Fountainhead, August 30, 1977







Serving the campus com-
munity fa over 50 years.
With a circulation of 8,500,
this issue is 24 pages.
Fountainhead
. MMn5 East Carolina University Greenville, North Carolina 30 August 1977
Vol. 5o, ro. ������i���� Asm
ON THE INSDE
SU Boardpage 3
N.O.R.M.Lpage 11
'77 Rosterpage 18
Bus Schedules page 8
Greenville, North Carolina
Soda shop needs
completion funds
ByLYNNCAVERLY
Staff Writer
The renovation of the Student
Supply Store soda shop will be
completed as soon as funds have
been appropriated, according to
Curtis May, assistant manager of
the ECU bookstore.
According to May, approxi-
mately $5,000 ' has been spent
so far on renovations of the
bookstore and soda shop comp-
lex, located in Wright annex.
"The bookstore is complete
now in respect to any major
touch-up painting and other
minor details remain to be done
by the contractors" stated May.
"When bids were first taken
on the project, a decision had to
be made whether to scratch the
entire project or to push comple-
tion on the bookstore a the soda
iop one, because the bids were
high said May.
"The decision to go with the
bookstore appeared to have been
the best one in the interest of the
students said May.
When the approximately
8,800 sq. ft. soda shop is finished,
it will be in the design of the
THE RENOVA TED STUDENT SUPPLY Store lacks only a little polishing to be complete.
Photo by Pete Podeszwa)
hanges said May. "Only some Croatan, said May.
Vehicle towing extended to include all offenses
ByLYNNCAVEPLY
Staff Writer
Towing of vehicles wrongly
parked on campus was extended
to include all offenses, effective
Sunday night, according to
Campus Chief of Security, Joe
Calder.
Ticketing and towing of cars
STUDENTS ARE REGISTERING their bicydes to keep them from being '�" by pooeszm
parked on grass and blocking of
traffic began last week, said
Calder.
The priority system is in
effect now in which first priority is
given to cars parked on the grass,
second, to unregistered vehicles,
third, to vehicles in no-parking
areas, and fourth, to illegally
parked , or freshmen vho park in
the wrong areas, Calder said.
"Usually about a week after
registration , we have about
3,000 registered student cars, and
about 1,000 registered staff
cars said Calder.
"This year, because of the
semester system, last year's
parking decals are still good until
September said Calder.
" When the crux of registering
vehides is over, I expect there
will be about 1,500-1,600 register-
ed dorm vehicles, and about 1,800
registered day vehicles
Additional parking lots have
been established, but it will be
until December when they are
straightened out, according to
Calder.
One lot is located on land the
University bought between 8th
and 9th Streets, and the other is
located on the hill. Also, work is
not complete on the lot located on
Cotanche between 7th and 8th
Streets, according to Calder.
The rental parking spaces
located in front of the drama
building have had good response,
said Calder.
"Of the allotted student
places, there are two left as of
August 26 said Calder.
"Also, there are only two
spaces allotted for faculty park-
ing. But these spaces are rented
on a first-come-first-served basis
So, if four students oome to rent
them, we will rent them out to
them said Calder.
"The spaces rent fa 90.00 a
year, "said Calder.
ECU experiences acute housing shortag
ByJOE BALLANCE
Staff Writer
ECU is experiencing its worst
housing shortage in years, ac-
cording to Housing I "�tor Dan
Wooten.
University officials are optim-
istic, however, that more housing
will become available as the year
progresses.
Wooten stad the waiting list
that reached 200 during the
summer has already dwindled to
about 20. Nearly all the remaining
students on the list are men,
according to Wooten.
In addition to the marked
redjction of students on the
waiting list, student traffic for
off-campus housing has slowed,
according to Wooten.
Wooten said many students
who were on the waiting list
looked elsewhere fa housing, a
decided to delay enrollment until
spring semesta.
Some students failed to pull
up their grade point averages
during summer school and were
not eligible to return to school this
semester, and some decided at
the last minute not to return to
school, said Wooten.
Some incoming freshmen
have found themselves with an
extra roomate. Jones damitay
has 28 rooms with three oc-
cupants, accading to Wooten.
Three women's dorms,
Cotten, Fleming, and Jarvis have
15 rooms among them with three
occupants All such over-loading
should be eliminated within a few
weeks, accading to Wooten.
ECU has 5,539 spaces avail-
able in the residence halls Of
these, 3,239 spaces are reservea
fa women while 2,300 are
allotted to the men.
WECU moves toward FM
ByKENTYNDALL
Assistant News Edita
Campus radio station WECU
has been making plans to go FM
fa the past few years This year,
howeva, the idea of changing
WECU to FM is top prkTity,
according to WECU General
Managa, Rob Maxon.
WECU, located on the second
floor of the old wing of Joyna
Library, is presently an AM
station run on carrier current to
the dams and various other
campus buildings. Campus radio
can only be received in those
buildings which are hooked up by
special telephone loops.
ECU used to have an FM
station, WWWS, but the trans-
mitta blew up and an antenna
was malfunctioning. This caused
WWWS to loose its license,
because funds would not permit
the replacement of the damaged
equipment, accading to Maxon.
An FM station would allow the
radio station to better send its
signal on campus, also including
the Greenville area.
Maxon and Chief Engineer
John Jester are looking in depth
to the possibilities of going FM.
WECU would probably be a
10-watt educational station, but
(there are possibilities of obtaining
much more power.
Accading to Maxon, it would
take anywhere from six months to
one year to obtain a Federal
Communications Commission
license after applying fa one.
Maxon said a 10-watt educa-
See WECU page 5.





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Flashes
Page 2 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 August 1977
Soccer
Dental test Law test
Chairperson Freshman
There will be an organiza-
tional meeting of the Greenville
soccer club on Wednesday,
August 31, at 700 in the Elm St.
gym. All those interested are
urges to attend or oontact Terry
Flanagan at 752-2186.
Anyone interested in filing fa
Fall elections chairperson or
committee should file in the SGA
office, Room 218 Mendenhall
Student Center, as soon as
possible.
Tournaments
All full-time students, pick up
your information today oonoern-
ing the ACU -1 tournaments to be
conducted this semester by
Mendenhall Student Center.
Tournaments will be conducted in
chess, billiards, bowling, and
table tennis. If participation is
substandal, final winners will
represent ECU in the regional
tournaments in Blacksburg, Va.
Detailed information ooncerning
all aspects of the competition is
available at the Billiards and
Bowling Centers, Mendenhall
Student Center.
Rentals
Whether you'd like to polish
up your game with some steady
practice or invite three friends
along fa some friendly competi-
tion, you can rent a cowling lane
to use fa one hour and it only
costs $2.50 Lane rentals are
available at the Mendenhall
Student Center every Saturday
from 1200 Noon until 6O0 PM.
Stop by and try it out; it's a great
way to spend an hour.
Rugby
There will be a meeting of all
those interested in playing on the
ECU Rugby dub Wednesday,
August 31, at 7.00 in Roan 102 of
Memaia! Gym. This will be an
aganizatioial meeting so all old
members are urged to attend. If
you can't make the meeting call
Bob Davis at 758-5279 befae
Wednesday
Tickets
There are still plenty of
student and guest tickets fa the
ECU-Duke football game to be
played on September 10 in
Wallace Wade Stadium in
Durham. The price is $5.00 fa
student tickets and $8.00fa guest
tickets. Get your tickets early and
avotd the rush befae the game
Golf
Anyone interested in going
out fa the ECU golf team should
come to the meeting in Room 145,
Minges Coliseum, at 7 00Thurs
Sept 1st
Freshman Registers should be a
in by the end of September. I 61111 IS
Registers may be picked up at
that time in the SGA Vice
President's office.
Swimming
The first team meetings fa
both the men's and women's
swim teams will be Thursday,
September 1 at 3:30 in Room 145,
Minges Coliseum. This meeting
is mandatay fa anyaie interest-
ed in swimming this seasai.
Bahai
The opening meeting of Bahai
Assodation fa the fall semester
will be held Thursday evening at
7:30 in Room 238 Mendenhall. A
film oi the Bahai Faith will be
shown and there will be friends
there to answer your questions on
this newest of the World
Religions. Guests are weloome.
Fun in the Son
Fun in the Son; Fa fun and
fellowship, drop by Room 221,
Mendenhall, 7.00 Thursday
night. (Campus Crusade for
Christ).
Snow-Ski
The ECU Snow-Ski dub will
hold an aganizatioial meeting
Thursday afternoon September 1
at 4O0 in Room 108 Memaial
Gym. Plans will be discussed fa
the Thanksgiving trip to
Snowshoe West Virginia. A limit-
ed number of plaoes are avail-
able. Plarib fa the Christmas trip
to Beech Mountain and other
adivities will also be discussed.
Pep Rally
There will be a beat State pep
rally on the ECU campus
September 1, starting at 700 at
Greene dorm and ending at
Fioklin Stadium. Last pradice
under the lights before the
Pirates beat State! The public is
invited to attend.
Crafts
Students, faculty and staff,
your Crafts Center is now open
Located on the ground floa of
Mendenhall Stedent Center, the
Crafts Center offers facilities fa
wak m a wide variety of aafts.
The Center's new hours are 300
PM until $0.00 PM, Monday
through Friday, and 1000 AM
until 3O0 PM, Saturday. Drop by
and find put what the Crafts
Center is all about1
All male students wanting to
tryout fa the 1977-78 men's
varsity tennis team should attend
the meeting that will be held
Thursday September 1 at 7:30 in
Room 142, Minges Coliseum.
Bowling
All students interested in
faming a bowling league should
attend an aganizatioial meeting
at Moiday, September 5 at 7:30
PM in the Mendenhall Student
Bowling Center.
Manager
Anyone interested in becom-
ing a manager fa the ECU men's
basketball team is urged to oome
by Coach Larry Gillman'soffice in
Minges Coliseum as soon as
possible. There are several open-
ings.
SGA
Any person interested in
applying for SGA Attorney
General should oome by the SGA
office 218 Mendenhall student
Center and fill out an application.
Hours
Free play hours in Mjnges and
Memaial Gymnasiums are as
follows:
Minges Coliseum:
MonThurs. 8-11 PM
Friday 8-10PM
Saturday 10AM-9PM
Sunday 2-9PM
Memaial Gymnasium
Moi-Friday 3-10PM
Saturday dosed
Sunday 2-9PM
All gyms will be dosed from
6O0 PM Friday until Tuesday
maning during the Laba Day
weekend.
Homecoming
There will be a honecoming
Steering oommittee meeting on
Thursday, September 1 at 3 O0 in
Room 221, Mendenhall Student
Center Please plan to attend.
Billiards
Students interested in faming
a billards league are invited to
attend a meeting scheduled foe
Monday, September 12, at 7:30
PM in the Billiards Center,
Mendenhall Student Center
The Dental Aptitude Test will
be offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday, Odober
8, 1977.
Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to Division
of Educational Measurements,
American Dental Association, 211
East Chicago Avenue, Chicago,
lllinios, 60011 to arrive by Sep-
tember 12, 1977. These applica-
tions are also available at the
Testing Center, Room-105,
Speight Building, East Carolina
University.
MCAT
The final test date fa the
Medical College Admission Test
(MCAT) fa 1977 will be offered
on Saturday, Odober 1, 1977.
Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to MCAT
Registration, The American Col-
lege Testing Program, P.O. Box
414, Iowa City, Iowa 52240 to
arrive no later than September 2,
1977. These applications are also
available at the Testing Center,
Room-105, Speight Building, East
Carolina University.
GRE
The Graduate Reoad Exami-
nation will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
Odober 15, 1977.
Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to Educa-
tional Testing Service, Box 966-R,
Prinoeton, NJ 08540 to arrive by
September 19, 1977. Applicatios
may be obtained from the Testing
Center, Room-105, Speight Buil-
ding, East Carolina University.
Refrigerators
The SGA still has 100 refri-
gerators available fa fall semes-
ter rental. Rent is $38.00 fa the
year a $21.00 per semester, plus
a $10.00 safety deposit. Come by
Room 231, Mendenhall, SGA
Refrigerata Offioe.
BUG
There will be a meeting of the
Buocanneer staff in the Buc offioe
on Wednesday, August 31 at
4:30. If you cannot attend, call
757-6501 between 12:30 and 5.00
The Law School Admission
Test will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
Odober 8, 1977.
Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to Educa-
tional Testing service, Box 966-R,
Prinoeton, NJ 08540 to arrive by
September 8, 1977. Applications
are available at the Testing
Center, Room-105, Speight Buil-
ding, East Carolina University.
01' Waylon
The pride ui iuienbach.
Texas, Waylon Jennings, will be
featured this Friday night from
7-8 p.m. on WECU's Artist
Series. Artist Series is heard
only on 57 AM. WECU!
Legislature
Anyone interested in filing fa
SGA legislative positions, day o
dorm representatives, should
oome by the SGA offioe to file
befae September 7.
Free concert
The Popular Entertainment
Committee brings you the first of
hopefully many good shows to-
night free on the mall. The 10th
Ave. Band will rock & roll you
tonight at 8 p.m. If you missed
them last week at the Elbo
Room, don't miss this free show
toight. If you saw them, then
oome on! Vou know how good
they are. Bring yourself, your
goods and your friends and raise
hell. (In case of rain, the show wiil
still be free in Wright Audito-
ium.)
Gamma beta
The Lamda Chapter of the
Gamma Beta Phi Society will have
its first meeting on Thursday,
September 1. The meeting will
start at 7:00 in Room 244,
Mendenhall. All members should
attend this meeting.
WECU news
Anyone interested in waking
fa the WECU news department
should oontad the WECU News
Direda immediately
Interested persons should call
757-6657 to make an appoint-
ment. Openings indude posttiais
fa news writers and broadcas-
ters. No experience is necessary.
Interpersonal research
Unmarried undergraduates between the ages of 18 and 24 who are
battered bylf-consdousness and lack of oonfidenoe around members
of the opposite sex, are invited to participate in a research prqed
comapring several methods intended to promote less self
oonsdouuiess in heterosexual interpersonal situations.
Your partidpatio will improve your understanding of the methods
by whidn college people might learn to be more natural, less tense.a nd
less inhibited around members of the opposite sex
If you are interested in participating in this project, please oontad
(by mail a by phaie), Dai Marcus, Department of Psydiology, ECU,
Greenville, N.C. 27834-a leave your name, address, and phone
number with the seaetary at 757-6800.
The projed requires about aie hour per week fa six weeks.
DF





