Fountainhead, November 1, 1977






Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
Vd. 53 No. 18
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
1 November 1977
ON THE INSIDE
Oil Spill Grantp.5
Career Workshopp.5
Opera Theatrep.7
Pirates Losep.10
CLIFF MOORE VCE Chancellor for Business Affairs
REAL to assist
'battered wives'
By DOUG WHITE
Assistant News Editor
Real Crisis Intervention Inc. is
laying the groundwork for a
program to help battered wives
which should begin in approx-
imately one year, aooording to
Mary Larew, program coordina-
tor.
"At present, there is really no
place for a battered wife to go for
help. The polioe can't get involv-
ed until the wife swears out a
warrant to have her husband
arrested, and since the husband
can usually make bond in about
four hours, the wife is simply
asking for. a beating when her
husband gets out of jail said
Larew.
The local Department of Social
Services has no program for
battered wives, and the Mental
Health Center usually counsels
married couples. It is during this
counseling that incidences of wife
beating often come out, according
to Larew.
"The battered wife has no place
to go. Friends and relatives
sometimes don't like to get
involved out of fear for what the
husband might do. We hope to be
able to provide a shelter where
these victims can find refuge
said Larew.
Most women don't leave their
abusive husbands because they
are financially dependent and
have no place to go. This shelter
would give battered wives a place
to stay until they were able to get
back on their feet again.
Women who choose to enter
the shelter must sign an affadavit
promising not to reveal the
whereabouts of the shelter, in
order to prevent any retaliatory
moves by the husband against the
wife. Possibly, a guard may be
posted inside the house to protect
the occupants, according to
Larew.
"For the moment, all Real can
do for a battered wife is treat her
like any other person who comes
to us with no place to stay said
Larew.
Representatives of Real
attended a seminar Oct. 13 in
Greensboro where various
methods of dealing with the
problem of battered wives were
discussed.
The seminar consisted of a
panel discussion which included
an emergency room physician a
polioe officer, a lawyer, and a
sociology professor from UNC-G.
Approximately 150 people
throughout the state attended the
meeting.
� We learned a lot of things we
didn't know such as the fact that
approximately 28 per cent of
wives in the United States have
been beaten at some time. In
North Carolina, physical abuse is
not a grounds for divorce.
"We don't have any figures
for Pitt County right now since
the police only have reoords on
instances of assault on a female
where a deadly weapon is not
involved, but the Police Depart-
ment isocoperating with us to go
through the list of assault on a
female charges and find out how
many might have been cases of
wife beating said Larew.
The wife-beating husband
often was a witness to scenes of
abuse as a child, and learned that
type of behavior from his father,
according to Larew.
"We really need to get the
whole community behind us in
order to get this thing off the
ground said Larew.
Stadium pledge total
surpasses $1 million mark
By BILL HARRINGTON
Assistant News Editor
Pledges totaling $1,175,000
have been received so far in the
proposed $2.5 million Ficklen
Stadium expansion drive, aooord-
ing to Cliff Moore, Vioa Chancel-
lor for Business Affairs.
Moore said he was pleasant-
ly surprised with the progress of
the fund drive up to the present,
and said that they re going to take
contract bids Wednesday fa the
planned construction.
The North Carolina State
Legislature authaized $1,000,000
in revenue bonds to be used as
collateral in backing the pledges,
accading to Moae.
Moae said the only previous
University experience with fund-
ing a project from pledges had
been in the construction of the
press box side of the stadium in
the early 1960s.
"Over 90 per cent of those
pledges were good Moae said.
Moae said the pledges fa the
new expansion are payable over
a five year period
Accading to Moae, when
construction is canpleted Ficklen
Stadium will seat a minimum of
35,000.
"It's going to approximately
double in size
The new stadium would en-
able ECU to classify as a NCAA
Divison I A school if proposed
NCAA legislation is passed in
January, said Moae.
Divison I A schools must have
stadiums with seating capacities
of at least 30,000, sponsa eight
inter-collegiate sports, and play
an as yet unspecified percentage
(approximately 50 to 60 per cent)
of fellow Division I A teams,
accading to Moae.
"People in I A will be getting
a lion's share of TV money said
Moae. "TV money is one thing,
but exposure fa recruitment -
and I'm not talking just about
athletics, but student recruitment
also - will be a terrific asset to the
school.
Moae said his personal view
is that athletics attract students.
"At least a good athletic
program does�certainly a bad
one doesn't
Athletic Director Bill Cain
agreed with this theay of expo-
sure and its positive effects.
"If East Carolina's name is in
print and it's good, it helps your
diploma and my diploma he
said.
Citing the "woeful condition
of our press box Moae said the
stadium expansion plans call fa
enlarging the press box and
adding an eievata as a means of
access.
"If we have a first cjass press
box he said, "we should get
some of the better known sports
writers, and here again, better
exposure.
Legislature debates
issues, funds groups
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
and
CINDY BROOME
News Edita
The SGA appropriated the Art
School Visual Arts Faum $17,303
approximately $10,000 less than
its requested budget. The Visual
Arts Faum was appropriated
approximately $1400 last year.
The VAF bill was debated in
the appropriations oommittee fa
two consecutive nights, one
debate lasting eight hours, the
longest a bill has ever been
considered.
Each line item of the bill was
considered separately, and after
much debate during three ses-
sions, the bill passed.
A motion was made to rescind
the amendment passes in last
week's legislative session which
eliminated the $2 pick-up fee fa
the BUCCANEER, aiginally pro-
posed by the staff.
The SGA will have $10,000
mae than previously thought.
Students will have to pay $2 fa a
yearbook.
Students have already paid $8
fa the yearbook accading to
Legislata David Cartwright, ano
should na have to pay an extra
$2.
I doi' t think if s fair fa them
to pay their annual twice said
Cartwright. "It says in the
student handbook that it's free
and I think the student's paying
fa it through SGA activity fees is
enough
It was pointed out that other
UNC university students pay fa
their yearbooks, some who pay
much mae than $2.
FOUNTAINHEAD was ap-
propriated a little over $34,000.
See LEGISLATURE, page 3.
MR. AND MRS Ted Bankston are presented with
the game ball from this year's N.C. State game in
memory of their son Assistant Coach Rick Bankston
who was killed in a tragic explosion at his home this
summer. Harold Randolph made the presentation
during half time Saturday on behalf of the team's 15
seniors.
Photo by Pete Podeszwa





Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 1 November 1977
Concert
Tickets are now on sale for the
FIRE FALL concert in Mendenhall
Student Center. Ticket prices are:
$3 for students and $5 for the
public. The concert will be Sun
Nov 6th at 8 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum. FIREFALL is another
in a series of concerts brought to
you by the Popular Entertainment
Committee of the Student Union.
Bowling
Red Pin Bowling is back! At
the Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Center you can have a
chance to win one (1) free game
with every game bowled. If the
red pin is the head pin and you
make a strike, you win. Every
Thursday evening, from 8 p.m.
until 11 p.m could be your lucky
day.
Rebel
The Rebel, ECU'S literary-arts
magazine, is now accepting sub-
missions in poetry, fiction, es-
says, art work, and photography.
Submit your material to the Rebel
office or mail it to the Rebel,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Please make sure to keep a copy
of each work of literature for
yourself, and include your name,
address, and phone number on all
work.
Crusade
Campus Crusade for Christ
invites all students to "Leader-
ship Training Class" fa practical
Biblical insights as well as Fun
and Fellowship. Christians and
skeptics alike will find the mes-
sages intellectually stimulating
every Thursday at 7 p.m. in
Brewster D-202.
Faculty
All faculty-staff members are
invited to participate in the
faculty fitness program which is
being held Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 12.00-1 00 p.m. in
Memaial Gym. All thrjse interes-
ted in jogging, exercising, basket-
ball, swimming, etc. should re-
port to the gymnastics room on
the first floa of Memaial Gym
any Monday, Wednesday, or
Friday at 12 00.
Karate
NTE
A Japanese Karate Club (JKA
style) isbeing famed. Those who
have trained JKA previously a
those who are interested in this
style call 756-3767 and leave
name and number.
Bridge
The Bridge Club meets each
Thursday evening at 730 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center. All
persons interested in playing
bridge are invited to attend
Prospective teachers who plan
to take the National Teachers
Examinations Nov. 12,1977 at
ECU are reminded that they have
less than two weeks to register
with Educational Testing Service
(ETS) of Prinoeton, NJ. Those
taking the Common Examinations
will report at 8 JO a.m. and finish
at about 1230 p.m. Area Exam-
inations are scheduled from 1:30
p.m. to about 4:15 p.m.
Happy Hour
Don't miss "HAPPY HOUR
at Mendenhall Student Center.
Prices are v3off on billiards, table
tennis, and bowling. The time is 3
p.m. until 6 p.m. every Monday.
Don't miss it!
Beta lota
The Beta lota chapter of
Gamma Theta Upsilon, the
National Geography Honor
Society, is looking fa members to
join during the '77-78 school
year. There are two categaies of
membership: Associate, which
requires a minimum of one course
in Geography, and regular, which
requires a minimum of three
Geography oourses with an over-
all B average in all Geography
courses.
Several activities are being
planned, including trips to Geo-
graphy conventions. Anyone who
has ideas to share and would like
to apply fa membership should
see Dr. Birchard, Brewster A-232
fa an application fam.
SociAnth
The Sociology-Anthropology
Club will hold a very impatant
meeting Nov. 2 to discuss the up
and coming program featuring a
guest speaker. All members are
urged to attend this meeting.
Bring along your friends too! The
meeting will be held in Brewster
D-302 at 7 30 p.m. Wed Nov. 2
Fun Time
The ECU Pom Pom girls will
be having a "fun time" at
Blimpie'sThurs Nov. 3 from 7 to
11 p.m. Everyone come on down
and drink your blues away.
Workshop
A School and Community
Health Majas wakshop on job
oppatunities will be held Nov. 7
from 7-9 p.m. in room 206 Allied
Health. All members COHE
majas and interested persois are
urged to attend.
SNA
For all interested nursing
students, there will be a SNA
meeting Wed Nov. 2at 7p.m. in
room 101 of the Nursing Bldg.
