Fountainhead, September 1, 1977






f
Serving the campus cpro-
munity for over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 16 pages.
Fountainhead
ON THE IN3DE
Frat Rushp. 5
Cinema Societyp. 7
ECU-Statep. 11
Vol. 53. No. 3
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina
1 September 1977
Beat
State!
There will be a Beat State Pep
Rally on the ECU campus Sep-
tember 1, starting at 7 p.m. at
Greene dorm and ending at
Ficklin Stadium. Last practice
under the lights before the
Pirates beat State
Let the players know you are
behind them! Get in the spirit of
the Beat State Week and attend
the pep rally on Thursday. Bring
purple and gold shakers, horns,
bells, and other spirits). Share a
sheet with a friendmake a sign
to bring to the state game.
Suggestion: 1) "Beat State" 2)
"Raise Hell"
Wear your caps donated by
Taylor beverages and bring your
purple Pirate Rags to game.
THESESTUDENTS ARE apparently discussing the outcome of the upcoming ECU-State germ
which will be held Saturday in Raleigh
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
Sessoms urges students to file for legislator
By CINDY BROOME
News Editor
Students may begin filing fa
SGA legislature openings in the
SGA office, according to Neil
Sessoms, SGA president.
"The legislature is probably
the most powerful branch of the
student government said
Ssssoms.
"Considering the budget said
Sessoms of the second largest
student government in the U.S
"the legislature holds a very
responsible position
The legislature convenes
weekly for approximately two
hours, and committee meetings
convene weekly for about one
hour.
"Experience is not necessary
to be legislator, but it's helpful
said Sessoms
"It'sagood way to learn how
government works
Sessoms said he hopes the
legislature will be a good cross-
section of day and dorm students,
Greeks and other particular
organizations.
The best way to get something
done is to have a representative in
the legislature, said Sessoms.
"Legislators will work for
other projects said Sessoms,
"But not like their own
"What the legislature does
effects everyone on campus, from
grad students to freshmen
Sessoms said.
"I hope the legislature will be
a conscientious group of students
who are interested in serving the
ECU student body by giving their
time and talents said Sessoms.
Sessoms said there will be a
mandatory candidates' meeting
after filing ends September 7.
The meeting date will be an-
nounced later.
"I'd like to see a good turnout
for this election said Sessoms.
Voting precincts will be in
strategic areas so students will
have easy access to vote, accord-
ing to Sessoms.
Students running fa legis-
lata positiais must be full-time
students with an overall 2.0
average, said Sessoms.
Election day will be announc-
ed sometime next week.
More lighting imi
ECU campus walkways
By CINDY BROOME
NewsEdita
Twelve bases fa more liaht-
ing on campus have recently been
established and many branches of
trees have been cut to provide
better lighting, accading to Reed
Warren, SGA vice-present.
Warren discussed the lighting
problem this summer with Vice-
Chancella of Business Affairs,
Cliff Moae.
"He was very willing to help
ussaid Warren. "I was very
pleased with the quick response
we received
Warren said many lights
which were hung from trees were
put on light poles.
"They're waking at the Slay
dam area now said Warren.
"The lights should help with
the night bus route said
Warren.
"I hope the girls will use the
lighted area for walking to
Mendenhall and to the library at
night said Warren.
Warren said that in a couple of
weeks, he and Moae will check
the lights to determine if more
lighting is needed.
"If it's necessary, the lighting
will be expanded said Warren.
Warren mentioned that the
By DENNIS KAHN
Staff Writer
H & R Block is offering a
course in filing tax returns which,
accading to Dave Harter, mana-
ger of the Greenville branch of H
& R Block, should be beneficial to
both the individual and H & R
BLock.
"Students who successfully
complete the 81-hour, 13-week
course and demonstrate an ability
to do the wak have a good chance
of being hired during the tax
season said Harter.
"Snce the tax season lasts
from January 1 to April 15,
graduates of the course should
not expect year-round wak
said Harter.
Harter said the course entail-
project was accomplished without
spending any of the students'
money. The university is financ-
ing the lightingWe should be a
catalyst fa getting things daie
said Warren.
I think the key fa SGA to get
projects like this accomplished is
to uncterstand the problem of
limited funds and keep our
requests reasonable
"Vice-Chancella Moae was
na oily helpful, but responded
quickly to better the lighting
situation said Warren.
"I'm very pleased with the
results
course
ed no obligation to wak fa H & R
Block, and H & R Block assumed
no obligation to hire the student.
However, a good percentage
of my employes are graduates of
the course said Harter.
Harter said the course was
also useful in helping the student
to better manage his finances.
"The knowledge of little de-
tails -an save money said
Hart� "The little details would
STUDYING STARTED IN August this year due to the change to
semester system; this coed cracks the books early. Photo by Kirk
Kingsbury
be the ins and outs of filing tax
returns.
"Pathsnot known befae open
like ocas through this course
The 13-week course begins
September 14, at the downtown H
& R Block office on the Greenville
Mall The three-hour classes will
be held Wednesdays and Fridays
from 9 a.m. to 12 noon, with
evening classes fron 7-10 p.m.
Mondays and Wednesdays.
"The $81 tuition for the
course also covers the cost of four
texts, a wakbook, a diploma fa
those who graduate, and use of
the audio-visual material said
Harter.
The course covers ever" as-
pect of personal, farm, ano small
business taxes, according to
Harter.
Fa more infamatiai, contact
Dave Harter at 752-4807.





m
I
1
Flashes
Paye 2 FOUNTAINHEAD September 1,1977
su
The Student Union has open-
ings on the following committees.
Travel 3 openings
"Entertainer" �1 opening
Artist Series -2 openings
Anyone interested in applying
fa one of these openings should
pick up an, application at the
Student Union office or the
Information Desk in Mendenhall
Student Center.
Psychology
The psychology honor-society
will hold its first meeting
Tuesday, September 6 at 7 P.M.
in Speight 129.
This will be a general business
meeting.
All Psi-Cni members and
other interested students are
urged to attend.
Pep rally
There will be a Beat State Pep
Rally at the Elbo Room Friday
from 3-7 p.m. ECU cheerleaders
will be present to boost spirit.
DAZZLE will play.
NCSL
The North Carolina Student
Legislature will have its kick-off
meeting of the new year, Wed-
nesday, Sept. 7 at 750 in 244
Mendenhall. All members are
strongly urged to attend.
FG
"How to have a successful
nervous breakdown, or, how to
deal with discouragement
That's the topic of the Forever
Generation Bible study tomorrow
night: Speaking will be Dan
Coutcher, the National Assistant
Director of the FG. Why not join
us for this time of Bible study,
singing and fellowship?-That's
tomorrow night at 7:30 in
Brewster B-103. Hope to see you
there!
Jaycees
The Winterville Jayoees
will work and help organize this
chapter. There is a meeting
planned at Mendenhall Monday,
September 5 at 730 p.m. (Meet
by the information desk for
further instructions.) Both men
and women are encouraged to
join.
If there are any questions,
contact Ernest Hooks, 756-0282 a
Bobby Manning 756-1828 after 8
p.m.
SGA
Any person interested in
applying fa SGA Attorney Gen-
eral should oome by the SGA
office 218 Mendenhall student
Center and fill out an application.
Buses
There will be two buses
leaving fa the game Sat. at
Carter Stadium from Mendenhall
at 300 p.m. No signing up a
oost, just be there ready to go.
Worship
Rev. Bill Hadden, Episcopal
Chaplain announoes that Episco-
pal Waship fa students and
faculty begins this Wed Sept. 7,
at 5:30 at St. Paul's Church, 406
4th St.
4-H club
Welcome back students! The
ECU 4-H Collegiate Club is
having a ocok-out at the East-
brook party house Thursday,
Sept. 1 at 7 p.m. Plans fa the
coming year will be discussed,
and interested members and
others are invited to oome.
AIP
The Offices of Intramural
Sports and Handicapped Student
Services are in the process of
developing and ooadinating an
Adaptive Intramural Program fa
all handicapped students. Should
you be interested in recreational
activities, you are invited to
attend the first aganizatioial
meeting oi Wednesday, Septem-
ber 7, 1977 at 4 p.m. in room 221
of Mendenhall Student Center.
Thiswill be your opportunity to
express your ideas, and to show
us the suppat that we will need.
Chairperson
Anyoie interested in filing fa
Fall elections chairperson or
oommittee should file in the SGA
office, Room 218 Mendenhall
Student Center, as soon as
possible.
Frig, rentals
The SGA still has 100 refriger-
atas available fa fall semester
rental. Rent is$38.00 fa the year
a $21.00 per semesta, plus a
$10.00 safety deposit. Come by
Room 231, Mendenhall, SGA
Refrigerata Office.
Band
The Interfraternity Council, in
initiating the start of Fall Rush,
will sponsa the band "Staircase"
on the Mall from 4-8 P.M.
Tuesday, Sept. 6th. Everyone is
invited to attend and is encourag-
ed to attend Rush this fall.
Psi-Chi
Psi-Chi Hona Society rush is
on.
Eligible psychology majors
will be contacted, however, Psyc.
minas and aha students with 12
hours a mae of Psyc. may be
eligible- Psi-Chi has no way of
knowing who you are. If you are
interested in Psi-Chi, inquire at
the psychology offioe a see a
Psi-Chi officer listed on the
Psi-Chi bulletin board across from
the Psyc. offioe in the Speight
building. Rush ends Sept. 27, sc
don't delay.
Bowling
All students interested in
faming a bowling league should
attend an organizational meeting
on Monday, September 12, at
7:30 PM in the Mendenhall
Student Bowling Center.
SGA posts
Anyone interested in filing fa
SGA legislative positions, day a
dorm representatives, should
oome by the SGA offioe to file
befae September 7.
Gospel
The Essence Gospel Singas
will meet at 7 p.m. Tues Sept. 7,
1977 at Mendenhall rm. 244. All
persons intaested in joining the
choir are welcomed to attend.
Co-op
Anyone intaested in learning
mae about cooperative education
may do so by visiting the Co-op
offioe in 313 Rawl building a by
calling 757-6979.
Clowning is f unbut
Birth defects ore forever.
Unless you help.
March of Dimes
THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED AS A PUBLIC bi Wv � BY TMI "IW
No one eke
can give us
what you can
(Join Us. Please.)
Nobody else in the world can give us what you can.
A pint of your blood.
And your gift has never been more important. Be-
cause blood from healthy donors, who freely do-
nate their blood, is 10 times less likely gVx
to cause infectious hepatitis in the -�- v
recipient than is blood from many
commercial sources.Think about
that.
The need is urgent, and continuous.
Help us. Join us.Today.
The American
Red Cross.
The Good
Neighbor.
1mbaHMHMHB
mmMnmH





