Fountainhead, September 27, 1977






Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
iu m wr, ft pa�� r-arriina Universitv Greenville. North Carolina 27 September 1077
Vol. 53, No. 8
Greenville, North Carolina
ON THE INSIDE
Xing Tutp. 3
Job interviewsp. 6
Laredo Shinesp. 8
Bucswlnp. 12
ECU Board of Trustees
swears in four members
By STUART MORGAN
Staff Writer
Four new members of the
ECU Board of Trustees were
sworn in by District Judge Robert
Wheeler this past Saturday.
Swan in were Neil Sessoms,
SGA president, John F. Minges
II, Dr. Andrew A. Best, and
William D. Stanley.
Four officers were also re-
elected at the meeting. Troy W.
Pate was re-elected chairperson,
Ashley B. Futrell, vice-chairper-
son, and Mrs. J.G. Burgwyn,
Secretary.
Neil Sessoms announced to
the board that the SGA has
purchased a van and additional
equipment to serve the handicap-
ped students
Sessoms also said the SGA is
stndying alternative plans for
funding publications. Long-range
plans suggest that funding be set
up independent of the SGA and
funded directly by student fees.
Sessoms also estimated the
operating budget fa this year to
be approximately $250,000. He
said part of the money will be
used to pay for a new night route
for the transit system which
operates from the Allied Health
building to Joyner Library.
Dr. Leo Jenkins, Chancella,
oanmended the responsible, ma-
ture manner in which the SGA
operates in disbursing one of the
largest student government bud-
gets in the nation.
Robert L. Holt, Vice-Chancel-
la of planning, announced that
the ECU plan fa helping handi-
capped victims has been selected
as a model fa the 16 campus
university system.
Clifton G. Moore, Vice-
Chanoella of Business Affairs,
announced that ECU now has
$1.2 million in pledges fa the
contribution of the additional
seats in Ficklen Stadium.
However, he also said that
due to inflation and the resulting
high costs of construction, will
need approximately $2.5 to $2.6
million before it can begin
construction.
A request by Mcore that the
additional money be funded was
approved by the Board of Trus-
tees.
Open contract bids fa the
expansion of Ficklen Stadium by
17,500 seats, totaling 35,000
seats, will be held Oct. 26. Moae
said the stadium will not be a
haseshoe, but will have four
oaners, faming an oblique angle
at each end.
Last year the State Board of
Transit approved the Tenth Street
Overpass Project, but they did not
fund it. The Board of Trustees
re-affirmed its position on the
overpass, and approved a resolu-
tion which will be sent to
Governa James Hunt.
William D. Stanley, said that
presently no streets on campus
are named. Dr. Jenkins sugges-
ted that the streets be named in
hona of some of the benefactas
of ECU. Stanley is heading a
oommittee on the matter, but no
definite plans have been made at
this time.
Awards to be given
Writing contest announced
By STEVE WILSON
Staff Writer
A student writing oontest has
been announced by the ECU
Division of Academic Affairs and
the Phi Kappa Phi Hona Society.
The oontest is coadinated
with the third annual Symposium
sponsaed by these two groups.
The topic for this year's
Symposium is "Coping with the
Energy Dilemma and the
competitioi is open to all stud-
ents.
The Symposium Committee
is interested in the views of all of
the academic disciplines, and a
creative approach is stressed.
Awards of $100 each will go to the
two students whose papers are
judged best on the basis of
oontent and ovaall quality. Dr.
Fred Broadhurst, chairman of the
Symposium Committee, met with
N.C. Senata Robert Magan,
New social fraternity
to initiate members
ByKENTYNDAU
Assistant News Editor
Between 25 and 30 men will
be initiated hae Wednesday into
the Sigma Tau Gamma sodal
fraternity, the newest fraternity
at ECU.
This fraternity is the result of
the national Sigma Tau Gamma's
effort to spread chaptas through-
out the southeast, acoading to
Mark O'Ravitz, Sigma Tau
Gamma member.
The fraternity's headquarters
is in Warrenaburg, Missouri, and
there are currently about 60
chapters across the U.S.
Accading to O'Ravitz, the
expansion directa is flying in
Tuesday to help start the new
chapter and initiate the new
members
ORavitz, initiated in 1975, at
Shippensburg State College in
Pennsylvania, has just transfer-
red to ECU.
The setting up of a manage-
ment oouncil and the drawing up
of a constitution are the first two
priaities, accading to O' Ravitz.
Any money-making projects in
the beginning will support the
fraternity, however future fund-
raising projects will benefit
charity.
ORavitz said he hopes the
fraternity will have a house no
later than next fall, and hopefully,
by the summer, so that prepara-
tion can be made befae fall.
Several real estate agents
have been contacted already,
accading to ORavitz.
"I think we have a good bunch
of people, and the school is
behind us said ORavitz.
Sigma Tau Gamma, began in
1920, claims Senata Jesse Helms
as a member, according to
ORavitz.
who will be waking with the
Symposium Committee in secur-
ing a prominent keynote speaker
fa the Symposium.
They hope to have U.S.
Energy Advisa James Schlesin-
ger to speak. Senata Magan is a
graduate of ECU, and an honaary
member of Phi Kappa Phi.
Contestants are asked to first
submit a two-to three-page
abstract of their idea. The
students who submit the two best
abstracts will be asked to com-
plete their final papers, and will
receive the awards. The papers
should be in style suitable fa
publication; they will be present-
ed by the winners at the
Symposium, which is scheduled
fa Feb. 15-16, 1978 at ECU.
There are no length require-
ments, but presentation of the
paper at the Symposium is limited
to 50 minutes.
Phi Kdppa Phi is an hona
society that recognizes scholastic
excellence in ail disciplines. The
first two Syrnpoaiurrffl have treat-
ed the themes of "World
Hunger and "Influence Sys-
tems The Symposium program
includes ECU faculty and
prominent external speakers
The deadline fa abstracts is
Nov. 14, 1977. They should be
sent to:Dr. Fred Broadhurst,
Chairman - ECU-Phi Kappa Phi
Symposium Committee - School
of Technology, campus mail.

ALTHOUGH APATHY STILL exists, some students voted
yesterday in the legislature and class officer elections. Photo by
Election results
The unofficial results of the legislature and class officer elections
are as follows:
DAY LEGISLATORS
The names preceded by asterisks indicate that the person was
also elected to a class office. Only one of the positions is allowed to
be held.
Doug White
Chris Cheatham
Nancy Jones
Debbie Boyce
Tommy Joe Payne
David Cartwright
Suzanne Lamb
Phil Barbee
'Tim Sullivan
Robert M. Swaim
Randy Ingram
Chic Cariaga
'Chip Mayo
Lynn Stegall
Hal Sharpe
'Mike Cunningham
'Mark Snyder
Guy Lucas
John Epperson
Ricky Price
'Randy Bailey
Kathy Dixon
Ron Morrison
Susan Westbrook
DORM LEGISLATORS
3ay
'Charles Sune
Belk
David H. Mayo
'Alonzo Morris Newby
Crtten
Sky Larsen
Fleming
Jenny Caldwell
Jarvis
Tina Padilla
Greene
Mary Kay Lilley
CLASS OFFICERS
Senior Class President - Mark Snyder
Vice-President - Randy Bailey
Treasurer - Chip Mayo
Junior Class President - Tim Sullivan
Vice-President - Mike Cunningham
Sophomore Class President - Charles Sum
Vice-President - Chubby Abshire
Freshman Class President - Alonzo Newby
Graduate Student President - tie
Ronnie Rose - 19
David Denning - 19
Due to lack of space, FOUNTAINHEAD will print the number of
votes Thursday that each candidate tor a class office received.
Clement
Lynn Bell
Lynn Calder
Tyler
Bertha Phillips
Umstead
MarcAdler
Aycock
Steve Kinney
Chuck Gouge
Scott
Kevin McCourt
'Chubby Abshire
Bettie Lou Davis
Garrett
Rachel Ramsey
Fletcher
Caroline Blackwell
Margie Uhlig
White
Renee Hinson
Nancy Johnson
Jones
(write-ins)
Gary Blizzard
Tim Mertz