Please come out and find what it
is all about
Sigma Tau
Sigma Tau Gamma, the new
national fraternity at ECU is
planning many fund raising pro-
jects in the future. The first of
these projects will be a gasoline
raffle to be held this week. Some
2500 tickets will be sold fa $1
each. The prizes include a first
place prize of 50 gallons of gas.
There will be two second place
prizes of 25 gallons of gas each.
A party is also being planned
fa this Friday at Pantana Bob's
located downtown. Anybody in-
terested in Sigma Tau Gamma
prospective brothers or little
sisters are invited to oome on
down fa a good time at Pantana
Bob's. Also, any girls interested
in becoming little sisters fa Sig
Tau can contact Mar O'Ravitz at
752-8657 a Greg Schwemley at
752-6635. Further information
about Sig Tau will follow in future
editions of the Fountainhead.
Society SCEC
All persons interested in
joining the Eastern Carolina Film
Society, an aganizatioi designed
to allow members to choose the
motion pictures they wish to see,
please call 758-5253, if there is no
answer, phone 752-6389 a write
Box 27 Falkland, N.C. 27827.
Craftsmen
Craftsmen East will meet
TuesNov. 1 at 4 p.m. in room
223 Jenkins. All members are
urged to attend.
BUC
The BUC needs two advertis-
ing salespersons to wak fa five
months beginning Nov. 1. Pay
will be $75 per month. If you are
interested, call 757-6501, 6502 a
stop by the Buc office.
Aerospace Coffeehouse
The Department of Aerospace
Studies will administer the Air
Force Officer Qualifying Test
(AFOOT) on the dates listed
below. See Captain Lane in room
204 a Captain Tinkham in room
209 of Wright Annex a call
757-6597 to make an appointment
fa the test. This test must be
completed if you wish to apply fa
the two year AFROTC program.
Nov. 1
Nov. 16
Nov. 19
A remarkable young blues
guitarist, Mike Wells will perfam
at ECU Coffeehouse Nov. 3 and 4
at 9 p.m. Admission is only .50.
Free refreshments. Rm. 15
Mendenhall.
4-H Club
The ECU Collegiate 4-H Club
will meet Thurs Nov. 3at 6 p.m.
They will meet at Peppi's Pizza on
264 by-pass. Come and join us!
Ski Trip
Careers
Vacation Ski Trip to Beech
Mountain Jan. 2-6. You may still
sign up to go: PHYE 1000, PHYE
1105, or Non-Credit. Call Jo
Saunders, 757-6000 Memorial
Gym. First meeting is Nov. 1 in
room 108 at 4 p.m.
Exhibit
An exhibit entitled "The
French Press in Perspective" will
be on display in Joyner Library,
room 104, from Nov. 1 through
Nov. 14. The exhibit will be open
Nov. 1 from 7 to9 p.m and Nov.
2 through 14 from 6 to 8 p.m.
Over 300 newspapers and mag-
azines depicting French attitudes
and opinions will be featured. The
exhibit is sponsored by the
Department of Foreign Lang-
uages and Literatures.
Car Clinic
Free! A car emission clinic
Sat Nov. 5 from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. at the Pitt Plaza Shopping
Center. This is a service of ECU
Student National Enviromental
Health Association. It only takes
three minutes, so drive on
through.
Outing Club
The ECU Outing Club will
meet Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m. in
Brewster B-102 Auditaium. A
shat general meeting and a
program on backpacking equip-
ment and selection will be the
agenda. We need enthusiastic
people.
Is there anyone who isn't
interested in finding out rrxxe
about careers, job infamatioi, a
your future? If you are interested,
then oome to Clement Dam
tomarow at 7 30. Furney James
from the Placement Office will be
sharing infamatioi that you can
use.
Fellowship
The Christian Fellowship will
meet every Wed. night at 7 p.m.
Please come out and praise the
Lad with us. Brewster B-203.
Phi Sigma Pi
Phi Sigma Pi will hold a
business meeting Wed Nov. 2 at
6 p.m. in Austin room 132.
Mandatory meeting for all
pledges.
C0AS2125
COAS 2125 was left off of the
preregistration list of courses to
be offered during the spring
semester of 1978. Although it is
now too late to preregister fa
COAS 2125, this course will be
offered and interested students
can enroll during the scheduled
registration period in January
1978.
The first class meeting will be
at 12 noon, Wed Jan. 11,1978 in
the Institute for Coastal and
Marine Resources' office located
in Wright Auditaium, Room 102.
At this time, a mutually satisfao
tory time will be arranged fa
class meetings.
Help is a desperate wad
Intended fa desperate people
But few are able to use this
plea
And the pain mounts to an
awful degree
"HELP when screamed
draws a chill through every bone
But how many people will
answer a silent scream?
They know something is
wrong
But there's nothing they can
do, it seems.
YOU CAN HELP. There is an
organization on campus, the
Student Council Fa Exceptional
Children, (SCEC), that recognizes
this plea fa help fran retarded
children. Our goals are to suppat
and initiate programs and activi-
ties fa retarded citizens. All
students are invited to our
meetings the first Wednesday of
every month in Speight 129 at
7:30 p.m. Please show that you
care. Be an exceptional person;
support exceptional children!
Surf Club
There will be a meeting fa the
"Surf Club" Wednesday night at
700o'clock in Rm. 105 Memaial
Gym. All interested persons are
invited to attend. You don't have
to surf to be in this dub just
enjoy the beach.
Schedules
The ECU Intramurais Depart-
ment would like to familiarize
everyone with the schedules fa
freeplay, equipment checkout and
recreational swimming. The free-
play at Minges is from 8-10
Monday through Friday, 10-9
Saturday and 2-9 Sunday. At
Memaial Gym, Monday through
Friday, freeplay is from 4-10,
closed all day Saturday and open
2-9 Sunday. The pool at M inges is
open from 8-10 Monday through
Friday and 3-9 Saturday and
Sunday. The pool at Memaial is
open from 4-6 Monday through
Friday and also on Monday,
Wednesday and Friday 12 noon
until 1 p.m. The equipment room
in Minges and Memaial are on
the same schedule. Monday
through Friday they are open
from 7:45 until 10:15, closed all
Saturday and open from 2 until 9
Sunday. Keep these schedules fa
future references and use these
facilities to the best of your
advantage.
THANKS
The Lambda Chi's would like
to thank all those who participat-
ed in Sunday's Field Day which
resulted in a fantastic time fa all
Congratulations are in ader fa
the Tri-Sigs and the Phi Taus fa
being the first place winners in
the saaity and fraternity div
isions respectively, and fa the
Kappa Delta saaity who won the
Lambda Chi Needy Family Cothes
drive. With over 200 chapters
across the nation, these are just
two of the many projects that
Lambda Chis aaoss the nation,
and especially here at ECU, that
contribute to both the growth of
community and the campus.





1 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD
Page 3
Beta Nu Chapter members attend D.C. convention
Beta Nu Chapter of the Sigma
Theta Tau nursing honorary
society of ECU sent two delegates
to the National Biennial Conven-
tion held in Washington, DC.
last month.
Charlotte Martin , Beta Nu
Chapter president, and Cindy
Jones, a senior nursing member
attended.
The convention, entitled
Leadership in Action included
speakers Martha Keys and Rose-
mary Donely.
LEGISLATURE
Continued from page 7
Last years FOUNTAINHEAD
budget was approximately
$51,000 However, advertising
revenue this year will revert back
to the FOUNTAINHEAD budget
instead of reverting to the SGA
general fund, as it has in the
past.
Senior Editor Kim Devins
proposed cutting out funds fa
conventions before the bill went
to the appropriations committee
the first time. The bill was
debated in the committee twice,
amended, and passed in the
Legislature last night.
FOUNTAINHEAD, with an
approximate budget of $34,000,
will have to make $18,000 in ad
revenue this year in order to
reach the amount of last year's
budget.
The amount of money made
by advertising up to $23,000 will
go to FOUNTAINHEAD, and
money made totaling over
$23,000 will revert back to the
SGA.
The School of M usic request-
ed $15,795. A motion to cut $650
fa Renaissance instruments pas-
sed, and the School of Music was
appropriated $15,145.
Model United Nations
requested a suspension of the
rules so the legislature could
consider its budget without hav-
ing to go befae the appropna-
tionsoommittee. The request was
made in ader to plan specifically
to have famer Seaetary of State
Dean Rusk as a speaker this
spring. The motion to suspend the
rules was defeated.
Keys, a Caigresswoman fron
Kansas, spoke on "Update of
Federal Health Legislation
Donley, president of the Sigma
Theta Tau Society, presented a
film entitled "Beyond Alpha"
which was a histaical look at the
student nurses in the 1920's and
the birth of the nursing hona
society.
The first chapter was begun in
the 1920's by six student nurses,
of whom five attended the
convention and were interviewed
in the film.
Attending members met in
the House of Delegates and voted
on the by-laws, elected new
officers and inducted 18 new
chapters.
Various other lectures, pro-
grams, banquets and receptions
Iron Horse Trading Co.
Merchants and Craftsmen
In Fine Gold and Silver Jewelry
Crystal Jewelry
from Austria
10 OFF
Located: 301 S. Evans Mall
First State Bank Building
Boors: MonThurs. 10-6
Fri. 10-6 Sat. 10-6
were held during the three days
where Martin and Jones had the
oppatunity to meet some of the
guests.
Dr. Janet Campbell will be the
guest speaker at the next Beta Nu
Chapter meeting. She is an ANA
certified psychiatric mental
health nurse and consultant in
counseling and training at Rex
Hospital in Raleigh, N.C.
The meeting will be Mon
Nov. 14, 1977 at 7 p.m. in room
101 of the Nursing Building.
She will lecture on "The Role of
the Nurse in Private P-actice
The general public and all
nursing students are invited to
attend.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House
and Oyeter Bar
SPECIAL
MON. - THURS.
FISH .99
French Fries, Slaw and Hush puppies
14 LB. HAMBURGER99
French Fries, Slaw and Rolls
CRAB CAKES1.50
French Fries, Slaw and Hushpuppies
Now Salad Bar
WASHINGTON HIGHWAY (N. C. 33 Ext.)
