Fountainhead, August 23, 1977








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Fourrtainhead
uu uh Carolina 23 Aeguat1977
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Vd. 53, No. 1
East Carolina Univeraty
Greenville, North Carolina
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9
Page 2 FOUNTAINMEAD 23 Augut 1977
ERIC CARMEN
Boats Against The Current
THE
RLRN PARSONS PROJECT
I ROBOT
Includes: BOATS AGAINST THE CURRENT
SHE DID ITRUN AWAY
Melissa Manchester SJNGIN
Includes BREAKDOWN DON'T LET ITSHOW
I WOULDN'T V ANT TO BE LIKE YOU
Includes YOU MAKE IT EASY
SAD EYES WARMTH OF THE SUN
$4.99
Vy Topes
GRATEFUL DEAD
Includes: TERRAPIN STATION
PASSENGERSAMSON & OELILAH
THE
TIM WEISBERG BAND
Including. Cascade
ARISTA
On Sale August 23-29
Choose your music without an advisor's signature or a required readinq list longer
than the wait in line at registration. The Record Bar has all kinds of music-vour kind of
music. Whether you prefer the liberal arts like rock and soul or something fine in iazz or
classical Record Bar offers a complete selection, music-wise sales people and weeklv
specials. Save on the music featured here and check out additional bargains waitTnq for
you now at the Record Bar. M waiuny iui
Pitt Plaza
10-9 Monday-Saturday





S Mi
23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page3
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Two Fine Stores
Under the Same Roof
Your Complete Supply Headquarters
Downtown
Across Cotanche from the
girls' dorms you'll find everything
you need for fall semester.
Come to see us first this fall and
make us your one stop supply center.
DowntOWnWe've got it all for you
Used textssave you 25 over new texts
Art suppliescomplete selection for Art Majors
Photographic suppliestop name brands
Study aidsMonarchCliff Notes
Schaurn's Outlines
SportswearECU T Shirts,
sweatshirts &� jackets
Film ProcessingFast Quality Service
ECU NoveltiesGreat for Gifts
School SuppliesThousands of Items
Come See Us This Fall!
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Page 4 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
WELCOME
ECU PIRATES
Students, Clubs and
Organization accounts are
welcomed at
Planter's National Bank.
Open your account
and receive:
1. FREE CHECKING
(No minimum balance �
No Strings attached)
2. FREE INTRODUCTORY
PIRATE CHECKS
Contents
SGA
page 5
Academics
page 14
Services
page 22
Trends
page 28
Sports
page 41
Cover Photo by Pete Podeszwa
Staff
Senior EditorKim Devins
Production Manager. Jimmy Williams
Advertising Manager. Sheila Byrum
News EditorCindy Broome
Trends EditorDavid Bosnick
sP�rts EdjtcrSteve Wheeler
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper 01
East Carolina University sponsored by the Student
Government Association of ECU and is distributed
each Wednesday during the summer, and twice
weekly during the school year.
Mailing address: Old South Building, Greenville,
N.C 27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309






"r i
I
SGA
23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag 5
Various services provided for students
By CINDY BROOME
News Editor
The Student Government As-
sociation (SGA) offers many
useful services for students.
A service widely used by day
and dorm students alike is the
transit system.
Three routes are run daily
during the regualr schco year,
and plans are being made to
operate a night route serving the
women's dorms, Allied Health,
and the library, according to Neil
Sessoms, SGA president.
Ten thousand students utilize
the transit system weekly during
the year, said Sessoms.
"Gene Summerlin, the transit
manager, is doing a tremendous
job said Sessoms. "The
operation is running smoothly
REFRIGERATORS
The SGA rents refrigerators,
either yearly or by the semester.
Only a few student governments
handle refrigerator rentals, said
Sessoms; most universities use
outside refrigerator rental ser-
vices.
LEGAL AID
Free legal aid is another SGA
service. Many students are on
their own fa the first time, said
Sessoms, and sometimes may
need legal help. Students in
trouble with the law should also
seek help from the legal aid
service, said Sessoms.
DISCIPLINE
"The SGA handles the disci-
plinary problems said Sessoms.
"The defendants go befae a
student attorney general and
student jury, and is represented
by a student public defender
said Sessoms.
The students, na the admini-
stration, handle disciplinary pro-
blems, said Sessoms.
" I feel like it's only fair said
Sessoms.
MEDIA
We have a very good campus
newspaper Sessoms said of
FOUNTAINHEAD.
Concerning the BUCCANEER,
Sessoms said, "I'm terribly sary
there won't be a yearbook fa the
past year. I'm planning to do
everything I can to see there is a
yearbook this year
There is a possibility of
WECU going FM, said Sessoms.
If ECU's radio station does
become an FM station, it will be
the only FM station in Greenville.
"The minaity newspaper
(EBONY HERALD) is a strong
paper and has a wide reader-
ship said Sessons.
"This year's REBEL is one of
the best litaary magazines I've
ever seen Sessoms said. "The
wak in it was of the highest
quality
"Publications, as a whole,
have been very successful
LOAN SERVICE
A loan service also sponsaed
by the SGA can loan a student up
to $25.
The loan service gets a la of
utilization by the students said
Sessoms. "I'm glad we're in a
SGA has 2nd largest U.S. budget
By CINDY BROOME
News Edita
The SGA has the second
largest student government bud-
get in the nation, accading to
Neil Sessoms, SGA president.
Sessoms said UCLA has the
largest student government bud-
get in the United States.
"We are definitely one of the
most active student governments
in the oountry said Sessoms.
Students here have opportun-
ities to decide certain policies.
"I'm glad students have a
chance to determine policies that
concern them, and I hope to get
mae students involved in the
policy-making process through
the SGA said Sessoms.
ECU otters a wide variety of
activities, and Sessoms said
various activities ocmplete col-
lege life.
"I think activities like publi-
cations, Student Union, and SGA
serve to round out the taal
university experience said
Sessoms.
"Although academics are im-
patant, life should na be center-
ed around the classroom
The SGA is currently waking
ai several projects, one of them
being a search fa a facility fa
all-night studying.
"We are looking into finding a
facility to allow students to study
all night during exams said
Sessoms.
"Reed Warren, vice-
president, has been instrumental
in looking fa a place.
"The project to improve cam-
pus lighting is also a project of
Reed's said Sessoms.
Concerning the yearbook, due
to inadequate funding last year
there will be no BUCCANEER fa
the past year.
There was an attempt to raise
money by selling student sub-
scriptions, but it was na enough
to print a yearbook.
"I'll do everything in my
power as SGA president to assure
that students will receive a
yearbook paid by SGA, and na by
student subscriptions said
Sessoms.
"The legislature will be the
main determiner of this, but I'll
do everything I can
The SGA and City of Green-
ville have formed a parking
oommittee to study the ever-
growing parking problem.
"I realize there are no easy
answers to the parking problem
here, but we are concerned and
we are studying the problem
said Sessoms.
"The universitycity parking
comn 'tee to study parking is
headed by Jerry Cox, Secretary of
External Affaire and will try to
educate the students to parking
problems and regulations to save
students from inconvenience.
"I'm looking into alternate
ways of funding publications to
try to separate publications from
the SGA as much as possible
said Sessoms.
Publications are funded by the
SGA, and there has been friction
in the past between the two
organizations.
"I think this would alleviate
some of the conflict that has
existed in the past.
"You can't have a truly free
and effective press when the
government holds the puree
strings Sessoms said.
Sessoms said the SGA is
studying techniques used by
schools whose publications and
student government are separate.
Sessoms also stressed that the
SGA na only appropriates and
spends money, it has the
potential to do mae.
"We try to improve student
conditiaisat ECU. I think in the
past the SGA was meetly con-
cerned with spending money
said Sessoms.
"We don't just sit back and
spend our budget
New refrigerators
By CINDY BROOME
News Edita
Tne summer legislature ap-
proved a proposal to buy 900
refngeratas to replace 900 old
ones, accading to Ron Lewis,
Directa of Refrigerata Rentals.
"We will keep 100 refrigeratas
from last year Lewis said.
The new refrigerators are
slightly larger than the old ones,
and there is mae freezer space,
said Lewis.
How to
avoid
drop-add
Class, exam schedule
for Fall Semester 77
August 23, Tuesday - Registration Day
August 24, Wednesday - Drop-Add
August 25, Thursday - Classes begin
August 30, Tuesday - Last day to register a apply fa graduatiai
in December
September 5, Monday - Laba Day Holiday
Hooker Road. Orders may be place
equipped with a night depository. Alan undergraduate course
NCNB in Greenville. ing
Thanksgiving Holiday
sume. Last day to drop
nission
s
IS
fa Fall Semester close
position to of fa this service
FACULTY SENATE
There are student positions on
various Faculty Senate commit-
tees.
"Thae is a la of student
input thae said Sessoms.
"Academics is the life at a
univasity
SGA officers
NEIL SESSOMS
REED WARREN
president
SGA vice-
i
I .
CRAIG HALES SGA treasurer
LIBBY LEFLER SGA secretary
m
i
1
l





Page 6 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
1 GETS YOU TWO
!
I
I
I
I
I
One coupon per customer please
Offer good at any Greenville Hardee's
ecu Tnrou9n September 7, 1977
Bring this coupon to any Hardee's
in Greenville and get two big
beautiful Roast Beef Sandwiches
for only $1.00.
Hardecr
The taste that brings you back.
HaRteer
Three locations in Greenville
� 910 Cotanche St.
� 300 E. Greenville Blvd.
� 2907 E. 10th Street
a
vn)
FOUNTAINHEAD is the student newspaper of
East Carolina University sponsored by the Student
Government Association of ECU and is distributed
each Wednesday during the summer, and twice
weekly during the PdkwA year.
Mailing addre . Old South Building, Greenville,
N.C. 27834
Editorial offices: 757-6366, 757-6367, 757-6309





REBEL - BUCCANEER
23 Augurt 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD P�q� 7
FOUNTAINHEAD
ECU is served by three major
publications, outline below. The
purpose of these publ icat ions is to
inform, record, and provide a
creative outlet for talented writers
and artists.
REBEL
The East Carolina Literary
and Arts Magazine is an award-
winning magazine that has repre-
sented a creative outlet fa the
artistically-inclined student here
at ECU for many years.
There are many mediums of
expression available to students
through the magazine. The
magazine oonsiders short stories,
plays, poems, illustrations,
paintings, photography, and gen-
erally, any aspect of literature
and the visual arts that a student
many wish to submit for publica-
tion.
The East Carolina Literary
and Arts Magazine is one of the
few such university publications
that can offer the artist a small
stipend for work accepted for
publication
There are also opportunities
for the student who wishes to
become directly involved in the
production of the magazine.
The salaried positions of
editor, associate editor and art
director are selected every year
by the publications committee.
There are volunteer positions
to be filled in business manage-
ment, circulation, proofreading,
public relations, lay-out and
design.
BUCCANEER
One of the few tangible things
that goes with a student after he
or she graduates from college is a
yearbook. It is the one thing that
has pictures and words recaptur-
ing the fond memories and
special moments of being in
college.
Generations later, dusty books
will be taken from the attic and
looked at by grandchildren who
will no doubt laugh at the clothes
and ask "Who was Fleetwood
Mac?" "What isan ElboRoom?"
"How do you drop-add?"
The BUCCANEER, the year-
book of East Carolina, is pu-
blished by students for the
student body so the memories will
forever be alive in print long after
they have faded in the mind.
Paid for by student activity
fees, the yearbooks arrive in
mid-fall and are distributed to all
students from the office located in
the Publications Center.
No experience is necessary to
work on the staff and everyone is
welcome to contribute stories,
photographs and ideas to help
make it a better and more
representative book of ECU.
For information call 757-6501
or drop by the office between 9
and 5.
FOUNTAINHEAD
The students on the staff of
FOUNTAINHEAD strive to keep
the student body up-to-date on
the news, and at the same time,
learn practical newspaper experi-
ence that is invaluable to journa-
lism students.
Working fa a campus publi-
cation keeps one in touch with the
latest events, current gossip and
student views. Besides all that,
the students also get paid.
One doesn't have to be a
journalism student to be on
FOUNTAINHEAD, although it is
encouraged. However, it would
be advisable to take a couple of
journalism courses (including one
writing oourse) if you have no
plans to be a journalism mina.
There are several positions
which are periodically open that
require only keen interest and
common sense.
So, those who like writing ana
keeping up-to-date with the latest
news, come by and give us a
hand. We are located on the
second floa of the Publications
Center, across from Joyner Li-
brary, a call us at 757-6366.
Greeks are great
Co-op work program offers
invaluable work experience
Thae are a number of social
fraternities and saaities on the
ECU campus which help play a
major role in student affairs on
campus.
Besides SGA and Student
Union, many high student posi-
tions at East Carolina are filled
through the ranks of greeks at
East Carolina.
In addition, the fraternities
and saaities at ECU make up a
large part of the strong following
given the school's athletic teams.
Greek Rush takes place in the
fall during the first month of
school. Look fa exact dates in
the FOUNTAINHEAD and on the
infamation areas around cam-
pus.
Fraternity Rush is open to all
with no registration required,
while Saaity Rush is a bit more
formal as each girl is required to
attend every saaity's rush par-
ty.
The greek life is not fa
everyone, but most of those who
choose it, it is a memaable and
lifelong experience.
Work experiences exist fa the
interested student who wishes to
explae a to investigate hisa her
future.
Cooperative Education pro-
vides the opportunity fa full time
students to alternate periods of
academic study with periods of
off-campus employment. These
experiences are designed to en-
rich your education and career
goals. The Co-op staff waks
directly with you to find employ-
ment experiences designed fa
your needs.
Cooperative Education is not
geared to any specific department
of maja but waks with students
in a variety of academic fields. I f
you want a chance to add
something special to your future
employment prospects, broaden
your career understanding, a
explae career oppatunities,
oomeby313Rawl building, a call
757-6979 fa an appointment.
Cooperative Education can
help you make a valuable invest-
ment toward your future.
FOUNTAINHEAD
organizational meeting
Thursday, August25
at 400 Come by and get involved,
ALWAYS LOOKING FOR THE END OF THE LINE?
Make your telephone application now for faster installation.
Applying now will also ensure your number being listed in the ECU studentstaff
faculty directory being printed by Carolina Telephone.
Carolina Telephone employees will be on campus to take your orders Monday,
August 22 through Friday, August 26 at:
� The Book Store Lobby
� Clement Dorm Lobby
� Tyler Dorm Lobby
Oh, yes �, while you were away, we moved to larger and better quarters at 1530
Hooker Road. Orders may be placed and payments made at our new office
equipped with a night depository. Also payments can be made at any branch of
NCNB in Greenville.

uTs

Carolina Telephone
Wfere here to help.
What are neighbors for?
i





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When music becomes more
than just something to listen to,
PAIR ELECTRONICS AUDIO CENTER
is involved.
Store Hours: 8:30-5:30 Weekends Sat. 8:30-12:30