I SWfffig-�y: ?
: � �
SU accepting Board applications
30 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 3
By CINDY BROOME
News Editor
The Student Union will accept
applications from day students,
starting today, for two day
student posit ions on the SU Board
of Directors, according to Dennis
Ramset, SU president.
The SGA treasurer and
speaker of the legislature posi-
tions were ousted from the board
last spring.
Ramsey said it was unfair for
the SGA to have input on the SU
Board.
"The Student Union is no
longer under the SGA he said.
"They (SGA) don't do anything
for us
Members of the board include
Men's Residence Council (MRC)
and Women's Residence Council
(WRC) presidents, Intre-Frater-
nity Council (IEC) and Panhei-
lenic presidents, SGA president,
a representative of the faculty, a
representative of the chancellor,
Associate Dean of Student Affairs
Rudolph Alexander, and SU
president Dennis Ramsey, the
latter two being ex-officio board
members.
Ramsey siad there was a need
to have two day students on the
board to offset the dorm students
(MRC and WRC presidents).
Among the responsibilities of
the board is to select the
president, authorize
establishment of committees, ap-
1
flMItfK
prove the budget, approve pres-
idential appointment of commit-
tee chairpersons and establish
and enforce the politics fa the
Student Union, according to
Ramsey
The committees of the Student
Union are the Art Exibition,
Artist Series, Coffeehouse,
Entertainer, Films, Lecture
Series, Minority Arts, Popular
Entertainment, Theatre Arts, and
Travel committees.
Applications may be picked up
at the SU office on the second
floor of Mendenhall Student
Center or at the Information
Desk.
Day students may turn them
in starting today, through Sept. 9
at 5 p.m.
� II1 :I l1
1 1! '1�
.
,
��UI:
v�J �'
T
Semester schedule
September 5, Monday-Labor Day Holiday
October 3-14-Change of major
October 6, Thursday-Last day to drop an undergraduate course
or withdraw from school
October 10-14-Pre-registration fa Spring Semester
November 23, Wednesday-10 p.m. Thanksgiving Holiday begins
November 28, Mcnday-8a.m. Classes resume. Last day to drop a
graduate course without special permission
December 9, Friday-Classes end
December 10, Saturday-Common exams
December 12, Monday-Reading Day
December 13, Tuesday-Exams begin
December 17, Saturday-Commoi exams
December 20, Tuesday-10 p.m. Exams fa Fall Semester dose
DROP-ADD BEGINS EARLY; this photo was taken ar 7 a.m. on the first day of drop-add.
Photo by Pete Podeszwa
This week at the
ELBO
ROOM
Tues. - TIMES SQUARE
Wed. thru Sun. - DAZZLE
1
mm
BIGGS DRUG STORE
300 EVANS- ON- THE-MALL
DOWNTOWN
PHONE: 752-2136
FREE PRESCRIPTION PICKUP
AND DELIVERY
OLD FASHION SODA FOUNTAIN
DRINKS MADE THE WAY YOU
LIKE THEM: FRESHLY SQUEEZED
LEMONADES AND ORANGEADES-
MILKSHAKES MADE WITH ICE CREAM!
PRESCRIPTION DEPT WITH MEDICA TION
PROFILES: JOUR PRESCRIPTION ALWAYS
AT OUR FINGERTIPS, EVEN THOUGH YOU
MAY LOSE YOUR Rx BOTTLE.
COSMETICS-
SUNDRIES-
TOILETRIES-
DELIVERfo TO
YOUR DOOR
GREETING CARDS-
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
TIMEX WATCHES
COSTUME JEWELRY
ATHLETIC SUPPORTS,
CON VALESCENT SUPPLIES,
FIRST-AID SUPPLIES
SUNGLASSES BY FOSTER
GRANT AND COOL RAY
!
- i
-� n.� q0tj0wWXH0lB





Editorials
Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 August 1977
Ficklen expands as
academics shrink
This editorial appeared in the June 15 edition of FOUNTAINHEAD.
The staff felt it important enough to be reprinted for the regular
student body to read.
While funds for the expansion of Fioklen stadium
are continuing to pour in and seven-foot centers are
being signed on for the ECU basketball team,
academic scholarship funds are being used to help
repay a $400,000 loan secured for the expansion of
the Students' Supply Store.
Many university officials, as well as generous
alumni are obviously under the impression that a
school's reputation depends on its athletic program
and the success of its sports teams. Fine for the
officials and alumni, but the students are paying for
this misguidance.
According to Dr. John H. Home, Dean of
admissions, academic standards, and consequently
the school's reputation for academic excellence, are
affected by three things: admissions requirements,
retention requirements and scholarship funding.
However, the ECU students are being led to believe
that their school's reputation depends on a student
supply store with a 100,000 square-feet sales area
and an enormous football stadium equipped with a
$500,000 press box a 150-seat chancellor's guest
box, and an elevator, not to mention seven-foot
centers.
For an institution originally designed for higher
education, the officials seem to be doing everything
to de-emphasize academics and emphasize athletics.
Not a penny has been touched of the athletic
scholarship funds to help pay back this supply store
expansion loan. And half of the $2.5 million reserve
funds were dished out for the stadium expansion. But
the scant funds set aside for academic scholarships
have been totally wiped out.
Not only have these funds been depleted, but
when the academic scholarship program is reinsta-
ted, it will be cut from the usual $60,000 to
$30-40,000, according to Robert M. Bordreaux,
financial aid offioer.
So the Scholarships, Fellowships and Financial
Aid Committee has decided to place extra emphasis
on National Merit scholarships which have not been
affected by the cut. But according to Suzie Stearn,
vice-president of the League of Scholars and student
member of the committee, the success of this task is
not a sure thing. ECU does not have a reputation fa-
attracting National Merit scholars. And with this
further cut in ECU'S reputation for academic
importance and excellence, increasing this proba-
bility looks extremely doubtful.
A school's reputation for academic excellence or
non-excellence depends on the quality of the
students in that xhool, not on how big a stadium or
how manv soorts heroes it has. By discontinuing the
academic suncnarship fund program for an indefinite
period of time, ECU is also discontinuing itsquest for
academic respectability.
While a larger stadium and -unlimited athletic
scholarship funds are helping pack the football and
basketball teams with super-stars, more and more
ECU graduates are unemployed because graduates
from universities with reputations for academic
superiority are beating them out of jobs.
Almost $1.5 million remains dormant in the
Reserve Funds since Ficklen Stadium took its cut.
These funds could be used to help pay the supply
store's loan and ECU could continue its academic
scholarship program.
The university officials and alumni are either
going to have to get their priorities straightened out,
or this school is going to be left with a dozen scholars,
a huge book store, ond an athletic complex the size of
northern New Jersey.
Z&-
Rl)D I EXPECTED f PRlACTE ROOM!
Something's got to give
The ECU dormitories are
filled 100 per osnt this fall.
Students, although welcome to
apply, need the luck of a
leprechaun to get into the city's
low income housing units by
graduation. Landowners in this
budding metropolis continue
building townhousecomplexes
renting at two arms, one and a
half legs.
Greenville's housing shortage
for ECU students is critical, and
something's got to give.
According to Robert Usury,
director of Institutional Research,
ECU will "never again" build
another dormitory, nor will the
old dorms, when crumbled and
fallen, be replaced.
According to Sally Streeter,
director of tenant affairs for
Greenville, students do not us-
ually qualify for low income
housing. In order to get into one
of the units, one must have lived
in the city 12 months prior to
application, be part of a "family"
(i.e more than one person
seeking a unit, related by blood or
marriage), and be willing to sit at
the end of a waiting list of 400
people. Although 541 units now
stand in Greenville and 111 more
are presently under construction,
Streeter says a student would be
"extremely lucky to get one of
these apartments by the time he
or she graduated
Finding an apartment or, God
forbid, a small house in or around
Greenville is a oommon joke
among ECU students. Several
oomplexes have been built over
the last two years. But these
architectural beauties rent for
more tnan even a daddy s girl can
afford without a loan. And why
not? Landowners in Greenville
have a captive audience, more
than ready to plunk down their
summer savingson any roach bed
with walls they can find.
The city could build low
income housing exclusively for
students. Landowners could build
apartment oomplexes without bay
windows, balconies and shag
carpet. ECU could take care of its
own and build one or two more
"Cottens
Forum
BUC goes back to work
To Fountainhead:
With the opening of school, all
organizations on campus get back
to work, and so it goes with the
BUCCANEER. Our year will
officially get started on Wednes-
day, August 31 st at 4:30 when we
have our first staff meeting.
Previous experience isn't neces-
sary. All you need is a whole-
hearted interest and a willingness
to work a few late hours. Anyone
may attend, so if you'd like to see
what it's all about, stop by the
BUC office Wednesday after-
noon. We'll be glad to have you
on staff.
Sincerely,
Susan Rogerson, Editor
1978 BUCCANEER
Fountainhead
Serving the East Carolina community for over fifty years.
Senior EditorKim j Devins
Production ManagerBob Glover
Advertising ManagerRobert 9vaim
News EditorCindy Broome
Trends EditorMichael Futch
SX)rtsEdJtorAnneHogge
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of East Carolina
University sponsored by the Student Government Association of
ECU and ,s distributed each Wednesday during the summer,
and twice weekly during the school year.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville, N.C. 27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309
Subscriptions: $10.00 annually.





Interpreters aid the
hearing impaired
30 Augu 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Hm 5
By DOUG WHITE
Assistant News Editor
Public response to sign lang-
uage dasses has been "super
according to Mike Ernest,
Director of the Program for
Hearing Impaired Students.
The non-credit dasses are
held on the second floor of Joyner
Library from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Tuesdays and from 7 p.m. to 8:30
p.m. on Thursday evenings.
Each time period has a
beginning and an intermediate
dass.
Persons completing the dass-
es may redeve jobs as dassroom
interpreters for hearing impaired
students.
"Classroom interpreters are
paid 3 an hour, and notetakers
redeve 2.30 an hour said
Ernest.
Ernest said that notetakers
were necessary because hearing
impaired students could not
watch the interpreter and take
notes simulyaneously.
"We are very pleased both
with the response to the sign
language dasses and with com-
memts redeved from, students
and instrudors whose dasses use
an interpreter.
"The initial distradion of the
interpreter wears off after the
first 15 or 20 minutes of dass
said Ernest.
"One problem concerning
hearing impaired students that
has not yet been fully approached
is the one of foreign language
requirements.
One solution employed by
other schools with programs such
as ours is substituting a foreign
history or dvilization oourse
said Ernest.
According to Ernest, there are
presently only seven impaired
students redeving the services
offered by his department, but
thatnumber is expeded to in-
crease as the program beconttw
better known.
Similar classes held on
campus this summer were attend-
ed by over 200 students and
faculty, according to Ernest.
Persons interested in the free
sign language dasses, serving as
notetaker if a deaf student is in
one of their dasses, or in tutoring
a cJeaf student should contad
either Mike En ' Crras Luke,
2ff brewster builumg 757-6729.
DROP ADD UNES move slowly, and many people stand in line for hours. Photo by Pete Podeezvm)
WECU
Continued from page 1.
tional station would cost approx-
imately $5,000 to $10,000 where a
1,000 to 3,000-watt station would
run between $15,000 and $30,000.
This cost would indude equip-
ment, a construdion permit, and
engineering fees.
Maxon also said there is a
possibility of going FM by the fall
of 1978.
"There is a definite need for
FM to provide Eastern North
Carolina with an alternative radio
station said Maxon. "But,
there is a great need of adminis-
trative help, as well as student
support
WECU staffers have been
hard at work this year preparing
the station for oepration. A lot of
maintenance and technical work
has been done.
Chief Engineer John Jeeter
has repaired and tuned all of the
transmitters, which should re-
lieve the "buzz" or "hum" that
the station signal carried last
year.
WECU plans to be on the air
by Wednesday, August 31. A
contest is scheduled for the first
week of operation.
Many new ideas have been
put to use this year.
"We are out to meet the
needs of our listeners said
Maxon.
News
writers
needed!
Call
757-S366.
Pi
� $&
�J � .
�- .
factory
for blue bell apparel r
Fall & Winter Sportswear For Ladies
SAVINGS UP TO 50-75
Starts Thursday
Blouses Gauchos
Boot Pants
Corduroy Slacks
Special Group of Suspender Jeans $9.88
Hours 1(A.MIM. Moiir'ri. .
IOA.M6P.M. Sal.
Greenville Square Shopping Onler
Master Charge & Visa Card Weleome