�y ppmm bnpp
Kissinger still on scene
September 1,1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
(LNS)Former Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger hasn't
quite left the foreign service yet.
In April he began serving as
vice-chairman of the international
advisory committee of the Chase
Manhattan Bank, and beginning
next January he will be promoted
to chairman.
The committee's major re-
sponsibilities, according to a
Chase Manhattan spokesperson,
are advising the bank on its
investments overseas, the world
political climate and world eco-
nomic trends.
Chase Manhattan has good
reasons for choosing a former
Secretary of State as its head
international advisor.
More than 50 of its profits
come from the $16 billion it has
invested abroad. One third of its
foreign investments are in Latin
America.
In the coming years Kissinger
will also be appearing on NBC
television as a foreign affairs
expert fa a repated $1.5 million
fee.
And fa writing his memoirs
about his government service he
will receive $2 million.
Another outlet fa Kissinger's
expertise will be the Geagetown
University School of Foreign
Service, where beginning next
September he will be teaching
courses in diplomacy.
Kissinger had considered a
chair at Columbia University,
endowed by his longtime benefao-
ta Nelson Rockefeller, but de-
clined the offer after several
student rallies and faculty pro-
tests against the appointment.
According to The New York
Times, the famer Seaetary of
State, whoengineered U.S. policy
throughout much of the Indochina
War as well as the "destabiliza-
tion" in Chile, is "quite sens�tive
toaiticism
Earlier this spring he declined
to attend a ceremony at the
University of Pennsylvania which
was awarding him an honaary
degree, after opposition was
expressed in the faculty bulletin
and on the campus.
interested in news
writing? Call
FOUNTAINHEAD
757-6366
Women hitchhikers
blamed for rape
(LNS)A panel of judges in
Califania has declared an open
season fa rapists who attack
women hitchhikers.
In judgement handed down at
the end of July, the Califania
Court of Appeals voted unani-
mously to set free a man
convicted of raping a woman he
had picked up in his car.
The written decision by Judge
Lynn Compton explained in
practically so many wads that
any wonan who stands by the
side of a road with her thumb up
deserves whatever she gets.
"The lone female hitchhiker
Compton wrae, "in the absence
of an emergency situation, as a
practical matter, advises all who
pass by that she is willing to enter
the vehicle with anyone who stops
and in doing so advertises she has
less concern fa the consequences
than the average female
Several months ago, a judge
in Madison, Wisconsin applied
the same logic in ruling that rape
isa"namal" react ion to "prov-
ocative" clothing worn by
women. Women's groups in
Madison are currently conducting
a petition campaign in an attempt
to remove the judge from office.
THE LINE
Thursday & Friday
"Gallery" with Bisa
Famer Members a
WakShop
Watch Saturday Night Live
5th STREET
IMPORT SERVICE
Finest in Foreign Car
Repair
Volkswagens- Porsche
specialists
1007 ESth St. Greenville
758-1534
WESTERN SIZZLIN
JO JOL
HOURS:
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11:00 TO 10:00
FRI &SAT
11:00 TO 11:00
Western Sizzlin will feature
a special each day of the week
beginning Sept. 5th- 9th

STEAK HOUSE
U.S. DA choice beef cut fresh daily
For the full month of August
IHHB





