Fountainhead, September 22, 1977







Serving the campus com-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE INaDE
Candidatesd. 3
SCJ Workshopp. 8
Legal Heroinp. 9
Volleyball p. 12
Vol. 53, No. 7 East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina 22 September 1977
Questions raised
Officials discuss
needed overpass
By CINDY BROOME
News Editor
Many students have expres-
sed concern over having an
overpass constructed at the inter-
section of Tenth St. and College
Hill Drive to alleviate pedestrian
traffic and lessen the danger of
pedestrian-vehicle accidents.
Some university administra-
tors believe an overpass is needed
However, now they raise ques-
tions as to the feasibility.
"I think we need it said Dr.
James H. Tucker, Dean of
Student Affairs. "But will the
students use it?"
The latest estimate on the
proposed overpass was approx-
imately $200,000, according to
Cliff Moore, Vioe-Chancellor fa
Business Affairs.
Moore said he thinks students
would not use an overpass.
"I could be wrong said
Moore. "But human nature being
what it is, people cut carters and
don't always use sidewalks
The N.C. Legislature approp-
riates money to the Dept. of
Transportation, which would ap-
propriate money fa the overpass,
according to Moore, because an
overpass on Tenth Sreet would
be a state project.
In the meantime, almost
$30,000 worth of lighting was
installed in the intramural fields
on the nath side of Ficklen
Stadium.
Moore said the university
requested money from the legis-
lature in 1973 to install intramural
lighting; $29,961.12 was approp-
riated in 1975.
"It was a specific appro-
priation fa capital improvement
by lighting those intramural
fields said Moae.
"It's a great improvement
over what we had said Chancel-
lor Leo Jenkins. "It's a very
important part of the program
"You can't do evaything at
once he said concaning the
overpass. "It'san entirely diffa-
ent project
Moae also said the overpass
would have to be ramped fa
handicapped students.
" I f the students would use it, I
think it would be a fine thing he
said. "I'm afraid someone will
get killed.
"I think there should be a
oontinued effort to get it
THOUSANDS OF ECU, students brave the hazar-
dous intersection of 10th st. and College Hill Dr.
daily on their way to their dasses Photo by Jeff
Robb)
Dr. Jenkins returns after
suffering mild heart attack
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
After missing East Carolina's
first three football games of the
season, Chancella Leo W.
Jenkins will attend the Pirates'
home opener against VMI this
Saturday night.
Jenkins, who suffered a mild
Cheerleaders funded by
SU, SGA, Athletic Dept.
By DOUG WHITE
Assistant News Editor
Funding of the ECU cheer-
leaders should be the total
responsibility of the athletic de-
partment, according to Dennis
Ramsey, Student Union presi-
dent.
"I dai't feel the Student
Union should be required to
appropriate $600 a year to the
cheerleaders when we derive
little if any direct benefit said
Ramsey.
This whole situation started
during the school year 1971-72
when the Student Union broke
away from the SGA.
"Just befae the final split,
two amendments were tacked
onto the independence bill giving
us total responsibility fa Home-
caning and the cheerleaders
said Ramsey.
The Student Union funded the
cheerleaders that year and they
caused "a terrible headache
said Ramsey.
At the beginning of the
1972-73 school year, Rudolph
Alexander, Associate Dean of
Student Affairs, negotiated a
"gentleman's agreement" with
the Athletic Department which
plaoed responsibility fa manag-
BILL CAIN, ECU Athletic Director
ing the cheerleading squad in the
hands of the Athletic Department
and left the Student Union with
the responsibility of providing
$600 a year to the cheerleaders,
accading to Ramsey.
"While I feel there is a
definite need fa the cheerlea-
ders, I do not see where the
Student Union should be invol-
ved.
The Athletic Department al-
most solely benefits from the
cheerleaders said Ramsey.
The cheerleaders receive $800
a year from the Athletic Depart-
ment's budget of approximately
$1,100,000, according to Cliff
Moae, Vice-Chancella fa Busi-
ness Affairs.
In addition to the cheerlea-
ders the Athletic Department
supports 19 sports with a budget
approximately two-thirds less
than other maja universities in
the state, accading to Bill Cain,
Directa of Athletics.
"They (cheerleaders) have
permission to use state vehicles
and this year I got them a van to
travel to the games said Cain.
"I think they do a great Job
with the funds allotted them. You
have to understand that in
addition to the 19 sports we
finance, we support the ECU
Marching Pirates out of our
budget
"In comparison with other
See CHEERLEADERS p. 75
heart attack in July, has been
unable to attend any of the Pirate
football games this year because
of emotional stress, accading to
Charles Blake, Assistant to the
Chancella.
"Dr. Jenkins was advised by
his docta not toattendthe games
because of the extreme emotional
stress involved said Blake.
"His recovery has been moving
along very well and he's just
about back at full strength
Jenkins suffered the mild
attack July 7 in San Francisco
traveling with an ECU western
alumni aganizatioi. He returned
to Greenville five days later and
entaed the hospital, where he
remained fa three weeks.
Blake said that all the
chancel la's out of town speaking
engagements and appearances
were postponed throughout the
rest of July, August, and Sept-
ember.
Dr. Donald Tucker, Jenkin's
physician at Pitt County Mem-
orial Hospital, repated the
chancella was showing steady
improvement after a checkup last
Tuesday.
"Right now, Dr. Jenkins is
spending as much time as he eva
has in his office and around the
campus said Blake One maj-
a facta in his recuperation was
his strength. If this hadn't been a
strong facta Dr, Jenkins might
have been in much more serious
trouble
Blake also said Jenkins will
travel with the team next week to
Columbia fa the game against
the University of South Carolina.
Senators question
confidentiality rule
By STEVE WILSOt
Staff Writa
Some Faculty Senate mem-
bers Tuesday questioned the
strict confidentiality under which
the Chancella Selection Commit-
tee must operate as mandated by
the UNC Board of Governas.
The Chancella Selection
Committee is responsible fa the
replacement of Chancella Leo
Jenkins, who will retire this year.
Some Senators requested
more knowledge about the actions
of the oommittee, especially the
names of the nominees fa the
chanceilaship.
Other members defended the
mandatory confidentiality fa
being in the best interests of
those involved.
The oommittee will decide on
two candidates to be submitted to
UNC President William C. Fri-
day, if approved, these two will
be considered in the election fa
the chancella.
In aha business, the Senate
considered some legislation
which oonoarned a six and one
half per cent salary inaease fa
faculty members and an inaease
in insurance, retirement, and
aha benefits
Additional funding fa ECU
authaized by the UNC Board of
Govanas was also discussed.
The Board wants to raise the
teaching quality standard of all
the UNC constituent schools to
equal the national teaching qual-
ity standard achieved by UNC-
Chapel Hill.
The faculty symposium on
teaching methods is tentatively
scheduled fa January 18-191978.
The Senate approved the
Calendar Committee's motion to
change the date of Spring gradua-
tion. Graduation day has been
changed from the previously
scheduled Sun May 14, to Fri
May 12.





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Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 September 1977
Phi Alpha
Phi AlphaTheta, international
honor society in history, will be
meeting Tues. Sept. 27, at 750 in
Brewsjer D-110 (Richard C. Todd
Room). Any undergrad who ful-
fills the following requirements is
eligible for membership: a) 20
quarter hours in history b) 3.1
average in all history courses
taken c) 2.67 overall grade point
average Come and join us!
Refreshments will be served.
NORML
National Organization for the
Reform of Marijuana Laws
(NORML) is the first presentation
of the Student Union Lecture
Committee. The program is Sept.
29, 1977 in the Mendenhall
Student Center Theatre. ECU
students are admitted by I.D. and
activity card. This program has
received raving reviews from
college campuses across the
nation. Highlights from the film
"Reefer Madness" are included
in the lecture.
Rebel
The Rebel, ECU's literary-arts
magazine, is now accepting sub-
missions in poetry, fiction, es-
says, art work, and photography.
Submit your material to the Rebel
office or mail it to the Rebel,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Please make sure to keep a copy
of each work of literature for
yourself, and include your name,
address, and phone number on all
work.
Bowling
Whether you'd like to polish
up your game with some steady
practice or invite three friends
along for some friendly competi-
tion, you can rent a bowling lane
to use for one hour and it only
costs $2.50 Lane rentals are
available at the Mendenhall
Student Center every Saturday
from 12:00 Noon until 6:00 PM.
Stop by and try it out; it's a great
way to spend an hour.
Bahai
"Mankind is one" will be.the
topic of the Bahai Association
discussion tonight at 730 in room
247 of Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. Everyone is welcome.
Business
Beginning Tues Sept. 27, the
Business Fraternity will start
their regular meetings. All Busi-
ness majors, a those taking at
least one business course are
invited to attend. The meeting
will be held in Rawl-Room i30 at
4 p.m.
Spree
How would you like to have
the opportunity to win either a
90-second shopping spree in
Overton's Supermarket, or a 30-
seoond spree in Apple Reoords?
You can have that chance by
entering the first annual Lambda
Chi Alpha Shopping Spree.
Chances to win are only $1.00 and
all proceeds will be donated to the
ECU Stadium Drive. Here is the
perfect opportunity to grab either
a lot of groceries or a bundle of
records and at the same time to
contribute to one of the fastest
growing universities in the East.
Tickets can be obtained from
Overton's, Apple Reoords, or the
ECU campus, or from any
Lambda Chi. The drawing will be
held Oct. 5 during homecoming
week.
Auditions
Auditions fa the first Men-
denhall Student Center Dinner
Theatre Production; MARY,
MARY, will be held Thurs Sept.
22, from7pmiGntil 10pmandFri.
Sept. 23, from 3 pm until 5 pm in
-Mendenhall Student Center Rm.
212. Scripts will be available at
the'auditions.
L.S.A.
The Lutheran Student Assoc-
iation, a group of Christain
students with a Lutheran identity,
will meet Sunday night at 6 p.m.
for fun, food and fellowship. We
meet at the church at 1801 Elm
St. Call 756-2068 fa rides. All are
invited.
Lil Sis
The Pi Lambda Phi fraternity
will have little sister rush Sept. 28
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. If you are
interested in becoming a little
sister please come to 410
Elizabeth St. If you need a ride
call 758-4655.
I.LO.
The International Language
Organization is holding a pool-
side get-together Saturday, the
24th of September. Bring your
own whatever. Interested parties
should contact the Department of
Faeign Languages fa further
infamatiai.
Buy A Slave
A business deal YOU cannot
resist-Buy a slave
WHERE: Mendenhall Student
Center
When: Friday, Sept. 20,1977.
Feel free to cone and purchase
ANY of the QUALITY merchan-
dise in stock a bring your own
selections fa others to bid upon.
Proceeds will go to the Omega
Psi Phi Scholarship Fund.
Workshop
Register now fa aie of the
aafts wakshops which are being
offered by the Crafts Center at
Mendenhall Student Center. Sign
up fa beginning Darkroom, Basic
Pottery, Floa Loom Weaving,
Leather Craft, Batik, Enameling,
Contemporary Basketry, Mac-
rame, or beginning Jewelry.
Upon payment of a $10 semester
Crafts Center membership fee, an
individual may register fa any of
the available wakshop without
additional charges, excluding
costs of personal supplies.
Fa details, call a visit the
Crafts Center during the hours of
3 until 10 Monday through
Friday, and 10 until 3, Sat. Class
space is limited and the regist-
ration deadline fa all wakshops
is Sat. Sept. 24.
Fellowship
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow-
ship will meet this Sun Sept. 25
at 8 p.m. in the Afro-American
Center. The topic of discussion
will be "What Is A Christian?"
All interested persons are wel-
come.
Billiards
Students interested in faming
a billiards league are invited to
attend an aganizatioial meeting
scheduled fa Tues Sept. 27, at
7, in the Billiards Center, Mend-
enhall Student Center.
V.A.
The Veterans Administratioi
Representative for ECU, Ron
Brown, announces that, effective
immediately, his office in Which-
ard 206 will be open Tues and
Thurs. only until Oct. 1st, 1977,
and Tues. and Thurs and Fri.
thereafter. This change is due to
the addition of Lenia Community
College to Mr. Brown's area of
responsibility. The office regrets
any inconvenience this may
cause.
Bridge
All students interested in
faming a bridge dub should
attend an aganizatioial meeting
Tues Sept. 27 at 730 in the
Mendenhall Student Center Cof-
feehouse.
Model-UN
Are you interested in wald
affairs? Faeign policy? Get invol-
ved with the Model United
Nations (Model UN) club. Contact
Wiley Betts at 758-6936 a Sheila
Wilsoi at 752-6044.
Baptist
The Baptist Student Unicn,
511 E. 10th St. is spoisaing a
Coffeehouse, Fri Sept. 23, at 8
p.m. Admission is free. Refresh-
ments will be at a minimal
charge. Carl Hunt, banjoist and
visiting artist, will be the featured
entertainment. Come join the fun
and fellowship"
ACU-I
All students interested in
participating in the ACU-I
recreational tournaments this
semester should pick up neces-
sary infamatiai at the Billiards
and Bowling Centers at Mend-
enhall Student Center. Day
student and dam students pre-
liminary tournaments will be held
to select the participants to
oompete in the All-Campus Tour-
naments sponsaed by Mend-
enhall. Winners of the final
tournaments will be sent to the
regional tournaments in Blaoks-
burg, Va. The competition will
involve billiards bowling, table
tennis, and chess. Register today!
F.G.
Don't faget! Taiight is the
night of the seminar "The
Ressurection: Fact a Fiction?"
This interesting, important sem-
inar deals with histaical evidence
of the Ressurection. The seminar,
which is being sponsaed by the
Faever Generation, begins at 7
p.m. in Mendenhall 244. Guest
lecturer is FG Staff Evangelist
Rich Kerns. So, consider the
evidence and decide fa yourself
whether the Ressurection is fact
a fiction!
Happy Hour
Don't miss "HAPPY HOUR"
at Mendenhall. Prices are 1 3 off
on billiards table tennis, and
bowling. The time is 3 p.m. til 6
p.m. every Monday. Don't miss
it!
Crusade
Campus Crusade fa Christ
weloanes all students fa fellow-
ship and practical insights into
the exciting Christian life! Come
by Brewster B-202 every Thurs. 7
p.m.
Hawaii
The Student Union Travel
Committee is taking reservations
fa it's fantastic Hawaii trip.
Leave the cold winter behind and
spend it in a Pacific paradise. The
trip participants will fly on United
Airlines to Honolulu and spend a
week on Wakiki Beach at the Reef
Towers Htfel. Watch the surfers
at surfing's peak season. There's
much to do in Hawaii. Transport-
ation lolqing and inflight meals
$489.00. The perfect Christmas
gift fa yourself. December 27-
January 3.
Red Pin
Tonight is the night fa Red
Pin Bowling at the Mendenhall
Student Center Bowling Center.
You get a chance to win one (1)
FREE game with every game you
bowl. If the red pin is the head pin
and you make a strike, you win!
Every Thursday evening, from 8
until 11, could be your lucky day.
Parking
Freshman
Freshman registers may be
picked up Wed Sept. 28 in the
SGA vice-president's offioe, Rm.
229.
Attention is drawn to the fact
that freshmen are prohibited from
having or operating a motor
vehicle on the ECU campus
between midnight Sunday night
and 5 p.m. Friday, accading to
Joe Calder.
Freshmen vehicles violating
this policy are very likely to be
towed. The towing fee charged by
local towing oompanies is $20.
A Freshmen parking lot is
located on the south side of 14th
street between Berkley road and
Elm street. This lot will hold
approximately 100 to 125 vehi-
cles. Another Freshman parking
lot is located two (2) blocks nath
of Fletcher Dam between secaid
and third streets oi the east side
of Reade street.
This lot will hold approxima-
tely 400 cars. These are the only
two parking lots available to
Freshmen between midnight Sun-
day night and 5 p.m. Friday
night.
Freshmen parking their cars
on city streets must comply with
city parking adinances affecting
the area. The Greenville Police
Department strictly enfaces the
city's parking adinances and will
tow illegally parked vehicles.
N.Y.
The Student Unioi Travel Gom-
mittee is taking reservation now
for the New York trip over
Thanksgiving holidays. Spend
four days in the Big Apple seeing
the sights. The inaedible prioe of
65.00 includes transpatation and
lodging at the Hotel Taft. See
Macy's Parade, Broadway shows,
Radio City Music Hall, Central
Park, the Empire State Building,
the Village and the grand old
lady, the Statue of Liberty. Make
your reservations now in the
Central Ticket Office.
Dance-A-Thon
Coming soonyour chance to
"Dance the Night Away" again!
Remember: You Can't Stop
Dancing Just because the Music
stcopedSecond Annual Dance-
a-thon fo Eastern Lung Associa-
tion, October 14-15.
Ski Club
The Ski Club is planning,
among others, a trip to Snowshoe,
West Virginia over Thanksgiving
break. The Christmas trip fo
aedit a nai-aedit will take place
again this year also. All those
interested in snowskiing this
winter at lower prices please
attend the dub meeting Thur
Sept. 22, at 4 p.m. downstairs in
Memaial Gym room 109.
Nickelodeon
Sept. 23 & 24, 1977
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre Shows at 7 & 9 p.m.
A star-filled cast and the
excellent direction of Peter Bog-
danovich bring this laugh-laden
movie about early movie-making
to the saeen. NICKELODEON
mixes drama and slapstick with
histaical film dips. NICKEL-
ODEON stars Ryan ONeal, Burt
Reynolds, and Tatum O'Neal.