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Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 September 1977
SAM
The Society for the Advance-
ment of Management will hold its
first meetinj of the year at 3:30
p.m. Thurs Sept. 29, in Raw!
102.
Prospective members are
urged to attend. An interest in
management is the only require-
ment for membership.
The society puts students in
touch with the American Manage-
ment Association and American
Managers through guest speak-
ers and plant tours.
For further information
contact Dr. Willcox, faculty
advisor. Rawl 110-A or 757-6632.
Phi Alpha
Phi Alpha Theta, international
honor society in history, will be
meeting Tues. Sept 27, at 7:30
p.m. in Brewster C-103 (Richard
C Todd). Any undergrad who
fulfills the following requirements
is eligible for membership: a) 20
quarter hours in history b) 3.1
average in all history oourses
taken c) 2.67 overall grade point
average. Come and join us!
Refreshments will be served.
Economics
Omnicron Delta Epsilon,
Honor Society in Economics, will
have an organizational meeting in
Rawl 202. at 4 p.m. Thurs Sept.
29. All current members and
interested potential members are
invited. Check the Raw! cases fa
details.
Counseling
If you are " wasting away in
Margaritaville and would rather
be doing something about your
love life, call 757-6883 and ask fa
Dr Knox. He will arrange a
confidential (free) session with a
graduate intern in the Depart-
ment of Sociology's Premarriage
MARRIAGE Counseling Program
Through counseling you and your
partner can discover how to
resolve the issues which concern
you so you won't need to be
looking fa your lost shaker of
salt
SOULS
There will be a SOULS
meeting Thurs Sept. 29 at the
AACC. Time of this meeting will
be 8:30 p.m. Everyone should
plan to attend.
Concert
Margaritaville, N.C. Come get
washed away at the JIMMY
BUFFETT concert Oct. 5, 1977 at
8 p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
Tickets are now on sale at the
Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Center. Tickets are
$4 fa ECU students and $6 fa
the public.
Snow Skiing
To receive elective aedit fa
PHYE 1105-Snow Skiing (1 s.h.)
during the Spring Semester, a
student must attend pre-ski
classes starting Nov. 1 at 4 p.m.
and oontmuing each Tues. and
Thurs. until Dec. 8 (11 class
meetings). The student must also
attend the ski session at Beech
Mountain, Banner Elk, NC from
January 2-6. The total cost ($105)
includes housing, instruction,
equipment, and lift fees.
This activity may also be used
to fill the Physical Education 1000
requirement. The student may
pre-register for PHYE 1000,
attend all class meetings and the
ski session, and receive aedit fa
the activity portioi of PHYE 1000.
The student will still be required
to meet all physical fitness,
swimming, and classroom comp-
etencies during the first part of
the spring semester, but will be
exempt from the activity pation
of the course.
IF fa sane reasai the student
does not attend either the pre-ski
sessions a the actual ski sessions
and has pre-registered fa the
course, he will be required to
drop the course during drop-add
period, January 10-Feb. 21, a
receive an F fa the oourse. Fa
further infamatiai, oontact Mrs.
Jo Saunders at Memaial Gym
757-6000.
Business
Beginning Tues Sept. 27. the
Business Fraternity will start
their regular meetings. All Busi-
ness majas, a those taking at
least one business course are
invited to attend. The meeting
will be held in Rawl-Room 130 at
4 p.m.
Freshman
Freshman registers may be
picked up Wed Sept. 28 in the
SGA vice-president's office, Rm.
229
Grand Canyon
See the Grand Canyon tonight
at 8 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre. Ralph
Franklin presents "The
Canyon the first Travel-
Adventure film of the season.
ECU students are admitted by ID
and activity card and faculty and
staff are admitted by MSC card.
Public tickets are $1.50 each a $6
fa all six films. Groups of 20 a
mae may purchase season tickets
fa $5 each.
Writing
Writing Program Majas and
Journalism Minas will meet in
Austin 202 Sept. 28 at 2:30 p.m.
to discuss the Spring term
Practicum.
If you're interested in acad-
emic aedit fa writing jobs, come
to this
College Bowl
Registration is now open fa
COLLEGE BOWL teams partici-
pating in intramural oonpetitiai.
Four team members, an alter-
nate, and a sponsa are all one
needs fa a team. Teams may
cone fron aganizatiois a a
group of friends. Register in the
Program Office in Mendenhall
Student Center from now until
Oct. 6. If there are any questions,
phone 757-6611, ext. 213.
Egypt
Movie
"The Day of The Jackal
Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, 1977,
Mendenhall Student Center The-
atre, shows at 7 p.m. & 9 p.m.
Based on Frederick Fasyth's
best-selling novel of political
suspense, "The Day of The
Jackal tells of a mercenary
hired by French OAS officers to
assassinate General de Gaulle. It
stars Edward Fox, Alan Badel,
Tony Britton, and Adrien Cayla-
Legrand.
Square Dance
Join the ECU "Yellow Rock-
ers Square Dance Class. Join us
at 7 p.m. Tues Sept. 27, room
102 Memaial Gym. You'll love to
'Yellow Rock
Gamma Beta
The Gamma Beta Phi hona
and service society will be having
its Fall Rush meeting Thurs
Sept. 29. The meeting will be held
in Mendenhall Student Center in
room 244 and will begin promptly
at 7 p.m. All students who are in
the top 20 of their class are
eligible fa membership.
Spree
How would you like to have
the oppatunity to win either a
90-second shopping spree in
Overton's Supermarket, a a 30-
seoond spree in Apple Recads?
You can have that chance by
entering the first annual Lambda
Chi Alpha Shopping Spree.
Chanoestowinareonly $1.00 and
all proceeds will be donated to the
ECU Stadium Drive. Here is the
perfect oppatunity to grab either
a lot of groceries a a bundle of
reoads and at the same time to
contribute to one of the fastest
growing universities in the East.
Tickets can be obtained from
Overton's, Apple Recads, a the
ECU campus, or from any
Lambda Chi. The drawing will be
held Oct. 5 during homecoming
week.
Coffeehouse
ECU Coffeehouse proudly
presents John & Mallon, Sept. 29
and 30 at 9 p.m. John & Mallon
will entertain you with sane good
old oountry, and fiddle tunes,
aiginals, and good boot stomping
Blue Grass tunes. So, if you tired
of the same old D.T. blues &
disco, float over to the Coffee-
house, rm15MendenhaJI, .50 will
get you all the refreshment you
need, and your way into a new
D.T.
"Dealing: a The Berkeley to
Boston Forty-Brick Lost-Bag
Blues Sept. 28, Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre, shows at
8 p.m.
From the book by Michael
Douglas comes an engaging spoof
of the youth drug and oops and
robbers film genres. The film is a
potpourri of aooked oops, double
crosses and close calls that
culminates in a grand finale chase
sequence that alternates between
edge-of-the-seat suspense and
belly-aching laughter. This film
stars Robert F. Lyons, John
Lithgow, and Barbara Hershey.
ECU students admitted by ID
and activity card.
King Youth
There will be a meeting of the
King Youth Fellowship Tues. ,
Sept. 27, at 7 p.m. in 308
Flanagen. The KYF is a Full
Gospel campus aganizatioi fa
the benefit of all ECU students.
Come and join us fa fellowship
and Bible-teaching.
Walkathon
"Battered Boot Campaign" A
what? The Pitt County React
Team, CB operatas that moiita
channel nine, the emergency
channel, are sponsaing a March
of Dimes Walkathon Oct. 15,1977
at 900. Last year we were proud
to have presented a bicycle to one
of ECU's young ladies, as first
prize in the Cerebral Palsy
Campaign, and would like to do it
again and we can with your help.
The walk will start at The Jaycee
Shelter, Elm Street Park. Free
lunch and snacks fa all partici-
pants. A trophy will be given fa
the largest group. A steak dinner
fa two will be second prize, so
give us your suppat. We need
your help and so do birth defect
children Fa further infama-
tiai ai where to obtain your
sponsor sheets, phone Betsy
Heath at 758-0876 a 752-1600
anytime.
Lacrosse
Anyoie interested in playing
laaosse is invited to the meeting
in Memaial tonight at 7:30. We
are still seeking an advisa. If
anyoie is interested yet unable to
attend, please call Mike at
758-9583.
NTE
The National Teacher Exam-
inations will be offered at ECU
Nov. 12, 1977; Feb. 18, 1978; and
July 15, 1978.
The NTE is the national
standardized test for persons
preparing to teach, and is admin-
istered by the Educational Test-
ing Servioeof Princeton, N.J.
The subject of Kay Curry
Hospitality House WITN channel
7 from 11:30 to noon on Sunday
will be Egypt.
Some items in the King Tut
exhibit will be removed from
Tues. night to Thurs. maning.
WECU
WECU presents LP Expo with
Mac McKee each week night at
11 p.m. This weeks featured
albums are: Tuesday, AJA,
Steely Dan; Wednesday, Another
Night Time Flight, Blue; Thurs-
day, China, China (Elton John's
backup band). LP Expo is heard
exclusively on 57 WECU.
Pom Pom
The ECU Pom Pom, Squad is
having a bake sale Thurs Sept.
29 from 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the
lobby of the student stae. There
will be a wide selection of goodies
to choose from. Stop by fa a
snack and help support the
squad.
NORML
Nickle bags? Are there dcor
prizes at the NORML lecture?
Find out Sept. 29. at the NORML
(National Organization fa the
Refam of Marijuana Laws) lec-
ture in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter Theatre at 8 p.m. ECU
students are admitted by ID and
activity card and faculty and staff
by MSC card. Public tickets are
$2 each. Groups of 20 a mae
may purchase tickets fa $1.50
each.
Bridge
All students interested in
faming a bridge dub should
attend an aganizatioial meeting
Tues Sept. 27 at 7:30 in the
Mendenhall Student Center Cof-
feehouse.
Rebel
The Rebel, ECU'S literary-arts
magazine, is now accepting sub-
missions in poetry, fiction, es-
says, art wak, and photography.
Submit your material to the Rebel
office a mail it to the Rebel,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Please make sure to keep a copy
of each wak of literature fa
yourself, and inlcude your name,
address, and phaie number on all
wak.
Billiards
Students interested in faming
a billiards league are invited to
attend an aganizatioial meeting
scheduled fa Tues Sept. 27, at
7, in the Billiards Center, Men-
denhall Student Center.
Happy Hour Cru$ade
The Alpha Omiaon Pi saaity
will had a Happy Hour Thurs
Sept. 29 at Blimpie'sfrom 6 p.m.
until. All proceeds will go to the
National Arthritis Foundation.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Campus Crusade fa Christ
welcomes all students fa fellow-
ship and practical insights into
the exciting Christian life! Come
by Brewster B-202 every Thurs. 7
p.m.
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Pharaoh's treasures discovered SO years ago
el
ay
ut
27 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
exhibited
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Replicas and illustrations
of the treasurers discovered in the
tomb of 18th Dynasty Egyptian
Pharaoh Tutankhamen are on
display in ECU'S Jovner Library.
The items exhibited are from
the collection of Antoinette
KING TUTs TREASURESAntoinette Jenkins and ECU Refer-
ence Librarian Ralph Scott look over some of Mrs. Jenkins'
collection of replicas and illustrations of the treasures discovered in
the Pharaoh mummy's tomb. The collection is on view in ECU'S
Joyner Library. ECU News Bureau photo
Ml
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ALL SUBJECTS
Choose from our library of 7,000 topics
All papers have been prepared by our
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mail order catalog.
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assiatance also available.
EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS
P O Box 25916-E,
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Name
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Zip
Jenkins, a retired faculty member
of the ECU Department of
English, and were purchased in
London in 1972 during a special
British Museum exhibition which
commemorated the 50th anniver-
sary of the tomb's discovery by
archaeologist Howard Carter.
Included in the Joyner display
are replicas of a scarab bracelet, a
gold and enameled pectoral (
neckpiece) found under the
second layer of the mummy's
wrappings, a signet ring inscrib-
ed Tut-Ankh-Amen and an eye
swivel ring ornamented with an
enameled eye of the god Horus
and the ankh symbol.
The exhibit also features
colored illustrations of the
Pharaoh mummy's gold mask,
jewels, sculptures amd other art
objects found in his tomb. A
push-button slide-film machine
located near the display area
enables viewers to examine some
of the objects in detail.
Mrs. Jenkins said her
Tutankhamen collection was
previously displayed in 1972 and
1973 at area gatherings of several
organizations, including the
altrusa Club in Rocky Mount and
the local Delta Kappa Gamma
TACOS - ENCHILADAS - TAMALES - RICE - BEANS -CHILI CON CARNE
cj

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AUTHENTIC TEXAS-STYLE
MEXICAN
GREENVILLE'S
GREAT NEW
TASTE TREAT
DELICIOUS - NUTRITIOUS - ECONOMICAL
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chapter.
The ECU exhibit is accomp-
anied by a large illustrative chart
and several books, including a
three-volume set of "The Tomb
of Tut-Ankh-Amen" by Howard
Carter lent by Dr. David Phelps,
ECU faculty anthropologist
The exhibit, open to the public
during the library's operating
hours, is located on the first floor
near the circulation desk.
FOUNTAINHEAD
needs news, trends,
and sports writers
Call 757-6366
This Week At
The ELBO ROOM
From Burlington , N.C.
CLEARSMOKE
EARLY BIRD SPECIAL
THURS FRI & SAT.
Vi PRICE TILL 9:30
Don't Forqet FRI. 3 to 7
LADIES WITH AFTERNOON STAMP
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Every Sun. Is Ladies Nite
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DITTO OF
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takes an active role on
campus with jeans of
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denim. These are the
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softer and better with
wear. Junior sizes
3 to 15, short, medium
and long; misses sizes
8 to 18. Ask for Dittos
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denim
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1 CONE MILLS � 1�4C BWQADWAV NEW YQflK N V iQQie
6





