The East Carolinian, March 31. 1988






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31,1988
�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Opinions differ about condom dispensers
By KAREN MANN
Staff Writer
Should condoms be sold in
vending machines in ECU dormi-
tories? According to Chancellor
Richard Eakin the answer is no.
"We at ECU are presently mak-
ing condoms available to all stu-
dents through the Student Health
Service. Moreover, businesses in
the community present the op-
portunity for students to pur-
chase condoms he said.
Several weeks ago, the
chancellor's AIDS Education
Subcommittee submitted ten rec-
ommendations for preventing the
spread of AIDS on campus. The
chancellor supports all except the
fourth recommendation, which
calls for the installation of con-
dom vending machines in dormi-
tories as well as Mcndenhall Stu-
dent Center and the Belk build-
ing. Supporters of this recom-
mendation claim that the ma-
chines would give students con-
venient access to condoms when
the Health Center would be
closed. Chancellor Eakin believes
that this is not a strong enough
reason to install the machines.
"A responsible adult who has a
need to purchase condoms will do
so beforehand he said. Other
recommendations from the
committee, such as selling con-
doms over the counter at the Stu-
dent Store, are already being
acted upon.
SGA legislator Ben Eckert ob-
tained a copy of the committee's
report and on March 21 intro-
duced a resolution to the SGA
calling for support of all ten rec-
ommenda tions.
"I was aware that the Chancel-
lor had seen the resolution and
didn't support that part he said.
"I hope he understands there is
much student support for this but
I realize his right to veto
Eckert claimed that condoms
can be sold in vending machines
in a tasteful manner. 'This
wouldn't be like the stereotype of
the old rest room condom ma-
chine. I wouldn't support some-
thing like that
Legislator Allen Manning, who
argued against the fourth pro-
posal to the SGA, disagrees with
this point.
"As far as a tasteful environ-
ment, the seller isn't discriminat-
ing against who sees it. In a dorm
lobby everyone, including par-
ents and children will see it.
SGA candidates restate their views
TIM HAMPTON
Assistant News Editor
As the April 6 run off elections
for SGA president and vice presi-
dent approach, the candidates are
reiterating their individual stands
on issues racing the futureof ECU.
On the ballot are presidential
candidates, Larry Murphy and
Greg Thompson, and vice presi-
dential candidates, Steve Som-
mers and Kelly Jones.
In interviews this week, the
candidates were asked to re-
sponse on four campus issues,
dorm renters rights, the parking
problem, the work petition pro-
gram and Pirate Walk. Here are
their responses to the issues:
Dorm renters' rights
MurphyDorms are like apart-
ments. I think when it comes to a
dorm situtation, it is the renter's
room and their rights should not
be violated. Forty eight percent of
ECU students live in the dormito-
ries and their rights should be
protected
ThompsonBeing an resident
advisor, I know that it is out of our
jurisdiction to change the laws
because dorms are state owned
property. It is policy handed
down bv the state.
I am not aware of RAs abusing
the use of the master key, but 1
don't think you should search a
room without cause.
SommersThe resident advi-
sors are getting caught in the
middle of all this. They are actu-
ally making refrigerator checks
for alcohol. During my campaign,
I have heard at least 50 stories of
people's rights being violated.
It is not the RAs at fault, it is the
people putting the heat on the
RAs. Why on this campus do we
leave the constitution at the door?
There needs to be a change in
policy
Tones- "First of all, I don't think
the rights are being violated as
much as Steve says they are. 1
called Campus Security and they
said that the only reason they
could enter a dorm room would
be for illegal substances. Before
they can search the room, they
must get premission from the
people.
I see no reason to take awav the
master keys from the RAs because
it is a safety precaution. If I were
getting raped in my dorm room, I
would expect the RA to open the
room
Parking
MurphyEven though the
parking plan has already been
decided on, I think we should
building up and not building out.
Maybe we should think about
building a parking deck at the
bottom of college hill. I would try
to push for a 1,200 space deck.
The Minges parking lot should
be for freshmen and the existing
freshmen lot across from Rose
High should be open for commut-
ers. The lots at Belk Allied Health
should be used for commuters
with a shuttle system running
every five minutes.
Thompson propose an op-
tion to commuters, either buy a
parking sticker and park on cam-
pus or park for free at Belk Allied
Health and catch a shuttle to
campus.
Offering the option would give
commuters incentive to park
awav from campus. I propose a
shuttle to run every ten minutes
SommcrsMy parking plan
has four parts, 1) New lines for
compact cars. 2) Carpool-have to
have more than one person in the
car to park on campus. 3) Proity
parking-for those students who
don't want to carpool make a lot
for them with a higher priced
sticker. Maybe $75 to $80. 4)
Shuttle bus-for commuters who
can't carpool. A quick ten minute
shuttle from Minges, Allied
Health and the Willis Building
lones sit on the TrafficPark-
ing Committee, so I have seen
most of the problems come
through. We need to work on the
reallocation of parking spaces for
everybody. We need to work on
the lot on the bottom of the hill.
We don't need to build anymore
lots, but more reallocation needs
to be done
Pirate Walk
MurphyIt is very important
ot rejuvinate this program for the
safety of the girls on campus
which compose of 55 percent of
the population. We need to think
about possibly extending the
hours the service is provided and
extend the radius of the walkers
beyond the 5th and 10th street
barriers.
We need more advertisement
about Pirate Walk and we need to
get the head RAs of the dorms to
inform the girls that the service is
available for them. The most
important part about Pirate Walk
is communicating to the females
on campus about the escort serv-
ice
ThompsonWe need to incor-
porate Pirate Walk with public
safety. Emphasis needs to be
placed on Pirate Walk to make it a
more stable program.
I propose to make a work study
See CANDIDATES, page 4
You're really cloaking conven-
ience with the AIDS scare Man-
ning argued that installing con-
dom machines would bring un-
wanted media coverage to the
university and that the condoms
sold would be of questionable
quality. Yet, Manning admitted
that many ECU students support
this legislation.
Mary-Elesha Adams, family
practitioner at the Student Health "
Center and a member of the
chancellor's subcommittee, ad-
mits that Thorpe Vending Com-
pany would choose the condoms
to sell. However the Health Cen-
ter is compiling a brochure en-
titled "Use Good Condom Sense"
which lists characteristics to look
for in a condom. The Health
Center also sells packets of twelve
condoms for two dollars. Still,
Adams agrees with resolution
four.
"We hope that people would
plan ahead but in reality we know
that's not always the case she
said.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for Student Life, raises a new �
point.
"It's an admirable idea, but I
think we need to further think
through the problem of vandal-
ism. Also, will the public really
accept this?" Meyer believes that
the University should see how
successfully condoms sell in the
Student Store before adding them
to vending machines.
"Most of the other major uni-
versities in the Southeast sell con-
doms in their student stores but
they don't have them in the
dorms
Edwards, others, sentenced
Theodore "Blue" Edwards, sus-
pended this year from the ECU
basketball squad for disciplinary
reasons, was sentenced Monday
to a three-year suspended sen-
tence and five years of supervised
probation for his part in a series of
Scott dormitory break-ins in De-
cember of 1986.
The sentencing by Superior
Court Judge David Reid Jr. came
after Edwards' entered a plea of
no contest to one count of receiv-
ing stolen property as part of a
plea bargain. He had originaly
been charged with three counts of
breaking and entering. A no con-
test plea is not an admission of
guilt but rather an agreement not
to contest the charges. -
Three former ECU basketball
players, Howard Brown, Tracy
King and John Williams were also
sentenced Monday.
Brown, now a student at Mis-
souri Valley College, was sen-
tenced to 90 days in jail and must
remain on supervised probation
for five years. Brown pleaded
guilty in November to two counts
of breaking and entering. He was
also involved in another, earlier,
dormitory break-in. His jail term
will begin the first Monday after
his last day of classes this
semester.
King, who pleaded no contest to
two counts of receiving stolen
property, received a three-year
suspended sentence, five years of
probation and 72 hours of com-
munity service as his punish-
ment.
Williams pleaded guilty in
November to two countsof break-
ing and entering. He received a
four-year suspended sentence,
five years of supervised proba-
tion and 72 hours of community
service Monday.
Each defendant must also make
restitution based on the value of
the items taken in the particular
break-ins in which they were in-
volved.
11
y ,
i
LARRY MURPHY
GREG THOMPSON
KELLY JONES
STEVE SOMMERS
Chancellor's inauguration upcoming
By JEANIE WHEBY
Staff Writer
The inauguration of Chancellor
Richard R. Eakin will be held
April 15 at 11 a.m. in Wright
Auditorium. Many events have
been planned in his honor.
Eakin has been serving as chan-
cellor since March, 1987. He chose
to wait and have his inauguration
in April of the following year
however, because he feels that
both ECU and Grenville are at
their best in the spring. According
to Richard Edwards, the supervi-
sor of the inaugral events, "Chan-
cellor Eakin believes that atten-
tion should be focused on the
school instead of him; these
events should celebrate the life of
the University
The inaugral planning commit-
tee, chaired by Max R. Joyner Sr.
and made up of faculty, staff,
alumni, and students, has been
meeting since early November
and has planned many events.
Although the committee has
mailed approximately 3,000 in-
vitations, the general public is
able to attend several of the events
including a concert, an inaugral
symposium and the actual inaug-
ral ceremony.
The inaugral events begin April
14th with a concert in Wright
Auditorium. The East Carolina
University Choir and Orchastra
with special gut sts will perform
Bach's Passion According to St.
John. The concert begins at 8 p.m.
The inauguration ceremony
will be conducted the following
day and will also be held in
Wright Auditorium. The cere-
mony begins at 11 a.m. and is
predicted to last until 12:15 p.m.
Although the public can attend
the ceremony, the Planning
Committee requests that one calls
in advance for a complimentary
ticket so that they may estimate
the number that will attend. The
committee's phone number is
757-6105.
Speakers at the ceremony in-
clude Thomas Bennett, chairman
of the Board of Trustees, Edward
E. Carter, mayor of Greenville,
and James G. Martin, Governor of
North Carolina.
There will be a reception and
lucheon following the ceremony
that is closed for guests and
friends. The luncheon is spon-
sored by the Student Government
Association, and Scott Thomas,
SGA president, will be host.
To end the events, there will be
an inaugral symposium is Hen-
drix Theater at 230 p.m. the same
day. This is open to the public .
The topic is Leadership and Ethics �
and the principal speaker is Dr. ;
Ronald Roskens, president of the j
University of Nebraska.
Foundation protects environment,
starting new chapter at ECU
Filled with
(Hardy Alligood
during the day, the new building has more peaceful moments through the night
Photolab)
Most people do not realize the
importance of the Tar River, but
the Greenville chapter of The
Pamlico-Tar River wants to
change that.
The Pamlico Tar River Founda-
tion (PTFR) is a non profit tax-
exempt organization whose pur-
pose is to promote and protect the
natural resources and water qual-
ity of the Pamlico and Tar River.
According to Becky Leach,
member of the group, "The PTRF
is a group of members who are
concerned with the water quality
issues that concern both rivers
Leach said the PTRF serves as a
watchdog for the rivers. It keeps
track of all permits and public
meetings of all permits and public
meetings pertaining to the river.
Leach said the waters of both
rivers are now turbid and murky
and the PTRF wants to aid in pers-
erving the waters.
The Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) is now in the proc-
ess of studying the rivers and how
to improve the water quality.
The PTRF hopes to establish a
sub group on campus by meeting
with prospective members inter-
ested in the environmental issues
that effect the river.
The object of this meeting is to
introduce the campus commu- :
nity to the organization. Water i
quality issues that the PTRF is :
involved with will be discussed !
and Rusty Gaul will present a jj
slide show on the PTRF she said. :
Gaul, an ECU graduate, serves on I
the PTRF Education committee.
This committee is busy organ
izing an "All Species Day" 3
planned for April 23rd. Many of :
ECU'S faculty are already in- S
volved in PTRF. The meeting to I
establish a subgroup of PTRF will
be held April 12 at 7 p.m. Hi the
Biology Building Room 10N j
and is open to anyone interested
in attending.
Colleg
(CPS) � The school that pi
neered one of the now-sundardl
experiments in helping parent;
prepay tuition years before then
children get to college ha
dropped the idea.
Just weeks after the Reagai
administration asked Congress tc
adopt a similar plan for the whole
country, Duquesne University lr
Pittsburgh announced March 2 i
was suspending its landmark
prepaid tuition plan.
"The economy has changed
drastically that we have to re
evaluate the program to makt
certain it's a good venture sau
Duquesne spokeswoman Am
Rago.
Duquesne attracted nationaj
IRS dect
grad studi
WASHINGTON, DC. (CPS)
Grad students around the counj
try got a reprieve from the Intel
nal Revenue Service March 10. j
The IRS said it was going H
delay prosecuting 17,000 gra
students who allegedly had no
paid taxes on the campus stipend!
they got for working as teachin
assistants or research aides n
1984 and 1985.
Responding to nationwide
complaints, IRS Commissionej
Lawrence B. Gibbs announced
March 10 that his agency wal
going to suspend its efforts to ta
the stipends until it creates
"national policy" on the matter
The tax reform act of 1986 n
quired, for the first time ever, the
Sports Me
ECU News Bureau
A two-day Sports Medicii
Conference for athletic trainci
coaches and team physicians wi
be held April 15-16 at East Car
Una University.
The conference will place s
cial emphasis on the treatme
and careof arm and shoulder inj
ries. Some other topics will i
elude AIDS and the athlet
trainer, abdominal injuries, ai
kidnev and urinary tract pro
lems in athletics.
Rod Compton, ECU director
Sports Medicine, said the prj
gram is designed to provide nej
essary skills and techniques rj
developing a systematic prograj
of prevention, treatment and
habilitation of athletic injuries
CONTAi
ATTIC
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CoMedY
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immiwum iwl1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31.1988
in
isers
re rcalK cloaking eonven- ,
th the AIDS scare Man-
gued that installing con-
ies would bring un-
ted media coverage to the -l
: and that the condoms
A be ot questionable
t et Manning admitted
students support
on
sha Adams, family I
ner at the Student Health '
ter and a member of the
- subcommittee, ad-
: Thorpe Vending Com-
. choose the condoms j
sever the Health Cen-
mpiling a brochure en-
ood Condom Sense" .
t lists characteristics to look ,
a condom. The Health
- packets of twelve
for two dollars. Still,
grees with resolution
v that people would
but in reality we know
always the case she
lever, vice chancellor
lent Life, raises a new
tdmirable idea, but I
e need to further think
the problem oi vandal-
will the public really
Mever believes that
versity should see how
fully condoms sell in the
cent Store before adding them
g machines.
" the other major uni-
- m the Southeast sell con-
i in their student stores but
n't have them in the
0�
?k
i
College drops pre-paid tuition
(CPS) � The school that pio-
neered one of the now-standard
experiments in helping parents
prepay tuition years before their
children get to college has
dropped the idea.
Just weeks after the Reagan
administration asked Congress to
adopt a similar plan for the whole
country, Duquesne University in
Pittsburgh announced March 2 it
was suspending its landmark
prepaid tuition plan.
"The economy has changed so
drastically that we have to re-
evaluate the program to make
certain it's a good venture said
Duquesne spokeswoman Ann
Rago.
Duquesne attracted national
i
1
3
z
STEVE SOMMERS
Ipcoming
Speakers at the ceremony in- .
ude Thomas Bennett, chairman
the Board of Trustees, Edward
Carter, mayor of Greenville,
amesC. Martin, Governor of
h Carolina.
"here will be a reception and
cheon following the ceremony
iat is closed for guests and
lends. The luncheon is spon-
red by the Student Government
association, and Scott Thomas,
IA president, will be host.
To end the events, there will be
inaugral symposium is Hen-
Inx Theater at 230 p.m. the same
ay. This is open to the public .
le topic is Leadership and Ethics
nd the principal speaker is Dr.
tonald Roskens, president of the
University of Nebraska.
onment,
U !
itroduce the campus commu-
lity to the organization. Water
juality issues that the PTRF is
ivolved with will be discussed
ind Rusty Gaul will present a
fhde show on the PTRF she said,
lul, an ECU graduate, serves on
he PTRF Education committee.
This committee is busy organ-
izing an "All Species Day"
lanned for April 23rd. Many of
�CU's faculty are already in-
volved in PTRF. The meeting to
OaWish a subgroup of PTRF will
held Apnl 12 at 7 p.m. �n the
Jiology Building Room 10N
" is open to anyone interested
attending.
attention in 1985 when it initiated
its program that enabled parents
to pay it a fixed amount that, by
the time their children grew to
college age, would cover 4 years
of tuition at the school.
"We have been on the cutting
edge by starting this program
Rago said. "Now we will be on the
cutting edge in reevaluating it
At the end of February, more-
over, the National Governor's
Association cautioned the federal
government against adopting
similar plans that would "pre-
empt" state pre-paid tuition ef-
forts that have already been
adopted or are under considera-
tion.
The governors also stated their
concern that the federal govern-
ment would use a tuition savings
plan as r.n. excuse to reduce stu-
dent loan and grant programs.
Officials in many states also are
anxiously waiting for the Internal
Revenue Service to rule on the tax
status of pre-paid tuition plans
before proceeding with their own.
Duquesne officials said they
were stopping their program be-
cause the bonds they'd invested
in to help pay for it were not
earning as much as they had an-
ticipated, and because they had to
raise tuition much faster than they
had planned.
As a result, their investments
would not return enough money
to pay the tuition of the children
IRS decides to not prosecute
grad students who misfiled
WASHINGTON, D.C. VCPS) �
Grad students around the coun-
try got a reprieve from the Inter-
nal Revenue Service March 10.
The IRS said it was going to
delay prosecuting 17,000 grad
students who allegedly had not
paid taxes on the campus stipends
they got for working as teaching
assistants or research aides in
1984 and 1985.
Responding to nationwide
complaints, IRS Commissioner
Lawrence B. Gibbs announced
March 10 that his agency was
going to suspend its efforts to tax
the stipends until it creates a
"national policy" on the matter.
The tax reform act of 1986 re-
quired, for the first time ever, that
grad students pay taxes on any
stipends they got over and above
the cost of their tuitions. It also
made stipends paid in 1984 and
1985 � years before the tax re-
form law � subject to taxes.
About 17,000 grad students got
IRS letters in recent weeks, warn-
ing them to pay taxes or face
prosecution.
IRS spokeman Steve Pyrek at-
tributed the letters to normal,
computerized procedures.
Campuses automatically report
the stipends they pay grad stu-
dents to the IRS, whose comput-
ers, treating the money as taxable
income, automatically produced
and sebt the threatening letters,
Pvred said.
"To be hounding these young
people who are living on meager
incomes is ludicrous fumed
University of Alabama graduate
studies Dean William MacMillan
upon hearing complaints from
grad students.
At Indiana University's gradu-
ate studies office, "I had a student
in my office in tears because whe
got a student loan and had to pay
it over right away to the IRS
Sheila Cooper told the Associated
Press.
Alter several members of Con-
gress also complained, IRS
Commissioner Gibbs announced
the IRS would give up chasing
down crad students at least until
the end of March.
Sports Medicine conference held
ECU News Bureau
A two-day Sports Medicine
Conference for athletic trainers,
coaches and team physicians will
be held April 15-16 at East Caro-
lina University.
The conference will place spe-
cial emphasis on the treatment
and care of arm and shoulder inju-
ries. Some other topics will in-
clude AIDS and the athletic
trainer, abdominal injuries, and
kidney and urinary tract prob-
lems in athletics.
Rod Compton, ECU director of
Sports Medicine, said the pro-
gram is designed to provide nec-
essary skills and techniques for
developing a systematic program
of prevention, treatment and re-
habilitation of athletic injuries.
He said the program will pro-
vide instruction for certified ath-
letic trainers, teacher-trainers,
coaches, student trainers and
team physicians in schools with
or without a sports medicine pro-
gram.
Members of the conference sta ii
include Compton, Karen Baker
and Greg Beres of the Sports
Medicine Division. In addition
presentations will be made by
medical doctors Edwin Bartlett,
James Bowman, James Carter,
James McCallum, Denis McGilli-
cuddy and Emmctt Walsh. Phillip
Callicutt from the Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center will
discuss AIDS and the athletic
trainer and Robbie Lester of the
N.C. Department of Public In-
struction will present information
about sports medicine in North
Carolina.
Friday and Saturday sessions
will be held in the Carol G. Belk
(Allied Health) Building from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Some
other activities include a tour of
the National Athletic Trainers
Association national office, a tour
of the ECU sports medicine facili-
ties and an eastern North Carolina
style pig pickin.
Tuition for the conference is
$50. For information and to regis-
ter contact the ECU Division of
Continuing Education,
Greenville, N.C. 27858-4353 or
call 919-757-6143. The registration
deadline is April 1.
when they tinally get to
Duquesne.
The 662 families already en-
rolled in the program will not be
afected, Said Rago.
Governors, legislatures and
private college officials around
the country have been weighing
variations of the Duquesne plan,
which lets parents pay a lump
sum that would � after being
properly invested by the school or
the state � grow into enough
money to pay for 4 years of college
by the time the student gets to
college age.
Michigan, for one, already has
adopted such a plan, but is still
waiting for the IRS to rule on its
tax status.
The IRS is to decide if it will tax
the plan the same way it taxes
other investment gains.
If the IRS decides to treat a tui-
tion investment the same way it
taxes all other investments, some
critics say the plan will provide
too little incentive to participate.
Other states are postponing estab-
lishing such programs until the
IRS reaches a decision on the
Michigan program.
The Reagan administration also
had proposed a plan to give tax
breaks to parents who buy sav-
ings bonds for their children's
tuition.
While the National Governor's
Association did not object to the
Reagan proposal, spokeswoman
Emily Yaung said the governors
wanted to "set some parameters
for federal action" when they
asked the administration not to
upset other state savings plans
now being debated.
Still others think the plans, like
Duquesne's would be destined to
go broke, and require states to bail
them out.
"What you may be doing said
Aims McGuiness of the Educa-
tion Commission of the States, "is
shifting the burden of education
from the next generation of stu-
dents through loans to the next
generation of governors through
state subsidies
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Wednesday. April 6th
Poll Locations
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Croat on and Mendenhall
ADMISSION
$2.00 29th & 30th
$3.00 31st
ECU Students (with ID)
$1.00 Off Regular Admission
Group Tickets Available
Call 757-3042
i3th TlfC
ANNUAL I IXC
BOXING
TOURNAMENT
FOR ST. JUDE'S CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL
MINGES COLISEUM
East Carolina Univ.
Thursday, March 31 at 7:30 p.m.
Great
Taste.
Filling
Bring Valid Student I.D. with Activity Card
by tht MHIer Brtwing Conanv. MMmmjMc. � 01-718W
aMMM"