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 Auguat 1977

-
� � .
KROGER SAV-ON S HERE WITH QUALITY,
VARIETY AND WEEKLY SPECIALS THAT
ADD UP TO
oorec
THROUGHOUT THE STORE!
TOGETHER AT LAST
FOOD & DRUGS UNDER
ONE ROOF!
Just park your car onoe, browse through our wide, uncluttered aisles,
check out once, let us carry out your parcelsand you've done the
biggest part of your weekly shopping at Kroger Sav-On. This easy,
pleasant way of one-stop shopping will make even more sense when
you've compared our store-wide low prices with those you've been
paying!
Sb
on
FOODDI0JG
HAS QUALITY MEATS, FARM-
FRESH PRODUCE, AN IN- STORE
BAKERY, A DELICATESSEN
RESTAURANT, COSMETICS, AND A
FULL- SERVICE PHARMACY!
OPEN
7A.M. 'til MIDNIGHT
Monday fhru Saturday
9A.M. 'til 8P.M.
Sunday
back-to-school
shopping list
200-COU1NT
0 FILLER PAPER3f'$1
3-RIlNG ASST
0 VINYL BINDERS$119
0 LABEL MAKER79
DUO-TANG
0 DUO-PORT PORTFOLIOS 19
12-INCH
0 PLASTIC RULERS9L,
STYLETTE
0 A-JUSTA-LAMP$3"
5-PACK
0 BIC PENS68
ASSORTKU COLORS
0 FLAIR PENS3f $1
80Z
0 ELMERS, GLUE77
PLASTIC
0 DRAWER ORGANIZERS77
10-PACK
� DRAWS-A-LOT ftCK
M WATERCOLORS CRAYONS
ASSORTED
0 DUO-TANG FOLDERS91�
WKKKSKKVK IIIKKK.in HMIM.r OI AMII lls
� .��





�IVPnfl9BINHgFMVBVMHMK9MHBBH&
1
30Augu�tl977 FOUN7AINHEAD
West Texas city turns garbage into gold
fPNCa This Wp5 Tcvac ��w f . .
(PNS) This West "texas city
o9f 90,000 is turning garbage into
gold. The first American city to
recycle all its daily waste, Odessa
has not only cut its expenses but
may even soon make a profit from
its garbage coTection.
The Odessa formula goes like
this: The city's green water
(treated sewage effluent) is pas-
sed to a sub-oontractor, who
stockpiles it and puts in on
agricultural land near the sewage
treatment plant on the south side
of the city
Its solid waste goes to a
recovery center on the northwest
side of twon for sorting, shred-
ding and grinding. This proces-
sed material is then spread over
ranchland, where it will even-
tually convert itself into compost
in the soil and improve ailing
prairie grass so as to feed more
cattle and provide ritore beef.
Extracted metals are sold.
And with the current rising trend
in pig-iron prices, this alone may
pay the $800,000 cost of the
recycling plant vfcWri another
five to eight years.
"Garbage is golden said
Dr. Geoffrey B. 9tanford, who
designed the Odessa recycling
system. "We cannot affcrd to
throw it away
While pointing out that the
recycling program is still in the
experimental stages, city officials
are delighted with results so far.
"It (the recycling process) has
tremendous potential, both here
and around the world says Jim
Reese, a stockbroker who has
mayor of Odessa when the
program was started. "People
have come from all over to look at
the techniques being applied
here
City Manager Ron Neighbors
describes the recycling program
as "still experimental but going
very well We have learned a lot
and have proved some things
he says, "though it will be
another year or two before we'll
know definitely about the soil
enrichment aspects of it
Odessa's household garbage
is collected twice a week without
the customary spillage and bash-
ing of cans. Groups of neighbors
-hare big city-owned bins, which
are placed along the alleys back of
their homes.
Householders are urged to
keep the containers and alleys
dean. Undue neglect may bring a
warning ticket or even a tele-
phone call from City Hall.
mm "�" pnone can from City Hal
ECU trestle message welcomes affiliates
Motorists enterin the heart I
Greenville and the ECU campus
on South Charles Street now are
being greeted by a brightly paint-
ed train trestle that crosses
above this busy thoroughfare.
For several hundred yards, as
the five-land artery dips past the
University's athletic complex, the
hugh lettering ECU, in purple on
a gold background can be seen at
the center steel plated structure.
Then, as one nears the overpass,
the rest of the messaae aoDears.
"Welcome toHome of the
Pirates
"We hope the sign will
generate increased school spirit
and provide a warm welcome to
friends, students and alumni
returnina to the ECU campus via
MUCH WORK AND negotiating has resulted in the
new purple and gold sign painted across the
Southern Railway tram trestle on South Charles
street Left to right) Clyde B. Bailiff, assistant
superintendent, Eastern Division Southern Railway
System; John F. Jack Minges, president of
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co Dr. Robert holt, vice
Chancellor for ECU Administration and Planning;
Max Joyner, president of the ECU Alumni
Association; Don Leggett, director of ECU Alumni
Affairs; and Rob vy hit ley, V.P. ofA.B. Whitley Inc.
Photo by ECU News Bureau)
I!
T
Serv
Jim's
A
i
Offers you Free Pick � ups & Deliveries to the
College Dorms Every Tuesday and Thursday
Nights between 6:30 � till.
Still Giving Guaranteed Repairs
for 90 days & Installations on
C.B. HiFi � Stereo T.V.
Call Jim or Tommy at
756-7193
Located at 3103 S. Memorial Dr. Greenville, I.C.
the Charles Street route says
Don Leggett, director of the ECU
Office of Alumni Affairs.
It was Leggett who coordina-
ted the efforts to get "Welcome
to ECU, Home of the Pirates"
painted on the trestle and he
concedes that it was not an easy
task. It took months of planning
and negotiating.
"First of all, permission had
to be obtained from the Southern
Railway System and contracts
signed with the Railroad Com-
pany regarding certain areas of
responsibility Leggett said.
Then someone had to be found
to donate the work. A.B. Whitley,
Inc. of Greenville, paint contrac-
tors, agreed to provide the gold
background, while Pepsi-Cola
Bottling Co. of Greenville dona-
ted the painting of the actual
letters.
"This was done at consider-
able time and expense to these
two Greenville-based busines-
ses Leggett said.
"Plans also had to be coordi-
nated with the city and with the
Highway Department and the
State of North Carolina, both of
whom were most cooperative
he said.
The painting of the structure
took only a couple of days and a
few gallons of purple and gold
paint, which are the school oolors,
to complete But before that work
could begin, special insurance
coverage fa the sign maker had
to be obtained.
Leggett admits that the exper-
ience has taught him a lot about
painting train trestles. Tough
work?
Absolutely, he says. But,
"H was inspiring to receive the
cooperation from so many differ-
ent agencies while putting this
project together. This illustrates
the vast amount of interest and
enthusiasm that our local citizens
have for ECU and its various
activities
East Carolina University foot-
ball games will be heard through-
out eastern North Carolina and
parts of the Piedmont this season
over the 20-pl-s station lineup of
the Pirate Sports Network.
The Greenville outlet will be
WOOW-AM. while the flagsbip
station will be WKTC-FM in
Tarboro.
The Pirate Sports Network is
the third largest ooilege network
in North Carolina, with a cover-
age area of nearly three million
people.
Formerly of Downtown Greenville
has moved to its new location.
We Feature;
GIBSON FENDER
MARTIN AMPEG
GUITARS & AMPS.
Plus all the other, musical instruments.
The Music Shop
Greenville Square Shopping Centerl
756-0007 (Next to K-mart)
(Thurs. & Fri. nights until 9 p.m.)





� I
� I �
Page 8 FOUNTAINHEAD 3fi August 1977
SGA transit
Schedules for purple, gold, brown routes
co-rec scanpick up bus schedules at Mendenhall
information d&, SGA office and dorm counselors
offices.
Buses will run 730 a.m5 JO p.m.
Night schedule is 6-10 Uonday through Thrusdays.
PURPLE
PlaceDeparts
SpeightOn half hour
East brook25 till hour
River Bluff22tillhour
Kings RowI8till hour
Village Greene15till hour
Memorial Gym12till hour
Mendenhall10till hour
SpeightOn the hour
East brook5 after hour
River Bluff8 after hour
Kings Row12 after hour
Village Greene15 after hour
Memorial Gym17 after hour
MendenhallGOLD20 after hour
10th and College Hill25 after hour
College Hill26 after hour
Mmgeson half hour
Allied Health27 till hour
Pitt Plaza24 till hour
Oakmont21 till hour
Mendenhall16 till hour
10th and College Hill5 till hour
College Hill4 till hour
Mmgeson the hour
Allied Health3 after hour
Pitt Plaza Oakmont6 after hour 9 after hour
Mendenhall14 after hour
BROWN
NIGHT ROUTE
Speight
Memorial
Mendenhall
5th and Elizabeth
Avery and Holly
Willow and Woodlawn
Elm and Willow
Willow and Oak
Speight
Memorial
Mendenhall
5th and Elizabeth
Avery and Holly
Willow and Woodlawn
Willow and Elm
Willow and Oak
on half hour
28 till hour
26 till hour
22 till hour
18till hour
16till hour
15tillhour
13till hour
on the hour
2 after hour
4 after hour
8 after hour
12 after hour
14 after hour
15 after hour
17 after hour
Mendenhall
Joyner
College Hill
Mmges
Allied Health
Greenville Square
Pitt Piaza
Mendenhall
Joyner
College Hill
Mmges
Allied Health
Greenville Square
Pitt Plaza
TEN THOUSAND STUDENTS use the buses weekly
on the hour
3 after hour
10 after hour
15 after hour
18 after hour
21 after hour
23 after hour
on half hour
27 till hour
20tillhour
15 till hour
12tillhour
9till hour
7 till hour
SOPHOMORES
IT'S NOT TOO LATE
TO ENROLL IN AIR FORCE ROTC
and here are some facts that should interest you:
Courses open to college men and women.
Four hours academic credit per semester.
No service obligation now.
Full scholarships available that pay tuition, all fees, plus $100 a month tax-free al
An Air Force officer commission when you receive your baccalaureate.
The opportunity to get to know the spirit that made our nation great.
Talk with our Air Force ROTC representative.
Air force ROTC Ca'�w�Y to a Great
Way of Life
lowance.





30 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAP Pag 9
i Photos by
PIRATE RAG-THE purple and gold "Pirate Rag" will make its
debut among thousands of ECU football followers this fall,
beginning Sept. 3 at Carter Stadium in Raleigh.
'Pirate Rag ' is being sold through the ECU Student Supply Stores
and is expected to become a familiar emblem, handy for waving the
ECU Pirates on to victory. ECU News Bureau Photo.
THE WAR' IS ON
you've heard of starwars
now you've got'album wars
ALL$6.98 LP's$3.99
ALL$7.98 LP's $4.99
higher priced albums
red ueed
$7.981ist tapes$5.9
all others reduced
Pete
Podeszwa
STUDENTS CONTINUE TO wait in drop-add lines.
We'll put 2 pounds of
Alaskan
crab leg!
on the
table
you for only $535.
They're big and meaty, shipped direct from the cold, clear waters
of Alaska So come to the Family Fish I louse and bnng your appetite
Along with your men you II enjoy tasty i ole slaw, hushpuppies. and
a choice of baked potato or french friesu� Alaskan crab legs are avail
able for a limited time only, so hurry on over
Washington-419W Main Street-946-1301
Also Burlington. Fayetteville &
2 locations in Raleigh





