 'ujoojuooq 0O)tOoi joojdOOj
jix1f�a(89q 'eouapuodapjeiui eDU83�BAJ93 c BjqspeoBjqy iiqisiAipu i j�Mtuy
A barbecue dinner and square
dance has been scheduled fa
Friday evening at the American
Legion Post here.
Organized in 1969, the N.C.
Science Teachers Association
includes persons actively engag-
ed or interested in the teaching of
science in public or private
schools at all levels, from kinder-
garden through university.
Pitt causes
higher
death rate
(LNS)-A recent study of the
effects or oral contraceptives on
women sponsored by the British
Royal College of General Practi-
tionershasoondudedthat women
who take the pill have a 40 per
cent higher death rate than
women of the same age who
never used the pill.
This most comprehensive
study to date of pill-related
deaths was based on an analysis
of 101 deaths that occurred
among 46,000 women involved in
the study sinoe 1968 Half of the
women used in the study had
never taken the pill.
The study attributes the in-
creased death rate to circulatory
diseases, including heart attacks
and other heart ailments, high
blood pressure, blood dots, stro-
kes and brain hemorrhages.
The new findings also suggest
that the risk of death associated
with the pill may increase with
the length of time a woman takes
the pill and that this risk may
remain elevated for some years
after pill use is discontinued.
Combined with cigarette smo-
king, the dangers of pill use were
said to escalate further.
The study has prompted Bri-
tish medical authorities to recom-
mend tha women over 35 stop
using the pill.
ATTIC
Th
i la Iki imi
Fri. & Sat.
Good Humor
Sun. Super (rit
Dm
ThurK. & Fri.
TBA
Sat. LOUIS
BYOL






������fflHnraiiBBMHHiainiBnHnHBBBHnn
3 Novembgr 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
MMHHHI'Mfa, SERVE YOUR FAMILY THE VERY BEST AT A&P's "BEST" LOW PRICES!
CS2� HOME MADE
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale at
or below the advertised price in each A&P
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT. NOV i IN
ANN PAGE BRAND
SLICED BACON
2 K9
HOLIDAY COLLECTIONS
FOOTED SHERBET
AD DESSERT BOWLS 5v'
2 "5? X AQ
EACH
ONLY
MARVEL SANDWICH SLICED
WHITE
SULTANA REGULAR FRENCH FRIED
POTATOES
SEALTEST LIGHT N LIVELY
ICE MILK
SAVE 36c
' j GAL.
CTN.
� �

DAIRY FEATURES
NUTLEY - IN QTRS
1 LB
PKGS
AAP SWEETMILK OR BUTTERMILK
biscuits 6 79
GOODNESS!
A&P Poultry Shop
A&P U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
YOUNG TURKEYS
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRYER
BOX-0-CHICKEN
A&P quality fresh
GROUND BEEF
5Sb chub pack
$3.99
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
AAP QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FEO BEEF
T-BONE STEAKS
OR PORTERHOUSE WJJL.MM
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U.S. 1
RUSSET POTATOES
5 BAG 58c Lflk. dk feak JL
15 1.28 At Wk flrn awn
50 3.78 hbA HJ W VLf m
�S , FLORIDA JUICY
ORANGES
$1000 WINNER
�r�ll�C� Von Ann mmniui Joyce Godfrey
Ownam N C Geo'fleo�f S C HilliborouQft H C
n 9 n
Sendre Wttion Rachel Slevent Fannie Pow�"
S25 WINNERS
$1000 cash bonanza
$100 WINNERS $50 WINNERS 1
Meat Franks 21b pkg
SI. 69
VicCo Ntniltr John DouOhfie
Copp�'htl Ttnn ftoi�oO Rapids C
r
AAP COUPON
PURE VEGETABLE SHORTENING
CRISC0
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON AND
ADDITIONAL 7.50 ORDER
SAVE 40c Mjffefe
�674
LIMIT ONE COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT NOV 4 IN
AAP COUPON
Louis 0-oqs Jane Hi'nde
thoflit�n� NC fteieiah NC