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 September 1977
Cheerleaders not
SU, SGA wards
The ECU cheerleaders, as reported in FOUN-
TAINHEAD Sept. 22, receive funding from the
Athletic Dept the Student Union and the SGA.
Although cheerleaders are certainly an asset to ECU,
they serve athletics only and should, therefore, be
funded solely by the Athletic Dept.
As Dennis Ramsey, president of the Student
Union said, the Union derives little if any benefit
from the cheerleaders and should not be required to
appropriate the $600 a year for them.
First of all, the Union has total responsibility for
Homecoming activities as well as all campus
entertainment. Secondly, the Student Union's
budget this year is only $248,000. The Athletic Dept.
has a budget of approximately $1,000,000 out of
which only $800 goes for the cheerleaders.
Last year, the SGA appropriated $2,183 to the
cheerleaders out of its budget. (This year the SGA
has only received $186,892 from Fall Semester
activity fees and anticipates only about this much
more Spring Semester, approximately $100,000 less
than last year.) The Athletic Dept's. contribution
pales sadly beside this. Consequently, $2,183 was
taken away from programs which could have
benefited the entire university and student body.
It does not make sense for the Student Union and
SGA, both with much smaller budgets than the
Athletic Dept to have to pay for a group which was
nothing to do with the duties of either organization.
Last year all coaches in the Athletic Dept.
received an annual raise of $2,000. While supporting
19 sports with a budget "two-thirds less than
other major universities" the department can
obviously afford this, so it seems logical that it could
afford to support its own cheerleaders. (Or perhaps
the coaches' raises shouldn't have been so great so
that part of this money could go to the cheerleaders.)
The Athletic Dept. has never had much trouble
raising money when it wanted to. The Ficklen shrine
bears witness. Nevertheless, the simple fact is
cheerleaders serve athletics and should be funded by
the Athletic Dept. This way the Student Union and
SGA could use their money for services benefiting
the entire university.
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over titty years.
Senior EditorKim J. Devins
Production ManagerBob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert Swaim
News EditorCindy Broome
Trends EditorMichael Futch
Sports EditorAnne Hogge
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspeper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and is distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
and twice weekly during the school year.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.
ANHBOW KNOW flWV S.G.fi. Oft STUDENT UWON CKEBRS?
Forum
Student beats the textbook dilemma
Td FOUNTAINHEAD:
After negotiating a loan
with Wachovia Bank (but to no
avail) and having sold my soul to
the devil, this student proceeded
to buy the commodity every
scholar needs (but not necessarily
has), textbooks.
Having forfited such luxuries
as soap, underclothes, eating
�tJtensils and toilet paper, ' stood
in line to buy my textbooks.
Unshaven and sporting my Good-
will Store suit, I was a classic
example of a student turned
pauper by the textbook monopoly.
Knowing that the godfather, Joe
Clark, had pointed his "hit n,on"
Roger Bullock and Curtis May, in
my direction, I trembled in boots
that were almost pawned in lieu
of the textbook payment. But
little to the knowledge of Joe and
the Federal Copyright biggies, I
had schemed a plan to turn the
tables on this corrupt portion of
our campus community. I would
pass the cash register as most
students, meek and passive, yet
torn and broken by the experience
of releasing $100 to these text
sharks. I would purchase my
books but only to return them for
a full refund after making com-
plete Xerox copies of them at the
nearby Joyner print shop. Here at
Joyner where prices are much
more reasonable (5 cents fa 2
pages of opy), I would simply fit
the books into my formula (no. of
A thletic Dept. defended
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
There have been a few
editorWs in fOUNTAINHEAD
recently which need some factual
clarity. On Aug. 29, "Ficklen
expands as academics shrink"
ran, and on Sept, 15, "Sports or
Safety?" was published.
In the "Ficklen" editorial,
there were references to the fact
that ECU has signed seven-foot
centers for the basketball team
and an inference that athletes are
a using academics to drop. Well
ECU has no seven-foot centers
(the tallest player signed was
6-7V2( and the Athletic Dept.
takes no funds from academic
scholarship resourses to run Us
affairs. ECU'S operating budget
is $36 million whjie the athletic
department operateVlon $V
million. A comparison can be
seen at UNC-Chapel Hill ($70
million for the university to $4.5
million for the Athletic Dept. Of
this million dollars with which the
ECU Athletic Dept. operates,
there are three ways to raise the
money. Gate receipts from sport-
ing events constitute the largest
way of inoome (about 9012 which
comes from football receipts)
full-time students pay $29 per
year when paying fees (student
athletic fee). This allows students
(See DEFENSE p. 5)
pages divided by 2 times .05
cents) and make copies. Then in
the final stage, I would return my
books fa full refund. Now I have
a copy of the book and 3-4 extra
dollars.
Put that in your bowl and
smoke it�
Nervous
after violating 100 copyright laws
(Name witheld upon request)
Activities
schedule?
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
(Attention Dennis Ramsey )
What's the stay on Home-
coming night? Is there to be no
traditional Homecoming danoe?
If not-why not? And what about
The Carousel of Bands that is
supposed to be held at Menden-
hall Student Center on Home-
corniag2,Hasthat been cancelled?
Why?
The previous questions are
being asked by many, many
students and everytime one reads
the "Fountainhead ' it repats
something differently so PLEASE
reply post haste.
Curious Student
(Name witheld on request)
Editor's Note: Ramsey will reply
in this Thursday's FORUM





05
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Forum
27 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
Fraternity president defends himself against editorial, tactics
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In the Sept. 20th issue of
FOUNTAINHEAD, I was charged
with leading the way to the
destruction of the yearbook,
twisting the SGA constitution,
being power-hungry and indirect-
ly spearheading physical threats
towards Neil Sessoms' supporter.
First, it seems I would have a
Shriners grateful for ad
rewarded ten fold.
Please except
again.
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
Thank you so very much
for advertising our annual Shrine
Fish Fry as a Fund Raising
project fa the Crippled Chil-
dren's Hospital.
We feel your effats will be
A word of'advice'
our thanks
Sincerely
Bonnie Baoher
(Sec.) fa D.M. Harris chairman
Shrine Fish Fry Project
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
A word of advio to the
current FOUNTAINHE. D staff,
Student Union and SGA officers:
It is of upmost impatance that
you taget about aiticizing past
SGA officers and wary about
cleaning up your own act!
Sincerely,
KimTayla Bunns
DEFENSE
Continued from p. 4
to see all athletic fees free of
charge. This fee is also the
smallest of any major state-
suppated university in Nath
Carding UNC-CH students pay
$50 annually) . The third way is
through doiatiois by alumni and
fans to the Pirate Club, ECU'S
educational foundation for
athletics. This money can, by law,
go fa athletic scholarships only.
These contributors give the
money fa athletic scholarship
only.
There is a state law against
the usage of state funds fa
athletics. This brings me to the
second editorial, "Sports or
Safety?" The Intramural depart-
Biting reply to letter
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In response to Elizabeth
Weeks' letter which appeared in
the Sept. 22, FOUNTAINHEAD;
Neil Sessoms, Reed Warren and
Dennis Ramsey are not only SGA
a SU officers, they are also
conoerned students. As such ,
they have every right to voice
their opinions about ANYTHING
on this campus.
Last year's SGA legislature
was a farce: an assembly
containing a la of "puppets"
waking fa the good of a few
select individuals and groups on
this campus. I n an effat to assure
an SGA with less political over-
tones and more real concern fa
student welfare, a group got
together to look into the candi-
dates fa the 1977-78 legislature.
Having done this, fliers were
circulated naming persons the
committee felt wathy of election.
EVERYONE has the right of
peaceable assembly and to an
opinion, so let's not assume that
ECU Students fa an Hoiest SGA
carries any undue or unjust
prejudices. We KNOW the ef-
fects the legislature has on this
campus. All we set out to do was
try to see to it that this year was
not a repeat perfamanoe of last.
Sinoerety,
Susan Rogerson, Co-chairperson
ECU Students fa an Hoiest SGA
Forum policy and deadlines
Forum letters should be in the FOUNTAINHEAD
offioe or left at the Information Desk in Mendenhall
Student Center no later than 12 noon on Mondays
and Wednesdays. Letters received after this time will
be held until the following edition. Forum letters
should be typed or printed and include the writer s
address or telephone number or they will not be
accepted. Letters are subject to editing for taste and
brevity.
ATTIC
Wed. & Thurs.
Adelphi recording
artists
NIGHTHAWKS
Fri& Sat
The 'new sound
of
GLASS MOON
difficult time destroying the Buc-
caneer since I was a student at
N.C State in Raleigh during the
time of the issue. Furthermae, I
openly suppat yearbooks (I was
disappointed at the loss of the
ECU yearbook and I also paid $3
of my own money fa a NCSU
yearbook I never received.)
Secondly, I find it hard fa me
to twist the SGA constitution to fit
my needs since I have never run
a served offioe fa an SGA
position in my past years at ECU.
This is my first attempt at ECU
student government and I'm very
enoouraged thus far.
Power-hungry? I am president
of my fraternity. That's the only
maja offioe I've held since high
school. My policy: everyone has
his own responsibilities and
should be mature enough to
handle them. I am also running
fa SGA offioes with only one
year of school left since I am a
Senia. When I graduate, I wish
to have aedentials and exper-
iences which I deem necessary to
oope with today's wald. I feel
attempting these offices will help
me reach that goal. If that's what
you call power-hungry, than I
must be.
It seems that I have been
charged with indirectly spear-
heading threats towards
Sessom's suppoters. How does
someone "indirectly"? Both are
direct acts which I have not been
involved in either directly a
indirectly as was stated.
As far as me trying to do away
with FOUNTAINHEAD, that's
the same as saying I don't believe
in freedom of speech. If that is
ment is oompletley separate from
athletics. It (Intramurals) is at
ECU (and all universities) so
regular students (no student-
athletes can compete in their
spats) can pa'ticiapte in athletic
activities. The state can suppat
this department, just as they can
suppat the arts a any other
student activity.
Although the state has na
started construction on the Tenth
& College Hill overpass (which
we dearly need), your advertising
manager, Robert Swaim received
much support fron the governa
and his top people last spring to
get the ball rolling.
Another way to get this done
would be to get money from the
building fund (the students voted
last fall to release some funds fa
the stadium expansion but much
of it is left sitting damant, more
than enough fa the overpass).
These funds can be used fa
construction only and this would
be a good project.
So. Please Kim, stop blaming
the Athletic Dept. fa everything
you think is wrong, on this
campus.
Respectfully,
Steve Wheeler
true, then why would I have my
letter here now? It seems we need
a few more
"FOUNTAINHEADS" to get all
the facts straight. I was extremely
insulted at this attempt to deny
me of trying to make achieve-
ments during my final year at
ECU. Let's keep these elections
honest and quit trying to win
elections using "Bert Lance"
tactics of slander.
Chip Mayo
Angcy Student
Editors note: An apology to Mayo
appeared in the Sept. 22
Fountainhead for connecting him
with the "Sullivan regime" while
he was in NCSU.
ACADEMIC
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quality. Choose from our library of
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SHED SOME
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YOUR FUTURE
Air Force ROTC 2 Year
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For Nursing, Pre-Med, Math,
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Contact Capt. Ashley Lane
ECU Wright Annex-Room 206
or Call 757-6598
Air Force ROTC Gateway to a Great Way of Life