���(���HMMHmBM
P�Q� 10 FOUNTAINHEAP 30 Augu 1977
This is the semester to get your
programmable.
The TI-57.
Its self-teaching
system gets you
programming
fast.
79
95
.ms-gaw Tl Programmable 57. The powerful
aicrJsaBJsas: � suPerslide rule calculator you can program
right from the keyboard. Comes with a asy-
to-follow. self-teaching learning guide-over
200 pages of step-by-step instructions and ex-
amples. Quickly learn the value of making re-
petitive calculations at the touch of a key.
Recall entire instruction sequences. Display
intermediate results at any point in a calcula-
tion. Eight multi-use memories provide ad-
dressable locations to store and recall data. Program memory
stores up to 150 keystrokes (50 program steps). Editing too
Singlestep. Backstep. Insert or delete at
any point in a program. Also a powerful $m ��
slide rule calculator with logs, trig func-
tions and advanced statistics routines.
The TI-58 and TI-59 combine three major inno-
vations to bring the power of programming to
you-even if you've never programmed before:
1 Extraordinarily powerful - at remarkable low prices.
2. Revolutionary plug-in modules put complex formulas to work
at the touch of a key.
3 Step-by-step learning guide that takes you from the basics of
programming through advanced programmings-language you
can understand.
Tl Programmable 58. up to 480 program
steps, or up to 60 memories Master Library
module contains 25 prewritten programs in
math, engineering, statistics and finance. Also
increases number of steps - up to 5000. Library
programs may also be addressed from the key-
board or inserted as subroutines. Can also be
used with Tl's new
PC-100A printerplot- �g iQC
It lets you plot, w �
Programming
ter
124
print headings and prompt-messages
Tl Programmable 59. More powerful than the TI-58 Up to
960 program steps or up to 100 memories. Magnetic cards store
up to 960 steps. And, record and pro-
tect custom programs Also 10 user"V Q�
flags 6 levels of subroutines 4 types
of branches
'2
Optional Libraries. Applied Statistics, Surveying, Real
EstateFinance, Aviation, Marine Navigation. $35.00 each.
The Tl 58 and 59.
Both use
revolutionary
plug-in
Solid State
Software"
libraries.
FREE.
When you buy a Tl Programmable 58
or 59 you can get this 19-program
Leisure Library.
A $35.00 value if you act now.
Football Predictor. Forecast score, point spread Bowling
Scorekeeper. Track 90 bowlers Golf Handicapper. Up
date handicap from latest round's score Bridge Computes
points Irom tricks made and bid U.S. Chess Federation
Rankings. Wins, losses, draws Codebreaker. 3,024 possi
ble codes make this a unique challenge Blackjack Acey
Ducey. Craps. Mars Lander. Pilot to a safe landing Jive
Turkey. Guess mystery number-tells you if you re hiqh
or low-but is it jiving you Nim. Play the machine each
time it gets better Sea Battle. 15 missiles to sink sub
Quarterback. Call plays. Photo 1. Compensate for change
in photo enlargement magnification Photo II Fill-in flash
Computes correct lens f-stop in strong ambient light Use
it with a PC-100A and have even more fun Computer Art.
Hangman. Put in a word, second player guesses or hangs
Memo Pad. Write, enter messages Print and record them
on 59 s mag card Use the card to replay the messaae
Biorythm. Plots all three cycles
l�nu� Library
Leisure Library comes
with Plug-m module
Library manual Quick
reference guide Label
cards Library wallet
r
Orfer good from August 15 to October 31. 1977 Here s
what you do. Fill out this coupon Return it to Tl with your
serialized Customer Information Card (packed in the box)
along with a copy of a dated proof of purchase showing
the serial number Important. Your envelope must be
postmarked no later than October 31 1977
Leisure Library Oder
P 0 Box53 Lubbock Texas 79408
Name
Address
City
State
'Suggested retail price
� 1977 Texas Instruments Incorporated
Texas Instruments
INCORPORATED
Tl 58 or 59 Serial Number �rnm h . . ,
(from back of calculator)
Texas Instruments reserves the right to substitute software library nt wiuai u,i k�,
Please allow .10 days lor delivery oV, vorf where pro�hZo ��rl�IZn���'
F
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11
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ti
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th
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fa
en





Between the Lines
by Michael Futch
Explanations
1977-78a fresh new year at booming East Carolina University.
For the college "veteran it means a time to mentally erase those
F's from the past, wrap up those nasty Inoompletes, and strive for the
seemingly impossible-a 2.0. Or maybe better, having your name
removed from the University probation list.
Fa the "rookies it oould mean come culture shock, a lot of dirty
hangovers, first attempts at study, and a few disillusions. And these
are just a few of the many experiences to look forward to.
A new year at ECU also means a new year at The Fountainhead.
The pseudo-intellectual, forget bout the '60's (whatever happened to
ecology?), favoriet of most Jones Cafeteria regulars, twice-a-week
tabloid.
But don't be dismayed. The Fountainhead'soutput is dependent on
the students' input. We'll package and deliver all the news, features,
entertainment, art, sport sand ads that the paper has room to fill. We'll
be the gatekeepers; but more importantly, the student will be the
critic.
The beginning of a new school year invariably means a new
Fountainhead staff, or at least a re-organization of the previous ones.
As new editor of Trends-a section of the paper which specializes in
entertainment, features and the Arts-it will be my job to package an
informative, entertaining, and scholastic section of the publication.
In the past, the trend has been for the editor of this department to
write hisher personal column. Whether surprisingly strong, a
apparently weak, the column ran in its usual place each week.
This column will not be a mandatory once-a-week part of Trends,
unless student response is good. It will not have priority over an article
a review which I feel is more pertinent to the students.
"Between the Lines" will be a somewhat liberal and open column.
It may be an attempt at humor, a review, a a sidebar to a review,
possibly some personal philosophizing, a retrospective, etc. Or it may
not even run. The column has no dear definition, no certain goals
probably because at this point this writer is unsure what inspirations
will have shaken me between now and then.
The only goal of "Between the Lines" is that the column will be
entertainning and informative, and at times, controversial. If student
response is derogatory, it will be canceled. Only to surface under a new
title, on a different page. No seriously, it will continue only as long as
it has appeal and as long as the ribbon holds out. (Note: I have all of
David R. Bosnicks '76-77 film review outtakes catalogued and locked
for quick filler material, in case the column bombs)
The overall Trends section should be fairly unique and innovative,
as compared to previous years The goal is not to mire in entertainment
and reviews alone, but to include material that will be intellectually
stimulating. It needs to be remembered that The Fountainhead is not
Hi Parade or Creem magazine; it is a college newspaper.
The Fountainhead has a large available reading audience. I hope
this year's Trends will attract the attention of the majority.
Ideas are weloome from students; it is your newspaper. Whether
you know it or not, the University takes out a portion of your semester
fees to help finance this paper.
So much fa petty explanations and anarchaic goals Hope you
enjoy
1977 FOUNTAINHEAD
CAMPUS LIFE evokes contemplation Photo by Brian Stotler
Trends
Best
Sellers
FICTION
The Thorn Birds by Colleen
McCullough
The Crash of '79 by Paul E
Erdman
Illusions by Richard Bach
Delta of Venus by Anais Nin
Oliver's Story by Erich Segal
Condominium by John D. Mac
Donald
ull Disclosure by William Satire
Falconer by John Cheever
Dynasty by Robert E. Elegant
Trinity by Leon Uris
NONFICTION
Your Erroneous Zones by Wayne
W. Dyer
The Book of Lists by David
Wallechinsky
Looking Out for Nutnbm die by
Robert J. Ringer
The Dragons of Eden by Carl
Sagan
Vivien Leigh by Anne Edwards
The Camera Never Blinks by Dan
Rather
It Didn't Start With Watergate by
Victa Lansky
The Managerial Womag by Mar-
garet Hennig and Anne Jardin
The Grass is Always Greener
Over the Septic Tank by Erma
Bombeck
The Path Between the Seas by
Fsvid McCullough
Acoordlng to The New York
Times Book Review Survey
N.O.R.M.L program slated
for Mendenhall Center
"Marijuana: The New Prohi-
bition" is the title of the
film-lecutre program presented
by N.O.R.M.L. (National Organ-
izatioi fa the Refam of Mari-
juana Laws) on September 29,
1977 in Mendenhall Student
Center.
"Enough people were arres-
ted fa marijuana in 1973 to
empty the whole city of a. Pau
Minnesota. Don't you think it's
time we stopped?" This is one of
the many questions posed by
N.O.R.M.L. lectures
N.O.R.M.L. director Keith
Stroup says that unfortunately his
aganizatioi is not passe. In
October of 1975 Jerry Mitchell
was convicted oi selling 11 grams
of marijuana and sentenced to 12
years in jail.
The N.O.R.M.L. campus lec-
ture examines in detail the
historical, medical, social, and
legal aspects oi marijuana use. It
features a oomprenhensive re-
view of progress towards decri-
minalization. It also analyzes
alarmist scientific research about
the drug.
Two short films, "Marijuana:
Assissin of Youth" and highlights
of "Reefer Madness" are also
included in the program.
N.O.R.M.L. is a non-profit
lobby seeking a non-criminal
response to private use of mari-
juana. The aganizatioi suppots
a policy of discouragement of all
recreational drugs including al-
cohol and tobacco. However, the
group feels that the use of
criminal penalties has been harm-
ful to both society and the
individual, economically waste-
ful, and ineffective as a deterrent.
N.O.R.M.L's current activi-
ties include lobbying fa decri-
minalization of marijuana with
state and federal legislatures,
bringing constitutional challenges
to some state and federal mari-
juana laws, sponsaing re-educa-
tion programs, and giving legal
referral and assistance to those
arrested.
Rolling Stone sayd, "N.O.
R.M.L. is not the only group
waking fa marijuana refam,
but it is the most prestigious and
most successful aganizatiai. It
has set the style fa an effective
approach to the issue N.O.R.
M .Lsmember ship includes such
people as Ramsey Clark and
Benjamin Spook.
ECU'S N.O.R.M.L. lecture on
September 29 is at 8fl0 P.M. in
Mendenhall Student Center
Theatre. Admission is free fa
ECU students Faculty and staff
are admitted by MSC card, and
public tickets are $2.00 each.
Groups of 20 or more may
purchase tickets fa $1.50 each.
Concert
on the Mall
Tenth Avenue Band
Tuesday, Aug. 30th
8:00 p.m.





12 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 A
Coeds strugale with fridoe
J&'taticT'uJa
ance
aulfnlicMS�llg dancing"




Smithsonian
exhibition
scheduled
The theme that the earth is a
spaceship is a recurring one in the
exhibition "Our Only World
Part of the Smithsonian Institu-
tion Traveling Exhibition Series,
this exhibit was produced by the
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency.
Illumnia, the Student Union
Art Exhibition Committee, is
sponsoring the exhibit which
opens September 4, 1977 in the
Mendenhall Student Center Gal-
lery and remain on view through
October 1, 1977.
The exhibit oonsists of 113
oolor photographs selected from
E.P.As Project Documerica.
Documerica is a program design-
ed to portray the environmentalk
crisis and the efforts being made
to stow down and reverse envi-
ronmental damage.
47 of the country's finest
photographers contributed to the
exhibition. Their photographs
were chosen from 10,000 prints in
the Documerica files. Some pho-
tographs show breathtaking
beautv. Others show indictments
of mistreatment of tha, environ-
ment. Vieweo logeuief mey are a
document of the American land-
scape and its condition.
Jt fun ani creative toay
Ic fotip in tKap� I
BICYCLE SHOP
�530CotancneSt.
Greenville, N.C.
Wilson & Raleigh
Authorized Dealer for
rFUCiEOT
Takara Model 721 129,00
Discover the difference a quality 10 speed can make. And discover, too, how mucn quality
your dollar can buy. The 721 features Takara's Agile-light Ride combined with equipment
normally found only on higher-priced bicycles. It's an outstanding value . from the SUN
TOUR� derailleurs to the Dia Compe� safety-lever brakes, this is one for the road.
Course confusion at ECU
Goings On
TUESDAY:
" The Day the Earth Stood Still" shows at 1, 4 and 8 p.m. and
�'Things to Come' at 2:45, 6:15, and 8:45, at the Roxy. Adm. $1.00
Tenth Avenue Band on the University Mall, 8 p.m.
THURSDAY:
Student Union Film ' Shampoo starring Warren Beatty, 8 p.m.
Adm. ECU ID and Activity Card.
Poetry Forum, 8:00, Conference Room in Joyner Library
Co-Rec Almost Anything Goes, 4 p.m University Mall
Auditions fa ECU Playhouse Production of 'Bye, Bye, Birdie"
7:30-10 p.m.
FRIDAY:
Student Union Film ��Shampoo 7 and 9 p.m. Adm. ECU ID and
Activity Card
Auditions for ECU Playhouse Production of 'Bye, Bye. Birdie"
7:30-10 p.m. McGinnis Auditorium.
SATURDAY:
ECU-vs-N.C. State, 7:00, Carter Stadium.
EAT FOR JUST
V; plus cax MonTh
urs.
Crabeakes, slaw, jfrem li fries plirs
hushfkippies.
Vt pound hamburger steak, slaw,
french fries an'd rolls.
Fisb, slaw, french fries, hushpuppies.
CLIFF'S
Seafood Restaurant
East 10th Street Ext.
Old Washington Highway
752-3172
Open 4:30-9:00 MonSat.