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22 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
Legislative, class officer candidates speak
KEVIN MoCOURT
I will skip the political redun-
dancy of campaign promises, and
spare you from the boring
sermon-like speeches. But as a
veteran of two SGA legislatures
and the Attorney General's off ice,
the main theme behind my
Sophomore Class President can-
didacy is unity.
Most candidates are promis-
ing the world while forgetting
that before the legislature can act
on an issue, it has to be united.
We went through, a tough
period this past spring, and the
clout of the legislature was
heavily damaged. Before we can
promise the world, we should be
able to oommand our consti-
tuent's respect.
DANNY SMITH
Though I have not previously
served in the SGA, I have served,
and still do, as an officer on the
Slay House Council. I have also
served on the ECU Honor Coun-
cil. Through these activities I
have gained valuable experience
working with people. Extending
the drop period to midterms and
eliminating the foreign language
requirement are two of the
numerous changes I'd Iike to see.
Dedication and hard work are two
promises I can make if I am
elected to serve you.
BILL BENNETT
The week of September 19-26
may well be remembered as one
of the most important seven days
in the history of ECU Student
Government. Many things that
we take for granted, that we
expect from our SGA - The
FOUNTAINHEAD, better light-
ing on campus, funding for the
Fine Arts, a BUCCANEER - All
these things are hanging in the
balance, pending the outcome of
next Monday's SGA elections.
I will strongly support these
programs and will always be open
to proposals on how the SGA can
Homecoming Pirate
Nominees are presently being
received for the Homecoming
Pirates and Court for Homeoom-
ing 1977 (Milestones of ECU: A
Tribute to Dr. Leo Jenkins).
The Pirate selection is being
organized by Kappa Sigma Fra-
ternity in conjunction with the
Inter-Fraternity Council of ECU.
The contest is open to
ALL groups and nomi-
nees' names should be submitted
to: Chuck Freedman, co Home-
ooming Pirate, 700 E. 10th St
Greenville, North Carolina 27834.
Nominees(1 per organization;
must be ECU students. An 8X10
black and white, glossy photo-
graph must accompany the nomi-
nee's name, address and phone
number. No entry fee is required.
Deadline for entries will be
Sept. 26 and voting will take place
from Oct. 3 through 5 p.m Oct.
5th.
Nominees' pictures will be
displayed in the lobby of the
Student Store along with the
ballot box during the week.
An eight member court will be
selected and notified Friday night
prior to the parade on Saturday,
Oct. 8th. These eight members
will be expected to ride in the
parade and attend the game with
an escort.
A Pirate will be chosen from
these eight members (on totals
accumulated during voting per-
iod) and presented during half-
time.
All members participating in
the Homecoming Pirate contest
are urged to ride in the parade
However, transportation will only
be furnished for the top eight
members. I f you plan to have your
member participate in the parde,
contact: Chuck Freedman, 700 E.I
10th St Greenville, N.C
WRITE IN A VOTE FOR
TOMMY JOE PAYNE
FOR
JUNIOR CLASS PRESIDENT
LET'S ELECT A REAL JUNIOR WHO CARES
ABOUT THE GOOD OF ALL THE STUDENTS
WHO IS NOT JUST AFTER THE POWER.
IF YOU WANT HONEST GOVERNMENT
YOU MUST WRITE IN THE NAME
TOMMY JOE PAYNE
SINCE IT DOES NOT APPEAR ON THE
BALLOT. ELECT A RESPONSIBLE JUNIOR
TO THE OFFICE OF CLASS PRESIDENT.
REMEMBER: WRITE IN THE NAME
TOMMY JOE PAYNE
FOR JUNIOR CLASS PRESIDENT.
best serve the student interest.
Your vote for me, BILL
BENNETT, and the entire slate
endorsed by the Students for
Honest S.G.A.
ALONZO4EWBY
As a candidate for the office of
Freshman Class President, I am
provided this space to present my
platform. However, I have chosen
this time to urge each and every
member of the Freshman Class,
to cast their vote for someone. We
cannot allow ourselves to fall
victim to the apathy that exists
elsewhere.
If, of course, it does matter who
you vote fa. But it is of more
importance that whoever heshe
is they have the overwhelming
support of the freshman.
The opportunity for the
strongest leadership possible, is
clearly yours.
MICHELLE OBOLD
How many times have you
yelled obscenities (ormore crea-
tive adjectives) about the lack of
parking at ECU? Have you ever
wondered where all of those
student fees are going?
I am a sophomore day student
with some of the same gripes as
you. I would really like to be your
representative too, and liaison
with the S.G.A.
ECU'S legislators will approp-
riate approximately 300,000.00
this year that can be used to your
advantage - if you allow it.
Let me be your Representative
if you any suggestions, questions,
problems, or scruples - Call me at
758452 or come by 304 S. Jarvis
St.
Thurs. & FrL:
"PRES. OF JAZZ"
Sat
SATURDAY NIGHT
LIVE
BYOL
�ECU did not have a Buccaneer Last
Year for the first time in over 50 years.
�At the regional IFC Convention last
year in Atlanta it was discovered the
our IFC is the only one in the Southeast
that does not receive Funds from the
student government.
�Students have no appeal, no chance
to give their side of the story when the
campus police tow their cars, and they
tow hundreds of student's cars through
out the year.
"These are some serious problems that
need to be corrected. I will be more
than willing to put forth my best effort
to solve them if the students elect me to
the legislature
VOTE: Robert AA. SWA IIV!
DAY STUDENT LEGISLATOR
let's elect legislators that will work for
students rather than themselves
i
Cf
n ccAcn
SEAFOOD
Special Mon. - Thurs.
All you can eat perch or shrimp
mix or match french fries,
hush puppies cole slaw & ice tea
$4.95
Luncheon Specials good from 11:30 - 2:00
Shrimp Hawaiian with fried rice
& tossed salad
Fried shrimp & cole slaw &.
french fries
$2.25
$2.25
$1.25
Perch special
Shrimp Creole over rice
& tossed salad $2.25
WITH THIS COUPON ONLY
$1.00 off on our all you can eat dinner
or free salad with any dinner
sandwiches salads & specials not included





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 September 1977
For the 77-78 SGA
After carefully scrutinizing this list of candidates
endorsed by "Students For Honest SGA FOUN-
TAINHEAD also urges the ECU students to cast their
votes for these deserving candidates Sept. 26, in the
effort to alleviate petty politics from our student
government and restore it to a unit of service for the
student body.
In our effort to promote honesty, and integrity in
Student Government, ECU Students for Honest SGA
have considered the slate of candidates running for
SGA Legislative and Class Officer positions this Fall.
We conclude that the following candidates will
promote the ideas of honesty and service to the
student body and ask you to support them on
September 26, by voting fa the below list of
candidates.
Dennis Ramsey
Co-Chairperson
ECU Student For Honest SGA
DAY STUDENT LEGISLATORS
Hal Sharpe
MarkSnyder
Bill Hammond
Bill Bennett
Doug White
Tommy Joe Payne
Robert M. &vaim
Randy Ingram
David Cartwright
John Epperson
Kathy Dixon
Susan West brook
Nancy Jones
Suzanne Lamb
Jeff K earns
VicYancey
Roy Pursley
LynnStegall
KirbyLashley
Lynn Hewitt
John Walters
Gini Robertson
DORM LEGISLATORS
Chuck Gouge-Aycock Esther Snyder-Cotten
Kevin McCourt-Scott Lynn Calder-Clement
Charles Sune-Slay Barry Lee-Aycock .
Rachael Ramsey-Garrett Bill Powell-Say .
David Helms-Umstead Josie L. Roseborough-
Garrett
'FOUNTAINHEAD would like to add to this
Wayne Stevenson for Belk dorm legislator.
list
Presidents
CLASS OFFICERS
Freshman-Alonzo Newby
Sophomore-Charles Sune or Kevin McCourt
Junior-Tommy Joe Payne-write in vote for Junior
Class President
Senior-Mark Snyder
Graduate School-Ronnie Rose
Be sure to vote
Sept. 26 for
SGA Legislature!
CORRECTION
In Tuesday's editorial, Chip Mayo was associated
with the activities of the "Sullivan regime" last year
prior to Spring Quarter. Mayo did not come to ECU
until Spring and was not involved in such blunders as
the BUCCANEER fiasco. For this, we apologize.
Forum
Payne supported as SGA write-in
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
The time has oome fa ECU
st udents to wake up and support a
leader, not a politician. The
upcoming elections are your
chance as students to do some-
thing about this campus and its
leading officers.
Therefore I would like to take
this opportunity to personally
endorse Mr. Tommy Joe Payne as
a write-in candidate for the office
of Junior Class President.
Tommy Joe is that element of
change that this campus has
needed fa so long.
I have personally known and
waked with Tanmy Joe fa the
past three years. As a friend, he
Separation?
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
" St udents fa a ho�est SGA ?
How about "Lets elect friends of
Sesaoms, Reed & Ramsey I
thought there was a purpose to
separating the student govern-
ment and student entertainment. V
was disgusted last year when
Dennis Ramsey and other Student
Union officials were involved with
the "election" and as a Student
Union member and student I'm
disgusted once again.
Elizabeth Weeks
'Nuffsaid
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
In regards to Tuesday's
editaial: UNFAIR.
Ellen Fishburne
is a superb individual. As a
leader, he is a dynamic, upstand-
ing personality, with a barrage of
new and innovating ideas.
Looking ova the past, you
have to examine one's aeden-
tials. Tommy Joe Payne has a list
of credibilities unsurpassed by
many in his three years as an
ECU student.
Having served as a memba of
the Day Student Legislature in
1976, along with involvement on
the Appreciations Committee fa
the SGA, and on the Media
Board, his willingness to wak fa
you is obvious. But the list goes
on
Tommy Joe has also been
involved in many outside leader-
ship positions. Serving as treas-
urer of Phi Kappa Tau in 1976 as
well as the fraternity executive
board, has proven his abili-
ties to set objectives and accomp-
lish goals!
I wholeheartedly urge all of
you to vote next Monday because
of the importance of elections and
NEW leacters it can bring to this
campus.
Vote fa a leader, not a
politician! Support Tommy Joe
Payne as WRITE-IN candidate
fa Junia Class President .
Sincerely,
David B. Wright
Pres Phi Kappa Tau
Fountainhead
Serving the East Caroline community tor over fifty years.
Senior EditorKim J. Devins
Production Manager Bob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert Swaim
News EditorCindy Broome
Trends EditorMichael Futch
scrXs EdltorAnne Hogge
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and Is distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
and twice weekly during the school year.
Mailing address: OW South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Editaial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6308.
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.





Forum
22 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAP Page 5
Pirate supporter defends ECU fans' behavior
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
In recent letters published by
the N & O and
FOUNTAINHEAD, certain slan-
derous remarks were made con-
cerning the integrity and behavior
displayed by the student body
and supporters of ECU football.
I would like to clarify these and
other situations concerning the
recent victories by ECU over two
of the ACC's "Big Four Duke
andNCSU.
In the letter published by
FOUNTAINHEAD Sept. 13, near-
ly two weeks after the ECU -
State game, Mr and Mrs. David
Powell of Raleigh have consider-
ed bringing criminal charges
against a drunk fan who, Mrs.
Powell claims, was an East
Carolina supporter. This fan
tossed a liquor bottle and hit her
husband in the head, requiring
several stitches. With the attend-
ance over 49,200 many State fans
in the area had switched teams
and were rooting for East
Carolina because of the poor
performance by State. So how
could she tell who was pulling for
ECU and who was rooting for
State? We couldn't help it if the
final score was ECU -28, NCSU
-23.
Upset State fans were seen
getting drunk while waving red
and white pom-poms, and part-
icipating in post-game activities
as fighting, tearing ECU stickers
off bumpers of cars, and all-in-all
having a poor attitude towards
the final outcome of the game.
The only thing left to say to Mr.
and Mrs. Powell is to look at your
Unhappy with editorial
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
Fellow Students, you have
been chosen as judge and jury fa
the trial of myself by this
"unbiased" newspaper. In the
editorial of Sept. 20, I was
accused, unjustly, of improprie-
ties while serving on the SGA
during the past year. Please let
me state my case.
I have been aligned with a
"conspiracy" of "power hungry
politicians" which plan to over-
run the government on our
campus. This news of a con-
spiracy ismisinfamatiai wraigly
directed by the edita. I have not
been affiliated in political activi-
ties, during this academic year,
with any of the "staunch suppa-
ters of Tim Sullivan Being an
art maja, plus a proud member
of Lambda Chi Alpha Fratanity, I
have little desire to aeate any
political movement to gain power
fa myself.
By running fa Sophomae
Class President, I feel that I could
best represent the greatest
amount of people being in SGA.
Yet, I could also serve day
students by holding the day
legislature position. If the edita
had any knowledge of SGA
methods, she would understand
that an individual is allowed only
to hold one legislative position.
Therefore, it would only be
possible fa any of the people
mentioned in the Editaial to hold
one legislative position.
By being in the SGA during
this academic year I would
suppat the BUC. However,
when the legislature decided to
do away with the yearbook I was
not involved in the SGA. Yet I get
blamed fa its destruction. Also,
the FOUNTAINHEAD edita has
implied that I was involved in
threats of physical violence
toward Neil Sessoms and others.
Although Neil and I have political
differences, I have no personal
vendetta against him. Na do I
have any intention of threatening
any physical harm to any person
on this campus.
Fellow Students, it is this
campus and its students that I am
concerned with and it is fa this
reason that I have served ECU
with my best intentiois during
the past year. Concerned with the
barriers on this campus for
handicapped students, I waked
fa the adering of a specially
equipped vans fa handicapped
students. Also, the Cheerleaders
requested funds fa this owning
year, and it was Philip Barbee
and I who waked to get legisla-
tion passed. And fa the first time
in years, the art department was
given a small portion of its
financial input into SGA. These
are a few of the many tnings that I
accomplished during my term in
the legislature, although I was
only installed as a Day Represent-
ative in April.
The Students do need to know
what the SGA is doing now,
However, I believe that the petty
politics that this paper is playing
is slanderous and damaging to
the students right fa cared
infamatiai. Therefae, the stud-
ents must decide and vae fa the
best man during the SGA eleo-
ions. But please vote fa the best.
Yours Sincerely,
Chris Cheatharr
Candidate endorsements
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
The purpose of this letter
is to make public my suppat of a
few candidates who are seeking
SGA legislative and class officer
positions.
We must remember that SGA
isa powerful governing body. It is
charged with the duties of
dlstrlbin'sudeTrt fees to sup-
port publications, the transit
system, and to finance programs
fa drama, art, and music. SGA is
also responsible fa maintaining
the student judiciary, another
powerful branch of student gov-
ernment.
The people we elect to hold
offioe must be responsible, intell-