m
Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD September 1, 1977
Bike registration:
service or law?
The Campus Security Office requires all students'
bicycles to be registered if they are going to be on
campus. This is called a service. Service? Or law?
The purpose behind registering bicycles is so a
stolen bike can be traced and identified by the
campus police for the owner, according to Joseph H.
Calder, Director of Security. Another reason, he
says, is for proof of ownership. In other words, if
someone is suspected of possessing a stolen bike and
the bike is registered, the police can establish
whether or not it is in fact stolen.
Fine. But that's it. The only reasons for
registering bicycles is for the protection of the
owners. A service, so far. But what happens if a
student does not wish to partake of this generous
service? The lock will be cut off and the bicycle
impounded. This smacks of law, not service. Since
when are people penalized fa refusing a service?
While the Security Office lauds registering
bicycles as a service fa the students, it turns around
and treats nonacceptance of this service as breaking
a law. This is contradictay at best.
If the purpose behind registering bicycles is
solely fa the protection of the owners, as officials at
the Security Office say, the students should have the
choice between whether a not they want this service,
just as merchants have the choice of whether a not
they want special police surveillance of their
businesses. Merchants are not faced to have this
extra police protection, and students should not be
faced to accept this campus police protection.
Granted, the help in tracking down a stolen bike is
certainly wathwhile. But the owner should be able to
decide fa himself whether a not he wants this help.
Bicycle owners are not only penalized fa not
accepting this "service" by having to pay to get their
bikes out of impoundment, but they are also
punished by having expensive locks and chains fa
their bikes destroyed. And if a bike is locked and
chained, it is obviously owned and cared fa and not
likely to be left lying about as rubbage on campus to
be cleaned up.
The Security Office states that it makes no money
off these registration and impoundment fees. So
padding around campus in hot pursuit of an
unregistered bike is only wasting time and money fa
the campus police and causing endless hassles fa
students who should never be faced to obey the laws
of this "service" in the first place.
If bike registration is a service, it should be
treated as such. But if it's going to be treated as a
law, then the students should be given some
justification.
FM seen as boon
WECU has been trying to go FM fa several
years. This year, this project is "top priority
accading to Rob Maxon, WECU general manager.
But it is going to take student and administrative
support to make it happen.
WECU is almost a joke now and has been since it
was begun. With only power enough to broadcast on
campus, the effats and moiey put into this station
have been wasted. By going FM, WECU oould
broadcast into the Greenville area as a wathwhile
educational a, at least, sophisticated radio station,
as it should if it is an associate of a university. Fa
students with an IQ of three digits, an alternative to
canned Top 40 and tired acid rook would be a
welcome relief.
i
i
WHfTT BIKE REGrlSTPtflTfOV?
Forum
Student slams local drivers
To FOUNTAINHEAD:
I have a gripe to voioe about
95 per cent of the lioensed drivers
in Greenville, N.C I am taking it
fa granted that they do, in fact,
have licenses. However, some-
where, somehow, they obviously
were not told what the little
handle on the left of the steering
wheel is for. Well, surprise! It's a
turn signal, used to tell other
motorists approaching from the
front and behind that you intend
to turn. They are truely uncanny
devises that some genius engi-
neer designed so beautifully to
make driving easier and safer.
And it seems such a waste that
these cute little products of
modern technology are going to
waste.
I just do not understand why
people refuse to use turn signals.
Do they expect us to read their
minds through the windshield
and know when they plan to turn?
I am really getting tired of
digging my teeth out of the
Forum letters
should be typed or
printed, signed and
include the writer's
address or tele-
phone number. Let-
ters are subject to
editing for taste and
brevity and may be
sent to FOUNTAIN-
HEAD or left at the
Information Desk in
Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
steering wheel after some lazy
driver approaching an intersec-
tion decides to turn left without
signaling and I'm going straight
across. Not only is this inconsi-
derate, (an understatement), but
it's just a touch dangerous. It's
not as if flicking on the turn signal
took some great physical effort,
after all.
Not only do these Greenvil-
lites refuse to use turn signals,
but they also seem to insist on
driving in the left hand lane of
double highways fa no reason
(other than that it may be
"fun?"). Left lanes are for
passjng, and all highway regula-
tions say we are to stick to the
right lane except fa passing. So,
you get behind a farmer in a
pick-up (the most notaious of all
N.C. drivers) and want to pass.
But, guess again! Fa in the left
lane another farmer is auising at
a hot 35 mph.
I don't know what it's going to
take-maybe a good, gaey wreck
a two-but lazy inoonsidaate
drivers are nothing but a nuisance
and a pain in theneck fa the
rest of us.
Bill Devins
Founlainhead
Serving the East Carolina community tor war titty years.
3enior Edjt0rKim J. Devins
Production Manager. Bob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert Swaim
f5 EditorCindy Broome
Trends EditorMichael Futch
SportsEditor AnneHogge
FCWNTAmHEADisthestudemnewtpaper of East Carolina
EctTlS'XSlS 55S- S" Asscoatlon �
ECU and is distributed each Wednesday during the summer
and twice weekly during the school year '
paeS8:0,dS�Uth G��nville, N.C. 27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.
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te
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' :
September 1,1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 5
ECU co-op students
enjoy NASA work
A GROUP OF students and faculty members from
the ECU Dept. of Science Education plan a
workshop program for ECU'S environmental educa-
tion project. Left to right are: graduate student Jo
Duckett, faculty members Robert Dough, Dan
Nicholson, Carolyn Hampton and Carol Hampton,
graduate student Nancy Hall and faculty member
Charles Coble. Photo by ECU Dept. of Science
Education
t
i
Fraternity fun week: rush
By ROBERT SWAIM
Advertising Manager
Next week will mark the
beginning of the fraternity rushes
at ECU. ECU has 11 fraternities
located throughout the city. All
will be having parties throughout
the week.
During rush week, most fra-
ternities try to have bands or
"mixers" with "little sisters
Some even have picnics or
pig-piokins.
According to Kirk Edgerton,
IFC president, the purpose of
rush is to attract new members.
"We try to look for anyone
who is interested and influence
them to join the fraternity sys
tern said Edgerton.
Edgerton said that attending
fraternity rushes costs students
nothing.
Approximately 10 of the
students at ECU are members of
fraternities or sororities.
Edgerton said most greeks are
very active in campus affairs.
I would say that the SGA was
40 to 50 greek last year, and
many greeks are members of
honorary professional fraterni-
ties and sororities said Edger-
ton.
Many greeks live in their
fraternity and sorority houses.
Generally, the houses are spa-
cious old mansions with party
rooms and study areas. Some of
the houses even employ cooks to
prepare meals for the fraternity
brothers and sorority sisters, said
Edgerton.
According to Edgerton the
houses can accommodate any-
where from 20 to 40 brothers.
Edgerton said fraternities per-
form many civic acts such as
raising money for the Heart Fund
and the Red Cross.
Fraternities have many social
functions. Drinking contests and
greek field days are at the top of
the list. There are also inter-
fraternity, fraternity-sorority
parties and band parties.
Edgerton enoourages every-
one to attend rushes to have a
good time and take a look at
fraternity life.
"Joining a fraternity can
enhance a persons' college
years said Edgerton. "It's a
great way to become aquainted
with other people and become
involved in campus activities
Two ECU students, Ellen
Schraeder of Westchester, Pa
and Lori Anderson of Lincolnton,
N.C recently completed their
summer coop work experiences
with NASA Headquarters in
Washington, D.C.
Schraeder, a senior with a
double major in sociology and
psychology, worked as an assis-
tant to the summer programs
coordinator in the office of
Employee Development at NASA.
In addition to her assistant's
duties, Schraeder was responsi-
ble for helping the summer
programs coordinator screen
films and distributing a monthly
calendar of events which she
helped to develop.
Anderson, a junior business
education major, worked as a
Student Management Aid during
her co-op experience. As Student
Management Aid, she was re-
sponsible for processing training
forms fa NASA employees who
were enrolled in Continuing Ed-
ucation courses or specific cour-
ses of training as well as typing
memos and filing.
Both students agreed that
their oo-op work with NASA was a
deciding factor in developing
their career goals.
"As a result of my oo-op
experience with NASA, I've deci-
ded that working with the govern-
ment is where I belong said
Schraeder.
Anderson agreed, saying,
"Co-op gave me a good insight
into what I want to do. I had
planned to teach Now I'd like to
go back to Washington and work
for NASA
ECU offers cooperative study-
work experiences for students in
several academic areas, allowing
full-time students to alternate
periods of academic study with
periods of off-campus employ-
ment.
THE ATTIC
Wed. Thur Prodigy'
FriWide Open'
Sat. Sun.formerly Fresh
Have Time? Need Money?
We seek 2-3 additional salespersons MF for Part or Fulltime
work in and near Greenvile, dealing direct with public Experi-
ence desired but not mandatory Very High Hourly Income.
Contact: Box 3735
Greenville. N.C.
With Phone tor Immediate Interview.
Kroger Sav-on
Back to College store
junior fry-baby
junior cookin' crock
Q99
nevco hot pot
$29
A whole lot more
than just one store your
hair blower dryer
$777
lOaer&von
FOODMUJG





HMHBBJHBMHBSBBIMbH
Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD September 1,1977
AOVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily
available for sale at or below :he advertised price in each
A&P Store, except as specifically noted in this ad.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 3 AT AAP IN GREENVILLE. N C
Buy One-
Get One Free
COME CELEBRATE WITH US
GRAND
OPENING
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GREENVILLE, NX.
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BONELESS
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12 GAL.
CTNS.
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BUY ONE BAG OF SOUTHERN BISCUIT
FLOUR
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� PLAIN OR
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AND YOU RECEIVE
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CORN MEAL
JACK'S
VANILLA WAFERS