Tl IE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31. 1088
Causes become hip again for
(CPS)� Causes are hip again.
But not if vou are have to wear
love beads.
The new volunteers are swarm-
ing to help the less fortunate at a
startling rate. Perhaps more star-
tling is their origin. These are not
particularly socially conscious
individuals raised ona kebbutz or
a commune These are people liv-
ing in high-rises and driving "cars
that cost twice what most of us
will be paid our first year out of
college. These people are busy.
Thev have money toearn, coffee
Ivans to grind and brunches to
eat.
Yuppies are volunteering, it's
the latest thing.
Good for them Right? What
could be be better than people
with time, money and copassion
to give? People who actually give
it.
As one volunteer put it, volun-
teering "makes me feel lucky.
When 1 go home and see what 1
have, it all means so much more
Huh?
"There are so manv social prob-
lems and so few ways to address
them notes another, adding that
volunteering "makes vou feel less
guilty
Shirlev Keller, vice president
oi Workplace Programs for Vol-
unteers, spectulates this sudden
increase in voluntarism is, in part,
due to the need for secuntv. Indi-
viduals feel that if thev look after
someone now, someone will look
after them later. Probably whHe
their friends and children are
boating.
Mike King, executive VP of the
organization, has a different the-
ory.
"Why are they there? To meet
other yuppies. It's better than a
singles bar
The newest trend, the compas-
sion kick, is receiving more pub-
licity every day. Tutors. Hospital
volunteers, soup-kitchen work-
ers. Volunteering is a lot less fun
than squash, but it beats aerobics
any day.
The upward mobile are anzious
to help. It sounds so good. It only
takes a few hours a week.
Candidates discuss salvaging Pirate
Walk and work petitions for '8889
Continued from page 2
program tor Pirate Walk in which
SO percent of the wages would be
made by state funding. The other
20 percent could come from pub-
lic safety or the SGA
Sommers- The need tor Pirate
Walk needs to be recognized.
There has been three rapes and
two attempted rapes since spring
break that I know of. The engine of
Pirate Walk is there it just needs
oil and spark plugs.
We need consultation with
women's groups on campus to
find ways to run the service more
effectively
Jones I have done a lot oi work
with Captain knox on Pirate
Walk. By using auxiliary campus
Korea, Summer Olympics
topics of ECU symposium
tCL New Burau
Korea, the host country for the
1988 Summer Olympic Games.
will be the topic for a symposium,
April 7, at East Carolina Univer-
sity.
lop oi the U.S. State Department
on "The United States and the
Two Koreas in Transition"
All presentations are free and
open to the public.
Prior to joining the School oi
"lie 14th Symposium on Asia Foreign Service at Georgetown
The Far Fast in Transition: Focus
on Korea" will begin at 2 p.m. in
Room 1032 of the New Classroom
Building. At 7:30 p.m. rOr. Donald
McDonald of the School of For-
eign Service at Georgetown Uni-
versity will deliver the keynote
presentation in Room 1031 of the
Now Classroom Bunding.
University, McDonald was direc-
tor of the Office oi Intelligence
Coordination in the U.S. Depart-
ment of State and was an interna-
tional relations officer in Korea.
He has lectured and written
extensively on Korean affairs.
Park is a professor of Political
Science at the University of Geor-
. gia. He writes and lectures on
McDonald, a research professor human rights and Asian politics
of Korea studies, will discuss
South Korea: The Future oi
Democracy
Afternoon presentations begin-
ning at 2 p.m. include "Security
for the Olympiad and Inter-Korea
Relations bv Dr. Han Shick Park
of the University oi Georgia. He
will be followed bv Thomas Dun-
artd is involved in reuniting sepa-
rated Korean families.
Dunlop is director of the Office
of Korean Affairs with the U.S.
Department oi State.
For more information about the
symposium contact the ECU of-
fice oi International Studies and
Scholarships at 757-�7bQ.
Institutes offered for teachers
T.CX oi Bureau
Five math and science institutes
for middle grade school teachers
will be held this summer at East
Carolina University.
Sponsored by the ECU Science
and Mathematics Education Cen-
ter, the institutes provide special
studv for teachers who wish to
become certified, renew their cer-
tificates or update their skills in
science and mathematics.
The institutes include: Field
Geology, June 20-July 8; Founda-
tional Approaches to Science
Teaching, first session June 20-
luly 1, second session July 11-22;
Math 5268 - Logo: A Computer
Language for Educators, June 23-
luly 12;and Applied Mathematics
for Educators, July 18-29.
Students win
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) �
The 2,200 hearing-impaired stu-
dents at Gallaudet College got
their wish March 31 when their
trustees appointed a deaf person
as the school's new president.
Students had been rallying for a
deaf candidate ever since March
1, when the trustees announced
they would soon appoint a suc-
cessor to Jerry C. Lee, who re-
signed Jan. 1. They then shut
down the school the week of
March 7 when the Board of Trus-
tees named University of North
Carolina at Greensboro adminis-
trator Elisabeth Zinser as the new
president.
Zinser could hear, did not know
sign language, and ultimately
resigned March 11 before she ever
took office.
Two days later, the trustees
named L King Jordan, 45, as presi-
Jordan, who is deaf, had been
Gallaudefs dean of Arts and Sci-
ences
"It's great said tudent Paul
Singleton.
There is no charge for the
courses and participants may be
paid $35 a day.
security officers tor the service,
the officers could practice law
enforcement and the walkers
would have sit around.
Advertisement about Pirate
Walk would be well worth the
monev. Through ads the girls
would know that the service is
there for them
The Work Petition Program
Murphy think the best alter-
native would be to do more check-
ing on empolyers oi the students
who sav thev work. Handicaps
and athletes have to have this
program. If elected I would try my
txst during the summer to try to
get the program back
ThompsonLast year the ad-
minstration did not monitor the
program sufficiently. By closely
monitoring the program so that it
wouldn't be abused, 1 think the
program could work. We should
limit the program for the students
who definitely have a time con-
flict with their work
SommersIt is ridicules to
think just because a small percent-
age oi students abuse the system
that it should be scraped. If that is
our criterion than wer have to get
rid of the American justice sys-
tem.
There is such a need for the
program. Trying to balance an
academic schedule working
schedule is hard enough so why-
make it harder
lonesi would reinstate the
system. I would make sure that
more indept forms are used be-
cause people abuse the system. 1
was talking to Dr. Davis in aca-
demic affairs who has a lot oi
good ideas on it.
They should run a through
check on the work places. 1 think if
I were a working student, I
wouldn't mind filling out the
addition forms
However, as a friend of mine
noted, "Um, I don't mean to cut it
down, but I think volunteering
has been around for quite a while.
It's nothing new
She's right. I have an aunt in
Washington, D.C, who, wvery
holiday season, stays there. Her
mother lives in Chicago, as does
the rest of the family, but my aunt
stays to deliver Christmas dinner
to shut�ins. My aunt is no saint,
but I do admire her for this. She
genuinely wants to help someone.
She does not do to for the sole
benefit of making herself feel less
guilty for owning a Cuisinart.
In many cases, a lot of the moti-
vation is positive publicity. Com-
panies that sponsor volunteer
programs look good in the eyes of
everyone but the stockholders. It
bothers investors to think that
their money may be poured into a
company that is not putting all its
effort into making more cash.
Some companies, most notably
Atlantic Richfield Company,
were forced to downplay volun-
teer expenditures when the com-
pany was not as profitable as it
had been the previous year. Help-
ing the less fortunate has its mer-
its, but shareholders have their
good points too.
There's something wrong with
LOU' COST
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
Abortions from 13 to 18 weeks at additional coat. Pregnancy
Teat. Birth Control, and Problem Pregnancy Counseling, For
further information, call 832-OS35 (toll free number 1-800-
532-5384) between 9a.m. and 5 p.m. weekday's. Genenl anes-
thesia avaUabW.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
FLIGHT ATTENDANTS
wyourcar
has
The raptd expansion of our fleet - already one of the largest in the skies
created new openings for flight attendants
If you re about to start a career or want to make a career switch or if you're
interested in returning to the work force we welcome your application What
we have to offer is nothing less than an exciting and rewarding future with an
airline that's first in the air and second to none on the ground
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
Friendly, outgoing personality
with nest, well-groomed
appearance.
Willinq and able to relocate.
you must be a U.S. citizen or
lawfully permitted to work
in the U.S.
High school diploma or GED
D Height: 5 1H'to SO" without
shoes. Weight in proportion to
D Age: 20 years minimum.
? Vision: 2050 minimum (each
aye). Corrective lenses atxwfstsbie.
Two years college or two years public
contact experience preferred Fluency
in a second language desired
If interested, please send a self addressed,
business size envelope for an
application and career information to.
American Airlines, Inc.
Flight Service Recruitment
P.O. Box 619410. Mail Drop 90S
DFW Airport. TX 75261-9410
ATTN: Dept SECU33188
AmericanAirlines
Ar equa opoorturtfy employer
this whole rationale.
Volutecring, 1 always thought,
was something one might do
with one's extra time because
there was a need to be filled. The
needy take the form of homeless
individuas, children with reading
problems or senior citizens
unable to pick up their own gro-
ceries. It could take the form of
terminally ill kids.
This need, until now, had not
manifested itself as a need to
purge oneself of guilt or meet
others who share that guilty in
hopes of diffusing it.
We can only hope that the ends
do indeed justify the means. Even
if the helping is done for the
wrong reasons, there remains the
potential for an important learn-
ing experience.
Personal interaction with
people in need can only raise
conscousness, making individu
als with the power a ware of what
needs to be done. After the trendi
ness of the whole concept wears
off, maybe there will remain a
core of concerned people with the
means to do a lot oi good.
It would be a shame if the cause
became old news and was re
placed by another diversion.
Read
The
East
Carolinian
ATTENTION STUDENTS!
For Your Summer Storage Needs
Call
Economy Mini-Storage
757-0373
300 Farmer's St.
Greenville, NC 27834
Discount To All Students
P IVANTED
.t ON IV Ma
i