own school and quit aitiazing
others.
During the DukeECU
CONTEST FANS FROM "Blue-
Devil Country" were cheering
and yelling during the "National
Anthem and didn't even cheer
fa their own team when they
came back befae the second half
began. The nationally known East
Carolina University Marching
Band's drum caps were invited
by the Duke band to oome to the
home side of the field to oonverse,
but when they went, they were
met with a barrage of ice and
Priorities
reevaluated
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
The fate of this university
could well lie in the balloting fa
SGA class officers and legislatas
on Sept. 26. The namal issues of
such a campaign take a backseat
to the issue of a stable legislature.
We saw how one Issue can
deadlock a legislature and ruin
reputations even on the college
level. Petty politics prolonged the
issue and stand in the
way this fall.
With Dr. Jenkins" veto, the
issue of another election last
Spring was technically dead, but
the editaials and cartoons of this
paper extended its literary life.
Keeping this issue alive only fa
the sake of revenge a spite is in
fact doing the students the most
harm. We find a type of journal-
ism that is over-publicizing the
faults of a few, instead of
oovering the accomplishments of
many. I am not jumping on
anyone's case, but only trying to
emphasize our need to re-eval-
uate our priaities.
During the debate over the
re-election issue last spring, it
was a favorite past time to
associate a legislator with one of
the two controversial presidential
candidates. To me, the candi-
dates had nothing to do with my
stand against another election. To
say the least, I was somewhat
less than enthusiastic with the
choice fa president. Fa aie
thing, I knew Tim Sullivan too
well, while on the other hand, I
knew very little about Neil
Sessoms. Neither one of the
candidate's reputations a threats
stood in the way of what I thought
was right.
I feel the same way now. I
think we should put our biggest
priaity on organizing a legisla-
ture that will wak to the benefit
of the students who elect them. It
should be a legislature that will
stand at issues, not personalities.
Unless we wak toward this goal,
the SGA will gradually lose the
student's faith, and in turn
neutralize itself.
Kevin McCourt
VOTE
SEPT. 26!
cups. If that is a good representa-
tion of the school, I would hate to
see the deserters.
If you are any kind of football
fan, you should know by now that
you do not act as if you were at a
funeral. All fams of spirit are
used throughout the game, in-
cluding screaming, holering, and
yes. cussng every now and then.
We at ECU think a lot of our
athletic program and will support
the Pirates 100 percent all the
time, not just when they are
beating Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence teams.
Thank you,
Duane Grooms
Pingston for McCourt
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
SGA elections are once
again in progress. The fall
elections deal with all class
presidents and legislatas fa the
SGA. This, year marks the first
time that the SGA is holding
elections on a Monday, of all
days. All students should make a
special effort to vote and become
involved in this year's political
activities.
As Vice-President of the SGA
last year, I came in contact with
most of the candidates on the
ballot.All are very conaciencious
people, but one stands out as an
extraadinary student who has
devoted a great deal of time to the
betterment of East Carolina and
the people who I ive and wak here
Kevin McCourt has served the
students as Freshmen Class
President. During his first year at
ECU, he also served as chairman
of the Parkjng Committee which
was vital in outlining the parking
problem. He also served in the
SGA Legislature fa two years
and has waked toward such
projects as the overpass, constit-
utional revision, communicaticns
board, expanded visitation rights
and other successful legislation.
Recently, he has served as acting
Attaney General and has waked
well with the Hona Council.
Kevin McCourt is fa you the
students. He is not concerned with
petty politics a obligations to any
aganization. He is his own man,
and he should be your choice this
fall. Be sure to vote Kevin
McCourt, Sophomae Oass Pres-
ident.
Greg Pingstoi
76-77 SGA Vice Pres.
IFC prez supports Payne
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
With regards to the Uy.
coming SGA elections, I would
like to voice my approval and
praise fa a hard waking, and
diligent person who is campaign-
ing fa the SGA Legislature and
Junia Oass President, as a write
in candidate: Tonmy Joe Payne.
Having been in the SGA
legislature last year I came to
know Tommy very well and
recognize the fine wak that he
did oi the Appropriations Com-
mittee. He was one of the most
active members on the commit-
tee. He always voted with regards
to the best interest of the
students.
Tommy Joe, with his previous
legislative experience, would be
an asset to the Executive Council
of the SGA. I am certain that he
would continue to practice a high
degree of integrity and fairness
on the council if elected Junia
Class President.
Remember, Tonmy Joe Pay-
ne's name will not be on the ballot
fa Jr. Class President, so it is
imperative that the voters write
his name on the ballot. Let's elect
an honest and capable person to
serve not only in the legislature
but on the all important Executive
Council as Junia Oass Presi-
dent.
Sneer ely,
KirkEdgerton
IFC President
Tennis courts not fixed
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
I am writing in regard to the
condition of the tennis courts at
the Minges Complex. It is my
understanding that the tennis
courts have not been resurfaced
fa ten years. The condition of the
courts certainly indicates the
need fa immediate resurfacing.
The fact that the courts have not
been resurfaced in ten years
means that only minimum maint-
enence expenses have been in-
cured. The cost of resurfacing this
type of hard court is minumal
since a level foundation is already
present. The total oost of resurf-
acing should not exceed $7,000.00
and would require less than one
week to complete.
It should be remembered that
both the men's and women's
tennis teams compete and prac-
tice on these courts in addition to
the numerous students and facul-
ty who play these reaeationally.
Asking the tennis teams to play
competitive tennison these courts
is analgous to asking football
teams to play on uneven turf. It
would seem that if money can be
raised to enlarge the football
stadium and to build extravagant
enclosures for VIP's at the
stadium then certainly a relatively
small sum could be committed to
ECU tennis program and the
playing enjoyment of students
and faculty.
Dr. JamesE. Akers
Dept.of Miaobioiogy





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 September 1977
Howdy Pardner's
Roy Roger's Family Restaurant
is now in Pirate Country!
Come on in and try
our delicious Western
Fried Chicken. It's
great to carry out to
the ballgame!
"The best
of the fresh
waitin' in convenient carry-
out paks of 8 and 12. There's
a big 20pc. pak too for under
SI0.00. The whole gang can
enjoy it
8pc. pak-$3.90
12pc. pak-$5.75
20pc. pak- $8.95
10 discount
on any chicken
purchase
of SI0.00
or more.
You've got my word
on it, pardner
Don't forget to include some
helpins of our crisp, Texas
Tatars an' fresh cole slaw, too.
So, c'mon in and carry-out
our famous fried chicken to
the ballgame or wherever
you go!
Save TimeCall Ahead and Reserve Your Order,
752-1401
Yes Pirates, We Now Have Breakfast, Also!
Breakfast Hours: MonSat. 6:30a.m10:30a.m.
Blueberry and Golden
Brown Waffles
Creamed Chipped
Beef
over nutter toasted roll
Scrambled Eggs
and Grits
Early Rider Sandwich
egg and 'h�s� with sausage or
ham on butter toasted roll.
c
L
C
V
c
c
F
i:
tl
d
ti
tc
li:
tl"
w
pi
d;
i t i
a.
Side Orders of Smoked Ham and Sausage
Pastries - Tatars - Juices
ALSO
CELEBRATE AT ROY's after the game. Bring your game ticket for
50' off the purchase of any platter.
GOOD LUCK PIRATES, ROY'S RANCH HANDS WILL BE PULLING FOR YOU
Come on in and join the ranch hands for breakfast
Located at the Corner of 10th and Cotanche





Forum
22 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAP Page 7.
Editors note: This is a "special"
edition of FORUM for the 9GA
Legislature elections. FORUM
will not normally appear beyond
p. 5.
Jones adviser disapproves of 'biased' editorials
ToFOUNTAINHEAD: ,
In my three years as an
ECU student and reader of
Fountainhead, I have never read
an issue as one-sided as the Sept.
20th issue. I am, of course,
speaking of the articles, editorial,
cartoon, and letters to the editor
concerning the "attempt" of the
"Sullivan regime" to take over
the SGA.
I am not a Sullivan or Sigma
Nu supporter "nor can I claim to
have ever been, but I hate seeing
any single issue of Fountainhead
which doesn't present both sides
of the story. Though I do not know
Mr. Sullivan personally, I am
Payne for Jr. President
ToFOUNTAINHEAD:
I strongly support Tommy
Joe Payne in the upcoming
election as a write-in candidate
for Junior Class President. Even
though Tommy Joe and I were
opponents in last year's Spring
election, there has never been
any anomosity between us and
there is certainly a strong tie of
mutual respect. I am not only
writing this letter in support of
Tommy Joe, but I am actively
SGA
Continued from p. 5
igent and above reproach, most of
all they must be honest. It is
unfortunate that some members
of last year's student government
were lacking in these qualities.
SGA legislators and class presi-
dents wield a sword oftawesome
power. Because of the power that
is vested in these offices it is of
the upmost importance that stu-
dents take a long hard look at
those who are seeking office.
It would be wise for students
to read and strongly consider the
I ist of candidates being offered by
the ECU "Students For Honest
SGA Much work and research
was done by the organization in
preparing the list. Those candi-
dates being supported by the
"Students For Honest SGA" are
capable people who will be
campaigning for him
I remind ail Juniors, Tommy
Joe Payne is a WRITE-IN candi-
date, so you must write his name
on the ballot for Junior Class
President.
I look forward to working
closely with Tommy Joe on the
Executive Council this year.
Sincerely,
Reed Warren
SGA Vice-President
representative of their consti-
tuents.
The choice is ours, lets make
the best of it. I encourage the
voters to cast a ballot fa Tommy
Joe Payne, a write in vote for
Junior Class President. Also
David Cartwrignt, Randy Ingram,
Hal Sharpe, Kevin McCourt,
Charles Sune, and Bill Bennett.
Space does not permit me to
endorse all of the qualified
candidates, those I have listed are
just a few of the many good
people that we have the opportu-
nity to elect.
Remember to vote.
Respectfully,
Robert M.Swaim
VOTE
SEPT. 26!
CHARLES
SUNE
SOPH CLASS
PRESIDENT
"Tomorrow's Changes Today
FOR
Revision of Visitation Regulations
Creation of Additional Parking
Independent Publications Board
wr
acquainted with a few of his
supporters and respect them as
honest individuals. The "Stu-
dents For Honest SGA how-
ever, seems to imply that these
people are "dishonest" because
of their association with Mr.
Sullivan. It hurts me to think that
"Student Leaders" (including
Dennis Ramsey) and the Foun-
tainhead hate someone so much
that they are willing to destroy
him and his associates politically
without presenting solid justifica-
tion for doing so.
ACADEMIC
RESEARCH
ALL SUBJECTS
Fast, professional, and proven
quality. Choose from our library of
7,000 topics Send $1 00 for the
current edition of our 220 page
mail order catalog.
PESEARCH ASSISTANCE
11322 IDAHO AVE No. 206-E
LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 90025
(213) 477-8474
I will not support a political
faction which so cleverly disguis-
es itself as "Students Fa Honest
SGA And I cannot continue to
appreciate a newspaper that will
allow itself to support a single
political faction.
I urge all students of ECU to
examine all candidates closely
and to vote for the men and
women that they think will do the
best job, regardless of whether
those men and women receive the
"Students For Honest SGA" seal
of approval.
A oonoerned senic,
Joe Collins
Resident Advisor-Jones Dorm
For President
Senior Class
MARK
SIMYDER
Opening
Tonight
Pantana Bob's
(next to Jasons)
Cotanche Street.
Open 7 days
a week,
4p.muntil





Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 September 1977
SCJ to
sponsor
workshop
fly CINDY BROOME
News Editor
the Society for Collegiate
Journalists (SCJ) is sponsoring a
journalism workshop Sat. Sept
24 with the journalism and art
departments.
The workshop, although gear-
ed towards high school journal-
ists, can also be beneficial to
college journalists, according to
Michael Futch, SCJ president.
"Many ECU students in pub-
lications and broadcasting have
an opportunity to benefit them-
selves by attending said Futch.
"I don't think they're aware of
it because they think it's mainly
for high school students
Registration will begin at 8:46
a.m. in the Leo W. Jenkins Fine
Arts Center.
Approximately 22 workshop
sessions will be offered, among
them being newspaper produc-
tion, law and ethics, radio and TV
writing, and pbojography.
Fiitch said tf; .students are
jeurnalisticatty hTjfoqd, 4he work-
shop will help thenugain insight
about ccmmunicaticASc
' 't depends Hjjw.much the
student puts inigjik to how
mueti'he of. ahK-hiS said
safe places to go for help
Committee helps battered wives
(LNS)We want people to
know about Roxanne said a
member of the newly-formed
Roxanne Gay Legal Defense
Committee.
"We want to help battered
women break the silence by
letting them know that there are
safe places to go for help and that
there is support available ail over
the country
Roxanne Gay, a black, 25-
year-old student nurse from New
Jersey, was charged August 11
with the murder of her husband
after a night during which he
brutally beat her. She pleaded not
guilty, and a defense committee
has formed to gain national
support for Gay and all battered
women.
During her last two years of
marriage with Blenda Gay, a
6'5" defensive lineman for the
Rriadelphia Eagles, Roxanne
had called the police more than 20
times for protection against her
.husband's brutality.
"I called the police so many
times it wasn't funny Gay siad.
"Whenever they called back,
they'd discuss football with him
The township's public safety
director also admitted after
Blenda's death that the Gay's had
"a history of family problems"
and that police had been called to
the apartment on several occa-
sions.
On December 20, after a
night's violent quarreling and
beating, Roxanne Gay,stabbed
her husband with a kitchen knife
as he was resting. Her three-year-
old daughter was asleep in the
apartment at the time.
He promised to finish me off
when he got up Roxanne told
supporters. Robert Ansel I Gay's
"If these men beat on other
people as badly as they beat their
wives, they'd be sitting in jail
said Nancy Musgrave, one of the
center's founders.
"But because it's their wives,
they're sent home with a slap on
the wrist
Many women are afraid to
report beatings by their husbands
or to leave them, because the men
often follow and brutalize their
wives. And in areas with no
shelters, after pressing charges
women must go back home to the
men who assaulted them.
To send donations and for
information about benefits being
planned by the Defense Commit-
tee, contact the Women's Re-
sources and Survival Center,
Roxanne Gay Legal Defense
Fund, 57 West Front St Key-
port, N.J. 07735. (201)-264-4141.
attorney v
Foreign lang. hosts meet
-
V'l think the workfcop will be
a-success
The ECU Department of For-
eign Languages and Literatures
will host the regional meeting of
the North Carolina Council of
Teachers of Foreign Languages
here Sat Sept. 24.
The Council of Teachers of
Foreign Languages is a depart-
ment of the North Carolina
Association of Educators (NCAE).
The theme of the program is
"Methods and Activities for
Beginning and Intermediate Le-
vel Foreign Language Teachers
The free program is open to all
teachers of foreign languages in
the public and private schools in
the area.
Registration begins at 930
a.m. in the ECU Nursing Build-
ing.
VOTE
KATHY
DIXON
Day Student Legislator
Mon. Sept .26th
VDTE
mm
BDPHDMDRE
HAS PRESIDENT
RIGCAIS
SHOE SHOP
REPAIR ALL
LEATHER GOODS
Downtown Greenville
7WesL4thSt.
"A new voice for
an effective SGA.