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAO 27 September 1977
Job recruiters conduct interviews with students
ByLYNNCAVERLY
Staff Writer
Job recruiters from various
organizations will conduct inter-
views with students who have
registered with the- Placement
Office beginning October 5.
According to Furney James,
director of the Career Planning
and Placement Office, graduating
seniors are urged to file
According to Furnay James,
director of the Career Planning
and Placement Office, graduating
seniors are urged to file a resume
and a set of credentials and
references so interviews can be
set up with the recruiters.
"We will have recruiters from
Jefferson Standard, K-Mart,
Sunoco Products,Branch Bank
and Trust , and Corning Glass, to
name just a few said James.
Last year 1,654 people applied
to the Placement Office, said
James. He includes 1,200 seniors
and 485 alumni.
"When a student places a file
with us, it is kept for a lifetime
said James. "The student can
return anytime for our service.
We work a lot with alumni
Last year the Placement Office
records showed that 80 Vz of their
applicants had indicated they had
found employment and 20 V2 were
still looking.
James also stated that some of
the recruiters will return in the
spring, along with some unable to
attend in October.
Different organizations, both
business and educational, don't
recruit until the spring said
James. "But it is particularly
important for December grad-
uates to register now. The
FG ponders facts, beliefs of Resurrection
By JO ANN SMITH
Staff Writer
Dynamic Rich Kearns, For-
ever Generation staff evangelist,
presented a series of thought-
provoking facts about the Resur-
rection of Christ at a seminar last
East Carolina
Playhouse Studio Theatre
presents
11
An Evening with
Tennessee Williams
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
September 29, 30, & October 1
8:15 p.m. in the Studio Theatre
General Admission Tickets, $1.50
Students and
Season Coupon Holders FREE!
Reserve tickets in person at the
Drama Office, or call 757-6390
Thursday.
The Forever Generation is a
Christian group that provides
fellowship and guidance. Weekly
Friday night meetings in Brew-
ster B-103 (730 p.m.) include
Bible study and retreats.
Rich Kearns appears regularly
on the FG broadcast and is
currently touring the country to
speak on campuses and hold
seminars.
Rich's informal lecture reveal-
ed the historical facts and "infal-
lible proofs" of the Resurrection;
the talk allowed each listener to
believe or not to believe as he saw
fit Kearns presented such ideas
as the five main areas of evidence
that Christ did indeed arise from
the dead.
Two of these areas are the
moving of the rock that oovered
the entrance to the tomb, and the
various post-Resurrection appear-
ances.
FOUNATINHEAD regrets
that there was an error in the
Downtown Greenville
Association ad that appeared
in the 9-20 issue Student
appreciation week was the
week of the 19th, not the 27th.
We apologize to the downtown
merchants and the students.
interviews will continue through-
out the semester
The Placement Office also
works with undergraduates in
areas of career counseling.
"Students come to us and
want to know what job opportuni-
ties exist with a certain degree
said James.
The Career Planning and
Placement Office is located in the
Mamie Jenkins Alumni building.
Remember!
New Flashes,
Class, ads.
policy!
If you want a
Flash or
Class, ad.
in next Tues.
it MUST be in
the FTHEAD
office
this Friday
For next Thurs.
they must be in
by next Tues.
Don't forget or
you'll miss out.
BGGS DRUG STORE
300 EVANS- ON- THE-MALL
DOWNTOWN
PHONE: 752-2136
FREE PRESCRIPTION PICKUP
AND DELIVERY
OLD FASHION SODA FOUNTAIN
DRINKS MADE THE WAY YOU
LIKE THEM: FRESHLY SQUEEZED
LEMONADES AND ORANGEADES-
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PRESCRIPTION DEPT WITH MEDIC A TION
PROFILES: VOtIR PRESCRIPTION ALWAYS
AT OUR FINGERTIPS. EVEN THOUGH YOU
MA Y LOSE YOUR Rx BOTTLE.
COSMETICS-
SUNDRIES-
TOILETRIES-
DELIVERtD TO
YOUR DOOR
GREETING CARDS-
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
TIMEX WATCHES
COSTUME JEWELRY
ATHLETIC SUPPORTS,
CONVALESCENT SUPPLIES,
FIRST-AID SUPPLIES
SUNGLASSES BY FOSTER
GRANT AND COOL RAY





jgh-
also
in
and
uni-

and
the
mg.
a
i
27 ttftmtm 1977 FOUWTAINHEAD Page 7
Fine Arts Center gains new gallery director
BMiuniiHKnaa MllSAlim IQ Iho nau nailarw ��i:�:� .
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Aaron Karp, formerly a
staff member at the Guqqenhei
Museum, is the new gallery
director for ECU Wellington B.
Gray Art Gallery.
He will be
s.
in
t.
organizing, coordinating and at-
tracting exhibitions of interest
and high artistic merit to the
gallery, which is located in the
Leo w. Jenkins Fine Arts Center
at ECU.
Karp is a native of Albany,
N.Y with degrees from the State
University of New York at Buffalo
and Indiana University. He prev-
iously taught at the University of
New Mexico and at the Univer-
sity of Albuquerque and was on
the staff of Indiana University's
Fine Arts Museum before becom-
ing Operations Supervisor at the
Guggenheim.
His plans fa the Gray Gallery
include a fund-raising campaign
to help support expansion of the
gallery's viewing program and
initiate an artist-lecture program.
The Gallery is open to the
public each weekday from 9 a.m.
until 4 p.m and will begin
weekend hours later this semes-
ter.
On display this month is a
collection of Donald Sexauer
intaglio prints, entitled "Images
of Man
Tentatively set fa snowing
later this year are an exhibition of
wateroolas by North Carolina
artists, a joint show of waks by
Chicago ceramicist Kent Follette
and Indianapolis fiber artist Earl
Snellenberger, and a selection of
prints bv Jane E. Abrams of New
Mexico.
Former Better Homes and
Garden editor speaks to class
A POTTERY STUDENT works diligently in Jenkins tine Arts
Center. Photo by Kirk Kingsbury
By CAROLYN BRYANT
Staff Writer
Terry Elsberry, famer edita
of Better Homes and Garden.
magazine, shared his personal
experiences with an introductay
class of journalism students
Thursday.
He discussed the publication,
cover, edita's page, and differ-
ent pages of the advertisements
of the magazine.
Interested in music, histay,
and journalism, said he was
influenced into journalism,
"when communications offered
broader oppatunities
"Journalism is one of the
most important and exciting
careers in the wald he said.
He also edited Apartment
Life, which is also published by
the Berfer Homes and Garden
magazine people.
He gave up editing and
published a bcok entitled Maria
of Rumania, which was a success
in Europe.
"The variety and profusion of
student questions during the
press conference' period follow-
ing the talk indicated unusual
enthusiasm from student partic-
ipants said Ira Baker, professa
of Journalism.
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r
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 September 1977
Cinema,
K$ $
by Steve Bachner
'Lovers Like Us'
Not unlike television, this kind of movie massages the brain.
Small wonder the distributors of "Lovers Like Us" are already
debating TV. time. It isdoubtful that sponsors; networks, and the like
will be leaping at the opportunity to seize rights to "the comedy hit of
the year" (as the film is so billed)�that statement is the only funny
thing about it.
So what is a movie like this doing opening in three countries? The
answer is, nothing. But take careful note. "Lovers Like Us" didn't
have to be a commercial, a critical, flop. In fact, the personnel
admirable, the performances adequate, the budget eloquent, and the
production (under the supervision of Raymond Danon) above average.
Take all of the above and transfer to another movie and the problem is
solved.
Catherine Denuve, who oo-starred with Jack Lemmon in 1969's
"The April Feds wasBurt Reynolds classy call-girl in "Hustle and
has done numerous television commercials since, looks rapturously
beautiful throughout-l was never even aware of her performance.
Yves Montand, the talented French actor who played Barbra
Streisand's psychiatrist,in the glossy production of "On a Clear Day
You Can See Forever does a remarkable job as the film's dissatisfied
but irreplaceable perfume chemist. Montand almost saves the movie
with his portrayal of a millionaire, enslaved in a ocntract, trying to find
himself on a private island. There is more depth and pathos here than
the venicle is worthy of. But then, everyone in the cast looks a bit on
the pathetic side.
Tony "Annie Hall" Roberts and Dana Wynter are along for the
ride.
The "ride" is as follows: A wealthy Italian businessman named
Vittorio marries an uncertain French secretary (Deneuve) called Nellie
with as much worldly knowledge as clerical. On their wedding night
she sneaks off, reservations getting the best of her, to a hotel where
Vittorio traces her. It is here that she meets Sanders, a low-pressure
vegetable gardener who has oome into Venezuela to market his goods
and stock up on supplies before returning to his island which is
somewhere south of Santo Domingo.
In the ensuing sequence of events, Nellie steals a priceless painting
from her ex-boss (Roberts), then steals away to Sanders private island
where she discovers the truth about his prowess as a perfume
chemist; his multi-million dollar franchise in New York; his wife, and
his subsequent change of idenity. She falls in love with him; he with
her, and the movie falls-apart-as if it were ever really together in the
first place. It is not perfume you are smelling now.
The production offers some swift, but unfunny, stunt work. It also
provides an elegantly uninspired background score by Michel Legrand
whose compositions foe "Brian's Song "The Go-Between and
"The Summer of "42" were respectively poignant, compelling, and
inspirational.
The film is an international oo-production shot mostly on location
under the careful direction of 47-year-dd Jean-Paul Rappeneau.
Rappeneau paces the action energetically and utilizes several rather
impressive techniques in his plight. The editing of the film comes
down to alternate close-ups and long shots strewn together' almost
entirely by the jump cut-at least in the early going. Near the end of
"Lovers Like Us" the pace is slowed down considerably and some of
Rappeneau's best moments are here.
A frozen frame captures and sustains Montand's look of oomplete
frustration when he finds out his wife had hired a private detective to
photograph him on his treks into port: "She knows stresses a
business associate. And some well photographed overlap cutting gives
us Deneuve, running to greet the long missed Montand, from at least
four different angles.That being the last sequence in the movie before
the credits.
It was inevitably Rappeneau himself who brought about his own
demise. The picture's major flaw, its screenplay and story, are the
director's brainchild. Together with his wife Elizabeth and Jean-Loup
Dabadie, Rappeneau contrived his variation on the "boy meets girl,
boy looesgirl, etc theme. It is an unusual paradox for a man whose
talent is so bursting with life to have this strange preoccupation with
suicide. See CINEMASCOPE p. 11
Trends
Laredo sparkles in
Artist Series ooener
ByRENEEDIXON
Staff Writer
Ruth Laredo opened the ECU
Artist Series last Wednesday
evening with a sensational per-
formance of works by Choplin,
Rachmaninoff, and Scriabin. She
captivated the Mendenhall
audience with her flawless tech-
nique, innate sensitivity, and
breathtaking virtousity.
The Choplin B flat sonata was
an early highlight in the program.
The contrasting natures of the
four movement demanded the
structural and emotional unity
that only an experienced artist
can provide. Ms. Laredo effect-
ivley bound the movements
together by achieving a balance
between detail and overall struct-
ures.
As a recording artist, Laredo
gained tremendous recognition
for her outstanding performances
RUTH LAREDO IN Mendenhall Wednesday night Photo by Pete
Podeszwa
of the Scriabin sonatas. Her
success with Scriabin's challeng-
ing musical lines and structure
reflects her poetic sensitivity and
powerful intensity.
The juxaposition of the Poem,
Opus 321, as an introductory
Scriabin opus offered the listener
a tonal foundation prior to the
disconcerting atonality of the
Sonata, Opus 68 9. Poem is a
simple, lyrical work which cont-
rasts greatly with the enigmatic
qualities of "The Black Mass"
sonata. Laredo's perceptive
insight into the demonic qualities
of this unusual sonata made it the
highlight of the program.
Laredo is in the process of
recording the complete
Rachmaninoff solo piano litera-
ture for Columbia Records. Her
latest release includes the Etudes
Tableaux, Opus 39; Moments
Musicaux Opus 16; and the
Kreisler transcriptions,
Liebeslied and Liedesfreud.
Selections from these works com-
prised the second half of Wed-
nesday evening's program.
The artist's treatment of the
Rachmaninoff work displayed a
unique talent for communication
sentiment without resorting ta
melodrama. Romanticism was
brought to life without sacrificing
the impeccable technique,
rhythmic precision, and textural
balance that are necessary fa
clarity.
Throughout the program
Laredo conveyed her musical
dedication through a truly artistic
communication with the
audience. Such interaction
between performer and listener
is the very essence of the musical
language.
Music, dance courses offered
ECU NEWS BUREAU
Five non-credit courses in
music and dance will be offered
by ECU to interested adults in the
Greenville area.
They are "Folk Guitar Mon.
Oct. 10-Nov. 28, 7830 p.m
"Five-String Banjo Thurs. Oct.
13-Dec. 8,730-9 p.mArabic
Dance Tues. and Thurs Oct.
4-Dec. 13, 10-11 a.m "Begin-
ning Jazz Dance Exercise Mon.
Oct. 10-Nov. 28, 730-9 p.m.
The guitar oourse, designed
as a folk approach to the
development of the basic guitar
technique, will be taught by Lisa
Heller, graduate student in the
ECU School of Music and exper-
ienced guitar teacher.
"Five-String Banjo" will
provide students with beginning
skills in the "Scruggs" and
"Clawhammer" styles. Instructor
is Andrew Farnham of the ECU
School of Music faculty.
Instruction in the Arabic
dance course will be given by
Donna Whitley, Arabic dance
teacher and performer who
studied the dance as a folk art in
Casablanca, Morocco.
Both jazz dance classes will be
taught by Michele Mennett, who
has taught and performed
throughout the East.
Guitars and banjos may be
rented through the duration of the
classes by special arrangement
with ECU. Qothing for the dance
classes may be any loose-fitting
garments which allow bodily
movement. Dance shoes are not
required.
Further information about
these and other non-credit course
offerings is available from the
Office of Non-Credit Programs,
Division of Continuing Education,
ECU, Greenville, N.C. telephone
757-6143.
Best Selers
Fiction
"The Thorn Birds" by Colleen
McCul lough
"Illusions" by Richard Bach
"The Silmarillion" by J.R.R.
Tolkien
"The Crash of '79" by Paul E.
Erdman
"Dynasty" by Robert S. Elegant
"Coma" by Robin Cook
"Delta of Venus" by Anais Nin
"The Investigation" by Dorothy
Uhnak
"The Second Deadly Sin" by
Lawrence Sanders
"Full Disclosure" by, William
Safire
Nonfiction
"All Things Wise and
Wonderful" by James Herriot
"Your Erroneous Zones" by
Wayne W. Dyer
"Looking Out fa Number One"
by Robert J. Ringa
"The Book of Lists" by Davis
Wallechinsky
"The Dragons of Eden" by Carl
Sagan
"Th Camera Never Blinks" by
Dan Ratha
"Roots" by Alex Haley
"Vivien Leigh" by Anne Edwards
"It Didn't Start With Watergate"
by Victa Lasky
The Possible Dream" by
Charles Paul Conn
'Accading to New, York Times.