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
You too
-gtftf�.
��'�
could become
a collector's item
MM
?5ft4
Make your YEARBOOK PORTRAIT
lintment NOW at:
in
Buccaneer Office, 2nd floor of Publications Center.
Pictures will
be taken
Nov. 7th
- 18th.





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 1 November 1977
Forget
� �
Dr. John Maiolo, chairperson of the Sociology-
Anthropology Dept. and the Graduate Council are up
in arms because the president of the SGA, Neil
Sessoms, recommended the Legislature cut all
funding fa trips and speaker programs. They want
future bills for these to be debated in the Legislature.
First of all, the individual bills will be debated in
the Legislature asall bills are. But as for getting the
money this semester: it simply is not there.
Maiolo should have known how the Legislature
handles bills for appropriations before getting so
upset about whether or not they will be debated.
When a bill is introduced it automatically goes to the
Appropriations Committee-another point Maiolo
recommended-then the oommittee reports back to the
Legislature the following Monday with its amend-
ments and approval or disapproval. The speaker of
the Legislature then calls for positive and negative
debate on the bill as amended. If the members of the
Appropriations Committee want the Legislature to
consider the points deleted by the majority of the
Committee, they can file a "minority Report" and
the Legislature must vote on whether or not to re-add
the deleted points to the bill before debating it as a
whole.
Consequently, the decision will not be made "by
one person" as Maiolo said. Of course the president
of the SGA has ten days afterwards to veto, but even
if he does, the Legislature can override his veto by a
two-thirds vote. So Maiolo and the Council can relax
on that point.
The major issue however, is not whether the bills
will be debated by the Legislature, but the asking for
money for these trips to begin with.
According to SGA treasurer Craig Hales, after the
major organizations of ECU are funded, even with
cuts, there will be less that $2,000 left for Fall
Semester in the SGA budget.
These departments on campus cannot ask the
SGA to go in the red. The ECU SGA is presently the
second most powerful SGA in the nation, second to
the University of California in Los Angeles. It is this
powerful only because the ECU administration allows
it and gives it this much money. If the SGA
appropriates more money than it has, the
administration, especially the new chancellor next
year, can consider the Legislature irresponsible and
take away this power.
More money will be coming to the SGA Spring
Semester and first sesson Summer School. But this
is, nevertheless, hoped for money. The Legislature
cannot be certain it will have even the same amount
to appropriate that it had this semester, so it should
not appropriate on speculated money.
Maioloar j the Graduate Council should just wait
until Spring Semester before asking for these funds.
David Cartwright, Appropriations Committee chair-
person, has said he will be the first to advocate
appropriating money for trips when and if the money
is there.
Perhaps Maiolo and the Council want the SGA to
hatchet the major organizations on campus. Perhaps
they would like to aee the Transit System, the Art
Dept Publications or the Executive Council, all
serving the whole student body, scratched out of
SGA funding so a handful of people from different
departments, who serve only those in the depart-
men can spend a nice weekend at the beach
chatting.
The major organizations have already cut their
budgets drastically to help the SGA stay above water.
Maiolo said his department will have a retreat
even if he has to pay for it. Fine. Maybe he has the
money. But the SGA does not.
ut trips
RETI?ATS GIVE US THAT ESSENTIAL STUDENT-
PROfESSOR RELATIONSHIP WE N��D !
Forum
Get your picture in the BUCCANEER
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The 1977-78 BUCCANEER
staff is hard at work to assure that
this year there will be a yearbook.
Our focus in the book will be on
thingsthat make ECU distinctive-
Homecomfng
Queen-farce?
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In response to "Miss
Reese's letter, I would like to
retort in defense of the new
homecoming Queen and the
nominees of that position.
Too bad she had to stereotype
the winner. Any girl with enough
confidence to run for the title is
probably not the typical "dumb
blonde" that is usually associated
with these types of contests. Jan
Master, in m, opinion is more
than qualified for the honor of
Homeooming Queen. She is intel-
ligent, outgoing, kind and attrac-
tive. It's obvious that many
students here appreciate her
qualifications.
Sure a good looking girl gets a
lot of attention, but wtt topper
when i girl looks at a guy? I
hardly think the first thing she
thinks of is his grade point
average, or his church atten-
dance. Farce? Lets just call it
human nature.
Mitch Klimek
ly ECU: the things with which
our fine school has become
associated. YOU are a part of this
institution, and as such should be
pictured in the '78 BUC.
Stevens Studios, an outstan-
ding company from Bangor,
Maine, has been contracted to
photograph ECU students FREE I
There will be NO SITTING FEE.
It takes only five to ten minutes of
your time to stop by and have
your picture taken. A few weeks
later, you will receive 4-8 cola
proofs to choose from. You are
automatically pictured in the '78
BUC. Any portrait purchase you
wish to make is up to you. All we
ask is that your photography be
included in the yearbook.
Two photographers will be at
ECU from Monday, Nov. 7th-Fri.
Nov. 18th. There will be a
photographer in Wright Annex
Room 212 and one in the lobby of
Fletcher Hall weekdays from 9-5.
CALL 757-6501, -6502 FOR AN
APPOINTMENT. This way we
can assure you that yGur wait will
be minimal.
If you need any further
information, call us a stop by the
BUC office.
Please let us hear from you
soon!
Sincerely,
Susan L. Rogerson, Editor
78 BUCCANEER
ir
PLEASE NOTE:
Letters must comply with Forum
policy as posted outside
fountamhead office, and appear-
ing here usually, or they WILL
NO T be pnptecf.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor over fifty years.
Senior EditorKim J Devins
Production ManagerBob Glover
Advertising Manager � .Robert Swaim
N Mtor Ondy Broome
Trends EditorDavid W. Trevlno
SP�rts Edjt0rChris Holloman
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and is distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
and twice weekly during the school year.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C 27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.





1 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
DECA club sponsors career orientation program
By CINDY BROOME
News Editor
The ECU Collegiate DECA
Club sponsored a career orienta-
tion workshop for high school
students here last Thurs. Approx-
mately 450 students attended.
The workshop included sev-
eral speakers and four workshop
sessions - apparel and acces-
sories, petroleum industries, food
services and food marketing.
"We're not just studying
books said Dr. Leo Jenkins.
"We're trying to pull the two
areas together. We give students
practical experience along with
his academics.
"One out of five people on
campus here are pursuing careers
in business
Furner James, Director of the
Placement Office, said there were
more job opportunities than
students realized, and that it is
taken fa granted there are no
jobs.
There are plenty of opportun-
ities for work said James. "You
have to decide that you can make
it despite the limitations
James spoke of a blind ECU
student who said, "I know I have
some disadvantages, but all I
want is an opportunity
"When you make up your
mind that you can't do some-
thing, you can't do it said
James.
James spoke of the fact that
few people want to be sales-
people.
"Selling is a matter of atti-
tude he said. "That's where
the opportunities are
James also said that while
some students' grades fall if they
take a part-time job, other
students' grades rise because
they have taken a job.
Some students organize
their time better when they have
a job and know they have only so
much time to study said James.
ECU sociologists
receive grant to
study oil spill effect
Two ECU sociologists have
received a grant of $11,498 from
the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration to
study the socio-economic impact
of the Argo Merchant oil spill off
the coast of Massachusetts.
The spill occurred in Dec-
ember, 1976, when the Liberian
registered tanker, loaded with
27,000 tons of fuel oil, ran
aground and finally broke to
pieces.
The oil, however, never wash-
ed ashore but many days, coastal
New Englanders were fearful that
their resort beaches would be
polluted.
The study, headed by Dr.
Peter Fricke and Dr. John Maioio,
will include a survey of residents
in the towns of Nantucket,
Edgartown, Chatham and
Falmouth as well as the collection
of data covering fisheries, tour-
ism and recreation in the area.
The object of the study,
according to Dr. Fricke, is to
identify any divergence of pop-
ular beliefs concerning the socio-
economic impact of oil spills and
the real impact the spill would
have in a community.
"We want to find out what
people know about oil spills and
what they think would happen.
Did fewer people come to the
Cape this year because of it? Has
it affected such things as fishing
patterns, recreation and property
ownership?
The study fieldwork will be
conducted from a research base in
Falmouth. It istobeoompletedby
mid-November and the report
submitted to the NOAA in
December.
Dr. Fricke is a visiting assoc-
iate professor of sociology at ECU
and a senior scientist in the ECU
Institute for Coastal and Marine
Resources. From 1975 to 1977, he
was a research associate at
Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institution.
ALTHOUGH THE PIRATES lost, the crowd seemed toenoy themselves.
Photo by Jeff Robb
The Student Welfare
Committee has placed Ballot
boxes in each dorm lobby for
suggestions of the revision of
ECU's visitation policy.
The boxes will remain
in the lobbies through Friday
Nov. 4th.
l1 44
�V'

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�������o
Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 1 November 1977
First father in U.S. to win custody of children
Social work orof soeal
By WILLIAM DELQACH
Staff Writer
Dr. Ken Lewis, a social work
professor of the School of Allied
Health and Social Professions, is
the first father in the United
States ever to win custody of his
children following a divorce.
Lewis, who spoke to the
National Organization for Women
(NOW) last Thursday, said his
case came up in February of 1973
when he was a college professor
in Nebraska.
Lewis said his case seemed
rather hopeless because he had a
big statute against him. The
Tender Years Doctrine states that
in the case where both parents
were declared fit parents the
mother always got custody if the
children were very young.
Without a statute in his favor,
Lewis had to invent an argument.
He based his argument on the
assumption that the term
' mother was a verb, and not a
noun. Hiscase went all the way to
the Nebraska State Supreme
Court.
Four months after Lewis'
much publicized case, the Tender
Years Doctrine was denounoed as
unconstitutional and in January of
1974 was killed in that state.
Twenty other states followed
suit, induding North Carolina
which ratified Cathy Sebo's Bill
on July 17, 1977 to end the
Tender Years Doctrine.
Lewis said that in 1975 there
were 4,40X),000 single mothers
and 500,000 single fathers in
America.