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CAMECO BRAND SLICED
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- , : "���
�H
VM IP
Trends
September 1, 1977 FOUNTAINHEAP Page 7
Communique'
(Editor's Note: Herein debuts Communique a weekly oolumn
contributed by writers in all walks of life. An East Carolina senior who
has had some extraordinary experiences with the Law sends us the
following Communique)
It was a scene no doubt repeated with minor variations in high
schools throughout theoountry, when LedZepplin was still a new band
and before the fall of Woodstock. My girl-friend wore a thin leather
bracelet and the night before we had seen "The Graduate" which had
just come to town. I was in the yearbook office working on the sports
section of the "Quatra-Log our annual, when the principal appeared
at the door.
"Tom I looked up, "There are some men in my office who would
like to talk with you
Walking down the hall I considered the possible identities of the
"men" my principal had so enigmatically mentioned. They might be
some sort of military recruiters wanting to tell me that the Marine
Corps oould make a man out of me, or perhaps, and more hopefully,
they would be agents from some magazine or another wanting to give
me the job. Regardless, my palms were moist before I stood in front of
the thick, oak-grained door on which was affixed the awesome title
"principal
I he two men were youngish, I notioed upon walking in. One was
slender and dark, the other was blond. I held out my hand to the
slender one and instead of snaking it, he pulled a black wa-let-like
thing out of his breast pocket and snapped it open in front of my face. It
was a badge. "I'm Detective G� C� from the Narcotics Division. I am
here to inform you that you are under arrest. You have the right to
remain silent The mind defends itself with a device known as
shock. I barely heard what the officer was saying. It was almost as if I
were transfixed, there, sitting in the cushioned institutional office
chair, not hearing what was being said and my oonscious mind refusing
tooonfront the situation. "You have the right to consult an attorney
Still, it is not long before the man who has lost his leg, indeed
realized that he has lost his leg. A yellow piece of paper was handed to
me. It seemed to make my hands shake. I read it and in the impersonal
cant of jurisprudence I was informed that I was charged with "the
distribution of a controlled substance, to wit: LSD My principal
leared at me over his glasses. I hated him. I wondered which of the
people I had sold add to had turned informer. I couldn't think of a
single likely one, and indeed had no idea at all as to whom it was until I
saw him in the witness box several months later.
The two men prepared to leave but I just kept sitting. "You're
coming with us said the tall one and produced a pair of handcuffs
from his briefcase. Funny, I had thought all of it was going to be over
when they left. I stood up and the other officer waved the handcuffs
away. I ai.i grateful to this day for his touch of humanity.
At the poiioe station they inked my fingertips and rolled them on
paper. I stood in front of a grey wall and held a post-board sign with a
number written on it in front of my chest while they took my picture.
The same men who were in the principal's office asked me some
quest ions about where I had gotten the acid and to whom I had sold it. I
didn' i answer. They said I was entitled to one phone call; a privilege I
made certain to enjoy. I called a friend of mine who was still at school
and asked him to "bring the book on my night-table to the
police-station" which was a code I knew he'd understand for "take my
pot and flush it My friend was, prosaically, simply shitting, but he
said he'd do it.
The two men then lead me to an elevator. One of them pushed the
button fa the top floa and when the metal doas re-opened we
stepped into a small caged area. A large man, the jaila, came with
keys jangling (much like they do on "Gunsmoke") and let us into his
office. After some talk with the jaila the detectives left and the fat man
walked me to a eel I. Once I was inside he closed the doa and left. I was
alone.
Paperback Best Sellers
Star Wars by Geage Lucas
Passages by Gail Sheehy
Love's Wildest Fires by Christina
Savage
The Other Side of Midnight by
Sidney Sheldon
This Loving Torment by Valerie
Sherwood
Touch Not The Cat by Mary
Stewart
The Users by Joyoe Haber
Ordinary People by Judith Guest
What Really Happened to the
Class of '65 by Michael Medved
and David Wallechinsky
Blind Ambition by John Dean
The Pride of the Peacock by
Victaia Holt
Rogue's Mistress by Constance
Gluyas
Life After Life by Raymond A.
Moody Jr.
Magic by William Goldman
The Deep by Peter Benchley
�According to The New York
Times
Cinema Society offers
Greenville film alternative
ByDAVIDTREVINO
Assistant Trends Edita
Are you interested in viewing
"quality" films right here in
Greenville? The newly famed
Cinema Society of Greenville
wants to make them available at
the most reasonable of rates.
The purpose of the Cinema
Society is to screen movies which
would not namally appear either
in the commercial theaters in
town or Mendenhall Student
Center. On a trial basis, the
Cinema Society would like to
make the following films available
during the fall semester: The
Go-Between, Love is a Funny
Thing, Je T'Aime, Je T Aime,
Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams
and A Brief Vacation. An expan-
ded selection may be offered in
the spring if the response during
the fall is enthusiastic enough.
However if even one film is to
be shown this fall, the Cinema
Society needs at least 150 subscri-
bers. The modest subscription fee
of only $5.00 includes all five
films to be screened this fall.
Buying a subscription is the only
way to see these movies as
absolutely no tickets fa indivi-
dual films will be made available.
All subscriptions must be
purchased by September 15 at the
latest. They can be obtained by
sending a check made payable to
the Cinema Society of Greenville
to either William Stephenson a
Peter Makuck in care of the
English Department in Austin
here at ECU. The subscription
tickets will be distributed at the
doa of the first film to be shown
on September 25.
Preceded by a coffee hour, all
the films will be screened Sunday
evenings in the theater of the
Jenkins Memaial Art Center.
After September 25 the other
showings will be the following:
Oct. 9, Oct. 23, Nov. 6 and Nov.
20.
The oppatunity to see movies
other than Godzilla on Monster
Island and recycled commercial
releases is limited indeed. The
Cinema Society of Greenville is
trying to change that situation
and deserves the enthusiastic
suppat of the East Carolina
University community and the
people of Greenville. Or else, you
can just watch Shampoo faever.
Album deluge scheduled
for fall season release
KEITH EMERSON OF Emerson, Lake and Palmer, The group's
"Works" II LP is scheduled fa September release. Fountainhead
File photo
The Fall seasoi is approach-
ing and textbooks aren't the only
hot item on the market.
The maja recad oompanies
shouldn't be eyeing red as most
are on the verge of re-stocking all
the record stores with their
seasonal discharge of discs.
Along with the important
Christmas shopping season, and
after the demise of a maia fand
very often mina) music figure,
the early. Fall appears to be a
favaite period fa most recad
oompanies to release albums on a
probability with profit in mind. Or
maybe one should oared that
sentence by saying a huge profit
in mind.
The pattern is definitely not
being altered in the Fall of '77.
The number of albums to be
released in the next two months
will be incredible. The record
conpanies may not seal as many
LP's as McDonalds sells Bin
Macs. But Big Macs don't retail
at $7.98 a piece.
Warner Brothers fall-release
Ifst induces Rod Stewart, the
recently released Doobie
Brahers' LP, Randy Newman,
Maria Muldaur, Loe Sayer, yet
another studio over-dubbed
Hendrix album, a "best of"
Jethro (Wasn't "Living in the
Past sufficient?) Tull, new
Leonard Cohen prodioed by Phil
Spector, and the threedisc
"Decade" retrospedive of Neil
Young.
Atlantic has Sept.3 scheduled
fa the release of the long-delayed
Rolling Stones live album, "Love
You Live With album package
artwak by Andy Warhol, how can
these 'ole boys miss? Other
September releases induce Ringo
Starr, volumn two of ELPs
"Waks a Small Faces (Rem-
ember "ItohycooPark?") reunion
album, without Ronnie Lane,
Bette Midler, Roberta Flack,
Abba, Mark Farner of Grand
Funk fame, Phil Manzanera of
Roxy Music, and the tempting
Temptations.
Motown has a Diana Ross
studio album for September
release. Odober releases induce:
Smokey Robinson, Thelma
Houston, !�� e Commodores,
Junia Walker, a Eddie Kendncks
greatest hits package, and a
possible Fifth Dimension recad.
Arista's Fall schedule indud-
es Lou Reed, Rick Danko from the
Band. Don McLean, Jery Garda
and Bob Weir, with David
Faman, and a hopeful Patti
Smith LP.
A live Crosby-Nash aium
highlights ABC recad company
Fall list. There will be a new
music from Steely Dan, Levon
Helm, and Don Williams.
On Columbia. September re-
leases include Aerosmith,
Chicago, live Santana, Art
Garfunkel, and Phoebe Snow.
Odober's list comprises of fresh
Boz Scaggs, Earth, Wind and
Fire, another Loggins and
Messina live album, and Neil
Diamond. Bob Dylan and Paul
Simon are both repute? to be
reoading fa the Fall.
New Linda Rondstadt,
"Simple Dreams is scheduled
fa release this week oi Elektra
Asylum. Also fa September
release is new Tom Waits.
Odober'slist induces Queen and
Joe Walsh.
On Epic and other roiated CBS
labels, new Rick Nelson, Gilbert
OSullivan, Wild Cherry, Charlie
Daniels. MFSB, David
Johanssen, and Isley Brothers are
schedulec fa . jiease.
Richie Havens and Gato
Barbieri are on the slates fa
immediate release by A and M
recads. Also fa Fall release are:
a Peter Allen live album,
Carpenters, Rick Wakeman, Nils
Lofgren, Michele Phillips, Joan
Armatrading, Pablo Cruise, Billy
Preston, and Billy Swan.
RCA'stall release list indudes
the recently released Hall and
Oates, Iggy Pop, David Bowie,
Jefferson Starship, and John (the
Pat Boone of the 70s) Denver.
Of oourse these, are just a few
of the many albums, from just a
few of the many recad compan-
ies, to be looking fa in the very
near future. With kids returning
to their respedive college cam-
puses, carrying a pocketful of
cash, the record companies have
dollar signs in thoir eyes. It's the
time of the season and they will
definitely make the moot of it.