Thanks to African robust a bean
27 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
r
African coffee - bitter tastes, better prices
By CHARLES EB�L
Pacific News Service
If today's skyscraper coffee
prices are driving you to instant
instead of fresh-brewed, chances
are the South American accent to
your morning cup has turned to a
slightly bitter aftertaste -thanks
to the African robusta bean.
And, if Americans grow ac-
customed to African coffees and
prompt increased planting there,
the result could be a coffee glut
by the early 1980s that would
send prices plummeting to record
lows.
With coffee giant Brazil's
exports falling-and world prioes
still at near-reoord levels-African
coffee producers are taking up the
slack. Africa's most oommonly
grown coffee, robusta, is the
cheap, naturally harsh variety
used largely in the making of
instant ooffees.
While it is a hardier plant that
yields more beans than most
South African varieties, robusta
also lacks the familiar delicacy of
Brazil's arabica bean. Instant
coffee now accounts fa about half
of all sales in Britain and Nath
America. And African robustas
are used mae and mae as
extenders in the less expensive
roasted blends, replacing the
once-plentiful arabicas, which
were devastated by a killer frost
in Brazil.
U.S.Department of Agri-
culture (USOA; statistics show
that robusta imports rose from 12
to 32 percent between 1960 and
1974�the bulk coming from
Africa and Asia. At the same
time, Africa's share of the total
U.S. oof fee market rose to 33
percent, equal to Brazil's output
at its peak.
And while Brazilian ooffee
production nas slipped from over
25 million bags in 1972 to 9.5
million last year, Africa's output
has held relatively steady around
19 million bags-despite numer-
ous obstacles encountered in the
past three seasons.
In Angola, once the wald's
third largest exporter behind
Brazil and Columbia, the Pat-
uguese exodus and the ensuing
civil was have cut production by
as much as 75 percent. Tanzania-
a producer of fine arabicas as well
as robusfas-has suffered declin-
ing yields since 1974 due to poa
weather.
Uganda has been plagued
with smuggling. And Ethiopia,
the birthplace of ooffee, has been
faced to watch production drop
because its coffee-growing pro-
vinces are the scenes of serious
SHJ Canerof5th&
Cotanche
Downtown
Greenville
For the
Little Things That
Add Pleasure in
Your Life
guerrilla insurrections.
Yet despite these setbacks
prices have been so good that
most expat ing oountries have
still enjoyed increased earnings.
The Ivay Coast-now the wald's
third largest exporter-and
Cameroon are setting the pace.
Further incentive fa stepping
up production is that all produo-
Easy Rider
ing oountries are currently en-
gaged in competition to deter-
mine their share of the wald
market in the event of a price
plunge.
Under the International
Coffee Agreement (signed by ail
major producers amd con-
sumers), export quotas will be
imposed on producers if prices
fall to an unsatisfactay level.
Since this mechanism doesn't
take effect until 1979, the quotas
will be based upon a country's
perfamance during this interim
period.
But there are pit falls as wet I in
the wald ooffee market that have
led many African countries to
hesitate about putting their ooffee
production into full gear.
There is now massive replant-
ing under way in Brazil. Since it
takes at least three years fa
newly planted ooffee trees to
mature and bear fruit, Brazilian
production is expected to eturn
to namaJ levels by 1r
THE LONG DAYS of summer are slowly being consumed by the shadows of fall. Photo by Jeff
Robb
Dne
Tues. T.B.A.
Thurs.
AH vs. Shavers
a
"Bitter Sweet"
BYOL
WHEN DO MUSIC MAJORS
SAY BUDWEISER X





P�gt 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 Stplemtotr 1977
Works -in-progress'presents first in series
ECU NEWS BUREAU
The East Carolina Playhouse
will present the first in a series of
"works-in-progress" productions
in the ECU Studio Theatre Sept.
29 and 30 and Oct. 1 at 8.15 p.m.
"An Evening with Tennessee
Williams will include four short
dramas by the award-winning
playwright, directed by Ella
Gerber of the ECU drama faculty.
PfcYiPty
shocsQ
As
Advertised
on TV
Boot
Fewer!
Well-seasoned
for Fall!
A Women's Fashion Boot
Reg $19 99. SAVE $6 09
13.90
B. Girls' Pretty New Boot
Reg S13 99 SAVE S4.09
9.90
Assorted Shoulder Bags
Regularly $7 99
5.55
Women's Lace-up Wedge O
Reg $9 99 SAVE $3.09
6.90
Get to know us; you'll like us.
a
Prices Good thru Saturday
Open Evenings � MasterCharge, Visa or Ask About Our Layaway Plan
Stanley Richards, anthologist
of American drama has said of
Williams' work: "His plays pul-
sate with the heart's blood of the
drama � passion. He is an
electrifying dramatist because he
breathes fire into scenes, explos-
ively and woundingly.
"He writes about people who
are not meant to win - the lost,
the odd, the strange, the difficult
people - fragile people who lack
talons for the jungle. The clarion
call of many, of not most of his
plays is loneliness
The casts of the four plays
include both students and faculty
at ECU The Gnadiges Fraulein
will feature Mary Ann Franklin of
Henderson, Martha Hewitt of
Raleigh, Danny Wright of Jack-
sonville, John Reber of Roanoke
Rapids, Shauna Holmes of Jack-
sonville, and Janet Horton of
Elizabeth City.
The cast of The Unsatisfactory
Supper includes Roberta
Fountain of Jacksonville, Chris
Kara-Eneff of Wilmington, Del.
and Hazel Stapleton of the ECU
psychology faculty.
At Liberty features Debra
Zumbach of Cary. as well as Ms.
Stapleton and John Reber.
Can't Imagine Tomorrow
includes Shauna Holmes and
Rodney Freeze, a woodbridge,
Va. native.
Ms. Gerber is seeking to
emphasize the luminescent
qualities in the four plays, to
capture something of the play-
wright's lyricism in the staging.
"Early in my career I fell in
love with At Liberty. It has all the
yearning and desperation that
every young person feels in
pursuit of a career in spite of
adversity she said.
The Unsatisfactory Supper, on
the other hand, is a poignant play
of old people without a nest of
their own. In Can't Imagine
Tomorrow, the two characters
finally accept the need to face
alone the terras which might be
more easily met together.
Tickets for "An Evening with
Tennessee Williams" are avail-
able from the Playhouse Box
office by telephoning 757-6390.
Goings On
Tuesday
Travel-Adventure Film Series presents "The Canyon a look at
Grand Canyon, in the Student Union Theatre, 8 p.m. Adm ECU ID and
Activity Card for students, $1.50 fa public.
The Roxy will present John Fad's "Stagecoach" with JOin
Wayne, at 8 p.m. Adm. is $1.00
Wednesday
Student Unioi special film, "Dealing:Or The Berkley-to-Bostcn
Faty Brick Lost-Bag Blues' to be shown in Mendenhall Student
Center Theater. Adm ECU ID and Activity Card.
Thursday
Student Union Lecture Series presents "MarijuanaThe New
Prohibition a program conducted by N.O.R.M.L In the Mendenhall
Student Center Theater 8 p.m. Adm. ECU ID and Activity Card fa
students, $2.00 fa public.
Friday
Student Union film, "Day of the Jackal will be shown in
Mendenhall Student Center Theater, 7 and 930 p.m. Adm. ECU ID
and Activity Card.
A Senia Recital, Robert Hedrick, string bass, will be held in the
A.J. Fletcher Music Center Recital Hall, 815 p.m.
Saturday
ECU-vs-University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C 730 p.m.
Student Union film, "Day of the Jackal will be shown in
Mendenhall Student Union Theater, 7 and 930 p.m.
Sunday
Delta Phi Delta Art Show opens in the Mendenhall Gallery.
K - MART
Piece Goods
The Music Shop
The Factory
GREENVILLE SQUARE'S
GRAND OPENING
Sept. 29, 30 & Oct. 1
Happy Talk
Shoe Show
Baskin - Robbins
The Wishing Well
The Pet Kingdom
Live band Thursday night 5:30 - 8:30 pm
Free Door Prizes to be given away in many stores
Savings & Grand Opening specials by each merchant
Shop nightly until 9 pm
Opening soon
A �f p Tru - Value Hardware
CJ's Arts & Crafts
A - 1 Imports
The Cheese House
The Kitchen Cupboard
Each mew merchant in Greenville Square appreciates your business
located on 264 By Pass