Win $52.23 at
The Tree House
Gong Show
$iw
If You Have Talent
(No Matter How Strange
or Unusual) This is Your
Big Chance to be Discovered!
Wednesday Nite Sept. 28th 8p.m.
TACOS - ENCHILADAS - TAMALES - RICE - BEANS -CHILI CON CARNE
CO
X
8
m
I
AUTHENTIC TEXAS-STYLE
MEXICAN
DELICIOUS
DINE IN
� TAKE OUT
a
I
GREENVILLE'S
GREAT NEW
TASTE TREAT
NUTRITIOUS - ECONOMICAL
SUFFICIENT
VARIETY
TO SUIT EVERYONE,
INCLUDING VEGETARIANS
8

8
LU
U
5
I
TIPPY'S TACO HOUSE
US 264 BY-PASS (ADJACENT PEPPI'S PIZZA)
New Hours Sun-Friday 11 30-2 430-9 Sat. 4-9
7564737
O
3D
H
r
i

O
8
I

O
38
(Official Gong Show Entry Form)
Name
Phone No.
Type Act
i
c
r
r
t
tl
in
T
b
S31VWV1 - 33IU - OS-00 NOO IIIHD - -lOWVOVnO - 000V38 - i
You Must Bring This Entry Form to the Tree House
(Corner of 5th and Cotanche) No Later Than
3:00p.m Friday Sept. 23rd.
A
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7
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or
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After 50 years of strict heroin prohibition
22 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD
Heroin maintenance clinics considered
ByMARKSHWARTZ
Pacific News Service
"We figure, conservatively,
that at least 60 h.rcent of the
criminal calender is drug related.
Heroin maintenance would knod:
out 90 percent of the black
market said San Francisco
Judge Francis McCarty.
"We would be forfeiting the
strugglyover the real issues if we
paralyze half a million people
with heroin and accept the
government as pusher said
Detroit Judge Justin Ravitz.
Legalize heroin? Pass it out
free?
Outrageous ideas. Or so it has
seemed to most of the nation's
polioe and narcotics policy mak-
ers.
But now, after 50 years of
strict heroin prohibition and an
estimated addict population of a
half million, a growing number of
American doctors judges and
even some police are proposing
establishment of "heroin maint-
enance centers" as a technique
for cracking the cycle of drug
addiction and crime.
Support for such experimental
cl inics has come from Consumer's
Union, the National League of
Cities, the Drug Abuse Council
and committees of the National
District Attorney's Association
and the American Bar Associa-
tion.
Heroin maintenance, which is
the cornerstone of drug control
policy in Britain, has caught the
attention of policy makers for
several reasons:
(1) sharply escalating urban
crime rates including theft and
personal violence;
(2) dramatic increases in the use
of narcotics since the mid-1060" s,
coupled with failure in traditional
enforcement and treatment pro-
grams;
(3) the relative success of the
British system; and
(4) the reoord of oorrupt and
illegal practices by both local and
federal narcotics agencies.
Dr. Peter Bourne, President
Carter's special assistant on drug
abuse, has opened the door to
heroin maintenance projects
speaking in San Francisco at the
annual oonferenoe of the Ford
Foundation's Drug Abuse Coun-
cil, Bourne declared such propos-
als "will get the same kind of
consideration as any other scient-
ific proposal.
Bourne's statement also open-
ed the door to a storm of
controversy from the top of
America's drug control establish-
ment all the way down to
neighborhood treatment clinics in
such cities as New York, Detroit
and Oakland.
Richard Hatcher, the black
major of Gary, Indiana, is one of
the leading proponents of heroin
maintenance experiments. Last
year he chaired the National
League of Cities Committee that
endorsed such experiments.
"Look, we've spent $3 billion
a year on drug abuse and what we
have to show for it is a half million
addicts and maybe two million
users Hatcher argues. "In
effect there already is a heroin
maintenance program-and it's be-
ing operated by the underworld
as opposed to the government.
"The only way to find out if
heroin maintenance would help
he says, " is trying tightly control-
led small experiments"
Even more outspoken is San
Francisco Superior Court Judge
Francis McCarthy, an 18-year
veteran of the bench. "We have
bPtween 7,500 and 20,000 heroin
users in this city McCarty told
PNS.
"We figure, conservatively,
that at least 60 percent of the
criminal calendar is drug related.
Heroin maintenance would knock
out 90 percent of the black
market, especially if high quality
heroin were available
The sort of program McCarthy
favors would first legalize heroin,
then administer it in government-
oontroiled clinics to registered
addicts free or at a few cents a
dose, thereby undercutting the
profit in black market heroin.
Although there have been no
heroin maintenance clinics in
America since the 1920's, the
federal government did institute
the controversial methadone
maintenance projectsof the late
1960 s.
In 1969 the federal govern-
ment spent $46 million on meth-
adone and other drug treatment
programs, By 1976 the budget
had increased ten-fold.
It is partially because metha-
done maintenance has had so
little impact on drug addiction,
however, that a strong opposition
has emerged against any legal-
Jesse Winchester to back
Buffett in Minges show
What do the Eagles, Jackson
Brown , and Waylon Jennings
have in common? Jesse
Winchester.
These three all proclaim them-
selves staunch Jesse Winchester
fans. They came in contact with
Winchester in various ways:
through Joan Baez, Jimmy
Buffett, the Everly Brothers, and
Jonathan Edwards.
Unless you're over 30, you
probably know Jesse Winchester
only because these people have
recorded his songs, if you know
him at all.
Winchester's career was on
the rise when he fled to Canada in
the 60's rather than be drafted
into the Vietnam War.
A member of a prominent
Tennessee family, related by
blood to Robert E Lee, Winchest-
er refused to fight in a war to
which he was morally opposed.
With the support of his father, an
Air Force Captain, he gave up a
promising career that was just
beginning to bloom.
This is Winchester's first
American tour, indeed, his first
American visit, in over 10 years.
Jimmy Carter's pardon makes
this return possible.
I feel the pardon was an act
of mercy said Winchester in a
People magazine article, "I never
expected it. Justice would have
said I could never oome back, but
mercy allowed the pardon
Now Winchester is ready to
begin anew, his career in the
States after, as he puts it, "a
ten-year drum roll He is
already quite popular in Britain,
Holland, Germany, Denmark,
ized heroin projects.
Surprisingly, some of the
staunchest resistance has come
not from local pofioe-where tt
might be expected-but instead
from community groups and drug
oounoeling programs.
"A band-aid solution" de-
signed to pacify people is how
Amos Henix, founder of New
Yak's Reality Hot e detoxifica-
tion project described the new
proposals. An ex-addict himself,
Hemix adamantly opposes any
scheme to provide heroin to
junkies. And, he says, his neigh-
bors in Harlem are just as
determined.
" If I can believe what I've been
told, the people are going to blow
them up if the government tries to
put any clinics here. The people
have had it as far as these
band-aid solutions are concerned.
If they think they're going to put
one in ouroommunity they better
think again
Nancy Jo Albers, who works
in Oakland, Ca as the Alameda
County Drug Co-ordinator, be-
lieves "setting up a heroin
maintence program would be one
See HEROIN p. 10
Goings On
THURSDAY mm &w W"
A Senior Recital, Marshall Swing, trombone, will be held in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 9 p.m.
FRIDAY:
Student Union film, "Nickelodeon to be shown in Mendenhall
7 and 9 p.m. Adm. ECU ID and Activity Card.
SATURDAY:
There will be a Journalism Workshop oonducted from 8:45-4.�
on the ECU campus
Student Union film, "Nickelodeon to be shown in Mendenhall, 2
p.m. Adm. ECU ID and Activity Card.
ECU-vs-VMI, 7:30 p.m in Ficklen Stadium.
SUNDAY:
A Senior Recital, Ava Geczy, organ, will be held in the
Memorial Baptist Church, 3.15 p.m.
A Faculty Recital, Henry Doskey, piano, will be held in the A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 815 p.m.
Belgium, Switzerland, and of
course, Canada.
A new Jesse Winchester
album "Nothing But a Breeze
already been released by Brian
Ahern, Emmy Lou Harris' prod-
ucer.
Excited about the album as
well as being home, Winchester
doesn't want to dwell in the past.
He feels that his d�asions were
important then, but that its time
to go on to something new.
There are a few things which
remain the same about Jesse
Winchester One is his music.
Tom Zito in the Washington
Post describes him as a 'master
of the simple lyric, a sometimes
sentimental view which is always
tempered with a sense of
humor
Jesse Winchester will appear
in his first American tour with
Jimmy Buffett in Minges
Coliseum on October 5,1977, at 8:
Tickets are $4.00 for ECU
studentsamd $6.00 for the public.
Art Exhibition Committee
JESSE WINCHESTER
Mendenhall plans next show
Trends
If response is greater for trie
second show sponsored by the
Student Union Art Exhibition
Committee than fa the first,
Mendenhall Student Center may
have standing room only in its
gallery.
Presently showing in the
Mendenhall Gallery is a
Smithsonian Traveling Exhibi-
tion. It oonsists of a series of
photographs from the U.S. Envir-
omental Agency's Project
Documerica.
The next show is Delta Phi
show. Delta Phi Delta is the art
department's honor society, and
while not every outstanding art
student is a member, Delta Phi
Delta members are all outstand-
ing students
Delta Phi Delta has two shows
in Mendenhall Gallery this school
year, a member's show and a
competition show. The first show,
which begins Oct. 2, is the mem-
ber's show.
The show is a multi-media
exhibition. There will be pieces
from various areas of specialty,
including textiles ceramics, scul-
pture, painting, and commercial
art. The show isas varied as Delta
Phi Delta's membership.
Hopefully, response to the
efforts of the Art Exhibition
Committee will continue to be
enthusiastic. There has been a
great deal of written as well as
verbal response to the first show.
Many people picked up posters
from the exhibition, and the show
also received television coverage.
ILLUMNA, the Student Union
Art Exhibition Committee, invitee
you to view the Smithsonian
Exhibit through October 1,1977.
They then encourage you to see
the Delta Phi Delta show from Oct.
2 to Oct. 9. The Mendenhall
Gallery is open from 8 a.m. to 11
p.m. on weekdays and 830 to 12
midnight on weekends.






mm
Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 September 1977
THE NEW YORK CITY
"The Finest Ballet Company
in the Worldhubemi saa n�w�wmii
HARRY K MC WILLIAMS presents a MICHAEL TAINES FILM
A (Midsummer flight's 'Dream
Full Length Motion Picture Based On Shakespeare's Romantic Comedy
COLOR PANAVISION
Choreography by George Balanchine Music by Felix Mendelssohn
COMPANY OF 100 featuring
Suzanne Farrell Idw.ird Villella Arthur Mitchell Mimi Paul
Niche-la Magallancs Patricia McBride Roland Vazquez
Francisco Moncion Gloria (iorin Richard Rapp
Jacques d'Amboisc Allcj;ra Kent
SHOP
Formerly of Downtown Greenville
has moved to its new location.
We Feature;
GIBSON FENDER
MARTIN AMPEG'
GUITARS & AMPS.
Plus all the other, musical instruments.
The Music Shop
Greenville Square Shopping Center
(Next to K-mart)
(Thurs. & Fri. nights until 9 p.m.)
STORE
10th �r Evans
Stewart Theater presents
Shakespearean classic
Twelve of the world's most
brilliant dancing stars will appear
in Raleigh when the New York
City Ballet film of A Midsummer
Night's Dream is shown at
Stewart Theatre on the North
Carolina State University cam-
pus.
The first full-length ballet to
be produced as a motion picture,
A Midsummer Night's Dream will
present the 100-member company
in Shakespeare's romantic com-
edy. It was choreographed by
George Balanchine to the music
of Felix Mendelssohn.
Shows are on Sunday, Oct. 2
at 3,7 and 9 p.m. and on Monday,
Oct. 3 at 7 and 9 p.m. This is the
first show in the Stewart Theatre
Dance Series. Season ticket hold-
ers may attend any one perform-
ance.
Individual tickets will be avai-
lable at the door at $2.50 for the
general public and $1.50 for
children, all students, and those
65 and older.
Suzanne Farrell and Edward
Villella dance the parts of the
fairy king and queen. Arthur
Mitchell dances the role of Puck,
the practical joker who causes the
merry mix-ups in Shakespeare's
romantic comedy. Jacques
D'Amboise and Allegra Kent
dance the spectacular perform-
ance in the palace of the Duke of
Athens.
This is the famous scene fa
which Felix Mendelssohm, who
wrote the music for the ballet,
provided the world with his
universal favorite, "The Wedding
March
Patricia McBride, Roland
Vasquez, Mimi Paul and Nicholas
Magallanes dance the roles of the
young lovers whose romances are
confused by the impish Puck
HAL SHARPE
FOR
DAY STUDENT LEGISLATOR
Or rent Hit, ff. C.
Happy Times at the Rathskeller
Weds. 5-7 pm
Thurs. ladies night 9-11 pm
Fri. 4-6 pm
Discount Beverage
air condition comfort
Gloria Govrin dances the rde of
Hippdyta, Francisco Monioon is
Thesues, Duke of Athens and
Richard Rapp is the mummer
known as Bottom. The fairies that
dance in the magic forest are the
students of the American School
of the Ballet.
A Midsummer Night's Dream
reaches a new high in ballet film
production values. Howard Bay,
noted Broadway scenic designer
and Albert Brenrer, outstanding
stage artistic director joined
hands to create the forest fairy
land and spectacular palace set
for the film.
The picture was produced by
Richard Davis, former publisher
of Dance Magazine for presenta-
tion by Michael Taines. The ballet
company was under the direction
of Balanchine, the film was
directed by Dan Ericksen and
photographed in odor by Arthur
J. Ornitz.
Critics hailed A Midsummer
Night's Dream as one of the best
dance films ever made. (Live
Barnes of the New York Times
used these exact words in his
review. Many have acclaimed it
as being far more enjoyable on
film than live on the stage.
A prime cultural event for the
whde family this film will be
shown in Stewart Theatre on the
second floor of North Cardina
State University's Student Cen-
ter.
HEROIN
Continued from p. 9
of the deadliest things that oould
happen Albers, whose back-
ground is in local community
work.insists that "the govern-
ment should nd be invdved in
narodizing the public
A committee of the Michigan
legislature is hdding hearings
this month on a bill proposing
establishment of a state-run
experimental maintenance pro-
gram.
Pack of Cigarettes
25
with this coupon and
$1.00 or more purchase
EXPIRES SEPT.30th 77
10 Lb. Bag of Ice
29
with this coupon and
$1.00 or more purchase
EXPIRES SEPT. 30th 77
I
Perkeo
and
Liebfraumilch
$1.88
SXPIRtS SEPT.30th '77
I
I
I
Cooler Case'Nice
$8.00 (Our Choice)
$9.75 (Your Choice)
EXPIRES SEPT.30th 77
Come by and check out
these specials at the
Galley Room.
Open: MonFri.
Lunch 1 1:00-2:30 Dinner 4:30-7:00
Monday -
Ham and Cheese Hoagie
small drink $1.50
Tuesday -
Chicken Platter
small drink $1.50
Friday -
Hamburger
medium drink and ice cream bar C 05
Locoted at the South end of Jones Dorm.