g
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD September 1,1977
Tuesday's concert on the malt
Tenth Avenue shows tasteful restraint
ByMACMCKZE
Staff Writer
There is a formula to Top-40
rock music that is difficult to
master.
It is essential that the songs
be concise and polished, as well
as tightly performed. If this
formula is followed step by step,
then it should seem logical that
the band using this formula
"hould be a suocess. It sounds
simple enough, but it isn't.
There are some bands that no
matter how hard they try, they
simply aren't good imitators of a
certain artist, or artists, that they
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bring aaoss in performance. If a
band plans to stay in the Top-40
genre, it is important that they be
instantly recognizable to the
average music fan.
That fan may be a rabid radio
listener of three to four hours
everyday. Another person may
listen to the radio for only an hour
twice a week. But it really
doesn't matter. A band who plays
popular music as the basis of their
show, can't afford to make those
kind of assumptions about the
people they play to.
On the other hand, it is
detrimental that the band not
make the mistake of becoming
slaves to the formula. When a
band does fall victim to the
formula, they are depriving the
audience of the stamp of original-
ity the band puts on the music, as
well as depriving the band of the
natural feel and emotion they
need to make the show a success.
Tenth Avenue has mastered
these two extremes of the formula
very well. They have been able to
do so by a capable mix of material
that will please the singles
fanatic, yet not disappoint the die
hard rock 'n' roller. Tenth
Avenue is also a band of tasteful
restraint. All of the members are
potent soloists, but they are really
able to showcase their talents
playing as a unit.
During their concert rm thp
Mall Tuesday night, the band's
professionalism shone, well. Lead
vocalist Steve uuinney sang with
the confidence of any rock'n' roll
veteran. L.D. Worly won the
respect of the crowd with his
searing guitar lines.
The rythym section of drum-
mer Danny Lupton and bassist
Mickey Hayes was unrelenting
throughout the evening. All of
this musical activity was further
enhanced by Johnny Cut red's
commandment of the keyboards.
The band blistered every song
that they performed. The stand-
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Steve Quinney especially sang in
with such power, it would have
made Boston's Bradley Delp turn
green with disbelief.
Apart from a few technical
problems, the evening was a
enjoyable one. Tenth Avenue may
not strike some people as daring
as some bands, but there are few
of them that are as proficient.
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September 1,1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
East Carolina Playhouse
holds musical auditions
THE LEO JENKINS Art Building.
Auditions for the East
Carolina Playhouses season
opener will he held Thursday and
Friday nights of this week, from
7:30 to 10:00 p.m. in McGinnis
Auditorium on the E.CU.
Campus.
The musical comedy, BYE
BYE BIRDIE directed by Edgar
Loessin, is scheduled for perform-
ance October 10 through 15 at
McGinnis Auditorium. The char-
acters range in age from high
school students, faculty and staff,
as well as to citizens of Greenville
and the surrounding area.
"Anyone interested is invited
to try out said Loessin, who is
Artistic Director of the Playhouse
and Chairman of the Department
of Drama and Speech at ECU
"People who audition should
be prepared to sing a song of their
own choice-we'll provide an
accompanist-and to danoe. Our
choreographer, Frank Wagner,
will lead each auditionee through
some movements
BYE BYE BIRDIE written by
Michael Stewart with music by
Charles Strouse and lyrics by Lee
Adams, tells the story of a rock
and roll singer who is about to be
inducted into the army. "The play
was inspired by the success of
Elvis Presley in the late 1950 s,
and we thought it would be a
fitting tribute to his passing
Loessin said.
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�����MHHHVHBBHHRHniHRfliHHB
Page 10 FOUNTAiNHEAD September 1,1977
9 9
I
East Carolina Medical Sch
increases staff with nurse-midwife
ECU NEWS Bureau
A unique training exper-
ience is awaiting East Carolina
University medical students when
Josephine Hookway, a nurse-
midwife on the clinical staff of the
ECU Department of Obstetrics
-Gynecology begins teaching later
this month.
M rs. Hookway sees her teach-
ing role as giving medical
students practical training and
instruction in support of expect-
ant mothers.
"I see myself as one who's
helping to improve the outcome of
pregnancy she said.
Mrs. Hookway's objective is
timely and necessary, since the
infant mortality rate for eastern
North Carolina was 21.3 per 1,000
live births in 1975 as compared to
a rate of 18.5 fa the state and
16.1 fa the natiai.
The N.C. Board of Medical
Examiners, the agency which
licenses all Tarheel doctors,
granted Mrs. Hookway approval
in April, allowing her to carry out
her current responsibilities under
supervision of an obstetrician-
gynecologist.
She explained she can handle
all aspects of namal pregnancy
from the pregnancy test through
delivery This means she can
give instruction to other nurses
and perfam physicals, she said.
Because her duties are similar
to those of a medical decta, Mrs.
Hookway finds it necessary to
carry malpractice insurance.
In addition to her teaching
duties, she is doing normal
deliveries at Pitt Memaial and
waking in two prenatal clinics in
the Pitt County Health Depart-
ment.
During the month of June, she
perfamed 14 deliveries.
Mrs. Hookway's experience
and Tedentials are impressive.
She received her registered nurs-
ing education in native Great
Britain at St. Mary's College in
Cardiff. She waked as a nurse
midwife and instructa of medical
students in England fa five
years.
In 1959, she and her husband
emigrated fron England to the
Kinston area where her husband
took a job as a physicist with
DuPont. After taking the register-
ed nursing examination Mrs.
Hookway went to wak at Lenoir
Memaial Hospital in the Labor
and Delivery Department.
In 1972, Mrs. Hookway left
Lenoir Memaial to teach nursing
at Lenoir Community College.
After four years as an instructa,
she went to Booth Maternity
Center in Philadelphia for a
four-month course in her special-
ity and was duly certified as a
nurse-midwife by the American
College of Nurse-Midwives last
year.
Mrs. Hookway said she has
good rappat and waking rela-
tioiships with Pitt County obstet-
ricians who ask her to come to
Greenville to help with the patient
load.
She is doing an excellent job.
We don't know what we would do
without her said one. "She
serves as a liasion person
between the health department
and us, and she takes care of
patients prenatal I y and post nat al-
ly
"I think there is a need fa
mae nusse specialists to relieve
overwaked doctors said Mrs.
Hookway. "In Europe all namal
hospital deliveries are perfamed
by nurse midwives
Practicing midwives are also
mae common in the Natheast
and Midwest regions of the
country tnan in the south, she
said.
"Many people ask me if I
believe in home deliveries. I'm
not in fava of it. I think women
should have babies in the
hospital, which is the safest
place she said.
Answers
to
crossword
puzzle
Would you like to see Colle-
giate Crossword appear in the
Trends Section of the Fountain-
HEAD AS A REGULAR FEA
TURE? If you do, write a call
Michael Futch, Trends Edita, at
the Fountainhead, 757-6366.
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Formerly of Downtown Greenville
has moved to its new location.
We Feature;
GIBSON FENDER
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Plus all the other, musical instruments.
tThe Music Shop
viUe Square Shopping Center
(Next to K-mart)
hurs. & Fri. nights until 9 p.m.)