'Bye Bye, Birdie' opens
ZT September 1977 FOUWTAINHEAD Page 11
Comedies highlight playhouse season
Eastern North Carolinians
who enjoy dramatic comedy will
welcome the offerings of the East
Carolina Playhouses's 1977-78
season.
Comedies to be produced at
the ECU theatre range from the
ourageous to the poignant and are
guaranteed to appeal to the
theatre fan who enjoys a good
laugh.
SCHEDULE
Scheduled for this season are
Bye Bye, Birdie! (Oct. 19-22), The
Skin of Our Teeth (Dec. 1-3, 5-6),
The National Health, or Nurse
Norton's Affair (Feb. 20-25, Feb.
27, March 1) and A Midsummer
Night's Dream (April 18-22).
The season's lineup is ded-
icated to ECU Chanoellor Leo
Jenkins who, according to Play-
house Producer Edgar Loessin,
has given theatre at ECU "vigor-
ous administrative support and
whirlwind creative energy
Loessin himself will direct the
season opener, Bye Bye, Birdie,
one of the most captivating
musical shows ever performed.
Birdie traces the rise and disillus-
ionment of a sideburn-wearing,
guitar-toting rock and roll singer
through swooning fans, TV
appearances and even induction
into the army.
Such songs as "A Lot of Livin'
to Do" and "Put on a Happy
Face" are featured in this mus-
ical, which pokes gentle fun at
teenagers and their parents.
Thornton Wilder's The Skin of
Our Teeth, takes the Antrobus
family on a wacky trip through the
ages, all the way from the last ice
age to the end of the war, and
finds them coming through "by
the skin of our teeth
DIRECTOR'S PLANS
Director Ella Gerber plans a
multi-media approach to the
staging of this Pulitzer Prize-win-
ing modern classic.
The National Health, or Nurse
Norton's Affair is a dark comic
portrait of life in a men's hospital
ward by Peter Nichols. Patients
oome aivi go, some facing illness
with fortitude and others with
boredom, while the hospital staff
itself includes the familiar, highly
romanticized characters of the TV
soap operas. Loessin will direct
the production.
Shakespeare's beloved
Midsummer Night's Dream is
appropriately set for April when
warm weather will be returning to
Greenville. One of his most
festive comedies, Dream is a
fantasy of two young couples who
elope on a midsummer evening
and are tricked by the fairies into
falling in love with the wrong
fiancees. Del Lewis will direct the
production.
Broad comic situations and
some of Shakespeare's most
unforgettable characters, such as
Nick Bottom and Puck the
mischief-making sprite, have
made this play a favorite with
audiences for nearly 400 years.
Season tickets at $8.50 each
are available from the ECU
Playhouse Box Office and may be
reserved by telephone, 757-6390.
Special discount rates are avail-
Cinema,
Continued from p. 8
-
Alternatives
This is the time of year when theater owners start pulling their hair
out by the roots. The lull between the summer super-productions and
the Christmas blockbusters always has the exhibitors in a state of
limbo. This weeks selection of movies in Greenville typifies the lull.
The Buccaneer Movies 1 and 2 serve up schmaltz until Thursday with
"You Light Up My Life" and "The Dove
Cars and sex, not necessarily in that order, are featured at the Plaza
Cinema 1 and 2 in the films "Herowork" and "Cherry Hill High
"Rocky" is back at the Pitt Theatre downtown. Save your
money.The student center has it scheduled for November 4.
Hang On! Sure to be a brilliant film, "I Never Promised You a Rose
Garden based on the best selling novel, will be at the Plaza Cinema
Meet
GERDA NISCHAN
Internationally Known Greenville Poet
at
The MUSHROOM
ON THE MALL
WEDNESDAY
SEPTEMBER 28 3:30 - 5 P.M.
She Will Autograph
Your Copy Of Her New Book
" RED SKY
IN THE NIGHT "
$3 PAPERBACK $5 CLOTHBOUND
$��
�(ana tfcapnr
�ty
�itom'& JJu. QakudL
ib Cam ir. Wnui�.
Onui. &JLh Cjjdttux mt Atats
JbJu.
-yffuh.
-UauJj
iCifiJjjDeJLL,
of SyfnmffV 6 infc "fed!
-iWarta
in a
ew
trf�rr
able to persons in groups of 20 01
more.
The advance season ticket
coupon price offers a 20 per cent
saving over the single ticket price
for all four shows, and" theatre
patrons with season tickets may
reserve seats one week earlier
than non-subscribers. The season
ooupon also provides free admis-
sion to all ECU Workshop
productions this season.
low prices at the Galley room
Wed Stacked ham& cheese
sandwich on choise of rye
whole wheat or white bread,
small drink $1.50
Thurs 2 chili dogs
medium drink $1.25
located south end of
Jones Dorm
pl a mm See
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W leaf t4M
Philodendron j43
(Selloums) r pus I
Ei.
ASPARAGUS
FERNS
4" Pots
LARGE
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4" Size15 Ea.
5" Size19 Ea.
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Maw . �-�-�.
mmmmmamam





Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 September 1977
Pirates fumble past tough VMI
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Assistant Sports Editor
In winning their fourth victory
of the year, East Carolina had to
overcome a number of mistakes to
defeat a tough VMI team 14-13.
The victory, the Pirates fifth in a
row and fourth this year, was in
doubt until the last play. The
crowd of 23,581, the largest in
Fioklen Satdium history, was once
again kept on the edge of its seat
as the Pirate offense fumbled ttie
ball ten times losing six.
In the first few minutes of
the game East Carolina was
unable to hole on to the ball. In
the first thirty minutes of the
game the Pirates fumbled seven
times losing four to VMI.
The first fumble came as
Willie Hoi ley bobbled a punt and
VMI" s Jeff Washington fell on the
ball to recover for the Keydets at
the ECU sixteen. The Pirate
defense pushed the Keydets back
to the twenty two and from there
Craig Jones. VM I' s fifty yard sure
shot, booted a thirty nine-yarder
to put the Keydets up 3-0.
East Carolina then got the ball
and drove down to the VMI thirty.
The Pirates then tried a 47-yard
field goal only to miss.
After the Pirate defense got
the ball back, Jimmy Southerland
replaced Leander Green at quar-
terback and fumbled the ball
trying to hand off to Eddie Hicks.
The Keydets then drove to
mid-field where Craig Jones
attempted a 60-yard field goal
which failed.
The next time the Pirates got
the ball Southerland, who had
been sick all week, fumbled the
ball again at the ECU 46-yard
line . From here VMI, aided by a-
thirty four yard pass to tight end
Greg Weaver moved in for the
score in two more plays. The kick
was good and the score was VMI
10-ECU 0.
On the Pirates' next posses-
sion, Leander Green tried to make
a pitchout as he was being tackled
and fumbled the ball at the ECU
nineteen. Here VMI kicked a
thirty two yard field goal and the
score was VMI 13-ECU 0.
Just as it was beginning to
look as if East Carolina was going
to be blown out of Ficklen
Stadium Jimmy Southerland
came in and moved the Pirates
down the field for a touchdown in
eight plays. The drive almost
started in disaster, however, as
Willie Hawkins fumbled the
kickoff twice and recovered his
own fumbles. During the drive
Theo Sutton and Jimmy Souther-
land did most of the damage to
the Keydet defense as the Pirates
drove down field to score on a
keep by Southerland, making the
score VMI 13-ECU 7.
VMI then moved down field to
the East Carolina twenty eight
where Jones attempted a fake
field goal. The Pirate defense was
not fooled and an alert Willie
Holley came in and snuffed the
fake.
The Pirates made one more
ECU
First downs15
Rushes-yards57-248
Passing yards90
Return yards4
Passes11-7-0
Punts3-38
Fumbles-lost10-6
Penalties-yards8-79
East Carolina0 77 0.14
VMI3 10 0 0-13
VMI
17
49-52
164
11
24-14-1
4-39
4-2.
8-65
VMI-FG Jones 39
VMI-Gibson 4 run (Jones kick)
VMI-FG Jones 32
ECU-Southerland 8 run (Creech kick)
ECU-Hicks 2 run (Creech kick)
A-23, 581
Season opener
OFFENSIVELY, THE PIRATES had a total of ten fumbles. VMI was able to spore on three.
Photo by Brian Stotler
DEFENSIVEL Y, THE PIRA TESheld VMI to only 52 outstanding game,
yards rushing. Mike Brewington86) played an
Photo by Brian Stotler
attempt before halftime to get on
the board and almost succeeded.
On first down Southerland hit
Terry Gallaher on a 46-yard pass.
Gallaher was almost able to break
away but was grabbed by VMI's
Tony Hamilton at the last second.
From here the Pirate offense
committed a couple of key
penalties and had to opt fa a field
goal. As has happened all year,
the field goal was wide and the
score remained at half time ECU
7-VMI 13.
In the third quarter VMI
began to make some mistakes of
their own. The Keydets fumbled
on their first play from scrimmage
and Pirate Noah Clark jumped on
the ball at the VMI twenty two.
From here the Pirates drove in for
the winning touchdown.
The touchdown took just five
plays as the East Carolina offense
played like they should have the
whole game. Eddie Hicks finished
the drive by going over from the
two yard line.
East Carolina, just like last
year's 17-3 win in Lexington, had
many opportunities to score in the
last quarter but mistakes stopped
the Pirate scoring drives.
Fa the Pirate offense, two
bright spots were Terry Gallaher
and Theo Sutton. Sutton ran fa
114 yards on fifteen carries.
The Pirate defense played
their best game of the year
against the rush as they held VMI
to just fifty two yards rushing on
faty nine carries. Mike Brewing-
toi had a fine game individually,
including a game-saving tackle
against VMI's Mike Freeman as
the dock ran out.
For the Pirates, however,
there is no time to rest as they
must face probably the best team
thus far this year, South Carolina.
The game with South Carolina
will be on ABC TV at 1:30 p.m.
Sports
ECU beats 'ACC team
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
Joe Clark down at the student
stae had better get to wak
again printing up those purple
and gold ECU tee shirts. After
Saturday's ball game the scae
now stands - East Carolina 3,
Atlantic Coast Conference 0.
Yep, the Pirates won another
one of those "ACC games" this
weekend except this ball game
didn t take place at Wallace
Stadium The
sport Saturday was field hockey,
her one of thase growing
minor sports in the won �
athletic progi
Nevertheless, the Pirates cap-
tured their first victay of the
season as they trounced a help-
less Clemson squad 6-0 in froit of
an enthusiastic aowd of about
200 plus. And the majaity of
those spec at as who watched the
game Saturday mqrning would
probably agree, it was a heckuva
a lot mae exciting than what
went ai in Ficklin Stadium later
that night.
' Gosh, can you believe how
many people came out here to see
us play this morning?" said an
excited Lauie Arrants after the
e "l know the girls really
enjoyed playing in front of a lot of
Any lime that crowd la
behind you, it inspires you to play
better
Whether a aowd had been
there a not, it was quite obvious
after the first five minutes of play
that the Clemson Tigers were
simply no match fa the Pirates.
The entire first half, as well as the
rest of the game, was played
down at the ECU end of the field.
The Clemson squad was
downright pitiful, but then a n
this is the first year the fibers
played the spat down in
Death Valley. The Tigers were
beaten 12-0 by Appalachian State
last week, so maybe their 6-0
Set; HI 11), p 15
at
f CU FIELD HOCKEY team got off to a good
itioir opener 6-0. Photo by Brian Stotler
start by winning