He said 10 million children
lived with their mother and 1
million children lived with their
father.
to NOW group
One out of six children in the
U.S. live in single parent families,
said Lewis. Eleven per cent of all
white children and 41 per cent of
all black children live in single
parent families. Ninety-two per
cent of all these children live
without a father.
Lewis is a senior editor for
"Single Parent's News He is
also a consultant for MEN (Men's
Equality Now) and Men's Inter-
national, Inc. which has 82,000
members from four countries.
When asked why he came to
ECU, Lewis said, "I have grand-
parents who live nearby, I get
afternoons of f so I can take care of
my two little girls, and there are
many single parent families in
Greenville
THIS SIX PACK temporarily rests in its searcn tot an oversized refrigerator
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
The Pro Shop
Of GreenvHle, Inc.
(Adjacent to King & Queen Restaurant)
� WARM-UP SUITS
Complete Shipment of Beautiful
White Stag Has Just Arrived
For Men, Ladies, & Children
COME IN AND SEE THEM!
(Open Till 8:00pm Mon Fri.
Till 6:00 on Sat.)
752-1526
SGA offers
legal aid
By SCOTT BARNES
Staff Writer
For any ECU student who
needs legal advice, there is a free
legal aid service offered by the
SGA, according to Neil Sessoms,
SGA president.
The service will cover any
student's questions and aid in
some legal disputes. The legal
aid, however, will not represent a
student in oourt.
The most frequent cases that
are involved are tax violation,
landlord disputes, contract dis-
putes and drug related problems,
said Sessoms.
To see a lawyer, call the
SGA at 757-6611 to set up
an appointment. The times sche-
duled for counseling are8 a.m10
a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays,
and 2 p.m5 p.m. Mondays and
Wednesdays.
The Blount and Crisp partner-
ship gives legal aid to students.
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Downtown Greenville
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Trombone Choir and Jazz Ensemble performing too
Opera Theatre to play Frid
TRENDS STAFF REPORT
Activities planned by the East
Carolina University School of
Music include a scenes program
to be presented by the Opera
Theatre on Friday and Saturday
(Nov. 4 & 5) nights at 8 XX) p.m. in
the A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall as
well as perfamances by the ECU
Concert Choir, Trombone Choir
and Jazz Ensemble at the Nath
Carolina Music Educatas Assoc-
iation Convention in Winston-
Salem. The convention will run
from Sunday, November 6 to
Tuesday, November 8.
The scenes from the Opera
Theatre production will include
excerpts from some relatively
unusual waks. These include
scenes from Richards Strauss's
Schweigsame Frau The Silent
Woman, Chaikovsky's Pikovaia
Dama Queen of Spades, and
Moussagsky's Boris Godunov as
well as a scene from the familiar
La Boheme by Puccini.
Another feature will be two
shat excerpts from Scott Joplin's
Treemonisha which will be ac-
companied by a small instrument-
al ensemble.
All of the scenes will be sung
in English and directed by Dr.
Clyde Hiss of the School of Music
faculty.
Admission to the program is
by ticket only. Tickets may be
obtained in the main office of the
A. J. Fletcher Music Building a
fran any Opera Theatre student.
ECU students can receive their
tickets free with an ID and activity
card. Public price per ticket is
$1.00.
The East Carolina University
Concert Choir, conducted by
Brett Watson, will perfam at the
Nath Carolina Music Educatas
Association's annual oonventioi
in Winstoi-Salem oi Monday,
November 7.
The ECU chaal group is one
of several outstanding school and
college choirs invited to appear at
the event, and is scheduled to
perfam at 215 p.m. in the First
Baptist Church of Winston-
Sal em.
Among the waks included in
the Concert Choir's program are a
Palestrina motet, , "Dies
sanctificatus the Heinrich
Schutz setting of the 100th Psalm;
J.S. Bach's "Der Geist hilft
unsrer Schwachheit auf four
Brahms songs; two Christmas
carols and two spirituals.
The Schultz and Bach select-
ions are arranged fa two choirs,
and will be per famed by two
divisions of the Concert Choir,
from the opposing balconies of
the church.
Also invited to perfam at the
Nath Carolina Music Educatas
Association Convention are the
student members of the East
Carolina University Jazz Ensem-
ble and the East Carolina Univer-
sity Tromboie Choir, both direct-
ed by Geage Broussard of the
School of Music faculty.
The 20-member Jazz Ensem-
ble will perfam with recading
artist George Roberts, whose
musical career includes several
years with the Stan Kenton
Orchestra and many recadings
fa motiai pictures, radio and
television.
� In addition to his pafaming,
1 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 7
d Saturday
OPERA THEATRE STUDENTS rehearse under direction of Dr. Clyde Hiss fa weekend pafam-
3006 Photo by Kirk Kingsbury
Roberts has assisted in the design
of new bass trombones and is
autha of a methos book on bass
trombone playing.
Eight members of the Trom-
bone Choir will join other per-
famers in a combined Trombone
Ensemble from six North Carolina
campuses to be directed by
Donald Knaub, professa of trom-
bone at the University of Texas at
Austin and co-aganizer of the
Eastman Brass Quintet.
The eight East Carolina trom-
bonists and four-member rhythm
section will perfam with jazz
artist Kai Winding, a maja
founder of the modern style of
jazz trombone playing. Winding
has waked with Stan Kenton,
Benny Goodman, Woody
Herman, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry
M ulligan and aher renowned jazz
artists and band leaders.
New Film Society Formed
By LYNN HUGHES
Staff Writer
Craft Center
Offers Courses
The Mendenhall Student Center Crafts Center is offering'three new
wakshops especially fa the Christmas Season. Whether you'd like to
make your own gifts a decaate your room with unique anaments,
these wakshops offer something fa everyone.
The wakshop schedules are as follows:
Handbuilt Christmas Ceramics
limit 10 people
6.00 pm until 9.00 pm Tuesday, Nov. 8 & Wednesday, Nov. 16
Make beautiful as well as useful gifts fa your friends and family-
mirra frames, tree anaments, mobiles, toothbrush holders, napkin
rings, jewelry boxes, and more. All materials are provided.
Christmas Candles
limit 12 people
6.00 pm until 900 pm Tuesdays Nov. 8 & 15
Make ice cream candles that look good enough to eat and your own
Christmas candles to decaate your room a apartment. Learn the
simple techniques in the aaft of candlemaking.
Good news fa the movie fans!
An aganizatioi called the East-
ern Carolina Film Society has
been famed and is in the process
of becoming a waking body! The
purpose? To give interested parti-
cipants a chance to choose the
films they would like to see.
The club will operate through
suggestions of prospective mem-
bers of movies they would like
shown. These suggestions can be
taken by phone, mail, a at public
meetings and can consist of
specific film titles, topical cate-
gories such as comedies or
westerns, a those movies with
specified directasa perfamers.
The outcome of this infamal
survey determines that films will
be shown.
After a tentative schedule of
the most popular choices has
been drawn up, membership
would be sold to the dub at a set
rate. Members would be admitted
to all shows free, but the public
would also be admitted at a set
rate per show. In this way, a
constant recruitment of new
members would be achieved and
the outside revenue will make it
possible fa the film soaety to
offer additional shows to its
members at now extra cost.
Charles Lawrenoe, an aigina-
ta of the society, expressed an
interest oi bringing thisaganiza-
tion to the campus, but no
progress can be made without the
support and interest of the
student body. Approximately 150
members would be required
befae the society can function,
but once this number is reached,
the shows could begin, he said.
The Eastern Carolina Film
Society is an effort to keep movies
at the Roxy alive. Susan Whalen,
one of the ooadinatas of the
ROXY expressed conoern over
recent nonpartidpation.
Although prices of member-
ship and public admission has not
yet been determined, Whalen
suggested that movie-goers pay
at the doa first and then buy
their season tickets. "This brings
in trust she said.
A public meeting will be held
on Nov. 3 at 7.00 p.m. fa
suggestion as to the Society. The
meeting will be held at the Roxy
on Albemarle a. Until then, all
persons interested in partidpa-
ting in the soaety are encouraged
to do so by calling 758-5253 (if no
answer dial 752-6389) or by
writing Box 27, Falkland, N.C.
27827.
Trends
Macrame for Christmas
limit 12 people
600 pm until 9.O0 pm Mondays Nov. 7 & 14
Decaate fa Christmas with maaame anaments Its easy and fun
to make holly wreaths, candle rings, and tree anaments, not to
mention the many possibilities fa gift giving.
Sign up today at the Crafts Center to partidpate in a Christmas
wakshop. All students, faculty and staff are eligible to partidpate. A
$10.00 semester Crafts Center membership fee is required and there is
no charge fa the wakshop, except the nominal cost of personal
supplies.
The Crafts Center, located on the ground floa of Mendenhall
Student Center, isopen from 3.00 pm until 10.00 pm, Monday through
Fnday, and 10O0 am until 3.O0 pm, Saturday. The deadline fa
wakshop registration is Saturday, November 5 and dass size is
.limited.
THE SCENT of burning leaves fills ECU campus during fall.
'04jbLj� . Iir,
wmumaum





I
FOUNTAINHEAD 1 November 1977
LOCAL DOG ENJOYS fruit turnover
on the border of starvation.
overseas exist
Uorkslnops
ristmas
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all day Tues Ribeye 81.79
Fri Sat Sun 8oz . T-Bone 82.79
with this coupon, you can get a
Rib-eye dinner with texas toast,
large baked potato
can eat from our SUPER salad bar
and to top it off, a FREE dessert
of your choice.
$2.35
CAMPUS FATTIES FEED faces while foreigners fast.
CARE Crusade Begins
TRENDS STAFF REPORT
Tomorrow will mark the start
of CARE'S annual Food Crusade.
This year the goal is to raise
$6,500,000 to help provide better
health and hope fa more than
25,000,000 people, most of them
children in developing countries
around the globe.
In many cases, the relief
CARE brings means a simple
survival. Frank L. Goffio, Execut-
ive Director of CARE explains
that "Such foods as bulgur
wheat, soya and wheat flour, milk
powder, oorn-soya blend, rice and
oooking oil supply desperately
needed nutritional building
blocks to the poorest of the poor.