"Must" game for both
wnbar 1,1977 FX NTAINHEAD Pap 11
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Pirates, Pack clash Saturday
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Assistant Sports Editor
By late Saturday night the
mystery surrounding the football
teams of NC State and East
Carolina will be known. State
hopes that this first game will be
the start of a winning season and
the end of the losses the Pack
suffered last year. Meanwhile
ECU is hoping that their young
team, which lost eleven starters
from last year, will take up where
last years team left ott. in tnis,
the eighth meeting of the two
schools, both head ooaches Pat
Dye and Bo Rein feel that their
teams are capable of doing the job
of winning games.
As far as East Carolina is
concerned, Pat Dye feels both
anxious and optimistic about his
team's chances this year.
"I thinkwehave more players
than ever before, but due to the
lack of experioe, I'm not sure
about the quality said Dye. "It
may not be what it has in the past
I think we have more depth, in
that we have more players
capable of winning. I'm real
anxious to see this team play, just
like I think the players are
anxious. I think we'll have a good
sound football team before the
year is over, but I don't know if
we'll start out that way. But no
matter what happens early, we
will just have to keep on, keeping
on
The injury situation has been
a problem this year although it is
felt that most of the injuries will
be straightened out by game
time.
"We were hurt some in
pre-season with the wet and cool
weather, along with injuries
Dye said. "Otherwise, things
were pretty good. Our practices
haven't been what we wanted
them to be, but then all teams
find this to be true. If it were not
true, then the team is not being
Sports
Here are the starting line ups fa East Carolina and N.C. State. We
felt it necessary to publish this chart since there are so many new
players for both teams. You may want to cut this out and take it to the
game. This will be done on a weekly basis for your convenience.
East Cardina-vs-N.C State
Saturday Sept. 3, 1977 700 p.m.
Carter Stadium, RaJeigh, N.C.
Last years soore: ECU 23, NCSU 14
OFFENSES: East Cardina-wishbone; N.C. State-twin veer
DEFENSES: East Cardina-5-2; N.C. State-5-2
1976 RECORDS: East Carolina 9-2-0
N.C. State 3-7-1
Pirates
OFFENSE
When East Carolina has the ball
TE Barry Johnson (Sr. 225)
LT Mitchell Smith (Jr. 236)
LG Nelson Smith (Jr. 238)
C Rickie Hdliday(Sr. 193)
RG Wayne Bolt (Sr. 257)
RT Matt Mulholland (Jr. 235)
SE Terry Gallaher(Sr. 174)
LHB Willie Hawkins(Sr. 188)
FBVinoeKolanko(Sr.188)
RHB Eddie Hicks (Jr. 201)
QB Jimmy Southerland (Sr. 170)
or Leander Green (So. 165)
Wolfpack
DEFENSE
N.C. State
E Joe Hannah (So. 223)
E Marion Gale (So. 190)
LT Tom Prongay (Sr. 239).
MGA.W.Jenkins(Sr.224)
RT Simon Gupton (So. 252)
LBKyleWescoe(Jr.225).
LB Bill Cowher (Jr. 216) .
CB Tommy London (Sr. 204)
CB Richard Carter (Sr. 164)
SS Ralph Stringer (Sr. 198)
FS Woodrow W i I son (So. 181)
DEFENSEOFFENSE
1 East CarolinaWhen N. C. State has the ball
SSE John Mario (So. 206)TETomFabiny(Jr. 188)
LT Wayne Poole (Jr. 235).LT Chris Dieterich (So. 219)
I NG Oliver Felton (Jr. 207).LGTimGillespie(Jr.232)
1 RT Noah Clark (So. 225) .CJimRichter(So. 238)
WSE Zack Valentine (Jr. 218)RG Rodger Parker (So. 219)
SLB Harold Randolph (Sr, 195)RT Ricky Olive (So. 232)
WLB Harold Fat (Sr. 193)SE Elijah Marshall (Sr. 186)
LCB Char I ie Carter (So. 173)HB Ted Brown (Jr. 188
1 SSGeraldHall(Jr. 184) .FB Timmy Johnson (Sr. 188)
1 FS Steve Hale (Sr. 177) .FLK Randy Hall (Jr. 179)
RCB Willie Holley (So. 176)QB Johnny Evans (Sr. 200)
waked hard enough
When talking about the Pirate
offense, Coach Dye feels confi-
dent in his two quarterbacks,
Leander Green and Jimmy
Southerland. Dye also feels good
about his backs and the offensive
line.
Dye saidWe've never gone
into a game with two quarter-
backs that are out fa the first
time ai their own. But then
everyone must start somewhere. I
have confidence in both Jimmy
Southerland and Leander Green.
Thev are nip-and-tuck and it will
go right down to starting time
befae we know who will be the
first team quarterback. We may
even alternate throughout the
State game. I think we will be
able to do mae things this year
with our offense due to the people
we have. Terry Gallaher at split
end and Willie Hawkins and
Eddie Hicks at running back are
excellent skill people. Half our
line is back but half is new. I think
we can be better up front.
A oonoern of Coach Dye this
year has been the defense. Last
year the Pirates had the third best
defensive team in the nation.
Dye teams so far at ECU have
been naed fa their fine defen-
sive play. Still, even with six of
last years starters back, Coach
Dye is a bit waried
"I'm real concerned about
defensive line going into the State
game said Dye. "State has big
people on their offensive line and
we just aren't that big defensive-
ly. If we do na play good
technique, then we are in trouble
there. Our linebackers are solid,
the best position on the squad.
"As fa the secondary, we
have the ability but na the
experience. There is no substitute
fa either, but I'd much rather
have ability with no experience
than no ability and no experience
together
JOHNNY EVANS
See EVANS, page 14
Dye announces seven Pirate
. waikons to serve as captains
East Carolina coach Pat Dye
has put special emphasis on his
waikons this season. And Satur-
day night at N.C. State, Dye will
dimax that emphasis by making a
dream come true fa the senia
walkais.
Seven young men that aigi-
nally entered East Carolina with-
out aid to play football will serve
as captains fa the opening game.
Those seven are: Junior
Creech, kicker from Smithfield,
N.C; Rickie Holliday, center
from Williamston, N.C Barry
Johnson, tight end from Farm-
ville, N.C; Eddie Murphy, nose-
guard from RaJeigh, N.C; Larry
Paul, linebacker from Raleigh,
N.C Harold Randolph, lineback-
er from Greenville, N.C; and
Jimmy Southerland, quarterback
from Wilmington, N.C.
These four young men came
here four years ago with nahing
except a promise to play and try
and make the team said Dye.
"Each of these four has stuck it
out fa the four years and made
contributions in many ways. I
think fa them to be captains
Saturday night is just great
Five d the seven have earned
scholarships since joining the
team and five of the seven are
likely starters against the Wdf-
paok, Creech, Holliday, Johnson,
Randolph and Southerland are
expected to start.
"It's almost unheard of to
have four starters and five senias
ai scholarship that were aigi-
nally walkais added Dye.
"That's great
Eddie Murphy, termed by Dye
as "the best scout team and team
man I've had at East Carolina
noted, "Being selected a game
captain isagreat hona. It's just a
tremendous thrill
Jimmy Southerland added,
"The first year I get here I was
the 11th team quarterback. You
can't get discouraoed that first
year. Being selected as a captain,
I feel, is a reward fa four years of
hard wak
And perhaps Rickie Holliday
sums up the feeling of the entire
group the best.
"It was tough coming as a
walkon said Holliday, "Really
tough. During my freshman year,
there were several times I consi-
dered quitting. I never thought
I'd play here. But with wak, I
found myself playing a lot my
sophomae and junia years. To
walkon and stay with it, you just
have to love the game. Being
captain is a great feeling. If s one
of the greatest feelings I've had
since I've been here. I have no
regrets at all being a walkon
When the seven original
senia walkais step to midfield
Saturday night with helmets
under arm at 658 p.m. fa the
ooin toss, yet andher dream will
have come true fa walkais at
East Carolina University.
SEVEN SENIOR PIRA TE waikons will be the team
captains for Saturday night's dash with N. C. State.
They are from left to righi Eddie Murphy NGl
Barry Johnson TE, Rickie Holliday C, Larry Paul
LB, Jimmy Southerland QB, Harold Randolph
LB and Junior Creech KPhoto by Pete Podeszwa





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Page 12 FOUNTAINHEAD September 1,1977
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September 1,1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 13
Bolt returns for fourth year as a starter
In the wishbone offense, the
guard block is usually the key to
the inside running game. With
Pirate fullbacks having lost yard-
age on only two plays out of over
170 last season, the guards were
doing their job admirably. Wayne
Bolt, senior all-American cand-
idate, was the top grader on the
Pirates' offensive line last season
and returns fa his fourth year as
a starter.
Bolt graded out at 68 peroent
for the year, which in the Pirates'
grading system is very high. As
he approaches the ooming season
he will be the key man on the
Pirates' fine offensive line. He is
also the key pulling guard that
springs running backs like Eddie
Hicksand Willie Hawkins for long
gainers.
"I really like the pulling
game Bolt said. "You can get
out there and just sustain your
block for a second and Hicks a
Hawkins have already blasted by.
Also, it's every guard's dream to
be able to get a one-on-one block
against one of those 180-pound
defensive backs
The 6-1, 265-pound native of
Augusta, Ga would outweigh
that back by 50 percent, but does
not lack the speed. His 5.0 in the
40 is considered good fa his size.
Bolt and Matt Mulholland,
starters on the right side center,
ECU-State Tickets
Today at 200 pm. 750 tickets will go on sale fa the ECU NCSU
game. These were extra tickets that were not picked up at State.
There will be 350 student tickets and 400 General admission.
If you do not have a ticket this will be your last chance to get one.
are the only returning starters on
the line, but Bolt has confidence
in all the starters fa this seasai.
"We could be better on the
line this year than last season
Bolt added. "We will be much
bigger. Rickie Holliday has in-
creased has bench (press)
tremendously, as has Nelson
Smith. Mitchell Smith and Barry
Johnson have both played a lot in
the past and are like starters
already
Na being heavily reauited in
high school, Bdt's high school
ooach told Pirate head coach Pat
Dye that he knew Bolt could play
ooilege ball. Dye took the wad
and Bolt has been starting since
the middle of his freshman vear.
"I feel this made me a much
better player, na being reauited
heavily Bolt said. "I was
probably a la hungrier than a
player that was a big star. I know
I have to play a la.
Bolt also said he liked the
closeness of the team, at ECU.
Since most of the players were na
heavily reauited out of high
school, he said, they always drove
towards improvement. This, he
says, has brought the team into a
closely knitted group.
The tough schedule lined up
fa the Pirates this seasai also
has Bolt excited.
"Every team we play will be
better than last year he stated.
"State is going to be mighty
tough and improved. They'll be
shoaing for us since we beat
them last year
WAYNE BOLT
Dye show rescheduled
This week the Pat Dye show will be seen on Sunday at 6.00 p m It
will feature highlights of the East Carolina-N.C. State game
Again this year the show will be hosted by "The voice of the
Pirates, Jim Woods.
The show will be aired on channel 9 Greenville.
Classifieds
for sale @
SMITH CORONA TYPEWRITER
one portable manual student
model, one funky old upright.
Excellent cond $50.00each. Call
752-4511.
FOR SALE: 1967 Plymouth Fury
III. Hardtop, white with black
vinyl top. 383-V8 engine. Must
Sell! Good Cond. $380.00 but will
Negotiate. Call 752-6713.
FOR SALE Olivetti adding mac. 6
months old, 80.00, 120.00 new.
call 752-5133.
WHIRLPOOL AIR COND. 10,500
btu. Good Cond. 170.00 Call
756-4290.
CROWN IC-150 preamp, JBL SE
460, 80 watts per channel-$300.00
for the pair. Call 746-4898.
1973 FORD TORINO. 4 deer hard
top. Very low mileage, air am
fm stereo, power steering and
brakes. Only 300 miles,on set of
new tires. 2,000.00. Must Sell.
825-7381. Bethel. Ask fa Mike a
loave
STEREO axnplete with built in
turntable, reel to reel, cassette
unit and speakers. 150.00 Sharp
System. Call Elm Villa 752-4349.
COMPACT REFRIGERATOR
freezer stainless steel top w2
burners. Call Vicki 758-6227.
PANASONIC STEREO- Reel to
Reel tape deck, auto reversing.
Excellent cond. $150.00. Call
752-6042.
BOOKTRADER located, caner of
Evans & 11th. Trade your paper-
backs, buy used paperbacks also
comic book-Tues. thru Sat. 9-4
FOR SALE: AKC Basset Hound
females, tri-ooJaed, 10 mos & 4
yr. All shas & housebroken.
$100.00 firm fa each female. Do
na fit into my breeding program.
Bandits Bassets 447-2872.
FOR SALE: Pair of ladies ice
skates size 8. If interested call
"Jo" at 752-0411.
FOR SALE: Maey Boogie Surf-
board '77 $50.00. Twin fins,
excellent conditioi. 758-9655.
FOR SALE: 1974 Honda 360
excellent cond. under 8,000 miles
new tire and battery, elec. star,
only 600.00 Call 752-9600 a carte
by 211C Scott Dorm.
ART STUDENTS- Exhibit and sell
your work oi ansignment in
the Silver Thread, 218-A E. 5th
St. 752-3601. Need ceramics,
feather jewelry, weaving and
other Fibre works.