23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 9
Infirmary provides 24-hour service, care
By DOUG WHITE
Staff Writer
Many students are uneasy
about their first visit to the ECU
infirmary. They are skeptical
about adjusting to new doctors
and their techniques. Well, Dr.
Irosn, director of Student Health
Services would like to put the
students' minds at ease.
The infirmary is here to take
care of the health needs of the
students and if they have signs or
symptoms that make them think
they are ill, then they should
come to us for assistance he
said.
The infirmary isopen 24 hours
daily, and there are nurses on
duty and a doctor on call at all
times. The doctors are on duty
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
"We have four full-time doc-
tors, one part-time doctor, and a
consulting psychiatrist who
comes in twice a week.
"We also have 13 nurses who
do an outstanding job and they
are here at all times he said.
The infirmary is geared to-
wards preventive care and treat-
ment of illnesses and accidents,
but they also perform routine
immunizations, allergy shots, and
physicals for school-related acti-
vities.
Other programs include con-
tinued care from a student's
hometown doctor, pregnancy
and VD tests, and a counseling
referral service for problem preg-
nancies and other troubing situa-
tions.
The Family Planning service
includes an audio-visual pro-
gram on conception control and
venereal disease. This program
is required before oral contracep-
tives are prescribed.
The infirmary has 48 beds for
patients who require hospitili-
zation. The facility is also
equipped with a clinical and
bacteriological laboratory.
All medical information con-
cerning the student is confiden-
tial, but the information can be
forwarded to the student's private
physician if the student requests
S.O.U.L.S. offers special minority program
In addition to the normally
scheduled Freshman Orientation
Program sponsored by the Stud-
ent Affairs division of ECU, an
orientation program designed es-
pecially for the minority students
to be sponsored by the Orienta-
tion Committee of S.O.U.L.S.
(Society of United Liberal Stud-
ents) will take place August 29
through September 3.
This is supposedly an oppor-
tunity to introduce those incom-
ing minority freshmen and trans-
fer students to those organiza-
tions and activities specifically fqr
the black population on campus
as well as to better inform them
concerning their expectances as
students.
The orientation committee
consist of representatives from
each of the six black Greek
fraternity and sorority organiza-
tions. Members are as follows:
Chairman, James Greene (Alpha
Phi Alpha); Milas Kelly (Omega
Psi Phi); Zack Smith (Kappa
Alpha PsiSecretary of Minority
Affairs); Faye Elliot (Sigma Gam-
ma Rho) Velma Jackson (Alpha
Kappa Alpha) and Adriene
Thorn (Delta Sgma Theta).
The committee anticipates a
large turn-out with full student
participation in spite of the
apathy which tends to exist within
many of ECU'S minorities. Both
social as well as academic-related
activities have been planned.
The committee feels that the
correlation of the two related
activities is a plus because a
student's academic as well as
social welfare are two very
important aspects of his or her
college life. A student's aware-
ness of the availabilities could
indeed serve as . beneficial
It has been proven that
just as many blacks are leaving
because of academic failure as
there are ooming in on academic
acceptance. Therefore, according
to oommittee chairman, James
Greene, "The committee hopes
that this year's incoming minori-
ties will take advantage of this
opportunity to become better-in-
formed
Unlike past years when only
one night was set aside fa the
incoming minorities, a variety of
activities is planned for this year.
Festivities will begin on
Monday, August 29 with an
"Evening of Entertainment
Several of the Greenville area
business merchants have rVxiated
gifts to be given away as prizes
during the evening. Representa-
tives from every ECU academic
department have been invited to
be on hand to share information
in relation to their school as well
as to answer any questions
students may have on Tuesday,
"Academic Affairs Night
Nothing is scheduled fa Wed-
nesday.
Organizations Night is set fa
Thursday. Emphasis will be
placed upon the importance of
black student interest and parti-
cipation within campus activities
and organizations. Spokesmen
will be present to discuss inform-
atiai pertaining to S.O.U.L.S
SGA, Minaity Affairs, Student
Unioi, and Minaity Arts.
Friday is "Greek Day Black
Greeks will display their colas
proudly throughout the day. An
informal rap session fa all
interested students followed by a
joint Black Show with all the
fraternities and saaities "step-
ping' ' is scheduled to take place.
The aientatiot festivities will
be highlighted at Saturday night
with an Orientatioi Party which
will be free fa all students.
Schedule of events:
MONDAYEvening of
Entertainment" 7 p.m. First
floaMulti-Purpose Roan
Mendenhall Student Center
TUESDAYAcademic Affairs"
8 p.m. Brewster building Owing,
Rm. 103
WEDNESDAY-Nahing,
scheduled
THURSDAY Organization
Night" 8 p.m. Afro-American
Culture Center
FRIDAYGreek Day"
5 p.m -Informal rap session(s)
Mendenhall, Rm. 244-fraterni-
ties; Rm. 232-saaities
6 p.mBlack Show-Mendenhall
Student Center
6 p.mBlack Show-Mendenhall
Student Center Patio
SATURDAYOrientation Party"
9 p.m2 a.m. AfrchAmerican
Culture Center
UNIVERSITY
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Phone:758-1893
Member FDIC
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Page 10 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
Faculty Senate oversees academic program
If interested in getting in-
volved with the Faculty Senate,
contact Ed Beane, Secretary of
Academic Affairs, at the SGA
office in Mendenhall.
Admissions Committee
1 student member
The admissions Committee
recommends policies governing
undergraduate admission and re-
admission to regular sessions and
to the summer sessions for
entering students and transfer
students. It serves as an appeals
board for students who for
sufficient reason cannot meet
admission requirements. This
oommittee suggests to the Dean
of Admissions such research
studies as are helpful for eval-
uation of the efficiency of current
practices.
Continuing Education Committee
1 student member
The Continuing Education
Committee acts primarily as an
advisory group on programs and
future directions of continuing
education. In addition, the oom-
mittee examines and recom-
mends policies relating to the
entire concept of work outside the
regularly assigned departmental
loads, including extension teach-
ing and consultant activities.
Credits Committee
1 student member
The Credits Committee re-
oommends policies and practices
per aining to academic credits
and academic standards. It serves
as an appeals board for students
who wish to appeal administrative
decisions involving the inter-
pretation and enforcement of
policies pertaining to academic
credits and standards.
Calendar Committee
1 student member
The Calendar Committee de-
cides (1) on the number of days
the University shall be in session
during the regular terms and on
the beginning and closing dates;
(2) on the number of days and the
beginning and closing dates for
each semester and summer ses-
sion term; (3) on the scheduling of
examination periods and (4) on
the scheduling of holidays and
vacation periods.
University Curriculum Committee
2 student members
The University Curriculum
Committee studies undergradu-
ate curricula and evaluates their
effectiveness in meeting the
objectives of the University;
receives, considers, and recom-
mends to the Faculty Senate
curriculum changes, new courses,
or new programs of instruction
including general education re-
quirements for all undergraduate
curricula; recommends policy for
deletion of courses from the
curricula and the catalogue.
Library Committee
1 student member
The Library Committee form-
ulates and recommends policies,
governing the development of
collections of books, periodicals,
and other instructional materials,
and the apportioning of the
library budget; serves in an
advisory capacity on matters
relating to the services and
facilities of the library, interprets
the problems and policies of the
library to the faculty and brings
faculty opinion and needs to the
library staff.
Student Flecruitment Committee
1 student member
The Student Recruitment
Committee recommends policies
governing recruitment and orient-
ation of students entering ECU.
In addition, the oommittee makes
special recommendations to the
Dean of Admissions and to the
Associate Dean for Men regard-
ing special recruitment and
orientation problems relating to
minority groups.
Student Scholarships, Fellow-
ships, and Financial Aid Com-
mittee
1 student member
The Student Scholarships,
Fellowships, and Financial Aid
Committee reoommends policy in
the granting of scholarships and
fellowships, interviews nominees
and selects recipients of the ECU
academic scholarships and merit
scholarships, and reviews
periodically the overall financial
aid program.
Career Education Committee
2 student members
The Career Education Com-
mittee studies present vocational
and career education curricula of
ECU, reoommends that curricula
be added as needed; studies
statewide programs; determines
the patterns of career education
needed; reoommends the pro-
cedures and changes necessary in
career education programs; pub-
licizes and promotes the career
education programs of ECU.
Teacher Education Committee
1 student member
The Teacher Education Com-
mittee studies the present teacher
education curricula of ECU by
department; recommends to the
University Curriculum Committee
that duplication of oourses be
oorrected and that needed curri-
cula be added; studies the
changes in the teacher education
program which should be made in
order to keep pace with modern
trends; studies teacher education
programs of statewide organi-
zations to analyze the type of
teacher education that now exists,
determines the type of teacher
education needed, and recom-
mends the steps that should be
taken to obtain it; promotes
various means of enoouraging
students to enter the teacher
profession.
Industrial Survey Comnittee
i student members
The Instructional Survey Com-
mittee is charged with the
responsibility of studying the
methods and procedures for the
identification of excellence in
teaching, developing a program
that assesses student and col-
legial opinion, utilizing profes-
sional statistical procedures for
analysis of data, assuring maxi-
mum oongeniality, oooperating
with the Alumni Association and
others in identifying recipients of
teaching awards.
General College Committee
1 student member
The General College Com-
mittee's charge is to advise- the
Senate on matters relating to the
General College and its functions;
formulate policies and criteria
governing students' declaration
of major study, as well as their
entry into, tenure in, and exit
from the General College; re-
commend to the Senate proce-
dures for the selection of General
College advisors from the various
units with students in the General
College; recommend to the
See SENATE, p. 11.)
FRESHMEN
NOW IS THE TIME TO ENROLL
IN THE AIR FORCE ROTC
4 YEAR PROGRAM
and here are some facts that should interest you:
Courses open to college men and women.
Two hours academic credit per semester.
No service obligation now.
Full scholarships available that pay tuition, all fees,
plus a $100 a month tax-free allowance.
An Air Force officer commission when you
receive your baccalaureate.
The opportunity to get to know the spirit that
made our nation great.
Talk with our Air Force ROTC representative.
Contact: Captain Ashley Lane
ECU Wright Annex 206
Phone 757-6697
Air Farce ROTC
Gateway to a Great
Way �f Lite
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Jim's
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Every Tuesday and Thursday
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Call Jim or Tommy at
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91919
By TIM JONES
Staff Writer
The Pitt County Department
of Social Services at 709 Johnston
St. allotts food stamps to low-in-
come students as well to low-in-
23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Hm 11
ogram offers services to students
come families in the county.
According to Mrs. Betty B.
Rouse, supervisor of the Food
Stamp Center, 150 students are
included in the 8,200 people
receiving food stamps in Pitt
County.
SENATE
Continued from page 10
Senate policies, concepts and
procedures for most effective
utilization of the General College
by the academic groups concern-
ed; and review, study and pro-
pose to the University Curriculum
Committee changes to, additions
to, or deletions from the Univer-
sity's general education require-
ments.
Course Drop Appeals Committee
1 student member
The Course Drop Appeals
Committee is charged with the
responsibility of reviewing the
appeals submitted by students
who have been denied permission
by the Provost, Vice Chancellor of
Health Affairs or Dean of Con-
tinuing Education as appropriate
to drop a course following the
system in effect.
Campus Facilities Planning and
Development Committee
3 student members
The Campus Facilities Plan-
ning and Development Commit-
tee shall meet regularly with
appropriate university officials
and advise them of university
community interests regarding
esthetics, landscape, space utili-
zation, building location, traffic
and parking, and other pertinent
areas. The committee shall report
to and seek the recommendation
of the Faculty Senate on the
above matters at least every
fourth Senate meeting.
University Computer Committee
1 student member
The University Computer
Committee shall interpret the
problems and policies of the
University Computing Center to
the faculty and bring faculty
opinions and needs to the Com-
puting Center staff. It shall
initiate recommendations affect-
ing academic usage of computer
facilities above the department
and school level to the Faculty
Senate or appropriate authorities.
The Committee shall serve as a
resource of faculty opinion on
computer services and policies to
the University Computer Policy
Committee. It shall represent
faculty interest in the selection of
new computing equipment for the
University Computing Center or
for any academic unit seeking to
duplicate existing computing ser-
vices.
The maximum income for one
person receiving food stamps is
$262 per month. This figure
includes any veteran of social
security benefits and parental aid
that the student receives.
Students applying for food
stamps should also bring verifi-
cation from the Financial Aid
office of income from scholarships
and loans, Rouse said.
The maximum income re-
quirement is prescribed by feder-
al regulations, which became
effective July 1, 1977.
In households (dorm rooms
included) with more than one
occupant, the income of the
roommates is combined to obtain
the maximum income eligibility
requirement.
A total income of $344 per
month is allowed for two people
and $447 per month for three,
according to Rouse.
An applicant who has room-
mates can apply for food stamps
separately if he can prove that he
purchases, stores, and prepares
food separately, from the other
members of the unit.
In this case, Rouse said, a
representative from the Food
Stamp Office will visit the house-
hold to sea that this procedure is
carried out, presenting a state-
ment requiring the signature of
each occupant.
Off-campus students, apply-
ing for food stamps, are required
to present a rent and utility bill
fa one month. If the bills
encompass over 30 per cent of the
students' monthly income, 70 per
cent of the bill will be deducted
from the income of the applicant.
i union rees are also deducted
from all students, on- or off-cam-
pus.
Rouse added that dam stu-
dents must have access to cooking
facilities to receive food stamps.
Students are not eligible fa
food stamps if they are claimed as
tax dependents. Dependency is
verified by a letter to the
students' parents from the Food
Stamp Office. This process is
repeated on a semester basis.
Food stamps can be used only
fa the purchase of foods, Rouse
said. This does na include soaps,
cigarettes, papa products ani
alcoholic beverages.
Fifty-two dollars worth of food
stamps is allotted fa a household
occupied by one pason. Ninety-
four dollars worth is allotted fa
two people and $134 fa three.
Counseling sets up new office
By TIM JONES
Staff Writa
The ECU Counseling Centa,
located in 307 Wright Annex, will
set up a satellite office in 331
Cotten Hall this year to accom-
modate handicapped students.
Dr. Wilbert Ball, a counselor
at the centa, said this is in
compliance with the Rehabilita-
tion Act, which requires student
savices to extend themselves to
the handicapped.
This is a good idea, Ball said,
since the univet sity will enroll a
greater number of handicapped
students this fall.
The centa will be willing to
make arrangements to meet
handicapped student in their
rooms a sane designated place
on campus, if they are unable to
come to eltha of the two offices.
The Counseling Centa han-
dles all kinds of problems such as
family, academic, social, emo-
tional and monetary which may
arise during the school year.
The centa is always available
fa students who have problems,
and they encourage any student
who feel they need the services to
feel free to drop by the Wright
Annex office and discuss their
particular problem.
Also serving as a practical
teacher, the centa is available fa
students to do their field place-
ment wak.
The study skills program at
the Counseling Centa enrolled 42
students last year. Approxi-
mately 1,029 students received
counseling.
Dr. Geage Weigand, directa
of the centa, teaches special
classes on study skills which the
students find helpful in obtaining
better study habits.
According to Ball, the primary
service of the Counseling Centa
is the play a supportive role and
help any students who may
have adjustment problems blend-
ing into the ECU community.
Including Weigand and Ball,
the centa has five counselas.
They are Drs. H.D. Lambeth,
Jane Ryan and Phillis Smith.
Cliff's
99 SPECIAL
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
Hamburger dinner
Crabcake dinner
Fish special
includes french fries, cole slaw,
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3 miles east on E. 10th St. Ext.
Old Towne Inn
Greenville's finest salad bar
Meals $1.95 and up
includes 1 vegetable and a trip
to the salad bar.
SALAD BAR ONLY$1.50.
E. Fifth St. next to Chapter X
Good Things For Gentle People
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Also for sale are fine candles,
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Open AAon.�Sat. from 10 A.M.�6 P.M.
318 S.Evans St. On the Mall Phone 752-3815

4)





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11
Page 14 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS
Allied health
The School of Allied Health
and Social Professions, as a part
of its commitment to provide
well-trained health workers in all
fields, now offers a curriculum
leading to a B.S. degree in
Environmental Health.
An environmentalist graduat-
ing from this program will be a
specialist in control of the envir-
onment for better health. Re-
sponding to the many factors that
comprise and influence the envir-
onment, the oollege-trained en-
vironmentalist will work toward
controlling hazardous elements in
air, food and water supplies. He
will be prepared to carry out the
numerous inspections required
by law to assure safe and sanitary
conditions in public and private
water supplies, food and drug-
processing concerns, foodserving
establishments, recreational faci-
lities and sewage disposal sys-
tems.
Of particular importance to
this part of the country is the
environmentalists' understanding
of the large role that insects and
rodents play in the spread of
disease, and therefore his work in
controlling these animals. His
educational background also in-
cludes training in occupational
hygiene and accident prevention
so that he is qualified to serve as
an industrial hygienist.
ADMISSIONS
Students may entr the uni-
versity at the freshman level with
a declared intent to major in
Environmental Health or be ad-
mitted by transfer. Whether
admission is at the freshman level
or by transfer, the Environmental
Health Program reserves the
right to select those individuals
who seem best qualified for
admission into the program at the
junior level.
At this time a minimum grade
point average of 2.5 is required
Final selection of students accep-
ted into the junior level of the
program will be made by the
Admissions Committee of the
School of Allied Health and Social
Professions.
Specific admission require-
ments are listed in. current
university bulletins which may be
obtained by writing: Dean of
Admissions, ECU, Greenville,
N.C. ,17834.
Biology
Are you interested in life?
Undecided about your future
career? Consider a major or
minor in Biology (professional or
teaching) or Biochemistry.
Career opportunities are
numerous:
1) Research: Employment in
laboratories in industry, govern-
ment, and private research or-
ganizations
2) Industry & Government:
Product research, sales, environ-
mental monitoring, environmen-
tal impact, enforcement, quaran-
tine, foods and drugs, wildlife,
natural parks, agriculture agen-
cies, military
3) Pre-professional: , Founda-
tion for careers in medicine,
dentistry, veterinary medicine,
law
4) Teaching: Preparation for
teaching positions in biology
5) Other: Scientific illustration,
science writing
"Employment in the life sci-
ences is expected to increase
rapidly through the mid-1980's.
Thousands of jobs for life scien-
tists will open because of this
growth and the need to replaoe
those who transfer to other fields
of work, die or retire -(from the
Occupational Outlook for College
Graduates, 1975. U.S. Depart-
ment of Labor Statistics.)
For further information, see
Dr. James S. McDaniel, chair-
man, Department of Biology,
Biology building, Administrative
Bridge, N-207, or any faculty
member in the department
Computers
The ECU Computing Center
(ECUCC) serves the instructional
research and administrative
needs of the university. The
Computing Center Burroughs
B5700 computer, TUCC terminal
Academic User Room, and the
Offices of User Services, Opera-
tions, the Programming staff and
the Center Management are all
located on the first floor of
Austin.
The Computing Center is
available to presently enrolled
ECU students, university faculty
See DEPTS, p. 75.
DROP-ADD FORM East Carolina University
PRINT
Date
NOT VALID UNLESS DATED
ID NUMBER
First Name
M.ddle
REASON FOR CHANGE
Last Name
MAJOR
DEPARTMENT
1. To be valid, this form must de dated and signed by adviser and signed by major dept. head
2. Student must obtain from instructor a course card for each course being dropped
3. Student must have copy of present schedule to drop-add.
DROP
ADD
Note: If student is raising a course, the ;aised course form must be attached
Signed
Extra
Hour
Approval
Faculty Adviser's Approval
Departmental Chairman
Signed
Major Department Head's Approval
No of Hours Carrying After Change
Telephone 756�2444
2105 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, N.C.
HJ. Bunton, Owner
Latest hair cutting techniques
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DEPTS.
Continued from page 14
and staff, and other persons
authorized access by the appro-
priate authority. Users of the
Center are generally required to
obtain a user code, and should
consult User Services fa further
information on how to apply.
University users are generally
provided B5700 computing re-
search. A schedule of charges for
the B5700 may be obtained from
the IO Control Clerk in A-106.
All TUCC usage is chargeable to
the university at the current
NCECS price schedule.
The main point of contact for
new academic users is User
Services in A-112. The User
Services staff can help you by
answering your questions about
survey preparation, questionnaire
design and analysis, data pre-
paration and processing, use of
any of the available software and
any program problems.
Austin 108 has been set aside
as a user room for the conveni-
ence of Computing Center users.
The room contains an information
bulletin board, magazine rack
with current periodicals, key-
punches, terminals and work
areas. The student programming
assistants' desk is also in this
room. The students who sit at
this desk are available to aid
users in debugging their pro-
grams.
The Job Submittal and Return
window is normally open from 8
a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday though
Friday. A detailed operating
schedule for the B5700 and the
TUCC terminal is available on the
bulletin boards in A-106 and
A-108. Users are reminded to
watch the bulletin boards, news-
letters, and first pages of their
printouts fa any changes in the
operating schedule.
English
The English Department is
offering a major, in Concentration
in Writing this year. Many
students have shown an interest
in a writing maja, accading to
Dr. Erwin Hester, chairman of
the ECU English Dept.
Writing courses concerning
poery, magazine writing, and
shat stay writing will be offered.
In addition, the English De-
partment offers courses that
fulfill the humanities require-
ment, also. Check the university
catalogue fa further information.
Faculty will include Terry
Davis, a famer freelancer fa
Sports Illustrated.
Foreign lang.
The Department of Faeign
Languages and Literatures offers
work in French, German, Italian,
Latin, Russian and Spanish. Of
these, French, German and
Spanish can be chosen as a maja
a a mina and lead to the A.B.
B.S. degrees.
Students having taken a fa-
eign language in high school may
qualify fa advanced placement in
university courses and receive up
to 12 semester hours credit
toward graduation. On the basis
of the placement examination,
by-pass aedits may be earned fa
language levels 1001, 1002, 1003
and 1004, the department's intro-
ductay course sequence.
Fa those who wish to explae
the faeign literatures but do not
wish to study language as such,
the department offers a series of
courses in which students read in
English translation the master-
pieces of French, German, Latin,
Spanish and Russian literatures.
These courses fulfill the General
College literature requirement in
the humanities.
The Department of Faeign
Languages and Literatures offers
a very flexible mina program
which can readily be shaped to
complement the most diverse
professional interests and per-
sonal tastes.
Pre-professionaJ majas-in
law and medicine, fa instance-
find the broad perspectives of
undergraduate language study a
healthy and stimulating balance
to their later, total specialization.
Students in art and music find
elective language study a valuab-
le adjunct to their maja pro-
grams.
Students who choose to maja
in faeign languages will find
many career objectives open to
them in public education, in the
civil service opportunities offered
by agencies of the federal go-
vernment, in international trade
and many other areas.
Students interested in study-
ing faeign languages are invited
to come by the faeign language
department in Brewster A-427 fa
furtha infamatiai ai majaing
a minaing in faeign languages,
careers and languages, study
abroad, languages and the co-op
wak program, and aher inter-
esting possibilities open to fa-
eign language students.
Geography
The Department of Geography
23Augu1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 15
at ECU with a staff of 14 faculty
members and a large offering of
courses is well-aganized to pre-
pare students fa public life and
service and fa a wide variety of
private and governmental
positions.
The ability to cope with life is
faemost among the needs of our
society as we strive to exist on a
rapidly shrinking planet, where
population is exploding, resour-
ces dwindling, and pressures are
mounting dangerously. Many, if
not most of the problems this
generation will have to face,
have strong geographic over-
tones.
WHERE (physically) will we
put another 100 million people in
the United States by the year
2000? WHERE will we build the
100-odd cities - each averaging
one million inhabitants and all
unknown and unnamed today - to
accommodate them? WHERE
will we find the resources to feed,
clothe, house and educate these
new Americans, much less the
three billion additional neighbors
they will acquire within the next
30 years? WHERE will the levels
of pollution and human attrition
become most serious? These are
the kinds of questions fa which
people are going to need answers
These are also precisely the types
of questions to which modern
geographers are already address-
ing themselves.
Geography is the study of
place a space, in the same sense
that histay is the study of time.
Thus the geographa's method of
inquiry concentrates on asking
two essential questions:
"WHERE are things located?"
"WHY are they located where
they are?" While the answer to
the famer is largely descriptive,
the answer to the latter is entirely
analytical. Therefae the modern
geographa is concerned primar-
ily with interpreting and explain-
ing the occurrence, distribution,
and inter-relationships of the
physical and cultural patterns
which can be discerned.
Modern geography analyzes
pattans accading to the attri-
butes of location, extent and
density. As the analysis is
continued over time it assumes a
fourth dimension - succession.
The constantly changing physical
and human landscapes on the
earth's surface challenge the
geographer to provide continuing
interpretations of all parts of the
wald from the spatial point of
view. Geographers are prepared
fa high school teaching and
government positions and with
advanced degrees fa university
teaching and a wider range of
government wak.
Geology
The geology program at ECU
is a relatively small but very
active and growing concern.
With seven full-time faculty
members and approximately 35
undagraduate majors, thae ex-
ists an excellent faculty to student
ratio. This promotes inaeased
sensitivity and attention to indivi-
dual student needs and enhances
the quality of professional prep-
aration. Brth undergraduate and
graduate programs are available
within the department. The
number of students pursuing an
M.S. degree has stabilized at
Sen
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Phone 752-0647.
University Chancellor Position
Available
The Chancellor Selection Committee invites applica-
tions and recommendations for the position of Chancellor,
East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.
East Carolina University is one of the sixteen consti-
tuent institutions of the University of North Carolina. With
a present main campus enrollment of 10,000
undergraduates and 1,600 graduate students, it confers
appropriate degrees from eighteen departments of the
College of Arts and Sciences, Schools of Allied Health and
Social Professions, Art, Business, Education, Home
Economics, Medicine, Music, Nursing and Technology.
The Division of Continuing Education furnishes additional
academic programs throughout the eastern area of the
state.
The Chancellor is the primary administrative and
academic officer of East Carolina University. Not only
are administrative and academic skills a component part
of a prospective candidate's competencies, but marked
abilities to relate the goals of the University to the con-
cerns of regional, civic, and community interests as well
as serving as an effective liason to the budgetary
authorities are requirements.
Applications will be received until December 1, 1977 and
should be directed to: Dr. Clinton Prewett, Executive
Secretary, Chancellor Selection Committee, Box 3335,
Greenville, North Carolina 27834.
East Carolina University is a constituent
institution of the University of North Carolina
� An Equal OpportunityAffirmative Action Employer





Page 16 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
DEPTS.
about 15.
Despite its modest size, the
department offers a rather im-
pressive selection of scientific
equipment for student and faculty
use. This includes interpretive
instrumentation housed in Gra-
ham building, specimen prepara-
tion labs in the basement of a
nearby building, and several
research vessels stationed along
the ooast of North Carolina.
The acquisition of much of the
aforementioned equipment has
been through research grants.
Eastern North Carolina is well-
suited for varied investigations
within many subdisciplines of
geology. Perhaps the major area
or concentration has been marine
geology and contemporary ooastal
processes, specifically those o-
perative in the Outer Banks
system. However, current pro-
jects within the department span
a broad geographic area from
Canada to Mexico.
Activities other than formal
oourse work are also an integral
part of the program. An active
geology club sponsors socials,
field trips, and guest speakers.
These events are by no means
limited to geology majors.
Anyone with even peripheral
interest in geology is weloomed to
all activities and to visit the
department at any time.
HomeEc
The programs of study in the
School of Home Economics are
designed to provide academic and
professional competencies for
those oonoerned with the condi-
tions of the environment which
contribute significantly to family
and oommunity life. Academic
programs are built upon a strong
arts and science base and draw
heavily on other schools for
supportive oourses appropriate to
the student's interests and needs.
The School is oomposed of five
departments all of which offer
both undergraduate and graduate
programs.
Child Development and Family
Relations
If students are interested in
understanding people and how
they relate to their environment,
how preschool children learn, and
how members of a family relate to
each other, the Department of
Child Development and Family
Relations offers you a firm
"footing" in dassroom instruct-
ion with emphasis in developing
attitudes and skills.
The flexibility in this program
allows students to prepare for
such jobs as preschool teaching or
supervision; social agency
counseling; or working with ex-
ceptional children and their
families.
Clothing and Textiles
If one is interested in positions
relating to: changes and trends in
fashions, using new fibers and
fabrics in design, textile chemis-
try, writing, promotion, or mer-
chandising, an area in clothing
and textiles that will be challeng-
ing is available.
The Department of Clothing
and Textiles offers two options.
The merchandising option pre-
pares students interested in mar-
keting and management to be-
oome buyers in a department or
specialty store or perhaps to own
their own boutique or fabric store.
The clothing and textiles
option prepares students for
entering the design and education
phase of the clothing and textile
industry. Graduates are sought
by textile, pattern and clothing
supply companies for research,
consumer education, advertising
and product specialization.
Food, Nutrition and Institution
Management
Food service management and
clinical dietetics are challenging
and rewarding vocations in an
industry that today is one of the
largest in the oountry. Clinical
dieticians are challenged by the
problem of feeding people all over
the world, helping to understand
their nutritional needs and how
different foods affect body
growth.
Food service managers are
interested in attractive and ef-
ficient food service for large
groups of people-translating
nutritional needs intothe needs of
groups-focusing on managerial
aspects of the hows and whys of
arranged food services by hotels,
hospitals, restaurants, schools,
and industries.
Home Economics Education
Are you interested in teaching
young adults in the increasingly
important field of oonsumer and
homemaking education? or would
you prefer a position in the
agricultural extension service? or
in business and industry? or in
oonsumer service? or in social
agencies? If so, then serious
consideration should be given to
the undergraduate program in
home economics education.
The program provides a broad
background to prepare students
for any of the above specialized
areas. It offers oomposite pre-
paration in both theory and
practice of home economics.
Students learn about clothing and
textiles, child development,
family relations, housing and
management, food and nutrition,
and home economics education.
Housing and Management
In the Housing and Manage-
ment Department students are
prepared for exciting and re-
warding positions working as
teammates with home builders,
architects, city planners, sociolo-
gists, and other professionals to
provide a more satisfying en-
vironment in the home and
oommunity.
In well-equipped laboratories
students design residences of all
types, prepare renderings and
swatch boards, plan lighting and
wiring layouts, refinish and re-
upholster furniture, test appli-
ances, and practice management
of time, money and human
resources.
Mathematics
The Mathematics Department
would like to take this opportunity
to welcome returning students,
freshmen, and transfers to the
ECU campus.
The department offers the
B.S. and B.A. degrees in Mathe-
matics, B.A. in mathematics with
an Option in Information Science,
and a B.S. Double Major in
Mathematics and Physics. Mi-
nors are offered in the A.B. in
Computer and Information Sci-
ence and in the B.S. in Mathema-
tics. Students desiring informa-
tion concerning these programs
may stop by Austin 119.
The Mathematics Department
also operates a Math Lab. Any
student taking a Mathematics
oourse and needing help in that
oourse is weloome to oome by
Austin 110 any class day between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Information concerning the
Freshman Mathematics Program
can beobtainedin Aust'n 110 and
Austin 119.
Medical Tech
The Department of Medical
Technology offers oourse work
leading to the BS degree in
Medical Technology. Upon grad-
uation, most medical technolo-
gists work in hospital laboratories
where they carry out laboratory
tests which are necessary for
making accurate diagnosis and
monitoring treatment. Some also
work in research laboratories,
sales of lab equipment and
supplies and teaching. The job
market in this field both in the
present and future appears to be
excellent.
The department sponsors the
ECU Society for Medical Techno-
logy which meets monthly with
informative programs about clini-
cal laboratory medicine. Mem-
bership is open to all students
interested in this profession.
Students desiring further in-
formation are urged to contact Dr.
Susan T. Smith, chairperson,
Department of Medical Techno-
logy.
Music
The School of Music not only
offers programs fa majors in
music but also provides many
opportunities for the non-music
student, as well.
It is necessary fa the music
maja to begin music courses at
the beginning of his freshman
year in ader to complete the
sequence oourses and to achieve
the required applied music profi-
ciency level in four years.
Acceptance into the School of
Music is by audition. Students
who become music majas by the
spring semester of the freshman
year may complete freshman
sequence courses in summer
school. Infamatioi regarding
auditions may be obtained from
the assistant dean of the School of
Music in the A.J. Fletcher Music
Center.
The university offers the
Bachelor of Music, the Bachelor
of Arts and Master of Music
degrees. Majas at the under-
graduate level are offered in
music education, perfamance,
theay-oomposition, church mu-
sic, music therapy, piano peda-
gogy and vocal pedagogy. Majas
at the graduate level are offered
in perfamance. church music,
music education and compositiai.
All students at the campus
are invited to audition fa the
perfamance aganizatiois of the
School of Music. Many non-mu-
sic majas are members of the
Marching Pirates. Other perfa-
mance groups are: Symphaiic
Wind Ensemble, Caicert Band,
Varsity Band, Chaale, Men's
Glee Club, Women's Glee Club,
Symphony Orchestra, and two
Jazz Bands.
Several music service oourses
are offered which qualify as fine
arts courses on the general
education guidelines fa nai-mu-
sic majas. The most popular of
these oourses is Music Apprecia-
tion (MUSC 2208). However, the
following oourses also qualify and
are offered frequently: Orchestra
M usic (M USC 2218), M usic of the
Theater (MUSC 2228), and the
Histay of Jazz (MUSC 2258).
A music mina curriculum has
been proposed by the faculty of
the School of Music and will be
presented to other campus com-
mittees early this fall. Many
students have inquired about a
possible music mina. One will
hopefully be available in the near
future.
Philosophy
The Department of Philosophy
offers an undergraduate maja
intended to prepare students fa
graduate study in philosophy a in
any of the other areas of the
Humanities, fa law school, a fa
pre-professiaial studies such as
premedical. The department also
offers a number of 5000-level
courses which serve to comple-
ment degree work at the master's
level in such areas, fa example,
as art, English, psychology,
histay. education and political
science.
Courses in maal problems of
See DEPTS p. 20
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� AMP 1977 FOUNTAINHEAO