May be due to radioactive fallout
22 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 11
Infant mortality rate rises in eastern U.S.
By JON STEWART
Pacific News Service
Radioactive fallout from the
Sept. 26, 1976, Chinese nuclear
bomb test may have been respon-
sible for a sharp increase in infant
mortality rates registered in the
eastern United States early this
year.
In a paper presented to the
National Academy of Sciences in
Washington, D.C July 18, a
well-known University of Pitts-
burgh physicist contends radio-
active fallout was responsible for
infant mortality increases of up to
60 percent in some areas of the
Northeast.
The paper has already begun
to generate controversy among
scientists, who agree only that, if
accurate, its impact on the public
could be enormous.
Dr. Ernest J. Sternglass,
professor of radiological physics
and a frequent critic of nuclear
hazards, surveyed infant mor-
tality rates state by state during
the three-month period of Jan-
uary to March 1977. Those rates
were compared with the same
period of 1976, well before the
fallout rained down on the East
Coast in the first week of October.
At the time, government
health officials insisted there was
no cause for alarm.
But, says Sternglass, "I found
that it (infant mortality) increased
there enormously in the first
three months of this year, com-
pared to the rest of the U.S
The survey, which relied on
statistics published monthly by the
National Center fa Health Statis-
tics, found the following increases
an infant mortality for the three-
month period in these states:
Delaware, up 60 percent; New
Jersey, up 15 percent; Connecti-
cut, up 13 percent; New Hamp-
shire, up 41 percent; Maine, up
17 percent.
Sternglass claims the path of
the radioactive cloud missed New
York, Rhode Island and Vermont,
all of which showed either no
significant increase or a decline.
Massachusetts, however,
which was in the path of the
cloud, also registered no in-
crease. There, the State Depart-
ment of Health, at the urging of
radiation experts, agreed to with-
draw dairy cattle from normal
pasture feeding during the fallout
incident and feed them instead on
dry food to prevent oontamination
of milk.
In fact, infant mortality in
Massachusetts actually declined
by 30 percent during the three-
month period, while rates in most
surrounding states rose, says
Sternglass.
And because only the East
Coast was hard hit by the falout,
the infant mortality rate for the
U.S. as a whole continued a
relatively normal decline of six
and a half percent, he says.
Government infant mortality
statistics for the months immedia-
tely prior to the radioactive rain
showed "normal mortality he
says. The increases only began to
show up in Denember 1976, and
were most noteworthy during the
next three months.
On the West Coast, where it
rained on Oregon and Washing-
ton during the fallout incident,
only Washington saw an infant
mortality increase (four percent),
which most experts dismiss as
statistically insignificant.
Sternglass says that total
infant deaths (up to one year old)
during the January-March 1977
period was 562 in the northeast-
ern states affected. That figure
compares with 471 infant deaths
The Canyon'to be
shown on Tuesday
in the same states during the
same period of 1976.
"So there were 81 extra
babies that died in '77 in that
three-month period alone and
only in those states says
Sternglass.
"The federal government did
not warn them in time and they
didn' t know what to do. We oould
have prevented a great deal of
unnecessary death and poteruial
defects which are going to show
up in the children that didn't
die
He claims that an unknown
number of the deaths w e
caused by exposure of fetuses to
radioactive Iodine 131 in the
fourth through sixth months of
pregnancy, when they are most
susceptible to oonoentrations of
the poison.
ECU NEWS BUREAU
"Is this any way to see the
Grand Canyon? You bet it is
said James Martin of Hartford,
Conn after "The Canyon" was
shown at his university
The film weaves together
geology, paleontology, zoology
and botany, and discusses the
growing pains of our nation's 17th
national park. Also features is a
look at the people whose liveli-
hoods stem from the Canyon.
Beginning with Garcias
Cardenas' discovery of the can-
yon in 1540, the film traces the
Grand Canyon's history to the
present day, and takes viewers
on a 321 -mile raft trip down to the
Colorado River with glimpses of
Indian ruins, waterfalls, fossils
and various plant and animal
forms.
The film ischeduled for 8 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Student Center
Theater Public tickets are $1.50
each, and are available from ECU
Central Ticket Office.
Greenville, N.C.
MEN'S CLOTHING
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12 FOUNTAINHEAO 22
1977
lrtra murals
byJOHHEVANS
Registration slow
I really can't understand women sometimes. It seems that with all
the activities in the intramural department for women, they are having
the hardest time making their scheduled play dates fa flag football.
In the first two weeks of scheduled games, the women have
managed to get in only seven of a scheduled 23 games. That isn't very
good. It is so bad, as a matter of fact, that for a while the powers to be
In the intramural department were considering discontinuing flag
football for women this year. They have decided, however, to let it go
on for a little longer to see if participation picks up now that sorority
rush and the first few hectic weeks of school are over. But 10 forfeits
and six defaults out of 23 games isn't a very good record.
It would have been nice to see a bigger field for the women's
doubles play, also. Only four teams signed up this year and that was
only after the women were given an extra week to sign up. The ones
who did sign up are to be commended for their efforts It just seems to
me that with all the good tennis players among the women on this
campus, and the field for the tennis singles competition shows that,
there would be a few more ladies who are interested in playing.
Maybe the new semester system is the reason and maybe there are
other reasons, but with volleyball coming up next week I hope that
more women choose to participate in that activity than apparantly have
chosen to play in the other sports so far.
FLAG FOOTBALL IS DIFFERENT
After watching over a dozen games in the past few weeks, a few
comments come to my mind about the new flag football format for
intramural s.
While the game is most certainly a more physical brand of football
than the tojch football competition was, it also provides a more
exciting game-with more running incorporated in the game.
In the old game the running plays rarely went fa many yards
because it was easier to tag a player than it is to pull out his flag. And
believe me it seems that the flags being used fa ECU Intramural play
are as hard to remove as any I have ever seen in many games I have
seen this year so far, the difference between the two teams was in their
ability to run down and yank the flag from their opponents flag belts.
Indeed, in many of the games "sloppy tackling" has been the cause fa
defeat.
What the new flag football has brought about are higher scoring
games and a more exciting brand of offensive play in the men's
division. I have seen many exciting runs on offense and much less
passing, where in ear tier years passing seemed to be 75 per cent of the
game.
I have heard a lot of good comments about the new system and I like
it better. About the only real complaint I might have Is the degree of
difficulty involved in yanking the flag out, but then there is certainly no
doubt as to whether the man has been downed a not and that was
always a everpresent problem in touch football.
M EN'S FOOTBALL RESULTS
The Time Outs are without a doubt the team to beat this year in
men's football play. In two games last week they scored 70 and 68
points to establish themselves as the most prolific scaing team in the
league. But the Time Outs are not alone in the highscaing ranks. The
Rugby Leathernuts have won two of their games by the soores of 54-2
and 66-40. In that second game, I bet there were some wild plays and
some wild spectatas. In two aher wins the Leathernuts soored 44 and
40 points.
On the average, though, it seems that teams are scaing around 30
points a game and giving up about 12-14 points on defense when they
are winning. That isabovelast year saver age and the new flag football
famat has to be the reason.
While the Time Outs seemed to have established themselves as the
top of the crop on campus and in the damitay league, there are
several aher dam teams that are making good showings. Among
these teams are the Aycock Rockers, Slay Lost Gonzo, Soott Wombats,
and the Beltics II.
The top fraternity team by far this year has been the Kappa Alpha
group, which has already beat its two biggest traditional foes, the
Tekes and Pi Kappa Phi.
In the independent .division the teams to beat are the Bogue A
Dykes and Sadaharu Oh. In the club division it appears that the Rugy
Club has the oorner on the market with the Leathernuts and Ruggers
setting the pace.
In the women's play, which as we said befae has beentJisappoint-
ing, the Tylermites are the top-ranked teams, just ahead of the Day
Demons and Hypertension. In two games the Tylermites have by
scaes of 36-0 and 64-0, Wow
TENNISCOMPETITION CONTINUES
The top seeds begin play this week in both the men'sand women's
singles play as the first rounds in each division produce few surprises.
We will have rnae at that next week.
Volleyball team sparked
by six returning players
ECU new woraeJffvioTjeybail
coach Alita Dillon isT;5fcr v. "pleased
�bout the upcoming3$a9on. She
feels she has six -pffl?good
reasons fa being pleSbeeHhey
are Kim Claytoi, -DdtRAaTFree-
man, Gale KerbaugtV, Basle
Thompson, Gaye Hineaand Joye
Fabes Each of these grJS'is a
returning starter from fast years
team. Another returning starter,
Linda McClellan, will miss the
start of the season because of
illness, but isexpected back scon.
Along with those seven re-
turnees, Coach Dillon has four
freshman on the team. Twins
Sandra and Susan Sampson, Elm
City's Lydia Rountree and Judy
Halladay will see their first
coiiegiate action.
To date, Coach Dillon is very
happy about the progress her
team is making, especially after
last night's win over Louisburg
College.
According to Coach Dillon,
strategy played an important part
in pre-season practice sessions.
"We are doing some new
things on offense and defense this
year she explained. "Even
though most of the girls played on
the team last year, they are really
having to wak hard to learn the
new style
As fa Coach Dillon herself,
she says she is excited about the
season's start.
"I'm ready to get rolling
she stated. "We have been
through enough practices for
them to get used to me, and me to
get used to them. The team has
got a super attitude. It could
really be a fun season fa us
I f the team is as good as Coach
Dillon thinks they might be,
women's volleyball at East Caro-
lina should be exciting this year.
Bucs win opener
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
The ECU women' svott&ybSlrT
team successfui Iy opened its197?
.season test nrght in Minges
fcUseurirwirha-3-IYKiory over
J&ls&rgfcg&ege.
�' Aftpr dropping the first game
jjj$0i 4f feady- Pipat.ee Bounced
tj&ok toHakqjne next-three games
and earn their first win of the
year. ECU won the second game
15-9, the third game 16-14, and
sealed the win with a dose 15-13
;verdict in thefourth game.
L; Piate bead coach Alita Dillon,
how.iaHejfirst-yeSr- at- the helm
�of the volteybafl 'program, was
extremely pleased with the over-
all play of her team.
"Kim Clayton did an outstan-
ding job setting the ball up fa
us" said Dillorr, "Debbie Free-
marfdid a goodjjpb spiking-the
ball and bJockifrcrfcn defense
Gale Kerbaugh and Roeie Thomp-
son also played well
Dillon alo praised freshman
Sandy Sampson fa her play at
defense and ha serves Sandy's
iwin sister Susan is also a
Jrnember of theleanV
J, The Rralesrelurn ,td acficrT
'this Friday when they travel to
Chapel Hill to face the University
of North Carolina and Appala-
chian State.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY 1977 VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE
DATEOPPONENTPLACETIME
Sept. 23ASU, UNC-CHChapel Hill, N.C7:00 pm
Oct. 1UNC-GGreenville, N.C.7:00 pm
Oct. 4Chowan JC, ACCMurfressbao,6fl0pm
Oct. 6NCSU, WFURaleigh, N.C.7:00 pm.
Oct. 7ASU, UNC-GGreensbao, N.C.TBA
Oct. 20ElonCollNCCUElon College, NC5:00 pm
Oct. 25Duke UnivasityGreenville, N.C.6:00 pm.
Oct. 28-29ASU TournamentBoone, N.C.TBA .
Nov. 1Chowan JCGreenville, N.C.630 pm
Nov. 3Peace JCGreenville, N.C.7:00 pm.
Nov. 10-12NCAIAW State TournamentRaleigh, N.C.TBA .
Coach-Alita Dillon
Sports
VMI talent ed,tough
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Assistant Spots Edita
East Carolina wtllplay its'
�home opener t,his weekend
gaainst'the-KeydetsorVMT. ThV
Pirates once again will face a stiff
challenge from a very tough team
with one of the finest ooaches
anywhae.
VMI has always given the
JPirates trouble and this year wffl.
tee nb exception. A it bough the.
Pirates lead the series with the
eydets four games to one, the
Keydets have been hard-hitting
and tough in every game. Coach
Pat Dye is all too aware that the
,VMI squad will come to town full
jof enthusiasm and fight The only
!dtfference this year is that VMI
has the talent to go the fighting
spirit.
"VMI has its best football team I
have seen since I've been at East
Carolina Dye said. "They have
the best skilled people eva. And
jfjthey get past the 50 yard line,
�Craig Jones is a dangerous young
man kicking. They have two great
big tackles and a super linebacker
in Glen Jones. VMI also has good
secondary speed
The thing is, VMI now has
very good skilled people. They've
!got as much speed at the skill
fjosition as we do, with a tailback
(Andre Gibson) that runs a 4.3 40.
Bah quarterbacks Robby Clark
and Larry Hupertz, the tailback
and their tight and Greg Weaver
are big play people. We can't let
VMI have the big play an offense.
"VMI always gives you diffi-
culty due to their great variation
of famatiois. They run fron
everything known to man. And
they always have a good, solid
game plan
- "We have ga a tremendous
amount of improving we can do. If
ve don't get better this week.
See KEYDETS, p. 15
ROBBY CLARK11) WILL be VMI's starting quarterback this
Safdrtfay:
I