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
YOUR FIRST STEP TOWARD SUCCESS IS THE ONE
YOU COULD TAKE THIS SUMMER.
rKl MMi
At Army ROTC Camp Challenge, you'll
learn what it takes to succeed - m college
arid in life You'll build self-confidence and
develop your leadership potential Plus you
can also qualify to earn ar, Army Officer's
commission when you graduate
Army ROTC Camp Challenge It may be
just what you need to reach the top
,T .XT. .
ARMY ROTC
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE YOU CAN TAKE.
For More Information Contact: Captain Steve L. Jones - Erwin Hall
757-6967
v
INSTORE WAREHOUSE SALE
ii�g�iigpjy
BONUS
17.99
4 DAYS ONLY � THURS-FRI-SAT & MON -LAST DAY EASTER MONDAY
YOUR
CHOICE
SoW Brass
Wail Swingers
$75 value
Bnte Brass
Mmi Beanpot
$60 value '4 �ig�
WALL MIRRORS
YOUR CHOICE
$79
36x36
$200 value
o
34x36
$260 value
tlUfttit.iiTTtiiitli.vyy
BONUS
Crystal Platters
YOUR
CHOICE
Divided
Rehsh Trays $30 value
BONUS
Solid Brass
Firetool Sets
29.99
SHELBY SOFA SLEEPERS
$500 value
�00 Colon
� Novv � G'ev
� Block � Notuioi
rsorw hjOnc
� 2 Molding Pillow
� Myjhc G�� . ,
� Opens �o o ui Size S�eeoH
$199
�eoin� kxjcn foooc $700 value
� Mou�� � Bioc�
� Almond � Gwy $299
BONUS
$120 value
29.99
Br'te Brass
Fan Pieated
Torchiers
63 nigh
BONUS
$120 value
39.99
ft
Bme Brass
4 ght
Floor Lamps
52 nigh
FUTONS-N-FRAMES
� mm Conor' go
Pun Sue futons
� '5 0( Sc os � Nt reKjoei p-
$200 value
2 Position
Futon Frames
� �� Side Arms
$500 value
Light Natural Color Hardwood
BONUS
So�d Brass
Ptano-N-Desk Lamps
YOUR CHOICE
29.99
Solid Color
Torches .
si jg
$100
value
� Biacn
� Grey
� Sand
� White
� Navy
� Maove
Solid Brass
Table Lamps
YOUR CHOICE
49.99
BONUS 0Q0
$00 vaiue oy.yy
100�� Z " ,
� . hairs
- �
JACK-N-JILL
BOOKSHELVES
49.99
34.99
vVhile Me:Qmn finish
Ceramic or Glass
Table Lamps
YOUR CHOICE
19.99
value $100 value
L &J �
- :
3EHHBEHC
PLUS MUCH MUCH MORE!
Ail Stores Open Nightly & Sundays
'Except Cameron Village
'Cameron Village Open Friday Till 9
RALEIGH
� Cameron Village & North ridge
�iiim.

0NQ SBWSBUr
DURHAM � Northgate Mall GREENVILLE � The Plazal
rBAl I 'iHRN
iR,v- oy


H.wi G! LPI�
Rean
-
mg v.
JCtl " rrli
Whini n P 8 RAF
Registrar) �� for fa ttamural
Recreation
held from Ma en 2 I Apr! 5 Th
meeting wili bo nel i on pi
Activity dato are Torn A; I
more into call 7
The Sculptured nip of EC J
student exhibition of current wi.rl
former kxarjon of Blount'� ded
store on the corner of 4th and t
downtown. K ar -h 29-Apnl 1Q





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31,1988 5
others
'ersoital interaction with
ople in neod can only raise
nscousness, making individu-
w ith the power aware of what
�d to be done. After the trendi-
- oi the whole concept wears
maybe there will remain a
re ot concerned people with the
�arts to do a lot ot good.
v ould bo a shame if the cause
:ame old news and was re-
a ed b another diversion.
tead
he
East
Carolinian
UDENTS!
. e Needs
ii-Storage
G CORPS
5&
x�Ns-

Af m
THE ONE
ones - Erwin Hall
757-6967
SALE
iTER MONDAY
IIIMIIITTTTTIISW
I
r
BONUS -000
$ioo votue oy.yy
V
m
JACK-N-jILL
BOOKSHELVES
49.99
34.99
f v- Me mme Pmun
-eramtc or Glass
Table Lamps
YOUR CHOICE
fgr
-� �u� si�o
� ice r
00 -oiue
GREENVILLE � The Plaza