T

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MERCHANTS
IN FINE GOLD AND
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proudly announces for your enjoyment
and shopping pleasure
our gala grand opening celebration
featuring
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Custom Silversmithing by Let
Hours: Saturday, August 27th 10:30�5:30
301 S.Evans St. Top of the Mall Sreenville
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THE STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
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The sales floor has been doubled in size, in order to serve you better.
Shop for your back to school needs.
You can save 25 of your textbook cost
by shopping early and purchasing USED BOOKS
USED Textbooks
Largest USED book inventory
in own history
Registers
Mo re cash registers for faster
service
The Supply Store will remain
open until 6 p.m. on Aug. 25, 26,
29, 30 and 31 for shopping
convenience.
Calculators
Texas Instruments�
Hewlett-Packard to help
solve your problems
Personnel
Extra personnel have been
employed to give you fast
efficient service.
Room Accessories
Shop for your favorite imprinted items
Fraternity and Sorority Supplies
Trash cans
Lamps
Bulletin Boards
Desk Pads and
Blotters
Ash Trays
Pencil Holders
Pencil Sharpeners
Book Ends
Lap Desks
Clocks
Mugs
Jewelry
Greek Crests
Letters
Shop
MonFri 8:30-5:00
Sat. 9:00-12:00





Page 18 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
8
ir
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A congenial atmosphere
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Serves a selection of
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all prepared fresh daily-
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Serving from 11:00-2:00 &
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23 August 1977 FQUNTAINHEAD Page 19
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A large selection of cards
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A wide variety of books
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Stuffed animals
And many items to decorate
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Hours: Fri. 6a.m. to 9 p.m.
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Page 20 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 197
DEPTS.
Continued from page 16
medicine and health care are
available for students in medi-
cine, nursing, and the allied
health professions. Students in
these and other areas may wish to
consult the current and specific
semester course descriptions
posted in Brewster building out-
side rooms A-317 and D-309 for
information about courses which
may interest them.
In its undergraduate major, its
undergraduate minor, and in each
course and seminar, the depart-
ment of philosophy has the
following objectives: to provide
the student courses in philosophy
which would serve as a significant
introduction tothe Humanities, to
provide the student with an
opportunity to study significant
philosophical works, as part of his
or her heritage, to provide the
student with certain basic skills in
philosophical methods, including
the undemanding and the eval-
uating of concepts, distinctions,
arguments and themes.
As wall as offering to the
student body at large certain
period groupings of philosophy
courses (ancient, medieval, 17th
and 18th century, 19th century,
and 20th century) and certain
area groupings of philosophy
courses (the fine arts, Spanish,
French, German, mathematics,
psychology, sociology, science,
and political scienoe)-oonsult the
current University catalogue, pp.
202-203 the department also
strives to provide courses which
convey information about our
philosophical heritage and which
are designed to improve critical
reasoning skills.
The following are specific
points about the department's
offerings: (1) The department
offers Philosophy 1500, Intro-
duction to Logic, the completion
of which satisfies the general
education requirement in mathe-
matics, (2) The department offers
nineteen oourseson the 1000 and
2000 levels none of which have
prerequisites and each of which
helps to satisfy the general
education requirements in the
Humanities, (3) The department
offers several specific courses
(Philosophy of Sport, Philosophy
of Science, Philosophy and Edu-
cation, Moral Problems in Medi-
cine, Introduction to Critical
Thinking, etc.) directly relevant
to several other major fields of
study. Information about these
courses is available on the
bulletin boards outside Brewster
A-327 aid D-309.
Many students not majoring
in philosophy have found philoso-
phy to be an important part of
their education as a minor field of
study or as an area of multiple
course concentration. Students
who wish to ask questions about
the philosophy curriculum or
about any specific course may
contact Professor Frank Murphy,
philosophy major advisor,
Brewster A-334, or any member
of the philosophy faculty.
A new philosophy course,
Philosophy 2280 (Philosophy of
Sport) will be taught MWF
9:00-10:00. There is no prerequi-
site for the course, and counts as
three semester hours towards the
humanities requirement.
PoliSci
The Department of Political
Science offers two undergraduate
degrees-the Bachelor of Arts
(B.A.) and the Bachelor of
Science (B.S.) degrees. The B.A.
degree is earned through the
pursuit of a traditional liberal arts
program, including a foreign
language, and it is customarily
recommended for those students
who wish to oontinue graduate
work preparing them fa a career
as a political scientist (teacher,
researcher, legislative consultant,
etc).
The B.S. degree was institu-
ted in 1976 as a quasi-profession-
al program emphasizing the
social sciences along with political
science and requiring courses in
statistics and computer science
in lieu of a foreign language. One
hundred and twenty-six semester
hours of credit are required for
graduation with either degree.
At the graduate level, the
department offers the Master of
Arts and the Master of Admini-
strative Services degrees. The
M.A. degree program is the first
step toward the achievement of
standing as a political scientist;
the M.S.A.S. degree program is
designed to provide basic admin-
istrative skills which can be
utilized in a variety of adminis-
trative careers. The student may
earn the M.A. with 30 semester
hours (thesis option) or 33
semester hours (non-thesis op-
tion). Fa the M.S.A.S. degree
the student must complete 36
semester hours of ooursewak. A
comprehensive examination is
required n all graduate degree
programs.
Planters Bank has
free checking for
ECU students
Everybody can use an extra
ECU T-shirt. At least, that's the
idea behind Planters National
Bank's special "Registration
Campaign" fa ECU checking
accounts.
Rolling out the red carpet
during East Carolina's Fall regis-
tration, Planters is offering an
array of enticements to attract
ECU students and staff to its two
Greenville offices.
First, there's a free ECU
T-shirt fa opening a checking
account at Planters. Then,
there's free checking (no service
charge, no strings attached), plus
free ECU introductay checks,
free travelers' checks, free money
aders and free cashier's checks.
"We're na giving the bank
away said Ranters Vice-Presi-
dent W. Douglas Starr, "but we
are taking a strong, competitive
stance you capturing a significant
share of the ECU market
Bolstering the Planters' blitz,
members of Sigma Nu Fraternity
are manning a special booth set
up during registration to provide
assistance, newcomer informa-
tion, Greenville maps, and new
account infamatioi. A number
of Sigma Nu's are business and
marketing majors, and they,
along with others, agreed to take
on a project of helping students
get their checking accounts op-
ened quickly and easily.
Starr said a new, streamlined
procedure fa opening special
ECU accounts is extremely fast
and efficient.
"We've eliminated the bot-
tlenecks, provided extra training
and personnel, and reduced tran-
saction time to a minimum. We
are confident this new procedure
will be popular with evayone
During registration, free tran-
spatatioi is being provided to
either of the bank's offices fa
anyaie who wants to open an
account. The drive-up windows
are open daily, Monday through
Friday, until 6 p.m.
"Wll also make an extra
effort to assist students in cashing
non-Planters' checks when they
present ECU ID cards said
Starr.
"With all the planning and
freebees, it's apparent we are
seriously interested in the ECU
market concluded Starr.
"Best of all, however, we
have a highly motivated staff of
competent young bankers (many
of whom are ECU graduates) who
want to help you manage your
finances in a friendly, profes-
sional way
OFFERS A BITOF VEGAS
�TT�
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CotancheSt.
Downtown
Greenville
Sam & Dave's
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Located 1114 N. G reen St.





��HHH
23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 21
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Page 22 FOUISTIAINHEAD 23 August 1977
Traffic Dept: students must register vehicles
By DOUG WHITE
Staff Writer
The ECXI Traffic Department
is charged with the duty of
registering student, faculty and
staff vehides and bicydes, and
regulating campus parking areas.
All students who have a car,
motorcyde, or bicyde on campus
must register their vehide or run
the risk of having it towed or
impounded.
Vehides may be registered at
the Traffic Office, located behind
the Flanagan building on the
main campus. Freshman students
are not allowed to have cars on
campus, but may register their
vehides as freshman driven cars.
The purpose of freshman
registration is to allow freshmen
to p-irk on campus during week-
ends and to notify the Greenville
Police Department that an ECU
student is driving that particu.ar
car.
It also permits freshman to
park in the two freshman parking
lots, one on the corner of 14th and
Elm Streets, the other between
Second and Third Stress.
Students having 48 quarter
hours (a 32 semester hours) or
more are termed sophomores and
are eligible fa a dorm parking
permit. Certain parking areas on
campus are restrided to dorm,
day, and staff registered vehides.
No vehide mav park in an area
designated for a dassification
other than his own.
There are, however, many
spaces on campus "For Univer-
sity Registered Vehides Only"
where any university registered
vehide except those with fresh-
man decals may park.
Students with unregistered
vehides who continually park on
campus will face certain fines and
probable towing charges. De-
pending on the time of day a
vehide is towed, towing charges
range from $15-$20.
Students who choose to park
on the dty streets are warned to
look carefully fa any no parking
signs on the block. It takes one to
quarantine the entire block, and
more than a few are neatly
obscured by tree limbs.
Students should also be
familiar with the dty of Green-
ville's regulation concerning
abandoned cars. Any car parked
in the same spot fa seven days is
considered abandoned and will be
towed.
Unregistered bicydes a II-
Housing assigns dorm rooms
The Housing Office, located in
the Whichard Building, is de-
signed to handle all housing
assignments and problems that
students may encounter while
living on campus.
Thedireda of housing is Dan
K. Wooten and his job is to
regulate the damitaies ai cam-
pus and to see that they are
operating properly.
All problems pertaining to the
various dam rooms are, managed
by the Housing Office, induding
room assignments, maintenance
and resident advisas. The Hous-
ing Office is one of the many
administrative departments on
campus that students should
become familiar with.
The policy on living in dams
is that all unmarried freshmen
and sophomae students with less
than 60 semester hours (96
quarter hours) who are not
oommuting from the home of a
parent a guardian must reside oi
campus as long as space permits.
A dam student should take
maintenance problems to the
floa advisa, a to the Resident
Advisa first. If a student gets no
results from these authaities, he
should then refer his problem to
the Housing Office.
The ECU Housing Office is
prepared to assist all students
with their housing problems, if
the students are in need of
assistance.
legally parked bicydes will have
their chains cut and will be
impounded. To recover an im-
pounded bike, go to the Traffic
Office, prove that you own the
bike, and pay the impoundment
fee.
Bicyde registration requires a
small fee, plus a description of
the bike and the bike's serial
number. In the unfatunate event
that your bike is stolen, an all too
frequent occurence, this infama-
tioi should aid in its recovery.
Bicydes parked in stairwells,
sidewalks, a hallways, by law,
must be impounded. This is
required because of the danger
posed to blind students by such
obstrudions.
There are numerous traffic
violations on campus fa moving
vehicles, both motorized and
people-powered. Students should
go to the Traffic Off ice and obtain
a copy of the ECU Traffic
Regulations pamphlet so that
they can become better acquaint-
ed with traffic violations, regula-
tions and penalties at ECU.
Library offers various useful services and facilities
Bibliographies. Biblio-
graphies and guides to the use of
indexes are available in the
Reference Collection area.
North Carolina Section. A
spedal sedion on the second floa
of Joyner Library is devoted
especially to North Carolina
material.
Computer Terminal. A com-
puter terminal is located in Rm.
B101. It is available fa use by
patrais having computer account
codes.
ECU student bank
ByKENTYNDALL
Staff Writer
ECU offers a student bank
right on campus, located on the
first floa of Mendenhall Student
Center. It provides convenient
banking service fa all ECU dam
and day students, as well as ECU
faculty and staff members.
The bank has been in exist-
ence fa ever 15 years. It started
in a small room in the old Austin
building (located at the present
site of the Art building), then
moved into the basement of
Wright Auditaium, and now has
larger fadlities in Mendenhall.
Services indude cash accounts
for students with no service
charge. These accounts provide
security fa large sums of money
and easy aocess to cash.
Also, easy check-cashing is
provided at the student bank. To
cash a check, a student must
write his I.D. number, his local
address and telephone number on
the back of the check, and present
his current adivity and I.D. cards
to the teller. Check-cashing policy
is limited to $100 per seven days.
Another maja service which
the student bank offers is that a
student, faculty, a staff member
can now pay his telephone bill at
the bank, allowing him to make
one trip fa all transadions.
This will espedally save time
and trouble, since the telephone
company has moved further away
from campus to Hooker Road.
Students must bring their com-
plete telephone bill when paying.
The bank, with three tellers, is
open from 10 a.m. until 430 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Placement service
The Career Planning and
Placement Service is available to
ail graduates of ECU and grad-
uates of other institutions who
have completed at least 15
quarter hours of oourse wak at
ECU.
Forms fa registratiai and
infamatioi fa completing and
filing these fams may be obtain-
ed from the Placement Service
Office. Hours are 8-1230 p.m.
and 130-5 p.m Mondays and
Fridays.
It is requested that you come
to the office in person during the
hours listed bove to secure the
necessary fams.
Since the directa wishes to
get acquainted with you personal-
ly, jt is desirable fa the com-
pleted fams to be returned by
you.
Please read and follow the
printed instrudions induded in
the packet. Neatness and ac-
curacy are necessary since these
resumes represent you to pro-
spective employers.
Registration by mail is not
reoommended as students must
visit the professors and ask them
to serve as references. When a
professa agrees to serve, please
ask him to send the reference to
the Placement Office in the
envelope provided, as early as
possible. Your credentials can not
be furnished to employers until
your file isoaplete.
The Placement Office is lo-
cated in the Mamie Jenkins
Copying machines. Coin-
operated oopying machines are
available fa use in the lobby of
Joyner Library. The price per
page is five cents. These may be
copied on the 2400 copying
machine located in the Library
Administration Office.
FilmService. Faculty and stu-
dents may barow 16 mm films
from the Nath Carolina Film
Library in Raleigh. A catalog of
available films is located in the
Reference Colledion area. Re-
quests should be placed at least
three weeks in advance of the
showing.
Inter library loans. An inter-
library loan service is available
fa faculty members and graduate
students. Applications fa loans
should be made in the Reference
Colledion area.
Lectures on Library use. The
reference staff offers ledures on
use and interpretation of library
resources in various subject areas
to dass groups. Faculty members
desiring such a presentation
should contad any member of the
reference staff at least one week
in advance.
New Books. Each week a
seledion of new books is display-
ed in the lobby. These books may
be checked out during the week
they are on display.
Public telephone. A public
telephone is located in the lobby
near the card catalog.
Smoking lounges. Smoking
lounges are provided on each
floa of the new addition to Joyner
Library.
Tours. Tours of the library are
offered by the reference staff.
Also, a self-guided tour is avail-
able from tne media center.
Typing facilities. Typing
rooms are located on each floa of
the new sedion of Joyner Library.
Several typewriters are provided
fa student use.
Student directory
Carolina Telephone and Tele-
graph (CT&T), in oooperation
with the SGA, will publish a
student direday this fall listing
day and dam student numbers
which are namally left out of the
dty directay.
Acoading to Don A. Collier,
CT&T district commerdal man-
ager, the student direday will be
entitled the "StudentFacultyStaff
Direday" and will feature cover
art by an ECU student.
"The telephone company will
bear all costs of printing and
publishing the diredaies said
Collier.
Acoading to Collier, there
will be approximately 2,250
phones in service in the dams
next fall.
"We plan to print about 5,000
copies of the diredaies, and the
SGA will distribute them in late
September.
"The sooner students apply
for service, the sooner the
diredaies will oome out said
Collier.
The CT&T offices have moved
this year to 1530 Hooker Rd near
Nichol's department stae.
"CT&T representatives will
be on campus the week of
August 22-30 in the Student
Supply Stae, and the lobbies of
Clement and Tyler damitaies to
take aders fran students desir-
ing telephone service said
Collier.
Students may pay their
monthly bills by mail, at the
telephone office, a at any NCNB
bank in Greenville.
Financial aid helps
with work-study
Free Concert
on Mall
By TIM JONES
Staff Writer
The Finandal Office, in 201
Whichard, offers temporary off-
and-on campus wak-study pro-
grams, and numberous grants,
scholarships, and loans, induding
a new Health Professions Loan fa
medical students.
The primary ccnoern of the
off ice is to wak with the parents'
and students' contributions in
comparisons with the oost of
education.
In order to become asscoiated
with the finandal aid offioe, a
student must complete a "needs
-�i�. analysis
Free ooncert on the mall
featuring Fudge Ripple
Thursday, August 25th, 8
p.m. to 12 midnight. Spon-
saed by MRCWRC. Food
and refreshments will be
available.
The needs analysis involves
filling out a combination of three
of the four available fams (Basic
Opportunity Grant, Student Con-
fidential Statement, The Basic
East Carolina Grant, and the
Parents Confidential Statement).
Students should try to plan in
advance fa maiey they will need
in the future. Those applying fa
loans should have the necessary
material completed about eight to
10 weeks ahead of time.
The offioe hours of the Finan-
dal Aid Offioe are from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m Monday through Friday.
Dr. Robert Boudreaux is the





23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 23
IS
ave
be
im-
affic
the
rent
esa
n of
erial
vent
I too
rma-
y-
ells,
law,
s is
nger
such
�affic
iving
and
lould
Dtain
affic
that
aint-
jula-

� �.
-
factory
Sor blue bell apparel
ping
or of
rary.
'ided
Your Wtanglcr headquarters
for the Greenville area.
Hours 10 A.M9 P.M. MonFri.
10 A.M6 P.M. Sat.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
756-0337
j the
late
apply
the
said
oved
near
will
k of
dent
es of
esto
iesir-
said
their
the
ICNB
�!S
Dives
hree
Jasic
Con-
Jasic
the
jnt).
�n in
need
3 for
ssary
htto
nan-
n. to
lay.
the
item-
SUB SHOPS in GREENVILLE and NAGS HEAD. NORTH CAROLINA





��������I
Page 24 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
I
BB&T lowers the cost
of higher education.
With no service charge
checking for students.
If your kids will be full time students at a college
or technical school, they can get no service charge checking
at BB&T.
You'll be able to deposit money in their accounts at
your nearest BB&T office.
And your kids will have the convenience of being able
to cash a personal check at any BB&T office across
North Carolina.
So open a BB&T checking
account now for your future
graduates.
It's the smart thing to do.
�-�x � tt'vi&So&MJMfe
r�imntot'mitimxm�'
v��.
�;
,&y
5
BB&T
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY
�FMf)fR FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORAriOM





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lpmmBHPpppH g
23 Augut 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Pm 25





Page 26 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 19771
Specializing in Performance and Power
Matched Total Stereo System
i �mmmmmmmmmmm? mm- mmmw msa
DISCOUNTED SONY
COMPLETE
SYSTEM
DISCOUNTED
U"
FREE HEADPHONES with the
purchase of these systems
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DISCOUNTED
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DISCOUNTED
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o�&"�
i irrr
fcirt

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TOTAL SYSTEMS FROM $189.95 UP!
vvvvx;x:vvv �:�x�x?
DISCOUNTED BOSE SPEAKERS
m$M
JZ
BOSE901
BOSE301
BOSE 501
BOSE601
SONY 1050
SPEAKERS
SONY 1800
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SONY 1250
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SONY 2800
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SPEAKERS
SONY 3800
RECEIVER
SONY 1100
TURNTABLE
The Dealer with a F
Authorized Service
in the Store
i
SALES
BRONSON
PHILIP
MATNEY
SERVICE
JOHN
EMMERSON
not pictured
SERVICE
DA VE SHOFF
t brsrert
H
SA
JIM L
SA,
BRO
MATN
BOOK KEE PIN
SHELLY
BASNIGHT
We Discount Everything
HARMONY
THE MALL DOW MOW
752-3651