22 September 1977 FOUMTAINHEAD Pwl3
U aepiemDei 1877 FOUNT AINHEAD Pegs 13
Pirates face tough game at home
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
After opening the season with
three tough victories, all which
have come on the road, it's about
time Pat Dye and his ECU Pirates
returned to Greenville for a
breather.
Trouble is, they're just not
many breathers on the Pirates
schedule this year. And with a
much improved VMI team inva-
ding Ficklen Stadium Saturday
night, it's a game the Pirates
can't afford to look past.
Once again, the Pirates have
jumped off to another quick start.
To date, East Carolina is 3-0 with
road wins over N.C. State, Duke,
and Toledo. Although, the Pirates
struggled past Toledo 22-9 last
week, an emotional let down was
expected after back to back
victories over in-state rivals N.C.
State and Duke.
"I don't think we were very
excited about playing up there
last week said ECU head coach
Pat Dye at his weekly press
luncheon Wednesday. "I don't
recommend having to win games
in the fourth quarter like we did
against Toledo, but we did what
was necessary to win
Dye was pleased with both the
play of the defense which allowed
only 147 yards against Toledo
along with an improved kicking
game.
"Our kicking game showed
much better improvement ob-
served Dye. "Our ooverage on
punts and kickoffs was better and
Willie Hawkins set up one of our
touchdowns with a kiokoff re-
turn
"A capacity crowd of 20,000
plus is expected at Ficklen
Stadium Saturday night when the
Pirates face VMI, a team which
has always given Dye problems.
VMI defeated the Pirates 13-3
to win the Southern Conference
Championship in 1974, Dye's first
year at ECU. The following year,
East Carolina took a 28-12 victory
over the Keydets and last season
had to go all the way until the
EDDIE HICKS
Iron Horse Trading Co.
Merchants and Craftsmen
In Fine
Gold and Silver Jewelry
Downtown on Mai,
Top of First State Bank Bldg.
Hours: Mon. - Thur. 10-6
Sat 10 - 6 Fri. 10 - 6
25 OFF Stone Candles me(m
from California While they Last
JFrame - 3t
$0urflelf
UI
p
WELCOMES BACK ECU STUDENTS, AND TO CELEBRATE
YOUR ARRIVAL AND OUR SUCCESSFUL SUMMER, WE
ARE HAVING A 10 OFFSALE FROM SEPT. 14 TO
SEPT. 24 ON ALL MERCHANDISE IN OUR SHOPPE,
INCLU-DING:
MATTING IN OVER 120 COLORS 3 DIFFERENT STYLES
LARGE GALLERY OF FRAMED PRINTS, POSTERS,
AND MAPS - OVER 150 DIFFERENT! STYLES
OF IN STOCK MOULDING DRY MOUNTING AND
LAMINATION -A WIDE VARIETY OF PRINTS,
INCLUDING LIMITED LJlTIONS
PLUS DO- IT-YOURSELF FRAMING- THE MOST
ECONOMICAL WAY TO FRAME-UNDER EXPERT
SUPERViaON-WITH EVERYTHING PREPARED FOR YOU
-JUST ASSEMBLE-HAVE FUN-AND SAVEI!
STORE HOURS
MON. & WED 10-9 pm
TUES. THRUS-SAT 10-5
PHONE 756-7454
106 TRADE STREET, ACROSS
FROM TARHEEL TOYOTA
GREENVILLE
fourth quarter before finally
winning 17-3.
This season the Keydets upset
William and Mary 23-13 in their
opener, largely on the efforts of
placekicker Craig Jones who
booted five field goals. Last week,
the Keydets went right down to
the fourth quarter against Army
before finally losing 27-14.
"This is the best VMI team In
four years warned Dye. "Coach
Thalman always has his teams
well prepared. They're very
strong physically up front both on
offense and defense. They' ve also
got the best placekicker in the
country in Craig Jones. I'm just
glad we're playing at home and
not up there
One weapon the Pirates have
used sparingly on offense so far
this season has been halfback
Eddie Hicks. Last yearHicks led
the Pirates in rushing with 897
yards for a 6.5 average per carry
and scored eight touchdowns.
This year, however, the Hender-
son, N.C. native has carried the
ball only 17 times fa 49 yards and
a 2.9 average. Dye indicated
Hicks will have to get the ball fa
the offense to operate more
effectively against the Keydets.
"Eddie has been blocking
extremely well this season said
Dye, "we've just got to pet him
See HICKS p. 15
East Carolina vs VMI
Saturday, Sept.24th, 1977, 7X� pm
Ficklen Stadiurr, Greenville, N.C.
PROBABLE STARTING UNEUPS
OFFENSEDEFENSE
S�TaryGallaha(Sr174)LE Greg Arnet(Sr 194
LT Mitchell Smith (Jr 236)-LT Dutch Goddard (Sr 237).
LG Nelson Smith (Jr 238)MGJef Morgan (So225)
CRickie Holiday (Sr 193)RT Ned Stepanovich (Sr 260)
RG Wayne Bolt (Sr 257)RENickCollins(Jr193)
RG Wayne Bolt (Sr 257)LB Glen Jones (Sr 217)
RTJoeGodette(So224)LB Glen Jones (Sr 217)
TE Barry Johnson (Jr 225)LBDaleOgg(Jr217)
QB Jimmy Southaland (Sr 170)CB Gary McNeal(Jr 180)
RB Eddie Hicks(Jr 201)SS Walt Bellamy (So 176)
RBWillieHawkins(Sr188)FS Mike Alston (So 182)
DEFENSEOFFENSE
SEJohnMaris(So206)SE Tom Ferguson (Sr. 155).
LT Wayne Poole(Jr 235)LT Bob Bookmiller (Jr 237)
NG Oliver Felton(Jr 235)LG Jim Reynoids(Sr 230)
RT Noah Clark (So225)C Craig Cox (So230)
WE Zack Valentine (Jr 218)RG Tom Replogle (Sr 220).
SLB Harold Randolph (Sr 195)RT John Shuman (So 225)
WLB Harold Fort (Sr 193)TE Greg Weava(Jr 225)
LCB Charl ie Carta (So 173)QBRobby Clark (Jr 175)
SSGerald Hall (Jr 184)TB Andre Gibson (Sr 178).
j FSSteve Hale (Sr 177) ,FB Steve Oddi(Sr 208)
RCB Willie Holley (So 176)FL Johnny Garnett (Sr 180)
Avg. Wgts:Line:217.6;LB's:Avg. Wgts: Backs-185.3; Line
210;Sec 181.8217.4
Placekickas:Junia Creech, BillPlacekicker: Craig Jones
LammPunta: Mark Lambert
Punta: Rodney Allen
Chapel Hill sponsors second
annual A CLU Freedom Fair
j
"The most valuable basket-
ball ever signed in North
Carolina" will go on the auction
block Sat. Sept. 24 at the
American Civil Liberties Union's
second annual Freedom Fair in
Chapel Hill.
Autographed afta the UNC
Alumni Basketball Games Sept.
10, the ball carries the signatures
of present Tar Heel team mem-
bas Phil Fad, Mike OKaen,
'WILLIE B. NIMBLE'
One Of The East Coast Hottest Groups
Don't Miss Them
Thurs. Fri. Sat.
At The
ELBO ROOM
Remember Fri. 3-7 Sun is Ladies Nite
mn
COLLEGIATE
i RESEARCH
k PAPERS
RESEARCH
AsiittiRW
ALL SUBJECTS
Choose from our library of 7,000 topics.
All papers have been prepared by our
staff of professional writers to insure
excellence. Send $1.00 (air mail
postage) for the current edition of our
mail order catalog.
We alee provide original
r�march � all fields.
Thesis and dissertation
assistance also available.
EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS
P.O. Box 25916-E.
Los Angeles. Calif 90025
Name
Address
City
State
Zip
Rich Yonacker and others; and
former UNC and professional
stars Billy Cunningham, Bob
McAdoo, Charlie Scott, Larry
Brown, Walter Davis, York Lar-
ese, and others. The staff of the
UNC basketball offios termed the
ball "one of a kind" in the
country.
The basketball is one of over
100 items and services up for bids
at the Saturday carnival, auction
and pig-pickin' dinner sponsored
by the ACLU at the Wesley
Foundation and the Newman
Center, 214 and 218 Pittsboro
Street in Chapel Hill. The Red
Qay Ramblers and the UNC
Jugglers will be joined by the
Durham Pocket Theater to pro-
vide the day's entertainment.
Beginning at 1 p.m. the carnival
will feature games, booths, and a
minifilm Festival" for children.
Items at the auction at 2 p.m.
will include antiques, jewelry,
pottery and prints, and "a
vices" ranging form tennis let.
sons and garden tilling to a day's
sail on a cabin cruiser berthed at
Wilmington.
The Red Clay Ramblers will
go on at 5 p.m. when the dinner
lines form fa the pig-pickin
beef pot roast, vegetarian meals,
taoos and egg rolls, soft drinks,
beer and dessert. Admission to
the carnival is $1 for adults and
.50 fa children; dinners are $3.50
fa adults and $2.00 fa children.
The American Civil Liberties
Union has 2,000 members in 11
North Carolina chapters. The
state affiliate was famed in 1966
to fight the unconstitutional
"speaker ban" law.





Wmmfm mm
,ifr:vtyK.
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 September 1977
'King of the Gridiron Award' to be given
An East Carolina University
football player will receive a
$1,000 scholarship following each
home game this season. The
player receiving the scholarship
will be selected by the news
media and considered to be the
outstanding Pirate player in the
game. The scholarship will be
known as the "King of the
Gridiron Award
The scholarship is being pre-
sented by R.W. Moore Equip-
ment Company of Raleigh and
Greenville, in conjunction with
the Pirate Club, the University
Educational Foundation for athle-
tics. Moore Equipment Company
is owned and operated by R.W.
Moore of Raleigh.
On behalf of the entire Pirate
Club, the gesture made by Mr.
Moore in sponsoring the scholar-
ship is generous, and a boost in
the direction of our total goal in
Booters play first home
game against Goldsboro
This Saturday the Pirates will
face the Goldsboro Soccer Club in
their first home match of the
season. ECU coach Brad Smith is
hoping the match will be his
team's first victory of the year.
"I expect a good game from
everyone said Smith. "Hope-
fully the game will be a win for
us. I want to let some of the
younger players play so they will
get some valuable experience
With forward Jay High still
injured, Smith is looking to
senior Ed French as a replace-
ment. Smith also plans to rotate
Ric Browning and Daryl High in
the forward position.
Crowd support still remains
one of Smith's main concerns
about Saturday. "This will be our
first home game said Smith,
"and I really hope everyone
comes out to see the match. Last
week when we played Campbell
they had a large crowd while we
had none. I think it is important to
the players to see that they have
some support
Portable bleachers will moved
next to the playing field.
The game is scheduled to
begin at 2.00, and will be played
on the soccer field at Minges.
SUPPORT PIRATE SOCCER
Patriots
vs
Browns
Sept 26 on
7 ft Advent TV
Free Beverage
with this ad
The Pro Shop
Of GreenvHIe, Inc.
Complete Golf & Tennis
Equipment and Attire
Casual Wear
New Fall Lines Arriving Daily
i Faded Glory, Fashion Jeans &
Coordinates
i TKG - Khakis
� Izod & Difini Sweaters
Munsingwear Shirts
Hours: MonFri. 10 A.M8 P.M.
Sat. 10 A.M6 P.M.
111 Eastbrook Drive 752-1525 Greenville, N.C.
scholarship fund raising for this
year noted Gus Andrews, Exe-
cutive Director of the Pirate Club.
"The player selected as 'King
of the Gridiron' will receive the
recognition, but the scholarship
money will be placed in the
general scholarship fund of the
Pirate Club in his name added
Andrews.
Moore's interest in the East
Carolina program stems from the
future potential of eastern North
Carolina and the growth of the
East Carolina athletic program.
Also, Moore's son, Bill, is a
graduate of East Carolina Univer-
sity.
NOW AVAILABLE!
PIRATE JACKETS
purple lined jackets
with gold letters on
back spelling pirates
P
PAT'S
HAT!
ADVERTISED IN SPORTS ILLUSTRATED
The ONLY official ECU
I coaching hat
as worn by
HEAD COACH,
ECU FOOTBALL
Don's accept any imitationslook for this label!
tm
'$ v
m 1
lt
Hi. HODGES
AND COMPANY, INC.
210 E. 5th St. Phone 752-4156
The Great Haircut Look
For men and women at
SUPER EGO HAIR SALON
222E. 5th Street
Precision styling by Jennis , Jeanne, Lola, Olivia
Located over the College Shop
PH. 7582455
Redken Hair Products available
THURS.
Suffers Gold
FRI. & SAT.
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SUN.
Jesse Bolf
ATTIC
s





niver-
Saunders appreciates support
22 September 1977 FCjJNTAINHEAD Page 15
Cheerleaders receive funds from campus groups
Continued from p. 1
schools, we do a lot more with a
lot less
"We have to pay for the
football team first. Also, we don't
allow the cheerleaders to solicit
HICKS
Continued from p. 12
the ball more. He makes things
happen out there on offense
NOTING THE PIRATESDye
praised split end Terry Gallaher,
quarterback Jimmy Southerland,
and offensive linemen Wayne
Bolt, Mitchell Smith, and Joe
donations from local businesses,
although some donate material
for the uniforms said Cain.
Each football coach last year
received a $2,000 annual raise,
aocording to Vice-Chancel lor Cliff
Moore.
The SGA last year gave the
Godette for their performance
against Toledo last weekDefen-
sively, endsZack Valentine, John
Morris, and Fred Chavis drew
praise along with linebackers
Harold Randolph, Harold Fort,
and Mike BrewingtonDye also
noted the improvement of the
secondary, praising Charlie Car-
ter, Steve Hale and Thomas
McLaurinSteve Hale, Harold
cheerleaders $2,183, according to
Neil Sessoms, SGA president.
"I sometimes fail to see the
rationale behind SGA funding of
oertain campus organizations. I
feel that the cheerleaders are the
sole responsibility of the athletic
department, but I would rather
Randolph, Jimmy Southerland,
and Tommy Summer will serve as
game captains Saturday against
VMISports Information Direc-
tor Ken Smith said Wednesday
the East Carolina-South Carolina
game next Saturday in Columbia
may be televised. A final decision
will be made sometime Sunday
morning after the Pirates game
against VMI.
TERRY GALLAHER
JOE GODETTE
TOMMY SUMMER
have the SGA support them than
to see them done away with due
to lack of funds said Sessoms.
The cheerleaders have receiv-
ed nothing but support from all
sides, aocording to Frank Saun-
ders, faculty advisor for the
cheerleaders.
"We appreciate every bit of
support that we get from all
sides "Everyone we have been
in contact with has been helping
forward the cause said Saun-
ders.
Saunders said it was valuable
to receive support from several
souroes, since it would lessen the
chances of being severly handi-
KEYDETS
Continued from p. 12
we're in trouble against VMI
Saturday night
Virginia M ilitary Institute is in
a very tough position in that it is a
military school and it is also the
smallest school in NCAA's Divi-
sion 1 with an-enrollment of 1250
men. In fact, VMI from 1969
until 1971, only won two of the 31
games played.
The program turned around,
however, with the hiring of head
coach Bob Thalman. He led the
Keydet program not only as a
coach but as a businessman as
capped should a budget crunch
occur.
"If we got all our money from
athletics, they might have to out
back in other areas of their,
program said Saunders.
Saunders praised the help of
area businessmen and reiterated
his hope to make the ECU
cheerleading squad the best in
the nation.
Be sure to
vote
Monday!
well. In 1974 Thalman's VMI
team won their first Southern
Conference Championship sinoe
1959.
Last year VMI had a five and
-five record including wins over
Furnan and Virginia.
The enthusiasm that people
will see from the Keydets Satur-
day will be because VMI believes
that they can win every game no
matter what the odds. The
Keydets will then be a formidable
opponent fa the Pirates and one
which will no doubt test the
ability of our young team.
The game will start at 7:00
and a sellout crowd is expected to
be on hand.
Classifieds
for sale
j
FOR SALE: Saxophone Alto:
Buescher Anstorat: Used 1 year
$150.00 - includes stand. Tenor
Buescher Aristorat: Used 1 year
$195.00 - includes stand. Bari-
tone : Conn: Used 1 year $550.00 -
includes stand. All in excellent
Cond. See Bobby at 205 Jones or
call 752-9746 after 5.00 and leave
a number and name.
FOR SALE: 66 Chevy Station
wagon great engine, AMFM
stereo with 8 track, good tires,
and air shocks. $400.00 or make
offer. Call Kevin 752-1190.
FOR SALE: 10 piece Drum Set,
natural wood finish, excellent
cond for more info, call Ray-
mond Brown, 758-7434.
ACOUSTIC GUITAR: excellent
fa beginner. 50.00 Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Craig 3512 FM
Stereocassetter tape deck, under
dash model. Fast faward, re-
wind, Matrix-stereo switch, Very
little use. Call 752-5028 a cane
by 112 River Bluff Apt. After 5.00
p.m.
FOR SALE: 5 speed Chiada
Bike. Good Cond. Two years old.
Only 35.00 Call 752-9885 after 5
p.m. Ask fa Sheila.
FOR SALE: 1 man's 10-speed
falcon Bike. Good Cond. $125.00
Call 756-5416.
FOR SALE: Schwinn Continental
Bicycle. Almost New, Blue, 10-
speed. $130.00 Firm Call 756-
4155 after 5.00.
FOR SALE: Teac 2505 cassette
tape deck bought in April 75. Is
now in excellent cond must sell,
best offer accepted. Original price
$250.00 Call 758-2073 after 5:30.
FOR SALE: 35 mm Camera
Outfit. Camera body with namal
lens, 135 mm and 28 mm lens.
Hand held light meter, electronic
flash, extension rings $400.00
Bundy trumpet excellent Cond.
$130.00 Call 752-1068.
FOR SALE: Wardrobe and sta-
age cabinets of metal, both
standard size, good oond cheap.
756-4681.
FOR SALE: '76 Mazda RX-4
Stationwagon fa sale. Excellent
cond great gas mileage, $200.00
equity and take over payments.
Also diamond engagement ring,
retail $515.00 will well fa $400.00
appraisal available. Call Nartz
at 756-0680.
ALBUMS FOR SALE: Most about
2.00 Room 404-D Scott. Wide
selection including Beatles,
Clapton, Beach Boys, James
Tayla, Yes, America, ZZ Top,
Chicago, Jethro Tull and many,
many mae. Cane now fa best
selection.
FOR SALE: 1871 Buick Skylark
Custom automatic, FMAM
RADIO Air Cond. Runs great -
needs some body work. Must sell
fast & cbeap 752-8907 - 756-0416
John White.
FOR SALE: Remington Manual
Desk Typewriter Good Cond.
$80.00 Call 758-7660.
FOR SALE: Box springs t ,d
mattress. Fair Condition. $30.00
Call 752-5090 after 500.
FOR SALE: 55 V.W. Classic Sun
roof, refinished interia, excellent
transaxle, body in good cond
great car. Call Raymond Brown,
758-7434.
FOR SALE: 1972 Fiat Spyder 850
Blue Convertible AMFM radio.
Na a scratch on it-asking $2,000.
00 will negaiate. Call evenings
756-1518.
FOR SALE: Monte Carlo Landau,
black with white landau top. Air
Cond. power steering, AMFM
stereo. Must sell immediately,
best offer.
MUST SELL: 66 V.W. Fastback.
sunroof, radio, new tires, battery,
muffler, and brakes all under
warranty. Great Cond. Call 752-
1068.
FOR SALE: Patable Zenith ster-
eo. Good oond only $25.00. Call
Julie at 758-6714.
FOR SALE: Lafayette Stereo
System with RK-84 eight track
palyer, four 25-A speakers (25
watts), and 100 watt amplifier
LA-950. Will sell individual comp-
ponents. Call Brain Evenings
752-2326.
FOR SALE: 10 speed bike in
excellent cond hardly ever used.
Accepting reasonable offers. Call
752-8320.
FOR SALE: 1969 450 Honda.
Needs tune up. Reasonable offa
accepted. Call 752-2476 after
500
LOST:20 Reward fa return of a
lost Seiko automatic Cartographer
watch. Lost in Minges Sept. 20.
758-6365.
FOR SALE: 5 cubic ft. refrigera-
ta (perfect fa dams) with large
freezer capacity, veg. bins, etc.
Good oond $125.00 (was $225.00
new) Call 758-3559 after 6.00.
FOR SALE: 4.3 cubic feet refrig-
erator . has freezer space. One
year old in excellent oond. Call
752-7460 after 5O0.
FOR SALE: JVC 25 watt Receiver
wamp BIC 940 Turntable,
Pioneer 2121 cassette deck, Mag-
natex 3-way speakers only 1 yr.
old. 575.00 (1000.00 new) Call
752-8907 - 756-0416.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female
needed immediately to share 2
bedroom apt. located off of 1st St.
Must furnish own bedroom furni-
ture. $50.00 monthly plus V4 of
utilities. Call 758-3559 after 6O0.
torrent @
REEDED. 2 girls- $56.25 per
rtwnth Geagetowne Aptsluxury
apt. Call 758-7786.
FEMALE ROOmmATE: Needed
share 5 room house. Call 752-
5621.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed
share 2 bedrm. apt. at Village
Green. Rent $58.00 plus utilities.
Call 758-7144.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Fa
Shady Knoll trailer $55.00 plus
telephone bill. 758-2853 (female
prefared).
WANTED: 2 male rconates to
share a townhouse Apt. at 37
Riverbluff. Call 758-2650 ask fa
DaiaJd.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: At
Shady Knoll Trailer Pk. $125.00 a
month plus utilities. Contact
Larry at la 180 Shady Knoll.
(washer, cooking facilities, etc.)
personal (a
PART TIME HELP WANTED:
Position available immediately fa
persai seeking approximately 20
hrs. per week and flexible sche-
dule. Person with electronics and
computer background is desira-
ble. Drafting and typing exper-
ience is a plus. Call 758-9505.
PORTRAITS: and aher prratog-
graphic wak. Call Mark 752-
1068.
LEAD GUITARIST NEEDED:
immediately. We are looking fa
someone with either, a back-
ground in soul a rock music. Call
LB. 758-8310 after 6 p.m.
WORK WANTED: Hate house-
keeping? I will do all your
housekeeping chaes for a
reasonable fee. Experienced. Ref-
erences available. Call 758-3109.
PAPER TYPED: I need money.
Call 752-4013 after 5 p.m.
LOST: If anyone found a pipe in a
brown vinyl tobacco pouch on the
wall by the music bJgd. on Thurs.
afternoon Sept. 15 please call
Kevin at 758-3334.
TRAGIC: Lost Davis Imperial
Tennis Racket, green grip on
handle. Racket lost Wed. Sept.
15,1977 on wall a at Purple Bus.
Person is on tennis team and
needs racket fa match. Large
reward. Please contact Beth a
Dee at 752-5786.