Classifieds
HELP WANTED
3E ON TV: Many needed for commer
culs. C ashng info (1) 805-687-6000 Ext
TV-U66
CAMP Sea GullSeafarer need food serv-
ice counselors Cn coast of N.C. Room
and board included. Coif, tennis, etc.
av lUable. No experience required. Must
be hard working and have excellent ref
erences. Min. age 17. Contact Beth McMil-
lan. P.O. Box 10976, Raleigh, N.C, 27605
- 12 6691.
WORK AT BEACH; have a ball! Coastal
staui mt needs summer cooks bartcn-
and waits. Above average pay and
benefits. Full rime schedules
avai April week end schedules
ivailable now Contact Papagayo in At-
lantic Beach, 919 247-7876 between 2
ivmS pro Wed Sun. Ask for Mary or
Kevin.
HELP WANTED Part-time interior de
tudent send resume to: Designer,
: 1st 10th Street. Greenville, N.C.
IJTRA
Need 1 summer job at the beach?
Looking for excellent pay, benefits,
and flexible hours
Then apply at the Food Lion store
located in Market Place (Southern
Shores), or US. 158 By Pass (Nags
! lead), 01 at your placement office.
v for therm st progressive and
rocery ihin in the United
States Food Lion, inc
iti mis available in all
departments ith various shifts.
Apply at vour convenience and
secure your summer job NOW!
Remember if vou are going to be
� rre the jetion is in Nags Head,
trolina, then you will also
war t to be working for the best -
FOOD LION.
Equal Opportunity
Employer
SERVICES OFFERED
TOP QUALITY typing, $150 per page.
Resume, $15.00 caU oy at 758-7423, call
from 6-9 p.m.
PARTY ANIMALS BaHJtodtiivcj;e
in costume' Con!largrap. Gator �rarns.
Penguin too" Male sttip"pe"Fsf Birthdays,
ect. Call 830-1823.
CARS WAXED: Student washes, pol-
ishes and waxes cars. Good job, good
price-S25.00 Call 752-2839.
SOUND MIXTURES DJ SERVICE has
the music to move the crowd (onto the
dancefloor, not out the door!) The right
songs, the right timing, the right mix. For
�od time, call 72-4916, Bob.
TYPING AND WORD PROCESSING.
Letter Qualityt Laser Printing. Rush jobs
accepted. Designer Type. 752-1933.
AIRBRUSH ARTWORKS-got a rad idea
and want it on a T-shirt? Hot colors and
artwork reproduced with airbrush art-
work! T-shirt, sweatshirts, banners.
Handpainted one of a kind art work
(won't wash out). Professionally air-
brushing 1980-88. Recently came up from
Daytona, Fla. Paul 1U1L 752-0607.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24
hours in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand writted pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106 East
5th Street (beside Cubbies) Greenville,
N.C, 752-3694.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1982 Ponbax phoenix, two
tone, five door, AC, bucket seats, rear
window defroster, 125,000 miles, good
condition Call 758-4779, ask for Dan.
1983 HONDA 650 Nighthawk, less than
8,000 miles, good condition. 4 valve, 6
speed, shaftdrive, $1,000. Call Mark at
752-3133 after 6:00 p.m.
FURNITURE: Matching loveseat, chair,
and footstool. Excellent condition. Ask-
ing $150.00 Call Teresa at 355-6233.
FOR SALE: Heins Greken (mint condi-
tion) German leather riding jacket. Price-
S210.00, very neg. Also, black and white
trench coat for $90.00, neg. Both in excel-
lent condition. No longer want. Call 752-
9133.
FOR SALE: Assorted furnishings includ-
ing coffee table, book shelves, chairs, all at
inexpensive student prices. Graduating
in May. Must sell soon. Call 758-4779, ask
for Dan.
FOR SALE: 1987 1 londa Scooter. Brand
new, never ridden, Elite 50. 1984 Chev
Corvette, 40,000 miles excellent condi-
tion. Peavey mace amp with 4 x 12"
speaker cabinet. Call 756-9864.
FAST FUN FOOD: Pizza's, sandwiches,
subs, salads, lasagne, spaghetti, and beer.
Fast free delivery. Call Famous Pizza.
757-1278 or 757-0731.
TROLLS TUX AND TEES: Don't pay
high prices for your formal wear, try
Troll's Tux and Tee's for your formal
needs. Traditional and designer models.
Special fraternity rates. Call 757-1007 or
830-1447.
FOR SALE: Coupon for one way ticket to
anywhere Continential Airlines flies.
$89.95. Must be used by 52588. caU 355-
2580.
RED HOT bargains! Drug dealers' cars,
boats, planes repo'd. Surplus. Your area.
Buyers Guide. (1) 805-687-6000 Ext. S-U66.
CAN YOU BUY Jeeps, cars, 4 x 4's seized
in drug raids for under $100.00? Call for
facts today. 602-837-3401. Ext. 711.
NEED TO SELL quickly: 1979 Honda
Civic Stationwagon, heater and AC.
$1,250 or best offer. Call: 752-4755 after 5
p.m.
SURFBOARDS FOR SALE: A 60" Rip
Curl thruster with Trac-top for $130 and a
5'11" Kim 1 lickman thruster for $70. Great
buys. CaU 758-5300.
WHY WAIT until Friday when there's
everyday at Famous Pizza. Stop by for
pitchers. $1.99 and $2.99.
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE: Buy a 10 inch
1 topping for $8.00, get one free. Buy a 16
inch 1 topping for $10.50, get one free. Call
for fast, free delivery. 757-0731 or 757-
1278. Famous Pizza.
FREE FREE FREE: Subs delivered free
Order an 8 or 12 inch sub and recicve a 16
oz. drink free. Call Famous Pizza at 757-
0731 or 757-1278. Celivery only.
R1NGGOLD TOWERS Condo for sale
B-unit, 2nd floor, fully furnished. Tax
market-value. $43,730.00. Make me an
offer. 919-787-1378.
ON A TIGHT BUDGET? Come join your
friends at Famous Pizza for a Meal Deal.
Hamurgers and sandwiches served with
fries and a drink only $2.49. Not valid on
delviery.
MOPED FOR SALE: Good condition,
low mileage. Great for summer, beats
parking. Price negotiable. Call Patricia at
758-8818.
FOR SALE: Entertainment centerwall
unit, $60.00. No assembly required. Also,
aqua blue carpet with padding 12' x 14
$50.00. CaU Travis or Dianna at 757-3543.
FOR RENT
ONE BEDROOM apartment for sub-
lease for May-July. Villiage Green Apart-
ment, 10th Street. $240.00 per month. Call
752-5645 after 5 p.m.
Dive
PenneKamp
v �,�, Mi 4
Key Largo, Fla.
2 Persons $369
4 Persons $309
May 8-13
For More Information &
Registration Call The
Rum Runner
Dive Shop
758-1444
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New 2 Bedroom
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Ne�rBCU
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - $275 a month
Contact J. T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8,12 - 5:30 p.m.
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quiet one bedroom furnished
apartments, energy efficient, free water and
sewer, optional washers, dryers, cable TV.
Couples or singles only. $195 a month, 6 month
lease. MOBILE 1JOME RENTALS - couples or
singles. Apartment and mobile homes in Azalea
Gardens near Brook Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE
VILLAGE GREEN APT. � Female,
smokers are welcome. Call Susan 830-
0265.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Clean, mature
person needed to share a 2 bedroom
apartment at Langston Park (furnished).
Call Chuck at 757-0660.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Need room-
mate for the summer, two bedrooms, one
and one half baths, livingroom, kitchen,
dinette, cement patio great for barbecues,
fridge, dishwasher, central air, quiet
neighborhood, five minutes from cam-
pus. 107-E Cedar Court. $160.00 per
month plus utiUties. Call 758-4779, ask for
Dan or Warren.
ONE BEDROOM apartment to sublease
for SS at River Bluif. $220.00. Pool, laun-
dry room, SGA Transit, unfurnished. Call
Lisa: Work, 757-6174; 1 lome, 747-5903.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED for
summer, fall, and spring. Non-smoker, 1
2 utilities and rent. ViUage Green. Call
758-7001.
GOING TO SUMMER SCHOOL?
(andor sticking around for the Fall?) 2-3
female, non-smoker roommates needed
by May 1 (or August 1 for the Fall) to share
apartment convenient to campus. $147.50
for private or $73.75 for shared. AC, cable,
pool, laundry. CaU Carla at 758-6831.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to share
a 2 bedroom duplex. $75.00 per month
rent and 13 utilities. Smokers welcome.
Call 752-5279.
HOUSE FOR RENT 3 bedroom, 1 12
baths, $350.00 per month, 1 block from
campus. Available May 1st. Call 830-1215.
ROOM FOR RENT: $125.00 per month
plus deposit. Available April 1st. Call Art
at 757-3543 after 5:00 p.m. Near campus.
SPRING SPECIAL: Fairlane Farms
Apartments-2 bedroom2 bath apt. 894
sq. feet. One month free rent with 12
month lease. $95.00 security deposit. Call
355-2198.
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT to sub-
let. $300.00 per month. Central heat and
air, pool, fully carpeted. 757-6423, days,
919 975-2481, evenings (caU collect).
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Available May 8 to share 3 bedroom
apartment at Wilson Acres. Private bed-
room, 13 rent and utilities, furnished
except for bedroom. Non-smoker. Call
Dawn or Corey at 758-7368 or leave mes-
sage.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Apartments for
rent. Furnished. Contact 1 lollie Si-
monowich at 752-2865.
PERSONALS
1ST ANNUAL SAE7PANTANA BOB'S
Bikini Contest, Wednesday, April 6 at
U:00 p m. Don't miss the best one of the
year. Contestants resgister at Pantanas.
SIG TAU LIE SISTERS: Great Softball
games this week. We hope you had alot of
fun-you made us all real proud. The
Brothers.
ADTT FORMAL DATES-Virginia
Beach was awesome! Thanks for joining
us. It was definitely a memorable week-
end! Love, the ADTT's.
CONGRATULATIONS to aU the newly
elected officers of Phi Kappa Tau for the
next school year: President-Wayne King,
Vice President-John Decker, Treasurer-
Sean Gilsenan, Recording Secretary-Guy
Harvey, Corresponding Secretary-Justin
Stoehr, and Sargent at Arms-Johnny
Dickinson.
JAMES G-Get into my car! Off to formal
for a weekend of fun, stopped by a
"bored-N" is how it begun. Laughing,
singing "she breaks the wind can't get
no satisfaction because it won't bend.
Peabladder is what you claim to be, as
was evidenced by the parking lot pee.
Liddy, Autumn and Scott the games we
did play, and all the nasty things we did
say. Gymnastics, your shorts, and a butt
zit, not to mention swinging and . Sig Ep
Sam, maU groupies and a box of vivarin,
Scott and Autumn the P.O.Ps sure
weren't jammin Dirty dancin Rum-
plmintz, jaccuzi and the rain, "We are the
World" drove us insane! Funeral dinner,
dental tunes, my uneaten bun, your meat
was so rare it got up and run. Sweater
teeth, dunkin stix, strokin' with you,
"Your weights on my head" and a "flash"
to black-iv-blue! Carpet lint, lysol, room
301, nasty pictures oh what a ton. Another
fun weekend lets do it again soon. I swear
thru the elevator shaft I saw the moon!
Your delirious date.
MIKE: Happy 21st! Thank God for Mary
Katherine. Things have been wonderful!
Get ready for Beach weekend! I love you,
Michele.
MASSAGE: The physical therapy stu-
dents will have their last massage clinic
for this year on Tuesday, April 5 from
530-9:30 p.m. in the Physical Therapy lab
at the AlUed Health Bldg. Advanced tick-
ets are $1.00 and $1.25 at the door. Be sure
to come and get you last massage for this
school year
EVERYONE We'd like to wish you a
happy and safe Easter Love, the
ADTT's.
IF YOU'RE HUNGRY and need a smack,
Sigma's are selUng MorM's. Come find us
or we'll find you! Have a good week!
HAPPY Easter everyone! Love, the Sig-
mas.
KA'S: Thanks for a great social! Toga 3
was n blast. Hope to do it again soon!
Love, the Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS to Noelle
I logan, 1988 Lambda Chi Alpha Crescent
Girl. We love you! The Sigmas.
TREY AND SKEETER: Va. Beach For-
mal we did go. Pi's and TKE's were a
great combo. The morning it rained we
soon did learn, to wake and bake, turn
and burn. Omlettes were great, Jacuzzi
was kill, skeeters friend didn't give us a
thrill. At Jewish Mother we had some fun.
they didn't know we'd eat and run. Skim
boards and mooseheads were the nexf
rule, we knew how to be cool! Upside-
downers were a blast, what do you mean ?
Were we aU trashed? Triple zombies were
the most, we were all comatose. Check
out 11 and stay rill 6, peach shots made us
sick. Pots and bowls were best, so were
the hare krishnas we met. To ECU but not
over yet, brew in hand and a game of stuff
it. Weekend was great, lets do it again
soon, had a kill-er rime. Hope you did too!
Carol and Kristine.
TO ALL ECU GREEKS: We want to wish
everyone a safe and happy Easter break.
Love, the Alpha Phi's.
LAMBDA CHI'S: New Years eve in
March was a blast, even though the
bubbles didn't last. Let's get together
sometime soon, and plan on celebrating
until noon. Love, the AOTT's.
JJ-For a while now things haven't been
quite right. We've both been hurt, but
things won't change overnight. So lets
take it easy for a while, and give it
another chance. And next time, save me
the last dance. I'm sorry and I LOVE
YOU! Bean.
ATTENTION ALL GREEKS: AZD All-
Sing is almost here It is scheduled for
Tuesday, April 5 so get your acts together
and let us know what songs you are doing
as soon as possible, by calling the AZD
house at 758-5677 or 830-0545 Can't wait
to see you at the Attic!
NEW DELI jams on! come down and
skank to the reggae tunes of Roily Gray
and Sunfire Friday. Next week look for-
ward Flipside, Southern Culture, and the
LombardoGuys. Don't forget open mike
Tuesdays and Dead Wednesdays.
GET READY April 8 at Lambda Chi
Alpha. All campus party with Free Spirit,
Locals Only and The Usuals BYOB. Tick
ets on sale in front of Student Store week
of April 4.
SAE HAPPY HOUR at the Elbo, Fridays
from 4-7. $2.00 teas-why drive anywhere
else?
Bring Club Football
To ECU.
For anyone interested in
starting a full contact foot-
ball team at ECU there will
be an organizational mecting
April 7th in room 221
Mendcnhall at 6:00. For
more information call Laron
Huntley at 752-3440.
Typesetters
Needed for
Sundays,
Tuesdays,
and the
Summer.
'Ill il(Vr. �
If You can type,
you can typeset.
4ppty at The
East Carolinian
Announcements
FUTURE TEACHER?
The Foreign and Domestic Teachers
Organization need' teacher applicants in
all fields from Kindergarten through Col-
lege to fill over six hundred teaching va-
cancies both at home and abroad. Since
our organization has been iding
mdes and locating teachers both in
foreign countries and in aU fifty states.
Our information is free and comes at an
opportune time when there are more
teachers than teaching positions. Should
you wish a iditioual information about
our organizati an, you may write The
National Teacher's Placement Agency,
: niversal Teachers, Box 5231, Portland,
�gon 97208.
SOFTBAUJrOJJRKEY
Registration toi the Intramural All
Night S.ftbil Tourney will be held
through Apri1 15. For more info call 757-
6387.
GOLF
Registration for Intranviral Golf will be
held on April 18 at 5 p.m. in MG 102. For
more inh call 757-6387.
FRIBJFJLGOjyE
Registration for Intramural Frisbee
Golf v,ill be held on April 12 in MG 102 at
6 p.m. For more info call 757-6387.
HAM! PIPING
Registration for Intramural Outdoor
Recreation Hang Gliding will be held
from March 21 -April 5. The pre-trip meet-
ing will be held on April 6 at 4 p.m. The
activity date will be on Apnl 9. For more
mfo call 757-6387
VUTEJAATTRBAFTJNG
Registration for Intramural Outdoor
Recreation White Water Raiting will be
held from March 21-April 5. The pre-trip
meeting will be held on April 13 at 4 p.m.
Activity dates are from Apnl 15-17. For
more info call 757 6387.
SCULPTURE GROUP
j The Sculpture Group of ECU presents a
student exhibition of current work on the
former location of Blount's department
store on the corner of 4th and Evans St.
downtown. March 29-April 19.
FREE FOOT SCREENING
The Creative Living Center of
rnrmvillc, an adult day care center,
operated by the ECU School of Medicine,
and your community is offering a free foot
screening on April 12, from 11:00-1:00
p.m. Dr. Tim Seavers, podiatrist with
GrecnviUe Podiatry Associates wiU be
performing this service at the Center, 417
S. Main St. (Farmville Community Cen-
ter) Farmville. Any interested adult is eli-
gible for the screening. Pre-registration is
not necessary, but if you have any ques-
tions, please call the Creative Living Cen-
ter of FarmviUe at 753-2322.
AI
Amnesty International meets every
fourth Wednesday, St. Pauls Epicopal
Church, 3rd St. GreenviUe. Next meeting
March 23.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
Meetings: Monday - Friday at 8:00 p.m.
and Saturday at noon at St. Paul's Epis-
copal Church, 401 E. 4th St. (these meet-
ings are open to anyone). Saturday and
Sunday at 8:00 p.m Arlington St. Baptist
Church, 1007 W. Ariington St. (these
meetings are closed�for addicts only or if
you think you have a problem).
STUPY APRQAP
Applications are now being accepted
for study abroad placements under the
International Student Exchange Program
(ISEP). ISEP is a worldwide network of
colleges and universities that provides
exchanges of students on a one-for-one,
fully reciprocal basis. The cost of an ISEP-
sponsored study abroad experience is,
except for travel costs, the same as that of
attending ECU. If you have completed at
least one year of college-level work, have
a GPA of at least 2.5, and yearn to experi-
ence other people and other places, con-
tact IMMEDIATELY Dr. R.J. Hursey, Jr
ISEP Coordinator, Austin 222,757-6418 or
756-0682. A limited number of summer
intensive language programs are avail-
able.
mi.ECr REPUBLICANS
The ECU College Republicans wiU
meet every Tuesday night in room 221
Mendenh all at 7 p.m. Call 758-5775 or 752-
3587.
SPECIAL ED. SPEAKER
Dr. Betty Levey, of the Special Educa-
tion Department of ECU, wUl speak on
"Learning DisabiUties and the Family" at
7:30 p.m. on Thurs March 31,1988. She
will address the Pitt County Assoc. of
ChUdren and Adults with Learning Dis-
abUities at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, E.
3rd St Greenville. Interested parents or
professionals are invited to attend. A
business meeting of the ACLD wiU be
held at 7 p.m. for election of officers. For
more information, call Debra Kerrawa
at 756-2584.
JOURNALIST TO SPEAK
Phi Kappa Alpha and The Division of
Academic Affairs are proud to present
Ms. Helen Thomas in a lecture on Tues
April 12, 1988, at 730 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. Ms. Thomas has been a United
Press International journalist since 1943
and has covered The White House since
John F. Kennedy became President in
1961. Her wealth of experience fortifies
her lecture talents and makes her a highly-
sought after speaker. In addition, Ms.
Thomas will lead a panel discussion on
Wed AprU 13, at 10:00 a.m. in Menden-
haU Student Center, room 244. The panel
will consist of Ms. Thomas, faculty, and
students. Admission for both the lecture
and the panel discussion is free
NOW MEETTNG
The Greenville chapter of the National
Organization for Women wiU hold its
monthly meeting in room 221, Menden-
hall, at 7 p.m. on Wed April 6. Judith
Komegay, attorney, will speak on "Vio-
lence Against Women particularly
domestic violence. A business meeting
and chapter elections will follow. For
more info call 756-1018. Students are
especially welcome
MARCHING PIRATES
Auditions for flag and rifle positions on
the 1988 Colorguard will be held Sat
April 16, Sat April 23, and Sat May 21
from 1200-4-30. Select one date to attend.
Any questions! Call Tracey 758-1217.
PRIME TIME
Prime Time, sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ, meets every Thursday
at 730 p.m. in Brewster C-103. Everyone is
welcome.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The National Gamma Beta Phi Honor
Society will hold a meeting Tuesday,
April 5 in Jenkins Auditorium at 7 p.m.
PERSONAL CARE?
Employment opportunities are avail-
able to students who are interested in
becoming PERSONAL CARE ATTEN-
DANTS to students in wheelchairs. Past
experiences are desired but not required.
Applications will be taken for employ-
ment during the Summer, FaU and Spring
Semesters 1988-1989. If interested, contact
Office of I landicapped Student Services,
212 Whichard Bldg 919-757-6799.
AUCTION
From the Heart Auction Tues April
19th, 7:00 p.m. at the Attic. Auctioned will
be a wide variety of merchandise, services
and trips. A Hilton Head Island get-away,
antiques, home decor items, dinners, gift
certificates, retail items, appliances; serv-
ices�cleaning decorating and repairs.
All bids are tax deductable. For more info
caU Carol Brown at 752-9989. Sponsored
by American Heart Assoc.
SALES AND MGMT.
Looking to hire 5 students for the sum-
mer to run their own business and gain
business experience and to earn money
for their coUege education. Come by
BB203 today (April 5) at 3:30 and 7:00 for
all details. Brochures in Placement Office
and Cooperative Ed. Dept.
KERYGMA
A Bible study for those who are serious
about studying the Bible. Weekly meet-
ings (tentatively Tues. afternoon) will be
scheduled to accomodate those who are
interested. Kerygma is an interdenomina-
tional program sponsored by Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministry. For more infor.
Call Mike at 752-7240.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
There will be meetings every Thursday
at 6:00 in the culture center. Everybody
welcome.
�EJ2
Students for Economic Democracy will
meet every Sunday from 7:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall 8-D For more information,
call 758-9760 or 746-6049.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Worship God and celebrate Commun-
ion this Wednesday night at 5O0 p.m. at
the Methodist Student Center. Also avail-
able: all-you-can-eat meal which is $2.00
at the door, $1.50 in advance. CaU 758-2030
for reservations. Sponsored by Presbyte-
rian and Methodist Campus Ministries.
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
There will be practice every Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 2:30 on In-
tramural Fields 5 and 6 behind Minges
Colliseum and on Sunday at 2:00. New
players welcome.
PERFORMING ARTS
The 1988-1989 Performing Arts Series is
sponsoring the following events: The
Ohio Ballet, Wynton Marsalis, The Acting
Company, The Atlanta Symphony, PHI-
LADANCO, The N.Y. Gilbert and Sulli-
van Players in Pirates of Penzance, The
Polish National Radio Orchestra, CABA-
RET, The ECUNC Symphonies in con-
cert with SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST
KAREN SHAW, and Nadja Salerno-Son-
nenberg. For a brochure detailing the
events contact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall, 757-6611, ext. 266. Office
hours are 11:00 a.m6O0 p.m Monday-
Friday.
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Friday nights are ALIVE more than
ever before! Join us at Jenkins Auditorium
(Art Building) at 8:00 p.m. Every FRIDAY
NIGHT for Christian Fellowship and
Bible teaching where JESUS IS LORD!
CHAMBER MUSIC
The 1988-1989 Chamber music Series
attractions include: Buswell-Parnas-Lu-
visi Trio, National Gallery of Art Vocal
Ensemble, Tokyo String Quartet, and
OREGON. For a brochure detailing the
events, contact the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, 757-6611, ext.
266. Office hours are 1100 a.m6.O0 pan
Monday-Friday. This series is co-spon-
sored by the Department of University
Unions and the School of Musk.
EGA
Fellowship of Christian Athletes will
meet every Tuesday at 9:30 at the Pirate
Club. Coaches, athletes, and others are
welcome to attend.
GAY COMMUNITY
Greenville Gay Community is a group
formed last fall to meet the needs of the
gay and lesibian Community in
Greenville. The group meets every othber
week at different locations in Greenville.
For more information please call and ask
for Charley at 752-2675.
BRASS QUINTET
The Department of University Unions
presents The Empire Brass, America's
finest brass quintet, on Friday, April 8,
1988, at 8O0 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
This group's repertoire of over 300 works
is unparalleled in diversity and quality.
SPECIAL NOTE: There will be an oppor
tunity for you to meet The Empire Brass
following tJieir performance at East Caro-
lina University. For further formation
on the reception contact: WTEB Radio,
Craven Community College, P.O. Box
885, New Bern, N.C 28560, or call (919)
638-3434. For further ticket information
contact: The Central Ticket Office, men-
denhall Student Center, phone 757-6611,
ext. 266. Office hours are Monday-Friday,
11O0a.m6KX)p.m.
CQQP-ED
Students holding North Carolina Real
Estate Sales license are neede for positions
with major resort developer located in NC
mountains, for more information contact
Cooperative Education, 2nd floor, New
Classroom Building.
WOMEN'S FRISBEE CLUB
Practice will be held Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday from 3:30 until, at the
bottom of CoUege Hill. All interested
players should attend Those who have
received forms need to have them com-
pleted and ready to turn in.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Volunteers are needed to help with the
1988 Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olympics Games which will be held on
Friday April 15,1988, at E.B. Aycock Jun-
ior High School in Greenville. Volunteers
must be able to work from 9O0 a.m. to
2:00p.m. If you are interested you need to
attend a volunteer training session in
Biology 103 on Tuesday, April 12 at 5:00
?J�. For more information, call Leslie
ooles at 830-4551.
.urim&mw9immHBmi
�r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
Utarwa
MARCH 31,1988 Page 6
A real feature story on an English teacher
By BRYAN ASKEW
, Special �o the East Carolinian
"As a songwriter, it's pretty
much whatever comes when you
get an inspiration says Mike
Hamer � songwriter, political
activist, and ECU. English
the Kennedy years and still enjoys
a minimal existence. The group
professor. "Whatever comes, you strives to get community projects
put it down and sometimes it's started in an area and build them
house. "I came down here anywhere So VISTA came in,
actually fifteen years ago now, it helped to mobilize these people
seems like it's gone fast, as a and got them to city council
VISTA volunteer meetings where they could voice
VISTA, Volunteers In Service their opinions about the need for
To America, was started during the bus system. One and one-half
Seeger singin' those protest songs
and, boy, I thought that was
pretty radical Hamer says, the
excitement still evident in his
voice. "He was up there singin'
against the whole U.S.
years later, the bus system was government and really calling the
started shots against the whole Vietnam
Mike's interest in political War, which two and three years
activity stems from his early love later everybody caught on and it
political and sometimes it's just up until the volunteers can leave of the folkprotest music of the bacame kind of a popular thing.
about Oo Baby, baby,baby and have the project function 1960's, which he became But back when Pete Seeger and
without their help. One way interested in shortly after Bob Dylan were opposing the war
VISTA contributed to the city of graduating from high school.
Greenville was in getting the Artists like Bob Dylan, Joan Baez,
Greenville transit system started, and especially Pete Seeger were
"Fifteen years ago there was no early influences, and still remain
stayed. He stops occasionally to bus system recalls Hamer. "The big heroes for him.
smile, wave, and speak to friends poor people in town would have "I went to the Newport Folk
passing in the street in front of the to take a taxi if they wanted to go Festival in '66, and I saw Pete
Sitting on the front porch of his
house near the Tar River, the
northern Vermont native reflects
on how he first came to
Greenville, and why he has
it was pretty radical.
Hamer soon gave up playing
drums, which he'd done in the
high school band, and got a guitar
to become a folkie. He played in a
folk group through college at Lie
University of Vermont, and in his
Carl Weathers sighted on campus,
but then, this is April Fools Day
PX By MICAH HARRIS �g
Staff Animator
Special note to all our loyal
readers: As you incredibly astute
and intelligent types who follow
the Features Vagc on a regular
basis have already deduced, this
is an April Fool'sarticle filled with
blatant lies. But four of the news
items below are actually true.
And we all know how queer
truth is, right? The first person to
identify the correct items will
receive a semi-fascimile of a 60s
marvel Comics No-Prize! How
about that? C'mon, loyal readers
prove that you're not just
picking up the paper to drop it in
the nearest trash can. Gosh
you're all so incredibly savvy, it
warms me. No, I mean that. I do.
ITEM: Carl Weathers sighted in
Greenville area: giving a stirring
lecture on molesting parking
offenders to the ECU campus
police overseeing construction
of Mendenhall Reflecting pool
thumbing a ride on Highway 13
North rooting through the
garbage bin behind the Fast 'N Go
Carl Weathers walksamong us!
Is he here to speak with William
Hallbergabout playing the lead in
the movie version of Hallberg's
semi-autobiographical novel, "A
Rub of the Green?" Is he here to
date Assistant Features Editor,
Carol Wetherington, who has
Carol talks about downtown art
b
CAROL WETHERINGTON rCfy d�nown
Aistant Feature. Editor � you have, then maybe you've
� seen the sculpture exhibit in the
Have you been downtown windows of the old Blo-jnt-
lately? No, I'm not talking about Harvey building. No boring art
having been to Rafters or Elbo. I here. No sir.
CriHcvill visit artsy school
School of ArtPresi Release
The Visiting Critics Program at
East Carolina University's School
of Art will sponsor a lecture by
noted art critic, Steven Henry
Madoff on April 7 at 7:30 p.m. in
Jenkins Audiotium. As a part of
the program, he will also be
visiting classes and individual
studios while at the School of Art.
Born in New York, Madoff
graduated with a bachelor's
degree in English and American
Literature from Columbia
College of Columbia University
in 1979 as the Butler Scholar in the
Humanities. While there, he also
served as Editor-in-Chief of The
Columbia Review and received
the Academy of American Poets
Poetry Prize and the alumni
award for most distinguished
undergraduate achievement in
the arts.
Before returning to New York
in 1981, Madoff studied at the
Sorbonne and the College do
France. While receiving his
masters and doctorate from
Stanford University in Palo Alto,
California in 20th Century
English and American literature
with orals in Literature and Art
History, he served as contributing
editor to University Publishing, a
quarterly review in Berkeley,
California.
Madoff's lecture is free and
open to the public and is funded
by a grant to the School of Art by
the North Carolina Arts Council.
Thanks to Jack Stillman and
Norman Keller of The Downtown
Enthusiasts Club, this sculpture
exhibit is an effort to promote
dying, downtown Greenville. It's
one of many eforts that the club
has initiated lately and it has got
to be oneof thtS?5f
Not xmiy wilf this exhibit
hopefully attract people and
business to downtown
Greenville, but it also gives
students at ECU a chance to show
off their most recent work.
There are seven students
participating in the exhibit:
Melissa Lovingood, Erik Johnson,
Tom Ghant, Karen Precise,
Robbie Barbour, Hugh CBryant
and Albert Home. Thank you
students for helping us put life
back where it belongs!
The pieces are new, intriguing
and totally different. Head on
downtown and have a look. The
exhibit will be there untii April 19,
so everyone can stop by and sliare
in The Club's newest venture.
mmm
made no secret that she's warm
for the form of the obsidian,
monolithic warrior? Or to
promote the $1.50 Greenville
debut of "Action Jackson?"
No, Weathers is rehearsing for
the East Carolina Playhouse's
upcoming production of
"Othello" in which he plays the
title role. Justine Bateman co-stars
as Desdemona.
ITEM: Denise Crosby's
character on "Star Trek: the Next
Generation Lt. Yar, will die at
the end of this current season.
Crosby apparently wants to
pursue other roles.
ITEM: Keshia Knight Pulliam's
character on "Crosby Show
Rudy, will die at the end of the
current season. Pulliam
apparently wants to pursue
Roman Polanski
ITEM: Over in England,
"Fame's" Debbie Allen is gearing
up to choreograph the stage-
musical version of Stephen King's
"Carrie
ITEM: Patrick Swayze has been
hopitalized in Los Angeles. Seems
that pelvic thrust went just a little
too far last time
ITEM: Bea Arthur is really a
man!
ITEM: New Deli under new
management to feature Elvis
impersonaters every Thursday
night!
ITEM: Musical version of the
life of transvestite, B-movie
director Edward Wood, Jr in the
works. Tentative title: "Plan 9
From Yucca Street
Okay kids. Remember four
of the above items are true. Can
you guess which fourAnswers
are on Fun 'N Games page. Word.
early days in Greenville. "I've
always done some kind of music
he says.
In fact, when he had finished his
work here as a VISTA volunteer,
his involvement in the local music
scene played an important role in
his deciding to stay in Greenville.
"I just fell in love with the
flatlands and stayed around he
says. "I started playing music,
and that was the big part of what
kept me here
But Hamer's musical
preference isn't all seriousness
and politics. "I also love rhythm
and blues, and songs about
having a good time he says. "I
guess thafs just another part of
who I am. That's a big part of what
I believe, that life is about
celebration. And life is about
having the blues, too, and shakin'
off the blues
Mike's own songs more often
reflect this ethic. "I guess an
important thing for me, as a live
musician, I love to play for people
who are dancing Hamer states.
"I think that's why so many of my
songs are like party songs, R & B
songs
Even though he doesn't write a
great number of political songs,
Hamer does feel compelled to
spread a political message
through other means. February
through August of 1985 found
Hamer participating in another
volunteer organization.
This one, Witness For Peace,
took him to the war zones of
Nicaragua. WFP is a grassroots
movement which concerns itself
with showing North Americans
what is really going on in
Nicaragua. When these people
return home, the idea is for them
to spread the word about what
they've seen through grassroots
organizations such as church
groups, "because Witness For
Peace, we don't have the money
that the Administration has to
send out its propaganda ,r
The members of the delegations
live with the people of Nicaragua
and spend a lot of time listening to
them and getting their views on
what is happening there. "Some
are very much in favor of the
Sandinistas, some dislike the
Sandinistas very much says
Hamer. "Most don't like the
contras. Just about all of the
Nicaraguans dislike the contras
because they know they're really
just thugs
Another thing that members of
WFP delegations do is reporting.
Whenever there is news of an
attack, on either side, they go and
find out what took place. "So the
Witness For Peace office in
Washington has all kinds of
reports of attacks on civilians, and
predominately by contras
reports Hamer. "I mean, there's
no doubt that the contras are
operating a terrorist faction
WFP has recently released a
tape called Songs Of Witness. The
tape, recorded locally at Blue
House Studios on 4th Street and
produced by Hamer, consists of
protest songs often sung by
members of delegations while in
Nicaragua. Hamer and other
members of his delegation
reunited to perform on the tape.
"We used to do demonstrations in
front of the U.S. Embassy, and it's
kind of scan recalls Hamer.
"You're out there in public and
there'd be cameras and there'd be
kind of CIA-looking types
around. But it's nmazing how
singing together just kind of
there's a real solidarity says
Hamer.
"It's like the union songs in
thefrs and '3Cs; union folks
had it real tough Hamer says. "1
mean they'd get their heads
busted in, and singing those
union songs gave them courage.
Music can do that, it can really lift
your spirits up
Hamer hasn't let his
Nicaraguan experience sour his
"Celebrate Life" attitude. He still
likes to play and write dance-
oriented music, which is evident
on his tape, I'll Sing For You.
Put out last summer, the tape is
a collection of some of his songs
which have been written over the
last fifteen years, and which have
stood the test of time for him. But
he did write a few songs while in
Nicaragua which he says are quite
angry and political, "because you
can't be down there very long
without becoming very angry
about U.S. policy
About three weeks after
returning from Nicaragua, and
the day before he was to begin his
teaching position at E.C.U a
swimming accident Jeft Hamer
paralyzed, from the chest down;
He broke his neck while diving
into shallow water, sustained
instant paralysis, and spent the
next six and one-half months in
recuperation.
The accident left him with only
partial mobility in his arms,
which has rendered him unable to
compose his songs on guitar, as he
used to do. He went through a
long period when he didn't write
songs for lack of the means to set
them to music. But he has since
taken up playing harmonica,
synthesizer, and the hammer
dulcimer.
The hammer dulcimer � a
See MORE, page 7
Pickin' the Bones
Terra Nova means Bojangles to Bonehead
By CHIPPY BONEHEAD
is a picture of the Empire Brass. They play brass instruments and they will play them next
Friday at 8 p.m, in Wright Auditorium. Brass sure is pretty. I mean, wood is fun to dance on, but
there's something about a brass sheen on a musical instrument Vail have a good one. We'll leave a
light on for ya.
One of the things I like most
about Bojangles� is that you
don't need to know a speck of
Latin to go eat there. You can
order all the cajun fries you want
and they won't ever ask you if you
know what "Terra Nova" means.
Unfortunately for the
commoners of the G-Ville, there's
only one Boj in this this suburb
the residents laughingly call a
city. Where!come from (Raleigh-
the Greatest City of All Time), we
have THREE Bojangles���.
Of course, it's fine with me they
only have one Boj here. There's
less chance any art fags or hard
working thespians might venture
to the other side of town for a
chicken filet biscuit.
It's hard to pin down the best
thing about the Boj. The food is, of
course, boss. You can sit home
with your Bisquick, or wait until
three o' dock in the morning
when Hardee's starts cooking
biscuits, but you can always do
the Boj thing.
But it's more than that. Eating at
Boj, you can see some of the hvmg
legends that work there, like
Crew Leader Sharon, and the
Ever Cheerful Banks. B?ett
though they still think Jeff "No! I
wont say Cyo Parker is Jacko
from the battery commercial,
they're still unparalleled in fast
food service.
I'm not saying the Boj is mere
fast food though. Some are, such
as the bogus ones in Florida which
give no free tea refills. But on me
whole, the Boj experience is
something like a ralgramage and
a baptism rolled up in one 45
minute visit
Bojangles is truly a
transcendent event. ' If�
impossible for any normal human
to not glimpse the hidden
workings of the universe while
munching on a bacon biscuit with
mustard on it
Each bile expands the mind a
little more. By the time you're
relaxing wim your second cup of
teaorDr.Pepperyoubegtntofeel
sympathetic towards all inferiors
and lackeys, even those who spaz
out at the sight of fun headlines.
Bojangles, a few comic books
arid a boss babe like Jennifer
Pearson (Staff Book Reporter)
giving you a hackrab-this is mat
place mat Belinda Carlisle is
singing about. But there is the evU
opposite
help are all named Marie.
No festive, Mardi Gras-type
light bulbs. The color scheme is
mauve and fuschia. The biscuits
and chicken are unworthy of even
tasting. The clientele are of the
aging artsy persuasion.
The .ECU Association Of Fat
Girls Viho Write Poetry hok
weekly meetings there. The
manager burns any comic books
he finds on the premises
Backrubs are a big out
Scary. Never do anything tc
offend the Great Spirit of The Boj
I can't think of a worse fate than
the Anti-Boj. Except aybe
having to sit through 4 play,
gallery show or poetr eading. '
t's true that .e simple
And for meager amounts of
money, you can have al! these
things at Bojangles tf ypg
worthy.
See, only those pure in motive
aridI who understand what made
the bottie city e
In a fout spatial warp
somewriereioffRfmareetHesme
Anti-Boj. Those luckless
who have Hie
'great can
acheive the mystical state
"? to pass through thT
J?V I know ft rrwy se cruel
�-�� an ideal thatiS
W WUTO8�

o
i
By RUBY QUARTZ
Suff Astronomer
"She's doing it the way I
iginally wanted to says Paul
(cCartney, when asked his
pinion on Tiffany's remake of "1
iw Her Standing There
believe she's done the
efinitive version of the song. A
A of the thing's Tiff's put in were
lea's of mine that John rejected
IcCartney revealed The
uestion had been put to the ex-
eatle last week in light of
rotests by many rock-n-roll
urists. McCartney went on to
laborate.
At the beginning of the song, Tiff
aysI saw you standing there,
yah-na-na-na-na I wanted to do
iat. But nooooo, Mr. Lennon
ouldn't have that. Ringo liked
he idea, as I recall
-IcCartney also pointed out that
he song has been retitled'l Saw
lim Standing There
Again, that's another good
hing. That's what I wanted to call
l" the Liverpuddian added,
Irawing stares and hide
omments from the crowd. An
mruly bystander began
creaming obscenities at
IcCartney, protesting that
.ennon would have never stood
�yc the remake.
Well he's dead now, isn't he
losed McCartney, climbing into
iis Rolls-Royce.
EEN AROUND TOWN
Uright boys and girls, here's the
oop on who all might just be the
itest item around Tinsel City
Lemember, you heard it first from
r
'rince Charles and Whoopi
ioldberg-were seen cavorting
Dgether at one of Bruce Willis'
�arties. A close friend of His
Loyal Earness disclosed a
omment he overheard straight
rom the Prince's mouth. "We
on't get much brown sugar in
he Isles Charles smirked.
Villiam Shatner and Mother
Tteresa-observed hanging out at
tudio 54. The ex-Capt. KirkT.J.
looker was heard to sayI dig
he oldchickShe's a gutsy babe.
iesides1ycr4tr�ow how k to:
o cTWere�W" man has gone
xjfore
eisha Knight-Pulliam and
Roman Polanski- Famous for her
role as Rudy7 on The Cosb
Show, Keisha was seen riding
piggyback on the shoulders of thel
director of "Frantic" during herl
recent vacation in France. "I v I
we had time to cultivate ourl
1
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31,1968
1W Page 6
icher
i.
a