Offering the Largest Selection
to the ECU Market
e Dealer with a Factory
thorized Service Center
in the Store
mmmmmm
Discounted Teac
SALES
JIM LASHLEY
A-150
-9 PB
SALES RONSONlr:ni
PHILIP
1ATNEYPI y
A-2300SX A-3300SX
Discounted Teac
SERVICE
JOHN
IMERSON
ot pictured
ERVICE
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DISCOUNTED CRAIG
CRAIG 3223
Compact Stereo
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with amfm 8-track
and phone & speakers
$179.95
CRAIG 360
Compact Stereo
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with amfm 8-track
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$249.95
- , - .m.
WWMfrMfM
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CRAIG 3143 DELUXE QUICK MOUNT $
EIGHT TRACK
STEREO PLAYER l
Reg. $84.95
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CRAIG 3148 IN DASH 8-TRACK STEREO PLA YER
WITH AMiFM
STEREO RADIO
Reg. $120.00 I
$94.95
CRAIG T-601 IN DASH AMFM STEREO
CASSETTE PLAYER
Reg. $180.00
$745.00 I
WELCOME BACK FEATURES
i
SALES
BRONSON
MATNEY JR.
(KEEPIN
HELLY
SNIGHT
DISCWASHER sw
REG. $14.95 FM CONVERTER SOUNDGUARD
$9 95 roflHK�V REG $6
$4.95
TDK SA-C90 CASSETTES
REG. $4.99 $3.19
:i 2
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EMPIRE
CARTRIDGE
REG. $60
$25
vMMmm
mmmmm
HOUSE SOUTH
I, now Mow GREEN ELLE
752-3651
SevoralPayment Plans
Some Equipment Not Exactly As Pictured





Page 28 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
Student Center - Student Union
By DAVID TREVINO
Staff Writer
Opinions on the city of Green-
ville among members of the
university community are varied
to say the least. One generally
accepted perception is that we are
not living at the hub of western
civilization and culture. To allevi-
ate, or at least react to this
problem of location off the beaten
path, the Student Union brings
entertainment to students which
they would likely have no other
opportunity to enjoy in Green-
ville.
The Student Union is an
independent campus organization
affiliated with the Mendenhall
Student Center. It receives a
percentage of your activity fee
each semester. With this money
the people over at Mendenhall try
and provide the most stimulating
entertainment possible.
Opening this year's Lecture
Series will be a new film-lecture
program from the National Or-
ganization for the Reform of
Marijuana Laws (N.O.R.M.L.).
The lecture entitled, "Marijuana:
The New Prohibition" will exam-
ine the historical, medical, social
and legal aspects of marijuana
use, as well as a comprehensive
review of current efforts toward
decriminaiization and an analysis
of recent alarmist scientific re-
search about the drug. Two short
films, Marijuana: Assassin of
Youth and Reefer Madness will
be shown as part of the program.
Others included in this year's
group of lectures are Gil Eagles,
Leonard Nimoy and Jack Ander-
son. Gil Eagles is an accomplish-
ed hypnotist popular with college
audiences throughout the United
States .and Canada. Leonard
Nimoy is a fine actor who is
presently appearing in the
Broadway production of EQUUS
and may be remembered for his
numerous appearances on com-
mercial television. Jack Anderson
is, of course, the nationally
recognized columnist and political
commentator. The list may not be
overly long, but we've gone from
James J. Kilpatrick to Jack
Anderson in a single year. Maybe
someday we can get into the
AOCf
The M8C 8ar iee this year is
one of the as exdting in recant
'lljftfil II ECU this
will beflt Qtasdief Guards
and Soots 4pejrds. the Thad
JonesMel A4s Orchestra,
Virgil Fox. tsfcsjqpssj Preserva-
tion Halt Jssrz Band (which
thrilled a ftfftnad Mendenhall
Student QajHi i 1 mi isat year)
and the aspect Csrfbm
Montoya. ,
The litjsasntiail galleries will
be filled nssss of the time this
year with tfsj.eprk of graduating
student afrtjm our own impressive
school of �l2?g� �t exhibition
oommittes fj? provided for a
series of W exhibits to be
displayed at efjiat times. Opening
the series M be a series of
photographs provided by the
SmithsoniaHmstitution Traveling
Exhibition Service entitled "Our
Only World' which deals with the
deterioration of our environment.
So SHOW p. 29.
MSC SERIES
A variety of events for all tastes
Nov. 20 Grenadier Guards and Scots Guards - 3 P.M Minges
Dec. 1 Thad JonesMel Lewis Orchestra - 8 P.M Wright Aud.
Jan. 30 Carlos Montoya - 8 P.M Mendenhall Student Center
Feb. 6 AVeavy Organ with Virgil Fox and Revelation Lights - 9
P.M Wright Auditorium
Feb. 14 Preservation Hall Jazz Band-8 P.M Mendenhall Student
Center Theater
TRAVEL-ADVENTURE FILM SERIES- 8 P.M.
Sept. 27 Ralph Franklin presents The Canyon
Nov. 8 Ed Lark presents San Francisco and the Bay Area
Nov. 22 Dr. John Paling presents The World That the Eye Cannot
Jan. 31 Kenneth Richter presents Treasures of Italy
Feb. 9 Capt. Irvin Johnson presents Sailing Adventures
April 6 John Roberts presents Caribbean Paradise
POPULAR CINEMA - 7 & 9 P.M.
Aug. 26-27 Monty Python and the Holy QraJI
Sept. 2-3 Shampoo
Sept. 9-10 Murder by Death
Sept. 16-17 Carrie
Sept. 23-24 MoVeooecn (Friday 7 & 9 P.M. Saturday 2 P.M.)
Sept. 30-OoM Day of the Jackal 7 8 9:30 P.M.)
Oxt. 7 Silent Movie (610 P.M.)
Oct. 14-15 Sherlock Hdrtmr Smart Brother (Friday 7 & 9 P.M.
' Saturday 2 P.M.)
Oct. 21-n CrKFtevOweTmQ&toor Neat (7 19 P.M.)
Oct. 26-29 Bound h Gloryfe7s, 930 P.M. Saturday 2 P.M.)
Nov. 44 Rooky
Nov. 11-12 TheOmem
Nov. 18-19 Outlaw JoaeyWetm (7 :9.15 P.M.)
Dec 2-3 Bad Name Bears
Dec �10 Netwen
Dec. 16-17 The Horn sartpMgody. mm
ARTEXHI&TION&
.
Sept. 3-Oct 1 Our Only World- Smithsonian institution Traveling
EaUMttan Service
Oct.2-0
Oct 9-28
Jan. 25
Feb. 5-25
April 9-23
Oefta Phi Delta'Art Shorn
Merc Chagall NorthCaroline Museum oi Art
Photographing the Frontier - Smithsonian Institution
Traveling Exhibition Service
Contemporary European Prints - North Carolina
Museum of Art
Fourth Annual IHumlna Art Show and Competition
Trends
SPECIAL FILMS- 8:00,P.M.
Sept. 14 The Harrad Experiment
Sept. 28 Dealing: Or the Berkley to Boston Forty Brick Lost-Bag
Blues
Oct. 31 Creature Fran the Black Lagoon 3-D (Wright Aud 11
p.m.)
Nov. 2 The River Niger
Nov. 16 The Vatachi Papers
FILM FESTIVALS
Oct. 9 Goldfinger (4 & 8 P.M.)
Thunder ball (550 & 950 P.M.)
Dec. 4 Macbeth (4 P.M.)
Taming of the Shrew (6 25 P. M.)
Hamlet (83D P.M.)
THEATER ARTS
��
Oct. 18
Nov. 16
March 2
April 10
Nov. 9-13
Feb. 8-12
April 1923
Dec 6-10
Sept. ���
Aprtf�
April 12
P�
Cabaret - 8 P.M Wright Auditorium
Grease - 8 P.M Wright Auditorium
William Windom Plays Thurber - 8 P.M Mendenhall
Student Center Theater
Keith Berger, mime-8 P.M Mendenhall Student Center
Theater
Dinner Theater - Details to be announced
Dinner Theater - Details to be announced
Dinner Theater - Details to be announced
Madrtgef Dinners- 7 P.M M3C Muttfurpose Room
ECO young Arista Series - 8 P.M Winner's Red,
Meridenhati Sttdant Center Theater
fCUStseflaetf 8PM , MSC MultPur pose Room
ECUPercusskx Pope-BPtA Merrtsriruil Student Center
��?
College BbwJ 19,77 Intra-campus Academic Competition - further
details to appear later.
Exhibits located in the Mendenhall Gallery, Mendenhall Student
Center
�W������ �� I II illI I I I N
LECTUHE SERIES
Sept. 29 Nation Organization tor the Reform of MarJiuane, Laws -
8 P.M Mendenhait Student Center Theater
Oct. 11 Gil Eagles- 8 P.M Mendenhall Student Center Theater
Jan. 17 JaoV Anderson - 8 P.M Mendenhall Student Center
Theater
Feb. 15 Leonard Nimoy - 8300 P.M Mendenhall Student Center
Theater
' I ' I.I.I. I I,I IPWM1





23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 29
More shows on the Center-Union agenda
Continued from p. 28.
Other shows to follow include the
Delta Phi Delta Art Shows,
"Photographing the Frontier
"Contemporary European
Prints the Fourth Annual II-
lumina Art Show and Competition
and from the North Carolina
Museum of Art, "Marc Chagall
The Travel-Adventure Film
Series is sadly not overly patron-
ized by ECU students. As dry and
boring as they may seem, t ravel-
adventure films and lectures are
one of the most pleasant op-
portunities fa painless enlight-
enment available to students
here.Unfortunately, the audiences
for many of these fine programs
often consist of geriatrics who are
too worn out to travel to any of the
places described or junior high
geography classes from Tarboro.
Squeeze out some of these Gray
Panthers and adolescents and
watch these programs and you
may find yourself pleasantly
surprised. Titles of lectures to be
delivered this year at Mendenhall
Student Center Theater include
"The Canyon "San Francisco
and the Bay Area "Treasures
of Italy "The World That the
Eye Cannot See "Sailing
Adventures and "Caribbean
Paradise
Theater Arts will provide a
varied and exciting program this
academic year. Included on the
agenda are presentation of
"Grease" and "Cabaret From
our own campus will come the
winner's recital of the ECU
Young Artists Series and per-
formances by the ECU Percussion
Pops and the ECU Stage Band.
Combining the culinary with
the aesthetic Theater Arts will
also present three dinner theaters
and a Madrigal dinner program.
In the past these programs have
always enjoyed tremendous pop-
ularity and the early purchase of
tickets is recommended.
Individual performers brought
to ECU by the Theater Arts
Committee this year will include
William Windom playing Thurber
and the renowned mime artist,
Keith Berger.
An expanded version of last
year's first annual ECU College
Bowl competition will be provided
for competitice scholars. Last
year the competition was ex-
clusively intramural with no
teams competing from other
schools. This year the competition
may be broadened to include
scholars from other oolleges.
See FREE FUCKS, p. 31.
CA RLOS MONTOYA, renowned dassicai guitarist, will appear at ECU
during the Mendenhall Student Center Artist Series, Jan. 30.
KEITH BERGER, the superlative mime artist from New York, will
appear in the MSC Series April 10 as another in a long line of
entertainers planned for the 1977-78 year.
JEANS BY
CLOTHING BY )EINlAUINI
SHIRTS & TOPS BY LEVI, MADMAN,
FORUM, & HIMALAYA
Also featuring the finest in European
leather coats, jackets, and sweaters.
We invite you to stop in and see our new store
and our progressive fashion look for Fall.
HEADSTRONG
CLOTHING
UNIVERSITY ARCADE
218 E. FIFTH ST.
203 East 5th Street � Greenville, N. C.27834
Sizes 3-13
Dresses
Long Dresses
Pants
Tops
Sweaters
Bags
Jewelry
Scarves
Sportswear
Jeans
Bank Americard Master Charge
Charge Accounts





m Eg 1 B I i mm
i
ON THE MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
OPEN 9 30 6:00 MON. SAT.
Wecome back
East Carolina Students!
Headquarters for
guys and girls'casual
and sportswear.
Be sure
to take advantage
of your student
discount cards.
ADIDASBROWNING
PUMAoJnW IiJANSPORT
NIKEBOAST
TRETORNSjCONVERSE
MOUNTAIN HOUSE YAMAHA
T.A. DAVIS J BATA
HEAD A' gx?tSPEEDO
DONNAT wflLl XIW f?nlYONEX
FRED PERRY t!FJ 00DUNLOP
CATERING TO ALL STUDENTS' NEEDS
SPECIALISTS IN ALL SPORTING NEEDS FOR
ALL ECU STUDENTS-AND WE DIDN'T
FORGET THE COEDS.
JM 1
H.L.HODGES
AND COMPANY, INC.
210 E. 5th St. Phono 752-4156
RESTRINGIN6 I CRIP REPAIR, LETTERING FOR
CAPS A SHIRTS, OFFICIAL ECU P.L UNIFORMS. TENNIS
WEAR AND SWIM WEAR I SHOES FOR MEN I WOMEN.
JUST A SNORT WALK FROM CAMPUS
Page 30 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977.
THE FITNESS CLUB
for men and women
1002 Evans St.
Greenville
758�9584
Welcome Back Students!
NAUTILUS FEATURES:
� Male and Female Instructors
� Nautilus Machines: 1 2 of the most
sophisticated fitness machines made.
� OLYMPIC Barbells and Dumbbells
� Whirlpool, sauna, showers, lockers
� Color TV and Lounge
� Protein and Vitamin supplements
� Diet Plans
Bring a friend and there is one week
of extended membership.
COME IN TODAY AND SIGN UP FOR A FREE WORKOUT
at Nautilus Fitness is our specialty
Beat
the Heat!
The UBE will be open from
800 AM to 94)0 PM
August 25th, 26th, & 29th.
Buy your texts at night
and
Beat the Heat and Crowds!
nLiT�x�iti
&
'ook
uitzc
y
528 S. Cotanche St.
Greenville, N.C.
Downtown





BVRHBBHH
.
23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 31
Free Flicks every Wednesday, weekends
Continued from p. 29.
And now we oome to the Free
Flicks. The free movies provided
by the Student Union are among
the most popular of all the events
scheduled at Mendenhall. Every
Friday and Saturday as well as
most Wednesdays and some
Sundays, films are shown without
charge to ECU students bearing
ID's and activity cards. The
Friday and Saturday movies are
supposed to be popular films
which will entertain a large
number of students while the
Wednesday film is supposed tC'
satisfy those who believe film is
an art form with intristic values
beyond mere entertainment. The
"film festivals" on Sunday are for
those whose minds have been
buzzed by a weekend of arduous
study and need relaxed activity.
This year the Films Commit-
tee has lined up an impressive
collection of movies to show. That
list does not include La Strada,
On The Waterfront, Casablanca,
any film by Ingmar Bergman,
Citizen Kane or Duck Soup (which
were obtainable). It does include
movies which were available last
year to the general audience on a
limited scale such as Rocky, The
Omen, Netword, Bad News
Bears, and Nickelodeon. Admit-
tedly, the Friday Free Flick is not
the place for old Buster Keaton
movies, but the Student Center
Theater would better serve the
university community if it would
quit trying to provide retreaded
commercial products and instead
offer films of artistic value not
readily available to the Greenville
audience.
The Wednesday "Special"
films are supposed to provide
entertainment for the fringe not
satisfied with Shampoo. But in
reality, it is a little difficult to
imagine a group of serious, young
minds getting all excited about
going to see either The Valachi
Papers or Creature From the
Black Lagoon in 3-D.
On Homecoming weekend the
first film festival will be shown to
delight both students and alumni.
Two James Bond movies, Gold-
finger and Thunder ball will jump
from your TV saeens to the silver
screen of Mendenhall. The
second film festival will come in
December and consist of three
Shakespeare movies, Macbeth,
Taming of the Shrew and Hamlet.
Enjoy it while you can.
Most importantly, the Student
Unions is yours. It's run fa
you. If you like what is going on
there, tell someone If a certain
type of programming is perceived
to be popular, then it will be
repeated. If you don't like sane-
thing, then say something about
that, too. Mendenhall can be a
wonderful place if you make it
that way.
LYNETTE DA VIES as she appeared in her role as Portia in the Royal
Shakespeare Company's presentation of "The Merchant of Venice
EQUIPMENT SANS PERFORMERS, of the Grenadier Band and Scots
Guards. The Grenadiers will be appearing Nov. 20, 3 p. m. Minges
Coliseum.
SOPHOMORES
IT'S NOT TOO LATE
TO ENROLL
IN AIR FORCE ROTC
and here are some facts that should interest you:
Courses open to college men and women.
Four hoursacademic credit per semester.
No service obligation now.
Full scholarships available that pay tuition, all fees,
plus $100 a month tax-free allowance.
An Air Force officer commission when you
receive your baccalaureate.
The opportunity to get to know the spirit that
made our nation great.
Talk with our Air Force ROTC representative.
Contact: Captain Ashley Lane
ECU Wright Annex 206
Phone 757-6697
Air force ROTC
Gateway to n Great
Way of Life
WWickes
iZ)
Check us for your
Shelving and Project Needs,
Wickes
Lumber
Store Hours
8-5 M-F
8-3 Sat.
756-7144
125 W. Greenville Blvd
I
�; 1
1
S I
I





Page 32 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
tig?
DELICATESSEN
One of the Largest Selections of
Delicatessen Sandwiches in North Carolina
ALLKINDSOF
SANDWICHES
� Hoagie � Pastrami
� Italian Steak � Turkey
Knockwurst
Kosher
Cheese
Cake
Hie Wm 7 Mf
STORE
10th & Evans
Pack of Cigarettes
25�
with this coupon and
$1.00 or more purchase
STORE
10th& Evans
10 Lb. Eagof Ice
with this coupon and
$1.00 or more purchase
EXPIRES SEPT. 15th 77 I EXPIRES SEPT. 15th'77
Wfil?
Wflflt
Open 6 Days a Week
CALL
752-1616
Fri.&Sat. 11AM-10PM
MonThurs. 11AM-9PM
2711 E. 10th
Greenville, N.C.
STORE
10th & Evans
FREE
50 Lb. Bag of Ice
With any Budweiser, Miller, Schlitz
or Blue Ribbon Keg purchase and this
coupon
EXPIRES SEPT. 15th'77
STORE
10th & Evans
Cooler Case'N Ice
$8.00 (Our Choice)
$9.75 (Your Choice)
EXPIRES SEPT. 15th 77
Blue Ribbon Keys $29.99
during Sept.
Bud, Schlitz & Miller $36.00
Free
delivery
to campus.
Minimum order
$2.00
Deliveries made
at 6,7,8,9,10,& 11
on the hour.
Get your order in
by a quarter'til
the hour!
Phone 758-0346
& a �t
st

W
0' XV
a c
o o
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Ol &-?'
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'oa
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Wt
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SUB SHOPS in GREENVILLE and NAGS HEAD, NORTH CAROLINA