30 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAP Page 13
ECU Artist Series opens with featured pianist
ECU NEWS BUREAU
The East Carolina University
Artists Series begins Sept. 21
with a conoert featuring pianist
Ruth Laredo. Other programs
slated for the year include
Shinichi Suzuki's Talent Educa-
tion Tour, flutist Jean-Pierre
Rampal and harpsichordist Ro-
bert Veyron-Laaoix, the Buffalo
Philharmonic Orchestra, the Nor-
man Luboff Choir and the Cana-
dian Brass.
Ruth Laredo has been solo
pianist with several United States
orchestras. A New York TIMES
music critic said of her: she
may just possibly become the
present generation's first truly
major American pianist Her
performance is set for 8 p.m.
Tickets are $1.50 fa ECU stu-
dents and $4 fa the public.
Shinichi Suzuki will appear with
ten Japanese children instructed
in his talent education method
who will perfam waks of Vival-
di, Bach, and Beethoven. The
program has been highly acclaim-
ed throughout the nation, both fa
the quality of the performance
from children so young and fa
the innovativeness of Suzuki's
teaching approach.
Flutist Jean-Pierre Rampal
RUTH LAREDO
Learn to
Prepare
Income Taxes
Like to meet the public?
� Want to earn extra money?
� Work accurately with figures?
Enroll in the H & R Block Income Tax Course beginning I
in your area and learn to prepare income taxes tor yourself
your triends and as a source ot income
Job interviews available for best students Send tor tree
information and class schedules today
Classes begin and will be held in
area locations
HR BLOCK
contact the office nearest you
316 S. Evans S.
Greenville, N.C.
Phone 752-4907
Please send me free inlormation about your tax
preparation course. I understand there is no
obligation.
Name
Address
.City
I Address
State
Phone
CLIP AND MAIL TODAYl
and harpsichordist Robert
Veyron-Laaoix are scheduled to
perfam 18th century music Feb.
16. The Buffalo EVENING NEWS
states the two have been declar-
ed by some celestial deaee to be
in a permanent state of musical
grace
On Feb. 28 the Buffalo
Philharmonic Orchestra will per-
fam with Michael Tilson Thanas
conducting and the Naman Lub-
off Char will appear at ECU
March 22 with a varied program
ranging from Bach to the Beatles.
Final show of the seasai will
be the Canadian Brass, an
ensemble assisting of two trum-
pets, a French nan, a tronboie
and a tuba.
All shows exoept the Buffalo
Philharmonic Orchestra and the
Naman Lubovv Choir are sche-
duled fa the Mendenhail Student
Center Theatre at 8 p.m. The
achestra and choir will appear in
Wright Auditaium.
Individual and seasai tickets
fa all Artists Series concerts are
Mail aders fa Artists Series
season tickets should be sent with
a stamped, addressed envelope to
Artists Series, Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhail Student Cen-
ter, East Carolina University,
Greenville N.C. 27834.
available from the ECU Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhail Stu-
dent Center. Public season tickets
are $15 each, and tickets ECU
faculty and staff members are $10
each ECU students may pur-
chase season tickets fa $5.
RIGGAIS'
SHOE SHOP
Shoes Repaired to Look Like New!
Downtown Greenville
111 Wesj
1
tw.
J
CHANELO'S
Pizza & Spaghetti
House
FAST FREE
DINE IN
DELIVERYlXCARRY OUT
coldest beer - lowest prices
DIAL 758-7400
507 EAST 14th STREET
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Nothing beats a Pizza from CHANELO'S
HOURS
MONDAY thru THURSDAY11:30 a.m. til 1:00 a.m.
FRIDAY and SATURDAY11:30 a.m. til 2:00 a.m.
SUNDAY 11:30 a.m. til 12:00 p.m.
a
DOWNTOWN
PITT PLAZA
WELCOME
STUDENTS!
SALE!
LEVI JEANS
Corduroy and Denim
Values to 516 00
s11.99
COWL NECK TEE TOPS
Stripes, solids Reg. to $15 � �y Garland
25 OFF
CLASSIC SHIRTS
Checks � Plaids � Prints
SPECIAL
s11.00
DOWNTOWN
PITT PLAZA





Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 August 1977
films
by David W. Trevino
Rollercoaster is a cinematic spectacular in which the film's most
spectacular event takes place before the first box of popcorn is gone.
The remainder of the movie is little more than limp filler as the faces
of crmri aro marshalled to insure nothing else will happen. And nothing
aco-rec
else ooea nappen.
At the beginning of the film, the management flashed a message
warning the audience about the powerful technique used to make
Rollercoaster more realistic, Sensu, round. By placing four large
speakers around the theatre and �' incredible photography the actual
shakes and sounds of a rollerooaster ride were supposed to be
reproduced. The actual effect achieved was closer to sticking your head
intoa washing machine and letting the blades of the agitator beat out a
rumba on your temples.
If Sensurround left something to be desired (namely earplugs), the
acting in thefilm was unable to match even that level of achievement.
George Segal seems willing to spend the rest of his career wearing
great suits and looking confused. As the safety inspector who first
conceives that the rol lercoaster accidents are the premeditated acts of a
man, Segal wanders through the film with his mouth alternately agape
in bewilderment and pursed in determination. Segal looks like a man in
a pay toilet with no change, and a plane to catch in five minutes.
Wrinkled Richard Widmark gets an airing-out as the incredibly
bumbling, hardboiled Federal investigator who plays the percentages
and doesn't take chancesor entertain audiences. Maybe Widmark
has done it just too many times, because he just doesn't seem to have
anything left. Or maybe the world really doesn't need another
crotchety, old father-figure cop.
Timothy Bottoms is a fine actor who has no real reason to e in a
commercial product like Rollercoaster, except for the money. However,
if he continues wasting his talent wandering around amusement parks
looking like he just discovered the secret of fire, the good roles may
start passing him by without any consideration at all.
As the deranged bomber who seeks to extort a million dollars from
the rollercoaster magnates of America, Bottoms finds his acting talent
demonstrated only in his ability to shift a twitch from eye to eye.
Rollercoaster is little more than a poorly conceived commercial
vehicle to bring a few name actors and a cheap technical effect together
in order to fleece the entertainment seeking movie goers of America. If
you really are interested though, George Segal and the police finally
manage to catch Timothy Bottoms (after he has been run over by a
rollercoaster) and no one cares.
BREAKING TRAINING Pitt The Bad News Bears ride again in this
sappy sequel without the stars of the original. Going to see these
movies only encourages their producers to make more and more. Skip
it. One star.
GODZILLA ON MONSTER ISLAND Buccaneer Movies One) This
Japanese monster film wastotally financed by the saleof a 1966 Toyota
earlier this year. It's Godzilla and the Spiny Turtle versus the Belly
Buzz Saw and the Flying Gorgon in a battle for planet Earth. Absurdly
costumed men run amok in cardboard cities setting plastic models
aflame while cockroaches try to take over the world. This late show
reject is penalized one star because admission is charged.
POCO LITTLE DOG LOST Plaza Two) Poco gets lost in the desert 250
miles from home and thumbs back it's as bad as it sounds. Most of
this poorly edited footage looks like atuff Alpo didn't use in their TV
commercials. The producers of Godziiia do Walt Disney and show
ninety minutes of a dog running through ;lds fa no stars.
ROLLERCOASTER Buccaneer Movies Two) Reviewed above.
THE RESCUERSPlaza One) This Walt Disney animated feature is far
and away the best cinematic entertainment commercially available this
week in Greenville. Eva Gaba and Bob Newhart provide the voices fa
the two humanitarian mice who risk all to save a little girl and her teddy
bear from the clutches of an evil hag and her flunkie alligatas. The
animation is excellent and sometimes spectacular. Three stars.
A TA LE OF TWO CRITTERSPlaza One) Loosely based on the Dickens
classic about revolutionary France, this is anaher film about lost
animals, a popular, recent theme.
A young raccoon and a bear cub meet under strained circumstances
and work out a relationship that is developed throughout the work.
Unfatunately, the raccoon finds the bear hibernating with anaher and
the affari ends. One star.
THUNDER AND LIGHTNING Park) This movie is fa all those people
who spend Friday and Saturday nights sitting on the hoods of their cars
in teh Faomat parking la. David Carradine and Kate Jackson drive
fast and get into fights with the same rednecks over and over again.
Watch Uniroyal take on the Baja Peninsula while punching yourself
silly and save the price of a ticket. One star because Burt Reynolds is
oot in it-
KEITH BOWERS CA TCHES up on the news as
he relaxes on the wall between classes.
Photo by Brian Stotler
Conversion to semester
brings suggested curriculum
By JEFF ROLLINS
Staff Writer
Enough with abstract quasi-
conceptual courses! We believe
that a liberal arts education ought
to help us live our lives. We want
courses in practical, fundamental
matters, ones that answer the
really trivial questions and leave
the impatant oies fa us. Here
are some oourses we suggest be
included in next year's catalogue.
English 2433 Attempts to answer
the question "Why is Milton so
boring?" This course also exam-
ines aher 18th century poets and
their childhood diseases.
Geology 2100 It has recently been
observed that the universe is
expanding into the shape of a
matzoh ball. Wherefae? Is there
life in Wisconsin: Why is there no
oonstellation of a dogfish? Also
study is made into the aigins of
the stars in Greer Gar son' s eyes.
Poly Sci 3733 The political
philosophies of Ezra Pound and
Richard Nixon are linked with
those of Donnie Osmaid and
David Bowie. Also, the "happy-
go-lucky" side of Marx is discus-
sed and why he neves made it
with girls.
WRITERS
NEEDED
for
Trends
If
Interested,
Call 7576367
Music 3400 How to sing an aria
while maintianing your masculin-
ity as well as how to play with
flugelhan with braces on your
uppers are topics discussed.
Special attention is paid to the
proper pronunciation of "Dva-
ak
Psychology 1750 Why are mice
neuraic? Why do some people
have a pathotoqical fear of cold
spaghetti? The writing and thea-
ies of the Buddhist psychiatrist
brahers, Jung and Jang, are
studied in detail.
Physics 10 Introduction to the
basic physical laws of the uni-
verse and their loopholes. If an
apple falls from a distance of 57
feet accelerating at 32 miles per
second per second will it still bake
into a good pie?
Philosophy 4570 Rare extant
copies of Plato's Dialogues have
recently been unearthed. In them
are segments recading argu-
ments between Soaates and his
wife, also some gossip from the
baths. Also included in these
parchments are one of Plato's
grocery lists.a nd a receipt fa a
take-out pizza, both of which are
studied in detail
Aimc
Wed.
Thur.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
'Prodigy '
'Wide Open'
formerly Fresh
MATTRESS MART
WHOLESALE TO EVERYONE
QUALITY FOR LESS
WATERBEDS by wavecrest
TWIN (2 PIECE SET)
FULL (2PIECE SET)
QUEEN (2 PIECE SET)
KING (3 PIECE SET)
39.00
87.00
89.00
160.00
215.00
ANY STUDENT WITH VALID ID WILL
BE GIVEN A $5-$30 COUPON
TOWARDS PURCHASE OF
MATTRESS AND FOUNDATION.
1302 N. GREENE ST.
(ACROSS THE RIVER)
OPEN MON-FRI 10-1 & 2-5
SAT 10-1 758-1101






1977-78 Lecture Series
Variety of speakers stated
30 AuQuat 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Pap� 15
collegiate crossword
NARD NIMOY
UMPIE
706 Evans St.
Ph 752-1828
"AN ADVENTURE IN EATING
Great Deli Menu Fun Place to Eat
BBQ Beef Giant T.V. Screen
Steak & Cheese Pinball
Salad Bar & Beverage Bar
Famous Blimpie Bucket
OPEN : Mon-Sat. at 11100 a.m. Sun. 12:00.
a
(We Cater)
(Much Parking)
ECU NEWS BUREAU
A speaker on marijuana law
reform and hypnotist Gil Eagles,
political columnist Jack Anderson
and television performer Leonard
Nimoy are featured on the
1977-78 Lecture Series at East
Carolina University.
The series is sponsored by
ECU'S Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter.
Gil Eagles will perform de-
monstrations of hypnotism and
the power of extra-sensory per-
ception when he appears at ECU
Nov. 1. He will use volunteer
participants from the audience.
Investigative reporter Jack
Anderson is scheduled to speak at
ECU Jan. 17. First to implicate
John Mitchell and H. Ft. Halde-
man in the Watergate affair,
Anderson is credited with un-
covering many major political
scandals.
Leonard Nimoy, best known
as "Mr. Speck" of the "Star
Trek" TV series, will speak at
ECU Feb. 15. He has also
appeared as King Arthur in the
musical production "Camelot"
and performed in the "Mission:
Impossible" TV series.
Each lecture will begin at 8
p.m. in the Mendenhall Student
Center Theatre. Public tickets fa
all four lectures are available at
$5 each per season ticket. Tickets
for individual programs are also
offered.
1734567"9loii1213�
14616
178
192021�
23�241Hir
2627282930
3132�33
3536
394041424344
15464748
49�50B
5253545556
575815960
6162
�64
��;
� EdwardJulius, 1977 CollegiateW76-32
ACROSS50 Part of USAF12Rank above knight1
51 science13Endurance1
1 Servile52 "Aba Honeymoon'16Relatives on the
8 Rich or prominent54 Aquatic mammalmother's side
persons56 fide21Garden toolH
14 Frequenter57 Cotton cloth27Sky-blue
15 Stuffed oneself59 Eating place28Gloomy (poet.)
17 Classroom need61 Certain movie29"Valley of the
18 Experienced personversions30Relay-race itema
19 Big bundle62 Howl32Common suffix
20 Knockout substance63 Most sound34Prefix: new
22 Suffix: body64 Men of Madrid37House bug
23 Basic Latin verb38"The of
24 Division of timeDOWNPenzance"
25 Insect egg39Tuscaloosa's state
26 Ship of old1 Affair40Most tidy
28 Be afraid of2 Fort or TV western41Agencies
30 Nota 3 Edible mollusk42Site of famous
31 Old men4 Workshop itemobservatory
33 Musical pieces5 Mineral suffix43Come forth
35 Exploit6 With 10-Down,44Payment returns
36 Tennis termcertainty47Computer term
37 Disciplined and7 "Scarlet Letter"53 for All
austerecharacter, et al.Seasons"
41 Radio or TV muff8 Catholic devotion54Individuals
45 Heapperiods55Mark with lines
46 Picture game9 Assert56Heavy knife
48 Designate10 See 6-Down58Past president
49 Mr. Gershwin11 Minerals60Wine measure
East Carolina Kennels
Will offer a course in beginner obedience
training for dogs The cost will be only
?25.00 for a 6 week course
classes will start Sept 20
For more information call
Ed perry
752 9854