irunately bv contras
s Hamer. I mean, there's
ubt that the contras are
ting a terrorist faction
P has recently released a
.111 ed Songs Of Witness. The
recorded locally at Blue
e Studios on 4th Street and
iced by Hamer, consists of
t songs often sung by
ts ol delegations while in
agua. Hamer and other
bers ot his delegation
ted to perform on the tape.
�i to do demonstrations in
A the US. Embassy,and it's
oi scan recalls Hamer.
re out there in public and
cameras irui there'd be
or CIA-looking tvpes
d. But :t ; Tiazmg how
ig together ust kind of
s a real solidarity says
like the union songs in
. and '30s; union folks
reai tough " Hamer says. "1
thev d get their heads
in and singing those
5s gave them courage.
:an do that, it can really lift
i
hasn't let his
;tun experience sour his
fe attitude. He still
pla and wnte dance-
i musk which is evident
II Sing For You.
summer, the tape is
some of his sone,
ave been written over the
en years, and which have
r time for him But
few songs while in
vhich he says are quite
because you
there very long
m � g very ann.
ree weeks atter
iragua, and
he was to begin his
iition at E.C.U a
ung accident left Hamer
f2ed from the chest down.
kc his neck while diving
vater istained
and spent the
ne-haif months in
I left him with only
mobihtv in his arm
ias rendered him unable to
se his songs on guitar, as he
t do. He went through a
Tiod when he didn't write
for lack of the means to set
to music. But he has since
up playing harmonica,
iiesizer, and the hammer
mer.
hammer dulcimer � a
See MORE , page 7

onehead �
! are all named Marie,
festive, Mardi Gras-type
bulbs. The color scheme is
kve and fuschia. The biscuits
chicken are unworthy of even
ing. The clientele are of the
fg artsy persuasion.
ECU Association Of Fat
Who Write Poetry hole
kly meetings there. The
iger bums any comic books
finds on the premises
crabs are a big out.
�ry. Never do anything to
d the Great Spirit of The Boj.
I't think of a worse fate than
Anti-Boj. Except aybe
ing to sit through j play,
ery show or poetr eading.
's true that .e simple
isures in life are the most boss,
for meager amounts of
you can have all these
at Bojangles - if you are
thy.
only those pure in motive
who understand what made
; city of Kandor great can
ive the mystical state
iry to pass through the
of Bojangles unharmed
tare die breaks.
I know ft may seem cruel
so about an ideal that the
shall never reach. But, hey
's how die TTL dub works.
" ' boweat
ever, discover tome
-ANDdon'tletafat
Starwatch with Ruby Quartz
relationship Keisha told a
friend but I've still got 'Cosby'
and school work holding me
down, and for some reason
Roman won't come to the States
Burgess Meredith and Meredith
Baxter-Birncy- A logical coupling
By RUBY QUARTZ
Suff Atmnomcr
"She's doing it the way I
originally wanted to says Paul
McCartney, when asked his
opinion on Tiffany's remake of "1
Saw Her Standing There
1 believe she's done the
definitive version of the song. A
lot of the thing's Tiff's put in were
idea's of mine that John rejected
McCartney revealed. The
question had been put to the ex-
Beatle last week in light of
protests by many rock-n-roll
purists. McCartney went on to
laborate.
At the beginning of the song, Tiff principle instrument
saysI saw you standing there, composition. "The
if ever we saw one. Mcredith(the
dame, that is) said at The Improv
Friday night that her new
relationship with the veteran
actor is her real reason for leaving
Family Tics. "The only way I
would have stayed on is if NBC
had put Burgess in the role of
Steven Keaton, replacing Michael
Gross When reached for
comment, Meredithfthe old
fogey, that is) replied only, "Wak-
wak-waaaak
More on that REAL feature story
PARA PISE
Step mo P�raa,$�
Step Cot � Sir1
329 Arlington
Blvd.
756-1579
Continued from page 6 saYs he simply had a blast
dancing with his friends,
stringed, percussive instrument Afterwards he had an idea to do a
played with light hammers which video on wheelchair dancing. He
arc held in the hand � in now his and a friend began to get excited
: i vah-na-na-na-na I wanted to do
that. But nooooo, Mr. Lennon
wouldn't have that. Ringo liked
the idea, as I recall
McCartney also pointed out that
for song
hammer
dulcimer is nice, but it's too
pretty Hamer notes.
"Like I say, 1 really like the
raunchy kinds of music Some
students in Adaptive Physical
the song has been retitledT Saw Recreation at E.C.U. are working
I lim Standing There on making a special slide for him
Again, that's another good so that he can play some slide
thing. That's what I wanted to call guitar, to get a raunchier, more
it the Livcrpuddian added, blues-related effect,
drawing stares and lude Last fall, Hamer went out with
omments from the crowd. An some friends to Beau's to hear his
nruly bystander began friend Lightnin' Wells play and he
creaming obscenities at . - -
Scott Sawyer Trio, a band,
about the prospects of the idea
and pursued some funding
possibilities.
The project is now underway
and Hamer hopes that it will be
completed by July. Hamer has
written some songs to be used in
the video, one of which begins
with these lyrics: "I may not be
walkin' baby, but I can roll right
up to you
"In a sense this wheelchair
video is political in terms of just
lettin' people know that, hey folks
in chairs have fun, and they like to
go out and dance Hamer says.
He certainly has become more
aware of disability issues since his
accident. "I'm sure that, as I keep
on, I'll probably get more and
more political about disability
issues he says.
"But once again, I guess I would
like to tackle it in sort of the same
way as tis wheelchair video: kind
of on the side of'Let's celebrate it
So we're in chairs. Let's celebrate
that
Read
the
Classifieds
ALL HAIR SERVICES
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1 Year of Unlimited Visits $100.00
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PETEY HATHAWAY, Owner
dcCartney, protesting that
.ennon would have never stood
r the remake.
Vell he's dead now, isn't he
�osed McCartney, climbing into
�s Rolls-Royce.
to play Mendenhall center
Mendenhall Prcs� Release
RACK ROOM SHOES
I BRANDED SHOES
Concerts Committee and the East
Carolina University School of
Music will present the Scott
poop on who all might just be the Sawyer Trio in a performance
tfttest item around Tinsel City.
The Student Union's Special extensively as a classical and jazz I Greenville Buyer's Market
SEEN AROUND TOWN
Alright boys and girls, here's the
Remember, vou heard it first from
or
Prince Charles and Whoopi
Goldberg-were seen cavorting
together at one of Bruce Willis'
parties. A close friend of His
Royal Earness disclosed a
comment he overheard straight
from the Prince's mouth. "We
don't get much brown sugar in
the Isles Charles smirked.
William Shatner and Mother
Theresa-observed hanging out at
Studio 54. The ex-Capt. KirkT.J.
Hooker was heard to sayI dig
the Old chick. She's a gutsy babe.
Besides, yem know how J Uk to
Go imere no man has gnc
before
Keisha Knight-Pulliam and
Roman Polanski- Famous for her
role as 'Rudy on The Cosby
Slow, Keisha was seen riding
piggyback on the shoulders of the
director of "Frantic" during her
pcent vacation in France. "I wish
had time to cultivate
April 7, at 8 p.m. in Room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center. This
concert is free, and refreshments
will be served.
Joining the trio for this special
artist. Among his recent
accomplishments is his
performance as the pianist for the
Statue of Liberty re-dedication
ceremonies.
The Scott Sawyer Trio features
guitarist Scott Sawyer, drummer
David Via, and bassist Ben
Seawell. Along with keyboardist
I Memorial Drive
I
I
I