FOR SALE: Pair of Frazier
Speakers. 8" Woofer, 37 tweeter.
Good Sound. $100.00 Firm.
752-3739.
FOR SALE: Sony TC355 Reel to
Reel Tape Deck. Very Good
Condition. Comes with hook up
and two excellent mikes $150.00
Firm. 752-3739.
FOR SALE Compoient Stereo
System with big sound at a cheap
price. Pioneer PL12 Professional
Turntable. Marantz Model 1060
Console Stereo Amplifier. Hitachi
Model ST-3411 AM-FM Stereo,
Cassette Deck-Recorder
Symphonic Model S-1Q5 8-track
Deck. Large Advent Speakers
with utility cabnet. Approximate
Saleprioe $650.00 Buzz Chip at
758-1437.
FOR SALE: Leather tae bag
(dance bag) Brand new. 50.00 on
best offer. Call 758-8724.
BUNDY TRUMPET and music
stand and case- take best offer
call John Rouse 753-2091.
torrent
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted
to share rent, $145.00 & utilities,
in a one-bedroom apartment
located at 12th & Cotanche.
752-2476.
FEMALE ROOMATE needed to
share 2 bedrm. apt. at Tar River,
205 Apt8, Elm St
personal (�
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Village
Green Apts. Call Carroll at
752-4161, days 746-6112, nights.
LOST: Ring, yellow-gold, black
onyx stone, reward. Call 757-6055
ask fa Dr. Long.
LOST: Dog, white with black
spas, looks like a bird dog. His
name is Oreo and he'll oome if
you call him that. He has a flea
collar with Arkansas tag. About 6
months old. Last seen on campus
and the aher side of 5th street. If
found please call 752-1696 a
cane by 402 Biltmae St. and ask
fa Denny. There is a reward.
LEARN TO BELLY,DANCE
authentic dance lessens by a
professional fa the maith of
Sept. ONLY 25.00! This offer will
na be repeated. Course will be
offered aaoss the street from
Kappa Sigma house within walk-
ing distance of campus on Tues.
and Thurs. nites from 7.00-8.00
P.M. Call 752-5214 fa mae info
a come Sept. 1 at 700. Ladies
only.
HELP WANTED taking applica-
tions fa a part time construction
type job. Must be able to wak
Tuesday and Thursday afternoons
and some Saturdays. Call
758-2300 days and 758-3480
nights. Ask to speak to Rick.
ARABIC DANCE authentic belly
dancing, call Donna Whitley,
experienced teacher and per-
former in Casablanca and
California 752-0928.
WANT TO BUY: 120 mm a
35mm camera. Call Linda, 752-
0385, after 3 p.m.
YOGA LESSONS Turn tension
into energy. Senderize your body
as you renew the elasticity of your
skin and musdes. The oldest
science for a youthful body.
Special introduaion to each area
of your body during the month of
Sept. only 25.00! Within walking
distanoe of campus. Tues and
Thurs. nite 8-9 aaoss from Kappa
Sigma house. Classes begin Sept.
1 Call 752-5214 fa mae info.
Antique Show & Flea Mkt.
Greenville Collect as Club's 6th
annual-Sun Sept. 4, 12-� PM-
at Wcodside Antiques, U.S. 264
West. Info, call 752-3456.
KITTENS to good home call
Rebecca after 5O0 at 752-0102.
FOR SALE: Wet suit, good
design fa waterskiing, exoellent
oondition. 758-9655.
FOR SALE: Twin bed (mattress,
springs, head & feet boards, the
waks!) Like new. One brown arm
chair. Come by 402 Biltmae St.
and ask fa Jim.
72 RED TRIUMPH SPITFIRE
752-8799 ask for Robin.
FOR SALE: Clairol Kindness
3-way Electric Rollers. Also
Clairol "Crazy Curl" curling
wand with steam. Call Margaret
at 758-8230 a cane by 415
Clement.
NEEDED: 1 female roommate, 1
bedroom apt. 3 blocks from
campus. $60 and half utilities.
Call Chariateat 758-7821.
ROOMATE NEEDED (ECU
STUDENT PREFERRED( FOR
TRAILER. Colonial Trailer Park
after 5O0 La 39.Located at
caner of Hwy 11 and 264 ByPass.
ARE YOU WORKING YOUR
WAY THROUGH COLLEGE? Get
ready fa tuition selling wald
famous Avon Produas. High!
Flexible hours. Call 752-7006.
WANTED: A Junior or Sen-
IOR MALE MAJORING IN Mer-
chandizing to work part-time
salesperson. Call 752-9265.
CRAFT CLASSES- Maaame and
weaving dasses, $10.004 weeks.
Sign up now at the Silver Thread,
218-A E 5th St. 752-3601.
Anyone intaested ip faming
a Film Society to make films
generally na seer in this area
available to the , ublic, contact
Charles Lawrence at 752-6388
after 7 p.m. a write to Box 27,
Falkland, N.C. 27827.





Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD September 1.1977
i
I
I
m

Quarterback decision goes down to wire
As the East Carolina Pirates
prepare to open their 1977
football season Saturday night in
Carter Stadium against the Wolf-
pack of North Carolina State, one
question still remains unanswer-
edWho will be the number one
signal caller for the Pirates?
The battle is being waged by
two contenders with about equal
ability, Jimmy Southerland from
Wilmington, N.C and Leander
Green, a native of Jacksonville,
N.C.
When watching the two on the
field, it is hard to pick a dear
victor of the contest. tBoth are
excellent runners, both pass the
ball well, and both are very
familiar with the famed wishbone
offense.
How do these two competitors
view the struggle for supremacy?
"I think both of us can do the
job says Southerland, the
senior signal caller.
"We've both prepared to
run the dub fa a long time, and I
know that whichever one of us
gets the nod, he'll do the job
LEANDER GREEN
JIMMY SOUTHERLAND
EVANS
Continued from page 11
In talking about NC State,
Coach Dye is quick to point out
that State will present the Pirates
with quite a problem. With
quarterback Johnny Evans and
running back Ted Brown, the
Pirates will face a formitable foe.
" I f we were as experienced as
last year, then it would be okay
Dye said. "I'd rather have
someone to open with this year
that we were supposed to beat,
with so much inexperience. But
then we've got to start with
someone and there is a mighty
good motivational fador with a
game like this
I know one thing We will
have to be at our very best to beat
State. They are going to be a
much improved football team.
And if there is a psychological
edge, then it must go to State due
to their losing to us last year.
"I've got to think they will be
much improved. We will probably
face the most skilled people we've
ever played against. Both their
wideouts run a 4.4. Ted Brown is
a super running back and Johnny
Evans is a dangerous young man.
They feel they have the best
center they've ever had. While
their line is young, it's big and
has lots of ability.
"On defense State has more
speed than ever before. They are
experienced at three secondary
positions and have good exper-
ienced people at linebacker and
across the front line. The soph-
mores they plan to pJay Have
outstanding ability and speed
The State-ECU game this year
is not just another game or just an
opening game, this game oould
chart a course fa the whole
season fa both teams. A loss fa
either team would have to hurt
maal, but a win would be a great
start which would carry over into
the entire seaseon.
Another sellout aowd will be
on hand to see what will no doubt
be one of the great games of the
season from two teams that want
to start out the year winning.
special late show
Fri. CrSat. nite
11" pm
GODARD
Sympathy forthe Devil (Kl)
"A movie experience
of major importance
-Canby, NY TIMES
In Ecttmancolor and Englith
Cttpld Product on from New Lin Cmiini
all seats $2.00 (r)
(ireen echoed that statement,
but added that starting was not
that important to him.
"It won't bother me at all if I
don't start the Jacksonville
sophomae stated. "I know that
I'm going to play a lot no matter
what, and that is what is
impatant
Both candidates agree that
they are about equal in terms of
ability, but Southerland feels that
he has one advantage over his
younger rival.
"I feel like I do have more
game experience he said.
"When I came here my freshman
year I was about the 11th team
quarterback, but I soon found
myself at number two. My
sophomae year I played in every
gam and I played in a few
games last year as well, so if
there is any advantage fa me at
all, it's got to be game exper-
ience
Even with the competition
that has been taking place
between these two athletes, nei-
ther one says that it has affeded
their relationship off the field.
"When you're competing
against someone said Souther-
land, "it's hard to be good
friends. But in this case, Leander
and I are pretty good friends. We
talked about this a lot befae
pradice started and we agreed
then that we would not let this
whole thing affed our friend-
ship
"When we get off the field
and back at the dam a even ai
campus adds Green, "wedoi't
really spend much time talking
about football. I can honestly say
that going head to head against
Jimmy has not affected us
negatively in any way
At the start of spring pradice,
Southerland was listed as the top
candidate fa the quarterback
spot, but an injury faced him to
miss all but a oouple of days of
pradice. Meanwhile, Green was
gaining valuable experience.
"I was pretty discouraged
about missing the spring said
Southerland. "Ever since I came
here I have thought about what it
would be like to be the number
one quarterback on the team.
When I was injured, I was afraid
that chance had been lost fa
good
In oontrast, Green feels that
the spring gave him the chance to
show his wares, and moved him
into the position he now shares.
However, both players agree
that starting, although nice and
somewhat prestigious, is not the
basis of success.
"We both know we're going
to play said Green. "It all boils
down to who does the better job
on the field
"Right now, we're both num-
ber one added Southerland,
"and our job is to see that our
team ends up that way
Qmt
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307 Evans St.
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All girls golf outfits and mens golf
slacks 20 off
15 off on all golf clubs and golf
bags
THE TREE HOUSE RESTAURANT
123 E. 5
Greenville
752-7483
N.C.
Mon. and Wed. Night Pizza Special
5-8p.m. $2.49
Ladies Night-Tues. 9-12p.m.
Happy Hour - Wed. Night 8-10p.m.
Free Delivery Service Hours 5-12p.m.
$1.50 Min. for Campus
$3.00 Min. for City