Osia ba�0eve wtfnsm ��neho"
Apai N C Aoetouc 1 C
�� OOOl ooot OOOl
Mrs M n McCiean Rotten Moe�
Caroline Beech"NC Rea'o'd NC �Joenohe Rapids N C Raetod NC Rete�jh NC (
$360,064 160.620
CASH PRIZES CASH WINNERS
QjAMfl MUJII Vl VlfcTt VIMT
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.
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i
Da MONTE ROUNDUP
Del monte yellow ding
I iced peafh.es
3 8oy. Vans $1.00
Del Mor.ie
fruit cocktail
3 8 OI i an-
$ 1.00
Del Monte slicec
pine apple
3 8V4 07
can 91.00
DEL MONTE YELLOW CLING
PEACHES
29 OZ
CANS
$SBgH�
PILLSBURY
FLOUR
LtMHT ONf WITN THI� COUPON
AMD ADDITIONAL 7 M tRD�A
VEc'sPLAIN OR SELF RISING
LMIT ONf WITH THI� COUPON fl I Jfl RV L
AND �OOMiO�A, -M CKH IFKi
5 B.Bd �JJ
875
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LIMIT ONE COUPON
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LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON AND
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GOOD THRU SAT NOV 5 IN





p
Page8 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 November 1977
MENDENHALL MOGUL CONTEMPLATES events coming to ECU campus.
������-�-�-��-� This Sunday's Firefall concert and next week's
1 Y& m fl Dinner Theatre fill the thoughts of Dean Rudolph
Alexander of the Student Center.
Ferguson bombs with dentist office disco
� A
MA NARDFERGUSON
�-GE
i'
.
ilbum is called
New Vintage it s bouquet is
3. This
jurn is another rw rgu-
or seems more
' erned with making music
�hat will sell than with hitting any
The arrar
m- - 3 part si
ling th
mi. i n wvrfwn
gly for -Ajt a
i
- ,tit.
Another
sparse, the
�ids best at two a.m.
.1 our favorite
mixture. One of the better songs
is ' old
Bernstein's West
rhissong h
performed by a
favoi ite fi
Side St or ,
ged and
number of
mdodically effective playing
MA fNARD i f RGUSON S be appeared last
in a i Arnjht Auditorium
to by Pete I
i
io)
- - oa (� in order
I erguson does a
I
'
i trumpet, t
fuiiy in ha
ing i rl does lil fa
;i. ire a supei fu
� by Bobby Milite
part a this numbei
In addition lo Maynard i- ergu-
i on trumpet otha soloist!
the album are Mike Mitli �
sax. guita and Jay
Chattaway on trumpet
By fat the be
album is the fas) paced Aire
gin, only four minutes -
the jazi oompoeei Sonny Rollins
rhe band plays -lit!
il bri i nedf speed
while i ergusa trumpet sii
ile album
sn I this good M yon �
.
by Mike Aberx
� Ih the price ol
urn





3 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD
Page
Student writes of encounter with Satanism
LUKE WHISNANT
Staff Writer
Everything seemed pretty
mal It was just another
Halloween: kids throwing eggs
and rolling yards; parents siicing
apples to check fa
blades; thousands of church-
group haunted houses raking in
the money and thousands of high
school carnivals burning life-sized
paper-mache witches under the;
almost full moon. There may have
been a few legitimate witches
standing around those bonfires
Monday night, watching their
symbolic alter-egos transmute
tshes, but more than likely
-vre busy with their own
xi-after all, Hallow
� holiest night of the year to
onm people
We're all familiar with it by
now-the Black Mass with all its
darkest ritua "ars at
� i on TV. usually in
ide-for-l �
movii The Devil s�h&
ders ot Satan s Daughter. Some
of thi - -phcit
remonies are only hinted
at during prime-time�you have to
k out the orgys at your local
� rback bookshelf Something
it rv exposure, though,
makes the whole ngamarole of
Satanism seem silly and a I'ttle
pathetic, and I'm not quite sure
we should feel
it it There are more people
, into Satanism than we
One blistering August day this
tting around
'd at the edge of a cornfield
with three friends of mine. The
oorn had been scorched to death
weeks ago, and even the crickets


i
som . lo
At mute, Tim
elf u i one elbow and
)id i ever tell ya'li about
und out here one
said Jeff
"I was hunting out here one
and the dogs had jumped a
rabb � a mile down the
o I just started walking
around until they could run him
back tome. All of a sudden I came
(o a clearing in the woods and
huge pyramid-pur-
ple, too, with a plexiglass eye on
top
You were stoned, right9'
n
W' � -

David
main highway and tl
Tim took us l bumpy
' I sss and less
navigable and eventually turned
sun-baked mud
ruts.
W' out and walked
Walked past an orange mailbox
with the word HOME painte
i te, up a little hill into a wall
of pines which hid the pyramid
from sight
It was purple. It stood about
20 feet tall, and it was big enough
inside to parallel park two Cadil-
t fioot
i

-
jdes
picture this
left-hand
Outsjo
campfire pil brie
Arou' s of
charred bones. I was q.�
� ng out until Tim informed
hat they Aere cow bones
tee SATANISM p. 10)
Iron Horse Trading Co
Merchants and Craftsmen
In Fine Gold and Silver Jewelry
Crystal Jewelry
from VuHtria
10 OFF

Located: 301 S. Evans Mall Hours: MonThurs. 10-6
First State Bank Building 6 Sat 10-6
AROUND THE P'J were dozens ot small bones
BLOOD
DONOR
CoKqftatutons
Or
Students ijacullttj 2taj
�fj
fiast Carina Qinuet$ity
Qjou Went Qm xjk 9bpl!
1.033 9mts Donated On
October 25fi 26tfc 8 2.
On Bd4 �i 9T� Patterns Qjou'w
helped 0(s Sttw. Ue Slant 3Jo�.
'xJidemtQh Qeg tonal!





Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 November 1977
Satanism
Continued from p. 9
Standing a little way off from the
firepit was a marble sundiah with
these wads inscribed on the face:
Before Light Comes Darkness
Jeff kicked the sundial over. "I
know what this is now he
hollared. "These people are
dev i I- worshi ppers
Tim politely told Jeff to shut
up and stop destroying other
people's property.
There was no door on the
pyramid, just an entrancway
with large black hexagrams pain-
ted over it. "Don't you know what
these are?" Jeff exclaimed.
"These are witches' symbols
"Ya'll go on'in if you want
to said Tim, "but I'm staying
out here
In the corner stood a make-
shift spice rack and an old iron
kettle. The spices were stored in
babyfood jars. At first we thought
we had found someone's stash,
but on closer inspection we were
unable to indentify any of the
herbs.
David and I went in. Dead
center of the dirt floor was a well
which Tim swore hadn't been
there before. We dropped a rock
down the shaft and counted two
seconds before it hit bottom.
"Let's see-32 feet per second
squared David whistled.
"Man, that thing's more than 90
feet deep
"How in hell do you suppose
they dug that?" The sides were
perfectly smooth. "No way they
could have gotten well-digging
equipment in here
I spent this past Monday night
in a barren room here in
Greenville, just as I have spent
the two previous Halloweens.
Trick-or-treaters kept banging on
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apples, I turned off the lights and
locked up, hoping they'd leave us
alone. Then it got very quiet.
Maybe I should have gone
downtown or hit a oouple of
parties. Instead, I sat around and
thought about what might be
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and unterrified. My dark side
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3 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Hawkins to appear in Idaho, Glenn on campus
Music faculty in weekend performances
By RENEE DIXQN
Trends Staff
Two members of the East
Carolina University School of
Music will be performing this
weekend. David R. Hawkins, an
instructor of oboe in his first year
on the faculty here, will be
appearing as a soloist with the
Idaho Falls Symphony Orchestra
in Idaho Falls, Idaho on Saturday
the fifth of November. On Sunday,
November 6, at 8:15 p.m. in the
A.J. Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall here in Greenville
Edward Glern, bass baritone will
perform in recitaJ.
Glenn is a member of the East
Carolina School of Music voice
faculty and has perfamed in solo
recital and with opera companies
and symphony orchestras in
Washington, D.C. and the
Carol inas.
His program will include
Mozart's "Mentre ti Lasrio
K.513; Brahm's "Vier Ernste
Gesange Opus 121; "Nemico
della patria" from Giordano's
"Andrea Chenier "Ave
Signor" from Boito's "Mefisto-
fele "Songs of Travel
Glenn will be accompanied by
Dr. Charles Bath of the ECU
keyboard faculty. The recital is
free and open to the public.
An alumnus of Converse
College, Glenn received the
Master of Music Degree in voice
permanence from Catholic
University and did additional
voice study in New York. He has
been baritone soloist with the
United States Navy Band in
Washington, D.C. and also per-
formed w'th the Washington
Opera Society, the Washington
Civic Opera at with the National
Symphony Orchestra.
His operatic performances
Area artists to participate
Piedmont Crafts Fair
ByJIM HANES
Staff Writer
This weekend, November 4-6,
the Piedmont Craftsman will have
a show and sale in Winston-
Salem, North Carolina.
There will be 135 artists
exhibiting in this year's show.
Some are residents of Greenville.
The work of Chuck Chamber-
lain will be on exhibit at the 14th
annual show. Chuck is an instruc-
tor in ceramics at ECU School of
Art.
Area artists invited to exhibit
works at the Piedmont Crafts Fair
include potters Betsy Markowski
and Eddie Smith and jeweler
Myra Sexauer.
The craftsmen and artists
gained the privilege of showing in
the upcoming show by being
talented enough to pass jury.
A juried show eliminates
works either not in keeping with
the tone of the exhibition or those
of inferior quality. This safe
guard serves to insure the unified
continuity of a particular show.
Areas of work to be exhibited
include pottery, weaving, glass,
wood, jewelry, photography,
print making, macrame, batik,
' iron work, leather, stitchery, book
binding, quilting, enameling and
basket weaving.
Suggestions for next years
attractions include Tatoo Art and
Van painting fa those who feel
this other stuff is a bit tame.
One good feature of a show
like this is that it gives the patron
who purchases an art wak an
oppatunity to meet that piece's
aeata. Another is that it also
allows ten artist to sell his wak
directly to the public without
having to pay a gallery commis-
sion.
In addition toall this projected
visual stimulation live entertain-
ment is planned as well as