The food is served as a nourishing
drink or porridge a combined
with local ingredients in soups or
stews
The international aid and
development agency has regular-
ly scheduled feeding programs in
pre-schco! and nutrition centers
and primary schools, many of
which CARE helped to build.
Emergency rations are rushed
to victims of such disasters as
earthquakes, hurricanes, floods
or droughts. And many of
CARE's self-help development
programs, including agricultural
production and community im-
provement, are based on food-fa-
work projects.
"Thirty-one years of exper-
ience has taught us a great deal
about wald problems, the remed-
ies available to us and the
solutions that work Mr. Goffio
continued to say. "Combining
food distribution with nutrition
and sanitary education, health
care and agricultural develop-
ment gives us an edge in the
battle against hunger �and mal-
nutrition
He went on to explain how
CARE stretches prices, donations
of food purchased in large
quantities at special prices, don-
ations of United States Govern-
ment commodities and local gov-
ernment contributions to operat-
ing costs last year enabled CARE
to provide $9.25 in aid fa every
daia dollar. Contributions may
be sent to CARE Food Crusade,
P.O. Box 13043, Atlanta, Ga.
30324.
3o
I UOMl
wfatiei wexldina
ANNIES 5DIDE6
5EAUTIFUL
LU. .
109 E. Arlington Blvd.
754-1744
MM
Thurs. Nov. 3 AT 9:00
Bluegrass with Bitter Creek
Ladies Night Also
Overall, CARE has feeding
and community i development
programs in mae than thirty
developing countries of Africa,
Asia, Latin America and the
Middle East.
Feeding programs operate in
the Arab Republic of Egypt,
Bangladesh, Bloivia, Chad, Chile,
Colombia, Costa Rica, the
Dominican Republic, Ecuador,
Gaza, Sri Lanks, Tunisia,
Guatamala, Haiti, Honduras,
India, Jadan, Macau, Pakistan,
Panama and the Phillippines. As
needs arise and resources permit,
CARE sends food to supplement
rther programs in Afganistan,
Belize, Cameroon, Hong Kong,
Indonesia, Israel, Kenya,
Lesotho, Liberia, Mali,
Nicaragua, Niger, Peru, Sierra
Leone. South Kaea and Turkey.
The hours
are long,
but that's
O.K
the pay is
lousy.
But as a volunteer
you'U get to help Amenca
stand a little taller. And you'll
stand a little taller yourself.
America needs your help or
we wouldn't be asking. Your
community needs your help.
People 18 or 80: we don't care
as long as you do. VISTA is
coming alive again. Come alive
with us. VISTA. Call toll free:
800-424-8580. tfliAjA
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11 30 5:30 UP





HnHMHHMKBHHMHHHBQIIH
1 Noverrfcer 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Sunday, November 6
Firefall gives Major Attractions concert
ByEDCOLLEVECCHIO
Staff Writer
This Sunday, November 6, at
8:00 p.m. the Student Union
Major Attractions Committee will
present Firefall in ooncert. The
concert will be held at Minges
Coliseum Tickets are $3.00 for
East Carolina students, and $5.00
for general public.
Although the band is most
exciting instrumentally, vocals
are worthy of praise and song
lyrics are crisp and aware. In all
aspects, they are disciplined
musicians, and perform with
intricate precision. Their debut
album, called simply, Firefall,
was responsible for three Top-40
songs: "You Are The Woman
"Livin' Ain't Livin and "Cin-
derella Their latest, Luna Sea,
has already produced a top hit,
"Just Remember I love You
and shows promise with two more
tunes, "So Long and "Sold On
You
Firefall is a relatively young
band whose members have devel-
oped a unique and distinctive
brand of music. With an effective
blend of aggressiveness and
gentle melodies, it is no wonder
why, that in its short existence,
Firefall has already produced
several impressive hit singles and
two well produoed albums.
Much of the bands success
can be attributed to the leader-
ship of writer, vocalist, guitarist,
Rick Roberts. Roberts and drum-
mer Michael Clarke are ex-mem-
bers of the Flying Burrito Broth-
ers although Robert's songs bear
little or no resemblance to this
early band. The other four
members of the band are: Mark
Andes (formerly of Spirit and Jo
Jo Gunne) who plays bass, lead
guitarist Jock Bartley (formerly of
Zephyr), writervocalistguitarist
Larry Burnett, and David Muse,
keyboards and horns.
Students tickets are available
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center. Only
public tickets will be on sale
Sunday at Minges.
Roy Ayers' Ubiquity to perform in Raleigh
rlnr fnr hn�h the 7 anrl tho Q 'Y) "
TRENDS STAFF REPORT
Roy Ayers Ubiquity, a unique
taste of progressive jazzrhythm
and blues with the soft touch,
comes to Raleigh's Stewart Thea-
tre for two performances on
Wednesday, November 9. This is
the second event in the 1977
Jazz Series at Stewart Theatre,
which is located on the second
floor of North Carolina State
University's Student Center.
The variety and sophistication
of Roy's musical viewpoint are
very much the product of his
background. In fact, music's been
the mam part of his life since
early childhood. "My mother
says Roy, "was the single most
important inspiration to begin
and continue my career in music.
She was a piano teacher, and I
was tinkling on the piano as soon
as I could reach the keys
Roy played steel guitar in public
school and on into high school,
but found his true vocation at 17.
That's when he heard the exotic
latin-jazz of Cal Tjader and the
soft ethereal sound of the MJQ's
Milt Jackson. From then on it was
the vibraharp (to the everlasting
joy of his avid following.)
Roy's big break came in 1966.
He sat in with Herbie Mann at the
Lighthouse and, in time-honored
show business fashion, was hired
on the spot. He remainedwith the
group fa over three years as a
featured artist, gaming valuable
experience and. in due course,
international acclaim. In 1967.
Roy was voted Top New Star on
vibes in Down Beat and has
continued to register well in their
Established Talent category
But Roy s skills are known to
than an elite coterie of
ies-and extend far be-
yond mere manual dexterity
Attuned to the best elements of a
variety of music, from jazz to
oul to latin and rock, he has
gathered around him a crew of
musicians who share his tastes
and talents. Live and on record,
their work is consistently exci-
ting, soulful and dynamic�and
increasngty popular m both pop
and jarz drdes. Altogether the
Roy Ayers Ubiquity is one of the
brightest aggregations m con-
temporary music.
It hasn't taken long for Roy to
solidify his standing among the
top practitioners of the vibes. As
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one reviewer said of a set at New
York's Village Vanguard, "Roy
Ayers brings a controlled fire to
his performance. He runs up and
down the keys of his vibes with
deft aaftmanship. He can stire
himself to a driving tempo a he
can just groove. Either way he
has complete control of himself
and his instrument
Of the same engagement,
anaher aitic observed that "the
audience said almost as much
about the music as the music
itself. I was probably the only one
that wasn't a famous musician,
mainstream a avant-garde. That
means that Roy Ayers is being
listened to by his peersper-
haps the ultimate aocolade.
Ultimately, Roy famed his
own group; the talented aew took
on the title Roy Ayers Ubiquity-
an apt desaiption fa music that
is indeed "in all places at the
same time
There are so many variations
and degrees in the music of
Ubiquity says Roy, "that it is
difficult to put it into one
category Jazz, rock, latin,
soul-ail have a place in the
Ubiquitous scheme of things. And
as Down Beat pointed out,
"Ayers' group is capable of
playing it alland most impor-
tant, all of it rings true
Tickets will be on sale at the
doa fa both the 7 and the 9:30
p.m perfamanoes. The Box Of-
fioeisopen from8:30 a.m. to4:30
p.m. weekdays. Fa mae infa-
matiai, please call the Stewart
Theatre at 737-3105.
Running out of ideas?
wine racks
wall shelves
pictures 10 off
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Pag� 10 FOUNTAINHEAP 1 Novembf 1977
Defensive contest won by USL
ByCHRlSHOLLOMAN
Sports Editor
In a game that was the
defensive struggle of the year fa
both teams, East Carolina lost its
second game of the season to
Southwestern Louisiana 7-3.
Although the Pirates defense did
an effective job against USL's Roy
Henry, it was the ECU offense
that oould not get on the right
track. In all the Pirates lost a total
of four fumbles, one which could
have given the Pirates a last
chance to win. The game has
probably destroyed any bowl
hopes the Pirates might have had.
The game itself was a total
frustration for both teams offense
in the first half as ECU and USL
blew scoring chances. The excite-
ment was there fa people who
like big defensive plays. During
the hair there were three missed
field goals, a blocked punt, two
fumbles, and an interception. The
oily time it looked like there
would be a scae is when late in
the first half, Gerald Hall picked
off a Roy Henry pass and ran it
back to the Pirate 12.
The Pirates then mounted a
drive from their 12 to Cajun 222
where Junia Creech attempted
and failed a 43 yarder.
The Cajuns marched all the
way down to the East Carolina 10
yard line. Henry tried to pass into
the endzone three times but was
unable to hit his receiver. USL's
John Roverto was wide to the
right on a 27 yard field goal try.
After a few punt exchanges
the Cajuns recovered a
Southerland fumble at the ECU 9
yard line. The Cajuns were called
fa clipping ai the first down
however and that moved the ball
back to the 23. Then in a super
defensive play by the Pirate
defense, Henry was sacked by
John Maris and fumbled the
ball. The ball bounced down to
the 47, where Wayne Poole fell on
it.
The Pirates were na able to
EAST CAROLINA DEFENSIVE tackle Wayne Poole 99 in foreground stops Southwestern
Louisiana tailback from making a first down. Photo by Brian Stotter
��
USL NOSEGUARD Keith Walker 99 and defensive end Ken Chenler 96- sack ECU quarterback Jimmy
Southerland. Walker recovered two Pirate fumbles to lead the Cajun defense. Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
Tennis team wins three
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
Pria to last week, ECU'S
womens tennis team was floun-
dering in the midst of anaher
somewhat poa season with a 2-7
overall recad.
But the Pirates seemed to
have caught fire at midseason as
they reeled off three straight
victaies last week, including a
6-3 win over nationally ranked
Peace College.