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAP 30 August 1977
Blue denim jeans have lengthy history
By BUD JOHNS
Blue Denim Jeans-the class-
less uniform of the world today-
got co-rec 'art m 1850 as Brown
Canvas Pants made by a man who
didn't like the word "Jeans" and
insisted that his products were
Waist Overalls Somehow it's
hard to imagine the "Brown
Canvas Revolution" and "The
Waist Overall Generation let
alone a "Canvasmachine
The man who started it all was
Levi Strauss-yes. there really
was such a man-and although the
first Levi's tor California's Gold
Rush Prospectors were made
from tent canvas, sailcloth or
whatever heavy material he could
find, he stitched as soon as
possible to denim oolor blue with
the native American dye indigo.
Denim is the Americanized
name and version of a rugged
fabric once known as "Serge De
Nimes" (cloth of Nimes, France).
Legend has it that the durable
cotton material was used fa the
sails on Christopher Columbus'
ships but while that can't be
verified there's no question that
denim was a major reason why
cowboys, miners and lumberjacks
Classifieds
i -�'��
. - � � � i
for sale 6ft
�4
SMITH CORONA TYPEWRITER
one portable manual student
model, one funky old upright.
Excellent cond $50.00each. Call
752-4511.
FOR SALE: 1967 Plymouth Fury
III. Hardtop, white with black
vinyl top. 383-V8 engine. Must
Sell! Good Cond. I380.0O But will
Negotiate. Call 752-6713.
OR SALE Olivetti adding mac. 6
months old, 80.00, 12000 new.
call 752-5133.
WHIRLPOOL AIR COND. 10,500
btu. Good Cond. 170.00 Call
756-4290.
CROWN IC-150 preamp, JBL SE
460, 80 watts per channel300.00
for the pair. Call 746-4898.
1973 FORF TORINO. 4 door hard
top. Very low mileage, air am
fm stereo, power steering and
brakes. Only 300 miles,on set of
new tires. 2,000.00. Must Sell.
825-7381. Bethel. Ask fa Mike a
leave
STEREO complete with built in
turntable, reel to reel, cassette
unit and speakers. 150.00 Sharp
System. Cat! Elm Villa 752-4349.
COMPACT REFRIGERATOR
freezer stainless steel top w2
burners. Call Vicki 758-6227.
72 RED TRIUMPH SPITFIRE
752-8799 ask for Robin.
PANASONIC STEREO- Reel to
Reel tape deck, auto reversing.
Excellent cond. 1150.00.Call
752-6042.
BOOKTRADER located, oorner of
Evans & 11th. Trade your paper-
backs, buy used paperbacks also
comic books- tues. thru Sat. 9-4.
FOR SALE: Refrigerator, I45.00,
small gas stove, 140.00. Call
Sherry, 823-2256 fa further info.
(Appliances are in Greenville
area.
FOR SALE: Clairol Kindness
3-way Electric Rollers. Also
Clairol "Crazy Curl" curling
wand with steam. Call Margaret
at 758-8230 a cane by 415
Clement.
FOR SALE: 1974 Hada 360
excellent coid. under 8,000 miles
new tire and battery, elec. star,
oily 600.00 Call 752-9600 a cane
by 211C Scott Dorm.
ART STUDENTS- Exhibit and sell
your work on consignment in
the Silver Thread, 218-A E. 5th
St. 752-3601. Need ceramics,
feather jewelry, weaving and
other Fibre works.
made Levi's "The Pants That
Won The West
Denim's durability and eco-
nomy made it ideal fa wak-
clothes and that remained its
principal use until the 1950s.
When it became increasingly
desirable-and acceptable-for
school and casual wear. It was
about this time that Levi Strauss
& Company began its rapid
growth from a small regional
company to the wald's largest
apparel manufacturer and intro-
duced its "Shrink To Fit" denim
in the eastern United States as
the jeans Guaranteed to Shrink,
Wrinkle and Fade
The Red Rooster Restaurant
2713 EAST 10TH STREET
BRAD N,CHOLS. Own GREENVILLE. N.C.
PHONE 758-1920
-B Every Da) of the Week Specials:
Salisbury Steak$1.75
Veal Cutlet$1.75
Hamburger SteakS 1.75
Daily Specials $2.45 Chuckwagon Steak81.75
Mon. B.B.Q. Dinner
Tues. Stew Beef rt M � L � .
Open Monday-Friday
Weds. Chicken Pastry , . n
6:00 a.m2:00 p.m.
Thurs. Country Style Steak
3:00 p.m8:00 p.m.
Fri. Fresh Fish r
Welcome to the Red Rooster Restaurant!
FOR SALE: Pair of Frazier
Speakers. 8" Woofer, 37 tweeter.
Good Sound. $100.00 Firm.
752-3739.
FOR SALE: Sony TC355 Reel to
Reel Tape Deck. Very Good
Condition. Comes with hook up
and two excellent mikes $150.00
Firm. 752-3739.
FOR SALE Component Stereo
System with big sound at a cheap
price. Pioneer PL12 Professional
Turntable. Marantz Model 1060
Console Stereo Amplifier. Hitachi
Model ST-3411 AM-FM Stereo,
Cassette Deck-Recorder
Symphonic Model S-105 8-track
Deck. Large Advent Speakers
with utility cabnet. Approximate
Saleprice $650.00 Buzz Chip at
758-1437.
FOR SALE: Leather tote bag
(dance bag) Brand new. !50.00on
best offer. Call 758-8724.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED
for house close to campus. Grad
student preferred. Will share
with 2 other students and split
cost 3 ways, approx. $80.00 ier
month. Linda Hunt or Patty
McMon at 757-6909.
r
rvt ir�lN
BUNDY TRIIMDct nri
stand and case. Take best offer.
Call John Rouse 753-2091.
torrent (fl)
ROOMATE NEEDED (ECU
STUDENT PREFERRED( FOR
TRAILER. Colonial Trailer Park
after 5:00 Lot 39.Located at
oorner of Hwy 11 and 264 ByPass
.i
(personal (A
AKC GERMAN SHEPPARD
puppies. Shots and De-wormed.
Call 758-0428.
KITTENS to good home call
Rebecca after 5.O0 at 752-0102.
COLLEGE STUDENTS develope
better skills and attitudes for
learning. Better Education Class.
Four 3-hour sessions: Effective
Communications-Handling
Changes-Achieving your Goals-
Living Up To Your Potential.
Class starts Tues. night, Sept. 6.
Call 756-5128 after 5 p.m.
LEARN TO BELLY DANCE
authentic dance lessons by a
professional fa the month of
Sept. ONLY 25.00! This offer will
not be repeated. Course will be
offered across the street from
Kappa Sigma house within walk-
ing didtsnce of campus on Tues.
and Thurs. nites from 700-800
P.M. Call 752-5214 for more info
or come Sept. 1 at 7.00. Ladies
only.
HELP WANTED taking applica-
tions fa a part time construction
type job. Must be able to wak
Tuesday and Thursday afternoons
and some Saturdays. Call
758-2300 days and 758-3480
nights. Ask to speak to Rick.
ARABIC DANCE authentic belly
dancing, call Donna Whitley,
experienced teacher and per-
former in Casablanca and
California 752-0928.
ARE YOU WORKING YOUR
WAY THROUGH COLLEGE? Get
ready fa tuition selling wald
famous Avon Products. High!
Flexible hours. Call 752-7006.
YOGA LESSONS Turn tension
into energy. Slenderize your body
as you renew the elasticity of your
skin and muscles. The oldest
science for a youthful body.
Special introduction to each area
of your body during the month of
Sept. only 25.00! Within walking
distance of campus. Tues and
Thurs. nite 8-9 across from Kappa
Sigma house. Classes begin Sept.
1 Call 752-5214 fa mae info.
FEMALE ROOMATE needed to
share2bedrm. apt. at Tar River,
205 Apt8, Elm St
CRAFT CLASSES- Maaame and
weaving classes, 110.00-4 weeks.
Sign up now at the Silver Thread,
218-A � 5th St. 752-3601
1 ' l �J 't n ' - ' ,





30 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 17
WESTERN SIZZLIN
HOURS:
SUN THRU THUR
11:00 TO 10:00
FRI &SAT
11:00 TO 11:00
STEAK HOUSE
U.S. DA choice beef cut fresh daily
No. 12 will be on special
TyesWed Thurs.
Lunch and Dinner
CHOPPED SIRLOIN
WITH
MUSHROOM GRAVY
TEXAS TOAST WITH
MEL TED BUTTER
BAKED POTATO
OR FRENCH FRIES
ALL
FOR
1.29
EAST 10TH ST.