Ex Libris
by DAVID R.BOSNICK
What to do before the diploma
or, college life without guilt
Unpack, do it all quickly, take the side of the room that one sees
when one first enters the room. Then you don't oontend with the open
door. You will feel better about campus if you are able to come back to
a room that is recognizable.
It rains alot in Greenville, one cannot allow the rain to signal a
despondency. You will find most of the early days here at school
unbearably hot and humid, (especially if you are from the North) and
you might take as many as four or five showers a day.
You will buy a fan, and buy a couple of new alburns, give yourself a
treat.
Do not sign up for early classes unless you are well disciplined. The
people who take early morning classes are almost invariably
elementary education majors who are coming back to school fa a
second degree and have nothing to say beyond "Will that be on the
midterm" or "Could you spell that again They never speak in class
and if they do they hold opinions you would be embarrassed to
attribute to your little sister. They never miss class and are always
engaged, separated or just married.
There is not much difference between the beaucracies at your old
school and the ones you will come across here. The center of all
administrative activity centers around the provost. She is a woman,
and while she is generally fair and open-minded, she is humorless and
a company man. Play it straight wih her all the time.
If you have already registered, when you receive your schedule,
walk about campus and see where all the buildings are. It is easier than
rushing about that first morning. The campus is small and all of the
buildings are marked with signs and faces of pirates.
You will receive an incredible amount of garbage from companies
and student interest groups. They will give you anything from petitions
to small bottles of shampoo. The petitions are useless, and the short
explanation at the top gives you no idea of what the problem is. If it
makes you feel more a radical young college student to sign it, then do.
Keep the shampoo and give it to your roommate. You bought all that
stuff while you were home anyhow, and it's nice to get on good terms
with your roommate for the first few days.
This is what to do about your roomate. If you generally get along
well with people, do not have a history of violent c sexual crimes and
the person in the bed across the floor annoys you, it is his fault, and
move out. There is no need to make desperate efforts to get along with
anybody. There is a housing shortage on the campus and changing
rooms would not be difficult. Live off-campus if your have to. Any
doctor's note will give you university permission to live off-campus as a
freshman or transfer student.
Moving off campus can be expensive, moving too far from the
campus win isolate you more than one needs. It multiplies the difficult
problem of early classes, rainy days, cold weather, ill health, laziness.
You will see people in your classes who are in your dorm, and will talk
to them on the walk from class. These are other possible roomates;
check the classified adds in the school newspaper.
They are like g-ddamn locusts on this campus. They will be putting
notices on or under your door from the moment you move in, until the
end of the first semester. They are fraternities (sororrities), they are
exactly alike in their structure and generally alike in philosophy.
People need organization, there is strength in numbers, a flag to fly
under. It is an immediate circle of "friends It is also fairly expensive
(20-30 dollars a month) and anywhere from 400-700 dollars a year to
live at the house.
They will attack you with parties and company. They will call you
"brother" and "sister The number of good, intelligent, responsive
individuals is exactly, proportionate to the number outside of
organization. Except those in the group needed to join. There are
exceptions on both sides of this generality, but they prove the rule.
There are other organizations you are automatically a member of; a
class, the Men's Residence Council (Women's) or you are a "Day
Student You will have representatives, who were your homeroom
delegates in high school. There are occasional group outings where
they give you beer, which they feel is enormously liberal at this
institution. They are chaperoned, by the heads, or the employes of the
sponsoring organization. You can judge the entire program by the
administrators they present to the public.
There are very few angry young men at this University.
There is nothing I can say on drugs or sex that would not sound
ridiculously pompous and oratorical. There is a sufficient amount of
both "Downtown" where the quality of both fluctuates, but does not
cease.
You meet the people there, that are attracted to popular music,
various forms of danoa, and each other. There is, almost vengeful
disco, the same caliber ock, and a small if amitious jazz place. They
are all somewhat noisy and easy to get lost in.
You will have instructors that are extraordinary. They will be viable
scholars, interested !n their subject. They will be unintimidated by
genius, and undiscouraged by apathetic and dull audiences. They will
be infrequent, but regular.
The others will demand attendance upon punishment, read from
the text, let you leave early and credit you with merely the ability to
understand what is taught. There is a way to successfully deal with
this type of instructor, but I don't know it.
Perhaps death by depilitory.
There is a woman in the Admissions off ice named Mrs. Whiteside.
She is a saint. She is sincere and intelligent and important. She can
answer any of your questions herself, or will send you to someone of
equal sincerity who can.
These things are impossible to do anything about.
1) Bad food in the cafeteria
2) Math 66Required courses
3) Parking problems
4) Dorm Counselors who take their job too seriously
5) The heat
6) The rain
7) The inability of campus oops to be everywhere at once.
There are literally hundreds of dubs on this campus. There are
cheap private music lessons available, and the music building remains
open late everynight.
There are student art shows and recitals constantly and the
departments are strong.
This college can be more than a place to wait out the final years of
your adolescence. It is not the Harvard of the south, but there are
programs and resources at this university that will enable one to learn a
great deal. One can grow beyond the soope and emphasis of this
university, but merits of this institution are varied and can inspire a
sense of the worth of intellectual development.
The "E.Z.U concept is an attitude, not an absolute.
?&&&�;
y
23 AuguM 1977 FOOWAINHEAP Pw 33
Greenville
nightlife
considered
Nightlife in Greenville.�is,supris-
ingly varied considering the mod-
erate size of the university and
the town. Although Greenville
lacks the sophisticated afterdark
entertainment found, say, in
Chapel Hill or Raleigh area there
is no reason why you should
spend a Saturday night playing
pinocle if you don't want to.
Cover charges are well within
walking distance from campus.
Here follows a description of the
nightspots usually frequented by
East Carolina scholars
Chapter X
The sound system is one of the
best downtown and the music
puts sand in your shoes. It's right
downtown and although you
probably won't want to stay there
all night it's generally not as
crowded as other places on the
week-ends and is nice if you get
tired of elbows in your beer. On
5th and Contache a.
Jolly Roger
1002 disco. The music is so
loud about all you can do is dance
and look at bodies, but that's
usually what people want to do
here anyway. Beer is60 cents and
65 cents and the cover is never
above 50 cents. There's breathing
room through the week but on the
week-ends you need a shoe-horn
to get in. Beside Beef and Shakes.
The Library
This bar has a disco arrange-
ment but plays a lot of beach
music as well. It's never crowded
through the week but on week-
ends quite a number acme to play
footsball or pinball machines. The
best thing about this place is that
you can truthfully tell your
parents that you've been spend-
ing time at the library. Behind
Jason's.
The Paddock Club
Greenville's first gay bar,
beer is65 cents and if you're not a
member it costs 3.00 to get in on
week-ends. M usic is always disco
and of you're gay you don't have
to drive to more distant bars. At
10th and Dickinson.
The Rathskeller
A last enclave of the
Woodstock nation people talk
more than anything else in this
bar. Music is provided by a
juke-box carrying all your hard-
rock and country-rock blue-grass
favorites. There's never a cover,
and for about a half dollar you can
choose from one of the best
selections of beer downtown. On
Fifth across from Sanitary Barber
Shop.
The'Sunset
No live entertainment but they
lay Beatles, Crosby, Stills,
4ash, and Young, other like stuff
ind some more progressive music
wer the sound system. You don't
lave to scream to be heard here,
onsequently it's a good place to
neet people. During the week it's
juiet but week-ends sardine
ity-THE WAY WE LOVE IT.
Jeer is about half a dollar and
here is never a cover. One
ontache beside the Bcokbarn.
See DOWNTOWN, p. 38)





Page 34 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
ONE BLOCK FROM MENDENHALL
PHONE
752-5012
the Wine Shop
321 EAST 10th STREET � GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
Haul: (Eharli Harrison
HOURS
MON-WED
11 A.M 10P.M.
THURS-FRI
11 A.M10:30 P.M.
SAT
10 A.M. -11 P.M.
FOR THE BEST SELECTION
OF WINES IN TOWN
AT PRICES YOU HAVE TO CHECKOUT
BEFORE YOU GO ELSEWHERE
LARGEST BEER SELECTION IN THE EAST
KEGS AND PONY KEGS
YOU DONT HAVE TO BELIEVE THIS AD
(JUST CHECK IT OUT)
ATTIC
THE A TTIC ENTERS SIX TH YEA Ft
The Attic, billed as North Carolina's
number three nightclub and home of
Greenville Rock N' Roll, is located at 103 E.
4th St. For five years, quality and
diversification in music has been the
Attic's goal.
Tom Haines manager and part owner
of the Attic emphasizes the importance of a
variety in entertainment. "College stu-
dents can easily become bored with re-
petition, so that's why we offer a larger
selection of bands and kinds of music than
any other dub in the state. We try to cover
the whole spectrum of progressive rock
entertainment Last year the Attic used
sixty-three different groups and numerous
types of music including album rock,
country rock, southern rock, show rock,
blues rock, blue grass, jazz and commercial
rock. However, soul, disco, and beach
music are avoided. Although the Attic
offers excellent music, cold beer, and a
large dance floor, it doesn't end there.
Footsball, which was introduced to Green-
ville by the Attic in 1972, offers a diversion
while the band is taking a break or fa just
plain old fashioned fun.
Stewart Campbell, co-manager, feels
that the clubs downtown are important to
most of the studends at East Carolina
University because they fill a void in the
students' curriculum. ,lt- provides them
with an alternate to work and study, a place
to relax, unwind, and socialize. After a big
test, a long term paper or a grueling
academic week nothing beats a oool brew,
a large crowd, an accommodating date,
and a good band; all readily available at the
Attic on most any Wednesday thru Sunday
night. The admission price is generally a
dollar and the entertainment is brought to
you by either Brice Street, Blaze, Choioe,
Bull, Nighthawks, Spike, Nantucket or one
of fifty other talented acts. As Chip Gwynn
(staff writer) said in a past article in
FOUNTAINHEAD, "The Attic seems to
have reached a certain plateau of success.
It has remained a favorite night spot of
college students for several years and has
remained successful because students
know the Attic is going to book good
entertainment and they are willing to go
and see that entertainment even if they
have never heard of the performing band
This week's main act is a band out of
Atlanta called Choice. They were selected
by the people of Atlanta as their favorite
band and played for Jimmy Carter's
election night victory party. Haines stated
to us that Choioe received the best
response of any new band at the Attic in
the past two or three years. So check out
the Attic this and each week for the best in
live Entertainment.
22 MONWAREHOUSE
23 TUESWAREHOUSE
24 WEDCHOICE
25THURCHOICE
31 WEDPRODIGY
The Line
THE LINE ADDS A TOUCH OF CLASS
TO GREENVILLE
The Line, a private membership club,
formerly The Bottom Line, located behind
the attic is the students' choice for an
"alternative" nightclub. What The Line
hastooffer isalong list of "onlys It'sthe
only place you can get a larye selection of
imported beer (38 in all, from Poland to
Japan, from Brazil to Italy). It's the only
place downtown you can brown bag, leave
your bottle in your own locker, and receive
table service. The Line is the only place you
can watch a seven foot oolor Advent
Television. It's the only .place in Greenville
that offers a showcase setting. The
atmosphere is plush, cozy, and intimate.
The entertainment is high in quality and
lowinvoiumn. It's a perfect place to take a
date and have a conversation over a
cocktail or imported beer.
Whitey Martin, manager of The Line,
said that he plans to present a full calendar
of tasteful entertainment which will consist
of a blend of sporting events, some movies
on the Advent TV and a variety of music
from traditional and contemporary Jazz,
mellow acoustic, and stand up comedy.
The Line will be open every night and
some afternoons and will be accepting
membership immediately. There will be a
discount on memberships for all ECU
students during registration week only.
This week's entertainment includes al
return performance by Up Front with
Adele Foster who set the audience to
rousing applause and thoroughly impress-
ed the reviewers from the DAILY
REFLECTOR, FOUNTAINHEAD and
WNCT-TV (who filmed her performance
for television from The Line).
Basketball enthusiasts enjoy
NCAA tour- nament at The Line
on Greenville's largest
Advent TV.
The Line will present Up Front with
Adele Foster Aug. 25 & 26.
- �: S�' -�!3�W'� :





�IMWM
IBBMPMHI�-
I
WESTERN SIZZLIN
HOURS:
SUN THRU THUR
11:00 TO 10:00
FRI &SAT
11:00 TO 11:00
STEAK
HOUSE
U.S. DA choice beef cut fresh daily
For the full month of August,
No. 12 will be on special
Mon.�Thur Lunch and Dinner
CHOPPED SIRL 01 N
WITH
MUSHROOM GRAVY
TEXAS TOAST WITH
MEL TED BUTTER
BAKED POTATO
OR FRENCH FRIES
ALL
FOR
1.29
EAST 10TH ST.
�� � mmmmmmmwmmimmammmtmr)tiinmiirii'�-v-4i0mBti





Bm
SPPSmhNWhB'b
IHHEMHHHMB
Get Mugged at the
Bank of North Carolina
You get a free mug
just for opening a
checking account
Plus, your checking
is free with any
savings account.
� ECU.
!y�RTH CAROLINA
BANK of
NORTH CAROLINA
FWC
'Free mug offer good until September 2. Two locations. One
the comer of 4th & Cotanche Street and the other at 2818 1
1 Oth Street Detention.
STOP
HC?
FOODS
WELCOMES
ALL ECU
STUDENTS
GETYOUR CHECK
CASHING CARD TODAY
Ipsi
64 oz.
Bottle
KEGS ICE
PARTY BEVERAGES
OPEN
24 HOURS
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
2CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
810 E. loth ST
29U5E. 10th ST
BUYASUB
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America gets at
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We do only the work you authorize
We return worn � out parts
Engine
Tune-Up
36?�
Add J2 00 (or
air conditioning.
Pnce includes
parts and labor
$30.88- 4 cyl $.88 - 8 cyl
� Our mechanics electronically tine tune
your engine � New points, plugs and
condenser � Test chargingstartmg sys-
tems, time engine, adust carburetor
� Helps maintain a smooth running en
gine � Includes Oatsun. Toyota, VW and
ight trucks � Cars with electronic igm
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Lube &
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Uptc
5qts
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Ask for our
free Battery rower Check
Front-End
Alignment
us
made
cars
parts eitr�
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deludes front wheel dn�e cars
� Complete analysis and
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Brakes
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$4088
Additional
parts eilra
if needed
J-Wheel fronl Due Install new front
disc brake pads � Repack and inspect
Iron) wheel bearings � Inspect hy-
draulic system and mlors (does not
include rear wheels)
OR
4-rVheel Drum - type Install new
brake linings all four wheels �Repark
front wheel hearings � Inspect drums
and brake hydraulic system add fluid
Power
Streak
78
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Whitewall
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26 00
25.95
28.00
Excise Tax
Per Tire
and Trade
1.47
2.01
721 Dickinson Ave. 752 � 4417
H8 15
L7815
28.50
29 95
32 50
20 00
25.60
29.50
3095
226
35 50
1
3295
tore Manager, Donnie Barnes
Greenville, IM.C.





23 August 1877 FOUNTAINHEAD Pag 37
A little light entertainment
Your horoscope or so they say
By JEFF ROLLINS
Staff Writer
Are you dissatisfied with your
Horoscope? You're not the only
one. Horoscopes are always so
vague and they never tell us what
we really need to know. It's time
for a change. Why should Carroll
Righter be the only one to direct
our lives? Here is an alternative
horoscope for today if the one in
the Reflector isn't enough.
GENERAL TENDENCIES: If not
held or balanced most things will
fall to the ground.
ARIES: Today the bumblebees
will urinate on your diffenbachia.
Morning is a good time for
breakfast but hold supper off until
evening. Love, romance, waves
lapping the Cote Azur are on
your mind today but just take a
cold shower.
TAURUS: Being drenched by a
water-sprinkler awakens you to
sensuality and you and you ver
fly off for two nights ai the
Ouagadougou Hilton. Evening
finds you philosophic.
GEMINI: You realize the dual
nature of your personality when
one part of you asks for a
pastrami on rye and the other
demands a cream cheese bagel.
This situation becomes doubly
awkward when you realize that
your alter-ego has spilled
mustard on your suit.
MOON CHILDREN: Morning is a
good time for suicide, afternoon
for bowling and evening for
cleaning your wok. Duplicity,
collusion and infidelity highlight
your lovelife.
LEO. What you thought was love
was really over-starched undies.
A swarthy Lithuanian walks into
your life looking fa spare change.
VIRGO: Beward of that important
social function. Ineptitude and
bumbling idiocy are your high-
lighted characteristics todays. As
regards that business matter on
your mind, lie.
LIBRA Today will be but another
empty day in your long, mean-
ingless, lonely life but cumquats
are on sale.
SCORPIO: "When life gives you
lemons, don't just stand there like
an idiot is your motto for today.
Your worth is recognized at the
office and they present you with a
two day old grilled cheese sand-
wich.
SAGITTARIUS: A problem
you once thought difficult you
now find insurmountable. Even-
ing is a good time to get very
drunk.
CAPRICORN: Communications
are numerous today. The loan
oompany has found you. Travel is
likely in the evening.
AQUARIUS: Mate insists that
you keep your live insect col-
lection out of the kitchen. You
both quarrel then about science
as opposed to culinary art.
Evening finds you alone with an
arachnid.
PISCES: You mistake an over-due
notice for a divine intervention
and consequently a half-gallon of
chocolate ice cream melts all over
your backseat. Your Venus Fly-
trap suffers from mild indigest-
ion.
IF YOUR
TODAY
tomorrow.
CHILD
the bill
IS BORN
will oome
llPlllIiS
THE TREE HOUSE
Pizza Special
Pizza, Salad, Tea
Only $2.19
Mon. Wed. 5-9
No. 1 Coffee House
Free Stage Night
No Cover Charge
Entertainment
THE TREE PEOPLE
ARE
YOUR FRIENDS
Salad Specials
Our Famous Min-Chief
a Tea Only .99
MonFri. 12-2
Specials on Your
Favorite Beverage
Every Wed. Night
8-10
Footsbali & Pinball
Talent Welcome
Corner of 5th and Cotanche St. Greenville, N.C.





Page 38 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
Collins: The First Fifteen Years
� �: '�
:
t
By ROBERT MORNINGSTA R
Staff Writer
This reviewer stated that the
Trends section fa the months of
June, July and August would
contain no reviews of albums of a
non-jazz or classical nature. That
was done in an attempt to
discourage articles concerning
minor "popular" music stars.
The non-review policy is a
statement on this editor's opinion
of that caliber of music, and its
artisans.
Judy Collins is more than
mere popular music. She is, by
personal definition, a folk singer.
She disdained classical piano fa
ha desire to write ha own lyrics
and compose ha own songs. She
married, and gave birth, twice, all
befae she was twenty. So Early
In the Spring, The First Fifteen
Years, Collins' latest album,
while an indulgent revival of the
emotion of ha early years, is
contained of the finest cuts of ha
best songs, ooupled with sevaal
new intapretations. Miss Collins
is using familiar taritay to break
new ground.
This double album could be
classified as a "greatest hits"
collection but that definition
smacks of material inspiration.
This album appears to be a
purging, the release of Jeffer-
son s slaves, Vonnegut' s charact-
ers, Tolstoi's safs. She is show-
ing off in this wak, but she is
closing down in a vay real sense.
This assemblage is an essay in
the success of ha gaire. It is
also, I believe, a statement that
ha music shall move from this
point.
The first side opens with an
extended and improved vasion of
"Pretty Polly This is the most
lyrical of the four sides and Miss
Collins incorporates the William
Butler Yeats' poem "The
Wandaing of Aengus" as ha
fourth song. It is a sparse
rendition of a poem that is a
statement on poetic embroiday,
but ha interpretation is valid.
The numba is done with nominal
guitar accompaniment as if she
were crying to the winds in ha
loss. The melody does nothing to
embellish the vase, but Yeats is
arguably the greatest poet to have
written in English. It is a
disappointing if ambitious at-
tempt.
The second side, in opposition
to the first side, is the boisterous
feminist Collins. None of these
songs were written by Miss
Collins and ha role in these
numbers is as lead vocal. The
songs range in subject from the
French revolution to a coal
miners' strike. The theme
throughout all of the numbers on
this side is freedom, with Bread
and Roses" by James Oppen-
heima as Collins' feminist state-
ment She is strong in all of these
songs, only two of which were
recorded after 1966. Having
pictured ha early ideas of music
and statement as lyrical and soft,
this side indicates a stage of
urgency and revolution. It is the
harshest side of the album, and
she seems uncomfatable singing
other artists' a chest rat ions.
The third side is the most
diverse. If I may be allowed to
beat this progression analogy into
the ground, this side might be
that of confusion. The frantic
"The Levin' of the Game" is the
antithesis of the poetic and subtly
rendaed "Send in the Clowns
The final song is the Lootard
Cohoi song writtoi fa Miss
Collins, "Bird on a Waire This
is the recording from Who Knows
Where The Times Goes album.
All of the numbas on this album
are taken from earlier albums.
The final side is the most
elegant. She speaks of her
parents, in the gentle "My
Fatha ha son and daughta,
her lover; it is a side of
dedications and relationships. It
is as if she feels she has turned a
oorna, in ha mournful "Seaet
Gardens
"But most of ail, it is me that has
changed,
And yet I'm still the same,
That's me at the weddings, that's
me at the graves
Dressed up like the people who
once looked so grown-up and
brave.
I look in the mirror
through the eyes of the child that
was me
The album's oova contains a
scenaio writtoi by Miss Collins
in a stream of consciousness
MISS JUDY COLLINS, a performer at Minges latest double album release of collected works from
Coliseum during November '77, as she appears in ElectraAsylum Records, THE FIRST FIFTEEN
one of three photos taken by Richard Avedon. A YEARS: SO EARLY IN THE SPRING,
triad of A vedon photos comprise the cover of her
style. The style is genaally trite,
with mundane "oi the road to
glay" images, and the piece
ends with ha seeming to begin
again.
"The Daimla is thae with the
beautifully tailaed driver in the
front of the hotel at eleven. I spill
flowers in the back seat, and a
bundle of books, and my big
sheepskin coat, and climb into the
car. The Princess pulls out from
the hotel and glides through
London. The Thames with its
barges floats below us, and we
cross a bridge near Westminsta
Abbey, and the dock sounds out
ova the city. I snuggle into the
cushions of the back seat and
watch the Riva go by, then the
little houses with their gardens,
the pubs in the side streets. I onoe
saw, as I was driving back from
Bath, a man walking through a
cabbage field in the winta time,
with a nine-foot surfboard under
his arm. I knocked on the window
and shouted to the driva to look,
and he turned around and smiled
and nodded at me in the rear view
mirra, as though he saw them
every day, thank you. Now I
watch the road streaming in front
of the Princess's shiny black
hood, the haizon rides on the
road ahead, and we move ever
towards it
The album is varied and
genuinely impressive. The same
cannot be said fa her fiction,
which cannot tell you what her
music can; that the past 15 years
have been hard, but so beautiful.
DOWNTOWN
Continued from p. 33
The Attic
This place is cavanous and on
week-ends it's packed. It's loud
but a good place to get loose and
danoe to gena'ly high quality
county-rock a hard-rcck. Bea is
60cents and the oova is usually
1.00. On 4th and Contache.
The Elbo Room
The house-band hae is quasi-
glitter and plays well the hard
stuff that you hear on the radio.
It's one of Greoivillp's most
established plaoes. The decibels
may do you damage but it's a
sacrafice almost everyone is
willing to make. It is a popular
Greek watainghds. Bea is 65
cents and the oova ranges from
25cents to 1.50 depending on the
band. Between 4th and 5th
streets on ootanche.
The Line
Famerly called the "Bottom
Line' 'this new jazz club is a great
place to escape from the crush
downtown. The bands are un-
usually good azz trios with a
female vocalist sometimes high-
lighting the show. Domestic beer
is65centsa you may want one of
the large number of impated
trews available'






����
I ' vvK �'�� ��' "�' SpifSPfiPPlfWI
The Roxy: an alternative
for local, ECU artists
23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAO Page 39
The roxy is not a collection of
malevolent geniuses unleasing
their frustrations at a callous
world in artistic exuberance. It is
not a group of writers the caliber
or Roethke and Yeats, a a circle
with the talent of a M ichaelangelo
Buornarto. It is a number of
people who admit to a oonstant
need for artistic input and do not
have the oommunity structure for
its display. The Roxie is a series
of presentations compiled or
employed by the Roxy member-
ship to "stimulate their own and
others" artistic needs and en-
deavors.
The Roxy was formed in 1965
and since that time has been
managed by a man named Bill
Shepard. It is his faith in the need
for art the caliber and premise of
the Roxy. that holds the oonept
together It was through his
efforts, (though aided) that the
Roxy members were able to lease
the theater in 1972, with an option
to buy at a later date. Until
recently, the Roxy has had
difficulty paying the rent, but the
addition of divergent attractions
has given fiscal hope to the
Roxy's dream of financial in-
dependence.
The Roxy is often viewed as a
showcase for small, rather bad
poets, singers and people who
have always had a desire to cavort
onstage, but that sort of self-in-
dulgence is ending. It is un-
affordable. The Roxy now centers
it's scheduling upon acts the
caliber of "Hot Grog" which was
a professional theater company's
version of the story of Bluebeard.
Enterprises of this nature allow
the Roxy to hold small poetry and
crafts festivals, allowing both
members and non-members to
read and perform.
There isa stigma and glamour
that clings to the Roxy ooncept of
art and performance. There is no
question that there should be art
"by and for the people
This statement of the neces
sity however of art presuppose
that interpretation should be
allowed almost total freedom of
expression. The Roxy is of that
belief and therein lies the major
flow in the Roxy's premise.
if a group commits itself to the
idea that art is important, it is
entering the worlds of DaVinci,
Byron and Chopin. These men
devoted their energies to the
perfection of the art they employ-
ed for expression. It was not, and
is not, enough to merely want to
perform. One must earn an
audience. The Roxy, in the name
of free expression, often presents
acts or shows of questionable
quality. It is a young effort, and in
the attempt to please many of its
members, (some of whom are
medioae artists) it displeases
much of its audience.
But the Roxy is learning. On
Tuesdays of this year, for approx-
imately $1.00, there will be
"classic" cinema presented at
the Roxy. The early series of films
are Alfred Hitchcock classes,
"Early" and "39 Steps It will
attempt both a Humphrey Bogard
and Marx Bros, festival during
first semester. These presenta-
tions will give the students and
community an alternative to the
popular movies the caliber of
which seems to vary greatly.
Do not join the Hoxy immedi-
ately. There will be several events
staged early in the school year,
including dance and poetry, with
a Comioon later, if sufficient
interest is aroused. These present
ationswill give the audience a fair
estimation of the enthusiasm and
direction of the Roxy and its
members.
The Roxy is an alternative to
the college and its artistic pro-
grams. It is not always a fine one,
but for its members and fans, it is
the only game in town.
All quotes courtesy of member
DavidAyscueandMr. Shepard.
THE ROXY THEATRE, founded in 1965, offers an arena of artistic
display unique to the Greenville area.
BICYCLE SHOP
SM SOUTH PC m STtffT
MM! TSI-AtS
�OWKTMH MEBmtlf
During the month of September,
bring your bike to John's for repair
and you receive a 10 discount
on parts if you bring this coupon.
FOREVER
GENERATION
Forever Generation - what's that? Glad you asked. The
Forever Generation of ECU is a Christ-centered fellow-
ship group.
We meet every Friday night for fellowship and fun.
There'll be a study, discussion, or challenge from the
Bible. Singing, games, refreshments, and warm
friendship too. Our meetings are supplemented by
cookouts, get-togethers, weekend retreats, and other
good activities.
Why not come out this Friday night? We'll be having a
special "Get Acquainted" meeting and showing a
unique slide presentation, "Introducing Forever
Generation ECU For more information about FG pick
up one of our brochures now available in the CU lobby.
Come join us Friday, August 26, 7:30 P.M. in Brewster
B-103.