September 1,1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
Field hockey team young but promising
By SAM ROGERS
Staff Writer
In the midst of all the
preseason excitment surrounding
the Pirates football program,
there's another head coach on
campus who's just as exoited as
Pat Dye about her upcoming
season.
The irrepressible Laurie Ar-
rants, head coach of the women's
field hockey team, is out on the
field every morning at 650 with
her team to conduct practice
sessions. Arrants and the rest of
her squad are eagerly anticipa-
ting their season opener Septem-
ber 24, when the Pirates host the
Clemson Tigers.
"I'm really excited about this
year's team said Arrants, now
entering her third season as head
coach. "The girls we've got out
here have made up their minds
t they' re going to be ready. They
' have shown a tremendous amount
of enthusiasm and I'm expecting
much improvement from this
team despite their youth
Last year the Pirates posted a
7-7-2 overall record. Seven start-
ers are returning from that squad.
Arrants indicated that this
year the team will switch to a
systems type game cm the field
instead of the "Traditional" style
which the Pirates have used
during the last two season.
"The traditional style of play
was simply using designated
players in designated areas on the
field explained Arrants. "The
systems strategy works much like
basketball with several different
patterns and formations we can
switch to during the game. It will
open up the game and provide a
faster paced game for us
Sophomore Kathy Zwigard
and senior Linda Christian are the
Pirates top two otrensive piayets
back from last year. Zwigard, a
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cuprofifuruRf reeerence j
native of Lawrenoeville, N.J. was
the team's leading scorer with ten
goals while Christian, from War-
ren, N.J scored three goals from
her winq position.
" Kathy's an extremely ag-
gressive player with excellent
quickness said Arrants. "Linda
matured into a very steady player
last year and I'm counting on her
to assume a lot of responsibility
on the field this yea Since both
of them play on the same side of
the field they really oompliment
each other. They'll be the key to
our offense
Susan Saltzer. a soohomore
from Cherry Hill, N.J returns to
the team after sitting out last
season because of personal prob-
lems. She was a top offensive
performer during her freshman
year and will be playing at either
wing or halfback.
Defensively, the Pirates will
look to senior Beth Beam, who
will be at the centerback position.
Beam, a native of Springfield,
Pa made the Deep South
All-Star 3rd team in last year's
Deep South tournament and will
be calling the signals on defense
for the Pirates.
She'll get help from junior
halfback Montine Swain, labeled
by Arrants as one of the "tough-
est" players on the team, along
with junior halfback Sally Burch,
who was the goalkeeper last
season.
The all important goalkeeper
position will be manned by Leigh
Sumner, a freshman from Newton
Grove, N.C. who has never
played field hockey until last
spring. She attended a field
hockey camp this summer at
Appalachian State where instruc-
tors were simply amazed at her
natural ability. Arrants feels
Sumner "has everything it takes
to beoome a tough goalie
Sue Jones is another top
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FOUNTAINHEAD REGRETS THAT THE
AI) FOR CLIFF'S SEAFOOD WHICH
APPEARED IN THE AUGUST 30 ISSUE
WAS IN ERROR. THE AD LISTED
CRABCAKES AT 99 IT SHOULD HAVE
READ "crabcakes91JMT.
FOUNTAINHEAD APOLOGIZES TO
CLIFF'S AND THOSE STUDENTS WHO
WERE INCONVENIENCED BY THE
MISTAKE.
freshman prospect who could
break into the starting lineup. She
scored eight goals last season for
her Bayside High School team
and was highly recruited by other
college teams.
"We're facing another highly
competitive schedule this year
said Arrants. "We've got Duke,
Carolina, Wake Forest, and High
Point on our schedule along with
some stiff competition in tourna-
ments. We've got to continue to
improve fundamentally and ma-
ture quickly to be competitive this
season
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY 1977 FIELD HOCKEY SCHEDULE
10:00 a.m.
4:00 pm
10:00 am
330 pm
All Day
130 pm
400 pm
lOflOam
330 pm.
TBA
Sept. 24Clemson Univ.Greenville, N.C.
Sept. 29Duke UniversityGreenville, N.C.
Oct.1UNC-GreensboroGreensboro, N.C
Oct.4UNC-Chapel HillGreenville, N.C.
Oct.8Winthroplnvita.Rock Hill, S.C.
Oct.9Davidson CollegeDavidson, N.C.
Oct. 13Old Dominion U.Norfolk, Va.
Oct.15High Point Col.Greenville, N.C.
Oct.21Wake Forest U.Winston-Sal em
Nov. 4-6Deep South Tour.Greenville, S.C. (FurmanUniv.)
Tonight Thru Sunday
At The Elbo Room
'DAZZLE4
Fri. 3-7 Beat State Pep Rally
with Dazzle
Every Sun. is ladies night
HI HODGES
Free ECU T-Shirt
with any shoe purchase
r �
j-
K
KB
�H
to
'�'�� . -�
.
All swimming supplies
and Official
ECU P.E. uniforms
available
Pat's Hats still available
210 East 5th St. 752-4156





16 FOUNTAINHEAD September 1, 1977
Roger's Family Restaui
; now in Pirate Country
Come on in and try
our delicious Western
Fried Chicken. It's
great to carry out to
the ballgame!
"The best
of the fresh
waitin' in convenient carry-
out paks of 8 and 10. There's
a big 20pc. pak too for under
SI0.00. The whole gang can
enjoy it
8pc. pak-$3.90
12pc. pak-$5.75
20pc. pak- $8.95
You've got my word
on it, pardner.
Don't forget to include some
helpin's of our crisp, western
fries an' fresh cole slaw, too.
So, c'mon in and carry-out
our famous fried chicken to
Wolfpack Country this
week-end.
10 discount on any
chicken purchase
of SI0.00
or more.
Yes Pirates,
We Now Have Breakfast, Also!
THIS COUPON GOOD FOR
gj 25� OFF
t ON ANY BREAKFAST ITEM LISTED BELOW
Blueberry Waffle Scrambled Eggs and Sausage
Waffle and Sausage Creamed Chipped Beef
FAMILY
RESTAURANT
MonSat. 630 A.M1030 A.M.
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LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER
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e TimeCall Ahead and Reserve Your Order
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Your order will be weitin' for youl


stop in at any of our Raleigh Locations Hillsborough St. 832-4256
Western Blvd. 833-7898
� . � - � ��:�� .





Title
Fountainhead, September 1, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 01, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.597
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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