I
I Open
performance will be East Carolina Jim Crew, they play a variety of I Monday - Saturday 10-9
University's own jazz-pianist, original music from Scott's LP, ISundav 1-6
Paul Tardif. Tardif has performed
Two Sides
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Great Comic Panels
of All Time
Pictured here are some of the best comic book L
panels of all time. Kids, see if you, the reader,
can identify which books they came from. If
you guess all six, we'll think about putting
your name on the Fun N Games page. Here
are some clues
Clue 1) This is the funniest panel in the history
of the written word. Only the funniest plagarist
in modern comics could have written it.
Clue 2) Three members of this "World's
Greatest Comic7' are shown, but the fourth
might be in there too.
Clue 3) If you can't get this one, you might
as well go be a business major.
Clue 4) and 5) They might have gotten their
own magazine, but they still don't dress any
j better, and they still walk funny. -
Clue 6) This super hero's mode of transport
was asked as a "Jeopardy" question. Were
you watching that night?
Base
By TIM CHANDLEl
Sports Editor
East Carolina used soi
hitting and a little
Wednesday night at Ham
Field to sweep a pair of
conference baseball games
St. Bonavenrure.
ECU won the opening gal
a 6-5 count, while in the nij
the Pirates routed the Bonn!
3.
In the doubleheader swei
Pirates used some kev
experiments that proved fr
David Ritchie, who playe
base for the first 24 games
season, was moved to shoi
and freshman Kevin Riggl
inserted at third base.
The changes gave the Tii
batting lineup consisting d
left-handed batters, four
handed batters and one
hitter. The moves paid off aj
the two right handed pitchi
Bonnies hurled at the Pirat
The opening game victo
the Pirates was up in air untl
nranaged to score a single
Jhe bottom halt of the sc
inning.
Steve Godin led off the
half of the seventh with a
Godin then stole second am
bases. Following that,
Thomas struck out an
Bonnies then elected to
Tommy Yarbrough and Rij
load the bases with one oul
Intram
Ready to pull anothei
nighter?"
Coming April 22-24,
Rental Tool CoECU Intraj
Softball All Nighter! The
will be held in conjunctioi
the annual Pirate Purple.
Pigskin Pigout Party. There j
eligibility restrictions, and
and women's teams are inv
sign up. The entry fee is set
and all entry forms mi
postmarked by April 13
Coach
DURHAM (AP) - When
beat Kansas 74-70 in ovi
Feb. 20, Jayhawk star
Manning scored 31 points
rebounds - a pertormana
enough to win the respect
opponents.
"What I remember most I
Manning is how har
worked said Duke's
Ferry. "I was impressed bv
knew he had great skills
think I underestimated hn
After that, he had my v
player of the year in the coi
But Ferry and Blue Devil
Mike Krzyzewski know)
Mannning won't be the
player on the floor when the
Kansas again in the Final Fj
; the NCAA tournament.
"If d be a real mistake
concentrate solelv on Man,

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Main Event winds up tc
I held tonight in Minges C
be $3, while East Ci
'the regular price. Pr�
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 31,1988 Page 9
Baseballers sweep pair from St. Bonaventure
By TIM CHANDLER
Sport Editor
East Carolina used some key
hitting and a little luck
Wednesday night at Harrington
Field to sweep a pair of non-
qpnference baseball games from
St. Bonaventure.
ECU won the opening game by
.i 6-5 count, while in the nightcap
the Pirates routed the Bonnies 15-
In the doubleheader sweep, the
Pirates used some key lineup
experiments that proved fruitful.
David Ritchie, who played third
base for the first 24 games of the
season, was moved to short stop
,ind freshman Kevin Riggs was
riser ted at third base.
The changes gave the Pirates a
batting lineup consisting of four
left-handed batters, four right-
handed batters and one switch
hitter. The moves paid off against
the two right handed pitchers the
Bonnies hurled at the Pirates.
The opening game victory for
the Pirates was up in air until ECU
managed to score a single run in
the bottom halt of the seventh
inning.
Steve Godin led off the Pirates
half of the seventh with a walk.
Godin then stole second and third
bases. Following that, John
Thomas struck out and the
Bonnies then elected to walk
Tommy Yarbrough and Riggs to
load the bases with one out.
Chris Cauble failed on his
attempt to bring in the winning
run when he grounded into a
fielder's choice, however, Ritchie
managed to push the winning run
across when he grounded a ball to
the Bonnies' second sacker Pat
Johnston. The ball was fielded
cleanly by Johnston, but first
baseman Mike Nayman bobbled
the ensuing throw to allow
Yarbrough to score.
Thomas led the way at the plate
for the Pirates in the game by
going two-for-four with a triple
and a RBI. Jay McGraw and Riggs
each swatted doubles for the
Pirates in the game enroute to
posting one-for-two hitting
performances.
Pirate hurler Johnathon
Jenkins, 2-0 for the season, picked
up the win on the mound in relief
of starter Gary Smith. Jenkins
pitched two and two-thirds
innings of hitless ball.
The Pirates trailed 5-3 heading
to the bottom of the fourth frame
in the contest but managed to get
the game knotted at 5-5 thanks to
a sacrifice fly by Ritchie and a run-
scoring single by Calvin Brown.
In the nightcap, the Pirates
belted 10 hits and received nine
bases on balls from the Bonnies'
pitching staff to insure the rout.
Among the 10 Pirate hits were
three doubles, a triple and a pair
of round trippers.
The Pirates broke out on top of
the game early with a three-run
first inning blitz. ECU went on to
add four runs in the second frame
to build a 7-0 lead.
The door was slammed shut in
the Bonnies face in the third
inning as the Pirates tacked on
five more runs. McGraw's
delivered a three-run homer in
the inning to aid the five-run
burst.
Yarbrough accounted for the
only other Pirate runs in the
contest when he belted a two-run
homer in the sixth inning. The
home run was the first of the year
for Yarbrough.
Freshman pitcher John White
improved his season mark to 3-0
with the win on the mound for the
Pirates. White pitched four
innings for the Pirates, giving up
two hits and striking out three.
The doubleheader sweep
pushed the Pirates record to 17-9
for the season with a key three-
game series set with Colonial
Athletic Association foe William
& Mary this weekend at
Harrington Field.
The Indians are currently
second in theCAA standings after
sweeping three contests from
George Mason earlier this year.
The Pirates will play a
doubleheader with the Indians on
Saturday with the first game
getting underway at 6 p.m. A
single game will be played on
Sunday at 1 p.m.
NOTES:
� John Adams' seven game
hitting streak came to an end in
the opening game against St.
Bonaventure on Wednesday.
Adams, however, started another
hitting streak in the second game
by collecting a hit.
�The doubleheader sweep of
the Bonnies Wednesday night
ended a two-game Pirate losing
streak. Before the two wins, the
Pirates had lost five of their last
seven contests.
� The Pirates exhibition
matchup against the Kinston
Indians at Grainger Stadium is
only a week away. The game will
be played on Thursday, April 7 at
7 p.m.
Pirate first baseman Calvin Brown makes an out during the Pirates doubleheader action against James Madison
on Sunday at Harrington Field. (Photo by Ellen Murphy � ECU Photo Lab)
Intramural Department is ready for annual All-Nighter
Ready to pull another "all
nighter?"
Coming April 22-24, it's the
Rental Tool CoECU Intramural
Softball All Nighter! The event
will be held in conjunction with
the annual Pirate PurpleGold
Pigskin Pigout Party. There are no
eligibility restrictions, and men's
and women's teams are invited to
sign up. The entry fee is set at $50
and all entry forms must be
postmarked by April 13. Entry
forms are available at the I.R.S.
office or by calling 757-6387.
Co-Rec Volleyball action is now
underway. IMA REC says put
your money on Somethin'
Special, Scrags, Likity Split, and
Technics. Unfortunately, the first
three will compete in the same
division. Upcoming match to
catch - April 11 10:00p.m. Scrags
vs. Likity Split - Minges Coliseum
Court 3.
Time is running out for all you
outdoor buffs to sign up for an
upcoming activity. Registration
closes April 5 (that's Tuesday) for
the white water rafting, hang
gliding and kayaking trips.
White water rafting is set for
April 15-17. For just $47, which
covers transportation, camping
fee, food and the actual river trip,
you can experience the ultimate in
adventure. Hang gliding is
scheduled for April 9, as is
kayaking. For more information,
call or stop by the outdoor
recreation center.
Tennis doubles champions will
be crowned next week. Action is
under way in Men's Intermediate,
open men's and mixed doubles.
IMA REC says watch for Men's
Intermediate finals to feature
Madden-Miller versus
Clingman-Comacho, which in
layman's terms is Sigma Phi
Epsilon versus Delta Sigma.
Men's open teams to watch are
Schecter-Harley and Cotten-
Halstead.
In mixed doubles, the favorites
are Belgania-Hedrick and Asaad-
Eagle. Carreras-Pierce and
England-Storch lead the women's
pack.
Two big events are scheduled
for registration as the intramurals
season draws to a close. Frisbee
golf registration is set for April 12.
Todd Kirkpatrick is the defending
novice champ, while John Brady
and Susan Allen are the reigning
advanced champs. Registration
will be held in Memorial Gym,
Room 102 at 6 p.m.
The Golf Tournament is set for
registration on April 18 at 5 p.m.
in Memorial Gym, Room 102.
Leonard Moretz and Carolyn
Oxendine are the respective
men's and women's champions.
Coach K remembers Manning, Kansas
DURHAM (AP) - When Duke
beat Kansas 74-70 in overtime
Feb. 20, Jayhawk star Danny
Manning scored 31 points and 12
rebounds - a performance good
enough to win the respect of his
opponents.
"What I remember most about
Manning is how hard he
worked said Duke's Danny
Ferry. "I was impressed by that. I
knew he had great skills, but I
think I underestimated him a bit.
After that, he had my vote for
player of the year in the country
But Ferry and Blue Devil Coach
Mike Krzyzewski know that
Mannning won't be the only
player on the floor when they face
Kansas again in the Final Four of
the NCAA tournament.
"It'd be a real mistake if we
concentrate solely on Manning
Ferry said. "They have other, like
(Milt) Newton, who people don't
pay much attention to, but they're
great players
"I've never felt that way
because I've never been a great
player, but I've seen some great
players feel that way. I think you
have to make Manning earn
everything not to lose track of the
other guys.
"You can't let their other
players hurt you . . . he said.
"The focus should be how to
make things difficult on Manning
but we haven't come up with a
game plan yet
Manning, averaging 24.6 points
and 8.7 rebounds, has scored 30 or
more points 10 times this season in
leading the Jayhawks to a 25-11
record.
Duke is 28-6, largely due to
defense and a deep bench.
However, Krzyzewski said he's a
bit worried he won't have 6-8
reserve center John Smith to help
guard Manning. Smith missed the
Temple game with a broken hand
and is lost for the Final Four.
"We'll miss Smith
Krzyzewski said. "Thaf s not an
excuse. . . but you like to use
John's experience. One thing our
younger players aren't atuned to
is our defense. It's something you
learn after a few years
Ferry, a 6-10 second-team Ail-
American; 6-10 reserve Alaa
Abdelnaby; and 6-5 starting
center Robert Brickey all will be
guarding Manning at different
times, Krzyzewski said.
"I think it's an evenly matched
game Krzyzewski said. "Larry
(Brown's) philosophy and mine
are pretty similar. Defensively,
both teams play good man-to-
man, both have good team unity,
we use a number of players and
are pretty simple in what we do.
He's probably done as good a job
as anybody this year in the
country in coaching.
"He's a great basketball coach
and a good guy he said. "I
haven't followed his career and I
don't have his picture up in my
room or anthing, but just being
friends with him over the past few
years to me I think he's done a
great job. I like their program. I
think there's mutual respect
(between programs)
Two cagers commit
East Carolina University head
basketball coach Mike Steele has
received two verbal
committments from a pair of
prospects for next season,
according to a report published in
The Daily Reflector.
The committments mark the
first two received by Steele for
next year's campaign.
The two are 6-3 guard Jay
Sherer and 6-8 forward Brooks
Bryant. Both are from Huntsville,
Ala.
Both Sherer and Bryant played
together on the Alabama 6-A state
championship squad at Gus
Grissom High School. Sherer was
named the co-player of the year in
Alabama, while Bryant was I
tabbed as the Most Valuable
Player in the Alabama state
playoffs.
Both players averaged in
double figures for the season with
Sherer firing in 20.5 points and
Bryant chipping in 13.5 points per
contest.
The committments came from
the two this weekend when they
visited the ECU campus.
L
Super Sport was huge success
The IntramuralBudweiser
Super Sport Competition was a
huge success as 20 teams battled it
out on three separate days
through four events under quite
extraordinary conditions.
After Sunday's competition,
Frisbee Golf, it looked as though
the Slimy Seanymphs would
walk away with the top prize.
Their total intramural score after
six holes of Disco Golf was a
whopping 100. However the
Beerwolfs were close behind as
were other squads who scored in
the SO's and above.
Going into the next round of
competition, teams found
themselves playing human
foosball and hockey shooting in
Memorial Gymnasium.
In the hockey shootout event,
Arthur Brunson of Oreo Cookies
Dipped in Chocolate (quite a
name!) ripped in 10 goals in 15
seconds to lead his squad to a 24-
goal first place position following
closely were the Health Nuts. The
Beerwolfs tapped in 14.
The foosball competition
matched team against team in a
somewhat unusual rendition of
the table foosball game palyed at
Duke getting ready
Th. Vfein FvmiI winds ud tonight Th� finals of the 13th Annual Tan Kappa Epsilon Boxing Tournament will
SwCoS beginning a. 7:30 p.�. Admission for the genera. puhBc to the flm right
wiUbeS3 whUe East Carolina University stndenls with valid identification cards can recdve a $1 dKcount
BrtingCoI SSSmK J- ���. Hospital (Photo h, EUe. Murph, - ECU �mto Ih)
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) � By the
end of the day, Duke coach Mike
Krzyzewski will know who is
staying in which hotel, who gets
tickets and who gets interviews.
When you're in the NCAA Final
Four, you're everybody's friend.
"If s amazing how many people
you haven't heard from in years
you hear from this week,
Krzyzewski said. Krzyzewski's
East Regional champion Blue
Devils meet Kansas on Saturday
in Kansas City, Mo.
"Everybody wants tickets or
interviews or something. I'm still
worrying about who's in what
motel room and whose family is
staying with whom.
"But I learned a lesson last
time' said Krzyzewski, whose
1986 club reached the Final Four,
losing to Louisville in the
championship game. "You get all
of the logistics out of the way
today, and then, we're ready to
concentrate on Kansas, or
whoever happens to be our first-
round opponent"
There was another lesson from
1986, and that focused on two
emotions � ecstacy and hunger.
See BLUE page 10
your local bar. U-Lose came out
nowhere and took the title with
145 points. Beerwolfs and Ima
Who? (just guess what team this
is) pulled out of the event with
totals in the 140's as well. Disco
Golf leaders, Slimy Seanymphs
fell short with a 97 total while the
Oreo Cookies Dipped In
Chocolate stayed in the running
with 115 points.
The culmination of this
madness was held at the bottom
of College Hill on Tuesday in the
form of an obstacle Course.
Making their way in to the final
event the top teams were,
Beerwolfs, U-Lose, Belk
Shelshocks, and Ima Who?.
The Beerwolfs, took the event
with a one second margin over the
Slimy Seanymphs followed by
Skimpy and Suds Inc. The lop
trophies were presented to the
Beerwolfs, second place overall
went to U-Lose, third place was
captured by Suds Inc. (who kept a
steady pace throughout the
competition) while the fourth and
final set of trophies went out to the
Belk Shelshocks.
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services would like
to thank all the participants for
their time and madness along
with Jeffreys Beer & Wine who to
graciously provided each
participant with t-shirts and top
place trophies.
npwiaiiipiMp�ilni � '
� f.mi ii ji �.