�?�:�! KBH�
- r �Sis
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAP 22 September 1977
'King of the Gridiron Award1 to be given
An East Carolina University
football player will receive a
$1,000 scholarship following each
home game this season. The
player receiving the scholarship
will be selected by the news
media and considered to be the
outstanding Pirate player in the
game. The scholarship will be
known as the "King of the
Gridiron Award
The scholarship is being pre-
sented by R.W. Moore Equip-
ment Company of Raleigh and
Greenville, in conjunction with
the Pirate Club, the University
Educational Foundation for athle-
tics. Moore Equipment Company
is owned and operated by R.W.
Moore of Raleigh.
"On behalf of the entire Pirate
Club, the gesture made by Mr.
Moore in sponsoring the scholar-
ship is generous, and a boost In
the direction of our total goal in
Booters play first home
game against Goldsboro
This Saturday the Pirates will
face the Goldsboro Soccer Club in
their first home match of the
season. ECU coach Brad Smith is
hoping the match will be his
team's first victory of the year.
"I expect a good game from
everyone said Smith. "Hope-
fully the game will be a win for
us. I want to let some of the
younger players play so they will
get some valuable experience
With forward Jay High still
injured. Smith is looking to
senior Ed French as a replace-
ment. Smith also plans to rotate
Ric Browning and Daryl High in
the forward position.
Crowd support still remains
one of Smith's main concerns
about Saturday. "This will be our
first home game said Smith,
"and I really hope everyone
comes out to see the match. Last
week when we played Campbell
they had a large crowd while we
had none. I think it is important to
the players to see that they have
some support
Portable bleachers will moved
next to the playing field.
The game is scheduled to
begin at 2XX), and will be played
on the soccer field at Minges.
SUPPORT PIRATE SOCCER
Patriots
vs
Browns
Sept 26 on
7 ft Advent TV
Free Beverage
with this ad
The Pro Shop
Of GreenvHIe, Inc.
Complete Golf & Tennis
Equipment and Attire
Casual Wear
New Fall Lines Arriving Daily
Faded Glory, Fashion Jeans &
Coordinates
i TKG - Khakis
i Izod & Difini Sweaters
1 Munsingwear Shirts
Hours: MonFn. 10 A.M8 P.M
Sat. 10 A.M6 P.M.
111 Eastbrook Drive 752-1525 Greenville, N.C.
scholarship fund raising for this
year noted Gus Andrews, Exe-
cutive Director of the Pirate Club.
The player selected as' K ing
of the Gridiron' will receive the
recognition, but the scholarship
money will be placed in the
general scholarship fund of the
Pirate Club in his name added
Andrews.
Moore's interest in the East
Carolina program stems from the
future potentiaJ of eastern North
Carolina and the growth of the
East Carolina athletic program.
Also, Moore's son, Bill, is a
graduate of East Carolina Univer-
sity.
T
THURS.
Suffers Gold
NOW AVAILABLE!
PAT'S
HAT!
ADVERTISED IN SPORTS ILLUSTRATED
The ONLY official ECU
PIRATE JACKETS
purple lined jackets
with gold letters on
back spelling pirates
f(
HEAD COACH,
ECU FOOTBALL
Don's accept any imitationslook for this label!
H.L.H0D6ES
AND COMPANY, INC.
210 E. 5th St. Phone 752-4156
The Great Haircut Look
For men and women at
SUPER EGO HAIR SALON
222E. 5th Street
Precision styling by Jennis , Jeanne, Lola, Olivia
Located over the College Shop
PH. 7582455
Redken Hair Products available
FRI. & SAT.
Super Grit
SUN.
Jesse Bolt
Aimc







Saunders appreciates support
22 September 1977 FQUNTAINHEAD
15
Cheerleaders receive funds from campus groups
Continued from p. 1
schools, we do a lot more with a
lot less
"We have to pay for the
football team first. Also, we don't
allow the cheerleaders to solicit
donations from local businesses,
although some donate material
for the uniforms said Cain.
Each football coach last year
received a $2,000 annual raise,
according to Vice-Chancellor Cliff
Moore.
The SGA last year gave the
cheerleaders $2,183, according to
Neil Sessoms, SGA president.
"I sometimes fail to see the
rationale behind SGA funding of
certain campus organizations. I
feel that the cheerleaders are the
sole responsibility ot the athletic
department, but I would rather
HICKS
Continued from p. 12
the ball more. He makes things
happen out there on offense
NOTING THE PI RATESDye
praised split end Terry Gallaher,
quarterback Jimmy Southerland,
and offensive linemen Wayne
Bolt, Mitchell Smith, and Joe
Godette for their performance
against Toledo last weekDefen-
sively, endsZack Valentine, John
Morris, and Fred Chavis drew
praise along with linebackers
Harold Randolph, Harold Fat,
and Mike BrewingtonDye also
noted the improvement of the
secondary, praising Charlie Car-
ter, Steve Hale and Thomas
McLaurinSteve Hale, Harold
Randolph, Jimmy Southerland,
and Tommy Summer will serve as
game captains Saturday against
VMISports Infamatioi Direc-
ta Ken Smith said Wednesday
the East Carolina-South Carolina
game next Saturday in Columbia
may be televised. A final decision
will be made sometime Sunday
maning after the Pirates game
against VMI.
TERRY GALLAHER
JOE GODETTE
Classifieds
TOMMY SUMMER
have the SGA suppat them than
to see them done away with due
to lack of funds said Sessoms.
The cheerleaders have receiv-
ed nothing but suppat fran all
sides, according to Frank Saun-
ders, faculty advisor for the
cheerleaders.
"We appreciate every bit of
suppat that we get fron all
sides "Everyone we have been
in contact with has been helping
faward the cause said Saun-
ders.
Saunders said it was valuable
to receive suppat fran several
souroes, since it would lessen the
chances of being severly handi-
KEYDETS
Continued from p. 12
were in trouble against VMI
Saturday night
Virginia Military Institute is in
a very tough position in that it is a
military school and it is also the
smallest school in NCAA's Divi-
sion 1 with an-enrollment of 1250
men. In fact, VMI from 1969
until 1971, only won two of the 31
games played.
The program turned around,
however, with the hiring of head
coach Bob Thalman. He led the
Keydet program not only as a
coach but as a businessman as
capped should a budget aunch
occur.
"If we got all our money from
athletics, they might have to cut
back in other areas of their,
program said Saunders.
Saunders praised the help of
area businessmen and reiterated
his hope to make the ECU
cheerleading squad the best in
the nation.
Be sure to
vote
Monday!
well. In 1974 Thalmans VMI
team won their first Southern
Conference Championship since
1959.
Last year VMI had a five and
iive reoad including wins ever
Furnan and Virginia.
The enthusiasm that people
will see from the Keydets Satur-
day will be because VMI believes
that they can win every game no
matter what the odds. The
Keydets will then be a famidable
opponent fa the Pirates and one
which will no doubt test the
ability of our young team.
The game will start at 7:00
and a sellout aowd is expected to
be on hand.
for sale
FOR SALE: Saxophone Alto:
Buescher Aristaat: Used 1 year
$150.00 - includes stand. Tena
Buescher Aristaat: Used 1 year
$195.00 - indudes stand. Bari-
toie: Coin: Used 1 year $550.00 -
indudes stand. All in excellent
Good. See Bobby at 205 Jones a
call 752-9746 after 500 and leave
a number and name.
FOR SALE: 66 Chevy Station
wagon great engine, AMFM
stereo with 8 track, good tires,
and air shocks. $400.00 a make
offer. Call Kevin 752-1190.
FOR SALE: 10 piece Drum Set,
natural wood finish, excellent
cond fa mae info, call Ray-
mond Brown, 758-7434.
ACOUSTIC GUITAR: excellent
fa beginner. 50.00 Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Craig 3512 FM
Stereocassetter tape deck, under
dash model. Fast faward, re-
wind, Matrix-stereo switch, Very
little use. Call 752-5028 a come
by 112 River Bluff Apt. After 500
p.m.
FOR SALE: 5 speed Chiada
Bike. Good Cond. Two years old.
Only 35.00 Call 752-9885 after 5
p.m. Ask fa Sheila.
FOR SALE: 1 man's 10-speed
faloon Bike. Good Cond. $125.00
Call 756-5416.
FOR SALE: Schwinn Continental
Bicyde. Almost New, Blue, 10-
speed. $130.00 Firm Call 756-
4155 after 500.
FOR SALE: Teac 2505 cassette
tape deck bought in April 75. Is
now in excellent oond must sell,
best offer accepted. Original price
$250.00 Call 758-2073 after 550.
FOR SALE: 35 mm Camera
Outfit. Camera body with namal
lens, 135 mm and 28 mm lens.
Hand held light meter, eledroiic
flash, extension rings $400.00
Bundy trumpet excellent Cond.
$130.00 Call 752-1068.
FOR SALE: Wardrobe and sta-
age cabinets of metal, both
standard size, good oond cheap.
756-4681.
FOR SALE: '76 Mazda RX-4
Stationwagon fa sale. Excellent
cond great gas mileage, $200.00
equity and take over payments.
Also diamond engagement ring,
retail $515.00 will well fa $400.00
appraisal available. Call Nartz
at 756-0680.
ALBUMS FOR SALE: Most about
2.00 Room 404-D Scott. Wide
selection including Beatles,
Clapton, Beach Boys, James
Tayla, Yes, America, ZZ Top,
Chicago, Jethro Tull and many,
many mae. Come now fa best
seledion.
FOR SALE: 1871 Buick Skylark
Custom automatic, FMAM
RADIO Air Cond. Runs great -
needs some body wak. Must sell
fast & cheap 752-8907 - 75&0416
John White.
FOR SALE: Remington Manual
Desk Typewriter Good Cond.
$80.00 Call 758-7660.
FOR SALE: Box springs and
mattress. Fair Condition. $30.00
Call 752-5090 after 500.
FOR SALE: 55 V.W. Classic Sun
roof, refinished interia, exoellent
transaxle, body in good oond
great car. Call Raymond Brown,
758-7434.
FOR SALE: 1972 Fiat Spyder 850
Blue Convertible AMFM radio.
Not a scratch on it-asking $2,000.
00 will negotiate. Call evenings
756-1518.
FOR SALE: Monte Carlo Landau,
black with white landau top. Air
Cond. power steering, AMFM
stereo. Must sell immediately,
best offer.
MUST SELL: 66 V.W. Fastback.
sunroof, radio, new tires, battery,
muffler, and brakes all under
warranty. Great Cond. Call 752-
1068.
FOR SALE: Patable Zenith ster-
eo. Good oond only $25.00. Call
Julie at 758-6714.
FOR SALE: Lafayette Stereo
System with RK-84 eight track
palyer, four 25-A speakers (25
watts), and 100 watt ampliWer
LA-950. Will sell individual oomp-
ponents. Call Brain Evenings
752-2326.
FOR SALE: 10 speed bike in
excellent cond hardly ever used.
Accepting reasonable offers. Call
752-8320.
FOR SALE: 1969 450 Honda.
Needs tune up. Reasonable offer
accepted. Call 752-2476 after
5O0
LOST:20 Reward fa return a a
lost Seiko automatic Cartographer
watch. Lost in Minges Sept. 20.
758-6365.
FOR SALE: 5 cubic ft. refrigera-
ta (perfed fa dams) with large
freezer capadty, veg. bins, etc.
Good oond $125.00 (was $225.00
new) Call 758-3559 after 6O0.
FOR SALE: 4.3 cubic feet refrig-
erator, has freezer space. One
year dd in exoellent oond. Call
752-7460 after 5O0.
FOR SALE: JVC 25 watt Receiver
wamp BIC 940 Turntable,
Pioneer 2121 cassette deck, Mag-
natex 3-way speakers only 1 yr.
dd. 575.00 (1000.00 new) Call
752-8907 - 756-0416.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female
needed immediately to share 2
bedroom apt. located off of 1 st St.
Must furnish own bedroom furni-
ture. $50.00 monthly plus Vi of
utilities. Call 758-3559 after 6O0.
3
Ifbrrent �
REEDED. 2 girls- $56.25 per
rtxxith Geagetowne Aptsluxury
apt, Call 758-7786.
FEMALE ROOmmATE: Needed
share 5 room house. Call 752-
5621.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed
share 2 bedrm. apt. at Village
Green. Rent $58.00 plus utilities.
Call 758-7144.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For
Shady Kndl trailer $55.00 plus
telephone bill. 758-2853 (female
preferred).
WANTED: 2 male roomates to
share a townhouse Apt. at 37
Riverbfuff. Call 758-2650 ask fa
Donald.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: At
Shady Kndl Trailer Pk. $125.00 a
month plus utilities. Contact
Larry at Id 180 Shady Kndl.
(washer, cooking facilities, etc.)
personal (X
PART TIME HELP WANTED:
Position available immediately fa
person seeking approximately 20
hrs. per week and flexible sche-
dule. Person with eledronics and
computer background is desira-
ble. Drafting and typing exper-
ience is a plus. Call 758-9505.
PORTRAITS: and dher photog-
graphic wak. Call Mark 752-
1068.
LEAD GUITARIST NEEDED:
immediately. We are looking fa
someone with either, a back-
ground in soul or rock music. Call
LB. 758-8310 after 6 p.m.
WORK WANTED: Hate house-
keeping? I will do all your
housekeeping chaes for a
reasonable fee. Experienced. Ref-
erences available. Call 758-3109.
PAPER TYPED: I need money.
Call 752-4013 after 5 p.m.
LOST: If anyone found a pipe in a
brown vinyl tobacco pouch on the
wall by the music Wgd on Thurs.
afternoon Sept. 15 please call
Kevin at 758-3334.
TRAGIC: Lost Davis Imperial
Tennis Racket, green grip on
handle. Racket lost Wed. Sept.
15,1977 on wall a at Purple Bus.
Person is on tennis team and
needs racket fa match. Large
reward. Please contad Beth a
Dee at 752-5786.





Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 22 September 1977
'King of the Gridiron Award1 to be given
An East Carolina University
football player will receive a
$1,000 scholarship following each
home game this season. The
player receiving the scholarship
will be selected by the news
media and considered to be the
outstanding Pirate player in the
game. The scholarship will be
known as the "King of the
Gridiron Award
The scholarship is being pre-
sented by R.W. Moore Equip-
ment Company of Raleigh and
Greenville, in conjunction with
the Pirate Club, the University
Educational Foundation for athle-
tics. Moore Equipment Company
is owned and operated by R.W.
Moore of Raleigh.
"On behalf of the entire Pirate
Club, the gesture made by Mr.
Moore in sponsoring the scholar-
ship is generous, and a boost in
the direction of our total goal in
Booters play first home
game against Goldsboro
This Saturday the Pirates will
face the Goldsboro Soccer Club in
their first home match of the
season. ECU coach Brad Smith is
hoping the match will be his
team's first victory of the year.
"I expect a good game from
everyone said Smith. "Hope-
fully the game will be a win for
us. I want to let some of the
younger players play so they will
get some valuable experience
With forward Jay High still
injured, Smith is looking to
senior Ed French as a replace-
ment. Smith also plans to rotate
Ric Browning and Daryl High in
the forward position.
Crowd support still remains
one of Smith's main ooncerns
about Saturday. "This will be our
first home game said Smith,
"and I really hope everyone
comes out to see the match. Last
week when we played Campbell
they had a large crowd while we
had none. I think it is important to
the players to see that they have
some support
Portable bleachers will moved
next to the playing field.
The game is scheduled to
begin at 2.00, and will be played
on the soccer field at Minges.
SUPPORT PIRATE SOCCER
Patriots
vs
Browns
Sept 26 on
7 ft Advent TV
Free Beverage
with this ad
The Pro Shop
Of GreenvHIe, Inc.
Complete Golf & Tennis
Equipment and Attire
Casual Wear
New Fall Lines Arriving Daily
i Faded Glory, Fashion Jeans &�
Coordinates
I TKG - Khakis
Izod & Difini Sweaters
Munsingwear Shirts
Hours. MonFn. 10 A.M6 P.M.
Sat. 10 A.M6 P.M.
111 East brook Drive 752-1525 Greenville, N.C.
THURS.
Sutters Gold
scholarship fund raising for this
year noted Gus Andrews, Exe-
cutive Director of the Pirate Club.
The player selected as' K ing
of the Gridiron' will receive the
recognition, but the scholarship
money will be placed in the
general scholarship fund of the
Pirate Club in his name added
Andrews.
Moore's interest in the East
Carolina program stems from the
future potential of eastern North
Carolina and the growth Oi the
East Carolina athletic program.
Also, Moore's son, Bill, is a
graduate of East Carolina Univer-
sity.
�,
Vj
TV
NOW AVAILABLE!
PAT'S
HAT!
ADVERTISED IN SPORTS ILLUSTRATED
The ONLY official ECU
u-xt 4
PIRATE JACKETS
purple lined jackets
with gold letters on
back spelling pirates
'(
HEAD COACH,
ECU FOOTBALL
Don's accept any imitationslook for this label!
)M 1
H.L.HODGES
AND COMPANY, INC.
210 E. 5th St. Phone 752-4156
The Great Haircut Look
For men and women at
SUPER EGO HAIR SALON
222E. 5th Street
Precision styling by Jennis , Jeanne, Lola, Olivia
Located over the College Shop
PH. 7582455
Redken Hair Products available
FRI. & SAT.
Super Grit
SUN.
Jesse Bolt
ATTIC
i





Saunders appreciates support
22 September 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
Cheerleaders receive funds from campus groups
Continued from p. 1
schools, we do a lot more with a
lot less
"We have to pay for the
football team first. Also, we don't
allow the cheerleaders to solicit
donations from local businesses,
although some donate material
for the uniforms said Cain.
Each football coach last year
received a $2,000 annual raise,
according to Vioe-Chancellor Cliff
Moore.
The SGA last year gave the
HICKS
Continued from p. 12
the ball more. He makes things
happen out there on offense
NOTING THE PI RATES. Dye
praised split end Terry Gallaher,
quarterback Jimmy Southerland,
and offensive linemen Wayne
Bolt, Mitchell Smith, and Joe
Godette for their performance
against Toledo last weekDefen-
sively, endsZack Valentine, John
Morris, and Fred Chavis drew
praise along with linebackers
Harold Randolph, Harold Fort,
and Mike BrewingtonDye also
noted the improvement of the
secondary, praising Charlie Car-
ter, Steve Hale and Thomas
McLaurinSteve Hale, Harold
cheerleaders $2,183, according to
Neil Sessoms, SGA president.
"I sometimes fail to see the
rationale behind SGA funding of
certain campus organizations. I
feel that the cheerleaders are the
sole responsibility of the athletic
department, but I would rather
Randolph, Jimmy Southerland,
and Tommy Summer will serve as
game captains Saturday against
VMISports Information Direc-
tor Ken Smith said Wednesday
the East Carolina-South Carolina
game next Saturday in Columbia
may be televised. A final decision
will be made sometime Sunday
morning after the Pirates game
against VMI.
TERRY GALLAHER
JOE GODETTE
TOMMY SUMMER
Classifieds
have the SGA support them than
to see them done away with due
to lack of funds said Sessoms.
The cheerleaders have receiv-
ed nothing but support from all
sides, aocording to Frank Saun-
ders, faculty advisor for the
cheerleaders.
"We appreciate every bit of
support that we get from ail
sides "Everyone we have been
in contact with has been helping
forward the cause said Saun-
ders.
Saunders said it was valuable
to receive support from several
sources, since it would lessen the
chances of being severly handi-
capped should a budget aunch
occur.
"If we got all our money from
athletics, they might have to cut
back in other areas of their
program said Saunders.
Saunders praised the help of
area businessmen and reiterated
his hope to make the ECU
cheerleading squad the best in
the nation.
Be sure to
vote
Monday I
KEYDETS
Continued from p. 12
we're in trouble against VMI
Saturday night
Virginia Military Institute is in
a very tough position in that it is a
military school and it is also the
smallest school in NCAA's Divi-
sion 1 with an-enrollment of 1250
men. In fact, VMI from 1969
until 1971. only won two of the 31
games played.
The program turned around,
however, with the hiring of head
coach Bob Thalman. He led the
Keydet program not only as a
coach but as a businessman as
well. In 1974 Thalman's VMI
team won their first Southern
Conference Championship since
1959.
Last year VMI had a five and
�five record including wins over
Furnan and Virginia.
The enthusiasm that people
will see from the Keydets Satur-
day will be because VMI believes
that they can win every game no
matter what the odds. The
Keydets will then be a formidable
opponent fa the Pirates and one
which will no doubt test the
ability of our young team.
The game will start at 7:00
and a sellout aowd is exported to
be on hand.
for sale
FOR SALE: Saxophone Alto:
Buescher Aristaat: Used 1 year
$150.00 - includes stand. Tena
Buescher Aristaat: Used 1 year
$195.00 - includes stand. Bari-
tone : Coin: Used 1 year $550.00 -
includes stand. All in excellent
Cond. See Bobby at 205 Jones a
call 752-9746 after 5:00 and leave
a number and name.
FOR SALE: 66 Chevy Station
wagai great engine, AMFM
stereo with 8 track, good tires,
and air shocks. $400.00 a make
offer Call Kevin 752-1190.
FOR SALE: 10 piece Drum Set,
natural wood finish, excellent
cond fa mae info, call Ray-
mond Brown, 758-7434.
ACOUSTIC GUITAR: excellent
fa beginner. 50.00 Call 758-6645
after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Craig 3512 FM
Stereocassetter tape deck, under
dash model. Fast faward, re-
wind, Matrix-stereo switch, Very
little use. Call 752-5028 a come
by 112 River Bluff Apt. After 5O0
p.m.
FOR SALE: 5 speed Chiada
Bike. Good Cond. Two years old.
Only 35.00 Call 752-9885 after 5
p.m. Ask fa Sheila.
FOR SALE: 1 man's 10-speed
faloon Bike. Good Cond. $125.00
Call 756-5416.
FOR SALE: Schwinn Continental
Bicyde. Almost New, Blue, 10-
speed. $130.00 Firm Call 756-
4155 after 500.
FOR SALE: Teac 2505 cassette
tape deck bought in April 75. Is
now in excellent cond must sell,
best offer accepted. Original price
$250.00 Call 758-2073 after 5:30.
FOR SALE: 35 mm Camera
Outfit. Camera body with namal
lens, 135 mm and 28 mm lens.
Hand held light meter, electroiic
flash, extensioi rings $400.00
Bundy trumpet excellent Cond.
$130.00 Call 752-1068.
FOR SALE: Wardrobe and sta-
age cabinets of metal, both
standard size, good oond cheap.
756-4681.
FOR SALE: '76 Mazda RX-4
Staticnwagoi fa sale. Excellent
oend great gas mileage, $200.00
equity and take over payments.
Also diamond engagement ring,
retail $515.00 will well fa $400.00
appraisal available. Call Nartz
at 75&O680.
ALBUMS FOR SALE: Most about
2.00 Room 404-D Scott. Wide
selection including Beatles,
Clapton, Beach Boys, James
Tayla, Yes, America, ZZ Top,
Chicago, Jethro Tull and many,
many mae. Come now fa best
selection.
FOR SALE: 1871 Buick Skylark
Custom automatic, FMAM
RADIO Air Cond. Runs great -
needs some body wak. Must sell
fast & cheap 752-8907 - 756-0416
Join White.
FOR SALE: Remington Manual
Desk Typewriter Good Cond.
$80.00 Call 758-7660.
FOR SALE: Box springs and
mattress. Fair Condition. $30.00
Call 752-5090 after 500.
FOR SALE: 55 V.W. Classic Sun
roof, refinished interia, excellent
transaxle, body in good oond
great car. Call Raymond Brown,
758-7434.
FOR SALE: 1972 Fiat Spyder 850
Blue Convertible AMFM radio.
Na a saatch on it-asking $2,000.
00 will negaiate. Call evenings
756-1518.
FOR SALE: Monte Carlo Landau,
black with white landau top. Air
Cond. power steering, AMFM
stereo. Must sell immediately,
best offer.
MUST SELL: 66 V.W. Fastback.
sunroof, radio, new tires, battery,
muffler, and brakes all under
warranty. Great Cond. Call 752-
1068.
FOR SALE: Patable Zenith ster-
eo. Good oond only $25.00. Call
Julie at 758-6714.
FOR SALE: Lafayette Stereo
System with RK-84 eight track
palyer, four 25-A speakers (25
watts), and 100 watt amplifier
LA-950. Will sell individual oomp-
ponents. Call Brain Evenings
752-2326.
FOR SALE: 10 speed bike in
excellent cond hardly ever used.
Accepting reasonable offers Call
752-8320.
FOR SALE: 1969 450 Honda.
Needs tune up. Reasonable offer
accepted. Call 752-2476 after
5O0
LOST:20 Reward fa return of a
lost Seiko automatic Cartographer
watch. Lost in Minges Sept. 20.
758-6365.
FOR SALE: 5 cubic ft. refrigera-
ta (perfect fa dams) with large
freezer capacity, veg. bins, etc.
Good cond $125.00 (was $225.00
new) Call 758-3559 after 6.00.
FOR SALE: 4.3 cubic feet refrig-
erator . has freezer space. One
year old in excellent cond. Call
752-7460 aft 3r 500.
FOR SALE: JVC 25 watt Receiver
wamp BIC 940 Turntable,
Pioneer 2121 cassette deck, Mag-
natex 3-way speakers only 1 yr.
old. 575.00 (1000.00 new) Call
752-8907 - 756-0416.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female
needed immediately to share 2
bedroom apt. located off of 1st St.
Must furnish own bedroom furni-
ture. $50.00 monthly plus V2 of
utilities. Call 758-3559 after 6.O0.
)
Ifbrrent �
fJEEDED. 2 girls- $56.25 per
rtwnth Geagetowne Aptsluxury
afct. Call 758-7786.
FEMALE ROOmmATE: Needed
share 5 room house. Call 752-
5621.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed
share 2 bedrm. apt. at Village
Green. Rent $58.00 plus utilities.
Call 758-7144.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: For
Shady Knoll trailer $55.00 plus
telephone bill. 758-2853 (ferrile
preferred).
WANTED: 2 male roomates to
share a townhouse Apt. at 37
Riverbluff. Call 758-2650 ask fa
Donald
ROOMMATE NEEDED: At
Shady Kndl Trailer Pk. $125.00 a
month plus utilities. Contact
Larry at la 180 Shady Knoll.
(washer, oooking facilities, etc.)
personal vA
PART TIME HELP WANTED:
Position available immediately fa
persai seeking approximately 20
hrs. per week and flexible sche-
dule. Person with electraiics and
computer background is desira-
ble. Drafting and typing exper-
ience is a plus. Call 758-9505.
PORTRAITS: and aher phaog-
graphic wak. Call Mark 752-
1068.
LEAD GUITARIST NEEDED:
immediately. We are looking fa
someone with either, a back-
ground in soul a rock music. Call
LB. 758-8310 after 6 p.m.
WORK WANTED: Hate house-
keeping? I will do all your
housekeeping chaes for a
reasonable fee. Experienced. Ref-
erences available. Call 758-3109.
PAPER TYPED: I need money.
Call 752-4013 after 5 p.m.
LOST: If anyoie found a pipe in a
brown vinyl tobacco pouch on the
wall by the music Wgd. on Thurs.
afternoon Sept. 15 please call
Kevin at 758-3334.
TRAGIC: Lost Davis Imperial
Tennis Racket, green grip on
handle. Racket lost Wed. Sept.
15,1977 on wallaai Per pie Bus.
Persai is on tennis team and
needs racket fa match. Large
reward. Please contact Beth or
Dee at 752-5786.





ASSORTED
PLASTIC QQQ
HANGERSO OO
CARLAN
SHELF PAPER Q Q
ASSORTED COLORS O 7
FRIFD .2 PC. CHICKEN
CHICKEN 2 VEG 1 49
PLATE LUNCH .�f I
6-PACK
DRUMMOND 1 39
BROS. BEER I
FLICKER Q Q
SHAVFRO O
"ORIGIN"
VITAMIN-C
.500 mg 100-COUNT f J f J
WITH ROSE HIPS X W
MM
MM
Last Day Friday
Friday Only!)
Special Introductory Price On
Men's Traditional Siladium Ring
Only $59.95
Regularly $82.00
WTIRVED
RING DAY FRIDAY
That's when the ArtCarved representative will be here to help you select your custom
made college jewelry, it's also the day you can charge your ArtCarved college
jewelry on Master Charge or BankAmericard.
place: time:
WRIGHT UNION BUILDING LOBBY 10 AM UNTIL 3 PM
WEDNESDAY THRU FRIDAY





Title
Fountainhead, September 22, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 22, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.601
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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