East Carolina also topped Old
Dominioi 6-3 and St. Mary's
College fa the second time this
season 6-3 to improve its overall
recad to 5-7 this season.
The Pirates victay over Peace
College, who was ranked third in
the nation in junior college
rankings, was astounding.
It was Peace College's first
loss of the season and avenged an
earlier season loss which came in
Raleigh Peace is currently the
third ranked junia college team
in the nation.
"The key to our match against
Peace was the play of Dacas
Sunkel said head coach Cynthia
Averett She was playing with
an injured ankle and split sets
against Ellen Easter. But she
seemed to ignae the ankle and
went ai to win in the third set 6-2.
This was bv far our biggest win of
Baker came through with auaal
victaies in the number five and
six singles, as the Pirates rolled
past Old Dominion. Diane
Keough went three sets against
ODUs Jane Clifton befae finally
winning.
Louise Synder and Keough
bah won their singles matches
Sports
the season
Sunkel, who has played in the
number three singles position fa
the Pirates most of the season,
now has an impressive 9-3 overall
recad this season. She is 7-2 in
dual matches.
Sunkel also defeated Princey
Dicksonof St. Mary's6-1, 6-1 and
Mary Beth Clarkson of Old
Dominion in three sets 6-1, 3-6,
6-3.
Susan Helmer and Claire
against St. Mary's and teamed
together to win the number one
doubles match in ECU'S victay
over St. Mary's.
Top ranked Duke oomes to
Greenville today to play the
Pirates. The match will start at
230 at Minges.
The Pirates are hqpi�g that
the momentum generated by the
three straight victaies will mark
a turn around fa the tennis team
RESULTS
East Carolina6 Old Dominioi 3
Singles: Shaulis (OD) def. Sny-
der, 6-1,6-0; Spinazzda (EC) def
Magan, 6-0, 6-1; Sunkel (EC)
def. Clarkson, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3;
Keough (EC) def. Clifton 5-7, 7-6,
6-4; Helmer (EC) def. Hatcher
6-3, 6-3; Baker (EC) def. Stepp,
6-2, 6-3; Doubles: Spinazzda,
Sunkel (EC) def. Shaulis, Clifton,
8-6; Magan, Clarkson (OD) def.
Keough, Snyder, 8-4; Hatcher,
Stepp (OD) def. Helmer, Gainey,
6-1, 5-7, 6-3.
EastCardina6 Peace3
Singles: Snyder (EC) def. Lamm,
6-0, 6-3; Spinazzda (EC) def.
Ottes, 2-6, 6-4, 6-1; SUnkel (EC)
def. Easter, 4-6,6-4,6-2; Walston
(P) def. Keough, 6-1,6-0; Helmer
(P) def. Peacock, 6-4, 6-3; Jacobs
(P) def. Baker, 6-2, 6-1. Doubles:
Lamm, Oattes (P) def. Spianz-
zola, Sunkel, injury, default
move anywhere as the big USL
defense stopped them odd. On an
attempted punt.RodneyAllen was
blocked by Cajun Jeff Tanguis
and USL recovered at the ECU 38.
USL then moved down to the
Pirate 26 where on third down
Roy Henry attempted to pass into
the endzone. The pass was inter-
cepted by Gerald Hall and
returned to the 12 yard line. From
here the Pirates marched down to
the Cajun 15. On second down
from the 15, Southerland was hit
fa a nine yard loss and the
Creech kick was no good. This left
the scae at half time ECU 0, USL
0.
In the second half the ECU
offense received the ball and then
fumbled it on the Pirate 24. The
ECU defense stopped the drive
however, as Charlie Carter inter-
cepted andher Henry pass in the
endzone.
Southwestern held the Pirates
and then burned the Pirate
secondary on a Roy Henry to
a David Gray pass fa 54 yards.
This put the Cjuns ai the Pirate
12 where Roverto hit his field goal
attempt making the scae USL 3,
ECU0.
Fa the second time in the
game the Pirates gd their dfense
on the right track. Leander
Green, trapped by the Cajun
defenders, reversed himself and
ran from the 15 all the way to the
40. Green picked up 12 more
yards two plays later, and in two
mae, the Pirates gd andher first
down at the USL 36. After two
plays netted only three yards,
Green faked to the fullback cut
back into the line and ran fa a 33
yard touchdown. The Creech kick
was good and the Pirates had a 7
to 3 lead.
The Pirates had andher shd
at putting some pdnts on the
board but were unable to move
anywhere. The Pirates backed up
to their eleven yard line and
punted. Allen's punt was fa 50
yards, but it still put the Cajuns in
great field position.
A Roy Henry to Strambler
pass gd ten yards and a second to
Dennis Reidmiller added seven
mae. Then ai a fourth and one
try, Henry gd the first down at
the Pirate 29. Strambler then ran
fa an additiaial 15 yards. A pitch
to Gray gd a first down at the two
and the Cajuns appeared ready to
scae.
Once again the Pirate defense
rose to the occasion and threw the
Cajuns back to the five. Roverto
then kicked a 22 yard field goal to
put the Cajuns behind by only oie
at 7-6.
On the first play after the
kickoff, ECU fullback Theooore
Sutton fumbled the ball and
Walker recovered fa the Cajuns.
The fumble wa; Walkers second
recovery of the night and put the
Cajuns at the Pirate seven. A
penalty pushed the Cajuns back
to the 26 but in two plays they
were back down to the six. From
there Roverto kicked the winning
fieldgoal that put USL ahead fa
good at 9-7.
The next game fa the Pirates
will be at Boone as they renew an
dd rivalry with the Mountaineers
of Appalachian State.
The tickets fa the game can
still be bought in Boone.






BRnmpmnEMBnmancsiflnH
HHHNHMi
1 No�emb8f1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Noah Clark Pirate defensive standout
By STEVE BYERS
Staff Writer
Noah Clark is not your ave-
rage mammoth defensive line-
man.
The soft spoken sophomore
from Robersonville would seem to
make an ideal babysitter; that is,
until the day of the game when he
lullsthe opposition to sleep with
his powerful foreman. "I'd rather
just lay back, listen to music, and:
shoot pool
Noah redeved all-conference
honors his junta and senior years
at Robersonville (now Roanoke),
and was selected to play in the
East-West all-star game his
senior year. Still, with such high
credentials, Noah was considered
too small by most college recruit-
ers. At 6'2" 225 Clark relies a lot
on his upper body strength.
� That's where the first contact is,
so you've got to stick 'em
Clark started three games his
freshman year, and is one of the
leading tacklers on this years
squad. Woodrow Stevenson,
another Pirate tackle, had kind
wads fa Clark He helped me a
lot with my weightlifting
Stevenson, another sophomae,
earned a starting position when
Wayne Poole was injured earlier
in the year. Noah recognized
fellow players Zack Valentine,
Fred Chavis, and especially
Oliver "Brute" Felton. "Heplays
noseguard like nobody else can
A man with high team aspir-
ations, Noah was particularly
upset with the passing away of
defensive line coach Rick
Bankston. "He helped me a lot
personally, he looked at you as
maethan just a football player
said Clark. "Befae the seasai,
the defensive line grt together
and dedicated the season to
to him this year however
the line has flourished under the
direction of coach Troupe, a
converted offensive perfamer.
Flat foot, as he is called by
teammates, would like nothing
better than to play professional
football after graduation but fears
lack of size might be detrimental.
However, recommendations from
opposing players might awake
professional scouts as East
Carolina's own Noah Oark con-
tinues on as the silent giant 93
Duke drops Pirates
Noah Clark
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
"We have our brilliant spots
and then all of a sudden we go
into these bad slumps explain-
ed Alita Dillon about the up and
down perfamance of her volley-
ball team last week.
The Pirates hit a harendous
slump last week losing to Duke
3-1 Tuesday and then dropped
three straight matches in the
Appalachian State Invitational
Tournament over the weekend.
The four losses last week
dropped East Carolina's overall
reoad to 13-11 this season. The
Pirates return to action Tuesday
night in a home match against
him It seems to have waked as
Chowan Uollege and play Peace
College Thursday at home.
"I've put up a sign in our
dressing room which says Meet
Your Opponents, Not Their Rep-
utations said Dillon. "I don't
know whether it's going to wak,
but we've ga to start playing
better if we're going to get
anywhere in the state tour-
nament
The Pirates lost the first game
j' ;r,v Amm Twrnirr:t
to Conoad 2-1. Conoad won the
first game 15-10, but ECU took
the second game 15-5 to even the
match at one game a piece.
Conoad then wai the third game
with a narrow 15-13 decision.
It was basically the same stay
fa the Pirates in the second game
of the tournament against
Louisburg College, a team ECU
had already beaten earlier in the
year. Louisburg won the first
See VOLLEYBALL page 2.
Globetrotters here Thurs.
The Harlem Globetrotters will
show once again why they are the
World's Greatest Family Enter-
tainment" when they come to
Greenville, N.C. on Thursday,
Nov. 3.
Accompanying the Trotters
will be an all-star variety show
featuring Lilly Yokoi. bicyclist
and Dick Franco, juggler. Now in
their second half century, the
Trotters continue to amaze fans
with their superb basketball
skills. Long-time fans will marvel
at new dimensions of basketball
wizarui y now part of the Globe-
trotters show. New fans will
simply marvel.
The fans make it happen
says Trotter president Stan
Greeson. "They supply the
energy which makes the Trotters
tick
The Globetrotters have been
9een by mae than 82 millioi fans
around the wald.
Throughout mae than fifty
years of Globetraters successes,
ot which there have been many,
the fans have always played a
maja role. Globetrotter fans are
unique, fa geographically they
have no bounds. They are found
throughout the wald. Wherever
they play, the famed Magicians of
Basketball are hailed as the
home" team. It is a distinction
other teams only dream about.
Each time the Trotters step
onto the court, spats histay is
made. In mae than fifty years of
spats and entertainment magic,
the harleqiuns of the hardwood
have been seen by mae than 82
millioi fans around the wald.
The Harlem Globetrotters,
unquestionably the most popular
spats team this side of the moon,
have played mae games befae
mae people than any team in
histay.