27 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
600 view Pirate soccer victory
by ANNE HOGQE
Sports Editor
Despite sloppy play, the
Pirate socoer team trounoed the
Gddsboro Socoer Club 7-0, win-
ning their first home game of the
season.
" I was disappointed with our
overall play despite the score
said Pirate coach Brad Smith.
"I'm happy we were able to
improve enoug. i throughout the
game to win
ECU scored two points in the
first half, made by halfback
Malcolm McLean, with an assist
from Charlie Hardy, and forward
Phil Martin, with an assist from
Daryl High.
"We played sloppy in the first
half said Smith. "We were
bunching (too many people on the
ball at the same time) which is
due to a lack of communication
The Pirates exploded in the
second half, scoring five times.
Phil Martin made two unassisted
goals, Mike Hitchcock scored on a
penalty kick, Tim Harrison made
an unassisted goal, and Mike
Fetchko scored with the assist-
ance of Curt Winoorne.
Coach Smith substituted many
of the team's younger players
during the match. Smith said
fullback Pete Amato, a freshman,
"played real good. His exper-
ience will enable him to play
much more Smith singled out
wing Ric Browning, who showed
much improvement, and halfback
Tom Quails whom Smith said
picked up the game's tempo
Mike Lawrence, who started
at goalie, has had two good
Greenville
Soccer Club
now 2-1
ByANNEHOGGE
Sports Editor
The Greenville Socoer Club
began its season early this month
and now has three matches under
its belt.
In their opener, played the
11th, Greenville lost to the
Gddsboro Soccer Club, 4-3. Jeff
Karpovich scored Greenville's
three goals, the first assisted by
Bob Jones and the second by
Jimmy O'Boyle.
One the 18th, Greenville
defeated the Cataret Socoer Club,
3-0. Scoring was done by Hugh
Parker (with an assist by Bob
Jones), Jack Kelly and Jeff
Karpovich.
Greenville visited the Wilson
Soccer Club on the 25th. Wilson,
the leaders in the Eastern Divi-
sion of the North Carolina Socoer
League, defeated Greenville 2-0.
Greenville's next match will
be October 9th, when they
weloome the Gddsboro Socoer
Club. All home games are played
at the West Greenville Field
(formerly the Rose High Field) on
the corner of West 5th Street and
Nash. Game-time is 200, and the
public is urged to attend.
(2) led the soaring Saturday with three
goals. Photo by Brian Stotler)
games back to back and, accord-
ing to Smith, will see alot of
playing time in the future.
Smith was also happy with
Phil Martin's play. "You can't
say enough about him said
Smith, "he improves with each
game. He oould possibly be the
Just Arrived at The
Book Barn a
Frightfully Good
Selection of:
�- I23 E. 5tf S
GREENVILLE, N. C. 27834
Halloween Mask
Beards and Wigs
'Costume Accessories
Party Goods
Located Downtown
Greenville, 5th St.
BUFFET
Effective October 2nd
We will be open on
Sundays
regular hours
Mon -Fri
Lunch
11:00 - 2:00pm
Dinner
4:45 - 8:00 pm
SUNDAYS
11:30-7:30
first ECU player to be fiamed to
the All-South team
Injuries now plague the
Pirates at several key positions.
Charlie Hardy, a team co-captain,
suffered a pinched nerve and may
not be able to play in the next
match. Fullback Tom Long pulled
a hamstring and it is doubtful
when he will return. Jay High,
who was injured in the Campbell
Classic last week, may be back
with the team by next week.
A bright spot concerning
Saturday's match was the large
crowd turnout. An estimated 600
prople attended the match. "I
think it really helped the players
to have such support said
Smith. "Crowd support lifts the
team's spirit, and makes it more
difficult for the visiting team. I'd
like to thank those who attended,
it was a big help
THE TREE HOUSE
Every Tuesday from 5-8pm
you can enjoy your health and
our newSalad Bar for only 99
with 16 ingredients
Tues. night music festival
8HM2j30
Iron Horse Trading Co.
Merchants and Craftsmen
In Fine Gold and Silver Jewelry
Liquid Silver Anklets
& Bracelets Your Choice $3.95
Hours: MonThurs. 10-6
Fri. 10-6 Sat. 10-6
Downtown on the Mall,
Top of First State Bank Bldg.
Pantana Bob's
next to Jason's
Cotanche Street
open 7 days a week
4pm until





I
I
I
I
11
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 27 September 1977
Volleyball team splits pair
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
The East Carolina women's
volleyball team topped Appala-
chian State 2-0 and lost to North
Carolina 2-0 Saturday in a tri-
meet played in Chapel Hill.
The Pirates took a 15-9
decision over Appalachian in the
first game and won their second
game 16-14 to record their second
straight victory of the season. But
the Tar Heels came back to stop
ECU in the second match 2-0.
North Carolina won the first game
15-9 and captured the second
game 15-12. East Carolina is now
2-1 for the season.
The volleyball team returns to
action this Saturday when the
Pirates play UNC-G in Memorial
Harriers place second
By JIM DILL
Special to Fountainhead
While many of East Carolina's
athletic teams were home this
weekend, the Pirates cross-
country team traveled to Lumber-
ton for the Pembroke State
Invitational. This was the Pirate
harriers first meet of the season,
held on the hilly, five mile
Riverside Country Club golf
course.
Pembroke State, a challenger
for the state championship, won
the meet with 21 points. East
Carolina was a close second with
36 points, followed by St. August-
ine with 105 points, Campbell
College with 133, Francis Marion
with 161, St. Andrew's with 166,
and Fayetteville State with 200
points, (in cross-country, low
score wins).
ECU vs USC on ABC
For the second consecutive year in a row, the East Carolina Pirates
will appear on television. Saturday's game between ECU and the
Gamecocks of South Carolina will be televised regionally from
Columbia by ABC. Because of the television broadcast, the game har,
been moved from 7:30 to 1 50 kickoff time. Airtime will be 1 JO.
Ken Smith, Sports Information Director, said 300 tickets remain to
be sold for the game Saturday. East Carolina enters the game with a
4-0 record while the Gamecocks are 3-1. The Pirates picked up its
fourth straighfwin of the season Saturday night over VMI, 14-13, while
South Carolina dropped its first game of the year to Georgia 15-13.
East Carolina defeated Appalachian State 35-7 last year on
television to win the Southern Conference Championship. The Pirates
have a 2-1 record on T.V.
Jeff Moody of Pembroke took
individual honors, although well
off the oourse record set last year
by this year's second place
finisher, Gary Henery, also of
Pembroke. Ray Moore of ECU
took third place, followed closely
by Jim Dill, also of ECU in fourth.
Both were trophy winners. Coach
Bill Carson remarked, "Those
two really had guts.they hung in
there and wouldn't give up the
whole race
Other ECU finishers were
Charlie Powell-12th place, Ray
McDaniels-17th place, John
White-20th place, Jerry Cook-
24th place, and Robbie Williams-
38th place.
There were approximately 60
runners oompeting in the meet.
This was an excellent showing for
the young Pirate team.
Their next meet will be on
Saturday, October 8th at Camp-
bell, against Campbell College,
the North Carolina Track Club
and Godivia Track Club.
NOW OPENED
can 758-6500
f& "e
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FREE
V
xFAST
DELIVERY
MENU
ECU VOLLEYBALL COACH Alita Dillon here demonstrates the
serve. Photo by Kip Sloan)
dp this coupon!
And get three games ior only $1.25,
Bring three friends along. We'll let
them in on the deal, too.
WASHINGTON HWY
GREENVILl E, N C
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Expires Oct. 1,1977 Phone 758-1820
FREE Fast Delivery
To Your Home-Office
School-Any Place
Our Superb Cheese Pizza
Additional Items
12" small $2.80
14" medium $3.55
16" large $4.10
Mike's Deluxe
Pepperoni, Ham, Mushrooms,
Onions and Green Peppers
12" small Deluxe $4.80
14" medium Deluxe $5.95
16" large Deluxe $6.90
Pepperoni
Ham
Onions
Green Peppers
Olives
Fresh Sausage
Ground Beef
Bacon
Mushrooms
Double Cheese
Double Crust
Anchovies
I Soft Drinks 16 oz. 35�
I 32 oz. 55'
Additional Items
12" small 50' each
14" 60' each
16" 70' each