I
T
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31,1988
Final Four tickets hot number
KANSAS CITY, MO. (AP) -
Final four tickets in this city
brimming with well-heeled
Kansas fans could sell for as much
$2,000, some speculators say.
Police thought it a good time to
remind residents that ticket
scalping in Kansas City is against
the law.
"From everything we've heard
today, I do believe that this will be
the toughest ticket in the history
of sports Richard Konzem, a
harried Kansas athletic official,
said. "We could sell out the
Superdome
The Final Four long ago reached
parity with the World Series on
the scalpers' list of profitable
events. But when the Kansas
Jayhawks beat Kansas State 71-58
Sunday in the finals of the NCAA
Tournament's Midwest Regional
at Pontiac, Mich they did more
than join Oklahoma, Arizona and
Duke in the 50th anniversary of
college basketball's party. They
stirred up a ticket frenzy that 36
hours later was gatering strength
and fury like the tornado that
whisked Dorothy and Toto away
toOz.
"I was told that I could probably
get $2,000 per ticket on game
day said a Kansas City
advertising executive with close
ties to Kansas.
"If I had a bunch, I would take
them to the bank and put them in
the safety deposit box with the
gold coins added the man, who
asked that his name not be used.
In the first semifinal game
Saturday, Kansas meets Duke, the
school that vanquished the
Jayhawks in the 1986 Final Four.
Oklahoma, another Big Eight
school, meets Arizona in the other
semifinal.
And thousands upon
thousands of Kansans suddenly
want to be there, the Jayhawk
basketball tradition, in fact, was
firmly established before John
Wooden ever won a game at
UCLA. When Kansans talk about
their past, names like James
Naismith, Wilt Chamberlain,
Dean Smith and Phog Allen spill
from the tongue.
Allen Fieldhouse, located on
the Kansas campus just 35 miles
or so from Kemper Arena, has
been sold out for years. Students
in need of pocket money can
always can always get $40-$50 for
a $10 ticket.
The populous Kansas alumni in
the greater Kansas City area are
mostly affluent, upscale group of
professionals and business
leaders. They've suffered an
embarrassing football program
that won only one game last year
and ranked near the bottom of
almost every statistic the NCAA
keeps. But they love their
basketball, they have money, and
cozy little Kemper seats only
about 17,000.
"We have been allotted 1,625
tickets for the Kemper Arena
Final Four said Konzem, KU's
assistant athletic director. 'It's
just unbelievable how far that is
from filling our needs
To Konzem falls the terrible job
of saying no to thousands of loyal
supporters who helped funnel
almost $2.5 million in donations
into the athletic department last
year.
Blue Devils to realize dream
"Supply is very, very limited.
Demand is very, very large
Konzem said. "The fact that one of
the teams is KU is not the only
factor in this. You have Duke, an
ACC school with a great
basketball tradition already and a
lot of loyal fans. Then you have
Arizona, which is making its first
trip to the Final Four and has all
that excitement surrounding it
and creating interest among the
fans.
"And then you have Oklahoma.
Not only is Oklahoma a second
Big Eight school with Kansas, but
it's a bordering state with Kansas
and Missouri
Anybody with a handfull of
tickets and dreams fo early
retirement would do well to
ponder city ordinance no. 26.57 It
clearly says that it is against the
law to "resell a ticket or entry to a
public entertainment event" for
more than face value.
"You can get a fine not to exceed
$500, or a jail sentence of no more
than 60 days, or both police Sgt.
Billy Richardson said.
I can tell you that we have done
some enforcemnt of this la w in the
past
CAROLINA
PREGNANCY CENTER
TftfT fiff llt"r Is �Pen
Mon Tues, & Wed. Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
9 a.m. - 2 p.m. & by appointmenl
For an appointment or more infor-
mation, call 24-Hour Helpline,
757-0003
111 East Third Street - The Lee Building
Greenville, N. C.
Free Pregnancy Test-
Confidential Counseling
Jfe
GandalTs
��mmhmJ � �!�� I �
dfcwvr iJic iiKic!
Easter Bunny Gift Ideas
Fill baskets with toys for kids of
all ages, including giant bubble
blowers � crystal prisms � stuffed
animals � balloon boxes to fill
with Easter Surprises � You can
even dress yourself for spring
with our large selection of hand-
crafted jewelry.
756-7235
Open
Mon. - Sat. 10-9 p.m
Continued from page nine
I learned two years ago how
hard it is to get there
Krzyzewski said.
"You drean about being there as
a player and coach, and we might
have teams that are better than
this team that will never make it
to the Final Four. I think if we
don't take time to appreciate what
a special cventitisand takecareof
that emotion then we're missing
out on what it's all about
The Blue Devils, 28-6, also must
be hungry for a title, Krzyzewski.
He thinks they are after losing in
the 1986 championship game.
"The second feeling you have to
take care of is hunger he said. "
Taking advantage of the
opportunity of being there and
remembering that you want to
play two games, and you want to
play them well and win both of
them. It comes in order
Duke will be making its sixth
Final Four appearance � 1963,
1964, 1966, 1978 and 1986 � but
the Blue Devils have never won
the national championship.
Saturday's game against
Kansas, 25-11, in Kansas City will
be a rematch of the 1986 semifinal
game, which the Blue devils won
71-67. However, Krzyzewski said
Duke's 74-70 overtime victory
against the Jayhawks earlier this
year is more significant.
"The youngsters playing for us
now were not the guys that beat
Kansas (two years ago)'
Krzyzewski said. "It's different.
It's their turn
Duke, which usually plays a
man-to-man defense, may have
problems stopping Kansas' 6-11
Ail-American Danny Manning
inside, Krzyzewski said.
Manning has been the Jayhawks
leading scorer in 33 of 36 games
games. He's also averaging more
than 24 points in four NCAA
games.
"I knew he was a great player
from watching him in the Pan Am
trials and playing against him a
couple of years ago
Krzyzewski said. "But when we
went out there (to play Kansas)
this year he's bigger, quicker
and better than I thought he was.
"You have to expect him to be at
a top level he said.
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
PRESENTS AN ULTIMATE EVENING
THE AMATEURS
FLIPSIDE
STARK NAKED & THE CAR THEIVES
THURS 7 APRIL
� THE ATTIC
IMA RECK GOES HOLLYWOOD!
The success and reputation of Ima Reck has grown so rapidly that I will be taking my act on the road this summer in an attempt to pay my bills so needlessly neglected. But in the meantime, I have to dedicate
this next round of op picks to two young ladies in the DIRS who have taken quite a bit of ribbing (to be kind) from a variety of participants who feel that I would be better off selling vacuum cleaners.
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S SOFTBALL
(Women's Softball)
1 ENFORCERSIf IMA RECK can't win, nobody can win. End of discussion.
2 THE BAKED POTATOESThese girls are cookin
3 TI IE FLUNKEEZInability to satisfactorily keep up with a score of 2-0
eliminates this group. Dig a little deeper in the well.
4 BELK BABESWill be especially effective on rainy nights after an
impressive all-campus title game in water polo. Gives the
Babes a slight edge over fifth-place team.
5 ALPHA OMICRON PIThe cream of the sorority girl crop. They have all the right
omicrons.
(Men's)
1 SUMPTHIN' SPECIALThis category will go to the wire. Sumpthin' Special gets the
nod for taking the pre-season title. It will be close though.
2 EXTERMINATORSSee above. The talent here is neck-and-neck.
3 AMERICA'S TEAMMamas don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys! This
team will be in competition right to the end, then choke.
Isn't that what happens to "America's Teamr
4 THE TOOTHThese guys really know how to sink their teeth into the
heart of the competition. How could IMA RECK overlook a
team with that determination.
5 SIGMA PHI EPSILONAlways a solid competitor in any sport. When all is said and
done, these guys will be in the running.
Please don't feel offended by IMA RECK, who incidentally is feeling frisky these days. How-
ever, if you are a bottom of the barrel pick, feel free to stop by my office (wherever that is)
('Bottom of the Barrel' picks are posted downstairs in Memorial Gym.)
CO-REC VOLLEYBALL
(Co-Rec Volleyball)
1 DAJN BRAMAGETop pick because this team is a bunch of
typical jocks - major talent, minor brain.
2 BURRITO CREWA team after IMA RECK's own hungry
heart. Pre-game meetings at Chico's and
Taco Bell create team unity.
3 ALPHA RHO MU PSIYou gotta figure they can do something
with a name like that.
4 S.C.U.MAll S.C.U.M. eventually rises to the top
of the pond.
5 HELP WANTEDThis is a paid advertisement. This team
can't be counted out. To be sure they
will have the needed skills on the team
come playoff time.
6 SCRAGSSeriously an all-around good team.
Already own co-rec bowling title,
looking for more.
7 LIKITY SPLITIn a flash, it's ballgame. Will waste no
time blowing by the competition.
8 FREAK SHOWWill win many matches with unfair side
freak shows, simply getting the
competition's attention and then serving
while they're still in shock.
9 TECHNICSA team going back to the basics - using
proper dunking, spiking, and serving
skills. Or is it bump, set and spike?
10 SOMETHIN' SPECIALAnd what's so special about this team,
IMA? Somethin Okay.
"All Night Long"
Be sure and get your teams together for the annual
Purple Pirate Pigskin Pigout Party Rental Tool Intra-
mural Softball All Nighter. The event has quite a name
and will have quite a reputation after this years
competition.
The Softball competition will fill the air on April 22-
24. Men's and women's teams are urged to get their
entry forms in quickly as seeds will be filling up.
A $50 entry fee is required for participants which
will cover balls and officiating costs. Team winners
will receive trophies and t-shirts as well as Most
Valuable Player awards in both the men's and
women's division. For an entry form and additional
information,please contact Nance Mize or J.R. Roth at
757-6387.
Informal ReCreatiOn (Hour mayvary In accordance to program needa)
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Mon-Wed12.00 noon-1:30 p.m. Fri.11:30am-130p.m.
Mon. & Tuee�4O0 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Wed. at Thura.�3O0 p.m. - 900 pan.
Fri3O0 p.m. - 700 pjn. Sat�HOP tm - S.O0 p.m.
Sun12O0 noon - 5O0 pjn.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
Mon. - Thurammmm���.10s00 am � 9O0p.m.
Fri��.�10O0 a.nv - 7O0 p.m.
Sat����.HO0a.rn5O0 p.m.
Sun���1200 noon - 5O0 p.m.
Mingea
Mon. - Thura3O0 pjn. -9O0p.m.
Fri300 pjn. - 7O0 p.m.
Sun12O0 noon - SOO p.m.
MonFri.
MonFri.
Mon. Wed. .
Mon.Wed.Fri.
Mon. - Thura.
Sat
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial
7O0 a.m. - 800 am Fri. ����.�300 pjn. - 7O0 p.m.
12O0 noon -130 p.m. Sat11O0 ajn, -SOOp.m,
3O0 p.m. - 9:00 pjn. Sun12O0 noon - SOO p.m.
Tuca. fc Thura400 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.730 p.m. - MO pjn.
Mingea
�O0 pjn. -1000p.m. Sum1200 noon - SOO p.m
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
Memorial Gym 115
. 1000 ajn. - MO pjn. Fri
. 1100 ajn. - SOO pjn. Sun
10001
.1200 n
PAID ADVERTISEMEN
7O0p.m.
i � 500 pjn.
)
ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
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COMING ATTRACTIONS

tf�tt�Mftttf��tffMMMmm)t�M9�iMji�i)iItt�
Frisbee Golf Registration
April 12 - 6p.m. MG 102
Annual Golf Classic Registration
April 18 - 5p.m. MG 102
P.P.RP.P. All Night Softball
thru April 13 - 204 MG
INTRA-ACTION
HOTLINE
757-6562
For Up To Date Information and Schedule Chai
m muiiu mm ��� ,�
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 31. 1988
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 31, 1988
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.600
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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