Attendance recads are stag-
gering. The outdoa basketball
attendance reoad which to this
day has na been approached,
was achieved in 1951 when the
Trotters played before over
75,000 fans in Berlin.
The Traters hold the indoa
pro-basketball attendance reoad,
too. A mark set when mae than
30,000 cheering fans viewed the
Magicians of Basketball in the
Louisiana Superdome
Wed. Tenth Ave.
Thurs. "The Drifters"
AT THE
EM
ROOftT
Don't Forget Fri 3-7 Sun is Ladies Night
Tues. "Table Magic"
Wed.
Backgammon Tourn
BYOL
ACCOUNTING AND
FINANCE MAJORS
LET US HELP YOU TO
BECOME A CPA
D
CPA
REVIEW
704375-3051
COURSES BEGIN MAY 22 8. NOV 21
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7r
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a






Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 1 Ncwembf 1977
Defensive contest won by USL
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Sports Editor
In a game that was the
defensive struggle of the year for
both teams, East Carolina lost its
second game of the season to
Southwestern Louisiana 7-3.
Although the Pirates defense did
an effective job against USL's Floy
Henry, it was the ECU offense
that could not get on the right
track. In all the Pirates lost a total
of four fumbles, one which could
have given the Pirates a last
chance to win. The game has
probably destroyed any bowl
hopes the Pirates might have had.
The game itself was a total
frustration fa both teams offense
in the first half as ECU and USL
blew scoring chances. The excite-
ment was there fa people who
like big defensive plays. During
the half there were three missed
field goals, a blocked punt, two
fumbles, and an interception. The
only time it looked like there
would be a soore is when late in
the first half, Gerald Hall picked
off a Roy Henry pass and ran it
back to the Pirate 12.
The Pirates then mounted a
drive from their 12 to Cajun 222
where Junia Creech attempted
and failed a 43 yarder.
The Cajuns marched all the
way down to the East Carolina 10
yard line. Henry tried to pass into
the endzone three times but was
unable to hit his receiver. USL's
John Roverto was wide to the
right on a 27 yard field goal try.
After a few punt exchanges
the Cajuns recovered a
Southerland fumble at the ECU 9
yard line. The Cajuns were called
fa clipping on the first down
however and that moved the ball
back to the 23. Then in a super
defensive play by the Pirate
defense, Henry was sacked by
John Maris and fumbled the
ball. The ball bounced down to
the 47, where Wayne Poole fell on
it.
The Pirates were na able to
EAST CAROLINA DEFENSIVE tackle Wayne Poole 99 m foreground stops Southwestern
Louisiana tailback from making a first down. Photo by Brian Stotter)
H�" c
USL NOSEGUARD Keith Walker 99 and defensive end Ken Chenler 96, sack ECU quarterback Jimmy
Southerland. Walker recovered two Pirate fumbles to lead the Cajun defense. Photo by Pete Podeszwa
Tennis team wins three
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
Pria to last week, ECU'S
womens tennis team was floun-
dering in the midst of anaher
somewhat poa seasai with a 2-7
overall recad.
But the Pirates seemed to
have caught fire at midseason as
they reeled off three straight
victaies last week, including a
6-3 win ever nationally ranked
Peace College.
East Carolina also topped Old
Dominion 6-3 and St. Mary's
College fa the second time this
season 6-3 to improve its overall
recad to 5-7 this season.
The Pirates victay over Peace
College, who was ranked third in
the nation in junior college
rankings, was astounding.
It was Peace College's first
loss of the season and avenged an
earlier seasai loss which came in
Raleigh. Peace is currently the
third ranked junia college team
in the nation.
The key to our match against
Peace was the play of Dacas
Sunkel said head coach Cynthia
Averett. "She was playing with
an injured ankle and split sets
against Ellen Easter. But she
seemed to ignae the ankle and
went oi to win in the third set 6-2.
This was bv far our biggest win of
Baker came through with aucial
victaies in the number five and
six singles, as the Pirates rolled
past Old Dominion. Diane
Keough went three sets against
ODU' s Jane Clifton befae finally
winning.
Louise Synder and Keough
both won their singles matches
Sports
the season
Sunkel, who has played in the
number three singles position fa
the Pirates most of the season,
now has an impressive 9-3 overall
recad this season. She is 7-2 in
dual matches.
Sunkel �lso defeated Princey
Dicksono' j�. Mary's6-1, 6-1 and
Mary Beth Clarkson of Old
DominiO) in three sets 6-1, 3-6,
6-3.
Susan Helmer and Claire
against St. Mary's and teamed
together to win the number one
doubles match in ECU'S victay
over St. Mary's.
Top ranked Duke comes to
Greenville today to play the
Pirates. The match will start at
230 at Minges.
The Pirates are hoping that
the momentum generated by the
three straight victaies will mark
a turn around fa the tennis team
RESULTS
East Carolina 6 Old Dominioi 3
Singles: Shaulis (OD) def. Sny-
der, 6-1,6-0; Spinazzola (EC) def.
Magan, 6-0, 6-1; Sunkel (EC)
def. Clarkson, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3;
Keough (EC) def. Clifton 5-7, 7-6,
6-4; Helmer (EC) def. Hatcher
6-3, 6-3; Baker (EC) def. Stepp,
6-2, 6-3; Doubles: Spinazzola,
Sunkel (EC) def. Shaulis, Clifton,
8-6; Magan, Clarksoi (OD) def.
Keough, Snyder, 8-4; Hatcher,
Stepp (OD) def. Helmer, Gainey,
6-1, 5-7, 6-3.
East Carolina6 Peace 3
Singles: Snyder (EC) def. Lamm,
6-0, 6-3; Spinazzola (EC) def.
Ottes, 2-6, 6-4, 6-1; SUnkel (EC)
def. Easter, 4-6,6-4,6-2; Walston
(P) def. Keough, 6-1, 6-0; Helmer
(P) def. Peacock, 6-4, 6-3; Jacobs
(P) def. Baker, 6-2, 6-1. Doubles:
Lamm, Oattes (P) def. Spianz-
zola, Sunkel, injury, default
move anywhere as the big USL
defense stopped them cold. On an
attempted punt, Rodney Allen was
blocked by Cajun Jeff Tanguis
and USL recovered at the ECU 38.
USL then moved down to the
Pirate 26 where on third down
Roy Henry attempted to pass into
the endzone. The pass was inter-
cepted by Gerald Hall and
returned to the 12 yard line. From
here the Pirates marched down to
the Cajun 15. On second down
from the 15. Southerland was hit
fa a nine yard loss and the
Creech kick was no good. This left
the scae at halftime ECU 0, USL
0.
In the seooid half the ECU
offense received the ball and then
fumbled it on the Pirate 24. The
ECU defense stopped the drive
however, as Charlie Carter inter-
cepted anaher Henry pass in the
endzone.
Southwestern held the Pirates
and then burned the Pirate
secondary on a Roy Henry to
a David Gray pass fa 54 yards.
This put the Cjuns on the Pirate
12 where Roverto hit his field goal
attempt making the scae USL 3,
ECU0.
Fa the second time in the
game the Pirates ga their offense
on the right track. Leander
Green, trapped by the Cajun
defenders, reversed himself and
ran from the 15 all the way to the
40. Green picked up 12 mae
yards two plays later, and in two
mae, the Pirates got anaher first
down at the USL 36. After two
plays netted only three yards,
Green faked to the fullback cut
back into the line and ran fa a 33
yard touchdown. The Creech kick
was good and the Pirates had a 7
to 3 lead.
The Pirates had anaher sha
at putting some points on the
board but were unable to move
anywhere. The Pirates backed up
to their eleven yard line and
punted. Allen's punt was fa 50
yards, but it still put the Cajuns in
great field position.
A Roy Henry to Strambler
pass ga ten yards and a second to
Dennis Reidmiller added seven
mae. Then on a fourth and one
try, Henry ga the first down at
the Pirate 29. Strambler then ran
fa an additioial 15 yards. A pitch
to Gray ga a first down at the two
and the Cajuns appeared ready to
scae.
Once again the Pirate defense
rose to the occasion and threw the
Cajuns back to the five. Roverto
then kicked a 22 yard field goal to
put the Cajuns behind by only one
at 7-6.
On the first play after the
kickoff, ECU fullback Theodae
Sutton fumbled the ball and
Walker recovered fa the Cajuns.
The fumble was Walkers second
recovery of the night and put the
Cajuns at the Pirate seven. A
penalty pushed the Cajuns back
to the 26 but in two plays they
were back down to the six. From
there Roverto kicked the winning
fieldgoal that put USL ahead fa
good at 9-7.
The next game fa the Pirates
will be at Boone as they renew an
old rivalry with the Mountaineers
of Appalachian State.
The tickets fa the game can
still be bought in Boone.






JwBBBBBiBHMmHHHHMMHBnBHHHHHHHinnHIHHHHnHHHHBHHnHHMi
1 November 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Noah Clark Pirate defensive standout
By STEVE BYERS
Staff Writer
Noah Clark is not your ave-
rage mammoth defensive line-
man.
The soft spoken sophomore
from Robersonville would seem to
make an ideal babysitter; that is,
until the day of the game when he
lulls the opposition to sleep with
hispowerful foreman. "I'd rather
just lay back, listen to music, and:
shoot pool
Noah recieved all-conference
honors his junior and senior years
at Robersonville (now Roanoke),
and was selected to play in the
East-West all-star game his
senior year. Still, with such high
credentials, Noah was considered
too small by most college recruit-
ers. At 6'2" 225 Clark relies a lot
on his upper body strength.
"That's where the first contact is,
so you've got to stick em
Clark started three games his
freshman year, and is one of the
leading taoklers on this years
squad. Woodrow Stevenson,
another Pirate tackle, had kind
wads fa Clark, "He helped me a
lot with my weightlifting
Stevenson, another sophomae,
earned a starting position when
Wayne Poole was injured earlier
in the year. Noah recognized
fellow players Zaok Valentine,
F-red Chavis, and especially
Oliver "Brute" Felton. "He plays
noseguard like nobody else can
A man with high team aspir-
ations, Noah was particularly
upset with the passing away of
defensive line coach Rick
Bankston. "He helped me a la
personally, he looked at you as
mae than just a football player
said Clark. 'Before the season,
the defensive line got together
and dedicated the season to
to him this year however
the line has flourished under the
direction of coach Troupe, a
converted offensive perfamer.