demonstrations by master aafts-
men and educational exhibits. A
sidewalk cafe is also planned.
But who needs distracting
entertainment when it is possible
to watch an artist midwifing a
piece into existence.
The 14th Annual Piedmont
Crafts Fair will be held in
MemaiaJ Coliseum in Winston-
Salem.
CLYDE GOBBLE OF Winston-Salem throws a pot for the 14th
Annual Piedmont Crafts Fair-November 4, 5 and 6 in the
Winston-Salem Coliseum.
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have included music festival
opera appearances in Brevard,
Uuiiowhee and Spartanburg,
South Carolina as well as the
Chariate Opera Association.
Prior to coming to East
Carolina, Mr. Glenn was head of
Vocal Music at Nathern Virginia
Community College. This is Mr.
Glenn's second year with the
ECU School of Music. He is also
the directa of the Greenville
Community Chaus.
In Idaho Fallson Saturday Mr.
Hawkins will be perfaming the
"Symphonie Concertante" for
oboe and achestra by Jacques
Ibert.
Hawkins, an hcnas graduate
of the New England Coiservatay
of Music, has perfamed with
chamber ensembles in Carnegie
Recital Hall and the Concert Hall
of the Kennedy Centa fa the
Perfaming Arts.
Before coming to ECU,
Hawkins taught at Washington
State University and perfamed
fa two years with the Spokane
Symphony Orchestra.
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3 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
PRESSBOX
by CHRIS HOLLOM AN
The oldest continuing series in East Carolina University football
will be renewed this weekend in Boone, N.C when the Pirates face
in-state rival Appalachian State. These two teams first met in 1932, the
first year that East Carolina University fielded a football team. The
Apps were 21-0 winners in that first game and have dominated the
Series 19-7-0. The series has been played in three parts, the first being
1932-1939, with ASU winning all eight games. The second part was
1960-1962, again Appalachian on top with 13 wins to ECU'S four. The
third part has been 1972 to the present, with East Carolina leading that
modern day stretch 3-2. Last season, the Pirates overwhelmed
Appalachian in Ficklen Stadium 35-7 to take the Southern Conference
championship before a regional ABC-TV audience on Thanksgiving
Night.
East Carolina set a new season attendance record with 18,354 on
hand Saturday night in Ficklen Stadium. The Pirates have drawn
262,056 fans thus far, breaking the old season record of 237,191 of last
year, set in 11 games. ECU still has two games remaining this year.
The Pirates missed setting a Ficklen Stadium record for a single season
by only 2,225. However, only four games were played in Ficklen this
year, while the record was set in five games last season. Already, with
two road games remaining, the Pirates have set a new road attendance
mark by over 15,000.
The Pirates of East Carolina have played before three over capacity
crowd thus far, and are assured of the same this weekend in Boone.
Some 13,000 are expected for the East Carolina-Appalachian State
clash, while capacity is listed as only 9,500 fa Conrad Stadium.
Through nine games, the Pirates have drawn 252,056 fans, with
total stadium capacity in the nine games of 259,584. This means the
Pirates have drawn fans to the rate of 97.1 of stadium capacity when
all ninegamesareoornbined.Topswas126.3vsSouthern Illinois in
Ficklen Stadium, while the low was 60.1 vs The Citadel in
Charleston, S.C.
Senia quarterback Jimmy Southerland became the seventh leading
passer in East Carolina histay against Southwestern Louisiana with
but 20 yards in the game, his lowest output of the year. But it did up
Southerland's career total to 821 yards, one mae yard than Neal
Hughes (1965-67). The Wilmington. N.C native needs 108 yards to
move to sixth.
Senia split end Terry Gallaher continues to lift his way towards the
career reoad at East Carolina fa reception yardage. Gallaher added
only 15 yards against Southwestern Louisiana, but needs only 96 yards
in the final twogamestotop that first place total of 1,193 yards by Tim
Dameron (1970-72). Gallaher has 1.098 yards. Further. Gallaher needs
but three receptions to become the seventh leading receiver in number
of receptions.
Junia running back Eddie Hicks moved into a tie fa tenth on the
career rushing list with 41 yards against Southwestern Louisiana.Hicks
has 1408 yards to tie BH1 Cline (1962-64). The Henderson native leeds
but 46 yards to move to the ninth spot.
The score was 0-0 at half time Saturday night, marking the first time
since September 13, 1975. that East Carolina had not scored pants in
the first half of a game. The last time was in Boone vs this week s
opponent , Appalachian State, where the Pirates trailed by three
scores at the half. Further, the 00 score was the first non-soaing half
fa either team since East Cara.na's battle with Furman on September
29, 1973, a game the Pirates won in the seond half 14-3.
The Southwestern Louisana game was the first time in 25 games