Page 40 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 Aupust 19771
8 GOOD REASONS FOR BUYING
YOUR TEXTS DOWNTOWN
1. Low Prices� The University Book Exchange
has got thousands of USED TEXTS that save
you 25over the price of new texts.Shop early -
due to change from quarter to semester system,
supply of used texts can be limited.
2. Great textbook selection � The UBE has made
an all out effort to have every book used at ECU.
3. Quick Service�This Fall we will have 8 cash
registars to get you through our store quickly!
4. Friendly Personnel-75 of our book rush em -
ployees are ECU students. They can easily re-
late to your textbook needs and problems
5. Mastercharge and Bank Americard-Again this
fall at UBE! We now accept America's top 2
charge cards for texts �r supplies.
6. Convenient Location- We're across Cotanche
Street from the girl's dorms-down the hill from
Greenville's bars.
7. Extended Hours- The University Book Ex-
change will be open from 8:00 AM to 9:00 PM on
August 25th,2 25th, 26th, and 29th.
8. Increased Selection of school supplies, art
supplies, and sportswear. Let us be your only
stop for all your texts & Supplies.
(
niudxiitu
'ooc
cZxahanas.
REEl
NVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA .





Pirates enter campaign
with some inexperience
While the 1977 season must be classed a
rebuilding year, suooess should continue in the ECU
football program.
Sports
Eleven starters, five on offense and six on
defense, will head a group of 32 returning
lettermen. Lettermen lost totaled 16.
"While we have great ability on thisteam said
Dye, "and there's no question we have more
football players than ever before, there are several
key areas that are major question marks.
"We must find a quarterback, a center, three
players for the secondary and someone to handle the
kicking game. These are all crucial positions. Spring
practice went a long way in solving these problems,
h�rt that's not a aame-tvDe situation
EDDIE HICKS
Offensively, the backfield runners are intact.
All-Southern Confernce junior running back Eddie
Hicks (6-2, 205) (897 yards6.5 avg.8 TDs),
honorable mention all-conference senior running
back Willie Hawkins (5-11, 195) (750 yards5.2
avg.5 TDs) and senior Vince Kolanko (5-9, 195),
who played at both running back and fullback, will
anchor the backfield. Sam Harrell, junior running
back, and soph Theodore Sutton, a walkon fullback,
developed as excellent depth.
Top candidates to replace the three-year starting
quarterback Mike Weaver in the wishbone are
senior Jimmy Southerland (5-9, 175), sophomore
5�
4f �
MATT MULHOLLAND
Leander Green (5-9, 170) and junior Steve Greer
(6-1,185).
The offensive line will be much larger this
season, with weights of 220-230 going up to 240-250.
But the problem is whether the new players are as
hungry and aggressive as the smaller graduated
ones of the past.
Senior guard Wayne Bolt (6-1, 265), all-Southern
Conference returnee and all-America candidate,
junior tackle Matt Mulhdlant (6-0, 230), and senior
split end Terry Gallaher (5-9, 175) will provide the
experience up front as returning starters. Senior
tight end Barry Johnson (6-2, 215), junior guard
Nelson Smith (6-1, 235), junior tackle Mitchell Smith
(6-3, 245) and senior center Rickie Hdliday (5-9,
185), all backup men last year, will be starters filling
the positions of the graduated tackle Ricky Bennett,
guard Randy Parrish. tioht end Clav Burnett and
BARRY JOHNSON
ZACK VALENTINE
center Tim Hightower.
The linebacking corp will rank as the premier
group for 1977. All-Southern Conference and
all-America candidate senior Harold Randolph (6-1,
200), heads a group of five experienced players, four
of which have started at some time. The quick,
powerful Randolph has had over 100 indidivual
tackles for two consecutive years. Sophomore Mike
Brewington (6-4, 225), senior Harold Fort (5-11,
205), junior Tommy Summer (6-1, 205) and senior
Larry Paul (5-11, 210) provide the supporting cast.
Honorable mention all-conference junior defens-
ive end Zack Valentine (6-2, 200) will team with
junior Fred Chavis (6-2, 195) and sophomore John
Morns(6-1, 195) toprovidea strong end contingent
Tackles Wayne Poole (junior, 5-11, 240), and
sophomore Noah Clark (6-3, 230), the form a
fS. i TBALt p 4
23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 41
-1977 ROSTER
after spring drills
Adams, Nate: So, RB, 6-0, 185, 20, Fuquay-Varina, N.C.
�Allen, Rodney: So, K, 6-1, 195, 11, Henderson, N.C.
Allred, Perry: So, FB, 6-2, 230, 19, High Point, N.C.
�Banks, Wayne: Jr, LB, 5-11, 210, 20, Elizabeth City, N.C.
Bauer, John: So, DE, 6-1, 195, 19, Loveland, Ohio
�Benton, Pete: So, QB, 6-2, 205, 24, Havelcck, N.C.
Blackwell, Henry: So, DE, 6-4, 200, 19, Williamson, W. Va.
Bolt, Wayne: Sr, OG, 6-1, 260, 21, Augusta, Ga.
Brewington, Mike. So, LB, 6-4, 230, 19, Greenville, N.C.
'Bullock, Reid: So, DB, 6-0, 185, 19, Robersonville, N.C.
�Camp, Blake: So, NG, 5-10, 195, 19, Lithonia, Ga.
Carter, Charlie: So, DB, 5-10, 180, 20, Fayetteville, N.C.
Chavis, Fred: Jr, DE, 6-2, 200, 20, Dunn, N.C.
Dark, Noah: So, DT, 6-2, 225, 18, Robersonville, N.C.
�Creech, Junior: Sr, K, 5-10, 160, 23, Smithfield, N.C.
�Davenport, Vern: So, SE, 6-3, 195, 19, Grifton, N.C.
�Davidson, Bobby: So. LB, 6-0, 190, 19, High Point, N.C.
Dross, Mike:Sr, DB, 6-1, 175, 21, Marietta, Ga.
�Elcock, Williams: Jr, DT, 6-0, 235, 19, Winston-Salem, N.C.
Felton, Oliver: Jr, NG. 5-9, 215, 20, Hertford, N.C.
Fish, Drew: Sr, DB, 6-0, 195, 21, Fuquay-Varina, N.C.
Fort, Harold: Sr, LB, 5,11, 200, 21, Raleigh, N.C.
�Foushee, Jack: Jr, DE, 6-1, 195, 21. Clinton, N.C.
'Freer, James: So, DB, 5-8, 175, 19, Rocky Mount, N.C.
�French, Alexander: Jr, RB, 5-8, 175, 22, Warner Robins, Ga.
Gallaher, Terry: Sr, SE, 5-9, 170, 21, Warner Robins, Ga.
Godette, Joe: So, TE, 6-3, 215, 19, Greenville, N.C.
Green, Leander: So, QB, 5-8, 175, 19, Jacksonville.N.C.
Greer, Steve: Jr, QB, 6-1, 185, 20, Durham, N.C.
�Grove, Tommy: So, DB, 5-10, 80, 19, Southern Pines, N.C.
Hagans, Jeff: So, C, 6-1, 235, 20, Greenville, N.C.
Hale, Steve: Sr, DB, 5-10, 178, 21, Columbus, Ga.
Hall, Gerald: Jr, DB, 5-10, 185, 20, Edenton, N.C.
Harrell, Sam: Jr, RB, 6r2, 210, 20, Harrellsville, N.C.
Hawkins, Willie: Sr, RB, 5-11, 190, 21, Grimestand, N.C.
Heywood, Mike: Jr, OT, 6-3, 235, 20, Virginia Beach, Va.
Hicks, Eddie: Jr, RB, 6-2, 210, 22, Henderson,
Hill, Kevin: Sr, DT, 6-3, 275, 21, Sylvester, Ga.
�Hines, Allen: So, LB, 6-0, 205, 19, Rocky Mount, N.C.
�Hofmeister, Von: So, SE, 6-0, 170, 18, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Holley, Willie: So, DB. 5-11, 185, 20, Edenton, N.C.
Holliday, Rickie: Sr, C, 5-9, 188, 21, Williamston, N.C.
�Ingram, Jesse: Sr, RB, 5-10, 170, 22, Ansonville, N.C.
Inman, Wayne: So, C, 6-4, 240, 19, Hope Mills, N.C.
Jamison, Johnny: So, SE, 6-0, 200, 20, Vass, N.C.
Johnson, Barry: Sr, TE, 6-2, 220, 21, Farmville, N.C.
Johnston, Mitchell: Jr, OG, 6-3, 245, 20. High Point, N.C.
Joyner, D.T Jr, DT, 6-0, 240, 20, Norfolk, Va.
Kolanko, Vince: Sr. FB, 5-9, 190, 21. Weirton, W. Va.
.Lambert, Alfred: So, DE, 5-11, 190, 19, Mabane, N.C.
�Lamm, Bill: So, K, 5-10. 180, 19, Satellite Beach, Fla.
�Maness. John: Jr. OG, 5-11, 220. 21. New Bern, N.C.
�McLaurm, Thomas: So, DB, 5-11, 175, 19, Roseboro, N.C.
McNeill, Ruffin:So, DB, 6-2. 190, 19, Lumberton. N.C.
Morris, John: So, DE, 6-1. 195, 19, Durham, N.C.
'Moss. Reggie: Jr. TE, 6-4, 200, 20, Elizabeth City, N.C.
Mulholland, Matt: Jr, QT, 6-0, 235. 20, Bethesda, Md.
'Murphy, Eddie: Sr, NG, 5-10, 198, 22, Raleigh, N.C.
Nelson, Ed: Sr, DE, 6-0, 180, 21, Commerce. Ga.
O'Donnell, Drew: So, OG, 6-3, 225, 19, Havelcck, N.C.
Olliver, Valla: Sr. RB, 5-11, 175. 22, Mount Olive, N.C.
�Pabers, Greg: So, LB, 6-0. 215, 20, Toronto, Canada
�Painter, Mike: Jr, LB, &0, 205, 20, Belmont, N.C.
Paul, Larry: Sr, LB, 5-11, 215, 22, Raleigh. N.C.
�Petty, Gino: So, OG, 6-1, 230, 23, Columbia, S.C.
Poole, Wayne: Jr, DT, 5-11, 240, 21, Knightdale, N.C.
�Powell. Joe: So, QB, 6-1, 190, 21, Raleigh, N.C.
'Pringle, Bruce: So, OT, 6-2, 225, 22, Haddonfield, N.J.
Randolph, Harold. Sr, LB, 6-1, 210, 21, Greenville, N.C.
�Riociarelli, Paul: So, K, 5-10, 175, 19, Grifton, N.C.
Smith, Jim: Jr, C, 6-3, 240, 20, Fayetteville, N.C.
Smith, Mitchell: Jr, OT, 6-3, 240, 20, Southern Pines, N.C.
Smith, Nelson: Jr, OG, 6-1, 230, 20, Gddsboro, N.C.
Snyder, Steve: So, OT, 6-0, 240, 19, Springfield, Va.
Southerland, Jimmy: Sr, QB, 5-9, 170, 21, Wilmington, N.C.
Stevenson, Woodrow: So, DT, 6-5, 230, 20, Longwood, N.C.
Summer, Tommy: Jr, LB, 6-1, 205, 21, Cherryville, N.C.
'Sutton, Theodore: So, FB, 5-9, 200, 19, Kinston, N.C.
Swords, Tim: Jr, OT, 6-3, 235, 21, New Martinsville. W. Va.
Tingler, Vance: Jr, DT, 6-2, 230. 20, Wilson, N.C.
Trevathan, Henry: So, QB, 5-10, 170, 19, Greenville, N.C.
Tripp, Tony: So, QB, 6-3, 200, 20, Havelcck, N.C.
'Tucker, Tod: So, NG, 5S, 210. 19, Kinston, N.C.
Valentine, Zack, Jr, DE, 6-2, 210, 20, Edenton, N.C.
Walker, Eric: So, TE, 6-3, 220, 19, Warner Robins, Ga.
Washington, Billy Ray: So, SE, 6-1, 195, 19, Jacksonville. N.C.
Williams, Clifford: So, NG, 6-2, 210, 21, Fayetteville, N.C.
Winters, Gene: So, C, 5-11, 205, 19, Dunn, N.C.
Wirthlin, Robert: So, C, 6-1, 210, 19, Montgomery, Ohio
Wrape, John: Jr, OT, 6-2, 225, 21, Ash xxo, N.C.
� inrllrrflnfi





m p
� ���-�
MiMBwMBIHMMMMMHBHHBBHHHBHPPMMBHHIiHH
Page 42 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
Schedul
Sept 3
Sept. 10
Sept. 17
Sept. 24
Oct. 1
Oct. 8
Oct. 15
Oct. 22
Oct. 29
Nov. 5
Nov. 12
N.C. State
Duke
Toledo
VMI
South Carolina
"SOUTHERN ILLINOIS
RICHMOND
The Citadel
SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA
Appalachian State
WILLIAM AND MARY
Raleigh, N.C.7
Durham, N.C.1:30
Toledo, Ohio7:30
HOME7
Columbia, S.C.7:30
HOME7:30
HOME7
Charleston, S.C7
HOME7
Boone, N.C.1:30
Norfolk, Va.1:30
1977 Recruits
NAME HGT
Boykins, Robert Lee 6-5
Butler, Ronald Dean 6-2
Butler, Walter CecilJr. 6-2
Chapman, Michael
Collins, Anthony
Dawson, EricZachary
Fann, Michael P.
Frederick, Ronald J.
Habit, Edward James
Hawkins, Michael L.
Headley, Ronald A.
Jordan, Michael
Kepley, David Alan
LoCock, Barney W. Ill
Martin, Dexter A.
Montford, Herman
Parker, Billy
Perry, Gerald W. Jr.
Pinkney, William A.
Ray, Andray
Roach, Timothy J.
Robbins, James E.
Saltmarsh, Ernest O.
Tart, Dwight
Warren, Jeffrey
Wigfall, Nathanill
6-0
6-0
6-0
5-9
5-9
6-1
5-9
6-3
64
6-0
6-1
60
6-1
6-2
6-1
5-10
6-2
6-1
6-5
5-10
6-5
5-11
6-5
WGT
210
195
215
175
200
175
175
160
180
235
225
210
220
190
215
210
185
175
195
190
240
180
235
196
250
HOMETOWN
Lumberton, N.C.
Roseboro, N.C.
Greenville, N.C.
Rockville, Md.
PennYan, N.Y.
Fort Bragg, N.C.
Salemburg, N.C.
Goldsboro, N.C.
Virginia Beach, Va
Manson, N.C.
Lively, Va.
New Bern, N.C.
Goldsboro, N.C.
Wilmington, N.C.
Cocoa, Fla.
Warner Robins,Ga.
Wilmington, N.C.
Morrisville, N.C.
Fayetteville, N.C.
Lillington, N.C.
Reidsville, N.C.
Merryville, N.C.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dunn, N.C.
Snow Hill, N.C.
Jacksonville, N.C.
POS.
L
B
L
L
B
L
B
L
. L
B
L
L
L
L
B
L
L
L
B
L
L
L
B
L
L
L
THIS IS HOW it looked on the line of scrimmage
when the Pirates whipped State 23-14 last year in
Carter Stadium. The two teams will line up again
next week for a renewal of one of the state's biggest
rivalries
FOOTBALL
Continued from p. 41.
starter, along with sophomore noseguard Oliver
Felton (5-9, 200) will anchor the very quick interior
Pirate defense. However, the experience of
All-America and all-conference end Cary Godette
and all-conference tackle Jake Dove will no doubt be
missed.
The real question mark is in the secondary. Only
junior Gerald Hall (5-10, 175), nother returning
all-conference selection, has any real experience in
the secondary. Three-year starters Jim Bdding,
Ernest Madison and Reggie Pinkney are gone.
Senior Steve Hale (5-10, 180) had a good spring at
free safety, while sophomore Willie Holley (6-0,185)
and sophomore Charlie Carter (5-10, 185) appeared
to move out front on the oorners. The three show
great promise, but just lack the valuable game
experience.
The kicking game took on more perspective
during the spring drills. Walkon Rodney Allen
appears set to handle the punting chores, while Bill
Lamm and Junior Creech should battle for the place
kicking duties. Snapper Gene Winters and Rob
Wirthlin definitely can handle their chores.
Following spring drills, Dye oommented, "I was
overall pleased with out work. This group had more
enthusiasm and worked harder than any group I've
ever been around in the spring. They really seem to
enjoy playing football.
"I think we have a chance to be a real tine
football team in the fall.
But the secret to how good we will end up being
will be determined by how much grit we've got. The
ability is great at some positions and average at
others. We have depth at some positions and very
little at others. If all the pieces fall in place and we
have no maja injuries or rash of injuries, then we
oould be good
For a complete variety
of food 24 hrs. a day serving
anything from pancakes
to steaks or shrimp.
Come in and study
for that big test with a
bottomless cup of coffee.
2518 E. 10th St. 758-2339 Greenville, N.C.





23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 43
The Dickinson Ave.
Shops
The Bunch with the personal touch.
Antiek Curiosa
817 Dickinson Ave.
Collectable furnishings, glass,
advertising books ,paper items
and more.
Western.
Pleasure
Bodie & Bobby Harrell
801 Dickinson Ave.
758-7450
Everything for the Horse and Rider
RR
Dickinson Ave.
Shops
T
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805 Dickinson Ave.
752-5186
Your Body Deserves
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Leotards �Tights A
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CAPEZIO DANSKIN
Mendenhall Student Center
Fire Dept.
Circle
Dams
Mall
5th Street
Dieners
Bakery
815 Dickinson Ave.
752-5251
Cookies for your Parties
and Cakes decorated for
any occasion
Williams Shoe
Shop
808 Dickinson Ave.
752-4121
Boots and Hats
All Leather Shoes
Harness and Saddle Repair
Farnam Dealer Factory Rejects
Yarns
812 Dickinson Ave.
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Page 44 FOUNTAINHEAP 23 August 1977
OPPONENTS
Pirates face tough independent schedule
By STEVE WHEELER
Sports Editor
Moving into its first year as an
NCAA major independent, East
Carolina has upgraded its sche-
dule to include two Atlantic Coast
Conferenoe foes, three holdovers
in the Southern Conferenoe and
four major independents, as well
as Southwestern Louisiana of the
up-and-coming Southland Con-
ference and the Toledo Rockets
from the Mid-American.
Although N.C. State, Duke
and South Carolina seem to have
the big names which the major
magazines like, the Pirates'
toughest encounter could very
well come from William and
Mary, who also left the Southern in
June, in the Oyster Bowl. The
Indians have 38 of the 46
lettermen of last year returning
and 18 of them are starters. Most
of the starters have already
logged two years as front-liners
and will have nearly three years
of experience by the time they
meet the Pirates in the season
finale.
N.C. STATE
In his first year as head coach
of the Wolfpack, Bo Rein was the
youngest head coach in the nation
at age 31. With a 3-7-1 record
after Lou Holtz had taken the
Pack to four straight bowl games,
Rein must have aged quite a bit.
The heat of alumni and fans is on
and Rein and his job would be in
jeopardy with a losing campaign.
Just as last year, the Pack
seems to have the individual
talent needed to produce a
winner, but the team just did not
pull together as a cohesive unit
after opening losses to Furman,
Wake Forest and the Pirates.
Junior running back Ted
Borwn is being tabbed by most
magazines as a pre-season all-
America, while defensive tackle
Bubba Green, just a sophomore,
is getting a lot of national
exposure, also. Ralph Stringer,
an all-star two years ago, is back
after sitting out last year with a
knee injury after moving from his
natural position, safety, to run-
ning back. He will play safety this
year.
But, Brown was most of the
Pack's rushing power last season,
rushing for 1088 yards. He has
2001 yards for his two-year
career. Green, a huge 6-5,
272-pound defensive tackle, is
very good with the pass rush and
is expected to attain all-stars this
season.
Senior signal-caller Johnny
Evans is the man that makes
State's offense go. He had 1,458
yards of total offense a year ago,
including 517 on the ground.
Evans was also the NCAA's
second leading punter last year
with a 46.1 average, with a
89-yard effort against Penn State.
"This should be ono heckuva
game Pirate head coach Pat
Dye said. "This game gets such a
tremendous fan interest. State
will no doubt be motivated for the
game, since we beat them last
year. It is a big game for both
schools.
"They have such good per-
sonnel at nearly all positions he
added. "Johnny Evans is one of
the better quarterbacks
around. Ted Brown is definitely
one of the nation's best runners
DUKE
Duke has to rank along with
South Carolina and William and
Mary as the Pirates' toughest
foes for the coming season. The
Blue Devils possess a do-every-
thing all-America candidate in
quarterback Mike Dunn. Dunn
rushed for a team high 757 yards
last year and hit on about 54
percent of his passes for 1,078
yards.
Mike McGee's main problem
will be finding someone adequate
enough for Dunn to hand the ball
off to. Tony Benjamin and Art
Gore, last year's starters have
gone the route of graduation and
the only experienced back left is
Mike Barney. Barney has gained
over 1,000 yards in three seasons
of reserve ball, filling in fa-
injured starters at times.
If the Devils cannot find a
running back to lug the ball,
Dunn should have no trouble
finding split end Tom Hall. Dunn
found him fa an ACC-leading 44
catches last season.
The Blue Devils, picked to be
second in the ACC by most
publications, have a la of meat on
the front offensive line (240 avg.
wt.) and could make a mediocre
back look strong.
The defense will be stronger
than last year, but will be a little
on the light side. The line
averages about 230, but will be
quick. In the secondary, Duke will
miss all-star Bob Grupp.
"We've never played Duke
Dye said. "They have a fine
football tradition. I've been a fan
of McGee's and Duke's team fa
some time. They are always
sound, fundamental teams.
"Dunn is one of the premier
quarterbacks in the nation. He
can run a pass and beat you
either way.
"Defensively, Duke has al-
ways defensed the wishbone real
good. It'll be their first game,
giving them three weeks to
prepare fa us, while we have
oily a week to prepare fa them.
TOLEDO
The biggest thing on Toledo's
side is that their coach (Chuck
Stobart-1 st season) will have an
easy pep talk befae the game.
"They didn't want to play us If
the Rockets' emotions are run-
ning, it could be one heckuva
game. East Carolina, when con-
tracting Duke fa the schedule
last spring, dropped Toledo from
the schedule to keep five home
games. The Rockets threatened
lawsuit and the Pirates put them
back on the slate.
The Rockets have led the
Mid-American Conference in
passing ten of the past 12
seasons, but with Stobart at the
helm, they may turn to running.
Stobard was offensive ooadinata
at Michigan fa the past few
years. The Wolverines run the
ball, almost exclusively.
Skip McCulley, a soph, is the
leading returning rusher with 578
yards, but quarterback Jeff
Hepinstall, a good thrower, is
slated to move to wide receiver.
(That's a sign of mae running.)
The offensive line is good-sized
with an average of 237.
Defensively, the Rockets gave
up over 26 points five times and
allowed less than ten on four
occasions, showing inconsistency.
They should be much the same
this season with seven of 11
starters returning, but may be a
little stronger.
"Withanewooach up there
Dye stated, "they will be very
excited and eager. They are very
See SCHEDULE, p. 45.
�i
ARE YOU SURE YOU KNOW
WHAT FAMILY PLANNING
IS ALL ABOUT?
If you think it means preventing unwanted pregnancy you're
partly right But it means more than that Like counseling
young people about how a baby before they are ready can
affect their health or mess up their lives helping couples
who want to have children but can't counseling men on male
responsibility and methods of birth control
It's important to know ALL about family planning
more than you may have thought
it means
For information or help, contact the family planning clinic in
your community, your local health department or your own
physician
US DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH.
EDUCATION. AND WELFARE
Public Health Service
This Week
at the
ElboR
� n
Sun. �Wed.
(21th-24th)
TENTH AVE. BAND
Thurs.
(25th)
RAZZ MA TAZZ
Fri. �Sun.
(26th-28th)
TENTH AVE. BAND
Don't Forget Friday 3-7
Sunday Night is Ladies Night
Welcome Back!