, . : 1 .
27 StpUntM 1877 FOUMTAINHEAO Pig 15
Field hockey team trounces Clemson Tigers 6-0 in opener
Continued from p. 12
setback at the hands of the
Pirates was some kind of moral
victory.
Freshman Sue Jones, one of
the few scholarship playerson the
team, opened the scoring barrage
for the Piarates early in the first
half.She got a nice pass right at
the top of the circle, dribbled the
ball down the middle, and
slammed the ball right past the
bewildered Clemson goalie. Score
ECU 1, Clemson 0, with a lot
more to oome.
One minute later Kathy
Zwigard, the leading scorer from
last year's team, zipped one in
from about 15 feet out to make the
score 2-0 with plenty of time still
remaining in the first half.
Susan Saltzer, one of the more
physical playerson the squad, put
the Pirates ahead 3-0 when she
canned one from ten feet after
getting a nice pass from Linda
"Jersey" Christain. The Pirates
scored still another goal near the
end of the first half when Saltzer
slipped one by the goalie in a
mass confusion of players directly
in front of the Clemson goal.
The half finally ended with the
Pirates ahead 4-0.
"We're not working as a unit
or a team out there complained
Arrants at halftime. "We're
playing sloppy on defense and
we're crowding too much inside.
We're playing good in spurts, but
we've had no consistency
Arrants sounded as if her
team was behind 4-0, but then
again the Pirates should have
been leading about 15-0.
Both teams were noticably
tires throughout the second half
and consequently play was ex-
tremely sloppy. Sue Jones got her
second goal of the game early in
the first half from about 12 feet
out on another fine assist from
Linda Christain. Kathy Zwigard
wrapped up the scoring with her
second goal on an assist from Sue
Saltzer whichmadethe final score
6-0.
A tired Susan Saltzer sat on
the bench breathing heavily after
the game. "We played real well
in the first half, but I think we all
got kinda tired in the second half.
Anyway, we should have beaten
them a lot worse
Laurie Arrants, just like any
other head coach, was simply
pleased her team won their first
game I thought we were in a lot
better shape than we showed in
the second half. Boy, we were
dragging out there said
Arrants. "We got good defensive
effort from Beth Beam and I
thought Sue Jones played a fine
game. But we've got to make
some adjustments in our offense
and defense before our next
game
The Pirates face Duke this
Thursday at 230 at home .
Tennis team drops season
opener to Methodist,6-3
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
Methodist College handed the
East Carolina women's tennis
team a 6-3 setback Thursday in a
season opener for both squads.
The Pirates won the number
one and two singles matches
along with the number one
doubles, but lost the remainder of
their matches.
Freshman sensation Debbie
Spinazzola topped Jeanne Ed-
wards 6-3, 6-0 in the number one
singles match while Louise Syn-
der defeated Elaine Lewis6-3, 6-1
in the number two singles match.
Spinazzola teamed with Dor-
cas Sunkel in the doubles to whip
Edwards and Lewis 6-2, 6-2.
Brendas Gunsallus of Metho-
dist defeated 6-0, 6-4 in the
number four singles while Cynni
Finn stopped ECU'S Dorcas Sun-
kel in three sets 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. In
the number five singles, Marie
Stewart lost to Kay Crawford 6-2,
6-1 while Jenny Wright topped
Susan Helmer in three sets 1-6,
6-2, 6-3.
Gunsallus and Crawford won
the number two doubles over
ECU's Keough and Louise Syncter
in three sets 6-7, 6-4, 6-3.
Methodist took the final doubles
match while Finn and Wright
teaming to beat Helmer and Jinny
Gainey 6-4, 6-2.
The Pirates return to action
this afternoon against N.C. State
at the Minges tennis oourts.
Classifieds
for sale
FOR SALt: Saxophone Alto:
Buescher Aristorat: Used 1 year
$150.00 - includes stand. Tenor
Buescher Aristorat: Used 1 year
$195.00 - includes stand. Bari-
tone :Conn:Used 1 year $550.00-
includes stand. All in excellent
Cond. See Bobby at 205 Jones or
call 752-9746 after 5O0 and leave
a number and name.
FOR SALE: 66 Chevy Station
wagon great engine, AMFM
stereo with 8 track, good tires,
and air shocks. $400.00 or make
offer. Call Kevin 752-1190.
FOR SALE: 10 piece Drum Set,
natural wood finish, excellent
cond for more info, call Ray-
mond Brown, 758-7434.
ACOUSTIC GUITAR: excellent
for beginner. 50.00 Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Craig 3512 FM
Stereocassette tape deck, under
dash model. Fast forward, re-
wind, Matrix-stereo switch, Very
little use. Call 752-5028 or come
by 112 River Bluff Apt. After 500
p.m.
FOR SALE: 5 speed Chiorda
Bike. Good Cond. Two years old.
Only 35.00 Call 752-9885 after 5
p.m. Ask fa Sheila.
FOR SALE: 1 man's 10-speed
faloon Bike. Good Cond. $125.00
Call 756-5416.
FOR SALE: Schwinn Continental
Bicyde. Almost New, Blue, 10-
speed. $130.00 Firm Call 756-
4155 after 5 00.
FOR SALE: '62 Chev. Pick up.
runs good, looks good, nice
interior. 6cyl. standard. 595.00 or
best reasonable offer. May trade -
want good 283 or 327 Chevy
engine and Transmission. Call
758-9909.
FOR SALE: Teac 2505 cassette
tape deck bought in April 75. Is
now in excellent cond must sell,
best offer accepted. Original price
$250.00 Call 758-2073 after 5:30.
FOR SALE: 35 mm Camera
Outfit. Camera body with normal
lens, 135 mm and 28 mm lens.
Hand held light meter, electronic
flash, extension rings $400.00
Bundy trumpet excellent Cond.
$130.00 Call 752-1068.
FOR SALE: Wardrobe and stor-
age cabinets of metal, both
standard size, good oond cheap.
756-4681.
FOR SALE: '76 Mazda RX-4
Stationwagon for sale. Excellent
cond great gas mileage, $200.00
equity and take over payments.
Also diamond engagement ring,
retail $515.00 will well fa $400.00
appraisal available. Call Nartz
at 756-0680.
ALBUMS FOR SALE: Most about
2.00 Room 404-D Scott. Wide
selection including Beatles,
Clapton, Beach Boys, James
Tayla, Yes, America, ZZ Top,
Chicago, Jethro Tull and many,
many more. Cone now for best
selection.
FOR SALE: 1871 Buick Skylark
Custom automatic, FMAM
RADIO Air Cond. Runs great -
needs some body work. Must sell
fast & cheap 752-8907 - 756-0416
John White.
FOR SALE: Remington Manual
Desk Typewriter Good Cond.
$80.00 Call 758-7660.
FOR SALE: Box springs and
mattress. Fair Condition. $30.00
Call 752-5090 after 500.
FOR SALE: Pair of car speakers,
6x9 Coaxial and power booster
for car radio or tape player 60.00
Motorcycle helmet 20.00 All in
excellent condition 752-7817 after
5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 55 V.W. Classic Sun
roof, refinished interia, excellent
transaxle, body in good cond
great car. Call Raymond Brown,
758-7434.
FOR SALE: 1972 Fiat Spyder 850
Blue Convertible AMFM radio.
Not a scratch cm it-asking $2,000.
00 will negotiate. Call evenings
756-1518.
FOR SALE: Monte Carlo Landau,
black with white landau top. Air
Cond. power steering, AMFM
stereo. Must sell immediately,
best offer.
MUST SELL: 66 V.W. Fastback.
sunroof, radio, new tires, battery,
muffler, and brakes all under
warranty. Great Cond. Call 752-
1068.
FOR SALE: Portable Zenith ster-
eo. Good oond only $25.00. Call
Julie at 758-6714.
FOR SALE: Lafayette Stereo
System with RK-84 eight track
palyer, four 25-A speakers (25
watts), and 100 watt amplifier
LA-950. Will sell individual oomp-
ponents. Call Brain Evenings
752-2326.
FOR SALE: 10 speed bike in
excellent cond hardly ever used.
Accepting reasonable offers. Call
752-8320.
FOR SALE: 1969 450 Honda.
Needs tune up. Reasonable offer
accepted. Call 752-2476 after
5.00
LOST:20 Reward for return of a
lost Seiko automatic Cartographer
watch. Lost in Minges Sept. 20.
758-6365.
FOR SALE: 1974 Olds Cutlass
Supreme, 35,000miles, AMFM,
Air, New Michelins, Battery,
Landau top, Dark metallic green,
beige trim. 3175.00 756-0082 after
5 p.m.
FOR SALE: 5 cubic ft. refrigera-
tor (perfect fa dams) with large
freezer capacity, veg. bins, etc.
Good cond $125.00 (was $225.00
new) Call 758-3559 after 600.
FOR SALE: 4.3 cubic feet refrig-
erates. Has freezer space. One
year old in excellent cond. Call
752-7460 after 500.
FOR SALE: JVC 25 watt Receiver
wamp BIC 940 Turntable,
Pioneer 2121 cassette deck, Mag-
natex 3-way speakers only 1 yr.
old. 575.00 (1000.00 new) Call
752-8907 - 756-0416.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female
needed immediately to share 2
bedroom apt. located off of 1 st St.
Must furnish own bedroom furni-
ture. $50.00 monthly plus Vfe of
utilities. Call 758-3559 after 6O0.
FOR SALE: 10 speed bicycle,
very good oondition, $65.00 - Call
Neil at 752-7065, a oome by
112-A A very St.
FOR SALE: Shaklee products.
The most natural food supple-
ments on the market. Available
are Instant Protein, Multiple
Vitamins, and Individual vitamins
Call Shaklee representatives Rich
Belhoff, at 758-7943 a Steve
Daughtridge, at 752-3267 for
mae infamatiai.
FOR SALE: Sanyo 5 cubic ft.
refrigerator with freezer, ice
trays, veg. bin, etc. Auto defrost.
Excellent Cond. $125.00 Call
757-6135.
for rent
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Fa
Shady Knoll trailer $55.00 plus
telephone bill. 758-2853 (female
preferred).
WANTED: 2 male roomates to
share a townhouse Apt. at 37
Riverbluff. Call 758-2650 ask fa
Donald
FOR RENT: Apartment to sub-
lease. One bedroom on Summit
St. Rent $155.00 per month. All
included except utilities (10-15
dollars per month) Call 758-2390.
NEEDED: 2 girls- $56.25 per
rhonth Geagetowne Aptsluxury
apt. Call 758-7786.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed
share 2 bedrm. apt at Village
Green. Rent $58.00 plus utilities.
Call 758-7144.
WANT TO RENT: woption to
buy - Ladies English saddle Call
752-1058 and leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: At
Shady Knoll Trailer Pk. $125.00 a
month plus utilities. Contact
Larry at lot 180 Shady Knoll.
(washer, cooking facilities, etc.)
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed
share 5 room house. Call 752-
5621.
personal�:
PAPER TYPED: I need money.
Call 752-4013 afta 5 p.m.
LOST: If anyone found a pipe in a
aown vinyl tobacco pouch on the
wall by the music Wgd. on Thurs.
aftanoon Sept. 15 please call
Kevin at 758-3334.
FLEA MARKET: On Hwy 33 112
mile on right. Used furniture and
antiques. Open daily ,11 til 5,
Sunday 1 til 6. Delivay can be
arranged.
WANTED: Spanish Tuta a good
Spanish student. Needed im-
mediately. Call 758-5978 for
details.
WORK WANTED: Hate house-
keeping? I will do all your
housekeeping chaes fa a
reasonable fee. Experienced. Ref-
erences available. Call 758-3109.





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Title
Fountainhead, September 27, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 27, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.472
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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