that East Carolina had not scaed at least 10 pants in a gameThe
Pirates had ranked second in the nation, tied with Texas Teen, and just
behind Notre Dame, in soaing 10 a mae pants in consecutive games.
Notre Dame kept its streak alive at 26, while Texas Tech also fell off the
list with a 25-0 shutout to Texas.
Despite two consecutive subpar games, junior all-America
candidate Gerald Hall ranks number one in the nation in punt returns.
Hall has had but three returns fa seven yards in the last two games
although still averaging 16.1 yards per return fa the season Last
weeks leader, Jimmy Cefalo of Penn State, dropped to second place
Mountaineers vs. ECU
By CHRIS HOLLOM AN
Spats Edita
This weekend the oldest con-
tinuing series in East Carolina
football will be renewed as the
Pirates take on the Appalachian
State Mountaineers in Boone
N.C. The Pirates will come into
Conrad Stadium with a 7- reoad
after last weeks loss to South-
western Louisiana. Appalachian
on the other hand comes into the
game with a 2-6 reoad and off of
a loss also. The loss to Ball State
was just another frustration fa
the Apps as they were routed
38-7.
It has been difficult fa ASU to
explain its problems so far this
year although Mountaineer coach
Jim Brakefield confirms that
those who picked ASU as the
favaite fa the Southern Confer-
ence title in the pre-season
probably did not have an accurate
guage of the team's talent.
In spots (backfield, center,
defensive end, linebacker) the
Apps have some of the best
personnel to be found anywhere,
but that simply hasn't been
enough to carry what is otherwise
a very young team.
Coach Jim Brakefield, in his
seventh year at Appalachian, says
the Pi rates are probably "30 a 40
points" better than the Apps
right now. "We just aren't a very
good football team he says.
One thing that will never be
fagotten was the stomping the
Apps put on East Carolina the last
time they were in Boone. The
41-25 scae was no indication of
how bad the Mountaineers routed
the Pirates. Coach Dye feels that
this game was one of his most
embarrassing moments and
doesn't want to see it happen
again.
"Nomatter how long I coach,
I wili never faget the embarrass-
ment Appalachian put our team
through up there in Boone Dye
said. "They rushed fa 394 yards
and had about 546 yards total
offense. At one time the scae
was 41-7 so they really whipped
us in every way. I just hope we
are ready fa ASU this time
because they really play tough
when they meet us. I think that a
win over us would help to turn
around their season so I know that
they want to beat us mae than
anything else. It will simply be a
great game and we hope we're
ready fa the challenge
The challenge that coach Dye
is talking about is trying to shut
down the ASU offense. The
Mountaineer offense was nation-
ally ranked last week and is
virtually the same group that ran
all over the Pirate defense in
1975. The big guns in the
Mountaineer offense are Robby
Pnoe and halfback Emmitt Hamil-
ton. Price is a do it all type of
quarterback who can pass as well
as run the ball. He always has a
way of giving the Pirate defense a
fit with his quick pitch-outs to the
halfbacks. Hamilton by the way is
the receiver of most of those
pitchoutsand hand offs. As of last
week the NCAA statistical service
rated Hamilton as the 12 rusher
in the nation. He is averaging
143.3 yards a game and already
See MOUNTAINEERS, p. 15)
East Carolina vs Appalachian State
DATE: Saturday, November 5, 1977
Pre-game fact sheet
TIME: 130 p.m.
LOCATION: Conrad Stadium Boone, N.C.
ESTIMATED ATTENDANCE: 13,000
OFFENSES: East Carolina-wish bone
AppalachianSt ate-wishbone
DEFENSES: East Carolina-5-2
AppalachianState-5-2
EAST CAROLINAAPPALACHIAN STATE
SE Terry Gallaher (Sr 174)LE Jay McDonald (Sr205
LT Mitchell Smith (Jr 236)LT Eddie High (Jr 250) -
LG Wayne Bolt (Sr 254)NG Ernie Henderson (So250)
CRickieHolliday(Sr193)RT Eric Elkin(Fr 210)
RG Wayne Inman (So 240)RESami Killman(So207). .
RTJoeGodette(So224)LB David Bowman (Jr 215)
TE Barry Johnson (Sr 225)LBPatMurphy(Jr220) .
QB Jimmy Southerland (Sr 170)LBPatMurphy(Jr220) -
FB Theodae Sutton (So 200)SSJeff Vincent (Fr 180) . .
RB Eddie Hicks (Jr 201)FSRickBeasley(Fr.155).
RB Willie Hawkins(Sr 188)RCBGaryFalden(So200 .
SE Fred Chavis(Jr 200)SEPatSwisher(Sr170) .
LT Woodrow Stevenson (So 230)LT Roy Thompson (Sr 230)
NG Oliver Felton(Jr 207)LG Russell Wilson (Jr 240)
RT Noah Clark (So225)C Gil Beck (Sr 240)
WE Zack Valentine (Jr 218)RG Steve Parrish (So240).
SLB Harold Randolph (Sr 195)RT Robert Mullen (So240)
WLBMikeBrewmgton(So225)RE Michael Peterson (Jr 165)
LCB Charlle Carter (So 173)QB Robby Price (Sr 165) . .
SSGerald Hall (Jr 184)RB Scott McConnell (Jr 190)
FSSteveHale(Sr177)RB Emmitt Hamilton (Sr 195)
RCB Willie Holley (So 176)FB Eddie Estes(So 220) .
Placekicker: Junia Creech
Punter: Rodney Allen
Sports
ASU QUARTERBACK ROBIE Price will lead the Mountaineer
wishbone against the Pirate defense Saturday afternoon





Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 November 1977
Gill man aims to please students
By STEVE BYERS
Assistant Sports Editor
"As long as I am the
basketball coach here my 'irst
two concerns are to win games
and to please the students says
East Carolina's new roundball
coach, Larry Gillman.
Armed with confidence and a
team bursting with enthusiasm,
CoachGi 11 man has on I y one aspect
of recruiting left this season. Says
Gillman, 'The one player that
can turn it all around is the
student body. They are worth 10
to 15 pants a game every home
game; and I know they can do it if
they want to
To aooomodate Gillman's op-
timism one entire side of the gym
has been reserved fa students.
"I want Minges Coliseum to be a
place where no opposing team
will ever want to return smiled
Gillman.
"All the players and ooaches
believe that whenever we step on
the floor with any team in the
country, we can win
Such optimism is not unwar-
ranted as the Pirates will intro-
duce some exciting recruits and a
group of hungry returnees anx-
ious to redeem themselves from
last year's disappointing season.
Leading the charge is junia
?5I
HERB GRAY foreground) vs. N.C. State
Photo by John Banks) GREG CORNELIUS (27) vs. N.C.

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college transfer Oliver Mack. A
sure starter Mack is joined at
guard by Walter Mosely, Jim
Ramsey, senior, Don Whitaker,
Greg Cornel ious, and walk ons
Scott Nelson and Ron Stumpo.
"Don Whitaker has been a
pleasant surprise and Ron Stum-
po has added a lot of personality
to the team he added, "I am
pleased with our overall guard
situation
Last year's second leading
scorer Herb Gray is joined at
toward by Herb Krusen, Kyle
Powers, Bernard Hill, Roger Carr
and Gary Kurr. Hill and Carr are
highly regarded freshmen while
Kurr made the team as a walk on.
Sane towards will be alternating
at center.
"I expect to play about 9 or
ten players a game said Gill-
man. "There will always be a lot
of running and I think that's what
students want to see
Gillman further stressed the
importance of student body back-
ing at not only home games but
away games. "I would like to see
the SGA sponsor some buses to
the tournament December 9th
and 10th in Charlotte he said,
"There will be some exciting
teams there which should make a
great weekend of basketball
State. Photo by John Banks
Gillman also pointed out the
game at N.C. State December
17th. "A big crowd in Raleigh
would really help the players
As for the next two weeks
practice will still be open to
students and November 10th the
Purple-Gold game will be played
at D.H. Conely High School at
7:30.
Coach Gillman invites anyone
who is interested to come out to
see practice and ask him any
questions that come to mind.
"We want to get the students
involved in East Carolina Basket-
ball One thing is for certain for
those who talk to coach Gillman,
they'll be made to believe.
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3 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAO Page 15
Dorcus Sunkel's play boosts tennis team
Last season when East Caro-
lina's Lady Pirate tennis team
was playing an admittedly weak
schedule, Dorcus Sunkel strug-
gled through a 6-7 year at number
one singles even though the Lady
Pirates had a 10-3 team won-loes
mark. But, this season, with the
Lady Pirates playing a much
tougher schedule, Sunkel has
come through with a 9-3 mark,
including a 7-2 dual match record.
"There's just not as much
pressure on me this year, playing
number three Sunkel said.
"There are no psychological
burdens on me. The competition
is as good a better because we' re
playing much tougher teams.
We're playing with people now
that play in the nationals
Last week, Sunkel led the
Lady Pirates to a 6-3 win over
Peace College of Raleigh, N.C.
Peace had placed second at the
National Junior College Tennis
Championships last season and
were ranked number one in the
nation fa junior colleges this
season.
A native of Baltimore, Md
Sunkel has benefited from the
influx of two newcomers to the
Lady Pirates this season. Debbie
Spinazzola and Louise Snyder
were both ranked high in their
regions of the country when they
came to East Carolina.
"Debbie and Louise have
added a lot of depth to our squad
this season the therapeutic
recreation major said. "They
have given us a strong lineup
throughout. They have inspired
the rest of us to trv to continue
improving our game
A strong serve and a lot of
hustle best characterizes Sunkel'�
game. Good short angle shots
seem to be strong with Sunkel,
while the backhand is giving her
the most trouble.
Dorcus is really a hustler out
there on the court said tennis
coach Cynthia Averett. "She is
really gutsy. She goes after a lot
of balls that most players would
let go. She is also very consistent
with her ground strokes. She can
play the baseline all day.
"But probably the best thing
about Dorcus Averett contin-
ued, "is her attitude. She just
doesn't know when to give up
As a preoster at Patapsko
High in Baltimore, Sunkel played
number one two years and was
undefeated both years in the
oounty league. She was also the
oounty champion in the open
division after her senior season.
Sunkel is also a very good
doubles Dlaver. teamming with
!
i
Spinazzola at number one.
"I like playing doubles as
much as singles Sunkel said.
"Debbie is just great at the net,