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23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 45
Soccer is back at East Carolina
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Staff Writer
Soccer is back at East
Carolina! After being dropped
from East Carolina athletics,
soccer has been reinstated at
ECU. The team will feature a new
head coach and a very demanding
schedule for the team's first year
as an NCAA independent.
The new head coach of the
soccer team is Brad Smith, former
ECU soccer standout and grad-
uate. Smith graduated from Liv-
ingston High School in 1971. He
earned his BA from ECU in 1975
and his MA in education in 1977.
Smith was an all star player in
New Jersey. A four year starter
on the ECU soccer team, Smith
was named an outstanding Col-
lege Athlete of the Year in 1971.
He was junior and senior co-
captain and All-Southern Con-
ference both of these years.
During Smith's senior season
the ECU soccer team posted a
seven and four won-loss reoord,
beat rivals, N.C. State, UNC,
Duke aid finished the number ten
team in the South.
Smith was also a player-coach
for three seasons on the Green-
ville Soccer Club which he helped
to organize. Under his direction
the Greenville Soccer Club posted
a 24 and three reoord and won the
Eastern Division Championship
in the North Carolina Soccer
League three times.
Bucky Moses has been chosen
SCHEDULE
Continued from p. 44.
big up front and will have skilled
people returning for the offense.
They also have the M id-American
Conference Defensive Player of
the Year. They will be extra
tough
VMI
The Keydets may very well
rely on the foot this season, as
they did most of last year.
Sophomore Craig Jones had a
perfect 4.0 academic average last
year and hit on all 13 extra points
for the Keydets. He was the
second leading field goal kicker in
the nation also, hitting on 15 of
18. His percentage of .833 led the
nation. But, that may be part of
VMI's problem. They could not
put the ball past paydirt but 13
times in ten games. Jones scored
58 of the team's 138 points. They
have to get more production out
of their offense.
That is possible with the
return of RobbyClark (QB), Andre
Gibson (RB), Steve Oddi (FB) and
flanker Johnny Garnett all intact.
Graduation took four of the six
heavyweights up front, however.
The Keydets have been trad-
itionally strong defensively, and
this season should be no ex-
ception. Senior linebacker Glen
Jones is expecting all-star ac-
colades, and will call defensive
signals. All-conference Ned
Stepanovich keys the line.
"VMI will be extra tough this
year, as their entire offensive
baokfield returns intact said
Dye. "They had the momentum
going at the end of last year and
won their last four games. They
as the Assistant Coach. Moses
played soccer at ECU during the
'73 and '74 seasons. He was
Honorable Mention All-Southern
Conference in 1974. Moses also
played on the Greenville Soccer
Club where he played the position
of goalie. Moses will be responsi-
ble for the goalie position here at
ECU. Moses is a former Raleigh
native and isa graduate with a BS
in Math and currently working on
a MBA.
When asked his oomments on
the upcoming seaion, Coach
Smith stated that he is optimistic
although the team itself will be
very young. There will be a lack of
experience but it is hoped that the
new ooaching situation will help.
The schedule must be sum-
med up as very tough with such
teams as Campbell, Appalachian
State, Duke, N.C. State and
William and Mary set for this
season. The games with State and
Duke will be home games this
season.
Listed below are the top
players and some information on
each of them.
Tom Long: Goldsboro, N.C,
All-Conference, Second Team
All-South. Said to be a good
steady defensive player which
must be counted on this year for
the big defensive plays.
Jeff Karpovich: Forward,
center or halfback. Great ball
control and play making ability.
Phil Martin: Greensboro, left
wing. "Excellent left foot and
good shot
JEFF KARPOVICH 13-dark uniform) maneuvers
for shot against North Carolina in action last year.
Charlie Hardy: Kinston, de-
fense. "Mr. Hustle-makes up for
lack of experience with hustle and
determination
Tom Harrison: Raleigh,
"Good all around performer.
Plays offense and defense equally
well
Hall Bullock: "Didn't start
until late last season, limited
experience but great desire and
attitude and will be tending the
nets
Mike Hitchcock: Charlotte,
"Will be oounted on to fill in at
forward or halfback
William Wilery:Goalie, "If he
recovers from knee injury he
could puch Bullock fa playinq
time
Karpovich is the top offensive player returning from
last season. FOUNTAINHEAD photo.
r� Soccer Schedule�,
Sept. 15-16 Campbell Gassic (Gilford, Erskinn, Campbell, ECU)
Sept. 24 Goldsboro
Soccer ClubHome2:00 p.m.
Oct. 2 ASUBoone2.00 p.m.
Oct. 4 DukeHome4:00p.m.
Oct. 8 St.AndrewsLaurinburg2O0p.m.
Oct. 15 UNC-
WilmingtonWilmington2O0p.m.
Oct. 18
Oct. 18 N.C. StateHome400p.m.
Oct. 20 N.C.
Wesley anRocky Mount4O0p.m.
Oct. 22 UNC-
Chapel HillChapel Hill1100 a.m.
Oct. 26 PembrokePembroke330 p.m.
Oct.28 W&MWilliam sburg730 p.m.
have given us a fit the past two
years and whipped us in 1974
SOUTH CAROLINA
Gamecock fans may be tired of
seeing football by the time East
Carolina rolls into town on Oct. 1.
The Pirates are USC's fifth game
and will be the fifth game in
Columbia. By the quirk of
the schedule Duke will be their
sixth straight home contest the
next week.
Coach Jim Carlen, in his two
years at South Carolina, has
turned the Gamecock team from
an exciting offensive show that
produced 42-35 games to a
defensive team that gave up few
points, but scoring lower also.
The offense may be in trouble this
season with the graduation of the
top two ball-toters (Clarence
Williams and Kevin Long). Ron
Bass returns to guide the offense
for the third oonsecutive year. To
move the ball, however, replace-
ments must be found for Williams
and Long.
Defensively, the Gamecocks
should be as strong as last year.
They gave up just 250 yards per
contest as opposed to 410 in 1975.
Carlen will have to find able
replacements fa three of the
front five, a linebacker spot and
two secondary positions.
"This will be the strongest
team Jim Carlen has had at South
Carolina said Dye. "They will
be up because it is their Home-
coming. Their defense carried
through many games and im-
proved tremendously over the
previous year. They lost two fine
running backs but will have
plenty to replace them
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS
Gone from the Southern
Illinois attack is Andra Herrera,
one'of the nation's leading
rushers last season. He led the
Salukis to a 7-4 recad, its best in
several years. NFL Hall of Famer
Gale Sayers was named athletic
directa at the Carbondale school
last year and he hired Rey
Dempsey to bring the Salukis a
winning recad. That he did.
With 21 lettermen and 11
starters returning, Dempsey went
to the junia college ranks to get
many of his players fa this
seasai. Gary Lirtai seems to be
the heir apparant to Herrera's
running back position.
"Southern Illinois came along
way last season under
Coach Dempsey Dye stated.
"Even though we beat them
49-14, they never gave up. We
played very good offensively, you
oould say we were hot. They have
a la of good people coming back
and they'll be tough
RICHMOND
Spider head ooaoh Jim Tait
must be pulling out his hair these
days thinking of his 1977 sche-
dule. His Richmond squad will
face ten teams that had winners
in 1976, with West Virginia (5-6)
the only team returning uncer
.500. The combined reoord of the
opponents was 81-40-2 last year,
with Maryland 11-0, East
Carolina and North Carolina 9-2.
The Spiders have several
holes to fill on the offense, as the
top three receivers went the route
of graduation. The top two
quarterbacks, na spectacular last
season, return, but Ed Kreilis,
the top running back and total
offense man, is gone.
Defensively, all-America Jeff
Nixon at safety returns. He was
third in the nation in interoeptions
last season and is one of the
better coverage men in the land.
Linebacker Orlandus Branch, an
honaable mention all-America
last year, led the squad with 182
tackles and is an all-America
candidate.
Punter Bruce Allen, son of
Washington Redskin coach
Geage Allen, was 16th in the
natioi in punting with a school
recad 42.9 avaage. He will also
take over the placekicking chaes
from four-year letterman
Johnny Jones.
"Games between us an
Richmond seem to always be
dose Dye said. "They beat us
in '74 and '75, but we were in it
until the very end. Last year we
beat them, but they were in it
until the horn sounded. It's
always an emrtional game be-
tween us and the Spiders. Coach
Tait does a tremendous job up
thae
THE CITADEL
All-America Brian Ruff is
gone, as well as ten other starters
fa the Bulldogs. Coach Bobby
Ross has some gaping holes to
replace. The Citadel, which
generally gives teams a fit
defensively, will have to have
people oome in and do the job
Ruff and all-confaenos Ralph
Ferguson did.
Offensively, Marty Crosby
will be one of the top quarter-
backs the Pirates will face. Last
season, as a soph, Crosby hit on
54 percent of his passes fa ova
1,200 yards. He must find some-
one to fill the shoes of the flanka
Doug Johnson and tight end
Dickie Regan. All-confaence run-
ning back Andrew Johnson is now
gone also. It oould be a long
season in Charleston. Their big-
gest asset: they have seven hone
games.
"The hardest fought game
I've ever seen was two years ago
when we beat The Citadel 3-0
down thae Dye remembaed.
"That was the start of our big
winning streak (12 games) and
the first time that season we came
togetha as a team.
"Marty Crosby is anotha of
those tough quarterbacks we' II be
facing again this year Dye
continued. "He has a fine wide
receiver also. And that Wide-
Tackle Six they run on defense
alwas gives us problems
SOUTH WESTERN LOUISIA NA
The Ragin' Cajuns were ragin'
in Lafayette last season as they
rolled to a 9-2 season and second
in the Southland Confaence. But
to rage this season, they will have
to build a new offensive line.
They lost nine of 11 startas on
offense last season, but they have
record-holder and honorable
mention all-America quartaback
Roy Henry back.
Henry was 16th in the nation
in passing last season and 16th in
total offense in leading the
Cajuns. The otha returna is one
of Henry's favaite targets, 5-5
Nat Durant.
Defensively, the Cajuns were
second in the Southland last year
and return seven starters. They
expect to improve in this aren.
The kicking game will be fair with
the return of the top two puntas,
but place-kicka Rafael Section, a
recad holder, is gone.
"Southwestan Louisiana will
See SCHEDULE, p. 50.)





Page 46 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 Augut 1977
All Mens Sports Shirts
$12.50 each
Top �Line Golf Balls
Titleist Wilson Pro - Staff
$11.50 per doz.
Great Selection of New and Used Golf Clubs
Top - Flite
Large Selection of Men's and Women's Golf Shoes
Men Casual Sports Slacks 25 off
Large Assortment of Putters 15 off
WELCOME
STUDENTS!
FRESHMEN,TRANSFERS,RETURNEES:
People's Baptist Temple invites you to join us this and
every Sunday. Following the 11 a.m. service this week,
August 28, will bo a special
HOME-COOKED MEAL
prepared by our church family to welcome our old and
new ECU students.
Our College-Career Sunday School class is designed to
meet the interests and needs of the single young adult.
Time of fun and fellowship are planned frequently for
your enjoyment. Come be with us this week!
PEOPLE'S BAPTIST TEMPLE
2002 W. GREENVILLE BLVD.
756-2822
DR. BARRY BAGWELL, Pastor
756-0504
iEDULESunday MorningSunday EveningWednesday Evening
Greene9:30 a.m.6:00 p.m.7:00 p.m.
Cotton9:35 a.m.6:05 p.m.7:05 p.m.
Scott9:40 a.m.6:10 p.m.7:10 p.m.
The Pro Shop
Of Greenville, Inc.

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Open Til 8 P.M.
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111 Eastbrook Drive 752-1525 Greenville, N.C.
Adjacent to the King & Queen Restaurant





1 Warn i !
siSiPijiss

23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 47
The answers
to Ficklen
ByCHRISHOLLOMAN
Staff Writer
For many years the idea of a
large football stadium at ECU has
been talked about. It was an idea
that until the last few years
9eemed almost too unlikely to
believe possible. By the fall of
1978, the dream is scheduled to
become North Carolina's fourth
largest football facility. This all
sounds very good from the
football fans' viewpoint, but what
about the people who question
"Why do we need a larger
stadium or "How will a larger
stadium help ECU academical-
ly?" The following article will
attempt to answer some of the
questions that the students have
been asking, in hopes that the
purpose of such an undertaking
will be better understood. In
order to answer some of the
questions a history of Ficklen
Stadium would help the student
to see what has been done already
and what will be changed.
The James Skinner Ficklen
Memorial Stadium, was dedi-
cated on September 21, 1963,
with East Carolina defeating
Wake Forest 20 to 10.
This dedication game was the
realization of a dream for East
Carolina College and all of
eastern North Carolina. The idea
of building a new stadium was
announced on October 7, 1961, by
Dr. Leo Jenkins at a meeting of
the Society of Buccaneers (now
known as the Pirates Club).
Within a year, $283,287 had
been raised, although the goal
had been $200,00. By 1963 the
construction was completed.
The original stadium consist-
ed of the permanent stands on the
south side, the current press box
and the old lighting system that
was removed after the 1974
season. The total oost of the
original stands was $300,000.
The north side permanent
seating was constructed in 1968,
increasing the stadium capacity to
20,000.
The second major change in
Ficklen Stadium was the lighting
system, a change that occurred
just before the 1975 season
started. The old inner stadium
lights on six poles were removed
and replaced with six towers
outside the stadium containing
the new lighting system.
Cost of the new system was
$450,000. Engineers say ECU has
the best lighted stadium in the
Southeast.
How much will the stadium
expansion cost and where is the
money coming from?
The stadium expansion will
oost around $2.5 million. An
estimated $1.6 million has been
donated and the rest of the money
will oome from the ECU building
fund, which the student body
voted to release last year.
What do the expansion plans
include?
The plan is to expand the
EAST CAROLINA'S athletic complex in 1956 was
located beside Memorial Gym and where Brewster
and the Nursing buildings are now. This changed in
1963. Photo courtesy of ECU News Bureau
seating capacity to approximately
37,000 and to build a much
needed press box with a Chancel-
lor' s box and an elevator to reach
the boxes.
How will the stadium be
expanded now that the "Horse-
shoe" idea is out?
There are to be additions
made to each of the four corners
of the stadium. This will nearly
double the size of the current
stadium.
Why was the "Horseshoe"
idea for the stadium expansion
dropped?
The main reason for this was
dropped was because it was not
feasible. If Ficklen had been
expanded in this manner then the
horseshoe side of the stadium
would extend over the road. Also
from a seating standpoint, sight
in the first few rows of the
horseshoe would be very poor.
When is the construction
scheduled to begin on the ex-
pansion?
Around the first of November
THIS IS THE NORTH SIDE of Ficklen Stadium
today with the dotted line showing where
construction will be done. Both sides will be
enlarged in this
Reflector.)
manner. (Photo courtest of Daily
THIS IS THE athletic complex as it is today at East
Zarolina.JheSlapiumpanm
approximately 37,000 seats after this season
of this year.
Why expand Ficklen Stadium
at all?
The biggest reason for ex-
panding Ficklen Stadium is be-
cause in order to get teams such
as N.C. State and Wake Forest to
play ECU on our home field,
ECU'S athletic department must
be able to pay these schools
certain financial guarantees to
play the Pirates in Greenville. In
other words we must make it
worth their while to play us in
Greenville instead of in Raleigh or
Winston-Salem year after year
Because their stadiums are larger
these schools can make more
money for ECU and fa them-
selves by playing at their home
stadiums. This may be all well
and good for N.C. State but what
about the fact that many people in
eastern North Carolina would like
to see an ECU-State game but
cannot drive the three hours from
Elizabeth City or New Bern.
Bringing these teams into Green-
ville would put all of eastern
North Carolina within driving
distance of some top notch
football games. An expanded
Ficklen Stadium would also help
eastern North Carolina in otehr
ways. Fa example, a ausade
such as the one Billy Graham held
in Carter Stadium in 1973 oould
be held in Ficklen Stadium.
Concertsbymaja artists could be
held in Greenville, because the
artist oould make enough money
and draw enough people to make
the effort worth the time. A clear
example of this is the concerts
that have been held at Groves
Stadium of Wake Faest since its
completion inf 1968. In other
wads expanding Ficklen Stadium
would benefit na only ECU but
all of eastern Nath Carolina.
How will the expansion of
Ficklen help East Carolina
academically?
The expansion of Ficklen
Stadium will help ECU to sche-
dule better teams. Thus by
beating these teams a even
playing them, ECU gets publicity.
Many people right now are
wondering what this means. It is
as simple as this. Think of all the
times that you have seen East
Carolina in the paper, say tne
News and Observer in any maja
article besides spots. Spots,
whether oie would I ike to admit it
a not, puts ECU'S name in black
and white mae often than any
other means. When ECU made
the "Top Twenty" last year, this
gave ECU national exposure like
never befoe. Also when you
think of the great universities in
the nation the ones that usually
come to mind are Notre Dame,
Ohio State, UCLA, Yale and so
on. Now how many people really
know about these schools
academics. They are good as far
as academics are concerned but,
even befoe this, these schools
made a name fo themselves in
spots. Future college students
read about these schools time and
time again and then wondo what
they have to offer academically.
An example of helping aca-
demics with a solid sports pro-
gram was witnessed by the mass
of applications received by N.C.
State after winning the NCAA
championship in basketball in
1974. State's growth was out of
propatioi with the otha schools
in the state. They had too many
applications, so they took only the
best students that applied and
rose their admissions standards.
How will the expansion of
Ficklen help other sports at ECU
besides football?
By expanding Ficklen
Stadium, ECU will be able to
schedule more big money games
such as State, Duke, and Wake
Faest. With the stadium as it is,
the Pirates are faced to play
teams like Furman at home,
which even though may have a
good football team, can't draw
enough people to make anything
like the money that ECU could
make playing Duke. This inaease
in revenue will help ECU'S
athletic department to inaease
scholarships in all sports. Thus
other sports such as track,
swimming and women's sports
can have the maximum number of
players the NCAA allows instead
of losing good players because of
the lack of scholarship money.
What one act really got the
stadium expansion underway?
IN 1976 the NCAA was
threatening to lower East
Carolina's dassif ication to a lower
status than maja college. What
the NCAA proposed was that
Division 1, the maja classifica-
tion fo Univosities, be separated
into Division 1 and Division 1A.
The Southern Confaence was
placed in this Division 1A. ECU
was faced to leave the Southern
in June because of this. But to
survive as a maja �allege in-
dependent, a larger stadium has
to be built in oder to inaease
revenue and help scheduling.
Also in the last meeting of the
NCAA a new proposal would sety
a minimum size a school's
stadium must be in Oder to be
classified Division 1. There was
no decision on the matter but it is
believed that in January a
stadium size limit of 30,000 to
35,000 will be set. It is important
that East Carolina remain in
Division 1 to keep the maja
college status. �
JB9I9