Flatfoot, as he is called by
teammates, would like nothing
better than to play professional
football after graduation but fears
lack of size might be detrimental.
However, recommendations from
opposing players might awake
professional scouts as East
Carolina's own Noah Clark con-
tinues on as the silent giant93.
Duke drops Pirates
Noah Clark
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
"We have our brilliant spots
and then all of a sudden we go
into these bad slumps explain-
ed Alita Dillon about the up and
down perfamanoe of her volley-
ball team last week.
The Pirates hit a harendous
slump last week losing to Duke
3-1 Tuesday and then dropped
three straight matches in the
Appalachian State Invitational
Tournament over the weekend.
The four losses last week
dropped East Carolina's overall
recad to 13-11 this season. The
Pirates return to action Tuesday
night in a home match against
him It seems to have waked as
Chowan College and play Peace
College Thursday at home.
"I've put up a sign in our
dressing room which says, "Meet
Your Opponents, Not Their Rep-
utations said Dillon. "I don't
know whether it's going to wak,
but we've got to start playing
better if we're going to get
anywhere in the state tour-
nament
The Pirates lost the first game
in theADDalachiarToumament
to Concad 2-1. Concad wai the
first game 15-10, but ECU took
the second game 15-5 to even the
match at one game a piece.
Concad then wai the third game
with a narrow 15-13 decision.
It was basically the same stay
fa the Pirates in the second game
of the tournament against
Louisburg College, a team ECU
had already beaten earlier in the
year. Louisburg won the first
See VOLLEYBALL page 2.
Globetrotters here Thurs.
The Harlem Globetrotters will
show once again why they are the
World's Greatest Family Enter-
tainment" when they cone to
Greenville, N.C. on Thursday,
Nov. 3.
Accompanying the Trotters
will be an all-star variety show
featuring Lilly Yoka, bicyclist
and Dick Franco, juggler. Now in
their second half oentury, the
Trotters continue to amaze fans
with their superb basketball
skills. Long-time fans will marvel
at new dimensions of basketball
wizardry now part of the Globe-
trotters show. New fans will
simply marvel.
The fans make it happen
says Trotter president Stan
Greeson. "They supply the
energy which makes the Trotters
tick
The Globetrotters have been
seen by mae than 82 millioi fans
around the wald.
Throughout mae than fifty
years of Globetrotters successes,
of which there have been many,
the fans have always played a
rnaja role. Globetrater fans are
unique, fa geographically they
have no bounds. They are found
throughtout the wald. Wherever
they play, the famed Magicians of
Basketball are hailed as the
home' team. It is a distinction
other teams only dream about.
Each tinv the Trotters step
onto the court, spats histay is
made. In mae than fifty years of
spats and entertainment magic,
the harleqiuns of the hardwood
have been seen by mae than 82
millioi fans around the wald.
The Harlem Globetrotters,
unquestionably the most popular
spatsteam this side of the moon,
have played mae games befae
mae people than any team in
histay.
Attendance recads are stag-
gering. The outdoa basketball
attendance recad which to this
day has na been approached,
was achieved in 1951 when the
Trotters played before over
75,000 fans in Berlin.
The Traters hold the indcor
pro-basketball attendance recad,
tco. A mark set when mae than
30,000 cheering fans viewed the
Magicians of Basketball in the
Louisiana Super dome
Wed. Tenth Ave.
Thurs. "The Drifters"
AT THE
ROOM
Don't Forget Fri 3-7 Sun is Ladies Night
SKI TRIPS
Gne
lues. "Table Magics"
Wed.
Backgammon Tourn
BYOL
ACCOUNTING AND
FINANCE MAJORS
LET US HELP YOU TO
BECOME ACPA
55
Anyone Interested in Ski Trips This Winter
Beech Mountain, N.C.
Winter Green, VA
Snow Shore, W. VA.
Steam Boat, Colorado
Come By or Call at 756-0504
Organizing Groups Now at Discount Rates - Ski Rentals
available this winterpoles, boots bindings )
Contact Head Pro-Gordon Fulp
Professional ski, golf,tennis,shop
with repair service included for all merchandise
D
CPA
REVIEW
704375-3051
COURSES BEGIN MAY 22 8. NOV 21
13 " USA
WEEKLY SPECIAL
golf balls- all brands $12.00 per doz.
tennis balls- Wilson, Dunlop
$2.75 per can (limit 2 cans)
End of season close out on all Izod
short sleeve shirts

v.
'hfr&
Jf4





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 1 Nwember 1977
Soccer
ByANNEHOGGE
Staff Writer
East Carolina's soccer team
ended its season last week,
splitting its last pair of matches.
The Pirates beat Pembroke 5-2,
while losing to William and Mary
6-0. The ECU booters finished
their season with a 3-10 overall
mark.
The Pirates bombarded
Pembroke in the first half of the
Wednesday match, holding a 4-1
halftime lead. Ric Browning
scored twice, with assists from
Phil Martin and Mike Fetchko.
Martin scored one unassisted
point, and Mike Hitchcock scored
on a penalty kick. Martin scored
the Pirates' final goal of the
season in the second half, with an
assist from Tim Harrison.
Smith was disappointed in
losing the season's final match
Friday to William and Mary.
"They scored on some cheap
goals said Smith. "I think
Eddings and Harrison played
exceptionally well
Naturally, Smith was dis-
appointed that his first coaching
season was a losing one. "I'm
disappointed, but I think both
myself and the players learned
aiot said Smith. "But I think
we've improved the program. We
will continue to work out during
the off-season. I think we've
impressed the athletic depart-
ment enough that we will be back
next year
����
VOLLEYBALL
Continued from Page 11
9 $
es 1-1 for week
ECU-ASU
tickets can be purchased
with ID andAcivity card
in Boone for '3.50
Phil Martin
Photo by Brian Stotler)
Oyster Bowl tickets for the
ECU vsW&M Game
must be purchased by Wed
Nov. 11th. The tickets are '7.00
game 15-12 and took the match in
the third game with another 15-13
decision. East Carolina won the
second game 15-12.
The Pirates were eliminated
from the tournament in the third
match against Winthrop losing
again by a 2-1 score. This time
ECU jumped out in front in the
first game with an impressive
15-6 decision, but lost the next
two games 15-10 and 15-8.
Sports
Writers
Needed
Call
758-6367
MJOHN ROVETO KICKSthe winning field goal in a9-7 defeat of the East Carolina P.raies. Hoveto, iiadhu
two others earlier in the game and scored all of USL's nine points. Photo by Jeff Hod
Classifieds
s
FOR SALE: '68 Squareback
fast back owners: replacement
parts for your car at low cost.
Have 68 Fstbck breaking for
parts. Lights, fuses, seats, trans-
axleclutch parts, fenders, tires
and wheels. You need it? I
probably got it. Call Mike 756-
6674ext. 6360.
FOR SALE: AKC Great Dane
pups - 5 weeks old - 3 fawn 1 blk.
Call after 6 p.m. 826-5100.
FOR SALE: 73 Honda 500 four,
7200 miles, excellent cond. $950
see next to Pollards Grocery
(Bells Fork 3 miles out 43 south).
FOR SALE: '73 350 Honda $350
758-0693
FOR SALE: Texas Instruments
SR-52, 224 step programable.
Also card programable. Complete
with math, Stat games and basic
libraries. Cost 300 plus new, 5
mos. old. Contact Tony Bennett at
401 Jones.
FOR SALE: 2 Frazier speakers; 3
inch tweeter, 10 inch woofer;
good sound. $90. 752-3739 after 9
p.m.
FOR SALE: Sears self cleaning
toaster-broiler oven. Used once
cost $44 sell $30 excellent for
home or dorm. 752-5499.
FOR SALE: '71 Super Beetle.
Good Cond. Good gas mi. $900 or
best offer. 758-7866.
FOR SALE: Epiphone accoustic
guitar. Best offer. Call Mike
758-1693.
FOR SALE: 4.3 cubic foot refrig.
Perfect for dorm use. $115. If
interested call 756-6951 after 5
p.m. M-F.
FOR SALE: Sony reel to reel tape
deck; good cond comes with 2
mikes. $150 752-3739 after 9 p.m.
FOR SALE: 8 clubs, goU bag, golf
cart. Call 753-3624 after 6 D.m.
FOR SALE: Waltham 5-function
LCD Quartz digital. Regular $175
will sell fa $80 a trade for good
used bike. Call Lou after 5 p.m.
758-2887.
WANTED TO RENT: 3-bdrm
house in country within 10 miles
of Greenville. Reward upon
rental. Call 752-0982.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
$65 plus 1 3 utilities, 2 story, 2
bedroom, 2 bath. 758-6617.
personal�
torrent �
FEMALE ROOMMATE: needed
pay Vi of rent and utilities.
Greenway Apts. Call 756-7888.
FILM SOCIETY: All persons
interested in joining Eastern
Carolina Film Society call at
758-5253. If no answer phone
752-6389 or write Box 27
Falkland, N.C. 27827.
TO BUY: FM Signal generator
(used) must have 140-170 MgHz
bandwidth capacity. Call 752-
0982.
RIDE NEEDED: to Boone, N.C.
for ASU - ECU game. Wants to
leave Fri. and return Sun. even-
ing or early Mon. morning.
Please call 758-1636.
NEED TYPING? For efficient,
fast service Call 756-3815 after
5:15 p.m. Reasonable rates IBM
Carbon type used.
MUSICIANS: Newly faming soul
band looking fa singers, lead
guitarist, and' keyboard player.
Call L.B. 758-8310.
ALTERATIONS: Fall things too
big, too long? Call Kathy.
752-8444 a 752-8642.
RIDE NEEDED: to Miami
anytime after Dec. 13, 1977. Call
Marie-Noelle Connil 758-9229.
FOUND: Rings. Ccntact Depart-
ment of Psychology 757-6800.





Title
Fountainhead, November 1, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 01, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.612
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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