while my best game comes at the
baseline. We're a very compati-
ble team fa doubles
"With Dorcus' consistency
and Debbie's power game
Coach Averett said, "they are
really a good team. They wak
together real well and both have
strong serves. And in doubles,
you have to have a hustler like
Dacus at the baseline
With Sunkel playing well all
season, the Lady Pirates have
improved their mark to 6-8 after a
harendous1-7 start.
Even though the Lady Pirates
have played much tougher com-
petition this season and have
taken a few lumos as a team, no
one had to wary about number
three singles, because Dacus
Sunkel has taken real good care of
that class.
MOUNTAINEERS
Continued from p. 13
has 1003 yards fa the year.
The problem fa the Moun-
taineers this year has been a
young defense which is being
burned fa an average of 407.4
yards a game. Last week against
Ball State fa example the Apps
gave up 580 yards total offense.
This may make things seem easy
fa the Pirates but there is oie
factor that could make the
Appalachian team tough to cope
with. This is the fact that ASU
runs the "wishbone" also and
will have plenty of experienced
scouting team personnel fo teach
the defense to stop the bone. In
shat the Pirates will be easy to
prepare fa because ASU is very
familiar with our offense thus the
defense will probably play the
Pirates tougher.
Appalachian isn't the only
school involved that has personet
ranked in the NCAA stats. Safety
Gerald Hall is the number one
punt returner in the nation this
week followed by Peon States
Jimmy Cefalo.
The game this Saturday after-
noon shapes up as another tough
rivalry game between ECU and
ASU. Coach Dye wants to prevent
the trouble he had in Boone the
last time he was there, but the
M ountaineers are sure to give the
Pirates their usual tough recep-
tion.
r
I
A
ASU HEAD COACH Jim Brakeheld
TERRY GALLAHER IN 76 ECU ASU game.
Classifieds
forsde
FOR SALE: 68 Squareback
fast back owners: replacement
parts fa your car at low rst.
Have 68 Fstbck breaking fa
parts. Lights, fuses, seats, trans-
axleclutch parts, fenders, tires
and wheels. You need it? I
probably ga it. Call Mike 756-
6674 ext. 6360
FOR SALE: AKC Great Dane
pups - 5 weeks old - 3 fawn 1 Wk.
Call after 6 p.m. 826-5100.
FOR SALE: '73 Honda 500 four,
7200 miles, excellent cond. $950
see next to Pollards Grocery
(Bells Fak 3 miles out 43 south).
FOR SALE: 73 350 Honda $350
758-0693.
FOR SALE: 68 Volvo sedan -
auto - rebuilt engine. Good oond.
$800. Call 758-0458.
FOR SALE: 14k. white gold
diamond engagement ring and
matching band size 5. $125.00 a
best offer. Call Daothy 758-8452.
FOR SALE: Texas Instruments
SR-52, 224 step programable.
Also card programable. Complete
with math, St at games and basic
libraries. Cost 300 plus new, 5
mos. old. Contact Tony Bennett at
401 Jones.
FOR SALE: '76 Mustang II
fast back, A.C 4-speed. Low
mileage - 27 mpg. Exoelient oond.
$2,800 a bargain. Call 758-0458.
FOR SALE: Sears self cleaning
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jost $44 sell $30 excellent fa
hone a dam. 752-5499.
FOR SALE: Recad your own
tapes and savewith an Akai
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Features include 2vu metas, fast
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p.m. M-F.
FOR SALE: Sony reel to reel tape
deck; good oond oomes with 2
mikes. $150 752-3739 after 9 p.m.
FOR SALE. 8 dubs, golt bag, golf
cart. Call 753-3624 after 6 o.m.
FOR SALE71 BMW Motacycle
' Best road machine in the wald
low mileage - $1295.00 a best
reasonable offer. May accept
partial trade. Call 7& 7059 from 5
to 10 p.m.
fcxrertjj
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
pay V3 of rent and utilities.
Greenway Apts. Call 756-7888
NEEDED: One female roommate
by Nov. 16, 1977 at College View
Apts E. 10th St. Call Linda at
752-6963.
FEMALE ROOMMATE; needed
by the end of Nov. Tar River
Apts. Call 752-4984 Ask fa
Bobbie.
WANTED TO RENT; 3-bdrm
house in country within 10 miles
of Greenville. Reward upon
rental. Call 752-0982
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
$65 plus 13 utilities, 2 stay, 2
bedroom, 2 bath 758-6617.
persondOa
FILM SOCIETY: All persons
interested in joining Eastern
Carolina Film Society call at
758-5253. If no answer phone
752-6389 or write Box 27
Falkland, N.C. 27827
TO BUY: FM Signal generata
(used) must have 140-170 MgHz
bandwidth capacity. Call 752-
0982.
ID. a passpat Pictures. At
Rudy's Photography 1025 Evans
St 752-5167.
WANTED: Silver ooins, dimes,
quarters, halfdollars dates 1964
a pria. Will pay three times face
value. Call 756-3466 - 9 a.m. - 9
p.m.
RIDE NEEDED: to Boone, N.C.
fa ASU - ECU game. Wants to
leave Fri. and return Sun. even-
ing or early Mon. maning.
Please call 758-1636.
NEED TYPING? Fa efficient,
fast service Call 756-3815 after
5.15 p.m. Reasonable rates IBM
Carbon type used.
MUSICIANS: Newly faming soul
band looking fa singers, lead
guitarist, and keyboard player.
Call LB. 758-8310.
ALTERATIONS: Fall things too
big, too long? Call Kathy.
752-8444 a 752-8642.
RIDE NEEDED: to Miami
anytime after Dec. 13, 1977. Call
Marie-Noelle Connil 758-9229
FOUND: Rings. Contact Depart-
ment of Psychology 757-6800.
WANTED: Used BlackWhite
T.V. in good oond. Will pay
reasonable price. Call 758-8452
after 5 p.m ask fa Michelle D.
LOST: 1 Female Malmute and
Sheep dog. Black and white, need
medicine. Call Bill 752-8862.