Sports
Page 18 FOUNTAINHEAO 30 August 1977
Pirates rank high in overall
national football statistics
Sideline Chat
co-rec
withSTEVEWHEELER
Critics rate Pirates
Now that East Carolina University has Jropped out of the Southern
Conference, the Pirates must face a tough independent schedule that
includes several independents in the south, as well as a couple of early
games against Atlantic Coast Conference teams.
Most of the so-called authorities, the annual football magazines,
have had East Carolina facing a tough year, with a chance to break the
.500 mark. The Pirates have been depicted by one publication to be a
beaten team, with a 3-8 mark predicted. Another said the worst the
Pirates could finish is 9-2.
One magazine had, N.C. State beating the Pirates by a 38-10
margin, and further, has the Wolfpack going on to a 10-1 season and
beating Maryland for the ACC championship (sic). Another publication
has the Wolfpack ranked as the tenth worst team in the nation, and
their Rout of the Week' fa Sept. 3: East Carolina over N.C. State. So
much for the magazines. The game is played on the field.
This writer feels the Pirates have the potential to have a good
season, maybe as good as last year. But, many injuries have popped up
in pre-season practice, and if more occur, the Pirates could have as low
as a 6-5 season. Barring anymore injuries, the Pirates look to have the
skilled personnel to go 9-2 a 10-1, which is a lot to ask considering 11
starters graduated last year.
MEDIA RESPECTS DYE
Head coach Pat Dye has spoken at several medic gatherings . the
past few weeks, and seems at each to have the respect of all the media,
even me Raliegh Durham and Greensboro-based people. There is
little skepticism on the faces of these writers and broadcasters, many of
whom cover UNC and N.C. State for a living, or graduated from those
schools. He has their respect.
One of the reasons Dye captivates his audiences is his Southern
drawl and his way of speaking to the point and not evading touching
questions.
At the ECU media day, Dye was asked several questions about his
first two games being job-savers or breakers for the N.C. State and
Duke coaches, Bo Rein and Mike McGee, respectively. Straingt to the
point, Dye said he was here to win football games for East Carolina,
while Rein and McGee were at their respective schools for the same
reasons. If they lost their jobs in the process, that was their problem.
He said he would prepare for those games the same way he prepares
for any others-to win.
When asked about the situation UNC brought up during the
summer when they made a policy not to play in-state non-conference
teamsafter contracts run out, Dye replied, "A coach at Carolina cannot
keep his job if he loses to East Carolina. And the only way not to lose to
East Carolina, is not to play East Carolina
Such candor has brought Dye a kind of respect from the media that
few ocaches have. During the Southern Independents media gathering
in Atlanta, Ga Dye was said to have been the best speaker among the
coaches there. The Atlanta Constitution gave the Pirates a big spread
out of Dye's speech.
PIRA TES NOW BIG DRA W
East Carolina seems to be the state's biggest draw for N.C. State.
The Pirates last year drew 49,700 at Carter Stadium in their 23-14 win
over the Wolfpack, by far State's largest home crowd. The UNC-ECU
game drew 49,000, Carolina's second largest home attendance.
This year, the game with State is a sure sellout, and is expected to
top 50,000. Reports from Duke show that ticket sales for the ECU-Duke
game on Sept. 10 are way up from any game they had last year. East
Carolina wasallotted 10,000 fa this game and they are going fast.
The Blue Devils have had some paltry aowds over the past ten
years, with just a couple of sellouts. Last year, they drew just 37,000 fa
national champion Pitt, and but 20,000 fa an impatant conference
game with number five ranked Maryland.
There has been talk from Duke's new athletic directa, Tom
Butters, that Duke will not Ixma verbal agreements fa three future
gamesthat were made between ECU'S athletic directa, Bill Cain, and
famer Duke AD, Carl James. Butters said recently that any future
Tames between the two schools would hinge on this year's attendant
See PIRA TES, page 23
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Assistant Sports Editor
Over the past five years, East
Carolina's football program has
established itself as one of the
finest in the nation. This five year
period, 1972-1976, has seen East
Carolina football become nation-
ally ranked in six of the NCAA's
eight football team perfamance
lists. These lists show the real
progress that East Carolina foot-
ball has made.
In winningest teams over the
last five regular seasons, East
Carolina ranks 11th, tied with
UCLA and just ahead of Miami
(Ohio) and Maryland. East
Carolina's record over this period
was 42 wins 13 losses fa a
percentage of .764.
In soaring offense over the last
five years, East Carolina ranks
16th just behind N.C. State and
Maryland which are 14th and 15th
respectively.
In rushing offense, East
Carolina ranks ninth averaging
274 yards a game. Local teams
ranked in this list include Nath
Carolina 21st and N.C. State at
22nd.
Defense has been a big reason
fa ECU'S success on the football
field in the last five years and
there too the Pirates rank with the
nation's best. In scaing defense
East Carolina , held
its opposition to just 13.9 points
per game.
In rushing defense East
Carolina ranks 13th, holding its
opponents to 142.1 yards per
game. Other local teams in this
categay include Maryland num-
ber seven and Furman at number
15.
In total defense and offense,
East Carolina ranks 12th and
22nd respectively. The Pirate
offense averaged 360 yards in
total offense and the defense held
its opponents to 263 yards total.
The 1976 football season
helped to improve the overall
ranking in the NCAA. There were
many team and individual
categories in which the Pirates
were ranked.
In home attendance East
Carolina ranked 87th with 17,738
people per game. This moved
East Carolina up five places from
the previous year with a jump of
2,202 per game.
In team statistics, East
Carolina ranked fifth last season
in rushing offense with an
average of 296.6 yards per game.
Defensively, East Carolina rank-
ed third in total defense with a
214.1 yard per game average. The
Pirates were 8th in rushing
defense, holding opponents to
123 yards per game. In scaing
defense, East Carolina ranked 6th
with a 10.5 average. In pass
interceptions the Pirates ranked
number one by picking off 11.9
percent of all passes thrown. ECU
also ranks first in interception
return yardage with 519 yards.
In individual categories
Gerald Hall tied fa 12th in punt
returns with 11.6 yards per
return. Eddie Hicks was one of
only eight running backs to
average over six yards per carry
at a 6.5 clip. He was ranked fifth,
but is the top returner as the four
ahead of him graduated.
In regional statistics East
Carolina ranks very high also.
ECU is the only Division One
team in the Nath Carolina, South
Carolina, and Virginia area to
post a winning season every year
over the last five years. The
Pirates are also the only team in
North Carolina to have all-
Americas the last three years in a
row. They were Danny Kepley
linebacker in '74, Jim BoJding,
safety, '75, and Cary Godette,
defensive end, '76.
If Pat Dye, fourth-year head
ooach, had two mae years under
his belt, he would be the seventh
winningest active NCAA coach in
winning percentage. His three
teams have won 24 while losing
just nine fa a .727 winning
percentage.
New coach greets
"77 soccer hopefuls
East Carolina Unversity's soc-
cer team opened practice last
week, and new head coach Brad
Smith greeted over 30 hopefuls
fa the 1977 team.
"We've been working on
conditioning all week said
Smith. "We'll begin waking ai
fundamentals and plays this
week
"We've been running them
alot, too Smith added. "I'm of
the feeling that if you're in better
condition than your opponents,
you'll be able to win many
matches in the latter minutes
Smith and assistant coach
Bucky Moser selected senias
Tan Laig of Virginia Beach, Va
and Charlie Hardy of Kinston, as
captains fa the coming season.
There will be one additional
captain per game selected befae
each contest.
Long, a defensive player is
probably the top returning player
on the team, as he was selected as
all-confer enoe and second team
all-South last year. Hardy is also
one of the top defenders on the
team. Jeff Karpovich and Phil
Martin are among the top retur-
nees on offense. Jeff Kluger is
another top player back fa Smith.
The team is preparing fa its
opener on Sept. 15 in the
Campbell Classic Tournament.
The Pirates will be in the Classic
with host Campbell, Erskine and
Guilfad.
TOM LONG
1977 Football Starters
DEPTH CHARTS AFTER SPRING DRILLS: Subject to change
OFFENSE
SE- TERRY GALLAHER, Billy Washingtoi, Van Davenpat
LT- Mitchel Smith, Mike Heywood, Tim Swads
LG- Nelsai Smith, Wayne Inman, Drew O'Darnell
C- Rickie Hdliday, Jeff Hagans, Rob Wirthlin
RG- WAYNE BOLT, Mitchell Johnston, John Maness
RT- MATT MULHOLLAND, Mike Heywood, John Wrape
TE- Barry Johnson, Eric Walker, Joe Godette
QB- Jimmy Southerland, Leander Green, Steve Greer
LHB- WILLIE HAWKINS, Sam Harrell, Alexanda French
RHB- EDDIE HICKS, Sam Harrell
FB- Vince Kolanko, Theoodre Sutton, Pary Allred
DEFENSE
DE- ZACK VALENTINE, Ed Nelson, Henry Blackwell
LT- WAYNE POOLE, Vance Tingler, D.T. Joyner
NG- OLIVER FELTON, Cliffad Williams, Blake Camp
RT- Noah Clark, Woodrew Stevenson, D.T. Joyna
DE- Fred Chavis, John Maris, John Bauer
SLB- HAROLD RANDOLPH, HAROLD FORT, Tommy Summer
WLB- Mike Brewington, Larry Paul
CB- Willie Holley, James Freer
FS- Steve Hale, Drew Fish, Mike Dross
SS- GERALD HALL, Ruff in McNeill, Tommy Groves
CB- Charlie Carter, Thomas McLaurin
KICKING
K- Junia Creech, Bill Lamm, Barry Johnson
P- Rodney Allen, Paul Riociarelli, Henry Trevathan, Tony Tripp
Returning starter in CAPS





��������������������B
30Augmt1877 FPU NT AIM HEAD P�g� 19
Walk on Randolph likes contact of the game
What makes a 6-2, 195-pound
man want to play linebacker in
major college football? For East
Carolina University all-America
candidate Harold Randolph, it's a
love for contact.
The Greenville native neters
his senior season with loads of
honors, including all-state and
all-Southern Conference for two
years running and honorable
mention all-America once, as well
as two heavyweight boxing cham-
pionships on the ECU campus.
"I love the game of football
mostly because of the contact
said Randolph. "I just love to hit.
When it stops being fun, I'll know
it's time to quit
Randolph has been the lead-
ing Pirate "hitter" for the past
two seasons, getting 115 unassis-
ted tackles in 1975 and 108 in
1976. And he does not "baby" his
opponent to the ground, as many
ball-carriers who have had to visit
the sidelines would quickly attest
to. His tackles have been labeled
"bone-shattering
Being the only senior return-
ing starter on defense, Randolph
has been put into the position of
being the leader.
"I don't think that will affect
my play at all he said. "I want
to keep the rest of the guys
(defense) fired up all the time,
anyway
Pirate head coach Pat Dye
says Randolph is one of the top
two or three linebackers he has
ever been around. The others
were all-Americas Woodrow
Lowe of Alabama and Danny
Kepleyof ECU.
"All great linebackers have in
common the great intensity with
which they play Dye said.
"Harold has just that. But he
stands above the others because
he has pure, great athletic ability
and is very fast (4.5-40)
Randolph was one of the many
walkons at East Carolina to make
Three recruits signed
for 1978 tennis season
East Carolina University
men's tennis coach, Randy Ran-
dolph, has announced the signing
of three recruits fa the 1978
season. Curtiss Tedesco, Dave
Marino and Maury Werness will
join the Pirates next year hoping
to improve the tennis program.
Tedesco was ranked 15th in
the East for 18-and-under players
last year and has beaten several
netters ranked in the top ten. He
is the son of Mrs. Irene Tedesco
of Huntington, N.Y.
Marino, hailing from Ches-
wick, Pa is currently ranked as
the number two singles and
number one doubles player in the
Allegheny Mountains Tennis
Association. He is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ken Marino.
Werness, a native of Norfolk,
Va is ranked in the top five
doubles players in the Mid-
Atlantic Tennis Association for 18
year olds.
"I'm very proud to have these
three fine, young gentlemen
enter our program Randolph
said. "I'm sure they'll be able to
help us out immediately
CaRoliru Qems & SilveR
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Friday
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Former Members of
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Wateh Saturday Nighl Live
J
it. (The Pirates will start six
players this season who walked
on without a scholarship). He said
he thought ooming out of high
school that he could play oollege
ball and when Dye gave him the
chance, he knew he had to make
the best of it. He did.
The Pirates last year ranked
third in the nation intotal defense,
sixth in scoring defense and
eighth in rushing defense. He
characterized the defense as
"being like a pack of dober-
mans always playing a team
defense and helping each other
out.
Randolph analyzed his play as
opposed to former Pirate Danny
Kepley, now a star in the
Canadian Football League.
"Kepley was bigger than me,
so when he hit someone he
naturally drove them back he
said. "Being small like I am, I
need something extra. That is the
forearm tackle I use
When asked why he got into
boxing, Randolph replied,
"When I was little, I used to get
whipped' all the time. It was to
protect myself
Harold Randolph no longer
gets 'whipped' by anyone.
HAROLD RANDOLPH
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� . - l 9 .





Page 20 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 August 1977
In tramuraI season no w under wa y
By JOHN EVANS
Staff Writer
Another big year of intramural
activity gets underway this week
when co-rec Softball and men's
and women's flag football regis-
tration closes and the Intramural
Co-Rec Almost Anything Goes
takes place on Thursday, Sep-
tember 1 on the University Mall.
The intramural department is
once again ready to serve you in
any one of seven areas. First,
there are the intramural events
and games themselves in men's,
women's and co-rec play, which
will run throughout the semester.
Next, the intramural department
is in charge of all reservations for
the handball and racquetball
courts under university control.
These oourts will be reserved to
ECU students, faculty and staff in
the morning for play on each day.
Also offered by the intramural
department are services in equip-
ment checkout, free play in both
Minges and Memorial Gym fa
the basketball enthusiasts and the
recreational swim program.
During certain hours each
week the gyms and swimming
pools will be open fa student use.
The swimming pool will be open
UNBELIEVABLE SAVINGS
CALCULATORS & STEREOS
calculators
Texas Instruments� ,i�Wpm K WAS
WASSALE
TI-59$300 . 4 95HP-10 . .$175
TI-58$93 95HP-19CS345
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PC-100A$200 $149 95 1HP-22. .$125
MBA-FINANCE $80$59 99 1HP-25. . $125
SR-51-11 �$70$45 95 '�HP-25C$160
SR-40 TI-1680$40 $40$23 95 $23 95HP-27 HP-29C .$175 $195
BA-BUSINESS $40$27 95 ����HP-55. . $395
TI-5015$80$6295V2S21HP-67 $450
TI-5040$130$94 95HP-91 $325
TI-5050M$110$79 95HP-92 $625
MODULE LIBFORHP-97 $750
58 & 59 $29 95
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2. AH abova calculator hava full ona-yamr factory warranty
3. Enclota paymant In full with ordar, or ramlt $20 with ordar,
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for racalvr.
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STEREO
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CATALOGUE
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ONLY WITH
CREDIT CARDS
$14 -237-5990
(Add � foir�dtl l�rs)
STEREO WAREHOUSE
110 NEW ALLEY, STATE COLLEGE, PA 16801
at the following times: Mingei
Pool will be openfrom8-10 p.m.
during the week and from 3-9 on
weeekends. Memorial pools will
be open from 4-6 p.m. during the
week and also from 10 to 1 p.m.
on Monday, Wednesday and
Friday.
For basketball free play,
Memorial Gym will be open from
4-10 p.m. on Monday through
Friday and from 2 to 9 p.m. on
Sundays. Minges Coliseum will
be open for free play from 8-11
p.m. on weekdays, from 10 a.m.
to 9 p.m. on Saturdays and from 2
to 9 p.m. on Sundays. Equipment
can also be checked out for use
during these limes at either
Memorial Gym or Minges Coli-
seum.
While registration periods for
flag football. Co-Rec Almost
Anything Goes and oo-rec soft-
ball close tomorrow, August 31
registration for men's and
women's tennis singles and dou-
bles runs through Thursday,
September 1. Play begins next
Wednesday for the flag football
and Co-Rec Softball competition
and the tennis tournaments on
both the singles and doubles
levels will begin on September 7.
The Co-Rec Almost Anything
Goes carnival will begin on
Thursday and there will be six
events: blind football, human
innertube, balloon toss, Skin the
Snake, Egg Toss and Shishkabob.
Some of you might be able to
guess what the event calls for by
its name, but some won't be able
to guess. The fun and action all
begins Thursday at 4 p.m. on the
University Mall.
Addition of Marino
fills basketball staff
The new East Carolina Uni-
versity basketball staff was recen-
tly completed with the addition of
Frank Marino, from the Univer-
sity of Detroit, as graduate
assistant.
Marino, a native of Mt.
Vernon, N.Y served as a gra-
duate assistant at Detroit last
season. Prior to that time, he had
served as assistant basketball
coacr at Westchester Community
College and in a similar position
at Tuckahoe High School in
East Chester, NY.
From 1972-77. he has been a
resident staff member of the
Five-Star Basketball Camp, which
is considered to be one of the
finest all-star camps in the United
States.
Marino is a 1970 graduate of
C.W. Post, where he earned his
degree in history. He attended
graduate school at lona College.
The 29-year old Marino, who
assumed his duties in August, is
single.
The Pro Shop
Of GreenvfNeJnc.
1st WEEK SPECIAL OFFER
now thru Saturday
Free nylon strings with any tennis
racket purchased
All Faded Glory fashion jeans &
coordinates one item at regular
price 2nd item price
15 off on all Sperry Top Sider
Shoes
All girls golf outfits and mens golf
slacks 20 off
15 off on all golf clubs and golf
bags
For those still interested re-
gistration closes August 31 and
each team must have three men
and three women to compete.
Co-Rec Softball is a new event
this year. Each team entering
must have at least five girls and
five guys on the roster. There has
to be enough girls on the field to
outnumber those guys on the field
for the same team. To offset any
physical advantage the guys
might have, a giant 16-inch
softball will be used. Registration
ends on August 31 for this event
and play will begin on Sept. 6.
One more event that is still a
few weeks away, but one that
everyone should watch for will be
the men'sand women's volleyball
competition. Registration begins
on September 19 and play will
begin on September 27.
CLUB SPORTS
This year Marty Martinez will
be working with the Intramural
Department in a full-time capa-
city. Among his duties will be
handling the dub sports program
at East Carolina University.
Martinez worked with the
sports club program as a Grad-
uate Assisant last year. Anyone
interested in joining a Club Sports
team see him.
Among the cl ,bs seeking new
members are the Bicycling and
Hiking Clubs. Anyone interested
in joining with these dubs should
see Martinez in the Intramural
Office on the main floor of
Memorial Gym.
INTRAMURAL TRAINER
One of the programs initiated
last year that will be continued
this year is that of Intramural
Trainer. The Trainer program will
give the student partidpating in
intramural activities the assur-
ance that, in case of injury, newiil
receive some form of first-aid fa
his injury, even though the
Intramural Program Is not re-
sponsible for any injury a student
might incur while partidpating in
adivities. See Intramural Trainer
Dan Beat for more information on
the services offered by this
department of the Intramural
staff.
INTRA-ACTION
That covers most of the
pertinent information for this
week. This column will appear
weekly in The Fountainhead on
Thursdays. So watch for it. In
addition, the Intramural Depart-
ment publishes a weekly newslet-
ter of its own that will bring you
up-to-date with what is happen-
ing Finally, for schedules and
registration dates call the Intra-
Adion Hotline at 757-6562. So
long until next week.