DBI
Page 48 FOUNTAINHEAD 23 August 1977
WALK-ONS
Scholarship is realization of a dream
� . t Fast Carolina that a waikr
"Every walkons dream is to
earn a scholarship said East
Carolina head coach Pat Dye.
"And I would like for each to be
able to do this
That explains how Dye feels
about walkons in his Pirate
football program. They are im-
portant.
Walkons are those players
that elect to try out for the team
without being recruited in any
way and are not on scholarship.
It's most unusual for walkons
to play a major role with a football
team. In fact, in many programs,
walkons stand little chance of
even making the team. But not so
at East Carolina.
" If football means enough to a
HAROLD RANDOLPH
JIMMY 90UTHERLAND
youngster in college to come out,
with the demands so great on
individual's time, then they are
going to be something special to
us continued Dye. "Every kid
that walks on at East Carolina will
be treated no different than a
scholarship kid and will get an
equal chance to make this team
The proof of that statement
can be found in the starting
lineup along at East Carolina, the
ultimate walkon. All-America
linebacker candidate Harold
Randolph, center Rickie Hdliday,
quarterback Jimmy Southerland,
tight end Barry Johnson, punter
Rodney Allen - these are all
starters for 1977 that were
original walkons at East Carolina
and have since ea ned a scholar-
ship. Kickers Bill Lamm and
Junior Creech are vying for
starting placekicker and both fall
in the same category.
Other walkons appearing on
the depth charts who have or will
earn scholarships are linebacker
Carnvk Paul, defensive tackle
Vance Tinger, offensive tackle
John Wrape, fullback Theodore
Sutton, defensive back James
Freer and split end Vern Daven-
port.
"I think it's very significant
that four years ago we enoour-
aged non-scholarship football
players to oome out added Dye.
"Although we did not recruit
them, we made sure that all
students knew our doors were
open.
"Our roster currently shows
about 27 walkons from the 90 that
ended spring practice. That's
about 13 of our team
Why have walkons? Why
worry with some folks that you
know will never be a football
player?
"Walkons give tremendous
support answered Dye. "On
the practice field in our prepar-
ation fa other teams they are
scout team members executing
the opponents plays. Plus, good
football players sometimes
emerge from this group.
There is a belief among coaches
at East Carolina that a walkon can
play. So we seem to get more out
than some programs. And, m
some cases, we have signed some
to scholarships that maybe were
not as good a football as one
should be to get a scholarship,
but they were such good people
we signed them anyway for their
help "
At East Carolina University,
walkons are speaal in football
And in many cases, East Carolina
is speaal to walkons. Here, they
get a chance to play, even to start,
and in some cases, see the drearr
of earning a scholarship come
true.
RICKIE HOLLIDAY
1977 Walk-ons
�RODNEY ALLEN
Wayne Banks
Pete Benton
Reid Bullock
�JUNIOR CREECH
Blake Camp
VERN DAVENPORT
Bobby Davidson
William Elcook
Jack Foushee
JAMESFREER
Tommy Grove
Allen Hines
Von Hofmeister
'RICKIE HOLLIDAY
Jesse Ingram
'BARRY JOHNSON
Albert Lambert
�BILL LAMM
John Maness
Thomas McLaur in
Reggie Moss
Eddie Murphy
Greg Pabers
ALL CAPS - Walk-ons who have earned scholarships
1977 Starters
Mike Painter
LARRY PAUL
Gino Petty
Bruce Pnngle
H,RANDOLPH
Paul Ricaarelli
Bruce Pringle
�JIM SOUTHERLAND
THEODORE SUTTON
VANCE TINGLER
Tod Tucker
JOHNWRAPE
Qwtft
Men's Brown Moccasin
Oxfords
$29.00 D Width Only
Ladies Brown Moccasin
Oxfords
$25.00 N&M
Ladies Moccasin
by Spalding
Tan Camp Moccasin
Tunnel laced Top line,
3 eyelet blutcher,
plant, crepe sole.
Natural Jute
Latigo leather
$24.00
Med. Width Only
Hours: Mon.�Sat. 10 A.M. 6 P.M.
307 Evans St.
On the Mall





fftMBm
INTRAMURALS 1977-78
23 August 1977 FOUNTAINHEAD Page 49
MEN SINTRAMURALCALENDAR 1977-78
Intramural Council Meeting - August 2b, 1977
4:00, Room 105
FALLSEMESTER
Activity
Touch Football
Tennis Singles
Doubles
One-on-One
Basketball
Volleyball
Track
Soccer
Free Throw
Baskebtall
Entry Dates
August 25-31
Play Begins
September 6
Aug. 29-Sept. 1 September 6
September 12-15
September 19-22
October 10-11
October 10-12
November 28
Nov. 28-Dec. 1
September 19
September 27
October 12
October 18
November 28
December 6
SPRING SEMESTER
Entry Date
Nov. 28-Dec. 1
January 9-12
Activity
Basketball
Bowling
Racquet ball
Singles DoublesJanuary 9-12
Arm Wrestling January 16-18
Play Begins
December 6
January 16
January 16
January 19
�&f
A

A?
$
WOMEN'S PARTICIPATION in Intramurals was
about 25 percent of their enrollment. It is expected
to gam in the coming year with the addition of new
sports.
February 20-23
Feb. 27-March 1
Swimming
Softball
Hor shoes
SinglesDoublesMarch 13-16
Badminton
SinglesDoublesMarch 13-16
Team Tennis March 20-23
February 27
March t3
March 2.
March 20
March 27
CO-RECINTRAMURAL CALENDAR 1977-78
Intramural Council Meeting -August 15. 1977
Activity
Two-on-Two
Basketball
SportsTnvia
Bowling
Activity
Novelty Swim
Meet
Tennis Mixed
Doubles
FALLSEMESTER
Entry Dates Play Begins
October 10-13 October 17
November 28-30 December 5
Oct ober 17-20 Oct ober. 24
SPRING SEMESTER
Entry Dates Play Begins
February 20-23 March 1
Feb. 27-March 2 March 13
Co-Rec Volleyball March 20-23 March 27
Badminton Mixed
Doubles April 3-6 April 10
WOMEN SINTRAMURALCALENDAR 1977-78
Intramural Council Meeting -August 25, 1977
-4100, Room 105
FALLSEMESTER
Activity Entry Dates
Flag Football August 25-31
Tennis
SinglesDoublesAug. 29-Sept. 1
One-on-One
Basketball
Volleyball
Track
Golf
Soccer
Archery
Intramural
Marathon
Free Throw
Basketball
September 12-15
September 19-22
October 10-11
October 10-12
October 10-13
October 17-20
November 14-17
November 28
Nov. 28-Dec. 1
SPRING SEMESTER
Play Begins
September 6
September 6
September 19
September 27
Oct ober. 12
October. 17
October. 18
October. 24
November 21
November 28
December 6
Entry Dates
Nov. 28-Dec. 1
January 9-12
Activity
Basketball
Bowling
Racquet ball
SnglesDoublesJanuary 9-12
Swimming February 20-23
Softball Feb. 27-March 1
Horseshoes
SnglesDoublesMarch 13-16
Badminton
anglesDoubles March 13-16
Play Begins
December 6
January 16
January 16
February 27
March 13
March 20
March 20
Intromirals
byJOHNEVANS
ICE BALL was the favorite co-rec sport fa
Intramurals last year It will be back this year along
with about 40 others to comprise the most
Intramural spats ever.
Last year over 4,000 full-time students of East Carolina University
took part in some form of intramural activity. That was over 40 per cent
of the student body.
Over half of the male student body participated in intramural
activities and about 25 per cent of the women students at East Carolina
competed in at least one intramural activity.
At the same time the use of the Intramural Equipment Room
increased by 20 per cent.
These cold figures may not seem I ike much to the student. but what
they mean is that more and more students are beooming involved in the
East Carolina intramural programs. That is a trend that has developed
ever since Dr. Wayne Edwards took over the program in 1975. Now in
his third yet' as Director of Intramurals, Dr. Edwards and his staff
have planned an even bigger year for the coming school year.
Because of the semester system, football and Softball games will be
played both during the day and at night. This will be the first time that
intramural games will be played outdoors at night.
"The night activity is the first of its kind outdoors that I have ever
heard of at East Carolina stated Edwards. "We were faced to take
such actions because of the shortened spring time fa Softball, but I
think that the students will enjoy playing at night
To provide fa the night play, two fields have been lighted next to
Ficklen aadium. In addition, four fields next to Ficklen that haven't
been used fa soft ball play in the last two years have been resurfaced
and ;eveled and will be ready fa play this year. That will give the
students use of 10 soft ball fields instead of six, as in past years. In
addition, other changes have been made in the intramural schedule fa
this year.
Soccer will be played as a fall spat this year to allow mae time fa
scheduling softball in the spring. Team Handball, a spat introduced in
the spring last year, will be played as a point system spat in the fall.
Golf will be played in the fall this year, instead of in the Spring.
Touch football will become flag football and Archery will be added
as an individual spat fa men during fall quarter. The yearly aoss-
oountry race that is namally run on the school's aoss-oountry course,
will be run through campus this year. With the big interest in jogging
these days the aoss-oountry event has become one of the biggest
individual spats at ECU.
In the Co-Rec program Ice Ball wasthe most popular spat last year
and it will be continued this year. A new spat last year, Ice Ball
outdrew Water Basketball as the biggest co-rec sport. Ice Ball, Water
Basketball and Volleyball will be the maja co-rec spats this year,
along with Co-Rec mixed doubles tennis. Water Basketball has been
played in both the fall and spring in the past, but this year it will be
held only in the spring. A new Co-Rec event will be added this
year-Softball. Each team will have five men and five women on the
field and a larger 16-inch softball will be used. That spat will begin in
early September and registratioi will be the first week of school.
Last year Co-Rec events were handled by Rose Mary Adkins, the
Assistant Directa of Intramurals. and the program enjoyed their
biggest growth ever. Co-Rec events also grew mae than either men's
a women's program last year.
� Overall, football, basketball, volleyball and softball were our
biggest spats last year said Dr. Edwards, 'but we had an maease
in almost every spat except a few individual spats. Team Handball.
Team Tennis. Ice Ball and Soccer were the biggest new sports last
year
Edwards also oommented that he didn' t think the semester systems
would pose that many problems to the program this year.
Other than causing us a lot of headaches schedule-wise. I don't
think the semester system will hurt us pointed out Edwards.
�Outdoor spats in the spring will be hurt sane, but basketball will be
helped because we won't have any exams in February that we have to
work around We will be able to play mae games and we will have
mae time fa the playoffs. That means we can put mae teams in the
playoffs.
�Winter spats will be helped added Edwards, "because we
won't have to split them up around exams and vacations like we've had
to do in the past. The new lights should help alleviate some of the
problems we will have with scheduling softball in the spring. We might
have to play games as late as 11 o'clock at night
Edwards albo pointed out that backpacks have been added to the
equipment in the equipment rooms and that he hoped to purchase
some tents, canoes and other camping gear by the winter.
Four spats dubs will be aided and sponsaed by the Intramural
Department this year. They will be in Rugby, Skiing, Karate and
Volleyball. Plans are also being made to aid clubs in Laaosse and
Archery.
Events whicn will start in early September are: Men's and
Women's football, Men's and Women's tennis singles and doubles,
co-rec softball, co-rec Almost Anything Goes and Volleyball.
Registration fa these events begins the first week of classes, so come
by Memaial Gym to Room 204 and register as a team a individually.
In additioi, an Intramural Council meeting will be held on August
25 at 4 p.m. in Room 105, Memaial.





50 UXINTA1NHEAD 23 August 1977
ALL-STARS
Hicks, Randolph, Bolt, Hall A -A candidates
Eddie Hict &-1 SW. Junior.
Running Back, Henderson, N C
Al-Southern Conference as
sophomore second leading vote
getter in offensive backfield in the
conference balloting, rushed for
897 yards inn 137 carries for 6.5
average, one of only eight play-
ers in the country last year to
:ro scouts have been hungry
for two years, career average of
7 4 yards per carrythat's 1193
yards in 161 carries.
Says Coach Pat Dye: "Eddie
has been a great player since his
freshman year. He was handicap-
ped his freshman year with
injuries but was great one what
i"
EDDIE HICKS scores one of his eight touchdowns last year. He rushed
for 897 yards and is the nation's top returner runner in yards per carry.
He averaged 6.55 last season.
average over six yards per
carrysixth best rushing season
ever in ECU history by an
individual led a team that was
fifth in the nation in rushing
offense last year with 296.6 yards
per gamescored eight touch-
downs, for second in team
scoringset school record fa
longest non-scoring run with 75
yarder vs. North Carolinaranks
12th in rushing offense for career
at ECU with 1159 yardshad
most yards rushing in a single
game last year with 172 vs.
Southern Illinois six pass re-
ceptions for 91 yardsnamed by
Playboy Magazine last year as
one of the players to watch as a
sophomoreproved to be very
true .had 24 carries for 296 yards
as freshman for 12.3 average
played little as freshman due to
injurynad 44 speed in the
little time he did play. He's an
excellent runner, excellent pass
receiver, excellent blooker. Eddie
has great speed at 4.4. He's one
of the most exciting backs I've
ever been around. The only
problem we had last year was that
we didn't get the ball to him
enough. Eddie teams with Willie
Hawkins to be as fine a pair of
backs as there are in the country
in the wishbone
Says Coach Bo Rein of N.C.
State University: "Eddie Hicks is
as fine a back as we faced all last
year. He has great natural
instincts, both as a runner and as
a pass receiver. He is one fine
football player
Says Dallas Cowboy scout
"Eddie is the kind of player that
jumps right out of film you are
watching. Even when you are
looking at the other team and not
oking fa 'e jumps out
h tfi.it you want to find out who
that player is. He's a dominating
foroeinagame. He's got a type of
cockiness about him that you can
tell in films he commands respect
of other teams. Eddie gives an air
of knowing what he's doing He
plays with confidence. He has
good size and speed and appears
to be just what the pros are
looking for. Even though some
may think he gives an air of being
cocky. I think it is a "bashful
cockiness" and that he really is
not just sure how good he is
Harold Randolph, 6-2, 195,
Senior, Linebacker, Greenville.
N.C: An absolutely incredible
linebackerhis statistics prove
the fact he's one of the finest
anywherenamed honorable
mention All-America by Associ-
ated Press last yearAll-State
All-Southern Conferencethe
statictics are taken from coaches
film grading and are not hypered
in any way by this officeso now
the factsHarold has 114 un-
assisted tackles in 1975 and 108
unassisted tackles in 1976that's
roughly 10.5 tackles unassisted
per gamehe had 37 assists in
1975 and 47 assists in 1976he
had 16 tackles for loss for minus
58 yards in 1975 and six tackles
for loss for minus 44 yards in
1976he had a season high 23
unassisted tackles vs. William
and Mary last yearHarold's
tackles are by no means easy ones
eitheron a number of occasions
over the last two yers, players
have been taken off the field and
did not return from what most
refer to as "bone shattering"
tackleshe is simply awesome.
Says Coach Pat Dye: "Harold
would have to be in the top two or
three linebackers I've ever been
around. My thoughts turn to two
others. Woodrow Love from
Alabama and Danny Kepley
from East Carolina. All great
linebackers have in common the
great intensity with which they
play. Harold has just that. But
Harold stands above the others
because he has just pure, great
athletic ability and because he
has 4.5-4.6 speed in the 40. I
think his statistics alone must
place hirn in the elite in the
country. Harold's ability enables
SCHEDULE
Continued from p. 45.)
be one of the strongest teams on
the schedule Dye said. "They
went 9-2 last year and have one of
the most versatile offenses
around. And Roy Henry is a
magnifident quarterback Had he
not have transferred from Notre
Dame, he would have probably
been the starter there this year
APPALACHIAN STATE
The Mountaineers will once
again be a strong offensive force
to be reckoned with They have
the multi-talented Robby Price
back for his senior season, as well
as running back Emmitt Hamil-
ton They have a strong offensive
line keyed by center Gil Beck, a
second team all-state, all-
conference performer from last
year. He is being touted as an
aJI-America candidate this sea-
son.
The ASU defense could be
good if a few key players can be
replaced. The Mountaineers im-
proved in 1976 from 1975 on
defense and Coach Jim Brakef ield
says his list of recruits are his
best ever
Missed will be punter Joe
Parker, one of the nation's
leaders over the past three years.
"That trip to Boone Dye
moaned "We have been most
unfortunate there in the past.
They will be as good or better
than last year. Robbie Price is
another of the premier quarter-
backs we'll be facing this year.
He is healthy now and will be
hard to stop
WILLIAM AND MARY
This could be the year the
Indians tap into the top 20 of the
nation. They have 18 starters
(nine each of offense and defense)
who return. Most of these already
started for two years and will
have nearly three years of start-
ing experience by the time they
meet the Pirates in the Oyster
Bowl in Norfolk.
Tom Rozantz, Jim Kruis.
Keith Famian and Ken Cloud lead
the talented offensive unit into
HA HOLD RANDOLPH prepares to deliver one of his patented bone-
shattering tackles on WCU's Darrell Liptud in last seasons
Homecoming victory Randolph has led the Pirates in tackles for two
years now
us to do alot of things defensively
that we couldn't do with just an
ordinary linebacker
Says Dallas Cowboy scout
"Harold is one of the top
linebackers around. Based on
others of the same style and size.
it looks like he's going to be a fine
one for the pros. He has
dominated some games and
proven he can play Now. if he
only starts dominating in all
games, he's going to be a super.
Harold has the natural skills and
can run. And being able to run
probably means more in making
the pros than anything. With his
statistics and i it
means Harol
something out si
tenor,
Offt
freshi . . . . ,
ding Fri ;
since then as s . . and
junior highest grader on the
offensive line last year (68 percent
which in our grading system is
very high) most conastent of-
fensive lineman last year on a
team than ranked fifth in the
nation in rushing cffense with
296.6 yards per game, team set
new school record for most
rushing yards with 3263 one of
the four strongest players on the
team based on the bench press,
was second leading vote getter at
offenave guard in balloting last
year for all-Southern Corence
runs the 40 in 5.0.
See ALL-AMERICAS, p. 51.)
WA YNE BOL T
1977. Rozantz and Kruis were
both all-conference and honorable
mention all-America. Kruis was
also all-ECAC (East Coast Ath-
letic Conference). Cloud was
all-league as a 6-4, 240-pound
t'ght end. Fam.an was not
honored but gained over 700
yards, second behind Kruis'
1,164. Every point scored by the
Indians last year returns fa this
season.
The Indians ranked fifth in the
nation in pass defense, but were
somewhat paousagainst the run
of all-oonference defer;
�rmer Bruno Schmalhofer
key loss, but the Indians
; 'W improve against the run
The schedule seems to be the
biggest problem of the Indians.
but a win over national champion
Pitt could give possibly Wiinam
and Mary a perfect recad coming
into the Oyster Bowl. They ve
an overall tough schedule, hut
could be favaed In most all
except the Pitt qame.
"This is definitely the strong-
est team they have had. Dye
stated. "Rozantz is amply superb
at quarterback and Kruisisoneof
the best running backs m the
nation They will be extra tough
"But eveiy team will be that
way There's not a sure win on
our schedule. We'll have to 9�
fa every win "
mum





Mb
c
I
52 FOUNTAINHEAO 23 Auauat 1977
We II give you some of our green for some of your green.
Come to McDonald's! buy a buck s worth of goodies, present
your ECU student ID and we'll give you a free Spider Planffor
your room.
It's a nice way to start a new school year. With something
that II grow on you, just like we hope we have.
10th & Cotanche Streets
McDonalds
� i.
Available while supply lasts
MB�www��� n.��m





nted bone-
st season's
rtes tor two
jnsstent of-
: year on a
fifth in the
:ffense with
eteam set
J for most
263 one of
ayers on the
(nch press
Dte getter at
aJlotmg last
Conference
ZAS. p. 51.
I
�,
M,

LT
is to be the
he Indians.
jj champion
Dly William
xxd coming
They hdve
edule, but
i most all
the strong-
had, Dye
nply superb
uisisoneof
cks in the
xtra tough
Mil be that
ure win on
fight
23 Auourt t�77 FOUNT AIWHIAD P�g� M
PAT DYL and North Carolina head coach Bill Dooley take time out
before last year's game to chat with Dye's youngest son, Brett.
'T �
WmLm S jm W "1l"fr
� �f�b'
GERALD HALL returns this punt for v 70-yard
touchdown against Southern Miss in last year's
opener He was 13th in the nation in punt returns
and intercepted six passes.
ALL-AMERICA
Continued from p. 50.
����������������B
Says Coach Pat Dye: "Wayne
has shown continued improve-
ment since his freshman year.
He's an excellent athlete with
good speed. He's been a starter
for three years and is very
important in our offense in
pulling and trapping from the
guard position. We feel this is the
most important position in the
offensive line in the wishone
attack. The running backs go
right off the guard. He's an
excellent drive blocker and a good
pass protector
Gerald Hall, 5-10, 175, Junior.
Safety, Edenton, N.C Started all
of his sophomore yearhad six
interceptions for 153 yards, tying
for leader on the teamhad 26
punt returns, which tied a school
record, and returned them for 302
yards, a new school record had
one return of 70 yards for a
touchdownwas 12th in the
nation in punt returns .with 11.6
averagerecovered two tumbles
broke up four passeswas
named second team all-America
by Football Weekly fa sopho-
mores for last year's play
named all-Southern Conference
as a sophomore.
Says Coach Pat Dye. "Gerald
was the best defensive back we
had overall last year. And every-
one knows what great ones we
had in the three seniors that had
started for three years together
Each of the seniors played in
post-season all-star games
Gerald is a very smart, intelligent
player. He has exoellent quick-
ness. He may be the quickest
player I've ever seen. He offers
good help on the run. He'sa great
punt returner. After just four
games last year, people started
kicking away from Gerald. That in
turn helped our return game as
the other teams couldn't get the
distance they wanted in kicking
away from Gerald
Says Coach Bo Rein of N.C.
State University: "Gerald Hall
has excellent quickness and great
ability at his position. He can
effectively take on blockers much
bigger than he is
Ik
� y? �
n n
u o
"
FLOYD G.ROBINSON
JEWELERS
Eastern N.C. Largest Seiko Dealer
Over 200 in Stock with more on the way.
Complete Seiko Repair Department
Diamond Rings, Pendants, Watches, Earrings, and Stick Pins. If You
Already Have Your Stone We'll Remount It For You.
We at Floyd G. Robinson Jewelers Assure You of Personal Service - Where
You're A Name Not A Number - Independently Owned We Have What
Jewelry Stores Used To Have.
� 2 Full Time Watchmakers
� Complete Engraving Service (Greek Crest also)
� Remounting Done on Premises
� Jewelry Repair
� Diamonds For Any Need
� Over 500 Seiko and Timex Watches
(We also repair Timex watches)
Greenville's Exclusive Dealers fa J.O. Pollock Fraternity & Sorority Jewelry
We Carry Cells For All Electronic Watches
Floyd G. Policy- If You Come In And We Don't Have A Battery To Fit Your
Watch In Stock, We'll Get You A Battery and Give It To You FREE.
v:


.��
:
t"3 "i"3
758-2452 Bus.
756-1423 Res.
756-3667 Res.
Floyd G. Robinson
Jewelers
On the Mall
Downtown
IFITDONTTICK-TOCKTOUS
Member
1977-78
Pirate Club
HB





Title
Fountainhead, August 23, 1977
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 23, 1977
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.04.595
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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