16 FOUNTAINHEAD 3 November 1977
DO YOU NEED A T-SHIRT
FROM THE DEAN OF BEER?
(DID THE TITANK NEED LIFEBOATS?)
Stglinda fteinWIIer
Dean of Beer
Mm
.
-Hfiie" f-SMrt. Yellov; with
turr&rf the-century Schtez
design in full cokw. 5Qcotton,
50�lyesteT. SUes: &H L
"tan ��r" Uisar SWrt.
Ventilated mesh football style
shirt for men or women.
Numerals on shoulder and back
100 stretch in Sizes:
S.M,UXL$l4T"
fffEOEAN
' 3
k��
&&&
IjtfP
m
ScMHi 'PatteriT T- Shirt. Wl lite
with colorful pattern of Schlitz
trademarks Sizes S. M. L. XL
$3 50

I
-Ort oi SdHtar f-SMrt.
Blend of cotton and polyester.
Gray color Sizes S. M. L. XL.
$3.50
QUAN
Dl S KIPTIQN
SII
UNIT
PRICE TOTAL

TOTALS
? My order is over $25
Please send me my surprise gift worth b (X)
Send order with check or money order payable tr
Schlitz Dean of Beer
Post Office Box 9373
St Paul, MN 55193
Allow 4 weeks for shipment Void where prohibited by law Offer
expires December 31. 1977 Prices include shipping and handling
costs
SHIP TO
Name.
Address-
City
State
.Zip.
�1977 Jos Srhlil Brewing Co Miluauhe Wk
V �1977.
y
Dean o ���r T-SMrf. F
deserve to wear the title. Je
sleeves and Dean of Beer
cotton Sizes: S, M, L XL
lose of you who reafty
style with gold M length
Jn full color 100
$4.50
Schlitz is a trademark of Jos. Schlitz .Brewing Co, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202
K f' '� '�'





Title
Fountainhead, November 3, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.480
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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