�����������(��������Mi

30 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 21
Hicks strives for personal, team success
One could not blame East
Carolina running back Eddie
Hicks if his thoughts about the
Pirates' upcoming opener against
N.C. State drift back to a year ago
in Raleigh.
East Carolina was leading
Wdfpack 16-14 with just ever a
minute left to play. ECU lined up
for an apparent field goal, but the
snap from center was taken by
Willie Hawkins who handed off to
Hicks on a reverse, who outraced
a State defender into the end
zone for the game clinching score.
"That was definitely one of
the highlights for me alst year
said the fleetfooted junior recal-
ling the play. "We had great
blocking, and everything worked
out well
This season, Hicks says that
he has set several goals for
himself, ones that if he reaches,
the team will benefit.
"I'd like to rush for 1000 yards
if I could Hicks said, "and it
would be nice to make all-
America. But the most important
thing is fa the team to be
successful. If the team is suoceT.
Put, I'll be happy
Last season at this time, Hicks
was an unknown sophomore, a
question mark in the offensive
backfield. That question mark
was soon changed to an exclama-
tion point as the Henderson,
N.C, native rushed fa 897 yards,
and was ranked fifth out of eight
running backs in the country last
year to average over six yards per
carry (6.5).
This year, a lot of attention is
being focused on one half of the
famed "H & H Trucking Co as
the Pirates prepare fa their Sept.
3 opener against N.C. State.
Hicks admits it's a different
feeling being one of the players
most watched in pre-season, but
claims that he is not preparing
any differently.
"I'm really not doing anything
that I haven't done before he
said. "All I'm doing when I go out
is trying to do the best I can all
the time
Actually, Hicks admits he has
had one problem to date, and that
is with the quarterback situation.
However, as opponents wait with
bated breath to prey on ECU'S
unknown quarterbacks, they may
have to settle fa seeing streaks of
purple flash right befae their
eyes.
1' The quarterbacks have caus-
ed a problem fa me the ECU
halfback admitted. "Those guys
are so fast going down the line,a
so quick with their releases
that I sometimes have trouble
keeping up with them When
was the last time anyone with 4.3
speed had trouble keeping up
with anybody?
Although Hicks was the lead-
ing ground gainer fa the Pv ites
in 76, he doesn't feel like he is
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featuring 'FrameWork'
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the key man in the wishbone
attack, na does he bel ieve that he
is the one to stop.
"We'vega several good guys
in the backfield thi; year he
said. "Hawk(WillieHawkins, the
other half of the H & H Trucking
Co.) gained over 700 yards last
season, and Sam Harrell is a third
breakaway back. Rus we've got
good receivers and Vince Kolanko
istoughasa fullback. As a matter
of fact he added, " the offensive
line would like to see all of us gain
over a thousand yards
That may na be possible, but
that should serve a proper
warning to those who feel the
Pirate offense may suffer from
last year.
When it comes to a philosophy
of football fa Eddie Hicks, he
keeps it simple and straight to the
point.
"I just want to win stated
the speedster. "When I get my
handson the ball I'm going to run
as hard as I can fa as far as I can.
When I'm not running the ball
I'm going to see to it that my
block is made. Fa us to be a good
football team, everything's got to
fall right in place. I'm gonna try
my best to see that it happens
if 1977 turns out anything like
1976, East Carolina's opponents
will fall right into placeright
behind Eddie Hicks.
EDDIE HICKS
NOW AVAILABLE!
PAT'S
HAT!
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as worn by
'S
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ECU FOOTBALL
Only 14 days left until the N.C. State football at Raleighbe sure
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game! Better hurrysupply is limited!
Don's accept any imitationslook for this label!
?A1
1 1
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AND COMPANY, INC.
210 E. 5th St. Phone 752-4156





� �
Page 2k. FOUNTAINHEAD 30 August 1977
Strong safety Hall All-America candidate
What goes through a college
football player's mind when he
has become the veteran at his
position instead of the youngster
in just on short year? Gerald Hall,
East Carolina University all-
America candidate at strong
safety, says he doesn't feel any
differently.
"I really don't feel any
differently than last year said
Hall. "Sure, I'll be the one the
young guys will come to for
advice, but I have confidence in
them just as I did last year in the
three seniors
Hall was the sophomore in the
Pirates' four-deep secondary last
�VCXK
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year that included all-America
Jim Bolding, Reggie Pinkney and
Ernest Madison, all four-year
starters. His position was the one
that produced worry because of
lack of experience. But he may
have been the best of the bunch
and the three seniors all were
invited and played in post-season
all-star games.
"This is a new year Hall
added. "We have to forget all
about last year. The only thing on
our minds right now is winning on
Sept. 3 against State
Hall hinted that this year's
backfield, composed of senior
Steve Hale, sophs Charlie Carter
and Willie Holly, and himself,
oould be as good or better than
last year's crew, generally
thought of as being one of the
elite secondaries in the country.
"We're going to fool a lot of
people Hall said. "I feel we can
be just as good as last year. These
corner men (Carter and Holly)
will hit hard. They'll stick you.
and Steve (Hale) has played
enough in the past three years
that he is like another starter
coming back
Hall was 12th in the nation in
punt returns last season with an
11.6 average and is the seventh
leading returner coming back this
year. He also had six intercep-
tions and returned them for 153
yards. Fa his efforts, he was
named second team all-America
by Football Weekly for sopho-
mores last year.
Hall returned a schooi-iecord
tying 26 punts last season and
would have had more, except for
the fact that teams kicked from
him fa the last half of the year.
"I feel that helped our team
when they punted away from
me Hall added. "They often
times got off a shat punt, which
gave us jood field position
The Edenton, N.C native
came to East Carolina right off
the rebound, so to speak. Pat
Dye, Pirate head coach, was
reauiting Zack Valentine when
he was Hail playing basketball.
When he saw what a good athelte
Hall was, Dye immediately offer-
ed him a scholarship to play
football, and Hall has never let
him down.
"Gerald was the best defen-
sive back wo had overall last
year Dye said. "And everybody
knows what great ones we had in
the three senias that had started
fa three years together
East Carolina's defense was
ranked third in the nation overall
last season, but Hall thinks they
can be better this season. He may
be slightly biases, however, since
three members of the defense
(including Hall himself) gradua-
GERALDHALL
See HALL page 23
BIG DADDY'S
CHUCKWAGON 10th St.
Dinners nightly
Fresh vegetables
Homemade potato and chicken salad
Good onion rings
Variety of sandwiehes
Fresh BarBQ
Ham hu rger stea ks
Milksliakes
Tea
8:30-7:30 MF. 8:30-3:00 Sat.
Closed Sun.
HARDEE'S
CAR SHOP
3 MiUi East of Gr�t�nvill�t on Hwy. 33
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�����I
mmmmm
Liz White named to
Sports Medicine staff
30 Augml 19T, FOUNTAINHEAD Pag� 23
Hall remains optimistic
East Carolina University
Sports Medicine Director Rod
Compton has announced the
appointment of Liz White as
Assistant Athletic trainer.
White, a native of Norfolk,
Va will assist Compton with
administration of the Sports Med-
icine curriculum, and in supervi-
sion of student trainers, as well as
heading up Sports Mediane's
work with women's athletics.
White came to East Carolina
in 1974, and served for two years
as a graduate assistant. She
gained her certification last year,
while waking at ECU on a
graduate fellowship.
This year, White will move
into a full-time position as
non-tenured faculty. With the
appointment, she becomes the
first woman on the full-time
Sports Mediane Staff.
Continued from page 22
ted from Holmes High in Eden-
ton. Valentine and Willie Holley
are the others.
"The people back home are
real proud Hall said. "They
give us a lot of support and keep
telling us to keep up the good
work.
"I feel we can be better
defensively mainly because of our
linebackers and the strength of
our line. Wayne (Poole) and Noah
(Clark, defensive tackles) are
much stronger than a year ago,
while Zack (Valentine) and Fred
(Chavis) are awfully quick. We
can be better
Hall also feels the Pirates'
tough schedule will deep the team
alert. "There's no easy game on
the schedule. We'll just have to
take them one at a time
Hall not only has a new
supporting cast in the secondary,
but also a new coach. Bobby
Wallace came to ECU when
Lanny Norris resigned to enter
private business. He is impressed
with Hall from what he has seen
in films.
"Gerald's one of the best
defensive backs I've ever seen.
he said. "He does a great job
defeating blocks on the option
game and with his ooverage. He' II
be a leader on defense.
From an inexperienced starter
at the start of 1976 to the leader at
the start of 1977. That's a long
way to go in a year, but Gerald
Hall will have done just that on
Sept. 3 in Carter Stadium.
Pirate games sell tickets
Continued from page 18
Butters said that before he knew sales for the game were much
higher than in the past, and he seems to have put himself back into a
corner. Butters is said to be close to Duke head ooaoh Mike McGee.
and McGee, according to sources, wants no part of playing the Pirates.
But, if the game this year draws a sellout, as it seems it is going to,
Butters will have to agree fa future games.
As Art Chansky, spats edita of the Durham Maning Herald, put
it befae the contracts were signed fa this year's game. " Duke is
either foolish a scared, a both, fa na playing East Carolina, now a
in the future.
LIZ WHITE (RIGHT) was recently named as Assistant Athletic
trainer with the Sports Medicine Department.
DIAL-A-PIRATE
East Carolina University's "Dial-A-Pirate" is now back in
operation fa the yea. Taped messages, cnanged daily, with coacnes
and players, are available to you by dialing 919-757-6900. Stay in toucn
with Pirate athletics daily through "Dial-A-Pirate

Sports
writers
needed
Call 757-6366
for more information
Pirate scrimmage marks improvement
CHRISHOLLOMAN
Assistant Spats Edita
Thursday night. August 25th,
Pat Dye presented his football
team under the lights in Fioklen
Stadium to see what fall practice
had done to shape up his fourth
East Carolina team. What Coach
Dye did see was an improvement
by both the offense and defense.
The game itself pitted the first
team offense and defense against
the rest of the team. The Purple
starters won a 49-19 victay over
the gold .earn.
Running back Eddie Hicks
scaed fa the Purple, as did
quarterback Leander Green with
two long runs. Other standouts
were quarterback Jimmy Souther-
land, showing a marked im-
provement in passing, and Mit-
chell Smith, coming off an broken
hand injury.
Injuries still plague the Pi-
rates. Those on the injury list
include fullback Vince Kolanko,
offensive tackle Matt Mulholland,
strong safety Gerald Hall, nose-
guard Clifford Williams, and
center Jeff Hagans.
Coach Dye hopes his team will
be healed in time fa the opener
at NC State this Saturday, 7 00
p.m at Carter Stadium. The
game is a sellout.
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Pay 24 FOUNTAINHEAD 30 August 1977
� It
f
HOW TO HAVE YOUR CAKE AND EAT IT T
Thursday after 5, have some cake on us.
We'll be one year old September 1st,
so you get to eat a piece of the party!
Cake on the house, with seconds while it lasts.
And who ever heard of celebrating a birthday
without candles?
Thursday sit down to candlelight and flowers
at every table in our place.
Come to our party
It's going to be a piece of cake.
And there's nothing that can hold a candle to that.
� .
!(�
I

McDonald's
� �
sS�
Mfe do it all tor you
�XfSqjj.
y
10th and Cotanche Streets
(Ad Manager's note: The McDonald's ad that appeared in the 8-23 issue
was not supposed to run until the 25th. Therefore iff you were mconvienienced
when you went to get your plant, FOUNTAINHEAD apologizes. McDonalds
was not at fault. We regret the error.)





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Title
Fountainhead, August 30, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 30, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.596
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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